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THENORTHERNLIGHT MAY 25, 2010

FEATURES

09

UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE

Wally Hickel:

Remembering his accomplishments

A&E

12

Craft:

Local beader sells jewelry

WWW.THENORTHERNLIGHT.ORG

OPINION

13

Editorial:

Hold oil companies responsible

Track and Field qualifies Heifer International nine athletes for NCAA’s study tour sends nine students to rural China Rural community members in China share agricultural, economical and social developments with UAA students By Brittany Bennett The Northern Light

PHOTO COURTESY OF KELLEY L COX/GOSEAWOLVES.COM

UAA sophomore Alfred Kangogo in action at the Stanford Invitational March 26 in Palo Alto, Calif. Kangogo was recognized as Most Outstanding Male Performer at the 2010 GNAC Championships. Kangogo will be competing in multiple events at the NCAA Division II Track & Field Championships that will take place May 2729 in Charlotte, NC.

By Taylor Hall The Northern Light

Nine conference titles. 14 All-GNAC performances. Nine GNAC All-Academic selections. Things look pretty good for the Seawolf track and field team, who finished up the GNAC Championships May 14-15 in record fashion. “The team competed very strongly,” TJ Garlatz said, UAA assistant track and field coach. “Obviously, we’re a small team, but we won all the events on the men’s side from the 400m event up, which is pretty phenomenal.” With the NCAA Division II Track and Field Championships coming up May 27-29, the Seawolves will look to be strong contenders in every event. This is because nine athletes (five women and four men) qualified for the NCAA’s and will represent the green and gold in Charlotte, N.C. The Seawolf team is stacked with talent on both the women and men’s squads, but it is the trio of distance runners on the men’s team that has high hopes for a strong showing at the highest level.

Sophomore Alfred Kangogo, junior Marko Cheseto and freshman Micah Chelimo have all helped lead the way for the Seawolves team. The trio helped the men’s team to a fourth place finish at the GNAC Championships. Kangogo won the Most Outstanding Male Performer award during the weekend due to his victories in the 800m (1:54.51) and 1,500m (3:49.03 – GNAC and UAA record), as well as an eighth place in the 5,000m. Add a second place in the 3,000m Steeplechase and it’s easy to see why Kangogo racked up the most points individually in the men’s championships. In that same 5,000m race, Cheseto won the event with a record setting 14:37.18 time. He walked away with a victory in the 10,000m (31:23.03). He also finished runner up to Kangogo in the 1,500m. Garlatz is used to this kind of performance from a runner of Cheseto’s caliber. “He became the first GNAC athlete to break the 14 minute mark. It was the best distance race I’ve ever seen a UAA athlete SEE NCAA PAGE 05

Geography students recently returned from a short-term study abroad to China. Nine students participated in fieldwork to study agricultural development and the environment in locations around China as part of a three-credit geography class. Students elected to enroll in the class, hosting fundraisers, paying out of pocket and taking out loans to cover the $4,200 travel and tuition cost. Students shadowed members of the nonprofit, nongovernmental organization Heifer International, which aims “to work with communities to end hunger and poverty and to care for the earth,” according to the Heifer International website. “Seeing this type of work firsthand was amazing,” Lang Van Dommelen, political science major, said. “Heifer is doing so much to help these people help themselves and their community, and it was very apparent.” The group visited four Heifer International project sites, rural areas that are engaged in agricultural development projects. Heifer International visits these developing communities, identifies their needs and creates an action plan to improve the village’s agriculture techniques. The project plans are actually developed by the community members, with Heifer International as a guide and support. “Heifer International doesn’t come in and lay down the rules. Instead they go in and they help those local villagers develop their own systems of development based on their local values,” Dorn Van Dommelen, chair of the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies,

said. Dorn Van Dommelen and political science professor Mara Kimmel are teaching the course and led the geography students throughout their China trip. Members of the communities showcased their developments made since Heifer International’s contribution and involvement. “In the last village we visited, Shicaoguo, we saw that the more sustainable agriculture allowed for more food the be produced and, thus, more income to flow into the community, which made dramatic differences in the levels of poverty in the village,” Meneka Thiru said, international studies and Spanish major. The students not only gained experience with rural impoverished areas, but also learned about the agricultural techniques used by the communities. “The biogas system… allowed the villagers to harness methane from animal and human waste as cooking and heating fuel through a basic series of tanks,” Lang Van Dommelen said. The organization’s fundamental contribution to these developing communities is livestock, primarily funded by individual donations. It also provides education on the proper care of the livestock, and ensures that the living quarters for these animals are adequate. “On the one level, we’re talking about numbers of animals being added to the villages, but numbers of animals translates into increased income,” Dorn Van Dommelen said. “One of the projects we were in, the annual per capita income was about $95 a year. After Heifer International’s involvement, the incomes went up nearly fourfold.” SEE CHINA PAGE 10

Academic Master Plan outlines goals of UA By Jerzy Shedlock The Northern Light

More is needed than steady academic excellence for a university system to thrive, especially in an institution as dynamic as the University of Alaska. A total of 17 campuses serve Alaskans throughout the state. The state’s financial and political environment is constantly changing. As a result, the creation of an academic strategy is essential to the shifting nature of higher education. The Statewide Academic Council (SAC) and the Research Advisory Council (RAC) of the University of Alaska have recently revised an Academic Master Plan (AMP) in hopes of providing a tactical plan for the future development of UA’s academic programs. It is a document that aims to enhance the university’s management of public and private

resources. The plan was drafted by the SAC and presented to the Board of Regents (BOR) at their December 2008 meeting. The committee was unable to stay within the original schedule developed. The goal is now to have the final version of the AMP submitted to the BOR for action by their December 2010 meeting. “There were a number of drafts that got kicked around,” SAC member John Petraitis said. “After reflecting on the documents the councils decided to change major components. It took awhile to find something that everyone could agree to.” The vision outlined by the AMP states, “(UA) aims to strike a balance between being responsive to changing state needs and cherishing Alaska’s unique SEE AMP PAGE 02


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NEWS| May 25, 2010

AMP: Goals in plan are still in drafting process; retention and cultural awareness to be adressed CONTINUED FROM COVER

cultures; between fostering partnerships with business and industry and pursuing knowledge of artistic creation for their intrinsic worth; and between valuing Alaska for its unique opportunities and celebrating all the nation and world has to offer.” One major goal of the AMP is to increase the retention and graduation rates of students. To achieve this goal, UA will have to deliver developmental education that prepares students to succeed in degree programs so they can reach their educational goals. Alaska has the lowest baccalaureate degree completion, within six years, for first-time full-time baccalaureate-seeking freshmen of any state, according to the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. Only 27 percent of Alaskans ages 25 to 64 have a bachelor’s degree or higher. Thus, the AMP aims to, “develop and implement programs to increase timely graduation rates, including financial aid, advising and academic support.” “There’s no single silver bullet cause for low retention. Basically, a number of students are not fully prepared for college work when they come to the university,” Gary Rice of the Office of Institutional Research at UAA said. “The change of culture, especially for the Alaska Natives coming from rural Alaska to an urban setting, is highly difficult having to adjust

in combination with taking on college level work.” Fortunately, UAA retained an all time high of 68.7 percent of its first-time fulltime students in FY09. The performance was 2 percent above the previous period’s retention rate and 2.7 percent above the FY09 target. UAA anticipates maintaining a 68 percent retention rate into the future. In addition, the AMP aims to develop more academic support and enrichment for students in PK-12 districts or schools with fewer college graduate parents. The university must work with the PK-12 education system in Alaska to increase the number of high school graduates who plan to attend college and have had preparation to do so. The AMP articulates specific criteria that guide decisions regarding the placement of programs on all campuses. Important to the improvement of the UA system is the creation of new programs and augmenting existing programs. A significant mandatory criterion for new or significantly augmented programs is that either the same or similar program does not exist at another location within UA. Doctorate degrees may only be awarded by UAF, with the exception of the clinicalcommunity psychology Ph.D. being awarded jointly by UAA and UAF. “We have to make difficult choices and the Ph.D. programs tend to be far more expensive per student than undergraduate

programs,” Petraitis said. This duplication policy means that students will have to switch to a different UA campus or transfer universities to seek certain degrees. “The university can’t be all things to all

‘It takes a lot to put together a plan like this that people from each one of the campuses can agree to, so there was a number of drafts that got kicked around.’ John Petraitis UAA professor and SAC member

people, so we have to spend our nickels and dimes carefully,” Petraitis said. “However, UAA Faculty Senate has responded to the AMP and has pointed out the current prescription for duplication as maybe being foolish. It is being discussed.” In some instances, replication of

programs is needed, so with ‘sufficient justification,’ it is permitted. Replication is permitted for the education degree and certificate programs. A need for well-prepared teachers exists in every region of Alaska, especially for teachers in remote communities, for special education teachers and for math and science teachers. Students are not involved in the drafting of the AMP, but they are encouraged to comment on the draft that gets circulated. “We certainly want students to respond to it,” Petraitis said. “If students have responses, particularly collectively, like student government, I think they should compile some responses and send it to the SAC.” Students, for the most part, are satisfied with the university’s actions, but a number of them are concerned that the university cannot obtain the vision stated in the AMP. Having attended UAA for two years, criminal justice major Eric Hoffman believes the university lacks the organization to establish connections between the university and businesses, or the initiative to promote Alaska’s heritage and culture. “I would like to see better organization in the university,” Hoffman said. “I feel like nothing is organized at a satisfactory level for the students, and I feel like the university leaves students in the dark too much when it comes to policy.”

