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THE VOICE OF PEND OREILLE COUNT Y SINCE 1901

www.pendoreillerivervalley.com

Freeman principal new Newport schools superintendent

Dave Smith’s father was superintendent here in 1980s BY DON GRONNING OF THE MINER

NEWORT – Dave Smith Jr., a 1989 graduate of Newport High School, was formally selected as the new superintendent of the Newport School District Monday, July Smith 1, during a special school board meeting. Smith, 42, will start work Monday, July 8. The board appointed business manager Tom Crouch to serve as interim superintendent for a week. Smith said he was happy to return to Newport. “I‘m happy to come here. I know a lot of people here,” he said after Monday’s board meeting. “I wasn’t planning to apply for any jobs until I heard this one opened up.” The board voted unanimously to hire Smith. School board president April Owen said Smith stood out among the 14 candidates who applied for the job. “We thought he would be a good fit,” she said. “He has a good personality and lots of positive ideas.” Smith has been high school principal and Career and Technical Education director for the Freeman School District for the last six years. Prior to that he spent four years as elementary school principal and director of special education for Freeman. He has also worked as a

classroom teacher, teaching special education for four years at Horizon Middle School in the Central Valley School District. Smith got his undergraduate degree from Whitworth University in Spokane. He received a master’s degree from Washington State University and is working on his doctorate at WSU. Smith, who played football, basketball and baseball in high school, joined the U.S. Navy right after graduation. He served four years, stationed in California, where he met his wife, Melissa. Initially, the Smiths will live at Diamond Lake. They have four sons, ages 9, 12, 15 and 18. Melissa Smith has her teaching credentials. When the Smiths moved back to Washington after he got out of the Navy, she taught Spanish for the Riverside School District. She also teaches religious education at St. Anthony Parish in Spokane. School board members conducted a three-week search to find a person to replace Jason Thompson, the former superintendent who left to take a job as executive director of human resources for the Marysville School District. Owen said it was a challenge to hire somebody that fast. In the end, though, they ended up with a strong group of prospects, she said. “We had a good pool of candidates,” she said. The board narrowed the 14 candidates to three – Smith, Chris Rust, principal of

Wednesday, July 3, 2013

Volume 110, Number 22 | 2 Sections, 20 Pages

75¢

MINER PHOTO|DON GRONNING

Ray and Dilys Raley are regulars at the Camas Center for Community Wellness swimming pool in Usk. Here they get their weekly swim. The Raleys live in Newport and ride the Rural Resources van to the center each week. Ray is 92 and Dilys is 89.

Swimming keeps these seniors active BY DON GRONNING OF THE MINER

USK – It’s a Wednesday morning and Ray and Dilys Raley are doing what several others are doing – swimming at the Camas Center for Community Wellness. But there is something unique about the couple that most wouldn’t notice: Dilys is 89 and Ray is 92. “They’re here every week,” says Sheri Webb, who works as a lifeguard at the center. They swim for about a half hour. The Raleys have been swimmers most of their lives. “I’ve always felt swimming is the best exercise,” says Dilys. They were raised in California and moved to Newport nine years ago. “We had some friends who were moving up here

SEE SUPER, 2A

The Raleys grab a bite to eat in the Camas Wellness Center cafeteria before heading back to Newport after their swim.

SEE SWIMMERS, 2A

MINER PHOTO|DON GRONNING

Pend Oreille County plans for timber harvests BY JANELLE ATYEO OF THE MINER

MINER PHOTO|DON GRONNING

Kayaking at the cove These three were out kayaking into the Albeni Cove campground area, taking advantage of the summer weather Friday, June 28. In addition to a popular swimming area, Albeni Cove has a boat launch and campsites.

NEWPORT – Pend Oreille County is planning about $140,000 worth of timber harvesting from county land this year. The commissioners approved a tentative harvest plan at their regular meeting June 24 and also hired a new consulting company to manage the county’s timber. The timber market is looking better than it has in the past few years, Pend Oreille County Commissioner Steve Kiss said. Kiss has been a self-employed logging contractor for 40 years. “Right now they’re feeling out the demand. At least it’s an upward motion,” he said.

|| Offices closed for holiday NEWPORT – Government offices and libraries will be closed Thursday, July 4 in celebration of Independence Day, and the U.S. Postal Service will not deliver mail that day. Pend Oreille County commissioners did not meet this week. The Priest River Driver’s License Office will be closed July 4 and 5 and will re-open for business July 8. The Sandpoint Driver’s License Office, located on North Boyer next to the sheriff’s office, will be open for business July 5. The Sandpoint office can be reached at 208-265-1431. The Newport and Gem State Miner Newspaper office will be closed Thursday for the Fourth of July,

On the list of potential harvest sites is: • About 15 acres on a 40-acre parcel at Anderson Lake totaling about 260,000 board feet of harvestable timber worth about $41,000, • Three harvests at Baker Lake of about 20 acres each with 411,000 feet of harvestable timber worth about $64,000, • A 35 and 79 acre harvest at the Basnaw parcel for about 190,000 feet each, worth a little more than $30,000 each, • About 77 acres in the Deer Valley to bring in 182,000 board feet worth about $39,000, • Harvesting on a 35-acres parcel at the Fertile Valley Section 16 park area where trees are diseased,

B R I E F LY

reopening Friday, July 5 at 8:30 a.m. Deadlines remain the same.

• The eight-acre Schneider 4 harvest at the Ione sand pit site, where the trees are already decaying with bark beetles and fungus, consists of 43,000 feet of timber that could be harvested by county crews, worth about $8,000, and • About 25 acres at Tiger Hill with about 121,000 board feet of timber worth about $21,000. All of those combined contain an estimated 1.4 million board feet of timber, worth about $238,000. But not all timber will be harvested this year. Some parcels, such as Anderson Lake, have access issues and easements that will need to be negotiated. Public works director Sam Castro will work with the county’s new timber consulting firm to select the

best harvest options for this year. As they do most years, commissioners have already budgeted for $140,000 of harvest revenue this year, so some cuts will have to be done before year’s end. “We have to harvest some this year because it was in the budget,” Kiss said. “Beyond that, we want to come up with a long-term plan to harvest X amount each year forever.” He said that the harvest volume would vary with market, but he thinks it would get the county on a more sustainable flow of revenue. In the past, county timber harvest was more dollar driven, and Kiss feels that maybe the county SEE TIMBER, 2A

||

Smith, R-Colville, voted no. Gov. Jay Inslee signed the budget Sunday, July 30.

State budget passes just before shutdown

New voters can register for primary election

OLYMPIA – Washington state passed a $33.6 billion operating budget Friday, June 28, just before many state services were scheduled to shut down because of lack of a legal authority to pay salaries. The new fiscal year started July 1. The state House of Representatives voted 81-11 to pass the budget, with 7th Legislative District Reps. Joel Kretz, R-Wauconda, voting in favor and Shelly Short, R-Addy, voting no. The state Senate passed the budget 44-4. Sen. John

NEWPORT – Pend Oreille County’s primary election is coming up Aug. 6. Any new voters can register online through Monday, July 8. After that, they’ll need to visit the audtior’s office in the old county courthouse in Newport to register in person, through July 29. Voters will receive their ballots in the mail on or after July 17. The following offices will have candidates appear on the ballot:

• State Senator, Legislative District 7: Mike Brunson, John Smith and Briand Dansel, • Pend Oreille County Commissioner for District 2: Mark Zorica and Mike Manus • Fire District 2 Commissioner Position 1: Rick Stone, Jon Carman and Sue Cona. The entire county will vote on the senate seat, but only District 2 voters will have their say on the county commissioner seat this time around. The entire county will vote for commissioner in this fall’s general election. The fire district election pertains only to voters in the district, in North Pend Oreille County. Those with questions can contact the auditor’s office at 509-447-6472.

SPORTS 2B - RECORD 4B - POLICE 4B - OPINION 4A - CLASSIFIEDS 6B-10B - PUBLIC NOTICES 7B-10B - DOWN RIVER 9A - LIFE 1B - OBITUARIES 4B


2A

| JULY 3, 2013

The Newport Miner Serving Pend Oreille County, WA

FROM PAGE ON E 

TIMBER | Harvest would help fund roads FROM PAGE 1

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CO N N EC T W I T H U S The Miner Online

cut it a little too much. He wants to see a more sustainable harvest so the county doesn’t have to wait 40 years for the next cut. Last year, the county harvest brought in $413,000 and $355,000 in 2011. The amount of revenue has varied widely over the past 10 years. No harvesting was done in 2009, and in 2007 the county brought in less than $70,000. The type of logging planned varies by stand. If the trees are diseased, Kiss said they would probably do a shelterwood cut. That involves thinning smaller trees pretty heavily and leaving some larger trees for shade and a seed source, he explained. After about 20 years, when the young trees are well established, loggers take out the bigger trees that were left. “That’s real popular right now,” Kiss said. The county usually performs logging that would be considered thinning, selective harvesting or partial cutting. The actual revenue from the county’s timber harvest this year will vary depending on how bids come in from logging contractors and the price of logs at the time. The price of logs took a big run up this spring increasing $100 per thousand board feet, Kiss said. That saturated the market, and lumber didn’t move as quickly as anticipated, so loggers backed off a little bit. “It’s still in better shape than last year,” Kiss said. “My crystal ball says it’s going to go up again in the fall. But if I was that smart I’d probably be in a different business.”

Park harvest would be with an eye to recreation The board of commissioners have been discussing new ways to allocate the timber harvest revenue. In the past, logging on county park land, such as the Fertile Valley Section 16, all sale revenue would go directly to parks. That gave the park fund a big boost recently, but it’s the only revenue parks has to work with. Commissioner Mike Manus said they have talked about designating a percentage of all timber revenue to go to parks. In turn, the parks

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doesn’t put money into maintaining its roads they would soon be beyond repair. Manus said they would like to get back on a seven year cycle of chip sealing roads, but the cost to do that work has risen considerably in the last decade. When the county moved away from the seven-year rotation around 2005, chip sealing cost $12,000 per mile. Now it’s more than $20,000 per mile. Commissioner Karen Skoog has been working to push the U.S. Forest Service to do more timber harvesting, which in turn helps the county as a percentage of their timber sales receipts would be used by the county to maintain roads.

New timber consultant will manage county land The commissioners chose a new company to replace retiring forester Steve Gibson of Four Seasons Forestry. Northwest Management Inc. will handle the county’s harvest planning and long term forest management of the county’s 3,300 timbered acres. Commissioners approved proceeding with a contract with Northwest Management at their June 24 meeting. A committee from the county interviewed three companies before selecting their top candidate. Northwest Management is based in Moscow, Idaho, but has had an office in Deer Park since 2000. The firm has 55 employees. The county is considering a two- or three-year contract with one-year openers following the initial term. The county will pay the consultant 10 percent of the harvest, and in some cases it will be an hourly rate – the same arrangement the county had with Gibson. The county is planning to remove hazardous trees from the campground at the fairgrounds in Cusick. The project could cost up to $7,000, but volunteers have offered to do some of the work. In light of the coming expense, the commissioners approved a new policy that uses money from the timber fund to finance hazard tree removal. This is a change from when trees were removed from the Hall of Justice parking lot last year. That expense was charged to the buildings and grounds budget.

County seeking funds for roads The county needs to find ways to fund road work such as chip sealing and rock crushing. Money from the parkland timber harvest could go to that. “We want to put it back into infrastructure,” Kiss said, adding that he doesn’t want the timber harvest revenue to disappear in the general fund. Last summer, a previous board of commissioners considered using timber revenue from park timber sales for general fund expenditures. A resolution that pre-dated that board states that any revenue from timber sold within the park must be used for park projects. It wasn’t written in the deed for the Section 16 property that the harvest revenue must go to parks, when the county received the land from the Department of Natural Resources about five years ago. Kiss noted that the county is still looking to sell off some parcels of land to gain revenue, but not timber land. “We made a commitment to start maintaining our roads again,” Manus said. The commissioners met with engineers from the County Road Administration Board this spring and discussed road maintenance. The CRAB members had visited before and warned that if the county

SWIMMERS | Both are longtime swimmers Rural Resource van schedule NEWPORT – The Rural Resources van carries people from Newport to the Camas Center for Community Wellness four days a week, with six runs a day. FROM PAGE 1

and we like small towns,” she says. They soon discovered the Camas Center and the Rural Resources van. “We’re so happy they have the Camas Center,” says Dilys. She is equally happy there is a bus that picks them up at their house to take them to the Camas Center and then returns them to their home in Newport. “I think more people would use the center if they knew about the bus,” she says. Both have been swimmers most of their lives. She started swimming when she was 4. When she was 10 years old, Dilys swam two and a half miles across Lake Elsinore in California. “My father accompanied me in a rowboat,” she says. “I got my name in the paper.” She continued her swimming, winning a trophy as an adult at Green Valley Lake in California for being the fastest swimmer in

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and recreation board would share revenue from timber harvest on park land to help cover other county expenses, such as road repairs. Before the park land was logged in 2011, the county park fund had dwindled so much that the operating budget was less than $4,000 a year. Recently, logging on an 80-acre parcel brought in $357,000. “It would give them available funds on an annual basis, and it would give us funds now,” Manus said. The board hasn’t yet determined what percentage of revenue would go to parks. It will likely be a topic as the board plans for the 2014 budget. Commissioner Kiss said they’ve emphasized with their timber consultant if they do a harvest on park land, it would be with an eye to recreation. Loggers would take out diseased trees and thin the dense, dark areas, but leave way more trees for shade and scenic beauty.

Vans leave Newport at 6:30 a.m., 9:05 a.m., 10:55 a.m., 1:15 p.m., 2:55 p.m. and 4:25 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays. A donation of 50 cents each direction is suggested. People

can make reservations by calling 1-800-776-9206. You can see the complete schedule online at www.ruralresources. org/wp-content/uploads/PendOreilleCountyDAR.pdf.

her age group. Ray acknowledges she is the faster swimmer. “She can swim side stroke faster than I can swim the crawl,” Ray says. “And she doesn’t get her hair wet.” After the Raleys swim, they soak for a bit in the hot water whirlpool, then have a bite to eat at the cafeteria before catching the van back to town. “We really like the food in the cafeteria,” Dilys says. The Raleys have been married 67 years. “We met at church,” Dilys said. “We were having a membership drive and I said come to our youth group.” She was 18 and he was 20. More than a half-century later they are still together, but they belong to a different church. They are Jehovah’s Witnesses. Dilys jokes that Ray converted because the Jehovah’s Witnesses don’t ask their parishioners for money as often as their previous church.

They spend quite a bit of time on church activities. “Spiritual life is important to us,” Dilys said. When they are not at the Camas Center, they spend time at the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah Witnesses. She figures time she spends walking door-to-door talking about her religion also contributes to their health. Ray, who worked most of his career as a mechanical engineer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, no longer does the door-todoor calling, although he is still involved with the church. Their adult children, who are seniors themselves, still live in California. The Raleys have two daughters, age 65 and 62, three grandsons and a granddaughter and three great-granddaughters. The Raleys like just about everything associated with the Camas Center. “We feel the exercise we get here helps us to live longer,” Dilys says.

THE NEWPORT MINER

High court rules beach is for everyone BY MICHELLE NEDVED OF THE MINER

SANDPOINT – A group of landowners at Priest Lake maintained their access to the local beach after an Idaho Supreme Court ruling affirming the judgment of First District Court judge Steve Verby. The case involved the Steamboat Bay Lots subdivision, located on the east side of the lake, where eight lots extend out from the lake in a horizontal line, with the first lot adjacent to the beach. The appellants, Tommy and Erin Dorsey, argued the beachfront property belonged to them after they purchased Lot 1, which is adjacent to the beach. The respondents, owners of the other seven lots, contend the beach was dedicated for the use of all eight lots in the subdivision. The district court agreed with the respondents, ruling the property was privately dedicated as an easement, benefitting all of the lots. According to court documents, the original owners of the prop-

Priest River airport being upgraded Closing July 15 for month

stationed there. “We have plans going on to make OF THE MINER it more accessible, and give more reasons for people to fly in and visit what PRIEST RIVER – The Priest River this town has to offer,” Batsch said. Municipal Airport will be closed The airport has one asphalt runfor about a month to undergo some way that measures 2,950 feet long by upgrade work. Starting around July 48 feet wide. 15, the airport will be closed as crews While Bonner County owns the expand taxiways, “We have plans going airport, the operations create a new tie are overseen by the down run and open on to make it more Priest River Airport some real estate Advisory Board. The accessible.” for building more county commissioners hangars. are in the process of apDennis Batsch The work will pointing a new member Airport Manager be done with a to the board to repre$655,000 grant Bonsent the city of Priest ner County received River government. through the Federal Aviation AdminCurrently on the board are istration. The low bidder for the work Batsch, George Weaver, Jim Caviglia, was Woods Crushing, coming in at Randy Blinn, Todd Sudick and Glenn $545,693. Rohrer. Airport manager Dennis Batsch Board members are appointed by said they hope for the airport to the Bonner County commissioners re-open within a month. Planes for three-year terms, and members won’t be able to fly in or out during report directly to commissioners. the closure. In summer months, the The board meets the last Thursday of site is used mostly by travelers visiteach month at 6:30 p.m. at the Priest ing family, he said. Ten aircraft are River Senior Center. BY JANELLE ATYEO

SUPER | Staff, community met candidates Wednesday FROM PAGE 1

Warden High School and Steven N. McCullough, superintendent of the Curlew School District. Teachers, staff and community members met with the three Wednesday, June 26. The teachers and staff met with the candidates first, with the community members meeting with the three in the evening. Smith was offered the job late Wednesday night, Smith said. “Everything went pretty fast because I needed to let my school district know as soon as possible,” he said. Smith’s father, Dave Smith, was superintendent of the Newport School District from 1984 to 1989. He came to the district in 1979 as principal at the elementary school in Newport. He left the superintendent position in 1989 to take a job as superintendent of the West

T H I S W E E K’S FO R EC A ST

Wednesday Thursday Sunny and Warm

Sunny and Warm

94/52

91/49

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

Sunny

Sunny

84/47

86/52

85/53

Sunny

Monday Sunny

86/48

Tuesday Sunny

85/56

Source: National Weather Service and Accuweather.com, Newport, WA

erty included a clause in their deed dedicating the beach to everyone in the subdivision when the first subdivision plat was filed with the county in 1966. In 1999, the Dorseys acquired lots one and two via a quitclaim deed. In 2009, the other property owners filed a complaint stating, “the language of the Plat of Steamboat Bay Lots and (the deed) have created a cloud on title as to right, title and ownership” of the beach property. The district court ruled last summer that the plat, along with the deed, created an easement. The trial court stated that, “every owner of each lot has an easement to use the disputed property or beach area between the ordinary mean high water line and the west boundary of Lot 1 of Steamboat Bay Lots.” The court further ordered that “no owners of any lots in the Steamboat Bay Lots subdivision have any fee simple interest in the disputed beach property or private road.” The Dorseys appealed but the high court concurred with Verby.

June 25 26 27 28 29 30 1

L A ST W E E K

High 64 66 71 77 89 75 93

Low Precip. 53 .36” 53 .16” 55 - 53 - 55 - 59 .15” 58 - Source: Albeni Falls Dam

Valley School District in Spokane. Two of the current board members – Keith Cordes and Jim Brewster – were on the board then. The senior Smith said he was thrilled his son got his first superintendent job at Newport. “Newport was where I got my start as a superintendent,” he said. “It’s great that it will be his first superintendent job, too.” The new superintendent’s salary hasn’t been finalized and wasn’t public yet, Owen said. She expects the board to finalize it next Monday. Thompson earned $115,000 annually as superintendent. Smith said he will spend the first week or so settling in and meeting people. Word of Smith’s hiring spread quickly following Wednesday’s interviews. “It was on Facebook by Friday,” board member Lynn Kaney said.

L A ST Y E A R This time last year we had a mix of temps ranging from the lower 70s early in the week to mid 90s towards the end of the week. We closed the week with showers and temps in the upper 80s.


THE MINER



JULY 3, 2013 |

Know your fireworks rules and regulations

BR I E FLY Stay fed with free food NEWPORT – The Newport School District is offering free lunch for children, served in the Newport City Park this summer. The free lunch will be served July 2 through Aug. 1. Serving time is noon on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Children under 18 are encouraged to come and eat. Lunch will not be served July 4, in observance of the holiday.

Man crashes after falling asleep CUSICK – A man was hospitalized after his car ran off the road when he fell asleep while driving about 4 p.m. Friday, June 28. According to a press release from the Washington State Patrol, Archie Schrader, 50, of Cusick was driving by himself west on Highway 20 about five miles south of Blueslide, when he fell asleep. The 1993 Nissan Quest van he was driving crossed the road in a curve and came to rest in the eastbound ditch. He was transported to Mount Carmel Hospital in Colville with minor injuries. He was wearing a seatbelt and drugs and alcohol were not involved. He was charged with second degree negligent driving.

School board will discuss budget CUSICK – The Cusick School District Board of Directors will hold a meeting Thursday, July 25 at 3 p.m. at the Cusick High School library. The purpose of this meeting is for the 2013-14 school budget hearing, as well as to hold their normally scheduled board meeting. The board typically meets on the third Tuesday of each month.

Port, PUD, county commissioners meet July 9 USK – Commissioners from the Port of Pend Oreille, public utility district and Pend Oreille County will meet Tuesday, July 9, at the Camas Wellness Center in Usk. The meeting will start at noon. Commissioners from the three agencies meet periodically to discuss matters of mutual interest.

Tourism group to meet in Ione July 23 IONE – The Northeast Washington Sustainable Tourism and Recreation Team (NEWSTART) will hold their monthly meeting in Ione July 23 at Ione City Hall. The two-hour meeting will start at 10 a.m. NEWSTART is a group that promotes sustainable tourism in Pend Oreille, Ferry and Stevens counties. Business owners, chamber members and citizens are invited to attend the July 23 meeting.

County beginning pavement work NEWPORT – Pend Oreille County is beginning its pavement preservation program for the summer, doing chip sealing and patching. Some work is taking place on Coyote Trail Road between Deer Valley Road and South Shore Diamond Lake Road. The count approved bids for chip seal oil in mid-June. Idaho Asphalt was the low bidder at $122,282. “We’ll do as much of it as we can afford. We’d like to do more,” county engineer Don Ramsey said about their pavement preservation program.

Name change proposed for Amber Lane NEWPORT – Amber Lane in the southeast corner of Pend Oreille County will be changing to Moonbeam Court, if approved by county commissioners. The board will hold a hearing on the matter July 16 at 10 a.m. at their meeting room on the first floor of the old county courthouse in Newport. Amber Lane is located off of Willms Road near Ellery Ranch Road and Becker Road.

3A

COURTESY PHOTO|COLVILLE NATIONAL FOREST

Cally Davidson of the Newport Ranger District, left, and Capitol grounds superintendent Ted Bechtol check out a possible Christmas tree candidate in Pend Oreille County.

Christmas tree choice in D.C.’s hands

Tree might come from Pend Oreille County forest BY JANELLE ATYEO OF THE MINER

NEWPORT – The Capitol grounds superintendent visited the Colville National Forest last week, June 26 and 27 to choose the Christmas tree that will adorn the West Lawn in Washington, D.C., this winter. Grounds superintendent Ted Bechtol and a team of U.S. Forest Service employees visited 10 trees throughout the Colville: five in Pend Oreille County, three in Stevens and two near Republic in Ferry County. He’ll take information about those trees back with him to D.C. and examine pictures and information on each tree . Colville officials expect a decision in a few weeks. At that point, they’ll announce which county the tree will come from and which ranger district. “It’s a big honor for us,” said Jen Knutson, a civil engineer working out of the forest supervisor’s office in Colville. For this project, she’s serving as the Capitol Christmas tree coordinator. “It is fun, but I did it because I love my agency and I love my communities,” she said. “What an opportunity for us. I get to talk about our corner of the state and what we’re all about up here.” No matter where on the Colville the tree is cut, all counties will get to take part in the

celebration. The tree will make time,” Knutson said. stops in Newport, Colville and The Colville Forest will also Republic before it tours the rest of supply about 70 companion the state. trees, small trees that will go in “We can keep it a forest-wide Capitol offices. Two trucks will celebration,” she said. make the cross country trip, one Knutson said they plan to with the big tree for the Capitol make it all the way to the Inlawn, the other with the comterstate 5 corridor in Western panion trees and about 5,000 giWashington. It will ant ornaments, which will “What an also make stops be handmade by Washingsomewhere in cen- opportunity for tonians to adorn the outtral Washington side tree. More ornaments us.” – possibly Omak or are being donated for the Wenatchee – and it indoor trees. The ornawill go to Yakima Jen Knutson ments will reflect the 2013 Capitol Christmas Tree theme “Sharing Washingor the Tri Cities just before it leaves Coordinator ton’s Good Nature.” Washington, headThose interested in ing for Boise. making ornaments can contact The exact location of the tree local coordinators, Amy Dillon at will be kept secret, to prevent 509-447-7361 or adillon@fs.fed. vandalism, until a few days us or Olivia Giannasi at 509-447before it’s cut Nov. 2. 7325 or ogiannasi@fs.fed.us, All but one of the trees the who will get them to the truck selection team visited were Enas its staged in Republic. Ornagelmann spruce, the other was ments should be delivered to the subalpine fir. Newport Ranger District office by Last year’s Capitol tree was an Sept. 27. Engelman spruce from Colorado, Kids between 5 and 19 can near Aspen. Knutson and others make an ornament and be enfrom the Colville attended the tered into a drawing for a trip to cutting ceremony, and Cally DaWashington, D.C., for the Christvidson from the Newport Ranger mas tree lighting ceremony in District helped wrap the tree for early December. Traditionally, its journey on the semi truck. one child from the tree’s state The Capitol lawn has been lights the Capitol Christmas decked out for Christmas each Tree with House Speaker John year since 1964. The only other Boehner. Find criteria for the time the tree has come from contest and the ornaments at Washington state was in 2006, capitolchristmastree.com/ornawhen the Olympic National Forments. est supplied a Pacific sliver fir. “Come out and join the celebra“We’re really excited. In Easttion. It’s going to be a lot of fun,” ern Washington, this is our first Knutson said.

