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according to information from the city of Marysville. In addition, the Marysville Police Department participates in the North Snohomish County Property Crimes Unit in partnership with the Sheriff ’s Office. The unit made 633 arrests with 394 in Marysville and recovered $174,000 worth property, ac-

425-422-3888 Marysville

“It is continuing with its success,” Thomas said. Starting in 2018, officer Mike Buell and county social worker Rochelle Long work to build relationships with people they meet on the streets, in homeless camps and in the jail. In 2019, 89 people completed dependency assessment, 13 completed mental

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cording to information from the city of Marysville. The Marysville Police Department instituted an Embedded Social Worker Team that pairs an officer with a social worker to go out into the community to try to connect with the homeless and people who have addictions and mental health issues.

les

Vol. 13 No. 20 n

PAID

COURTESY PHOTO

Members of the Marysville Police Department and staff members of Marysville Toyota after a "Coffee with A Cop" community event hosted at Marysville Toyota.

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Over the course of 2019, Marysville residents saw a nearly 9 percent reduction in crime. Over the course of the past four years, crime in the city has gone down 19.45 percent. Marysville Police Commander Mark Thomas described 2019 as "busy" as officers’ efforts to address specific crime issues and repeat offenders helped with the reduction in crime. He also cited the efforts of the department's crime analyst who helped in finding geographic trends in specific areas of the city. In 2019, officers initiated or responded to more than 71,000 cases. Thomas highlighted the efforts of the department's ProAct team that consists of one sergeant and three officers that proactively works to reduce crime and target repeat offenders. He said a lot of crime comes back to narcotics and the team seized 419 grams of methamphetamine, around 40 grams of cocaine and 1,400 pills. The team also made 413 arrests in 2019,

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Pages 9-16

February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020

MARYSVILLE • ARLINGTON • SMOKEY POINT • LAKEWOOD • TULALIP • QUIL CEDA VILLAGE

Mayor Nehring delivers State of the City address By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring discussed transportation improvements, public safety and parks upgrades at his recent State of the City address on Jan. 31. Nehring spoke to community members and business leaders at the Marysville Tulalip Chamber of Commerce’s January meeting to give the address. Police and jails remain a large expense for the city “Public safety is by far the largest expenditure in a city or county budget,” said Nehring. For the past five years the city of Marysville has reported less crime each year, he said. Nehring points to the NITE team and other agency programs to explain the drop, which are proactive groups within the Marysville Police Department that are meant to address crimes. Last year the team had

Locals learn about environment at Arlington's Eagle Festival By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

413 arrests, 54 warrants and 20 cases of property recovered. The city plans to continue hiring police officers. “We’re in a hiring spree and it’s difficult to hire police officers right now,” he said. The Embedded Social Worker program which partners police officers with social workers is scheduled

Arlington residents got to learn about eagles up close, go on nature walks and learn from local organizations at the annual Eagle Festival. The festival was held Jan. 31 and Feb. 1 this year, with the majority of activities on Saturday. Environmental groups come out to interact with families and talk about their work during the festival. This year instead of being at the City Council chambers those groups were moved to Haller Middle School, which was the biggest change to this year's festival. The additional space meant the festival could bring in more organizations. "We're really excited

See CITY on page 3

See EAGLE on page 2

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Marysville Mayor Jon Nehring talks at the Marysville Tulalip Chamber of Commerce’s Jan. meeting to give his State of the City address on Jan. 31.

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

One of the chainsaw carvers at Arlington's Eagle Festival on Feb. 1 works on a wood sculpture.

Marysville school boundaries could be finalized soon By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Marysville School District Superintendent Jason Thompson talks about proposed school boundaries at a community forum on Jan. 30

The Marysville School District may soon have new middle school and high school boundaries and a possibly final proposal has been presented to local parents. District officials met with local residents in a series of community forums in January to gather feedback of the new plan. “In March 2019 the [school] board decided to move to two comprehensive high schools and away

from the old SLC model,” said Scott Beebe, assistant superintendent of the Marysville School District. “When they did that they decided to move to boundaries for the two high schools." The school board also wanted to move to a feeder model for elementary schools so that kids who go to kindergarten together would stay together throughout their schooling. A committee consisting mostly of parents was formed by the school

district to put together the boundary proposal. “We tried hard to make sure our representation was from across the district,” said Beebe. Marysville School District Superintendent Jason Thompson thanked the committee members for their work. “Whenever you talk about changing boundaries in a school district, it’s a very sensitive subject,”

See BOUNDARIES on page 2

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February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

s ’ h a e L eads L Check out these upcoming local events! FEBRUARY Now

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Youth Spring Soccer Registration Now thru February 12 City of Marysville (360) 363-8400 2020 Fed Cup: World Cup of Tennis February 7 - 8, Times Vary Angel of the Winds Arena www.angelofthewindsarena.com

8

Father-Daughter Valentines Dance February 8, 5:30pm – 7:00pm and 7:30pm – 9:00pm Cedarcrest Middle School www.marysvillewa.gov

8

Valentine Pet Food Drive February 8, 12:00pm – 3:00pm Skookum Brewery, Arlington (360) 403-7094

9 10

That Magnificent Mozart! Everett Philharmonic February 9, 3:00pm Everett Civic Auditorium www.everettphil.org Community Health of Snoh Cte Health & Social Services Signup February 10, 4:00pm – 6:00pm Darrington Library www.sno-isle.libnet.info

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Outdoor Speaker: Rudy Giesek February 11, 6:30pm – 8:30pm Marysville Opera House www.marysvillewa.gov

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Dueling Pianos February 14, 6:30pm – 9:30pm Marysville Opera House www.marysvillewa.gov

14

Mother-Son Superhero Dance March 14, 5:00pm – 6:30pm & 7:00pm – 8:30pm Registration began January 7 Cedarcrest Middle School www.marysvillewa.gov

Communities BOUNDARIES

ceive free/reduced lunch are not too concentrated at any one school, said Beebe. Officials also tried to balance the two high schools in terms of total attendance. “Right now we have a very large difference between the two high schools in enrollment,” said Beebe. “That creates a disparate experience for the kids in the number of courses we can offer and programs we can offer." This is the reason why Sunnyside Elementary students head to M-PHS in the model, he said. Sunnyside’s service area also shares a border with Tulalip Quil Ceda's area, which makes bus routes more efficient, said Beebe. The middle school boundaries were a challenge. “These were by far the hardest to come up with anything that made sense,” said Beebe. Besides 10th Street Middle School, all of the district’s middle schools are close to each other. “They are crazy close together for an area the size we serve,” said Beebe. In the model, Liberty Elementary students are bused to Cedarcrest Middle School, despite two middle schools being in their service area. Beebe noted this region has high student density, so running buses there does not cost as much. “We have three schools that are

Continued from page 1

said Thompson. “I appreciate the work of the committee. It’s been a long process and a very difficult process,” he said. Under the model recommended by the committee, students who go to Pinewood, Kellogg Marsh or Liberty elementary schools would go to Cedarcrest Middle School and then Marysville Getchell High School. Students who go to Marshall, Quil Ceda Tulalip or Sunnyside elementary schools would attend Totem Middle School and then to Marysville-Pilchuck High School. Grove Elementary and Allen Creek Elementary students will head to Marysville Middle School and then to Getchell. Cascade Elementary and Shoultes Elementary students would also go to Marysville Middle School but then to M-PHS. The Marysville Cooperative Education Partnership, 10th Street Middle School, Heritage High School and Legacy High School remain as choice schools. Many of the boundary decisions were made in mind to make sure that students of color and/or those who re-

EAGLE Continued from page 1

to have this new space at Haller Middle School so that we could invite 24 organizations," said Sarah Lopez, community revitalization project manager and one of the main organizers of the event. "It's a really good turnout and we're happy that it's going so well," she said. Lopez said she got the idea from Tamara Neuffer, an outreach and education specialist at the Stillaguamish Tribe and who is one of the main organizers of the Festival of the River.

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"We wanted to do what we do at the Festival of the River and put all of our educators together and create a bingo card for the kids to give out prizes," she said. Many families came out to Haller Middle School to see the organizations. "So far, we're feeling really good. It's only 40 minutes in and were filled with people already," said Neuffer. Other events returned as part of the festival as well, including Sarvey Wildlife Center displaying eagles and other birds of prey, chainsaw carvers working at the Legion Park

significantly different in terms of economics,” said Beebe. Quil Ceda Tulalip, Cascade and Liberty elementary all have high rates of free/reduced lunch and therefore couldn’t feed to the same middle school. Due to this and other considerations, Liberty Elementary to Cedarcrest Middle School was the preferred choice from the boundaries committee. The Marysville School District has committed that if these boundaries are adopted there will be no disruption to current high school students, said Beebe. “We’ve already committed that we will grandfather kids into their existing high school,” he said. “We will also provide transportation,” as the district did not want to penalize those families who could not provide their own transportation. The initial presentation of the boundary proposal was slated go before the school board on Feb. 3 although a final vote is not scheduled for that time. “There’s a misconception that the decision is already made. This is a board decision,” said Beebe. Beebe said that the decision should be done by March 2 if the board wants to enact boundaries the next school year.

parking lot, and nature and bird identification walks. The festival is meant to help families connect with the nature around them. "It's fun," said local parent Barry Moss. He said his two daughters liked "the science, learning things about the fish and about the water and about the animals." Parent Emily Goodman said she was enjoying herself. "It's fantastic. There's lots of fun stuff to do and great stuff for kids and adults," she said. "We came from Camano and we're enjoying it a lot."

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We're really excited to have this new space at Haller Middle School so that we could invite 24 organizations.

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Sarah Lopez

Organizations also liked the opportunity to talk to families. "Actually, someone from PUD came up to me and told us that it was awesome and they were getting so many people at their booth," said Neuffer. Department of Fish and Wildlife habitat biologist Lindsey Desmul also said the event was useful. "I think it's really neat. It's nice that it's in the gym so that people can walk around and interact. It's great coming out here and honoring our eagles," she said.

