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THE VOICE OF PEND OREILLE COUNT Y SINCE 1901

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

www.pendoreillerivervalley.com

Volume 110, Number 18 | 2 Sections, 20 Pages

Stolen vehicles seized in raid

Todds arrested again; drugs, guns found at compound BY DON GRONNING OF THE MINER

NEWPORT – More than 50 law enforcement officers descended on a location just off Stohr Road, near Spring Valley Road south of Newport early Tuesday morning, June 4, to serve a search warrant. “We have two in custody, recovered several stolen vehicles, uncovered a marijuana grow operation and found meth and guns,” Washington State Patrol Trooper Kyle Witt said. Arrested were Walter “Randy” Todd, 49, and

Robert Patrick Todd, 47. They are charged with possession of stolen property. More charges are expected, Pend Oreille County Sheriff Alan Botzheim said. The search uncovered a number of stolen vehicles, ATVs and snowWalter R. mobiles. “Randy” Washington State Patrol’s auto Todd, 1998 theft unit led the search. It included a helicopter, at least two SWAT teams and five tactical vehicles, bomb sniffing dogs and hazardous materials teams. All of Stohr Road was closed for a time, and as The Miner went to press, a hazardous materials truck was

still at the property Tuesday afternoon. People were awakened to the sound of a helicopter and explosions early Tuesday morning, said one resident who didn’t want to be identified. Witt said explosion may have been flash bangs used by law enforcement. The two people arrested were arrested without incident, he said, and there was no gunfight. There were a number of agencies involved in the raid, including Pend Oreille County, Bonner County, Kootenai County, Spokane County, the U.S. Border Patrol, as well as WSP. A stolen car recovered by Pend Oreille County SEE RAID, 2A

Players begin campaign for building NEWPORT – With the goal of purchasing the theater the group now calls home, the Pend Oreille Players Association has launched a capital campaign to raise the $80,000 down payment to purchase the $300,000 building. The former feed store at 240 N. Union Ave. has been known as “The Playhouse” since the Players moved in around 2008. Since then they’ve hosted plays, workshops, theatre camps, open mic nights, farmers markets and more. POPA member Danny Littowitz of Newport hopes POPA can continue offering a place for the arts. “It’s gratifying to contact a playwright and notify him or her that their submission has been selected to be performed by The Pend Oreille Players in our One Act Play Festival. Or watch the growth of a young actress or actor in a youth production of ‘The Wizard of Oz,’” he said. The Pend Oreille Players Players (POPA) rent the space through a long-term lease agreement. Recently the owner of the building decided to put it up for sale when

SEE POPA, 2A

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Nurses contract heads to mediation BY FRED WILLENBROCK AND DON GRONNING OF THE MINER

NEWPORT – Fifty-seven nurses and the administration of the Newport Hospital District have reached the point where they need a mediator to try and help them reach an agreement on the terms of a new two-year contract. The registered nurses last two-year contract ended Dec. 31, 2012. Sue Johnson, one of the nurses negotiating for Service Employees International Union Local 1199, says the nurses want to

keep negotiating. “We would have been happy to meet again, but they don’t want to,” Johnson said. Since the SEIU representatives and the administration negotiator began talking about the contract when it ended in January, they have moved closer on wage increase amounts. But apparently they haven’t been able to finalize the agreement. At the last hospital board meeting, about 50 nurses and supporters attended to tell the hospital district board that they didn’t feel the administration

SEE NURSES, 2A

Pike netting wraps up for year two of three BY JANELLE ATYEO OF THE MINER

COURTESY PHOTO|CHRIS DEMLOW

Newport exchange student Wintang Warastri performs a dance from her native Indonesia during the senior showcase at the Pend Oreille Playhouse May 19. She also acted in “Thoroughly Modern Millie,” and “Alice in Wonderland” during the past Players season.

USK – The Pend Oreille River water is warming and rising, making it a good time to wrap up the northern pike netting program for the year. This is the second year of a three-year project to reduce the pike population in the Pend Oreille below Albeni dam. The overall goal is to reduce the pike population by 87 percent. It took two rounds of suppres-

sion netting in the north end of the river to reach targets this year. In the first round of netting, 5,945 pike were removed throughout the reservoir, according to Nick Bean, biologist for the Kalispel Natural Resources Department. After that, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the tribe did the spring index netting (SPIN) survey to gauge the pike population. The target for the catch in the

SEE PIKE, 2A

County planning for parks Parks board seeks public opinion on park usage, funding BY JANELLE ATYEO OF THE MINER

NEWPORT – The 80-degree highs this weekend will be beckoning people outside. The county wants to know just how you’ll be recreating and ways you think the area’s offerings could be improved. This month, Pend Oreille County residents and visitors alike are being asked by the county parks and recreation board to provide opinions about outdoor recreation needs and desires by filling out a survey. “We want to know what activities they’re interested in,” said Dixie Chichester, a consultant who is helping the park

board devise a new comprehensive plan. Find the survey online version at http://pendoreilleco.org/county/survey.asp. Paper surveys are available at all four libraries (in Newport, Cusick, Ione and Metaline Falls) as well as at the county’s community development department in the basement of the old courthouse in Newport. Upper level students in the three school districts in the county will have the opportunity to fill out a special “Fun in the Out of Doors” survey for youth. “These are very important surveys and will give people the chance to let us know what types of outdoor recreation they want provided by Pend Oreille County,” said Sam Nicholas, chairman of the parks and recreation board. The survey questions range from gath-

ering opinions on how the park board should focus its efforts at Pend Oreille County Park – building trails, improving restrooms and campsites, building a picnic shelter, organizing nature hikes – to how the county should fund its parks. Earlier this spring, the county commissioners and some other key players did an ORV tour of some motorized recreation areas. The Batey Bould motorcycle track was included in that tour, as well as some county-owned riverfront land near the Edgewater Campground that could be developed for motorized trails. The trails at Batey Bould are in rough shape, said Mike Lithgow, county commuCOURTESY PHOTO|ANGELA CAIN nity development director. The U.S. Forest Selkirk High School students Dave Cronoble, left, and Dominc Cain stand with the picnic tables they made as a class project. The materials were provided by the county park board, and Seattle City Light crews SEE COUNTY, 2A trucked them to Pend Oreille County Park along Highway 2 May 23.

|| Republicans holding town hall meeting CUSICK – Everyone is invited to a town hall meeting with their Washington state representatives Saturday, June 8, at 10 a.m. at the American Legion Hall in Cusick. Sen. John Smith, Rep. Shelly Short and Rep. Joel Kretz will discuss the legislative session and other issues. The Pend Oreille County Republican party is organizing the meeting because the three were unable to attend their Lincoln Day dinner due to the legislative agenda. Cookies and coffee will be served.

Spray park opening June 14 NEWPORT – The new spray park at Newport City Park will be open the first day school is out for the sum-

B R I E F LY

mer, Friday, June 14. The park is more simplified than the original conceptual drawings showed. Early plans were to use a pond theme with sprayers designed to look like frogs and lily pads. Instead, the park has three colored poles and a number of in-ground fountains – making 18 water features in all. “This is a very conservative splash park,” city administrator Ray King said, adding that the other design would have been cost prohibitive. “The fact that the city went to the effort to get something like that put in is commendale,” he said. Half of the $200,000 project was funded through the state’s Recreation and Conservation Office through the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program.

||

The city’s half came mostly from in-kind work, materials and staff labor, plus about $45,000 from the city’s reserves. The spray park will open at 10 or 11 a.m. each day and shut down at 7 p.m. Signs will warn that no pets, bikes or skateboards are allowed in the fenced area.

Council discusses parks plan NEWPORT – The Newport city council reviewed the assets it has in its city parks during the May 20 regular meeting. They updated rules for the downtown T.J. Kelly Park and Newport City Park. The rules note that the parks are available for reservations with a written application,

a $35 reservation fee and $50 damage deposit. No horses or farm animals are allowed in the parks, and no overnight camping is allowed in T.J. Kelly Park, which opened in 2010 after an EPA Superfund cleanup project. The council also updated the parks and recreation plan originally adopted in 2010. Future improvements include adding ADA accessible parking and sidewalks at Little People’s Park on the south side of town, adding more picnic tables and putting them on a concrete slab, modernizing the playground equipment, adding a drinking fountain, and putting up a fourth side of fencing. At the city park, the goal is to refurbish the picnic tables and add two ADA accessible tables with sidewalks.

SPORTS 2B - RECORD 4B - POLICE 4B - OPINION 4A - CLASSIFIEDS 6B-10B - PUBLIC NOTICES 8B-10B - DOWN RIVER 9A - LIFE 1B - OBITUARIES 4B


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|JUNE 5, 2013

The Newport Miner Serving Pend Oreille County, WA

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Pend Oreille County Sheriff Doug Malby raided the compound of Walter “Randy” Todd at 395 Stohr Road, where they found a pipe bomb, other explosives and several loaded firearms, along with a meth lab. In August 1997, 90 law enforcement officers and helicopters descended on the compound thinking they would find a meth lab. They didn’t find anything and

FROM PAGE 1

Sheriff deputies led to the search warrant, Botzheim said. “A couple weeks ago we came up with a stolen vehicle that we shared with the Washington State Patrol,” Botzheim said Tuesday morning. He said he thought the search would continue all day. The area has been the site of a raid before. In January 1998, then

no charges were filed. Botzheim was a Pend Oreille County deputy when that raid occurred. He said the thing that was nice about Tuesday’s raid was that it was planned outside Pend Oreille County, reducing the chance word would get out ahead of time. He said Pend Oreille County has been working closely with WSP’s auto theft unit.

PARKS | County looks at funding options FROM PAGE 1

Service maintains the parking area and restroom facilities there, as they own the land where the trail is. “We have a vested interest that it continues to be functional,” Lithgow said. They also toured the Rustler’s Gulch area last month, property that became county parkland in recent years. The county is pursing a grant to build an equestrian trail on the property. The county would use its money that’s earmarked for paths and trails. The fund totals about $90,000 right now. State law requires counties set aside a portion of their state road funding for capital projects used just for alternative transportation methods. It amounts to just a little money every year, Lithgow said, but it has been accumulating. The total project will cost more than $200,000. The grant application is due this week. Commissioners gave their unanimous approval of the project Monday. Chairman Mike Manus said they requested letters of support from the area ATV clubs as

well as the equestrian groups. “We need to include everybody. That’s going to help make it go,” he said. The board of commissioners has been discussing other ways to fund parks, including possibly using a percentage of logging revenue on lands countywide to support parks. Currently, logging on the new Rustler’s Gulch park land is the biggest support for the parks budget. Lithgow noted it would better protect the parks fund if parks didn’t have to rely on revenue from just that one section. “The commissioners seem very supportive of parks,” he said. “They all see the value of having a lot of recreation opportunities for the county. Hopefully we can have a sustainable fund.” The park budget currently totals about $260,000. Lithgow hopes to use that to leverage some grants. Some other improvements have been underway at Pend Oreille County Park along Highway 2. A new vault toilet is being installed in the campground area, and Selkirk students Dave Cronoble and Dominc Cain built new picnic tables as a class project. The materials

were provided by the county park board, and Seattle City Light crews trucked them to the park May 23. For the first time since 2006, the county is in the midst of updating its comprehensive parks and recreation plan, this time with the help of Chichester. She has a degree in recreation resources from Colorado State University. She said they’re in the midst of taking an inventory of park lands the county owns, as well as state, federal and private park areas in the vicinity. The survey will be one component that helps guide that plan. Town hall meetings will be held in August. Once approved by the county and the state, the plan will allow the board to apply for grants through the State Recreation and Conservation Funding Board, helping to fund parks and recreation projects in the county. The park board hopes to have the first draft of the comprehensive plan to the county commissioners by fall. Those with questions or if you need further information about the survey, call Lithgow at 509-4476457.

PIKE | Tribe, state: Bass bycatch minimal PikePalooza draws 80 anglers USK – Part of the pike suppression efforts was the PikePalooza fishing derby, held May 17-19. As a special bonus, the tribe tagged one pike in the reservoir, and it was caught by Craig Moody of Elk, earning him a $1,000 cash prize. Despite the rainy, cool wet weather, more than 80 anglers participated in the derby, and

amongst 26 of them, they landed 40 pike. Four anglers each captured three pike each and shared the prize for most pike caught. Jim Volquardsen of Metaline Falls, Aaron Hall of Colville, Taylor Massengale of Usk, and Adam Cesal of Spokane, each received $612 in prize money. Jim Volquardsen earned $700

for landing the largest pike, a 30 incher. Eleven-year-old Janessa Porter of Bonners Ferry won the $350 award for smallest pike by catching an 11.5-inch fish. The unsettled weather and high water created tough fishing conditions, but many anglers commented that they are looking forward to next year’s derby.

FROM PAGE 1

50 fish a day. That’s a significant change from their first round of netting when they were pulling in up to 300 pike a day. After next year’s netting effort, the third and final year of the study, the state and the tribe will look at where the overall population is at through the SPIN survey and determine what to do for the future. “The goal is not to see a rebound. We don’t want to have to go through this again,” Bean said, referring to the suppression netting. He hopes the pike will be kept in check at that point and not have a population explosion again. “We don’t know if that’s possible at this point.” Also next year, they’ll do the warm water fish survey, which is conducted every three to four years. Using electro fishing, will give a snapshot of the entire fish population in the reservoir, and how pike has impacted other species. Anglers have been critical of the study, not only for getting rid of a popular pike sport fishery, but for what the netting could do to the bass population, another angler favorite. Bean said the bycatch in the gill nets hasn’t been significant. The nets aren’t set up to capture bass effectively due to their different body size, he said, and they also come out

of the net easily. “We’ve heard rumors of thousands of bass caught in the gill nets. That’s just not true,” Bean said. In Phase 1 of the suppression netting, they captured 251 large mouth bass and 40 small mouths. Bean said they saw a greater than 90 percent survival rate for all species released from the net, and bass are no different. WDFW biologist Bill Baker said the number of bass they saw was relatively low compared to other species: bullhead, tench and yellow perch. He pointed out that reducing the number of pike should benefit bass and that benefit will outweigh the cost of using gill nets. As the water warms, more bass will be around. Bean said it was also a benefit that they started the suppression netting earlier this year. The overall bycatch was significantly less this year, by several thousands fish. It also helped avoid a lot of the spawning fish, especially tench, which are difficult to deal with in the gill nets. He said they’ll start netting as early as they can in the coming year too, as early as the environment will let them. This year, early in the season, pike were already starting to congregate at the edge of the ice in the sloughs.

south end of the reservoir and the sloughs, from Riverbend to Oldtown, was 1.73 pike per net. The actual catch in the SPIN survey was under that target: 1.21 fish per net. Prior to the suppression efforts, biologists were catching 13.7 fish per net. “That’s a lot of fish,” Bean said. “That’s a pretty significant population in the system.” He’s happy to see the lower numbers. “It’s a good indication we’ve made a significant dent in the population,” he said. The north end hasn’t had as many pike in the past, and it doesn’t have the same habitat where pike really thrive. That gave them a lower target from Riverbend, north to Boundary Dam: less than a half a fish for every net. But the SPIN survey came up with 1.44 fish per net. That triggered round two of netting for the northern end. Starting the week of May 20, crews did a single day of netting at each of the primary locations that are support pike, moving upstream from Ione. “We just want to make sure in the few areas they’re in, that they don’t expand out,” Bean said. He said they were catching 40 to

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Fiber update meeting June 11

RAID | Compound also raided in 1998

LE T T E R S POLIC Y We welcome letters to the editor. Letters should be typed and submitted to The Miner and Gem State Miner office no later than 5 p.m. Friday for publication the following Wednesday. No letter will be published unless it is signed by at least one individual, even if the letter represents the view of a group. The letter must include a telephone number and address for confirmation of authenticity. Letters should be no longer than 300 words. The Miner reserves the right to edit to conform to our publication style, policy and libel laws. Political letters will not be published the last issue prior an election. Letters will be printed as space allows.

THE NEWPORT MINER

NEWPORT – Pend Oreille Public Utility district commissioners will meet with general manager John Jordan Tuesday, June 11, at 8 a.m. in their board room to discuss the fiber optic project in south Pend Oreille county. About 25 retail customers have

PUD holds off on rate increase decision NEWPORT – The Pend Oreille Public Utility District commissioners held a public hearing Tuesday afternoon, June 4, to take comments on a proposed 2 percent rate increase. They decided to table any action until their June 25 meeting. Three members of the public attended and spoke about irrigation rates and supporting agriculture, taking into account the impact

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Source: National Weather Service and Accuweather.com, Newport, WA

on Ponderay Newsprint and questioned when the fiber system would be able to support itself. The board asked staff to come to the next meeting with a new resolution amending the increase for irrigation and possibly lowering the overall increase to 1.95 percent. New rates would be effective July 1.

NURSES | Wages $26.68 FROM PAGE 1

was negotiating in good faith. Hospital District Chief Executive Officer Tom Wilbur said they have offered increases but are also watching the impact on their bottom line. He noted that without tax revenue and other special government subsidies they would lose money. He also noted that with the health care reform measures and federal budget cuts beginning to hit them they must be extra careful about increasing expenses. Seventy percent of the hospital district’s expenses are from the cost of salaries and benefits. Their current offer on the table would cost the district about $100,000 more than in the 2013 budget. Both offers will be retroactive to January 2013. Formal negotiations didn’t begin until then, when the last contract ended. Johnson said that negotiations couldn’t have started any sooner than November. The SEIU lost a negotiator and couldn’t start before January, she said. Currently starting wages for registered nurses are $26.68 per hour with the highest earning $40.25 per hour. The hospital district is offering across the board increases of 2 percent in 2013 and 1.5 percent in 2014. They are also adjusting the automatic annual longevity based step increases. When adding the two together, registered nurses wages will increase from 8.1 percent to 10.3 percent over the next 21 months. The hospital district offer has made adjustments to the step scale increase they say

will make them closer to market wage rates for the various levels of experience. Their step increase offer goes from about 2.5 percent in the first year to 1 percent in the 26th year. The nurses union is asking for a 3 percent increase starting in January 2013, then another 3 percent increase starting in July. For the second year of the contract they are asking for a 2 percent increase. Their step increase proposal is the same as the current contract, starting at 2.4 percent and going to 1 percent. Also at the heart of negotiations has been finding the average rate of nurses’ wages for hospital districts that are similar to Newport’s size and other characteristics. While Newport administration says the new offer will make them competitive when considering all the factors such as benefits and workload, the nurses aren’t so sure. Both sides have presented their data to support their positions. Wilbur said Tuesday that he isn’t sure when the mediation will begin but points out that it isn’t binding on either side. He hopes they will come to agreement soon. Wilbur said he plans to attend the mediation and any future negotiations. The nurses see Wilbur’s absence at negotiations or when a decision needs to be made as a sign of disrespect. Johnson said that she doesn’t think the hospital is in any hurry to settle. While any settlement will be retroactive, that won’t compound, she said.