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May 25, 2010 | NEWS

TNL

Shell faces several hurdles before drilling in Arctic seas By Dan Joling

The Associated Press

Shell Oil won a court victory in its quest to drill exploratory wells in Arctic waters this summer but still faces several regulatory hurdles, a company spokesman said. Curtis Smith said Thursday the company awaits appeals of required federal air permits before it can send its drilling ship north to the Chukchi and Beaufort seas off Alaska’s northwest and north coast. The company also needs a final Interior Department blessing and authorizations on several wildlife issues. Shell Oil, a unit of Royal Dutch Shell PLC, hopes to drill three exploratory wells in the Chukchi and two in the Beaufort this summer with a 514-foot drilling ship, the Frontier Discoverer. Shell in 2008 spent $2.1 billion for leases in the Chukchi Sea. Chris Krenz, Arctic project manager for Oceana, one of the plaintiffs, said the decision was disappointing in light of the ongoing BP crude oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. “Oil companies have tapped the easy oil off of our coasts,” he said. “They are now pushing the limits and increasing the risk by heading to the deep water of the gulf and the remote and unforgiving Arctic.” He said BP was not ready to deal with an oil spill tragedy in

the gulf, and “Shell will have far fewer resources to contain and address an accident in the Arctic.” Pete Slaiby, Shell Alaska vice president, said the decision again demonstrates that Shell has submitted robust, safe plans for exploration in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas. He said Shell faces several other hurdles before it can drill. “In light of the recent spill in the Gulf of Mexico, we are working hard to identify additional measures that could be incorporated into the program to make it even stronger,” Slaiby said in an e-mail. “That said, this decision is a very large step in the right direction for us.” The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Thursday rejected consolidated lawsuits that challenged Minerals Management Service approval of Shell’s exploratory drilling plans. The expedited ruling followed oral arguments last week in Portland, Ore. The court determined that the MMS met its obligations to consider the potential threat of exploratory drilling to wildlife and the risk for disaster before it approved Shell’s Arctic Ocean projects. The Environmental Protection Agency earlier this year approved clean air permits for Shell to operate its drilling ship in the Chukchi and Beaufort seas.

Alaska Native and conservation groups filed challenges last week, claiming the permits allow the ship and support vessels to emit tons of pollutants, harming Inupiat people and wildlife and contributing to climate change. Smith said drilling this year depends on quick resolution of the appeals by the EPA Environmental Appeals Board without any issues for remand. Drilling also depends, he said in an e-mail response to questions, on Interior Secretary Ken Salazar giving final approval to a revised five-year lease sale plan under which Shell obtained its Chukchi leases. Salazar also must sign off on the company’s application for permit to drill. The application is on hold by for review in light of the Gulf of Mexico spill, Smith said. Shell also needs marine mammal incidental harassment authorizations for whales, seals, polar bears and walrus. Drilling critics on the losing end of the court case are pushing Salazar to halt drilling. “If a blowout does occur in the Arctic, the industry does not have the knowledge or resources to respond effectively to an oil spill in icy conditions let alone to respond to the devastation that it would bring to Alaska Native communities,” Carole Holley said, Pacific Environment’s Alaska program co-director.

Palin speaks at NRA meeting By Mike Baker The Associated Press

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin warned NRA members Friday that President Barack Obama wants to gut the Second Amendment and told a separate gathering that “mama grizzlies” will help Republicans win this November, sweeping away the Democratic agenda. Palin, a potential 2012 presidential candidate, told National Rifle Association members during their annual meeting that the only thing stopping Obama and his Democratic allies from trying to ban guns is political backlash. “Don’t doubt for a minute that, if they thought they could get away with it, they would ban guns and ban ammunition and gut the Second Amendment,” Palin said, a lifelong NRA member who once had a baby shower at a local gun range in Alaska. “It’s the job of all of us at the NRA and its allies to stop them in their tracks.” Palin, the GOP’s 2008 vice presidential nominee, also praised tea party activism as a “beautiful movement,” drawing a rousing applause from thousands of NRA members who gathered in an arena used by the NBA’s Charlotte Bobcats. During an event earlier Friday in Washington, sponsored by an anti-abortion group, she

challenged Republican women to help the GOP “take this country back” and elect anti-abortion lawmakers. She praised female leaders of the tea party movement and invoked the 2008 acceptance speech where she compared herself to a pit bull. “You don’t want to mess with moms who are rising up,” Palin said at the Susan B. Anthony List event. “If you thought pit bulls were tough, you don’t want to mess with mama grizzlies.” Palin said she understood how some women might consider abortion, citing her own experiences as the mother of a child with Down syndrome and the parent of an unwed teen mother. Last year, Palin said that “for a fleeting moment” she considered having an abortion when she learned of her son Trig’s prognosis. But she said Friday that abortion is morally wrong and women should carry a fetus to term. “It may not be the easiest path, but it’s always the right path,” she said. She said Obama is “the most pro-abortion president ever to occupy the White House” and asserted that the health care law would fund abortions. In fact, Obama’s health care law would not allow federal dollars to pay for elective abortions. Catholic hospitals and organizations of

Catholic nuns backed the measure. U.S. Catholic bishops and major anti-abortion groups opposed it, arguing that federal dollars could end up paying for abortions. Stephanie Schriock, president of EMILY’s List, said Palin talks a good game, but her version of what American women want doesn’t honor freedom and independence. She mentioned the Democratic lawmakers whom Palin had targeted for their votes for health care overhaul. “First she puts targets on their back, then she wants the government in their bedrooms — what is Sarah Palin doing to Western women?” Schriock said. EMILY’S List helps candidates who back abortion rights. Palin also criticized the media, singling out their coverage of her daughter Bristol, whose pregnancy was announced days after Palin was named the vice presidential nominee. Bristol Palin is a single mother who works on an abstinence-only campaign. She said some young women would see what happened to Bristol and perhaps be encouraged to seek an abortion instead of facing similar criticism. Palin also said Friday that the United States should continue to drill for oil despite the Gulf spill. She made the comments in an interview with ABC News.

03

SAY WHAT?

California investigating teen strippers PARAMOUNT, Calif. (AP) -- The assistant principal at a California high school has been placed on leave after a campus talent show where male students pranced seductively in underwear and Speedos. The Paramount Unified School District began an investigation after video of the student performances showed up on YouTube and local television news reports. One performer, Christian Dominguez, says he simply wanted to “pump up” the class at Paramount High School. But some parents complained. Superintendent David Verdugo says the performance was inappropriate and the assistant principal who was present has been placed on administrative leave while the district investigates who arranged and managed the acts. No students have been disciplined.

20K pieces of mail end up in Pa. carrier’s garage PHILADELPHIA (AP) -- The United State Postal Service has recovered approximately 20,000 pieces of mail - some of them more than a decade old - from a Philadelphia postal carrier’s garage. Special Agent Scott Balfour says it took three mail trucks to remove the letters. The carrier worked in the city’s Bustleton neighborhood. Balfour says some of the mail dates back to 1997. Postal officials say they recovered the mail on April 28 and it was being delivered to customers this week. Balfour wouldn’t comment on what prompted the investigation but says the carrier hadn’t been to work since February. Postal officials haven’t identified the carrier. Balfour says they’re still trying to find the man so they can question him.

Alligators, snakes, rodents rescued in Milwaukee MILWAUKEE (AP) -- Milwaukee police were called to investigate an alleged sexual assault and stepped into a crime scene crawling - in some cases literally - with hundreds of reptiles including alligators and snakes. Police spokeswoman Anne E. Schwartz says the reptiles and rodents were found in a home and inside a building doubling as a storage facility and residence. The initial discovery was made Wednesday, and officers remained at the scene Thursday. Lt. Paul Felician told WTMJ-TV in Milwaukee at least five anaconda snakes 20 to 30 feet long were found, along with spiders and a chicken. Some animals were stored in containers; others roamed. Officials from nearby zoos, an animal control unit and other agencies helped police. A 50-yearold woman was arrested and could be charged.

Mules will help in radiation survey at LA-area lab LOS ANGELES (AP) -- The Environmental Protection Agency has a new weapon in the fight against radioactive contamination at a Los Angeles-area lab: Mules. The EPA will use four mules to

carry high-tech scanning equipment to detect radiation on steep and rocky terrain at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory. The EPA is conducting a survey of soil and water contamination at the lab near Simi Valley, where rocket engines were tested for years and a partial meltdown of a nuclear reactor took place in 1959. About 500 acres of the lab will be scanned for gamma radiation. Results will be turned over to the state, which is overseeing a cleanup.

Thieves steal Ohio hearse; dump corpse, leave note CLEVELAND (AP) -- A corpse was taken for a ride in Cleveland, then dumped by thieves who stole a crematory’s hearse and abandoned it with a note telling police where to find the body. Police on Wednesday found the woman’s body, in a bag and on a gurney, at the intersection specified in the note. Computer equipment also was taken from the crematory during Wednesday’s break-in. Sgt. Sammy Morris says police are investigating whether the hearse was stolen to haul the gear away. No arrests have been made. Funeral director Jim Murphy says the corpse was unharmed. It was scheduled to be cremated Wednesday. The Greenfield Crematory has apologized to the family. It says it was not unusual for the body to have been left in its vehicle, which was locked inside the building.

Rare ‘King of Herrings’ found off Swedish coast STOCKHOLM (AP) -- A maritime expert says a 12-foot (3.65-meter) Giant Oarfish - the world’s largest bony fish - has been found in Swedish waters for the first time in 130 years. Also known as the “King of Herrings,” the dead fish was picked up by a west coast resident who found it floating near the shore over the weekend. It was handed over to The House of the Sea aquarium in the town of Lysekil, where expert Roger Jansson says it’s being kept pending a decision on what to do with it. Johansson said Wednesday the Giant Oarfish can grow up to 36 feet (11 meters), and is believed to live in deep waters. He says the last recorded discovery in Sweden was in 1879.