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Communities

February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

3

Grace Academy completes expansion By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Grace Academy expanded their campus with new classrooms and a new cafeteria that were opened in January. The $6 million expansion for the Marysville private school began construction in January of 2019 and opened this year. The project has been in the works for a while. “We started in 2013, and there were just a number of delays along the way,” said school administrator Timothy Lugg. “It’s just a huge blessing to, number one, get the project finished, but also just to use these spaces. It’s refreshing and we’re excited about the student learning,” he said. Students had their first day in the expansion on Jan. 27. “They’re enjoying the new space,” said Grace Academy teach-

CITY Continued from page 1

to continue with support from the City Council. “The idea is to build a relationship over a few weeks and really plead with these people to get into treatment,” said Nehring. “We do have a carrot and stick approach. They will be fairly patient, but if the help is not accepted we will process outstanding warrants,” he said. The program is responsible for 55 detoxes, 105 people getting into in-patient treatment and 113 people receiving temporary housing and has recorded nearly 2,000 encounters. For housing, the city continues operate some MESH houses and just opened their third such house. “These are city-owned houses for people that have been through some kind of program and need housing to have more time to get back on their feet,” said Nehring. The city hopes to partner to create more houses if possible. “We’re looking to open more and we seek partners,” he said. Nehring also discussed new businesses coming to the city. “We love the fact that new businesses are opening every single year here in Marysville,” he said. Last year saw many new businesses such as 5-Rights Brewing and Boost Mobile, and more are scheduled for 2020, such as Bindi Hot Yoga and Gourmet Latte. City officials also hope to bring in more manufacturing jobs with the Cascade Industrial Center. Last year the Puget Sound Regional Council named the area just the second officially designated manufacturingindustrial center in the

er Elizabeth Callaghan. “They have been enthusiastic about getting to tasks. There’s more space for them,” she said. “For them to be able to get into groups and not be right on top of each other is so much easier.” The impetus for the expansion project for the school was their old science lab, which Lugg said wasn’t adequate. “The other lab was probably around half this size and it was difficult to do anything,” he said. Storage space was lacking and the room wasn’t outfitted specifically for science projects like the school’s new space is.’ “As a smaller school, we have one lab, so this has to accommodate biology, chemistry and physics,” said Lugg. The new science lab features better technology for demonstrating experiments. All of the new classrooms have

county. That designation helps the area be eligible for federal funds to improve infrastructure. Marysville officials hope the area attracts better jobs for residents. “I think we do really good at quality of life, but what we need to improve on is family-wage jobs,” said Nehring. As growth comes to the city, more transportation infrastructure will be needed as well, said Nehring. The I-5/SR-529 interchange is getting closer with construction possible next year. “This is critical to Marysville. It will be the only way into the city that avoids the train tracks and it will divert some traffic from that failing intersection on Fourth Street,” said Nehring. The First Street bypass, already under construction now, will allow the downtown area another corridor to the Sunnyside neighborhood as well. “A lot of our growth is in that Sunnyside region, and those people will be able to turn right into this bypass when they get off the highway,” said Nehring. Finally, State Avenue will be five lanes across its entirety soon, with construction currently going on between 100th Street and 104th Street. The final hurdle for the city was a culvert that will become a bridge, but a good amount of funding coming from the state allowed the city to start that project, said Nehring. Nehring said the city is also looking to improve it’s parks. The Ebey Waterfront Trail and Bayview Trail could receive extensions, although the Bayview connection to Centennial Trail has been delayed to 2021 be-

new technology as well, such as smart whiteboards. “The neatest thing is that right away this week it was already improving learning,” said Callaghan. “I had four students up at the same time writing principles on the board,” she said. The smart whiteboards allow teachers to pull up images from their computer and make notes directly on the screen for students, among other features. “It’s not like we didn’t have technology in our old rooms. I had a projector, I had a document camera,” said Callaghan. “But they were slower, even the turn on in the morning, and there’s no prep time with the interactive white board." The expansion also features a new cafeteria for the school. Formerly students ate at tables put up on the stage of the school. Now there’s a dedicated cafete-

cause of state funding. The Cedar Field baseball field is also receiving improvements. “This thing was getting really run down. We lost some lights that had been blown over by the wind,”

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Elizabeth Callaghan, a Grace Academy teacher, demonstrates the use of one of the interactive whiteboards that were part of a recently completed expansion on Jan. 29. ria area. “And the stage will be dedicated to the fine arts now,” said Lugg. This is the first time the building will have an elevator as well. “We’re fully ADA compliant with an elevator, which we’ve

said Nehring. Local partners including Marysville Little League helped to fundraise for the improvements. “There will be a new fully turfed field, fully lighted. We will be able to play in the

never had in this building before,” said Lugg. “We frequently have students that are injured and they’ve had to make due with our stairs, and now they have something better,” he said.

night again,” said Nehring. To look toward the future and to manage growth, Nehring has also started a new committee, the Mayor’s Task Force on Growth Management, for citizens who are concerned about how the

city will change. “We just want to make sure that as we grow we want to respect our values,” said Nehring. “We’ll look at how we want to grow as a community,” he said.


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Sports

February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

M-P battles for 61-57 victory over Chargers By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com The Marysville-Pilchuck boys basketball team, which is undefeated in league play, hosted their crosstown rival Marysville Getchell Chargers in one of the most highly anticipated matchups of the season on Jan. 31. From the tip-off, the Tomahawks used their length on defense to keep the Chargers along the perimeter and worked the ball inside on the offensive end. Over the first half of the quarter MarysvillePilchuck generated a slight lead on a 14-8 run. After the slow start, Marysville Getchell bounced back with

better ball movement and drew fouls to match the Tomahawks the rest of the way, 8-8, as they entered the second quarter down 2216. Through the rest of the half the Chargers found a rhythm and outscored the Tomahawks 11-5, as their star guard Malakhi Knight scored six of their 11 points. Entering halftime both teams were back at square one, tied 27-27. The Tomahawks came out in the second half with renewed energy as they pushed the pace and used their athleticism to score inside and outside. Over the first four minutes of the half they outscored the Chargers

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Luke Dobler, Tomahawks’ senior guard, brings the ball up the court as the Chargers’ junior guard Cole Norton plays full court defense in the first quarter at Marysville-Pilchuck High School on Jan. 31.

12-7 to extend their lead to 39-34. Over the final few minutes of the third quarter Marysville Getchell inched back to a one-point deficit before Marysville-Pilchuck’s Cameron Stordahl hit a three-point buzzer beater to end the quarter up 47-43. In the final quarter neither team was going to allow easy points. The Chargers made up the ground early as they tied up the game, 49-49, with 5:30 left on the clock. They continued to go back and forth with tough shots made all over the court as they were tied once again, 53-53, with 2:44 left. Over the final few minutes the Tomahawks were able to hit just a couple more shots as they walked away with the 61-57 victory over the Chargers. “There’s something to say about a rivalry game and it’s a unique game when you have the entire city out there. We have so many great players and the key to our success is teamwork and balance. We do what we can to put them in the best position possible, but at the end of the day we have guys that can make plays,” said Marysville-Pilchuck Head Coach Bary Gould. The Tomahawks relied heavily on their senior forwards and center Aaron Kalab, Cameron Stordahl and Ethan Jackson. Kalab dominated inside as he led the team with 18 points,

six rebounds and one assist. Stordahl was right behind the team-high with 16 points along with three three-pointers, three assists, three rebounds and one block. Jackson was the final double-digit scorer for the Tomahawks, finishing with 14 points, six rebounds, four assists and a block. Stordahl and Jackson are currently playing their second year at MarysvillePilchuck after transferring from Marysville Getchell following their sophomore season. Pilchuck’s senior guard duo of Luke Dobler and Brady Phelps organized the offense and played smart on both ends. Dobler filled the stat sheet scoring nine points, one three-pointer, two assists, five rebounds and a steal. Phelps was able to contribute with a gamehigh six assists, four points, four rebounds and two steals. “It’s been an uphill battle for us at Marysville Getchell in terms of everyone buying in and people believing in what we have going on. We’ve had a lot of pain in our program over the last couple of years, but I think we came out tonight to show we have a lot of pride and a lot of heart. I’m really proud of them and wish we could have seen them play it out at the end,” said Marysville Getchell Head Coach Corby Schuh. Malakhi Knight, junior

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Chargers’ junior guard Alex Owens slips through the Tomahawks’ defense and scores on the layup late against senior forward Cameron Stordahl at Marysville-Pilchuck High School on Jan. 31. guard, had an incredible performance on both ends of the floor, while seeming to score at will. He scored a game-high 34 points with two three-pointers while going four-for-four at the line. Knight filled out the rest of his stats with three assists, seven rebounds and three steals. The Chargers had a great supporting cast in Josiah Koellmer, Austin Townsend, Alex Owens and Will Dunn. Koellmer, junior guard, was the only other player to hit doubledigits wit 10 points, three three-pointers, for assists, one rebound and two steals.

Townsend, junior forward, scored four points with one assist, two rebounds and one steal. Off the bench Owens, junior guard, and Dunn, senior forward, combined for nine points, two assists, seven rebounds and a steal. The Tomahawks will only have one game left at home this season as they will take on another top team in the Stanwood Spartans on Monday, Feb. 10, at 7:15 p.m. Marysville Getchell’s next home game will be against the Snohomish Panthers on Wednesday, Feb. 5, at 7:15 p.m. as they battle for a late season run.

High School Winter Sports Marysville-Pilchuck Tomahawks BOYS BASKETBALL Feb. 7 Feb. 10

Games begin at 7:15 p.m.

Everett Stanwood

Away Home

Arlington Eagles

GIRLS BASKETBALL EvtHS M-PHS

Feb. 6 Feb. 10

Games begin at 7:15 p.m.

Everett Stanwood

Home Away

GIRLS BASKETBALL M-PHS StanHS

Feb. 6 Feb. 10

Games begin at 7:15 p.m.

Snohomish Marysville-Getchell

Away Home

BOYS BASKETBALL SnoHS ArlHS

BOYS SWIM

Feb. 6

Meet begin at 4 p.m.

JV Qualifier 4 p.m.

Home

Feb. 6

Game begins at 7:15 p.m.

Lynden Christian

Home

GIRLS BASKETBALL Feb. 7 Feb. 10

BOYS BASKETBALL LWHS

Feb. 6

Games begin at 7:15 p.m.

Oak Harbor Snohomish Marysville-Getchell

Away Home Home

Game begins at 7:15 p.m.

