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VOLUME 22 ISSUE 16

JANUARY 23, 2013

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$600,000 more for Old Main renovations 5

Pride collective up for vote at TRUSU AGM 7

WolfPack sports... including curling?

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TRU’s Independent Student Newspaper


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January 23, 2013

Feature

Blanket licencing called into question

Changes in Copyright Act continue to affect universities and their students Allison Declercq-Matthäs

University of British Columbia (UBC), Queen’s University, the University of Saskatchewan and the University of Winnipeg chose In the library the photocopy not to sign on for a new license. machine breaks the silence as it Before 2010, 100 per cent of spits out copies of a book excerpt. the eligible (outside of Québec) On a computer monitor, a mouse universities signed an agreement cursor hovers over a link leading with Access Copyright. to an assigned reading on Moodle. “Now 65 per cent of the eligible After the mouse is clicked, an universities signed,” said Erin electronic copy scanned by your Finlay, Access Copyright’s professor instantly fills the screen. manager of legal services. Did you know you paid for the UBC expressed its decision in right to produce those copies? a letter to the faculty and staff, Each TRU student contributes calling the move “the bolder, to the yearly fee paid to Access more principled and Copyright, a nonsustainable option.” profit collective It listed three reasons that acquires for its choice: 1) it has money from agreements with 950 organizations like publishers without universities for the Access Copyright; right to reproduce 2) it’s cheaper for c o p y r i g h t UBC without the p r o t e c t e d license; and 3) their works and then direct method is less distributes these limited. revenues to those TRU considered that own the rights. similar arguments Those fees are when it was making paid even now, despite changes —Merilyn Simonds, TWUC chair its decision. Those opposed argued to the Copyright the agreement was Act law allowing people to copy portions of work Association of Universities and too expensive, infringed on the without pay or punishment, Colleges of Canada (AUCC) privacy of faculty and students, TRU pays an average of $26 per full-time student for licences so long as it is for educational Model License, it permits students inappropriately expanded the such as Access Copyright. and professors to copy 10 to 20 definition of copying and that purposes. —PHOTO BY ALLISON DECLERCQ-MATTHAS It’s this expansion of fair per cent of the original source. was unnecessary due to the new dealing to education and the TRU acquired this license from amendments to the Copyright Act, on campus. But they aren’t set Law Society of Upper Canada, lack of defined boundaries in its Access Copyright in late June according to a release from the in stone. In fact, the perplexing where a citizen’s right to produce application that has the Writers’ 2012 just before the Copyright TRU Intellectual Property Office. tangle of exceptions to the “set” copies of texts for personal use In the end it was decided signing boundaries of fair copying and the and research was upheld before a Union of Canada (TWUC) Modernization Act received royal onto the license would benefit added vagueness of the amended publisher’s right to profit. assent. concerned. The Law Society of Upper Some universities, like the TRU. A look at the estimated cost Copyright Act have everyone “We take issue with creators Canada, a non-profit organization, of acquiring copyright without confused. Even the courts, the main was taken to court by three the license revealed staff fees and royalties would make it just as decision-makers of copyright publishers of legal sources, CCH Limited, Carswell expensive. The process without fairness, are slow to decide what Canadian the license would require more constitutes as fair and within Thomson Professional Publishing and Canada Law Book Inc., time as each right holder would education. for providing have to be tracked photocopying down individually. services to the “It could take patrons of its three to six weeks Great Library at to get a reply from York University’s the publisher,” said Osgoode Hall Law Scott Blackford, School. TRU’s rights Eleven works and permissions were considered supervisor. for copyright The issue of infringement. privacy concerns was —Erin Finlay, The court addressed by AUCC debated whether who negotiated some Manager of legal services - Access Copyright the works were guiding principles original, whether to discourage In this case, they lack what is the Great Library was responsible breaching privacy. But Finlay insisted the guidelines were never known as common law or judge- for its patrons’ actions and made law, where judges draw on whether any reproductions were needed. “Access Copyright has no the decisions of the past in areas outside of fair dealings. “The Law Society does not interest in monitoring emails and of indistinct law to help them infringe copyright when a single come up with a decision. chat rooms,” she said. But students won’t be easily copy of a reported decision, case The responsibility of monitoring staff and students has been left persecuted if they overstep the summary, statute, regulation or to TRU, where the Intellectual boundary set by Access Copyright limited selection of text from a treatise is made by the Great Property Office handles such accidently. “When it comes to non- Library in accordance with its matters. “We monitor the print shop commercial purpose [the courts] access policy,” the Supreme Court and call if someone is over [the have a large fair dealing,” held. Further copyright restrictions guidelines],” said Blackford. Blackford said. For instance, the courts could would result in more court time, “The faculty are pretty aware of Individuals might not be prosecuted for copyright infringecontinue to imitate the decision money and possibly the stagnation copyright.” ment for a few copies here and there, but services like the For students, the boundaries are made in the case Commerce of intellectual and creative growth TRU Printshop must be particularly careful. posted near all the copy machines Clearing House Canadian Ltd. v. in Canada.

Ω Contributor

or producers having to give their work for free to the education environment, when teachers aren’t asked to teach for free,” said Merilyn Simonds, TWUC’s chair. The union prefers institutions pay blanket licenses, like those provided by Access Copyright, so writers and publishers are paid appropriately and students and staff will have easy access to their work. TRU spends an estimated $316,338, equal to $26 per fulltime student or its equivalent for such a license. Called the

“We take issue with creators or producers having to give their work away for free....”

“Access Copyright has no interest in monitoring emails and chat rooms.”

—PHOTO BY ALLISON DECLERCQ-MATTHAS

ON THE COVER: So...I’m confused. Is it illegal to photocopy pages out of books or not? — PHOTO BY MIKE DAVIES


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The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 16

THE

MEGA

www.theomega.ca

January 23, 2013

Volume 22, Issue 16

Published since November 27, 1991

editorialstaff EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Editorial/Opinions Oh, what to write…

Mike Davies

editor@truomega.ca

250-828-5069

@PaperguyDavies NEWS EDITOR

Devan C. Tasa

news@truomega.ca @DCTasa ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Brendan Kergin

arts@truomega.ca @roguetowel SPORTS EDITOR

Adam Williams

sports@truomega.ca @AdamWilliams87 ROVING EDITOR

Courtney Dickson

Editor’s Note

COPY/WEB EDITOR

Mike Davies Ω Editor-in-Chief

roving@truomega.ca @dicksoncourtney

Taylor Rocca

copy@truomega.ca @manovrboard

omegacontributors Travis Persaud, Kassandra Mitchell, Allison Declercq-Matthas, Kevin Skrepnek, Karla Karcioglu, Justine Cleghorn, Oriol Salvador, Amy Reinitz, Travis Persaud, Allen Douglas

publishingboard

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF * Mike Davies BUSINESS MGR * VACANT INDUSTRY REP * Mike Youds FACULTY REP * Charles Hays STUDENT REP* Sadie Cox

letterspolicy

Literary and visual submissions are welcomed. All submissions are subject to editing for brevity, taste and legality. The Omega will attempt to publish each letter received, barring time and space constraints. The editor will take care not to change the intention or tone of submissions, but will not publish material deemed to exhibit sexism, racism or homophobia. Letters for publication must include the writer’s name (for publication) and contact details (not for publication). The Omega reserves the right not to publish any letter or submitted material. Opinions expressed in the Letters & Opinion section do not represent those of The Omega, the Cariboo Student Newspaper Society, its Board of Directors or its staff. Opinions belong only to those who have signed them.

I sit down to write this column every week and truly struggle with what to say to you fine folks. Should I come up with some sage words of wisdom and possibly come off like an arrogant knowit-all preaching about something that you have no way of knowing whether I know anything about? Should I try to convince you to believe this way or that about an issue in your community or to support some worthy cause? Maybe I should just shut up with all that and just tell you what’s in this week’s paper so you know whether or not to keep turning pages. I think maybe this week I’ll do all three of those things. First, if you haven’t already, read

All material in this publication is copyright The Omega and may not be reproduced without the expressed consent of the publisher. All unsolicited submissions become copyright Omega 2012.

(Correspondence not intended for publication should be labelled as such.)

