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Thompson Rivers University’s Independent Student Newspaper Nov. 23, 2011

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Is the term even relevant anymore?

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November 23, 2011

Feature

Hipster: counter-culture or mindless trend? A look into the true meaning of this popular style

Leah Batstone

The Concordian (Concordia) MONTREAL (CUP) — What do you think of when you hear the word “hipster”? For hipster haters, it is an arrogant trend follower, who loves sarcasm and drinking Pabst Blue Ribbon while wearing black thick-rimmed glasses with no lenses. It is clear to see that it has become an overused word that has lost its significance and impact due to mainstream popularity. Dr. Zeynep Arsel, who jokingly calls herself a “hipsterologist,” is an assistant professor in Concordia’s marketing department. Her doctoral dissertation looked at “the intersection of indie culture and mass mediated hipster narrative and the consumption patterns that emerge as a result of this co-optation.” She explained how marketers began pegging people with the term hipster. “We’re talking about ’90s. This was where indie music was very exotic and interesting and nothing like anything out there. “Marketers were trying to understand, and I was looking at the media discourse about indie music. Gradually, journalists and marketers started to label and categorize people who are in this indie culture as hipsters. “I don’t know what the challenge was with [labelling] indie, but it was sort of a production system rather than a lifestyle,” she said. “Using hipster helped them understand what indie was about.” Arsel explained that marketers “cool-hunt” for subcultures and new styles in areas where the culture is merely emerging. They “find stylistic cues, fashion, and make them mainstream.” This happened with hipsters, who were originally discovered in the New York City borough

of Brooklyn, and Williamsburg, one of its neighbourhoods. These individuals, who were 18 to 35, were edgy and had interesting taste in music and fashion. Hipsters aim to stand out in a crowd, yet they all look the same. The hipster style is a mix of all other counter-cultures and actually shows little originality: oversized glasses of the ’80s, unflattering sweaters from dad’s closet, and beards from the Paleolithic period. Stereotypically, hipsters are young people who believe in forward thinking, helping the environment, and think of themselves highly. Hipsters live and dress like aspiring artists, but spend copious amounts of money on the latest Apple technologies. It’s easy to list the stereotypes, but there is more to the hipster label than what mocking photoblog Look At That Fucking Hipster tells you. Despite popular belief, hipsters aren’t just attention seekers. “I have a lot of disagreement with people who talk about hipsters, and say, ‘hipsters are trend-seeking people.’ In most cases, hipsters actually really like the music they listen to and like to dress a certain way,” said Arsel. She also sees people stereotype others as hipsters when they only borrow from the counter-culture. “In every group, there are always the people who are hardcore, and people who paraphrase and emulate. There are always people who are the tail end of the moment,” said Arsel. Glancing around any campus, it appears that hipsters are everywhere, but most of these people are hipster emulators. Because the hipster style of frumpy sweaters and skinny jeans can be bought at Urban Outfitters and American Apparel, it has become conventional. Part of hipster style is trying hard to look like you’re not trying hard, and it’s fashionable. “I think it’s a way people go back in time and remember the ’80s and ’90s, especially people ages 20 to 30,” said Concordia University political science graduate student Juan Diego Santa. “People go back to old fashion to remember

“...I think the category is no longer meaningful.” -Dr. Zeynep Arsel

Imagae by Katie Brioux/The Concordian everything about the culture, from TV shows, fashion, music. I like the hipster style. I think it’s original and it reflects people’s appreciation for art.” Indie music, which is a hipster trademark, has also turned into an increasingly popular genre. Bands such as Foster The People and The Black Keys are crossing over to Top 40 radio stations. Indie and alternative music can even be heard playing at Hollister, a clothing brand at the height of becoming mainstream. The style, music, and mindset of hipsters have become so common the purpose is defeated. The hipster counter-culture began because people didn’t want to conform, but it’s used so frequently that it’s ordinary. Arsel believes being a hipster has no point anymore. “One thing that baffles me is that by looking at the definition of hipster, you can basically categorize anyone as a hipster. If you have a funky haircut, you’re a hipster. Am I a hipster professor because I wear band T-shirts? Every-

body that is 18 to 35 could be hipster. That’s why I think the category is no longer meaningful.” Concordia student Sabrina Patti agrees. “It’s been really overused. I think everyone has something they can relate to the hipster style. I wouldn’t even call it a style anymore. It became such a general term,” she said. Arsel has seen The New York Times use the word many times, and even apologize for using the word so many times. “It ceased to be meaningful because anyone can be categorized into the term. “We talked about it so much that we contaminated it,” she said. Googling “Hipster” produces 6.7 million results. Magazines and newspapers have used the word excessively. Hipsters are imitated, borrowed from and laughed at like it’s second nature. The retro fashion and underground music have become meshed into our personal tastes to the point where they are common. The exclusivity of the counter-culture is gone.

Wait…I remember this! Mike Davies Editor-in-Chief

First I’d like to thank Leah Batstone of the Concordian for the above article. Until I read this I had not thought much of the whole “hipster” trend other than the fact that I “knew it when I saw it,” and that I hated their high-andmighty, holier-than-thou, selfinterested and self-absorbed attitude. Upon reading Batstone’s piece, the thought that kept popping up in my head was, “So it’s really no different than the ‘Grunge’ fad in the 90’s.” Which made me instantly connect to this “movement” (though that term itself seems to have lost about as much meaning as the term Hipster itself ) in that I freely admit that for quite a while in my formative years I could be found scouring secondhand clothing stores for oversized plaid shirts and Doc Martin boots

to show the world that I too didn’t care what people thought of me. I obviously did, though, or why would I be trying so hard to prove that I didn’t, right? It was kind of a farce, actually. I wanted people to recognize that I was someone who didn’t care what they thought of me. And I would prove it by dressing and acting in a way that was recognized as representing those ideals. I got on it in the early stages, but it didn’t make my presence in the whole culture any less of a charade. I thought I was doing it for the right reasons (which means I was, right?) but doing it at all was actually ridiculous. And looking back objectively at the situation, those ideals were almost identical to those attempting to be portrayed by this Hipster trend. These stereotypical folks (I freely admit to generalizations here) are self-interested (or act as though they are) music/art-appreciating, “you just don’t get me,”

types, who want to be seen as being part of a counter-culture, but are really just embedding themselves as the culture itself. Or as Batstone put it, “Hipsters live and dress like aspiring artists, but spend copious amounts of money on the latest Apple technologies…[and] aim to stand out in a crowd, yet they all look the same.” Sure sounds like how I remember the mid-90’s. I remember all of a sudden seeing those one-dollar plaid shirts I’d been wearing showing up in shop windows at the mall with $50 price tags attached. I remember Doc Martin’s tripling in cost seemingly overnight. And I remember it all just fading away as we grew past it. Just as I assume this one will fade away to make room for the next one. Maybe something leather-oriented again. We haven’t seen that for a while, and these things do seem

pretty cyclical. Personally, I just hope the Bieber-hair thing goes away soon. But then the fauxhawk might come back — or has that ever left? I stopped paying attention. Fad-followers tend to do that eventually. It’s completely natural and understandable to follow the trends that represent the way you think, but if you’re doing it because you’re trying to represent yourself as different than the norm, you should probably start something else, because as Batstone says, “The hipster counter-culture began because people didn’t want to conform, but it’s used so frequently that it’s ordinary.” Exactly the same thing we did to grunge not 20 years ago, and we’ll do again to the next one. I can respect the hipsters a bit more now that I’ve connected it to something I’ve been involved in myself. If you think about it you probably can, too.