7:15 p.m. Away

Games begin at 7:15 p.m.

Oak Harbor Arlington

Away Home

BOYS BASKETBALL OHHS MGHS

BOYS SWIM

LCHS

Schedules subject to change. For more information, visit www.wescoathletics.com.

Feb. 6

Meet begins at 4 p.m.

JV Qualifier 4 p.m.

Home

Feb. 5 Feb. 7 Feb. 10

Games begin at 7:15 p.m.

Snohomish Oak Harbor Arlington

Home Home Away

M-PHS

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Carl’s Jr. Cascade Veterinary Clinic Chinook Lumber CLC Licensing Community Health Center Cuz Concrete Defensive Driving School Dr. Scott Stayner E&E Lumber Edward Jones-Andy Smith Edward Jones-Loren Van Loo Flowers by George Gary Wright Realty Gary’s Gutters Gilmore Insurance H&M Electric Heritage Bank-Marysville Hibulb Cultural Center Honda of Marysville Julie’s Licensing

OHHS ArlHS ArlHS

Marysville Getchell Chargers

M-PHS

Lakewood Cougars GIRLS BASKETBALL

Feb. 5 Feb. 7 Feb. 10

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Paraiso Restaurant Parr Lumber Peterson Family Chiropractic Pilchuck Rentals Port Gardner Bay Winery Port of Subs-Tulalip Reaction Physical Therapy (Arlington|Smokey Point) Rex’s Rentals Rhodes River Ranch Riverside Topsoil Roy Robinson S&S Roofing LLC Schaefer Shipman Shaklee Skagit Regional Clinics Sleep Advantage-Alan Erickson, DDS Slumber Ease Mattress Factory Smith Brothers Carpet Cleaning Sno-Isle Natural Food Co-op

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MGHS MGHS ArlHS


Sports

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Eagles defeat Chargers on the mat By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com The Arlington Eagles hosted their senior night and final home dual of the season against the Marysville Getchell Chargers on Jan. 30. It was a back-and-forth battle all night as the Eagles opened with a major decision victory and then lost the next match by decision, as they held a 4-3 lead over the Chargers. Over the next five matches Arlington took three victories, one by decision and two by pin, while losing the other two by pins. After the first half of matches Marysville Getchell was slightly behind, 19-15, as they looked to make up the ground. Arlington added on to their lead in the next match as they earned a pin and extended their lead to double digits, 25-15. The Chargers wouldn’t just lay down after falling behind, winning the next three matches with pins to capture their first lead of the night by a score of 33-25. Unfortunately for Marysville Getchell the lead was short lived as the Eagles came back winning the final three with one forfeit and two pins. In the end, Arlington captured the senior night victory with a final score of 43-33. “It was a lot of fun and

we were able to make it into an event with both of our middle school teams coming in to see us compete. At this point it’s just about focusing on our strengths and weaknesses as individuals and cutting them loose. It gets interesting at this point in the year with coaching, scouting and getting them ready for a high level of competition,” said Arlington Head Coach Jonny Gilbertson. The Eagles had five wrestlers end their match by pin including Gabe Price, Rylan Polkinghorn, Jon CernaGalindo, Dawson Reed and Dorian Tollenaar. Price, 145-pounds, and Polkinghorn, 170-pounds, both finished their matches in the first round in 1:26 and 1:14, respectively. Cerna-Galindo, 120-pounds, competed in his first varsity match and sealed the dual with a pin 1:37 into the second round. Reed, 182-pounds, and Tollenaar, 113-pounds, both took their pins in the third round as Reed finished his match in 4:53, while Tollenaar ended it 22 seconds into the round. “We’re a little beat up, but that doesn’t matter because it’s wrestling, and everyone has to deal with that. When you fail you can either learn or quit and we’re always going to be learning from our mistakes. Right now, we just

The Marysville Getchell girls basketball team hosted the Shorewood Thunderbirds on Jan. 27 as they look to fight for a late postseason push. It was a slow opening quarter for both teams as they were unable to convert close shots and neither team was able to create space to make plays. The Chargers used their size inside to create second-chance points but by the end of the first were only able to score four, trailing the Thunderbirds' five points. In the second quarter, Shorewood had trouble keeping Marysville Getchell out of the paint and had to make up for it in the passing lanes as they created a handful of turnovers. Even with a few bad passes, the Chargers continued to dominate on the boards as they tied with the Thunderbirds 7-7 in the quarter. Shorewood entered the halftime with a slight lead of 12-11. The Thunderbirds came out in the second half on a quick 5-2 run to put them ahead by their largest margin of the night, 17-13. After slowly falling further behind, Marysville Getchell began to create space along the arc and take aggressive shots. The Chargers exploded with a new energy as they went on an 11-4 run to end the third quarter, entering the fourth up 24-21. In the final quarter, Shorewood couldn’t slow down Marysville Getchell as they continued to move the ball and push the pace. The Chargers outscored the Thunderbirds 11-1 in the quarter and

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Pet

Building A Bond For Life.

Drako

Drako is a 2 year old male Doberman Pinscher Mix

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Marysville Getchell’s 152-pound junior wrestler Jesus Cabadas, right, hand fights and looks for the takedown against the Eagles’ junior Dimitri Shaffer, left, at Arlington High School on Jan. 30. have to take care of the little things to make the big things happen,” said Marysville Getchell Head Coach John Deaver. The Chargers also had five wrestlers take their wins by pin in Erick Duenes, Caleb Blonk, Jesus Cabadas, Cheron Smith and Chris Bonner. Duenes, 220-pounds, and Blonk, 195-pounds, had the fastest finishes of the night as they won by pin 37 seconds and 47 seconds into the first round, respectively. Cabadas, 152-pounds, finished his match in the final few moments of the first

took the victory by a commanding score of 35-22. “We’re figuring things out but we’re missing the little pieces and the easy baskets. In the second half we were able to make a few adjustments and it was good to see them up their intensity on both ends. If we can keep this going, I think we can make a run,” said Marysville Getchell Head Coach Shannon Grandbois. The Chargers were led by the youngest player on their varsity roster, freshman guard Ellie Jackson. She finished with a game-high 15 points with five three-pointers, two assists, five rebounds and four steals. Marysville Getchell’s senior post players took control of the pain behind Faith Sherman, Alexus Atkins and Brionna Palm. Sherman led the game in rebounds with 11 and filled the stat sheet with four points, two assists, one block and two steals. Atkins used her size to grab seven rebounds and a block while scoring four points and dishing one assist. Palm came off the bench to score four points and grab four rebounds. The playmakers for the Chargers were seniors Madison Hagglund and Maddy Grandbois, as they controlled the pace and led on both ends. Hagglund played inside and out as she tallied two points, three assists and six rebounds. Grandbois only scored two points but filled the stat sheet with four assists, one rebound and an incredible five steals. Following the passing of basketball icon Kobe Bryant on Sunday, Jan.

Drako is an active canine who will enjoy daily adventures whether it is a walk (he LOVES to run too!) or a nice long hike. He will do best in a home with KIDS 8+. This boy has been known to be shy especially around men so make sure the entire family comes to meet. He has been crate trained and knows some basic commands. He hasn’t had too much interaction with other dogs and is inclined to chase any furry critter that moves fast. This smart boy is very playful and ready to explore the world! Drako is not suited for apartment living. Come to NOAH and get to know Drako today! He weighs 58 lbs. Open Monday - Friday, 11-6 and weekends from 11-5. 31300 Brandstrom Road • Stanwood • 360-629-7055 Visit us on the web at www.thenoahcenter.org email: adopt@thenoahcenter.org

round as he had 16 seconds left in the round. Smith, 285-pounds, felt out his matchup in the first round and took the victory 37 seconds into the second round. Bonner, 160-pounds, was the final Charger to end his match with a pin as he took the victory in 4:54 in the final round. If you want to come support your local wrestling teams, they will be competing at the 3A Sub-Regional Tournament at Snohomish High School on Friday, Feb. 7, at 5 p.m. and Saturday, Feb. 8, at 10 a.m.

Chargers pummel Thunderbirds By Andrew Hines sports@northcountyoutlook.com

5

February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Our doors are open!

Volunteers Needed!

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Call Leslie at 360-659-1100 to include your services in this directory for as little as $50 per month! leslieb@northcountyoutlook.com

Sun, Moon and Tides in Snohomish County Wednesday, February 5, through Tuesday, February 11

Wednesday, February 5 Sunrise 7:31 am • Sunset 5:14 pm

Sunday, February 9 Sunrise 7:25 am • Sunset 5:21 pm

Thursday, February 6 Sunrise 7:29 am • Sunset 5:16 pm

Monday, February 10 Sunrise 7:23 am • Sunset 5:22 pm

3:42 am 8:37 am 12:53 pm 8:34 pm

PHOTO BY ANDREW HINES

Marysville Getchell’s senior captain Maddy Grandbois brings the ball up the court against the Shorewood Thunderbirds on Jan. 27. 26, Coach Grandbois said, “We talked about it as a team. What really hurts for me is how much he was starting to do for women’s basketball and how much he was doing for his daughters. It’s a devastating loss, but I still think that we can continue to take his message and be role models moving forward.” Your final chance to watch the Chargers at home this season will be against the Arlington Eagles on Monday, Feb. 10, at 7:15 p.m.

4:20 am 9:35 am 1:45 pm 9:20 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

9.8 ft 7.6 ft 9.9 ft -0.5 ft

10.5 ft 7.4 ft 10.1 ft -1.3 ft

Friday, February 7 Sunrise 7:28 am • Sunset 5:17 pm 4:52 am 10:18 am 2:37 pm 10:06 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

11.1 ft 7.1 ft 10.4 ft -1.9 ft

Saturday, February 8 Full Moon Sunrise 7:26 am • Sunset 5:19 pm 5:23 am 10:59 am 3:29 pm 10:51 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

11.5 ft 6.6 ft 10.6 ft 1.2 ft

5:53 am 11:40 am 4:21 pm 11:35 pm

6:25 am 12:23 pm 5:15 pm

High Tide Low Tide High Tide Low Tide

High Tide Low Tide High Tide

11.8 ft 5.9 ft 10.8 ft -2.1 ft

12.0 ft 5.1 ft 10.7 ft

Tuesday, February 11 Sunrise 7:22 am • Sunset 5:24 pm

12:20 am 6:58 am 1:10 pm 6:12 pm

Low Tide High Tide Low Tide High Tide

-1.6 ft 12.2 ft 4.1 ft 10.5 ft

Source: Mobile Geographics LLC NOT FOR NAVIGATION North County Outlook assumes no liability for damages arising from the use of these predictions. They are not certified to be correct, and they do not incorporate the effects of tropical storms, El Nino, seismic events, continental drift or changes in global sea level.


