November 2, 2011

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The Ωmega www.theomega.ca

Thompson Rivers University’s Independent Student Newspaper Nov. 2, 2011

The dead take to the streets!

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PHOTO BY CORY HOPE

WolfPack Another mostly-empty show Women’s soccer takes the 6 PACWEST 9 Sports 11 that you should’ve seen


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November 2, 2011

Opinion

Tip your server

Service industry jobs in hospitality can be inhospitable Sarah Del Giallo

The Eyeopener (Ryerson) TORONTO (CUP) — While you’re sitting comfortably in a restaurant, the service will cross your mind. Maybe the drinks took too long to arrive or your appetizer was missing a sauce. But when your server arrives with your meal, smiling and asking if there’s anything else they can get you, your mind turns to your food. When you finally assess that tip, you might want to consider that your server hasn’t eaten for the last eight hours or so.

“People

ployees aren’t getting their minimum 30-minute breaks, the employer can be fined. “The employer has to ensure they [take their break].” The inability to take proper breaks is a common problem for servers. Natalie Rineshore, whose name has been changed, is a Ryerson student who works in a sports bar on King Street West. “If it is a busy night, like a 14hour shift, you really don’t get a break unless you plan ahead and take one at 4 o’clock before the 5 o’clock rush.” But Rineshore’s main concern isn’t breaks — it’s the required uniforms.

have

said we make

Skipping your breaks

Hooters

look

like Chuck E.

Vi r g i n ia Connors, 19, is a second-year child and youth care student at Ryerson. She works part-time as a waitress at Joey at the Eaton Centre. She regularly goes four to seven hours without a break in the one-inch heels that are a mandatory part of her uniform. “It’s too busy during the night shifts to take a break,” said Connors. Connors usually chooses to skip her breaks to avoid losing her tables to another server. “They don’t offer breaks, you just know that you’re entitled to them. I’ve gone almost 10 hours without a break, and that’s at my discretion,” she said. “While I’m working I don’t notice it so much, as compared to after work and I realize I haven’t eaten — then I’m tired.” According to Ontario’s employment standards act, an employee is to work no more than five hours straight without a break of at least 30 minutes. Jennifer Savage at the Ministry of Labour said, “It’s not the choice of the employee, it’s law.” According to Savage, if em-

Cheese’s.”

Dressing part

the

For Connors at Joey, the heels are a hindrance, but her uniform is otherwise comfortable as long as the air conditioning isn’t too cold. But Rineshore is more upset by her company’s dress code. “Low cut shirt, very low cut, to the point where bra is exposed. The cup of the bra, and the wire, everything’s exposed. And mini skirts and knee high boots,” she said. Rineshore said the knee-high boots need to have at least a oneand-a-half to two-inch heel. According to Rineshore, some guests don’t like the uniforms and have filled out comment cards about how revealing they are. One guest wrote an online review saying the bar was more akin to “an upscale gentlemen’s club.” “Our managers are all men. So obviously they’re enjoying it and it’s helping to promote the image of the restaurant that they want, but these comment cards have been filled out, handed to a manager, the manager reads them, laughs at them, rips them

up and throws them in the garbage,” said Rineshore. “So they don’t get sent to corporate. No one finds out about this. And even if they did get sent to corporate, who knows what they would do about it,” she said. “People have said we make Hooters look like Chuck E. Cheese’s.” Regardless of the clothing, Rineshore’s main concern is the boots. “I had to host on the patio in boots, and it was 30 degrees and my legs are sweating, and they get mad if you have a cup of water on the host stand, because they don’t want that image to be portrayed of you just sitting and drinking and socializing,” she said. “They want you to look like you’re professional. But I’m sweating in my boots, literally.” Rineshore said people have wiped out on the restaurant’s cement f loor which has very little friction. “People could get injured just by falling,” she said. “Waiting hot plates? You could burn a guest.” According to Rineshore, the serving staff of about 30 employs only two men and one male bartender. The male servers are not required to wear equally provocative uniforms. Jennifer Ramsay, communications coordinator for Toronto’s Human Rights Legal Support Centre, expressed some concerns over Rineshore’s situation. “If only the women are being asked to dress provocatively, then that could be [discriminatory],” she said There have been legal cases throughout Canada of female employees fighting against revealing uniforms. The 1982 Ontario case of Ballentyne v. Molly N’ Me Tavern favoured Susan Ballentyne who was offered a serving job with a topless dress code. A 1997 case in Quebec favoured female employees when the establishment imposed a uniform of short skirts, tight tops and high heels, similar to the uniforms at Rineshore’s restaurant.

Photo by Lindsay Boeckl/The Eyeopener But the human rights commission doesn’t take action against offensive dress codes without a complaint. “If the employer could argue that it’s absolutely necessary for them to wear this uniform then that’s that,” said Ramsay. But she said she finds it difficult to believe an employer could argue that successfully. Injury reservations Kristine Norris, 20, is a fourth-year dance student who was a waitress at Cedarhill Golf and Country Club in Ottawa in 2009. Once, while setting up for a banquet, she was asked to set up a nine foot table by herself. It fell on her toe as she tried to take it down. She had to ice her foot for about 45 minutes, and she said no report was filed for her injury. While that was her only in-

stance of getting hurt at work, like her fellow servers, she often went without her breaks. “I would work 14-hour shifts on the hot dog cart … I couldn’t go to the washroom ever, because I had a cash box,” she said. In order to go to the bathroom, she would wait for the beverage cart worker to drive over and watch her station, but that wasn’t often. When Norris was working weddings, she would start at 4 p.m. or 5 p.m. and work until 4 a.m. if she was closing. She said she would get one 30-minute break if she was lucky.She was warned about the hours and the breaks when she applied for the job, but she took the position anyway. “Anytime you’re in an interview, you’re just going to [nod] your head and say yes,” Norris said. “You want a paycheque at the end of the day.”

