Page 1

The Ίmega www.theomega.ca

Thompson Rivers University’s Independent Student Newspaper Oct. 26, 2011

The last Omega geocache?

6

PHOTO BY CORY HOPE

Eating disorders. Examined first-hand. 2

WolfPack Is beer marketing reversing 9 Sports 11 other steps forward?


2

October 26, 2011

Opinion Eating disorders: more than a food problem The mental illness of ED can push their victims to new extremes Tabitha McCarl

Interrobang (Fanshawe College) LONDON, ON (CUP) — It’s 5:30 a.m.; I can’t get back to sleep. My body aches all over, even though I take as much Tylenol as I am safely allowed (if not twice as much, most days) just to get by. I tiptoe down the stairs to my basement, trying not to wake my still-sleeping family, and start my two- to three-hour run on my treadmill. I know that I should stop, especially since I’ll be going for an hour (or longer) swim at the YMCA that evening, after I’ve completed my four-hour shift at work and my schoolwork. I have decided to treat myself and eat half a carton of strawberries for dinner. That is all that I will eat today besides water and the orange that my parents will monitor me

eating after my morning shower. I will cry three times for various reasons, or no reason at all. My parents’ eyes are full of worry every time I look into them, sometimes brimming with tears after our daily argument over what I eat. This is what almost every single day of my life looked like three years ago. No, I wasn’t trying to fit into a special dress. I was anorexic. I devoted almost a yearand-a-half of my life to making the number on my bathroom scale go down. After a few months of this mission, the devotion was no longer my choice. Many people believe that those with eating disorders are taking vanity to new extremes. In reality, the eating disorder has pushed its victim to new extremes. People also believe the mis-

“I devoted al-

most a year-anda-half of my life

to making the number on my

bathroom scale go down.”

Photo courtesy of Charlotte Astrid/Flickr Creative Commons conception that fad dieting is harmless, but if the circumstances are right, that two-month summer boot camp can turn into something that will change your life forever. While their weight is the main focus of those with disordered thinking, countless other issues are present as well. Depression, self injury, self hate, obsessive compulsivity, perfectionism, thoughts of suicide, strained relationships at work and in school life; these issues (and many others) can all come wrapped in the same package as the eating disorder (ED). Some researchers say that malnutrition and stress cause such problems, while others say

Stop being so awkward No topic of conversation, no matter how bizarre, is inherently awkward Christopher Carmichael

The Campus (Bishop’s University) SHERBROOKE (CUP) — “Awkward” is the word that people use to proclaim their embarrassment when the content of a conversation makes them feel uncomfortable. In truth, “awkward” has nothing to do with content, and everything to do with context. Awkwardness isn’t a product of what’s being said, but a measure of how uncomfortable you are saying or hearing it. For example, if I were to start talking to some random girl about this one time in the second grade when I accidentally pooped on the lid of the toilet seat, she might say, “Awkward!” However, if I were to tell my mother the exact same story, she would laugh and praise me for my self-deprecating sense of humour. Given that the story is the same in both conversations, the non-awkward outcome with my mother indicates that she and I understand that everybody poops, and there’s nothing awkward about it. Granted, my mother wiped my ass for years, but even so, why should the same kind of understanding be missing in my conversation with the random girl? Why should it be awkward to discuss something as common as defecation? The point I’m trying to make is that no topic of conversation, no matter how bizarre, is inherently awkward. If a random girl feels embarrassed

when discussing my ancient bowel movements, it’s because she can’t live with the fact that, below the surface, people are far more disgusting than the image they present. I don’t know why, but it’s quite common for people to deny the implications of their own biology. What advantage do we gain from this repressive type of thinking? Maybe you only feel comfortable discussing “polite” subjects, but the undeniable truth is that you came flying into this world out of a woman’s vagina, and now that you’re here, you’re pooping on a regular basis. Wouldn’t you rather live with the truth than maintain antiquated Victorian sensibilities? Indeed, to go around affecting awkwardness about the facts of life indicates the extent to which you — not the facts — are awkward. If you happen to feel awkward discussing masturbation, it doesn’t mean that masturbating is awkward; it means that you are awkward for failing to come to terms with a universal human behavior. The same logic applies to all those gross-yet-universal things we all do, but refuse to publicly acknowledge. Things like picking your nose, or wanting to have kinky sex or looking at your poop after you wipe. What good does it do us to deny the reality of our own actions and desires? So many wonderful activities and ideas are shunned as taboo because we’re afraid to accept them as part of ourselves.

Within this denial of self we find what is truly awkward: those who are afraid to express their unusual sexual desires, those who are afraid to voice their controversial political opinions and those who cannot accept themselves for who they are because they’re “different.” Our fear of being awkward prevents us from enjoying all the really fun parts of being human. As children, we ran around naked without even the slightest hint of embarrassment. Now that we’re adults, we can’t act in accord with our desires. Let us embrace the spirit of our childhood by recognizing how wonderful it is to be strange. If nothing else, at least our conversations will be more interesting! How much more fascinating would life be if we all started talking about our secrets? Imagine the glory that could be ours if only we shunned the typical and sought the extraordinary! Instead of drinking beer and watching hockey, we could eat exotic fruit and perform sock puppet theatre! Instead of going out for coffee, we could snog in pillow forts until the sun comes up. Almost anything would be better than what passes for normal these days. There’s a world of infinite possibility out there, and your fear of being awkward is the only thing preventing you from investigating its subtle delicacy.

the ED is formed partly because some of those issues are already present. Whatever the case, up to 80 per cent of those with eating disorders suffer from major depression, 25 per cent self-injure and almost 40 per cent attempt suicide. There are many contributing factors related to the formation of an ED, but definite causes have never been established. Major life changes, like moving away from home for the first time, low self-esteem, a bad family life, personality disorders and cultural expectations are a few of the contributing factors for some people. Most people suffering from an

ED refuse treatment, not just because they fear weight gain, but because they fear losing control over their lives. Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness, which is why recovery is so crucial. Often, treatment and recovery aren’t possible unless family and/or close loved ones are part of the process. Eating disorder support centres offer an array of resources and supports for those who know someone with an ED. It can be nearly impossible to persuade someone with the illness to receive treatment without proper knowledge of what the disorder really entails.