6

Health

February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

n EMILY'S WELLNESS WISDOM

Ways to help you cut the cravings When you’re making the transition from eating sugar and other items you crave to eating more of a whole foods based diet, it can be a shock to the system, and you have probably experienced some cravings. Sugar is all around us, everywhere we turn. So, to cut the habit of eating it and stop the cravings, you’ll need some strategies. Plan Your Meals When it comes to real success on any diet, the only way is to make sure that you will have that success is to have a plan in place so that you aren’t tempted

Emily Countryman

to immediately abandon your diet when you feel as if you’re being tested. That means that you should have some foods that you can grab and go along with the main dishes that you plan to eat. That way if you find

yourself feeling weak and hungry, you already have some meals that are available to you. Having easy, go to items like prepped and chopped veggies, nuts, cheese or hard boiled eggs is a great way to eat something nutritious and filling without reaching for the sugary snacks. Drink More Water One of the fastest and best tips when dealing with cravings or hunger is to just drink a glass of water. Hydration is important for your health and helps your body send signals you are full. Liquids like water can

fill up your stomach temporarily and give you some peace while you are figuring out what to do. Studies have shown that drinking a glass of water before a meal can even help you to lose weight because it helps you to become more aware of your satiety and will aid in digestion. Avoid Getting Overly Hungry If you are the type to skip meals that can spell disaster for a new and big change in your diet. When you make this kind of alteration to the way you eat, there will be major things

that you find are different with how you process the food and how long it stays in your system. A lot of people only find success with a whole foods diet because they have gotten used to a schedule where they eat multiple times a day. Cravings that come from being hungry can be very dangerous to your clean eating plan and lead to making rash decisions. When you get too hungry you are more tempted to eat whatever is available and typically overeat. Plan for Three Days Our brain lives on sugar,

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or glucose. When you are cutting sugar from your diet you will most likely crave it for a few days as your body depletes its sugar stores. This transition to deplete the glucose stores will take at least three days. If you know this and know there is some light at the end of the tunnel of the cravings fading, it will make the transition of reducing your sugar intake more tolerable.

Emily Countryman is a board-certified health coach and owner of Ideal Wellness located at 2639 172nd St NE Suite 104 in Smokey Point/Marysville. She can be reached online at www. idealwellness.com or info@ idealwellness.com.

Two flu deaths reported in Sno. County

The Snohomish Health District received its first reports of flu-related deaths for the 2019-20 season. At the same time, District staff are also investigating increasing numbers of hepatitis A cases in the county. A Lake Stevens man in his late 80s died Jan. 5. A woman in her early 30s from rural north Snohomish County died Jan. 1. Both had multiple underlying medical conditions. As of Dec. 28, this flu season had seen 28 hospitalizations and 12 schools that reported greater than 10 percent absenteeism due to influenza-like illness. During the 2018-19 flu season, there were 26 confirmed flurelated deaths in Snohomish County and 362 people were hospitalized. There are several important reminders during flu season to avoid catching or spreading the virus. 1. Get your flu shot if you haven’t already. Check with your medical provider or local pharmacy. 2. Wash hands thoroughly with warm, running water and soap. Clean and disinfect frequently used surfaces. 3. Stay home if you are sick, and keep children home if they are sick. Wait until fever is gone for a full 24 hours without fever-reducing medicine like Tylenol before returning to work or school. 4. Cover coughs and sneezes. Droplets from coughing or sneezing spread the flu virus. More information about the flu, including weekly reports, is available online at www.snohd.org/flu.


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Communities

February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

7

Improvements planned for Getchell Road By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Some safety improvements are on the way for Getchell Road. The Washington State Department of Transportation is providing $3.1 million in grant funding for two Snohomish County projects that will support the corridor. The funds come as part of the federal Highway Safety Improvement Program. The improvements will improve the two-lane road that is a main connecting route between Granite Falls, Arlington and Marysville. “There are two grants

that we’ve received,” said Snohomish County engineer Doug McCormick. The first grant for $1.3 million will put in some rural road curve improvements, including some upgrades in signage. High friction surface treatment (HFST) will also be applied to the roadway. “Basically, HFST helps vehicles have better traction with the road surface,” said McCormick. “It’s like adding a coarser grit of sandpaper in that it gives you a stronger grip." The second grant of $1.8 million will help fund intersection improvements at

84th Street (Getchell Road) and 163rd Avenue, which currently has two stop signs on 163rd Avenue as the primary traffic control. “We hope to design to reduce the number of accidents and the severity of them,” said McCormick. “It is one of the local areas where we have a higher than average number of accidents." The speed on the road contributes to the danger of collisions that happen at that intersection, said McCormick. “It’s a pretty high speed road for us,” he said, as most county roads are around 35 mph.

The types of vehicles along that road also tend to increase the severity of the traffic collisions. “There is a lot of truck traffic that we see along this road as well, particularly coming from Granite Falls because of the pits and quarries there,” said McCormick. That area of the county has seen growth in the surrounding cities as well, which has increased the amount of vehicles that use the road. “If we, in our analysis, determine there is a better solution to what we have there we hope to implement it,” said McCormick.

“During the engineering phase we will look at all the possible solutions,” he said, which include a traffic light signal or a roundabout. “We will analyze and will make a decision on what is most effective,” he said. A roundabout is possible as that form of intersection has many advantages. “At a roundabout you have less severe accidents,” because there are very rarely head-on collisions and the roundabout itself tends to slow the speed of traffic, said McCormick. Design is scheduled to start this year for any intersection changes. If right-of-

Meeting looks at plans for downtown Arlington By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Planning for the future of downtown Arlington continues this month with a meeting scheduled for Feb. 11 to present initial ideas for one of the town’s signature areas. The city of Arlington partnered with Western Washington University beginning last fall to produce a downtown plan. The next meeting will be held on Feb. 11, at the Haller Middle School commons at 600 E. 1st St., Arlington. The meeting is scheduled from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Officials started the process because they hoped to create a roadmap for the direction the downtown should be headed. “We wanted to create a

downtown long-term plan that had buy-in from all the community members,” said Sarah Lopez, community revitalization project manager. “Something that would have the best feel for our downtown. We know that it is the heart of the community." Western Washington University officials and students are helping assist with the planning process as part of a year-long course. They held meetings and talked with many different community groups over the fall quarter. “They have used the information they’ve gathered to prepare two different reports,” said Lopez. One report focuses on the Centennial Trail and recreation opportunities that the city could plan for.

A team from the school was recently on the trail to look at all the space available there for planning. “Actually they’re walking the trail today [Jan. 29],” said Lopez “Quite a few sites have been identified as part of the plans,” she said. “They’re working on parks and trails suggestions.” The second report is about housing and businesses in the downtown.

The two reports will have recommendations about how the city should be planning for the future of the downtown. “They will present those two reports for the public at this meeting,” said Lopez. “They intent to present some big early preliminary idea. So that the community can respond and they can be open for feedback,” she said.

Lopez said that the ideas were pulled from what the community has said they want in recent meetings and surveys. “So far it looks like the work they’ve done is in line with what the public was thinking during the fall meetings,” she said. More updates about the downtown corridor planning can be found at arlingtonwa.gov/646.

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way acquisitions are necessary those could take place in 2021/2022 with construction in 2023, although this timeline is not set in stone. McCormick said the two grants are meant to help the county prevent traffic collisions. “Safety has always been a high priority for the county,” he said.


8

February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Communities

Marysville convenes new Growth Management Task Force Mayor Jon Nehring has created and appointed a new Mayor’s Task Force on Growth Management to consider and provide input into the future of Marysville. As the second largest city in Snohomish County and one of the fastest growing in Washington state, Marysville expects continued growth and must comply with the Growth Management Act while leaders aim to maintain our sense of community. “I am excited about the formation of this task force, whose input will play a critical role in informing how we grow and build our community in a way that respects and responds to our community values,” Mayor Nehring said. Task force members ap-

pointed by the mayor include Marysville citizens Peter Condyles, Dan Hazen, Kristin Kinnamon, Rickelle Pegrum and Rob Robertson. Other task force members are Planning Commissioner Steve Leifer; City Councilmembers Mark James, Steve Muller and Michael Stevens; and Master Builders representative Dylan Sluder. Gloria Hirashima and Jeff Thomas, the city’s Chief Administrative Officer and Community Development Director, will provide staff support. The task force will generally meet monthly during 2020. Its first meeting was Monday, Feb. 3, at Marysville City Hall, 1049 State Ave. Subjects the task force may be asked to weigh in on

include: n neighborhood character and values, n mixed-use development, n high-density residential development, n transportation networks & utility capacity, n industrial center implementation, n downtown redevelopment, and n future population and employment targets. Task force findings will be used to help the city establish scope and policy for the required update of the Marysville Comprehensive Plan due in 2023, and to update other planning documents such as the Downtown Master Plan and amendments to development codes.

