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The Ωmega www.theomega.ca

Thompson Rivers University’s Independent Student Newspaper Oct. 19, 2011

Kamloops gets in on the “occupy” movement

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Heroes hosts and the fans win out. 6

PHOTO BY MARVIN BEATTY

WolfPack Attendance doesn’t reflect 7 Sports 11 the show....we hope


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October 19, 2011

Editorial Deferring (most of) my time for a worthy cause fer most of my editorial space to another anonymous source who shares this view and has phrased it so eloquently. I will comment on the piece itself after its conclusion—as I’m sure you were all hoping to read my words at some point today, right? Without further ado, I give you the Omega’s first “letter to the editor,” and I thank the anonymous source out there who provided it. “Dear classmates,

Editor’s Note Mike Davies Editor-in-Chief I received our first real “letter to the editor” this week, and as such I feel that I should really make some room for it even though we don’t get enough of them regularly enough to make it even a semi-regular section. I should elaborate a bit before you get to it. This letter wasn’t really a “letter to the editor” but rather a letter to you — my fellow students — and as it shares my own editorial thoughts on the matter being discussed, I thought it right to de-

“I love coming to class. I love sitting in lecture and listening to the professor speak. I enjoy participating in hands-on exercises. I love hearing your perspectives and insights. I have gotten to know a number of you and I quite enjoy your company. “Unfortunately, the things that I love about coming to class are often ruined by the inconsiderate actions of others. “To all my classmates who deem it necessary to chat online for the entirety of class, at least try typing quietly. The noise of you hammering away on the keyboard is not helping me absorb the professor’s lecture. It’s actually giving me a headache. If you

would rather spend class time chatting online, I have a suggestion for you: stay at home. Don’t disturb my learning experience. Don’t disturb the learning experience of any of your classmates. I won’t speak for anyone else, but I will venture a guess that they don’t appreciate inconsiderate individuals interfering with their learning experience. “I realize that some students take notes using Microsoft Word; that is acceptable. But when I see you talking to friends on your social media page, that is where my tolerance ends. “To all my classmates who would rather watch YouTube videos while classmates give presentations, don’t be rude. Your classmates gave you their undivided attention when you nervously stumbled through your presentation. The least you can do is show the same respect that your classmates gave to you. It’s just common courtesy. “To all my classmates who would rather have their own individual discussion rather than participate in the group discussion, please choose to gossip on your own time. I appreciate chatting with friends, in fact I love talking with my friends. My issue is

that I do not appreciate it when your chat time interferes with class discussion. “When I have difficulty hearing the class discussion because you are having a loud and unrelated personal chat, there is a problem. “In conclusion, all that I am asking for is a little respect for our shared learning environment. I probably sound like a grumpy, old, high-strung keener, and feel free to think of me in that way if you wish. All I want is a classroom learning experience free of distractions and interruptions where fellow students respect one another. I don’t think that should be too much to ask. “See you in class. “Sincerely, “Eager but frustrated in 3rdyear” Dear “Eager but Frustrated,” I hear you, my friend. These people — while I’m sure they know somewhere inside themselves that they are annoying the people around them and simply do not care — clearly don’t understand that it’s not only their own educational goals that they are hindering with their selfentitled and arrogant behaviour,

but the goals of others who are attempting to better themselves in attending a post-secondary institution, as well. If they did know that, they would obviously cease these actions, right? Because knowing you’re annoying (and not caring enough about people to spare them your presence) is one thing — being a hindrance to others’ development is quite another. So to them I say this: Now you know this is what you are. Go home and play your Facebook games and Skype with your girlfriend. Because it’s obviously more important than your own development as an academic — and we’ve already established that you’re more important than anyone else. If anyone else wants to chime in on this topic, head over to theomega.ca and comment on this piece (won’t likely be up until evening sometime), check out our new Facebook page and drop us a line there, or follow us on Twitter @TRU_Omega Or, as always, you can drop me a line at: editorofomega@gmail.com.

Get off my bus

Sport is a cruel mistress sometimes: Someone has to take a tribute to Tyler Lowey Sports can sometimes deal the cru- sports. We also both cheered for Calgary ellest blows to people’s careers and no matter how bad things looked for lives. them. That’s the way it sometimes goes. We were in Carlos O’Bryans and That’s why we play and why we we talked sports for an hour. watch. He said he was inClichés like “what terested in helping lies ahead” and “any me with broadcasting given Sunday” nevWolf Pack basketball er tire in the sports and volleyball games world, because they and I was stoked. are constantly appliWe then talked cable. about the MLB playOn any given Sunoffs. day, a life can be I told him the Deturned upside down. troit Tigers had the Sunday, Oct. 9, right stuff to win a wearing the TRU World Series. Wolf Pack uniform He didn’t agree and with pride, Tyler now the Tigers are Lowey was at bat, out. I should have lisfacing a pitcher from tened to him. the Douglas RoyWhen I returned als in an exhibition from the Thanksgivgame. Nate’s News ing weekend to hear The pitch came towhat had happened; I wards him – a high Nathan Crosby felt completely sad for fastball – and he Sports Editor Tyler. wanted a piece of it. He is a thoughtful He swung and the ball fouled off the bat and it hit his and intelligent guy, why did this have to happen to him? face, smashing his right eye. That’s sports. An inch to the left or He will have one eye for the rest right and history can be re-written. of his life. Without a doubt in my mind, or As a result, Lowey will have a others who know Tyler, such as his glass eye surgically placed. The injury has forced him to leave teammates, classmates, teachers, school for the year, after just starting coaches and family, we know he will his third year in the bachelor of jour- get through this harsh accident and come out on top. I look forward to nalism program. I was lucky to meet Tyler right be- hearing Tyler’s name one day in the sports reporting business. fore the incident. I know he will come back to TRU Him being a third year journalism student and me being a fourth year, and finish the Journalism program I was happy to meet someone like and still be one hell of a ballplayer. We’re rooting for ya, Ty. Tyler who shared my enthusiasm for

