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THENORTHERNLIGHT OCTOBER 19, 2010

NEWS

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UAA hits road against Duluth

UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE

USUAA vice president: Candice Perfect has been sworn in

SPORTS

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UAA Volleyball:

WWW.THENORTHERNLIGHT.ORG

FEATURES

Streaking ‘Wolves hit road this week

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Art scene:

Anchorage’s is growing

Forum reveals Senate candidates’ style

By Taylor hall The Northern Light

The Seawolf hockey team is ready to open the book on the 2010-11 WCHA campaign as they go to battle with the Minnesota-Duluth Bulldogs. UAA will travel to Duluth Oct. 22-23 for a pair of road contests against a perennial power in the conference. Despite the tough challenge presented in UMD, the Seawolves (1-2-1 overall) are coming into the games having already been on highs and lows in the early season. Last week, the Seawolves were in Fairbanks for the Brice Alaska Goal Rush tournament, hosted by rival UAF. The tourney pitted the Seawolves against fellow WCHA team Colorado College and Union College out of the Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference. The game against CC would be a back and forth tilt that would see the ‘Wolves in constant catup mode with the Tigers. It would finally catch up with UAA as they ultimately wouldn’t be able to get the late equalizer and fell to the No. 18 team in nation 4-3. UAA got goals from sophomore Mitch Bruijsten, freshman Jordan Kwas, and the second on the season from junior Curtis

See HocKeY PAGe 06

Edgar Allan Poe honored in Halloween play By heather hamilton The Northern Light

Few can deny the fame of Edgar Allan Poe or his literary contributions to American horror. “The Raven” rendered him a household name immediately after publishing in 1845, and is still arguably his most well known work. But who was Poe the man? What drove him to write such dark tales and poems of illness, murder, insanity and death? According to Shane Mitchell, the auditorium manager of the Wendy Williamson and writer/ director of “The Death of Edgar Allan Poe,” he led a very tragic life. “His father left him, his mother, and two siblings before Poe was three. His mother already had tuberculosis; she died a few months after he left,” Mitchell said. Poe also lost every other woman he ever loved to the same illness, was verbally abused by his stepfather, had drug, alcohol and gambling problems, was scorned by the general public and died in a way so mysterious even now there are dozens of different See Poe PAGe 10

shana roBerson/TnL

From left: Sitka Mayor Scott McAdams, Sen. Lisa Murkowski, and leading Senatorial candidate Joe Miller field questions from community members at the Anchorage Chamber of Commerce, as part of their “Make it Monday” forums, Oct. 11 at the Dena’ina Center.

shana roberson The Northern Light

A forum held on Oct. 11 hosted by the Anchorage Chamber of Commerce showcased three of the Alaskan candidates for Senate: Joe Miller, Sen. Lisa Murkowski and Sitka Mayor Scott McAdams. In an afternoon that consisted largely of the candidates’ major talking points, there were glimmers of the candidates’ ideologies and style. Murkowski skillfully repeated each question in her answer to either buy time or to cement the answer in the minds of the audience. She also drew laughs from the audience on several occasions, once after being asked which Senator she most admired. After a moment of pause,

Murkowski responded, “Ugh.” Beyond her style, Murkowski had one clear message for the audience. She highlighted her history of working across the aisle, saying that she plans to continue doing so if re-elected. “I have taken a somewhat unprecedented step as advancing myself as not necessarily a Republican,” Murkowski said, quickly adding that she was still a Republican. Murkowski was not the only one to highlight her political bipartisanship. McAdams touted his bipartisan abilities while also displaying his wit. “You know when I was President of the state School Board Association, I didn’t represent liberal kids,” McAdams said jokingly, as part of an explanation

of his plan to put Alaska before his personal ideology. McAdams also had a penchant for extended metaphors, evident from a comparison of Alaska’s natural resources to an empty house on the market that requires a new agent. He also threw in a metaphor when highlighting one of his life goals. “My goal throughout the course of my lifetime is to see the day when forever gone is Alaska the colony,” McAdams said. “People from the outside come in, extract our resources, take the best bite of our apple, and move their resources and money offshore.” Miller also took to a metaphor, repeating one in particular several times throughout the forum. “Alaskans have to understand that we have to diversify and

ensure all the eggs are not in the federal basket,” Miller said. Often referring to himself in third person, Miller’s tone was serious and he made no jokes. He did receive loud applause after he was the only candidate who specifically mentioned leaving Afghanistan. “The priority has got to be eliminating the threat and then getting out,” Miller said, referring to his own service during Desert Storm as an example. The candidates also took time to criticize each other. During a round in which the candidates were able to ask questions of each other, McAdams criticized Murkowski for voting against appropriations for Alaska. Murkowski defended the charge,

See forum PAGe 04

International students adapt to life in US By Jerzy shedlock The Northern Light

Modern communications systems and the emergence of the Internet have pushed the world’s population toward a global identity faster than ever before. Diversity is now a straightforward fact of everyday life, especially in Anchorage.

Diversity in droves The International student population has continually grown at UAA in recent years. There are 265 students on F-1 and J-1 visas at the University this semester, which is just below the largest international student body ever attained at 280 students. This pool of international students brings different cultures together in a freethinking learning

environment. International student advisor Doni Williams explained that while UAA has remained a small speck on the international radar in past decades, it is becoming to be well known as a travel-abroad University in foreign countries for a number of reasons. “It’s a pleasant atmosphere. Students experience less prejudice here than they would in other parts of the country,” Williams said. “We’ve got a wide variety of majors, and some people dream their whole lives of coming to Alaska. It’s just a matter of getting the word out and making sure students understand they are not going to live in an igloo, or a polar bear is not going to get them when they get off the plane.” Stereotypes associated with Alaska are something the office has had to address, Williams stated. It is assumed that such

stereotypes are not typical, but for students arriving from countries such as Germany and Sudan, our state is a mystery until they decide to come to Alaska and begin learning about it. The visa students from 41 different countries have come to Anchorage for the express purpose of studying at UAA. The largest numbers of F-1 and J-1 students come to the university from Russia, South Korea and Canada, according to International Student Services (ISS). Others come from countries such as Australia, Mongolia, Liberia, Nicaragua, Ghana, Norway, Kenya and Malaysia.

Processed diversity When international students arrive in Anchorage they have to “check in.” This

See internAtionAL PAGe 03


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TNL

NEWS| October 19, 2010

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Photo by Cody Swanson

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October 19, 2010 | NEWS

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Annual health fair in Rasmuson a collaboration among clubs, faculty and community members By Melissa newton

Special to the Northern Light

UAA students have seen the busy, commotion-filled sea of bodies that fills Rasmuson Hall on a daily basis. Thursday, Oct. 14 was no different. On this particular day, however, it wasn’t just students that filled the halls. As students walked the crowded corridor between classes, many stopped at the exhibits for UAA’s annual health fair held in Rasmuson. Everything from fitness to fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) prevention had an exhibit where students could gain valuable information. The emphasis this year was on having UAA student clubs collaborate with campus and community resources in providing information, hosting exhibits, and keeping the fair running smoothly, according to Betty Bang, who organized the event.

Many student clubs got involved including: Voices for Planned Parenthood (VOX), The Family, American Medical Student

was provided on a range of topics, such as fitness, breast cancer awareness, birth control methods, safe sex, HIV testing, domestic

‘Lots of people are passing by, and many are stopping and looking at our fact sheets. So they’re at least taking one thing with them.’ -Elizabeth Daniel, President of Voices for Planned Parenthood Association, Human Services Club, Psychology Club and the PE Majors club. The event “gets the kids educated, and encourages their curiosity,” said DJ Wilhite, nursing major, who volunteered at the fair. Through diligent preparation from staff and clubs, information

violence awareness, FASD prevention, alcohol education, winter safety, depression, Seasonal Affective Disorders and hypertension, according to Bang. A lot of people are exposed to information they wouldn’t normally look up themselves, according to Sarah Cross, psychology major, who was

examining the different exhibits. Many students walked through and were offered breast cancer ribbons and additional valuable information on just about anything you could want to learn at a health fair. On this day, education left the class room and instead filled the halls. “Lots of people are passing by, and many are stopping and looking at our fact sheets. So they’re at least taking one thing with them,” President of VOX Elizabeth Daniel said. Kristina Jensen stated that while students are more interested in birth control, she spoke to one student that didn’t know that men could get breast cancer. “That proves that people are being educated here,” Jensen said. The Student Health and Counseling Center sponsored the event. The center provides primary health services to students for physical and mental

health, diagnosis, and treatment of general health and mental health conditions as well as education and support to help maintain a healthy lifestyle, according to their website. The center also organizes many other events, including movie screenings. The upcoming screening will take place today, Tuesday, Oct. 19, in the Student Union Den. The featured movie for the event will be “The Hangover.” Other upcoming events organized and hosted by the Student Health and Counseling Center include the National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week, an event educating students on alcohol and drug abuse. Further, On Wednesday, Oct. 20, UAA will have a Virgin Bourban Street Bash from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. in the Student Union, according to Bang.