POPA | Watch video online FROM PAGE 1

the lease expires in November. Now that the opportunity to own the building has become a possibility, the POPA board has determined that it makes good fiscal sense to move toward purchasing at this time. The driving force behind this decision is to ensure both longterm operation and fiscal stability for the organization. Owning the building will open up new grant opportunities that could further improve the building and program offerings. POPA is now looking to the community and lovers of the arts everywhere for help with the capi-

T H I S W E E K’S FO R EC A ST

Wednesday Thursday

been connected so far, mostly in the Sacheen Lake and Fertile Valley area. Community Network System Manager Joe Onley said they have been evaluating the budget. The project will probably go over its budget, he said, and they’re trying to implement an approach to keep costs down.

May 28 29 30 31 1 2 3

tal campaign. The organization is starting with a goal of reaching $80,000 for the down payment and initial costs to purchase The Playhouse. The group has until November to raise this amount. Contributions may be made at the Playhouse, on the POPA website at www.pendoreilleplayers. com or via their video at Indiegogo.com (http://igg.me/at/PendOre illePlayhouse/x/3319577). For additional questions regarding POPA, The Playhouse, and this capital campaign, contact POPA Board President Donna Maki at 509-445-1062. All donations are tax deductible to Pend Oreille Players Association, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization.

L A ST W E E K

High 67 61 66 62 66 72 62

Low Precip. 50 .05” 47 .01” 48 .01” 44 .01” 41 - 43 - 44 .17” Source: Albeni Falls Dam

L A ST Y E A R The weather of last year was warm and stormy, with thunderstorms and showers all week.


THE MINER



JUNE 5, 2013|

Christmas tree search is on

BR I E FLY Agencies practice firefighting

USK – About 90 firefighters took part in a practice session with live fire Saturday, June 1, near the Camas Center in Usk. The multi-agency two-day practice session gave firefighters a chance to practice wildfire fighting techniques. Firefighters from U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Kalispel Tribe, Spokane Tribe and Spokane County and Pend Oreille County fire districts participated in the two-day drill. The first day’s drill was Thursday, May 30 in Airway Heights.

Safe boating class this weekend SACHEEN LAKE – Free safe boating classes will be offered Saturday and Sunday, June 8 and 9 at the Sacheen fire station. Each day will be one complete class. Registration for the free class will take place at 8 a.m., with the class over by 3 p.m. People are asked to bring a sack lunch. To register, call Charlie Schaefer at 509-447-2279.

Invasive grass topic of hay tour USK – Area hay growers are invited to attend a field tour of test plots in the Usk area Thursday, June 13, demonstrating potential strategies for management of an emerging invasive annual grass, Ventenata dubia or North Africa grass, in timothy hayfields. The program will be from 1-4 p.m., and is funded by Western Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program through a collaboration of University of Idaho, Oregon State University, Washington State University, and Natural Resource Conservation Service. The agenda includes an update on the biology of Ventenata, fertilizer trial results, integrated pest management studies on fertilization, cutting height and herbicides, and an herbicide registration update. An additional tour will be held in Latah County June 19, and will feature Ventenata management in pasture and conservation reserve program areas. Space is limited for each tour, and participants need to RSVP by June 7 to guarantee space. Call 208-885-9246 to leave a message with name, number of participants and tour title. Restrooms and refreshments will be provided.  Directions to the field site and tour flyers are available through the WSU Pend Oreille County Extension Office, 418 S. Scott Ave., 509447-2401.

Newport man airlifted following rollover PRIEST RIVER – A 22-yearold Newport man was airlifted to Kootenai Medical Center in Coeur d’Alene after a single vehicle wreck Sunday, May 26, about 7 p.m. Joshua J. Frye was traveling south on East River Road when he lost control of the 1993 Dodge Dakota pickup he was driving and rolled several times. Frye was cited for driving under the influence. Neither he nor his passenger, Jeffrey Baker, 21, of Newport, were wearing seatbelts. Baker was not injured. Frye was discharged May 28. The investigation is ongoing, according to a news release from the Idaho State Police.

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MINER PHOTO|DON GRONNING

Students take on archery These Newport Learning Experience students were participating in the last session of the archery class, held at Stratton Elementary School. Dale Munson looks over the budding archers Wednesday, May 29. The archery program is part of the National Archery in Schools Program and counts a physical education credit for students. The Pend Oreille County Hunters Association assisted with the program, including finding funding for the program.

Projects chosen for EDC funding BY DON GRONNING OF THE MINER

USK – At their board meeting May 15, the Pend Oreille County Economic Development Council named the recipients of $37,010 in funding the EDC will provide for projects. In addition, the EDC set aside $10,000 for marketing and website development for its own site. The EDC has had a web page on the county website but has been trying to get its own site established for years. The EDC is funded through a variety of sources, but one of the biggest sources is the $75,000 Pend Oreille County provides each year. The EDC budget committee received requests for five projects. All projects met the minimum requirements and were forwarded to the EDC board with the recommendation to fund them all. The budget committee is made up of Dan Peterson, Mike Manus, Bob Shanklin, Jamie Wyrobek and Terry Knapton. The EDC board of

Chamber meeting date changes NEWPORT – The Greater Newport Area Chamber of Commerce has rescheduled some meetings this summer. There will be a June/July chamber general membership meeting Tuesday, June 11 at 6 p.m. at the PUD’s Box Canyon Room in Newport. On the agenda is the presentation of the recommended color pallet for downtown Newport, along with rolling out the new website features. Tuesday, June 18, at 6 p.m. there will be a meeting at the Station 2:41 coffee house in Oldtown to discuss the Lightbulb to Launch program. The program started as a chamber committee with the ultimate goal of developing a business incubator in the greater Newport area. The July meeting of the Lightbulb to Launch program will be held Tuesday, July 23, at 6 p.m. at Station 2:41 in Oldtown.

MOUNTAIN VIEW APARTMENTS 1 & 2 Bedroom

in Newport Subsidized, quality, like-new affordable Housing with many Amenities. Rent based on income. Must be income Eligible. For Information call (509) 467-3036 or TDD# 1-800-545-1833 ext #530 This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer

directors is made up of Lonnie Johnson, Knapton, Peterson, Shanklin, Loyce Akers, Bob Spencer, Leslie Maki, Alex Stanton, Melannie Jones, Manus and Steve Shumski. The largest grant of $13,000 went to the Port of Pend Oreille to expand their existing shop facility. The port had requested $20,000 to add a 100- by 100-foot extension on the southern end of the current shop building. The budget committee recommended $15,000. In addition to the increased area for maintenance and repair of locomotives and other equipment, they will be adding a locomotive paint booth to the facility, which will enhance their ability to work on locomotives. This project will assist in expanding opportunities for the port in working on additional equipment for other businesses and will help ensure continued employment for the port’s current 14 employees. It is estimated that this project will create two additional jobs and retain 14. The next largest grant went to Pend Oreille County, which was awarded $9,500 to complete the final two byway sites – Eagles Nest and Crescent Lake – for a total of nine sites along the Highway 31 North Pend Oreille Scenic Byway from Tiger Junction to the Canadian border. The county had requested $7,500 and the budget committee recommended $6,000. These sites provide wildlife viewing, benches for picnicking, tourist information and orientation and signage. The funds will help to match a federal grant the county received in the amount of $189,360. According to EDC chairman Lonnie Johnson, the EDC

membership felt they could provide more money for the project so that it can be completed. If the project isn’t completed, the EDC won’t pay, Johnson said. He said the byway request that was presented was “minimalist” and the board felt they had the money to put toward the project. The Kalispel Tribe of Indians received $8,000 from the EDC. The tribe had requested $11,220 for the construction of a seasonal covered vendor area for events such as craft fairs, farmer’s markets, performances, and other such economic opportunities for local residents and members of the Kalispel Tribe. The budget committee recommended $8,000. The covered areas will be located adjacent to the tribe’s new cultural exploration and rest area along Highway 20, providing visibility and visit ability for the site. This project is expected to create two jobs in one to five years. The budget committee recommended $5,000 for the Tri County Economic Development District. TEDD had requested that amount to pay for a third of a position for a regional tourism specialist for NEWSTART. The Cutter Theater asked for $1,510 to renovate an office, prior to renting to a new business. The committee recommended that amount and the board agreed. The facilities manager has donated the labor to allow for a low cost. The budget committee views the Cutter as an economic engine that helps to run the Cutter as a business incubator space for business. The space has fiber connection. The EDC also agreed to set aside $10,000 for marketing and developing a website for the EDC.

Office Services Has Moved

Now located at Hwy 57 & Hwy 2, Priest River

Stop by our (Lamanna Law’s Old Location) new office & Tax Prep • Payroll • Bookkeeping Services 208-448-2941 Say “Hi”

Lunch Lady Bash!! You’re Invited a Retirement Party Friday, June 14th • 7pm Kid friendly 7-9pm American Legion #217, Cusick

After 34 years,

Debbie Hilzer

is putting away her spatulas and hanging up her oven mitts

Cake & Punch Music by DJ Greg McGuire

NEWPORT – The U.S. Capitol’s Christmas tree will come from the Colville National Forest this year, and the search for the perfect tree is on. Join the search by meeting Friday, June 14, at 9 a.m. at the Newport and Sullivan Lake Ranger district offices. You can choose to ride with a ranger (limited space available) or drive your own vehicle. Groups will choose the area they would like to search and be provided with the specifications of what the perfect U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree looks like. If you have a GPS unit and a camera, bring them because you will want to take pictures and accurately map your tree. They’ll be looking for a tree between 60 and 85 feet tall, with the classic Christmas tree shape to adorn the lawn in front of the U.S. Capitol Building this holiday season. Preferred species are Engelmann spruce, sub alpine fir, Douglas fir or grand fir. The location of the tree needs to be within 100-feet of a road. Once we have a number of candidate trees, the U.S. Capitol Architect will come out later in June and select the best tree from those we have found to be the official 2013 U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree. If you plan on joining us, RSVP with Olivia Giannasi at 509-447-7325 or at ogiannasi@fs.fed.us. The Newport Ranger Station is located at 315 N. Warren in Newport, and the Sullivan Lake Ranger Station is 12641 Sullivan Lake Road near Metaline Falls.   If you can’t make this event you can still participate. If you know of a tree that meets the specifications listed above and it is on the Colville National Forest, provide your informa-

CUMMINGS GRAVEL PRODUCTS Sized Gravel 160. per 12 yd. Load

$

Call 509-447-0515 Cell 509-671-3652

tion to us no later than June 14. Tree information and pictures can be sent to cadavidson@fs.fed.us. In addition to providing the U.S. Capitol Christmas tree, Washingtonians have the privilege of providing 5000 handmade ornaments to adorn the tree. The state will also supply several smaller “companion” trees to decorate government offices throughout the Washington, D.C., area. Those trees will also need 3,000 indoor ornaments. The Colville National Forest will collect ornaments until Oct. 1. If you are interested in making ornaments as part of an organization, visit www. capitolchristmastree.com to find the ornament criteria and submission forms. You can visit the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree team at local events such as the Newport Rodeo, Down Rivers Days, Lavender Festival, Pend Oreille County Fair and Pend Oreille County Relay for Life. There will be information about the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree and ornament making at most of these events. For more information on the U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree or how you can be involved, contact project coordinator Jennifer Knutson at 509-684-7254 or jenniferknutson@fs.fed.us. Get fast relief for an upset budget with The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds. They work for others; they’ll work for you! Call (509) 447-2433.

RIVERBEND VILLAGE APARTMENTS 1, 2 & 3 Bedroom

in Newport Subsidized, quality, like-new affordable Housing with many Amenities. Rent based on income. Must be income Eligible. For Information call (509) 467-3036 or TDD# 1-800-545-1833 ext #530 This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer

Old Goat Jr. Golf SIGN UPS

Thurs., June 13th

2 p.m. - 6 p.m. at the Ranch Club Classes run June 17th - thru 21st 8 years to 18 years - Cost $30

For information call: The Ranch Club (208) 448-1731, or Rhonda (208) 627-8174 Volunteer instructors needed. Please call if you’d like to help.


4A

| JUNE 5, 2013

||

Viewpoint

 O U R

O PI N I O N

THE NEWPORT MINER

Have grad night to remember, not regret

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Those that study fishery must be studied

BY SHARON FOSTER AND MICHAEL LANGER CO-CHAIRS OF THE WASHINGTON STATE COALITION TO REDUCE UNDERAGE DRINKING

A

fter more than 5,000 pike were netted and destroyed in the Pend Oreille River and over a 1,000 lake trout taken and killed at Priest Lake in the interests of government studies, we believe these studies should be monitored and reviewed. An independent and unbiased research group should evaluate both studies to determine if the goals are realistic and necessary. The impacts must also be audited independently. Then the public should have another chance to review and be heard. The lake trout netting at Priest Lake concluded May 17 with just more than 4,000 lake trout caught. Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IFG) biologists tagged and released less than 3,000 of those fish. The independent studies should determine if Priest Lake would lose a popular lake trout fishery and if it is necessary to enhance a bull trout fishery. They also must determine the effect the netting has on other species and the local economy. IFG reported that 1,114 fish died. That’s a 27 percent mortality rate when including those that died from handling as well as those scarified for aging and diet analysis. They captured three bull trout, one kokanee, 95 suckers, 11 whitefish and 22 pike minnow, all of which were released alive. Annual angler harvest has ranged from 15,000 to 30,000 per year, so this sample netting didn’t do a lot of damage. But the independent study should determine what will happen if they begin eradication netting and take say 10,000 out. What happens to the tourism based economy and the rest of the fishery? In the first round of netting this year on the Pend Oreille River below Albeni Falls Dam, 5,945 pike were removed. After that, the spring index netting (SPIN) survey was done to gauge the pike population. They were catching 40 to 50 fish a day compared to the 300 pike a day they were pulling in earlier this spring. After next year’s netting effort, the third and final year of the study, the state and the tribe will look at where the overall population is at and determine what to do for the future. Everyone must begin by acknowledging that the fish management record in the past in these two bodies of water by government agencies has not been good. They need to be studied as much as the fish do. We believe that in both states our elected officials should demand independent reviews of the goals, feasibility and impacts of this obvious new fishery management plan. What science is the eradication of a trophy fishery based on? Or is it based on politics like most resource management is today? --FJW

Much good to come from fiber project PUD staff has been fielding a wide variety of questions about the fiber optic broadband system: when will it be available, what will it cost, and how does it work? The Newport Miner has done a great job of covering this new community service and getting the word out. PUD employees and the retail service providers who will be selling this service – Concept Communication Corporation, iFiber Communications, and Pend Oreille Valley Networks – are working hard to  inform everyone. Many of these questions are answered at our website at cnsfiber.net. I would like to address this article to a specific question that has been coming up recently: “Why is the PUD going about this build in such an obviously inefficient way?” The reason relates to conditions of the $27 million grant that financed most of this project. The grant, from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, required the money be spent within three years (later expanded to three and a half years) to stimulate the economy. The time constraint created many problems for the PUD and did, indeed, result in some inefficient spending. If we could have fully designed the project before starting the build, many things could have been done better. This was not just a problem for us; we know of another PUD that turned down a similar grant

for this very reason. This project should have taken a year for environmental analysis and permitting, three years to engineer, and three years to build. To build efficiently, all engineering work should be completed before starting the build. The PUD was able to compress this seven years of work in half GUEST by engineering OPINION concurrently with the permitJOHN JORDAN ting process, PEND OREILLE PUD and then buildGENERAL MANAGER ing right behind the engineering work, as it progressed. As a result, instead of being able to build out to an entire neighborhood at the same time, customer drops (fiber from the pole lines to the home) were done more or less in the order in which customers signed permission forms. It is true that many people had their yards spray painted multiple times, when contractors thought a customer drop was ready to go and then found out differently. There is an old engineer’s saying that you cannot have it done right, fast, and cheap; you can only have any two of those three options. The

SEE FIBER, 5A

|| Hospital board hopes to have union contract soon To the editor: The purpose of this letter is to respond to a letter written to the editor last week by Susan M. Johnson, RN at the Newport Hospital. Mrs. Johnson misquoted me in a statement, and I feel it is important for me to take the time to correct this statement. In our most recent board meeting regarding the nursing contract, which is now in negotiations, a community member asked the board directly what our involvement and responsibility is in regards to the negotiations. My correct response was “the board is not directly involved in the negotiation process.” Mrs. Johnson stated in her letter that my response was “it was none of the board’s business.” I want to clarify to the community, to the nurses, and to the staff of the Newport Hospital that I have never felt, thought, or said this statement. In fact, it is very much the board’s business and I, along with others, hope to resolve this process in a timely manner. -Lois Robertson Vice Chairwoman of the Newport Hospital Board

Liberals fail to

LE T T E R S

||

ficed to save an election. I suppose you don’t think DOJ went after news reporters. I suppose the 157 visits by the IRS commissioner was not about targeting fellow Americans. That’s right neighbor, he was there for an Easter egg hunt but the truth is they are after our nest egg of freedom, liberty and principles! You truly are drunk on their public union Kool-Aid, huh? Please quit insulting your neighbors intelligence because it makes you look like one of the fools in the king of fools court. Either you have principles of honor and truth or you are part of the 70 percent that can be brainwashed. Which one is it, my friend? All roads lead to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. – lies and truth, except only lies flow out that front door and it has destroyed our trust in the government gone wild! You look at yourself in the mirror and go right on believing that the debt clock does not exist. Blame the top 1 percent for all our woes. Put our problems in the deep, deep dark abyss so they cannot be solved because our fellow man refuses to see the truth even when it’s slapping you upside the head! -Donna Lands Newport

see the truth To the editor: The war on terror is always over according to the left liberal Democrats until the next attack comes along. Are you kidding me? You must be reading the Democratic talking points of bull again. I suppose you believe that Bo Peep never lied to his sheep about Benghazi where four Americans were sacri-

||

Players groups should join forces To the editor: Last week’s feature article on the Circle Moon Theatre contrasted with the efforts of the Pend Oreille Players in buying their current playhouse. Both groups have been around for a long time and have done great things in the

R E A D E R S’

P O LL

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Visit The Miner Online to answer our readers’ poll question through Monday afternoon. Find it on the left-hand side of the page at www.PendOreilleRiverValley.com. The results will be printed next week on this page. You need not be a subscriber to participate. If you have ideas for future readers’ poll topics, submit them to minernews@povn.com.

