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Thompson Rivers University’s Independent Student Newspaper Nov. 16, 2011

TRU remembers the fallen

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What’s it like to be allergic to Omega editor learns a few 2 things 6 food we all love?

WolfPack Sports 11


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November 16, 2011

Feature

In a celiac’s shoes:

Trying out a week without wheat Kai Benson

The Eyeopener (Ryerson) TORONTO (CUP) — Before last week, I knew almost nothing about Celiac disease. I knew celiacs couldn’t drink beer, and I suspected something to do with bread, but that was about it. Wanting to challenge myself and learn more about the disease, I decided to research it and live on a celiac diet for a week. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease where your immune system attacks the small intestine in the presence of gluten. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, rye and triticale (wheat and rye hybrid). The symptoms can be varied and often vague, such as chronic fatigue or irritability. Jim McCarthy, executive director of the Canadian Celiac Association (CCA) said that the amount of celiacs is higher than ever, but many remain undiagnosed, although it is improving. He said about one per cent of Canadians are celiac, but another six per cent have gluten sensitivity, which is a different problem with the same solution. “There are no drugs or surgical cures, just a gluten-free diet for life,” he said. Ontario is also the only province in Canada that doesn’t cover the tests for Celiac disease, which can run at about $200 a pop. As a result, many people diagnose themselves as celiac, which can be problematic, according to McCarthy. “If you’re right and you go on a gluten-free diet, then fine,” said McCarthy. “But if the condition is something else, you may not be properly diagnosed for whatever it is, and you’ll have to go back on a regular diet before finding out what it is.” He said the CCA has been working for over two years to get Ontario to cover the tests, with no success. Any new test being covered first has to go through an assessment process from the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee, which has to recommend the change to the government. In December 2010, it recommended that there was sufficient medical and financial reason to offer the tests. And the challenges of living a healthy gluten-free life add up. “Food is more expensive than normal, and often hard to find.” Avoiding hidden gluten sources is also a challenge, he added. I embarked on my week of glutenfree living with that in mind.

So when I wake up on Saturday morning — okay, more like early evening — the only food I have in my house is half a bag of frozen corn. After a nice bowl of breakfast corn, I venture over to my local food store to replenish my stocks with glutenfree fare. Websites such as celiac.ca had told me to avoid anything made with wheat, rye, barley or triticale. At first that didn’t sound too difficult. I would avoid eating bread for a week and be on with my life. Piece of cake (gluten-free, of course). I would soon learn that the life of a celiac is one of vigilance and paranoia. The fresh produce section greets me as I enter the store in the style of every grocery store ever. Great, I think, no gluten here—I’ll grab some carrots, maybe some fruit, and we’re off to the next section. Leaving the section, I noticed some dip that would go well with carrots, so I check the ingredients. While I don’t see anything I recognize as wheat, rye, barley or triticale products, I begin to realize that I am very new at this and can’t remember most of the other things listed online. There’s very little chance that there would be “hidden” gluten without also having some kind of warning label, but unfortunately, products do not have to be labeled as containing allergens, gluten or silicate until August 2012. Until then, celiacs and other gluten-free folk will have to remain vigilant. Back on the shelf it goes. I would later learn that one of the “foods to question” on Celiac.ca is salad dressing, so for all I know I did the right thing. Salad dressing and dip are similar, aren’t they? My hatred of this project begins to grow, as I’m a big fan of certainty and find this sort of helpless ignorance depressing. After the veggie section comes the bread section. I walk past to the meat section, defiantly ignoring my desire for bagels. The meat section is about as easy as the produce section. Obviously, I stay away from anything breaded, but that’s not the type of stuff I usually eat anyways. Some fresh chicken breasts, some bacon and I’m off. Later, I’ll learn that many meat products are actually in that frustratingly ambiguous “foods to question” category on celiac.ca. Processed meats, luncheon meats and vegetarian meat substitutes can all contain gluten and should be checked on an individual basis. Five minutes into shopping and I’ve already been reduced to relying on luck to avoid gluten. The rest of the store is where I lose much of my confidence. Almost everything could have gluten in it I think — yogurt, chips, crackers, french fries and oatmeal — all stand out in my mind as possible sources. Though I’ve never eaten lentils before, I pick up a two-kilogram bag because I seem to recall those being a

Later, I’ll learn

that many meat products are in that frustrat-

ingly abiguous

“foods to question” category.

Shop like a celiac In preparation for my week of living gluten-free, I let the food situation in my house deteriorate considerably. I made sure to eat all my pasta and bread so it wouldn’t be around for me to eat while drunk, desperate or forgetful.

Photo by Mohamed Omar/The Eyeopener good substitute for gluten-free diets. Turns out that’s for vegetarian diets lacking protein, but at least lentils are gluten-free and I’m trying new things. A lot of daunting aisles with pasta and processed food come next, and I walk past all of these with the determination of someone way too lazy to read the labels on everything. However, I find a gluten-free section in the last aisle, and pick up some gluten-free cookies and breakfast bars. They cost much more than their glutinous counterparts. A package of gluten-free cookies: almost $5 for 250 grams. A comparable no-name package: $2.50 for 350 grams. Buying gluten-free got me almost three times fewer grams per dollar. I head home to see how I did. In addition to what I already mentioned, the website told me that the most common substitutes for wheat and grains are corn, rice and potatoes. I bought none of those (though I still had my leftover frozen corn). I had managed to avoid gluten, but fell into the other problem celiac living brings: I hadn’t bought any decent starch sources. The potatoes and rice would have to wait. For now, I had some vodka to buy. Party like a celiac I arrive at a buddy’s apartment with a 26 ounce bottle of vodka and some fruit juice. I mix a drink as I explain to the six or eight guys watching television that I can’t drink beer tonight. I’m trying to live like a celiac for a week. Hard liquor doesn’t contain gluten because the distillation process removes it, and wine is gluten-free as long as wheat was not used in the process of sealing the barrels, but beer almost always contains gluten. This was the single most troubling fact, for me, when I agreed to do this article. With the lowered inhibitions that come from getting as egregiously hammered as I do, there was a possibility I would be chugging beers and eating gluten-rich fast food by the end of the night. I didn’t, but the internal struggle was akin to fighting a pack of ferocious wheat-tigers. I don’t think any-

body would suspect the white powder I’m addicted to is flour. Shawn Sutherland, a former Ryerson student celebrating his birthday that night, says he is celiac and laughs, taking a swig of Canadian. I don’t know Shawn, so I immediately question him on how he drinks beer with the disease while also wondering why anybody would fake it. “I trained myself to drink it. I guess I built up a tolerance,” he says. Our mutual friends corroborate his story, assuring me he is celiac. “I remember that one time when you drank one Guinness,” someone says, speaking of before the supposed tolerance. “You were on the floor like an hour later.” Everyone laughs as they remember this, making me feel u ncom for t able and left out but convincing me that he probably does have some form of the disease. This new information tempts the beerswilling demon that lives in my brain. “You can have a beer if he can,” says the demon. “Nobody specified which celiac you have to live like.” I tell the demon to be quiet and carry on drinking my vodka. Several drinks and a pirated copy of the Charlie Sheen Roast later, Shawn insists that we go out to a bar. Within ten minutes of getting there, my friend Tyler buys me a beer. This was not done maliciously, but rather because everybody had already forgotten my experiment. Actually, I almost had too. I had the beer in my hand before realizing my error and giving it back. Many rum and Cokes later, we leave the bar after last call. We cross the street to get some pizza, much to my displeasure. If you want to know what it’s like to quit smoking, try sitting in a pizza place while drunk and gluten-free for no good reason. I guarantee you it’s harder to resist