NEWPORT – The rules for fireworks depend on where you live. Only the “safe and sane” type fireworks are legal. In Washington, including within Newport’s city limits, fireworks may be sold and discharged June 28 from noon to 11 p.m., June 29 to July 3 from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m., July 4 from 9 a.m. to midnight and July 5 from 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. Washington residents caught firing fireworks outside of the prescribed hours may be charged with a gross misdemeanor, resulting in a fine of up to $500 and possible jail time. Idaho law allows fireworks to be sold and ignited from midnight on June 23 to midnight on July 5 (plus Dec. 26 through midnight Jan. 1). Within Priest River city limits, igniting fireworks that fly in the air is prohibited. Non-aerial fireworks devices are permitted, such as ground spinners, fountains, sparklers, smoke devices or snakes. Discharging fireworks of any kind is illegal on all federal lands, including National Forest campgrounds. Regulations are enforced, and violation is punishable as a misdemeanor by a fine up to $5,000. Forest visitors are also reminded to ensure that all fires are extinguished and cold to the touch before leaving them. In Spokane County, no fire-

works of any kind are allowed in the cities of Spokane and Spokane Valley. “Safe and sane” fireworks are allowed in Deer Park, Airway Heights and Medical Lake. There were 354 fireworksrelated injuries and fires reported to the Washington State Fire Marshal’s Office in 2012 by fire departments and hospitals. Of those reports, there were 128 fires and 226 injuries. Most incidents were cause by males between 8 and 21. There were seven residential fires totaling $880,500 in loss. One was caused by an illegal device, three were caused by legal fireworks. A total 26 fires and 64 injuries were caused by devices which are illegal to own or possess in Washington state. Seven sparkler bomb incidents included five fires and explosions. Two caused facial, torso and hand injuries. These devices are considered improvised explosive devices which are illegal to manufacture and possess. The fire marshal encourages parents to talk to your kids about fireworks and safety. Set family boundaries. Only adults should light fireworks. Store fireworks in a secure location out of the reach and sight of curious children. Be prepared; have water nearby and put pets indoors.

Area Fourth of July festivities Usk and Cusick: The Kalispel Tribe of Indians Independence Day celebration starts at 2 p.m. with games and prizes, a band, free snow cones and popcorn. A free lunch is served from 3-4 p.m. Firworks are after dusk. The Usk Community Club pancake breakfast is from 8-11 a.m. The parade starts there about noon and travels to Cusick, where the American Legion Post 217 will have family Bingo at 1:30 p.m. and a band at 7 p.m.

Diamond Lake: A boat parade is at 2 p.m., and fireworks are set off at dusk from a barge in the lake.

Priest River: Fireworks are set from Bonner County Park. Bands play in the park at 6 p.m.

Metaline is holding a potluck at 5 p.m. and fireworks at dusk.

Spirit Lake: A parade starts at 11 a.m., and vendors will set up in the Big City Park. Fireworks are at dusk, set from the baseball park on Jefferson Street.

Priest Lake: A kids parade is at Granite Bay at 10 a.m. The Coolin Civic Center is holding a free ice cream social from 6-8 p.m. Fireworks shows are at Hill’s and Elkins resorts on July 4 and at Grandview July 5.

LaClede: The Community Club is hosting a pancake breakfast at 8 a.m. The parade will start there at 11 a.m. . Fireworks are at dark.

Metaline:

Volunteers help monitor water quality BY JANELLE ATYEO OF THE MINER

COEUR D’ALENE – Twice a year, Master Water Stewards collect water samples from IDAH2O monitoring sites, analyzing them for nutrients and bacteria. The spring 2013 Snapshot was held May 29. Idah2o Master Water Steward volunteers are encouraged to

|| C O R R E C T I O N S || A story in last week’s edition of The Miner incorrectly stated the amount of the line extension fee for those who did not sign up for PUD fiber by the Sept. 28, 2012, deadline. The PUD will pay the first $1,500 of the cost to run the line to the house, and the customer will be responsible for the remaining cost. The Miner regrets any confusion this may have caused. A photo cutline about a garage fire on Coyote Trail Road last week incorrectly listed the year of the vehicle the property owner lost in the fire. A 1955 Ford was destroyed. The Miner regrets any confusion this may have caused.

bring a water sample from their monitoring site to the University of Idaho Coeur d’Alene Harbor Center water lab to have it analyzed for Nitrate-N, total phosphorus, total coliform bacteria, and E. coli bacteria. Total coliform is a measure of all coliform bacteria in the water, of which E. coli is one type. Over time, our snapshot events can provide valuable data,” said Marie Pengilly, Idah2o Volunteer

Coordinator with the U of I Extension. The data from the Snapshot events indicate that both Diamond Lake and Sacheen Lake are not impaired for either bacteria or nutrients. Test points at Diamond Lake are located at Elu Beach and North Bay. Diamond Lake Samples were taken last fall too. Nutrient levels SEE WATER, 8A

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4A

| JULY 3, 2013

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O PI N I O N

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Newport needs an airport

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f a few of the diehard aviation buffs that spent their spare time around the former Newport airport were still alive, they would be at every city council and county commissioner meeting asking for their airport back. Their pleas at the time should be haunting our leaders today. They said if the city sold the property to the Newport School District for a new school then eventually the community must find a new location for an airport. It never happened and it is hurting this community. As Priest River, Ione, Deer Park, Sandpoint and Colville receive federal aviation grants to upgrade their community airports, south Pend Oreille County leaders haven’t even talked about establishing an airport site. As development and environmental restrictions grow, there will be less suitable airport sites close to Newport. Someday there won’t be any. Small airports are not only important for the growing number of recreational pilots in our communities but are increasingly important to business. This demand will only increase as technology makes planes lighter, safer, cheaper and more fuel-efficient. Every futurist predicts air transportation being essential to future communities. If in doubt about the use of private planes for transportation, visit XN Air, the FBO at the Spokane International Airport any day of the week. Small private planes to executive jets come in regularly. Coming off the planes are families going to events like Hoopfest, companies flying in technical help to fix a production problem, executives closing a land deal and tourists from around the world. There are also regular medical flights. This scene goes on at Coeur d’Alene airport and in Sandpoint, and is increasing at the others in the region. Newport is being left out of the flight plans and economic prosperity. The federal government awards grants to help with airport development because they realize that airports are as important to the infrastructure as highways and the Internet. The south Pend Oreille County leaders need to realize this as well and get to work: Find a site, get a design and look for funding. --FJW

Keep student loan rates from doubling Constituent’s college days mirror my own, and Democrats are playing politics with her future It’s not every day you meet a college sophomore who serves burgers at the local McDonald’s drive-thru just to put herself through college and graduate with a degree in quantitative economics. But in light of recent tuition hikes and the threat of some student loan rates doubling in less than a week, that’s exactly what 18-year-old Hayley Hohman – an Eastern Washington native and Washington State University “Cougar” – is doing to fund her final years of college. I know what it’s like to be in Hayley’s shoes. As someone who once worked the drive-thru window at our neighborhood McDonald’s, just a few miles north of where Hayley works now, that is exactly what I had to do to put myself through college, too. More than two decades later, I am still paying off my student loans. Just like Hayley – and the 12 million college students like her who are forced to take out loans – I understand firsthand the challenges students face when it comes to putting themselves through college. My mom dropped out of college after her dad passed away, and many years later, I was grateful to become the first in my family to graduate from college and be able to access a federal loan to go to graduate school. But it’s far more difficult now than it ever was before – especially when state budgets are being cut, college tuition is going up and the president and Senate Democrats refuse to act on the impending rise of student loan interest rates in the days to come. On July 1, students and families

all across this country will see interest rates for new federally subsidized student loans double if the Democrats who run Washington fail to act. Just last month, House Republicans passed The Smarter Solutions for Students Act, which would prevent federal loan interest rates from GUEST doubling, and OPINION take WashingREP. CATHY ton politics out MCMORRIS of students’ RODGERS R-WASH. wallets. But even with the deadline looming, Democrats have not acted. In fact, President Obama threatened to veto the bill and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said with unequivocal conviction, “I am not looking for a compromise.” What they haven’t said, though, is far more important: their failure to compromise is putting students in danger of not being able to attend college. It is students like Hayley who will pay the price for Democrats’ inaction if student loan interest rates double. Not only have her academic scholarships expired, but like most students at American public universities, her tuition has already increased by over 16 percent in just the past year alone. As the oldest of four children – all of whom plan to go to college in the foreseeable future – her mother is currently working to finish her bachelor’s degree in nursing so she can help put her kids through school. With the cost of college going up, Hayley, like many other students, will be forced to take out loans to

SEE RODGERS, 5A

THE NEWPORT MINER

The Miner Staff

|| What qualifies Sen. Smith for office? To the editor: Is John Smith the best the Republican Party can offer in Stevens, Ferry, Pend Oreille, and parts of Spokane and Okanagan counties? A man who won’t list his educational background on his own Legislative webpage, who ran a failed business, The Court House Café, and runs a nonprofit Farmer’s Market for his own profit? Things must be pretty grim on the far right side of the party. Only two of the 15 Republican county commissioners abstained from voting for John Smith. It appears that Brian Dansel and Steve Parker stood up to the party leaders and wouldn’t be pushed into voting against their conscience. Now Brian is running against Senator Smith, I wonder will Mr. Dansel share his educational background. I know he has served as Ferry County commissioner for the past three years that at least gives us a window in how he might work as a Senator. Senator Smith, can you explain why you supported the building of a new airport in Colville? What in your background leads us to believe you have the management skills that would be expected as a senator? What is your financial record as a private citizen that shows that you know how to navigate around a multi-billion dollar state budget? Oh I know, you claim to be a rancher. Ranching is a tough business, lots of up and downs, tough decisions to be made daily, that could be where you learned the old fashion way of making ends meet, so tell us about your ranching experience so we can get a better understanding of your on the job training. How many head of cattle, or horses, or pigs, or whatever you ranch? -Scott Christensen Mead

Fiber optics are a gift To the editor: You removed Joe Onley as CNS Manager? Really? Does Pend Oreille County realize what a gift he has brought to the county? To have fiber optics run to your house,

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R E A D E R S’

Newport Hospital offers great care To the editor: I have just spent a month in the care of our local doctors and community hospital in Newport. I now have a profoundly widened appreciation for the services we have locally. All of the staff were so caring and giving well beyond the call of duty. Let’s hope everyone in our community realizes the quality of care available when needed. Thanks so much to all who cared for me and my family while there. -Audrey Hunt Diamond Lake

To the editor: In many states the conservative political element has taken over the state legislatures and crazy bills and agendas are being promoted. Texas will hold a special session to take up an anti-abortion bill that recently failed. Our own legislature came close to shutting down the state after two special sessions to pass a state budget, and state employees were given lay off notices. It seems that governing has been replaced by conservative stalling and obstruction. No government is better than a functioning one. There is no right to life when it comes to abortion. Rich people have options to travel to other places that allow abortions and poor people will simply self-abort without medical help. They won’t have unwanted children and the law isn’t going to prevent abortions. It would be about as effective as outlawing suicides. Abortion laws are just a means to lockup women and people that aid them in nonmedical abortion. That’s what happened before Row v. Wade. It’s just amazing that Republicans want limited government unless it’s about sex and reproduction. There is simply no religious basis for what is called pro-life and then supporting wars of choice and the death penalty. The abortion issue came to

Visit The Miner Online to answer our readers’ poll question through Monday afternoon. Find it on the left-hand side of the page at www.PendOreilleRiverValley.com. The results will be printed next week on this page. You need not be a subscriber to participate. If you have ideas for future readers’ poll topics, submit them to minernews@povn.com.

The Obama administration announced plans to cut emissions from hundreds of coal fired electric power plants by using rules to be developed by the Environmental Protection Agency. The idea is to address climate change by reducing carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants. This would bypass Congress. Do you think using the EPA and bypassing Congress is the best way to deal with climate change? Yes, we should have done this years ago. Time is running out. No, the coal will be burned somewhere, it might as well provide family wage jobs in this country. Yes, the corporate controlled Congress will not allow any meaningful legislation to addresses climate change to pass. No, the president isn’t king. Congress must be consulted on something that will have this big an economic impact on the coal industry.

The Miner staff invites readers to comment on select stories on our Web site, www.pendoreillerivervalley. com. Commentators have the option of adding their name or writing anonymously. The Miner staff will review each comment before it is posted and reserves the right to omit or edit comments. If you want to comment only to our writers and editors let us know that you do not want your comment published.

the forefront only when neo-cons teamed up the religious right to make abortion a political wedge issue. Frankly, conservatives are only pro-life for purpose of imposing their political will on others. Our own state senate fell apart when a couple of Democrats went over to the dark side and now we have the same ineptness as the federal congress. You might note that our own congresswoman recently failed to lead her party to pass the farm bill. The dark side wanted more cuts to food stamps and eating less food isn’t exactly farm friendly idea. -Pete Scobby Newport

Conservatives cause more stalling, obstruction

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Web story comments policy

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LE T T E R S

what a gift! So you have cost overruns that are $2 million. Progress costs money, and you were able to get the federal government to pay for 80 percent of it. He has done nothing buy try and prepare the county for the coming century. You’re going to have a gold mine (of information, not actual gold) at your fingertips and you don’t realize it. If this project fails it will not fall on Joe Onley’s shoulders, it will on the citizens of South Pend Oreille County who didn’t have the vision to support him. -Jeff Pittman Post Falls Submitted via The Miner Online

P O LL

LETTERS POLICY We welcome letters to the editor. Letters should be typed and submitted to The Miner and Gem State Miner office no later than 5 p.m. Friday for publication the following Wednesday. No letter will be published unless it is signed by at least one individual, even if the letter represents the view of a group. The letter must include a telephone number and address for confirmation of authenticity. Letters should be no longer than 300 words. The Miner reserves the right to edit to conform to our publication style, policy and libel laws. Political letters will not be published the last issue prior an election. Letters will be printed as space allows.

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Thanks to firefighters To the editor: The Umbarger Family would like to thank the heros at the fire department who were able to put out our garage fire and prevented further damage to our property. We are eternally grateful to have such brave, selfless people who put their lives on the line every day in service of the community. There are no words that can really express our gratitude. We encourage everyone to take the time to thank these men and women for their valiant service. -Robert Umbarger Newport

R E A D E R S’ P O LL R E SU LT S

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How big do you go with your fireworks on the Fourth of July? My display rivals the biggest and The bigger the best professional shows in the area. better. I spend top It’s more fun to do it yourself. dollar for the coolest exploders. It might be illegal, but I make my own explosives. More bang for your buck.

13% 13% 4% 26%

I leave the big displays for the professionals. It’s more fun to sit back and watch.

Total Votes: 23

43% I don’t buy fireworks. It’s money gone up in flames.


THE MINER



JULY 3, 2013 |

5A

Newport graduates 86

Many get thousands of dollars of scholarships

COURTESY ILLUSTRATION|JAMES A. SEWELL & ASSOCIATES

Every residence in Sacheen Lake’s Local Improvement District will be required to connect to the system. Lots shown in green are within the system.

Sacheen Lake sewer system construction will finally start Bid opening is July 24 BY DON GRONNING OF THE MINER

SACHEEN LAKE – Sacheen Lake is one step closer to having a sewer system, as the Sacheen Lake Water and Sewer District has called for bids to do the work. District commissioners plan to open the bids July 24. “They’ll take about a month to evaluate them,” said Kevin Koesel, consulting engineer for James A. Sewell and Associates, the firm that designed the $7.8 million system. If the weather cooperates, work will be well underway this year, with completion slated for 2014. Sacheen Lake Water and Sewer District commissioners could award the contracts to three different firms, Koesel said, one to do the work on the treatment plant, one to work on the collection lines and one to work on the onsite improvements. Or they could award it to one firm. The area will be busy this summer, as crews work to build the system, which will serve 388 lots around the lake. Regardless of how many firms get the bid all will be working simultaneously on the three parts of the project. The sewer will be similar to the Diamond Lake system except for one key component. “The Diamond Lake system has septic tanks,” Koesel said. While the liquid waste from Diamond Lake system is still pumped to a treatment plant located on Telephone Road, the sewer district has to periodically empty the sludge from the 1,000-gallon septic tanks at each home and business using trucks. That won’t happen at Sacheen Lake, as all the sewage will be pumped to the treatment site.

Treatment plant The Sacheen Lake system will pump all sewage to the treatment

plant, which will be located about a mile north of the lake on 160 acres of wooded land the district owns. Sixteen acres will be used for the treatment system. Sewage will be held and treated in a lagoon system. There will be three lagoon cells constructed, with the option to add another as needed. All the lagoon cells will be double lined with high-density polyethylene liners to prevent leaking. Two of the cells will be able to hold 5.3 million gallons each. These will be used to treat the sewage with aeration – using air to treat the sewage. In warm weather, it will take about 30 days to treat the sewage in the lagoon. That will extend to 180 days in the winter. The third lagoon will hold 13.2 million gallons and will be a storage lagoon. The treated wastewater will be used to irrigate the forest. The sewage will be disinfected with chlorine prior to land application, Koesel said. Since irrigation won’t be possible in the cold months, the district will have to store the sewage about seven months of the year. There will be an 800 square-foot headworks building constructed at the treatment site. That’s where the system’s operator will be housed. Sewage will be pumped to the headworks building from the collector lines, entering the building through an eight-inch line. At the headworks building inorganic materials such as plastics will be removed before the sewage goes to the lagoons.

Collector lines Before it gets to the treatment plants, the sewage will travel through eight miles of collector lines. The collector lines, which will be varying sizes, will run down the highways and roads around Sacheen Lake. The lines will be underground, which will involve a lot of digging. “It will be challenging,” Koesel

said. “It’s not like going into a new subdivision.” Crews will likely encounter a great deal of solid rock, he said, although there will also be areas where it will be relatively easy digging. Nevertheless, Sacheen Lake residents will likely see plenty of heavy equipment and crews around the lake as the lines are installed.

Onsite improvements Workers will do the onsite improvements at each home at the same time they are building the lagoon system and the collector lines. Each home will get a pumping station, with 1 ¼ inch pipe taking to sewage to the collector line, which in most areas will be on the street. The pumping stations will are about 30 inches in diameter and about 6 ½ feet tall, but will be installed underground, with only the top showing. They will operate using an electric pump with an electric controller on each home. Koesel said that the plan is for crews only spend a couple hours at each home installing the pumping stations. Since each home likely has a septic system, the old septic tanks will be pumped and filled with gravel. “Some of the septic systems are in pretty bad shape,” Koesel said. Crews will install the new system, test it and make sure it’s working and then dig up the pipe and connect it to the new system. All but 21 property owners within the LID have given permission to do the onsite improvements, he said, with more still coming in. Since everyone in the Local Improvement District (LID) will have to be connected to the system, if the onsite improvements aren’t made at the time the system is constructed, property owners will be responsible for paying for the onsite improvements necessary to connect.

Fake calls from courts demand money SEATTLE – Scammers are calling Washington residents claiming to represent various Washington courts and demanding residents wire money by 10 a.m. or face arrest. People who receive these calls assume the calls must be about outstanding fines or warrants they are unaware of. It’s only when they follow up with the court they discover there is no violation, and confirm they got scammed. The Washington Attorney General’s Office believes the scammer is spoofing court phone numbers, so it looks like a court is calling. Most recently, the scammers are using the Des Moines Municipal Court’s phone number. The attorney general suggests people keep these facts in mind if you receive a call: Courts never call people to collect debts, nonpayment of debt is not a crime; and most courts accept cash or credit cards and don’t encourage

wiring money as an option. The attorney general encour-

ages consumers to be skeptical of any call demanding money.

NEWPORT – Eighty-six seniors graduated Newport High School in a ceremony held June 8. Cathi Rawley played “Pomp and Circumstance,” Kyle Genther and Ann McGetrick were guest speakers, Valedictorian Sydney Siemsen and Salutatorian Jenna Kersting also spoke and school board members April Owen and Jim Brewster presented diplomas. Newport grads received $595,560 in scholarships and grants. Margaret Abercrombie plans to attend Washington State University. She received a total of $93,746 in scholarships and grants, including: $10,868 per year from the Washington State Grant, $6,000 from the Hubert Smith scholarship, $5,000 over two years and $1,000 over two years from the Washington State Opportunity Fund, $5,195 per year in federal grants, $1,036 per year from the College Bound Scholarship, $2,000 from the Washington State PTA Scholarship, $1,500 Verne and Lorraine Lindsay

Memorial Scholarship, $1,000 from Inland Empire Softball Hall of Fame Scholarship, $1,000 James and Mildred Sewell Scholarship, $1,000 Honorable Mention AOA Waiver, $600 Newport Priest River Rotary Scholarship and a $250 PSE II Scholarship. Jenna Kersting will attend the University of Puget Sound. She received $81,200 in scholarships and grants, including $19,000 per year from a PS Trustee Scholarship, $1,500 from the Verne and Lorraine Lindsay Memorial Scholarship, a $1,000 Newport Alumni Scholarship, a $1,000 Maw and Paw’s Scholarship, a $700 Diamond Lake Ranch Scholarship, $500 from a PEO Scholarship and a $500 from the Wilma Black Scholarship. Sydney Siemsen will attend Whitworth University. She received $74,400 in scholarships and grants, including a $17,500 per year Presidential Scholarship, a $1,000 Maw and Paw’s Scholarship, a $1,000 Newport Alumni Scholarship a $700 Diamond Lake Ranch Scholarship, a $500 Durham School Services Scholarship, a $500 PEO Scholarship and

a $500 and a $200 NAT Family Scholarship. Alexandra Abercrombie will attend Washington State University. She received $70,146 in scholarships and grants, including a $10,868 per year Washington State Grant, federal grants worth $5,195 per year, a $1,500 Verne and Lorraine Lindsay Memorial Scholarship, a $1,036 College Bound Scholarship and a $250 PSE II Scholarship. Rebecca Daigneault will attend Whitworth University. She will receive $67,300 in scholarships and grants, including a $12,500 per year Whitworth Scholarship, $13,800 in grant aid and a $3,500 Music Grant. Ethan Tafoya will attend Eastern Washington University. He will receive $51,008 in grants, including $5,555 per year in federal grants and $7,197 per year in state grants. Arielle Walden will attend the University of Montana. She received $37,645 in grants and scholarships, including $5,000 per year from the Leadership Achieve-

an education, and find a job once they graduate. That’s why House Republicans acted, but by refusing to compromise on student loans, the president and Democrats are doing just the opposite. Despite the many years that separate Hayley and me, our shared stories – of Eastern Washington roots, long McDonald’s workdays, and the determination to put ourselves through school – are strikingly similar. When I was young, my parents told me the same thing

Hayley’s told her: higher education is an investment from which I would benefit long after I collected my diploma. Nothing could be more true. To receive an education at one of America’s pre-eminent colleges or universities is, by far, one of the greatest opportunities of living in this country. Republicans have fought to make sure more students like Hayley can afford to go to college. We’ve acted to prevent their rates from doubling. Now it’s time for Democrats to join us.

RODGERS | FROM PAGE 4A

pay for school. And if the Democrats allow loan interest rates to go up, she may not be able to afford to finish college. With student debt at an alltime high, it is easy to see why this is so problematic. According to a recent study conducted by Fidelity Investments, 70 percent of those in the class of 2013 graduated with some kind of debt, averaging over $35,000 per student. Over 60 percent of college students nationwide borrow annually to help cover the cost of college, and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau reports that today there is $1 trillion in total outstanding student loan debt in the United States. And with the economy still struggling to expand, it’s Locally 31 3 311 11 W. Walnut harder than ever for recent col- Owned Newport, N Ne e WA lege graduates to find jobs and & Operated (509) 447-3933 pay off their student loans. That’s why raising student loan interest rates is, without a doubt, the worst thing we could do to college students right now. We’re elected to WITH COUPON Congress to help the people we represent – to make it easier for Most Vehicles • 4x4’s & Diesels Extra them to go to college, receive

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6A

| JULY 3, 2013



THE MINER

High traffic drug area causes sheriff concern BY DESIREÉ HOOD OF THE MINER

NEWPORT – Sheriff Alan Botzheim held a special session of the Pend Oreille Youth Task Force Monday, inviting more than 27 Newport residents, to discuss the drug activity that has plagued the neighborhood south of the railroad tracks in Newport. With more than 41 reports of suspicious activity at three houses that nine families call home in the past year, residents fear that this situation will only get worse before it improves. Martina Coordes, drug free communities program coordinator, and the sheriff, led the discussion about what options are available to curb the growing problem and concern of the nearby residents. “If you want to survive, you have to be aware of your environment,” concerned resident William Paylor said. He has been in the area for the past 10 years and according to him, he has watched the suspicious activity get worse in the last several years. Although a specific solution is hard to come by in terms of curbing the growing drug problem, many different options were discussed that may eliminate some of the activity and give residents more peace of mind. Homeowners who live in the problem areas are encouraged to write letters to the sheriff’s office. Botzheim feels that an open door

policy is important and wants to know what the residents see and have concerns over. Keeping law enforcement informed by calling in suspicious activity is also important. It notifies them of current activity and according to the sheriff, all calls are responded to. A Block Watch was discussed. For the past year, the neighbors in the area have been diligently calling and watching the high number of cars that frequent the three houses in question. One resident has formed the block watch, but Coordes is hopeful to find a volunteer to coordinate more blocks into the equation to watch the other houses as well. The block watch is encouraged to take pictures, write down license plate numbers and call in the activity if it can be done in a safe manner. Prosecuting Attorney Tom Metzger said getting a nuisance charge placed on the tenants causing the problem is more difficult than most understand. He feels that involving the landlord of the rental houses will help stop some of the problem. Sending out letters and copies of the reports that the officers take, called Form 1s, to the landlords was high on the list of options. Metzger and the sheriff will be discussing this option further over the next 30 days, and plan to notify the homeowners of the situations. “You want the landlord to have an incentive to do the right thing and evict the people. It needs to

be specific and they need to have notice. I have to be able to show that that landowner had notice,” Metzger said. He also stated that calling the landowners would be the first step before sending out the documents to give them an extra option of being notified. Community awareness is also critical. Mayor Shirley Sands is a resident of one of the areas in question. She has dealt with this situation in the past and had success getting a problem family evicted by diligently watching with binoculars and mailing out letters to the house. She got the neighbors involved and shortly after, the house came up for rent. “We ganged up on them,” Mayor Sands said. Chris Johnson, a concerned resident, is in agreement with knowing who your neighbors are and being diligent about keeping track of the situation. “I make a point to wave at everybody that goes by, right before I look at their license plate,” he said. The sheriff will take the information that was gained from the meeting and start making the appropriate changes to solve some of this issue. He will hold another meeting Sept. 9 at 6 p.m. to see how the changes have affected the area. He encourages residents to attend. Residents can reach the sheriff’s office by mail at P.O. Box 5075, Newport, WA 99156 or call 509-447-1901.