Follow us on Twitter: @TRU_Omega “Like” us on Facebook. Do it. Seriously.

to be formed) at this year’s TRUSU AGM, which takes place Jan. 24 at 7 p.m. in the TRUSU Boardroom. This meeting is where you get to have your say about how the students union spends your money, so if you don’t go to this and chime in — or at least pay attention so they know you’re watching them — then you don’t really get to complain about how you pay too much for your education. The arts and entertainment section once again highlights some of the great events that are available for music (and film) lovers around campus, so I guess we’re kind of making it so you can’t complain about not having anything to do, too. Sorry about that. Oh, yeah…and we have a curling team now. You can find out about that and updates on our men’s and women’s volleyball squads back there on page 10 before you do the crossword and Sudoku puzzles. I guess what I’m saying is this: there are plenty of things going on around you and if you decide to be ignorant of them, you’re not fulfilling your responsibilities or accessing your privileges or taking advantage of being here. Your education is what you make of it and you have no one to blame but yourself if you’re not getting enough out of the place you’ve chosen to receive it. At least you can’t blame your ignorance on us. editor@truomega.ca

With all of that being said, just when does it become too much? I am slowly realizing that it may be catching up to me — and not in a good way. These days, in the age of social media, I find myself growing more exhausted with the regular interactions I have with those around me. We live in a society overrun and oversaturated by communication. Whether it is the smartphone in our pocket, the tablet in our backpack or the laptop on our desk, we are connected to the world around us like never before. Social media applications run through these devices have almost replaced face-to-face communication. How often do you find yourself with a friend only to see them paying more attention to their phone? Whether they are texting, tweeting or reading Facebook updates, the sad reality is that they are paying more attention to people out in cyber space than they are to you, the person in their company. The frightening thing is that this trend isn’t likely to slow as social media usage and attachment to smartphones rises. According to a study released by the Pew Internet & American Life Project in September 2012, 66 per cent of people aged 18 to 29 own a smartphone. A similar report from Pew released in November 2012 discovered that 67 per cent of cell phone users find themselves checking their phones even when they aren’t receiving a call or message. Michelle Drouin of Indiana University — Purdue University described this sensation as “phantom vibration syndrome.” According to a study by Drouin, published in Science Direct, 89 per cent of undergraduates expe-

rienced phantom vibrations. People are becoming physiologically conditioned to the expectation of having their smartphone ring in their pocket! If that isn’t scary, I don’t know what is. Dr. Larry Rosen, psychology professor at California State University, also suggested young adults who have a strong Facebook presence show more signs of psychological disorders, antisocial behaviours and aggressive tendencies. I can certainly say that I have experienced a number of the issues described above. Phantom vibrations and antisocial behaviour are definitely on that list. This realization frightens me. It frightens me because I know I am not the only one out there experiencing this. By being so oversocialized in the world of wireless and mobile communication I find myself growing ever more antisocial when I leave the safety of my keyboard or smartphone. It’s not because I no longer know how to socialize in face-toface interaction. Rather, I believe it’s an oversaturation of communication and interaction that has exhausted me, leaving me unwilling to interact as much as I normally would in face-to-face contact. I think it’s important we all silence our mobile devices in order to calm our social media psychoses, even if just for an hour or two here and there. Exchange some cyber interaction for some true social interaction and see how much better you feel about yourself, those around you and the rest of the world. Maybe it’s not silence I have been searching for, but rather an escape from the buzzing, both real and imaginary, coming from my pocket. copy@truomega.ca

Social psychoses

copyright

Cariboo Student Newspaper Society (Publisher of The Omega) TRU Campus House #4 Box 3010, Kamloops, B.C. V2C 0C8 Phone: 250-372-1272 E-mail: editor@truomega.ca Ad Enquiries: managerofomega@gmail.com

the feature on the page opposite about copyright. Find out about how part of what you pay to this institution goes to copyright issues and licensing — and maybe go look at some of the ways other schools across the country operate in this regard. It’s a pretty hefty chunk of change we’re paying for these services and you are the ones buying them. Then flip the page (okay, read Rocca’s social media rant before you do that) and find an interesting tale of some nursing students travelling — just about as far as you can while remaining in Canada — to attend a conference and think about whether you’d like to have that opportunity as well. There are grants and bursaries available for those who want to commit to such endeavours to expand their education and it’s my hope that having you read about others doing such things, you might look into the possibility for yourself. If you have a student loan, be sure to check out the centre fold this week to find out about the federal government losing records of half a million students who took out student loans from 2000 to 2006. Is this just a minor error or does it highlight a systemic fault in our post-secondary system and the funding of said system? (Hint: it’s the latter.) Below that you’ll find information on a couple of new collectives being formed (or at least attempting

TRUe Thoughts Taylor Rocca Ω Copy/Web Editor Whatever happened to silence? That may sound strange coming from someone who enjoys interacting with people, having conversations and meeting new and unique individuals. That too may sound strange from someone who enjoys interacting with people through the use of social media. Just how much do I enjoy social media? Let me open up my smartphone to make sure I don’t miss anything... Feel free to follow me on Twitter (@manovrboard), Instagram (@manovrboard), FourSquare, add me as a friend or contact on Facebook or LinkedIn, check out my blog at upallnight11.blogspot.ca or my Tumblr at manovrboard.tumblr. com. Heck, you can even exchange your bubbly adult beverage preferences with me on this nifty little social media application called Untappd. Yes, I am probably more guilty than most people. In fact, as I write this, I take momentary breaks to check both my Facebook and Twitter.

The importance of criticism Sophia Hashi

The Fulcrum (U of O) OTTAWA (CUP) — As a writer, it may seem strange to announce that I used to hate criticism. My job requires my editors to scour my articles for mistakes, a process that used to make me cringe. Until recently, I used to scan my emails to see if there was a disgruntled reader, or worse, an anonymous commentator sending scathing remarks about an article I’d penned. After having been criticized relentlessly and having received backlash for certain articles I’ve written—or not written—I’ve learned to deal with and accept criticism, especially if it’s constructive. For that, I’m grateful. However, our society might not take the same stance when it comes to criticism. A quick Google search on the topic scores thousands of hits with articles called, “How to take criticism” and “How to know the difference between constructive and hurtful criticism,” appearing by the dozens. Clearly, we could all use some help in the department. Margaret Heffernan, the former CEO of five businesses, recently gave a TEDx talk in which she said people prefer to associate with like-minded people who don’t pose a threat and only confirm our beliefs instead of challenging them. She suggested that “A fantastic model of collaboration [is] thinking partners who aren’t echo chambers.” A world void of this type of constructive criticism and difference in opinion only continues to stunt our own personal growth. We might follow the old adage “If you don’t have anything nice to say, then don’t say anything at all” a little too closely. While certainly no one wants to cause harm to another person, rebuttals and conflict are necessary to resolving issues and growing. At times it may seem like the phrase “constructive criticism” has completely left our vocabulary. What’s wrong with a little criticism? Trust me, I do understand it can be hard to swallow a critique. This very article took more than the usual rewrite to be perfected. As much as I don’t particularly love criticism, I do know it’s important. Without criticism, we’d never grow. It’s an obvious statement, but somehow we still tend to cringe when someone has anything unpleasant to say. Words can assault us in ways that seem to almost physically hurt at times, but constructive criticism allows us to see things from another perspective and evaluate our own choices. Negating other people’s opinions as superfluous and invalidating them only does us a disservice. Don’t lie, don’t steal, be kind. Take criticism well. It’s right up there on the list of major life lessons. No less important a skill is giving criticism well. Dishing it out and taking it should be approached with equal attention and care. And when you’re dishing it, be respectful. We all know what it feels like to be on the receiving end. Sure, if you don’t have anything nice to say, then don’t say anything. If your intent is to harm, then shut your trap. But if you’ve got something important to say, then say it! Don’t agree with the point your professor made? Then say so. Don’t like the budget of the Student Union? Speak up. Conversely, if someone offers you some pointers, don’t turn your head away. We live in the age of opinions and sometimes a dose of constructive criticism might be just what we need.