Woman accused of forcing son to smoke in ‘lesson’ ELIZABETHTON, Tenn. (AP) -- An East Tennessee woman has been charged with forcing her 5-year-old son to smoke a cigarette. A Carter County deputy told the Johnson City Press that a 24-yearold woman was arrested Tuesday night on charges of child abuse and neglect, disorderly conduct and possession of marijuana. A jail officer said the woman was being held on a $12,500 bond. Jail records did not show if the woman hired a lawyer. Deputy Cory Tidwell said that in response to a complaint by a witness he stopped the woman in a car and she told him she had forced her son to smoke a cigarette because “she was teaching him not to smoke.” Tidwell also said he found a small bag of marijuana in the car. -Compiled by Jerzy Shedlock


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NEWS| May 25, 2010

STATEWIDE BRIEFS

Misleading ads down after state crackdown Suspect storefront advertising on Juneau’s main drag for cruise ship visitors is down this year after a state crackdown. The Juneau Empire reports the tourist season opened with virtually none of the “70 percent off,” ‘’blowout sale” and “clearance” signs prevalent in the past. Assistant Attorney General Cindy Drinkwater said such early-season advertising suggested impossible situations that raised consumer protection concerns. Drinkwater said she’s heard it’s common practice in the Caribbean. “They come here for the summer and they’re not aware of the laws here, but it’s certainly incumbent on business owners to know the law in the places where they’re operating,” she said. Last summer, the state warned businesses to stop unfair and deceptive advertising. It charged two jewelry store owners that didn’t comply. One paid a $50,000 fine; the other is due in court in August. Former Juneau jewelry store owner Tobe Thompson said the unfair practices helped drive her away in 2008. The atmosphere made it tough on businesses using legitimate pricing, she said. “A store that’s not willing to put a fake price on looks overpriced,” she told the Juneau Empire. Thompson now owns a gallery in Santa Cruz, Calif.

3-year-old Alaska boy dies after finding gun Anchorage police say a 3-year-old boy has died after finding a gun and accidentally shooting himself. Police spokeswoman Anita Shell says the father called 911 after 9 a.m. Friday. The father reported the child had taken a gun off a TV stand and shot himself. Shell says investigators were interviewing both the father, the only other person at home at the time of the shooting, and the mother. Crime scene investigators were en route to the home in the 4800 block of Loretta Lane. The child was pronounced dead at the scene. No other information was immediately available.

Alaska Railroad Corp. begins search for CEO The state-owned Alaska Railroad Corp. is taking applications for a new president and CEO. The railroad’s last chief, Pat Gamble, left to head the University of Alaska system. The new chief’s salary will be negotiable. Gamble earned $262,500. Gamble has been on leave from the railroad since April and begins at the university June 1. The railroad position has oversight of about 800 full-time employees, 650 miles of track and a budget that brings in more than $170 million. The application deadline is June 11.

US rig count increases by 14

The number of rigs actively exploring for oil and natural gas in the U.S. increased by 14 this week to 1,506. Houston-based Baker Hughes Inc. said Friday that 951 rigs were exploring for natural gas and 544 for oil. Eleven were listed as miscellaneous. A year ago this week, the rig count stood at 918. Of the major oil- and gasproducing states, Texas gained nine rigs, New Mexico and Oklahoma each gained four and Arkansas, California,

Colorado, Pennsylvania and Wyoming each gained one. Alaska lost two rigs and North Dakota and West Virginia each lost one, while Louisiana was unchanged. The rig count tally peaked at 4,530 in 1981, during the height of the oil boom. The industry posted a record low of 488 in 1999.

Elementary students visit UAA

Wildfire sparked by backfiring snowmachine A backfiring snowmachine ignited a 261-acre wildfire next to the Parks Highway north of Healy. Two Division of Forestry air tankers dropped retardant on the fire to keep it from spreading while more than 100 firefighters from Fairbanks responded. Several helicopters equipped with 320-gallon water buckets also helped slow the advance of the fire. The Parks Highway was closed for about three hours because of poor visibility and firefighters on the road. Alaska Division of Forestry investigator Mike Goyette says the snowmachine was sitting in tall, dry grass and backfired as the owner moved it into storage Wednesday night.

$5 million in aid for Yukon chinook fishermen Sen. Lisa Murkowski says the Appropriations Committee agreed to spend $5 million to help fishermen and communities affected by the failure of the Yukon River chinook salmon fishery. KTUU-TV reports the fishery was closed in 2009 after the 2008 harvest fell 89 percent below the five-year average.

Ice arena being built at Big Lake An ice arena is being built at Big Lake. The Big Lake Recreation and Community Center is expected to provide practice space for Mat-Su hockey teams. Bill Haller of the Big Lake Lion’s Club, which is developing the project, says the building will not be heated and the ice rink will be possible through ambient winter temperatures. Haller says artificial turf could turn the center into a roller-hockey rink in the summer. The Lion’s Club has $650,000 in hand and still needs to raise another $200,000. Haller says $300,000 of the funding came from the Mat-Su Health Foundation. The rest represents private donations. Haller says there have been in-kind donations as well.

Military parents get help in child custody fights State policymakers want to make sure military deployments aren’t used against Alaska’s servicemen and servicewomen in child custody cases. Gov. Sean Parnell is expected to sign the bill passed by the Legislature during its recently ended session. The bill says courts cannot use a military parent’s temporary duties or deployment as a factor in custody and visitation cases. It also allows for expedited court hearings before a deployment and restoration of custody after a deployment by default. Alaska has more than 28,000 active duty and reserve personnel. The bill was sponsored by Rep. Bill Thomas of Haines and Sen. Charlie Huggins of Wasilla, Republican cochairs of a veterans caucus.

-Compiled by Jerzy Shedlock

JERZY SHEDLOCK/TNL

Students from around the Anchorage area gather into groups upon arriving at UAA. The young students spent the entire day on campus taking part in numerous activities that helped educate them about the university.

By Jerzy Shedlock The Northern Light

One after the next, yellow buses appeared before the Public Services Building at UAA. Students from different elementary schools poured out onto the campus grounds. Following group leaders holding signs of common Alaskan wildlife, the students shuffled their feet toward the Wendy Williamson Auditorium in single line fashion. The noise in the theater escalated as anxious elementary students filled its seats while chaperoning parents snapped photos of happy young faces. These fifth- and sixth-graders from local schools gathered at UAA for the ‘I’m Going to College’ event. UAA hosted the event in partnership with the Northwest Education Loan Association and the Alaska Commission for Postsecondary Education. Students experienced a day in college through the event’s multiple workshops. UAA contributes financially to the event, but is tasked primarily with coordinating the workshops, presenters and volunteers. Planning for the event begins shortly after the previous year’s event ends and continues throughout the year. The community plays a big part in the event with many of its workshops being delivered or assisted by volunteers from the Anchorage area, according to Director of Student Information Mike Smith. “One of our goals is to use this event to create as many meaningful connections between UAA and the community as possible,” Smith said. “It seems that the more Anchorage learns of the event, the more members of the community ask to be put on next years list (of volunteers).” Smith shouted ‘good morning!’ to all the kids welcoming the large group to UAA during the opening ceremony. Then, with the help of Spirit the Seawolf, mini Frisbee discs were thrown out into the crowd. The young students screamed with delight as they dived for the prized memorabilia. Smith concluded the introduction to the university by wishing the students the best of luck in the workshops, and the students marched out the

auditorium as The White Stripes blared in the background. During the event, elementary students were exposed to classrooms with UA faculty in areas such as engineering, journalism, geology, chemistry, art and music. All workshops, however, were not related to schools within the university system. As kids dispersed throughout the campus one group crowed into Rasmussen Hall, room 111 to learn about diversity. Connie Dennis of Enrollment Services instructed the class and asked the students if they understood the meaning of diversity. ‘Multiple’ and ‘digestion’ were among their answers. Throughout the workshop Dennis emphasized that the differences and similarities between people should be cherished and that equal treatment belongs to everyone regardless of race, gender or disability. After all, if these young students choose to attend UAA in the future they will be working with a very diverse group of people. Students were receptive to the notions having a wheelchair dependant young girl in their class. At the end of the workshop students were given M&M’s and a poem by Dr. Marilyn KernFoxworth. The opening lines of the poem read, “I have always liked M&M’s. The most diverse multicultural integrated candy in the world.” In another part of Rasmussen Hall Ms. Brovelli-Moon’s sixthgrade class from Willow Crest Elementary were huddled in a computer lab of the Computer Information Systems (CIS) department. Joking with students and supervising those with questions, Brovelli-Moon was apparently concerned with their success. She considers contemplating college at such a young age as ‘very important.’ “They’re very excited. A lot of the students would like to go to college. They want to study law, medicine, or a number of different things,” Brovelli-Moon said. “They love this opportunity because it’s showing them ways to do that.” Willow Crest Elementary is a Title I school. Many of the students

are from low-income families, so they haven’t been exposed to what a university looks like. “Educational opportunities weren’t available to their parents. This gives the students a chance to put some visuals with what they have been taught about college in the classroom,” Brovelli-Moon said. Each student sat in front of a computer screen as assistant professor of CIS David Fitzgerald introduced himself. Once again, students received bags of M&M’s, this time not to be eaten immediately. Opening Microsoft Excel, Fitzgerald explained its functions and gave the class basic instruction. Using the pie chart function each student determined the percentage of each color M&M they had. “College is a fun place to go. The things that (the students) do here today show them that college is not all studying and agony, and that you can have a good time in your classes,” Fitzgerald said. “Thus, hopefully they will want to come to school here someday.” Employees of Enrollment Services at UAA were present during the event helping supervise the hundreds of students. Winston Montecillo, a psychology major, had certain doubts about the impact of the event on young elementary students. “I believe that exposure to college at any age is a good thing, but (the elementary students) actually being able to grasp the magnitude of its importance, they may not be able to,” Montecillo said. “At the same time, any education on the matter in better than none.” Groups gathered in the Wendy Williamson once more at the end of the day for a closing ceremony. Pictures of students enjoying themselves participating in the workshops were projected on a giant screen. Smith spoke adamantly to the crowd about the importance of attending college, and concluded by asking the crowd how many students came from homes where parents did not go to college. Nearly half of the students raised their hands. Smith ensured the room that every one of them was capable of attending college and urged them to make efforts to do so in the future.