You’re probably not very good at your job Mike Davies Editor-in-Chief

I was a food and beverage (FB) server for about 15 years, so I know what I’m talking about here — and I’m telling you that though the culture of that industry is changing, it’s not changing quickly enough for the women fortunate enough to be working in it, and at the same time they should be careful what they’re wishing for because they won’t be happy when it completes the shift towards gender equality. You have to be better at your job in the FB service industry if you’re a guy. Bring on the backlash — but it’s true. If you took a poll of people who frequent restaurants about which sex they would rather have serving them, you would find that even most men would admit that they generally get better service from a male server. It doesn’t mean they’d rather be served by

a guy — that’s a different idea altogether — but they will admit that the level of service will generally be higher. You can’t get a job as a server just because you’re an attractive male — well you can but you won’t keep it very long if you’re not also good at customer service. You simply have to try harder. Female servers are used as eye-candy for their business’ customers — in an industry that has failed to recognize that it’s not such a high percentage of men paying the dining bills anymore. Though it is true that you’ve likely seen an increase in the number of women paying the bill, it is also generally accepted that men are far better tippers than women, which may play a part in the female dominance in the service aspects of FB. Hcareers.com, the largest online site for jobs in the hospitality industry, conducted a poll in 2002 in regards to gratuities, and in all regions polled (Canada, the U.S. and the

UK) “Feedback suggests that women expect higher levels of service before tipping.” While that data is almost ten years old now, it certainly sheds some light on why there is the abundance of women in the front-end of most FB establishments. Because it’s easier for them. And to the women in the above article who are complaining about their company’s dress codes I say this: The skimpy uniforms are designed to make it so you need to put in even less effort than you already have to simply because of your gender. If you really have a problem with the dress code, there are plenty of places that don’t require quite so much of your skin to be revealed — but you’ll have to try a lot harder and be a lot better at your job to make a similar amount of money at these establishments. And to the women that are complaining about a lack of breaks I say this: If you’re not taking your breaks because you don’t want someone else to get the table

you’ll miss if you do decide to eat something (and therefore the gratuity from that table), then you’re the one setting your priorities, and you’ve got them messed up. You don’t get to complain to me that you chose not to eat for ten hours because you were hoping that group of guys that came in at 6 p.m. was going to tip you 25 per cent. You especially have no room for complaint when you’re also assuming that they’re going to give you that tip based on your attractiveness — the same attractiveness that you’re so upset that your employer is flaunting for them. I can’t tell you how many times I was greeting a table and was told how relieved they were that they “got the guy server.” Because they knew that I would try harder — and they knew the chances were good that I was better at my job than the girls dressed in miniskirts and low-cut tops who would walk out of the restaurant with more money in their pockets than I would at the end of the night.


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November 2, 2011

THE

MEGA

www.theomega.ca

October 26, 2011

Volume 21, Issue 9

Published since November 27, 1991

editorialstaff EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Mike Davies

editorofomega@gmail.com/250-372-1272 BUSINESS MANAGER Natasha Slack

managerofomega@gmail.com 250-372-1272 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Cory Hope

SPORTS EDITOR

Nathan Crosby Copy Editor

Larkin Schmiedl Photo Editor

Cory Hope News Editor

Brendan Kergin Promotions Coordinator/Adsales

Amrita Pannu

omegacontributors Sarah Del Giallo, Lindsay Boeckl, Daron Mark, Chistine Adam, Grace Romund, Devan C. Tasa, Marvin Beatty

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF * Mike Davies BUSINESS MGR * Natasha Slack INDUSTRY REP * Mike Youds FACULTY REP * Charles Hays STUDENT REP* Sadie Cox

letterspolicy

Literary and visual submissions are welcomed. All submissions are subject to editing for brevity, taste and legality. The Omega will attempt to publish each letter received, barring time and space constraints. The editor will take care not to change the intention or tone of submissions, but will not publish material deemed to exhibit sexism, racism or homophobia. Letters for publication must include the writer’s name (for publication) and contact details (not for publication). The Omega reserves the right not to publish any letter or submitted material. Opinions expressed in the Letters & Opinion section do not represent those of The Omega, the Cariboo Student Newspaper Society, its Board of Directors or its staff. Opinions belong only to those who have signed them.

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All material in this publication is copyright The Omega and may not be reproduced without the expressed consent of the publisher. All unsolicited submissions become copyright Omega 2010.

Cariboo Student Newspaper Society (Publisher of The Omega) TRU Campus House #2 Box 3010, Kamloops, B.C. V2C 5N3 Phone: (250)372-1272 E-mail: editorofomega@gmail.com Ad Enquiries: managerofomega@gmail. com (Correspondence not intended for publication should be labelled as such.)

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Editorial

Community? Really? I don’t remember the last time I talked to a science student that wasn’t a friend of mine before they became a science student. Or a trades student that I met here on campus. Or one of the new law-school students. I think we’re growing apart, TRU, and I don’t think it’s because we’re focusing on the improvement of our own programs or faculties, or because we simply don’t have anything in common with these folks from other disciplines. I think it’s partly because it’s just difficult to do this — this mingling of people from other areas of campus — partly (but only partly) because of just that. We’re in different areas of the campus. The Trades Building is up on the hill behind the Campus Activity Centre, and lets face it, there is simply no reason to go there if you don’t have a class in that building. The Science Building is out of the way for most arts students, too, as all their classes are in Old Main or Arts and Education — and the occasional one in the International Building. And from what I can tell, the law students are all holed up in the Brown Family House of Learning, so you’re only going to run into them if you’re at Timmies, and even then, you’re probably in a hurry to get back to class because you’ve been in line for 15 minutes for a doubledouble and a cruller. And soon there will be a coffee shop of some kind in every building (the Science Building just got one, right?), so you won’t even need to go to Timmies anymore if you’re not already in that facility. Even within the buildings themselves there’s a noticeable separation. The fine arts department has a little offshoot by the art gallery on Student Street in Old Main — which people not in the fine arts program likely walk right by without even noticing — and the journalism students have a little section down by the print shop in the opposite direction. I know there must be some reasoning behind the concept of similar studies being grouped together geographically, but I don’t think it’s conducive to building a community atmosphere like the one we claim to have here at TRU. It’s also part of the reason that we as a TRU

community don’t necessarily feel connected to the Kamloops community either. We’re up on this hill — kind of in the middle of the city, but off to the side in an industrial/ commercial area — and we’re definitely a destination point for people rather than an integrated part of the surrounding community.