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November 23, 2011

THE

MEGA

www.theomega.ca

November 23, 2011

Volume 21, Issue 12

Published since November 27, 1991

editorialstaff EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Mike Davies

editorofomega@gmail.com/250-372-1272 BUSINESS MANAGER Natasha Slack

managerofomega@gmail.com 250-372-1272 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Cory Hope

SPORTS EDITOR

Nathan Crosby Copy Editor

Larkin Schmiedl Photo Editor

Cory Hope News Editor

Brendan Kergin Promotions Coordinator/Adsales

Amrita Pannu

omegacontributors Daron Mark, Taylor Rocca, Amy Berard, Leah Batstone, Katie Brioux, Andrew Jeffrey, Jennifer Bednard, Jacquelin Gregoire, Tannara Yelland

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF * Mike Davies BUSINESS MGR * Natasha Slack INDUSTRY REP * Mike Youds FACULTY REP * Charles Hays STUDENT REP* Sadie Cox

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Literary and visual submissions are welcomed. All submissions are subject to editing for brevity, taste and legality. The Omega will attempt to publish each letter received, barring time and space constraints. The editor will take care not to change the intention or tone of submissions, but will not publish material deemed to exhibit sexism, racism or homophobia. Letters for publication must include the writer’s name (for publication) and contact details (not for publication). The Omega reserves the right not to publish any letter or submitted material. Opinions expressed in the Letters & Opinion section do not represent those of The Omega, the Cariboo Student Newspaper Society, its Board of Directors or its staff. Opinions belong only to those who have signed them.

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Editorial

Know your In case you community missed it Amy Berard

Omega Contributor

It’s that time of year when everything starts to fall – your bank account balance, your sleep levels and your motivation. Even amidst the stress of final exams there is no reason why you should not have enough food in your kitchen and a healthy mind and body. Your TRU and Kamloops community can take care of the basics for you while you focus on exams. The TRUSU Food Bank on campus can provide you with a generic bag of food at their service desk in the Independent Centre. They will also try to accommodate any dietary or allergic requirements you have through their same-day service. If you would prefer to visit somewhere off-campus, the Kamloops Food Bank (171 Wilson Street) offers hampers for students on Thursdays from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. if you provide proof of enrolment. Fridays at Kamloops United Church you can also pick up a hamper from 11 to 12 p.m. The Kamloops United Church also offers a free meal on Sunday afternoon for anyone in need. No information is necessary, just bring yourself and you will be taken care of. If you happen to catch the sniffles

or flu from that kid with the cough sitting next to you in class, it is easy to stop by the doctor’s office in OM 1463 and get checked out. With your care card and student ID, you will have an appointment within a week. And for the inevitable stress that comes along this time of year, the counsellors in OM 1631 can talk you through exam anxiety, stress management, relationship problems, and more. There is a Youth Health Clinic (519 Columbia St.) available to anyone under the age of 25. They focus on reproductive health, contraception and education. Call 250-851-7300 for more information or to make an appointment. All of these places are supportive, accommodating, and respectful in their interactions. As a student struggling to study and pay the bills, it isn’t a surprise some of us might need to take advantage of the services offered in the community. If you think TRU is missing something on campus, I would love to hear your thoughts. Amy Berard is a business student and the TRU Campus Liaison for United Way. To get connected with the community, email her at: youth@unitedwaytnc.ca

Twitter and politics NDP MP Pat Martin made years now to vent their frustraheadlines for dropping an F- tions on Twitter, but unfortubomb while seated in the House nately all it seems to do is cause of Commons last week, but he unrest with teammates. Even if it doesn’t work for did it without uttering a word. Referring to the Conservative athletes, complaining on Twitgovernment’s new infatuation ter could be incredibly advantawith closing debate on major geous for politicians, especially if it’s highly propieces of legislavocative. tion very quickly he Think about how tweeted “(expletive) many major news disgrace.” outlets covered While some peoMartin’s outburst. ple might condemn I read articles such actions as inabout it in the Globe appropriate and unand Mail, and on called for, I thought Yahoo News and Martin’s tweet was The Huffington nothing short of Post. brilliant. Each one had a His outburst gave slightly different him an extended angle, but all of platform to drive Daron Mark them quoted Martin home his dissatisvoicing his displeafaction with how sure with Conservathe Harper government has been conducting them- tive politics. The reason I think this could selves since winning a majority be so effective is because I think last summer. If Martin had done the diplo- we tend to forget most of what matic thing and bit his tongue we read in the paper. All that’s likely to be remem(or in this case, bit his thumb…?) the Conservatives might well bered from a story like this one have been able to use the same is that Pat Martin was pissed off tactic of culling debate on new because the Conservatives were legislation again without any playing dirty. (Even though they technically aren’t.) backlash. Twitter could become the ultiBy sounding-off in a provocative way, Martin was able to use mate political slander machine. Twitter to bring attention to the I know if I was an MP in the proceedings in a way that will House of Commons, I would be likely cause the Conservatives tempted to try to use it to sway to think twice before trying it public opinion. again, at least in the foreseeable Wouldn’t you? future. Sports athletes have tried for

Consider This

Brendan Kergin News Editor Global

The gals and guys up at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland have discovered a particles called neutrinos that may travel faster than light, which means many modern physics theories may have to reviewed. What does E = if m is fine but c is no longer the constant? Greece and Italy rotate leaders in effort to stave off more economic woes. Italy’s infamous Silvio Berlusconi has stepped down, though he’s not totally out of the spotlight. Greece, well, that’s just the economic equivalent of the ‘Nucks Stanley Cup Finals game seven last year, riot included. Syria’s rebellion is going well for workers in bullet factories. The Occupy Wall Street crowd have to be happy its not in Damascus, as BBC is reporting 3,500 dead in clashes with the government. Parallels to Libya and Egypt are, of course, being drawn. National The NDP leadership race is going on to replace the moustachioed one himself, Jack Layton. While the nation has recovered from Layton’s passing, his beloved party is in the midst of rooting around through its MPs and other politicians to pull out another leader like that. Meanwhile the official opposition is lacking leadership in the house of commons. An “honour killing” trial in Ontario is raising some questions of culture in Canada. Whether you believe the family is guilty of murdering three daughters and an ex-wife or not is not the only debate. It gets down into the sometimes gritty nature of Canada’s multiculturalism, like should we even be using the term, “honour killing”?