It’s high school graduation time. How do you remember your high school days?

community, but this small community cannot realistically support both groups. We don’t have the time or money to attend weekly events at two playhouses. The donations required for the purchase and upkeep of buildings and equipment would consume most of the funds currently given to other civic organizations. I view the playhouses like community churches, except that all the theatre patrons must come from the same faith and denomination. I suspect we only have enough followers for one playhouse. Now it’s a credit that the two groups have been able to exist for so long. Clearly, there is a lot of individual effort that makes that possible. Looking at greater Spokane, even they have difficulty keeping multiple theater groups viable. They, like our local groups, are in need of continual support. Support for two full-time playhouse buildings would require patrons from outside of the community to make up a large share of the audience. The Circle Moon and Pend Oreille Players should consider sharing one playhouse. They could still keep their artistic individualism and the community wouldn’t have to drain itself supporting two physical playhouses. This would allow all the good done by both groups to continue, but at half the cost to the community. My main point is that the line of needy groups in our community is longer than the local patrons and businesses can realistically support. Either the line must become shorter or we need to double the population of the community. -Pete Scobby Newport

||

It was among the best times of my life. I’m still friends with quite a few classmates.

SEE GRADUATION, 5A

R E A D E R S’ P O LL R E S U LT S

||

Is the IRS out of control; is it a threat to the rights of every citizen?

C. Yes. The IRS has become a political arm of the administration; they go after those that disagree with those in power.

19%

High school was a nightmare. I never want to see any of those people ever again.

48%

I don’t have any strong feelings about it. I’m glad I don’t have to graduate now, however. Graduation was the high point of high school. The gifts, the sense of adventure about leaving home, the fact that high school was over, all contribute to an exciting time.

Many teens are making plans for senior week and graduation. While these are fun and safe events for most, there is a heightened risk for underage drinking. Parents and other adults can help keep teens safe by being informed and prepared. Most students in Washington make healthy choices, but some are pressured to make alcohol part of their celebrations. Some teens may think of graduation night as a rite-ofpassage event that should be celebrated with alcohol. “The good news is that two out of three high school seniors choose not to drink alcohol (2012 Washington State Healthy Youth Survey),” said Michael Langer, chief of behavioral health and prevention for the Department of Social and Health Services’ Behavioral Health and Service Integration Administration. “It is important that parents and other adults recognize teens for the healthy choices they are making, and reinforce how good choices will help them now and in the future,” he said. It’s also important to make a plan with your teen for what he or she will do in a risky situation, such as attending a party where there is alcohol. Let your teenagers know they can call you any time for a ride home – no questions asked – if they find themselves in an unsafe situation. Remind them to never, under any circumstances, get in a car if the driver has been drinking. Their safety is the top priority. “Parents underestimate the influence they have on their kids when it comes to drinking,” said Liquor Control Board Chairwoman Sharon Foster. “In fact, they are the top reason their teen chooses not to drink. Now is the time for parents to talk to their kids about drinking.” To help your teen have a safe, fun and memorable graduation night: • Remember that you are the primary influence on your teen. • Set clear rules about not drinking, and enforce consequences for breaking them. • Offer to plan, host, and supervise a graduation party; assure parents the party will be alcohol-free. • Talk to other parents about post-event activities to make sure alcohol won’t be present. Alcohol has taken more young lives than tobacco and illicit drugs combined. Teens

Total Votes: 31

32%

A. No. It is a necessary agency; people will abuse the system if there is no enforcement. If anything, in this case there was some mismanagement of staff.

B. The problem is the tax code itself. There are too many loop holes and gray areas theft to interpretation of IRS agents. There should be a flat tax and no IRS.


THE MINER



JUNE 5, 2013 |

5A

Man sentenced for storage burglaries Learn about nature in interpretive programs BY DON GRONNING OF THE MINER

NEWPORT – A 37-year-old man was sentenced to 25 months in jail for his role in a series of burglaries at a Newport storage facility. Daniel Lama Smith had pleaded guilty to second-degree burglary, possession of stolen property and possession of methamphetamine. Pend Oreille County Judge Allen Nielson said he recognized there were likely more people involved in the storage unit burglaries,

but Smith was the one who was caught. Nielson told Smith he was getting a break. “Each one of the units could have been charged as a separate count,” he said. There were 17 units burglarized. Deputy prosecutor Dolly Hunt noted that Smith had an extensive criminal history that was meth related. He was on community correction at the time of the arrest, she said. Smith was facing a standard sentencing range of 22-29 months. Smith was arrested last Novem-

ber when law enforcement was called to investigate a possible DUI on Rumsey Road. When they arrived they found Smith slumped over in the drivers seat, with bolt cutters, gloves and items taken in the storage unit burglaries in the back of the van he was in. In addition to the stolen property, sheriff deputies also found a pipe with meth residue on it. In addition to the jail time, Smith was assessed financial penalties totaling $950. He will have to pay part of his public defender cost, and restitution will be set at a later time.

OLDTOWN – Park rangers from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Albeni Falls Dam are offering interpretive programs throughout the month at local campgrounds. Programs begin at 7 p.m. Join Ranger Kassadee to learn about big cats from this area and take part in a fun activity. The program runs Friday, June 7 at the Priest River Mud Hole and Saturday, June 8 at Riley Creek Campground. Become a Junior Ranger of

the Army Corps a Father’s Day program, June 14 at Springy Point Campground and June 15 at Riley Creek. Learn about Native Americans, play a native game and make a headpiece June 21 at Priest River and June 22 at Riley Creek. June 28 at Springy Point and June 29 at Riley Creek, learn about trees form this area as well as how to measure and identify them. The Albeni Falls Dam Visi-

tor Center is open seven days a week from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., offering free tours of the dam seven days a week at 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. until Labor Day. Read The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds.

Rhubarb Festival June 15th 10am-3pm

FIBER | Cannot make profit FROM PAGE 4A

federal government dictated fast. The PUD chose quality over low cost, which we believe was the right choice under these circumstances. The PUD is far from perfect. We do make mistakes. But accomplishing this task in the time frame allowed and very near budget is a significant accomplishment. Much good comes from this fiber optic project. Home values will increase. Some of the construction spending has been local, resulting in money making its way into the hands of local merchants, local government, and local residents. Most importantly, there is now a world class Internet service available in Pend Oreille County. These are not

small matters. It is worth noting that the PUD itself cannot benefit from this project. We took on a tremendous risk in building and operating an incredibly advanced communication system to benefit the people and businesses of this county. The best the PUD can do is recover its costs. As a public entity, we cannot make a profit from our endeavors, but we can certainly fail and be criticized for that failure. So why take the risk? To serve this county. To improve where we live. To improve property values. For economic development. For our kids. For our county. This project was not done out of self-interest on the part of your Public Utility District.

Rhubarb Baked Goods

House of the Lord Christian Academy Graduating Class of 2013

need to know there are also other risks that go along with underage drinking. Alcohol is especially harmful to the developing teen brain: it can damage learning, memory, and impulse control. Teens won’t want to remember graduation as the night they got pregnant or contracted a sexually transmitted disease, started a fight, or crashed their car.

Taylor Bricker

Jeremiah DeVerna

Floors & More Inc. 208-448-1914

Tayler Gould

Pend Oreille Veterinary Clinic 208-437-2145 Elizabeth Queen

Ben Franklin 208-437-4822 Selkirk Ace Hardware 208-437-5669 Aerocet 208-448-0400

Jordan Queen

Memorial Service

509-447-9277

PRANIC HEALING

Grant Schultz

Master Choa Kok Sui’s workshop for health professionals is being offered at Holiday Inn Express in Ponderay June 7, 8, 9. Course presents the non-invasive ancient technique of using our vital energy to heal.

WE SALUTE THE GRADUATES Animal Doctor 208-437-2800

Parents won’t want to remember this as the night they were arrested for giving alcohol to teens, followed by a year in jail and a $5,000 fine. We all want our teens to stay safe as they celebrate the final days of their high school career, yet only 29 percent of 12th graders say their parents talk to them about underage drinking. Talk to them now – they need the facts. To learn how, visit www.StartTalkingNow.org.

Corner of 4th & Fea, Newport

Graduation Ceremonies 7:00 p.m. - Friday, May 31st

GRADUATION | FROM PAGE 4A

Create Arts Center

* Step-by-step application for correcting energy imbalances associated with pain, stress and common physical ailments.

Mountain West Bank Newport & Ione 509-447-5642/ 509-442-3516

*Preventive healing

NAPA Auto Parts 509-447-4515

*Principles of self-recovery

Gem State Miner Newspapers 509-447-2433

*Applications for professional and health care practice.

Tri Pro Forest Products, Inc. 208-437-2412

CECs available

Kalispel Tribe 509-445-1147

Course presenter: Greg Toews, 20+ years instructor and Arhatic Yogi

Pend Oreille Players 509-671-1442

City Service Valcon 208-437-3513

for times, information/registration Lisa Mountain at 406-295-8134

for

Daniel Kelly

Happy

Foothills Mission Church

Locally Owned & Operated ted

5108 Elk Hwy Rd., Elk, WA Thursday, June 6th • 2 pm

509-703-2800 or 509-447-5777 Copper • Brass • Aluminum Stainless • Aluminum Cans Batteries • Radiators

We also recycle Cardboard • Iron Newspaper

PAYING CASH!*

at the

National Spring Savings Event

*In accordance with WA State Law.

Now thru June 30, 2013 • See Store for Details

DU-MOR RECYCLING N 6404 Perry • Spokane, WA (509) 489-6482 One block north of Francis, 14 blocks east of Division

Get ready for Summer!

Time to let us check your Oil • Coolant • AC • Alignment • Brakes • Shocks Certified Master Tech on duty to serve you!

A Proud Member of Your Local Newport Grizzlies Maws and Paws Booster Club “We support our local students in all their endeavors.”

BUYING CEDAR LOGS Delivered into Naples, Idaho & Swan Lake Landing, St. Maries, Idaho

Trevor Favaro 208-290-4547

21

st

311 3 1 W. Walnut Newport, N WA (509) (50 447-3933

Celebrating Our 21st Year in Business with Savings to please everyone!

Buy One Saw Chain Get One FREE Equal orr lesser value -- Offer good thru June 30th, 2013 * Sale does not apply to 1/4” or .404 Pitch Chain

BONNER SAW &682POWER EQUIPMENT High St. • Priest River, ID • 208-448-1522

Congratulations 2013 High School Graduates Newport • Selkirk Priest River • Cusick House of the Lord Start Here...

Go Anywhere!

• Small Classes • Flexible Schedules • Affordable

For admissions information call 208-769-3311 • 1000 W. Garden Avenue, Coeur d’Alene, Idaho • www.nic.edu


6A

|JUNE 5, 2013



Renew those boating decals OLYMPIA – Boating season is here, and the deadline for renewing boat and watercraft registration decals is right around the corner. All Washington state boat registrations expire June 30. Boat registrations can be renewed online at the Washington Department of Licensing website

(www.dol.wa.gov) or in person at the Pend Oreille County Auditor’s Office in Newport. Those who choose to renew at an office should make sure to note the registration number on the bow of the boat or watercraft and take that information to the office. Due to budget cuts, DOL dis-

Volunteers needed to help plant trees

continued paper renewal notices for boats in 2010 and instead offered boat owners the opportunity to sign up to receive email renewal reminders. It’s too late to sign up for an email renewal reminder for this year, but boat owners can sign up online at dol.wa.gov to receive renewal reminders by email.

NLI board president passes away SAGLE –During the Northern Lights Inc. 78th annual meeting May 4, NLI Board President Don Vickaryous suffered heart failure. He passed away May 6 at the Kootenai Medical Center in Coeur d’Alene. He was 74. Vickaryous, of Moyie Springs, served as a Northern Lights board director for the past 12 years, representing District 5, which includes the northeast

corner of the Panhandle into Montana. Directors for districts 1, 5 and 7 were up for election this year. The annual meeting was continued to May 20, when the election was held. District 1 board member Eric Anderson was unopposed, as was Vickaryous. District 5 member Vern Hollett won reelction over challenger David Farwell.

Northern Lights is accepting letters of interest for the District 5 position until June 11, and the board will select a replacement. Vickaryous worked as a logger and opened Twin Rivers Canyon Resort in 1992. He is survived by his wife Janet and five children, Ray, Barry, Shelly, Tammy and Carol and their spouses and 16 grandchildren. Read The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds.

||

The hearing will be Thursday, June 6, in the first flood conference room of the Bonner County administration building. The agenda also includes an amendment to the population component of the county’s comprehensive plan.

CO R R EC T I O N

||

Priest River graduate William Alderson was listed with the wrong name in the photo composite that appeared in last week’s edition of The Miner. We regret any confusion this may have caused.

Creek Road, where volunteers will be working, was recently rerouted and moved further away from the creek to protect fish and wildlife habitat and water quality. That effort was a partnership between the U.S. Forest Service, Kalispel Tribe, Stimson Lumber, and others. Conservation Northwest is recruiting volunteers Saturday and Sunday to help give nature a boost in restoring the old road bed to im-

prove habitat for bull trout, grizzly bear, elk, moose and other wildlife. This tree planting and restoration project is made possible by a grant from American Forests’ Global ReLeaf program. To sign up for one or both days of habitat restoration and get details on where to meet and what to bring (such as gloves, boots, lunch), contact Kyle Merritt at kyle_merritt@hotmail.com or 208-241-1764.

City approves long-range street plan NEWPORT – The Newport city council reviewed their six-year transportation improvement plan at their regular meeting Monday, June 3. The top-ranked project is installing sidewalks along Highway 2 from downtown to the schools. Engineering work will happen this month, and construction should begin next summer. The city received $646,000 from the federal pedestrian and bicycle program

and will put in about $72,000 of its own funds. As soon as Legislature adjourns, the city will know if funding is available in the transportation budget. Construction is underway on the Spruce Street widening, along with water and sewer replacement. Crews have cleared a few trees, dug up sidewalks and are grinding out the old pavement. State and federal funds will pick up most of the $1.02 million tab.

Work on Fifth Street near the elementary school is slated for 2014, and Garden Avenue past the Hall of Justice should be repaired in 2015. Also on the list for a few years out is work on Craig and Halford avenues, West First Street, upgrades to streets south of the railroad tracks, and improvements to the streets in the core residential area. Last on the list is the Highway 20 and 2 junction.

11th Anniversary Adoption Specials SODA

PRECIOUS

Kitten, 8 weeks old, we have several

Domestic long hair Calico female

208-448-0699

208-448-0699

KATIE

Young Lab/ Pitbull mix

June 15 & 16 and June 21, 22 & 23 and June 28, 29 & 30 Friday & Saturday at 7pm • Sunday at 3pm Tickets: $10 Advance • $12 at the Door • $5 Students

COLVILLE – Volunteers are needed to help plant trees and shrubs and restore fish and wildlife habitat on the Colville National Forest Saturday and Sunday, June 8 and 9. Conservation Northwest is looking for volunteers to help rehabilitate an old section of road in prime fish and wildlife habitat in north Pend Oreille County. The stretch of the Middle Branch of the LeClerc

ADOPT A PET

Planners consider RV park request SANDPOINT – The Bonner County Planning and Zoning Commission will consider a time extension request on a conditional use permit for an RV Park owned by Pat Anderson and Randall Votava. The site is along Highway 57, 37 miles north of Priest River.

THE MINER

208-448-0699

LILLY

Jack Russel mix 208-448-0699

SYDNEY

Female Lhaso Apso mix

EMMA

Gorgeous hound 208-448-0699

208-448-0699

CEECEE

Young Smoke and white long hair female

PUFF

Lovable, male long hair 208-448-0699

208-448-0699

At the Playhouse and online www.pendoreilleplayers.org

240 North Union Ave., Newport (509) 671-3389

MISTY

Very playful young adult 208-448-0699

ZIEBA

BELLA

OLIVER

Gorgeous, friendly long black hair female

Adult short hair orange and white

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THE MINER



JUNE 5, 2013 |

Gov. Inslee signs bills sponsored by Rep. Short

Veterans bill benefits disabled hunters

OLYMPIA – During the last week of the 2013 legislative session, Gov. Jay Inslee signed into law two bills sponsored by Rep. Short, R-Addy, aimed at bringing more transparency and accountability to the decisions – and the decision-making process – of the state Department of Ecology and the state Department of Fish and Wildlife. “Both of these bills will help keep the bureaucracies accountable to the Legislature and to the citizens,” said Short, who has worked on the bills for several years while in Olympia. Short’s bills require the agencies to identify the peer-reviewed science, scientific literature, and other sources of information reviewed and ultimately relied upon before taking significant agency action related to certain agency programs. The review would apply to action that: • results in substantive requirements for a non-state actor with penalties for noncompliance; • establishes, alters, or revokes any qualification or standard for the issuance, suspension, or revocation of a license or permit; • results in significant amendments to an existing policy or program; or • results in the development

of technical guidance, assessments, or documents used to implement a state rule or statute “From the people’s standpoint, some of the decisions made by these two particular agencies seem arbitrary or capricious. My bills were designed to require a little more substance behind the reasoning that leads to the final decisions taken by these agencies,” she said. “It’s not about having no government intervention or oversight; it’s about restoring state government to its proper role.” House Bill 1112 and House Bill 1113 made it through the entire legislative process without being amended and were approved by unanimous votes in both the House and Senate – a testament, said Short, to the work done on both sides of the aisle and in both chambers of the Legislature. “It’s taken some time to convince my colleagues in the Legislature that these bills are designed to protect the public and the state agencies alike,” said Short. “I’m extremely pleased we were able to get folks in Olympia on the same page and that the governor agrees with us that some of our state agencies need a little more public scrutiny and oversight.” Later, the governor signed Short’s veterans hunting and fishing bill into law.

Audit: Newport didn’t account for bond refinancing correctly BY DON GRONNING OF THE MINER

COURTESY PHOTO|WASHINGTON HOUE REPUBLICANS

Rep. Shelly Short, R-Addy sponsored a bill to make state agencies more transparent and accountable which was signed into law by Gov. Jay Inslee, left. John Stuhlmiller from the Washington State Farm Bureau, right, testified in favor of Short’s bill.