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January 23, 2013

News TRU nursing delegation heads to Halifax Kassandra Mitchell Ω Contributor

With bags packed and boarding passes printed, seven TRU nursing students f lew to Halifax, N.S. Jan. 21 for the Canadian Nursing Students Association’s (CNSA) annual national conference. The convention will provide an opportunity for approximately 500 nursing students across Canada to network with their peers and participate in professional development seminars. The five-day conference, which features a variety of keynote speakers including Dalhousie University’s assistant professor of nursing Dr. Sherri Price, has nursing students like Amanda Shibley excited. “Last year I took a cultural awareness workshop on Aboriginal health, as well as one on leadership from the vice president of the CNSA,” Shibley said. “It’s a really good networking opportu-

nity…after you have friends all over Canada in the same field as you.” Five of the seven TRU students in attendance are being fully funded, with one student receiving funding from the B.C. Nursing Union (BCNU) and another student (originally from the East Coast) paying out of pocket. $4,600 was provided by the Comprehensive University Endowment Fund (CUEF) and $3,000 was given by the dean of nursing’s Dr. Barbara Patterson. As well, TRUSU announced last Monday they will be contributing an additional $1,000. The Nursing Undergraduate Society also contributed financial assistance for the students. Funding is absolutely critical, according to Steven Ross, faculty liaison and lecturer with TRU’s school of nursing. He estimates the cost sits at around $2,500 per student for the entire week. “We’ve had conferences closer

in the past, like Vancouver and Edmonton…but it’s quite a distance to go this time, so funding is essential.” The TRU students in attendance this year were selected internally, based on how much engagement they’ve had with the CNSA already, as well as initiative taken within the nursing program and extracurricular involvement in the community. “It’s a great opportunity to network with peers and also high profile professionals and/or politicians from across the country on issues that are important to nursing,” Ross said. “As well, it allows students to act as a leader within their own school when they bring what they’ve learned back here.” The hope is that funding will continue to be made available, so other students will have the opportunity to attend the conference in the years to come, according to Ross.

First Aboriginal language course teaches Sepwepemcsin Devan C. Tasa Ω News Editor

The university is offering its first Aboriginal language course taught on campus. The first class in Secwepemctsín, the language of the local Secwepemc nation, will take place Jan. 21 at 5 p.m. in AE 100. It’s being taught by Janice Billy, a fluent speaker teaching the language at the Little Fawn Nursery and at the Skl’ep School of Excellence. “It’s timely,” said Jack Miller of TRU’s school of education. “First Nations language and culture is important to the university, so that’s why it’s being offered.” The course has been in the making since 2006, when the provincial government funded the developmental standards term certificate program, which aims to provide certification for teachers of Aboriginal languages to teach within the education system. “It’s been a long time in coming,” Miller said. “We were hoping we would have been able to offer it well before now, but it’s sometimes difficult to get things moving.” Nolan Guichon, TRUSU’s Aboriginal representative, was pleased to hear about the new course.

sity credit, but there’s a catch. “It’s a three credit course, but right at the present time, it is not eligible to meet the language credit for a B.A.,” Miller said. “I’m working on that as we speak.” There is currently debate within the arts faculty whether or not the course should provide language credits. “In my mind, there’s no reason why they can’t be considered because all of the courses in this program have been approved by the education programs committee, the TRU senate and the board of governors,” Miller said. Both Archie and Guichon said they —Jack Miller, TRU school of education wanted to university to have the course Archie said since the board of provide a language credit. “As the Aboriginal student repgovernors created its last strategic plan in 2007, it has been aiming to resentative, I would like to see promote greater inclusion of Ab- eventually an Aboriginal language credit course available for all stuoriginal people in the university “TRU has been a leader in Ab- dents,” Guichon wrote. “Right now, to say that it can’t be original education in the province and across the country, with 1,200 counted as a [language] credit, it’s Aboriginal students,” he said. similar to saying that our language “This fills a big gap. The addition isn’t a real language and I find that of the course will go a long way disappointing,” Archie said. The Secwepemctsín course is to enhance TRU’s reputation as a school of choice for Aboriginal one of the ways the university has been improving services Aborigistudents. ” TRUSU has also been asking the nal people, Archie said. Other exuniversity to include more Aborig- amples include the tripling of the space in the Aboriginal gathering inal content, Guichon wrote. The course does provide univer- place two years ago. “We think it’s a great course and are glad TRU finally has a course like this,” he wrote via email. Carl Archie, student member of the board of governors, had similar sentiments. “The Secwepemctsín course is massive for the university, which is a long time overdue,” he said. “It’s really great that the university is offering this course and they should continue to move in this direction.”

“It’s been a long time coming.”

—PHOTO COURTESY LOWER COLUMBIA COLLEGE/FLICK R

“It would sure be nice to have students going every year.” This year will feature a variety of practical workshops, including one called Safe Talk, which Shibley, a second-time conference attendee and now first-year TRU delegate, is excited to take in. “It teaches us is how to talk to people who are suicidal or hav-

ing suicidal ideations,” Shibley said. “The conference is great because every single person in the association is a student, so there’s no faculty or RNs. “It’s kind of cool that a bunch of students can get together and make something this big.” The week-long conference ends Jan. 26 with this year’s attendees returning to classes next week.

Leadership opportunities outside the classroom Courtney Dickson Ω Roving Editor

There are plenty of people in our community who could be considered leaders. These are the types of people who take charge, help others and often can make anything happen. The Centre for Student Engagement is hoping to assist students looking to utilize and nurture these skills. “Leadership is being in a position where you guide people towards a common purpose and create vision for that,” said Alana Frymire, Student Leadership Program coordinator. “Sometimes leadership isn’t about being out front, it’s about knowing someone else is capable of that and helping them.” For the third-year student, the Centre for Student Engagement (located in Old Main) will be offering a free seven-session workshop series aiming to provide students with the opportunity to learn more about leadership and who they are as leaders. Students can also earn a Certificate of Achievement in Leadership if they commit to and attend any five out of the seven workshops offered. The first workshop is the evening of Jan. 30 and the last one, date undetermined, will be during the third week in March. There will be one per week on average and each session will last two and a half hours. Each session will focus on a different aspect of leadership, such as collaborative leadership and personality types. Frymire organized the program as

an exploratory experience for those looking to develop their skills and answer questions about how to be a leader. “Some people are born with the ability to lead, but that doesn’t mean you can’t develop those skills,” Frymire said. Frymire will be partnering with the Career Education department to hold focus groups with local employers to ask what traits influence them to hire students from TRU. They will then evaluate whether those skills are being offered. “We want to know what we can do inside and outside of the classroom to make learning engaging,” Frymire said. Amy Berard, who is in her final semester of business and her fifth year at TRU, is a leader on campus who strives to help others get involved. “There are so many opportunities to get involved. Even things like new student orientation have become so much bigger than when I started at TRU.” A former member and vice president of Enactus (formerly SIFE), she is now the campus liaison for the United Way in Kamloops. According to Berard, leadership is “being the face of your organization and getting others involved by promoting and improving it every year, and taking the extra step and inviting new and younger students to get involved.” The Student Leadership Program will be accepting sign-ups until the workshops begin next Wednesday. Students can contact Frymire at truleaders@tru.ca.

International Days Speakers, Performances, Foreign Films, Workshops & Cultural Events Keynote Speaker: Colin Angus (Canadian author & adventurer), 6:30pm–8pm, February 4

MC117363

February 4–8, 2013


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The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 16

News Briefs Bank donates $600,000 to Old Main renovations It was the largest single donation the Bank of Montréal (BMO) Financial Group has made to a B.C. university outside the Lower Mainland. The $600,000 donation will go towards the second phase of the Old Main renovations, which cost $10 million. The provincial government contributed $7.8 million in October. In return for the donation, Old Main’s Student Street will be renamed the BMO Student Street. “We are proud to recognize BMO’s leadership investment and the significant contribution to our university,” said Alan Shaver, TRU’s president, in a

press release. “This is one area of our campus which touches each of our students. Many will now begin their TRU journey on BMO Student Street.” “Today’s donation announcement to Thompson Rivers University will, we hope, continue to strengthen and grow our partnership,” said Joanne Gassman, BMO Financial’s B.C. and Yukon vice senior president, in a release, “and build on our mutual understanding that the economic, social and environmental choices we all make will positively impact the lives of potentially thousands of students.”

TRU to review plastic bottles The university is conducting a review of the use of plastic bottles for beverages. The review, conducted by TRU’s environment and sustainability director Tom Owen, will examine the environmental, economic, contractual, social and health impacts of the drink containers and its possible alternatives. Students, the TRU community and drink vendors will be able to provide input for the review. Oral presentations are to be booked between Feb. 15 and March 1.