SPORTS

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Trio of distance runners lead pack for UAA, GNAC

PHOTO COURTESY OF AMANDA UMBERGER FOR THE GREAT NORTHWEST ATHLETIC CONFERENCE/GOSEAWOLVES.COM

Above: UAA junior Marko Cheseto cracks a smile as he finishes a race at the Great Northwest Athletic Conference Apple Ridge Run October 24, 2009. Cheseto will compete in two events at this year’s NCAA Division II Track & Field Championships. This will mark Cheseto’s second straight appearence at the national event. Right: UAA freshman Micah Chelimo competes in the 3,000 meter Steeplechase at the Stanford Invitational March 26. Chelimo will represent UAA at the NCAA Division II Track & Field Championships May 27PHOTO COURTESY OF KELLEY L COX/GOSEAWOLVES.COM

With the NCAA’s around the corner, Kangogo, Chelimo and Cheseto continue to push themselves to higher levels CONTINUED FROM COVER

run,” Garlatz said when reflecting on Cheseto’s 5,000m race at the Occidental Invitational May 8 this season. “And he basically did it on his own, it was a piece of art.” Rounding out the trio is Chelimo, who has not shied away from the spotlight in his rookie season. Chelimo ran to a record setting time of 9:02.79 in the 3,000m Steeplechase event. Chelimo also finished third in the 5,000m and fourth in the 1,500m events. Scariest though is that they will all be back next season for both the Track and Field team as well as the UAA Cross Country team. “You never look to the future, just because it’s whatever, who’s to say thing won’t change, but it’s very exciting to think about,” Garlatz said. The team is not only getting it done on the track, but in the classroom as well. Landing nine ‘Wolves on the academic list was very exciting for the coaching staff.

“It says a lot, as it takes focus to be a good athlete and it takes focus to be a good student,” Garlatz said. “They’re here to be both (students and athletes) and for them to achieve in both is basically reaching the pinnacle of the sport.”

‘They’re here to be both (students and athletes) and for them to achieve in both is basically reaching the pinnacle of the sport’

–TJ Garlatz UAA Track and Field Assistant Coach

Now, it’s time for the team to prepare for the NCAA’s and focus on individual races. Of course, they already know what they will be competing in as well which makes it easier to zero in on certain individual events. Kangogo will run the 1,500m and 5,000m events while Cheseto runs the 5,000m and 10,000m and Chelimo runs the 3,000m Steeplechase. Rounding out the men side is junior Demetrius Preston, who will compete in the long jump. Joining the trio are the likes of senior Laura Carr who will chase down glory in the 10,000m on the women’s side. Other female athletes competing include senior Elisha Harris (javelin), junior Hallidie Wilt (3,000m Steeplechase), sophomore Ruth Keino (5,000m and 10,000m) and sophomore Miriam Kipng’Eno (1,500m and 5,000m). “They’re just going to go there and they’re really confident in what they need to do,” Garlatz said. “They’ll execute whatever specific gameplan that applies to (their) specific event on raceday.


06

TNL

SPORTS| May 25, 2010

Glacier Pilots and Bucs prepare to take the field New faces and new managers for both teams still keep focus on developing players, as well as winning the season Anchorage baseball fans will be able to enjoy yet another close series between the two. Both squads have new managers this year. For the Pilots, they turn to Terry “Yogi” Cox, a former face in the organization. “Yogi is a great guy. He relates well to the players,” Dyson said. “He’s one of those guys that you respect him as a coach and respect him as a friend.”

The Pilots have five returners to their clubhouse, including a pair of ace pitchers. Justin Kemp, whose 0.66 ERA and 2-1 record made him one of the Pilots strongest pitchers last season. Also coming back is Charlie Robertson With the sun staying up later and later and the Alaskan who went 4-1 and had a 2.49 ERA. summer in full effect, it must be time for the 2010 Alaska On the field, Dyson is excited to see newcomers such Baseball League campaign to start up. as third baseman Kevin Lusson, a switch hitter from the For years, some of the best college players from around University of Texas, and catcher Trent Garrison, a solid the country flock up to Alaska to play for one of six teams offensive and defensive player from in a league full of tradition and with a Fresno State. reputation of producing some big name The Bucs will counter with 5 returners talent. themselves and a couple familiar faces Take for instance the two hometown to Anchorage fans. Infielder Colin teams, the Anchorage Glacier Pilots and Zimmermann, a graduate of West High Anchorage Bucs. in 2006, and pitcher Chris Schierhorn, a The Pilots have seen names such as South High graduate in 2008, will both Jacoby Ellsbury (2003), Erick Hinske return home to make their ABL debuts. (1996), Ben Francisco (2001) and Mark Joining them will be returning McGwire (1982). Of course these are only outfielder Brian Bello from Mesa State. a few of the names that have gone on to Last year, Bello finished second in the play in the majors. league for home runs (6), triples (2), runs The Bucs organization is no slouch (33) and had a solid .273 batting average. either when it comes to developing talent. On top of strong lineups for both Players such as Jared Weaver (2002), teams, promotions and a new turf infield Kurt Suzuki (2003), Jeff Kent (1987) and at Mulcahy Stadium should keep fans Jeff Francis (2001) have all adorned the happier than ever. pinstripes for the Bucs and played in the The Bucs will host four games with Last Frontier. Heroes of the Diamond, a military “From my point of view, it’s always baseball squad that travels the world and good to win, but our goal continues to is made up of solid players. develop young talent,” Gary Lichtenstein “They’re the military all-star team,” said, the Bucs Director of Baseball Lichtenstein said. “There is around 40 Operations. military teams in the country but these Both of the Anchorage squads have guys are number one.” made developing players and winning Also, with promotions such as Breast a big part of their clubs and it is easy to Cancer Awareness night, South of the see when one looks back on prior seasons Border night and the Anchorage Bucs in the ABL. Both teams have enjoyed PHOTO COURTESY OF THE ANCHORAGE BUCS Youth Clinic, there’s never been a better winning traditions in Alaska. Players of the Anchorage Bucs take batting practice before a 2009 game against the Fairbanks Gold Panners. The Bucs time to be a Bucs fan. For the Pilots, they have been to the start their 2010 campaign against the rival Anchorage Glacier Pilots in a doubleheader at Mulcahy Stadium June 6. Dyson said that the Pilots haven’t National Baseball Congress tournament released their promotional calendar many times and have five National Cox was an assistant coach for the Pilots back in the yet, but promises it will be one of the best seasons yet in Championships and five runner-up finishes. 1999, 2002 and 2004 seasons. He currently serves as the “We basically have three goals every year,” Glacier Pilot Athletic and Activities Director at North Cedar High terms of fan fun. Yet another season for the two clubs to battle it out for General Manager Jon Dyson said. “We want to win the School in Stanwood, Iowa, his home state. superiority in town. But both clubs recognize their main league, we want to win the Mayor’s Cup against the Bucs The Bucs will turn it over to TJ Bruce, an assistant coach goal is development of young players. and we want to win a National Championship.” at perennial power Long Beach State. Bruce was apart of “Overall, as long as these kids are improving, playing But, don’t forget about the Bucs. They have held their the 2004 squad, back when he was a player, and helped the own in the battle for the Mayor’s Cup, a series held between Dirtbags to a Super Regional win and College World Series hard, and giving it the effort, that’s all we can ask for,” Dyson said. the two clubs towards the end of the ABL seasons. appearance. Lichtenstein was in the same boat, but took it one level The series kicked off in 1990 and saw nothing but Glacier The field manager job will be a good chance for a young Pilot dominance as they won eight of the first 10 Mayor Cup manager like Bruce to show what he can bring to the further. “Obviously though, we want to take number one,” series. But since 2000, the series has been back and forth as organization in his first head manager job. Lichtenstein said. both teams have won five against the other ball club. Both managers will have a good mix of returners and Looks like it’s time to play ball, Anchorage. With this year’s teams shaping up, it looks like newcomers to manage under the midnight sun this summer.

By Taylor Hall The Northern Light

OVERTIME

Teams, not individuals, shine in the postseason Star players like Crosby, Ovechkin and James are not enough to win anticipated championship titles for their teams By Taylor Hall The Northern Light

“King James,” “Sid the Kid” and “Alexander the Great.” All nicknames of superstars in their respective sports; all of them with tremendous bankrolls and larger than life images; all of them possess countless individual accolades and records. None of them will win a championship this year. After stellar seasons by each of them, none of these leaders will be able to hoist a championship trophy or get fitted for a ring. This was the year of LeBron. He finally was going to get that illusive NBA title with his Cleveland Cavaliers. Someone forgot to tell that to the Boston Celtics, who stymied the two-time defending MVP and his court. The Cavs bowed out in six games and will now watch the conference finals and NBA finals from the comfort of their couches. Why? Simple: Boston played solid defense and got production throughout their lineup. Names like Rondo, Allen, Garnett

and Pierce were just too much for LeBron to overcome. Speaking of MVP’s, where did the President Trophy winning Washington Capitals go? The best team in the regular season bowed out of the playoffs in the first round. Alex Ovechkin and his team fell victim to the lowly Montreal Canadiens, a team that barely sneaked into the playoffs and were not given a chance to win a game in the series, much less the series. The Caps fell in seven games after having a 3-2 series advantage and game seven in their own barn. Recipe for disaster here? Add a struggling Washington offense at the most inopportune time. Mix in a red-hot Montreal goalie, Jarioslav Halak, and faltering pair of Washington goalies. Add a pinch of sacrifice and determination by an undersized and under-skilled Montreal team willing to do anything for one another. Voila! A first round exit for Stanley Cup favorite Washington Capitals. Now, on to Sidney Crosby, the savior of Canada and a defending Stanley Cup

champ. Without the Capitals in the way, the Penguins were surely on their way to the Cup finals for a third straight year. Hold the phone! That Montreal team is still here? Yes, and an encore performance of the “don’t wake us, we don’t know how good we’re playing” Montreal Canadiens showed the door to yet another superstar in the NHL ranks. Pittsburgh was ousted in seven games and had two possible series-clinching chances, including game seven in the “igloo” in Pittsburgh. Does that sound familiar? Red-hot forward Mike Cammalleri and Halak paced the Canadiens to another upset of NHL royalty and vaulted them into the Eastern Conference Finals. And how, you may ask? Timely scoring, superb goaltending, and a team of overachievers hitting their stride at the right time. So, are you starting to see a pattern here? These superstars that we hail as the faces of their sports are now just one of us – fans

watching the playoff drama unfold. Keyword: watching, not involved in. Without a supporting cast of players around them, the superstars can’t get it all done and march on towards a championship. Do you need an example? How about the Chicago Bulls six titles in the 1990’s? That dynasty was revolved around the likes of Michael Jordan, but without sidekicks like Scottie Pippin, Dennis Rodman, Ron Harper and Charles Oakley, to name a few, that team couldn’t have found the same success. Fast-forward to present day and the LA Lakers are again the team to beat. Sure, having Kobe Bryant doesn’t hurt, but without the likes of Derek Fischer, Pau Gasol, Lamar Odom and Andrew Bynum, that team wouldn’t be defending champs and vying for another title run this year. So, as the playoffs continue to unfold in the NBA and NHL, some of the star power will be missing, but that won’t bother the teams still in the playoff hunt. They got there as a team, not individuals. Take note superstars.