transit riders down a peg Darcy Ropchan

The Gateway (U of A) EDMONTON (CUP) — People who ride the bus think they’re so important. They listen to music at levels more appropriate for space shuttle launches, they talk at comparable decibels and they act like they own the place. Someone has to take them down a peg. That’s why, the second after I graduate, I’m applying to be a bus driver. I want to make a difference in my community. I may not be as nice, cheerful and helpful as the bus drivers that you’re accustomed to, but my buses will run quickly and efficiently. Since I’m the pilot of this loser cruiser, it is literally my way or the highway. Don’t like my laws? Walk, or wait 20 minutes for the next bus. My first rule is that I don’t stop. That doesn’t mean I won’t pick you up or drop you off, but in order to run at maximum efficiency, I’ll have to make rolling stops. Sorry, grandma: you’re going to have to push that walker a little faster if you want to get on this bus. This also means you’ll have to jump when you want to get off. Make sure to tuck and roll; I wouldn’t want my passengers to get hurt. My second law — no talking. No talking to me, no talking to your friends, no talking on your cell phone. No talking, period. People talk too much these days. The last thing I need to hear at 8 a.m. while I’m hungover and trying to steer the bus are the shrill voices of people yakking about pointless bullshit. I need to concentrate on the road. I’m the only one who can talk, and only so I can yell at other vehicles or passengers on my bus. The third rule is the most important: there’s no music allowed on my bus. It’s not that I hate all music.

I just hate your music. And my tastes are better than yours. In the wider system, every time you get on a bus you hear someone’s crappy music blasting out of their headphones. The volume is dangerous for those people’s ears and it makes the trip unpleasant for the other passengers. To make the ride more enjoyable, I’ll have my tunes playing out of the speakers on the bus. That way my passengers can be exposed to some good music for once. I hope my arts degree will make me qualified enough to meet the meticulous standards for bus drivers. Not just anyone can do it, you know. I know my rules may seem severe, but I promise they’re fair. People need limits, and after a couple trips with me, you’ll wonder how you ever got along without them. You’ll probably want to shake my hand and thank me for making the bus a better place. But remember, there’s no talking allowed.

The BCTransit bus on campus last month encouraging being environmentally friendly doesn’t really represent the attitude of the people you have to deal with when you ride. —Mike Davies


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October 19, 2011

THE

MEGA

www.theomega.ca

October 12, 2011

Volume 21, Issue 7

Published since November 27, 1991

editorialstaff EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Mike Davies

editorofomega@gmail.com/250-372-1272 BUSINESS MANAGER Natasha Slack

managerofomega@gmail.com 250-372-1272 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

Cory Hope

SPORTS EDITOR

Nathan Crosby Copy Editor

Larkin Schmiedl Photo Editor

Cory Hope News Editor

Brendan Kergin

omegacontributors Darcy Ropichan, Marvin Beatty, Trevor Chalifour, Jenny Lu, Lee Richardson

publishingboard

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF * Mike Davies BUSINESS MGR * Natasha Slack INDUSTRY REP * Mike Youds FACULTY REP * Charles Hays STUDENT REP* Sadie Cox

letterspolicy

Literary and visual submissions are welcomed. All submissions are subject to editing for brevity, taste and legality. The Omega will attempt to publish each letter received, barring time and space constraints. The editor will take care not to change the intention or tone of submissions, but will not publish material deemed to exhibit sexism, racism or homophobia. Letters for publication must include the writer’s name (for publication) and contact details (not for publication). The Omega reserves the right not to publish any letter or submitted material. Opinions expressed in the Letters & Opinion section do not represent those of The Omega, the Cariboo Student Newspaper Society, its Board of Directors or its staff. Opinions belong only to those who have signed them.

copyright

All material in this publication is copyright The Omega and may not be reproduced without the expressed consent of the publisher. All unsolicited submissions become copyright Omega 2010.

News Social movement comes to Kamloops

“Occupy Kamloops” supporters take to Victoria Street Marvin Beatty

Omega Contributor “Occupy Kamloops” is touted as a peaceful social movement in solidarity with “Occupy Wall Street.” It was scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. on a cool, crisp morning last Saturday Oct. 15 in front of the Kamloops Public Library on Victoria Street. As of 10:45 a.m. a small white f lag was the only visible sign of the demonstration. The lone sentinel holding the f lag aloft was Daniel Herman, a TRU psychology student. Others had apparently arrived earlier than Herman, but decided to search for cardboard to make signs. This low-key start was perhaps a bit unexpected, given that just two hours earlier the Facebook page promoting the demonstration had 168 “Likes” and over 360 “People talking about this.” But then, social movements have never been predictable. Over the next half-hour, participants began to trickle in as diverse as the autumn leaves dancing across the sidewalk. College students appeared with signs promoting peace, climate and employment issues. Older couples and small groups joined together, voicing their opinions on the widening gap between the rich and poor. One man wore a sign calling for the demise of the Canadian Wheat Board, while others sat, crosslegged, quietly taking it all in. Despite the apparent lack of any coherent agenda, one thing was clear: all were there to align themselves with the efforts of those