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Arlington Fire improves protection rating

By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com

The Arlington Fire Department has improved their fire protection services over the last five years according to the Washington Survey and Rating Bureau. The bureau (WSRB) rates fire districts in the state every five years from Class 1 to Class 10, with Class 1 being the highest. Arlington’s fire department was rated as Class 4 with their most recent assessment, which is an improvement from their previous Class 5 rating. This is the first time in more than 30 years that the rating has improved for the city. “We’re really happy to see we went up one level

from the bureau,” said Paul Ellis, Arlington city administrator. “That is a reflection on the hard work we’ve put into the fire department here in Arlington,” he said. The WSRB looks at a number of different areas of fire departments and districts across the state when performing their assessments, including inspecting facilities, equipment, training and staffing. “They inspect the water supply in our fire hydrants,” said Ellis, “and they look at the amount of fire hydrants that are being put in new development.” Ellis said that the Arlington Fire Department has seen a couple of different areas of improvement over the last five years. “We worked hard in improving those areas and adding staffing to our department,” he said. “An area that the bureau looked at that we improved in was staffing, we added some line staff to the fire department,” said Ellis. Investments into new fire engines and other equipment also helped the department become better overall in terms of their

available tools. “We bought a couple of new pieces of equipment,” said Ellis. “Some of the old equipment is now in reserve status, so we have backups incase our new equipment needs to be fixed,” he said. New partnerships with nearby districts have also helped the Arlington Fire Department improve, said Ellis. “We created some potent relationships with the surrounding fire districts, including the North County Regional Fire Authority and the Marysville Fire District,” he said. The WSRB’s ratings are used by property insurance agencies to determine the level of fire risk. Improving on the class rating “will save most of the residents and businesses some money on their fire insurance premiums,” said Ellis. The new rating will take effect April 1, 2020. Residents and business owners who are located within Arlington city limits can ask their insurance companies beginning in April about potential savings.

Legal Notices LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF: LOIS J. HEICHEL, Deceased, NO. 20-4-00056-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR SNOHOMISH COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF DARYL JAY HAMERLY, Deceased, NO. 20-4-00095-31, PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS, RCW 11.40.030

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 29, 2020 Personal Representative Barbara J. Jacobsmeyer Attorney for Personal Representative: Steven J. Peiffle, WSBA #14704 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223

The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and RCW 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: January 29, 2020 Personal Representative: Tagen Lehman Attorney for Personal Representative: Breanne W. Martin, WSBA #44519 Address for Mailing or Service: P.O. Box 188, 103 North Street, Arlington, WA 98223

Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 20-4-00056-31

Court of probate proceedings and cause number: Snohomish County Superior Court, Cause No. 20-4-00095-31

Submit Legal Notices to: editor@northcounty-outlook.com


Salute To Police

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9

February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Marysville Police Department

Marysville Police Department serves community By Nathan Whalen nathan@northcountyoutlook.com

Over the course of 2019, Marysville residents saw a nearly 9 percent reduction in crime. Over the course of the past four years, crime in the city has gone down 19.45 percent. Marysville Police Commander Mark Thomas described 2019 as "busy" as officers’ efforts to address specific crime issues and repeat offenders helped with the reduction in crime. He also cited the efforts of the department's crime analyst who helped in finding geographic trends in specific areas of the city. In 2019, officers initiated or responded to more than 71,000 cases. Thomas highlighted the efforts of the department's ProAct team that consists of one sergeant and three officers that proactively works to reduce crime and target repeat offenders. He said a lot of crime comes back to narcotics and the team seized 419 grams of methamphetamine, around 40 grams of cocaine and 1,400 pills. The team also made 413 arrests in 2019,

COURTESY PHOTO

Members of the Marysville Police Department and staff members of Marysville Toyota after a "Coffee with A Cop" community event hosted at Marysville Toyota.

according to information from the city of Marysville. In addition, the Marysville Police Department participates in the North Snohomish County Property Crimes Unit in partnership with the Sheriff ’s Office. The unit made 633 arrests with 394 in Marysville and recovered $174,000 worth property, ac-

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cording to information from the city of Marysville. The Marysville Police Department instituted an Embedded Social Worker Team that pairs an officer with a social worker to go out into the community to try to connect with the homeless and people who have addictions and mental health issues.

“It is continuing with its success,” Thomas said. Starting in 2018, officer Mike Buell and county social worker Rochelle Long work to build relationships with people they meet on the streets, in homeless camps and in the jail. In 2019, 89 people completed dependency assessment, 13 completed mental

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10

Salute To Police

February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Marysville Police Department MARYSVILLE Continued from page 9

detox, 19 mental health evaluations have been performed, 55 people have graduated from treatment and 114 people have secured housing, according to information from the city of Marysville. Thomas said the program has helped homeless people who are often struggling with addiction

and breaking into homes and businesses. “We saw a dramatic decrease in crime reports and loss of property,” Thomas said. The police department also has a School Resource Officer program in the middle and high schools. Officials continue to work with anti-bullying and suicide awareness initiatives with youth and they conducted their third successful police youth academy.

Thomas noted that nationally known inspirational speaker Mark Mero also made presentations to students within the school district in 2019. Officials are continuing to expand on such community engagement programs as Coffee with a Cop, where people have a chance to meet and talk with an officer. “We’re always looking at ways to do a better job at that,” Thomas said of the

department’s community engagement efforts. The Marysville Police Department is in a time of transition. As of press time, police leaders were in the process of finding a new chief to replace Rick Smith who retired after 12 years with the department. “There are a lot of great things that are his legacy,” Thomas said of Chief Smith. The police department is looking to hire five

new officers in 2020 in addition to the four officers, two custody officers and one records unit specialist hired in 2019, according to information from the city of Marysville. The city recently broke ground on a new civic center that will include space for a new jail, police department, municipal court as well as city offices, according to information on the city of Marysville

website. The new facility will be located on a six-acre site located on Delta Avenue between Fifth and Eighth streets. Construction on the $47.6 million project began in January and will take several years to complete. “We’re super excited for the new building to open in early 2022,” Thomas said.

COURTESY PHOTO

The Marysville Police Department participated in last year's National Night Out.

COURTESY PHOTO

Marysville Police and Embedded Social Workers visit a local homeless camp.

Salutes the Marysville Police Department

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11

Marysville Police Department

Marysville Police Department 2020 Police Officers

Years of Service *

Interim Chief Jeffrey Goldman Commander Robert Lamoureux Commander Wendy Wade Commander Mark Thomas Commander Bradley Akau Commander Lawrence Buell Sergeant Brian Lutschg Sergeant Rick Sparr Sergeant James Maples Sergeant Jeffrey Franzen Sergeant Joby Johnson Sergeant Wallace Forslof Sergeant Jonathan Elton Sergeant Matthew Goolsby Sergeant Pete Shove Sergeant Adam Vermeulen Sergeant Pat Connelly Sergeant Kawika Davis Sergeant Jay Tolbert Police Officer David White Police Officer Charles Smith Police Officer Jeremy Wood Police Officer Nathan Zaretzke Police Officer Derek Oates Police Officer Michael Buell Police Officer Alex Wiersma Police Officer Jeremy King Police Officer Daniel Vinson Police Officer Belinda Paxton Police Officer Danielle Rusch

30 33 29 28 25 23 24 24 22 22 20 18 14 13 12 11 7 6 6 29 25 22 20 18 18 17 14 13 12 12

Police Officer David Allen 11 Police Officer Billy Xiong 11 Police Officer Christopher Sutherland 11 Police Officer Matthew Mishler 10 Police Officer Brad Smith 10 Police Officer Jeffrey Norris 9 Police Officer Christopher Farley 9 Police Officer Mike Young 9 Police Officer Greg Cornett 7 Police Officer Joe Belleme 6 Police Officer Brandon Lawrenson 6 Police Officer Scott Richey 6 Police Officer Angie Fawks 6 Police Officer Dan Ozment 5 Police Officer Kelly Pitts 5 Police Officer Bryant Gerfin 5 Police Officer Frankie Nelson 4 Police Officer Jason Thompson 4 Police Officer David Negron 3 Police Officer David Adams 2 Police Officer Dylan Burnett 2 Police Officer David McKenna 2 Police Officer Shantel Ricci 2 Police Officer Calen Roberts 2 Police Officer Garrett Wiseman 2 Police Officer Nick Brevig 1 Police Officer Alaina Perry 1 Police Officer Brandon Blake <1 Police Officer Aimee Bergman <1 Police Officer Keegan Stuver <1 Police Officer Katie Wilson <1 Police Officer Andrew Sale <1

Thank you to our Local Heroes

Detectives Detective Cori Shackleton Detective Paul McShane Detective Craig Bartl Detective Derek Carlile Detective Christopher Jones Detective Wade Rediger

19 14 10 10 6 3

Custody Officers Custody Officer Russell Irvin Custody Officer Julie Swick-LaFave Custody Officer Jeffrey Burkholder Custody Officer James Strickland Custody Officer Michael Burtis Custody Officer Jason Morton Custody Corp. Brandon Palmer Custody Corp. Michael Saint-Denis Custody Officer Daniel White Custody Officer Patrick Allen Custody Officer Marlyn Anderson Custody Officer De Maramed Custody Officer Aaron Stewart Custody Officer Darbi Boggs Custody Officer Bryce Lether

30 27 20 17 9 9 5 4 3 2 2 2 1 1 <1

Records Unit Records/Prop. Clerk Patricia Duemmell 26 Program Specialist Lori Dye 13 Program Specialist Tanna Mosalsky 4 Program Specialist Marisa Orsborn 4 Program Specialist Leslie Burnette 4 Program Specialist Julie Lester 4

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COURTESY PHOTO

Former Police Chief Rick Smith, who retired from the Marysville Police Department in 2019, visits with a child during a “Coffee with a Cop” event in Marysville.

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February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Salute To Police

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Marysville Police Department

How you can show your support for local police Police officers put their lives on the line every day they show up for work. But in spite of the sacrifices officers routinely make, their contributions often go unnoticed. Police officers’ jobs might be thankless, but that does not mean people cannot express their gratitude to the men and women in blue who keep their communities safe. The following are a handful of ways to show support

for the police officers who work hard to protect and serve your community. n Pick up a police officer’s tab. Police officers work in your community and, therefore, they likely break bread in your community as well. When you see police officers ordering meals at a local restaurant or sitting down to lunch at a neighborhood diner, offer to pay for their meals or arrange payment with their waiter or waitress without letting the police officers know. Picking up police officers’ tabs is a simple gesture, but it’s one they will appreciate and it will let them know they’re supported in the community they’re working hard to protect. n Support police fund-

Thank You

for Keeping Us Safe!

raisers. Police departments fundraisers support various causes. Some might aim to raise funds for sports programs designed to help local youth, while others might hope to raise money for the families of fallen officers. Whatever the motivation for the fundraiser, by supporting the event you are donating to a good cause and showing the police they and their efforts are being supported. n Teach kids to respect police officers. Police officers have come under considerable scrutiny in recent years, and youngsters may not know how to respond to news stories that do not paint police officers in a positive light. Parents can show their support for police officers by teaching their kids to respect police at all times. Encourage children to come to you if they read or hear stories that depict police officers negatively so you can help

FILE PHOTO

There are a variety of ways community members can show their support for the members of their local police department. them process the story and encourage them to maintain the respect they have for police officers. n Thank a police of-

ficer when given the opportunity. Though it seems simple, saying “Thank you” to police officers can reassure them that the

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communities they work so hard to protect support and appreciate their efforts. Thanking police officers may only take a few seconds, but such a gesture can help police officers better cope with the stress of their jobs. Police officers have difficult jobs that require them to make considerable sacrifices to protect the communities where they work. But it doesn’t take much to show your support for local police officers and express your gratitude for the sacrifices they make every day.