COURTESY PHOTO|PEND OREILLE PUD

Fish planted at Power Lake The fishing’s fine, especially for the little anglers at Power Lake, where Pend Oreille Public Utility district recently planted 2,500 10-inch triploid rainbow trout. PUD natural resources staff suggests anglers give the fish a couple of weeks in their new environment. Amenities at Power Lake include a campground and sheltered picnic area. Only non-motorized boats may be used there.

Lavender fills the air for 10 years OF THE MINER

NEWPORT – Lavender plants, good food, live music and arts and crafts delight area residents with the celebration of the 10th annual Lavender Festival, that now takes up the Newport City Park for a two-day, fun filled event with festivities for everyone. The festival, July 6-7, is held annually in July when the lavender is in full bloom along the Pend Oreille River. The founding organizers for the event were the WSU extension office in Pend Oreille County and the Kalispel Tribe of Indians. Many volunteers also came from the community and businesses to develop the artisan event. It originally started in 2004, on Jerry and Wendy Kepelke’s 259acre homestead along the Pend Oreille River north of Usk. From there, more vendors and events

Burning banned on forest land County recreational fires okay NEWPORT – Strict fire rules are in effect in Pend Oreille County from now until Sept. 30, with a state wide burn ban in effect in all forestlands under Department of Natural Resources fire protection, and a county law preventing outdoor fires on most private lands in the county. In the county, there is an exception for attended recreational fires no larger than three feet by three feet by two feet tall. Under Pend Oreille County law, when the DNR puts a burn ban in place, it applies to lands within the county except for recreational fires. The recreational fires must have a fire break around the fire and a shovel and a charged hose or five gallons of water must be on hand. If a recreational fire escapes, the property owner is responsible for any and all fire suppression costs. The use of gas and propane self-contained stoves and barbecues will continue to be allowed under the ban. The DNR burn ban will apply to all forestlands in Washington under DNR fire protection, which does not include federally owned lands. Already this year, DNR has had 57 wildfire starts simply from escaped outdoor burn piles, which have burned approximately 202 acres. “The threat of wildfires from escaped outdoor burning is highest during the hot and dry days of summer,” said Commissioner of Public Lands

Peter Goldmark. “Wildfires are serious threats to public safety, private property, and wildlife habitat. We must take prudent steps to prevent wildfires and minimize the large expenditures of public resources spent to fight them.”  The ban will apply to all outdoor burning on DNR-protected forestlands with the following exceptions: 1. Recreational fires in approved fire pits within desig-

were added and visitors came from all over the area to smell the lavender, taste lavender flavored food and listen to live music from many regional bands. The first festival showcased thousands of lavender plants for festival visitors to view along with other indigenous flora. The visitors wandered among the plants and enjoyed the gourmet food and local artists’ talent. The festival grew every year with more visitors coming and by 2008, the event outgrew the family homestead and moved to the Newport City Park. Moving the location to the park allowed for more vendors to take part, for an array of gourmet cooking and the Newport/Priest River Rotary Club sponsored a wine and beer garden featuring local wineries and breweries. Parking was also better at the park and the venue became known for the safe, family friendly atmosphere.

BY DESIREÉ HOOD

nated state, county, municipal or other campgrounds, and 2. DNR-approved prescribed fires, implemented to enhance or restore fire-dependent ecosystems and forest health. In Idaho, open burning is prohibited within the Priest River city limits until further notice, according to Les Kokanos, Fire Chief for the West Bonner Fire District. In Bonner County, burning is allowed by permit only, he said.

In 2008, more than 3,000 people came to the park, marking the highest number of visitors in the Lavender Festival history and more than doubling the attendance from the first festival. The park is decorated each year to give the ambiance of a Tuscan Garden complete with planters of lavender, flags, chandeliers and live music. More than 80 vendors were chosen on a jury system so that the variety of options at the Lavender Festival remains open, assures high quality and there will always be something for everyone. The food is selected by the particular dishes the chefs offer. Those include lavender flavored baked goods, sausages, fresh wildberry jam, barbecue sauce and lemonade. With a variety of activities for the young and old and options for everyone, area residents are sure to leave the park with the smell of lavender still filling their nose.

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THE MINER



JULY 3, 2013 |

7A

Food, fun, smiles and a bus come to Lavender Festival BY DESIREÉ HOOD

Classes, crafts offer

OF THE MINER

something for everyone

NEWPORT – The 2013 Pend Oreille Valley Lavender Festival celebrates 10 years of festivities and fun this year, taking place July 6-7 at the Newport City Park. Festival organizers are bringing back the wine/microbrew garden gala Saturday evening, which is just one of the many events to choose from during this two-day festival. The festival opens Saturday, July 6, with vendors being in the park from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and continues Sunday, July 7, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission to the festival can be purchased at the gate and is $6 for adults or $10 for a two-day pass. Children 12 and under are free. Guests will arrive in luxury this year with the newest addition to the festival being a KALTRAN bus, operated by the Kalispel Tribe, that will pick guests up at four locations around Newport and drop them off on First Street in the middle of the festivities in 15-minute increments. Parking for the event can be found at Mountain West Bank, 330 N. Washington Ave., the parking lot on First Street across from the post office and at the visitors center, 325 W. Fourth St. The KALTRAN stops will be at Mountain West Bank, Fleur de Lis Floral and Home at 125 N. Washington Ave., Bling and Sparkles at 203 S. Washington Ave. and at the visitors center. The bus will take passengers from the respective parking locations and drop them off at the KALTRAN booth to enter the park and start the stroll through the festivities.

Saturday morning from 10-11 a.m., Dawn Hawks kicks off the children’s corner with marionette theater. She will continue the marionettes from 1-2 p.m. and return on Sunday, 11 a.m. to noon. There will be a storytime for children from 3-4 p.m. on Saturday. Also in the children’s corner is finger painting from 11 a.m. to noon and making clothespin fairies from 2-3 p.m., both events on Saturday. There will be face painting in the children’s corner on both days. An all about herb gardening class with Vicki Cahill is from 2-3 p.m. on Saturday and from 11 a.m. to noon on Sunday. Learn about photography with Don Goertzen from 1-2 p.m. on Saturday. There will be fly tying and casting from 10-11 a.m. with Mike Lithgow and Randy Hoisington on Saturday. Learn the art of tai chi with Doris Mar Lyons-Smelling, Saturday from 10-11 a.m. Robin Clemens will be offering energy readings from noon to 2 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Marci Van Dusdall of Lavender Dreams Farm will teach a how to distill lavender class from 3-4 p.m. Saturday. Adults can even take part in an hour-long coloring session at 2 p.m. with Terry Ann Hedtke on Saturday. Table demonstrations will also be set up showing model airplanes with Tony Worman from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday and Mike Moudy will showcase model trains from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and from 1-3 p.m. on Sunday. The Pend Oreille Master Garden-

ers are making lavender wands throughout the day and Pend Oreille Fiber Artists will be spinning all day both days. Learn about using local wild plants with Karen Tillinghast from noon to 1 p.m. Sunday. The wine/microbrew garden gala will be from 6-9 p.m. on Saturday and will include live music, raffles and hearty appetizers. Tickets to the gala must be pre-purchased and cost $25. Go to www.povlavenderfestival.com for more information. MINER PHOTO|DON GRONNING

Local bands take the stage Live music will be coming from the park during both days of the event. Saturday morning music starts with Spanish guitarist Paul Grove from 9:30-11:30 a.m. From noon to 1:30 p.m., Greg Parke will be playing the guitar and singing. Greg Parke will be headlining the Saturday evening Gala as well. The River Arts Alliance will be hosting an open mic time from 1:45-2 p.m. Laddie Ray Melvin will hit the stage from 2:30-4:30 p.m. Sunday artists include the Tedesca String Quartet from 10 a.m. to noon, and the Swing Street Big Band will close out the musical performances from 1 to 3 p.m. The Lavender Festival will also have a variety of food vendors spread throughout the park so that guests will be able to quickly grab a bite to eat before heading off to the next event. No pets are permitted for the event, with the exception of service animals and all events are subject to change by event organizers.

Off-highway vehicle riders hope to travel new trails

NEWPORT – The board of Pend Oreille County Commissioners will have open public hearings to address the proposed changes in the off-highway vehicle (OHV) ordianace passed in 2006. These hearings will be held in the commissioners’ meeting room at the courthouse in Newport, Tuesday, July 16 at 1:30 p.m. and July 16 at 7 p.m. at the Ione Community Center. The third meeting will be held Copper • Brass • Aluminum Stainless • Aluminum Cans Batteries • Radiators

Wednesday, July 17 at 7 p.m. at the Cusick Community Center. The proposed changes would include opening all county roads to OHV travel, while maintaining a maximum 35 miles per hour OHV speed limit or posted speed, whichever is less. In addition, OHVs would no longer be required to ride with two wheels on the shoulder of the road, as this has created a safety hazard. Finally, the wording requiring

We also recycle Cardboard • Iron Newspaper

the route to provide access to or between OHV recreation areas would be removed. The full text of the updated ordinance will be mailed upon request, call 509-447-4119. Written comments may be mailed to the county commissioners, P.O. Box 5025, Newport, WA 99156 or online at commissioners@pendoreille.org.

New rest stop opens July 4 The Kalispel Rest Area will be open to the public in time for the Fourth of July. The rest stop is located on Highway 20 just north of KALTRAN and Kalispel Career Training Center near Cusick. The rest stop will include restrooms that are open 24-hours a day, parking and a cultural exploration center. A café and interpretive trails will be added later.

GRADUATES | FROM PAGE 5A

ment and Service Scholarship, a $10,000 University of Montana Athletic Grant, $6145 in federal grants and a $500 Soroptimist Scholarship. Eric Peterson will attend Arizona State University. He received $36,000 in scholarships and grants, including $3,354 per year from the New American University Scholar WUE/Provost’s Award and $5,646 per year in federal Pell grants. Jacklin McCroskey will attend Louisiana State University. She received $24,700 in scholarships, including $5,000 per year from the Tiger Excellence Nonresident Award, $3,000 per year from a Washington Counties Scholarship, $1,000 from the All Class Reunion Scholarship, $700 from the Diamond Lake Ranch Scholarship and $500 from the Wilma Black Scholarship. Brittany Hopkins will attend the University of Montana. She received $24,000 in scholarships, including $5,000 per year from the LAS Award and $1,000 per year from the Bright Future Award. Courtney Wiese will attend Washington State University. She received $20,265 in scholarships and grants, including a $10,000 Washington State Grant, $5,745 in federal grants, $1,036 from a College Bound Scholarship, a $1,000

Honorable Mention AOA Waiver, a $915 Bismark H. Turner scholarship and a $700 Diamond Lake Ranch Scholarship. Jessica Smith will attend Central Washington University. She received $6,900 in scholarships, including a $1,600 per year Merit Scholarship and a $500 Wilma Black Scholarship. Allison Naccarato will attend Carrington College. She received $3,300 in scholarships, including a $1,500 Verne and Lorraine Lindsay Memorial Scholarship, a $1,200 Carrington College Scholarship and a Newport/Priest River Rotary Scholarship. Tiffany Thomas will attend Spokane Community College. She received $1,000 in scholarships, including a $750 Masonic Lodge No. 144 Scholarship and a $250

NAT Scholarship. Carlie Dice will attend Eastern Washington University. She received a $1,000 DECA Scholarship. Breauna Rohrer will attend Spokane Community College. She received a $700 Diamond Lake Ranch Scholarship. Jessica Emery will attend Spokane Falls Community College. She received a $700 Diamond Lake Ranch Scholarship. Vanessa Kaelin will attend Chabot Community College. She received a $500 Soroptimist Scholarship. Scott McMeen is undecided which college he will attend. He received a $300 Pend Oreille Players Scholarship. Gage Anderson will attend North Idaho College. He received a $250 PSE II Scholarship.

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8A

| JULY 3, 2013



THE MINER

Columbia River Treaty up for renewal next year Agencies release draft recommendations for treaty renewal with Canada PORTLAND, Ore. – A 50-year treaty with Canada, which coordinates flood control and optimizes hydroelectric energy production on both sides of the border, is up for renewal. The Columbia Basin Treaty also deals with fish and wildlife and other issues that span the Columbia River basin the two countries share. The Pend Oreille River is within the Columbia Basin Trust region, but local dams are not part of the treaty. The treaty was first signed in 1961 and implemented in 1964. The year 2024 is the earliest either Canada or the U.S may terminate the CRT provided 10-years advance notice is given in 2014. No decision has been made by either country on the future of the current treaty, but both countries are exploring options. Changes to the treaty could impact, among other things, water levels, annual payments from the U.S. to British Columbia, and the amount of hydroelectricity generated in the Columbia Basin. The treaty’s main component called for Canada to develop reservoirs in the higher reaches of the Columbia Basin sufficient to provide 15.5 million acre­feet of water storage to help boost flood control capabilities and provide a controllable source to fuel hydro production in both countries.

It resulted in doubled water storage capacity on the Columbia system with construction of three large storage projects – Duncan, Keenleyside and Mica – in Canada and Libby Dam in the United States. Under the terms of the treaty, requirements for flood control provided by the treaty projects will change in 2024 from the current pre­determined operation plan to a “called upon” provision wherein the United States may request flood control assistance from Canadian projects. The hitch is that flood control help can be called upon only if needs cannot be met by all related flood control facilities in the United States. If the United States uses the called upon option, it must then pay Canada for its operating expenses and economic losses due to flood control operation. While the U.S. and Canadian entities agree on several aspects of the treaty, some are still up for discussion. Amongst them, Columbia Basin Tribes and others continue discussing the extent to which both Canadian and U.S. hydropower production should be reduced or traded­off in order to benefit the ecosystem. The U.S. Entity maintains that reductions in hydropower production would also result in reductions in system reliability. Columbia Basin Tribes think that reliability issues can be addressed through the integration of renewable energy and increased

Study contends cattle grazing, clean water can co-exist DAVIS, Calif. – Cattle grazing and clean water can coexist on national forest lands, according to research by the University of California, Davis. The study, published in late June in the journal PLOS ONE, is the most comprehensive examination of water quality on National Forest public grazing lands to date. “There’s been a lot of concern about public lands and water quality, especially with cattle grazing,” said lead author Leslie Roche, a postdoctoral scholar in the UC Davis Department of Plant Sciences. “We’re able to show that livestock grazing, public recreation and the provisioning of clean water can be compatible goals.” Roughly 1.8 million livestock graze on national forest lands in the western United States each year, the study said. The Colville National Forest has 4,941 pair of cattle permitted to graze forestwide, in Pend Oreille County, it’s 421 pair. The study was conducted in 2011, during the grazing and recreation season of June through

November. Nearly 40 UC Davis researchers, ranchers, U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service staff and environmental stakeholders collected water samples from 155 sites across five national forests in northern California. UC Davis researchers analyzed the water samples for microbial and nutrient pollution, including fecal indicator bacteria, fecal coliform, E. coli, nitrogen and phosphorous. The scientists found that recreation sites were the cleanest, with the lowest levels of fecal indicator bacteria. They found no significant differences in fecal indicator bacteria between grazing lands and areas without recreation or grazing. Overall, 83 percent of all sample sites and 95 percent of all water samples collected were below U.S. Environmental Protection Agency benchmarks for human health. The study also found that all nutrient concentrations were at or below background levels, and no samples exceeded concentrations of ecological or human health concern.

State’s average wage tops $50,000 in 2012

COURTESY IMAGE|COLUMBIA BASIN TRUST

The Pend Oreille River is within the Columbia Basin Trust, but local dams are not part of the treaty that is up for negotiation.

conservation measures. Comments on the draft U.S. entity draft recommendations are required by Aug. 16 to help refine the

proposal. The U.S. Entity will post all comments received during this review period to the Treaty Review website through www.cbt.org.

OLYMPIA – For the first time in history, the average annual wage is more than $50,000 in Washington state, showing a growth of 3.4 percent in 2012. According to the Employment Security Department, the average weekly wage rose from $959 to $992, figures that include only the wages covered by unemployment insurance. The ESD is crediting the 6.1 percent increase to the number of insured workers earning more than $75,000. With an increase of 1.9 percent, the number of workers covered by unemployment grew to 52,519 in 2012. Total earnings for the year grew nearly $7.4 billion, a 5.4 percent increase. Three industries have seen the most growth in 2012. The management sector rose 17.6 percent, the information sector rose 11.5 percent and agriculture rose 11.5 percent as well. The management and information sectors also saw increases in 2011. These numbers are used by the ESD to calculate the minimum weekly unemploy-

ment benefits for those people who are jobless. This 15 percent is calculated using the average weekly wage of Washington State employees and sets the tone for a minimum benefit as well. The maximum benefit rose to 63 percent. With the increase in overall totals, the minimum unemployment benefits rose by $5 to $148 for new claims opened on or after July 7. The maximum amount that benefits rose was $20 to $260. The state average wage is used in computing employers’ unemployment taxes. In 2014, employers will pay unemployment taxes on the first $41,300 paid to each employee, which is up from $39,800 in 2013. The numbers are also used by the Department of Labor and Industries to calculate the salaries of workers who are employed. According to the ESD, there are 18 percent of the states jobless workers receiving full benefits and 7 percent are receiving the minimum weekly unemployment stipends.

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WATER FROM PAGE 3A

were up slightly this spring. Sacheen Lake and Moon Creek readings have been taken since the fall of 2011. Coliform readings in Moon Creek fluctuated from 290.9 parts per 100 milliliters of water in fall 2011 and spring 2012 to 31.7/100mL last fall and 178 this spring. E.C coli was measured at 86 parts/100mL last spring but was down to 5.2 this year. At Sacheen Lake, there was a higher amount of total coliforms measured in 2011. A year ago, it was 25.9 parts/100mL, and this year it was 9.8. E. coli levels have fluctuated from 7.5

Collection site Dock at Priest Lake Cougar Creek Priest Lake Dock at Diamond Lake Dock at Diamond Lake Dock at Sacheen Lake Moon Creek

parts/100mL in spring 2012, to 2 parts/100mL last fall and 5.2 this spring. Pengilly points out that the twice-a-year snapshot is not a perfect tool. Readings are taking on just a single day and from a single point on the lakeshore. “To get an accurate representation of the entire lake system, we would need to collect samples at multiple sites along the shore and in the open water,” she said. She urges those using the data to take caution because the parameters can vary significantly from day to day and from season to season. Another sample will be taken in the fall.

Coliform E. coli (MPN/100mL) (MPN/100mL) 21.3 2.0 5.2 <1 34.1 2 42.8 2 9.8 5.2 178 5.2

Animals in need of a good home will be featured in this section on the first and third week of each month, thanks to these advertisers and The Miner Newspaper. These pets can be adopted from the Priest River Animal Rescue, Hwy 2, across the street from Mitchell’s Grocery Store in Priest River. Hours are 11 to 4, 208-448-0699. Please visit our web site to view all available adoptions at www.pranimalrescue.org

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THE NEWPORT MINER

North Pend Oreille

NEWS FROM NORTH PEND OREILLE COUNTY INCLUDING IONE, METALINE & METALINE FALLS



JULY 3, 2013|

9A

Kinney named Educator of the Year

COURTESY PHOTO|ERIC WITTENMYER

John Redinger, left, stands with Lion Gayle Pollock, Tom Sullivan, EMT Jean Aneff, and ambulance driver Patrick Phillips on the newly repaved access road at the airport.

Ione airport paves way for ambulance

Board meeting will discuss airport zoning NEWPORT – The town of Ione partnered with the local Lions Club to gravel the driveway access at the south part of the municipal airport. This will keep the emergency vehicles in the area from having to use fourwheel drive to operate. Those involved said it will benefit the town because ambulance personnel can now focus solely on the patients in their vehicle and not worry about jostling the patient because of bad roads when loading them onto the medical helicopters.

The airport is primarily used for medical transports, the U.S. Air Force Survival School, weekend pilots, the Forest Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife. The Joint Airport Zoning Board will hold a public meeting Wednesday, July 31, at 2:30 p.m. at the Pend Oreille County Courthouse in Newport, Commissioners Meeting Room, 625 W. Fourth St. The board will discuss the airport mapping overlay work that is being done at the airport in the town of Ione. The project consists of making a map that overlays an area surround-

ing the airport. This map is used for placement of houses, businesses and other area services so that the noise from the airport does not impede on the residents. The Joint Airport Zoning Board was formed earlier this year to enforce regulations of the zoning area such as specifying land uses and regulating the height and structures and trees. Appointed board members are pilot Tom Sullivan, County Commissioner Steve Kiss, Ione Councilman Charles Spears and Airport Commissioner John Redinger.

Combine art, wildlife at summer ArtScape program METALINE FALLS – Get “wild about wildlife” at the ArtScape summer program, planned from July 8-19 at 10 a.m. at the Cutter Theatre.

Kids will learn drawing and relief painting, mural painting, how to make a birdhouse and butterfly net, go on a nature walk with a field journal and games, sample wild

|| N O R T H P E N D O R E I L L E CO U N T Y E V E N T S WEDNESDAY, JULY 3 Tiger Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. - State Routes 20 and 31 Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Metalines Library Basic Computer Class: 11 a.m. to Noon - Ione Library, Call 509-442-3030 For Reservations Commissioner Kiss Office Hours: 3-6:45 p.m. - Ione Library Weight Watchers: 6 p.m. Weigh in 6:30-7 p.m. meeting - Ione Catholic Church Ione Town Council: 7 p.m. - Clerk’s Office THURSDAY, JULY 4 Prayer Service: 10 a.m. - Busta Park, Metaline Falls Tiger Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. - State Routes 20 and 31 Boundary Dam Tours: 10:30 a.m., Noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. - Boundary Dam Road Community Potluck: 5 p.m. - Metaline Riverfront Park Fireworks Display: Dusk - Metaline FRIDAY, JULY 5 Tiger Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. State Routes 20 and 31 Boundary Dam Tours: 10:30 a.m., Noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. - Boundary Dam Road Story Time and Crafts: 10:30 a.m. - Metalines Library Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. - Ione Senior Center SATURDAY, JULY 6 Tiger Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. State Routes 20 and 31 Boundary Dam Tours: 10:30 a.m., Noon, 2

Now Showi

game and make their own food. The program is for kids ages 6-18. The cost is $25 for the week. Students must register ahead of time. Forms are available at the Cutter office or call 509-446-4108. Scholarships are available. Kids will need to bring their own sack lunch.

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from nominations included: • This teacher goes above and beyond in so many ways and is frequently one of the first to arrive and the last to leave. • This teacher creates a classroom culture where students feel comfortable, safe, and respected. • This teacher sometimes uses loud voices, odd noises, and interesting strategies to get you interested in the lesson. • This teacher has probably insisted you attend cultural events both inside and outside of our community and this teacher is often the person who plans, organizes, participates in, or chaperones these events. • This teacher has some unique skills and an even more unique sense of style. • This year’s Educator of the Year is someone who caring, respectful, creative, funny (maybe a little crazy at times) and, without exception, highly regarded by all students. When Kinney’s name was

finally announced, the students responded with a loud roar of approval and a spontaneous standing ovation. Prior to presenting the plaque to Kinney, Lotze said, “While not every student attending has had the opportunity to be in his class yet, I hope that he teaches long enough that you all do because this teacher is a gifted and talented educator with a caring attitude and a kind heart. He is a wonderful example of how a Selkirk graduate can positively impact the lives of others, because he is a Selkirk graduate, himself.” Kinney began teaching in 1974 with 21 of those years spent with the Selkirk School District. “Mr. Kinney continually strives to improve his already considerable skill and knowledge and while making his classroom a place where humor, respect, empathy and concern go handin-hand with teaching content,” Principal Larry Reed said.