the pizza than the cigarette. Between the awesome smell of fresh pizza, the knowledge that I could get away with eating a slice and my friends taunting me about not being allowed to, I’m going pretty crazy after about 10 minutes. After I’ve had about as much as I can take, I decide to wait outside while they finish up. I make it all night without cracking, and feel very proud of myself the next day, despite a rapturous hangover. We decide to go for a bit of highquality hangover food at MerryBerry on Parliament Street. It is the first time that I realize almost everything has gluten in it or with it when you eat out. The night before, I realized all fast food had buns or crusts, yet higher quality fare is almost as hard to navigate. Most lunch dishes are sandwiches, burgers or wraps, or soup with a side of bread. It’s all very frustrating. I order a salad with peaches, bacon and pecans, and probably-celiac Shawn orders the beef stew, which comes with a side of bread. He tells me he’ll only eat a bite or two of the bread. I ask him what happens when he eats too much. “I just get rashes mostly,” he says, gesturing about his body and arms. “But I know this girl whose stomach swells up when she eats any.” His info checks out: swelling or bloating is a common symptom, and the rash Shawn experiences could be dermatitis herpetiformis, a symptom suffered by a small percentage of celiacs. The adventure of partying glutenfree ends there, and I feel thankful. Thankful that I managed to make it through the ordeal, and thankful that I normally only have to worry about one poison I’m consuming. I’m on day two, and the vigilance is exhausting.

I’m on day two, and the vigilance is exhausting

SEE

Celiac PAGE 9


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November 16, 2011

THE

MEGA

www.theomega.ca

November 16, 2011

Volume 21, Issue 11

Published since November 27, 1991

editorialstaff EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Mike Davies

editorofomega@gmail.com/250-372-1272

Editorial

Women’s soccer does TRU proud

Literary and visual submissions are welcomed. All submissions are subject to editing for brevity, taste and legality. The Omega will attempt to publish each letter received, barring time and space constraints. The editor will take care not to change the intention or tone of submissions, but will not publish material deemed to exhibit sexism, racism or homophobia. Letters for publication must include the writer’s name (for publication) and contact details (not for publication). The Omega reserves the right not to publish any letter or submitted material. Opinions expressed in the Letters & Opinion section do not represent those of The Omega, the Cariboo Student Newspaper Society, its Board of Directors or its staff. Opinions belong only to those who have signed them.

I think by October he was singing a Faraway, so close; the women’s soccer team went on a great ride de- different tune. From the start of the year to the spite coming up short at nationals. It was such a memorable year for end of the PACWEST final, the ’Pack the ‘Pack; expectations were lower outscored their opponents 26-14 and given injuries, a rookie goal keeper goals were coming in from everyone. Amanda Barrett, Jaydene Radu and playing in a tough division. Yet they continued to dominate, go- and Alanna Bekkering gave TRU ing on a tear that included a 14-game depth and balance on offense. Veteran midfielder, Ashley Piggot, unbeaten streak that was snapped or “Velcro foot” as coach McMaagainst FX Garneau at nationals. From Sept. 10 to Nov. 11, the wom- nus calls her, scored four goals in 11 games and was named to the all-star en couldn’t be beaten. That’s why it’s hard to think that team at nationals. McManus said the ball never left foot the team finally met when it got to her, as if their match when losit was attached. ing to FX Garneau The coach will have and subsequently a new challenge next to Ahuntsic in the year trying to replace bronze medal game in that foot. Quebec City. This team is built to Sometimes things last for a while in orcan be going so right der to continue to be that it boggles the competitive. mind when things go Rookie keeper Emwrong. ily Edmundson had I remember talking the fourth-best goals to head coach Tom Nate’s News against average in the McManus on Sept. Nathan Crosby PACWEST with 1.06 8 at one of their first Sports Editor and had two shutouts. practices. You will also see forWe sat in the top row of the Hillside Stadium stands ward Katie Sparrow’s name on the and it was about 100 degrees outside. roster of the future. Losing sucks, but the women’s socMe being a ginger, I had to speak with Tom in the shade for fear of be- cer team gave it their best. Down 3-0 in the bronze medal ing turned into the guy whose skin game, the ‘Pack were minutes from melts in Indiana Jones. The team was practicing in the heat losing but didn’t stop fighting. The pace didn’t slow and no one and even they knew not to get too comfortable with the warm weather. gave in until the final whistle. They (The bronze medal game in Quebec nearly scored with 40 seconds left. To the women’s soccer team, on City was played in the snow.) McManus watched his players and behalf of all TRU students, thanks said it was going to be a season of for making us proud and representing our school to the rest of the nation. growing and learning.

All material in this publication is copyright The Omega and may not be reproduced without the expressed consent of the publisher. All unsolicited submissions become copyright Omega 2010.

Movember Madness

BUSINESS MANAGER Natasha Slack

managerofomega@gmail.com 250-372-1272 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Cory Hope

SPORTS EDITOR

Nathan Crosby Copy Editor

Larkin Schmiedl Photo Editor

Cory Hope News Editor

Brendan Kergin Promotions Coordinator/Adsales

Amrita Pannu

omegacontributors Daron Mark, Devan C. Tasa, Taylor Rocca, Brian Wallin, Briana Hill, Lauren Gagatek, Kai Benson, Clinton Hallahan, Mohamed Omar

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF * Mike Davies BUSINESS MGR * Natasha Slack INDUSTRY REP * Mike Youds FACULTY REP * Charles Hays STUDENT REP* Sadie Cox

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Cariboo Student Newspaper Society (Publisher of The Omega) TRU Campus House #2 Box 3010, Kamloops, B.C. V2C 5N3 Phone: (250)372-1272 E-mail: editorofomega@gmail.com Ad Enquiries: managerofomega@gmail. com (Correspondence not intended for publication should be labelled as such.)

Omega is on Twitter: @TRU_ OMEGA

It’s the middle of the month year. I’m sure those of you who now and the moustaches are know me noticed that disguststarting to come in nicely for the ing wolf-like hair that grew in patches all over my face; but in men of Movember. I am very impressed with the end, when the razor came out the support TRU students have to groom the ‘stache; it eventushown for such a worthy cause, ally all came off. So to the “Mo Bros” out there and I would like to take this chance to acknowledge each I extend my apologies. You are all better “Mo Bro” on cammen than me. pus who is raising May your mousfunds for prostate taches grow thick cancer research. and your pledges Good on you for abound. participating. May you not take I too had conthe brunt of too sidered numbering many jokes, and myself among the may all who see you ranks this year, but understand that you I have an unfortutruly do have a betnate confession to ter sense of style make. than it appears. I chickened out on Keep up the good you. Daron Mark work. I just could not Together (you dobring myself to leave that small patch of whis- ing the work and me standing kers hanging over my upper lip in agreement the sidelines), we can make a difference for men’s all month long. I think the moustache lasted health in Canada and around the about 10 minutes before I went world. As for me, well I guess there is back and shaved it off. That was roughly the amount always next year. Although I doubt anything of time it took me to see myself in a mirror after I had shaved the will change by then, I will still cheer you on and applaud your rest of my face. Of course it might also have efforts. There is something distinctly been partly due to the fact that my daughter pointed at my face horrid about seeing myself in the and said “yuck” about five times mirror with a moustache. Even now that it’s gone, the in those 10 minutes. To be fair though, I did try this image still haunts me.