Editor’s Note Mike Davies Editor-in-Chief Just ask Heroes Pub how much business they get from people “just popping in as they were on their way by.” Make sure you go ask them before 6 p.m. though — otherwise they might be closed. The Omega’s news editor, Brendan Kergin, pointed out to me after he’d been in town about two weeks — he hails from Victoria — that he’d never been on a university campus that was in the middle of the commercial area of a city and he thought that to be part of the reason there was little-to-no community feel between the school and the city of Kamloops. I hadn’t thought of this before he pointed it out to me — and I’ve been around this campus on-and-off for a dozen years or so — but it makes total sense. Why else would there not be a polling station for the upcoming Kamloops civic elections on campus? TRU makes up approximately one-

Txt Back…L8r Research In Motion (RIM) made we are so glued to our cellphones? I mean there has to be a good reason headlines earlier this fall for saving lives across the globe, though I don’t for continually putting ourselves in harm’s way like this. think they ever intended too. Think about what happens in your A malfunction somewhere in the brain when your cellcompany caused resiphone dings and you dents of Dubai and Abu realize that you have an Dhabi to lose service on incoming text. their BlackBerry cellThere is no rational phones for three days. explanation for it. The subsequent drop It’s like an itch that in motor vehicle accijust has to be scratched. dents (the Toronto Star How many times reported as much as forhave you been in the ty percent lower) during middle of the freeway the outages there is an when you notice a text alarming statistic, and coming in, and instantit caused me to wonly all you can think der why we seem to do about are the 160 charthings that we inherentDaron Mark acters on that tiny little ly know are dangerous. screen. In B.C. we have laws We just can’t stand against the use of cellphones while driving. But for some not knowing. We hate it so much we reason it hasn’t stopped most of us would rather risk a car accident than from sneaking the occasional text, or fail to text somebody back. Don’t get me wrong — I realize how making a quick phone call if we think important these texts are. I mean the we can get away with it. Admit it — in B.C. we text and world might end if we don’t answer drive all the time. It’s just something questions like, “what u up 2?” and that we take for granted. We willing- “how r u?” quickly enough. But maybe we should think twice ly agree that texting and driving is a dumb thing to do, because it’s just dan- about what we’re doing and realize that gerous. But for some reason we keep cellphone laws have actually been put in place to save lives. on doing it. When you think about it that seriSurely I am not the only one to realously — it’s worth the inconvenience. ize this disconnect, am I? So here is my question: why is it that

Consider This

tenth of the population of the city! Because we don’t feel connected in a way that makes us want there to be. I’m speaking generally here. I know there are those of you that care deeply about the Kamloops region (as I do, by the way) but even those folks can’t deny the disconnect. Or maybe they can. They’ll tell me if they disagree. They’ll fill my inbox with protests about how we are all a part of the community here and that they care deeply about the issue of a polling station on campus and whether or not there will be a massive parking garage built in Riverside Park and how involved they are with the Ajax Mine issue. I won’t refresh my inbox every few minutes this week so that I can be on top of my own defence of this issue of community — just like the school won’t start scheduling painting classes in the Science Building. Because we seem more and more to enjoy this separation. Every time I turn around there’s another “Nurses Ball” or “Biology Social” or “Social Work Dinner.” Not that I begrudge the individual faculties and disciplines the opportunity to engage on a different level amongst themselves instead of being cooped up in a classroom on the time. Quite the opposite, actually. I spoke at an “English Majors’ Social” just the other week about how proud I am to be a part of that department and the skills that it has taught me and the opportunities that have come my way because of my involvement in that faculty of study. But I’m also proud of those that acquire a BSc or their plumbing credentials here. So go say “Hi!” to a scientist this week if you’ve never been in that building. Just walk in the doors and look at the closest person to you that doesn’t seem like they’re in a hurry to get somewhere and say, “Hi, scientist!” Maybe that’s how it has to start. I don’t know. What I do know is that the willing segregation of ourselves has to stop. editorofomega@gmail.com

Do you know where you’re cation and the work life that you want to pursue during or going? I suspect that many of you in after your studies. They can help you with job your final year of studies ask search skills such as resume yourself this question. and interviewing. I suspect that friends and writing family members also ask you Their website at tru.ca/careerthings like, “What is your ca- education contains video workshops, advice reer plan?” or, on job search “Where do you strategies and hope you work a calendar of when you’re events. done?” And yes — The Career the CED is also Education your one-stop Department shop for every(CED) in 1712 thing co-op. Old Main is The possibila good place ities for co-op to start to placements are find answers Christine Adam extensive, and and the good students can news is that Dean of Students enter the proyou don’t need gram at many to wait until you’re nearing the end of your points in their education. Make a point of stopping by TRU journey to go talk to the the CED soon or visiting their people there! There may be a great many website. It’s never too early to students that think that the start integrating work and caCED is only a place to learn reer planning into your TRU about co-op. In fact, it does education. that and much, much more. Christine Adam, TRU’s dean The CED also houses the Student Employment Centre — of students, writes a weekly a site for information, events column on topics of interest and support related to your ca- to TRU students. You can find reer journey and your immedi- her in person in 1631 Old Main and follow her on Twitter @ ate employment needs. The faculty and staff that trudeanstudents. work there can help you make connections between your edu-