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p.m. and 4 p.m. - Boundary Dam Road SUNDAY, JULY 7 Tiger Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. State Routes 20 and 31 Boundary Dam Tours: 10:30 a.m., Noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. - Boundary Dam Road MONDAY, JULY 8 Fire District No. 2 Commissioners: 10 a.m. Fire Station 23, 390442 Highway 20, Ione Boundary Dam Tours: 10:30 a.m., Noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. - Boundary Dam Road Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Metalines Library Hospital District 2 Board: 3:30 p.m. - Fire Station 23, Highway 20, Ione TUESDAY, JULY 9 Metaline Cemetery District No. 2 Board: 10 a.m. - Metaline Town Hall Story Time: 11 a.m. - Ione Library Book Discussion Group: 4-5 p.m. - Ione Library Metaline Falls Town Council: 7 p.m. - Metaline Falls Town Hall WEDNESDAY, JULY 10 Tiger Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. State Routes 20 and 31 Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Metalines Library Basic Computer Class: 11 a.m. to Noon - Ione Library, Call 509-442-3030 For Reservations Weight Watchers: 6 p.m. Weigh in 6:30-7 p.m. meeting - Ione Catholic Church Metaline Town Council: 7 p.m. - Metaline Town Hall

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METALINE – Selkirk High School teacher John Kinney was named the 2013 Educator of the year. Kinney teaches math and science at the high school and Kinney also had the honor of addressing the Class of 2013 at graduation ceremonies last month. In addition to Kinney’s teaching skills, he has also been the driving force behind a studentrun environmental lab. About 15 years ago, Kinney wrote a grant that the Toyota Foundation funded. With the $10,000 he turned a classroom into a second lab where students learn about water and wastewater testing. Kinney provides testing services to many local water systems through this lab and is able to hire students to complete work in the summer. The onsite water projects require constant time and attention. Superintendent Nancy Lotze said Kinney is diligent in maintaining his training and certification, committed to teaching students the lab skills and knowledge to perform testing, and always ready to respond to any emergency or urgent situation involving the water system. Lotze announced that the school board of directors had selected Kinney during a student assembly June 7. Beginning in1999-2000 school year, the school board annually solicits nominations for the award from parents, students, and community members. A perpetual plaque housed in the high school trophy case contains a list of all past winners. At the presentation, Lotze encouraged the students to guess this year’s recipient by giving a list of clues. The list compiled

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10A

| JULY 3, 2013



Committee still accepting resumes for clerk position Marie Scott retired July 1

COURTESY PHOTO|WAYNE NEWACKI

Red Cross assisted the residents of this St. Germaine Road residence after fire destroyed the home located a couple miles northeast of Spirit Lake Thursday, June 27. Nobody was injured in the fire. It was one of two fires in the area last week.

Fire claims two homes near Spirit Lake SPIRIT LAKE – Fire destroyed two homes near Spirit Lake last week. Nobody was injured in either blaze and both are under investigation, according to Spirit Lake Fire Chief John Debernardi. The first fire occurred Tuesday, June 25, about two miles northeast of Spirit Lake at a Krupps Road residence, about 8:30 a.m. On Thursday, June 27, a St. Germaine Road residence was destroyed by a fire that was reported about 2 p.m.

Crews from the Timberlake Fire Department assisted, and Newport Ambulance was called to standby for the St. Germaine Road fire, Debernardi said. “We call them when there is a chance a firefighter or somebody could get injured,” he said. The Red Cross helped the residents of the St. Germaine Road residence, he said. The cause of the fires is unknown and both are under investigation, Debernardi said.

The deadline to apply had BY MICHELLE NEDVED been June 3, but Terry SteOF THE MINER vens withdrew his name from the running and the position SANDPOINT – The Bonner was reopened. Campbell subCounty Democratic Central mitted her name in late June. Committee is still acceptThe Bonner County Demoing resumes from Democrats will hold a special meetcrats who are interested in ing Wednesday, July 10, prior replacing The committee must to their regular county meeting at 6 p.m. clerk Ma- select three candidates in the Panhandle rie Scott Health District to forward to the through meeting room county commissioners the rein Sandpoint to mainder who will choose Scott’s discuss the status of her of the search and replacement. term. The possibly decide applicato submit the tion period names to the could close county. as soon as Friday, July 5. Scott announced her retireThe committee must select ment in May, effective July three candidates to forward 1. Scott was the last elected to the county commissioners Democrat holding a Bonner who will choose Scott’s reCounty office, serving as clerk placement. Currently, Susan since 1990. Campbell, Jason Benell and For more information, Steve Johnson have thrown contact search committee in their hats. Johnson unsucchairwoman Laura Bry at cessfully ran for county com208-290-5261, or to submit missioner as an independent your resume, email bonnerin 2012. democrats@gmail.com.

Newport School District LIBRARY TECHNICIAN The Newport School District is accepting applications for the classified position of Library Technician. Position closes Monday, July 22, 2013 at 3:00 PM.

HEALTH/PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER AND DISTRICT WIDE ATHLETICS/ACTIVITIES DIRECTOR The Newport School District is accepting applications for the certified position of Health/ Physical Education Teacher and District Wide Athletics/Activities Director. Position closes Monday, July 22, 2013 at 3:00 PM.

.8 FTE MIDDLE SCHOOL COUNSELOR The Newport School District is accepting applications for the certified position of a .8 FTE Middle School Counselor. Position closes Monday, July 22, 2013 at 3:00 PM.

Additional information and applications may be obtained by visiting our website at www.newport.wednet.edu or calling the Newport School District at (509) 447-3167. Equal Opportunity Employer. We sell Idaho Fishing and Hunting Licenses

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Laclede Store 14663 Hwy 2 • Laclede, ID 208-263-3892

THE NEWPORT MINER

HOT BOX

Special deadline Tuesdays 2 p.m. YARD SALE This, that and everything! 3501 Highway 211. Friday, Saturday, Sunday. 9:00-6:00. (23) WASHINGTON AND IDAHO LEGAL FORMS Available at The Miner Newspapers, 421 South Spokane, Newport. (509) 447-2433.(36HB-alt-tf) TIME TO ORDER Butcher hogs. Krogh Livestock. (509) 447-4632. (20HB-4) STRAWBERRIES Lettuce, greens, crafts, bedding plants, baked goods, log furniture. Farmer’s Market across from John L. Scott, Newport. Saturday 9:001:00. (22) SALES BY TUDY The Smith family’s sale at our home. Friday-Saturday, 8:00 to 2:00. 4736 Old Priest River Road. Furniture, collectibles, glassware, household, tools. Lots of “This and That”! No previews or early sales. Cash preferred. (22p) ROAD ATLAS Current, detailed road atlas, spiral bound with laminated cover. Pend Oreille County, Washington $30.00. Bonner County, Idaho $35.00. Sold at The Miner Newspapers, 421 South Spokane Avenue, Newport. (509) 447-2433.(12HB-alt tf) OPEN MIC First Friday of every month. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 240 North Union, Newport. 7:00 p.m. Admission $2.00. Bring a song or story to share, and watch the stars come out! (48, 52, 4, 9, 13, 18, 22, 26, 31, 35, 39, 44) OLDTOWN AUTO SALES We buy clean used cars and RV’s. See our complete inventory online at www.oldtownautos.com. (51HB-tf) MOBILE HOME For rent. 2 bedroom, 2 bath, washer dryer $445.00 month plus utilities, 1st and last,, deposit $350. Pet deposit $200.00. Ione. (509) 4423147. (22-4p) INSIDE HOUSE Garage sale! Kitchen, crafts, some furniture, clothing. Everything must go. Selling house. Friday and Saturday 8:00 a.m.....306 South Idaho Street, Oldtown. (22p) INDOOR/ OUTDOOR SALE 211 River Road, Usk Thursday, Friday Saturday, July 4, 5, 6, 9:003:00. Tools, yard equipment, boats and motors, household. Something for everyone! (509) 445-0753. (22p) HYPNOSIS Lose weight! Stop smoking now! Individual or groups. Purposeful Life Mastery Coaching. Dr. Douglas Rigg P.h.D., CHt, (509) 589-0638. (18-tf) Miner want ads work.

FREE SEMINAR BEST INVESTMENTS FOR RETIREMENT AND ESTATE PLANNING/ MEDICAID Thursday, July 11th, from 11;30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Denise Stewart Law Office, 301 South Washington, Suite A, Newport. Coffee and cookies provided. Call (509) 447-3242 to reserve a spot as seating is limited! (21HB-3) FOR SALE $115,000 or rent $800.00/ month. Go to zillow. com 110 South 8th Street, Ione, Washington for viewing. Lynn (509) 468-7773. (22p) FOR SALE 24 ft diameter by 52 inches high round metal frame swimming pool, complete kit, extras. Excellent condition, $450/ best offer. Cost new $950. King sized solid oak bedroom set, excellent condition. Sell complete $550/r best offer, separate pieces negotiable. Computer desk with back shelving, $75. 2 Lane swivel rocker recliners $75 each. Leather sofa and love seat, $400/ best offer. Refrigerator, 141/2 cubic feet ,self defrosting $50. Leather sofa and love seat. (509) 998-3225, Cusick. (22p) FABULOUS YARD SALE This weekend! 3 blocks from Lavender Festival on Quail Avenue. Follow signs. Furniture, household, kid stuff, good finds! 8:00 a.m.- 3:00 p.m. Lemonade stand! (22p) DID YOU MISS IT? You won’t miss a thing when you subscribe to The Miner. Save $14.50 a year and receive it in your mail every Wednesday. (509) 447-2433.(47HB-altTF) DIAMOND LAKE AREA 2 bedroom 1 bath with basement. washer/dryer, wheelchair accessible. Pets negotiable. Background check. 1st/ last/ $300 deposit. Available July 15th. $600/ month. (509) 671-6668. (22p) DAVIS LAKE GRANGE All you can eat breakfast Saturday July 6th 9-12:00. Pancakes, eggs, sausage and biscuits. $5.00, $3.00 for kids 5-12. Dalkena area. (22p) CUSICK ESTATE SALE July 4 and 5, 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. 107 2nd Avenue. Tons of stuff, cheap prices! (22p) ABANDONED VEHICLE AUCTION Newport Towing. 137 South Newport Avenue, Newport. (509) 4471200. July 9, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. Viewing starts at 9:00 a.m. (22) $569/ MONTH 2 bedroom 2 bath newly remodeled manufactured home. Water, sewer, garbage included. Small pets allowed. Also a 3 bedroom for 365, water sewer garbage included. Newport. (509) 993-4705/ (509) 496-9686. (22-4p)


THE MINER

Lifestyle



BR I E FLY CCC building to be dedicated for historical weekend NEWPORT – The Historical Society’s Pioneer Weekend returns Thursday, July 11 and ends July 13, with dedication of a new exhibit at the museum in Newport in between. On Thursday, July 11, people can take a Tacoma Creek Homestead Tour. The group will meet at the Crossroads Restaurant in Usk. Friday morning, July 12 is the Pend Oreille County Historical Society annual membership meeting at 10:30 a.m. at the Pend Oreille County Historical Society Museum in Newport. Following the meeting at 11:45 a.m., there will be a short dedication for the newly completed Civilian Conservation Corps oil house, on the museum grounds. The public is invited to attend. Plans are to have the Newport mayor speak and have an official representing the U.S. Forest Service. The oil house is from the ranger station at Sullivan Lake and is now a CCC camp exhibit. Dinner Friday can be eaten at 6 p.m. at the Riverbank Restaurant in Oldtown. This is the historical society’s annual no host dinner.

Watch movies at your library NEWPORT – The Newport Public Library will be hosting three movies in July. “Oz the Great and Powerful” will be the movie night feature Thursday, July 11, at 5:30 p.m. Snacks are provided from the Friends of the Library group. Two Saturday movies are planned for July 13. “The Neverending Story” will show from 10 a.m. to noon. “Jack the Giant Slayer” is the second movie, from 12:30-3 p.m. The day includes crafts and treats. Parents must sign a permission slip for each movie day.

Motorcycles to race in Oldtown OLDTOWN – The fourth annual Run Whatcha’ Brung event will have motorcycles drag racing in the streets of Oldtown Friday and Saturday, July 5 and 6. The event is a benefit for Spokane Veterans Forum. The track will be set up on North Idaho Avenue, near Ben Franklin and OK Lanes. Along with the hogs and plenty of leather, the day includes live music, food vendors, a beer garden, a swap meet and more. Riders pay $1 for each drag they want to race. Between that money, vendor fees and other donations, past years have brought in thousands for veteran programs. All bikes are welcome, and it’s free to spectators. Last year, organizers estimated there were about 1,000 who attended the races. The drags are spearheaded by a longtime rider and local bike builder, Peter “Algie” Pirrello, who owed Killing Machine Choppers from 2006 until retiring in 2011.

Catch a weekend of one act plays NEWPORT – The fourth annual One Act Play Festival is set for Friday and Saturday, July 12 and 13 at the Pend Oreille Playhouse in Newport. Five original one act comedies from playwrights throughout the country will be playfully performed by local actors. The plays include: • “Mom’s Coming for Christmas” by John Franceschini of Irvine, Calif., and directed locally by Danny Litowitz, • “Audition,” by Jeff Sult of Valley Stream, N.Y., directed by Gail Cory-Betz, • “Proof!” by Russell Weeks of Seattle, directed by Millie Brumbaugh, • “Dog Fight” by Donna Barkman of Ossining, N.Y., directed by Christopher Demlow, and • “The Pub Menagerie,” by Tim Scheurer of Westerville, Ohio, directed by Clerisa Hunter. Tickets are $10 in advance or $12 at the door for adults. Student tickets are $5. Shows begin at 7 p.m. each night. Purchase online through www.pendoreilleplayers. org or call 509-671-3389. The playhouse is located at 240 N. Union Ave.

COURTESY PHOTO|DIANE OLSON

Diane Olson, Cusick school reunion committee member, left, and Cindy Hoisington, committee chairperson, present a reproduction of the class of 1960 photo display that disappeared from the hallways of the school. All class pictures are on display in the hallways of the high school and will be open for viewing during the reunion.

School reunion pairs with Historical Society weekend

BY DESIREÉ HOOD OF THE MINER

CUSICK – The Cusick and Usk schools are holding an all-school reunion Saturday, July 13, starting with an all-you-can-eat pancake, egg, sausage and coffee breakfast for $4.50 per person at 8 a.m. at the Usk Community Club. “We have an awesome time,” Barbara McGill, with the Usk Community Club, said. Registration for the Cusick alumni begins at 1 p.m. in the Adam Wike gym. Meetings and introduction of classes will begin

at 3:30 p.m. at the Cusick Fairgrounds, followed by a dinner at 5 p.m. The Cusick reunion is held every fifth year at the school, and this is the 12th consecutive event. The Usk School holds a reunion annually. The event coincides with the Pend Oreille County Historical Society’s pioneer weekend. (See separate story.) Organizers have located old school trophies that will be displayed during the reunion. They are currently looking for old photographs to accompany the trophies during this special day.

The Civilian Conservation Camps that came through the Pend Oreille River area many years ago helped to create the roads and trails that the current residents still enjoy. Organizers are looking for any pictures or stories of the camps. They are not asking to keep the pictures, but simply to copy them so they can keep the history of the area going in public photographs. To donate photographs, contact McGill at 509-445-1433. For more information about the all-school reunion, contact Cindy Hoisington, reunion chairwoman, at 509-445-1359.

Book reading, signing benefits YES NEWPORT – Believe it or not, a commentary on a text by a 14th century Tibetan Buddhist yogi might be just the book to add to your reading list for a life-changing summer. This summer, local author and American Buddhist nun Thubten Chodron will read from and sign her latest book, “Don’t Believe Everything You Think: Living With Wisdom and Compassion,” in Newport July 19 at the Create Arts Center, 900 W. Fourth St. at 7 p.m. The book reading will benefit Youth Emergency Services (YES), a non-profit organization that supports homeless teenagers in Pend Oreille County. The event is being co-sponsored by Create, who is host-

ing the reading for free. A student of the Dalai Lama since the 1970s, Thubten Chodron is known for bringing Buddhist teachings alive for contemporary audiences. In “Don’t Believe Everything You Think,” she explains the pithy verses of “The Thirty-Seven Practices of Bodhisattvas,” a beloved text of the Tibetan tradition that teaches how to transform everyday experiences – success and adversity – to transform our minds, enrich our lives, and bring benefit to others and ourselves. “Don’t Believe Everything You Think is a call to let go of feelings of hopelessness, self-deprecating thoughts, and useless conceptualiza-

Renowned Buddhist scholar to visit Sravasti Abbey NEWPORT – Geshe Yeshe Thabkhe, a Tibetan monk regarded as one of the most eminent living scholars of Tibetan Buddhist philosophy, will teach a classic ancient Indian text, Aryadeva’s “Four Hundgred Stanzas on the Middle Way,” from July 10-15 at Sravasti Abbey, the Tibetan Buddhist monastery near Newport. Geshe Thabkhe was born in Tibet 1930 and earned his Geshe Lharampa degree – the equivalent of a doctorate with highest honors – at Drepung Loseling Monastery. He is currently an emeritus professor at the Central University of Tibetan Studies in Sarnath, India. Geshe Thabkhe was a chief adviser on the translation of Lama Tsongkha-pa’s “The Great Treatise on the Stages of the Path to Enlightenment (Lam Rim Chen Mo),” a major project undertaken by the Tibetan Buddhist Learning Center in New Jersey. American scholar Joshua Cutler was editor-in-chief for that project, and he will serve as Geshe Thabkhe’s interpreter for the Sravasti Abbey teachings. Aryadeva, author of the text for these teachings, was the chief disciple

of Indian philosophy master Nagarjuna. Together they are credited with founding the Madhyamaka philosophical school of Mahayana Buddhism, and Aryadeva’s “Four Hundred Stanzas on the Middle Way” is a fundamental text of this philosophy. Geshe Yeshe Thabkhe will teach the first four chapters, which address the four distortions – four ways in which, through ignorance, sentient beings misconceive reality. The teachings are offered as a residential retreat, and commuters are also welcomed. All programs at Sravasti Abbey are offered on a donation basis, and a $100 offering is requested to reserve a place. Preregistration is required. Sravasti Abbey is a Buddhist monastery in the Tibetan tradition. Ordained nuns as well as lay people live there, devoting their lives to studying and practicing Buddhist teachings and sharing them with others. Sravasti Abbey is located at 692 Country Lane, Newport. Write or phone Sravasti Abbey for more information and to reserve a place: 509-447-5549 or office. sravasti@gmail.com.

tions and to re-envision our lives,” writes Thubten Chodron. “In the depths of our hearts all of us want to live meaningful lives and make a positive contribution to the world, but some of our unexamined assumptions about life encumber us.”

CALVARY CHAPEL NEWPORT

“Where The Sheep Go To Be Fed” 409 S. Spokane • Newport Sunday Morning 10 a.m. (509) 939-0676 CalvaryNewport@aol.com / 97.3 FM “I am the bread of life. He who comes to me will never go hungry, and he who believes in me will never be thirsty.” John 6:35

JULY 3, 2013|

Jeopardy, Amazing Race brought to you by Albeni Dam rangers OLDTOWN – Park rangers from Albeni Falls Dam are offering free programs throughout the month of July at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers campgrounds on the Pend Oreille River, giving guests a chance to play Jeopardy, Amazing Race and spend a night with the stars. The Amazing Race comes to town Friday, July 5 at 7 p.m. in Priest River at the Mud Hole and Saturday, July 6 at 7 p.m. at Riley Creek. Similar to the television show, Ranger Kassadee will be playing host Phil Koegen as participants race around the campground accomplishing tasks and racing to cross the finish line first. The racers are competing for a free night of camping. Bring your brainpower Friday, July 12 at 7 p.m. at Springy Point and join Ranger Kassadee for a competitive game of Jeopardy. The questions will mostly be about campground knowledge. The Spokane Astronomical Society and Ranger Kassadee are looking to the stars Saturday, July 13 at 7 p.m. They are holding the Night Skies

PINE RIDGE COMMUNITY CHURCH

1428 1st Street West Sunday School ~ 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship ~ 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays: Girls Club, ages 9 to 12, 5:30 to 7:00 pm Soul’d Out Youth, ages 13 thru 19, 6:00 pm Pastor Mitch McGhee 447-3265

DALKENA COMMUNITY CHURCH • VILLAGE MISSIONS S.S. ~ 9:30 • Worship ~ 11 a.m. Family Night, Wednesday ~ 7 p.m. (Bible and Youth Clubs) Pastor Sandy Strait - 509-447-3687

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH of Diamond Lake Corner of North Shore Road and Jorgens Road Informal Family-style Worship Sundays 10:00 a.m. 509-671-3436

CHURCH OF FAITH

36245 Hwy 41, Oldtown, ID Sunday School 9 a.m. Sunday Services - 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wed. - Bible Study 6 p.m. Pastor Jack Jones Church Office 208-437-0150 www.churchoffaitholdtown.com

event to help the community have an appreciation for astronomy and to show other how to enjoy star gazing. Ranger Andrew will be making his fish prints talk as he teaches participants about the different fish in lake Pend Oreille Friday, July 19 at 7 p.m. at Priest River and Saturday, July 20 at 7 p.m. at Riley Creek. He will also show the guests how to make fish prints. The Pend Oreille Watershed is the final program offered in the month of July for the rangers. Ranger Andrew will talk to visitors about the watershed and have them participate in a fun activity, related to the area. The event will be held Friday, July 26 at 7 p.m. at Springy Point and Saturday, July 27 at 7 p.m. at Riley Creek. The Albeni Falls Dam visitor center is located in Oldtown and open daily from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. They offer free tours of the dam daily at 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. until Labor Day weekend. For more information about the programs, tours or area activities, visit the Albeni Falls Dam Visitor Center.

Create holds summer arts program NEWPORT – Kids can keep their hands busy this summer creating art. The Create Arts Center in Newport is offering a program in July. Tuesdays, July 9, 16 and 23, kids can learn free form beginning crochet. Those ages 8 to 12 will meet from 9:30-10:30 a.m. to crochet a potholder, purse or afghan squares. Ages 14-18 years meet from 10:45-11:45 a.m. to make a hat, vest or shirt. The cost is $10 a lesson. Also Tuesdays, kids of all ages can participate in Lego robot building form 1-3 p.m. Wednesdays, July 10, 17 and 24, learn to make paper mache sculpture. Ages 7-12 make a bird from 9-10:30 a.m., and ages 13-18 make a bird, animal or person. The cost is $15. Teens can learn flat form peyoteweave beadwork to make a small pouch from 1-2 p.m. for $10 per lesson. Also Wednesdays, storybook theatre

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST 3rd and Spokane St., Newport, WA Worship Service ~ 10:00 a.m. Church School ~ 10:00 a.m. Nursery Care Available Rev. Russell Clark 447-4121 newportucc@conceptcable.com www.newportucc.org

REAL LIFE MINISTRIES

“Where Jesus and Real Life Meet.” Worship Time: Sunday 10:30 a.m. at the Newport High School Real Life Ministries office, 420 4th St. Newport, WA - Office Phone: (509) 447-2164 or Toll Free (877) 997-1200

1B

Community Church Directory CATHOLIC MASSES

Newport: St. Anthony’s, 447-4231 612 W. First St., Sun. - 11 a.m. Saturday evening - 7 p.m. Usk: St. Jude’s River Rd., Sat. - 5p.m. Ione: St. Bernard’s, 802 - 8th St., Sun. - 2nd & 4th - 8:00 a.m. Metaline Falls: St. Joseph’s, 446-2651 -- 406 Park St., Sun., 1st, 3rd & 5th - 8:00 a.m.

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTISTS

Diamond Lake Church 326002 Hwy. 2, West of Newport Head Elder Dale French, (509) 447-4565 Newport Church - Corner of Lilac Lane & Hwy. 20 North Pastor Ron Fleck (509) 447-4755 Sat. Morning Services Sabbath School 9:30 • Worship 11:00 NACS THRIFT SHOP (509) 447-3488 PO Valley Church School (208) 437-2638

will bring timeless children’s storybooks to life. Each session, students will use our bodies, voices and imaginations to become fun characters. Gain confidence while exploring the magical world of theatre with storytelling, costumes and crafts. The session will be offered for kids ages 4-6 from 4-5:15 p.m. at the cost of $30 for three sessions. Thursdays, July 11, 18 and 25, beginning violin is offered for kids ages 7 to teen from 9 a.m. to noon. There are individual or family classes available, with 40-minute lessons costing $15. Learn foundation skills and musical understanding. Drawing class are also Thursday, for all ages. Classes are from 9 a.m. to noon for $10 per lesson. For more information, call Create at 509-447-9277 or email create@ createarts.org. Create is located at 900 W. Fourth St. in Newport. SPRING VALLEY MENNONITE CHURCH

4912 Spring Valley Road Sunday: 9:45 a.m. Worship Service 11 a.m. -- Sunday School (509) 447-3588

NEWPORT FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

“Sharing Christ As He Is, With People As They Are” 2nd & Spokane Sts 447-3846 9 a.m. Sunday School 10:15 a.m. Worship Service 11:30 a.m. Fellowship Time September - May AWANA - Tuesday 5:30 p.m. The Immortals (13-High School ) Thur. 7-9 Pastor Rob Malcolm

NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH

4 Miles South of Newport, Hwy. 2 Sun.: 9:30 Sun. School, 10:30, Worship, 6 p.m. Evening Service Sun. & Wed. at Pastor’s house. Jams 5 pm 2nd Saturdays Pastor, Walt Campbell: 447-5101

HOUSE OF THE LORD

754 Silver Birch Ln. • Oldtown, ID 83822 ‘’Contemporary Worship’’ Sun. ~ 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. “United Generation Church” Youth Group Wednesday 6 p.m. Jeff & Robie Ecklund, Pastors • 437-2032 www.hotl.me

NEWPORT SOUTHERN BAPTIST CHURCH

1 mile S. of Newport on Hwy. 2 • 447-3742 Pastor Rob Greenslade Sun. School 9:45 a.m. • Worship 11 a.m. Evening Worship 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Weds. 6:30 p.m.