DIVERSE: Students travel to UAA from around the globe Visa students required to maintain at least an average GPA, failure to do so can result in deportation continued from coVer

includes the gathering of information the government requires. The new students then receive a copious amount of paperwork and documents that all pertain to their new life in Alaska. The students are scheduled for placement tests, registered for classes and instructed to attend the official orientation, usually two weeks later. The four-hour orientation details everything involved with being a visa student. “We talk about all the stuff students have to do to keep their visa status. They have to be registered full time, they have to have health insurance, they can’t drop below full time,” Williams said. “Those things are far more serious for visa students than they are for other students.” For example, if an F-1 visa student receives a GPA below 2.0 for two semesters in a row they can be academically dismissed. This could be a problem for any student, but for a visa student it can mean deportation. Also discussed at the in-depth

orientation are things like how to obtain a driver’s license, how to obtain a bank account and— probably the most important— minor in consumption (MCA) charges. Often times, international students know nothing about MCA’s, in part, because the country they came from has a lower drinking-age limit or no limit at all. Russia has their drinking age set at 18. The dilemma of not being able to drink mixed with peer pressure can frequently cause troubles for foreign students. “One of the biggest mistakes (international students) tend to make is to listen to their friends, about things that their friends are not experts on,” Williams said. Irene Toporovskaya, accounting major, had a hard time not being able to go out and have a drink with friends or have a glass of wine with dinner. Luckily, she turned 21 years old in May. “We don’t have (the U.S.) drinking age. The official age is 18, but no one would ever check any documentation in Russia,”

Toporovskaya said. “That’s a big cultural difference.”

Diverse experiences International students can have trouble obtaining a job during college if they receive a MCA. Toporovskaya never got into trouble with alcohol, but she has not avoided mistakes altogether. In Russia, it is common to “cheat,” according to Topveovskaya. It is largely considered helping one another if students take turns copying each other’s homework or simply turning to help someone during a test. The worst punishment a student will receive is an F on the assignment, but nothing as severe as termination, she stated. “I was so sure that it was OK. In Russia, it is common to take information off the Internet and turn it in without citation,” Toporovskaya said. With this understanding an American student, her friend, asked Toporovskaya for help with an accounting test. They studied

for a while, but after some time the student asked her to attend the exam with him. The exam went smoothly enough, but the professor asked Toporovskaya to sign her name when she turned in the exam, so the con did not

‘...things are far more serious for visa students than they are for other students.’

-Doni WIlliams Int. student advisor

succeed. If that was not enough, the same student asked her once again to take a managerial accounting exam in the coming days. Toporovskaya recalls the professor looked at her strangely as she turned in the second exam for her friend, but thought little of it. A couple days later, the jig was up. The professor from Topveovskaya

and company’s first botched attempt had called Williams at ISS asking about a specific Russian girl. Toporovskaya signed the name of a girl she knew that was not able to travel abroad. The accounting professor and the staff at ISS were going through all of the pictures of current Russian students in their database when Toporovskaya came to them and explained what happened. In the end, Toporovskaya wrote a lengthy essay about what she had done and why it was wrong. She is still on academic probation until May 2011. The incident happened in May 2008. There is, however, a silver lining to this grey cloud. “There is one thing that was beneficial from the trouble I got in. I changed majors because I realized how much I loved accounting,” Toporovskaya said. “Now I am taking classes with both of the professors (from the incident). They seem to be cool with me.”


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NEWS| October 19, 2010

FORUM: Community asks questions Consensus on issues sparse among the three Senatorial candidates continued from coVer

stating she was working to reduce spending to the previous year’s levels. “I think most of us in this room would agree that when your budget is out of whack in your family or your business, you look to what you did last year,” Murkowski said. “And you try to do a little bit better this year.” Immediately afterward, Miller questioned Murkowski’s vote for the $700 billion Troubled Asset Relief Program, and he also accused her of being invested in some of the banks it bailed out, an allegation she largely refuted.

The candidates did not limit their critiques of each other to the candidate question round. After being asked about his own level of experience governing, McAdams compared himself to Murkowski and her father, saying he had more experience than either Murkowski had the first time they ran for office. McAdams also pointed to the Citizens Against Government Waste contract Miller signed that called for no appropriations outside of the President’s budget. Miller focused his attacks primarily on Murkowski, at one

point saying the national debt was half of its current amount when she initially took office. He also repeated the sentiment in his newest campaign commercial. “You can’t vote old system and expect new things to happen, because they won’t,” Miller said. For her part, Murkowski said that the intense pressures we face as a nation meant there is no time for on-the-job training. In her closing statement, she also delivered the line “Anger is not a platform,” to the crowd. There was room for consensus, however, on issues such as foreign policy, healthcare and the national debt. The candidates were also unanimous in their support for the military, both as a commitment to troops and veterans and also as a source of federal funding. The forum was followed by numerous interviews from local and national media sources, which highlight the importance of this race. Early voting begins Oct. 18 at the downtown elections office. Voting will begin at the UAA student union on Monday, Nov. 3 and continue until 8 p.m. on election day, Nov. 4.

STaTewiDe BrieFS Murkowski to air ads with Stevens U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski says she plans to air television ads featuring the late-Sen. Ted Stevens. Stevens filmed ads for Murkowski before the primary but she decided not to air them following his death in a plane crash two weeks before the August contest, which she lost to Republican Joe Miller. Murkowski is now running a write-in campaign. Murkowski said she’s been in contact with Stevens’ family and wants to ensure anything that airs is tasteful. Stevens was the longest serving Republican in U.S. Senate history, and Murkowski considered him a mentor. She often invokes his name and legacy of bringing home billions of dollars in federal aid and projects in the campaign. Murkowski wouldn’t describe the ads, but said they will air soon.

Soldier arrested in Fort Wainwright shooting One soldier is under arrest and another soldier is hospitalized after a shooting at Fort Wainwright. Army officials say the soldier accused in the Tuesday night shooting is a member of the 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division. Officials have not released his name or the name of the victim, whose condition was described only as stable. Officials say the Stryker soldier shot the other soldier in a parking lot near a barracks, using a .45-caliber gun. Army spokesman Maj. Bill Coppernoll says the shooting is still under investigation.

shana roBerson/TnL

Lisa Murkowski visits with supporters during a “Make it Monday” forum held by the Anchorage Chamber of Commerce Monday, Oct. 11 at the Dena’ina Center. State spending was one of the key issues that was addressed during the forum.

USUAA swears in new vice president

shana roBerson/TnL

USUAA President Miles Brookes (right) swears in new vice president, junior Candice Perfect (left), Friday Oct. 15.

By shana roberson The Northern Light

USUAA confirmed a new Vice President Friday evening. Junior Candice Perfect, nominated by President Miles Brookes, was confirmed by a unanimous vote during the weekly assembly meeting. Perfect is a junior in the political science department who has been active around UAA, including being part of the Juneau Advocacy Team, which travels to the capital to speak with the legislature about UAA issues. Perfect began attending UAA in the summer of 2009 and is on track to graduate in the spring semester of 2012. The process of Perfect’s confirmation included her nomination, a short speech given by Perfect, a vote and a swearing in. For the full story visit www.thenorthernlight.org.

SaY wHaT?

Woman in open robe drives through Florida animal park WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) -- Officials at a South Florida safari said a woman, wearing an open robe, drove her car through the park and then sped away. A Lion Country Safari official said the woman made comments Wednesday that terrorists were coming to kill the animals. Park employees called authorities and secured the park, but she drove off. The woman was not identified. No one was injured.The park’s marketing director, Jennifer Bethume, said they always say it’s “wild” at the park, but no one anticipated such an incident.

Piece of drill bit left in Rhode Island hospital patient PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) -- A surgeon and other staff have been suspended and public health officials have launched an investigation after a piece of a surgical drill bit was left inside a patient’s head following a procedure at Rhode Island Hospital. The hospital says a roughly quarter-inch long piece broke off and was left in a patient’s scalp during neurosurgery on Aug. 4.

The piece was discovered and removed on Aug. 6 “without incident” according to the hospital, and the incident was reported to the state Department of Health. WPRI-TV reports that the hospital suspended the doctor and operating room staff. Their names were not released. A Health Department spokesman confirmed the investigation. The hospital was fined $50,000 after brain surgeons operated on the wrong part of the heads of three patients in 2007.