Fluid for Thought? I read an interesting study last week into saving money. In today’s image-crazed culture you in The Globe and Mail about “drunkcan only consume so many calories evorexia.” It’s a new term coined in a study by ery day anyhow. Obviously every mature and thoughtthe University of Missouri, which outlines concerns that students are choos- ful student has set aside at least half of those calories for booze. ing alcohol over food. Times are hard for students, and we The study seemed to indicate two just don’t have extra monprimary reasons for ey lying around to blow on the choice: money and trivial things like dinner. calories. I hope that we can all But to be honest I put this little thing behind don’t really understand us quickly, understandwhat the big deal is. ing how absurd it is and Maybe if we lived moving on with our daily in some alternate uniroutines. verse where food was We need to get back to necessary for survival acting like adults, doing and drinking copious mature things like buying amounts of alcohol morning hamburgers and was considered detripopping pills for pounding mental to our health hangovers. I might be worried Daron Mark This whole study just about the results of this goes to show how amazstudy, but that’s crazy. ingly mature the univerIn fact sometimes I wonder if common sense has disap- sity students of this nation really are. Perhaps its time for our government peared completely. As university students we are adults to take notice and reward us for such exafter all, and ALWAYS make mature, ceptional work. So Mr. Harper, maybe you could do responsible decisions. It seems pretty clear to me that liquor all of us university students a huge facompanies have all but forced “drun- vour and slip another section into your korexia” on us by refusing to sell diet Omnibus Bill mandating bars offer wine spritzers and calorie free tequila Bacardi Zero at a dramatically reduced cost. shots at discount prices. Surely no one would notice anyway, I mean, what is a mature adult supposed to do when every shot at the bar right? costs $5 and averages almost 100 caloLook for Daron’s insights into colries, just abstain? lege life here in the editorial/opinion I think not. Of course in our wisdom we know section of the Omega and contact him what is going on: you get drunk faster on at daron.mark@gmail.com with ideas an empty stomach, which saves money. you think he should explore. Show me a college student who isn’t

Consider This


3

October 26, 2011

THE

MEGA

www.theomega.ca

October 26, 2011

Volume 21, Issue 8

Published since November 27, 1991

editorialstaff EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Mike Davies

editorofomega@gmail.com/250-372-1272 BUSINESS MANAGER Natasha Slack

managerofomega@gmail.com 250-372-1272 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Cory Hope

SPORTS EDITOR

Nathan Crosby Copy Editor

Larkin Schmiedl Photo Editor

Cory Hope News Editor

Brendan Kergin Promotions Coordinator/Adsales

Amrita Pannu

omegacontributors Devan C. Tasa, Tabitha McCarl, Christopher Carmichael, Christine Adam, Daron Mark, Charlotte Astrid, Drew Mervin, Anna Zoria

publishingboard

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF * Mike Davies BUSINESS MGR * Natasha Slack INDUSTRY REP * Mike Youds FACULTY REP * Charles Hays STUDENT REP* Sadie Cox

letterspolicy

Literary and visual submissions are welcomed. All submissions are subject to editing for brevity, taste and legality. The Omega will attempt to publish each letter received, barring time and space constraints. The editor will take care not to change the intention or tone of submissions, but will not publish material deemed to exhibit sexism, racism or homophobia. Letters for publication must include the writer’s name (for publication) and contact details (not for publication). The Omega reserves the right not to publish any letter or submitted material. Opinions expressed in the Letters & Opinion section do not represent those of The Omega, the Cariboo Student Newspaper Society, its Board of Directors or its staff. Opinions belong only to those who have signed them.

copyright

All material in this publication is copyright The Omega and may not be reproduced without the expressed consent of the publisher. All unsolicited submissions become copyright Omega 2010.

Cariboo Student Newspaper Society (Publisher of The Omega) TRU Campus House #2 Box 3010, Kamloops, B.C. V2C 5N3 Phone: (250)372-1272 E-mail: editorofomega@gmail.com Ad Enquiries: managerofomega@gmail. com (Correspondence not intended for publication should be labelled as such.)

Want to get involved in covering campus news? Apply to contribute to the Omega.

Editorial

You can’t argue with obvious problems, but you should sometimes argue with the proposed solutions I had the opportunity this past weekend to attend what was called a seminar (conference would be more accurate, though) in Vancouver put on by the Fraser Institute and discuss various aspects of policy implementation. Doesn’t that sound like a blast? To sit in a room full of people and be lectured at by members of a heavily funded right-wing thinktank about why the free market should take over everything that government does and how big business is what’s best for us as a society? At least that’s what I’d thought I’d gotten myself into when I was awarded a travel bursary to the event — and I was gearing up for a fight. In fact, I sort of expected that my revulsion at the ideas expressed by these people would lead to my removal from the proceedings. One of the topics on the agenda was “Canada’s medicare bubble: Is government health spending sustainable without user-based funding?” I like our universal health-care. I’m proud to live in a country where we take care of ourselves like that. It was the second session of the day — and the one I thought would likely get me removed from the Sutton Place Hotel. I guess I would have to miss the afternoon sessions including what the American Congress thinks of Canada, but it would be worth it to have a proper battle with the “expert” who was about to knock my beloved Canadian healthcare system. His point that the current trend of healthcare spending as a percentage of the incomes that the governments of the various provinces collect is rising more quickly than the rate at which those incomes themselves are rising was impossible to dispute. Dammit! I guess I couldn’t just lay into a guy for giving figures that happen to support his point, nor can I really disagree with a point that was just a straight statement of documented mathematical facts. After all — I had no such figures to dispute his claim.

And though some of the solutions that he proposed to reconcile this problem were against everything I believe in as a Canadian, I simply could not generate a hatred — or even a strong dislike — for this man. What was wrong with me?