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February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

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Tulalip Police Department

Tulalip Police Department looks to increase staffing in 2020 By Nathan Whalen nathan@northcountyoutlook.com

During the course of 2020, the Tulalip Tribes Police Department hopes to have 25 additional people employed either as commissioned officers or civilian employees. "It's a focus on recruiting and hiring the right people that have an interest in serving the Tulalip community," said Chris Sutter, chief of the Tulalip Tribal Police. He said he hopes to hire seven entry-level officers, six lateral officers, two corrections officers, four fish and wildlife officers as well as a boat operator, marina security officers and fill dispatch vacancies.  "We're putting them through a rigorous pre-academy," Sutter said. The pre-academy includes classroom instruction, test taking, physical training and mock scenarios to help prepare officers enter the academy.  Sutter said the department instituted an office of professional standards in 2019. A training officer was hired and police personnel collaborate on ways to improve the department. 

The Tulalip Tribes Police Department is the primary law enforcement agency on the Tulalip Indian Reservation. The department has 33 police officers, six fish and wildlife officers, and nine boat operators. The Tulalip Police Department patrols tribal fishing areas in the Puget Sound. Home to Seattle Premium Outlet Mall and Quil Ceda Village, Tulalip police officers are busy making sure the shopping area remains safe. Sutter said officers meet with business leaders monthly and they were patrolling businesses during the holidays. "The holidays was safer for businesses, customers and visitors," Sutter said.  Tribal Police in 2019 implemented a drug task force. "Our goal is to remove drugs and people who deal drugs from our reservation," Sutter said, adding the program implemented last year led to numerous arrests.  He also said officers are partnering with the Tribes' public works and public health departments to reach out to homeless people and remove illegal encampments. He noted that 95 percent of the homeless encamp-

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____

Chief Chris Sutter

ments police encounter are comprised of people who are not tribal members. He said removing such camps helps protect tribal lands and natural resources. Officers are also working with homeowners to improve their safety and protection of their property.  Sutter said the department is also focusing on meeting with residents to maintain an open dialogue. He is planning community engagement sessions in the neighborhoods throughout the Tulalip Tribes.  "We're also focused on listening to our citizens," Sutter said.

Tulalip Police Department 2020 C. Sutter – Chief R. Myers – Commander P. Arroyos – Commander J. Williams – Commander A. Davis – Professional Standards A. Hunter – Office Manager N. Cleary - PIO J. Jira – Sergeant W. Santos – Sergeant C. Gobin – Sergeant W. Schakel – Sergeant K. Martino – sergeant D. Sallee – Detective K. Zoller – Detective G. Churchill – Detective R. Bardsely, Officer M. Neslon – Officer I. Schmitz – Officer T. Pruitt – Officer / K9 Kait

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Salute To Police

February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Arlington Police Department

Arlington Police Department looks to expand By Nathan Whalen nathan@northcountyoutlook.com

Leaders with the Arlington Police Department will be busy expanding programs and reach throughout town. Arlington Police Chief Jonathan Ventura said the department hopes to add another detective in the investigation’s unit, which hasn’t had a new position since 2002. “The two detectives we have just work their tails off,” Ventura said. “It’s long overdue." In addition, he hopes to increase law enforcement presence in the Smokey Point area. Arlington Police had a busy year in 2019. While Arlington has the ninth largest population of cities in Snohomish County, Ventura said it was the fourth largest in terms of call volume. He noted that in 1995, the 10 officers comprising the Arlington Police Department re-

sponded to 1,164 calls for service. In 2019, 30 officers responded to 29,137 calls for service. He said the city saw an increase in misdemeanor court filings in 2019. Ventura attributed that increase to several factors. The department reached its full complement of officers in 2019. He said when the department is fully staffed, there is more time for proactive law enforcement that provides more time engaging with the community. The Arlington Police Department is looking to expand its Law Enforcement Embedded Social Worker program. That program pairs a police officer with a social worker. They venture into the community to connect with people who are homeless or have addiction and mental health issues and connect them with services to get help. “It’s a much bigger issue

COURTESY PHOTO

Members of the Arlington Police Department participated in the 2019 Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics. county wide and nationwide,” Ventura said. The social worker program made more than 1,200 encounters since it started in 2018. Their efforts led to 62 people getting housing

and 35 people completing treatment, according to information from the city of Arlington. Police officers are also focusing on school safety during 2020, with

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a priority being speed enforcement. Ventura said speeding is a number-one complaint around schools. School Resource Officers, traffic engineers and the school district will partner to come up with ways to address speeding. Options include using radar devices or seeking grant funding for improved, lighted signs on roads near schools. Starting March 1, the Arlington Police Department will be using the jail in Everett to house its prisoners and use Cascade District Court, which is

located in Arlington, to handle the city’s misdemeanor cases. The police department is taking steps to improve professional standards and earn accreditation through the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs. To help with that, the department will undergo a peer professional review of the organization. That review will help identify areas of improvement and highlight positive programs and help with

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February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Arlington Police Department ARLINGTON Continued from page 14

achieving accreditation, according to information from the city of Arlington. “I think it’s important to have that outside review,” Ventura said. The Arlington Police Department is also instituting violence de-escalation and mental health training as required by the Law Enforcement Training and Community Safety Act. It requires officers to receive 40 hours of training every three years. Ventura said the requirement is an unfunded mandate for smaller police departments. The department is looking to develop its own in-house trainer to help meet requirements. Retention and recruitment of officers continues to be a challenge due to the narrative surrounding law

COURTESY PHOTO

Arlington Police Department members attend career fairs looking for potential officers to serve the city. COURTESY PHOTO

Arlington Police Officer Erik Moon helps distribute bicycle helmets to community members. enforcement in general, low unemployment rate and the higher salaries offered at other departments such as some in California offering $180,000 a year in compensation.

Ventura said the city’s population could grow by 4,000 to 5,000 people in the coming year. He said departments in the county are dealing with the same challenges and

it takes two years to find, hire and train an officer before starting their duties in Arlington. “It’s a calling and it’s a very noble calling,” Ventura said.

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Arlington Police Department 2020 Chief Jonathan Ventura Deputy Chief Dan Cone Sergeant Peter Barrett Sergeant Rory Bolter Sergeant Mike Gilbert Sergeant Mark Pennington Sergeant Kay Schander Officer Luke Adkins Detective Stephanie Ambrose Officer Dustin Bartlett Officer Alex Donchez Officer Joshua Fox Officer Shelly Hamel

Detective Curtis Hirotaka Officer Molly Ingram Officer Seth Kinney Officer Mike McQuoid Officer Kendahl Metcalfe Officer Erik Moon School Resource Officer Justin Olson Detective Mike Phillips Officer Colin Roberson Officer Mike Sargent Officer Shane Sharp Officer Ken Thomas Officer Rhonda Urton

Officer Mark Wilde Officer Tim Zachman K9 Oso K9 Tara Police Services Manager Terry Quintrall Police Services Tech. II Andrea Hill Police Services Tech. II Monica Schlagel Police Services Tech.s II Karen Waidman Police Support Officer Val Copeland Embedded Social Worker Britney Sutton Domestic Violence Coordinator Brittany Nelson (contract) *As of January 21, 2020

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Salute To Police

February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

www.northcountyoutlook.com

Arlington Police Department

Arlington Police Department hands out honors The Arlington Police Department recognized residents, volunteers and employees for their contributions supporting the mission of the department. They presented awards during a ceremony that took place Jan. 24 at the Byrnes Performing Arts Center. The following people were recognized: Police Employee of the Year – Sergeant Mike Gilbert.

Life Saving Award – Officer Molly Ingram. Chief ’s Traffic Enforcement Award for efforts to increase public safe on the streets and highways in Arlington – Officer Joshua Fox. Chief ’s Community Engagement Award – Detective Mike Phillips, Police Services Technician II Andrea Hill and Officer Shelly Hamel. Chief ’s DUI Award for

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efforts to reduce traffic fatalities through enforcement of DUI laws and the detection and apprehension of intoxicated drivers – Officer Joshua Fox. Certificate of Appreciation – Officer Mike McQuoid of Snohomish County Sheriff ’s Office (Stanwood Police Department) for apprehension of multiple vandalism suspects at Stanwood High School. Five years of service – Officer Justin Olson 15 years of service – Sergeant Peter Barrett 20 years of service – Officer Erik Moon, Detective Sergeant Mark Pennington and Sergeant Kay Schander Award of Commendation – recognizing acts of heroism, meritorious achievement or service. n Jim Eldridge, Arlington High School staff, for extinguishing a small fire after a student detonated an improvised explosive device in a bathroom at

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Arlington High School Custodian, Jim Eldridge, was presented with an Award of Commendation by the Arlington Police Department for protecting students and staff at the school. From left,Duane Fish, Arlington High School Principal; Jim Eldridge, Arlington High School Custodian; and Jonathan Ventura, Arlington Police Chief.

the high school. n Arlington Police Officer Justin Olson who assisted in the criminal investigation into the detonated improvised explosive device including identifying, apprehending and interviewing the suspect. n Kristin Banfield for her work with as the city of Arlington’s Public Information Officer and social media administrator. n Katie Heim for her work developing a map-

ping tool for the police department and public to show where speed studies have been completed and show where additional enforcement is required. Volunteer Awards n Ed Krell for taking the lead on the speed study program for the department and ensuring officers have up-to-date information on problem areas for speeding. n Al Lehman for his high level of customer ser-

THANK YOU ARLINGTON POLICE DEPARTMENT

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vice, knowledge and cando attitude to support the department. Community Awards n Stilly Diner for providing meals to department personnel during Police Week. n S and S Roofing for sponsoring the department’s Bike Rodeo and donating roofing materials for the K9 kennel.  n Arlington Walmart for sponsoring the 2019 Shop with a Cop event and donating $10,000 to ensure more than 100 and their families could celebrate Christmas.  n  Smokey Point Starbucks for hosting Coffee with Cops events.  n R Transport for purchasing Blue Line flags that were hung on Olympic Avenue during Police Week.  n  Kent Prairie PTA for their support of the department’s K9 program. n  Reece Construction for donating material and staff time to construct a K9 kennel.  n  Axis Roof and Gutter for donating equipment, materials and staff time to construct two kennels at the police department to house lost dogs waiting for their owners.