TRUSU has been running a public campaign that’s lobbying the university to ban bottled water on campus. Dylan Robinson, TRUSU’s vice president external, told the Jan. 15 TRUSU council meeting this review represented progress for that campaign and the students union would be participating vigorously in the review process. Owen will be presenting the review’s results to the board of governors and the university’s senior administration at the end of April.

News Briefs courtesy Devan C. Tasa

Puzzle of the Week Puzzle of the Week #11 – Cookie Ripoff You just bought a package of two dozen oatmeal cookies. Well, you thought you did. It turns out that eight cookies with cinnamon, eight with raisins, and eight with chocolate chips do not make twenty-four if some cookies are counted more than once.

Clubs Day held in Old Main

BMO announces a donation of $600,000 to help with phase 2 renovations of Old Main, prompting a rename of Student Street, adding their name.

—PHOTO BY KEVIN SK REPNEK

No TRUSU delegation at this year’s CFS-B.C. AGM The provincial section of a national student organization held its Annual General Meeting (AGM) last week, but TRUSU wasn’t there. TRUSU was unable to send a delegation to the Canadian Federation of Students – B.C.’s (CFS-BC) AGM, held Jan. 17 to 20 because it was unable to spare any elected members from responsibilities such as Clubs Day and the Movie Night.

Representing TRUSU at the meeting is the Vancouver Island University Students’ Union (VIUSU). Dylan Robinson, vice president external, told the Jan. 15 TRUSU council meeting VIUSU was chosen because its membership is of a similar size and demographic to TRUSU’s. The CFS is the largest student organization in Canada. In B.C., it has a membership of 16 postsecondary institutions.

There was no shortage of clubs for TRU students to choose from at Jan. 15’s Clubs Day. Student Street was full of tables, which included clubs for sports like field hockey, academic pursuits like history and even television shows like Dexter. Approximately 30 clubs had tables at Jan. 15’s Clubs Day, said Dylan Robinson, TRUSU’s vice president external. “TRUSU resources all sorts of clubs, a diverse range of clubs,” he said. “We have approximately 70 clubs right now, so that’s a pretty good turnout for Clubs Day. “I think students really recognize the importance of clubs [and how] they are the social fabric of the campus.” Clubs Day is held once per semester. such as Clubs Day and the Movie Night. Representing TRUSU at the meeting is the Vancouver Island University Students’ Union (VIUSU). Dylan Robinson, vice president external, told the Jan. 15 TRUSU council meeting VIUSU was chosen because its membership is of a similar size and demographic to TRUSU’s. The CFS is the largest student organization in Canada. In B.C., it has a membership of 16 postsecondary institutions.

That’s what you said For this week’s issue, we patrolled the grounds looking for your answers to this question:

What do you think about BMO donating $600,000 for renovations on Student Street and the name change to BMO Student Street?

Four cookies have both cinnamon and raisins. Two have both cinnamon and chocolate chips. Three have both raisins and chocolate chips. There are no cookies with all three ingredients. So how many cookies did you get shorted? This contest is sponsored by the Mathematics and Statistics department. The full-time student with the best score at the end of the year will win a prize. Please submit your solution (not just the answer but also why) by noon next Wednesday to Gene Wirchenko <genew@ocis.net>. Submissions by others are also welcome. The solution will be posted the Wednesday after that in the Math Centre (HL210A). Come visit: we are friendly.

Puzzle of the Week #12 – Tennis, Anyone? A game of tennis is played to four points, more or less. Never mind that the names of the points are not 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4. And we are going to ignore the rule that after a 3-3 tie, one player must have two points more than the other to win. If playing a simple game to four points, how different sequences of scoring are possible? For example, with players A and B, we could have AAAA, AABABA, and ABBBB. This contest is sponsored by the Mathematics and Statistics department. The full-time student with the best score at the end of the year will win a prize. Please submit your solution (not just the answer but also why) by noon next Wednesday to Gene Wirchenko <genew@telus.net>. Submissions by others are also welcome. The solution will be posted the Wednesday after that in the Math Centre (HL210A). Come visit: we are friendly.

Tom Upson

Vivian Gu

Eric Hanzel

“It’s a renovation so I guess it’s good. No one’s going to call it BMO Student Street though, it’ll always just be student street. Money is money.”

“I don’t care. It’s a lot of money but I do not now what they can do with it.”

“It’s exciting that we’re getting money, but I don’t know what they’re going to do with it. They should bring in more arcade games. Maybe a pool table.”

First-year bachelor of Arts

First-year bachelor of science

Do you like food?

Second-year tourism management

Do you like inexpensive, really good food even more? The Omega and CFBX are hosting a steak/chicken/salmon dinner at Fox’n Hounds Pub on Feb. 24. Tickets are only $10 and all proceeds go to supporting independent on-campus media. Contact Mike at editor@truomega.ca for tickets


6

January 23, 2013

Life & Community

SLIDERS ARE ONLY GOOD FOR BASEBALL AND CURLING

Great Canadian Smoke Out returns to TRU Courtney Dickson Ω Roving Editor

Proper winter footwear will help you get to your destination safely. The Great Canadian Smoke Out returns to TRU on Feb. 1.

Not only are smokers and tobacco users encouraged to join the two and a half month challenge, but those who have never used tobacco in their lives are also able to participate. Students, faculty and staff who are non-tobacco users will commit to not starting tobacco use and passing on information about tobacco use. They will also be entered to win prizes. Last year, students interested in joining the program were asked to attend lectures by guest speakers about the negative effects of tobacco use. 30 people attended those sessions and the number dwindled as the challenge progressed. Stephanie Drysdale, secondyear respiratory therapy and one of the eight students working with the Tobacco Education Strategies Clinic, is hopeful that students,

faculty and staff will take advantage of the smoke-out. “Last year didn’t go as well as we planned. As a student, I wouldn’t be interested in going to a lecture,” Drysdale said, “[Students] want to be more engaged.” This year, experiments and trivia games will be the focus at the information tables. There will even be a mascot. The clinic plans to use social media to update followers on the progress of the smoke-out participants. The Tobacco Education Strategies Clinic can be found at TRU Tobacco Education Clinic on Facebook or @TRURespTherapy on Twitter, or contacted via email at tobaccoeducation@tru.ca for more information about the Great Canadian Smoke Out.

Safety meets sustainability Karla Karcioglu Ω Contributor

Campus Facilities strives to maintain sustainability on campus throughout the school year including in the winter when deicing campus becomes a priority. Ice Fighter Plus, produced by Morgro Inc., is the blue-green salt covering sidewalks and surrounding snow on campus. TRU has been using the product for five years. It was deemed the best option by staff that distribute ice melt on campus, after testing several different samples of environmentally friendly icemelt products. Warren Asuchak, associate director of facilities, is responsible for the de-icing efforts on campus. “The priority in choosing an ice melter was definitely effectiveness,” said Warren Asuchak, associate director of facilities. “However, we did require that all the products we were testing be environmentally friendly.” Campus sustainability is one of the eight core values of the university. TRU formed an Environmental Advisory Committee in 2008, consisting of three fulltime, paid members and a total of 17 staff, students, faculty, and administration representatives. The committee then created a Campus Sustainability Action Plan, which outlined goals for TRU through to 2012. “I work very closely with Tom Owens [director of environment and sustainability] through-

A message from TRU Facilities Services

—PHOTO COURTESY HAPROG_/FLICKR COMMONS

out the year to ensure TRU is maintaining its commitment to environmental s u s t a i n a b i l i t y,” Asuchak said. Morgro Inc. manufactures four different types of ice melt as well as lawn and garden products. Ice Fighter Plus is the only ice melt that inhibits freeze thaw/damage on concrete, meaning that it won’t crack and erode. According to the Morgo Inc. Material Safety Data Sheet, Ice Fighter Plus does not contain any hazardous ingredients as defined by W.H.M.I.S (Workplace Haz- Ice Fighter Plus at work on campus. ardous Infor- —PHOTO BY K ARLA K ARCIOGLU mation System) regulations. The main ingredients of the prod- products that are the major cause uct are propolyice (an unknown of damage to plant life.” The bright, non-staining color chemical trademarked by the Morgro Company), solar salt reduces the risk of over-appli(which is extracted from the nat- cation. The website further exural evaporation of sea water) plains the common chemicals found in ice melt, magnesium and “chemical additives.” The bright colour of Ice chloride and calcium chloride, Fighter Plus was also a factor are hydroscopic, meaning they in choosing the product. Morgro draw moisture from the air, Inc.’s website states “it is the plants, and soil, causing burning over application of ice-melting of surrounding vegetation.