As a results, veterans living outside Washington who’ve been disabled in the line of duty will find it cheaper and easier to hunt and fish in the state. The legislation, House Bill 1192, will also begin the process of “reciprocity,” making it cheaper for Washington’s disabled veterans to hunt and fish in other states as well. “This bill would allow veterans with disabilities in other states to qualify for reduced hunting and fishing license fees here in Washington,” said Short. “It would also encourage reciprocity – that is, it would

encourage other states to offer the same discounted license fees to our state’s veterans. We have veterans with disabilities that would like to hunt and fish in other states; and wounded veterans from other states that would like to participate in those activities here in Washington,” she said. “I think it’s the least we can do for those who have sacrificed so much for our country.” Short’s bill was signed into law May 1. Constituents and veterans from Ferry County joined Short at the bill-signing ceremony.

NEWPORT – An audit of the Newport School District found the district didn’t adequately account for nearly $5 million in expenditures and revenue. The underreporting did not result in any overpayment or other monetary consequence that the district will have to pay. The problem occurred in the refinancing of district bonds, something the district did in October 2011, when it refinanced $4.45 million in bonds. When it refinanced the bonds, which is a process similar to refinancing a house, the district didn’t account for them properly, the auditor found. “Bond refundings are an infrequent financial activity for the district and it was unfamiliar with the recording and reporting of this specific transaction type. We found the district did not adequately research or obtain guidance on the proper accounting treatment for the refunding activity,” auditors wrote. As a result, the district underreported revenue by $4,990,740, expense by $4,942,273 and debt service by $48,466, something that was not detected by the district management. District business manager Tom Crouch said that bond refinancing is rare and the mistake didn’t affect the district’s bottom line.

“Basically, we posted it wrong,” Crouch said. “We made an accounting error.” Crouch said the district posted only the difference between the refinanced amount of the bonds and the amount of the bonds that were retired. “We recorded the difference, we didn’t record the steps,” he said. He said the district should have asked for help or looked into the accounting manual for instruction. As a result of the audit, the district immediately began changing their procedures. “Accurate financial reporting is a high priority with Newport School District,” district officials wrote in the response. “To ensure that this happens, Newport School District has put in place a procedure to review month end transactions prior to entering the information in the Skyward system. We have also implemented a spreadsheet to record non-capitalized (operating) leases and capital leases. On unique or unusual circumstances (i.e. refund bond) where routing entries are not recorded, the Washington State Accounting Manual and/or Educational Services District No. 101 will be consulted. This process has already been started.” The audit covered Sept. 1, 2011, through Aug. 3, 2012. Auditors found that the district complied with all federal regulations, including regulations for the school lunch and breakfast programs.

CUSICK GRADUATING CLASS OF 2013 Graduation Ceremonies 10:00 a.m. - Saturday, June 8th

Haley Adams

Derrick Bluff

Jestin Brazda

Petra Cunningham

Sarah Martin

Delores McGuire

Jessica Nelson

Lauren Nelson

Nuttawan Poompuang

Zachary Read

Ryan Sample

Chelsea Samuels

John Cutshall II

Evan Fountain

Nicholas Lovette

Marcin Nieznaj

Sabrina Nomee

Gavin Peterson

Shanelle Savage

7A

Devlin Sherian

Duy Vu

Sherryll Wynne

WE SALUTE THE GRADUATES OF 2013 Boo Boo’s Bakery 509-445-2213

Selkirk Ace Hardware 208-437-5669

NAPA Auto Parts 509-447-4515

Newport Dental, Dr. Cool 509-447-3105

Pend Oreille Players 509-671-1442

Cusick School Dist #59 509-445-1125

PUD District 1 509-447-3137

Pend Oreille County Library 509-447-2111

Gopher’s Diesel Repair 509-684-6637

Rural Resources Community Action/Worksource 509-550-7050

Tri Pro Forest Products, Inc. 208-437-2412

City Service Valcon 208-437-3513

Royal Flush Septic Service 509-447-2264

Tri County Pee Wee Rodeo 509-292-2685/509-276-9862

Ben Franklin 208-437-4822

Ponderay Newsprint 509-445-1511

The Red Barn 509-684-8995

Kalispel Tribe 509-445-1147

Mountain West Bank Newport & Ione 509-447-5642/ 509-442-3516 Newport Miner Newspapers 509-447-2433


8A

| JUNE 5, 2013



THE MINER

Three Pend Oreille County schools hold graduation Saturday NEWPORT – School districts in Pend Oreille County will hold commencement ceremonies for graduating seniors Saturday, June 8.

Cusick High School The 21 Cusick High School seniors will graduate in a ceremony that begins at 10 a.m. Saturday. The class valedictorian is Zachary Read, and Evan Fountain is salutatorian. The speaker at graduation will be science and math teacher Glenn Miller. Superintendent Dan Read and school board trustee Mark Cutshall, both of whom

have sons graduating in the class, will present the diplomas. The class chose their motto as: “We’ll find a way or we’ll make one.” The class flower is a tiger lily. The Cusick seniors went on their class trip to Seattle between June 2 and 5. Thursday, June 6, at 6 p.m. is the senior scholarship awards night, followed by the baccalaureate. Mr. Lorraine is the guest speaker. Eighth grade promotion is Monday, June 10, at 6:30 p.m. The last day of school at Cusick is Tuesday, June 11, with an 11 a.m. early release.

Newport High School Newport seniors graduate at noon. The last day of school at Newport is June 13 with an early release. Newport has a class of 84 this year. Sydney Siemsen is the class valedictorian, and Jenna Kersting is salutatorian. Art teacher Kyle Genther and foreign language teacher Ann McGetrick will give speeches. The flower is the red rose, and the class selected as their motto a quote from Thomas M. Smith: Let us keep climbing even higher, never fearing the step that is next, for our goal is in our grasp, just beyond our hopes and

dreams.”

Selkirk High School Fourteen Selkirk seniors will graduate Saturday. Ceremonies begin at 1 p.m. The class speaker is science and math teacher John Kinney. The class valedictorian is Jessika Reiber, and Kendra McGeorge is salutatorian. Eric Whittenmyer will be singing the National Antehm, as well as the song “For Good.” He and Emily Maupin will duet on “Moon River.” The class motto is “Only 47 years until we’re seniors again.” The seniors are spending June 2-6 at Lake Chelan for their

senior trip. The seniors announced their plans for the future: Kirbi Anderson is going to Oregon Coast Community College to study aquarium science; Aley Curran is going to Spokane Community College for aerospace maintenance; Ray Davis is going into the Navy; Jessica Dickinson to Spokane Falls Community College for nursing; Michael Haskins Centralia, Community College for power productions and operations; Courtney Hill did not announce plans; Emery Maupin, SCC aerospace maintenance; Emily Maupin, SCC dental assistant program; Kendra McGeorge,

Washington State University for biomedical engineering; Jessika Reiber, Olympic Community College for business; Max Rumelhart, Eastern Washington Unversity computer science; Garet Sax is going into the Navy to be an electrician; Michael Weiss will go to work mining; and Eric Wittenmyer, North Idaho College theatre arts. Selkirk Eighth grade promotion is Wednesday, June 12, at 7 p.m., and the last day of school is June 13 with an early release. Priest River held graduation ceremonies June 1, and House of the Lord graduated six seniors Friday, May 31.

IFG supports removing grizzlies from endangered list

COURTESY PHOTO|U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE

When Lewis and Clark explored the West in the early 1800s an estimated 50,000 grizzly bears roamed West. Today only a few small corners of grizzly country remains, supporting about 1,400 to 1,700 wild grizzly bears.

BOISE – The Idaho Fish and Game Commission wants grizzly bears in Idaho removed from the federal list of threatened and endangered species. The commission adopted their position statement on grizzly bears in Idaho at their May 16 meeting. Grizzlies have been federally listed as threatened in the lower 48 states since 1975. The listing status of the population in the Selkirk recovery zone is under review. There are approximately 30 living in the U.S. portion of the Selkirk ecosystem, which covers the northeast corner of Washington, North Idaho and into Canada. “Idaho can manage the bears better,” said Commissioner Tony

McDermott of the Panhandle Region. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service could save millions by simply delisting the bear throughout all of Idaho, he said. The state has the regulatory and enforcement mechanisms in place, and people would be more tolerant of bears if the state were managing them, he believes. The commission would continue to act to ensure sustainable grizzly bear populations for the foreseeable future in the occupied core habitats the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has identified in Idaho, the statement says. “Key to the success of this effort is effective and efficient management of bear-human

conflict,” it states. The commission supports the prompt federal delisting and transition to state management for grizzly bears throughout Idaho as both legally compliant with the Endangered Species Act as well as the best vehicle for achieving the act’s objectives, the statement says. A new motorized access management plan that aims to curb human encounters with grizzly bears within the recovery zones for grizzlies was adopoted in 2011. It could take several more years before the plan is implemented, but it could mean closing 34 to 102 miles of forest roads.

Selkirk Graduating Class of 2013

Graduation Ceremonies 1 p.m. on Saturday, June 8th

Kirbi Anderson

Emily Maupin

Aley Curran

Kendra McGeorge

Ray Davis

Jessica Dickinson

Jessika Reiber

Max Rumelhart

Michael Haskins

Garet Sax

Courtney Hill

Michael Weiss

Emery Maupin

Eric Wittenmyer

WE SALUTE THE GRADUATES Weaver’s Garage & Exhaust 509-684-6524

Pend Oreille County Library 509-447-2111

Selkirk School District 509-446-2951

Carey’s Auto Body, Inc. 509-684-2587

Country Hardware Store 509-442-3532

Selkirk Ace Hardware 208-437-5669

NAPA Auto Parts 509-447-4515

Kaniksu Village Apts. 509-446-4100

Zombies Espresso 509-292-5169

PUD District 1 509-447-3137

Newport Miner Newspapers 509-447-2433

Country Hardware Store 509-442-3532

5th Avenue Bar & Grill 509-446-4234

City Service Valcon 208-437-3513

Mt Linton Hotel 509-446-2238

Kalispel Tribe 509-445-1147

Metaline Falls Trading Co 509-446-2301

Ponderay Newsprint 509-445-1511

Nu-Vu Theatre 509-446-2447

Rural Resources Community Action/ Worksource 509-550-7050

Mountain West Bank Newport & Ione 509-447-5642/ 509-442-3516 Pend Oreille Mine, Tech Washington, Inc. 509-446-4516 Ben Franklin 208-437-4822 Dawson Construction & Concrete 509-442-3702 Cathy’s Café 509-446-2447


THE NEWPORT MINER

North Pend Oreille

NEWS FROM NORTH PEND OREILLE COUNTY INCLUDING IONE, METALINE & METALINE FALLS

Ione Bridge work wrapping up next week

COURTESY PHOTO|SELKIRK HIGH SCHOOL

The senior class poses during a breakfast workshop on interview skills at the American Pie Restaurant.

Seniors learn interview skills METALINE – The Selkirk senior class met for breakfast and to learn job interview skills Thursday, May 30 at the American Pie Restaurant in Metaline. Selkirk principal, Larry Reed welcomed the class and CTE teacher Angela Cain spoke to the students about table etiquette. Job interviews are often conducted at a breakfast or

lunch meeting, so she discussed with them topics such as the proper way to eat bacon, chicken, etc. Guest speaker Brenda Miller, office administrator at Box Canyon Dam, spent time with the students discussing their employment portfolio and gave them interview tips. Guidance counselor Dianne Allert con-

cluded by encouraging students to electronically save their portfolios so they can access documents wherever they may travel. Students enjoyed an outstanding breakfast, meaningful presentations, and one last chance to converse with all their classmates before graduation, Allert said.

|| N O R T H P E N D O R E I L L E CO U N T Y E V E N T S WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5 Tiger Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. - State Routes 20 and 31 Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Metalines Library Basic Computer Class: 11 a.m. to Noon - Ione Library, Call 509442-3030 For Reservations Commissioner Kiss Office Hours: 3-6:45 p.m. - Ione Library Weight Watchers: 6 p.m. Weigh in 6:30-7 p.m. meeting - Ione Assembly of God Ione Town Council: 7 p.m. Clerk’s Office

Boundary Dam Tours: 10:30 a.m., Noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Boundary Dam Road Story Time: 11 a.m. - Ione Library North Pend Oreille Lions: 6:30 p.m. - Ione Train Depot

THURSDAY, JUNE 6 Metaline Cemetery District No. 2 Board Meeting: 10 a.m. Metaline City Hall Tiger Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. - State Routes 20 and 31

SATURDAY, JUNE 8 Tiger Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. - State Routes 20 and 31 Boundary Dam Tours: 10:30 a.m., Noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Boundary Dam Road

FRIDAY, JUNE 7 Tiger Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. - State Routes 20 and 31 Boundary Dam Tours: 10:30 a.m., Noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Boundary Dam Road Story Time and Crafts: 10:30 a.m. - Metalines Library Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. Ione Senior Center

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IONE – The final upgrade work on the Ione Bridge will be done next week. Crews from the West Company started May 6 doing some job site clean up, putting another coat of paint on the railings and repairing some winter damage. Project manager Nate McKinley said all that’s left if the roadway striping on part of the road and the concrete deck. That work is scheduled for Monday and Tuesday, June 10 and 11. That wraps up a two-year project that started after Labor Day 2011. The project involved structural upgrades on the timber pilings and girders, a new concrete overlay, replacing some of the steel grade decking and repainting the red-orange bridge. West Company Inc. of Medical Lake did the work for $3.6 million, paid through the federal bridge replacement program. The bridge crosses the Pend Oreille River on Sullivan Lake Road. This was its first major upgrade since the late 1960s. The upgrade is expected to prepare the 1930s bridge for another 10 to 15 years of service.

||

Selkirk Graduation: 1 p.m. - Selkirk High School SUNDAY, JUNE 9 Tiger Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. - State Routes 20 and 31 Boundary Dam Tours: 10:30 a.m., Noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Boundary Dam Road Monday, June 10 Fire District No. 2 Commissioners: 10 a.m. - Fire Station 23, 390442 Highway 20, Ione

Boundary Dam Tours: 10:30 a.m., Noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Boundary Dam Road Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Metalines Library Tuesday, June 11 Metaline Cemetery District No. 2 Board: 10 a.m. - Metaline Town Hall Story Time: 11 a.m. - Ione Library Book Discussion Group: 4-5 p.m. - Ione Library Metaline Falls Town Council: 7 p.m. - Metaline Falls Town Hall

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JUNE 5, 2013|

9A

Enjoy state parks for free select days in June OLYMPIA –Washington State Parks is offering three “free days” in June when visitors are not required to display a Discover Pass for daytime visits to state parks. Saturday, June 1, was a state parks free day in conjunction with National Trails Day. Two free days are offered in parks this weekend, Saturday and Sunday, June 8 and 9, in honor of National Get Outdoors Day, which is June 8. Crawford State Park and Gardner Cave near Metaline opened May 24. Hours are 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., but the park is closed Tuesdays and Wednesdays. The state parks and recreation commission selected most of its 2013 “free days” in conjunction with the National Park Service’s free days. State parks’ free day schedule for 2013 follows: • Jan. 21 – in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day • March 30 – in honor of Washington State Parks’ 100th birthday month • April 27 and 28 – in cooperation with National Parks Week •  June 1 – National Trails Day • June 8 and 9 – National Get Outdoors Day • Aug. 4 – Peak season free day • Sept. 28 – National Public

Lands Day • Nov. 9 through 11 – Veterans Day Weekend. The “free days” are in keeping with legislation that created the Discover Pass, a $30 annual or $10 one-day permit required on state-managed recreation lands managed by Washington State Parks, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Department of Natural Resources. The Discover Pass legislation provided that State Parks could designate up to 12 “free days” when the pass would not be required to visit state parks. The free days apply only at state parks; the Discover Pass is still required to access DFW and DNR lands.

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10A

| JUNE 5, 2013



Lake trout netting wraps up for spring PRIEST LAKE – The lake trout netting at Priest Lake concluded May 17 with just more than 4,000 lake trout caught. Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IFG) biologists tagged and released less than 3,000 of those fish. Anglers have been critical of the project, with worries not only about possibly losing a popular lake trout fishery, but also about what effect the netting has on other species. IFG reported that 1,114 fish died. That’s a 27 percent mortality rate when including those that died from handling as well as those scarified for aging and diet analysis. They captured three bull trout, one kokanee, 95 suckers, 11 whitefish and 22 pikeminnow, all of which were released alive, according to Jim Fredericks, IFG’s Panhandle Region fishery manager. Fredericks said the netting project is troubling to many people, but he emphasized that the number of fish handled and killed in the survey was a very small portion of the overall population. Annual angler harvest has ranged from 15,000 to 30,000, he said. “So an additional 1,100 fish is not a significant impact to the population,” he said. Fredericks also noted that the netting effort this spring was an assessment, not a suppression effort. The project is administered as part of the 2013-2018 State Fisheries Management Plan, and over the next five years IFG will continue biological and social assessments as we develop a long-term management plan for Priest and Upper Priest lakes. They want to determine if they should allow the current lake trout population to continue to thrive, or curtail the lake trout in efforts to resurrect native fish such as kokanee and bull trout. “This will not be done without extensive public involvement,” he said. He also pointed out that this survey is the first comprehensive assessment of the lake trout population on Priest Lake – ever. It will give the

state some understanding of population size, and provide information regarding age, growth rates, angler harvest rates, along with age/size structure of the population. “These are extremely valuable pieces of information regardless

of how the population will be managed in long term,” he said. Over the next several weeks, the graduate student and others at the University of Idaho will be analyzing and interpreting data.