participating in “Occupy Wall signals and the “public voice” or minutes. At 11:40 Donovan Cavers, a canStreet,” “Occupy Canada” and “human microphone”: measures other “Occupy” movements taking designed to try and overcome the didate for the upcoming City of Kamloops council election, made need for sound equipment. place across the world. A public address system was one a brief 15-minute appearance but These events, initiated by the Canadian-based Adbusters, are of the first things suggested when did not speak. When asked of his reasons for designed to bring people togeth- the crowd began to merge but was er to discuss concerns, generate quickly voted down given the size attending, he simply said he “just came to check it out.” consensus and build a movement of this particular gathering. By noon about 70 that may usher in new people had converged, financial and social far short of the apparmodels. ent interest indicated “There is too much on Facebook. power in the hands of Someone in the too few people,” Hercrowd began a discusman said. sion of moving to anSeemingly in agreeother area that would ment was 42-year-old be more easily occuCam MacQuarrie, pied for a longer pewho raised a large sign riod of time. above his head that The ensuing debate read “Greed Kills.” resulted in the majorMacQuarrie believes ity deciding to begin like many gathered, marching and chantthat the corporate elite ing through downare taking too much of town. the world’s wealth. With the assembly While he was unsure now somewhat fracof staying on scene tured, the gathered all day to support the media also began to cause, he feels it’s important to participate —Daniel Herman, “Occupy Kamloops” supporter divide. At 4 p.m. fewer than and send a message 10 occupiers remained of solidarity to those in front of the library. struggling to make At 10:16 p.m. the Occupy KamBy 11:30 a growing slate of ends meet. The mixed demographics were speakers were taking turns dis- loops Facebook page showed an update that seven people planned not surprising to 22-year-old TRU cussing various issues. Some received respectful hand to continue the occupation overinternational student Gemma signals of support, while oth- night at Spirit Square. Benet-Navarro. At 11:45 p.m. the @occupyka“Lots of ages are representa- ers were simply shouted down by tive of this movement,” she said, those they intended to generate mloops Twitter account had garnered the support of 24 followers “Let’s talk, step-by-step on mak- support from. At 11:32 someone yelled, but had only tweeted once. ing things better.” Day one of Occupy Kamloops By 11:15 a.m. approximately “We’ve got company!” as two 30 people were in attendance and uniformed members of the RCMP left participants and observers pondering what was achieved and a gentleman rose to explain how walked past. The officers brief ly spoke to a what day two might bring. “general assemblies” of this type All we really know at this point lone security guard at the entrance usually operate. Topics included the use of hand to the library but were gone within was that it was indeed peaceful.

“There

is too much power in the hands of too few people.”

Cariboo Student Newspaper Society (Publisher of The Omega) TRU Campus House #2 Box 3010, Kamloops, B.C. V2C 5N3 Phone: (250)372-1272 E-mail: editorofomega@gmail.com Ad Enquiries: managerofomega@gmail. com (Correspondence not intended for publication should be labelled as such.)

Want to get involved in covering campus news? Apply to contribute to the Omega.

The gathering at the “Occupy Kamloops” event was a peaceful one. There was even a poll taken about whether they should have voice amplification. Clearly the “Occupy” issue is not as agressive here as it is in some regions, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t an important discussion. —Marvin Beatty


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October 19, 2011

Life & Community Rejuvenate with Nutrition Trevor Chalifour Omega Contributor

Oh, university life: party, drink, study, read, read some more, then party again, and terror cram. Many have learned this from previous years at university, and most know what comes with the gig. With age comes many added stresses, and eating healthy and regularly are two simple ways to increase energy and lose some unnecessary weight without having to change the way you live. Aging students like most others struggle from fat and cholesterol complications. Greg Kozoris, an exercise physiologist and certified strength and conditioning specialist, explains that, “fat intake, sugar intake and carbohydrate intake after hours where you’re not going to utilize those intakes,” are things to avoid. The body relies on two things: nutrition that is being digested from recently eaten foods or drinks and from stored nutrition or unhealthy stores like fat. “Fresh is always best,” said Kozoris, “things like whole grains, vegetables sliced up, anything non-processed.” Most people think that not eating a meal equals more stored energy used. But by starving oneself of nutrition the body will trigger your system to use little amounts of energy, becoming generally slower and sleepier. The body will try to compensate and hoard enough food to last until it receives more nutrition. With irregular eating patterns the body can only do so much. Since it does not know when it will be fed next, this process continues. Starving oneself or depriving the body of nutrition is counter-productive in losing weight. The idea is to consume small amounts of food more frequently so the body will not need to store energy. Kozoris suggests four small meals a day is best and if attending class or on the go, that people try to “bring something from home.” Most people’s solution to their lack of nutrition is to fill the void with another stimulant like coffee or other caffeinated products.

Community Calendar Wednesday, Oct. 19 -Heroes Live Concert Series. Show starts 8 p.m. $5 Dollars cover.

Fresh vegetables and other non-processed foods are the most easily digested ones and are therefore more beneficial for regulating intake (or prducing weight loss) than eating nothing at all. (Photo coutesy of Wikimedia Commons)

Kozoris said caffeine “suppresses hunger” and creates awareness of the body and mind but doesn’t allow for proper nutrition. “One caffeine drink a day” is generally a rule according to Kozoris.

some type of nutritious food that will deliver the body natural nutrition like vitamins, minerals and other types of healthy supplements the body needs is a better choice than coffee. “Kick start the metabolic rate so your basal metabolic rate, burning calories at rest, is a lot higher,” said Kozoris. Food in the mor ning is the best way to wake up the metabolic system, for without food the system acts like it would if someone were asleep or star ving. The body will bur n less fat and rely on a smaller amount of energy causing the body to str uggle from insuff icient nutrition. Mor ning is not a good time for someone to cover his or her restlessness with a caffeinated product--remember healthy foods f irst and last. Consume healthy foods regularly to avoid large time gaps between meals where the body can store food. Consistent eating patter ns will eliminate the need for fat deposits. Keep that basal metabolic rate going and lose fat while you lear n!

“h y d r a t e w i t h t wo t o th ree lit res [of w a t e r] a d a y.”