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For those who made a new year resolution to quit smoking or end tobacco use, the Great Canadian Smoke Out could be a venture worthwhile. The Tobacco Education Strategies Clinic will have a table set up between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Jan. 29 in the Campus Activity Centre and Jan. 31 in the Trades Building where students, faculty and staff can access information about the smoke-out, which will run from Feb. 1 to April 12. Throughout the smoke-out, participants will attend check-up appointments every three to four weeks. At the first appointment, which will last just more than one hour, they will have their vital signs checked and the clinic will get their health history. Students will explain in detail what triggers cravings and what motivates them to quit. After that, appointments will consist of counselling and brainstorming ways to continue staying away from tobacco. Participants will be asked to provide the clinic with contact information of a close friend or family member so they can confirm the student has been faithful to their commitment to quit tobacco use. Connie Zhang, first-year bachelor of business administration, can often be found in front of Old Main lighting up a cigarette. As a chronic smoker who has tried to quit before, she is considering joining the smoke-out. “It helps that you can win prizes if you‘re successful,” Zhang said.


7

The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 16

Life & Community Government loses students’ personal information

583,000 students affected by Canada Student Loans Program security breach

Laura Howells

The Muse (Memorial University) ST. JOHN’S (CUP) — A division of the Canadian federal government has lost a hard drive containing the personal information of 583,000 clients of the Canada Student Loans Program. Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) issued an advisory on the privacy breach on Jan. 11. “I want all Canadians to know that I have expressed my disappointment to departmental officials at this unacceptable and avoidable incident in handling Canadians’ personal information,” said Diane Finley, Minister of HRSDC. “On behalf of our Government, I want to reassure Canadians that we are serious about protecting their personal information. As Minister, I will ensure that every effort is taken so that HRSDC meets the expectations of Canadians in keeping their information safe and secure.” The hard drive contains information on students who took out loans between 2000 and 2006. The missing information includes students’ names, social insurance numbers,

birth dates, contact information and loan balance. The breach affects students from all provinces and territories, except for those in Quebec, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories. Michael Walsh, the Newfoundland and Labrador Chairperson for the Canadian Federation of Students, has been getting numerous inquiries from students who are concerned about whether this breach affects them personally and what it means to have their personal information compromised. “These are students who are already burdened with huge student debts. They already have the stress of trying to work to pay off these huge debts and now they have the added stress of wondering if their personal information is in the hands of a stranger.” Walsh believes that this breach highlights a larger problem of postsecondary tuition fees for Canadian students. “The fact that so many students across the country are forced to borrow in order to finance their education is the reason that we have a situation of such magnitude right now. “I think this shows that we have a

—PHOTO COURTESY ALEX WALSH/THE FULCRUM

system of post-secondary education in Canada where largely, students have to finance their education on debt.” Adam Awad, chairperson for the Canadian Federation of Students, agrees.

LGBTQ collective in the works for TRUSU Justine Cleghorn

“If we just funded education properly across the country, we wouldn’t have to deal with this all.” Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development Diane Finley issued a statement on the breach Jan. 11.

There is no indication currently that any of the information has been accessed, however all affected accounts have been put on high alert. The situation is currently being investigated by the RCMP.

Advertise with The Omega Contact managerofomega@gmail.com

Ω Contributor

22% did it to get ahead. Corey Keith, a member of the TRU pride club, shows off the club’s flag outside TRUSU offices.

Do it your way.

—PHOTO BY JUSTINE CLEGHORN

community that can share experience and information at a higher level,” Keith said. “It’s not just about putting on a fun event, it is also about creating safety and awareness.” An estimated 350 people participated in the Kamloops pride parade in April 2012. “The response to the pride parade is a testament to why we need a pride collective,” Moulton said. “I’m really excited for it because I think it is something that we need on this campus and as well as in Kamloops as a community,” McIntyre said. “My fingers are really crossed that it goes through.” TRUSU also hopes to add a graduate students collective to the union following this year‘s AGM. Increasing the budget from $5,000 to $10,000 will give collectives enough money to host great events without going over budget, McIntyre said.

“We recognize that these events need to happen and they need more resources to do that,” he said. “As our membership gets larger and as advocacy becomes more important on campus, it makes sense that they have the ability to host the events that they need to. “We’ve also already anticipated that these collectives, the grad collective and the LGBTQ collective, will go through so they have already been allocated funds for the year even though there wasn’t an advocacy rep on our board,” said McIntyre. “So next year when they come into term, there will already be a budget established for them, making it a little easier to facilitate. “We didn’t have to strike anything off the budget to make this work.” TRUSU’s annual general meeting will take place in the TRUSU lecture hall on Thursday, Jan. 24 at 7 p.m.

Having difficulty getting into courses you need? Enrol today and combine online courses with your campus studies so you can complete your degree on time.

www.truopen.ca/yourway

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TRUSU is not only allocating more funds to student collectives, but also planning to add a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgendered, Queer and Questioning (LGBTQ) collective to the union after the annual general meeting on Jan. 24. 50 votes endorsing the creation of a pride collective is needed to secure the formation of the collective. The only way to create a new advocacy representative on the council within TRUSU bylaws is through the annual general meeting, said TRUSU president Dustin McIntyre. “So that’s why we didn’t do it when we first got into office. We had to wait and create the proper paper work.” The formation of the LGBTQ collective has been a priority for TRUSU since last year. “Right now, not having the LGBTQ collective is silencing a community that should have a voice,” said Alexandra Moulton, head of the women’s collective . A pride collective “will make room for all people with different gender and sexual constructions to have a space for advocacy,” she added. A club is like a social gathering, whereas a collective is a more structured, hands on approach to talk about issues, said Katie Hutfluss, a council member since April 2012 and one of the main organizers of last year’s pride parade. “This is where people learn about themselves, and we want to be that support group and tell them that being gay is okay,” she said. “One of the biggest things that I have found is although more and more people are coming out, a lot of people are still very scared,” said pride club member Corey Keith. “They are afraid of being discriminated against. “Having a collective allows for the creation of a safe space and a

Flexible • Credible • Online and Distance


8

January 23, 2013

Arts & Entertainment

Three albums reviewed by the Capilano Courier staff Caplilano Courier Capilano University

TYLER JAMES – A Place I Go (Reviewed by JJ Brewis) It’s not often you can call an album both a throwback and progressive, but Tyler James has managed just that. Like his late best friend and former collaborator Amy Winehouse, James has no problem pairing classic elements with his own spin on current sounds. The disc reads like an old set of ballads that have been revisited by a young rebel rouser, with James tying together a few unorthodox pairings: On “Baby Don’t Care,” his spot-on falsetto soars over the cluster of urban beats; on his cover of Steve Winwood’s “Higher Love,” he swaps out the ‘80s synths for a classy stripped-down piano vibe, giving it an entirely new tone. Much of the production and instrumentation subscribes to a minimalist approach, but James’ voice is capable of doing the heavy lifting here. No point letting that other stuff cloud up the rest of the picture. CHIEF KEEF – Finally Rich (Deluxe Edition) (Reviewed by Giles Roy) Is Chief Keef bad? This is something I wrestle with every time I bump his album, which seems to happen with shocking frequency. The brainless style of incredible-sounding slogan-centric antirap passed down from Young Jeezy to Rick Ross to Waka Flocka has been per-

fected on Finally Rich, which is a genuine feat. In fact, I’m pretty sure this managed to be the best album of 2012 simply by sidestepping any of the requirements that might normally entail such an achievement. You could take issue with the number of thought-provoking songs here (none) or the amount of effort it took to make it (very little) but there’s seriously no point. In fact, there’s no point to anything. Why are we alive, even? PASSENGER – All the Little Lights (Reviewed by Samantha Thompson) Folk-indie heartthrob Passenger had a milestone year in 2012. He started with a high profile opening act for fellow Brit Ed Sheeran, launching his own career across the pond in North America. Returning less than two months later on his own solo tour, he was selling out theatres from coast to coast. The year 2012 also marked the release of his fifth album, All the Little Lights, which was selected as iTunes UK’s singer/songwriter album of the year. A perfect blend of slower songs with emotive lyrics, like “Let Her Go” and “Life’s for the Living,” to the upbeat anthems of “I Hate” and “Holes,” All the Little Lights is filled with melodies that are the perfect accompaniment for every emotion of Passenger’s diverse fan base. It was not too long ago that Passenger was busking on the streets of various countries, and this release is the solid reminder that with a little perseverance, each of us can accomplish what we’ve set out to do.