Consider This

Something has to change Our justice system needs to stop needing to warn us they’re releasing predators into our midst

Every time the RCMP issue a warn- ous, but at least we told you before we ing to the public that another violent of- let him loose, right?” There has to be some kind of reform fender is being released back into sociof our judiciary process. ety it makes me a little angrier. Why can’t we sentence violent ofLet me first say that I completely believe in people getting a second chance fenders who are serious threats to after making mistakes in life, and that society to a term of “indefinitely?” It works for suspensions rehabilitation of ofin sports, and what fenders should be the I’m talking about is far priority in our judicial more serious. system. Or maybe a term People have the abillike, “Until deemed to ity to learn from their be no longer a threat to mistakes, after all, those around him.” which is why we have a I know, I know. This system in place to punis Canada and that ish offenders in the first would be taking away place, is it not? people’s freedoms. Wait But when someone — isn’t that the point of has completed their a jail term anyway? mandated time behind Some will say that bars for committing Editor’s Note we simply do not have an act contrary to the Mike Davies the resources (read as public interest, and they Editor-in-Chief money) to keep prisonhave still been deemed a threat to society after that term has ers indefinitely or be constantly measurbeen served — so much so that various ing their level of rehabilitation. Psychoanalysts are expensive, right? agencies responsible for public safety Well who is deciding that these make their presence in a community known to those living there — they people are a risk to others upon their reshould not be released into that com- lease? That the public should be warned about the imminent danger to their munity. In these situations, what is basically safety? That the chances of this person being said is, “We know he’s a danger- re-offending is high? If you can judge that well enough to ous predator, but we can’t hold him any more. Hopefully us telling you he’s in have it be morally responsible to anyour neighbourhood is enough warning nounce it to the world — and in fact for you to be able to defend yourselves consider it your duty to do so — then how can we not figure out a way to keep — or at least avoid him, maybe?” them locked up and just avoid that posThis is unacceptable. Would it be okay to release a tiger sible future problem in the first place? Something has to change. into a daycare full of children and say, Any suggestions? “Just so everyone knows, there’s a tiger in here. We didn’t want to feed him anyeditorofomega@gmail.com more, and we know he’s super danger-

Civic candidates are addressing the wrong issues Devan C. Tasa

Omega Contributor I went to the municipal allcandidates forum organized by the local media last Tuesday to find out where the candidates stood on the issues. Unfortunately, that was the problem. I found out where the candidates stood on such issues as medicinal marijuana, health care, and the provincial transitfunding formula. These issues are all similar in one respect: municipal governments in British Columbia have no power to affect them. Now, I’m not saying that these issues aren’t important, or that they should never be mentioned at a municipal all-candidates forum, but many of these issues had multiple questions from the public in attendance. The medicinal marijuana issue in particular dominated the mayoral portion of the forum. Since time was limited, the

more time spent discussing issues that the city has no power over, the less time there was to discuss issues that the city could actually work to resolve. There is a way in which future forums could solve this problem. Instead of having the public line up behind microphones, have them fill out a piece of paper with the question they want to ask. That way, the questions can be filtered to ensure that they in fact address a municipal issue. All-candidates forums are a tool that the public uses to help determine who they will vote for in the next election. It only serves to help the public if a forum is focused on asking candidates how they would address the issues that they would have the power to resolve if elected to office. Editor’s note: You can see Devan’s report on the specifics of the meeting on page 4.


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November 16, 2011

Lauren Gagatek Omega Contributor

A tragic loss has been felt across the campus after the sudden death of 23-year-old Bradley Munro Friday evening. Prior to his passing Munro was deeply involved in the TRU theatre program, growing close to many students in the theatre cohort. Despite the shock of Munro’s death, students acting in the school play A Mid Summer Night’s Dream continued Friday night’s production in his honour. “Some students said it was their best performance,” said Duane Siebel, manager of TRU student and judicial affairs. A memorial service was held this past weekend at the Sagebrush theatre. Members of the TRU faculty of arts presented Munro’s degree posthumously to his family. Munro completed his four-year theatre degree at TRU and planned to graduate at the end of this semester.

“Brad was a very engaged student,” said Siebel, who illustrated his point by talking about some of the many groups and programs he was involved with. Munro was very involved in TRU Pride and a true supporter of the LGBT community. He was involved in the Western Canada Theatre Company, and Project X Theatre Productions in Kamloops. He was a student representative for Arts, Science, Education and Advanced Technology on the TRU CUEF, and president of the theatre drama club. The upcoming theatre presentation Christmas Unwrapped will be dedicated to Munro, who was the stage manager for the production. Originally from Kitimat B.C., Munro’s funeral service will be held in Victoria next weekend where his family resides. Flags at TRU were at half-mast three days last week for former president Chuck Brewer on Nov. 10, Remembrance Day on Nov. 11 and in memory of Munro on Nov. 12.

Media-organized all-candidates forum held at TRU Devan C. Tasa

Omega Contributor Medicinal marijuana, transit, the Ajax mine and parks were the major issues discussed by municipal candidates at the media-organized all-candidates forum at TRU on Tuesday Nov. 8. The mayoral candidates were up first, with medicinal marijuana and the police raid of the Canadian Safe Cannabis Society being the first issue. Peter Milobar said that as the current mayor, he doesn’t direct the RCMP, but he doesn’t have a problem with people using prescribed medicinal marijuana. Brian Alexander said that if elected, he would stand up for medicinal marijuana users. Better transit on weekends and at night was also an issue. Both Milobar and Alexander said that they would lobby the provincial government to get more hours of service from BC Transit.

Candidates for council discussed the proposed Ajax mine. Most candidates were in favour of waiting until the federal environmental review process was complete before deciding. Candidates John Noakes, Dennis Paget and Ayren Messmer opposed the mine. Bryce Eberle said he was trying to keep an open mind, but it was tough. “Who wants to live beside a mine?” he said. Parks were the other major issue candidates discussed. Donovan Cavers wanted to see small, neighbourhood-focused parks. Tina Lange defended the city’s current action on parks, saying that Kamloops had two times more parkland than the provincial average. “Parks are a focus,” she said. Chris Ortner wanted a discussion on what should be considered surplus parkland. He said he wanted to ensure that parkland was sold at proper market value.