From the

d e a n ’s desk


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November 2, 2011

Seventeenyear-old B.C. student runs for mayor

University of the Fraser Valley student looking to make ‘bigger impact’ in Abbotsford election Grace Romund

The Cascade (UFV) ABBOTSFORD, B.C. (CUP) — Travis Daleman is one of five mayoral candidates who have thrown their hats into the ring for this year’s municipal elections happening in Abbotsford on Nov. 19. He also happens to be 17. Daleman, who has spent most of his life in Abbotsford and recently graduated from W. J. Mouat Secondary, can be found at most Abbotsford city council meetings immersing himself in local politics. Along with campaigning for the upcoming mayoral election, Daleman also has found the time to begin his university studies at the University of the Fraser Valley this semester. The student explained the “Why mayor?” question is often directed his way. “I think that by running for mayor I’m making a bigger impact and I’m able to have more effect on the decisions that local politics include,” he said. “By doing so, it’s made a big impact on people following politics locally. I’m noticing many young people talking to their parents about politics too.” Daleman has also noticed far more attention being paid to him since announcing his candidacy. “It’s been nonstop press and media coverage because of my age,” he said.

“I expected the media to have fun with the fact that I am 17 and I am involved, but I figure lots of people will get to hear my name and what I’m all about and it would involve them in politics. I had no idea it would become so big so fast.” When asked about what he would like to accomplish if awarded the position, Daleman was hesitant. “I haven’t really thought about what exactly it is I want to do. “I don’t have a one-sentence answer of what my platform is,” he explained. “Regarding municipal elections, I don’t think that there is one platform because it is where you stand on every individual issue. We have hundreds of issues municipally.” When it comes down to the biggest difference between himself and the other mayoral candidates, however, Daleman had a clear answer. “My age – how I view problems because of my age. “I would see things in a new way, and hopefully be able to solve problems in a new way than they were created. “It’s an older generation of thinking that has created all these problems for us,” he continued. “Therefore, a new generation has to think differently to solve the same problems. “I would say that is the biggest thing that differentiates me from the other candidates.”

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Community Calendar Wednesday, Nov. 2 -Heroes Live Concert Series. Show starts 8 p.m. $5 Dollars cover. -Arts & Sciences co-op information session 4:30 - 6 p.m. TRU Student Union Boardroom, CAC. If you are already a coop student, or you are a current student who would like to learn more about the co-op program at TRU you are invited to the Arts/Sciences coop Info session. Hear about co-op employers, jobs and opportunities. RSVP required to mdurvin@tru.ca Thursday, Nov. 3 -Inter-active Bible Study and Prayer Time 12:30-1:20 p.m. OM2464 Lunch bags welcome. For more info contact: TRU Chaplain Narayan Mitra 250.371.5940 or narayanmitra@tru.ca Friday, Nov. 4 Women’s Basketball 6 p.m. Tournament Capital Center vs UFV *SEASON OPENER

Men’s Basketball 8 p.m. Tournament Capital Center vs UFV *SEASON OPENER Saturday, Nov. 5 Men’s Hockey 8 p.m. Memorial Arena vs Okanagan College

I just found out that people think putting events in this calendar costs money. It sure doesn’t. You just have to tell us thw when, where, and why. editorofomega@ gmail.com


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 9

News

Academic plan discussed in detail

Do you have unpublished Student involvement too scarce stories or photos related to campus news? “What we want Submit them to to see in the the Omega. new academic Devan C. Tasa

Omega Contributor

When complete, the TRU academic plan will bring focus into the university’s creation of its curriculum and programs, giving students more opportunities in their education, said Katherine Sutherland, the Chair of the Academic Planning Steering Committee. “The academic plan should be the guiding document of the university,” said Sutherland. “It sets an academic vision for students, faculty and the community so we can move forward in a unified way instead of madly going off in all different directions.” The plan will develop curriculum and programs within the context of four key themes: science and applied skills; politics and the exercise of power in our society; health and well-being; and sustainability. “It should allow us to create new programs, but to do it in a really targeted, strategic way,” said Sutherland. Student representatives were generally pleased with the content of the draft academic plan. “Overall, I think it’s a fairly good plan,” said Dylan Robinson, a student senator. “It hits some themes that are going to be important to the growth of the institution over time.” “We were excited to see that they came out with it and excited to see their themes and their initiatives of moving forward,” said Jordan Harris, the TRUSU external vice-president. “We honestly

think that they can follow through two faculty members. At TRU, which has its Senate composition with those initiatives.” There were some concerns the dictated by different legislation, student representatives wanted to there are 16 administrators, four students, and 22 faculty members. highlight. The number of student senators “What we want to see in the new academic plan is more adequate is a concern to TRUSU and Robinson. student services,” said Harris. “I see the problems with student Harris said TRUSU wants the r e p r e s e n t a t io n university to on decisionfund student making bodservices on a ies throughout more permanent the institution,” basis. Currently said Robinson. student services “For example, have to apply we have tons of to a fund perisub-committees odically to get of Senate, and their funding, its really hard he said. for me to know TRUSU also what is going on wants to also in those comsee greater intemittees so I can gration between represent stuopen learning, dents.” TRU World, and Sutherland the aboriginal said that the accenter, said Harademic plan is ris. Robinson was —Jordan Harris not the place to deal with goverconcerned about the university’s “scattered fo- nance issues. “An academic plan doesn’t deal cus.” He said an example of this is that TRU has a law school, yet with governance issues,” said it doesn’t have a political science Sutherland. “A strategic plan might.” degree. “In terms of student goverAnother concern brought up by the student representatives is nance and involvement, that the lack of discussion in the plan comes down to the faculties, said about the university’s govern- Sutherland. “I know there is a strong dement. “We want to see some senate re- sire in faculty councils to involve students more and the provost’s form,” said Harris. Under the Universities Act, for office would like to involve stuevery one administrator on a Sen- dents much more in [the] planning ate, there must be one student and exercise.”

plan is more adequate student services.”