The Tragically Hip (and Arkells) at the ISC

Mike Davies

Ω Editor-in-Chief Gordie and the boys from Kingston took everyone who packed into the Interior Savings Centre (ISC) on Jan. 13 for a tour of the Tragically Hip’s long musical history. The Hip, as they are simply known, have been touring hard for almost 30 years. They stopped periodically, but just long enough to record 12 studio albums along the way. It is impossible to say whether it is the music or the show that has turned them into the Canadian rock icons they’ve become over time, but based on the ISC performance, one likely can’t be separated from the other once you’ve seen it. Whether riding around the stage in an imaginary gondola using his microphone stand as the pole, or putting on some strange Kabuki-type theatre performance that only he can understand — with characters like Handkerchief, Vest and Hat — front-man Gord Downie put off a contagious energy and just straight up exuded fun. Playing just the right blend of old classics and new releases, The Hip seemingly touched on something from all 12 of those studio constructions and though some of the choices — “It Can’t Be Nashville Every Night” was a

strange choice from In Between Evolution, for example — overall, they gave both long-time fans and those who may be new to their music something to sing along to. Not that you’d try if you’ve been a fan of the band for long. Downie is known for his spontaneity and often changes the words of his music on the f ly — to the point that even his band doesn’t seem to know what’s going on at times. Playing together for that long, though, you can tell the rest of the crew is used to it and they treat the stage more like a jam space than a venue for performance. The Arkells, who visited TRU campus as part of the Tunes Against Tuition show during the fall 2012 semester, looked perfectly at home to a stadium full of fans eagerly awaiting the legends backstage, and engaged the audience with a selection of their own repertoire for a solid half-hour — likely sending many to iTunes (or wherever they get their music) immediately following the show. They are clearly better than their radio-aired singles would suggest. While the sound quality at the ISC is less than exceptional, The Tragically Hip made up for it with their energy, camaraderie and well-earned status as Canadian icons — especially for fans who have heard decades of poorsounding bootlegs of their shows.

KAMLOOPS SETLIST: 1. At Transformation 2. Grace, Too 3. Gift Shop 4. Man Machine Poem 5. At The Hundredth Meridian 6. Morning Moon 7. The Lookahead 8. Blow At High Dough 9. Greasy Jungle 10. Ahead By A Century 11. Streets Ahead 12. It Can’t Be Nashville Every Night 13. Courage (For Hugh Maclennan) 14. We Want To Be It 15. The Lonely End Of The Rink 16. Bobcaygeon 17. New Orleans Is Sinking 18. Goodnight Attawapiskat Encore 19. Little Bones 20. Fifty-Mission Cap 21. Fiddler’s Green 22. An Inch An Hour 23. My Music At Work

Rihanna’s reign doesn’t let up with Unapologetic Sarah Sangha

Canadian Music Corner Travis Persaud

Ω Resident Music Guy Upon leaving Propagandhi, John K. Samson set his musical efforts on a slightly different course with The Weakerthans, a Winnipegbased folk-punk band. Now more than a decade and four full-length albums later, The Weakerthans is a stalwart of the Canadian folk-punk scene. Presenting a wide range of sounds from the slow-burning “Elegy for Elsabet” on Left and Leaving to “One Great City!,” the faux-acoustic ballad for its hometown, what puts The Weakerthans in a league of its own is Samson’s song writing.

Brendan Kergin

Ω Arts & Entertainment Editor While 40-year-old Nova Scotians aren’t taking over the hip-hop industry, one has made some serious waves in Canada. Richard Terfry, more commonly known as Buck 65, has put out more than a dozen fulllength solo studio albums over a career spanning nearly 20 years. While success didn’t come early, the Buck 65 brand began to carry more weight after the turn of the millennium with albums like Talkin’ Honky Blues (2004 Alternative Album Juno Award winner) and Secret House Against The World. While definitely part of the hiphop world, his style is often unique, especially when compared to the

He has the ability to write about hyper-specific situations that have larger implications and appeal. With such ease, he paints the listener at home in the scene he has crafted. Be it goofy, like the penguin who taught him French in Antarctica on “Our Retired Explorer (Dines with Michel Foucault in Paris, 1961),” or the disheartened spirit on “Left and Leaving,” Samson pulls the listener into the familiar with a new vantage point. As a staple of Samson’s ability to write, give “Plea from the Cat Named Virtute” a listen. Few could write a song from the perspective of a cat that moves the listener with such profound simplicity. mainstream standards. The music often features acoustic instruments and has a very percussive nature to it. The percussive style matches his lyrical delivery in many songs. With a gravelly voice and unique, rough delivery, he appeals to people who aren’t fans of the genre and by fans of mainstream rap stars, Buck 65 is often ignored as something outside the genre. His work isn’t just on his own albums though, as he’s produced material, notably for Sage Francis and regularly appears on other Canadians’ work, such as Cadence Weapon and Matt Mays. He’s also directed and appeared in Feist’s “One Evening” music video and hosts CBC Radio 2’s Radio 2 Drive program weekday afternoons.

The Link (BCIT)

BURNABY (CUP) — Despite what you may think of her music or persona, no one can deny Rihanna’s incredible work ethic. She’s been churning out albums almost once a year since her big break in 2005, in addition to worldwide tours and a film career. Unapologetic is her seventh studio album, which at the ripe age of 24 is no easy feat. Those who argue that music takes time may want to rethink their position after evaluating her success. Rihanna’s business model seems to be built on exposure. She is constantly on the radio, either in her own songs or belting the chorus for a range of performers from Drake to Coldplay. Every so often, when she seems to be teetering on the edge of overexposure, she releases a song that catapults her back to the top of the charts. Rihanna seems to be following Madonna’s wheel of reinvention. Every album has its own distinct image to set her apart from competitors. From sun-kissed island girl in her debut album, to a fire-engine redhead seductress in Loud, Rihanna knows how to market and brand herself. Her latest reincarnation is as a brash, outspoken young woman. From risqué photos on Instagram to daily tweets about marijuana use, it’s clear that Rihanna does not want to be a role model. Unapologetic is filled with these themes; the album seems to uncage her emotions. For pop fans, the album has a little something for everybody. There are empowering, upbeat songs, with “Phresh Out the Runway” and “Pour It Out” — two of the best for feeling fly and getting ready to party. Of all the artists mixing R&B

stylings with dance music, Rihanna does it best. She enlists David Guetta on “Right Now” to help her pick up where “We Found Love” left off. It’s a youthful anthem about living in the moment, sure to be played in every corner of the globe. The most interesting songs give a glimpse into her headspace over the last few months. Her tumultuous relationship with Chris Brown is reportedly back on, and she touches on the subject in a retro-sounding track with Brown titled “Nobody’s

Business,” which samples Michael Jackson. Rihanna plays around, sampling other artists and injecting her own sassy mood into the lyrics, including lyrics from 90’s track “Pony” by Ginuwine, and briefly copping a bit from “Can’t Tell Me Nothing” by Kanye West, an ode to her newfound relationship with Mary Jane. Rihanna’s made it clear that she’s not apologizing — but she doesn’t need to: we’re still buying what she’s selling.