@PatMartinMP - “This is a fucking disgrace...closure again. And on the Budget! There’s not a democracy in the world that would tolerate this jackboot shit.” MP Pat Martin (representing Winnipeg Centre) drops a tweeted f-bomb and media blows up for a day. A few offended, many worried about the escalating tone of disrespect in government and many others agreeing. Provincial Christy Clark has returned from China and India after embarking on BC’s largest trade mission. While it may have many long-term implications for BC, the most exciting thing for many was the bid for 2013’s Bollywood IIFA Awards (their version of the Oscars or Genies but held around the world). Occupy in Victoria and Vancouver have been ordered out of their places of occupation. The Victoria encampment, as of Sunday, had packed up and plan to “morph the movement in Victoria” according to their website. Occupy Vancouver, while moving slower, looks to be in the same category. There was an earthquake nearby. No, really! Penticton, Kelowna and most of the rest of the south Okanagan got shaken up Friday morning with a 4.6-magnitude quake. Local BC Hydro is moving ahead with plans to put smart meters on all homes in BC. While this may not affect most students right now, it could in the long term. It’s one of those issues that’s a slow burn until you realize your standing next to a firey financial situation. Occupy Kamloops packed up its tents after it lost a bid for a propane heater to help thwart cold winter nights. There was also word of threats uttered against them which is not cool, Kamloops. In other words health and safety won out, locally, over idealism. What ya gonna do? People would rather not be sick and stabbed.

Recently, the focus has shifted from I’ve been in the U.S. for the past week, and it’s difficult to escape the an obsession with catching “cheaters” Penn State – Paterno story here. There to a developmental approach that helps is much that can be written about this students learn to act with integrity in tragic story. And indeed much has been. both their academic and personal lives. I wonder how that is working out in What intrigues me most is that an institutional culture developed at Penn State College, PA this month. My hope is that students look at situState where many people knew about Jerry Sandusky’s abuse of children and ations like the one at Penn State and respond with disgust, did nothing about it. asking important Many people questions about how made choices to not to question power act. and authority. To not call out the My hope is that wrong. students do not point And I wonder to behaviour that is how that culture clearly unethical and translates from the use it to excuse their football team to the own poor choices. classrooms on camMy hope is that pus. Christine Adam students decide that How does a stubetter choices can dent that sees anDean of Students and should be made other student cheat and that they want to learn how to do on an exam feel about ratting him out? How does a student struggling with a just that. final paper feel about cutting and pastChristine Adam, TRU’s Dean of ing from Wikipedia? How does a faculty member address Students, writes a periodic column on topics of interest to TRU students. You the issue with her students? At campuses throughout Canada and can find her in person in 1631 Old Main the U.S., much is made of the need to and follow her on Twitter @trudeanstuhelp our students understand and act dents with academic integrity.

From the dean’s desk


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November 23, 2011

The next three years of Kamloops leadership Brendan Kergin News Editor

Peter Milobar remains Kamloops mayor despite a close race put up by Dieter Dudy. Milobar ran on a platform looking towards social issues such as the Royal Inland Hospital and transportation as well as pushing for greater economic growth through local businesses and tourism. The city councillors for the next three years will be: Ken Christian (10,880 votes) Marg Spina (7,857 votes) Tina Lange (7,498) Pat Wallace (7,461) Arjun Singh (7.330) Nancy Bepple (7,257) Donovan Cavers (7,118) Nelly Dever (6,852) Spina, Lange, Wallace and Bepple are all incumbents. Before the end of this term, Wallace will have spent over 20 years straight on city council. The only incumbent to run but not be elected was John De Cicco. Donavan Cavers, just in his midtwenties, is a local business owner who ran on a platform of environmentally sustainability. Arjun Singh is returning to municipal politics after three years out of politics after being ousted in the last election. The issues he looked closer at included fiscal responsibility and accountability. Ken Christian, former chair of the Kamloops/Thompson Board of Education, turned his attention to civic politics this year. After 18 years on the board, name recognition and a popular track record helped him to lead the polls. He ran on a platform creating a safe and healthy community. Also new to the council chambers is Nelly Dever, who beat Andy Philpot by only 119 votes. She’s looking to create better gateways to the community and work closely with the private sector in order to achieve community goals.

Peter Milobar Mayor

Pat Wallace Councillor

Donavan Cavers

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Community Calendar Wednesday, Nov. 23 -Heroes Live Concert Series. Show starts 8 p.m. $5 Dollars cover. Thursday, Nov. 24

Saturday, Nov. 26 -Women’s Basketball 5 p.m. Tournament Capital Center vs Regina

-Men’s Basketball -Inter-active Bible Study 7 p.m. Tournament Capital and Prayer Time 12:30-1:20 p.m. OM2464 Center vs Regina Lunch bags welcome. For more info contact: TRU Chaplain Narayan -Kamloops Symphony presents Mitra Classical Companions 250.371.5940 or 7:30 p.m. at the narayanmitra@tru.ca Sagebrush Theatre kamloopssymphony.com -Arts Show and Tell for details TRUSU Boardroom 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free lunch and fun! -Thompson Rivers University Foundation annual student awards ceremony 5-6 p.m. TRU Gym Friday, Nov. 25 -Women’s Basketball 6 p.m. Tournament Capital Center vs Brandon -Men’s Basketball 8 p.m. Tournament Capital Center vs Brandon

Next week is the last Omega of the semester, so if you’ve got an event happening in December, let us know and we’ll get it in for you.

editorofomega@ gmail.com


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 12

News

Former CEO criticizes current state of Canadian universities Gwyn Morgan, former head of EnCana, points to medicine’s brain drain ‘travesty’ and other issues Andrew Jeffrey