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News Theatre student remembered

Community Calendar Wednesday, Nov. 9 -Heroes Live Concert Series. Show starts 8 p.m. $5 Dollars cover. -TRU Movie Nights Presents: Captain America TRU Clock Tower Theatre 6:30 p.m. Admission $2 Thursday, Nov. 17 -Inter-active Bible Study and Prayer Time 12:30-1:20 p.m. OM2464 Lunch bags welcome. For more info contact: TRU Chaplain Narayan Mitra 250.371.5940 or narayanmitra@tru.ca -Cactus Jacks Nightclub welcomes Austra 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. $12 advance tickets, $15 day of. Tickets available at Mountain High Pizza and Cactus Jacks Friday, Nov. 18 -TRU WolfPack Hockey vs. Victoria 8 p.m. Memorial Arena -Women’s Volleyball 6 pm Tournament Capital Center vs U of Manitoba

-Men’s Volleyball 7:45 p.m. Tournament Capital Center vs U of Manitoba Saturday, Nov. 19 -TRU WolfPack Hockey vs. Victoria 8:30 p.m. Memorial Arena -Women’s Volleyball 5 p.m. Tournament Capital Center vs U of Manitoba -Men’s Volleyball 6:45 p.m. Tournament Capital Center vs U of Manitoba Monday, Nov. 21 -Kappa Sigma Fraternity Movember Spaghetti Dinner 5 p.m. All you can eat spaghetti dinner! $15, or $10 for Children/Students/ Seniors Tickets in advance or at the door Tickets will be sold in Old Main Nov. 16 2-4:30 p.m. email: philanthropy@ trukappasigma.com for more info or find them on Facebook.


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 11

News

More than 30,000 Canadian More money for education coming students seek food bank support every month: report from an NDP Overall food bank use in Canada has government increased by 26 per cent since 2008 Grants and available funding

Briana Hill

CUP Ottawa Bureau Chief OTTAWA (CUP) — HungerCount, an annual study of food banks and food programs in Canada, found that in 2011, an average of 851,000 individuals were assisted by food banks each month — and four per cent of them were post-secondary students. “Four per cent means that there [are more than] 34,000 students every month that are going to a food bank for help,” said Food Banks Canada executive director Katharine Schmidt. “It’s a group of people in this country that is important to us. Educating our young people and preparing people for their futures is important, so to know that we’ve got about 34,000 Canadians who are walking into or getting help from a food bank each and every month, who are postsecondary students, I think is a large number.” Since 2008, overall food bank use in Canada has increased by 26 per cent. “The reality is that someone using a food bank could be your neighbor, it could be a friend, it could be a family member, it could be somebody you sat next to on the bus on the way to school — really, it could be just about anyone,” suggested Schmidt. “The reason people end up at food banks is because their in-

come is not high enough to cover the cost of basic needs.” Two per cent of those receiving assistance from food banks cite student loans or scholarships as their primary source of income. The cost of housing, job quality and accessibility to employment insurance are all barriers students face, according to Schmidt. Food bank use has increased on campuses as well. According to numbers from the Student Federation of the University of Ottawa, the number of people using their food bank has increased from 259 in 2007 to 3,534 in 2011. “It’s amazing because ten to fifteen years ago, there weren’t campus food banks, and I think the majority of campuses now have food banks,” observed Schmidt. “It’s interesting how they’re helping to service those that need help with some really creative ways to do it so that there isn’t a stigma — and it allows students to get some help with a lot of dignity.” Beyond being a student, there is no set of eligibility criteria to access the SFUO food bank service. “We ask that in order for students to have access to the food bank that they produce a student number — it’s really simple. “We don’t ask for a lot of details or a lot of specifications, just that they can prove that they’re a stu-

dent here, [or] that they’re an employee,” explained Chris Hynes, SFUO food bank employee. Hynes and his coworkers are currently collecting information about who accesses the food bank service on their campus. They have found that students with dependents are more likely to be regular clients. Fundamentally, food bank services exist to provide help to those in need. Both Schmidt and Hynes invited any students who need assistance to seek it out. “If you’re struggling and you need it, make the phone call, send the email depending on your food bank, and just get some help, because it’s important — no one’s going to judge you and it will make a difference for you,” encouraged Schmidt. “Students shouldn’t have to choose between paying tuition, paying rent, and buying food,” said Hynes. To find a food bank near you, visit www.foodbankscanada.ca. Editor’s note: The Kamloops Food Bank is located at 171 Wilson Street (Northshore, just across the Overlander Bridge). You can find out how you can access their resources if you find yourself needing food or ways you can help others who might be in that situation at www.kamloopsfoodbank.org.

will increase: Adrian Dix Brendan Kergin News Editor

Student grants, or the lack of them, brought the B.C. NDP leader to TRU Monday. Adrian Dix, leader of the official opposition in the Legislative Assembly was on campus to make an announcement promising students of B.C. more money in the provincial grants system if the NDP are elected next election. “As part of the NDP platform for the next election we have made a specific commitment to $100 million non-repayable student grant to be paid for by reinstating a minimum tax on banks in B.C.,” said Dix at a small press conference in Common Grounds on Nov. 7. The tax had been in place up until 2004 when the B.C. Liberals removed it. Dix believes bringing the tax back will cover the $100 million grant program and some extra. When the tax was scrapped in 2004 it was collecting about $80 million. Part of the reason Dix and the NDP wish to increase funds towards students is the worry that B.C. will lack skilled labour force. He said the transfer of money from banks to students will help the economy. “In our economy today we need

young people to get training, to get the education they need, to get the jobs. The governments own statistics say that by 2020, 80 per cent of the jobs will require some form of postsecondary education.” Dix said that previous generations are doing much better than those under 35. He related this to the lack of a grant program and increased tuition compared to when his generation was in school. “This is not what our generation should be doing. “It’s in our own interest, surely, that young people have access to the training they need so that we don’t have a future where we have jobs without people and people without jobs,” said Dix. “Our generation needs to do better than we have.” Dix was surrounded by local NDP politicians and TRU faculty and student members supporting the announcement. “I want to say that we are very excited to hear an announcement like this, it makes education more affordable at TRU and across B.C. “It also helps students facing financial burdens and barriers,” said Jordan Harris, TRU External VP. The next scheduled provincial election is May 14, 2013, though one may be called before then.