AMERICAN LUTHERAN CHURCH E.L.C.A.

332801 Hwy. 2, P.O. Box 653, Newport Pastors Matt & Janine Goodrich Worship Service 9 am (509) 447-4338


2B

| JULY 3, 2013

Sports



BR I E FLY Kalispels host golf tournament at StoneRidge BLANCHARD – The second annual People of the Pend Oreille golf tournament is Friday, July 12, at StoneRidge Golf Course in Blanchard. The scramble format tournament begins at 9 a.m. with a shotgun start. The tournament supports three Pend Oreille Valley youth groups. The Panther Pride Athletic Association supports activities for students at Cusick schools, purchasing ASB cards, sports equipment and other items. The Kalispel Career Training Center teaches real life skills and helps kids compete for skilled jobs. The center is open to all youth ages 16-24. Money raised will fund scholarships for non-Kalispel students who can’t afford tuition. The Pend Oreille County Fair is the third group being helped. The fair has many 4-H kids participating. “We don’t want to lose this vital part of our tradition and culture because of the values it instills in our youth,” tribal chairman and CEO Glen Nenema said. The entry fee for the tournament is $100 per player. For more information, contact Jim Sattleen at 509-447-7219 or Terry Knapton at 509-9999300.

Free sports physicals offered NEWPORT – Newport Hospital is offering free sports physicals Friday, Aug. 2 from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Family Health Center, 714 W. Pine St. Free physicals are offered on a first-come first-serve basis, no appointment is necessary. Participants are asked to wear loose fitting clothing, such as a T-shirt and shorts. Sports physicals can be scheduled for a later time for a fee of $30. For more information, contact 509-447-4885.

Wolf Season opens on Panhandle private lands COEUR D’ALENE – The 20132014 wolf hunting season opened July 1 on private land only in the Panhandle Zone. The wolf hunting season opens throughout the rest of the state Aug. 30. The wolf trapping season opens Nov. 15 in eight wolf zones and Feb. 1, 2014, in one additional zone. Wolf hunters may use five tags, with no overall harvest limit. New wolf hunting and trapping seasons and rules are posted on the Idaho Department of Fish and Game website, and they are available on pages 78 through 82 in the 2013-2014 Big Game Seasons and Rules brochure. Wolf tags are available for $11.50 for Idaho residents and $31.75 for nonresidents. Wolf hunting tags are valid for a calendar year; trapping tags are valid July 1 through June 30. The 2012-2013 wolf hunting season closed June 30. As of June 24, hunters had taken 200 wolves, and trappers 120, for a total of 320 wolves.

Ranch bronc riding winners announced NEWPORT – The winners of the ranch bronc riding event that debuted at this year’s Newport Rodeo were announced. They were not available at press time last week. Buba Brachner and Vade Arnez tied for first with 79 scores. They won $441 each for their rides. JD Braach won third with a 76 score, pocketing $252 for his effort. Doug Pelfro won fourth with 65 points. He won $126. The ranch bronc riding will be one of the featured events at the Justin Kelly Memorial Rough Stock Invitational, set for Sept. 14 in Newport.

THE MINER

Running for fun

Area fun runs planned for summer BY DESIREÉ HOOD OF THE MINER

NEWPORT – Running for fun may not be for everyone, but for those athletes who like the feel of their feet gliding across the pavement on a designated course, this might just be the summer for you. Pend Oreille and West Bonner counties are holding a variety of different fun runs for the upcoming months, giving runners a chance to participate in at least one in their area.

Spokane run ends in the area The Spokane to Sandpoint Relay will be Aug. 16-17. This 200-mile relay begins at Mount Spokane, winds through 60 miles of the Centennial Trail and travels through two national forests. Teams of runners will cross the finish line at the beach in Sandpoint. Organizers have added a 139mile walk relay for this years’ event. Walkers will start at Mirabeau Meadows Park in Spokane and cross the finish line with the runners in Sandpoint. In Bonner County, from Spirit Lake, runners take Highway 41 to Hoo Doo Loop and Old Priest River Road where they cross the bridge into town and meet up at one of the major exchange zones at Priest River Lamanna High School. From there, it’s back to Dufort Road to follow the river to Sandpoint. The cost is $100 per person. Finishers will receive a medal, a T-shirt and a craft beer at the finish line. Register for the event at www. spokanetosandpoint.com.

COURTESY PHOTOS|ANITA URMANN

Local Hoopfest winners ABOVE: Players from Newport and Priest River joined forces to win the adult men’s bracket at Hoopfest. Pictured are Dalton Sommer, RC Akre, Cameron Riley and Jeron Konkright. RIGHT: The BrickSquad won the adult coed division at Hoopfest, held downtown Spokane Saturday and Sunday, June 29-30. They braved hot weather to take the title. Shown are Zachary Nuedtfelt, Whitney Urmann, coach Jared Barranco, Amber Trantum, and Haden Rainey.

Priest Lake offers a variety of runs

Annual Priest Lake golf tournament coming up July 13 PRIEST LAKE – The 39th annual Priest Lake Invitational golf tournament is set for Saturday, July 13, with a 8:30 a.m. shotgun start. Jon Luciani is organizing the event, taking over from Kerry Novell who held the reigns for 38 years. He’s planning some changes. The main tournament, in a Team-Net-Best-Ball format, will be divided up into four flights, both men’s and women’s, based upon the combined handicap of each four-person squad. Payouts will be for first through third place, based on the number of entries received.

Long Drive and Closest to the Pin holes will also be in play. In addition to the standard payouts, there will be prizes available for a Hole-in-One on all of the Par 3s. Tentative prizes range form a new SUV to a set of Callaway Irons to an LCD TV and two round trip plane tickets. The horserace will begin approximately 30-45 minutes after completion of the main tournament, with payout based on the number of entrants once again. The tournament will pay first through sixth places on a sliding scale. The horserace is open to

anyone with a maximum handicap of 30 who participates in the main tournament. Everyone is invited to come watch the horserace and wager on their favorite team. Entry forms are available through www.peckycox.com. The cost is $150 per person, plus $100 for the horserace. Proceeds will help families who struggle with heating their homes during the long winter months in North Idaho. Sponsorship opportunities are available. Contact Luciani at 509869-7213 or jluciani@mo-ins. com.

Time to enter second super hunt drawing BOISE – The deadline to enter Idaho Fish and Game’s second Super Hunt drawing is Aug. 11. Entries for two elk, two deer, and two pronghorn hunts along with one moose hunt will be drawn, and a “Super Hunt Combo” will be drawn that will entitle the winner to hunt for one each elk, deer, pronghorn and moose. With every entry in Fish and Game’s Super Hunt drawings, hunters get a chance at winning the hunt of a lifetime, and their entry fee helps support hunter and angler access to and across private lands. Winners can participate in any open hunt in the state for deer, elk, pronghorn or moose, including general hunts and controlled hunts, in addition to any general season or controlled hunt tags they also hold. Hunters who win any Super Hunt tag may still enter con-

trolled hunts, except where other restrictions apply. All other rules of individual hunts apply. The first Super Hunt entry will cost $6. Each additional entry purchased at the same time will cost $4 each. The Super Hunt Combo entries work the same way. The first one costs $20, and each additional entry purchased at the same time will cost $16. Entries are available at license vendors, Fish and Game offices, or they can be ordered online through the Idaho Department of Fish and Game’s website and on the phone at 800-554-8685. There is no limit to the number of entries. Fill out the entry order forms and mail them to: Idaho Fish and Game License Section, P.O. Box 25, Boise, ID 83707. After the first Super Hunt drawing of 2013, 26 lucky hunters won the hunt of their dreams. Deer tags went to two hunters from Idaho,

two from Washington, and one each from Wyoming, Wisconsin, Texas and Nevada. Elk tags went to five hunters from Idaho, two from Washington and one from Minnesota. Pronghorn tags went to four hunters from Idaho, two from California and one each from Washington and Minnesota. A moose tag went to a hunter from California, and the Super Combo went to an Idaho hunter. The number of entries increased by about 17.5 percent over 2012. This year Fish and Game received 41,722 entries for the June drawing. In 2012, there were 35,499 entries. The special drawings began in 2004 as a way to raise money for the Access Yes! program, which helps assure hunter and angler access to and across private lands by compensating willing landowners.

The Priest Lake Olympic Triathlon will take place Saturday, Aug. 24 at 8 a.m. This event is a 1,500-meter swim, a 40 kilometer road course and a 10K run. The course starts with the swimming and leaves from the front of the Hill’s Resort Lodge on the south end of the beach. The U-shaped course consists of three 500-meter sections around the large swim buoys. The bike trail is flat for the ride and the run is a drivable dirt road along the lakeshore. The cost to participate is $85 for a single person or $150 per team. For more information, go to www.priestlakerace.com. The Priest Lake Marathon, HalfMarathon and 25K run is Saturday, Sept. 21, and participants can choose between a marathon, half marathon, 50K run, 25 kilometer run or a 5K run. The course is on drivable dirt Forest Service roads that wind through the Panhandle

National Forest. The 50K run starts at 7 a.m. and each category has a scattered start time from there. There will be trophies and ribbons for first through third places in the different age categories. To register for the event, go to www.priestlakerace.com. Priest Lake is also holding a 100K, 50K and 25K mountain bike endurance race for the athletes who prefer to pedal their way through a course. The roads that make up the course are old fire roads. The 100K and 50K course was built in 1967 to fight the Sundance Mountain fire and has a rocky, rugged terrain. The 25K course takes bikers through cedar forests on a gravel drivable logging road. The events start at The Inn at Priest Lake, Coolin. The cost to bike the trails is $82 for the 100K, $65 for the 50K and $55 for the 25K. To register, go to www.priestlakerace.com.

Fall colors highlight Newport run The Newport Hospital and Health Services Foundation is holding the Autumn Bloom run Saturday, Sept. 21, to benefit the hospital and the programs that they offer. Participants may choose from a 5K or 10K course. The start and finish lines are located at the TJ Kelly Park in downtown Newport. The 10K race is the only fall second seed prequalifying race for Bloomsday. This means that male runners who complete the course in under 39 minutes and females under 47 minutes, will prequalify for Bloomsday 2014. The cost to participate is $25 for adults with a T-shirt and $15 without for the runs. Children under 16 have a cost of $15 to participate. To register for the event, go to www. active.com.

Triathlon swims into reservation The Kalispel Tribe is hosting the second annual Tsunami Sprint Triathlon Saturday, Sept. 7 at 10 a.m. The event includes a 0.61-mile swim in the Pend Oreille River, a 14.5-mile bike course and a fourmile run. The Spokane Taiko drum group will be drumming during the race this year and plans are being made to have authentic Japanese food to serve. Other festivities include live music. The cost is $50 and registration forms can be found at www.tsunamisprint.com. For more information call 509-671-1243. If your group is organizing a run this summer, contact The Miner Newspapers to have the event run on our sports pages. Call the newsroom at 509-447-2433 or email minernews@povn.com.

Fish and Game commission to meet in Pocatello POCATELLO – The Idaho Fish and Game Commission will meet July 10 and 11 in Pocatello. A public hearing will be at 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 10. Routine agenda items include rules for all game animals, nonresident deer and elk tag quotas, nonresident deer and elk tag outfitter set-aside, release of bighorn sheep tags for auction and lottery, expenditure of animal damage control funds, legislative proposals as well as a migratory game birds briefing.

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S P O R T S

Commissioners also will consider a proposed sandhill crane season and summer Chinook salmon season. The Fish and Game Commission usually holds a public hearing in conjunction with each regular meeting. Members of the public who want to address the commission on any topic having to do with Fish and Game may do so at the public hearing. All testimony will be taken into consideration when the commission makes decisions on agenda items at the meetings.

C A LE N DA R

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THURSDAY, JULY 4 Diamond Lake Half Marathon: 7:30 a.m. - South Shore Store TUESDAY, JULY 9 Group Hike at Bead Lake: 9 a.m. - Meet at Priest River Senior Center

208-448-2311

Albeni Hwy. • Priest River Washington Customers Call Toll Free 1-800-440-8254


THE MINER



JULY 3, 2013|

3B

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SPECIAL EVENTS CCC building to be dedicated for historical weekend

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NEWPORT – The Historical Society’s Pioneer Weekend returns Thursday, July 11 and ends July 13, with dedication of a new exhibit at the museum in Newport in between. On Thursday, July 11, people can take a Tacoma Creek Homestead Tour. The group will meet at the Crossroads Restaurant in Usk. Friday morning, July 12 is the Pend Oreille County Historical Society annual membership meeting at 10:30 a.m. at the Pend Oreille County Historical Society Museum in Newport. Dinner Friday can be eaten at 6 p.m. at the Riverbank Restaurant in Oldtown. This is the historical society’s annual no host dinner.

Catch a weekend of one act plays NEWPORT – The fourth annual One Act Play Festival is set for Friday and Saturday, July 12 and 13 at the Pend Oreille Playhouse in Newport. Tickets are $10 in advance or $12 at the door for adults. Student tickets are $5. Shows begin at 7 p.m. each night. Call 509671-3389. The playhouse is located at 240 N. Union.

JULY

1

8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House Noon— Senior meals at Kaniksu Village, 1:30 p.m.— Free Bread Meal Hospitality House

8

8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House Noon— Senior meals at Kaniksu Village, 1:30 p.m.— Free Bread Meal Hospitality House

15

8 a.m. --Coffee Hour, Hospitality House; Noon— Senior meals at Kaniksu Village; Potluck Hospitality House 1:30 p.m.

22

8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House; Noon— Senior meals at Kaniksu Village, 1:30 p.m.— Free Bread Meal Hospitality House

29

8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House; Noon— Senior meals at Kaniksu Village, 1:30 p.m.— Free Bread Meal Hospitality House

2

3

8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House 9 a.m.— Hospitality House Quilters; Noon—Senior Meals at Kaniksu Village

9

8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House 9 a.m.— Hospitality House Quilters; Noon—Senior Meals at Kaniksu Village

16 8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House 9 a.m.— Hospitality House Quilters; Noon—Senior Meals at Kaniksu Village

10 8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House •Kaniksu Village - Hospice Grief Management Support Group & Educational Forum at River Mt. Assisted Living

17 8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House •Kaniksu Village - Hospice Grief Management Support Group & Educational Forum at River Mt. Assisted Living

24

23 8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House 9 a.m.— Hospitality House Quilters; Noon—Senior Meals at Kaniksu Village

30

8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House •Kaniksu Village - Hospice Grief Management Support Group & Educational Forum at River Mt. Assisted Living

4 8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House 12:30 p.m. —Duplicate Bridge Hospitality House 6 p.m.—Pinochle, Hospitality House

509-447-2484 336 S. Washington Ave.

8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House 11:30 a.m. —Senior Meal at Blanchard Inn

11

12

8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House 12:30 p.m. —Duplicate Bridge Hospitality House 6 p.m.—Pinochle, Hospitality House

8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House Noon— Senior Meals at Ione Senior Center; 11:30 a.m. — Senior Meal at Blanchard Inn Noon— Happy agers Potluck Priest River Senior Center

18

19 8 a.m.—Coffee Hour,

8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House 12:30 p.m. —Duplicate Bridge Hospitality House 6 p.m.—Pinochle, Hospitality House

Hospitality House, Happy Agers Dinner at Priest River Senior Center; 11:30 a.m. — Senior Meal at Blanchard Inn

25

26

8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House 12:30 p.m. —Duplicate Bridge Hospitality House 6 p.m.—Pinochle, Hospitality House

6:30 p.m - Bingo, Ione IOOF Hall;

13 12 p.m - Happy agers Potluck Priest River Senior Center; 6:30 p.m - Bingo, Ione IOOF Hall;

20 6:30 p.m - Bingo, Ione IOOF Hall; 1 p.m.—Happy Agers Pinocle tournament, Priest River Senior Center

27

8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House; 11:30 a.m. —Senior Meal at Blanchard Inn Noon— Happy agers Potluck Priest River Senior Center

6:30 p.m - Bingo, Ione IOOF Hall;

8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House •Kaniksu Village - Hospice Grief Management Support Group & Educational Forum at River Mt. Assisted Living

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• MEDICAL EQUIPMENT: Wheelchairs, Crutches, Walkers & Canes. Bathroom Aids • MEDICAL SUPPLIES: Wound Care, Gloves • ATHLETIC PRODUCTS: Braces, Splints • PRESCRIPTION SERVICES

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5

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8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House 9 a.m.— Hospitality House Quilters; Noon—Senior Meals at Kaniksu Village

“Your Comprehensive Home Health Care Center and Local Pharmacy.”

8 a.m.—Coffee Hour, Hospitality House •Kaniksu Village - Hospice Grief Management Support Group & Educational Forum at River Mt. Assisted Living

Join us for a complimentary lunch, tour our community, meet our staff and see for yourself why Luther Park at Sandpoint was voted Best Senior Community for four consecutive years Phone Wendy at 208-265-3557 for more details or stop by for a tour.

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4B

| JULY 3, 2013

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FOR THE RECORD

O B I T UA R I E S

Carole Genevieve Pease Craig Bakersfield, Calif.

Carole Genevieve Pease Craig passed away in Bakersfield, Calif., June 23 after a long struggle with Alzheimer’s disease. She was 80. She was born May Craig 31, 1933, to Guy and Sarah John Pease in Pocatello, Idaho. She graduated from Pocatello High School in 1951. She married Jimmie Maynard Craig Nov. 28, 1950, in Elko, Nev. They were married 51 years, until his death in 2001. Carole and Jimmie raised their five children in China Lake, Calif., where they lived from 1954 to 1977. Family said Mrs. Craig was a wonderful mother to them and was especially devoted to her youngest, Danny, who had muscular dystrophy and required her constant care for 19 years, until his death in 1976. She was a very fun mom, who took her children to the library, to the movies, to the swimming pool, on countless road trips, and on their own private sky parties at night to gaze at the stars. She and Jimmie also took their children flying on weekends, first in gliders and later in hot air balloons. She knew the names of all the wildflowers in the desert as well as all the cultivated flowers in people’s gardens. She used to say she grew up with the kids, which was truer than not, since she married at age 17 and all of her children were born by the time she was 24. After the children were grown and gone, Jimmie and Carole moved to Newport, where they lived from 1977 to 2001. They loved being together in their geodesic dome in the forest and they met many people in the Newport area who became dear friends. Mrs. Craig was a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and served a mission with Jimmie in Florida from 1998 to 2000. She was an accomplished seamstress and loved reading. She enjoyed a good walk, most especially if her two little dogs were leading the way. They were her constant companions and much loved. Survivors include four children and their spouses: Roxann (and David) Rowberry, of Chicago; Denice (and Jim) Tweedy, of Port Ludlow, Wash.; Gennie (and Craig)

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D E AT H

Charles G. Duffy of Priest River passed away Thursday, June 27, at the age of 78. A

Tucson, Ariz.

Michael Alan Masters of Tucson, Ariz., passed away June 9 at the age of 58. He was born Nov. 12, 1954, in Torrance, Calif., and attended school in Masters Cusick. Mr. Masters always had great stories and jokes to tell and liked to sit and have a beer and spend time with his family and friends. He was a master mechanic and was always willing to help anyone in need. Mr. Masters was preceded in death by his father, Franklyn Masters and his mother, Margaret Gardner Masters, and a son, David Masters. He is survived by his fiancé, Michelle Bohlender, daughters, Rachel Bright and Rhiana Masters, and three sons, Michael, Evan and Shilo, as well as seven grandchildren and three step-grandchildren. He is also survived by five brothers, Patrick (and Helen), Dennis (and Denise), Sean (and Reyna), Kevin (and Denise), Anthony (and Patricia) Masters, as well as four sisters, Judi Leeper, Jennifer (and George) Naccarato, Maureen (and William) Johnson and Lisa (and Michael) Green, two step-sons, Skyler and Trever, plus many nephews, nieces and cousins. Memorial services will be held at the Our Mother of Sorrows Catholic Church in Tucson, Saturday, July 6 at 10 a.m. A celebration of Mr. Master’s life will be held afterwards for family and friends.

M E E T I N G S

WEDNESDAY, JULY 3 Diamond Lake Water and Sewer: 10 a.m. - District Office, 172 South Shore Road Oldtown Urban Renewal District Board: 5:30 p.m. - Oldtown City Hall Fire District No. 4 Commissioners: 6 p.m. - Dalkena Fire Station No. 41 Diamond Lake Improvement Association: 6:30 p.m. - Diamond Lake Fire Station, Highway 2 Pondoray Shores Water and Sewer District: 9 a.m. - Pend Oreille Public Utility District Office, Newport MONDAY, JULY 8 Pend Oreille County Commissioners: 9 a.m. - Pend Oreille County Courthouse Newport School Board: 5 p.m. District Offices Pend Oreille Fire District No. 6: 6 p.m. - Furport Fire Hall, 7572 LeClerc Road Oldtown City Council: 6:30 p.m. - Oldtown City Hall Cusick Town Council: 7 p.m. Cusick Community Center TUESDAY, JULY 9 Bonner County Commissioners: 8:45 a.m. - Bonner County Administrative Building Port of Pend Oreille Commis-

Michael Alan Masters

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full obituary with memorial service details will appear at a later date. Sherman-Knapp Funeral Home in Priest River is in charge of arrangements.

Priest River

PU B LI C

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Soelberg, of Bakersfield, Calif.; and Gary (and Mary Kay) Craig, of Wichita, Kan. She is also survived by 16 grandchildren and 22 greatgrandchildren. She was preceded in death by her son, Danny, and by her beloved husband, Jimmie. We are glad they are all together again, family said. Funeral services will be held Saturday, July 6, at noon at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints, Highway 2, Priest River. Friends are invited to visit with the family between 11-11:30 a.m. prior to the service. Interment will follow at Newport Cemetery, 161 County Lane. Sherman-Knapp Funeral Home in Newport is handling arrangements. Friends and family are invited to sign the online guestbook at www.shermanknapp.com.

N OT I C E

Charles G. Duffy

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sioners: 9 a.m. - 1981 Black Road, Usk Pend Oreille County Commissioners: 9 a.m. - Pend Oreille County Courthouse West Bonner Library District Board of Trustees: 9 a.m. Priest River Library Friends of the Library: Noon Priest River Library Pend Oreille County Planning Commission Hearings: 6 p.m. Cusick Community Center West Bonner Water and Sewer District: 6:30 p.m. - Oldtown City Hall West Bonner Library Board: 7 p.m. - Priest River Library Laclede Water District: 7:30 p.m. - Laclede Community Hall WEDNESDAY, JULY 10 Pend Oreille Cemetery No. 1: 8:15 a.m. - County Courthouse in Newport Pend Oreille Conservation District Board: 9:30 a.m. - Newport Post Office Building West Bonner County School Board Annual Meeting: 6 p.m. - District Office, Priest River Bonner County Democrats: 6:30-8 p.m. - Panhandle Health, 322 Marion St., Sandpoint Sacheen Lake Sewer and Water District Board: 7 p.m. - Sacheen Fire Station, Highway 211

Editor’s note: The police reports, taken from dispatch logs provided to The Miner by law enforcement agencies, are not intended to be an exact report but rather a comprehensive list of police calls in Pend Oreille and West Bonner counties. Dispatch also fields calls for the Kalispel Tribe property in Airway Heights. Certain police calls are generally omitted because of space constraints. These include but aren’t limited to ambulance calls for illness, unfounded alarms, traffic stops, dogs at large, abandoned vehicles, 911 hang–ups and civil standbys. All dispositions for the police reports are assumed to be active, assist or transfer at press time. The police reports are updated each weekday on The Miner Online.