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FEATURES

09

Hickel leaves legacy of advocating for Alaska By Joshua Tucker The Northern Light

Wally Hickel, 90, two-time Alaska governor and controversial secretary of the Interior under President Richard Nixon, was laid to rest May 18 with his coffin standing up in his grave and facing Washington D.C. The Dustbowl Era Kansas Golden Gloves Welterweight Boxing Champion was buried on his feet so he could “fight for what I believe in forever,” according to his widow and wife of 65 years Ermalee Hickel. At the Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic Church, where the Hickel Family attends mass, over 1,000 mourners filled the pews and many had to stand. Some watched the funeral on a projector screen in an overflow seating room. Many of Alaska’s lawmakers attended the May 17 funeral mass, including Gov. Sean Parnell, Sen. Mark Begich, Sen. Lisa Murkowski, Rep. Don Young, former Senator Ted Stevens and former Governor Sarah Palin. Hickel came to Alaska in 1940 with 37 cents in his pocket, leaving his family’s tenant farm near Claflin, Kan. In Alaska he washed dishes and founded a construction company in Anchorage in 1947. He built Anchorage’s first modern shopping centers and hundreds of houses. After a 9.2 magnitude earthquake leveled much of downtown Anchorage in 1964, seemingly before the after shocks had stopped, Hickel announced plans to built the landmark Captain Cook Hotel, inspiring confidence in a city struggling to rebuild. A pillar of Hickel’s legacy is his belief that natural resources on public land are common resources to be used and conserved in an “owner state,” for the benefit of the people, not multi-national corporations. According to his long-time assistant and friend Malcolm Roberts, it was Hickel’s experience growing up on a tenant farm that lead him to so strongly believe in public ownership of resources. These principles can be seen in Article VIII of the Alaska constitution. Hickel was a pivotal advocate for Alaska statehood, flying to Washington to lobby the U.S. Senate and President Harry S. Truman, demanding Alaska be given more than 100 million acres of state land to empower the frontier state with resources held in common.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MALCOLM ROBERTS

Wally Hickel standing in front of Gastineau Channel with the capital city of Juneau behind him, June 2009.

“We would have just been a national preserve without Wally weighing in and convincing the U. S. Senate to give Alaska 103 million acres of state land,” Roberts said. “Defining 87 percent of Alaskan lands as owned by the public made the principal of the commons a reality, like it is in Australia and Canada, where 80 percent of the land is owned by the public.” Eventually, Gov. Jay Hammond used this principle of the commons to give Alaskans their share in the states natural wealth through the permanent fund dividend. Elected governor of Alaska in 1966 as a Republican, and chosen by Nixon to serve as secretary of the Interior in 1968, Hickel surprised critics with his active defense of the environment. Four days after being sworn in as secretary of the Interior, a Union Oil platform just three miles off the coast of Santa Barbara blew out. In his memoir, “Who Owns America?,” Hickel recalls jumping into action: “It took only a few minutes in the air over the Santa Barbara channel to fill me full of the situation – the oil, the terrible mess, the justified outrage of the people of Santa Barbara. I was also outraged by what I sensed to be the bureaucratic resistance on the site to do anything positive about a crime committed against nature. Some people had worked so closely with the oil men for so many years that they simply could not conceive of a Secretary of the Interior

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doing anything drastic about an oil slick,” Hickel wrote. When Hickel landed, he stretched his constitutional authority and shut down all oil drilling in the Santa Barbara channel, including rigs operated by six different corporations and all offshore drilling throughout the U.S. until new regulations had been written and implemented. He permitted one relief well to stop the blowout. During his 22-month tenure, Hickel continued his fight through many rounds. He tackled a Chevron oil spill off Louisiana’s gulf coast in March 1970 and demanded that oil companies to assume unlimited liability for oil spills. After four students were killed by National Guard troops in the Kent State massacre, Hickel wrote a letter to Nixon disagreeing with Nixon’s practice of openly demeaning protesters. “Regardless of how I, or any American, might feel individually,” Hickel wrote, “we have an obligation as leaders to communicate with our youth and listen to their ideas and problems.” The letter was leaked to the press and Hickel was fired in the first public cabinet sacking in almost 20 years. “I’m going with an arrow in my heart and not a bullet in my back,” Hickel said in a 60 Minutes television interview. He did not pause to shake Nixon’s hand on his way out of the Oval Office after being fired, he noted in “Who Owns America?” Hickel remained a mighty presence in Alaskan life for decades and had three failed bids for governor before winning as an independent in 1990 with 39 percent of the vote. His second term was turbulent with the state in turmoil after the Exxon Valdez oil spill. In his eulogy for his father, Jack Hickel defended his father’s big dreams, saying of his longtime advocacy for a railroad tunnel from Alaska to Russia, “that is not a false dream, you wait and see.” Jack, Ermalee and the Hickel family laughed and wiped away tears beside Wally’s grave as he was buried standing up. His legacy lives on through his son Jack who has spent 15 years working as doctor to the destitute in Africa. Jack has been invited by the governments of Sudan other African nations to present his father’s ideas later this year on public ownership of natural resources. His father called it, “The Alaska Solution.”


10 FEATURES|

TNL

May 25, 2010

CHINA: students visits developing communities Heifer International’s study tour took nine UAA students to rural villages in China to observe agricultural development CONTINUED FROM COVER

Food security, the main focus of Heifer International, is the availability and access to food for a family or community. Heifer International takes a holistic approach in their community involvement by also encouraging social development. “They do not seek to merely bring people above an arbitrary poverty line as related to income, but they try to look at the big picture,” Thiru said. “They work to help people improve their own communities, their living environment, their education and their income.” Livestock and agricultural techniques are imperative for economic development in the communities, but Heifer International also encourages social development. “The introduction of self-help groups into the community was really the most impressive thing I saw,” Thiru said. “These groups were formed by the villagers

themselves by the encouragement of Heifer. A few of the villages had female-only selfhelp groups, and these groups allowed the

‘Heifer is doing so much to help these people help themselves and their community’ –Lang Van Dommelen Political Science Major women in those villages to achieve a more equal standing with the men of the village.” A cornerstone of Heifer International’s

model is “Passing on the Gift.” Families that receive livestock from Heifer International do not receive title to those animals until the livestock’s offspring is donated to another family. “The ‘Passing on the Gift’ in the Heifer model ensures that there’s an ever-growing, expanding network of development taking place in the local community,” Dorn Van Dommelen said. The group was present for this special ceremony, a rare occasion, at one of the project sites they visited. In this village, they witnessed the passing of piglets from one family to another. “It was a very emotional, heartwarming opportunity,” Dorn Van Dommelen said. The villagers were very responsive and enthusiastic about the presence of the students. Of the four villages the geography students visited, one had a parade, one

had fireworks and two had welcome signs, according the Lang Van Dommelen. “Most of the villagers we met were very receptive to our presence,” Thiru said. “We were welcomed warmly and the villagers were willing to speak with us, answer our questions and tell us their stories” Prior to the liberation of 1949, rural Chinese communities faced tough governmental regulations on farms, land and crop production, according to Dorn Van Dommelen. Agricultural reforms and non-government organizations, such as Heifer, have given the villagers a new sense of freedom and community. “I saw hope in these people that I never imagined possible,” Lang Van Dommelen said. “I feel like their generosity and the dreams they expressed show that there is hope to overcome poverty and address issues like food security.”

Far Left: Kyla Byers, environment and society major, helped plant eggplants in the Shicaogou village alongside her geography classmates. Nine students enrolled in a short-term study abroad geography class through UAA that sent them to China to observe the work of Heifer International in rural, developing communities. Left: James Prinn, political science major, held a piglet as part of the “Passing on the Gift” ceremony. This ceremony is the cornerstone of Heifer International’s community development model. The beneficiaries of Heifer International do not receive true ownership of the livestock they were donated until they pass on the offspring to another family. This encourages the expansion of development and promotes Heifer International’s goal of ending world hunger. Bottom Left: Dorn Van Dommelen, chair of the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, picked tea in the first village that the geography class toured. Dorn Van Dommelen led the class with Mara Kimmel, political science professor, and has been involved with Heifer International for several years.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MENEKA THIRU

PHOTO COURTESY OF MENEKA THIRU

Above: Mara Kimmel and Kyla Byers participated in a welcoming ceremony in Shicaogou Village, one of the four villages visited on the Heifer International study tour. The villages were very welcoming of the geography students, hosting parades, dances, fireworks and welcome signs, according to Lang Van Dommelen, political science major.


ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

MOVIE REVIEWS

“Iron Man 2” made of lead; poor writing sinks movie By Heather Hamilton The Northern Light

Robert Downey Jr. (“Sherlock Holmes”) returns to the silver screen as the self-outed superhero, Iron Man, in the sequel of the 2008 movie of the same name. The second movie takes place six months after the events of “Iron Man,” with Tony Stark preparing to open the “Stark Expo,” a year long technology exhibition where new world-benefiting inventions are to be showcased. This movie has much to live up to in regards to the first. The unique blend of humor, action, romance and visually pleasing computer graphics, which made “Iron Man” a hit with moviegoers, lured us back for more. Unfortunately, the movie did not deliver. While there was most certainly a blend of humor, romance, action and awesome graphics, it wasn’t the right blend. Known playboy Tony Stark is tamed quite a bit in this movie, possibly by his affections for his assistant Pepper Potts (played by Gwyneth Paltrow “Two Lovers”), though the two are not an item. There is also a problem with his arch reactor (the equipment in his chest keeping him alive), which is causing him to be slowly poisoned. Tony, knowing his time is short, becomes rather depressed, irrational and a mess altogether. While at first Tony strives to find a way to fix the problem, he hits a brick wall and quits. This is not the Tony Stark fans of the first movie expect to see. We expect Tony Stark to pour every waking moment not spent trying to bring peace to the world working on the problem. When Tony was held hostage in the first movie, there was never an air of hopelessness about him, so his lack of optimism in this movie is highly uncharacteristic.

Tony’s altered personality was likely the largest drawback to the film, but Downey’s acting was not an issue. While the character he portrayed wasn’t written true to form, Downey’s humor and portrayal made Tony Stark still admirable – most of the time. The villains in this movie weren’t very original either. It seems that once again, Iron Man has to face off with a nut-job in an armored suit with technological capabilities rivaling his own. The only difference is that this nut-job didn’t need someone else to design and build his armor; he could do it himself. Backing this villain was the head of a rival corporation who wanted to humiliate Tony Stark at the Stark Expo by upstaging him. He supplied the space and materials, while the other supplied the knowledge, creativity and manpower to get the job done. These minor differences didn’t deter from the feeling of monotony of Iron Man once more dealing with another suit of armor in the final showdown. Samuel L. Jackson’s (“Unthinkable”) role as Nick Fury, the leader of S.H.I.E.L.D., played much more than a cameo spot in this movie. In “Iron Man,” after the credits, was a final scene, where Tony meets Fury and is spoken to regarding the “Avengers Initiative.” In this movie, Jackson’s character appears once in a while, not doing much but affecting the plot of the movie all the same. He served to verbally knock a little sense into Tony, which led him to returning to his less-depressed and rational self and finally discovering a way to fix the problem with the arch reactor. It was at this point, when Tony Stark was back to his old self, that the movie became fun again. Lt. Colonel James “Rhodey” Rhodes also returns as a more

important character, unfortunately the actor portraying him in the first movie, Terrance Howard, (“Fighting”), was replaced by Don Cheadle (“Brooklyn’s Finest”). While Cheadle did a fair job, it just wasn’t the same. Overall, acting in “Iron Man 2” was not a problem (in fact, the acting saved the movie), the visually pleasing sci-fi graphics were spot on, and the basic plot of the movie was good. But when the four screenplay writers from the first movie were replaced by one new screenplay writer for the sequel, Tony Stark as a character seemed lost in translation. Hopefully, when “The Avengers” is released, (projected for 2012,) he’ll retain his sarcastic, flirtatious, impulsive and rational personality traits which originally drew fans in. “Iron Man 2” Directed byJon Favreau Starring: Robert Downey Jr., Don Cheadle, Gwyneth Paltrow Run Time: 124 minutes Genre: Action, Adventure

★★★

Freddy Krueger returns in remake By Heather Hamilton The Northern Light

Any die-hard movie purist should give this attempt at a cult classic remake a wide berth. There is no redeeming factor to “A Nightmare on Elm Street” as far as remakes are concerned. The acting is unbelievable. As in, it doesn’t seem realistic right from the opening credits. Lead protagonists Nancy, played by Rooney Mara (“Tanner Hall”), and Quentin, played by Kyle Gallner (“Cherry”), seem oddly apathetic to the notion that they are being stalked and murdered in their dreams. In fact, while they begin to realize this, they are speaking in a complete monotone with eyes and faces as expressionless as a doll’s. Any real person in their right mind would be terrified. Even the iconic Freddy Krueger, played by Jackie Earle Haley (“Shutter Island”), wasn’t up to par. Instead of the sarcastic, laughing, and deranged psychopath of a specter fans and viewers have come to know and love, we are presented with a rather dull Freddy who only flashes his knife-clad gloves a few times before killing someone. Mind you, those killings are as gruesome as any of the original ones, but still, the part was not well acted. In fact, his personality and voice were more reminiscent of Haley’s portrayal of Rorschach in “Watchmen” than anything expected of Freddy Krueger. The writing for this movie is fair in general, but horrendous as a remake. Not that it is easy to rewrite an iconic film to both pay homage to the original and make it your own, but this failed utterly. It seemed the writer’s plan for doing so consisted of rewriting the entire history of Freddy Krueger and his evil deeds while throwing in memorable quotes

and killings from every single “A Nightmare on Elm Street” movie made before. Even a quote from “Freddy vs. Jason” worms its way into the script. While some viewers may find this method of honoring the character rather clever, given that the story is so heavily altered from the original, it seems more of a last ditch effort and cop out. Whenever an event from the original “A Nightmare on Elm Street” movie appeared, I found myself surprised. This should not happen while watching a remake. The biggest peeve of the movie is the expanded and altered history. In none of the original movies is Krueger portrayed as a pedophile. Yes, there are sexual connotations from time to time while he is stalking his prey before he kills them, but never is it alluded to that he ever sexually abused the young children he killed while he was alive. He was just a child murderer in the neighborhood. In this film, it is alluded to on several occasions by various characters that sexual abuse was involved. The Krueger of this movie is also much more sexual after death than his previous incarnations. It was both distracting and eerie. Kudos for the eerie part. Another annoyance was the connection all the victims had. In the original movies, all the teenagers stalked and killed had originally lived on Elm Street, like Freddy, while the killer was alive. Hence the movie title. In this movie, while Nancy still lives on Elm Street, the connection all the victims have is that they all went to pre-school together on the other side of town, and Freddy was the gardener for the school who lived in the basement. SEE ELM PAGE 12


12 A&E|

TNL

May 25, 2010

From earrings to flowers, ELM: Bad local bead crafter does it all Remake Allison Reed sells hand-made jewelry for college-friendly prices By Heather Hamilton The Northern Light

PHOTO COURTESY OF REED CREEK JEWELRY

Close up of a jewelry set by Allison Reed

From earrings to rings and bracelets to necklaces, Reed Creek Jewelry has it all. Business owner Allison Reed may be a local gymnastics coach at Anchorage Gymnastics Association, but she also happens to have a knack for creating original and current fashion accessories. The inspiration for her beaded creations often comes from her gymnastics students. “A lot of the younger kids come in wearing some of the new fashion trends, so I try to coordinate with what they’re wearing,” Reed said, “and, I just like some of the classic looks too; bringing back some of the vintage styles.” Reed also makes anklets, beaded flowers and will soon begin selling aprons. She favors purchasing her materials locally, at shops such as the Alaska Bead Company, Black Elk and the Bead Shack. “I like to go and help them out,” she said. “I like to support a

lot of local businesses.” Reed sells her work at large events, such as the Girdwood Forest Fair and the Bear Paw Festival. She will also do private shows for friends on occasion. The next place to see her work will be at the Girdwood Forest Fair, which takes place the Fourth of July weekend. The affordability of her jewelry is important to Reed. She tries to stay within a range that she herself finds reasonable when purchasing jewelry. “The way I look at it is that, it’s a hobby of mine and I really love doing it, so I’m going to sit and do it anyways. I don’t have to be paid for a whole lot of my time,” Reed said. Prices range from $5 for earrings to $50 for a full set of jewelry, and her beaded flowers are roughly $40 each depending on the flower. For more information about Reed, or to get in contact with her regarding her work, she can be reached at (907) 952-0984 or at reedcreek@gmail.com.

PHOTO COURTESY OF REED CREEK JEWELRY

Beaded fireweed stalk by Allison Reed. Each stalk runs around $40.

PHOTO COURTESY OF REED CREEK JEWELRY

Beaded fireweed stalk by Allison Reed

PHOTO COURTESY OF REED CREEK JEWELRY

Beaded daisies by Allison Reed

To be completely fair, while this movie was in no way, shape or form a decent remake, it was a passable movie. The graphics were complimentary, the altered history made the villain more heinous and, while the humor wasn’t the same, there was enough of it to keep the movie from being boring. This movie is a good one to see if the viewer either hasn’t seen the original or has the ability to look past the differences between the two. While the acting isn’t the greatest, the story is much more full and keeps the audience entertained.

“A Nightmare on Elm Street” Directed by: Samuel Bayer Starring: Jackie Earle Haley, Rooney Mara, and Kyle Gallner Run Time: 95 min. Genre: Horror, Thriller

★★★

PHOTO COURTESY OF REED CREEK JEWELRY

A sample of three jewelry sets by Allison Reed. Each set runs for roughly $50.