Editor’s Note Mike Davies Editor-in-Chief I’d be able to come up with something during the discussion period that follows each of these talks, I’d thought to myself. I knew I couldn’t really be accepting the merit of his arguments. And I didn’t. I could not accept that our medical system was in need of a move toward user-funded, pay-for-treatment-type scenario that is bankrupting people in the United States who are just trying to survive their illnesses and misfortunes. But I couldn’t dispute the fact that it needs more money in order to survive. I decided that I could, in fact, dispute where they

Your official introduction to the Omega’s promotions coordinator and ad-sales representative Amrita Pannu is a pre-MBA student who is new to Kamloops — having recently arrived from Vancouver. She loves her sports and can be seen cheering for her favourite basketball, hockey, rugby, and soccer teams wherever the game is being shown. Outside of sports, dance, yoga, global politics, fashion TV, and coffee take up her time. Amrita loves socializing and having good conversations so don’t hesitate to say hello. A chat with a coffee in hand never sounds like a bad idea. We’re happy to have Amrita aboard helping us spread the goodness that is the Omega. If you’d like to get involved as a volunteer for our fundraising efforts or have ideas about how to spread the word about the paper, drop her a line at promotionsomega@gmail.com.

could find that money without resorting to a system I don’t agree with. Why don’t we stop subsidizing billionaire sports franchise owners when they want to refurbish the building their team plays in? Most people whose taxes went to the renovations of BC Place stadium in Vancouver will never get to attend an event being held there — because they don’t care about sports. We are losing the Canada I love when people who have no interest in sports have to pay (via their taxes) for a billionaire to improve his business investment when their choice is to not attend the events held there — but they might have to pay for their femur to be set if it’s broken by a slip-and-fall in the winter. Oh, but they won’t have to pay that under the new system, because they can sue for medical damages from the person who didn’t shovel and salt their sidewalk well enough, right? Because if we have to pay for our own medical expenses when they are needed because we don’t have the safety net of Canadians pitching in to take care of each other, then we’ll have to buy insurance against those expenses (and thus protecting us from those Canadians who can no longer be trusted to help each other). Buying insurance against each other’s need for healthcare is failure of our development as a nation. And I will not be a failure when we’re so capable of fixing the financial problems of one of our most sacred ideals in other ways. The Fraser Institute can produce all kinds of facts and data and tell us that the current system can’t survive fiscally without an overhaul — and I will agree. Because they are right. You can’t argue with dollar figures and documented statistics. Well you can, but it won’t get you very far or bring people over to your side. What you CAN argue about is the solution to the problem. And I’m ready for that battle. As we all should be — because it’s coming. editorofomega@gmail.com

I’m writing this week’s col- to know one another, learning umn from a small log cabin about university life and getoverlooking McQueen Lake ting their feet wet in some of the course content. just north of Kamloops. In fact, we spent last evening I’m here with a group of grade-12 students from Kam- out in the dark with dean of science (and program instructor) loops, Clinton and Lillooet. Tom Dickinson, They form hooting for owls the pioneer and howling for group for the coyotes! Aboriginal The culminatTRU Start ing activity for program — a this retreat is dozen stuattending a lecdents who ture given by Dr. will start Martin Brokentheir TRU leg on Oct. 21 on journeys in the topic of reFebr uar y Christine Adam siliency among 2012, takyouth at risk and ing courses Dean of Students the lessons proin English, vided by tradiStatistics and tional aboriginal childrearing Biology. The course credits will count practices. I’m not sure who is more extoward both their high school graduation and their first year cited about this project – the students or those of us that are at TRU. It’s an amazing opportunity watching it all come together. I look forward to updating and a great challenge, for how do you begin to engage in uni- you on the progress these stuversity material while you’re dents are making later next semester. still finishing grade 12? The past day that I’ve spent with this talented group has Christine Adam, TRU’s dean convinced me that they are more than ready to meet the of students, writes a weekly column on topics of interest challenge. Joined by SD73 staff, and to TRU students. You can find by TRU faculty, staff, student her in person in 1631 Old Main mentors and elders, the stu- and follow her on Twitter @ dents have spent time getting trudeanstudents.

From the

d e a n ’s desk


4

October 26, 2011

News Briefs

TRU’s Academic plan Community

TRU’s draft Academic Plan is up online and you should go look at it. There will be two open houses to discuss its details with the public — once in Kamloops and once in Williams Lake. The draft plan provides an outline for the direction the school is headed for the next five to 10 years. A major theme discussed in the current document is the idea of

moving forward with the Destination TRU identity, which creates an image of TRU as a place to come for regional and international students. The document also aims to develop curriculum and programs around four main themes: science and applied skills in society, politics and social justice, well-being and leisure and environmental sustainability. The 14-page document contains

only a loose outline — providing a general direction for future decisions regarding how the university should continue forming. The open house in Kamloops is taking place Wed., Oct. 26 at the TRU Campus Activity Center from 6:30 to 8 p.m. View the academic plan at: ht t p://w w w.t r u.ca /v pacademic/ a ca de m ic _ pla n /a ca de m ic pla n. html and get to the meeting to have your say on it.

Bears. Yes, the big furry kind If you’re one of the many humans out there, you probably wouldn’t enjoy a very close and surprise encounter with a bear. Therefore the Thompson-Nicola Regional District and Bear Aware are ramping up efforts to remind people about proper bear-human etiquette. They’ve created a list of things we SHOULD be doing in order to keep people safe and bears from being shot at. Store garbage, compost and

recycling in a bear proof container until proper disposal. Use bird feeders only during winter months. Remove fruit and berries from trees and shrubs. Feed pets inside and store food indoors. Keep all barbeques clean and free of residual food. Remember, bears poke around human populations because they are hungry, not because the really feel like attacking people.

Humans are the intelligent species here, play to your strength. If you feel like going the extra step with Bear Aware, they are looking for volunteers. For more information contact Katelyn Leitch of the TNRD Bear Aware Community at 250-319-6265 or bearaware@tnrd.bc.ca. If you see one of our furry urside friends or have evidence that a bear was in your area, report it to the Conservation Officer via 1-877-952-7277.