Pennsylvania teen crashes into center after passing test BRIDGEVILLE, Pa. (AP) -- A teenager who just passed his driving test crashed into a state driver license center in western Pennsylvania. The accident happened Wednesday afternoon as the teen was trying to leave the parking lot of a driver license center in the Pittsburgh suburb of Bridgeville. Officials said at least three people were injured, but their injuries were not considered serious. Township police Sgt. Brian Halbleib told the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review that the accident happened when the teen pulled into the parking lot of the driver license center to drop off the man who had administered the test. -Compiled by Jerzy shedlock

Young says he’s in line for committee chair Alaska Rep. Don Young says he’s in line to chair a committee if Republicans regain control of the U.S. House. Young, who is seeking a 20th term in Congress, said during a debate with Democratic rival Harry Crawford in Juneau that he never lost his seniority. He said he stepped down as a ranking member to make sure the cloud that had been hanging over him had cleared. And he said it has. Young was under investigation for years. Before the primary, it was announced that federal prosecutors had decided not to pursue an investigation of him over connections to a businessman convicted of bribing state lawmakers. Minor misspelling won’t spoil ballot. The overseer of Alaska elections says he doesn’t expect that minor misspellings will disqualify write-in ballots for U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski. Lt. Gov. Craig Campbell tells The Associated Press that officials do not want to disenfranchise any voters and that he suspects, if there’s a minor misspelling of, say, Murkowski, that those ballots will be

counted for her. But he says the farther a ballot gets from including either her last name or Lisa Murkowski, the more difficult it will be for ballot counters to determine voter intent — and the more likely it will be for those ballots to be challenged, particularly if the race is tight. Murkowski, who lost the GOP primary, officially filed as a write-in candidate Wednesday.

Whale movie filmed in downtown Anchorage Filming of the Drew Barrymore movie, “Everybody Loves Whales,” is moving to downtown Anchorage. Paperwork filed by film-makers shows movie crews on Thursday are to film scenes of a press conference outside the 4th Avenue Theatre. Scenes also will be filmed at the Hotel Captain Cook. A spokesman for the movie says actor Stephen Root plays a fictional Alaska governor named “Haskell” who will tell reporters at the theater that he is doing his best on the whale rescue. The movie is a fictional retelling of the attempt to rescue California gray whales trapped under the ice near Barrow in October 1988. Filming is scheduled to end Nov. 21.

Juneau system suffers glitch Juneau’s enhanced 911 emergency system suffered a glitch. The Juneau Police Department says the glitch occurred early Wednesday morning and lasted about an hour. Several calls were received during that time. Officers were able to see the data information about the call, but callers weren’t able to hear the dispatcher and the dispatcher couldn’t hear callers. The problem occurred when an ACS power source located in the police department building failed. The company has made some equipment adjustments to ensure the problem doesn’t occur again.

Juneau biologists produce Alaska seaweed guide The University of Alaska’s Sea Grant Program has published a book for anyone who has wondered about different kinds of seaweed. Juneau biologists Mandy Lindeberg and Sandra Lindstrom are the authors of “Field Guide to Seaweeds of Alaska.” Lindeberg says there are more than 500 seaweed species in Alaska and about 100 of them all are described with full-color photos and descriptions in the new field guide. The guide is the first of its kind for Alaska seaweeds and it took Lindeberg nearly 15 years to compile. Besides seaweeds, the nearly 200-page, water-resistant guide features sections on seagrasses and marine lichens.

-Compiled by Jerzy shedlock

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SPORTS

06

HOCKEY: Seawolves face first conference road test After an up and down to start to the 2010 season, the UAA hockey team opens WCHA conference play against the UMD Bulldogs in search of early road points continued from coVer

Leinweber. Rob Gunderson would end up stopping 23 of 27 shots in his second collegiate game. The game against Union would have a similar feel unfortunately. Despite enjoying a 36-23 advantage in shots and playing a disciplined game of hockey (only three penalties taken), the ‘Wolves couldn’t cash in and fell 4-3 to the 16th ranked Dutchmen. Freshman netminder Chris Kamal came up with 19 saves in his second game as a Seawolf. One of the bright spots for the Seawolves once agin would be getting balanced scoring as eight different players found the way on to the score sheet. Freshman Matt Bailey, sophomore Scott Warner, and senior Nick Haddad all scored for UAA in the losing effort. If there is one thing the two early season tournaments has shown fans, it’s that this Seawolf

team can put the puck in the net. Going into conference play, Head Coach Dave Shyiak knows that the ‘Wolves are going to have to keep rolling four forward lines to keep having success. “We need to get scoring by committee as it can’t just be Tommy Grant and Sean Wiles every night,” Shyiak said. “We’re going to need each of the lines to step up and help offensively.” Case in point: The Seawolves had 11 players record points in the Kendall Hockey Classic back on Oct. 8-9. That weekend, UAA won 3-2 against Air Force and tied No. 2 North Dakota 5-5. The team will also need their duo of freshman goalies, Kamal and Gunderson, to perform like upperclassmen against a strong Bulldog offense. The two goaltenders have split time and remain game time decisions as to who gets the next start, according to Shyiak. Neither has locked down the number one

spot, but that will come with time. “At that position, it’s all about getting more games under your belt and being seasoned more,” Shyiak said. Sophomore Dusan Sidor has yet to see game action but continues to work hard in practices and be a dark horse in the race for time in games. Gunderson, a 6’1” Lethbridge, Alberta native, says the battle for supremacy between the UAA pipes has not been an issue at all between the goalies. “Chris, Dusan, and I, we’re a bunch of brothers in the locker room,” Gunderson said. “It’s definitely a friendly competition but we strive to push each other as well.” Continuing to help lead the way offensively is senior forward Sean Wiles, whose (3-0--3) totals through four games comes from him doing all that Coach Shyiak asks of him. “He said just keep playing my

game, play hard, keep moving my feet, drive the net, and be a presence out there,” Wiles said, who this past summer attended the NHL’s Washington Capitals Development Camp.“ Fellow senior Tommy Grant also is doing his share as well by chipping in 5 points (1-4). Three Seawolves, Bailey, Cameron, and Bruijsten, currently have one goal and three assists on the season. also are paying dividends offensively for UAA. Despite being new to the college game, newcomers like freshmen Cameron, Mark Pustin, Kwas, and Bailey all have seen substantial ice time and have done well by adding point production and energy to supplement the top line of Grant, Wiles, and sophomore Alex Gellert. The freshman defensive pairing of Wes McLeod and Quinn Sproule have done well on the back end and have been effective, according to Shyiak.

Seawolves travel south to rival WWU and SFU in search of crucial road wins By Taylor hall The Northern Light

Just past the halfway mark in GNAC conference play, the UAA Volleyball team will put their four game win streak on the line when they take on No. 16 Western Washington and Simon Fraser this week. The ‘Wolves will get rival WWU Oct. 21 in Bellingham and then will finish the road trip with their first ever game in Burnaby, British Columbia against their new Canadian foe SFU on Oct. 23. The Seawolves (7-3 GNAC, 12-6 overall) are coming off a 3-1 win up in the Interior of Alaska against the UAF Nanooks. This vicotry avenged what sophomore Nikki Viotto called a “kick in the butt” loss earlier this season when the Nanooks shcoked UAA 3-1 in Anchorage back on Sept. 18. The Seawolves got a huge game out of their dynamic duo of senior Cortney Lundberg and freshman Robyn Burton. The pair had a comnined 27 kills to lead the attack for the Seawolves. The duo also put up four blocks apiece. Sophomore Adriana Aukusitino and freshman Siobhan Johansen had stellar nights setting for the green in gold as they combined for 48 assists. Also helping the UAA cause was junior Lee Golden (nine kills), freshman Quincy Haught (15 digs), and sophomore Shelby Hollister (seven kills).

As the Seawolves continue to rise in the standings, they know they have a great chance to catch one of the teams that sits above them in the conference by getting a win on the road. However, to get those wins and make up ground in the GNAC, they will have to do it one of the toughest places to get wins,

‘They’ll be ready for us and they’re definitely looking for a bit of revenge.’ -UAA Head Coach Chris Green something Head Coach Chris Green is fully aware of. “Western is flying pretty high right now and to play them on their home court is always going to be tough,” Green said, who earned his 500th collegiate victory on Oct. 2 against Montana State Billings. “They’ll be ready for us and they’re definitely looking for a bit of revenge.” UAA already has defeated the Vikings this season when they were able to come away with a 3-1 win at the Wells Fargo Sports Complex back on Sept. 25. The loss was the only conference loss for the Vikings so far this campaign.