Fairbanks play lets homeless kids tell their story By Josh Armstrong Fairbanks Daily News-Miner

In “Alice in the Underground,” actors portray teens who have struggled with life on the streets. But most of the play’s stars won’t be pretending. Homeless and at-risk youths make up about half of the cast of “Alice,” which opened with a free show May 6 — and again May 1415 — at the Empress Theatre. The play’s lead star and narrator, Brittany Ivey and Brandon “Pinstripe” Houger, were locked out of their apartment a month ago and never allowed to retrieve their possessions. Desiree “Snickers” Krei, who plays Frog, is raising a 2-year-old daughter on a bare-bones budget while trying to move to a stable living situation in Anderson. Michael Carter, known on stage as Burrito and Tweedle Dee, once lived in a tiny efficiency with 16 roommates. They play fictional characters,

but “Alice,” written by Americorps worker Cassidy Phillips, hits close to home. “Cassidy pretty much nailed it,” Houger said. “He hung out with us a long time and heard all of our stories.” The proceeds go to the Street Outreach and Advocacy Program, a division of Fairbanks Counseling and Adoption. SOAP operates a downtown center where at-risk youths can hang out, grab a meal or get help finding a job or counseling. Director Sarah Finnell, who works at SOAP, said “Alice” will serve as more than just a fundraiser. “It’s more about telling their stories than about raising the money,” Finnell said. “... It’s amazing to see some of the teens, upon hearing other teens’ stories, will say, ‘Hey, that happened to me’ and ‘I can relate to that.’” “Alice” is a surreal take on a real subject. Jabbering dialogue about numbers and physics is contrasted

by domestic abuse, suicide, drug use and profanity. The play is rated PG-16, which means it might not be suitable for anyone younger than 16. It follows 16-year-old Alice as she runs away from an abusive stepfather and ends up at a rave, at an eccentric drug dealer’s house and under arrest, among other misadventures. Ivey previously had been in a school play, but that’s about it. “It’s nerve-wracking,” she said a week ago of playing the lead. She echoed that sentiment after a performance Friday night but was excited for the next performance. Houger, Ivey’s beau, slipped into the role of Raven after the original actor stopped showing up. It’s actually a natural fit for him: Raven woos Alice in the play, so Houger flirts with his real-life girlfriend. He also was anxious Friday night, chugging five bottles of water as he waited to spring from a Dumpster and deliver monologues.

Phillips, 26, has never written a play — he’s dabbled in poetry and short stories — but felt it was the best way to raise money. “I thought that it would be more fun to do a play than a concert or something,” he said. “Alice” has several monologues derived from actual testimony by homeless youths. Some include graphic descriptions of violence and drug use. Finnell recalled when an atrisk student carried a seen-it-all attitude, and in response, she read him some of the testimonials that inspired the monologues. He was floored, she said. “They might feel alone because they weren’t able to talk about their experiences with anybody or they never felt like anybody would listen to them,” Finnell said, “but now they’re hearing other people’s stories come out, and that’s making them want to tell their stories. It’s really therapeutic.” Volunteers from across the Fairbanks arts community have

filled in the rest of the roles and technical jobs. They helped the at-risk youths get a crash course in community theater, as the inexperienced actors had to learn their roles while dealing with an often-chaotic lifestyle. Despite the at-risk youths’ lack of experience on stage, Tyler McClendon said they bring a dose of reality that can’t be matched by anyone who hasn’t been in their shoes. “These are their stories, and they just bring their everything into the show, much more than I can as an actor,” he said. McClendon, a 16-year-old who has acted since he was in third grade, said the experience has changed his perception of Fairbanks’ homeless youths. “I’ve always had this image of the homeless kid as the troublemaker, someone to stay away from,” McClendon said. “But these kids are not any different from me.”


OPINION The Northern Light 3211 Providence Drive Student Union 113 Anchorage, AK 99508 Phone: 907-786-1513 Fax: 907-786-1331 info@thenorthernlight.org

MANAGING EDITOR 786-1313 content@thenorthernlight.org Josh Edge COPY EDITOR copy@thenorthernlight.org Brittany Bennett NEWS EDITOR 786-1576 news@thenorthernlight.org Jerzy Shedlock FEATURES EDITOR 786-1567 features@thenorthernlight.org Heather Hamilton A&E EDITOR 786-6198 arts@thenorthernlight.org Vacant SPORTS EDITOR 786-1512 sports@thenorthernlight.org Taylor Hall PHOTO EDITOR 786-1565 photo@thenorthernlight.org Logan Tuttle WEB EDITOR 786-1506 web@thenorthernlight.org Vacant LAYOUT EDITOR layout@thenorthernlight.org Vacant ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR news2@thenorthernlight.org Vacant ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR features2@thenorthernlight.org Joshua Tucker ASSISTANT A&E EDITOR arts2@thenorthernlight.org Vacant GRAPHIC DESIGNER graphics@thenorthernlight.org Vacant ADVERTISING MANAGER 786-4690 ads@thenorthernlight.org Mariya Proskuryakova ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE Vacant CIRCULATION ASSISTANT Munkh-Erdene Tsend-Ochir MEDIA ADVISER Paola Banchero ADMINISTRATIVE ADVISER Annie Route

The Northern Light is a proud member of the ASSOCIATED COLLEGIATE PRESS. The Northern Light is a weekly UAA publication funded by student fees and advertising sales. The editors and writers of The Northern Light are solely responsible for its contents. Circulation is 5,000. The University of Alaska Anchorage provides equal education and employment opportunities for all, regardless of race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, Vietnam-era or disabled-veteran status, physical or mental disability, changes in marital status, pregnancy, or parenthood. The views expressed in the opinion section do not necessarily reflect the views of UAA or The Northern Light.

13

EDITORIAL

Gulf of Mexico oil disaster highlights need for accountability from industry The oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is shaping up to be among the worst man-made disasters in history. With an estimated 5,000 barrels per day pouring into the Gulf with no immediate solution to stem the flow in sight, it makes you wonder what really can be done to stop the disaster. People tend to think in the past tense when it comes to the spill; shoulda, coulda, woulda. As in, what should we have done to prevent the explosion of the oil rig from occurring, or what safety measures were overlooked in the companies safety procedures? The bottom line is that is has happened. It is time to stop looking at our past mistakes. We need to learn from our mistakes so that an enormous environmental catastrophe like this does not

happen again – hopefully. Environmental researchers and the oil companies are in dire need of finding ways to stem the flow of oil into the Gulf. Most Alaskans will probably remember, or are at least familiar with, the Exxon Valdez oil spill a little over 20 years ago. Alaska is still suffering from the repercussions of an oil company’s mistake. Even though nothing quite like this has happened before, it is still disconcerting that there was not some sort of plan in place that could help deal with this kind of situation. One of the possible theories for stopping, or at least limiting, the flow of the oil is what the oil companies are calling a “junk shot.” The junk shot is essentially the method of cramming a bunch

of old tires and golf balls in the blown oil head. Additional attempts at limiting the flow of oil into the Gulf of Mexico include using a four-inch pipe to divert roughly 1,000 barrels a day, according to reports by the New York Times, into tanks. Sure, it’s 1,000 barrels of oil per day less that is pouring into the gulf, but copious amounts continue to seep through the broken pipe. These methods have not done enough. Oil companies need to be pushed to put as much research into the remedy, containment and clean-up of oil spills and potential oil spills as they do into the technology of drilling in these kinds of deep water environments. The mere fact that the so-called experts are doing little more than

guessing about how to fix this terrible mess does not bode well with people. Watch essentially any news report or commentary broadcast on television, and almost whenever something regarding this issue comes up with public opinion involved, the people tend to think that the oil companies could have done more and should have done more to prevent it. Hold the oil companies responsible for their mess-ups. They have been held increasingly more responsible for their actions, but with this incident fresh in our minds, and news reports, there needs to be continued pressure on the companies to prepare for the possibility of this happening in the future and figuring out how to handle it.

Social justice is euphemism for theft By Daniel McDonald Special to The Northern Light

Among politicians, community agitators, environmentalists and clergymen, the term social justice seems to be making a comeback in popular discourse. But, for a term so commonly thrown around, the definition is more than slightly ambiguous. Everyone naturally wants justice. So, when someone questions those who evoke social justice, they are usually snubbed and left without answers, or given looks as if they are in opposition to rainbows and puppies. Upon further investigation, the most common meaning of social justice is economic redistribution of wealth. Unfortunately for the social justice advocates, egalitarians, true equality is impossible. In order for their utopia to become a reality they would have to take their grievances up with nature, because there can never be true equality of skill, intellect and talent of all peoples. The world would surely be a very dull place if every man and woman were equal in every way; no room for individuality, no room for the imagination, or artistic expression, just a grey mass of sameness. How boring! Thankfully for those of us who don’t give any credence to this cult of the envious, there is really only one way for the social justice advocate to achieve their so-called justice, and that is, of course, wealth. They may not have the means to take away the skill and athleticism of Kobe Bryant, but they can surely

take his money! So, is economic equality a good thing? Is it really just? Perhaps economic equality may be a desirable outcome, but the methods of achieving it are vitally important. If economic equality was somehow achieved through the voluntary labor and toil of every individual then it would be both good and just.

The most common meaning of social justice is economic redistribution of wealth. However, as stated before, every individual is unique and will therefore produce, create and achieve unequally. Thus, in a free society there will be different outcomes for the simple reason that people are different. Not only because we possess different natural abilities, but also our ambitions differ. Some people are willing to work harder than others to achieve more economic prosperity. The question to the egalitarian that must be asked is, who is owed the wealth that is created more than the person who works for it? It goes back to Aesop’s fable of “The Ant and the Grasshopper,” in which the ants work all summer collecting food in order to prepare

PRIDE

CHIDE

Student Activities…

Parking Services…

…for hosting free weekly BBQs, ice cream socials and breakfast.

for the winter, while the grasshopper was idle and lazy. By the time winter had come along, the ants were prepared and the grasshopper went hungry. The egalitarian would have to argue that the grasshopper is owed an equal proportion of corn he never even worked for. Now the ants may share with the grasshopper out of charity but they certainly do not owe him anything. If they were forced to give, then that would be called something other than charity, what used to be called theft. Therefore the only fair share that one can claim is what they themselves earn. That brings us to the alternative method of reassessing this muddled concept. Some believe it’s high time to change the meaning of the term into something that actually resembles justice. Bernard Chapin, a conservative author and columnist, has recently seen fit to advocate for the definition of “an individual keeping what they earn.” What a novel idea! What could be more just than that? More ideally though, the term would be better off with discontinued use, seeing as how vague it is in its current form. Though it is fairly obvious to see why it would be more popular than advocating the more accurate policy of income redistribution. The left wing loves to hide behind intuitively benevolent terms to mask their true positions, which are in the end ugly, oppressive and anything other than just.