Email us at: editorofomega@ gmail.com for more details


6

November 2, 2011

Arts & Entertainment Most of Kamloops misses more great bands Kill Matilda and Krome play to yet another mostly empty room

Cory Hope

Arts and Entertainment Editor After being on tour for two months straight, playing to the 30 or so people who showed up to Pogue Mahone might have been an excuse for Kill Matilda to take it at least a little bit easy. That’s not the way they do things though, and they played loud and hard and fast for the duration of their set. They stopped brief ly between songs to banter with the crowd or introduce their songs, as they did with a song about the women found murdered at Robert Pickton’s pig farm. Not all of their songs are quite so dark, however. They played a cover of Bonnie Tyler’s Hero during their set. With their own style of music and Dusty’s voice they made short work of any naysayers who would question the wisdom of attempting to cover that song. It’s a bold move, and Kill Matilda set upon it with confidence and vigour. After their set, I went to their merch table and picked up a copy of their new CD entitled hile, and while I was speaking to the girl at the table, the entire band approached me individually and thanked me for showing up and taking pictures. There wasn’t a trace of disap-

pointment on any of their faces to have played for such a small crowd. I’d go see them again if they were playing tomorrow. Krome took the stage after Kill Matilda, playing what they constantly referred to as a rock show, despite the small crowd. It took me a while to figure it out, but Krome was actually a really good band that just needed a larger crowd and a party atmosphere. Their musicianship was great, their voices solid, and the guitar player who had literally only jammed with the band for 12 hours prior to going on tour and playing live with them knew all the chords and all the words to every song (or at least enough to fool me), even though he hadn’t memorized the names of them yet. The only problem with Krome was that their music wasn’t translating properly in a room that wasn’t packed. If there had been more people there — not dedicated fans of theirs, mind you, just more people — the night would have felt different not because of the energy coming off the stage, but from the energy being reciprocated back onto it. I’d like to see Krome again in a packed room next time. Pogue Mahone has been bringing in great bands on a regular

PHOTO BY CORY HOPE Minimal attendance at great independent shows is worrisome. These venues will stop bringing on bands if they can’t at least cover the cost of the musicians’ dinners.

basis for years now and they have a great venue for live music, but the attendance seems to be in a slump right now. It would be a shame to see

them lose interest in putting on shows because of it. Support your local scene. Support independent music. Take a chance on a band you

haven’t heard before and try something new. You’re in university now, and you can experiment with your ears, too.

The dead take to the streets! Marvin Beatty

Omega Contributor A blood-spattered group of approximately 50 zombies lurched their way through downtown Saturday, taking part in the sixth annual Kamloops Zombie Walk. After scouring the city for human flesh for about two hours, many of the undead appeared to have worked up an appetite and stopped at the Noble Pig restaurant. Maeghan Summers, general manager, said no problems were encountered even though brains were not on the menu. “It was awesome,” said Summers. “We had about thirty zombies show up. They were here last year too and we really enjoyed having them.” Organized through a Facebook page created by Bonnie McLean, the decaying horde began its quest in front of Pandora’s Costume Box at 753 Victoria Street. For the living dead, the enthusiastic mob still had plenty of rhythm, stopping several times to break into well-choreographed dance moves to the haunting strains of Michael Jackson’s “Thriller.” Not a single zombie would confirm that three rehearsals had apparently taken place at Nuance Dance Studio earlier in the week. In fact, other than the occasional mumbling of the word brains, no zombies were speaking at all. According to Guinness World Records, the largest gathering of zombies ever achieved was 4,093 participants at the New Jersey Zombie Walk on Oct. 30, 2010. Whether or not the Kamloops Zombie Walk of 2012 will reach such numbers, no one knows. One thing is certain: these zombies aren’t talking.

The 2011 Kamloops Zombie Walk took place in the downtown core of Kamloops and Omega contributor Marvin Beatty took them on armed only with a camera and notepad.

-All photos by Marvin Beatty


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 9

TRUSU BY-ELECTION NOTICE POLLING WILL TAKE PLACE ON Monday, November 14th, 8:00AM-4:00PM & Tuesday, November 15th, 8:00AM-4:00PM in the Students’ Union Building

Nominations open Monday, October 31st, 2011 at 8:00AM for the following positions: • Representative – Arts, Science, Education, and Advance Technology

Nominations close Friday, November 4th, 2011 at 3:30PM

Nomination Packages:

All Candidates Forum:

Nomination packages must be picked up and dropped off at the Members’ Services Desk in the Students’ Union Building (Independent Centre). Late nomination packages will not be accepted.

The All Candidates Forum will take place on Wednesday, November 9th, 2011 at 12:30PM in the TRUSU Boardroom. All members are welcome to attend.

Campaign Period: The Campaign Period will run from 8:00AM Monday, November 7th, 2011 to 4:00PM Tuesday, November 15th, 2011.

Electoral Committee: For more information please contact the chair of the electoral committee by email at elections@trusu.ca or by phone at (250) 828-5289.