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November 16, 2011

Arts & Entertainment

The day I got schooled about DJs at Cactus Jacks…and more Cory Hope

Arts and Entertainment Editor Have you ever been out at a club listening to the DJs do their thing, and you ask yourself, “Just what the hell are the DJs doing up there anyhow?” I attended The Art of Flight after-party at Cactus Jacks (CJ’s) on Thursday night. While I was taking some photos of Bangers & Mash, a local three-DJ ensemble (four officially, but only three were on stage that night), I asked Roger Smith, a knowledgeable music enthusiast ,just what I was seeing. Apparently there’s a lot more going on up there than a couple of guys scratching records at each other. Thinking about it now, I suppose I should have been able to tell something more was up when I saw each of the DJs running two turntables along with a computer hooked up, and not a box of records to be seen anywhere. According to Smith, if you were simply to play the records on the turntables, it would sound like a fax machine. The records are actually reading .wav files of tracks selected from their computers. (If you don’t know, a .wav is like an mp3, but a larger file with more information. An mp3 is highly compressed and would sound terrible when amplified through their system.) Scratch the record and you’re scratching a digital file. Neat, huh? Bangers & Mash play together like a band does, but instead of playing songs, they play hours-long jam sessions, feeding off of what the other members are doing. And they do it really well. The explanation that Smith gave me while I was standing behind the turntables watching the

production being done gave me a new appreciation for what’s going on behind the music and what keeps the crowd dancing for hours. The event Thursday was an after-party for the premiere of The Art of Flight at the Paramount Theatre, which was sponsored by Cactus Jacks, Orange Board Shop and Sun Peaks Resort. The Art of Flight (which played again that night at CJ’s) is a snowboarding video sponsored by Red Bull. The video took two years to make and the end result looked like one of the Blue Planet specials on mountain ranges throughout the world with snowboarders tearing their way down the slopes. The film screening was put on by donation, with proceeds going to the Kamloops Food Bank. For those 19 and over, it included free admission to the after-party at CJ’s. I had such a good time on Thursday that I went back Friday to see One Hundred Dollars and Elliot Brood play instead of doing my homework. Based in Toronto, Elliot Brood is on tour promoting their new album “Days Into Years.” Having never heard of the band before, I was surprised not at the size of the crowd that showed up, but at the number of people that were singing along to almost every song they played. One of the most unique things about Elliot Brood’s performance was when Mark Sasso, vocalist and one of the guitar players, played the banjo strumming it like a guitar. I had never seen a banjo played like that, and found it to be the defining point of their sound. With limited space to cover so many events, there isn’t a chance I’m going to be able to fit everything in and give it the coverage it deserves, but I hope I did everything some justice. I had a great time at all the events I went to at Cactus Jacks this week, and I’ll try to keep my finger on the pulse to see what’s coming up next.

PHOTO BY CORY HOPE There’s more to being a DJ than just throwing some records on a turntable and scratching them to a beat...as Cory Hope found out by attending The Art of Flight after-party at Cactus Jacks on Nov. 10.

Are people finally getting it? Good live music finally has some people show up to see it...and Cory takes the credit somehow Cory Hope

Arts and Entertainment Editor I don’t know where everybody has been for all the shows I’ve gone to at Pogue Mahone since September, but they’ve all started to show up again. Perhaps it was a matter of people finding the time to make it to the north shore instead of hitting downtown, or maybe there is a new crowd that is just discovering the place. The narcissist in me believes it is due to the influence of the arts and entertainment editor of The Omega constantly berating people for not doing what he thinks is cool. With that, here’s a roundup of what you might have missed if you have yet to fall under his influence. Yukon Blonde hails physically from Vancouver but musically they are lost in time. An indie-rock band originally formed in 2005 and saturated with rock from the 1970s, they have a musical edge that few bands I’ve seen live can compare to, making direct comparisons to other bands difficult at best. They’re currently on tour in the United States promoting their new EP titled “Fire/Water” (an EP, all you digital downloaders, is a reference to things that used to be available in places called “record stores”

and were too short to be considered a full-length album, but longer than a single). They’re playing over 60 shows from September to December, and then continuing to Australia, where they will be bringing in the new year at The Brisbane Powerhouse. They played to a diverse crowd at Pogue Mahone on Wednesday night, with people of all ages (over 19) and many different walks of life (if we’re going to judge the books by their covers) enjoying the show. Thursday night saw the return of the Beatdown from Montreal playing a free show at Pogue Mahone. The Beatdown play a smooth version of ska, not slow enough to be reggae, but not as fast as a typical ska band. Alex Giguere’s vocals style reminds me of menthol cigarettes simultaneously rough and smooth. The band worked their way through two back-to-back sets of original tunes as well as covers of favourites from bands such as The Clash. Having already worked the crowd into a dancing mood, The Beatdown skipped the break they were going to take in between their sets and just kept playing. On Saturday night, it was noisy even by my standards. I don’t usually go to metal shows, but I went out in the spirit of broad-

ening my musical horizons to see Pangaia, Slagduster, and Fenrirs Thirst. I do admit to having preconceived notions about metal shows and I haven’t been to one in years. I will also admit to having a good time and being surprised at how friendly the crowd was. In between songs each of the bands would surprise me with their ability to speak in a normal tone of voice after singing (I’m using that term very loosely here) in tones that would probably send me to the hospital to have some form of vocal-chord reconstruction should I attempt to keep up with them. From indie-rock to ska to metal, Pogue Mahone brought in enough variety this week to placate many a musical palate. Shawn McLeod, entertainment manager at Pogue Mahone, gave me four tickets to The Sword to give away. If you’d like a free ticket to see them on Nov. 24, email me at cory. hope@gmail.com with the answer to the following skill-testing question: What is the sum of 1 + 1? I’m not going to give them all to one person, by the way (to avoid giving them to industrious scalpers), so if you’ve got a couple of friends that want to go, tell them to email me separately.

PHOTO BY CORY HOPE Alex Giguere of Beatdown at Pogue Mahone on Nov. 9.


7

The Omega 路 Volume 21, Issue 11

Photo Gallery

PHOTO BY CORY HOPE

PHOTO BY CORY HOPE

November 16 Photo Gallery ABOVE LEFT: Students, faculty and the public remember our fallen soldiers on Nov. 10 on Student Street by the art gallery. ABOVE: Wolf Pack cross country runner Alex Kluth approaches the finish line of the CCAA National Championships with a smile on his face and a cheering section waiting. LEFT: Brian Wallin catches the Brown Family House of Learning at just the right time to show off its impressive beauty. BELOW LEFT: MacEwan cross country runner Isabella Englert clearly shows the effort required to compete at this level as she approaches the finish line of the race at McArthur Island Park on Nov. 12. BELOW: The exertion of a national championship race is too much for some, as more than one participant receives medical attention after the race.

PHOTO BY BRIAN WALLIN

PHOTO BY TAYLOR ROCCA

PHOTO BY BRENDAN KERGIN


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November 16, 2011

Arts & Entertainment Which came first, college binge drinking or the college drinking flick? The uniformity of the people and situations portrayed in typical college movies is troubling Clinton Hallahan CUP Arts Bureau Chief

VANCOUVER (CUP) — The portrayal of the college experience in movies seems to be a self-fulfilling prophecy: a populace enslaved to the almighty Degree as the new price of admission to Life grows up seeing celebrities get blitzed at parties spilling out onto manicured Ivy League lawns and expects the same in the time before they toss their mortarboards. Upon climbing those ivory towers and finding that an education (gasp) makes attempts at relevance, committees are struck by the politically minded of them in attempt to reinvigorate “student life.” Pretty soon you have a student population way more interested in the party than the knowledge. Expectations have to be lowered so professors don’t look bad and, suddenly, coupled with that damn G.I. Bill and its inf lation of the value of a college degree, your B.A. looks like soggy receipt paper in a job interview. Kids watched and rewatched Dazed and Confused before they even got to college, so admission standards have to be lowered to let in the stoned twelfth-graders. Nobody learns anything after high school and then they all get elected to parliament. Now we have a nation that reads Italian Vogue for a challenge and no mandatory long-form census. All of this because John Belushi pretended to be a zit that one time in Animal House. Get it? Is he joking? Of course. Even when German statisticians use their fancy Chi-squared tests to find that adolescents allowed to watch R-rated Hollywood films drank, on average, more alcohol than those that were not, it’s tough for me to swallow the bitter pint that film might just inf luence the way we drink. As someone who has watched hours of My Little Pony and learned nothing about friendship, it’s just hard for me to understand. But let’s just say, for a moment, that mass culture creates expectations and then youth decide to make those expectations a reality. What is Hollywood teaching us about social drinking habits in college? What reality are they recreating? The easiest answer — one of excess. Remember, kids, sipping port wine is for the weak and the old. A young person does whatever they can to get the largest amount of the strongest liquor possible into their digestive system to maximize fun times. Alcohol poisoning is just something “the man” made up to keep young people down in the ’60s.