PEND OREILLE COUNTY Monday, June 24 SUSPICIOUS VEHICLE – Allen Rd., report of suspicious car in area no one seen around vehicle. THEFT – Tacoma Creek Rd., report that prescription meds were stolen. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Westside Calispell Rd., report that suspicious items were found. THEFT – W. Walnut St., Newport, report that purse was stolen out of unlocked vehicle. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Deer Valley transfer station, report that vehicle drove off without paying. TRESPASSING – Hwy. 2, report of unwanted female on property. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Diamond Lake, report that possibly stolen trailer was located. FOUND PROPERTY – N. Fea Ave., Newport, attempt to return drivers license left at sheriff’s office. ARREST – S. Scott Ave., Newport, Charla Ann Smetana, 30, of Priest River was arrested for fourth degree assault. ARREST – S. Garden Ave., Newport, John Joseph Slobodow, 23, of Spokane turned himself in and was arrested on a misdemeanor warrant. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE VERBAL – Deer Valley Rd., report of male subject out of control, threatening to kill female. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – N. Newport Ave., report of male sleeping in the parking lot. ARREST – Kelly John Wood, 43, of Newport was arrested for driving under the influence. Tuesday, June 25 ERRATIC DRIVER – Hwy. 20, report that black SUV passed respondent and almost hit oncoming car. ACCIDENT – Hwy. 211, report of blue car in the ditch. SUSPICIOUS VEHICLE – Hwy. 20, report of unoccupied vehicle filled with scrap metal. MISSING PERSONS – Conklin Meadows Rd., report that juveniles are missing. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Roberts Rd., report of loud explosion. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Falcon Lane, report that complainant found approximately 15 milk jugs with some brown liquid in them. JUVENILE PROBLEM – W. 1st St., report that five juveniles are skateboarding on stage after being told to leave. SUSPICIOUS PERSON – S. Spokane Ave., Newport, report that male continues to follow caller. TRESPASSING – W. Walnut St., Newport, report that female who has been previously trespassed is at location. MALICIOUS MISCHIEF – S. Scott Ave., report that complainant’s property was damaged. THEFT – W. Walnut St., Newport, report that subject stole beer. BURGLARY – Scotia Rd. E., report of unit being broken into. JUVENILE PROBLEM – S. Washington Ave., Newport, report that 14-year-old male being loud and disruptive and was trying to fight. ARREST – N. Calispell Ave., Mark I. Roberts, 48, of Newport

P O LI C E

was arrested for violation of court order. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE VERBAL – Monumental Way, Cusick, complainant wants subject to leave residence and he is refusing. Wednesday, June 25 DOMESTIC VIOLENCE PHYSICAL – Monumental Way, Cusick, report that male was throwing things in residence and pushing his mother around. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – S. Scott Ave., Newport, report that male was told that known subjects took items from his house. ARREST – Justin Michael Meckler, 21, of Oldtown was transported from the Spokane County Jail on warrants. ARREST – Dylan Daniel Boggs, 33, of Ione was arrested for failure to comply, failure to appear and on a Department of Corrections detainer. THEFT – S. Washington Ave., Newport, report of gas stolen from vehicles and damage to building. THEFT – Driskill Rd., report of sheep stolen out of pasture sometime over last few days. THEFT – Cooks Mt. Rd., report that copper wire and ground equipment are missing. DRUGS – S. Newport Ave., investigation of drugs. DRUGS – S. Union Ave., Newport, investigation of drugs. DRUGS – N. Union Ave., Newport, investigation of drugs. THEFT – Best Chance Rd., report of fuel stolen from equipment and broken lock. POSSIBLE DUI – Hwy. 2, report of pickup all over roadway, almost hit oncoming traffic. ASSAULT – S. Garden Ave., Newport THREATENING – Scotia Rd., report that intoxicated neighbor came over and threatened complainant’s children. FIREWORKS – S. Shore Diamond Lake Rd., report of fireworks going off in the area. Thursday, June 27 VIOLATION OF COURT ORDER – Grizzly Loop, Newport, report of male refusing to return son. DISTURBANCE – Lenora Drive, report of male inside yelling and screaming. LITTERING – Overlook Drive, report of red pickup possibly dumping garbage in the area. ARREST – River Rd., Matthew A Trumbull, 38, of Cusick was arrested for violation of a protection order. BURGLARY – Houghton St., report that rental property missing furniture and dishes. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Calispel St., reported problem with subjects making threats regarding drugs in the area. ARREST – Scotia Rd., Joseph R. Shanholtzer, 37, of Cusick was arrested on a warrant and for possession with intent to manufacture or deliver marijuana. DRIVING WHILE LICENSE SUSPENDED – Scotia Rd., report of suspended male driving. SUSPICIOUS VEHICLE – S. Scott Ave., report of white van with two males sitting in front of residence. ARREST – Scotia Rd., Alicia M. Smith, 23, of Deer Park, was arrested in a local warrant. THEFT – S. Washington Ave., Newport, report that known subject picked up complainant’s medications without permission. THEFT – Silver Birch Rd., report that trees were stolen from complainant’s property. ARREST – W. Walnut St., Newport, Kelly Rose Bemis, 19 was arrested for trespassing. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – W. 1st St., report that complainant was at the park with kids and elderly male tried to get kids to leave with him. FOUND PROPERTY – Veit Rd., found backpack in the area last week with ID inside. DISTURBANCE – S. Scott Ave., report of subjects in alley yelling. BURGLARY – N Quail Ave., Newport, report of medication stolen from residence.

THE MINER

R E P O R T S

||

Friday, June 28 BURGLARY – Grizzly Loop, Newport, report that subjects broke into complainant’s residence and are still there. ACCIDENT – Horseshoe Lake Rd., report of red Ford pick-up in ditch. ARREST – Hwy. 2, Desiree Michelle Franck, 33, of Newport was arrested for fourth degree assault domestic violence. NOISE COMPLAINT – Catamount Ridge Lane, report of ongoing problem with subject shooting in the middle of night. THREATENING – Newport area, respondent wants to report threats made by subject. TRESPASSING – Gray Rd., report of subjects on complainant’s property possibly trying to steal vehicle parts. TRESPASSING – LeClerc Rd. S., report that unknown subjects trespassed on property. ARREST – Rikki Nicole Bays, 29, of Spokane turned herself in on a warrant. THEFT – Big Dog Drive, reported theft of game cameras. ACCIDENT – Hwy. 20, report of single vehicle accident, male having hip and back pain. HARASSMENT – N. Halford Ave., report of subject being harassed by phone. THEFT – Grizzly Loop, report of gas and gas cans taken. INTOXICATION – W. Walnut St., Newport, report of intoxicated subject in store. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Driskill Rd., report of two bicycles seen at house where no one is home. WEAPON OFFENSE – S. 5th Ave., report that subject pointed a pellet gun at complainant. DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE – Hwy. 2 FIREWORKS – Terrace Ave., report of illegal fireworks being set off. SUSPICIOUS PERSON – W. 1st St., report of intoxicated homeless man hanging out in the alley. DISTURBANCE – W. Kelly Drive, report of female at residence refusing to leave. SUSPICIOUS VEHICLE – Hwy. 31, report of vehicle with hazards on. Saturday, June 29 THEFT – W. 4th St., report that adult son took items from her house. THREATENING – N. Spokane Ave., Newport, report of males arguing over Facebook post. DRUGS – S. Garden Ave., Newport, report of inmate found with inhaler. ARREST – S. Scott Ave., Newport, Shawn Eric Bryant, 29, was arrested on a local warrant. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – S. Washington Ave., report of ATV with no lights prowling in area. ARREST – Renee Dawn Tosh, 45, of Spokane was arrested on out of county warrants. Sunday, June 30 ARREST – W. 7th St., Andrew Michael Barnes, 28, of Newport was arrested for fourth degree assault domestic violence. BURGLARY – W. 2nd St., report of residence broken into possibly made entry through open window. MALICIOUS MISCHIEF – Finnila Drive, report that neighbors residence had windows shot with BB gun. WEAPON OFFENSE – Blackberry Lane, report of neighbors shooting on their property and caller believes it’s in an unsafe manner. ERRATIC DRIVER – Hwy. 31, report of two elderly drivers that cannot maintain lane travel. THREATENING – Tigerview

The Miner

Lane, report that known male came to residence yelling and screaming making threats. FOUND PROPERTY – Hwy. 2, report that brown wallet was found. HARASSMENT – S. Garden Ave., Newport, report that inmate arrested for assault domestic violence keeps calling and harassing the victim. SUSPICIOUS PERSON – Hwy. 20, report that disoriented male driving around looking for his wife. BOATING OFFENSE – Diamond Lake SUSPICIOUS VEHICLE – Black Rd., report that two vehicles pulled into the driveway and complainant told them to leave. WEAPON OFFENSE – W. Kelly Drive, complainant reports hearing two gunshots in the area. FIREWORKS – S. Shore Diamond Lake, report that subjects are shooting off illegal fireworks that are going 200-300 feet in the air.

WEST BONNER COUNTY Monday, June 24 MARINE INCIDENT – Willow Bay Rd., Priest River ARREST – Hwy. 41, Oldtown, Summer Isbell, 19, of Coeur d’Alene was arrested for possession of controlled substance. A 26-year-old male was cited and released for driving without privileges and possession of paraphernalia with intent to use. Tuesday, June 25 FIRE – Krupps Rd., Spirit Lake, report of a structure fire. VANDALISM – E. Jackson Ave., Priest River ACCIDENT – Hwy. 2, Oldtown RECKLESS DRIVING – Spirit Lake Cutoff, Spirit Lake RECKLESS DRIVING – Hwy. 41, Oldtown VANDALISM – E. Jackson Ave., Priest River DOMESTIC DISPUTE – 8th St., Priest River Wednesday, June 26 RECKLESS DRIVING – Hwy. 2, Priest River RECKLESS DRIVING – Hwy. 2, Priest River DRIVING WITHOUT PRIVILEGES – Hwy. 2 Oldtown, a Spokane man was cited and released for driving without privileges and another man was cited and released for providing false information to police. ACCIDENT – Luby Bay Rd., Priest Lake Thursday, June 27 FIRE – St. Germaine Rd., Spirit Lake Friday, June 28 MARINE INCIDENT – Indian Creek Park Rd., Coolin DOMESTIC DISPUTE – E. 4th St. S., Oldtown, report of domestic battery. ARREST – Hwy. 41, Blanchard, Amber Crespo, 19, of Post Falls was arrested for an outstanding Kootenai County warrant. DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE – Hwy. 41, Oldtown Saturday, June 29 ANIMAL PROBLEM – McDonald Creek Rd., Blanchard, report of loose horses. ARREST – Hwy. 57, Priest River, Michael White of Spokane Valley was arrested for driving under the influence. Sunday, June 30 THEFT – Pineview Lane, Spirit Lake ARREST – Riverside Rd., Priest River, a juvenile was arrested on outstanding felony warrants.

421 S. Spokane Ave., Newport, WA (509) 447-2433


THE MINER



JULY 3, 2013 |

5B

Many fourth quarter perfect grades at Sadie Halstead NEWPORT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Twenty-two students received the Principalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award for their perfect 4.0 grade point averages for fourth term at Sadie Halstead Middle School, with another 84 making the Honor Roll for grade that were 3.5 or better and 73 who received Honorable Mentions for grades point averages above 3.0. Students who got the Principalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Award for perfect grades include: Fifth grade: Samuel R. Thomas. Sixth grade: Megan A. Vaughn, Alexis M. Polensky, Cydni A. Lewis, Tabitha J. Horton, Myriah N. Dittmar, Matthew L. Burkett and Racine R. Balow. Seventh grade: Erica A. Simila, Brock S. Rosen, Alexandria R. Poisel, Esme A. Peck, Stephanie P. Huang, Madison M. Hofstee, Tyler W. Hill, Jason H. Hansen, Kari Goodrich and Jocelyn M. Endicott. Eighth grade: William D. VanDyke, Sonja D. Moore and Travis A. Dillon. Students who made Honor Roll for grades above 3.5 include: Fifth grade: Kiara M. Kinney, Brandon I. Hein, Amy L. McMeen, Adamae L. Holloway, Kylie M. Craft, Blake Y. Childers, Kayd L. Moss, Wyatt A. Dikes, Ashley N.Cox, Heather M. Lee, Lucas P. Nichols, Cora L. Pelleberg, Eternity Sue A. Deluna, Trevor S. Wylie, Gage H. Seger, Scheila A. Ward, Hunter J. Stiner, Hedy M.Seeber, Abigail K. Newcomb, Maree A. Graves, Maisi H. Armstrong, Connor P. Furman, Kayla M. Larson, Bennett P. Clark, Natalie R. Geary and Augustus L. Newman. Sixth grade: Maquenzie E. Arnold, Emmily M. Bronkhorst, Gerry D. Bradbury, Daylan M. Kiss, Matthew H. Reel, Adam J. Moorhead, Destiny L. Monroe, Kaylee A. Sawyer, Tanya A. Howard, Dylan J. Ralston, Lance W. Knight, Chelsea M. Hansen, Zachary I. Hein, Madysen R. Baldwin, Jessie R. Dillon, Aurora A. Zeason, Faith C. Rosen, Matthew C. Ragsdale and Claire M. Brock. Seventh grade: Miriah L. Otterson, Taven W. Groves, Christian D. Loutzenhiser, Paige M. Dice, Alexis N. Musso, Aleque Z. Fraser-Robinson, Kainoah T. Bowman, Joel D. McDermeit, Kylyah A. Mercurius, Parker Martin, Rianna L. Smith, Rylan W. Hastings, Justin E. Gill, Robert J. Owen, Tiara J. Hamberg, Angus S. Armstrong, Brad E. McMeen, Cierra D. Amende, Faith A. Jones, Jacob P. Wagar and Trystan A. Potter. Eighth grade: Timmi M. Schonewald, Joshua M. Cunningham, Samuel L. Hanley, Grace L. Johnson, Jalin P. Earl, Brittney A. Jackson, Shawna R. Zubaugh, Laurel R.Behrend, Stormy B. Anderson Persyn, Darion T. Ralston, Samantha R. Siemsen, Madeline R. Green, Gabriel L.Furman, Johnathan F. Quandt, Christopher W. Ownbey and Timothy J.Luback. Students who received Honorable Mention for grades above 3.0 include: Fifth grade: Sierra I. Mason, Jareth A. Monte, Jacob R. Kirkwood, Devon P. Bebow, Secret L. Fox-Reed, Andrew C. White, Braden C.Anderson, Nicholas M. Brock, Drew H. Green, Dylan M. Gilmore, Chloe L. Clark, Mattea L. Sigfrinius, Dawsen B. Baldwin, Troy M. Hill, Morgan A. Endicott, Cambria A. Mitcham, Allison I. Weber, Joel A.Miller, Joshua A. Lauzon, Bailey K. Corkrum and Klayten W. Baldwin. Sixth grade: Katelynn M. Dean, Elizabeth D. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neal, Nicholas J. Lemke (Peoples), Kyra E. Sawyer, Mitchell Jr E. Cunningham, Dylan J. Melville, Collin M. Campbell, Rocco H. Sherman, Brittany E. Noble, Amanda H. Fisher, Sarah E. Syverson, Sadi L. Librande, Alexander S. Adams, Cayson S. Maughan and Cody J. Warner. Seventh grade: Emily R. Millage, Kiara K. Hanni, Chelan R. McCuen, Land W. Carter, Sky R. Prentice, Lilly M. Gray, Jack T. Long, Tessa R. Pillers, Koa J. Pancho, Braedon K. Corkrum, David E. Skaugstad, Kyle D. Malsbury, Bradley A. Cornwell, Victoria A.Helton, Elisha B. Jones, Michael D. Warner, Jacob J. Weber and Grace C. Newman. Eighth grade: Adam M. McMeen, Ryan M. Terra, Mikhail G. Hammer, Chelsea L. Graham, Mariah J. Stott, Dalton J. Arrand, Andrew W. Donley Russell, Makayla R. Bowell, Kody A. Campbell, Conrad Madison, Nathaniel B. Buhler, Kai C. Thomas, Jesse J. Reyes, Jacob R. Willner, Jace L.Hoadley, Kailey N. Lacy, Cecianna Auld, Makenzee L. Ranck and John J. Hilden.

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6B

Classifieds

|JULY 3, 2013



THE MINER

TO PLACE YOUR AD, CALL US TODAY AT (509) 447-2433 All ads appear in

THE NEWPORT MINER [Pend Oreille County]

and GEM

STATE MINER

[West Bonner County]

On the Internet at

www.pendoreillerivervalley.com

To place your ad, call 447-2433 email: minerclassifieds@povn.com

Mon. thru Fri.., 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. or come in to The Office at 421 S. Spokane Ave., Newport. Mail to 421 S. Spokane Ave., Newport, WA 99156

2

HELP WANTED

2

HELP WANTED

ZODIAC AEROSPACE, a world leader in aerospace and high tech product manufacturing has an immediate opening for several production positions for the raw material manufacturing division located in Newport, WA. We are a fast-paced, widely diverse and pro-active aerospace manufacturer. We are recruiting for several production positions, and are currently working 12 hour shifts rotating 4/3 days a week. Pay rate is $10.50 to $13.00 per hour DOE. In addition to vacation and paid holidays, we offer good benefits - medical, dental, vision, voluntary life and disability insurance, 401k and flexible spending reimbursement. For more information and an application, Please apply: at Rural Resources Community Action 301 W. Spruce Street, Suite D, Newport, WA 99156

Zodiac Aerospace

Deadlines

Monday at 4:30 p.m. Late Ads until Tuesday 2:00 p.m. In The Hot Box.

Rates

First 20 Words plus bold, centered head . $11.00/Week Each Additional Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50¢ ea. Special: 2 Weeks Consecutive Run . . . . 3rd Week Free Hot Box - First 20 Words plus bold, centered head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14.00/Week Each Additional Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65¢ ea. Classified Ads require pre-payment

Free ads

•Items for Free: One week run only, 20 words or less. Offer limited to One Free Ad per Week. • Found Ads: Items found will be run one time FREE, 20 Words or less.

Current open positions with the Cusick School District:

Junior High Girl’s Head Volleyball Coach Junior High Boys Head Basketball Coach Junior High Track Coach Substitute Bus Driver Please visit our website at www.cusick.wednet.edu for details, or call the District Office at (509) 445-1125 for more information. Equal Opportunity Employer

Seattle City Light

Payment terms

All classified ads require pre-payment. We accept Visa and MasterCard. $8.75 Per Inch. Deadline: Monday, 4:30 p.m. Add a color logo or picture .....................$5.00/Week

$35.32 – 37.26/hour Plus Excellent Benefits

Statewide Classified

Acceptability

The Miner reserves the right to edit, reject or reclassify any advertisement.

Corrections

Please check your ad the first time it appears and immediately report any error to the Classified Department. We regret that we cannot be responsible for more than a one-time incorrect insertion if you do not call the error to our attention.

I N DE X 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Personals Help Wanted Business Services Work Wanted Lost and Found Child Care & Preschool Business Oportunities Misc. For Sale Washington Statewide Advertising 10 Rentals Wanted 11 Housing For Rent 12 Storage For Rent 13 Real Estate For Sale

2

HELP WANTED

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

Real Estate Wanted Mobile/Mfg. Homes Commercial Property Yard Sale Misc. Wanted Boats & Motors Cars & Trucks Motorcycles Recreational Vehicles Machinery, Tractors Logging Timber Farm & Ranch Animals for Sale Notices

2

HELP WANTED

Public Works/Road Division: On-call temporary positions. Wage: $19.54/hr. Temporary Maintenance Technician: Must possess a Class “A” Commercial Driver’s License. Temporary Mechanic: Three years’ experience as a mechanic required. See job descriptions for complete list of qualifications and essential job functions. Obtain application and job description: Pend Oreille County Human Resources, 625 W. 4th St. Newport, WA, (509) 447-6499 or County website: www.pendoreilleco.org. Application deadline: July 8, 2013 at 4:00pm.

HEAD START LEAD TEACHER

NEWPORT - Rural Resources Community Action is currently accepting applications for a Lead Teacher - Level 3 in our Newport Head Start classroom. Full-time school year, exempt; $1,829-$2,037/month; DOE. Position is required to plan, organize and conduct activities in a Head Start preschool classroom. Valid driver’s license & criminal history check required. For application and complete position description, contact WorkSource at 956 South Main Street, Suite A, Colville, WA 99114 or 509-685-6158. This position is open until filled. Rural Resources is an AA/EOE employer.

11

HOUSING FOR RENT

HOUSING FOR RENT

TENANTS...

Kaniksu Village Apartments

Need a home? Rental Homes Available

1 Bedroom Apartments Income Limits Apply

Northern Pines Real Estate Services 509-447-5922

www.nprents.com

Seattle City Light is looking for a Hydroelectric Operator for the Boundary Hydroelectric Project, 100 miles north of Spokane near Metaline Falls, Washington. A mandatory two and a half-year, on-the-job training program is required for this position. For more information and to apply, visit www.seattle.gov/jobs by 7/9/13. The City of Seattle is an Equal Opportunity Employer that values diversity in the workforce.

LEVEL 1 COMPUTER TECH SUPPORT

3

BUSINESS SERVICES

THE WATER PROFESSIONALS

Wage DOE Send or drop off resume at 108 S. Washington, Newport

BUSINESS SERVICES

TrussTek Fast, friendly service since 1990

Roof & Floor Trusses Bill • Ed • Marcus • Ted • Jeff

208-267-7471 1-800-269-7471 Every day is Sale Day in The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds. Read them every week.

12

HOUSING FOR RENT

NEWPORT 2 bedroom mobile home, $425 month includes city utilities and garbage. $450/ deposit. (208) 755-1568/ (208) 448-2290. (22-tf) TWO BEDROOM 1 bath, Newport. No smoking. No pets. $600 a month. Amy (208) 255-8500. (214p)

COZY TWO BEDROOM 1 bath, Newport house. Fenced yard. $700/ month, inlcudes city utilities, plus deposit. No smoking. (509) 671-2185/ (509) 671-0314. (22-3p)

Read The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds.

20

C ARS AND TRUCKS

(509) 446-4100 TDD

1-425-562-4002 2 BEDROOM Very nice mobile home. Highway 211. No smoking- no pets. $375 plus deposit. Application (509) 447-0631. (22-3) Miner want ads work.

24

LOGGING TIMBER

NEWPORT MINI-STORAGE (509) 447-0119 Enter at Hwy 41 and 1st Street

Lighted & Secure In-Town Location

13

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

109 E. 5th Ave.

Metaline Falls, WA

STORAGE FOR RENT

DIAMOND LAKE Waterfront apartment available. One bedroom unit only steps from the beach. $550 per month, includes electricity, garbage, cable, internet, water and sewer. Gorgeous view of lake out bedroom window. Call (509) 475-7524. (22-3p) 10 Read The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds.

WWW.BITOFHEAVEN.INFO 17 acres in Elk, Pend Oreille County. Immaculate 1974 doublewide. 2 shops. $155,000. Tamarack Realty (509) 999-6354. (20-3p) Miner want ads work.

24

24

LOGGING TIMBER

LOGGING TIMBER

Need HOP Poles!!

Call today for info

Oldtown Auto Sales

303 N. State Ave. • Oldtown

208-437-4011

www.oldtownautos.com

WE BUY LOGS AND TIMBER Let us Sell your Car, Truck or RV We charge 10% or a minimum of $200

2008 Ford F150 4x4 XLT $20,995 2004 Nissan Altima $7,995 1962 GMC Custom Pickup $6,995 2003 Buick Park Avenue $6,995 1940 Dodge 4D Sedan $5,995 1953 Chev Bel Air 4D $4,995 1997 Cadillac Deville $4,495 1989 Ford F150 Truck 4x4 $2,995 1990 Ford F250 4x4 $1,995

We gladly provide Consultation & Assistance for Manging your Forest Land For information contact

Skyler Johnson - (509) 690-3127 Office (509) 738-4711

Jasper Post Mill, Inc. Buying B i llodge d pole pine. . . Top Prices Paid on 6” & Smaller in Diameter Hwy. 41, Blanchard, Idaho 208•437•4411 or 509•238•6540

2002 Tahoe 25ft Trailer $9,995 1996 Sandpiper 26ft 5th Wheel $6,995

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY

You too can Advertise Weekly for only $8.00 Call 447-2433

EVERYTHING INTERNET

3

EQUAL HOUSING

ATTORNEYS FEMALE CORRECTIONAL OFFICER (Jailer), $2511.24/ month plus premium pay of 10% for graveyard shift and 5% for swing shift. Union. Application deadline: July 12, 2013 at 4:00 p.m. Examinations held July 19, 2013. Civil Service application required. $15.00 Processing fee. Application and job announcement available: www.pendoreilleco. org or Civil Service, 625 West 4th, Post Office Box 5060, Newport, Washington 99156; phone: (509) 447-2712. (20-3) MIDNIGHT RUN Rock and blues band needs serious lead guitarist. Plenty of gigs, no baggage please. (509) 738-4391. (21-3p)

11

OPPORTUNITY

Hydroelectric Operator 1

Classified Display Ads

Reach more than 1,100,000 Homes in 115 Washington State Community Newspapers. One Week, up to 25 Words, Prepaid - $195- 25 Words, $8 each additional. •Reach 325,000 Homes in 48 Idaho State Community Newspapers. One Week, up to 25 words prepaid $125. Deadline: 12 days before publication.

11

• WELL DRILLING • PUMPS • WATER TREATMENT

99% Customer Satisfaction A+ BBB Rating 30+ Years in Business

(1-800) 533-6518 www.foglepump.com Lic. # FOGLEPS095L4

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HOUSING FOR RENT

3 BEDROOM TRAILER No pets. Lazy Acres Trailer Park. Newport. (208) 4374502. (7-tf) METALINE FALLS Great location. Quality furnished 1 bedroom plus apartment, garage. Includes utilities. No pets/ smoking! $650/ month. (509) 999-0618. (21-3p) 3 BEDROOM 2 bath in Cusick,. Large well kept home. References and good credit required. $700/ month includes water. (801) 835-3440. (20-4p) RIVER VIEW Metaline house. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1 acre, garage. $550/ month, first, last, deposit. Pets okay. (509) 589-1250. (21-3p) 3 BEDROOM 2 bath mobile home, Oldtown. No smoking. Pets negotiable. $675 plus deposit. (509) 951-3274. (21-3p) Find it fast in The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds.

Law Office of Denise Stewart

Wills, Trusts, Probate, Medicaid, Business 301 S. Washington Ave., Suite A, Newport, WA (509) 447-3242

CHIROPRACTIC Camas Center Medical & Dental Services Ryan Leisy, DC - (509) 447-7111 1821 N. LeClerc Rd., #1, Cusick, WA 99119

COUNSELING Molly Phillips, LICSW, CMHS, GMHS

Licensed Counselor, Many Insurances Accepted 415 W. Walnut, Newport, WA -- (509) 671-0226

DENTIST

MASSAGE THERAPY Harmony Healing Arts Center Gloria Campbell -- 448-2623 47 10th -- Priest River

Cedar Mountain Massage Therapy

Lois A. Ernst, Licensed Massage Therapist 322 S. Washington -- Newport -- 447-3898

The Willows - Massage & Bodywork Studio Judy C. Fredrickson, RN, LMP Newport -- (509) 671-7035

OPTOMETRIST Newport Vision Source

Drs. Michael & Cheryl Fenno 205 S. Washington -- 447-2945

Newport Dental Center

James G. Cool, D.M.D. Family Dentistry -- Evening Hours 610 W. 2nd -- (509) 447-3105 • 800-221-9929

Wayne Lemley, D.D.S.