—IMAGE COURTESY EVA RINALDI/FLICK R CREATIVE COMMONS


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The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 16

Arts & Entertainment Locarno brings Latin sounds to TRU Oriol Salvador

Evan Mudryk

Ω Contributor

A cold winter day provided a great opportunity for people to head inside the TRU Alumni Theatre for the first Live at TRU! performance of the new year. From Vancouver, Tom Landa, front man of multi-Juno nominee the Paperboys, was introduced to the TRU campus and Kamloops audience with his side project, Locarno on Jan. 17. Locarno is his new band, started about two years ago. “We played a lot on the festivals season, all around Canada and in short tours like this weekend,” Landa said. The recent short tour included shows in Ashcroft on Jan. 18, and Kelowna on Jan. 19. The TRU Cultural Events Committee organizes the live performances at the Alumni Theatre in the Clock Tower building. English professor Susie Safford is the chair of the committee after being involved with it for approximately 20 years. They put together six events per year, three in the fall semester and three in the winter semester. The British Columbia Arts Council sends information about available performers and the committee selects the lineup. “We are so excited to have Locarno coming, they are an absolutely wonderful, exciting, highly professional act that I think everyone is going to enjoy, a lot,” Safford said. “We got the chance to see a little bit of the performance and they are very lively.” Due to a set-up delay, the show started 30 minutes late. Despite the set-back, the audience waited patiently in anticipation of Locarno’s Mexican and Latin American sounds. In a 45-minute set, Landa and his band, featuring a violin, guitar, bass,

Anna Karenina enchants with its portrayal of aristocracy The Gateway (U of A)

Vancouver-based Lorcano brings some Latin flavour to the TRU Alumni Theatre Jan. 17.

—PHOTO BY ORIOL SALVADOR

drums, percussion, trumpet, and trombone, brought Latin sounds including an untitled cumbia, a style of music from Colombia. The group also performed traditional sounds of son jarocho, a regional folk music style from Veracruz, Mexico, with “Arenita Azul.” Mixing in a multicultural song with a ska vibe, “America” brought a few spectators up from their seats to dance in front of the stage. “People was so chévere [cool] here,” Landa said after the show.

“There was a good mixture of youth but also older people, which makes a really good combination and it was nice to see the two little kids in the audience”. The goal that the TRU Cultural Events Committee has set out is to bring events to both students as well as the wider community on campus and within Kamloops. Students were, indeed, the smallest demographic. “We’d like to have more students coming, for sure,” Safford said.

EDMONTON (CUP) — Over the years, the Anna Karenina story has been done again and again to varying levels of success. This version marks the 13th film based on the popular novel by Leo Tolstoy, and there have been many different variations done for television, ballet and opera. Written in 1877, the story has clearly become a favourite with audiences, and is well worth taking in one more time. The film is set in 19th Century Russia, and follows the life of Anna Karenina (Keira Knightley), a fiery young Russian socialite. Her husband, Count Alexei Karenin (Jude Law), is a senior statesman whose cold demeanour has created a desolate life for the couple. But after dancing with the handsome Count Vronsky (Aaron Taylor-Johnson) at a ball, Anna discovers a new purpose to her life and soon convinces herself to be in love. Forced to choose between true love and maintaining her social status in Russia’s high society, the aristocrat finds herself facing a decision that will have severe social and familial consequences for everyone involved. Anna Karenina finds its strength in a great director and screenwriter who prove to be a one-two-punch duo. On the one hand, there’s director Joe Wright of Pride & Prejudice fame, whose stylized approach to filming is always a staple of his work. On the other, there is screenwriter Tom Stoppard, who wrote Brazil and Shakespeare in Love, two of the best pictures of all time. Together, this dynamic duo produces a film

that’s rich in story, emotion and poignant drama, which isn’t surprising given the success of their past work. A film that highlights the potentially devastating effect our life choices can have, the dramatic nature of the Anna Karenina story is only heightened by the riveting acting that accompanies it. Keira Knightley embodies the indecision of a woman about to make a life-altering decision about her future, while Jude Law is brilliant in his portrayal of the controlling Count Karenin, ultimately making this film a success. While there are many factors that contribute to the story’s triumphant reimagination, it’s the collaborative effort of the people both behind and in front of the camera that make Anna Karenina still worth watching today. The story of Anna Karenina has gone through an exciting journey over the years, and has finally reached a satisfying pinnacle.

—IMAGE COURTESY U NIVERSAL PICTURES

TRUSU prescreens Broken City for members Amy Reinitz Ω Contributor

The Aberdeen Cineplex had a packed theatre Jan. 17 with 330 TRU students for TRUSU’s exclusive prescreening of Broken City, a crimethriller starring Mark Wahlberg. To make the event happen, TRUSU partnered with the movie theatre earlier in the fall. Tickets were free for registered students, but as a limited number were available the students union opted to draw names and email the lucky winners. “We’re always trying to make better events, and partnerships with the community as well,” said Trad Bahabri, TRUSU’s vice president internal. Broken City was released Jan. 18. Directed by Allen Hughes, it follows Billy Taggart (Wahlberg) an excop turned private investigator, on a mission of justice and revenge. Mayor Nicholas Hostetler (Russell Crowe) hires Taggart to trail his wife Cathleen Hostetler (Catherine Zeta-Jones) on suspicions of adultery days before the mayoral election. To his surprise, Taggart finds Cathleen sleeping with the opponent’s campaign manager. He is even more surprised to find the campaign manager dead mere hours later. Taggart begins investigating the death and ultimately, Hostetler himself, only to find the mayor wrapped up in shady property dealings. Unfortunately, Hostetler has dirt on Taggart, who must decide between what is right for the city and preserving his own integrity.

(Left to right) Leif Douglass (Director at Large), Nolan Guichon(Aboriginal Rep), Trad Bahabri (VP Internal), Jeromy Spence (VP Finance) at TRUSU’s prescreening of Broken City.

Allen Hughes (The Book of Eli, New York, I Love You) delivers an actionpacked film with the help of Brian Tucker’s script. Hughes should be able to count on Broken City as being one of his most well-known films, if not the most original. Wahlberg engages the audience with his portrayal of the intense Taggart, but the typical rebel hero character feels a little overplayed. Crowe’s stoic depiction of Hostetler is a pleasant, if unexpected surprise, as is Zeta-Jones’ clever interpretation of Cathleen. The cast delivers a strong overall performance that raises the film above others in its genre. Hughes takes the concept of a crime-

—PHOTO BY AMY REINITZ

thriller and adds a political spin that will occupy audiences all around. Action fans and thrill-seekers will both relish the rebellious delivery of justice. Those looking for something unique can appreciate the political incorporation to a crime-thriller plot. Overall, Broken City should appeal to a wide audience with its powerful plot and talented cast. The 330 audience members applauded TRUSU’s efforts before the show and many lingered around the theatre afterwards to thank TRUSU for the event. “We are very happy there are lots of people,” said Bahabri. “Having a full house means it was a great success.”


10

January 23, 2013

Sports Ready the rink: WolfPack curling set to rock Adam Williams Ω Sports Editor

One after another they slide out of the hack, quietly practicing their deliveries over and over. While the sheets around them are filled with rinks playing games, shouting out commands to sweepers mired in a competition that is often described as quintessentially Canadian, the Wolf Pack women’s curling team practices the fundamentals. It’s a team that hasn’t garnered much publicity to date. Though they were formed in late August even the most ardent followers of TRU athletics are only just learning of their existence. Some might view that as a slight, others something to complain about, but the women just keep on practising. The men’s team is in a similar place, their formation has followed an identical trajectory. Both teams were the result of the Kamloops Curling Club’s successful bid for the CIS/ CCA Curling Championships in March. That sort of pressure would weigh heavily on some, but both skips -- Darren Nelson of the men’s rink and Tiffany Krausher of the women’s — are taking it in stride. “You’re on home ice, a lot is expected of you, but I try not to

let it get to me,” Krausher said. “That’s just the way I’ve always been, if you let it get to you you’re not going to do as well.” Krausher’s rink has played at the provincial level but this will be their first opportunity to compete on a national stage. So to compensate they practise three times a week as a team and for countless hours on their own. They have also traveled around the province competing in bonspiels. Nelson and his rink have previous experience at national curling events, he even played for TRU when they went to nationals in Winnipeg in 2007. He was a third then so this time around it will be different but he’s excited about getting a second crack at playing for his university. “It’s nice, you’re representing something bigger than yourself, so it’s fun to be a part of that,” Nelson said. “Especially going to TRU and supporting all the other sports teams, it’s fun to be a part of that myself now.” Nelson’s rink competes in the Sun Life Super League, an elite men’s division at the Kamloops Curling Club, and currently sits in third place. The team had aspirations of competing in men’s playdowns this year but had to abandon that path due to cost. Both Krausher and Nelson have been heavily involved in

the Kamloops curling scene for nearly 20 years. Nelson also coaches at his old high school, South Kamloops Secondary. “It’s nice to spread the game, as long as there’s people that are excited to learn the game, it’s awesome to help coach them,” Nelson said. “As long as people are showing the enthusiasm and the want to get better it’s really a pleasure to help them learn.” It’s unclear what the future holds for curling at TRU. Brenda Nordin, the head coach of both the men and the women, is hoping that a solid showing in March could lead to a permanent partnership between the Kamloops Curling Club and TRU Athletics. According to sports information officer Larry Read, the onus will be on the curling club to secure its own funding to support the team — as is done with Wolf Pack teams for baseball, hockey, golf and cross country. Winning is less of a concern for the athletics department. For the athletes, the future of the program is secondary. Their focus is on March, when teams from the Prairies, Ontario, Quebec and Atlantic Canada will arrive in Kamloops. They may not be the most well-known team at TRU, but slide after slide they are working to change that.