If someone gets hurt by excess, it will make for a hilarious anecdote to fill them in on as you explain the saline drip coursing through their veins. Movies about college (and college parties, more specifically) experienced a kind of arms race around the time Revenge of the Nerds hit theatres. Not content with the average party where the only casualties were the dignity of co-eds and the occasional acoustic guitar that totally had it coming, producers and writers made excessive drinking the basic unit of the college experience, and then festooned it with escalating hijinks. To wit: if your party does not

message coming from the leading provider of mass culture in the Western world. Funny thing is, I haven’t even directly cited a single college drinking film yet. The college movie formula is so set in stone that a child could write it (and it often feels like one did). Take one band of outsiders, one very literal journey or challenge, enough intoxicants to stop the Grand Army faster than a Russian winter, shake and pour over ice. Garnish with a Slim Jim. Animal House established the formula and made John Belushi a star, but every movie about the college social life has been a variation on that theme. Road Trip introduced a bus and cross-country infidelity, The Graduate introduced post-school malaise, PCU made fun of your pet cause and your band T-shirt and Dead Man on Campus brought in some light murder. At their core, however, they highlight one theme: college is about anything but academics, and drinking is the order of the day. Even The History Boys, a recent film concerned with students actually interested in their studies and college futures was mostly about homoerotic experimentation when you get down to it. Studying makes for poor drama, and if we’re taking our cues from Hollywood it’s no wonder there are such things as “party schools.” The formula made one stab at Oscar glory previously (but included more Mrs. Robinson than was palatable) but reached its critical and philosophical conclusion just recently in The Social Network. The implication? Pursuing this degree is a waste of time, you drunken secret-genius. Make your masterpiece to get back at a girl who spurned you while half in the can and then watch everyone line up to kiss your feet. Again, they sidestep the idea that academic success is the priority. Genius, athleticism and the pursuit of cougars are the orders of the day. There’s no interesting argument to be made on whether or not the portrayal of drinking in college movies is substantially contributing to how much liquor is being consumed, but the uniformity of the portrayals is troubling. Academics are meaningless in these documents of the human experience. A good time trumps all. At one point the cold stone and cloisters of sacred learning halls were probably separate from the social, but who can remember when? The question is fowl: What came first, college binge drinking or college drinking movies?

Animal House established the formula and made John Belushi a star, but every movie about the college social life has been a variation on that theme. feature foxy boxing in a kiddie pool full of intimate lubrication, a road trip to get the virgin in your party some action or farm animals, you have failed to drink enough. In the same way that the adventure film gave way to producers excising their action setpieces and stretching them to feature length, hijinks became the only notable feature of college sometime around the Nixon administration. Academia was a pursuit not even the nerds bothered with. The problem (or not, depending on how much you like booze) is that the idea of a social drinking occasion is almost wholly dismissed. In fact, only the stuffiest of squares choose sipping over chugging, and films lionized those who could hold their liquor best. Sure, Bond movies imply that real men can chug a martini, make love to a woman and disarm a death ray over lunchtime, but the badge of honour bestowed on the college souse is made to be an attractive university credential. Combine that with films about adulthood portraying the perpetually pickled as either pathetic losers or dangerous psychos (or Irish) and you have a confusing

The Big Lebowski: I can’t believe you’ve never seen this film Mike Davies Editor-in-Chief

The Big Lebowski is one of my favourite movies ever. And it has been for quite some time. It’s not newsworthy or pertinent to anything going on in the world right now — except maybe that most of the characters are in the 99 per cent and one is not, but that doesn’t have anything to do with why I’m writing this. I just felt like I should share with those of you who do not know this cinematic masterpiece just what you are missing. If you’ve never seen this film you likely have never seen two overweight, underfinanced (or underprivileged if you’d rather) people argue with a funeral home operator about the cost of an urn — and then substitute a coffee can for the funeral home’s “most modestly priced receptacle.” You’ve probably never seen a wealthy older gentlemen thrown from his wheelchair by a deranged and sociologically confused war veteran and laughed while you were watching it happen. You’ve likely never seen Flea — the bass player from the Red Hot Chilli Peppers — get in an awkward fight outside a bowling alley while trying to extort money from a group of lower-middleclass Californians who care more about the line up for the regional bowling tournament than they do about their personal hygiene.

And you’ve probably never seen someone who prefers to be referred to as “The Dude” sniff a jug of half-and-half in the store before writing a personal cheque for 69 cents for that litre of dairy to go home and make his white Russians and be accosted in his own shitty apartment by incompetent debt collectors who “peed on the dude’s rug.” “Donnie, you’re out of your element.” This film has so many amazing scenes — which is sort of the norm for the Cohen Brothers (and if you don’t know who they are, you’re beyond any help that might come your way from a newspaper review, and you should look into decent filmmakers) — that I can’t even touch on most of the ones that you should, and will, laugh at. “You brought a fuckin’ Pomeranian bowling?” “What do you mean ‘brought it bowling?’ I didn’t rent it shoes. I’m not buying it a fucking beer, he’s not taking your fucking turn, dude.” Okay, I’m just going to keep giving away awesome lines and plot points in the movie if I keep going, so what I am going to leave you with is this: After seeing this movie, maybe you can feel how the narrator feels in the opening voiceover when he says that since he knows the story that’s about to unfold, “I can die with a smile on my face, without feeling like the good Lord gypped me.”