—Greg Kozoris He says to make sure to “hydrate with two to three litres [of water] a day to f lush the system.” Choosing a piece of fruit or

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and get your events to us so we can See all this empty space share them with the in the events people who calendar? There’s no might attend. way that there’s editorofomega@ nothing gmail.com happening this week, Seriously, this is but you ridiculous. didn’t tell can you us about it, How possibly expect so we can’t people to come your event if tell everyone to you don’t even else. tell them it’s Hopefully happening? you learn from this


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 7

News

Report calls for drastic changes to Canadian education system Lee Richardson

CUP Ontario Bureau Chief TORONTO (CUP) – Canada’s entire education system is need of restructuring, according to a new report. Released Oct. 11 by the Canadian Council on Learning, the report says that without a national regulatory committee, Canada’s education system will decline, leading to a loss of economic productivity and innovation. “They talk about the dysfunctionality of post-secondary education,” said Glen Jones, a professor at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. “There are some criticisms and some of them are valid, but I think it’s going too far to say that it’s dysfunctional.” The report is likely to be the final paper released by the CCL, which is set to close in spring 2012 after federal funding for the national learning organization was withdrawn by the Harper government last year. “Some of the comments are made with greater vitriol than have been made in the past,” said Jones. “But that doesn’t mean that they don’t say some important things.” While acknowledging high participation rates in post-secondary education and praising Canada’s teaching staff and generally well-educated population, the report “What is the Future of Learning in Canada?” criticizes the lack of a federal body that sets national goals in terms in education. Currently, education issues are handled by individual provincial and territorial governments. “The principal cause of the unacceptable and deeply troubling state of affairs is that our governments have failed to

work together to develop the necessary policies and failed to exhibit the required collective political leadership,” stated the report. Another criticism revolves around research and development becoming a priority of universities, which then often move away from delivering a comprehensive education in favour of aiming to gain research funding from the federal government “We have a higher education system where there are very strong incentives for faculty to attempt to become great researchers, but there are not as many incentives for individual faculty, or the university as a whole to focus on the quality of undergraduate teaching,” said Ryerson politics professor David Trick, who has co-authored the book Academic Reform. “It’s almost as though high-quality teaching has become sort of a token aspect of our universities, a token area that we need to reward rather than something that is as celebrated as research,” said Meaghan Coker, a University of Toronto public policy and governance master’s student. “That small example is one of many that indicates the imbalance between research and teaching.” While some universities in provinces like British Columbia and Alberta operate under different models, some of which put an emphasis on teaching, provinces such as Ontario have switched entirely to a university model that concentrates on advancing research.

SEE

Education PAGE 9


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October 19, 2011

Arts & Entertainment

The Crazy 88 Takes on Heroes Mike Davies Editor-in-Chief

Joey Jack, a local – let’s call him a personality – has a new band. Anyone who was ever lucky enough to see the Sleeveless Tease in concert will know the charisma and atmosphere that Jack gives off behind a microphone is enthralling, and though the big-band feel that was the sound of saxophones and trumpets with driving bass lines and the amazing vocal attributes of the female singers that were until recently a part of the group are missing from their new venture, The Crazy 88 has a show that you should definitely check out if you get a chance. Jack realizes the new band will take some adjustment time before they are as tight-knit and clean-sounding as the Sleeveless Tease was. “This band is under three months old and we have kinks we’re still working out, but we’re really happy to have this new project and are looking forward to honing the sound,” he

said. The new sound might be missing a female voice and a saxophone, and it could certainly do without the new keyboard player behind a microphone trying to be a vocalist when they already has a perfectly good one in their frontman – but I have a feeling it will come together and be a local band that you will see around town and appreciate when you do. The talent of not only Jack as the focus that he will always attract (even when he tries to defer), but also their lead guitar/trumpet player, Percy Folkard—who by the way is an outstanding example of overall musical talent — and the unquestionable drum skills of Jamie Abate make this a band worth seeing. Your next chance to check them out is at the Music Makes Meals fundraiser on Nov. 10 at The Blue Grotto where you can enjoy the music and support the Kamloops Food Bank at the same time.

The Crazy 88 play Heroes on Oct. 12. You should check them out and help your community at the same time on Nov. 10 for the Music Makes Meals fundraiser —Mike Davies

Want to get involved in covering campus news? Apply to contribute to the Omega. editorofomega@ gmail.com “Are you doing as well in your (SL) Leaders work with students courses this semester as you had registered in a set of courses that we know are particularly diffihoped?” I ask this of many students cult. Each SL Leader taken one of I meet these days, particularly these courses before and received those in their first year. Most look down at their feet, an A or A+. They are trained to help stushuffle them self-consciously, dents currently registered in and answer “no.” Indeed, most students’ grades those course learn how to sucdrop when they enter their first ceed. They help stuyear of univerdents work in sity. groups to learn Some studies the material find that stuand excel at exdents’ grades ams and assignin their first sements. mester are a full Check out 10% below the the SL website grades they reat www.tru.ca/ ceived in Grade sl to see if your 12. courses are supThere is a lot ported by SL. to learn about Christine Adam If you don’t how to learn in find your course university. Dean of Students there, be sure to The week is divided into different chunks of check out the Writing and Math time, the textbooks are heavier Help Centres on the second floor (both in weight and content), the of the House of Learning. There’s another set of tutoring classrooms are bigger, and the assupports there to help you move signments are more difficult. When I think back on my first those grades back up to where Thanksgiving weekend after you expected them to be. starting university, I remember wishing I could rub a little vessel Christine Adam, TRU’s dean and have a tutoring genie emerge of students, writes a weekly colto help me figure it all out. It turns out that we have a dedi- umn on topics of interest to TRU cated group of such genies here students. You can find her in person in 1631 Old Main and follow at TRU. The Supplemental Learning her on Twitter @trudeanstudent