The Gateway (U of A) EDMONTON (CUP) — Despite the warning he jokingly put forward, the emergency exits weren’t needed and riots weren’t started following Gwyn Morgan’s polarizing lecture at the University of Alberta earlier this month, where he spoke about running universities more like a business for profitable benefit. In the U of A’s first edition of the 2011–12 Innovative Leaders Lecture Series, Morgan gave a nearly hour-long presentation that cast a critical light on current practices in Canadian universities. Morgan, a columnist for The Globe and Mail and former CEO of EnCana Corporation, has written two hotly-contested articles for the paper that have outlined his position on the role of Canadian universities. “The number-one challenge facing universities in the 21st century is developing higherlevel education with the knowledge and skills needed by our country at a lower cost,” Morgan said during his lecture. The declining quality of education in Canada is a major factor in this challenge, according to Morgan. A key issue he cited: professors who are more focused on research than teaching, and who lecture on material students could find from other sources. Morgan related these concerns to the education of his

nephew — a second-year engineering student at UBC — who argued that students aren’t getting their money’s worth from professors. “‘The problem is the one-way lecture style produces boring and repeat course content,’” Morgan quoted his nephew as saying. “The time it takes a professor to transpose a textbook onto the chalkboard serves absolutely no purpose.” According to Morgan, universities are producing a large number of graduates that aren’t contributing to valuable areas of the workforce. He believes problems negatively affecting the Canadian workforce and economy could be prevented if students enrol in programs that will best support Canada’s economy. “It’s clear that Canadian universities are turning out large numbers of graduates, while failing to graduate nearly enough professionals critical directly to our future,” Morgan said. “More than twice as many students [compared to engineering] are accepted into programs with low job prospects, such as visual and performing arts, humanities and social work.” “Many [medicine] applicants leave Canada to pursue their dreams elsewhere,” he added. “This, in a country where many citizens have no access to a doctor. This is a travesty that gravitates motivated, capable students to menial jobs out of

university, when they could be helping our country succeed in a competitive world.” But many in the audience weren’t convinced by the lecture. Some disagreed with the assertion that universities should focus more on preparing students for the workforce than providing general knowledge offered in degrees with “lower job prospects.” “There’s this expectation that businesses should be able to count on the education being received in universities in order to feed the labour force, and there’s this devolution of responsibility downwards in terms of accountability,” said Cory Dawson, a graduate student in education. “[Businesses] don’t want to put in that extra two-thirds of the funding in order to pay for the education ... They like the publicly-funded infrastructure to create their workers,” Dawson said. “My thoughts are that if they’re so dissatisfied, why don’t they do it themselves? “It’s pretty obvious why they’re not doing it themselves. It’s because the incentives are pretty low financially.” Morgan also presented his analysis of these issues in a meeting with the General Faculties Council earlier that day in hopes that universities can educate students to better support Canada’s economy.

‘Canadians are right, Canadians are always right’ Stéphane Dion talks Senate reform, political involvement at Simon Fraser University Jennifer Bednard The Peak (SFU)

BURNABY, B.C. (CUP) — Stéphane Dion, former Liberal party leader and current member of Parliament for Quebec’s Saint-Laurent– Cartierville riding, spoke at Simon Fraser University on Nov. 10. Focusing mainly on the Conservative plan for Senate reform, he gave two speeches: one each in English and French at two different locations on the SFU campus, and spoke to The Peak directly following his second talk. Dion argued that the Senate reform plans made by the Conservatives concentrates power in eastern Canada unfairly, since it does not take into account the population distribution. “It would be terribly unfair to some of the provinces of our country — British Columbia and Alberta — because they would be underrepresented,” he explained. “British Columbians have only six senators out of 105. I have to speak out against that.” The Senate, whose members are unelected, currently plays an arguably minor role in parliamentary affairs. The under-representation of the western provinces may be unfair, but is not as large of a problem as it could be, according to Dion. He cautioned that in an elected senate playing a “full constitutional role,” the small number of seats allotted to B.C. and Alberta would become a major issue. Dion agreed that the Senate needs reform, but explained that the process needs to be undertaken carefully in order to avoid the possibility of deadlock between the two houses. “Look at the United States,” he explained, “where the two houses are stopping each other all the time. Do

we want to paralyze our institutions like that in Canada? To go ahead now, when we have no way of creating a dispute mechanism and no plans to address the number of seats in British Columbia, is irresponsible.” Though Dion admitted that few Canadians are likely currently concerned with Senate reform issues, he stressed the importance of citizen engagement in the process. “People don’t care now because they have other priorities, and that’s fully understandable. They want to keep their jobs, they want to save their factories, to invest for the education of their children ... but it’s my role to say that something is happening that will not help your future,” he said. “[The issues] are not so complicated,” he continued. “I think that people should care about politics, because politics care about them.” Dion also included an appeal to students to get involved in the political process. “Don’t stay home because you think you’re not involved,” he stressed. “You are involved. You have priorities.” The former Liberal leader suggested that the decline in political participation may be a result of the lack of focus on party platforms and the rise of attack ads. “I would prefer to see Canadians looking much more carefully at the choices they are making. But, as politicians we can’t complain,” he said. “We need to succeed, to reach Canadians, to touch their emotions, to make our point clear in their minds. It’s the challenge that we Liberals have to face,” he admitted. “Canadians are right. Canadians are always right. It’s for us to make sure that they will understand why they would be right in voting for us.”


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November 23, 2011

Arts & Entertainment

Plenty of blood at the Pogue Blood Drunk and Three Inches of Blood show Kamloops some “grindcore” Cory Hope

Arts and Entertainment Editor I’ve been meaning to check out Blood Drunk for a while now, and I finally got the opportunity to see them at Pogue Mahone Nov. 10 when they opened for Three Inches of Blood. That’s a lot of blood. It would have made more sense for Three Inches of Blood to open for Blood Drunk, because I think that drinking three inches of blood might be enough to make somebody blood drunk. That might be the (recently retired) English major in me talking. Or the literalist. Probably not the literalist, actually, as the literalist would have to point out that I was typing and not talking. Sorry. I might have had a little too much blood. When Blood Drunk set up for the show, I was immediately surprised to see them set up the drums at the front of the stage instead of at the very back — the traditional location for the drummer. This left very little room for Marisa Etchart, the vocalist (and I use that term in the sense that it applies to the person holding the microphone and not playing another instrument). Etchart made up for the lack of room onstage by frequently taking to the pit and singing(?) amongst the crowd. I’m not being harsh here.