Bottled water bans catching on Bottled water will now be more difficult to find on Calgary’s St. Mary’s University College campus. The school has joined the small group of other Canadian post-secondary schools looking at alternative means of hydrating their students. While only six schools are listed as officially not selling water on campus, many others are considering the move. The TRUSU is working on a campaign here. The option has been discussed

at TRU for a few years. A 2008 document discusses joining the Council of Canadians’ Acting for Social Justice campaign “Unbottle It!” The document lists the reasons why it is beneficial to get rid of bottled water, including the environmental impact and the right to clean water that all people should have. The movement to go bottled water-free picked up steam in 2009 when the University of Winnipeg dropped bottles, and since then their sustainability

Power Smart Month comes to a close BC Hydro is starting to wrap up the provincial Power Smart Month campaign. The annual event is created to increase awareness of power use habits. Students may have noticed the campaign’s odd commercials on cable lately. The apparent highlight is the commercial where three office workers mis-hear lyrics to the song “Two Tickets to Paradise” by Eddie Money. Hilarity ensues. The campaign aims to use such cutting-edge humour to engage consumers in considering alternatives to more wasteful energy

choices. Products BC Hydro endorses include anything with an Energy Star qualification. The program does seem to be effective, as conservation efforts have accounted for 2,300 gigawatt hours per year saved according to BC Hydro. For more information on saving electricity yourself, visit www.powersmart.ca. You can also join Team Power Smart, an online community in B.C. that provides tips for conserving power.

Sign up on

www.dealmate.ca brought to you by

director says they have done all right in providing water for their students. For a campus to go bottled water-free more drinking fountains are generally needed. The University of Victoria brought a mobile water fountain on campus to encourage reusable bottle use. In 2010 the UN declared clean drinking water a basic right. Editor’s note: Thanks for this story go out to Tannara Yelland — CUP Prairies & Northern Bureau Chief.

Omega is on Twitter: @TRU_ OMEGA

Calendar Wednesday, Oct. 26

-Heroes Live Concert Series. Show starts 8 p.m. $5 Dollars cover. -TRU Movie Nights Presents: “Horrible Bosses” Doors @ 6:30pm TRU Clock Tower $2 admission Thursday, Oct. 27 -Kamloops Voter Society is hosting an All Candidates Mixer for the November 19th municipal election. Frick n Frack’s Taphouse 577 Victoria St. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. but drop in anytime to meet the candidates. Free admission and free food. Friday, Oct. 28 -Men’s Hockey 8:30 pm Memorial Arena vs SFU -Women’s Volleyball SEASON OPENER 6 pm Tournament Capital Center vs U of Calgary

-Men’s Volleyball SEASON OPENER 7:45 pm Tournament Capital Center vs U of Calgary

You’re getting better, TRU, but this thing should be full, because I know there are things going on that for some reason you don’t want to share. Get your events to us so we can connect you to the people who might want to be there. editorofomega@ gmail.com


5

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 8

News Trick or Eat helps feed those in need

Campus groups gather food instead of candy this Halloween Devan C. Tasa

Omega Contributor The TRU branch of the Kappa Sigma fraternity wants students to start trick-or-treating again. But this time, they want students to gather food for the poor instead of candy for themselves. “Trick or Eat is an annual philanthropy event, where we go on the evening of Halloween and we request food from the community,” said Jordan Phelps, Grandmaster of the Omicron Theta chapter of Kappa Sigma. On Halloween night, after meeting at the Thompson Hotel in downtown Kamloops at 4:00 p.m., teams of participants will go door-to-door, asking for nonperishable food items. Clubs and other groups on campus are organizing many of the teams. “We’re setting up a team,” said Kevin Pankewich, an executive member of the TRU Socialist Club. “We’re going to go doorto-door, asking for non-perishable food donations.” But being a part of a club isn’t a requirement to get involved. “You don’t have to be an member of a club to participate,” said Phelps. “You can make up your own team name and (bring) your own group of friends and you can come out and participate as (a) team.” Participants will also get prizes. Some of the prize categories

for teams will include best cos- we can do it.” Service is one of Kappa Sigma tumes, largest number of food collections, and most efficient at Omicron-Theta’s four guiding pillars, and organizing Trick collecting food. The food gathered will be or Eat is one way to fulfill that donated to the Kamloops Food mandate. “We like to help out in our Bank, with a portion going to the community and our campus in TRUSU Food Bank on campus. The TRUSU is enthusiastic any way possible,” said Phelps. The particiabout the efpants also have fect that Trick their reasons or Eat will have for being inon their food volved. bank. “[The Social“It’s great,” ist Club advosaid Nathan cates] for the Lane, TRUSU poor. This is executive dia good chance rector. “[It] alfor us to get out lows us to tide there and do us over until that,” said Panthe end of the kewich. second semes“I think that ter, so it has a it is a shame pretty big efthat capitalism fect.” doesn’t feed all The exact —Jordan Phelps of its citizens.” number of stuPa r t icipat i ng dents using the in Trick or Eat food bank on campus is unknown, but hun- has an effect, said both Kappa dreds of food packages are given Sigma Omicron-Theta executive members. away every year, said Lane. “All that money - $16,100 and Kappa Sigma Omicron-Theta is aiming to get over $30,000 change – that was 4 hours of worth of food and monetary do- work,” said Lauzon. “I mean 4 hours on Halloween nations with this year’s Trick or night, you can still have a really Eat. “Last year we got $16,100 and good time (afterward). Those that are interested in change worth of food [and donations],” said David Lauzon, the participating can sign up at Grand Procurator of Kappa Sig- www.trickoreat.ca or contact Kappa Sigma Omicron-Theta at ma Omicron-Theta. “It’s a lofty goal, but I think brothers@trukappasigma.com.

“We like to help out in our community and our

Do you have unpublished stories or photos related to campus news? Submit them to the Omega.

campus in any way possible.”