From the

d e a n ’s desk


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The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 7

Arts & Entertainment

Omega Expeditionary Force presents: MacArthur Island Park Cory Hope

Arts and Entertainment Editor I go back and forth as to whether or not I believe that MacArthur Island Park is actually an island, but it is definitely one hell of a park. Found on the North Shore of Kamloops, it houses areas for more recreational activities than most places I can think of — from lawn bowling to a beautiful skateboard park to the occasional gun show held in the main building. My disbelief in the concept of MacArthur Island being an island stems from its complete lack of being separated from the main body of Kamloops by a body of water--which is to me the definition of an island. When asked about it, the dictionary application on my Mac had this to say about its idea of an island: Noun: 1. a piece of land surrounded by water. 2. a thing resembling an island, esp. in being isolated, detached, or surrounded in some way: the university is the last island of democracy in this country. 3. a freestanding kitchen cupboard unit with a countertop, allowing access from all sides. I’m reasonably sure that the freestanding kitchen cupboard definition could have been left out of this equation, but as the arts and entertainment editor of the Omega, I feel it is my job to report to you things exactly as I found them. I also thought it was funny. MacArthur Island Park is less like an island and more like a moody peninsula that sometimes finds itself detached from the

mainland. Perhaps MacArthur Island and Kamloops find themselves in a seasonal fit of relationship trouble which they try to resolve by a trial separation. Or maybe it was named when it was discovered and that just happened to be at a time when the water level was high enough that it was separated. Imagine reporting back to your boss, saying, “We have found an island and named it after you,” only to be beheaded once your boss came to have a look at it and thought you were making fun of him. I haven’t counted how many holes of golf are available there. Nor have I counted the soccer and baseball fields. For such a small place it seems to go on for miles, and they even left room for wildlife. I’ve seen several large deer in the area, some of which almost ran through the skateboard park. I’m certain that there would have been some feelings of regret had they run through, although I’m not sure if it would have been the deer or the skateboarders that felt it. There’s also a walking/jogging/ biking path that goes around the park, and if you happen to be around N 50˚ 41’ 34.3”, W 120˚ 22’ 32.0” and find a piece of f lagging tape, you may have just won yourself a little something. Of course, you’ll have to email me at cory.hope@gmail.com and let me know what the message on the f lagging tape says. Please don’t remove the tape from where you found it. I’m going to get out there and remove them myself after about a week to avoid the litter, but it’s not fair (or fun) for others to go out to find the geocache without having something to look for.

The students’ residence as seen from MacArthur Island Park. Yes, it’s that easy to find, and if you find this view at MacArthur Island Park first you will win the Omega’s weekly prize. —Cory Hope

If The Matadors played and nobody was there to hear it, would it still have ruled? Cory Hope

Arts and Entertainment Editor Three Canadian rockabilly bands played at Pogue Mahone on Wednesday, Oct. 12 giving an outstanding performance to a crowd that barely outnumbered the band members. “Butch Haller and His Chesterfield Ramblers” were the first to take the stage. Butch, I was told when I walked into the bar, was the oldest living rockabilly performer still hitting the stage. This turned out to be not entirely true. Butch himself is actually Joel “Hooch” Parkins, the frontman for The Matadors, wearing a mask I am close to being ashamed to admit I completely bought into. Perhaps I just couldn’t see how the lips weren’t moving properly from where I was, or maybe I just really wanted to believe what I was told I would be seeing. No matter what though, Joel has his act down. Much like The Matadors (as can be expected when they’re the exact same band) Butch Haller is part stand-up comedy routine and part

rockabilly act hailing from EdGo-Go,” to name a few. rockabilly extravaganza. The songs are beautifully cov- monton. Where the main difference comes Between Paul from The Ignitered, and entertaining beyond belief in is the songs they play. ers on vocals and Greg on the upWhile The Matadors have sev- to watch. right bass, there eral albums is enough energy of original coming off the tunes, Butch stage to appease Haller and His anyone who might Chester f ield have been missing Ramblers have the standup comtaken over the edy routine in bejob of being the tween songs that cover band that Butch had brought The Matadors to the evening. started off as in And then, of 1995. course, there were Before alThe Matadors. most every Not to be outone of the done by himself songs they as his opening act played, Butch Joel came back to would make the stage wearing the claim that only his shoes, he had origisunglasses and nally written it boxer shorts; the long ago, and Butch Haller is only as old as he feels on the inside, ad it latter dangling a that the songs shows in his performance. —Cory Hope large fake penis had been stowhich he proceedlen from them. ed to play with for He would then After Butch Haller it was the a good portion of the show. burst into rockabilly-ballad versions The Matadors schtick involved of “Karma Chameleon” by Culture Preying Saints’ turn to take the Joel routinely grabbing the wrong Club, “Creep” by Radiohead, or stage. They are a more straightforward whammy bar while he was playing. Wham’s “Wake Me Up Before You

Of course, The Matadors aren’t known simply for their ability to make the audience and each other laugh (I don’t even know how they could continue to play, they were laughing so hard at times), but also for playing really solid original rockabilly tunes even when it appears that they’re not playing for anyone. Unfortunately acts like The Matadors stand a good chance of not being booked in town for very much longer, as the Kamloops crowds don’t seem to make it out to enough of the shows. In fact this is the fourth show I had attended since the summer that failed to produce a crowd significantly larger than the combined number of the band members that showed up to play. Perhaps it’s merely a problem of insufficient advertising on behalf of the promoter or the venue, or maybe it’s an unfortunate matter of rockabilly being a dying scene in the Kamloops area. Who knows? What can be said for sure is that unless you were one of the 10 or so people in Pogue Mahone that night, you missed one hell of a show.