The win was also their third straight against the Vikings, who still own the overall series record (23-10) over UAA. WWU (10-1 GNAC, 13-2 overall) comes in ranked 16th in the nation and sits in tie atop the GNAC with Seattle Pacific. The Vikings also are on a five game winning streak of their own and look to be hitting their stride as expected. The match with SFU (3-9 GNAC, 3-13 overall) will also present a challenge in itself. Not only are The Clan a possible trap game for the ‘Wolves, but it will be a brand new building to get acclimated to. The team also doesn’t know what to expect in terms of how many fans will come and what the atmosphere will be like. In the teams first meeting ever, the Seawolves easily dispatched SFU 3-0 in Anchorage back on Sept. 23. According to Green, the Seawolves have seemed to turn a corner on their early season struggles with consistency on the court. “Defensively we’re playing better simply because we know where each other is out there now,” Green said. “Setters are becoming more consistent and reliable and it has helped offensively as well.” Viotto, an unquestioned defensive leader on the team, pointed out another reoccurring problem that will have to be avoided down the stretch of the season. “We start games slow and

finally start to pick it up by the second or third game,” Viotto said, who has played in every game to date this season and is second on the team averaging 3.00 digs per game. “That has definitely been one of our struggles as a team.” Viotto also points out the return of a fully healed Cortney Lundberg as a much-welcomed boost. “When Cortney shows up to play, you know it’s game time,” Viotto said. “When she plays good, it pushes everyone else more to play good.” Lundberg, a senior middle blocker, missed eight games earlier in the season due to an ankle sprain. Despite being in the lineup, she has not been quite back to full health. Lundberg is currently second in the GNAC in attack percentage (.385) and first in blocks (1.36) The development of newcomers has also been helpful as of late for the green and gold as well. Most notable may be the constant improvement of Burton. Burton has emerged as a double threat as she ranks fourth in all of Division II Volleyball with her 1.29 blocks per game on defense. On offense, she ranks fourth in the GNAC with a .326 attack percentage. “Because of our youth on the team, a lot of freshman aren’t freshman anymore when it comes to playing,” Green said. “Robyn has such a good jump and is very smart and doesn’t commit a lot of errors.”

SPOrTS BrieFS UAA Basketball teams receive high preseason GNAC rankings Alaska Anchorage has been picked to finish fourth in the 2010-11 Great Northwest Athletic Conference’s men’s basketball preseason coaches’ poll, released Oct. 13. The Seawolves – coming off a 17-10 record and a 5th-place GNAC finish in 2009-10 – return three starters and six total letterwinners from last season, including 6-3 senior guard Brandon Walker (15.4 ppg, 5.3 rpg, .509 FG, 1st Team All-GNAC) and 6-6 senior forward Casey Robinson (12.0 ppg, 3.8 rpg, .407 3FG, Hon. Men. All-GNAC). UAA was picked to finish behind defending champion Seattle Pacific, Central Washington and Montana State Billings in balloting by nine of the league’s 10 head coaches. SPU garnered seven first place votes while one apiece went to CWU and UAA. The UAA women’s team has been picked to finish second in the 2010-11 Great Northwest Athletic Conference’s women’s basketball preseason coaches’ poll, released Oct. 14. The Seawolves – coming off a 24-5 record and their fourth straight NCAA Tournament berth – return three starters and six total letterwinners from last season, including 6-2 junior forward Hanna Johansson (9.7 ppg, 5.5 rpg, .547 FG, Hon. Men. AllGNAC) and 5-9 senior wing Nikki Aden (9.0 ppg, 3.9 rpg, 2.9 apg, .862 FT). UAA was picked to finish behind defending champion Seattle Pacific, which received eight of 10 first-place votes from the league’s head coaches. UAA and Western Washington gained the other two first-place tallies. Under head coach Tim Moser, the Seawolves have finished no worse than third in the GNAC in the past four years, including a co-title with SPU in 2008-09.

Seawolves basketball to be nationally televised twice The Great Northwest Athletic Conference and FSN Northwest have jointly announced a new partnership that will include a nine-game television package for the 2010-11 college basketball season. FSN will televise eight GNAC regular-season games along with the men’s GANC Tournament championship game on Friday, Mar. 4. The winner of that game qualifies for the NCAA Division II West Regionals that begin Friday, Mar. 11. The series will feature seven men’s games and one women’s game during the regular season, tipping off with the Jan. 5 men’s contest featuring Montana State Billings at Alaska Anchorage. The Seawolves will also play host to rival Alaska Fairbanks on FSN in the regular-season finale Feb. 23 The Great Northwest Athletic Conference is a NCAA Division II Conference that includes 10 schools in five Northwest states (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Alaska) and one Canadian province (British Columbia). FSN Northwest’s regional territory services the same U.S. footprint as the GNAC, providing a tremendous opportunity for both the conference and the network. In the conference’s nine-year history, three GNAC men’s teams and three GNAC women’s teams have qualified for the semifinals at the NCAA Division II Elite Eight national tournament. -Compiled by Taylor hall


October 19, 2010 | SPORTS

07

NEWS editor needed Call the managing editor at 786.1313

Free for All. Step right up if you like free! All UAA students, faculty, and staff ride People Mover for free simply by showing their current semester ID. Ride to and from school, or work, or anywhere along our 14 routes and more than a thousand stops, absolutely FREE! And free means free—all routes, all times, every day.

www.peoplemover.org 343-6543

Just flash your current school ID and get on board!


FEATURES

08

Community backs rise of contemporary art scene Local artists are opening multifaceted galleries that appeal to fellow artists and community members By Katie Forstner The Northern Light

Typicaly ,art galleries in Anchorage are chock-full of bronze dogsleds, meticulous oil paintings of polar bears and photographs of Denali. However, in the last five years, the artist community in Anchorage has been taking that traditional theme to new dimensions by expanding Alaskana art into a more contemporary and original focus. “When I was trying to get into galleries and trying to sell my work, I wasn’t fitting into the box that had been built in Anchorage about the type of art they wanted,” Katie Sevigny, owner of both the Katie Sevigny Studio and Fiddlehead Gallery, said. “One of the more reputable galleries turned me down but asked to keep the piece of art that I had brought in for

KaTIe ForsTner/TnL

Katie Sevigny is an Alaskana painter with a more contemporary style.

private use. That upset me so much and I was like ‘That’s it, I’m doing it.’ I opened up my own gallery right down the street.” Artistic growth in a community can easily be stunted without a place to exhibit and showcase new artists, and when established galleries were turning away fresher mediums, artists and art lovers demanded a reform. “I think that art has come front and center here because of the artists. There are some really amazing artists that live in Alaska and I think with the ability to now display their stuff in contemporary galleries, they are really coming into their own,” Sevigny said. The Sevigny Studio displays work from over 50 contemporary Alaskan KaTIe ForsTner/TnL artists. Katie Sevigny Studio on Fourth Avenue features over 50 Alaskan artists from all over the First Friday, a local event that The state. promotes local artists with a walking tour of downtown restaurants, shops printmaking, painting, fibers and ceramics,” Steve Godfrey, and studios, has catapulted the local art scene into a torrent of success. In the last couple years, the an art professor at the University, said. For example, Shara Dorris, a former UAA student, is the event has gotten bigger and more organized and presents owner of Octopus Ink Clothing in downtown Anchorage. artists with the key opportunity to exhibit their work. “There are so many opportunities to get your work on “One thing that’s nice about First Friday and the venues in Anchorage in particular is that you can never have done a display and get your name out there,” Godfrey said. “The show before and somebody will give you a chance. It’s nice MTS Gallery, the International Gallery of Art and Out that the people in the community are backing it,” Whaley North have really influenced everything.” Nothing is wrong with a little traditional art; artists like Schmoyer, a local artist, said. Despite being the new kid on the block, the recent crop Fred Machentanz have become Alaskan icons. However, of contemporary art galleries has been well received. Virtu with the art reformation taking place in the state, people are was one of the first non-traditional galleries to open in starting purchase more locally made products and decorate Anchorage four and a half years ago and their venue has their lives with it. “I think Anchorage’s art scene is only going to get better proven to benefit the community in countless ways. as long as there are people who are willing to be daring. “Part of Virtu’s mission has been to provide accessible Tourists are always saying how they had no idea something art for people so they can have original work and broaden like this could be here,” Zawodny said. their exposure to the arts,” Cari Zawodny, owner of Virtu, Kevin Costner said it best in Field of Dreams: if you said. “None of this is possible if you don’t have people willing to take the risk and try to display their work and build it, they will come. How true—all these artists needed if you don’t have people willing to take risks to open the was a place to simply show what they made, and Anchorage ate it up like a kid in a candy shop. venue.” “People bond with their art. I have people come in at As could only be expected, the University of Alaska lunch and visit their favorite paintings—it’s their little Anchorage produces some of the local art scene’s freshest mental health break,” Zawodny said. talent. Many students, a good chunk of which are nontraditional and take one or two classes, are successfully exhibiting their work around the community. “A lot of students that stay around open their own galleries and exhibit their work. I think we contribute a lot to the community by providing those classes in


October 19, 2010 | FEATURES

09

Highlights of Homecoming Week 2010...

LoGan TUTTLe/TnL

LoGan TUTTLe/TnL

The tug-o-war challenge took place on Tuesday, Oct. 12 at the Cuddy Quad, as part of UAA Homecoming Week 2010. Two groups of students were divided into “skiers” and “snowboarders” based on their preference of outdoor recreation. The “skiers” (left), lost all three times to the snowboarders” (right).