Blood Drunk is a grindcore band, which implies a lyrical style that ranges from distorted grunts to distorted wails, without feeling the need to enunciate along the way. It’s what they do, and they do it well. This was my first grindcore show, and I think the thing that surprised me the most was the way that the vocals are able to be distorted. I remember the Masters of the Universe Castle Greyskull play set when I was a kid. It had this piece you could speak through to make your voice sound a bit evil and summon extra powers for Skeletor to fight He-Man with or something like that. Etchart’s voice, as she shrieked at what I believe was the top of her lungs — and if it wasn’t, I’m not sure that I could stand hearing her shriek at the top of her lungs — would have sent Skeletor and He-Man running in tears to the farthest reaches of Eternia, where they would hold each other for comfort and wait for the bad woman to stop. Yeah, she’s that good. It probably has something to do with her training as an opera singer. No, that’s not a typo. Her pitch of “Hi, mom,” thrown out with a smile and a wave to her mom, who was indeed in the crowd (but not in the pit, I noticed. Come on, mom. A little support here!), along with the fact that Etchart’s pinky finger would occasionally point out as she grabbed her teacup for a drink, really showed how much Blood Drunk is in it for the fun.

Cablz was the mystery component of this show to me, as he stayed at the side of the stage using something that resembled a soundboard more than an instrument, and would frequently walk away from the stage to talk to people in the crowd or grab a drink. When I asked him what exactly it was that he was playing, he told me it is, “the fine instrument of delusion. “While standing around and drinking all the beer, I find occasional time to play an 808 Sampler.” In other words, Cablz makes noise. He cues up the tracks played before each of the songs plays, and appears to have an almost obscene amount of fun using the pitch modulator built into the board. It uses a built-in infrared sensor that changes the pitch of selected sounds as his hand is raised or lowered over it. Having met Cablz before, it didn’t entirely surprise me how much he gets a kick out of this toy. While Blood Drunk, and grindcore in general might sound like a wall of noise, once broken down to its component parts, there is actually quite a lot of talent behind that wall. Both of Blood Drunk’s guitar players are actually playing complicated metal-ish lines, and their drummer appears to be channeling an autistic ninja having a seizure. Read that description until it sounds like a compliment before going on with your day.

PHOTO BY CORY HOPE Marisa Etchart of Blood Drunk at Pogue Mahone on Nov. 10.

Arkells rock in the heart of the city Hamilton band plays sold-out show of Indie rock at the Blue Grotto Taylor Rocca

Omega Contributor The Arkells weren’t pulling any punches Nov. 15 at The Blue Grotto. Hailing from Hamilton, Ont., the band is touring in support of their second album, Michigan Left. Released Oct. 18, 2011, Michigan Left has spawned the singles “Whistleblower” and “Kiss Cam.” With a sound similar to fellow Canadian Sam Roberts, the Arkells are one of Canada’s young and upcoming rock acts. The band had a successful debut on the Canadian music scene, having won a 2010 Juno Award for New Group of the Year. The Arkells engaged the audience of the sold-out show with their performance early. They opened their 16-song set with the title track from their new album. As soon as the piano intro to “Ballad of Hugo Chavez” rang through the venue, the Arkells had the audience right where they wanted them. The band oozed passion throughout the performance. You couldn’t help but tap your feet and bop your head. A quick glance towards the stage at any moment through the evening and you saw each of the band members with a grin on their face. It was easy to tell that the Hamilton alt-rockers love what they do. The emotion was infectious. Not only did the Arkells love what they were doing, so did the crowd.

Lead singer Max Kerman was quite the conversationalist, addressing the audience between nearly every song. Kerman even poked a bit of fun at himself and his Ontarian bandmates, taking a break to challenge which of them could name the most towns from interior B.C. Despite naming Golden and Revelstoke, not exactly interior towns, the audience gave a resounding roar when “Kamloops” was finally announced by one of Kerman’s mates. Apart from playing nine songs from Michigan Left, the Arkells played six songs from their debut album Jackson Square. After a fast-paced opening to the show, they slowed things down just past the halfway mark with “Kiss Cam.” To finish off the set, they fired up “Oh, The Boss is Comin’!” their most successful single to date. Before they could get offstage, the raucous crowd was stomping and chanting “Arkells! Arkells! Arkells!” The band called out opening act San Sebastian to help them launch the encore with “On Paper.” Perhaps the greatest treat of the night came when the Arkells broke out their own fun rendition of Hall & Oates’s “You Make My Dreams.” They finished the encore with “John Lennon,” and Kerman beckoned San Sebastian back to the stage to bring it full-circle. The audience was jumping, dancing and singing along right until the last line. Indie rock band San Sebastian also calls Hamilton home. They warmed up the crowd with a half-hour set.

PHOTO BY TAYLOR ROCCA Juno Award winners for Best New Group of the Year in 2010 The Arkells showed the interior of B.C. what new Ontario music could be at the Blue Grotto on Nov. 15. The sold out crowd would not be disappointed.

They performed admirably as an opening act. By firing up the audience, they did exactly what you expect and want from an opening band. Lead vocalist Mike Veerman was enthusiastic and talkative, preparing the audience for the energy and enthusiasm that

Arkell’s frontman Max Kerman would display. Apart from playing a number of songs from their debut album, Relations, the high point of their set came with a fantastic rendition of Elvis Costello’s “Pump It Up.” San Sebastian’s Relations, hit record stores on Oct. 4, 2011.


7

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 12

Arts & Entertainment

Current Swell drowns Heroes with their sound...in a good way Brendan Kergin News Editor

Victoria stalwar ts Cur rent Swell swept into town despite snowy conditions and hit the crowd with a tsunami of coastal combustion at Heroes on Nov. 16. With a show that oozed Victoria, the recent winners of 100.5 the Peak’s, “Peak Performance Project” contest proved why they are considered an up-andcomer in Canada’s music scene. Openers Pablo Alto played a friendly Indie set to open things up as people f iltered into the campus bar, dropping their bestspent f ive dollars of the week. A local trio playing primarily a lighter acoustic sound, Pablo Alto also knocked out some great covers. Endearing themselves to all the Indie and alt-rock fans in the crowd they took on a strippeddown version of of “Karma Police,” pulled a female vocalist in for the “Only Boy in New York”

Traverse.

and slid their sound in well with Sam Roberts’ “Bridge to Nowhere.” By the time the headliners had their gear set up and were ready to play the room was nearly full. Opening with mostly new material from their Oct. 24th album Long Time Ago, they’re chasing the sound many Indie bands are tr ying to perfect right now. It’s a softer style with a slice of wester n in there, recalling, arguably, hints of the Band, or more recently Prairie darlings the Sheepdogs. Lead singer Scott Stanton brought a slide guitar that, despite being melodic and mour nful at f irst, crammed the dance f loor. The most touching moment of the night came when they played recent release “Brad’s Song.” A tribute to Brad Shuttleworth — a close friend of the group who passed away a couple years ago — the song moves from melancholy to a grand crescendo. If you weren’t feeling it

by then than you have no soul. Overall the set seemed to give a reverse progression of the band. They played the more recent blues and wester n-tinged rock early on from “Long Time Ago” and “Protect Your Own.” As they neared the end of the night the mood shifted from the stomping good times to the skanking good times, as they brought out early catalogue classics such as “Chestermans Valley.” They night ended with the bar relling “So I Say.” It was like watching a train losing control as the crowd crowded the f loor and the band picked up the pace. It seemed like they barely had control of the chaos as the buildup swept across the audience, pulling ever yone into the moment. Playing off the energy in the crowd created the best moments of the night as the last notes rang out.