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October 19, 2011

Arts & Entertainment Gender equality not present in video game industry

Females just as interested in gaming: study Jenny Lu

The Martlet (UVic) MONTREAL (CUP) — I grew up playing Goldeneye and Super Mario Brothers, and, as a result, gained a small modicum of video gaming skills. Though I enjoyed gaming, I was reluctant to admit to it, since I knew it was not a typically female activity. The rarity of women who play, or who will admit to playing, video games is just one reminder of the male domination of the video game industry. The video game industry is comprised of people from many different fields, such as design, music and marketing. About a third of these people come from computer science programs, where graduates are primarily male. Addressing this skewed gender distribution is the subject of a joint research project between the University of Alberta’s faculty of education and its computer science program. Their research involved introducing boys, who had more experience with video games, and girls, who had less, to ScriptEase, a game design program. Their findings show that girls and boys showed equal interest in the program, despite differences in initial experience.

According to Duane Szafron, one of the paper’s researchers, it is important to have more women in the field. He believes that a greater balance between genders is necessary. “The education they experience should be in a context in which they interact with as many women as men,” he said in an email. “This idea also suggests that other kinds of diversity should be present in the university [setting] to match the diversity of the Canadian community with regards to race, religion, etc. “Anytime someone is in a minority population there is a danger that they will be treated differently by the majority and feel that they don’t belong. I believe this is currently the case for women in computing science programs. It is too easy for them to feel that they don’t belong and so too many leave the program for the wrong reasons. In some ways, the minority is self-perpetuating,” Szafron continued. But there are many up and coming women within the gaming industry. Judy Truong is a project manager in the Technology Group at Ubisoft, a video and computer game company with a development studio in Montreal. Truong said that any female engineer, not just in those in the video game industry, will face male-dom-

inated environments. However, she explained that what drew her to the industry was that “the video game industry is so up-and-coming; there’s design, marketing and computer science aspects; there’s just a lot of possibilities.” Szafron’s research also confirms that for many women, the lure of video games is not the enjoyment derived from playing the games, but rather the design and creation aspects of the industry. However, according to Truong, “Many women don’t know about the industry unless they have been exposed to video games, which is not as common for women.” For Truong, who is an occasional gamer, video games were not something foreign nor unfamiliar. But even with this prior exposure, she was still surprised by the breadth of the industry. For many women, it seems that this lack of information deters those who would, if made aware of the different disciplines involved, be interested in the design of these games. Szafron and Truong agree that the best way to increase the number of women in computer science is through a change in curriculum. Currently, high school computer science curricula are much less developed than those of other sciences, such as physics, biology and

ILLUSTRATION BY Amina Batyreva/The McGill Daily

chemistry, and vary widely from school to school. Additionally, many universities do not allow computer science to be used for entrance credits. This means that computer science can be an afterthought for many students in high school, resulting in misconceptions about the discipline. However, Szafron believes these problems can be solved by implementing a course that centres around game design, where students work in project groups to create a game. “They learn computer science

and programming concepts while they are working on it, but they have a concrete creative goal and they can discuss the artifact that they are working on throughout the term,” he said. Truong agrees and suggested introducing more three-dimensional design and computer science-specific courses that could be beneficial for all streams of engineering. Perhaps the day will come when girls in video games won’t only bring to mind those of the animated variety.


9

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 7

News Education system report.... CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3 “We’ve often talked about finding balance between the two,” said Ontario Undergraduate Student Alliance president Sean Madden. “Several of our policies are on quality of education, specifically advocating for quality of teaching, transparent teaching and teaching development to become a larger part in a professor’s professional career progression.” According to Jones, however, the major problem with Canada’s education system is a lack of available relevant data, which is needed before changes in policy can be achieved. “We are behind many of our peers, and by that I mean many other Western developed countries that have much better data about how their educational system is going,” said Jones, who added that the amount of data the government has regarding its education system is not enough to develop effective policy analysis at the provincial and territorial level. “We need to know more about post-secondary education,” said Jones. “But it’s difficult to deal with because there [are] very few political advantages in investing in data.” While the report calls for the formation of a national body to reform the country’s system, Jones states that apart from a need for the federals to collect more information about the national educational infrastructure, such a reform might not be necessary. “Many of the problems involve issues that can be done at the provincial level or territorial level, so I agree with the problems — I guess I disagree with their solutions,” Jones said. “But I think people have to take a step back and realize that in order to get policies that work, you really do need to make that investment in data and the public infrastructure that collects this information and allows for that analysis, and then you can have an informed public policy debate.”

On March 31, 2005 the Thompson Rivers University Act created

NEW OMEGA SOCIAL MEDIA! Twitter:

@TRU_OMEGA Keep up to date with what we’re doing, or talk directly at us....if email isn’t you’re thing

three governing bodies for TRU: the Board, the Senate, and the Planning Council for Open Learning. Please see the ‘TRU Board, Senate & Planning Council Election Procedures’ document dated January 25, 2010 for details. It is available on the TRU web site at tru.ca. Search on ‘Elections’

The positions on the three governing bodies which need to be filled through the election process are as follows: Nominations: All candidates for election must be nominated in writing by three individuals eligible to vote in the election for the candidate. Nomination forms are available on-line at tru.ca. Search on ‘Elections’.