LoGan TUTTLe/TnL

Above: UAA freshman James Klepzig (left), tracks down a throw from UAA senior Josh Cohen (right) during the Ultimate Frisbee game that took place at the Housing North Field Wednesday, Oct. 13. The game was part of UAA Homecoming Week 2010.

ashLey snyDer/TnL

The Dirty Dozen Brass Band from New Orleans marches through UAA’s campus on Thursday, Oct. 14. The band also performed at the Wendy Williamson Auditorium Friday, Oct. 15 to an almost packed house as part of Homecoming Week 2010. The band also performed in Fairbanks and Homer before making their way to Florida and then back to New Orleans for an upcoming performance on Oct. 31. They recently released a 25th anniversary re-mastered edition of the album titled “My Feet Can’t Fail Me Now”.

ashLey snyDer/TnL


ARTS&ENTERTAINMENT

10

POE: ‘The Death of Edgar Allen Poe’ to show at Grant Hall Shane Mitchell directs a play written to pay homage to a key writer and developer in the horror genre continued from COVER

hypotheses, according to Mitchell. Tragic almost doesn’t cover it. Mitchell, an avid fan of all things horror and Halloween, is also a fan of Poe, and not just of one or two of his works. “He’s been reduced to basically

two works: “The Raven” and “The Tell-Tale Heart.” He’s written more than 30 other stories and poems,” Mitchell stated. Coincidentally or not, those two works frame Mitchell’s play, “The Death of Edgar Allan Poe,” which he wrote in 1999. Every year, TBA Theatre puts on a

Tony Batres/TBA Theatre

In the last hours of his life Edgar Allan Poe (Wayne Mitchell) is tormented and surrounded by figures from his past and his dark imagination including the Shadow Women (Zoe Grenier, Kristin Fernandez, Eleanor Janecek Delaney and Angela Worthy) in TBA Theatre's THE DEATH OF EDGAR ALLAN POE presented October 22-31 at APU Grant Hall. This dark tale weaves Poe's work and memories as he descends into madness and death. Call TBA Theatre at 677-PLAY (7529) or email play@tbatheatre.org for tickets and information.

Halloween production, and this year is Poe’s turn. Mitchell’s play takes place the moment that Edgar Allan Poe dies, and reflects the vast majority of his life through Poe’s narration and memories, but it isn’t just a bio piece. Because so much of Poe’s writing reflected what he was experiencing in real life, his memories fade in and out with some of his more wellknown works. Seven, to be exact, beginning with “Tell-Tale Heart” and ending with “The Raven.” “The Masque of the Red Death” is a short story about a mysterious plague that kills within half an hour of infection, and a prince who retreats to an abbey with his court to escape the chance of catching the fatal illness. Mitchell characterizes this story beautifully in his play with an abnormally seductive waltz. While considered rigid and proper by today’s standards, during Poe’s lifetime the waltz was the most scandalous dance in popular culture, and Mitchell and his cast make a splendid attempt to recapture that mentality. Another of Poe’s works utilized is his short story, “Premature Burial,” which, naturally, deals with the fear of being buried alive. In the play’s rendition of the story, young actor Rhiannon Johnson, 16, who is both claustrophobic and afraid of matches, is forced to face her fears. She is carried on stage in a closed wooden coffin, and at one point lights a match while inside. “I’m okay with it because Shane asked me to do it, and I trust him,” she said. It isn’t just any coffin either, Johnson’s 16 minute final resting bed is a genuine Transylvanian coffin, complete with two wax Transylvania national seals the coffin was required to have in

order to go through customs. While vampire and horror fans around the world may very well kill for an opportunity like Johnson’s, she is understandably unimpressed. “No, a coffin’s a coffin. It’s a box,” she stated. Johnson, who is home-schooled but taking classes in dance and musical theatre at UAA, did say however, that as she grows used to and places more trust in the other cast members both carrying and sitting on the coffin, the easier the ordeal becomes. She’s a trooper. Mitchell wrote “The Death of Edgar Allan Poe” as a sort of homage piece to its namesake, whom Mitchell feels is never done justice in popular media. The production is very dark, splendidly eerie and a fantastic Halloween activity that the greater theater community in Anchorage was more than happy to assist with. There are 36 cast and crewmembers involved, some of which Mitchell claims are typically out of TBA’s affordability range but who wanted to be involved because the play is about Poe.

One such person is Elle Delaney, the make-up designer for the Anchorage Opera. Her stylings for Mitchell’s play give the actors the ‘coffin’ look, similar to the waxy look of a body at an open casket funeral, to add to the creepy feel of the production. “The experience begins the minute you step out of the car. It’ll be night, chilly, and you’ll have to walk from the parking lot across the lawn to the theater. And there’s a hearse parked right in front of the building,” Mitchell said. “I’m pretty sure we can promise the ultimate Halloween experience.” “The Death of Edgar Allan Poe” runs from Friday, Oct. 22 through Sunday, Oct. 31 at Alaska Pacific University’s Grant Hall Theater. For more information on showtimes and ticket prices, go to www.tbatheatre.org. Because “The Death of Edgar Allan Poe” is geared towards an older crowd, TBA Theatre is also putting on a children’s Halloween show, “Mr. Spiders’s Extra Scary Halloween.” More information can be found at TBA’s web-site.

Tony Batres/TBA Theatre

A young lady (Rhiannon Johnson) awakes to find she has been buried alive in "The Premature Burial" one of the feature works of Poe in TBA Theatre's THE DEATH OF EDGAR ALLAN POE presented October 22-31 at APU Grant Hall. This dark tale weaves Poe's work and memories as he descends into madness and death. Call TBA Theatre at 677-PLAY (7529) or email play@tbatheatre.org for tickets and information.

game review

‘Quantum Theory’ not the brightest gaming idea Tecmo’s new game has great potential, but doesn’t deliver past its concept and melee combat system By Bryan Dunagan The Northern Light

It’s a shame that the first shooter that comes from Tecmo is a lame duck. The game starts out with brooding hero Syd escaping from a collapsing tower called an Ark. By his side is Nyx, a heroine that fights with a sword. It’s an interesting concept in a shooter to have a character that relies almost solely on melee fighting, and leads to an interesting dichotomy; the player can work through the female sidekick to attack a large enemy. Unfortunately, Nyx dies and Syd escapes and laments that everyone he fights with dies. So

starts the story, with Syd brooding more than ever. After he meets up with a contingent of soldiers later on, who are afflicted with a tower that is consuming and changing the nearby populace. The game has great ideas, changing battlefields, a buxom heroine sidekick and interesting melee combat. Not to mention a mildly interesting story and coupled with some decent graphics, but it is basically a terribly re-skinned version of “Gears of War.” Where it excels however, is with an interesting melee system. Tapping “x” and timing it right by watching a contracting circle allows the gamer to pull off a pretty cool melee combo attack. Pressing “A” will attach Syd

to cover. Unfortunately, breaking cover is done the same way, and when the game hits the fan, it can lead to cheap deaths. On the bright side, Syd is a battle tank that can absorb more damage than a sponge absorbs water. With the game being a shooter, one would assume that the aiming would be up to snuff. It’s not, which is sad because that game has some of the best gun ideas in awhile, and they feel powerful. It’s satisfying to fire a gun that shoots exploding ninja stars that cause enemies to explode into a bloody cloud. This is a little hard to do, though, as the aiming is a bit too sluggish or a bit too responsive, depending on the situation. To exacerbate the issue, enemies are

wicked fast, and can result in a lot of lost ammo and angry gamers. The graphics are slick, but sometimes the special effects are just terrible. It’s almost like going back to the PS1 era of gaming, just in high-res. However, the game has an interesting art style that works well and is great to look at, when it works. It’s a shame that a game that uses two characters for most of the story does not have co-op. It would be a really neat idea if one player relied on guns, and the other on running in close to do quick kills. This would have made the game stand out so much more, but as it stands, the game just feels like stilted “Gears” clone.

GAME: “Quantum Theory” MAKER: Tecmo RELEASE DATE: Sept 28, 2010

★★


October 19, 2010 | A&E

TNL

11

mOvie review

‘Red’ a fresh take on graphic novel movie adaptations Bruce Willis’s new movie is fun, fluid and utterly hilarious, but the actor himself is more of the same By heather hamilton The Northern Light

“Retired Extremely Dangerous” is why being a secret agent is a bad idea. If you are good at your job, and you live long enough to retire, you can be sure that some kind of government conspiracy will turn up to eliminate you. In the case of Frank Moses (Bruce Willis “The Expendables”), a retired CIA agent, knowing too much and being too good at what he did landed him with a big stamp on his file labeling him as “RED.” After dispatching would-be assassins who attacked him in his home, Moses goes on a mission to discover why he’s being targeted, and assembles his old team to help him. “Red” isn’t the most thoughtprovoking movie of the year, nor is it the most original. It is however, a fun romp into the action comedy genre. Originally a DC graphic novel of the same name written by Warren Ellis and Cully Hamner, the movie features a few campy costumes, older actors that look as though they should be well out of

their prime and more than a few action and gun wielding sequences that could never happen in even our wildest dreams. But don’t hold any of that against the movie. Willis delivers punchy oneliners and dry wit that is up to par with his usual “action hero” roles. Unfortunately, while he is absolutely fantastic as Frank Moses, he doesn’t deliver anything new or exciting to the role. We’ve seen this Bruce Willis in nearly every action movie he’s been cast in, and while it’s fun, it isn’t as exciting as it used to be. Nothing can quite stand up to the hilarity of John Malkovich (“Jonah Hex”) as Marvin Boggs, a member of Moses’s former team. Not only does he deliver several well-timed one-liners that will keep an audience reeling in laughter, but he proves that both as an actor, and on screen as a retired CIA agent, that he’s still got a lot left to give. Dame Helen Mirren (“The Tempest”) as Victoria is a joy to watch. Her interactions with other characters feels genuine even when her character turns stonefaced and appears void of emotion.