Email us at: editorofomega@ gmail.com for more details


6

October 26, 2011

Arts & Entertainment

Omega Expeditionary Force presents: “I’m not entirely sure what this area is called” Cory Hope

Arts and Entertainment Editor You know, I’m not entirely sure what this area is called, but it’s found on the bend of Summit Drive and it’s just a nice place to hang out. I found this area by accident while I was jogging last summer. I like to change the routes that I take because jogging sucks and the only redeeming quality I have found in it is that when you’re finished, you’re not jogging any more. The least I can do, therefore, is make sure the scenery is fresh. Every time I go up to this place, I find myself wondering why it is that I haven’t managed to get myself over to the island that I can see from there. This island has no name according to Google Earth or Google Maps. I tell myself every year that I’m going to head over there when the water level is low, or buy myself a kayak and go out there when the water level is higher, but I keep spending my student loans on stuff like books and beer and I haven’t managed to get enough money in empties to afford a kayak. Of course, the water level is

low right now, and walking there is free - provided it’s as shallow as it looks to be. It’s difficult to tell — like being in a bar and seeing a member of the preference for your orientation and saying, “Sure looks pretty over there. Wonder if it’s shallow?” Well, I’m sure I’ll find out about the island soon enough. You’ve probably gone by the Summit Drive entrance to the geocache area we’re actually talking about here repeatedly, and maybe once or twice even asked yourself where you would end up if you just took the exit instead of staying on the main road. The answer for me was you get bitten on the foot by a rather large dog whose owners barely mumble a word of apology, but I’m sure they aren’t there fulltime, and it was just a bit of bad luck on my part. Probably bad luck for the dog too, what with having complete jackasses for masters and all. I’m just ranting here. If you’re lucky though, you can find a piece of f lagging tape instead of a canine with a foot fetish, and if you’re the first person to get back to me at cory.hope@ gmail.com with what’s written on the tape, you’ll win respect from

your peers, my eternal gratitude, and something else, too. If you’re driving, turn off Summit at the main bend in the road. It’s called Guerin Road, but I’m not sure if there’s a sign for it anywhere. Park right away, and you’ll see a path on the right-hand side just beside you. If you type 50 40’ 53.8” N 120 22’ 15.7” W into Google Earth you’ll see where I’m talking about. The tape is located on a ridge, but not too close to the edge of it, so it’s still safe for the kids to look for it. Be mindful of the possibility of snakes and so on in the grass. It’s my understanding that the more noise you make the safer you are from them, but it’s getting colder and they’re not moving especially fast right now (I peed on a rattlesnake two weeks ago at Cooney Bay and although it wasn’t very happy with me it didn’t strike back). This might be the last geocache done through The Omega, as I haven’t received any emails from the last two that I’ve done, but rest assured I’ll try to find another reason to get you outside. Enjoy!

Find this view just off Summit Drive and win the Omega’s weekly prize. —Cory Hope


7

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 8

Arts & Entertainment

Holiday movie showdown Cory Hope

Arts and Entertainment Editor Rob Zombie’s Halloween vs. Peter Jackson’s Brain Dead. Before I start this Holiday Movie Showdown, I would like to explain why I chose these two movies. Brain Dead is the director’s cut of Dead Alive, Peter Jackson’s third film after Bad Taste and Meet the Feebles. I recommend these films to anyone who isn’t my mom. Your mom, fine. I have a reputation to uphold at home however, which might be tainted if I were to tell her to watch these (or the two up for review for that matter), seeing as she is a woman who considers ‘An Officer and a Gentleman’ to be one of the high points of all cinema ever. Brain Dead is often hailed as the goriest movie of all time by websites like 365horrormovie.com. I chose this cinematic masterpiece instead of John Carpenter’s original 1978 Halloween because Carpenter’s version features a 20-year-old Jamie Lee Curtis topless. Any film that has to contend with that is almost always going to be bringing the pro-

verbial knife to the gunfight. Rob Zombie’s Halloween is a reboot to a classic horror film, bringing one of the scariest villains ever to grace the background of the screen back to the stage. Both the mask that Michael Meyers wears and the score of the movie as he stalks his prey are iconic within the genre of horror films. Brain Dead on the other hand is a refreshing take on the genre of everybody’s favourite villains, zombies. The beauty of zombies is that they are no longer human, and therefore can be dispatched by any means necessary without any sympathy being felt towards them. Let’s talk special effects for a moment. Rob Zombie took the slasher film to new heights with Halloween, with the knife-wielding Michael Meyers making short work of promiscuous teens as we all expect him to. Special effects have come a long way since 1978, and the full-contact nature of Meyers’ preferred sport is no longer implied as it was when the original came out. He is still however just wielding a knife for the most part. Brain Dead is quite exceptional when it comes to special effects, although Jackson treats much of it with a light-hearted nature (if

that doesn’t seem too much of a contradiction for a movie that is known for splatter). It was made to be a splatter-comedy, which Jackson successfully pulls off with enthusiasm and special effects ranging from the claymation rat-monkey, whose bite begins the whole ridiculous adventure, to gallons and gallons of foamy pink blood that causes humans and zombies alike to fall over each other in a gore-filled slapstick that has yet to be topped. A quick word on body counts. The body count of Halloween is irrelevant. Not because people don’t get killed, but because there is a scene in Brain Dead in which the hero of the story straps a lawnmower to his chest and runs through a room full of the invading zombie hoard again and again.

Jackson pulled no punches during this scene, which was virtually redacted for the cinematic release. Get the director’s cut. Looking back at my comparisons for this holiday season, I suppose I really should have gone with the original Halloween, and let the Jamie Lee factor play its course. It would have made this a more fair fight. I’m not about to suggest that Rob Zombie’s Halloween isn’t worth checking out, but my recommendation for you this year is going to have to be Brain Dead. I know I wasn’t keeping a proper score this time around, but I’ll just make something up. Rob Zombie’s Halloween 2, Peter Jackson’s Brain Dead 527. Sorry, Rob.

Peter Jackson’s classic Dead Alive mows down Rob Zombie’s remake of Halloween in the year’s second movie showdown.


8

October 26, 2011

Arts & Entertainment

A Fun little Halloween story: Voice in the Vent Drew Mervin

Omega Contributor Kyle was about halfway through Terminator 2 when he thought he heard a voice from behind him. That’s odd, he thought. He was supposed to be home alone. It was in fact only the fourth time he’d been so, although this time it was for two whole days. Ever since he had turned twelve his parents had decided to stop wasting money on a babysitter. Now they had gone out of town, to the funeral of a distant relative he’d never heard of before, and had told him that since he had behaved so responsibly the last three times he was left on his own, they deemed him trustworthy enough to watch himself for a weekend. He was surprised, as last time he had accidentally set the shed on fire, but he was grateful nonetheless. He hated funerals. Kyle paused the movie and looked around, but didn’t see anybody. Perhaps he had imagined it. He’d be lying if he said that Terminator 2 didn’t make him a bit nervous, especially the part where the Terminator silences the barking dog. Speaking of dogs, where was Tucker? The little Jack Russel terrier had curled up at his feet when he had