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Opinion

facebook.com/TheNorthCountyOutlook Twitter: @ncoutlook

n GUEST EDITORIAL

What's in store for 2020 As busy as 2019 was for the City of Arlington, it is hard to imagine that 2020 could be any busier. Yet, it looks like that is going to hold true. Here’s a quick look at what’s ahead for plans and projects in the new year. This year could be considered the year of transportation improvements for the City, with eight separate projects either being designed or under construction in addition to our regular pavement preservation work. These projects include construction of roundabouts on SR-530 at Smokey Point Blvd. (funding dependent) and at 204th Street NE and 77th Avenue NE; design and construction of a new traffic signal at 204th Street NE and 74th Avenue NE; design of a new traffic signal on SR-531 (172nd Street NE) at 40th Avenue NE; design of the SR-531 widening project; planning for the repaving of Smokey Point Blvd. from 164th Street NE to 174th Street NE in 2021; designing the Smokey Point Blvd. corridor from 174th Street NE to 200th Street NE to accommodate more than just vehicle traffic; and completing the design for 173rd Street NE to take pressure off of 172nd Street NE. The City will also be finishing the Complete Streets project on 59th Avenue NE and 188th Street NE to connect the Arlington Boys & Girls Club with adjacent parks, providing sidewalks, crosswalks and other amenities to improve safety. All of these projects are including in the city’s adopted Transportation Improvement Plan, which takes a look at transportation needs for

Mayor Barb Tolbert the next 20 years. This list is available on our website at www.arlingtonwa.gov/648/ Transportation-Improvement-Plan. Many of these projects will be built thanks to significant state funding. In economic development, work will continue on the Cascade Industrial Center (CIC) to attract familywage manufacturing jobs in cooperation with the City of Marysville and our new partners, the Port of Everett. Transportation and utilities infrastructure in the CIC is a top priority for us and we will be working closely with Marysville to pursue funding. An important piece of growing the CIC is careerconnected learning for our local residents. A new initiative with the Arlington School District has been established to connect incoming high school juniors and seniors with local businesses. Contact Arlington Public Schools at aci@asd. wednet.edu for more information about the Arlington Career Internships program, including how to sign up. The City’s Innovation Center, on the corner of 4th and Olympic, will be opening after a remodel of the building. The Innovation Center will provide co-working and incubator space for entrepre-

neurs of all industries and will provide access to services and education resources. Finally, we are anticipating the completion of the sustainable Downtown Corridors Plan that we have been working on in partnership with students from Western Washington University. This plan will help guide the future of downtown Arlington over the next 10-20 years. In Police, we will be transitioning our court and jail services from the City of Marysville to Snohomish County by March 1, 2020. This move is prompted by a lack of capacity in Marysville court and jail due to the growth in population in both cities. Arlington Fire will be focused on further conversations with North County Regional Fire Authority on additional partnerships. In addition, the City will be designing and breaking ground on a new Fire Station 48 on Airport Boulevard. Both departments will be focusing on planning for anticipated future growth, similar to the work we have done on transportation. Our focus in Community Development this year will be on development of a Housing Action Plan with our community to address needs for affordable housing. This is only a short list of the plans and programs that are anticipated to be worked on by your city staff in 2020. All of these plans and projects require input from our local community. I encourage you to get involved and stay involved. You can find more information on the city website at www.arlingtonwa.gov.

February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

17

Our Favorite Quotes "If we talk about 'Groundhog Day' as a humanistic text — we only have one life, and there's no punishment or reward afterwards — then the wisdom is, just be kind because that will make you happy and the people around you happy." Author ­— Tim Minchin Submitted by North County Outlook editor Scott Frank.

n GUEST OPINION Cast your vote to support Marysville schools Marysville voters, show that you care for students here in our fine town. You should have already received your ballot for the upcoming Feb. 11, Marysville School District capital levy to rip down Liberty Elementary School and Cascade Elementary School here in town. My first teaching assignment as a teacher was in 1967 at Liberty for five years. It wasn’t a dinosaur then, but it is now. I ended my 30-year teaching career at Cascade. I taught second grade for a while but loved first grade more, and I taught the most years at that level. Liberty was built in 1951 and it needs to be ripped down, and rebuilt, and

so does Cascade. I would be sad if my granddaughter who will soon be in kindergarten had to attend either of these two dinosaur schools. Go visit them, and you will learn pronto what I’m describing. Ripping these schools down would be the best possible start for children. This levy has to pass by simple majority. The passage won’t ruin anyone’s budget. The passage of this levy is important to the future generations of students in this Marysville School District because I’m telling you the truth. Show that you care about our students in Marysville and future generations.

Laurel Lundgren Parratt Marysville

utlook

Real People. Real Life.

North County Outlook is published every Wednesday and mailed direct to households and businesses in Marysville, Arlington, Smokey Point, Tulalip and Quil Ceda Village. Letters to the editor, community news and story ideas may be e-mailed to editor@ northcountyoutlook.com, or sent to the mailing address below. The Publisher reserves the right to edit material for content, grammar, taste, style or length, and all submitted items are published at the sole discretion of the Publisher. News Deadline: Friday 5PM before publication editor@northcountyoutlook.com

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Weekly Puzzles Fun by the Numbers Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. See answers on page 18

Publisher/Sales Manager .............................. Sue Stevenson Editor .................................................................... Scott Frank Staff Writers .....Christopher Andersson, Andrew Hines Display Ad Sales ..............Terrie McClay, Carole Estenson Directory Ad Sales ..............................................Leslie Buell Graphic Design ..............Christina Poisal, Nathan Whalen Office Manager/Billing ................. Leah Hughes-Anderson Contributing Writers .......Steve Smith, The Tulalip Chefs

Ad Deadline: Thursday before publication 4 PM sales@northcountyoutlook.com

P.O. Box 39 • Marysville, WA 98270 1331 State Ave. #A • Marysville, WA (360) 659-1100 • Fax (360) 658-7536 www.northcountyoutlook.com

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Communities

February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Tell us about local special events and meetings for free publication in the Community Calendar in the paper. Local events only, please. Send an email to editor@northcounty outlook.com, phone (360) 659-1100 or fax to (360) 658-7536. Be sure to include contact info. Deadline: Friday before the following Wednesday publication. You can also submit your local events for our free online community calendar at www. northcountyoutlook.com

Submit your events via email to:

editor@northcountyoutlook.com Submit your events online at:

www.northcountyoutlook.com February 5 - February 11 Preschool Storytime: Let imaginations run wild with fun books, sing-along songs and creative activities that prepare young minds for the adventures of reading. For ages 3-5. Caregiver required. Held Wednesdays, Feb. 5-26, beginning at 10:30 a.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Charity Sew: The Clothing and Textile Advisors will be having a charity sew on Feb. 5  at the Ken Baxter Community Center, 514 Delta Ave. in Marysville. We will be sewing pads and shields

– providing personal hygiene products for Days for Girls. These products will help many girls and women around the world who have their activities restricted monthly.  The sewing community is invited to sew with us.  Bring your sewing machine or serger, regular sewing equipment and a few basic colors of construction thread.  Kits and instructions will be provided.    Bring your brown bag lunch, beverage and enjoy sewing fun.  Meeting is  from 9 to 1pm.Enter through door on Delta Avenue parking lot side. Contact: Kelli t 425-686-2563 or

Classified: Announcements A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. Call 855-4154148. ATTENTION: OXYGEN USERS. Gain freedom with a Portable Oxygen Concentrator! No more heavy tanks and refills! Guaranteed lowest prices. Call the Oxygen Concentrator store: 844-495-7230.

Lynn at  425-334-0787  with any questions. RCF auditions: Red Curtain Foundation for the Arts is holding auditions Feb. 8, Feb. 11 and Feb. 12 for roles in an upcoming production of "The Rememberer" by Steven Dietz. The play tells the story of the forced relocation of Native American children to governmentrun boarding schools in the early 1900s, and is set in the Tulalip Boarding School. Many of the characters in the play are Native American children, teens, and adults. Red Curtain is also seeking Native musicians, singers and dancers for the production. Auditions on Saturday, February 8, are from 9 a.m. to noon at the Hibulb Cultural Center

in Tulalip. Appointments are not necessary for the Saturday drop-in call, and prepared monologues are not required. On Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 11-12, auditions will be held at the Red Curtain Arts Center, 9315 State Ave. #J inMarysville, with appointments from 6 to 9 p.m. For more information, visit https:// redcurtainfoundation.org/ auditions. Beginning Bookkeeping, Part 4: Just starting out as a beekeeper? Learn what you need to have a pleasurable, successful first year. Join Eli Ocheltree for the final part of this instructional series on hobbyist beekeeping Feb. 9: Honey bee health, pests and diseases, integrated pest management, colony collapse disorder and the beekeeping year in review. Please register. Held Sunday, Feb. 9, 1:30-4 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 Washington Ave. Toddler Storytime: Jump and bounce into a magical world of stories, music and movements that nurture the desire to read in toddlers. For ages 18 months to 3 years. Caregiver required. Held Mondays, Feb. 10 and 24 beginning at10:30 a.m. at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Arlington Book Discus-

Classified: Events & Festivals PROMOTE YOUR REGIONAL EVENT statewide with a $325 classified listing or $1,575 for a display ad. Call this newspaper or 360-344-2938 for details.

Classified: Help Wanted

DONATE YOUR CAR TO CHARITY. Receive maximum value of write off for your taxes. Running or not! All conditions accepted. Free pickup. Call for details, 855-635-4229. ELIMINATE GUTTER CLEANING forever with LeafFilter. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off & 0% financing for those who qualify. Plus Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1-888-360-1582.