Her humor, like that of most of the characters’, is mostly very dry with sarcasm tastefully woven

‘We’ve seen this Bruce Willis in nearly every action movie he’s been cast in, and while it’s fun, it isn’t as exciting as it used to be.’ in, and it both keeps her strangely aloof and oddly engaging. The only true crime in the entire movie is the distinct lack of Morgan Freeman (“Invictus”), who plays Joe Matheson, another of Moses’ old crew. While he is funny and endearing on screen as always, he is under utilized to a point that is borderline criminal. Even if he has more screen time than he does as Lucius Fox in the Batman movies, at least those movies give him more of a key role. Still, “Red” would be less

without his talents. The action sequences are often a little over the top, which is to be expected of a movie adapted from a DC comic book, but usually don’t do so to the point where the scene is too fake to appreciate. One scene of note, shown in the trailer, is of Willis’s character stepping out of a cop car in slow motion, while the car is spinning after being hit. He practically glides out of the vehicle, and misses being clipped in the calf by the back bumper be less than an inch before firing a gun at his pursuers. While this scene could easily look overly stylized and gaudy, director Robert Schwentke makes it looks smooth and fluid; much more natural. Unlike other graphic novel adaptations in recent years, the entirety of this movie’s cinematography sports a deliciously natural style that almost forces attention away from itself and thrusts it onto the characters, where the audience’s attention belongs. The breakdown: “Red” is as funny as it is action-based, has good acting and looks more realistic than gaudy. See it in

theaters; it’s worth the ticket price.

MoVIe: “red” DIreCTeD By: robert schwentke sTarrInG: Bruce Willis, John Malkovich rUn TIMe: 111 minutes Genre: action, Comedy

★★★★


12

TNL

A&E| October 19, 2010

Comedian singer Stephen Lynch a side splitting hit After his show at the Wendy, Stephen Lynch sat down with TNL’s Eli Wray for a one-on-one interview with comments about his newly grown beard, a witty and blithe Stephen Lynch sits down with The Northern Light backstage at the Wendy Williamson. TNL: I can’t resist, and I know your wife thinks you look like a young Santa, but I think you resemble more of a young Red Green.

TNL: He fixes things out of duct tape on public broadcasting.

TNL: You were raised by a nun and a priest…

SL: Oh yes, now I remember I’ll have to tell my wife; she’ll like that.

SL: Former nun and priest.

TNL: You’re good at that.

The Northern Light

Stephen Lynch could have been a rock star, but that wouldn’t have been as much fun. The New York based comedian wrapped up his 2010 ‘3 Balloons’ tour with a performance at UAA on October 13. For those that did not attend the show and do not know of Stephen Lynch, his music is similar to artists such as Tenacious D, Spinal

Tap, Flight of the Concords, and Bloodhound Gang. Yet somehow in a category with so many familiar artists, Lynch has managed to carve out his own niche in the comedy rock genre. His style ranges from heavy metal in ‘D&D’ to Salsa in ‘Dirty Sanchez’ played with David Josefsberg. His topics range from tattoos you’d regret in ‘Queer Tattoo’ to getting back at a wife that ran away with ‘some doctor named Bob’ in ‘Superhero’. After playing a show lush

TNL: Have you thought about a children’s book? SL: Actually no I haven’t. But now that you bring it up…

SL: Well, the answer to that question isn’t going to be as satisfying as it was to ask, unless you’re asking someone like Don Rickles. (He then proceeds to do a Don Rickles impression) I think the answer to that question is that while on stage I don’t really think about what other people feel. Ok that came out wrong, I care, I just try to make more fun of myself.

By eli Wray

SL: Any age really, as long as your children are mature enough.

SL: I don’t know who that is.

TNL: So first of all, how did you get into the business of offending people?

CoUrTesy PhoTo

TNL: Or so we hope. So at what age are you lullabies ok to sing to children?

SL: Thanks. TNL: How bad have you offended people with your music? SL: Some people used to get very upset with me back when nobody knew who I was. Back in my young Santa days, I would play open mics in the [Greenwich] Village at these poetry readings and such. But back then people didn’t know what to expect when I got on stage. Now, when people buy tickets they know what they are getting themselves into.

TNL: How does that affect your subject matter and decision to do comedy? SL: Well being raised around the Bible, it’s easy for me to go back to it whenever I need material. They say you write what you know. So I guess the Bible has given me some good fodder over the years. TNL: How does your family accept your music and what you do for a living? SL: They have always been very supportive of what I do. TNL: In 2006 you starred in the Broadway production of the ‘Wedding Singer’, and delivered an award winning performance. What did you do to make your part different than the Robbie that Adam Sandler portrayed? SL: I wore a different wig. TNL: I guess that would do it. SL: But I also watched the movie a bunch of times and copied everything he did. I didn’t watch it too much because I didn’t want to be the exact same character.

Plus the Broadway production had some changes made to it to adapt it to the stage. TNL: How did your degree in drama help you in preparing for the performance? SL: I was very comfortable on stage; my degree had a lot to do with that. TNL: So did you enjoy being on stage in a different capacity? SL: Yeah, it was fun. TNL: So should we expect to see you back on Broadway any time soon? SL: I don’t know… TNL: Maybe do a Nathan Lane kind of thing, wait 30 years, gain 40 pounds and then go back? SL: Yes, that’s my new plan. TNL: One last question, what do you want as your epitaph? SL: -pause-…Wow that’s a deep question, you’re making me think about death right after a show, what a transition. I guess it would be...‘Here lies Stephen…. I’ll get back to you.’ TNL: I hope you do. Stephen and his tour mates David Josefsberg and Drew Lynch headed back home after their Anchorage performance and are planning on taking a break to spend with family. For more information about Stephen Lynch such as concert dates, press releases, videos and music visit www.stephenlynch.com.

mUSiC review

‘Free Wired’ not worth the money Far East Movement’s new album needs to head back to the studio≠ By Bryan Dunagan The Northern Light

The album sounds like stepping on flaming geese through a synthesizer. That being said, the sound that the album uses is grating, and it reuses hooks throughout every song, almost making the listener want to carve out their brain with the accuracy of a backhoe. If anyone can get past the first song, which is like ripping off your toe with a pair of pliers, they will be treated to generic pop that sounds like synthesized explosions. Lyrically, the album is Godawful. Yes, it’s about partying, (which is what the music world is ablaze with,) but it’s horrible.

In the song, “Don’t Look Now,” it starts off with the line “I see you texting on your BB, can we exchange?” Seriously, if an Emcee is going to use an acronym, at least make sure it’s a well-known one. “She Owns the Night” is about a man takes a girl off of the dance floor and whisks her away to his house. He blindfolds her and tells her she can’t see where he lives. He later rescinds the statement, but if anyone likes that kind of near kidnapping, then they can join Ke$ha and her vomiting in various parts of the house. If this is where modern pop music is going, everyone should stop going to college, start drinking and have wanton sex with women who don’t know their first name, and while they’re at

it, they can set fire to geese and record it.

aLBUM: “Free Wired” arTIsT: Far east Movement reCorD LaBeL: Cherrytree, Interscope reLease DaTe: oct. 12, 2010


OPINION The Northern Light 3211 Providence Drive Student Union 113 Anchorage, AK 99508 Phone: 907-786-1513 Fax: 907-786-1331 info@thenorthernlight.org

eXeCUTIVe eDITor 786-1434 editor@thenorthernlight.org Josh Edge ManaGInG eDITor 786-1313 content@thenorthernlight.org Jerzy Shedlock CoPy eDITor copy@thenorthernlight.org Brittany Bennett neWs eDITor 786-1576 news@thenorthernlight.org Vacant FeaTUres eDITor 786-1567 features@thenorthernlight.org Katie Forstner a&e eDITor 786-6198 arts@thenorthernlight.org Heather Hamilton sPorTs eDITor 786-1512 sports@thenorthernlight.org Taylor Hall PhoTo eDITor 786-1565 photo@thenorthernlight.org Logan Tuttle WeB eDITor 786-1506 web@thenorthernlight.org Ashley Snyder LayoUT eDITor layout@thenorthernlight.org Lisa Wagner

13

eDiTOriaL

Vote in favor of the equal media fee split Senate hopefuls aren’t the only hot topic coming up in November

As you all know, or should know, each student pays a hefty amount of student fees every semester. If you look closely at your bill, you might notice that one of those fees is an $11 media fee. This particular constitutes a large portion of both The Northern Light’s and KRUA’s yearly budget. There is one problem, however. The fee is split and distributed unevenly, with The Northern Light receiving $5.75 and KRUA receiving $5.25. Does this seem a little lopsided to you? Because it looks lopsided to us – us being The Northern Light and KRUA. Well, this year both organizations are making an effort to change the distribution of that fee, we are seeking to instate an equal split.