started the movie, but now the dog was nowhere in sight. He was about to call for him when he heard the voice again. It was faint and whispering, but with the movie paused he could make out the words. At first it sounded like a gruff laugh, and then he distinctly heard the words “The Diggles.” He froze. The Diggles – wasn’t that the last name of the people who lived in this house before them? They were friends of his dad’s or something. But why would a voice be calling their name? Maybe they had committed a heinous deed in this house and caused it to become haunted? Or maybe someone had returned to exact revenge on them, thinking that they still lived here? His thoughts were interrupted as once again the raspy voice laughed and called out the name of the previous owners. He stiffened and looked wildly about. The sound seemed to be coming from the vent at the end of the couch, but he wasn’t going to waste any more time to make sure. If someone was in the house he needed to protect himself. He ran to the kitchen and grabbed a knife out of the drawer. Not that he’d ever stab anybody. He just hoped that it’d be enough to prevent anybody from stabbing him. Though now that he thought

about it, he couldn’t really picture the culprit being a human. I mean, who hides in a stranger’s house, giggling about its previous owners? Regardless, he felt a bit safer with the knife in his hand. He decided to chance calling his dog. “Tucker?” he said timidly at first. Nothing. Maybe the menace had silenced the dog to keep it from barking, just like in Terminator. “Tucker!” he called louder, anxious now. There was a thump from upstairs, and a moment later the terrier scooted into the room, his head down and his tail between his legs. Kyle could only think of two instances when the dog acted like this: when he was in trouble, and during a lightning storm. And seeing as the kitchen garbage was intact and there was nobody’s leg to hump but his own, Kyle figured that the dog must be frightened. He in turn became more nervous as this reinforced the fact that there

was indeed something funny going on here. He decided that since the sound was coming from the vent it likely meant that the culprit was near one of the other vents in the house. So with knife in hand, and dog by his side, he worked up the courage to search the house. It suddenly seemed much darker and more forbidding than it ever had before, but he figured that it was better for him to find whatever was making the noise rather than let it find him. He set out on a path that would strategically cover every room in the house, making sure to turn on every light along the way. The first vent he found was in the playroom, but it only had old toys and stuffed animals by it. He found a second vent in his parent’s bedroom, just in front of the fish tank. The third vent was downstairs in the laundry room, by the dryer. And despite his effort to be stealthy, he found nothing suspi-

“So with knife in

hand

and

his dog by his side, he worked

up the courage to

search

house.”

the

cious. He finally decided to give up the hunt and returned to the living room, though he kept the knife on a nearby table, and changed the movie to Toy Story 3 for good measure. He kept the volume relatively low though, expecting to hear the voice any moment, but the rest of the night passed uneventfully. Kyle didn’t hear the sound again until late the following night. He was watching TV again and jumped to mute the volume. When the voice came a second time, he decided it was definitely coming from the vent. He also noted that the voice perhaps had an accent, as it sounded more like it was saying “tha” instead of “the.” He was just contemplating how he should react when he heard a loud bang from upstairs. Kyle jumped up, and ran to the kitchen to grab the knife back out of the drawer. Then he tore up the steps towards the playroom, where he was sure the bang had come from. His heart racing, he cautiously approached the open door, and peered into the room. And there, in the corner by the vent, was Tucker, furiously humping his old Tickle-Me Elmo doll near a chair that must have toppled from the commotion. Sure enough, it was only a moment before the words came from Elmo’s worn-out voice-box “hu hu hu, hu hu hu, that tickles!”


9

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 8

Life & Community Chick Beer was made especially for you/your vagina Pink-bottled, low-calorie suds brew controversy over marketing Anna Zoria

The Ubyssey (UBC) VANCOUVER (CUP) — Ladies, we all know that after a long day, there’s nothing more refreshing than a beer (or two or three) with some friends. But why, you might ask, are none of the beers out there made for ladies? Molson, Kokanee, Guinness, Sleeman’s: they’re all just so … manly. Sigh. Enter Chick Beer: a new kind of beer that’s made just for you and your vagina. It comes in a pink bottle (so that you can instinctively be drawn to it at the liquor store) and is low in calories and carbs (so that you can now consider having dressing with that salad). The company slogan, “Witness the Chickness,” is done in a sophisticated Curlz MT font over the image of a little black dress on the label. And if that doesn’t sound like your grade three lunchbox already, did I mention that the six pack is designed to look like a purse? The Spice Girl power doesn’t stop there. The beer is also less carbonated so that you won’t feel “bloated” or, god forbid, burp. It also has a milder, sweeter taste. To recap: if you’re still considering that liquid bread, known as regular beer, you should also seriously think about getting a sex change. All joking aside, it is undeniable that the founder of Chick Beer, Shazz Lewis, tapped into a niche market when she decided to make a beer “just for women.” While anyone who’s ever seen a beer commercial can tell you that the advertising is largely geared towards the male consumer, research shows that 25

per cent of all beer in the U.S. is bought by women. But is putting a light lager into a pink bottle really helping bridge that gap? Lewis said that from the start she knew that the uber-feminine packaging would garner some criticism. But she insisted that Chick Beer sends a positive message. “The women who embrace Chick Beer are self-assured, confident and powerful,” said Lewis. “They believe that fun and sexy are positive traits. “They embrace their femininity, and are bold enough to understand that a word like ‘chick’ can’t hold them back.” This type of argument, however, falls short when we consider what femininity in the year 2011 actually means. If we constrain it to all things pink, girly and Sex and the City, aren’t we trivializing femininity? Scott Anderson, a University of British Columbia philosophy professor who specializes in gender, agreed that “the use of derogatory and diminishing stereotypes to categorize women tends to reinforce a sense that women enjoy being treated in ways that are sexualized and unserious.” But Lewis does not seem to be fazed by the feminists. “Real progress requires dissent. We never expected everyone to like the Chick Beer concept. Name any concept — even something as accepted as the iPod or democracy — and I can show you some people who simply hate it.” “It would have been easy to make a quiet little beer for women that would have met with both universal approval and universal disregard,” she added. “We chose to go another route.” While it is debatable that a beer that looks like a Sophie Kinsella novel is bringing progress to the feminist