Sick of it all

WolfPack struggles yet again in weekend action Adam Williams Ω Sports Editor

Julia Niemczewska stands at the foot of the court heaving into a garbage can as the rest of her team talks with head coach Keith Lundgren. After a few minutes pass, Niemczewska stands up, wipes the tears from her cheeks and joins the rest of the Wolf Pack at the bench. The women are already down 2-0 and it looks like the third set will end just as quickly. Niemczewska has the f lu – she pukes not because of a case of nerves, or from over-exerting herself during the course of play. It would have been an easy conclusion to jump to, she and her teammates are going up against the UBC Thunderbirds, the number one team in the country. Nerves and exhaustion would be par for the course.

The game was never going to be easy for the Wolf Pack, few would have had the audacity to predict anything but a straightsets sweep. With a record of 13-1, UBC is the far superior team, with more veterans on the roster than TRU has players. Things more or less unfolded as one would have predicted. “Right now we gotta figure out how to compete,” Lundgren said. “They [the Wolf Pack] still have a tough time being vulnerable, taking risks. We don’t know very much right now, because we’re so young, so it’s just trying to get them out of their comfort zone a little bit. They like to go in their comfort zone every now and then and that’s when teams go on a roll.” The match lasted an hour, the Wolf Pack lost in straight sets (25-10, 25-16 and 25-11). TRU

Head coach Keith Lundgren talks to his team during a timeout against the UBC Thunderbirds Jan. 18. —PHOTO BY ALLEN DOUGLAS

took an early lead in the second, but UBC quickly rebounded. Many of the T-Birds’ points went uncontested by TRU, who struggled to even get a hand on UBC’s attacks. Lundgren was animated at times throughout the match, particularly during timeouts when speaking with his team. Post-game, he assessed his team as hesitant, afraid of being vulnerable and making the plays necessary. The Wolf Pack clearly struggled with on-court communication and Lundgren could be heard throughout the match reminding his players to talk to each other. “It’s not a concern, but it’s always something we’re working on,” Lundgren said. “Communication’s a big part of the game and we’re talking about that every day, every day.” Of the 37 points TRU scored on Jan. 18, 22 were on UBC errors (57 per cent). The team saw marginal improvement Saturday, when only 16 of 37 points (43 per cent) came on opposition errors, en route to another straight-sets loss (25-4, 25-17 and 25-16). This weekend epitomizes what has been a difficult season for the Wolf Pack. To this point the women won only one set, losing the other 48. The possibility of a winless season is now very real with their final three weekends being played against the fourthplace Mount Royal University Cougars (10-4), the sixth-place University of Calgary Dinos (77) and the ninth-place University of Winnipeg Wesman (5-10). The Wolf Pack’s next game at the Tournament Capital Centre will be Feb. 2 against Mount Royal University.

Skip Tiffany Krausher delivers a stone at practice Jan. 16 at the Kamloops Curling Club. —PHOTO BY ADAM WILLIAMS

Still in the hunt

WolfPack men split weekend action against UBC, remain in thick of playoff picture Adam Williams

“We had a little more emotion on Friday night,” Hennelly said. Ω Sports Editor “Philip [Ozari] had a great night The Wolf Pack men’s volley- Friday – an exceptional night. ball team is still in the hunt for That kind of made the difference a playoff spot, after winning one I think, he had a lot more offenof two games against the UBC sive output on Friday night.” Ozari had 15 kills and 4 four Thunderbirds this weekend. TRU won Jan. 18 by a score of aces in Friday night’s victory three sets to one (25-22, 30-28, and was named player of the match. 22-25 and 30-28). The WolfThe victoPack play ry helped the tenth place team bounce University of back from Calgary (4back-to-back 12), eighth losses in place Mount SaskatcheRoyal Uniwan to open versity (7-9) 2013. and seventh “We didn’t place Unihave a good versity of weekend in Winnipeg Saskatch(8-8) in the ewan,” said final three head coach Pat Hen weeks of the season, all of nelly. “We whom they wanted to —Head coach Pat Hennelly are fighting get back to with for the the level of seventh and play that we’ve been in at practices and final playoff spot in the Canada I thought we were there Friday West conference. “We’re really trying to stay and Saturday.” The Wolf Pack had to play aggressive on our side,” Henwithout outside hitter Hardy nelly said. “The message for the Wooldridge Jan. 19 who twisted guys, as young guys, is we’re gohis ankle in warm-ups. Though ing after these wins.” The Wolf Pack currently sit rookie Stuart Richey played well in relief, Hennelly cited in ninth place. Their next home Wooldridge’s absence as one of game will be Feb. 2 against the main differences for his team Mount Royal University at the Tournament Capital Centre. between Friday and Saturday.

“The message for the guys, for the young guys, is we’re going after these wins.”


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The Omega · Volume 22, Issue 16

Coffee Break

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1. Santa’s present carrier 5. Physics calculation 9. Goes with Saxon 14. S-shaped molding 15. Chip in? 16. Fabric 17. Part 18. Back of the house 19. Rumba relative 20. Start of a house? 23. In-flight info, for short 24. Consume 25. Jane Eyre, e.g. 28. It’s always sold in mint condition 30. Appear 32. “We __ family” 33. Gas used in welding 35. Wolf, coyote, fox, dog family 37. House plan related 40. Maids 41. Actress Bloom 42. Alter, in a way 43. Not just “a” 44. “Indian Idol,” for example 48. Italian town 51. Absorbed, as a cost 52. Can you dig it? 53. House to love 57. “Home ___” 59. Young salmon

60. Bachchan, for one (var.) 61. Danger 62. HOMES part 63. Whine 64. Add color to 65. Red or whitetail? 66. Potato, slangily Down 1. Cold dessert 2. Short-eared rabbit 3. Abdominal 4. Fall (over) 5. “Besame mucho” singer 6. Concerning 7. For men only 8. Balkan native 9. Knight’s “suit” 10. Civil rights org. 11. Equestrians’ field day 12. Court ploy 13. “Walking on Thin Ice” singer 21. “Six Feet Under” subjects? 22. What a house stands on 26. Fleshy seed covering 27. “Waking ___ Devine” (1998 film) 29. Microsoft support rep 30. Nee Al (anagram) 31. Gut areas 34. Carve in stone 35. Horse move

36. God of war 37. “The ___ have it” 38. Butting equipment 39. Snigger maker 40. “Bingo!” 43. Backgammon impossibility 45. Attach a hose 46. An alloy 47. Supposed, for Shakespeare 49. Building style 50. Refine, as metal 51. Eagle home 54. Didn’t dillydally 55. Ending with hard or soft 56. Shakira’s don’t lie 57. Appropriate 58. Orchid arrangement

L A O S

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

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MYLES MELLOR AND SALLY YORK

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“Let’s Dwell on It”


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January 23, 2013

M E M B E R S H I P A D V I S O RY Annual General Meeting 7:00 PM Thursday January 24, 2013 TRUSU Lecture Hall Open to all members of the TRU Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Union

Agenda 1.0)

Call to Order

1.1)

Approval of the Agenda

1.2)

Presentation of the Annual Report

1.3)

Presentation of the 2011-2012 Audited Financial Statements

1.4)

Appointment of the Auditor

1.5)

Presentation of the 2012-2013 Budget

1.6)

Special Resolutions*

1.7)

Adjournment

*Full details available online at trusu.ca

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January 23, 2013  

The January 23, 2013 edition of The Omega

January 23, 2013  

The January 23, 2013 edition of The Omega

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