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THE NEWPORT MINER

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Special deadline Tuesdays 2 p.m. DID YOU MISS IT? You won’t miss a thing when you subscribe to The Miner. Save $14.50 a year and receive it in your mail every Wednesday. (509) 447-2433. (47HB-altTF) TIME TO ORDER Butcher hogs. Krogh Livestock. (509) 447-4632. (16HB-4) HUGE 1 DAY SALE Friday June 7th 9-4 American Lutheran Church, Newport. (18p) YARD SALE JUNE 7 AND 8 8:00-4:30. Crafts, sewing, cross stitch, camping equipment, books, clothes, housewares and miscellaneous. 2201 Southshore Diamond Lake Road. (18p) HUGE YARD SALE Friday and Saturday, June 7 and 8, 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Behind Newport Laundromat. 5 families. Furniture, baby items, children’s clothing and toys, household items, tons of miscellaneous. (18p) NEED LEGO PIECES! Create is requesting donations of Lego pieces for the Children’s Summer Art Program. Drop off Create Art Center, 900 West 4th, Newport, Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 1:005:00 or call (509) 447-9277. (18, 20, 21p) NEWPORT HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF ‘63 Looking for Classmates! Reunion Saturday July 13th, 5:00 p.m. Riverbank Family Restaurant. Contact Jerry Gregory (907) 733-1611. (18HB-2p) BELLYDANCE FITNESS CLASS At Create Tuesday nights, 6:30 p.m. $10.00/ class or $40.00/ month. Come join the fit feminine fun! Contact Ali (208) 660-3362. (18HB-4p) MASTER GARDENER Plant Clinics. June-August 6:00-8:00 p.m. Thursdays at Newport Library. 2nd/ 4th Tuesdays at Calispel Library. 10:00-1:00 p.m. Ione Library 1st Tuesday of month. Phone: (509) 447-2401. (18p)

MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE Highway 2, 1/4 mile south of Diamond Lake. Friday, Saturday, Sunday, 9:00-4:30. Also, exotic houseplants, hanging flower baskets, garden starts. (18p) 3 BEDROOM TRAILER Diamond Lake area. Large back yard, carport, wrap around porch, washer/ dryer included. $650/ month. (509) 671-6668. (18p) CHURCH YARD SALE One day only! Friday, June 7. 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. American Lutheran Church, Highway 2, Newport. (18p) AUCTION 6 to 8 whole storage units will be auctioned off on Saturday, June 8, 9:00 a.m. Newport Mini Storage. Entrance 2 blocks south of Safeway on Highway 41 at 1st Street, Newport, Washington. Cash only. (18) FARMER’S MARKET IS OPEN! Fresh greens, spinach, bedding plants, crafts, log furniture and more. Saturday 9:00-1:00, across from John L Scott, Newport. (18) JUNK FROM TRUNK AND VINTAGE TRAILER SHOW June 22nd 10:00 to 4:00. Admission $2.00. Vendors from 4 states. Antiques, vintage, repurposed, salvage finds, good sassy junk! 5 miles south of Newport between mile markers 329 and 328. (509) 589-0097. (18HB-2) OFFICE SPACE Washington Street, Newport. 400 square feet with additional storage space of 350 square feet. (208) 660-9271. (18-4) LAKEFRONT HOME!!! On beautiful Davis Lake. 2 bedroom 1 bath. Large yard and 2 car garage. $785 per month plus deposit. (208) 610-9220. (18-4) HYPNOSIS Lose weight! Stop smoking now! Individual or groups. Purposeful Life Mastery Coaching. Dr. Douglas Rigg P.h.D., CHt, (509) 589-0638. (18-tf)

ROAD ATLAS Current, detailed road atlas, spiral bound with laminated cover. Pend Oreille County, Washington $30.00. Bonner County, Idaho $35.00. Sold at The Miner Newspapers, 421 South Spokane Avenue, Newport. (509) 447-2433.(12HB-alt tf) NEWPORT IRIS GARDEN Tall bearded iris and others blooming. 10:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays through Father’s Day. Weekdays by appointment. 205 North Craig. (509) 671-1540. See website www.newportnaturalsiris. weebly.com. (18) OLDTOWN AUTO SALES We buy clean used cars and RV’s. See our complete inventory online at www.oldtownautos.com.(51HB-tf) OPEN MIC First Friday of every month. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 240 North Union, Newport. 7:00 p.m. Admission $2.00. Bring a song or story to share, and watch the stars come out! (48, 52, 4, 9, 13, 18, 22, 26, 31, 35, 39, 44) SALES BY TUDY Estate of Carey Averyt. Friday 8:00 to 5:00; Saturday 8:00 to 2:00. 5-1/2 miles out on Highway 20 toward Cusick. Fishing tackle, shotgun shells for reloading, tools, hunting items (spotting scope, G.P.S., clothes) farm gas tank. Also; 100’s of books, Play Station 2 (40 games) household, clothes, (infant to adult) baby equipment, toys, 14 dozen jelly jars. No previews or early sales. Cash preferred. Open 8:00 sharp! (18p) BEAUTICIAN/ HAIR STYLIST needed at Priest Lake. Great turn key business opportunity at the Tamrak Shopping Village. Bill (208) 443-3827. (15HB-4p) WASHINGTON AND IDAHO LEGAL FORMS Available at The Miner Newspapers, 421 South Spokane, Newport. (509) 447-2433.(36HB-alt-tf)


THE MINER

Lifestyle



BR I E FLY Nashville group performing at local church Saturday NEWPORT – The award-winning Nashville-based Blackwood Brothers Legacy Quartet will be performing a community concert in Newport Saturday, June 8, at 7 p.m. at the Newport First Baptist Church, 517 Second St. Admission is free, and an offering will be received. The Blackwood Legacy Quartet link Southern Gospel’s traditional sound with today’s newer country gospel and worship music. Lead singer Daniel Childs is the great-grandson to Blackwood Brothers founding father, Roy Blackwood. Spokane native Luke Yates sings baritone with the group, and is also an awardwinning pianist. Tenor singer Paul Secord was a featured singer for Disney World. Group owner and bass singer, Rick Price, was originally a protégée of the late Cecil Blackwood. He began his 35-year career singing with the Blackwood Brothers in 1977, and was eventually inducted into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame.

Young named to dean’s list BILLINGS, Mont. – Newport resident Madilyn Young was one for 149 students named to the dean’s honor list at Rocky Mountain College in Billings, Mont. The list for the spring semester 2013 includes 258 students in all who earned a 3.6 to 4.0 grade point average. For high honors, 109 students achieved a 4.0 GPA. For the dean’s list, 149 students achieved a 3.6 to 3. 99 GPA. RMC is a private comprehensive college offering more than 27 liberal arts and professionally oriented majors.

Local families needed for exchange students NEWPORT – ASSE International Student Exchange Programs is seeking local host families for international high school boys and girls, ages 15 to 18. These academically selected exchange students speak English. They arrive from their home country shortly before school begins and return at the end of the school year or semester. Each ASSE student is fully insured, brings his or her own personal spending money and expects to contribute to his or her share of household responsibilities, as well as being included in normal family activities and lifestyles. The students are well screened and qualified by ASSE. Families can choose their students from a wide variety of backgrounds, nationalities and personal interests. People interested in obtaining more information about becoming a host family should call 1-800-733-2773.

COURTESY PHOTO|BILLIE WASHBURN

House of the Lord students pose with Smokey Bear and show their certificates for winning the annual poster contest.

Smokey visits House of Lord OLDTOWN – Smokey Bear recently paid his annual visit to House of the Lord Christian Academy with packets of educational materials and his message of fire prevention and how kids and families can be safe while camping in the woods. “We look forward to bringing Smokey to the schools every spring,” said Pam Aunan of the Idaho Department of Lands, a

co-sponsor of the event. U.S. Forest Service representative Billie Washburn presented slides and reminders for campfire safety. Results of the annual Smokey/ Woodsy poster contest were announced and certificates and prizes awarded to the winners. Winners include: First graders Jarron Lyon, Taryn Byler and Ryan Durbin; second graders

NEWPORT – The Inland Northwest Blood Center along with the Newport community blood drive volunteers led by George Lunden will be coordinating the blood drive Thursday, June 20, from 12:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at the United Church of Christ, 430 W. Third St. INBC needs an average of 200 blood donors every day to meet the needs of more than 35 hospitals in the Inland Northwest. A single donation can save the lives of up to three people.

Share your life events for free NEWPORT – The Newport and Gem State Miner Newspapers are looking to share your life events with the community. Submit births, weddings and engagements to The Miner for publication at no charge. The Miner can be reached at 509447-2433, minernews@povn. com or visit www.pendoreillerivervalley.com online, or stop by the office at 421 S. Spokane in Newport.

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Pee Wee Creek poker ride, clinics June 8-9 PRIEST RIVER – The 25th on the trail. Dogs must be on annual Priest River Valley leashes at campsites. A release Backcountry Horsemen Poker must be signed by a parent for Ride will be held Saturday, riders under 18. Riders under June 8 at Pee Wee Creek, north 14 must be accompanied by of Priest River, with a series of an adult. No horses may be left mini camps the next day. unattended while you ride. Registration for the poker For more information ride is from 8:30 a.m. to noon. about the ride, contact Dale The first riders start at 9 a.m. Schrempp at 208-448-1255 or and the last riders are out Jack Lamb 208-263-4772. by noon (no exceptions). The The Sunday mini clinics becharge for adults is $20 and gin with registration at 8 a.m. $8.50 for ridand the first event The best hand wins $75, starts at 9 a.m. The ers ages 17 and under. cost is $20 for the the worst hand $25. The cost day for adults and includes one $10 for those 16 and poker hand and lunch. Adunder; lunch will be available ditional poker hands are $5 for a small fee. each and lunch only is $8.50. The clinics presented will The best hand wins $75, the include a Dutch oven cookworst hand $25. ing class, equine first aid, a This ride has beautiful survival class, Horse Camping panoramic views of the Priest 101, mini packing clinic (basic River Valley. The trail is well packing techniques), and a groomed with some steep “leave no trace” clinic. sections and several small To get to the trailhead, take bridges to cross. Some riding Highway 57 north from Priest experience is required. Horses River 3.5 miles to Peninsula should be shod or booted. Road. Turn right, go across There is stock water at the the bridge and continue 4.5 trailhead. You may choose a miles. Turn left onto the 3.5- to 5-hour ride. Camping gravel Forest Service Road 334 is free. There are no hook-ups. (Gleason-McAbee Falls Road) Highline posts are available. and continue one mile. The Only one rider per horse is trailhead is on the left just past allowed and running horses is the old gravel pit. prohibited. People are advised For more information about to ride at safe intervals. No the clinics, contact: Louise Mcstud horses are allowed and no Bride 509-442-2127 or JoAnn alcohol or dogs are permitted Hale 208-304-2885.

Summer theater camp dates announced NEWPORT – Summer is just around the corner, and the dates have been set for Pend Oreille Playhouse fifth annual summer theater camp program. The Pend Oreille Players (POPA) use programs and activities appro-

priate to your child’s age, to teach basic instruction in acting, stage movement and direction, and much more. The beginning level program for grades 1-3 is July 15-18, 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m., with a performance for

friends and family July 18 at 1 p.m. The cost is $25 per student, and the class is limited to 12 students. The intermediate level program for grades 4-6 is July 29 through Aug, 2, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., with a performance for friends and family Aug. 2 at 2 p.m. The cost is $35 per student with the class limited to 15 students. Senior level classes for grades 7-12 are Aug. 12-23, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., with three public performances Aug. 23 and 24 at 7

CALVARY CHAPEL NEWPORT

“Where The Sheep Go To Be Fed” 409 S. Spokane • Newport Sunday Morning 10 a.m. (509) 939-0676 CalvaryNewport@aol.com / 97.3 FM “I am the bread of life. He who comes to me will never go hungry, and he who believes in me will never be thirsty.” John 6:35

p.m. and Aug. 25 at 3 p.m. The cost is $75 per student with the class limited to 25 students. Students are asked to bring a sack lunch, and a nutritious snack is provided. Classes fill up fast, and last year about a dozen aspiring young actors had to be turned away, so early registration is strongly recommended. If beginning and intermediate levels fill by June 28, additional sessions may be added, based on availability of instructors and staff.

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST 3rd and Spokane St., Newport, WA Worship Service ~ 10:00 a.m. Church School ~ 10:00 a.m. Nursery Care Available Rev. Russell Clark 447-4121 newportucc@conceptcable.com www.newportucc.org

REAL LIFE MINISTRIES

COURTESY PHOTO|NEWPORT SOROPTIMISTS

Blood drive set for June 20

Andrew Harris, Conner Erickson and Austin Reeves; third graders Nathan Lyon, Seth Wohlberg and Grace Youk with an honorable mention for Trentyn Kraeger; fifth graders Jeremy Young, Aya Considine, Toby McIntosh and Justin Jones. The organizers thanked the Garden Club for sponsoring the event and the Bonner County Fire Prevention Co-op for prizes.

JUNE 5, 2013 |

Acting Soroptomist President Gladys Bishop, left, presents a check for $300 to Terry Harding of Newport Young Lives.

Soroptimists donate to group for teen moms NEWPORT – The Newport Soroptomists, a branch of Soroptomist International, recently gave a $300 donation to help a club that offers support and mentoring for young mothers. The Soroptimists presented a check to Terry Harding, of Newport Young Lives. She is one of the lead organizers for the newly established Newport club. The group caters to those ages 13 to 20 who are pregnant or have young children. They meet the second Monday of each month at 6 p.m. at the Hospitality House on Washington Avenue in Newport. Teens learn childcare skills, develop friendships with other teen moms, and learn ways to earn a better life for themselves and their children. Harding, a leader and mentor, said that the contribution from Soroptomists will keep the program meetings going until the end of 2013.

Newport Soroptomists follow the goals of Soroptomist International in supporting Women and Girls in the U.S. and abroad. In Newport, the Soroptomists sponsor the Girl of the Month at Newport High School to recognize seniors who have outstanding academic and athletic achievements and leadership in their school. A scholarship is presented each year to one of these outstanding girls. The Soroptomist also support the Priest River Young Woman of the Year program and contribute to local groups, including supporting the Newport Hospital Foundation in the purchase of a digital mammography machine for the hospital. Soroptomist membership is open to all women in the area. The club meets the first and third Tuesday of each month at noon at the Pine Ridge Community Church on First Street in Newport.

“Where Jesus and Real Life Meet.” Worship Time: Sunday 10:30 a.m. at the Newport High School Real Life Ministries office, 420 4th St. Newport, WA - Office Phone: (509) 447-2164 or Toll Free (877) 997-1200

PINE RIDGE COMMUNITY CHURCH

1428 1st Street West Sunday School ~ 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship ~ 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays: Girls Club, ages 9 to 12, 5:30 to 7:00 pm Soul’d Out Youth, ages 13 thru 19, 6:00 pm Pastor Mitch McGhee 447-3265

DALKENA COMMUNITY CHURCH • VILLAGE MISSIONS S.S. ~ 9:30 • Worship ~ 11 a.m. Family Night, Wednesday ~ 7 p.m. (Bible and Youth Clubs) Pastor Sandy Strait - 509-447-3687

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH of Diamond Lake Corner of North Shore Road and Jorgens Road Informal Family-style Worship Sundays 10:00 a.m. 509-671-3436

CHURCH OF FAITH

36245 Hwy 41, Oldtown, ID Sunday School 9 a.m. Sunday Services - 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wed. - Bible Study 6 p.m. Pastor Jack Jones Church Office 208-437-0150 www.churchoffaitholdtown.com

Community Church Directory CATHOLIC MASSES

A limited number of scholarships are available, and applications for scholarships, as well as the registration forms for camp are available at the playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave. in Newport, and on POPA’s website: www.pendoreilleplayers.org. If you would like to make a donation to support a theatre camp student, visit the website, or pick up a donation form at the playhouse. For more information, contact camp director Gail Cory-Betz at 509-447-2750. SPRING VALLEY MENNONITE CHURCH

4912 Spring Valley Road Sunday: 9:45 a.m. Worship Service 11 a.m. -- Sunday School (509) 447-3588

NEWPORT FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

“Sharing Christ As He Is, With People As They Are” 2nd & Spokane Sts 447-3846 9 a.m. Sunday School 10:15 a.m. Worship Service 11:30 a.m. Fellowship Time September - May AWANA - Tuesday 5:30 p.m. The Immortals (13-High School ) Thur. 7-9 Pastor Rob Malcolm

NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH

4 Miles South of Newport, Hwy. 2 Sun.: 9:30 Sun. School, 10:30, Worship, 6 p.m. Evening Service Sun. & Wed. at Pastor’s house. Jams 5 pm 2nd Saturdays Pastor, Walt Campbell: 447-5101

HOUSE OF THE LORD

Newport: St. Anthony’s, 447-4231 612 W. First St., Sun. - 11 a.m. Usk: St. Jude’s River Rd., Sat. - 5p.m. Ione: St. Bernard’s, 802 - 8th St., Sun. - 2nd & 4th - 8:00 a.m. Metaline Falls: St. Joseph’s, 446-2651 -- 406 Park St., Sun., 1st, 3rd & 5th - 8:00 a.m.

754 Silver Birch Ln. • Oldtown, ID 83822 ‘’Contemporary Worship’’ Sun. ~ 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. “United Generation Church” Youth Group Wednesday 6 p.m. Jeff & Robie Ecklund, Pastors • 437-2032 www.hotl.me

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTISTS

1 mile S. of Newport on Hwy. 2 • 447-3742 Pastor Rob Greenslade Sun. School 9:45 a.m. • Worship 11 a.m. Evening Worship 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Weds. 6:30 p.m.

Diamond Lake Church 326002 Hwy. 2, West of Newport Head Elder Dale French, (509) 447-4565 Newport Church - Corner of Lilac Lane & Hwy. 20 North Pastor Ron Fleck (509) 447-4755 Sat. Morning Services Sabbath School 9:30 • Worship 11:00 NACS THRIFT SHOP (509) 447-3488 PO Valley Church School (208) 437-2638

NEWPORT SOUTHERN BAPTIST CHURCH

AMERICAN LUTHERAN CHURCH E.L.C.A.

332801 Hwy. 2, P.O. Box 653, Newport Pastors Matt & Janine Goodrich Sunday School 9 am Worship Service 10 am (509) 447-4338


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Sports



BR I E FLY Anglers, bring your questions for IFG BOISE – Anglers are invited to join an online chat with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and ask questions, give feedback, and learn more about fishing in the Gem State. Anglers can chat live with fisheries and hatchery staff, along with enforcement officers, Wednesday, June 12, from 5 to 7 p.m. (Pacific time). Fish and Game will answer question about the status of the salmon fisheries, family fishing opportunities, outlooks for steelhead, kokanee, stream, reservoir, and mountain lake fishing, as well as other related topics during the live, two hour chat. Participants may also respond to fisheries-related polls and surveys, and see the results in real time. “The summer fishing season is here, and we hope this chat helps anglers with their questions in a new and interactive way,” said Dave Parrish, sport fishing program coordinator. Participants can join the chat by visiting Fish and Game’s home page at http:// fishandgame.idaho.gov and look for the chat link.