Advocacy | Services | Entertainment


8

November 2, 2011

Life & Community A haunted house, a dance party and some toilet paper Cory Hope

Arts and Entertainment Editor Halloween kicked off to an early start on Friday as students and guests were treated to a Halloween party put on by TRU’s International Student Activity Program (ISAP) and the TRU Wellness Centre in the Grand Hall at the Campus Activity Centre. The dance f loor was packed when I arrived, with a werewolf standing guard in a corner (or maybe just enjoying the spectacle of the evening) while ghouls, skeletons, a full compliment of sexy [insert professions here], a bunch of people that were dressed in pop-culture references I didn’t get (which made me feel pretty old), and some people that were dressed up as security guards and first aid workers. I’m under the impression that at least a few of those last group were legitimately security guards and first aid workers. If an accident were to occur, however, which nurse would one choose to approach for help? Certainly some of the nursing students would have been in attendance. Imagine twisting an ankle and having Little Red Riding Hood come to your rescue instead of the sexy nurse. It would be confusing as hell, and it’s probably a good thing that Halloween comes but once a year.

I didn’t see any accidents, though, which is probably an extra good thing on Halloween. Apparently there was an accident on the set of Resident Evil 5 in Toronto, and the attending paramedics couldn’t tell the real injuries from the fake ones when they came onto the scene. Pardon my digression. There was an impressive lineup to get into the haunted house, which never quite seemed to die down. I’m glad I had the opportunity to check it out before the evening started. It was a dimlylit labyrinth which went on for a deceptively long time, using a mixture of fake spider-andspiderweb-style gimmicks and a wonderfully creepy rendition of a baby’s room, complete with a zombified baby in the crib and a “Bless this house” sign that had the word “Curse” painted over the word “Bless.” I guess Halloween is the one time of year where you can get away with that. I mentioned that games were played, right? I only caught one of them, but it was an interesting adaptation of one of the Halloween classic pranks, “TPing.” Three teams of four people played against each other, with one person from each team standing still as the other three teammates ran rolls of toilet paper around them. Obi Wan Kenobi presided.

PHOTO BY CORY HOPE Obi Wan Kenobi (or reasonable facsimile) presides over the version of the classic Halloween prank turned into a team game at the ISAP and TRU Wellness Center Halloween Party.

Unfortunately, I had to leave before the rest of the games, as well as the pronouncement of the awards for best costumes for men and women. I’m not sure what my call would have been for whether the men or women were better this night.

Certainly the sumo wrestler was entertaining, but I didn’t have the opportunity to talk to many people while I was there, and part of any good costume is being in character. Hopefully the night continued to be as entertaining as it was during my brief stay there, and

more fun events like this one are planned for the future. Editor’s note: More photos from the event are up on our website at www. theomega.ca.

TRU student moves up sea cadet ranks

Totten takes command of RCSCC 137 Brendan Kergin News Editor

Tears and hugs are not generally associated with military events, but with the transfer of command of a local cadet corps came a few emotions. TRU’s own Nicole Totten — or as the cadets know her Lieutenant Totten — is the new commanding officer of the Royal Canadian Sea Cadets Corps (RCSCC) 137 Kamloops. “It is a scary thing, but I have a lot of people behind me. “It’s an emotional thing,” said Lt. Totten. The ceremony passed command of the group of about 30 young cadets from Lieutenant Commander Bernice Debert, commander of the corps since 2007. “Nicole is a very very good person and she’s great with the youth,” said LCdr. Debert. “She’ll do fine.” Totten has been a student at TRU for a few years, and will be graduating this year with a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology. This is in addition to a BA in Fine Arts she’s already earned. After graduation she expects to continue with cadets, especially as command of the corps

is a three-year minimum term. Cadets has been a big part of Totten’s life, starting with the sea cadets in 1996. “She’s been going to QuadraComox every year since she started except one,” says her father, proud of his daughter’s achievement.

“We’re very proud of her, everybody is. Even our church members.” “At Quadra all the cadets love having her there. “She takes time to talk to the cadets. “They really look up to her.” The ceremony started in the Kamloops Alliance Church gymnasium with classic military formalities such as a March on

Colours and inspection of the cadets by higher officers. Once the signing over of command was finished, the tone changed and speeches and gifts were given to Debert and others involved with the local sea cadets. “Most cadets will only witness this once,” spoke LCdr. Martin Head. “I would be remiss to mention how well you’ve done tonight. “Nicole you have my full support.” When it came Lt. Totten’s turn to speak, she only got a few words out but it was clear how she felt about the new role she would be playing. In a reverse of norms, most of the crowd sat on the stage, observing from above as the cadets marched below and the officers fulfilled their duties. The corps has grown substantially in the last few years since LCdr. Debert had taken over. LCdr. Debert, like Lt. Totten, is staying with cadets. She will stay involved with RCSCC 137 Kamloops on the side as she becomes Area Cadet Instructor Cadre Officer for the interior region. Lt. Totten said, “I’m really proud of the cadets, they did awesome, too.”


9

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 9

Sports Bonus Section

Women’s soccer takes division title in overtime Off to national championship in Quebec City next week Nathan Crosby Sports Editor The Wolf Pack women’s soccer team is bringing home a championship banner. The women won the 2011 PACWEST league title, beating the UBCO Heat 2-1 in overtime off the foot of Alanna Bekering. It was TRU’s first title since the 2003-04 season. The team will play for the Canaidan Collegiate Athletic Association Championship in Quebec City on Nov. 9. “Honestly, it still hasn’t sunk in,” captain Abbey McCauley said. “When she [Bekering] scored the first goal, it was this unreal feeling, because everybody knew we could go to Nationals and to score the first goal was

awesome.” Bekkering’s game winner came in the ninth minute of the first overtime period. It was her second goal of the game after opening the scoring at the 42nd minute, as described by McAuley. The ‘Pack had to battle hard against a tough host UBCO team. Rookie keeper Emily Edmundson was tested constantly by the Heat’s offense, making key saves including a free kick at the 40th minute. Amanda Barrett left the game at the 80th minute after receiving an elbow to the head that produced some blood. The short overtime was a relief to the Wolf Pack who had played their third game in three days.