Complete Family Dentistry & Orthodontics 424 N. Warren Ave., Newport -- 447-5960 Toll Free 877-447-5960

Camas Center Medical & Dental Services 1821 N. LeClerc Rd., #1, Cusick, WA 99119 (509) 447-7111 - (509) 445-1152 fax

HEALTH CLINICS Kaniksu Health Services Priest River Medical Clinic

Family Practice, Minor Emergencies Behavioral Health Mon. & Wed., 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tue. & Thu., 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Fri. 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (208) 448-2321

Camas Center Medical & Dental Services 1821 N. LeClerc Rd., #1, Cusick, WA 99119 (509) 447-7111 - (509) 445-1152 fax

HYPNOTHERAPY Purposeful Life Mastery Coaching

Dr. Douglas Rigg, P.H.D., CHt Registered Hypnotherapist Stop Smoking, Weight Loss, Motivation Individual and Groups - 509-589-0638

PHYSICAL THERAPY Priest River Rehab Services

A Service of Bonner General Hospital Tim Gray, P.T. -- 448-4151 Mon.-Wed.-Fri. - 9-5 • Tues. & Thurs. 9-4

Core Physical Therapy

at Club Energy • Newport Gary Schneider PT • (509) 671-3122 Monday thru Friday By Appointment

PODIATRIST -- FOOT SPECIALIST Douglas K. Monson, D.P.M.

Patients seen at Newport Hospital twice a month 509-926-2848 -- Call for appointments

PRINTING Printing & Design . . . at The Miner

We Have a Million Ideas for Our Customers! 421 S. Spokane, Newport -- 447-2433

REAL ESTATE Richard Bockemuehl

Century 21 Beutler - Waterfront Office (509) 321-1121 • Cell (509) 951-4390


THE MINER



16

OFFICE SPACE Washington Street, Newport. 400 square feet with additional storage space of 350 square feet. (208) 660-9271. (22-4)

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COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

YARD SALE

YARD SALE July 5/ 6, 10:00- 3:00. Multi families at Riverbend off LeClerc Road, north of Usk. Begin at 1721 Riverbend Loop Road. Quality eclectic mix; something for everyone! (22p) Get fast relief for an upset budget with The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds. They work for others; they’ll work for you! Call (509) 447-2433.

Your Right to Know

Your right to know and be informed of the functions of your government are embodied in public notices. In that self-government charges all citizens to be informed, this newspaper urges every citizen to read and study these notices. We strongly advise those citizens seeking further information to exercise their right of access to public records and public meetings. time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Pend Oreille, State of Washington, to wit: The East half of the Southeast quarter of the Northeast quarter and that portion of the East half of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter lying north of the centerline of the easement road as shown on the Declaration

2013173 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on the 12th day of July, 2013, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. inside the Hall of Justice, 229 South Garden Avenue in the City of Newport, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the

PU B LI C

of Protective Covenants and Easements, as recorded in the Office of the Pend Oreille County Auditor under Auditor’s file No. 159791 in Section 11, Township 30 North, Range 43 EWM, Pend Oreille County, Washington. Commonly known as, 422 Tree Top Road, Newport, WA 99156 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated June 14, 2007, recorded June 19, 2007, under Auditor’s File No. 2007 293015, records of Pend Oreille County, Washington, from Olga Bashaw, as Grantor, to The Land Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of Spokane Teachers Credit Union, as Beneficiary. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now

JULY 3, 2013 |

N OT I C E S

pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: Monthly payments and interest as follows: September and October 2012 in the amount of $1,001.54, plus November, 2012, through March 1, 2013, in the amount of $1,133.81, plus negative escrow of $907.01, plus late fees of $423.90 Other potential defaults do not involve payment to the Beneficiary. If applicable each of these defaults must also be cured. None known as of the date of this

7B

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document. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $130,809.73, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from the 14th day of June of 2007 and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on the 12th day of July, 2013. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by the 1st day of

BUSINESS DIRECTORY

July, 2013 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before the 1st day of July, 2013 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 1st day of July, 2013 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other

defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: 422 Tree Top Road, Newport, WA 99156, by both first class and certified mail on the 28th day of February, 2013, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on the 4th day of March, 2013, with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph 1 above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose CONTINUED ON 7B

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Accounting/Tax Service

Animal Boarding

Automotive

Automotive

Auto Sales

Carpet

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Office Services • Affordable Tax Service • Any Size Business • Bookkeeping • Payroll, Taxes 218 High St. Priest River, ID 208-448-2941

Professional Dog & Cat Grooming Dog & Cat Boarding and Daycare “Your Pets Home Away From Home” 1335 HWY. 2 EAST, OLDTOWN, ID

10 Minute Oil Change

No Appointment Necessary Free Vacuum & Window Wash

(509) 447-0120

We Offer: • Brakes • Engine • Air Conditioning Performance • Oil Changes • Electronics • Engine Repair • Diagnostics • Transmission • Steering & Repair Suspension • Full Service • Exhaust Service Mon-Fri 8am-5pm

PRIEST RIVER MOTORS

Hwy. 2, South of Newport

40 High St., Priest River, ID 208-448-0112

Concrete

Construction

Contracting

Digital Photos

Dog Boarding

Spokane Rock Products

On Budget On Time EVERY TIME!

Stutes Construction

Do-It-Yourself Digital Photo Center 4x6 30¢ 5x7 79¢ 8x10 $249 CD $149

CHANDREA FARMS

Inc.

Concrete • Sand • Gravel

39102 N. Newport Hwy.

Elk, Washington

(509) 292-2200 Equipment

BONNER SAW & POWER EQUIPMENT

Open: Tuesday - Friday 8:30-5:30 Saturday 8:30-2:00 Closed Sunday & Monday

Specializing in Custom & Log Home Construction “Lodge Logs” Log Home Dealer Foundations, Framing, Siding, Roofing, Decks, ETC. www.dependable-contracting.com

Jim 208-660-9131 ID#RCE-1494

WA #DEPENCI913N4

Flood Services

WATER

CLEAN-UP DRY OUT RESTORE

Floors & More, Inc Husqvarna • Jonsered and Echo Chain Saws 682 High St., Priest River (208) 448-1522

Kevin Johnson 24/7 Emergency Service 208-255-9580

The Remodeling Specialists!

• General Contractor • Roofing • Siding • Room Additions • Decks • Foundations • Manufactured Home Set-up 208-448-1869 208-660-4087 Harold Stutes Priest River

Ben Franklin

Flood Services

HOUSE FLOODED - BROKEN PIPE?

Flood Dryout Services Mold Inspection & Remediation Remodeling & Repairs Friendly Pre Purchase Home Inspections Insurance Claims Consulting Brooks Swanson (CMI) (CMRC) General Contractor RCT-13983 ALLAMA5940N5

(208) 448-2950

Idaho RCE-12308 Washington-FLOORMI974J1

AMERICAN SERVICES

Glass

Health Foods

Heating/AC

Priest River Glass

MOUNTAIN HARVEST HEALTH FOODS

Rob’s Heating & Cooling

Commercial • Residential

OWNER INSTALLER SERVICE

WINDSHIELDS WHILE-U-WAIT

• Natural & Organic Foods • Herbs, Vitamins & Supplements • Organic Juices & Smoothies

Priest River

Mon. - Fri. 9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

robs-heating-cooling@hotmail.com

1-800-858-5013

208-448-2095 100 McKinley • Priest River

LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED WA & ID

Mon-Fri. 7-5 Sat 8-12

208-448-2511 WA. Contr. No. PRIESRG132NZ

Plumbing

KARDOS

Printing

Printing & Design at the Miner Layout Services to Full Color Printing

509-671-7855 Lic#KARDOP*051K6 KARDOTS055NB

Journeyman Plumber Senior &Vet Discounts

“Where our High Standards Meet Yours” Corner of Hwy 2 & Spokane Ave. (509) 447-2433

(208) 610-5747 (208) 437-0174

Fuel

Floral

Traditions

208-448-2611 866-973-7673 Priest River

Flowers Plants Chocolates Balloons Tuxedos Gifts

125 N. Washington Ave., Newport

509-447-4416

Heating/AC

• Heat Pumps • Geothermal

YOUR HEATING COOLING & REFRIGERATION EXPERTS RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL Carrier

• Furnaces • Radiant Heat

Wood Stoves - Gas Stoves - Pellet Stoves & Oil Furnaces Available • We Service All Major Brands • Air Leakage Testing Available

Installations • Service Free Quotes

Bonded • Insured • WA #AMERIEH901G

509-447-4962

24 Hour Service: 509-671-6952

Complete Heating, Cooling & Duct Systems

Gas Fireplaces & Inserts

(208) 448-1439

N 6404 Perry • Spokane (509) 489-6482

Quality veterinary care for your pets and barnyard friends.

Dan Herrin D.V.M. (208) 437-2800

(208) 437-2145 217 N State Ave. Oldtown, ID

PRIEST RIVER FAMILY OIL

Delivering Propane & Fuel to All of Pend Oreille & Bonner Counties! Call us today!

208-437-3513 2459 Hwy.2 • Oldtown

Internet

EVERYTHING INTERNET Fiber - $49.95/Month Wireless Web Services Internet Telephone

24 hr. Commercial/Public Card Lock Fuels INCLUDE: • Highway Diesel • Off-Road Diesel • Unleaded Gasoline HOME DELIVERIES INCLUDE: • Stove Oil • Furnace Oil • Highway Diesel • Off-Road Diesel • Unleaded Gasoline Propane, Lubricants, Filters and Fuel Additives Available On-Site

218 Cedar St. Priest River, ID 208-448-1812

Painting

LIBERTY PAINTING

Conscientious & Reliable

Interior Exterior Repaints New Construction

Priest River

(509) 447-3067 or 1-888-800-POVN (7686)

Larry Liberty (208) 437-3353

Sawmilling

Storage

Toilets - Portable

Mountain Mobile Sawmilling 208-304-3966

THE ANIMAL DOCTOR

(509) 671-3599

Heating/AC

at Your Site!

PEND OREILLE VETERINARY CLINIC

Small & Large Animal Medicine & Surgery Brian Dockins DVM

Floral Plants Gifts Home Decor Floral & Home

Royal Towing Newport LLC

Newport

Cell 509-710-8939

Fleur de Lis

Newport

Available 24/7

• Coordination • Rentals • Linens • Chair Covers • Creative Design • Fresh Floral

Fuel

Veterinarian

Washington & Idaho

Matt Dahlin

Complete Event

Florist

Veterinary

509-447-1200

FREE Estimates

Sarah Webb

Florist Florist

DU-MOR RECYCLING

Towing Roadside Assistance 24 Hour Service

Quality Electrical Services at affordable prices

Alluring Events

Lic# RIVERCE886B7

Towing

• Towing • Lockouts • Jump Starts • Tire Changes • Recovery

We are celebrating 10 years of service for Pets and People, Too!

RCE

River City Electrical

Event Planning/Rentals

www.chandreafarms.com

Towing

Towing, LLC

Send your dogs to the Farm to play while you are away!

Electrical Services

Oldtown, ID • (208) 437-4822

CASH REWARD

Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Dog Boarding & Training

www.jakescimneysweep.com

(509) 475-6476 alluringevents@live.com www.alluring-events.com

Recycling

E. 911 Marietta (East of Hamilton) (509) 483-4094

509- 447-2244

priestrivermotors7.com

Newport

Recycling  LEAD ES TOP PRIC  BRASS PAID  COPPER  ALUMINUM  STAINLESS STEEL ACTION Recycling/ Phoenix Metals, Inc.

Cliff McDermeit 23810 E. Blanchard Rd., Newport

(509) 671-2276

“Our Variety Shows”

ID License # RCT-1510 WA License # STUTEC *92306

Operating Since 1980 Professional, Experienced, Friendly Service Clean, Inspect, Masonry Repair Licensed and Bonded

USED CARS 6098 HWY 2, Priest River, ID 208.290.9132 or 448.0500 Stephen & Cathy Stanley Dealer/Owners

(208) 437-0224

Chimney Sweep

Save money by turning your logs into valuable lumber Call Matt Lemas for an Estimate

Well Drilling

Licensed in WA & ID

Excess

Portable Service

PRIEST RIVER MINI STORAGE 5 Sizes

Resident Manager Highway 57 ~ 1 1/2 Miles from Hwy. 2 (208) 448-1273

Wrecking Yard

Portable Chemical Toilets 2654 E. Hwy 2 • Oldtown, ID Rent by the day, week, biweekly, month

(208) 448-2290 Yard Care

Lady Lawncare

Well Drilling & Pump Service Since 1964

Bus: 208-437-4168 Cell: 208-946-6944 stevepitts@verizon.net

Now Paying Top Dollar for your junkers Cars • Trucks • Machinery

Is your yard screaming for attention? We’ll scream back at a reasonable rate. 24 Years Experience

Full service yard care & spring cleanup

TERI-FIC AUTO SALVAGE

e Fre tes m i a Est

Newport (509) 447-2487 Chewelah (509) 935-4095

Deb & Debbie 509-710-3976


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| JULY 3, 2013

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CONTINUED FROM 6B name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to R.C.W. 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS ORTENANTS The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has to right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the unlawful detainer act, chapter 59.12 R.C.W. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. If you have been previously discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this notice is intended to exercise the note holder’s rights against the real property only. DATED this 4th of April, 2013. INLAND FORECLOSURE SERVICES, INC.-

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant womenandpeoplesecuring custody of children under 18. The newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising or real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800927-9275. (31tf)

-TRUSTEE By: SHERYL S. PHILLABAUM, authorized signer THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll Free: 1-877-894HOME (1-877-894-4663) http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/ post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm 
The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Toll Free: 1-800-596-4287 http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/indes. cfm?webListAction=se arch&searchstate=WA& filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys

Toll Free: 1-800-606-4819 http://nwjustice.org/ what-clear
 Published in The Newport Miner June 12 and July 3, 2013. (19, 22)

_________________ 2013185 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE SALE File No.: 7023.104510 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Grantee: Joshua S. Cox, as his sole and separate property Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 20100305540 Tax Parcel ID No.: 17165/453128240001 Abbreviated Legal: E 1/2 SE 1/4 NW 1/4 28-31-45 Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/

BLANKET WASHINGTON

consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287. Web site: http://www.hud. gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/ fc/index.cfm?webListAc tion=search&searchstat e=WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800606-4819. Web site: http:// nwjustice.org/what-clear. I. On July 12, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Hall of Justice, 229 South Garden Avenue in the City of Newport, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Pend Oreille, State of Washington: The East half of the Southeast quarter of the Northwest quarter in Section 28, Township 31 North, Range 45 East of the Willamette Meridian, Pend Oreille County, Washington. Commonly known as: 9251 Deer Valley Road Newport, WA 99156 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 05/07/10, recorded on 06/18/10, under Auditor’s File No. 20100305540, records of Pend Oreille County, Washington, from Joshua S. Cox, a married man, as his sole and separate property, as Grantor, to Northwest Trustee Services, LLC, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 03/04/2013 Monthly Payments $9,462.88 Late Charges $347.40 Lender’s Fees & Costs ($43.80) Total Arrearage $9,766.48 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $900.00 Title Report $615.47 Statutory Mailings $10.00 Recording Costs $15.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,610.47 Total Amount Due: $11,376.95 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $154,799.23, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 08/01/12, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession,

Cover it all . . . reach more than 2 million Ad Readers for just

255

$

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encumbrances or condition of the Property on July 12, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 07/01/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 07/01/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 07/01/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Joshua S. Cox 9251 Deer Valley Road Newport, WA 99156 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Joshua S. Cox 9251 Deer Valley Road Newport, WA 99156 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 01/18/13, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 01/18/13 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee. com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee. com and www.USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 03/04/2013 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact:

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THE MINER

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Neang Avila (425) 5861900. (TS# 7023.104510) 1002.239816-File No. Published in The Newport Miner June 12 and July 3, 2012. (19, 22)

_________________ 2013187 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12538530-SH APN No.: 443227519024 Title Order No.: 120404386-WA-GSO Grantor(s): WALTER R ROHRER, KATHERINE E BOWER Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR NEW LINE MORTGAGE, DIV. OF REPUBLIC MORTGAGE HOME LOANS, LLC Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 2004 0277350 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 7/12/2013, at 10:00 AM At the main stairs of the Old City Courthouse, 625 W. Fourth Street in the City of Newport, WA 99156 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of PEND OREILLE, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 3 IN BLOCK 2 OF THE REPLAT OF THE REPLAT OF PONDERAY SHORES, PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 208, RECORDS OF THE AUDITOR OF PEND OREILLE COUNTY, WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 91 OPEN SKIES ROAD, NEWPORT, WA 99156 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 9 / 2 4 / 2 0 0 4 , re c o rd e d 10/1/2004, under 2004 0277350 records of PEND OREILLE County, Washington, from WALTER R. ROHRER , AS HIS SEPARATE PROPERTY AND KATHERINE E. BOWER , A SINGLE PERSON, as Grantors), to FRONTIER ESCROW, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR NEW LINE MORTGAGE, DIV. OF REPUBLIC MORTGAGE HOME LOANS, LLC, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR NEW LINE MORTGAGE, DIV. OF REPUBLIC MORTGAGE HOME LOANS, LLC (or by its successors-in-interest and/or assigns, if any), to Wells Fargo Bank, NA. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $8,083.61 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $77,522.77, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 4/1/2012, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 7/12/2013. The

defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 7/1/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 7/1/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 7/1/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME WALTER R. ROHRER , AS HIS SEPARATE PROPERTY AND KATHERINE E. BOWER , A SINGLE PERSON ADDRESS 91 OPEN SKIES ROAD, NEWPORT, WA 99156 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 2/8/2013. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or

no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/ post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudpor tal/ HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/ offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=s earchandsearchstate=WA andfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/ what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 03/12/13 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866)645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 P o u l s b o , WA 9 8 3 7 0 (866)645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12-538530-SH, A-4364000 06/12/2013, 07/03/2013 Published in The Newport Miner June 12 and July 3, 2012. (19, 22)

_________________ 2013188 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12537485-SH APN No.: 443228-13-9001 443228139002 Title Order No.: 120394964-WA-GSO Grantor(s): ROBERT J. EVENSON, J. LYNN EVENSON, LYNN EVENSON Grantee(s): ADVANTA FINANCE CORP. Deed of Trust Instrument/Reference No.: 1999 0251143 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 7/12/2013, at 10:00 AM At the main stairs of the Old City Courthouse, 625 W. Fourth Street in the City of Newport, WA 99156 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, pay-

able in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of PEND OREILLE, State of Washington, to-wit: THE EAST HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 32 NORTH, RANGE 44 EWM. EXCEPT THEREFROM THE WEST 15 FEET FOR A ROAD. ALSO, A TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT A POINT, 345 FEET WEST OF THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 32 NORTH, RANGE 44 EWM; THENCE, SOUTH 165 FEET; THENCE, WEST 74 FEET; THENCE, NORTH 165 FEET; THENCE, EAST 74 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING. BEING CARRIED ON THE ROLLS OF THE PEND ORELLE COUNTY ASSESSOR AS TAX 9. EXCEPT COUNTY ROAD, PEND ORELLE COUNTY, WASHINGTON. More commonly known as: 301 WESTSIDE CALISPELL RD, USK, WA 99180 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/25/1999, recorded 10/29/1999, under 1999 0251143 records of PEND OREILLE County, Washington, from ROBERT J. EVENSON AND LYNN EVENSON , WHO ALSO APPEARS OF RECORD AS, J. LYNN EVENSON ; HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantors), to ABSTRACT AND TITLE AGENCY, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of ADVANTA FINANCE CORP., as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by ADVANTA FINANCE CORP. (or by its successors-ininterest and/or assigns, if any), to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $6,311.57 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $45,695.71, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 7/1/2012, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 7/12/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 7/1/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 7/1/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 7/1/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, CONTINUED ON 8B


THE MINER

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CONTINUED FROM 7B plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME ROBERT J. EVENSON AND LYNN EVENSON , WHO ALSO APPEARS OF RECORD AS, J. LYNN EVENSON; HUSBAND AND WIFE ADDRESS 301 WESTSIDE CALISPELL RD, USK, WA 99180 by both first class and certified mail, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. These requirements were completed as of 2/9/2013. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/ post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudpor tal/ HUD or for Local counsel-

ing agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/ offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=s earchandsearchstate=WA andfilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-606-4819 or Web site: http://nwjustice.org/ what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 03/12/13 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By: Michael Dowell, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866)645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 P o u l s b o , WA 9 8 3 7 0 (866)645-7711 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12-537485-SH, A-4364420 06/12/2013, 07/03/2013 Published in The Newport Miner June 12 and July 3, 2012. (19, 22)

_________________ 2013196 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE SALE T.S. No. 1368995-25 Parcel No. 443009-220002 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, CalWestern Reconveyance Corporation of Washington, will on July 12, 2013, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. At the Hall of Justice, 229 S. Garden Avenue, in the City of Newport, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Pend Oreille, State of Washington to-wit: The West half, of the Northwest quarter, of the Northwest quarter, of Section 9, Township 30 North, Range 44 EWM, Pend Oreille County, Washington commonly known as: 1055 North Shore Road, Newport, WA 99156, which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated November 08, 2006, recorded November 14, 2006, under Auditor’s File No. 2006 0290060, book XX, page XX, records of Pend Oreille County, Washington, from: Daniel E. Soares, a married person as his sole and separate property, as Grantor, to Frontier Title & Escrow, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as Nominee for Mountain West Bank, its Successors and Assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest

in which was assigned to CitiMortgage, Inc. under as assignment recorded on July 30, 2012, under Auditors File No. 20120312265, records of Pend Oreille County, Washington. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The default for which this foreclosure is made is as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $28,608.81; (together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due) IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal Balance of $184,138.91, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from November 01, 2011, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on July 12, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, must be cured by July 01, 2013 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before July 01, 2013 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after July 01, 2013 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: Daniel E. Soares, 1055 North Shore Road, Newport, WA 99156; Daniel E. Soares, 11 E. Michigan School Road, Sequim, WA 98382; Kim M. Soares, 1055 North Shore Road, Newport, WA 99156; Kim M. Soares, 11 E. Michigan School Road, Sequim, WA 98382, by both first class and certified mail on September 19, 2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on September 19, 2012, the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in the paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the

PU B LI C

Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060 THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Telephone: (877)8944663 Website: www.homeownership.wa.gov The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Telephone: (800)569-4287 Website: www.hud.gov The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: (888)201-1014 Website: http://nwjustice.org DATE: March 01, 2013 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation of Washington, Park Tower I Office Building, 201 NE Park Plaza Drive, Suite 217, Vancouver, WA 98684 (800)546-1531 Signature By: Yvonne J. Wheeler, A.V.P. (06/12/2013, 07/03) R-426924 Published in The Newport Miner June 12 and July 3, 2012. (19, 22)

_________________ 2013178 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON County of Pend Oreille Case No.: 13-7-00023-1 Notice and Summons by Publication (Termination) In re the Welfare of: Angelica Bepler D.O.B. 06/18/12 Minor Child. To: Samantha Melting, mother, A Petition to Terminate Parental Rights was filed on March 28, 2013; A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: July 25, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. at Pend Oreille County Superior Court, 229 S. Garden Ave., Newport WA 99156. YOU SHOULD BE PRESENT AT THIS HEARING. The hearing will determine if your parental rights to your child are terminated. If you do not appear at the hearing the court may enter an order in your absence terminating your parental rights. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Termination Petition, call DSHS at 509-447-6220. To view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www.atg.wa.gov/ TRM.aspx. Dated this 23rd day of May, 2013, by Tammie A. Ownbey, Pend Oreille County Clerk.

JULY 3, 2013 |

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Printed in The Newport Miner June 19, 26 and July 3, 2013, (20-3)

_________________ 2013195 LEGAL NOTICE LEADERS MEETING The Boards of Commissioners of the Port of Pend Oreille, Public Utility District No. 1 and Pend Oreille County will meet on Tuesday, July 9th at the Camas Wellness Center at Usk. The meeting will begin at noon. /s/ Kelly J. Driver, Manager /s/ Karen Willner Clerk of the Board /s/ Liz Braun Clerk of the Board Publish in The Newport Miner June 26 and July 3, 2013. (21-2) __________________ 2013201 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Pend Oreille Board of County Commissioners will hold a public hearing in their Meeting Room, 625 W. 4th, Newport, at 10:00am, July 16, 2013 on the matter of a road name change regarding renaming of a portion of Amber Lane to Moonbeam Court. If you require any reasonable accommodation to participate in the meeting, contact the Clerk of the Board at 509-447-4119, at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Published in The Newport June 26 and July 3, 2013. (21-2)

_________________ 2013208 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON

 FOR PEND OREILLE COUNTY

 No.13-4-00028-1

 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS

 (RCW 11.40.030)

 Estate of

 MILDRED M. LONG, 

 Deceased.

 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE

 The above Court has appointed me as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW I 1.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets.

 Date of First Publication of this Notice: June 26, 2013.
 