Wiese named golf MVP NEWPORT – Newport’s Courtney Wiese was selected Most Valuable Player for girls golf in the Northeast A League. She was joined by Sydney Wiese Hearnden on the all conference girls golf team. On the boys side, Gage Anderson was named all conference. The remainder of the all Hearnden conference golf teams include (boys): Clint Long (Chewelah), Josh Olson (Chewelah) and Adam Campasino (Lakeside). Lakeside’s Nate Yockey was Anderson named Most Valuable Player for the boys. For the girls, Sam Viehouser (Lakeside), Teresa Jansen (Medical Lake), Kelsey Jones (Lakeside), Savanah McMillan (Chewelah) and Alexa Weishaar (Medical Lake) rounded out the team.

Golf ‘Fore the Health of It’ June 14 BLANCHARD – The Newport Hospital and Health Services Foundation will host their sixth annual “Fore the Health of It” golf tournament Friday, June 14, at StoneRidge Golf Course in Blanchard. The fundraiser will benefit the Healthy Kids Snack Bags program, which provides weekly snacks and health information to students in need at Newport schools. The goal is to expand the program to neighboring communities. Registration for the tournament was due June 4. For sponsorship opportunities or any more information, contact the hospital foundation at 509-447-7928.

COURTESY PHOTO|KRISTINA PARKER

Kids get their kicks Players of Newport and Priest River under-six teams go for the ball in a May 17 game in Newport. The soccer season for the Pend Oreille Youth Soccer Association and the Priest River Youth Sports Association, for kids under 14, wrapped up with a tournament in Newport May 29. Pictured are Robert Warren, left, Parker Warren, Nathan Seal, coach Lauren Gailey, and Carsen Hirst.

Spartans honored for spring sports achievements PRIEST RIVER – Priest River Lamanna High School’s spring sports team held award nights at the end of May. Baseball awards were presented May 22. Ashton Brooks received the Big Stick Award and was named offensive MVP. Tyler Barber was defensive MVP, Wyatt King was most improved, Dalton Sommer and Nick Farnham were named Best Teammate. Cody Edwards and Jacob Munar received the coaches award. On the junior varsity team, Jesse Miller was offensive MVP, Ben

Huntley was defensive MVP, and Alex Carey was most improved. Softball awards were also May 22. Ayonna Lentz was named MVP, Erika Nelson was Most Inspirational and received a coaches award. Brittany Krampert was defensive player of the year. On the JV squad, Vivian Reynolds was MVP and received a coaches award, Courtney Weiler and Megan Kavashan received coaches awards as well. Regina Redl was most inspirational, and the entire team was most improved.

Track and field athletes had an awards night May 23. Andy Meyer was the boys MVP, and Dallas Hopkins was the runner up. Diamond Robinson was named most inspirational, and Starling Infate was most improved. Michael Taylor was the most outstanding freshman. On the girls team, Steffie Pavey was MVP and most inspirational athlete, and Jill Weimer was runner up. Amber Trantum was most improved, and Elisabeth Young was most outstanding freshman.

Three Spartans name All Intermountain softball PRIEST RIVER – Priest River players Ayonna Lentz, Brittany Krampert and Alyssa Deal were named to the All Intermountain League team for softball. The All Intermountain honors were Deal spread throughout

the league, with Timberlake having four players, including Most Valuable Player, Sydnie Malloy, named to the team. Lexi Posch, Katie Malloy and Olyvia Owen were also named to the team from Timberlake. Krampert Kellogg’s Craig

Free fishing weekend coming up OLYMPIA – Free Fishing Weekend in Washington is Saturday and Sunday, June 8 and 9. Anglers can try out the sport without purchasing a license. You can also do with out a vehicle access pass, Discover Pass, or two-pole endorsement for the weekend. Saturday, June 8, is Free Fishing Day in Idaho, and Idaho Fish and Game invites veteran and novice anglers of all ages, residents and nonresidents alike, to celebrate the day by fishing anywhere in Idaho without a license. Though fishing license requirements are suspended for this special day, all other rules, such as limits or

tackle restrictions, remain in effect. “Free fishing day provides a great opportunity for novices to give fishing a try and perhaps develop it into a life-long pursuit,” Fish and Game Southwest regional fish manager Joe Kozfkay said. “Parents are encouraged to bring their children out for a day of fun fishing excitement.” Lack of fishing experience is no excuse. At special locations around the state, equipment will be available for use and fishing experts will be on hand to help novice anglers learn the ins and outs of fishing. In addition, all these locations will be stocked with hatchery rainbow trout prior to the special day.

Walden named track MVP NEWPORT – Newport senior Arielle Walden was named the Northeast A League most valuable player for girls field events. Junior pole vaulter Braden Barranco was the only other Brranco Newport athlete to earn all league honors. Others on the girls all league first team were Riverside senior Jessica Chrisp was the running events MVP. Her teammates freshman Mikayla Shuler and seniors Courtney Davis and Holly Bolton joined her on the all league first team. From Lakeside it was senior Jenna Widman, junior Katie Collins, sophomore Lindy Jacobson and freshman Samantha Blake. Medical Lake sophmore Amarah Nicholson and Chewelah sophomore Kaitlin Krouse were on the list. The boys MVP for running events was Riverside junior Jordan Yaws, and Chewelah senior Adam Collins was field events MVP. On the first team with Barranco was Medical Lake sprinter Tellas

Johnson, a senior, Freeman senior Jacob Lara. From Lakeside: juniors Micah Humann and Ryan Coffman were on the team, along with three more from Riverside: senior Joey Walden Allen, junior Logan Owens and sophomore Tristan Downing. The second team atheletes were Max Axtell, Conner Rubright, Connor McVay and Billy Broussard from Freeman; Riverside’s Eric Taylor; Chewelah’s Mackenzie Miller; Conner McKern and Chris Boring from Kettle Falls; Charles Mitchell, Mike Schimke and Grant Perkins from Lakeside; and Zeb Klemke and Micah Dingfield of Medical Lake. On the second team for girls were Lakeside’s Tiffani Given, Stefanie Marikis, Chelsea Tremblay, Sofia Marikis, Farrahn O’Hara and Davine Carr. From Freeman, Dani Reilly was named to the team along with Chewelah’s Kaitlin Krouse and from Riverside, Jessica Colburn, Maddi Dykeman, Allie Shannon.

Turbak was named Coach of the Year, with Alesha Barr, Tarah Ivie, Raine Yergler also named to the team from Kellogg. MaKenzie Carle and Lindsay Taggart from Bonners Ferry were also named to the Lentz team.

Selkirk Little Guys finish season strong SPOKANE – The Selkirk Little Guy Wrestlers participated in their final tournament of the season April 13 at the Spokane Convention Center. Little Guy wrestlers from all over Washington met to compete with each other. The Jason Crawford Memorial Wrestling Tournament is an annual event hosted by the Mat Maulers wrestling club of Medical Lake. Four Selkirk wrestlers placed in the Championship tournament: Jaren Martin earned first place by pinning all three of his opponents in the first round. It was his third time as champ. Jaxen Martin took second place with one win by pin. Porter Carman placed fourth with two pins, and Chase Miller placed fourth with one pin.

COURTESY PHOTO|KATHY KONESKY

All invited to play pickleball COURTESY PHOTO|RAMI MARTIN

Little Guy wrestlers Jaxen Martin, left, and Jaren Martin hold their awards from the final tournament.

tingham said. “The online town hall meeting will let people tell us about trail issues and what they want to see in the future on their trails, all from the convenience of their own homes.” To participate, visit the Trails Town Hall website at www.watrailstownhall.wordpress.com. RCO is updating the state’s trails plan and the Non-highway and Off-Road Vehicle Activities (NOVA)

Wayne Taylor of Spokane, a former Pend Oreille County building inspector, hits the ball at a pickleball match in Stoneridge Resort recently. Joel Jacobsen of Newport is organizing informal workshops Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 8 a.m. and Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. at three locations in the area – Stoneridge, the Newport High School tennis courts, and at the Camas Center in Usk. Any and all interested players, new or experienced, including high school students are invited to get involved. Contact Jacobsen at 509-671-0466 for times and locations.

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Share your thoughts on Washington’s trails OLYMPIA – The Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office (RCO) is asking the public to visit an online town hall and help plan the future of trails in Washington. “Whether people hike, mountain bike, ride horses, off-road vehicles or motorcycles, crosscountry ski, or just walk their dogs on trails, we’d like to hear from them,” RCO Director Kaleen Cot-

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plan. The 2013 Washington State Trails Plan will assess progress on providing trail recreation opportunities since 1991, identify emerging issues and set the stage for future planning. The NOVA plan update will guide funding to develop and manage recreation opportunities for activities such as cross-country skiing, hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking, hunting, fishing, sightseeing,

motorcycling and riding all-terrain and four-wheel drive vehicles. “We’d like people who care about trails to tell us what’s important to include in the two trail plans we are drafting,” Cottingham said. “Input from the public is crucial for deciding what’s important to include in these plans, and ultimately how and where trails should be built and maintained in Washington.”

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5 Selkirk Baseball Awards: TBA

SUNDAY, JUNE 9 Free Fishing Weekend: Washington

SATURDAY, JUNE 8 Free Fishing Day: - Idaho Free Fishing Weekend: Washington

TUESDAY, JUNE 11 Group Hike at Elk Creek Trail: 9 a.m. Meet at Priest River Senior Center

208-448-2311

Albeni Hwy. • Priest River Washington Customers Call Toll Free 1-800-440-8254


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JUNE 5, 2013 |

NEWPORT SENIOR CLASS OF 2013

Graduation Ceremonies Noon - Saturday, June 8th

Cody Bradley

Jessica Brady

Rachel Brasch

Jordan Braun

Tamithy Bridges

Carlie Dice

Josephine Dykeman

Kyle Edwards

Jessica Emery

Kevin Farman

Kyler Ferguson

Daisy Hester

Brittany Hopkins

Tyler Hunt

Destiny Instasi

Vanessa Kaelin

Jenna Kersting

Christian King

Ashley Lacy

Brandon Larsen

Penny Lelle

Jacklin McCroskey

Michael McGee

Jared McLain

Scott McMeen

Homer Merriman

Allison Naccarato

Haley Nelson

Alexandra Nichols

Christopher Nichols

Gaberial Pagaling

Hailey Patterson

Erik Person

Rene Peters

Sierra Pittman

Breauna Rohrer

Jessica Ross

Karina Rousseau

Davis Sage

Amanda Santee

Medrano Saxony

Kylie Schrader

Shalisa Schrader

Sydney Siemsen

Jared Smiley

Jasmine Smith

Jessica Smith

Kristina Sotnikov

Ethan Tafoya

Jacob Thiers

Zachariah Wagar

Arielle Walden

Alexandra Abercrombie

Margaret Abercrombie

Alexander Brewster

Gage Anderson

Sasha Banning

Katelinn Borches

Austin Bronowski

Zekarias Chantry

Whitney Clark

Worley Coltin

Rebecca Daigneault

Cody Fisher

Josephine Frankel

Melissa Gillette

Brandon Girouard

Bryan Kirk

Brennan Knowles

Casey Kreinbring

Tony Mikhailenko

Jacob Morse

Starr Ridgway

Cameron Smith

Kimberley Sutton

Students who chose not to have their pictures taken

Wintang Warastri Aerocet (208) 448-0400 Seeber’s 509-447-2484 City Service Valcon 208-437-3513 Ponderay Newsprint 509-445-1511 Newport Vision Source 509-447-2945 Zodiac Aerospace

Nathan Courtney Wright Wiese 509-447-4122 Little Diamond KOA 509-447-4813 Farmers Insurance Group Bruce Hunt 509-447-3428 NAPA Auto Parts 509-447-4515 Durham School Services 509-447-0505 Newport Miner Newspapers 509-447-2433

Jazmine Young

Allie Casselman

Kyle Dean Michael Givens Aaron Miller John Poisel III

Tiffany Thomas

Andrew Thompson

WE SALUTE THE GRADUATES

Yoke’s Sandpoint 208-263-4613

Zombies Espresso 509-292-5169

Les Schwab 208-448-2311

H&D Diesel 509-447-4699

Carl Pitts & Sons Well Drilling 208-473-4168

Ben Franklin 208-437-4822

Connie & Clydes Barber Shop 509-447-3734

Pend Oreille Tri Pro Forest Products, Inc. County Library 208-437-2412 509-447-2111

Perfection Tire 509-447-3933 Selkirk Ace Hardware 208-437-5669 PUD District 1 509-447-3137

Royal Flush Septic Service 509-447-2264

Burnett’s Transmission 208-263-0589

Valued Merchant Services 208-313-9141

Kalispel Tribe 509-445-1147

Rural Resources Community Action/Worksource 509-550-7050

Royal Towing Newport LLC 509-671-3599

Newport Dental, Dr. Cool 509-447-3105

Walden House Inn 509-447-5771

Roger’s Body & Frame 509-447-4225

Safeway 509-447-4315

Pooch Parlor Pet Grooming 208-437-0503

Penrith Farms 509-447-2996

Pend Oreille Players 509-671-1442

Clark Construction 509-447-5209

Lane Mountain Co. 509-937-2221

Northern Lakes Dock & Barge 208-437-2004

Priest River Mini Storage 208-448-1273

Rob’s Heating & Cooling 208-610-5747

Bliss Chiropractic Clinic 509-447-2413

Riverbank Family Restaurant 208-437-0892

Bill’s Auto & Towing 208-437-3100

Black Rose 509-447-3825

Mountain West Bank Newport & Ione 509-447-5642/ 509-442-3516

Petticoat Junction 509-671-9963 Inland Power & Light 509-747-7151

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FOR THE RECORD 

O B I T UA R I E S

Sheila Schwab Thompson Newport

Sheila Schwab Thompson passed away May 30 in Spokane at the age of 92. She was born Aug. 3, 1920, in Newport to Walter and Thompson Margaret Schwab. Her mother died in childbirth, and her father died as the result of a horse accident when she was 4. At the age of one month, she was sent to McLean County, Ill., to be raise by her paternal grandparents Fredrick W. and Mary Schwab on their farm five miles west of Bloomington. In 1939 she married Eugene W. Thompson. The couple moved to Pend Oreille County in 1947 to work a ranch left to Sheila by her parents. The ranch had been saved for her by her uncle Fred Schwab, a well-known Pend Oreille County pioneer. Sheila and Eugene Thompson were married 51 years until Gene’s death in 1990. One son, Wayne G. Thompson preceded her in death, dying in 1994. She is survived by sons Stephen E. Thompson in Newport and John (and Susan) Thompson of Suncrest, Wash. She is also survived by grandchildren Angela (and John) Lynch of Black Diamond, Wash., Timothy (and Gena) Thompson of Priest River, Amy Schribner of Priest River and Dan (and Misty) Thompson of Coeur d’ Alene; Robert Thompson, Rebecca (and Sean) Flachmeyer, Jamie (and Nick) Todd, and Fiona Thompson, all of Spokane, and Georgia (and Jack) Boles, in Columbia, Tenn. She is also survived by 16 great-grandchildren. A funeral service will be held Tuesday, June 11, at 1 p.m. at the First Baptist Church of Newport. Sherman-Knapp Funeral Home

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in Newport is in charge of arrangements. Family and friends are invited to sign the online guestbook at www.shermanknapp.com.

Theodore Joseph Lakman Sweet Grass, Mont.

Theodore Joseph Lakman, a retired substation operator, passed away peacefully at his home near Sweet Grass, Mont., May 25 of natural causes. He was 82. He was born to Joseph and Margaret (Pogreba) Lakman June 26, 1930, in Great Falls, Mont. He grew up and attended schools in Sweet Grass. He served in the Navy from 1950 to 1954 and was a veteran of the Korean Conflict. He was a member of the VFW Sweet Grass Post. Ted married Peggy Ann Langman from Sweet Grass. They had three children, Lora Kim Mehaffey of Great Falls, Rebecca (and Andrew) MacArthur of Oldtown, and William (and Doris) Lakman of Naples, Fla. As a young man, Mr. Lakman worked for various farmers in the Sweet Grass area, later working for Montana Power and Bonneville Power in Ione. He retired from Bonneville Power and he and Peggy returned to the Montana prairie, which they both loved. He is survived by his children; seven grandchildren and many great-grandchildren; sister Margie Ellison of Reno, Nev.; and brother Bill (and Isabel) Lakman of Fremont, Calif. He is predeceased by his wife Peggy, grandson Lucas MacArthur, and brother John Lakman. His strong and faithful presence in his family’s lives will be greatly missed, they said, he was their pillar through good times and bad. A celebration of his life will be planned for this summer. Whitted Funeral Chapel is in charge of arrangements.

WA N T E D

Editor’s Note: The following are descriptions of people currently wanted by the Pend Oreille County Sheriff’s Office and other law enforcement agencies. Any information about these suspects should be directed to the sheriff’s office by calling 509-4473151. This is a regular section of The Miner. All information is provided by the sheriff’s office.

William T. Mills, 27, is wanted on one Pend Oreille County warrant for failure to appear on original charges of driving while suspended third degree. He is 6 Mills feet, 1 inches tall and weighs 165 pounds, with green eyes and brown hair. His last known address was in the Newport area.

Michele L. Springsteen, 45,

is wanted on one Pend Oreille County warrant for failure to appear on original Springsteen charges of driving

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while suspended third degree. He is 5 feet, 6 inches tall and weighs 210 pounds, with green eyes and brown hair. His last known address was in the Newport area.

Robert A. Rumsey, 25, is wanted on one Pend Oreille County warrant for failure to appear on original charges of domestic violence assault and making a false Rumsey statement to law enforcement. He is 6 feet, 1 inches tall and weighs 150 pounds. His last known address was in the Oldtown area.

Donna R. Kimberling, 52, is wanted on one Pend Oreille County warrant for failure to appear on original charges of DUI. She is 6 feet tall and weighs 180 pounds, with brown eyes and gray Kimberling hair. Her last known address was in the Newport area.

Smith promotes wood heat for schools OLYMPIA – A bill allowing schools to study the feasibility of heating schools with wood pellets and another that would pay livestock owners for animals killed by wolves were two bills sponsored by Sen. John Smith, R-Colville, signed by the governor recently. Senate Bill 5709 is a measure that the governor said holds “great promise.” Wood pellets – a heat source popular in Smith’s 7th Legislative District yet underutilized across the state, known as “densified biomass” in policy language – have the potential to save schools money on overhead costs. The bill creates a program to test the feasibility and money-saving results from using biomass to heat schools. Washington State University’s energy program will spearhead a two-year pilot program in two Washington public schools to de-

termine if schools and businesses all across the state could benefit from using biomass. Smith’s second measure signed was SB5193, which establishes a wildlife account and new wolflivestock conflict account to fund compensation to livestock owners for injuries or loss of livestock caused by wolves. As the state continues wolf recovery efforts, Smith says it is imperative for a funding source to be in place to help offset damages from conflicts. “As a whole, ranchers are committed to using non-lethal methods to deter wolves and other predators; however, it has been proven time and time again, that wolves are persistent, unpredictable, and often unfazed by flagery or fencing when they set their sights on livestock,” he said. “This gives ranchers protection when their livelihoods are at stake.”