“On Saturday night we did a bunch of ice baths and that sucked but it definitely rejuvenated my legs,” McAuley said when asked about the exhaustion of back-to-back games. Injuries were supposed to deter the team from advancing high in the standings this season. Three players went down early in the year — Sara Gomes had a severe concussion, Blair Mackay broke her nose and Chianne Smith tore her ACL. Head coach Tom McManus couldn’t even have predicted his team would win the PACWEST when looking back to the start of the season. “[At the] beginning, no. Part way through the year, definitely,” he said when asked if he thought his team would go as far as they did.

“I always knew we had a team that could do it, but as soon as the injuries started coming in, it became a test to see if we could actually do it without key players. “Everybody who filled in for different positions did an excellent job.” The Wolf Pack have now gone 13 matches without a defeat and haven’t lost a game since Sept.10. “I felt they were a very talented group right from the very beginning. “The recruits we had were extremely talented, but I thought it may take a year before we got into Nationals.” Bekering got a ball to the face in the semi-final against Langara and had to see a doctor who found her retina scratched. She

came back on in the same game to score the winner. “She said to me, ‘I want to play’ and I said ‘You can’t see, you can’t play.’ The doctor said once her vision cleared she could play,” McManus said. Bekering’s MVP performance in the semi-final game was overshadowed 24 hours later when she added another game-winner in the final. With a week to prepare, McManus likes their chances at Nationals and said he knows his team will give 100 per cent in Quebec. “The team has a never-say-die attitude and I believe they are going to f ly into and keep going and going,” he said. The team is f lying out on Nov. 7 and will start practicing on Tuesday.

WolfPack Bites Volleyball

Basketball

WOMEN

WOMEN vs. Calgary

MEN vs. Guelph (exhibition)

Oct. 28 PACWEST QUATERFINAL vs. Quest –

Oct. 28 – L – (3-1) 25-18, 25-21, 23-25, 25-15

Oct. 29 – W -94-87

W (3-2)

Oct. 29 – W – (3-2) 25-20, 22-25, 25-14, 25-13,

Oct. 29 PACWEST SEMI-FINAL vs. Langara –

15-11

W (2-1)

MEN vs. Calgary

Oct. 30 PACWEST FINAL vs. UBCO

Oct. 28 – L – (3-1) 23-25, 25-23, 20-25, 25-18

– W (2-1 OT)

Oct. 29 – W – (3-0) 25-23, 25-20, 25-18

Soccer

Puzzle of the Week #8 – Hallowe’en Curmudgeon Cranky, old Mr. Curmudgeon does not like kids. He has plans for this Hallowe’en to deal with them. By the time this sees print, he will have carried out his plans. Realising that he has to fork out candy, but to keep those nasty, young punks off his lawn, he has bought a Mark III Candy Bazooka. Using it, he will fire the candy out to the undeserving. The bazooka does not have good aim. There is a 90% chance that any given shot will have no ill effect, a 9% chance that it will wing a kid, and a 1% chance that it will nail the punk but good. (We will assume that only one kid is at risk with each shot, which Mr. Curmudgeon says is more than they deserve.) Mr. Curmudgeon is liable to be tossed in the pogey for a week if he nails a tyke or wings three or more of the alleged darlings. He does have big plans for Guy Fawkes Day which involve explosives. Is he likely to be out of the hoosegow to carry out said plans? This contest is sponsored by the Mathematics and Statistics department. The full-time student with the best score at the end of the year will win a prize. Please submit your solution (not just the answer but also why) by noon next Wednesday to Gene Wirchenko <genew@ocis.net>. Submissions by others are also welcome. The solution will be posted the Wednesday after that in the Math Centre (HL210A). Come visit: we are friendly.

Hockey Wolf Pack vs. SFU Oct. 28 – T – 2-2


10

November 2, 2011

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55. Jupiter, e.g. 57. Charlotte-to-Raleigh dir. 58. Frozen desserts 60. Karate moves 64. Sadly 68. Fill 69. Cookie Monster cohort 70. Call to a mate 71. 1914 battle line 72. Big Bertha’s birthplace 73. Combine Down 1. Apple variety 2. Condo, e.g. 3. Fixes, in a way 4. “Confessions” singer 5. Grassland 6. Balaam’s mount 7. Attempt 8. As yet 9. Genetic material 10. Took a load off 11. Extreme fatigue 12. Notify 13. College units 18. Detective, at times 19. Clothing 24. Drawn tight 25. Arise 27. Sword lilies, for short 28. Astronaut’s org. 29. Deadly biters

30. Small house, in London 32. End 35. Warms up 37. Turned sideways 39. 100 cents 40. Old World duck 42. Bologna home 43. Bog 48. Chinese fruit tree 50. “That hurt!” 52. Full of gossip 53. Son of Simon the Just 54. Noblemen 56. Bundle 59. Minus 61. Diamond Head locale 62. Some Olympians, nowadays 63. Eye affliction 65. “___ Town Too” (1981 hit) 66. Go for the gold 67. Appetite

last week’s answers L E A F C A E C R U T H E J A C T A I G A O O B A Y O U E C L A T T H E K I N H E M O S P R P I S T E I N T E N S Q U E E N O S U S E D O E E L S

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XKCD.com, creative commons

Anyone notice anything strange about the sudoku? Anyone? Bueller? Email editorofomega@gmail.com.


11

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 9

Sports

Two nights - two different outcomes Men’s volleyball goes 1-1 against Calgary Nathan Crosby Sports Editor The Wolf Pack put in a solid effort but lost to the fourth-ranked Calgary Dinos with a final score of 23-25, 25-23, 20-25 and 18-25 at the Tournament Capital Centre. Twenty-four hours later, the Wolf Pack swept the Dinos in three sets, 25-23, 25-20 and 25-17, and improved to 1-1 on the season. “I was really proud of the way the guys played and proud we used some depth and that it was effective,” Wolf Pack head coach Pat Hennelly said. “We got off the hook — Calgary gave us a few points.” It was the first time since the Dinos had returned to Calgary since winning the CIS title in 2010 when TRU hosted the tournament. Errors plagued the Wolf Pack throughout the third set on Friday night and the Wolf Pack were unable to recover in the fourth set. The ‘Pack also struggled with

containing outside hitter Chris Hoag, who finished the night with 14 kills in 30 swings, including three serving aces.