…for newly enforcing parking for the summer session.


14 COMICS|

TNL

May 25, 2010

BROKECOMICS | Alec Fritz

TUNDRA l Chad Carpenter

Camping WORDSEARCH l M. Proskuryakova and J. Shedlock

CRYPTOQUOTE PUZZLE l M. Proskuryakova

BACKPACK BEAR COMPASS FIRE FLASHLIGHT FRISBEE FUN HAMMOCK HUNTING KAYAK KNIFE LANTERN MARSHMALLOWS MOOSE MOUNTAIN RIFLES SLEEPINGBAG SUNGLASSES TENT TRAIL

A

25

12

4

12

5

7

23

7

24

17

24

5

15

12

25

6

23

16

A 13

25

24

16

13

13

7

10

7

12

19

4

24

16

13

12

16

23

16

13

9

16 1

7

8 25

7

3

13

9

4

9 16

1

4

17

A

15

17

15

15

7

5

M 24

17

15

7

10

16

13

12

5

,

6

.

3 8

B

C

D

E

F

G H

I

J

K

L

M N O

P

Q

R

S

T

U

V

W

X

Y

Z

this monthʼs cryptoquote solution Our greatest glory in not never falling, but rising every time we fall. Confucius

CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 6 10 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 28 30 31

this week’s SUDOKU solution

this week’s CROSSWORD solution

35 36 37 39 41 42 43 44 48 49 50 52 55 56 58 59 60 61 62 63 DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

HAWK’S GRIPPER CALCULUS OR TRIG MARK FOR ATTENTION COGNIZANT TO BE, TO HENRI GENTLE SLOPE LOWEST POINT (2 WDS.) MS. PAQUIN WIELD CAPSIZE OUT, AT THE DENTIST’S DRESSED LEVANT AND HAMMERSTEIN CHARM ROCKIES, BRIEFLY MEATS AND VEGGIES BUSINESS LETTERDESTINATION ATTIRE FOR CATO PRETTY, IN GLASGOW RARA — ART OF WATCHMAKING VALIDATE SENOR’S COIN SHAGGY FLOWER GO OVER AGAIN DECAYS POTENTIAL OAK DECEITFUL CUNNING BIOL. OR ASTRON. DESIGNER — CHANEL KITCHEN APPLIANCE (2 WDS.) JOIE DE VIVRE OODLES (2 WDS.) REMINDERS TRUST PROMONTORY BARELY ENOUGH SWIMMING-POOL COVER MP PREY DELICATE SITCOM PLANET INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS RATIONED OUT ENVELOPE ABBR.

8 9 10 11 12 13 18 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 31 32 33

WALKED FINISH A SKIRT EURO CASUALTY MS. ELLERBEE ED — OF “UP” BICYCLE PARTS IRIDESCENT STONE SOYUZ LAUNCHER FRAGRANT WOOD EXCLUSIVELY FORE OPPOSITE BEAR OF LITTLE BRAIN COMIC-STRIP POSSUM TROPICAL FRUIT VERY LITTLE PASTURE PLAINTS SWORN PROMISES ALMOND-SHAPED

34 36 38 40 41 43 44 45 46 47 48 50 51 52 53 54 56 57

“LA BOHEME” HEROINE GUSTED FITNESS CENTER SPREAD OUT, AS A MAP GLOSSY FABRICS KEWPIE FORMULA ONE CAR MADEMOISELLE’S SCHOOL NOT SHY WRY HUMOR CREVICES PERIL AT SEA ET’S CRAFT BAJA MS. DIRECTOR JOEL — PROF. PALE GOLD MEDAL ORG.


May 25, 2010 | COMICS

TNL

15

HOROSCOPE l Stella Wilder GEMINI

(MAY 21-JUNE 6) -- YOU’LL BE READY FOR A CONTEST OF WILLS, BUT WHEN THINGS GET PHYSICAL, YOU’RE GOING TO HAVE TO BACK AWAY AND REGROUP. (JUNE 7-JUNE 20) -- THAT WHICH SEEMS EASY AT THE OUTSET MAY SURPRISE YOU, FOR DIFFICULTIES ARISE QUICKLY WHEN YOU’RE IN THE THICK OF IT.

CANCER

(JUNE 21-JULY 7) -- YOU MAY FEEL AS THOUGH YOU HAVE ALL THE INFORMATION YOU NEED TO PROCEED ACCORDING TO PLAN, BUT IN FACT SOMETHING IMPORTANT IS MISSING. (JULY 8-JULY 22) -YOUR SEARCH FOR PERSONAL INFORMATION IS LIKELY TO TAKE YOU DOWN A FEW UNFAMILIAR ROADS.

LEO

(JULY 23-AUG. 7) -- YOU’LL GET ONE OR TWO IMPORTANT ANSWERS THAT ONLY SERVE TO UNCOVER EVEN MORE QUESTIONS. YOU’RE NEARING THE END OF THE ROAD; BE READY. (AUG. 8-AUG. 22) -- NOW IS THE TIME FOR YOU TO PUT IT ALL ON THE LINE. SUCCESS CAN BRING YOU TREMENDOUS REWARDS.

VIRGO

(AUG. 23-SEPT. 7) -- YOUR IMAGINATION IS LIKELY TO LEAD YOU IN A STRANGE DIRECTION, BUT THERE IS MUCH TO DISCOVER ABOUT YOURSELF AND YOUR CURRENT SITUATION. (SEPT. 8-SEPT. 22) -- YOU’RE NOT LIKELY TO BE AFFECTED BY THE SAME THINGS THAT HOLD OTHERS BACK; PROGRESS IS SWIFT.

LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 7) -- YOU MUSTN’T FOOL YOURSELF INTO THINKING THAT YOU CAN BEAT THE HOUSE, BUT YOU CAN INCREASE YOUR ODDS WITH THE RIGHT STRATEGY. (OCT. 8-OCT. 22) -- YOUR PRACTICAL, DEPENDABLE, FAIR-MINDED APPROACH WILL OPEN A FEW IMPORTANT DOORS FOR YOU.

SCORPIO

(OCT. 23-NOV. 7) -- YOU MAY BE SO EAGER TO SEE WHAT’S COMING THAT YOU’RE UNABLE TO ENJOY WHAT IS HAPPENING IN THE MOMENT. DON’T IGNORE THE HERE AND NOW. (NOV. 8-NOV. 21) -- YOU MUST BE WILLING AND ABLE TO STICK TO THE SCHEDULE; STRICT DISCIPLINE BRINGS MEASURABLE REWARDS.

SAGITTARIUS

(NOV. 22-DEC. 7) -- AFTER NEGOTIATING A FEW TWISTS AND TURNS, YOU’LL REALIZE THAT YOU MAY HAVE BEEN CHASING SHADOWS. THE TRUTH LIES ELSEWHERE. (DEC. 8-DEC. 21) -- YOU’LL REQUIRE INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATION OF THE FACTS BEFORE YOU CAN TAKE THE RIGHT STEPS.

CAPRICORN

(DEC. 22-JAN. 6) -- YOU CAN COLLECT REWARDS ALL ALONG THE WAY, PROVIDED YOU MAKE A STRONG START AND TAKE ADVANTAGE OF A HIDDEN OPPORTUNITY. (JAN. 7-JAN. 19) -- YOU ARE IN NEED OF MORE SOCIAL STIMULATION THAN USUAL; YOU CAN FIND IT IN SOME ROUTINE PLACES.

AQUARIUS

(JAN. 20-FEB. 3) -- ERRATIC OR ILLOGICAL THINKING CAN ONLY SET YOU BACK A GOOD DEAL -- WHILE GIVING THE COMPETITION A CHANCE TO MOVE AHEAD QUICKLY. (FEB. 4-FEB. 18) -- DON’T HESITATE TO ASK FOR PROFESSIONAL HELP. SOME THINGS CAN BE DONE IN-HOUSE, HOWEVER.

PISCES

(FEB. 19-MARCH 5) -- HONEST, STRAIGHTFORWARD WORK WINS YOU PRAISE -- AND IF YOU TAKE IT ONE STEP FORWARD, YOU CAN REAP INCREASED GAINS AS WELL. (MARCH 6-MARCH 20) -- THE PIECES OF A PUZZLE BEGIN FALLING INTO PLACE, AND YOU’LL BE ABLE TO SEE THE WHOLE PICTURE SOON.

ARIES

(MARCH 21-APRIL 4) -- OTHERS MAY THINK YOU’RE WASTING YOUR TIME, BUT ANY TIME SPENT DAYDREAMING IS VALUABLE TO YOU -- NOW AND IN THE WEEKS TO COME. (APRIL 5-APRIL 19) -- YOU MAY HAVE TO WITHSTAND MORE SCRUTINY AND CRITICISM THAN USUAL. ARE YOU UP TO IT?

TAURUS

(APRIL 20-MAY 5) -- YOU MUSTN’T LET YOURSELF BE SIDETRACKED; FOCUS ON THE GOALS YOU’VE SET, AND PROCEED ACCORDING TO PLAN. (MAY 6-MAY 20) -- THE MORE PHILOSOPHICAL YOU CAN BE ABOUT AN UNFORTUNATE TURN OF EVENTS, THE QUICKER YOUR RECOVERY IS LIKELY TO BE.

Volunteers Needed

Contact: walkthebeach@gmail.com

29TH ANNUAL ALASKA SCOTTISH HIGHLAND GAMES & GATHERING OF THE CLANS

Eagle River Lions Club Park June 26, 2010 Gates Open At 8am Tickets: In Advance / At The Gate Adults $12.50 $15.00 Children $4.00 $5.00

Tickets Available Starting May 1st at:

www.alaskascottish.org

Celtic Treasures, 4250 Old Seward Hwy Suzi’s Woolies, 420 G Street The Bookshelf, 11401 Old Glenn Hwy & Eagle River Center

PERFORMANCE BY SCANTILY PLAID On Stage From 7pm to 10pm



May252010