Do you have unpublished stories or photos related to campus news or events? Movies or albums you’d like to review? Other ideas you think we should consider? Email us at: editorofomega@ gmail.com


9

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 11

Feature cont’d Celiac experiment Continued from PAGE 2 Dine like a celiac On Thursday, I meet Ryerson master’s student Adrienne Comars at the Oakham Café on campus to have coffee and find some gluten-free dinner. Comars has been on a gluten-free diet only slightly longer than I have, as she was just diagnosed with celiac disease about a week ago. Her mother and sister have the disease, however, so she’s been familiar with it for most of her life. “We didn’t eat wheat pasta or the typical pastas that families eat because there’s always been this sensitivity issue,” says Comars. When she was six her mom got really sick while pregnant with her brother and was diagnosed celiac. Her younger sister was diagnosed from almost the time she started eating solids. “I think I was undiagnosed for so long because I don’t have any of the physical characteristics that go along with it,” she says. She says she’s been sick her whole life, unable to put on weight and chronically low in energy. She was tested for a variety of ailments, including celiac, but never found an answer. After returning from a threemonth trip to India, she was finally diagnosed with the disease. The trip increased her suspicion of being celiac, because of the largely gluten-free diet she ate there. “I had to get a bunch of shots to go over there and everyone was like, ‘you might get really sick, watch out,’ but while I was there I got really healthy,” she says. She gained ten pounds, her skin cleared up and her energy levels went through the roof. But when she returned to Canada she got sick again. She found out she had something called complete villious blunting, which means that the walls of her small intestine are essentially flat, hindering the absorption of important vitamins and minerals. “I have little to no iron in my body, little to no B12 and I have little to no folate.” We browse the menu at Oakham while we drink americanos and discuss how little choice celiacs have at restaurants. “Nope … nope … Yeah, there’s almost nothing on here I can eat,” she says, before excitedly noticing the circled “G” by some of the items, indicating gluten-free dishes. “Gluten-free toast, no way! Way to go, Oakham Café.” She can eat six things on the menu, which is pretty high. “Tim Hortons? That’s a complete write-off.” We looked over the Café’s selection of gluten-free bars and snacks, and agreed that Oakham is a fairly celiac-friendly restaurant, even if it’s not perfect. Three or so other oncampus restaurants do have gluten-free food, but most of it is coincidental. “This is definitely one of my favourite spaces on campus,” Comars says. “Both in terms of atmosphere and having an inclusive menu.” Inclusive menu or not, Comars and I decide to have dinner at an entirely gluten-free restaurant. We decide on Hibiscus, a tiny vegan and glutenfree restaurant in Kensington Market. She had heard about it through a friend. On the walk over, we talk about how nice it will be to be able to order anything on a menu without worrying about eating gluten, especially since even gluten-free dishes can be contaminated if the kitchen serves gluten dishes as well. Hibiscus primarily serves soup, salads and

crepes, but also offers snacks and treats to take away. There are about a dozen different types of crepes, both savoury and sweet. Comars goes for a savoury crepe with goat cheese, tomato and basil, while I get a sweet crepe with strawberries and kiwis. I find the food to be pretty good, if not astounding, but Comars goes crazy over it. I would probably be more excited about it too, if I wasn’t already counting the days until I could eat wheat again. “I guess for you, it’s temporary, it’s like, ‘ha-ha, next week I can start drinking beer again,’ but for me, that’s not going to happen,” she tells me. As we eat the crepes, she strikes me as someone who will do fine on a gluten-free diet, or at least much better than I did. She loves quinoa (pronounced keen-wah, a cereal-like grain); I’ve never had it. She loves to cook and can figure out gluten-free meals, I mostly eat sandwiches and pasta. After the meal, we decide to see if Kensington Market is a progressive enough place to have gluten-free beer in its bars, and are promptly shut down. It’s one of the things she misses most — having a pitcher of beer with friends. And until more gluten-free options are more readily available, she’ll just have to wait. But with all its difficulties, the gluten-free diet has worked for her, even in the short period of time since she was diagnosed with celiac. “It’s only been a week and I’m noticing significant changes in my body,” she tells me. “My skin has cleared up and my energy levels are high. I’m able to not fall asleep in class now.”

If you know a celiac, give them a hug...”

Back to bread

One thing I kept in mind as I did this was the fact that I didn’t actually need to be doing it. It’s one thing to avoid gluten, but quite another to actually need to avoid it. Before I began, I sought counsel from an actual celiac. I was cautioned that I couldn’t really say I truly lived the celiac life, because I didn’t have to be afraid that someone would mess up my order or accidentally cross-contaminate my food by accident. So I kept that in mind. It was hard at times, and annoying to actually track what I ate instead of eating whatever I wanted, but at least I didn’t have to be afraid of anything. There was nothing at stake. I made it through the week with only one screw-up: a single bite of cheesecake in an absentminded moment. Why does everything have a damn crust? But other than that, I was strict about my gluten consumption. I was pretty low energy, partially due to a messed up sleep schedule and partially due to a lack of complex carbohydrates in my diet. I should have been eating alternative grains like quinoa, but in all honesty, the majority of my energy for the week came from the sugar in coffee and Coca-Cola. If I lived like that for much longer, I probably would have been able to write another article on living with diabetes. As celiac disease becomes more recognized and better diagnosed, hopefully we’ll see more options for celiacs in grocery stores, restaurants and bars. Comars would surely like to be able to go out for a pitcher of beer again. I gained a lot of empathy for people with this disease, a major improvement over not even knowing what it was a few months ago. If you know a celiac, give them a hug and tell them how real beer and bread aren’t that great, anyways.

PHOTO BY CORY HOPE

Elliot Brood, long-listed for the 2009 Polaris Prize, plays Cactus Jack’s Nov. 11 and Cory Hope is all over it.

Puzzle of the Week #10 – Leaves Fall or autumn? Definitely fall. Thousands of leaves are relaxing on your lawn. abcd of them in fact. Here is your rake. 1. c is a doubled. 2. The lowest value for a digit is 3. 3. a is greater than exactly one of b and c. 4. d is equal to 5. 5. Each of the digits is different. 6. d is greater than b. Given the above, how many leaves are there? This contest is sponsored by the Mathematics and Statistics department. The full-time student with the best score at the end of the year will win a prize. Please submit your solution (not just the answer but also why) by noon next Wednesday to Gene Wirchenko <genew@ocis.net>. Submissions by others are also welcome. The solution will be posted the Wednesday after that in the Math Centre (HL210A). Come visit: we are friendly.


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November 16, 2011

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67. Brown shade 68. Fat units? 69. Frau’s partner 70. Blabs 71. Nobel, for one Down 1. Perry Como’s “___ Loves Mambo” 2. Any thing 3. In Aruban fashion? 4. Cool 5. Vendor’s mistake? 6. Linked series of writings 7. “Aladdin” prince 8. Exec’s note 9. Gotcha moments 10. Immediately 11. “Two Years Before the Mast” writer 12. Attracted 13. Bean used to make miso 18. Time piece? 19. Time div. 24. Catch 25. Alain Robbe-Grillet novel, with “The” 27. “Who ___?” 28. Kind of molding 30. Aardvark’s tidbit 32. Worthy of comment 33. Candidate’s concern 34. Certain posers

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last week’s answers C A G E

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Anyone notice anything strange about the sudoku? Anyone? Bueller? Email editorofomega@gmail.com.