Can’t beer be for ladies, too? Marketing goes a long way in the battle for consumers, but where do we start to regress on our progress sociologically? Photo by Peter Wojnar/The Ubyssey

cause, Lewis does touch on a viable marketing point. By being modestly provocative, the young company has managed to garner a substantial amount of publicity. Though the responses have not been entirely positive, in its mere eight weeks of existence, Chick Beer has caused quite a stir in the press and has been featured on two of America’s three major morning news shows. Sauder School of Business chair of marketing Darren Dahl says that,

Puzzle of the Week #7 – More Coloured Blocks You have some blocks with each block being a solid colour of one of red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet. 1. There are more purple blocks than orange blocks. 2. The quantities of blocks of each colour are in a five-number range and each of the five values is used. 3. There are fewer purple blocks than yellow blocks. 4. The quantity value for orange blocks is the value used twice. 5. The number of yellow blocks is a prime number. 6. Exactly three of the quantity values are primes. 7. There are more blue blocks than purple blocks. 8. The quantity value used twice is not prime, but the total number of blocks is prime. 9. There are fewer red blocks than green blocks. Given the above, how many blocks are there of each of the six colours? This contest is sponsored by the Mathematics and Statistics department. The full-time student with the best score at the end of the year will win a prize. Submit your solution (not just the answer but also why) by noon next Wednesday to Gene Wirchenko <genew@ocis.net>. Submissions by others are also welcome. The solution will be posted the Wednesday after that in the Math Centre (HL210A). Come visit: we are friendly.

while the company could have chosen to present the product with a bit more class, “often in marketing you’re not trying to get all the customers, you’re trying to get a segment that will make your organization viable. “You may piss off a bunch of people in doing that, but those are not the people you are interested in.” True, Chick Beer never claimed to appeal to all women. And if there is such a huge demand for this beer, then maybe our next step

should be to develop some Forever Alone PMS Chocolate and tap into a whole new segment of Carrie Bradshaws. At the end of the day, though, beer is beer. Women, just like men, enjoy it for its taste, body and strength. To assume that what women drinkers look for in a beer is mild taste and a low calorie count only further reinforces the idea that real beer is for men.


10

October 26, 2011

Coffee Break 4 7 6 2 8 3 3 1 8

4 3

5 7

1

5 9 1 1 7 8 6 9 7 2

8 2 3

SUDOWEB.COM

4

9

1 4

8

6

7 4 2

8 sudokuhard

MYLES MELLOR

sudokueasy

2

4 8 6

crossword

9

“Part of a Straight?”

7 8

3 9

1 5 4 2 8 3 5 2 8

3 SUDOWEB.COM

last week’s answers easy

hard

4

8

5

1

3

9

2

7

6

1

9

2

3

8

5

6

7

4

9

6

7

2

5

4

1

3

8

7

6

8

2

4

1

5

3

9

2

3

1

7

6

8

4

9

5

5

3

4

9

6

7

2

1

8

1

2

9

4

8

7

5

6

3

6

5

3

1

2

4

8

9

7

7

5

3

6

9

1

8

2

4

8

7

9

6

5

3

1

4

2

8

4

6

3

2

5

9

1

7

2

4

1

7

9

8

3

5

6

3

1

8

5

7

2

6

4

9

9

2

7

5

1

6

4

8

3

6

9

4

8

1

3

7

5

2

4

1

6

8

3

9

7

2

5

5

7

2

9

4

6

3

8

1

3

8

5

4

7

2

9

6

1

Across 1. Book part 5. “Cut it out!” 10. Five-time U.S. Open champ 14. Almond 15. Auspices 16. All-night party 17. Gardening guy? 20. Boreal forest 21. Old Germans 22. ___ and aahs 25. Dentist’s direction 26. “Blue ___” 30. Opens 33. Brilliance 34. Denials 35. Eerie gift 38. Romantic guy? 42. Haw partner 43. Ricelike pasta 44. Diminished by 45. More lively 47. Sportscaster Musburger 48. Ski trail 51. “Get ___!” 53. Profound 56. Contradict 60. 1991 Tinka Menkes film 64. Took advantage of 65. Zeno, notably 66. Assortment 67. Sea slitherers

68. Old Roman port 69. Don’t believe it Down 1. Affranchise 2. Genuine 3. Zone 4. Film maker 5. Chocolate source 6. “A rat!” 7. “Give it ___!” 8. Sort carefully 9. To be, to Brutus 10. Free 11. Radioactive element 12. A plant of the rose family 13. Shield figure 18. Rabbitlike rodent 19. Engine sound 23. Driven 24. Big bore 26. “Little Women” woman 27. Yearn 28. Hypothetical form of matter 29. Symbol of strength 31. Earlier 32. Wednesday tree? 35. Coastal raptor 36. Bowl over 37. “Check this out!” 39. “___ any drop to drink.” Coleridge

40. Insignia 41. Cause of inflation? 45. Mounts 46. ___ Station 48. Arouse 49. Sign on a plane facility 50. Brace 52. Banana variant 54. C-worthy 55. New newts 57. Come into view 58. Deeply 59. Cut, maybe 61. “i” lid 62. “Rocky ___” 63. Scale note

last week’s answers S T I R

U R S A

D E L I

S E E N C L S E R B I P R O O F E N D O F L I E L E O P O I L S I N G I O V O L O C A G E S K N O T

P A P A Y A

U N I T E

L O E S S

S L T H E A E O L D O S N I N S O M O S T

P A R A N A B I U R R A N S E C T H U L D E E P

R E D O

C L O G

H E S S

A T I N B R E A A W Y T E R A U N S O K N

S H O V E

S E W E R

I D L E

N O D E

A D D T O

A N A D E M

XKCD.com, creative commons

Anyone notice anything strange about the sudoku? Email editorofomega@gmailcom and tell me about it.