Board Employees: (One) Employee elected by and from the employees of the university who are not TRU faculty members (3 year term)

Faculty: (Two) Faculty members elected by and from all of the TRU faculty members (3 year term)

Students: (Two) Students nominated from students who are members of the TRU Student Union but elected by all TRU & TRU-OL students (1 year term)

Senate Faculty: (Two) Faculty members for each faculty or school elected by faculty members of that faculty or school (3 year term)

The five faculties and schools for purposes of these Fall elections are: Faculty of Arts, School of Business & Economics, Faculty of Law, School of Nursing, School of Tourism. Note: Under section 8(2)(g) of the TRU Act, only members of the above faculties and schools are eligible to vote for, and be elected as, faculty representatives on Senate in the Fall election. Representatives from the other faculties and schools were elected in the Winter election. Faculty members at the Williams Lake Campus will vote with the faculty or school with which they are most closely aligned. Non-instructional faculty who do not report to a faculty or school can be nominated and vote as part of the employee position on the Board and the support staff position on Senate.

Students: (Four) Students nominated from and elected by TRU & TRU-OL students (1 year term)

Support Staff: (Two) Support staff, elected by the support staff (3 year term) Teaching Staff Open Learning: (Four) Members from the teaching staff in the Open Learning Division, elected by members of the teaching staff in the Open Learning Division (3 year term)

Planning Council for Open Learning

Puzzle of the Week #6 – Prime Plus Mycredit unionchargesinterestonsomeloansatprimeplus5%. Suppose that the prime interest rate in percent is a prime number. Obviously, prime plus 5 is not the prime interest rate. Almost always, it is not a prime number either. Why is this? What is the exception? This contest is sponsored by the Mathematics and Statistics department. The full-time student with the best score at the end of the year will win a prize. Please submit your solution (not just the answer but also why) by noon next Wednesday to Gene Wirchenko <genew@ocis.net>. Submissions by others are also welcome. The solution will be posted the Wednesday after that in the Math Centre (HL210A). Come visit: we are friendly.

Students: (One) Student nominated from TRU-OL students and elected by both TRU and TRU-OL students (1 year term)

Teaching Staff Open Learning: (Two) Members from the teaching staff in the Open Learning Division, elected by members of the teaching staff in the Open Learning Division (3 year term)

The timelines for the 2011 elections are as follows:

October 3, 2011 – The Voters’ Lists are available for inspection at the TRU Registrar’s Office in Kamloops and Williams Lake. October 3 to October 24, 2011 – Nomination period: All nomination forms must be submitted to the Registrar by 4:30 p.m. on October 24, 2011. The Registrar will acknowledge receipt of all nomination forms from nominees. November 22 to December 5, 2011 – Voting period for online secret balloting: Voting will close at 4:30 p.m. on December 5, 2011. All online ballots must be submitted and paper ballots received in the Registrar’s Office by the close of voting. No ballots will be accepted by the Registrar after the close of voting. December 9, 2011 – Announcement of results on the TRU website and by e-mail Proposed Meeting Times (subject to change): Board – meets 5 times per year with some additional committee meetings Senate – the fourth Monday of each month, 4:30-6:30 pm, except in July and August Planning Council for Open Learning – meets 2 times per year - dates and times to be determined Meeting Attendance for TRU Employees and Students: Meetings will take place in Kamloops. For those not in Kamloops, teleconferences will be used and in person attendance will be arranged when necessary and appropriate.

Elected representatives will commence their term in office in January 2012. questions and requests for nomination papers: Nomination papers are available on-line at tru.ca (search on Elections), or from the TRU Registrar’s Office: in Kamloops or (Phone: 250-828-5032) or e-mail (lmcabee@tru.ca); for the Williams Lake Campus (Phone: 250-392-8000).


10

October 19, 2011

Coffee Break 4 7 6 2 8 3 3 1 8

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MYLES MELLOR

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“It’s Wet Out Here”

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last week’s answers easy

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Across 1. Brewski 5. Orange juice factor 9. Bow 13. Certain surgeon’s “patient” 14. Celebes beast 15. Anoint 16. Romantic setting 17. Dock 18. Carpentry grooves 19. Come down hard 22. Cleaning cabinet supplies 23. Absorbed, as a cost 24. Yugoslavia, now 28. Plant fuel 32. 86 is a high one 33. Aspersion 35. Not just “a” 36. Pot of gold site? 40. Golf term 41. Quite a stretch (var.) 42. Seize forcibly (old word) 43. Indiana town 46. Finn’s friend 47. 1969 Peace Prize grp. 48. The Amish, e.g. 50. 1952 musical 58. Convex molding 59. Music genre 60. Annul 61. Locks up 62. Fashion 63. Auction cry

64. Bow 65. Increase, with “up” 66. “Trick” joint Down 1. Ado 2. “Major” animal 3. Kosher ___ 4. Caught in the act 5. Yellow fruit 6. Bind 7. Fertile soil 8. Legal prefix 9. Wreath for the head 10. Completely fix 11. Blockage 12. Pianist, Dame Myra 15. Build on 20. Precipice 21. Lagos currency 24. Hex 25. “It’s a Wonderful Life” role 26. Isuzu model 27. “You stink!” 28. Make, as a CD 29. Cornered 30. Treat rudely, in a way 31. Ratty place 33. Abandon 34. “Seinfeld” uncle 37. Claw 38. About to explode

39. “What’s ___?” 44. Pooh’s pal 45. Hodgepodges 46. Drag 48. Condescending one 49. Chopin piece 50. Hit 51. “Terrible” czar 52. Canceled 53. Doctrines 54. Dry biscuit 55. Soon, to a bard 56. Doing nothing 57. Central point

last week’s answers S O R B E T

A H A A P T

A G O U T I

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K E E L D E T A E T A R C H Y A H S E M S S I S H O M L O N E E R I L I N C T

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Anyone notice anything strange about the sudoku? Email editorofomega@gmailcom and tell me about it.