But, in order to make this happen, we need your help. On the elections ballot in November, there will be a proposal that outlines the proposed change in the distribution of funds; and we need you, the students, to vote in favor of the proposition. It is important to realize that this is not an increase, the media fee will remain at $11 if this proposal is passed by the student body, it will only equalize the funding that TNL and KRUA receives from the fee. A $.25 change really does not seem like a whole lot, but, in actuality, it would total up to approximately $6,400 annually if the projected enrollments hold true. In a student organization, $6,400 is quite a large chunk of change and can go a very long

way toward the betterment of the organization. The reason that the fee was originally split the way it is, is because printing the paper costs a lot of money, and that extra couple of quarters was meant to offset that cost. It’s true, printing does cost quite a bit; this year printing costs have been projected at $41,935. Printing costs have gone down, however. So, that influx of cash is no longer needed for The Northern Light to make ends meet. On the other hand, KRUA’s costs have gone up substantially since this fee was first introduced. Almost everything that goes on at a radio station is dependent on technology to some extent, and I think we can all sympathize, knowing that technology is

expensive – especially the specialized and very technical equipment that is needed at KRUA. Bringing it back to the issue of voting; we need your vote on this issue. The approval of this fee would pave the way for the betterment of student media on campus as a whole. If passed, the new split in funds would likely begin in the Fall 2011 semester, and though it may not directly affect all of us involved in student media now, it will have an indisputably positive effect on the future of student media at UAA. So, this is our plea; please vote in favor of this proposal in November.

OPiNiON

A refreshing Nobel Peace Prize winner

assIsTanT neWs eDITor news2@thenorthernlight.org Vacant

Nobel recipient Lui Xiaobo leads non-violent struggle for human rights in China

assIsTanT FeaTUres eDITor features2@thenorthernlight.org Vacant

The Northern Light

assIsTanT a&e eDITor arts2@thenorthernlight.org Vacant GraPhIC DesIGner graphics@thenorthernlight.org Jessica Tiede aDVerTIsInG ManaGer 786-4690 ads@thenorthernlight.org Mariya Proskuryakova aDVerTIsInG rePresenTaTIVe Yulia Kim CIrCULaTIon assIsTanT Munkh-Erdene Tsend-Ochir PhoToGraPhers Daniel Jackson ConTrIBUTors Bryan Dunagan Megan Edge Daniel McDonald Melissa Newton Shana Roberson Stephanie Wonchala MeDIa aDVIser Paola Banchero aDMInIsTraTIVe aDVIser Annie Route The Northern Light is a proud member of the ASSOCIATED COLLEGIATE PRESS. The Northern Light is a weekly UAA publication funded by student fees and advertising sales. The editors and writers of The Northern Light are solely responsible for its contents. Circulation is 5,000. The University of Alaska Anchorage provides equal education and employment opportunities for all, regardless of race, color, religion, national origin, age, sex, Vietnam-era or disabled-veteran status, physical or mental disability, changes in marital status, pregnancy, or parenthood. The views expressed in the opinion section do not necessarily reflect the views of UAA or The Northern Light.

By Daniel McDonald

After the Norwegian Nobel Committee embarrassed themselves last year by granting their most prestigious award to an admittedly undeserving U.S. President, it would seem they have restored some of their credibility. On Oct. 8, Liu Xiaobo became the most recent recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize for his “long and non-violent struggle for fundamental human rights in China.” This decision will prove to be a prudent choice for two reasons. First, it was based on merit, unlike last year’s award. Second, it sends a message to the Chinese government that we in the West stand united in opposition to their trampling underfoot of political freedom. Liu has a long history of writing and distributing “subversive” material dating back to the infamous Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. Some of his more controversial positions seen as too unsavory for the likes of the Chinese public include a call for true democratic elections, support

for an increase in government accountability, and the separation of powers. He has also expressed a desire to advance personal freedoms, such as free speech and religion.

‘Ultimately it is China who has been tremendously more influenced by us than vice versa. Let’s not forget it took many tens of millions of deaths before they figured out the failures of communism.’ These views as well as others have landed him in prison on four separate occasions over the past 20 years. A year following his fourth

arrest, Liu was sentenced to 11 years for “spreading a message to subvert the country and authority.” It has been roughly a year since his trial, and despite the various calls for release from both the United States and European Union, the Chinese government has remained firm in maintaining his sentence. When news of Liu’s nomination spread, the Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson Ma Zhaoxu responded by saying, “Liu Xiaobo is a criminal... It’s a complete violation of the principles of the prize and an insult to the peace prize itself.” And characteristic of the Chinese government, all news of the award was censored throughout the country. Subsequently, a report was carried out by the Chinese state-run news agency Xinhua announcing that this decision may harm Chinese –Norwegian relations. I say good for Norway. Professor Milton Friedman once observed that, “History suggests only that capitalism is a necessary condition for political freedom. Clearly it is not a sufficient condition.”

PriDe

CHiDe

Homecoming staff...

Midterms...

.... for providing great food all week.

.... for stressing out UAA students.

And few countries have proved Friedman’s point better than China. Despite all the advances in the realm of economic freedom, it still heavily restricts freedom of speech, press, religion and due process of law. Some misguided human rights advocates insist that the United States and Europe implement a more restrictive trade policy with China in the form of tariffs and barriers. Instead, what must be done is to actually increase the flow of goods and people between the West and China. Ultimately it is China who has been tremendously more influenced by us than vice versa. Let’s not forget it took many tens of millions of deaths before they figured out the failures of communism. Perhaps it will take longer still before they realize the superiority of Western political freedom and individualism over tyranny and collectivism. Until the day the average Chinese citizen enjoys the same liberties as we in the West, we must do whatever we can to stand in solidarity with dissidents, such as Liu Xiaobo.


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BrOKeCOmiCS | Alec Fritz

TUNDra l Chad Carpenter

CrOSSwOrD

SODUKU

wOrDSearCH: SPaCe aND Time V Y L J F E S U W U S Y Z U G

T Z P D E L O N M N C T B Z N

TNL

COMICS| October 19, 2010

Y C R H C N I R O F R I Z N P

S Y A W I E E I L J D V U A Q

E U P R T L S F O H M I R D U

M E B S E N O J X H E T C L A

X U N A E S P K Q K I A O O R

Z I T M T H S T I C B L N F K

E O I N Y O I E L G N E T I S

S D F S A U M E T S Z R I N Z

M B I X O U S I E D S J N A Z

N C C K G R Q H C Q E Q U M G

S X L S P A C E T I M E U H L

Y T I V A R G O M E F S M V P

S A N O X E B U C R E P Y H F

CONTINUUM DIMENSIONS EINSTEIN GRAVITY HYPERCUBE MANIFOLD PARTICLES PHILO PHYSICS QUANTUM QUARKS RELATIVITY SPACETIME SUBATOMIC TESSERACT

LaST weeK’S SOLUTiONS:

ACROSS 1 Daytime drama 5 — Canaveral 9 Temporary job 12 Week da. 13 Overjoy 15 Viking letter 16 Till 17 Chill out 18 Not mention 19 First-stage rocket 21 Wields a sword 23 At the drop of — — 24 Pre-equinox mo. 25 Type of tire 28 Like a teenager 33 On both feet 34 Janitors’ tools 35 Calculator key 36 — de guerre 37 The Rumba King 38 Ms. Peeples of TV 39 Green-egg layers 41 Dye-yielding plant 42 Bed supports 44 Sirens 46 Meadow blossom 47 Recipe word 48 Reluctant investor 49 Wicks soak it up (2 wds.) 53 Yerevan is its capital 57 PDQ 58 Gauges 60 Slow time 61 Lean and sinewy 62 Rock debris 63 Topo info 64 Jazz instrument 65 Part of SWAK 66 Rick’s old flame DOWN 1 Pencil remnant 2 Cry of dismay (2 wds.) 3 Vehicle 4 Boring 5 Quick breakfast 6 Police bulletin 7 Crony 8 State, in Paris 9 Chewable sticks 10 Monogram pt. 11 Obtains 14 Deplete 15 Golf course areas 20 One of those 22 Wheel track 25 Overhaul 26 Kind of therapy 27 Express doubts 28 Asana practicers

29 30 31 32 34 37 40 42 43 45 46 48 49 50 51 52 54 55 56 59

Silica mineral Last Join together Minimum Bean-sprouts bean Unposed photos Make it —! Thailand, once Rhine nymph Familiar vow (2 wds.) Poem segments Bundles of hay Scientific principles Where India is Zeppo or Chico Seal an envelope Empty, in math Dots in the Seine Inventor’s middle name Jackie’s tycoon

“It always seems impossible until its done.” nelson Mandela


October 19, 2010 | COMICS

TNL HOrOSCOPe l Stella Wilder THE COMING WEEK IS LIKELY TO REQUIRE MORE IN THE WAY OF SELFKNOWLEDGE, SELF-AWARENESS AND SELF-ASSESSMENT THAN USUAL, AS CIRCUMSTANCES CONSPIRE TO TAKE MOST INDIVIDUALS OUTSIDE OF THEIR COMFORT ZONES AND DEMAND BOTH THOUGHT AND ACTION THAT DOES NOT COME NATURALLY. AT WORK AND AT PLAY, SITUATIONS COME AND GO RAPIDLY THAT ARE LIKELY TO KEEP ONE SOMEWHAT OFF BALANCE, AND YET THERE ARE MANY REWARDS TO BE ENJOYED AT THIS TIME, PROVIDED, OF COURSE, THAT ONE DOES NOT ALLOW HIM OR HERSELF TO DRIFT TOO FAR OFF-CENTER AND DISAVOW HIS OR HER INSTINCTS.