Real People. Real Life. P.O. Box 39 • Marysville, WA 98270 (360) 659-1100 • Fax (360) 658-7536 classifieds@northcountyoutlook.com

sion Group: Come share your thoughts as we discuss "The Soul of an Octopus" by Sy Montgomery, an exploration into the inner world of this complex, intelligent creature. Held Tuesday, Feb. 11, beginning at 6:30 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Friends of the Arlington Library Book & Bake Sale: The February theme is "Romance!" Great books, baked goods and gifts available at bargain prices. Something for everyone. Proceeds support the Arlington Library. Held Tuesday, Feb. 11, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and Wednesday, Feb. 12, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave.

COMING EVENTS Tweens & Teens Win-It Wednesday: Middle and high school students: You're out of school early today, so join us for We Didn't Playtest This At All, a fun, fast-paced card game. Win a snackish reward just for playing. Held Wednesday, Feb. 12, beginning at noon, at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Friends of the Arlington Library Meeting: Guests and new members are welcome to join the generous folks who help raise funds for library programs. Held in the Stillaguamish Conference Room, 154 W. Cox Ave. Held Wednesday, Feb. 12, beginning at 3 p.m. Waggin’ Tales: Read a tale or two with Arlington's favorite registered therapy pets. For children and families. Held Saturday, Feb. 22, beginning at 1 a.m.,at the Arlington Library, 135 N. Washington Ave. Have a Heart for Kids: The Skagit Valley Hospital Foundation will hold its 17th annual Have a Heart for Kids benefit dinner at 6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 24, at Il Granaio Italian Restaurant,

PAYING CASH FOR COMICS! Top national comic buyer will be in your area, paying cash for vintage comics (1970 & earlier). Call Will, 866-461-0640.

utlook

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In Print and Online!

Your classified ad runs in our print edition (published Wednesdays) and at www.northcountyoutlook.com for one low price!

100 W. Montgomery St. in Mount Vernon. The event includes a champagne reception, special prize drawing, program presentation and six-course Italian meal with wine hosted by Il Granaio owner/chef Alberto Candivi. $100 per person. Proceeds benefit Skagit Regional Health’s Children’s Therapy Program. For tickets and event information, call the Foundation Office at 360-814-5747 or visit https://www.skagitregionalhealth.org/foundation/ foundation-events/have-aheart-kids.

CTA Fabric Sale: Snohomish County Clothing Textile Advisors are preparing for their 10th Annual Fabric Sale with more details to come. Now they are collecting donations of fabric, notions, needlework, yarn, related supplies and equipment. Proceeds will go to local scholarships, grants and sewing classes. Call Arlene, 425-743-0118 for additional details.

ONGOING EVENTS

Lions Club: Are you interested in community service? The Lions are a worldwide community service organization. We are going to start a new Lions Club in the Marysville area and are looking for motivated community members to participate. Check out our web site (LionsMD19.org) under district B for some of the things we do. Also check out the Lions international web site for what we do around the world (lionsclubs.org). If interested contact mjlallysr@gmail.com.

Life in the Past Lane: The Comfort Genealogy Class meets every Thursday, 1011:30 a.m., at the Ken Baxter Community Center, 514 Delta Ave. in Marysville.The Comfort Genealogy Class is a group of people interested unlearning about their family history. Each week they will present information created by certified genealogists via webinar, speaker or DVD.

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February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

19

n WHISTLING GARDENER

Growing berries in the Pacific Northwest It should be no suryou want to mix it up a prise that our northwest bit, consider ‘Pink Popclimate is perfect for corn’ which sports pink growing all kinds of berblueberries or ‘Razz’ ries. Simply look around which claims to have at the omnipresent and overtones of raspberry noxious Himalayan flavor. For a more decoBlackberry, and one can By Steve Smith rative plant that funceasily deduce that berries tions well in the landwill grow with little effort on our scape, try ‘Cabernet Splash’ with part. The presence of vast commer- its dark burgundy colored spring cial fields of berries to the north foliage. The leaves will mature to in Skagit County and farther into a cabernet/green in the summer British Colombia, should remove and finish the season fiery red. For any doubt that gardeners can be anyone wishing to have an “edible successful in their own backyards. landscape”, ‘Cabernet Splash’ is the The hardest part for us is to decide perfect choice. which varieties to grow, as there Raspberries: It is important to are way more choices than there is understand that raspberries come room. Here are some suggestions in two models, June bearing and to consider for backyard berry everbearing — there are multiple growing. varieties within both of these cateBlueberries: Traditional high- gories. If you like to make jams and bush varieties come in early, mid, jellies, it is best to plant the June vaand late ripening times, which rieties, as they come on all at once. means that you could harvest ber- On the other hand, if you just like ries from early July into August. to graze throughout the summer, ‘Chandler’ seems to produce the then go with the everbearing types. largest berries, but there are others ‘Indian Summer’ is a good pick in the medium to large range that for everbearing, and ‘Candy Red’ are also very flavorful — you really or ‘Meeker’ are two good ones for can’t go wrong with any of them. If June bearing. For a twist, give ‘Cas-

cade Gold’ a try, it’s a June bearer with golden yellow fruit. If you are short on space or even limited to containers try ‘Raspberry Shortcake’, a June bearer that is thornless, which makes for easy picking — it only grows to 2 feet tall. Strawberries: Like raspberries, strawberries also come in both June bearing and everbearing varieties. For years 'Tri Star’ was the go-to variety for non-stop summerlong production, but ‘Seascape’ and ‘Sweet Kiss’ are dependable flavorful varieties as well. For June crops, ‘Shuksan’, ‘Hood’ and ‘Rainier’ are very reliable and delicious. For a unique variety, ’Hawaiian Berry’ is a novelty strawberry with red and white berries that boasts a hint of pineapple flavor. For you nativists, try ‘Temptation’, an everbearing variety that is an alpine strawberry hybrid with compact growth and good naturalizing habits. Blackberries: What with all the wild blackberries out there, one might wonder why a gardener would plant blackberries (also known as brambles). Simply put, modern cultivated blackberries have larger berries and many vari-

eties are thronless. Yep, no thorns. ‘Black Satin’, ‘Colombia Star’, and ‘Thornless Boysenberry’ are three varieties that have no thorns and extra-large fruit. ‘Prime Ark Freedom’ is a special thornless one that produces a June crop and then a second crop in the fall, so it is considered everbearing. It also claims to grow upright and not need staking, which could be a bonus if you are short on space. In addition to the above main categories of berries, gardeners can also grow some of the more obscure types such as cranberries and lingonberries — both of which make a nice ground cover for the edible landscape enthusiast. Both of our native huckleberries (evergreen and deciduous) can be grown in a backyard setting and will even take some shade. Honeyberries are a native to the northern hemisphere and are extremely hardy for our area. They produce an elongated bluish fruit that has a sweet-tart flavor, is higher in antioxidants than blueberries and is good eaten fresh or frozen. These plants prefer full sun and can reach 6 feet tall and as wide in 10

years. ‘Blue Moon’, ‘Blue Pacific’, ‘Cinderella’, and ‘Borealis’ are the main flavorful varieties. Goji berries are another new introduction to the northwest, although they have been in cultivation in China for thousands of years. They form a slightly thorny shrub that grows 4’ by 4’, when maintained in the garden. The fruit is bright red and high in antioxidants and vitamins. Grow them in containers for best results, as this will contain the spreading root system and help heat up the soil, which makes them bloom and fruit earlier. ‘Crimson Star’ and ‘Sweet Lifeberry’ seem to be the preferred varieties. Whatever berries you decide to grow, the sooner you plant them the sooner you can start harvesting. Most all of the above varieties should be available and ready to plant this time of year. Go have some fun growing berries in the northwest! Steve Smith is the owner of Sunnyside Nursery in Marysville and can be reached at info@sunnysidenursery.net.

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February 5, 2020 - February 11, 2020 NORTH COUNTY OUTLOOK

Communities

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Fathers, daughters enjoy Valentine's Dance By Christopher Andersson christopher@northcountyoutlook.com Fathers and daughters got together for a night of fun and dancing during the city of Marysville's annual Father-Daughter Valentine's Dance. The first two sessions for the dance were held on Feb. 1 and the second two are scheduled for Feb. 8. "We are excited to have all the families again with lots of returning dads and daughters," said Andrea Kingsford, recreation coordinator for the city of Marysville's Parks, Culture and Recreation Department. The event is usually sold out and this year was almost sold out as well. Marysville staff and other volunteers provide a night of dancing and music at the Cedarcrest Middle School commons. "The families love that it is the dad and daughter time together. The daughters get to spin, dance

and have fun," said Kingsford. "And it's just a special time where they get to do that together with their dad." Sound Source Seattle provides music and dance activities for families. "The DJ gets everyone on the dance floor," said Kingsford. Parents also enjoy the DJ and his energy. "I like the DJ. He mixes it up and keeps everyone going. And it's just gotten better as the girls get older," said local parent James Dunlap. For Dunlap, this is the fifth year at the event, and he is not alone in returning to the dance year after year. "Definitely my favorite part is just to see the dads come back year after year. I've seen daughters grow up and still come even when they're in university," said Kingsford. Local parent Darrell Walker has been to the event for eight years

and said he loves coming to it. "I probably know about 30 guys in here, so it's a good community get together," he said. "I go to church with about 20 of them. I went to high school with a couple of them, and now it's just a tradition. We come here every year and Marysville does a good job," he said. Walker brought several of his daughters to the event. "And now I have my newest one, she's only 19 months, here but she fits right in," he said. Kingsford wanted to thank all the families who support the event. "I always like to say thank you to the community and they've really made it part of their family tradition," she said. She also wanted to thank local businesses who help offset ticket costs and/or provide volunteer support. "We really appreciate all their sponsorship," said Kingsford.

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHER ANDERSSON

Darrell Walker, left, Tatum Carbajal, center, and Finley Walker dance at the city of Marysville's Father-Daughter Valentine's Dance on Feb. 1. This year's sponsors included Trading Post NW, Gamut 360, Bob's Burgers and Brew, Reece

Construction Company, Kiwanis, Sound Source Seattle and The Design Portrait Studio.

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