11

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 8

Sports

Lowey tragedy opens door to new opportunity Nathan Crosby Sports Editor

Various forms of social media are being used by a journalism professor to keep injured Wolf Pack baseball player Tyler Lowey a part of the TRU community while he is recovering in Alberta from a tragic accident. Shawn Thompson is using his thirdyear Reporting for the Media class to bring Lowey into the classroom when he’s not even in the province. “We want to use social media to build communities and build relationships outside the classroom. Tyler is in Calgary and he’s connected to the class through Twitter,” Thompson said. Lowey’s life was turned upside down after taking a baseball to the eye while batting for the Wolf Pack team on Oct. 9 forcing him to leave the journalism program for a year to recover. His right eye is now gone and he’s had to deal with his loss. Like all determined athletes, he looked at the accident and has decided not to let it ruin his dreams. Thompson said Twitter and Skype have an immediacy that email cannot compete with. He added that social media is chang-

ing the relationship between student and instructor. “When this terrible thing happened to Tyler, I realized it was also an opportunity for us to reach [out] and make him feel more like a participant. “We want to see him come back next year and part of coming back is making him feel like he’s part of the community,” he said. Thompson’s third-year journalism students are attending city council this week to learn about covering local politics and he wants them to tweet through the meetings so Tyler can be part of the class as they learn. It is the instructor’s wish to let Tyler know that this setback doesn’t mean he can’t participate with the class. As for Tyler, he was thankful for the response the school has given him. “I’m doing good,” Lowey said from his home in Calgary. “I found the day after the accident that I wouldn’t have an eye anymore, so I’ve come to terms with [that] pretty fast. “There was really nothing I could do to change my situation and I’ve realized that, ‘Ya, I’ve lost an eye but I lost it playing baseball, I didn’t lose it from doing something stupid.’” Baseball players are the type to play in rain, sun, or snow, whatever the cir-

cumstances, for love of the game. Playing baseball becomes a part of them, and it defines them and is nurtured in their souls. Although Lowey’s accident was a tragic setback for him, it happened while playing the game he loves. Surgery on his eye went successfully on Oct. 15. From where he is resting in his parent’s home, Lowey offered his World Series prediction: the St. Louis Cardinals will narrowly beat the Texas Rangers because of their home field advantage. To everyone who is thinking of Tyler right now and wanting to hear from him, he had this to say to his teammates and friends here at TRU. “Thanks for all the support. Everyone back in Kamloops has been keeping in contact with me, calling me, texting me and stuff, it’s tough but it’s been a lot easier with all the support I’ve had. “To my teammates, they know I love them. There are 45 of them, all that I consider to be my best friends and I can’t wait until I see them next year. I ‘m coming back next year, it’s not that far away, it will be here before you know it.”

WolfPack baseball player Tyler Lowey lost an eye doing what he loves. Social media is keeping him up-to-date with his classmates and giving him an advantage for when he returns to the journalism program. (Photo courtesy of TRU Athletics)

Women’s soccer clinches playoff spot with 10-game unbeaten streak the confidence her team is playing with as the regular season winds down is a reSports Editor freshing change from her past teams. “We have been in a rut for the last couIt could be that the Wolf Pack women’s ple of years,” she said. “We’ve had strong teams but never soccer team has forgotten what it feels the results that like to lose. we wanted. Now A 2-1 loss to to have a team Kwantlen on Sept. that is as equally 10 was the last time strong and getthat the team didn’t ting the results produce either a win we want without or a tie and have now having to worfinished the regular ry about other season on a 10-game teams.” unbeaten streak. The women’s The ‘Pack now sit success can be comfortably in the attributed to PACWEST standings many players with a record of five on the team, but wins, five draws, and head coach Tom that one loss at the McManus debeginning of the seaserves a share son. of the credit for The last weekend getting his playof play had the wome n ers to believe in travelling around themselves. Vancouver Island, Women’s soccer captain Abbey “He keeps us tying Capilano 1-1 on McAuley. focused. Oct. 22 and VIU 1-1 (Photo courtesy of TRU Athletics) “There are on Oct. 23. practices when The team finished we aren’t into the second in their dividrills. sion and will play in “Even when we go into weekends when the PACWEST playoffs in Kelowna startwe know we’re going to win, he puts a ing Oct. 28. Captain Abbey McAuley said although huge emphasis on focus,” McAuley said. Although the team’s record is undenishe remembers what it feels like to lose,

Nathan Crosby

ably great, McCauley said that there are still areas where the Wolf Pack need to improve before the playoffs. “One of the things we’ve struggled with this year is focusing for the whole 90 minutes and he [McManus] has really worked with us to keep our focus and intensity. “It’s nice to see someone who is as enthusiastic about the sport as you are. “He knows how to make a team win.” McManus said at the beginning of the year that lack of scoring was the team’s biggest downfall last year. This year the team has scored 20 goals, with Amanda Barrett and Ashley Piggot leading the attack. They’ve only had 12 scored against them. “It’s great to have a team that ref lects the talent in the scores. “For other teams to know we are a good team is great,” McAuley said.

“...he

“This year, everybody is together, we are a tight-knit group.” The play of goalkeeper Emily Edmundson has also made things easier on the team. She is in her first year and her confidence and reliability is what McAuley said was a big reason the team has had so much success. “She had to play for her spot. This year she came in with this confidence and this drive. “Whatever Danilo [goal keeper coach Danilo Caron] has done with her is working,” she said. “We are strong all across the field and it’s nice to have a unifying strength.” By the sounds of what McAuley said, the women’s soccer team is ready to prove to the PACWEST they are a force to be dealt with.

knows how to make a team win”

—Captain Abbey McAully praising head coach Tom McManus


12

October 26, 2011

TRUSU Membership Advisory

JOIN THE CAMPAIGN To get involved in the Drop Fees campaign sign up to be a volunteer

K / COLOURED BACKGROUND www.trusu.ca/section/183

Post-Secondary Education Fact:

Youth unemployment is 16.2%, more than double the overall rate This Week:

You shouldn’t have to choose between tuition and groceries Packages available at the Members’ Services Desk in the Students’ Union Building

N WHITE BACKGROUND

Get $10 tickets to any Blazers home game!

Buy your tickets at the Members’ Services Desk in the Students’ Union Building

• TRUSU TRUDAT Club Presents “Zombies” • Trick or Eat Check out the Events Calendar at trusu.ca for details!

Log on to trusu.ca and get connected! • Subscribe to the Newsletter • Join us on facebook • Follow us on Twitter

Advocacy | Services | Entertainment

October 26, 2011  

The October 26, 2011 edition of the Omega

October 26, 2011  

The October 26, 2011 edition of the Omega

Advertisement