Editor’s note: The police reports, taken from dispatch logs provided to The Miner by law enforcement agencies, are not intended to be an exact report but rather a comprehensive list of police calls in Pend Oreille and West Bonner counties. Dispatch also fields calls for the Kalispel Tribe property in Airway Heights. Certain police calls are generally omitted because of space constraints. These include but aren’t limited to ambulance calls for illness, unfounded alarms, traffic stops, dogs at large, abandoned vehicles, 911 hang–ups and civil standbys. All dispositions for the police reports are assumed to be active, assist or transfer at press time. The police reports are updated each weekday on The Miner Online.

PEND OREILLE COUNTY Monday, May 27 SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Hwy. 20, report that someone has been staying in complainant’s residence. PHONE OFFENSE – S. Garden Ave., Newport, complainant received message she feels is threatening. BURGLARY – S. Newport Ave., report of residence broken into. Tuesday, May 28 THEFT – Hwy. 2, report of fuel stolen from three separate vehicles. ARREST – Newport Area, Tyler C. Turner, 41, of Newport was arrested on an out of county warrant. DISTURBANCE – S. Union Ave., Newport, report of male walking and yelling. HARASSMENT – W. 7th St., report that subject continues to contact complainant after being told not to. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Rocky Gorge Rd., report of male trying to break into a truck with a coat hanger. FRAUD – Weber Rd., report that someone is using complainant’s social security number. HARASSMENT – W. Sacheen St., respondent reports being harassed by a known subject. ANIMAL CRUELTY – Bob Newman Rd. ANIMAL CRUELTY – Camden Rd., respondent reporting five horses she believes are emaciated. THEFT AUTOMOBILE – N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights ARREST – Frederick R. Nelson, 55, of Usk was arrested fro driving under the influence. ARREST – William Bryce Gilmour, 53, of Spokane was arrested for possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia. Wednesday, May 29 ARREST – S. Garden Ave., Newport, Jordan Mitchell Dalziel, 23, was arrested for failure to comply and fourth degree assault domestic violence. THEFT – LeClerc Rd. N., report that debit card stolen from purse was used in Ione. TRANSPORT – Thomas David Gillock, 20, of Spokane was arrested for motor vehicle theft. FOUND PROPERTY – S. State St., report of pistol found on

Angel Paws joins Petfinder NEWPORT – Angel Paws of Pend Oreille County has joined thousands of animal welfare organizations across North America that list their homeless pets on Petfinder. com. Priest River Animal Rescue also uses the site. To get started, potential adopters enter their search criteria and a list is returned that ranks the pets by proximity to the location entered. Adoptions are carried out by the animal placement group that is caring for the pet, following their best practices and policies.

THE MINER

P O LI C E

property. BURGLARY – S. Washington Ave., Newport, complainant was gone for a few days and reportedly found the back door was kicked in and items were missing. INTOXICATION – S. Washington Ave., Newport, report of man staggering in public may be intoxicated. ARREST – W. Spruce St., Jay T. Haikkila, 30, of Newport, was arrested on a local warrant. SUSPICIOUS VEHICLE – Hwy. 20, report htat vehicle was parked at the end of complainant’s driveway for 30 minutes. Thursday, May 30 SUSPICIOUS VEHICLE – Veit Rd., report of vehicle parked at the end of driveway for a few days. BURGLARY – Selkirk Trail, report that someone broke into cabin and has been living there. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE – W. Kelly Drive, report of domestic violence verbal between two males. TRAFFIC HAZARD – Hwy. 2, report of two horses walking in the highway. MALICIOUS MISCHIEF – S. Cass Ave., report that someone painted the side of the garage. TRAFFIC HAZARD – Deeter Rd., report of intoxicated male standing in the highway. FOUND PROPERTY – Giddings Rd. THEFT – Coyote Trail Rd., report of generator missing from yard. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Veit Rd., report that known subject left a safe at complainant’s residence. THEFT – Hwy. 211, report of tools taken from yard and other items removed in the middle of the night. ANIMAL PROBLEM – Watertower Lane, report of neighbors llamas on property. ARREST – N. Main Ave., Brian Keith Eubank, 38, of Cusick was arrested for violation of a court order. Friday, May 31 PROWLER – Berry Rd., report of male on back porch wearing black with black backpack. THEFT – S. 2nd Ave., reported gas drive off. HAZ MAT – Hwy. 41, report of hazardous materials. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Fertile Valley Rd., report that boat has gas cap off and may have had gas siphoned out of it. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Tigerview Lane, report of suspicious pictures on a computer. ACCIDENT – W. Walnut St., Newport, report of two-car accident, neck injury. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Rocky Gorge Rd., respondent believes there’s a large party about 10 cars unusual for area. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE – S. Calispell Ave., report of male and female screaming.

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R E P O R T S

ARREST – Landon Evans Brown, 39, of Newport was arrested for driving under the influence. Saturday, June 1 ACCIDENT – Hwy. 211, report that vehicle collided with power pole. POSSIBLE DUI – Conklin Meadows Rd., report of older gray Chevy SUV all over the road. ACCIDENT – Hwy. 20, motorcycle-deer collision. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Marshall Lake Rd., report of two ATVs with chains saws and Idaho plates in the area. ARREST – Reynolds Creek Rd., Victor J. Ray, 48, of Cusick was arrested for fourth degree assault domestic violence and illegal possession of a firearm. PHONE OFFENSE – S. Spokane Ave., report that complainant has been getting text messages from someone. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – S. State Line Rd., report of suspicious vehicle and a wanted person walking to it. FIRE – Ridge Runner Lane, report of smoke only in area. AGENCY ASSIST – W. Walnut St., Newport, report that subject was beating a vehicle with a crow bar. BURGLARY – Cedar Drive, report of cabin broken into. WEAPON OFFENSE – Fan Lake Rd., respondent heard shot fired suspicious vehicle in area but no one around the vehicle. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Hwy. 211, report that someone attempted to gain entry to motor home. TIMBER FIRE – Hwy. 20, report of timber fire in trees large flames and smoke. TRESPASSING – Scotia Rd., report of four-wheeler trespassing on property. TRESPASSING – N. State Line Rd., report that male attempted to open door. NOISE COMPLAINT – Beaver Valley Rd., report that subjects set off an explosion after 10 p.m. ILLEGAL BURNING – Spring Valley Rd., report that neighbors are burning plastic. FIRE – Driskill Rd., report of brush fire visible flames. ARREST – Martin Maxwell Hackett, 25, of Oldtown was arrested on a warrant. Sunday, June 2 SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Monumental Way, Cusick, complainant believes someone has stolen her identity. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Willms Rd., report of suspicious people possibly scouting out houses. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – N. Washington Ave., Newport, report that male attempted to rob subject at ATM. FOUND PROPERTY – S. Newport

PU B LI C

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5 Diamond Lake Water and Sewer: 10 a.m. - District Office, 172 South Shore Road Oldtown Urban Renewal District Board: 5:30 p.m. Oldtown City Hall Fire District No. 4 Commissioners: 6 p.m. - Dalkena Fire Station No. 41 Diamond Lake Improvement Association: 6:30 p.m. Diamond Lake Fire Station, Highway 2 Sacheen Lake Sewer and Water District Board: 7 p.m. - Sacheen Fire Station, Highway 211 THURSDAY, JUNE 6 Bonner County Planning and Zoning Commission Hearing: 5 p.m. - Bonner County Administrative Building, Sandpoint SATURDAY, JUNE 8 Pend Oreille County Democrats: 10 a.m. - Elk Pioneer Days MONDAY, JUNE 10 Pend Oreille County Commissioners: 9 a.m. - Pend Oreille County Courthouse Newport School Board: 5 p.m. - District Offices Pend Oreille Fire District No.

|| Ave., report that respondent found bike left in her yard. EXPLOSIVES – Ridge Runner Lane, report that respondent heard explosion in area.

WEST BONNER COUNTY Monday, May 27 DOMESTIC DISPUTE – Dry Creek Rd., Oldtown Tuesday, May 28 ARREST – Hwy. 57, Priest River, Jeremy Mock, 34, of Kingston, was arrested for driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Wednesday, May 29 BURGLARY – E. 3rd St. N., Oldtown NON-INJURY ACCIDENT – Old Priest River Rd., Oldtown Thursday, May 30 BATTERY – Blackthorn Rd., Oldtown ARREST – Cavanaugh Bay Rd., Coolin, Donald Shultz, 68, of Seattle, was arrested on an out of state felony warrant. CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE – Hwy. 2, Oldtown, a 31-year-old Newport man was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia. Friday, May 31 UNLAWFUL ENTRY – Hwy. 2, Oldtown DOMESTIC DISPUTE – Jackson Ave., Priest River CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE – Hwy. 2, Priest River, a 22-yearold Newport man was cited and released for misdemeanor possession of marijuana and paraphernalia. RECKLESS DRIVING – Hwy. 41, Oldtown HUNTING FISHING VIOLATIONS – Hwy. 41, Oldtown Saturday, June 1 HUNTING & FISHING VIOLATIONS – Stewart Drive, Blanchard CONTROLLED SUBSTANCE – Hwy. 2, Oldtown, a 23-year-old Post Falls man was in possession of marijuana in Oldtown. BURGLARY – Saddler Creek Rd., Priest River DISTURBING THE PEACE – Peninsula Rd., Priest River, report of a noise complaint. LOST PROPERTY – Hwy. 2, Oldtown ARREST – Hwy. 2, Oldtown, Jacob Kenneth Johnson, 22, of Newport was arrested for warrants, misdemeanor and felony drug offenses. Sunday, June 2 CHILD NEGLECT – Campbell Loop, Priest River ARREST – E. 4th St. S., Oldtown, Dylan Walkup, 21, of Oldtown was arrested on an outstanding misdemeanor warrant.

M E E T I N G S

6: 6 p.m. - Furport Fire Hall, 7572 LeClerc Road Oldtown City Council: 6:30 p.m. - Oldtown City Hall Cusick Town Council: 7 p.m. Cusick Community Center TUESDAY, JUNE 11 Bonner County Commissioners: 8:45 a.m. - Bonner County Administrative Building Port of Pend Oreille Commissioners: 9 a.m.: 1981 Black Road, Usk Pend Oreille County Commissioners: 9 a.m. - Pend Oreille County Courthouse West Bonner Library District Board of Trustees: 9 a.m. Priest River Library Friends of the Library - Noon - Priest River Library Pend Oreille County Planning Commission Hearings: 6 p.m. - Cusick Community

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Center West Bonner Water and Sewer District: 6:30 p.m. Oldtown City Hall West Bonner Library Board: 7 p.m. - Priest River Library Laclede Water District: 7:30 p.m. - Laclede Community Hall WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12 Pend Oreille Cemetery No. 1: 8:15 a.m. - County Courthouse in Newport Pend Oreille Conservation District Board: 9:30 a.m. Newport Post Office Building Pend Oreille County Noxious Weed Control Board: 2 p.m. - Commissioners’ Meeting Room, Newport Bonner County Democrats: 6:30-8 p.m. - Panhandle Health, 322 Marion St., Sandpoint

PROMOTE YOUR EVENT! 65,*(33‹65,)033‹:;(;,>0+, “ 0/(=,<:,+;/,>57(047(*;(+ 796.9(4-69-0=,@,(9:9<5505.>,/(=, :,,5(:702,0565305,;0*2,;:(3,:;9(*,()3, (:6<;6-(9,((-;,9,(*/(+73(*,4,5;” Access a powerful network of 102 Community Newspapers across Washington for one low price. e)90(53,,9(03: ;6(3,:)9,>-,:; *3,,3<4

The Miner

421 S. Spokane Ave., Newport, WA • (509) 447-2433

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL WNPA MEMBER NEWSPAPER TO LEARN MORE.


THE MINER



JUNE 5, 2013 |

Fire district in fine financial state BY MICHELLE NEDVED OF THE MINER

DIAMOND LAKE – If you have a medical or fire emergency at Diamond or Sacheen lakes, volunteers from South Pend Oreille Fire and Rescue will come to your aid. South Pend Oreille Fire and Rescue was formed a few years ago by the merging of Pend Oreille Fire District Nos. 1, 3 and 7. It covers 150 square miles, including Sacheen and Diamond lakes, and exists on tax revenue, grants and donations. In 2012, the district received about $350,000 in tax revenue, and will collect about the same in 2013. The tax rate is 98 cents per $1,000 of property valuation. The district applies for various grants and gets donations from various groups in the community. “(We have) huge community support,” chief Mike Nokes said. The district is doing well financially, able to purchase the equipment needed by its 50 volunteers. Last year, the district was able to purchase 10 new turnouts, the gear worn by firefighters during a fire. The recommended lifespan of a turnout is 10 years; some of the previous turnouts used by South Pend Oreille were pushing 20 years. Each turnout cost $1,600 for the pants and jacket. The district also purchased a heart monitor for $4,500. Nokes said about 70 percent of the EMS calls the district goes on are heart related. The monitor tells the EMTs if the person is indeed having a heart attack, without having to wait for a trip to the hospital. The district’s budget is built on tax revenue, used for fuel, utilities, the operation of five different fire stations, 25 different “rolling” apparatuses, such as trucks and engines, and insurance, which averages about $15,000 annually. The budget is also used for training, electricity and office supplies. Nokes, along with a part-time secretary are currently the only two paid staff working for the district. Nokes’ salary is $57,000 annually. The district is in the process of hiring a part-time firefighter/EMT. Nokes said the position will hopefully be filled around June 1. The wage is budgeted for $10 per hour. EMTs have to maintain their training and it takes 160 hours of training to become one. The district has 56 volunteers, 20-25 of which are EMTs. Nokes points out that most have primary jobs elsewhere and volunteer their time to SPOFR. The district received a donation from the local 4-H kids, used to purchase a thermal imaging camera. The camera allows fire fighters to see heat inside walls, to determine if a fire has spread there. They can also use it to see flames through smoke. The district used money from the Diamond Lake Improvement Association to purchase a RIT pack, which is a portable air supply system. It is used to save firefighters who have run out of oxygen. Some firefighters go into the fire, others – known as the RIT team – stay outside. If a firefighter becomes trapped in a fire, they send in the RIT team. The district also maintains a reserve fund, which totaled about $100,000 in mid-2012. Along with Diamond and Sacheen lakes, SPOFR also covers Deer Valley, Camden and Fertile Valley. Commissioners are Gary Wilkey, Randy Miller, Leonard Pielli, Galen Hansen and Karen Johnston. Visit www.spofr.org.

(208) 448-2311

Albeni Hwy., Priest River, Idaho For Our Washington Customers Call Toll Free 1-800-440-8254

5B


6B

| JUNE 5, 2013

Classifieds



THE MINER

TO PLACE YOUR AD, CALL US TODAY AT (509) 447-2433 All ads appear in

THE NEWPORT MINER [Pend Oreille County]

and GEM

STATE MINER

[West Bonner County]

On the Internet at

www.pendoreillerivervalley.com

To place your ad, call 447-2433 email: minerclassifieds@povn.com

Mon. thru Fri.., 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. or come in to The Office at 421 S. Spokane Ave., Newport. Mail to 421 S. Spokane Ave., Newport, WA 99156

Deadlines

Monday at 4:30 p.m. Late Ads until Tuesday 2:00 p.m. In The Hot Box.

Rates

First 20 Words plus bold, centered head . $11.00/Week Each Additional Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50¢ ea. Special: 2 Weeks Consecutive Run . . . . 3rd Week Free Hot Box - First 20 Words plus bold, centered head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14.00/Week Each Additional Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65¢ ea. Classified Ads require pre-payment

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2

HELP WANTED

NURSING OPPORTUNITIES Life Care Center of Sandpoint Day Shift Nurse - RN | LPN Full-time position available for day shift (6 a.m.-2 p.m.) Must be an Idaho-licensed nurse. CNA $1,000 sign-on bonus included! Full-time positions available for day and night shift (10 p.m.-6 a.m.). Must be an Idaho-certified nursing assistant.

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$8.75 Per Inch. Deadline: Monday, 4:30 p.m. Add a color logo or picture .....................$5.00/Week

Statewide Classified

Reach more than 1,100,000 Homes in 115 Washington State Community Newspapers. One Week, up to 25 Words, Prepaid - $195- 25 Words, $8 each additional. •Reach 325,000 Homes in 48 Idaho State Community Newspapers. One Week, up to 25 words prepaid $125. Deadline: 12 days before publication.

Acceptability

The Miner reserves the right to edit, reject or reclassify any advertisement.

Corrections

Please check your ad the first time it appears and immediately report any error to the Classified Department. We regret that we cannot be responsible for more than a one-time incorrect insertion if you do not call the error to our attention.

I N DE X 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Personals Help Wanted Business Services Work Wanted Lost and Found Child Care & Preschool Business Oportunities Misc. For Sale Washington Statewide Advertising 10 Rentals Wanted 11 Housing For Rent 12 Storage For Rent 13 Real Estate For Sale

2

HELP WANTED

RESIDENT MANAGER for a 24 unit family complex in Newport. Apartment plus salary. Equal opportunity employer. Send resume to Post Office Box 10, Colbert, Washington 99005 or fax (509) 467-3079 or email prmgt@comcast.net (16-3) Miner want ads work.

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

Real Estate Wanted Mobile/Mfg. Homes Commercial Property Yard Sale Misc. Wanted Boats & Motors Cars & Trucks Motorcycles Recreational Vehicles Machinery, Tractors Logging Timber Farm & Ranch Animals for Sale Notices

2

HELP WANTED

KING’S BAR & GRILL Needs experienced cook. Pay depends on experience. Apply within. 6151 Highway 2, Priest River. (208) 448-0134. (16-3) Short of cash; long on “Stuff?” Advertise in The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds. Call (509) 447-2433 for full details.