/s/ George R. Guinn

 George R. Guinn, Personal Representative

 Richards Law Office, PLLC
 605 East Holland Avenue, Suite 113 Spokane, Washington 99218-1246 Published in The Newport Miner June 26, July 3, 10 and 17, 2013. (21-4)

_________________ 2013184 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF PEND OREILLE Case No.: 13-7-00033-9

NOTICE AND SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION (Termination) In re the Welfare of: QUINN FLEMING D.O.B. 09/07/11 Minor Child. TO: Sunny Yow, mother; Dylan Fleming, alleged father; anyone claiming a paternal interest, A Petition to Terminate Parental Rights was filed on May 16, 2013 (Date); A Fact Finding hearing will be held on this matter on: July 25, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. at Pend Oreille County Superior Court, 229 S. Garden Ave., Newport, WA 99156. YOU SHOULD BE PRESENT AT THIS HEARING. The hearing will determine if your parental rights to your child are terminated. If you do not appear at the hearing the court may enter an order in your absence terminating your parental rights. To request a copy of the Notice, Summons, and Termination Petition, call DSHS at 509/447-6220. To view information about your rights in this proceeding, go to www.atg. wa.gov/TRM.aspx. DATED this 30th day of May, 2013, by Tammie A. Ownbey, Pend Oreille County Clerk. Published in The Newport Miner July 3, 10, and 17, 2013. (22-3)

_________________ 2013209 PUBLIC NOTICE Chippewa Water and Sewer District Commissioners monthly July meeting will be held Thursday, July 11, 2013 at 6:00 p.m. at the water office on McInnis Street. /s/ Karyn Lovell Karyn Lovell Clerk Published in The Newport Miner July 3, 2013. (22)

_________________

TY

2013210 REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS PEND OREILLE COUN-

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 2013 ROAD SALT

Proposals will be received by the County of Pend Oreille Public Works Office, located in the Pend Oreille County Courthouse at 625 West Fourth Street, Newport, Washington 99156 or P.O. Box 5040, Newport, Washington 99156, for furnishing ROAD SALT to the Pend Oreille County Road Department in the estimated quantity of 360 tons of 3% moisture or less, Type 2, Grade 2 ASTM-D 632-84. Price quoted shall be per ton, delivered using hopper or end dump trucks, as follows: 90 tons delivered to 9302 Deer Valley Road, Newport, WA 9810 90 tons delivered to 13571 Highway 211, Usk, WA 99180 180 tons delivered to 161 Sullivan Lake Road, Ione, WA 999139 Salt shall be delivered to these County Maintenance Shops, Monday through Thursday, 6:00am to 4:30pm on or before September 26, 2013 Proposals will be due no later than 10:00 AM Tuesday, July 30th, 2013. Proposals are to be submitted by Email, Fax or envelope as follows: 1. E-MAIL – Don Ramsey, dramsey@pendoreille. org and Teresa Brooks, tbrooks@pendoreille.org with “Proposal for ROAD SALT” in the subject line 2. Fax - (509) 447-5890 with “Proposal for ROAD SALT” in the subject line 3. Mail – Public Works Department, P.O. Box 5040, Newport, WA 99156 with “Proposal for ROAD SALT” on the envelope 4. Hand delivered Public Works Department, 625 West Fourth Street, Newport, WA 99156 with “Proposal for ROAD SALT” on the envelope. Information concerning submission of proposals is available from the Pend Oreille County Public Works Department at 625 W. 4th Street in Newport, Washington, 99156 or by phone at (509) 447-4513. Bids will be evaluated on total cost of road salt delivered to all three locations. Pend Oreille County reserves the right to reject any or all bids, to waive any informality in the bids and to accept such bid or

bids as may deemed in the best interest of Pend Oreille County. Published in The Newport Miner July 3 and 10, 2013. (22-2)

_________________ 2013217 PUBLIC HEARING The Board of Pend Oreille County Commissioners will have open public hearings to address proposed changes in ORV Ordinance 2006-2. These hearings will be held in the Courthouse County Commissioners’ meeting room on July 16th at 1:30pm, in the Ione Community Center on July 16th at 7pm and in the Cusick Community Center on July 17th at 7pm. The proposed changes would include opening all county roads to OHV travel, while maintaining a maximum 35 mph OHV speed limit or posted speed limit whichever is less. In addition, OHV’s would no longer be required to ride with 2 wheels on the shoulder as this has created a safety hazard. Finally, wording requiring the route to provide access to or between OHV recreation areas would be removed. The full text of the updated Ordinance will be mailed upon request. Written comment may be sent to the County Commissioners, PO Box 5025, Newport, WA 99156 or to /s/ Elizabeth Braun Elizabeth Braun, Clerk of the Board Published in The Newport Miner July 3, 2013. (22)

_________________ 2013218 NOTICE OF PRIMARY ELECTION AUGUST 6, 2013 PEND OREILLE COUNTY, WASHINGTON NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Primary Election in Pend Oreille County will be held on August 6, 2013 with the following registration deadlines for all precincts within Pend Oreille County, Washington: The last day for mail or online voter registrations and transfer of an existing registration to a new adCONTINUED ON 10B

2013212 2013 CALL FOR BIDS PEND OREILLE COUNTY UNLEADED GASOLINE, NO. 2 CLEAR DIESEL Sealed bids will be received by the Board of County Commissioners of Pend Oreille County, Washington, at their Office in the Courthouse at Newport, Washington, until 11:00 a.m., Monday July 22, 2013, and then publicly opened at 11:30 a.m., Monday July 22, 2013 and read for the Contract to furnish Unleaded Gasoline and Diesel Fuel to Pend Oreille County from August 1, 2013 to July 31, 2014. The following are estimated annual quantities: NEWPORT SHOP CUSICK SHOP IONE SHOP Unleaded Gasoline - 15,000 gals 20,000 gals 25,000 gals No. 2 Diesel Fuel - 40,000 gals 45,000 gals 40,000 gals Bids shall state Octane level “not to be less than 87 for unleaded fuel”, supplier margin and delivered, to County Storage Tanks at Newport, Cusick, and Ione, Washington. Bids shall include all cost per gallon including but not limited to freight/delivery charges. Tanks must be maintained at 40% of rated capacity. All deliveries are to be metered into the tank at the time of delivery by the supplier and Pend Oreille County reserves the right to draw random samples for testing of any delivery. Failure to provide samples or a failed test will result in immediate termination of Contract. The tanks at the Cusick and Ione Shops are above ground tanks which will require pumping capability to fill. If for any reason it does not become financially feasible or due to mechanical problems as a result of poor quality fuel, Pend Oreille County reserves the right to terminate the contract and acquire its fuel elsewhere. The current tank sizes at the County Shops are: LOCATION DIESEL UNLEADED GASOLINE Newport, Deer Valley Rd 12,000 gals 1,500 gals Cusick, Hwy 211 8,000 gals 1,500 gals Ione, Elizabeth Ave 8,000 gals 4,000 gals The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any or all bids, to waive any informality in the bids and to accept such bid or bids as may be deemed in the best interest of Pend Oreille County. BIDS MUST BE SUBMITTED IN DUPLICATE MAIL BIDS TO: Board of County Commissioners PO Box 5025 Newport, Washington 99156 With “Bid for Fuel” clearly stated on the left side of the envelope. A copy of the Bid Proposal may be obtained by contacting: Pend Oreille County Public Works Department, P.O. Box 5040, Newport, WA 99156, (509) 447-6456 tscribner@pendoreille.org Clerk of the Board Published in The Newport Miner June 26 and July 3, 2013. (21-2)


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Editor’s Note: The following are descriptions of people currently wanted by the Pend Oreille County Sheriff’s Office and other law enforcement agencies. Any information about these suspects should be directed to the sheriff’s office by calling 509-447-3151. This is a regular section of The Miner. All information is provided by the sheriff’s office.

Krisstarah T. Bennett, 22, of Newport is wanted on one Pend Oreille County warrant for failure to appear on original charges of malicious mischief Bennett third degree. She is 5 feet, 3 inches tall and weighs 150 pounds, with blue eyes and brown hair.

Gibbs

Cody D. Gibbs, 20, of Newport is wanted on three Pend Oreille County warrants for failure to appear on

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original charges of driving while suspended third degree. He is 6-foot-1 and 300 pounds with hazel eyes and brown hair.

The following cases were resolved in Pend Oreille County District Court by Judge Philip Van de Veer.

Christopher J. Williams, 28, of Usk is wanted on two Pend Oreille County warrants for failure to appear on original charges of criminal Williams trespass two degree and criminal solicitation. He is 6-foot-1 and 240 pounds with blue eyes and brown hair.

Peter Heinen, 64, was sentenced to 364 days in jail (345 suspended), 24 months probation and fined $5,000 ($5,000 suspended) for malicious mischief; $93 total fees. Michael Johns, 32, was sentenced to 364 days in jail (363 suspended), 24 months probation and fined $5,000 ($4,800 suspended) for malicious mischief; $593 total fees and fine. Beth Labelle, 47, was sentenced to 364 days in jail (364 suspended), 24 months probation and fined $5,000 ($4,800 suspended) for operating a vehicle without an ignition interlock; $593 total fees and fine.

Gabriel T, Hernandez-Richardson, 25, of Newport is wanted on one Pend Oreille County warrant for failure to comply on original Hernandez- charges of harassRichardson ment. He is 5-foot-9 and 235 pounds, with brown eyes and black hair.

May 15 Lyle Abrahamson, 31, was sentenced to 364 days in jail (360 suspended), 24 months proba-

7 p.m. - 508 Quail Loop, Newport Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. Cornerstone Building, Oldtown THURSDAY, JULY 4 Pancake Breakfast: 8-11 a.m. Usk Community Club Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. - Newport, 402 S. Washington Ave. Fourth of July Parade: 11 a.m. Laclede Fourth of July Parade: Noon Cusick Family Bingo: 1:30 p.m. - Cusick American Legion Fourth of July Celebration: 2 p.m. - Kalispel Indiand Reservation Boat Parade: 2 p.m. - Diamond Lake Fireworks Display: Dusk - Kalispel Reservation, Laclede, Spirit Lake, Diamond Lake, Priest River FRIDAY, JULY 5 Motorcycle Drag Races: Oldtown Blanchard TOPS: 8:30-10 a.m. Blanchard Community Church Oil Painting Class: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. - Create Arts Center PRM-Advocates for Women: 9:30-11 a.m. - Cornerstone Mall, Oldtown Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. - Newport, 402 S. Washington Ave. Story Time: 11 a.m. - Newport Library

T H E

SATURDAY, JULY 6 Motorcycle Drag Races: Oldtown Priest River American Legion Breakfast: 8-10:30 a.m. - VFW on Larch Street Pend Oreille Valley Farmers Market: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. - Newport, 240 N. Union Ave. Lavender Festival: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. - Newport City Park Women’s AA: 9:30 a.m. - Create Arts Center, Newport Friends of the Library Book Sale: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. - Priest River Library Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Newport, 402 S. Washington Ave. Priest River Legion Auxiliary: 11 a.m. - VFW Hall, Larch Street Angel Paws: Noon - Kelly’s Restaurant, call Janet at 509-4473541

|| CONTINUED FROM 9B dress will be Monday July 8, 2013. The last day for in-person registration (for an individual who is otherwise eligible to be a registered voter, is not currently registered in Washington State and has resided in Pend Oreille County for at least 30 days before the election) is July 29, 2013 at the Pend Oreille County Auditor’s Office, 625 W 4th Street in Newport. All registered voters in Pend Oreille County will be mailed a ballot on July 17 - 19, 2013. If you do not received a ballot or need a replacement ballot please contact the Auditor’s Office at (509) 447- 6472 or come in to the Auditor’s office. Ballots must postmarked no later than Election Day or ballots may be dropped off in the Pend Oreille County Auditor’s Office Monday – Friday 8:00 am until 4:30pm or on Election Day 8:00 am until 8:00 pm. 24 Hour Ballot drop-boxes are located in the alley behind the County Courthouse at 625 W 4th Street, Newport and between Library and Community Center at 112 N Central, Ione and will remain opened until 8:00pm Election Day. The Accessible Voting Unit will be available for use at the Pend Oreille County Auditor’s Office. For information regard-

ing assistance with voter registration, voting, or accessibility issues, please contact the election office at (509) 447-6472 or email lkrizenesky@pendoreille. org or log onto http://www. pendoreilleco.org/county/ elections.asp. A public meeting of the Pend Oreille County Canvassing Board will be held at 10:00 am August 20, 2013 to canvass and certify the Primary Election pursuant to RCW chapter 29A.60. This meeting will take place in the Pend Oreille County Courthouse at 625 W. 4th Street, Newport. The following offices will have candidates appear on the ballot: STATE State Senator, Legislative District 7, Partisan office (1 Year Unexpired Term) *Ferry, Okanogan, Pend Oreille, Spokane, Stevens* Pend Oreille County County Commissioner Position 2, Partisan office (1 Year Unexpired Term) LOCAL Fire District 2 Commissioner Position 1, Nonpartisan office (2 Year Unexpired Term) /s/ Marianne Nichols Marianne Nichols, Auditor and Supervisor of Elections Pend Oreille County, Washington Published in The New-

port Miner July 3, 2013. (22)

_________________ 2013221 ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Town of Ione Biosolids Removal & Disposal Project Sealed bids will be received until 1:00 pm, July 25, 2013, at the Ione Town Hall, 207 Houghton (P.O. Box 498), Ione, WA, 99139, at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read aloud. This project provides for the removal of biosolids by dredging from the Ione wastewater treatment facility lagoons. The project will also include screening, dewatering, hauling and disposal of the biosolids, all in accordance with the Contract Documents. Each proposal must be submitted on the prescribed form and accompanied by cash, a certified check, cashier’s check, or bid bond, payable to the Town of Ione, in an amount not less than five percent (5%) of the amount bid. The successful bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and payment bond, each in the full amount of the contract price. The Contractor will be allowed twenty (20) working days to complete the Base Bid work. Ten (10)

May 22

W E E K

Dance Classes: 5:30-6:30 p.m. Create Arts Center, Newport Davis Lake Grange: 6 p.m. - Davis Lake Grange Two Old Broads Present the Music of World War II: 6:30 p.m. - Circle Moon Theater Al-Anon: 7-8 p.m. - Priest River, 119 Main St., Suite 204, Room 16, Call Jan 208-946-6131 Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting: 7 p.m. - Priest River VFW Open Mic: 7-9:30 p.m. - Pend Oreille Playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave., Newport

PU B LI C

additional working days will be awarded with the additive alternate work. Contract documents may be examined at the following locations: 1. Ione Town Hall, 207 Houghton, Ione, WA, 99139 2. Century West Engineering, 11707 E Montgomery Dr., Spokane Valley, WA 99206 3. Associated General Contractors, 4935 E. Trent, Spokane, WA 99212 4. Spokane Regional Plan Center, 209 N. Havana, Spokane, WA 99202 5. Associated Builders and Contractors, 12310 E. Mirabeau Pkwy Ste 100, Spokane Valley, WA 99216 Contract documents may be procured from Century West Engineering upon payment of a $30.00 non-refundable plan fee for each set (postage not included). For information regarding the proposed work, contact Bryan Hicks of Century West Engineering at (509) 838-3810. This project is partially funded through the Washington State Community Development Block Grant Program with federal funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. All work performed will be subject to federal or state prevailing wage rates, whichever are higher. Award of the construction contract is contingent upon approval

D I ST R I C T

tion and fined $5,000 ($4,800 suspended) for third degree driving while license suspended; $593 total fees and fines. Andrew Barnes, 28, was sentenced to 90 days in jail (89 suspended) and fined $1,000 ($750 suspended) for third degree driving while suspended; $542 total fees and fine. Monte Green, 51, was sentenced to 90 days in jail (90 suspended) 12 months probation and fined $1,000 ($750 suspended) for third degree driving while license suspended; $543 total fees and fines. Shaylin Hooper, 20, was sentenced to 364 days in jail (184 suspended), 24 months probation and fined $5,000 ($5,000 suspended) for third degree theft; $1,243 total fees and fine. James Lowry, 40, was sentenced to 364 days in jail (154 suspended) and fined $250 for fourth degree assault; $543 total fees and fine.

May 8

|| WEDNESDAY, JULY 3 Rotary Club: 7:15 a.m. - Oldtown Rotary Park Overeaters Anonymous: 7:30 a.m. - Pineridge Community Church, 1428 W. First St., Newport, use back entrance Newport TOPS: 9 a.m. - Newport Eagles Fiber Arts Knitting and Spinning Group: 9 a.m. - Create Arts Center, Newport Computer Basics for Adults: 10 a.m. to Noon - Newport Library Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Newport, 402 S. Washington Ave. Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Blanchard Library Weight Watchers: 11 a.m. Weigh in and 11:30 to Noon meeting - Camas Center for Community Wellness, Usk Al-Anon: Noon - American Lutheran Church Pinochle: 1 p.m. - Priest River Senior Center Jessa’s Creative Dance Class: 4 p.m. - Create Arts Center Alcoholics Anonymous: 5:45 p.m. - Cornerstone Building, Oldtown Calispel Post 217: 6 p.m. - American Legion in Cusick Priest River TOPS: 6 p.m. - Priest River Free Methodist Church Priest River Animal Rescue: 6 p.m. - 1710 9th St., Priest River BASIC Meeting: 6 p.m. - Blanchard Community Center Pend Oreille Rock and Gem Club:

THE MINER

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Joshua Collin, 23, was sentenced to 31 days in jail, 24 months probation and fined $5,000 ($4,500 suspended) for reckless driving; $1,743 total fees and fine. Sampson Pagaling, 28, was sentenced to 364 days in jail (346 suspended) 24 months probation and fined $5,000 ($4,800) for fourth degree assault; $1,443 total fees and fine.

May 29 Robert P. Clark, 44, was sentenced to 364 days in jail (363 suspended) 24 months probation and fined $5,000 ($4,750 suspended) for reckless endangerment; $1,743 total fees and fine. Jacob Conner, 22, was sentenced to 75 days in jail fourth degree assault domestic violence; $200 total fees. Derrick Hughes, 22, was sentenced to 364 days in jail (331 suspended) 24 months probation and fined $5,000 ($4,500 suspended) for fourth degree assault domestic violence; $843 total fees and fine.

Adelaide McGillis, 28, was sentenced to 90 days in jail (60 suspended) 12 months probation and fined $1,000 ($900 suspended) for each of two counts of third degree driving while license suspended; $1,086 total fees and fines. Jeffery Taylor, 57, was sentenced to 90 days in jail (90 suspended) and fined $1,000 ($1,000 suspended) for third degree driving while license suspended; $143 total fees and fines.

June 5 Tavis Davis, 29, was sentenced to 364 days in jail (284 suspended) 60 months probation and fined $5,000 ($3,300 suspended) for driving under the influence with a blood alcohol count over .15; $4,201 total fees and fines. Thomas McCaffrey, 19, was sentenced to 365 days in jail (335 suspended) 60 months probation and fined $1,200 for driving under the influence with a blood alcohol count over .15; $2,800 total fees and fines.

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A H E A D

Happy Agers Card Party: 1 p.m. Priest River Senior Center AA Meeting: 5 p.m. - Cornerstone Building, Selkirk Way, Oldtown Set Free Northwest Meal and Worship: 6:30 p.m. - Conerstone Building Behind Ace Hardware, Oldtown Two Old Broads Present the Music of World War II: 6:30 p.m. - Circle Moon Theater SUNDAY, JULY 7 Dharma Day: 9:45 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sravasti Abbey, Newport Lavender Festival: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. - Newport City Park Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Newport, 402 S. Washington Ave. Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. Cornerstone Building, Oldtown MONDAY, JULY 8 Country Breakfast: 7-11 a.m. Blanchard Community Center Evergreen Art Association: 10 a.m. - Riverbank Restaurant Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. - Newport, 402 S. Washington Ave. Hospitality House Senior Potluck - Noon - Newport Habitat for Humanity: 6 p.m. - Sandifur Room, Newport Hospital Young Lives Club for Pregnant and Teen Moms: 6 p.m. - Hospitality House, Newport. Call 208-691-2920

N OT I C E S

CO U R T

Priest River Lions: 6:30 p.m. Priest River Senior Center Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. Blanchard Community Church Blanchard Grange Meeting: 7 p.m. - Blanchard Grange Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. - Pend Oreille Bible Church in Cusick TUESDAY, JULY 9 Blanchard Stitchers Quilting Group: 10 a.m. - Blanchard Inn Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Newport, 402 S. Washington Ave. Writers Group: 2 p.m. - Create Arts Center Jessa’s Creative Dance Class: 4 p.m. - Create Arts Center Weight Watchers: 5:30-6 p.m. Weigh in and 6 p.m. meeting Pineridge Community Church, 1428 W. First St., Newport Pinochle: 6 p.m. - Calispel Valley Library, Cusick Belly Dance Fitness: 6:30-7:30 p.m. - Create Arts Center, Newport Bingo: 6:30 p.m. - Newport Eagles Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. St. Anthony’s Church Spirit Lake Lodge No. 57: 8 p.m. Spirit Lake WEDNESDAY, JULY 10 Rotary Club: 7:15 a.m. - Oldtown Rotary Park Overeaters Anonymous: 7:30 a.m. - Pineridge Community Church,

1428 W. First St., Newport, use back entrance Newport TOPS: 9 a.m. - Newport Eagles Fiber Arts Knitting and Spinning Group: 9 a.m. - Create Arts Center, Newport Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Newport, 402 S. Washington Ave. Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Blanchard Library Weight Watchers: 11 a.m. Weigh in and 11:30 to Noon meeting - Camas Center for Community Wellness, Usk Priest River Lioness: 11:30 a.m. Priest River Senior Center Al-Anon: - Noon - American Lutheran Church Home and Community Educators Diamond Lake Club: - Noon - Call Billie Goodno at 509-4473781 or Chris King at 208-4370971 Weavers’ Group - Noon to 3:30 p.m. - Create Arts Center Pinochle: 1 p.m. - Priest River Senior Center Jessa’s Creative Dance Class: 4 p.m. - Create Arts Center Alcoholics Anonymous: 5:45 p.m. - Cornerstone Building, Oldtown Priest River TOPS: 6 p.m. - Priest River Free Methodist Church Spirit Lake Historical Society: 6:30 p.m. - Call 208-665-5921 for locations Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. Cornerstone Building, Oldtown

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by the funding agency. The Town shall have the right to reject any or all bids not accompanied by bid security or data required by the bidding document or a bid in any way incomplete or irregular. The Town of Ione is an Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action Employer. Certified Disadvantaged Business Enterprise firms are encouraged to submit bids. /s/ Sandy Hutchinson Sandy Hutchinson Town Clerk/Treasurer Published in The Newport Miner July 3 and 10, 2013. (22-2)

_________________ 2013223 SALE OF TIMBER SEYMOUR SEYMOUR TIMBER SALE ADVERTISEMENT Kalispel Indian Reservation- Usk, WA. Sealed bids, in duplicate, on forms provided therefore, marked outside “Proposal for Timber, Seymour Seymour Timber Sale” addressed to the Kalispel Tribe P.O.B. 39 Usk, WA. 99180 Attn: Forestry, will be received until 1:00pm local time July 17, 2013 or hand delivered to the Kalispel Tribal Office on the Kalispel Indian Reservation (1981 N. Leclerc Rd.) in Usk, WA. for the

purchase of merchantable timber designated for removal. This timber sale contains approximately 40 acres with 11 acres to be logged, with an estimated volume of 62,000 board feet of sawlogs 5.5 inches DIB and greater scaling diameter on a sixteen foot log. Species consisting of 25,531 board feet of Grand fir, 3,538 board feet of Western Larch, 5,661 board feet of Hemlock, 640 board feet of Doug fir, 2,480 board feet of Lodgepole pine, 1,550 board feet of White pine, 13,535 board feet of W.Red Cedar and 8,632 board feet of Ponderosa Pine will be cut and hauled. The above volume estimates are not guaranteed. Each bidder must state the price per thousand board feet per bid group (Scribner Decimal “C” log scale) that will be paid for sawlogs cut and scaled. No bids of less than $268.48 per thousand board feet for Doug fir/Western Larch sawlogs, $259.08 per thousand board feet for Grand fir/Hemlock/Lodgepole sawlogs, $240.28 per thousand board feet of White Pine sawlogs, $607.83 per thousand board feet Western Red Cedar sawlogs, and $185.03 per thousand board feet for Ponderosa Pine sawlogs will be accepted. This sale is a fixed rate, or unadjusted stump-

age rate sale. Removal of Smallwood Products will be charged at stated fixed rates based on tonnage. If these products are removed, weight will be by certified scales only. No estimates for these products were performed. Minimum bid rates for All Species Hew Wood <4”DIB is $20.00 per ton and All species Pulp/Chip wood <4’DIB is $5.00 per ton. Bid deposits in the form of a certified check, cashier’s check, bank draft, irrevocable letter of credit, or postal money order made payable to the Kalispel Tribe, or cash in the amount of $_1500.00______ must accompany each sealed bid. The deposit of the apparent highest bidder and of others who submit written requests to have their bids considered for acceptance will be retained pending acceptance or rejection of the bids. All other deposits will be returned following completion of the bidding. The deposit of the successful bidder will be applied as part of the purchase price against timber cut on this logging unit, or retained a liquidated damages if the bidder fails to execute the contract and furnish a satisfactory performance bond in the amount of $_3000.00______ within 30 days of the acceptance of the bid and/or

before logging operations commence, whichever is sooner. The performance bond may be in the form of an irrevocable letter of credit, cash, or negotiable United States Securities or other form acceptable to the BIA SuperintendentSpokane Agency. The right to waive technical defects and to reject any and all bids is reserved. Payments and deposits shall be by electronic funds transfer at the purchaser’s bank through the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to the Treasury Department using instructions furnished separately by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Payments and deposits are due on the date specified using instructions furnished separately by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Before bids are submitted full information concerning the timber, road requirements, conditions of sale, use of irrevocable letter of credit, and the submission of bids should be obtained from the Kalispel Tribe, POB. 39 Usk, WA. 99180. Sale information including the prospectus and bid package may be obtained from the Kalispel Tribe-Forestry Dept. POB 39, Usk, WA. 99180 or by calling 509-445-1147 XT: 7284. Published in The Newport Miner July 3, 2013. (22)


July 3, 2013 Newport Miner