The current show at the TRU Art Gallery (beside Tim Horton’s in Old Main), curated by Stephanie Patsula, shows from Nov. 2125. Check out next week’s Omega for the story. —Photos by Cory Hope

PHOTO BY TAYLOR ROCCA Scott Stanton of Current Swell pumps up Heroes on Nov. 9.


8

November 23, 2011

Researchers from U of A and abroad pinpoint ‘exact time’ oxygen entered atmosphere

Jacquelin Gregoire The Gateway (U of A)

EDMONTON (CUP) — New research at the University of Alber ta has led to the groundbreaking discover y that oxygen-breathing organisms f irst appeared on land 100 million years earlier than previously thought. Microbiologist Kur t Konhauser and nine other scientists from across the globe used concentrations of chromium in ancient rock beds as an indicator of the “great oxidization event” — the biologically induced appearance of free oxygen in the atmosphere — which occur red 2.48 billion years ago. “We could see through this chromium spike, which could only take place in acidic conditions, that the oxidization of pyrite occur red and was made possible by bacteria that used oxygen. “It’s all interlinked,” Konhauser explained. The reaction between oxygen and pyrite released large amounts of sulphuric acid, which led to the deposition of chromium, traces of which show up today as rock layers. Stefan Lalonde, a member of the research group from the University of Brest in France, said the completion of the study took two years, much of which was spent collecting and analyzing samples from key time

inter vals to verify the consistency of temporal trends. “Sample collection alone required collaboration with a worldwide group of researchers having access to critical samples coming from remote locations in Wester n Australia,

“...we were able to pinpoint the exact time that oxygen made it into the atmosphere.” —Kurt Konhauser

South Africa, and Brazil, for example,” he said. The study began as a response to previous research on the topic and Konhauser’s proposition in 2009 that the decrease in atmospheric methane levels triggered the rise of oxygen.

“The overall stor y is that methane levels dropped around 2.7 billion years ago. “Cyanobacteria that produce oxygen then took over the shallow ocean waters,” Konhauser explained. “By 2.5 billion years, enough oxygen was produced that it could then accumulate in the atmosphere.” A summar y of the team’s work, published in the journal Nature said these oxygenbreathing and acid-tolerant bacteria still exist today, “living off pyrite and settling in the highly acidic waste waters of mining sites the world over.” Konhauser acknowledged that a 100-million-year time difference bears little signif icance on a grand scale of approximately 2.5 billion years, but defended the value of their discover y. “It’s not so much that (the great oxidization event) was 100 million years earlier than we thought, but it’s that we were able to pinpoint the exact time that oxygen made it into the atmosphere,” he said. Konhauser said the event carries great signif icance not only to scientists, but to the human species, as it allowed for the evolution from primordial microbes to complex creatures such as humans. Konhauser plans to continue his research on the subject and shed fur ther light on a complex phenomenon.

Rapid HIV testing clinics continue at UBC Spencer Toffoli The Ubyssey (UBC)

VANCOUVER (CUP) — Rapid HIV testing clinics on the University of British Columbia campus are making it possible for students to find out their status in just 60 seconds, dramatically quicker than the oneto two-day wait usually required for HIV test results. The rapid HIV testing clinics are part of the Seek and Prevent for Optimal Treatment (STOP) HIV/AIDS Project, a joint initiative from UBC Student Health Service and Vancouver Coastal Health. It is meant to encourage sexually active students — or those who have used IV drugs — to be tested annually for HIV. According to Dr. Patricia Mirwaldt, Student Health Services director, 55 to 60 per cent of undergraduate students have been sexually active, and of those, most have had 1 to 2 partners. Yet only an estimated 30 to 34 per cent of students have ever had an HIV test. The test involves a finger prick for blood, which results in a “negative” or “maybe positive” result within 60 seconds. Sexually active heterosexual women are the campaign’s targeted demographic, since a growing number of HIV diagnoses have been among heterosexual women, who aren’t typically considered “at risk.” “A lot of people who are not considered to be at high risk for contracting HIV are

sometimes of the idea that, because they are not high risk, they don’t need to be tested — and we know that’s not the case,” said Zoe Menge, a nurse with UBC Student Health Services. “The majority of people who are testing positive these days are actually not in the high risk category.” Mirwaldt emphasized the importance of knowing and managing your HIV status. “About a third of people who have HIV don’t know they have it. And that’s the group that’s actually spreading it,” she said. Encouraging STI testing as part of regular checkups has been recommended by the B.C. Centre for Disease Control, according to Menge. Even students who are in a monogamous relationship are encouraged to get tested once a year, because “life happens,” Menge said. Paige Zhang, an assistant for the Student Health Services STOP HIV/AIDS Project, said that the the Know Your Status campaign is not just about making people aware of the risks, but also about educating and reducing stigma around HIV and STIs. “The project is here at UBC specifically to raise awareness not only about HIV testing but also about other STI testing. At the rapid HIV testing clinics, [the nurses] will be providing lab requisitions to get other tests. [It’s] about providing a sort of sex-positive environment to promote these issues which are really important to overall good health,” said Zhang. So far, 34 students have found out their status via the rapid HIV testing clinics.

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Oxygen appeared 100 million years earlier than once known

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Science & Technology


9

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 12

Science & Technology New cell research at University of Alberta ‘final piece in puzzle,’ could lead to new disease treatment Tannara Yelland

Prairies & Northern Bureau Chief SASKATOON (CUP) — Groundbreaking new research from the University of Alberta has led to the discovery of a new part of the cells that make up complex life. Joel Dacks is an evolutionary cell biologist at the U of A. Four years ago, he began a project on what he calls a “harmless soil amoeba,” when he came across a protein that he had seen before in human cells. The protein is an adaptin that brings things into the cell or expels things. It is the fifth of its kind. Before Dacks’ work with his team and a team at England’s Cambridge University, it was commonly assumed that there were only four such adaptins. “When we started the research,

and, I would say, up until Jenny [Hirst, of Cambridge] gave the first talk about a year ago, it wasn’t in anybody’s mind that there was a fifth adaptin,” Dacks said. The discovery was so unexpected that the team included a section in their paper theorizing why this cell component had never been detected before. “Why wasn’t this found sooner?” Dacks asked. “Because this is well-trodden territory. It’s the equivalent of somebody looking down all of a sudden from a plane and going, ‘Whoo! There’s an extra province between Saskatchewan and Manitoba!’” Dacks said the part of the cell this adaptin is found in is the leastwell-known part of the cell, and that it is difficult to detect, which may explain why it had never been found before.