11

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 11

Sports

Women’s soccer finishes WolfPack fourth at nationals Prowl Nathan Crosby Sports Editor

After a hard fought and memorable season, the WolfPack women’s soccer team came one win shy of a medal at nationals. TRU finished fourth at the CCAA championships in Quebec City, losing 3-0 in the bronze medal match to the Ahuntsic Indiennes of Montreal on Nov. 12. Second-year forward Laura Smylie didn’t let the loss take away from the WolfPack’s unlikely season that saw her team win the PACWEST championship and compete against the country’s best. “I am happy we came fourth. It is never fun to lose a game,” she said. “But when you look at the big picture, coming fourth in the country is something to be very proud of. “Gold, silver or bronze would have been nice. But fourth is OK and I am proud to be on this team.” The snowy weather in the final game may have worked against the ‘Pack, as Ahuntsic got on the board quickly at the eight-minute mark and kept keeper Emily Edmundson on her toes early. Ahuntsic struck again before half time at the 43rd minute with what seemed like an innocent shot from outside the 18 yard box, beating Edmundson and putting TRU in a 2-0 hole. Despite some roster tinkering by WolfPack head coach Tom McManus in the second half, Ahuntsic added another goal and held off a TRU team that wouldn’t give up but couldn’t equalize the Indiennes play. “I thought we did well at times but we were missing linking up,” McManus said. “That was our biggest problem today. We were trying to get it out wide and it didn’t work.” This also marked the last game for

Soccer WOMEN CCAA Championships - Round Robin from Quebec City TRU women’s soccer does us proud not only in capturing fourth place nationally but also being named most sportsmanlike team of the tournament. -PHOTO COURTESY TRU ATHLETICS

fifth-year midfielder Ashley Piggot, who is graduating with a bachelor of science this coming spring and was named tournament all-star. “Both teams had to play in the poor weather and had to deal with the adversity,” she said. “I think we were a little tired and flat and they definitely came at us. At the end of first half we began to wake up but they definitely took it to us.” In addition to finishing fourth in the nation, the WolfPack were also named the Most Sportsmanlike Team at the tournament, having only two yellow cards in the three games they played in Quebec. “I am really happy we will probably have the same group of girls,” Smylie said. “We are definitely going to miss Ash-

ley. She is such a force in the field. I think the girls that are coming back will hopefully pick up where we left off and keep winning those games and make it to Nationals again.” Coach McManus and his team will come back to Kamloops looking towards next year with optimism, hoping to repeat as PACWEST champions with the same roster who captured the title back on Oct. 30. “Fourth in Canada is a good accomplishment,” he said. “Considering all the adversity that we went through this year, we weren’t even ranked until the last week of the season. I am proud of all the girls. I was disappointed in our play the last couple of days but they are a great group of girls.”

TRU hosts nation at CCAA crosscountry national championships Nathan Crosby Sports Editor

Over 240 participants took part in the CCAA Cross-Country National Championships hosted by TRU, including 21 WolfPack runners. The weather was overcast and cold but runners from across the country put their best feet forward on the flat McArthur Island course. The ‘Pack had eight female runners in the women’s heat, including Faryn Brown, who had the best time for TRU at 22:01 and said her team did an outstanding job. “I think they did really well, they were all right behind me, I’m really proud of them,” Brown said of her teammates. Fellow WolfPack runner Steffi Herrwigg finished a hair behind Brown with a time of 22:02 and Rolena Debruyan finished with 22:10. TRU runners Monica Hehli, Jessica Paustian, Kait Pengelly, Alannah Stewart and Chantelle Forseille all finished with a time less than 24:50. TRU had 13 runners in the men’s race with third-year arts student, Obed Masege, having the best time for a WolfPack runner with 28:59. “I’m so excited, so excited,” he said. “Where I come from is a very warm country and here it’s so cold but I kept saying to myself, ‘I think I can make it.’ My adrenaline just pushed me to not struggle with the race.” Chris Curl had the second-best WolfPack time with 29:34. TRU runners Josh Oostenbrink, Eric Goldie, Adrian Ballam, Colin

Macedo, Tim Routtu, Francisco Canizal, Dan Drynan, Maik Kliemann, Kiefer Stout, Malcolm Todd and Alex Kluth all finished the race under 39:10. Jodi Sanquin of Red Deer College finished first in the women’s 5k heat with a time of 18:10 after a thrilling finish in the final lap where she passed the race leader Vicky Siemon of Humber College who finished with a time of 18:13. “I was nervous because I was pretty far back in the first kilometre,” Sanquin said. “On the last lap I said, it’s now or never, so I picked it up and then once I had her [Siemon] I just tried to get some space and finish on my nerves.” Siemon led the race for the first two laps but wasn’t able to hold on until the finish. “I think I got too comfortable,” she said. “I had it in the back of mind that someone was behind me, I just didn’t know how far. I didn’t want to make a move too quickly so I tried to hold onto the lead. I didn’t have it in me to go after her until the very end, but kudos to her, she had an amazing race.” The men’s 8k race showcased talent from across the country. Andy Pohl of Augustana Campus University of Alberta had the best time with 25:30. He was part of a group of five runners that kept the lead pace for the four laps. “It feels amazing,” Pohl said. “I’ve been beaten all year and to pull it out at Nationals feels great.” He trailed Clint Smith of Fanshawe College for most of the race but took over the lead in the last lap. Smith finished with a time of 25:41. An unfortunate incident in the men’s race happened on the last lap when Fanshawe Col-

Nov. 10 vs. King’s College W 1-0 Nov. 11 vs. F.X. Garneau L

2-0

Nov. 12 vs. Ahuntsic Indiennes (Bronze Medal game) L

3-0

Volleyball WOMEN (3-3) Nov. 11 @ Regina W – (3-2) (15-25, 25-19, 16-25, 25-17, 15-10) Nov. 12 @ Regina W – (3-2) (19-25, 17-25, 25-20, 25-21, 15-10) MEN (1-5)

Nov. 11 @ Regina L – (3-2) (25-20, 23-25, 25-22, 20-25, 19-17) Nov. 12 @ Regina L – (3-0) (25-19, 25-20, 25-20)

Basketball MEN (2-2) Nov. 11 vs. Calgary W 96-79 Nov. 12 vs. Lethbridge L 102-93 WOMEN (2-2) Nov. 11 vs. Calgary L 76-61 PHOTO BY CORY HOPE Obed Masage keeps pace with the front leaders at the CCAA cross country championsships at McArthur Island on Nov. 12. Masage had the best time of any WolfPack runner.

lege runner Josh Lumani collapsed 100m before the finish line and needed to be taken off the course on a stretcher to Royal Inland Hospital. Lumani was conscious and had his teammates by his side, including silver medalist Clint Smith.

Nov. 12 vs. Lethbridge L 63-61


12

November 16, 2011

TRUSU Membership Advisory Done with your books this semester? Post your used textbooks on the Book Exchange and save money!

Sign up at www.trusu.ca

Post-Secondary Education Fact:

Students in financial need are 5x more likely to graduate when they recieve a grant This Week:

You can vote in the municipal election if: • You are a Canadian Citizen (18+) • You have lived in BC for 6 months • You have lived in Kamloops for 30 days

Bring 2 pieces of ID and proof of address to the nearest polling station on Nov. 19th

Visit city.kamloops.bc.ca for more info

COFFEE & SERVICES Bring a mug, get a free coffee and learn about a TRUSU Service Thursday Nov 17th | Old Main | 9am

• Coffee & Services • TRU Cultual Event • Council Meeting • One Cup at a Time • Free Sundae Night Check out the Events Calendar at trusu.ca for details!

Log on to trusu.ca and get connected! • Subscribe to the Newsletter • Join us on facebook • Follow us on Twitter

Advocacy | Services | Entertainment

November 16, 2011  

The November 16, 2011 edition of the Omega

November 16, 2011  

The November 16, 2011 edition of the Omega

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