L O O N B O A N R E I D L O R M O L U

W E E N E D


11

The Omega · Volume 21, Issue 7

Sports

Find your personal “why?” Nathan Crosby Sports Editor

The only Canadian to win an Olympic medal and a Grey Cup came to Kamloops to talk about his “why?” Ask Bob Molle what he thinks is his greatest accomplishment and he won’t say his two Grey Cup rings as an offensive lineman with the Winnipeg Blue Bombers or an Olympic silver medal in wrestling at the 1984 Summer Games in Los Angeles. He won’t say it was finishing a triathlon and an Ironman competition and publishing his first motivational guidance book; he will say his greatest accomplishment is his family. “My passion has always been about goal-setting,” he said. “People always come to me and ask ‘How do you stay motivated?’ or ‘How do I do this,’ or ‘How do I do that,’ and they are always worried about the ‘how.’ The ‘how’ is the easy part, it should be, ‘Why are you doing it?’” Molle said the philosophy of goalsetting is f lawed because people make that mistake of not knowing why they are doing something.

He is on a Western Canada tour in conjuncture with the release of his new book, Get Comfortable Being Uncomfortable, a book about goal-setting and personal achievement. Molle spoke to an audience at the Kamloops convention centre on Oct. 18, telling his listeners to focus on the “why” instead of the “how” when setting life’s goals. At 6’6, 240 lbs. and with a voice that booms deep enough to split the Earth open, Molle certainly has a presence when he enters a room. But even this giant had to find a ‘why’ if he wanted to achieve his list of goals. “It was recognition or lack thereof. I was upset that I wasn’t recognized in high school in Saskatoon, and I walked out.” Maybe anger was part of Molle’s drive to prove his doubters wrong. He then went to SFU on a football and wrestling scholarship. “My wrestling coach sat me down and said, ‘What are your goals?’ I said, ‘I want an Olympic medal and a Grey Cup.’ He said ‘okay, let’s go.’” By the time he was 24, he had both. Molle got his silver medal in the 100 kg weight class of the 1984 Olympic

wrestling matches, losing in the final to American Bruce Baumgartner. He was part of the 1988 and 1990 Grey Cup champion Winnipeg Blue Bombers — the second time as their captain. Now retired from football, Molle’s ‘why’ is as strong as ever. “I know what my ‘why’ is; I got three kids and they are what I live for,” he said. “I always wanted to experience everything I could in life. “My best man was Steve Rodehutskors. “I won two cups with him, I played beside him. We won the Grey Cup and hugged each other out in the middle of the field like two big bears. “At 43, he passed away with cancer and I thought we’d hang out the rest of our lives.” Rodehutskors’ death made Molle realize there are no guarantees in life and has been driving him since to live his life without worrying about his age. The glory of championship rings and Olympic medals can take people far, but what takes them further is their knowledge and ref lection of why they did it. Molle wants people to just ask themselves “why?”

Former CFLer Bob Molle stopped by the Kamloops Convention Centre on Oct. 18 to share his wisdom with fans old and new. (Photo courtesy of Bob Molle)

WolfPack hockey wins home opener Nathan Crosby Sports Editor

Wolf Pack hockey head coach Don Schulz wanted his players to forget about their two losses in eastern Washington and his team responded with a statement win at their home opener. TRU’s explosive offence held up to a late charge from the Trinity Western Spartans to win 5-3 at the Memorial Arena on Oct. 14. Coach Schulz was happy with his team’s effort and said it was good to get the first win despite giving up a four-goal lead. “We took the foot off the accelerator at the end,” he said. “We got a little complacent after that long power play in the second period and we seemed to lose that sense of urgency, but it was a deserved win and nice to win in front of the home town crowd.” TRU outshot the Spartans 20-13 after the first period and at one point in the second period had a 4-0 lead over the visitors. The Spartans weren’t doing themselves any favours in the penalty box, tallying 43 penalty minutes and giving the Wolf Pack plenty of time to work on their power play. Coach Schulz said he had been preaching to his players since day one about keeping their composure and it gave TRU’s special teams a chance to build chemistry. “Actions speak louder than words, if

they want to chirp, we’ll let the scoreboard do the talking for us,” Schulz said. After weekend play, Jassi Sangha’s seven goals and three assists now lead the team for points. “I didn’t play too well in Washington so I wanted to do more tonight, do the little things and it worked out,” Sangha said. Sangha’s second goal came on a dumping play in the third that was mishandled by the Spartans goaltender. “I don’t know what happened there, Tonello just dumped it in and the goalie was about to cover it and I didn’t know if I was going to slash him or not, I didn’t want to take a penalty. “I poked it, it went in and I was looking at the ref to see if I got a penalty and he signalled a goal.” It was Tonello’s earlier goal in the game that put the ‘Pack up 4-0 that turned out to be the game winner. TRU’s sharp offensive play and the Spartans lack of discipline got the Memorial Arena crowd hyped up. “We love playing in front of our fans, they get riled up and make a lot of noise when we score. “We look forward to our home games,” Sangha said. Riley Wall got the start in net for the Wolf Pack over Shane Mainprize, ending certain speculation of who Schulz was going to turn to for the home opener. Wall stopped 27 of 30 Trinity Western shots. All three goals from the Spartans were

David Gore (Right) and Andrew Fisher (left) celebrate the WolfPack’s second goal of the night. TRU improved to 2-2 on the season with a win at home and on the road against the Trinity Western Spartans. —Nathan Crosby

scored by Trevor Beaupre. Mick Ludvig not only contributed a goal to the evening, but was making highlight real plays, including a toe-drag around a Spartans defenceman that got big ap-

plause from the crowd. The ‘Pack finished the weekend at .500 with a 5-1 road win in Langley over the Spartans the next day, concluding the home and home weekend series.


12

October 19, 2011

TRUSU Membership Advisory Studying for Midterms? • Online Room Bookings • Food & coffee service until 9pm • Private and open study space

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October 19, 2011  

The October 19, 2011 edition ot the Omega

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The October 19, 2011 edition ot the Omega

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