The adaptin is found in eukaryotic cells, which is the type of cell that all complex life on earth is made of.

favour of “basic research,” or scientific research that is not specifically tailored to medical developments or new technologies. The second implication, as Dacks sees it, is the evolutionary one. The adaptin complex “looks like it’s an ancient” one, and Dacks called it “the final piece in a puzzle we’d been working on for a while.” He says this adaptin has al—Joel Dacks lowed his team to formulate a hypothesis on the evolution According to Dacks, there are of the eukaryotic cell, which has three major implications for this eluded scientists for decades. The final important implication discovery. “The basic cell biological or of this research is that they have scientific implications are that we already been able to tie this newly thought we had a reasonable han- discovered adaptin to a neurodle on how trafficking within the degenerative disease, hereditary cell works, and this is a complete- spastic paraplegia. This complex’s discovery may ly new, fairly major complex.” Tied to this, Dacks said he con- speed up research into treatments siders this a sterling argument in for the disease.

“Why wasn’t this found sooner?”

The Main Library is OPEN

Dacks says this is why basic research is integral to the progress of science: he had no idea when he started his soil amoeba project that it would lead to such a startling discovery that related to human cells, and to a crippling disease. “The analogy that I’ve been giving people is, ‘I can tell when my car doesn’t start, but when I lift up the hood and look at the engine, I have no idea what an engine is supposed to look like, so I can’t tell what’s wrong,’ ” Dacks said. “It’s the same kind of thing with a cell.” This is why Dacks feels there should be a larger space made for research that is not linked to specific medicinal or technological goals. “I mean, the fact is, fundamentally, we need to understand how the cell works. Then we can start talking about disease.”

s b o J e l b a l i a Av

We’re still setting up computers and labelling shelves, but the newly-renovated Main Library (located next to Clock Tower) is open: • Quiet study carrels on the 2nd floor • Full Reference, Circulation, Course Reserves, and Interlibrary Loans services • Complete access to the Arts, Humanities, Business and Social Sciences collections

Teach English Overseas Get your Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) certificate from TRU

Space available for Winter 2012! Info Session: Nov. 28, 4:30-5:30, OM 1741 MC00115490

Come and take a look...and welcome back!

• • • •

TESL is a 5-course Certificate Program Includes a practicum Program qualifies for financial aid Prerequisite is a university degree

More Information:

Marg Hanna, ESL Department > Tel: 250.371.5728 > Email: tesl@tru.ca

www.tru.ca


10

November 23, 2011

Coffee Break 5 7 8 1 9 3

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crossword

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MYLES MELLOR AND SALLY YORK

sudokueasy

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last week’s answers easy

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1. Certain bird 6. Keats, for one 10. “The Sound of Music” backdrop 14. Antipasto morsel 15. Biblical preposition 16. Gloss 17. George’s aunt 20. Calendar abbr. 21. Puzzle 22. Put something on 23. Blast from the past 26. Reduces friction 27. Contradicted 29. Arouse desire 30. Bouquet 31. “___ No Sunshine” 32. “A pox on you!” 35. “Stony End” singer 39. Numbskull 40. Irritate 41. Salsa, for one 42. Mark 44. Colorful bird 45. Call a koala an elk, e.g. 48. Chipper 49. Secrets 50. Arctic bird 51. TV doc 54. She beat Bo Bice 58. And others, for short

59. ‘80s rock band 60. As such 61. Gym set 62. 1987 Costner role 63. Myers and Douglas Down 1. Microsoft product 2. African plant 3. Stains 4. Holiday lead-in 5. “Losing My Religion” rock group 6. Blender button 7. Black stone 8. “Yadda, yadda, yadda” 9. Bear 10. Ancient meeting places 11. Floor coverings 12. Newbie, of sorts 13. Eye sores 18. All fired up 19. Aces, sometimes 24. Arm or leg 25. Abby address? 26. Romance, e.g. 27. Cake with a kick 28. “-zoic” things 29. Deed 31. Line to the audience 32. Needlepoint, e.g. 33. Ancient Andean

34. “Our Time in ___” (10,000 Maniacs album) 36. Speech of old Syria 37. Matinee ___ 38. Handel oratorio 42. “St. Elsewhere” singer, ____ Barkley 43. Eastern royal 44. Tip for the dealer 45. Court officer 46. Fit to be tied 47. Deep-six 48. Disloyal one 50. Cuckoos 52. Cheat, slangily 53. Lofty lines 55. Fair ___ doctrine 56. Engine speed, for short 57. Chinese dynasty

last week’s answers P A P A

I T E M

C A R E S

O V O L O

T R O P I C A L L Y

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H S I A P L E E R N S A A S I L S L I N P O W S L A B A G E Y O R E R Y R

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XKCD.com, creative commons

Thanks to Jesse Blom for pointing out that we’ve been running the same sudokus for about a month (and yes, we did it on purpose). Jesse wins a prize for noticing. Keep your eyes peeled and you could win stuff, too.


11

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 12

Sports TRU men’s volleyball losing streak moves to six Nathan Crosby Sports Editor

The men’s volleyball team fell to 1-7 after putting forth a gutsy effort against the thirdranked Manitoba Bisons over the weekend. Fans got on the Bisons early in both games but Manitoba was able to leave undefeated with an 8-0 record after beating TRU 3-2 on Nov. 18 and 3-1 on Nov. 19 at the Tournament Capital Centre. “It’s a tough building to play in,” Bisons head coach Garth Pischke said. “For us to keep our composure and our concentration and even feed off some of the things going on in here, I thought we did a great job of that.” Pischke’s son, Dane, got the brunt of many heckler’s chants, including being called a ‘daddy’s boy.’ The right-side hitter answered with 16 kills in 38 attempts on Nov. 18 to lead his team to the first of two victories. Despite TRU’s slow start, the ‘Pack got back into the game and forced a fifth set, only to end up short of the upset; 25-17, 2225, 26-24, 20-25, 15-8. The next day, the WolfPack had another slow start and weren’t able to keep up with the Bisons until the third set. Despite a lack of discipline by the Bisons, who were issued a yellow card in the third for tossing the ball in anger, Manitoba dominated the fourth to win the game; 25-15, 2518, 24-26, 25-17. “We really have to figure out a way to keep pushing through,” rookie outside hitter Brad Gunter said. “We’re up and down a lot as a team as a whole, we got to figure something out there. There were some really good moments for us but they got on a few runs that put us in trouble.” Gunter was named player of the first game of the weekend and could have been

Volleyball WOMEN (3-5) Nov. 18 vs. Manitoba

PHOTO BY CORY HOPE The still undefeated Manitoba Bisons just got out of the TCC with their record intact after the ‘Pack took them to five sets on Nov. 18.