Rookie right-side hitter Brad Gunter (Photo courtesy of TRU Athletics)

Saturday night, the ‘Pack wiped the slate clean and made only a few mistakes in an impressive

home victory. The weekend showcased rookie right-side hitter Brad Gunter, who has made the jump from high school to university volleyball seem effortless. “I’m really starting to get into the f low of playing CIS after coming from high school,” he said. “Last night was a disappointing loss and to come together really strong tonight and sweep them is awesome.” Gunter had 13 kills in 34 swings on Friday night, as well as six digs and a block assist. Alex Davis played his best ball Saturday night and was named Leader of the Pack for having six block assists and three kills. Davis recognized afterward that his team had beaten a tough Dinos squad. “They [Calgary} are ranked fourth in the nation and it was really good to split the weekend with them,” he said. Serving was agreed to be the biggest issue for the ‘Pack after assessing the weekend that was. “I’m glad today [Saturday]

that it was the spin guys missing their serves, and they were taking higher risk serves. They got us some nice points early in the set.

Middle attacker Alex Davis (Photo courtesy of TRU Athletics)

I don’t know if it’s fatigue but it’s happened twice where we served good to start and then [wore] off,

so we definitely want to address that; maybe do some video on their tosses as they move through a match.” The Dinos’ serving errors overshadowed the Wolf Pack and Hennelly said his team was fortunate that their own problems from the serving line didn’t cost them. “We still need to work on the serving, it was a little inconsistent,” Davis said. The middle attacker’s big game on Saturday was noticeable by everyone including his coach. “Alex missed a lot of the preseason but obviously his summer with the junior national team really made a difference. He’s blocking way bigger and hitting way harder,” Hennelly said. “Third year is when guys have to show they’re here and going to take their spot on the court and that’s what Davis is doing.” The team will have less than a week to work on their serves as they head off to Edmonton this weekend to take on the Alberta Golden Bears.

Women’s volleyball gets first win early Nathan Crosby Sports Editor

Two games into the season and the women’s volleyball team is in the win column. The WolfPack fought through five sets and were ecstatic to beat the University of Calgary Dinos 3-2 at the Tournament Capital Centre on Oct. 29. Final scores of the sets were 25-20, 22-25, 25-14, 13-25 and 15-11. Last year, the women’s first victory didn’t come until their eleventh game of the season and middle/outside hitter Katarina Osadchuk knows the early wins mean a lot in the long run. “It gives our team a lot of confidence,” she said. “With a team like Calgary, they have experienced players and it’s a really big confidence boost for us to get the split against them.” Osadchuk led the WolfPack attack, finishing the night of 12 kills on 19 attempts with a dig, solo block and two assists. Her most critical kill came in the fifth set which gave the WolfPack a five-point cushion in the shortened set. “She’s really improving each year and we are proud of her,” WolfPack head coach Keith Lundgren said. “She puts up a big block and it’s nice when we serve when she’s up there because I know we are going to have an opportunity to stop the ball.” Osadchuk may only be on her second year with the ‘Pack, but her leadership qualities

were apparent with her effort Saturday night. “Our goal is to get eight wins and as soon as we can get them that’s the best part for us,” she said.

Middle/outside hitter Katarina Osadchuk (Photo courtesy of TRU Athletics)

“We had an awesome team effort today, everybody stepped up.” Setter Kara Twomey helped the team with her two serving aces and had 37 assists. Kelly Asleson had 11 kills in 32 chances and Amanda Frayne joined in with seven kills

in 33 chances. Saturday’s gutsy effort impressed head coach Lundgren, who didn’t have to wait as long as last year to get his first victory. “We competed. When we come out and compete, we are a much more efficient squad,” he said. “We got a good young crew and we got some experience and when you put that together it’s nice.” The WolfPack led 16-7 in the third set and looked comfortable heading into the technical timeout. Katarina Osadchuk’s powerful swing was in full use and the ‘Pack played the best set so far in their season winning 25-14. On Friday night, the WolfPack seemed to fall under to the pressure of the home opener crowd and lost 3-1 to the Dinos. Final scores were 25-18, 25-21, 23-24 and 25-15. Amanda Frayne, who wasn’t in the starting line-up Friday night, finished the night with seven kills in 21 chances. Kelly Asleson was named Leader of the Pack for effort on opening night, finishing with 12 kills in 27 chances. Rookie setter Sarah Pettersson wasted no time in getting comfortable in her position as the game wore on, distributing the ball well to her outside hitters and finishing with 31 assists on Friday and 33 assists on Saturday. Things don’t get any easier as the team will travel to Alberta this weekend to take on the Pandas in Edmonton, but it seemed the WolfPack were glad to get a win out of the way in the first weekend.

Omega is on Twitter: @TRU_ OMEGA


12

November 2, 2011

TRUSU Membership Advisory JOIN THE CAMPAIGN Concerned about the cost of your education? TRUSU will be putting together an organizing committee for the Day of Action in February, 2011.

email info@trusu.ca to get involved

Need help in that Calculus class? The Tutor Registry can connect you with peer to peer help in those difficult subjects

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TRU recieves 39% less perstudent gov’t funding than the Canadian average This Week: • Council Meeting • Nominations for TRUSU By-election • Senator Jaffer Lecture • Acres of Lions play in Heroes Check out the Events Calendar at trusu.ca for details!

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Advocacy | Services | Entertainment