Leadership Honors are awarded to individuals upon graduation in order to recognize and honor their leadership contributions to the University of Alaska Anchorage while maintaining academic excellence. Leadership activities must enhance the educational mission of UAA, but more importantly, offer other students the opportunity to grow and excel. Involvement must promote individual and collective growth, thereby enhancing student life at UAA.Recipients of UAA Leadership Honors will have a permanent notation of the award on their transcripts and be commemorated at the spring Commencement ceremony. Further eligibility criteria and information regarding the awarding process can be found in the application. Please encourage the student leaders in your organization who are graduating in December to apply. Applications are due by 5 pm on Friday, October 22, 2010 and can be dropped off or sent to: STUDENT CLUBS AND GREEK LIFE University of Alaska Anchorage 3211 Providence Drive Student Union 210 Anchorage, Alaska 99508 Please contact Student Life and Leadership at 786-1371 with any questions.

UAA is an EEO/AA employer and educational institution.

let it snow

©Simon Evans

SCORPIO (OCT. 23-NOV. 7) -- SOMEONE IS LIKELY TO CHECK ON YOU MORE THAN ONCE, BUT THIS IS MORE A REFLECTION ON HIM OR HER THAN IT IS ON YOU. (NOV. 8-NOV. 21) -- PROGRESS MAY BE HALTED FOR A TIME TOWARD MIDWEEK WHEN YOU HAVE TO DEAL WITH AN UNEXPECTED ISSUE THAT SPRINGS UP FROM DEEP WITHIN. ANSWERS ARE FEW AT FIRST. SAGITTARIUS (NOV. 22-DEC. 7) -- YOU MAY NOT BE ABLE TO KEEP THE LINES OF COMMUNICATION OPEN AS MUCH AS YOU LIKE TO; REMAIN CALM, ACCESSIBLE. (DEC. 8-DEC. 21) -- YOU MAY HAVE OTHERS WONDERING IF YOU’RE DOING THINGS FOR ALL THE RIGHT REASONS -- AND INDEED EVEN YOU MAY HAVE A FEW QUESTIONS IN THAT REGARD. CAPRICORN (DEC. 22-JAN. 6) -- YOU’RE LIKELY TO FIND YOURSELF GETTING STRESSED OVER TRIVIALITIES IF YOU DON’T LET THINGS PAN OUT A BIT MORE BEFORE REACTING. (JAN. 7-JAN. 19) -- IT’S IMPORTANT FOR YOU TO KNOW WHAT YOU’RE TALKING ABOUT BEFORE EXPRESSING THOSE OPINIONS OF YOURS. NOT EVERYONE WILL RESPOND FAVORABLY. AQUARIUS (JAN. 20-FEB. 3) -- OTHER PEOPLE AREN’T LIKELY TO TAKE YOU SERIOUSLY FOR VERY LONG IF YOU DO NOT TEMPER AND MODERATE YOUR REACTIONS TO WHAT GOES ON AROUND YOU. (FEB. 4-FEB. 18) -- A LITTLE CAN GO A LONG WAY, ESPECIALLY WHEN IT COMES TO ANGER, FRUSTRATION AND OTHER NEGATIVE EMOTIONS. KEEP THEM IN CHECK. PISCES (FEB. 19-MARCH 5) -- YOU CAN DO MORE GOOD TAKING CARE OF THINGS FROM BEHIND THE SCENES THAN YOU CAN UP FRONT AND IN THE SPOTLIGHT. (MARCH 6-MARCH 20) -- THE TIME HAS COME FOR YOU TO STEP BACK AND LET SOMEONE ELSE TAKE IT FROM HERE. HE OR SHE IS READY TO PROVE TO YOU THAT YOUR TEACHINGS HAVE BEEN WELL WORTH IT. ARIES (MARCH 21-APRIL 4) -- A MILD INTEREST IS LIKELY TO GROW INTO AN ALL-CONSUMING PASSION -- OR, AT THE VERY LEAST, SOMETHING YOU WANT TO PURSUE FURTHER. (APRIL 5-APRIL 19) -- YOU AND A FRIEND MAY REACH AN IMPASSE OVER AN ISSUE THAT YOU BOTH FEEL STRONGLY ABOUT BUT HAS YOU DISAGREEING OVER THE FINE POINTS. TAURUS (APRIL 20-MAY 5) -- NOW’S THE TIME TO STEP FORWARD AND SHOW EVERYONE WHAT YOU ARE MADE OF -- AND DON’T LET ANYONE STAND IN YOUR WAY. (MAY 6-MAY 20) -- YOU AND A CO-WORKER MAY NOT AGREE ON THE BEST WAY TO ACHIEVE YOUR DESIRED ENDS, BUT AT LEAST YOU ARE ON THE SAME PAGE ABOUT WHERE YOU WANT TO END UP. GEMINI (MAY 21-JUNE 6) -- YOU MAY NOT GET THE REACTIONS YOU EXPECT WHEN YOU BEHAVE IN WAYS THAT ARE CALCULATED TO GET REACTIONS. (JUNE 7-JUNE 20) -- ARE YOUR MOTIVES PURE? IF NOT, YOU’RE LIKELY TO FIND YOURSELF GETTING INTO MORE TROUBLE THAN USUAL -AND OF A KIND THAT IS NOT QUICKLY OR EASILY RESOLVED. CANCER (JUNE 21-JULY 7) -- WHAT GOES AROUND COMES AROUND, AND YOU MUST BE PREPARED TO GET A LITTLE OF YOUR OWN BACK, BUT IT MIGHT NOT BE IN PROPORTION. (JULY 8-JULY 22) -- YOU’RE WAITING FOR SOMETHING TO END AND ANOTHER SOMETHING TO START, BUT SUCH CLEAN ENDINGS AND BEGINNINGS ARE NOT FAVORED. THINGS MAY GET HAZY. LEO (JULY 23-AUG. 7) -- YOUR PROSPECTS ARE LOOKING GOOD, BUT SOMEONE MAY DECIDE TO STAND IN YOUR WAY. HIS OR HER MOTIVES ARE NOT CLEAR TO YOU -- YET. (AUG. 8-AUG. 22) -- DESPITE ALL THE REMINDERS YOU ARE LIKELY TO GET, IT MAY BE DIFFICULT TO REMEMBER TO DO ONE SPECIFIC THING UPON WHICH EVERYTHING ELSE DEPENDS. GET IT DONE. VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 7) -- TIME MAY NOT BE ON YOUR SIDE, PER SE, BUT YOU CAN SURELY USE CERTAIN MOMENTS VERY MUCH TO YOUR ADVANTAGE. (SEPT. 8-SEPT. 22) -- YOU’RE GETTING DOWN TO BUSINESS NOW, AND YOU’LL WANT TO FIND YOUR TRUE STRIDE BEFORE THE WEEK IS OUT. DON’T HESITATE TO GET ADVICE FROM SOMEONE WHO HAS BEEN IN YOUR SHOES. LIBRA (SEPT. 23-OCT. 7) -- NOW IS THE TIME TO MAKE YOUR WISHES KNOWN; YOU’VE BEEN WAITING FOR OTHERS TO READ YOUR MIND FOR FAR TOO LONG, ACTUALLY. (OCT. 8-OCT. 22) -- FOCUS ON GETTING DONE THOSE THINGS THAT OTHERS NEED DONE AS WELL. THEN, AND ONLY THEN, CAN YOU SPEND TIME EXAMINING WHAT IT IS YOU MUST DO WHEN YOU HAVE THE TIME.

Buy your 2010-11 College Season Pass Now & Save $200! Pre-Season Sale ends October 31 Flexible class schedule? Midweek College Pass (valid M-F) only $560 New! Buddy Discount Grab a buddy & save more money! Buy passes online or call 754-2275

907-754-1111

alyeskaresort.com

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10-19-10F  

By heather hamilton By Jerzy shedlock Processed diversity Diversity in droves By Taylor hall S ee forum PAGe 04 S ee HocKeY PAGe 06 When int...

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