The women’s volleyball team couldn’t follow up their success in Regina in their return to the TCC last weekend, dropping two games to the Manitoba Bisons. The Wolf Pack lost a heartbreaker on Nov. 18 that went five sets and was within their reach, but came up short 3-2. The women then couldn’t get anything going the next day either — losing 3-0 to the Bisons on Nov. 19 putting them seventh in the Canada West with a 3-5 record. “I think we came out f lat,” Wolf Pack outside hitter Amanda Frayne said. “They got the momentum early in the game and they never gave it up.” Whether fatigue from the first game was a factor, the ‘Pack’s energy level was noticeably lower the second night. “We’ve shown that we can put out wins in five-setters; we’ve done it three times so far. Physically, we weren’t fatigued but mentally it might have been a problem.” Wolf Pack head coach Keith Lundgren said the team is taking things one game at a time, adding that the long game on Friday might have taken away from Saturday’s effort. “Maybe it was more than we could handle,” Lundgren said. “We didn’t give up tonight; they were fighting even when down 20-10. We just didn’t play well, we were trying to ex-

Nov. 19 vs. Manitoba

L (3-0)

(Twomey; 20 A, 3 ACE, 3 BA) MEN (1-7)

named it again in the Nov. 19 game if not for Colin Carson’s strong presence and 30 assists. “I thought Gunter was a lot better than we expected,” Bisons coach Pischke said. “I haven’t seen him play that much before and he showed a lot of character on the floor and was a tough guy to stop and I don’t think we really did.” Gunter led the ‘Pack in the second game, and finished with 16 kills in 35 chances with four digs and a block assist. “I think we expected more from the other side of the net to get us fired up,” WolfPack head coach Pat Hennelly said, adding that the energy level might have been a factor working against his team. “As a young team that’s something we have to address, who’s going to lead the

charge?” Hennelly let assistant coach Chad Grimm lead the team for Saturday’s game, saying the team needed a change for the night. Hennelly said he lost his temper in Friday’s game and wanted to keep his emotions in check, which is why he demoted himself for the night. As always, the WolfPack volleyball team did their best to make the Bisons uncomfortable, and it worked in their favour in the third set. The Bisons answered back in the fourth, lead by left-side hitter Chris Voth doing a Teemu Selanne fist pump in what could be seen as a jab back at the crowd hecklers. Manitoba won, but the ‘Pack is turning the TCC into a nightmare for even the best in the West.

Surprising women’s volleyball season slows down

Sports Editor

L (3-2)

(Osadchuk; 18/45 K, 8 BA)

Bisons too much for ‘Pack Nathan Crosby

WolfPack Prowl

ecute and it wasn’t happening.” Middle hitter Katarina Osadchuk was a six-foot-three tower of power in Friday’s game, with 18 kills in 45 attempts to go along with eight block assists. “TRU killed us in the middle on Friday and had their way with us,” Bisons head coach Ken Bentley said. Osadchuk’s numbers fell in Saturday’s game to four kills and so did the ‘Pack’s chances to score. TRU setter Kara Twomey was named the TRU Bookstore/ McDonalds “Leader of the Pack” for the match with 20 assists, four digs, three service aces and three block assists. The game ended an hour earlier than the previous night’s five-setter and the Wolf Pack were constantly chasing the Bisons on the scoreboard. A season of learning means Lundgren will try to get his rookies involved as much as possible. The weekend saw rookie ‘Pack defensive specialist Ilaina Hecimovic get some serious minutes, subbing in for Kelly Asleson. “It’s really nerve racking coming off the bench cold and having to make a dig or a pass, but you get used to it after a while,” Hecimovic said. “If I make a bad pass I just forget about it and move on.” Bisons left-side hitter Kristi Hunter was the best player on the court in Saturday’s game with 18 kills in 32 chances, a service ace, five digs and five block assists. When that middle wall — Bisons head

Nov. 18 vs. Manitoba L (3-2) (Osborne; 14/39 K) Nov. 19 vs. Manitoba L (3-1) (Gunter; 16/35 K, 1 BA, Carson; 30 A, 1 SB)

Basketball MEN (2-4) Nov. 18 @ Victoria L 7 7 - 7 5 (King; 35 PTS, 13 RB, Pierre; 12 PTS, 5 RB) Nov. 19 @ Victoria L 84-76 (King; 25 PTS, 9 RB, Pribilsky; 16 PTS) WOMEN (2-4) Nov. 11 @ Victoria L 73-65 (Ju; 19 PTS, Schuetze; 12 PTS, 1 RB) Nov. 12 @ Victoria L 96-88 (Schuetze; 26 PTS, 7 RB)

PHOTO BY CORY HOPE The WolfPack’s Kelly Asleson attacks the ball at the net during the heartbreaking loss to the Bisons on Nov. 18.

coach Ken Bentley said it dominated his team — came crumbling down in game two, Hunter was there to pounce on the ‘Pack. Final score for the Nov. 18 game was 23-25, 23-25, 25-17, 25-22, 15-10. It was 25-18, 25-19, 25-15 in the Nov. 19 game. Coach Lundgren is optimistic the upcoming trip to Winnipeg will include having a healthy Carly Nelson, who is practicing this week following a serious finger injury.

Hockey - (4-3-2) Nov. 18 vs. Victoria W 5-3 (Wall; 19 SV on 22 SH, Fisher; 1G, 1A) Nov. 19 vs. Victoria W 5-1 (Mainprize; 24 SV on 25 SH, Sangha; 2G, 1A)


12

November 23, 2011

TRUSU Membership Advisory December 6

th

Memorial

Each year on December 6th, Canadians gather to remember the 14 university students who were killed in 1989 because they were women.

Post-Secondary Education Fact:

There are an average of 431 empty seats at TRU every year

Join members of your campus and community on December 6th and take a stand against genderbased violence.

This Week: • Maurice : Live at Heroes Pub • TRUSU Pride Club Movie Night • Lunch with the President

December 1st, 7pm Independent Centre Refreshments provided

Stand Up Against Violence

BY-ELECTION RESULTS

Check out the Events Calendar at trusu.ca for details!

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November 23, 2011