Seattle City Light Administrative Specialist II $21.77 – 24.35/hour Plus Excellent Benefits Seattle City Light has an opportunity for a skilled administrative and accounting support person at their Boundary Powerhouse in Metaline Falls, WA. This position reports to and assists the Boundary/Lucky Peak Manager, and helps the Boundary Generation Supervisor, Work Planning Group, Warehousing Group and other associated employees. For more information and to apply, visit www.seattle.gov/jobs by 6/11/13. The City of Seattle is an Equal Opportunity Employer that values diversity in the workforce.

PART-TIME COOK/ HOUSEKEEPING position open at Camp Spalding, a Christian conference center on Davis Lake. Please contact Linda at linda@clearwaterlodge. org or (509) 447-4388, extension 42. (18-3p)

3

BUSINESS SERVICES

THE WATER PROFESSIONALS

Long-term care experience preferred. We offer great pay and benefits in a teamoriented environment. Vickie O’Connor, 208-265-9299 | 208-265-9710 Fax 1125 N. Division St. Sandpoint, ID 83864 Vickie_O’Connor@LCCA.com Visit us

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BEAUTICIAN/ HAIR STYLIST needed at Priest Lake. Great turn key business opportunity at the Tamrak Shopping Village. Bill (208) 443-3827. (16-3p)

3 BEDROOM TRAILER No pets. Lazy Acres Trailer Park. Newport. (208) 4374502. (7-tf) 2 BEDROOM 1 bath mobile between Priest River and Newport. No pets. Rent negotiable plus deposit. (208) 4374502. (8-tf)

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

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99% Customer Satisfaction A+ BBB Rating 30+ Years in Business

LCCA.COM. EOE/M/F/V/D – 40659

(1-800) 533-6518 www.foglepump.com Lic. # FOGLEPS095L4

VOLUNTEER DRIVERS NEEDED for transporting clients to medical appointments. Reimbursement for mileage and meals. Work your own schedule. Requires good driving record, clean insured personal vehicle, helpful attitude, good heart. Call 1(800) 892-4817, Extension 4. (16-3p)

TrussTek Fast, friendly service since 1990

Roof & Floor Trusses Bill • Ed • Marcus • Ted • Jeff

208-267-7471 1-800-269-7471 Miner want ads work.

Pend Oreille County Director, Extension Educator, Position #38196 Washington State University (WSU) is seeking a Pend Oreille County Director/County Extension Educator (open rank) in the area of 4-H Youth Development and Family Programming. This is a full-time, 12-month, non-tenure track faculty position located in Newport, Washington. Required: Earned Master’s degree or equivalent and strong academic training or experience in social sciences, human development, youth development, education, volunteerism, organizational leadership or related field. Screening date extended to July 12, 2013. To apply visit: http://www.wsujobs.com. For questions about the position contact Lisa Clyde, EEO Coordinator, 509-335-2822, eeo.coordinator@wsu.edu EEO/AA/ADA

HOUSING FOR RENT

MISC. FOR SALE

ALUMINUM WINDOWS Double pane, 8x4 (1); 6x4 (3); 6x3, (3); 5x3, (1); 3x3, (2). Make offer. Good for shop or greenhouse. (509) 447-2167. (18p)

DIAMOND LAKE AREA Custom home. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, attached garage. No pets. $725/ month (208) 610-6870.(16-3p) TWO BEDROOM 1 bath, Newport. No smoking. No pets. $600 a month. Amy (208) 255-8500. (183p)

• WELL DRILLING • PUMPS • WATER TREATMENT

Free ads

•Items for Free: One week run only, 20 words or less. Offer limited to One Free Ad per Week. • Found Ads: Items found will be run one time FREE, 20 Words or less.

HELP WANTED

Kaniksu Village Apartments

I HAVE A VERY NICE, USED BABY CRIB/ YOUTH BED For sale with a Sealy Ortho Rest Mattress. Made by Graco, the crib converts to a youth bed. All the necessary hardware included plus under the bed drawer for storage. Baby blanket and two sheets included. $80.00. (509) 447-2006 or (509) 850-7112. Diamond Lake. (18p) 10

1 Bedroom Apartments Income Limits Apply EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

109 E. 5th Ave.

Metaline Falls, WA

(509) 446-4100

Read The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds.

2

HELP WANTED

TDD

1-425-562-4002

2

HELP WANTED

FISCAL MANAGER WANTED Pend Oreille Crime Victim Services is currently looking for a part-time (30 hrs/wk) FISCAL MANAGER to work at private non-profi t 501(c)3 agency in Newport, WA. Duties include managing grant monies, reports to funders, payroll and other duties relevant to a fiscal position. Salary DOE, benefits. Applicant must have experience in bookkeeping. Experience with non-profits preferred. Interested persons may mail their resume to POCVS, PO Box 944, Newport, WA 99156 or drop off at 730 W. 1st Street, Newport. Resumes due on or before June 10, 2013.

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HOUSING FOR RENT

HOUSING FOR RENT

TENANTS...

Need a home? Rental Homes Available Northern Pines Real Estate Services 509-447-5922

www.nprents.com VERY NICE PLACE Townhouse. 825 West 3rd Street, Newport. Three bed, two bath, attached garage, laundry room. Daylight kitchen and large living room. Close to schools, hospital, park and shopping. Clean. No smoking. No pets. $775 per month, $750 security deposit, includes water and grounds maintenance, Email for application or call Ed (714) 377-1029. (16-3p) DOUBLEWIDE HOME On Pend Oreille River lot at Open Skies development, Newport. Very clean 3 bedroom, 2 bath with 2 car garage. No pets. No smoking. $700/ month, $600 deposit. (509) 4474629. (16-3p) METALINE FALLS WASHINGTON Beautiful 1 bedroom apartment. Nice view. Water, sewer, garbage plus wi-fi included. Post office building. $425 plus deposit. (208) 610-9220. (17-3) NEWPORT CHURCH Building, 4,000 plus square feet. 2 bathrooms, kitchen, fireplace, electric furnaces. $1,000 a month, first/ last. $750 damage/ cleaning deposit. No smoking! No pets! Shawgo Brothers, LLC. (509) 447-2346/ (509) 550-9083. (17-3p) METALINE FALLS Great location. Quality furnished 1 bedroom plus apartment, garage. Includes utilities/ internet. No pets/ smoking! $750/ month. (509) 999-0618. (18-3p) Miner want ads work.

CUTE FULLY FURNISHED 1 room cabin in beautifully maintained park-like setting. Includes refrigerator, air conditioning, microwave, dish television, dishes and utensils. 7-1/2 miles north of Newport on LeClerc road. Prefer long term, no smoking. $250/ month plus utilities. Security deposit and references required. (509) 671-0767. (17-3p) NEWLY PAINTED 2 bedroom 1 bath, Newport. $650/ month , water, sewer and garbage included. 1st/ last month’s rent and cleaning deposit required. (509) 447-5715, (509) 671-0533. (18-3p) FOR SALE OR RENT Diamond Lake 3 bedroom 2 bathroom HUD approved beach access $700.00 month plus $700 damage deposit. (509) 447-5444. (18-3p) METALINE FALLS 3 bedroom house with basement, 310 Lehigh Street. $500/ month. No deposit. Positive references required. (509) 945-1997 or (509) 949-2171. (18-3p) $569 MONTH In Newport. 2 bedroom 2 bath newly remodeled manufactured home. Water, sewer, garbage included. Small pets allowed. (509) 993-4705/ (509) 4969686. (17-4p)

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STORAGE FOR RENT

NEWPORT MINI-STORAGE (509) 447-0119 Enter at Hwy 41 and 1st Street

Lighted & Secure In-Town Location Need something at a good price? Try The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY

You too can Advertise Weekly for only $8.00 Call 447-2433 ATTORNEYS

Enterprise Risk Manager The District is seeking a well-qualified individual to act as the District’s Enterprise Risk Manager. This position is responsible for identifying and managing risks associated with power scheduling and marketing activities, as well as developing strategies for reducing associated costs and improving marketing revenues. This position is also responsible for directing the management of energy and transmission requirements for the District, including planning, scheduling, and power contract administration. Qualified candidates must have a demonstrated ability to communicate and work effectively with all levels of the organization and outside agencies; evaluate interrelated systems; understand and convey difficult concepts; perform meticulous and detail oriented tasks efficiently and accurately; and use computer systems and software efficiently and effectively. Requirements for the position include ten (10) years of experience in the power/utility industry, reflecting an increasing scope of knowledge and responsibilities. Five (5) of those years must include experience/expertise related to power marketing, energy trading, risk management and/ or closely related activities within a utility setting. An employment application and detailed job description are available at www.popud.org. Please e-mail or mail the application, along with a resume and cover letter, including salary requirements, to: careers@popud.org; or, P.O. Box 190, Newport, WA 99156 Attn: Human Resources. Deadline for submissions is June 14, 2013. Salary DOQ, excellent benefit package. The District is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

P

Law Office of Denise Stewart

Wills, Trusts, Probate, Medicaid, Business 301 S. Washington Ave., Suite A, Newport, WA (509) 447-3242

CHIROPRACTIC Camas Center Medical & Dental Services Ryan Leisy, DC - (509) 447-7111 1821 N. LeClerc Rd., #1, Cusick, WA 99119

COUNSELING Molly Phillips, LICSW, CMHS, GMHS

Licensed Counselor, Many Insurances Accepted 415 W. Walnut, Newport, WA -- (509) 671-0226

DENTIST

Public Utility District

Harmony Healing Arts Center Gloria Campbell -- 448-2623 47 10th -- Priest River

Cedar Mountain Massage Therapy

Lois A. Ernst, Licensed Massage Therapist 322 S. Washington -- Newport -- 447-3898

The Willows - Massage & Bodywork Studio Judy C. Fredrickson, RN, LMP Newport -- (509) 671-7035

OPTOMETRIST Newport Vision Source

Drs. Michael & Cheryl Fenno 205 S. Washington -- 447-2945

Newport Dental Center

James G. Cool, D.M.D. Family Dentistry -- Evening Hours 610 W. 2nd -- (509) 447-3105 • 800-221-9929

Wayne Lemley, D.D.S.

Complete Family Dentistry & Orthodontics 424 N. Warren Ave., Newport -- 447-5960 Toll Free 877-447-5960

Camas Center Medical & Dental Services 1821 N. LeClerc Rd., #1, Cusick, WA 99119 (509) 447-7111 - (509) 445-1152 fax

HEALTH CLINICS Kaniksu Health Services Priest River Medical Clinic

Family Practice, Minor Emergencies Behavioral Health Mon. & Wed., 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tue. & Thu., 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Fri. 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (208) 448-2321

Camas Center Medical & Dental Services 1821 N. LeClerc Rd., #1, Cusick, WA 99119 (509) 447-7111 - (509) 445-1152 fax

HYPNOTHERAPY Purposeful Life Mastery Coaching

end Oreille

MASSAGE THERAPY

Dr. Douglas Rigg, P.H.D., CHt Registered Hypnotherapist Stop Smoking, Weight Loss, Motivation Individual and Groups - 509-589-0638

PHYSICAL THERAPY Priest River Rehab Services

A Service of Bonner General Hospital Tim Gray, P.T. -- 448-4151 Mon.-Wed.-Fri. - 9-5 • Tues. & Thurs. 9-4

Core Physical Therapy

at Club Energy • Newport Gary Schneider PT • (509) 671-3122 Monday thru Friday By Appointment

PODIATRIST -- FOOT SPECIALIST Douglas K. Monson, D.P.M.

Patients seen at Newport Hospital twice a month 509-926-2848 -- Call for appointments

PRINTING Printing & Design . . . at The Miner

We Have a Million Ideas for Our Customers! 421 S. Spokane, Newport -- 447-2433

REAL ESTATE Richard Bockemuehl

Century 21 Beutler - Waterfront Office (509) 321-1121 • Cell (509) 951-4390


THE MINER



13

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

BY OWNER House for sale. 3 bedroom, 2 bathrooms, attached garage, 2nd garage/ storage shed not attached. 2 kitchens, large laundry area with lots of shelving. Newly painted inside and out. Very clean. $89,000. 319 South Cass, Newport. (509) 445-1153. (18-3p) 9 Get fast relief for an upset budget with The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds. They work for others; they’ll work for you! Call (509) 447-2433.

13

18

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

WANTED: Antique side by side shot gun. Any condition. Call Don (509) 671-3955, evenings. (18p)

NEWPORT CHURCH Building zoned for multi family housing. 4,000 plus square feet with 2 bathrooms, kitchen, fireplace, two electric furnaces. $225,000. Shawgo Brothers, LLC. (509) 550-9083, (509) 447-2346. (17-3p)

20

C ARS AND TRUCKS

SHARP LOOKING Dark blue 2000 Saturn LSI 4-door. Automatic, air conditioner, power everything, compact disk, cruise control, TRAC system, new brakes, battery, wiper motor, 157,300. $2,600 or best offer. Semkye (509) 447-5549 (17-3p)

17

25

MISC WANTED

YARD SALE

FRIDAY/SATURDAY 8:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. No early birds. Unique furniture, household items, and miscellaneous. 5882 Northshore Road, Diamond Lake. (18p)

Get fast relief for an upset budget with The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds. They work for others; they’ll work for you! Call (509) 447-2433.

Every day is Sale Day in The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds. Read them every day.

9

FARM AND RANCH

9

WASHINGTON STATEWIDE ADS

RANCH MATERIALS Livestock water tank, electric fence controller, 1/4 mile fence wire (17 gauge), 1400 feet fence wire (14 gauge), wood shavings. (509) 447-2167. (18p)

ADOPTION ADOPT: Art Director & Global Executive years for precious baby to Love, Adore, Devote our lives. Expenses paid. 1-800844-1670.

26

JUNE 5, 2013 |

ANIMALS FOR SALE

FREE! To good home only. Gray female house cat. Very loving. House broken, had all shots and spayed. (509) 671-5535. (18) Place your classified or display ad with The Miner and it will appear in both newspapers - The Newport Miner (Pend Oreille County) and The Gem State Miner (West Bonner County). All for one good price. Call (509) 447-2433 for details.

EVENTS-FESTIVALS

FOR SALE MISCELLANEOUS

ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details.

FREE 10” Internet tablet when your order DISH installed free. Free HBO. Offer ends Soon Call for details. 1-866-845-7776. Restrictions apply with approved credit.

FINANCIAL

SAWMILLS from only $3997.00 -- Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills. com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N

LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com

Give your important Business Message 100% Market Coverage in 3 publications for only $14.50 a week Automotive

Carpet

Automotive

Attorney at Law

Licensed in Washington and Idaho

50%

509-462-0827

10 Minute Oil Change

No Appointment Necessary Free Vacuum & Window Wash

OFF Wills

(509) 447-0120

Chimney Sweep

Jake’s Chimney Sweep

Dustin Deissner Specializing in Social Security & Personal Injury FREE Initial Consultation

We Offer: • Brakes • Engine • Air Conditioning Performance • Oil Changes • Electronics • Engine Repair • Diagnostics • Transmission • Steering & Repair Suspension • Full Service • Exhaust Service Mon-Fri 8am-5pm

Operating Since 1980 Professional, Experienced, Friendly Service Clean, Inspect, Masonry Repair Licensed and Bonded

Contracting

Digital Photos

Dog Boarding

CLARK CONSTRUCTION

On Budget On Time EVERY TIME!

Stutes Construction

Do-It-Yourself Digital Photo Center 4x6 30¢ 5x7 79¢ 8x10 $249 CD $149

CHANDREA FARMS

41 Homes built in the city since 1974

509-447-5209 or (509) 671-0171 Lic. # CLARKC*110CG

Owners Bob & Jane Clark Model Home By Appointment

Equipment

BONNER SAW & POWER EQUIPMENT

Open: Tuesday - Friday 8:30-5:30 Saturday 8:30-2:00 Closed Sunday & Monday

Specializing in Custom & Log Home Construction “Lodge Logs” Log Home Dealer Foundations, Framing, Siding, Roofing, Decks, ETC. www.dependable-contracting.com

Jim 208-660-9131 ID#RCE-1494

WA #DEPENCI913N4

Flood Services

WATER

CLEAN-UP DRY OUT RESTORE

Floors & More, Inc Husqvarna • Jonsered and Echo Chain Saws 682 High St., Priest River (208) 448-1522

Kevin Johnson 24/7 Emergency Service 2 0 8 - 2 5 5 - 9 5 80

208-448-1869 208-660-4087 Harold Stutes Priest River

HOUSE FLOODED - BROKEN PIPE?

Flood Dryout Services Mold Inspection & Remediation Remodeling & Repairs Friendly Pre Purchase Home Inspections Insurance Claims Consulting Brooks Swanson (CMI) (CMRC) General Contractor RCT-13983 ALLAMA5940N5

(208) 448-2950

WINDSHIELDS WHILE-U-WAIT Priest River

Mon. - Fri. 9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

robs-heating-cooling@hotmail.com

1-800-858-5013

208-448-2095 100 McKinley • Priest River

LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED WA & ID

509-671-7855 Lic#KARDOP*051K6 KARDOTS055NB

Journeyman Plumber Senior &Vet Discounts

Corner of Hwy 2 & Spokane Ave. (509) 447-2433

(208) 610-5747 (208) 437-0174

Recycling

CASH REWARD  LEAD ES C I R P P O T  BRASS PAID  COPPER  ALUMINUM  STAINLESS STEEL ACTION Recycling/ Phoenix Metals, Inc. E. 911 Marietta (East of Hamilton) (509) 483-4094 Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Towing

Veterinary

Veterinarian

Royal Towing Newport LLC

PEND OREILLE VETERINARY CLINIC

THE ANIMAL DOCTOR

Towing Roadside Assistance 24 Hour Service

Quality veterinary care for your pets and barnyard friends.

Dan Herrin D.V.M. (208) 437-2800

(208) 437-2145 Newport

(509) 671-3599

Small & Large Animal Medicine & Surgery Brian Dockins DVM

Concrete

William Thompson

Spokane Rock Products

General Manager Montana & Northern Idaho

Concrete • Sand • Gravel

Dog Boarding & Training

Send your dogs to the Farm to play while you are away!

We are celebrating 10 years of service for Pets and People, Too!

Cell 509-710-8939

River

City RCE Electrical Quality Electrical Services at affordable prices

FREE Estimates Matt Dahlin

Elk, Washington

(509) 292-2200

Alluring Events Sarah Webb Complete Event

• Coordination • Rentals • Linens • Chair Covers • Creative Design • Fresh Floral

Fuel

• Natural & Organic Foods • Herbs, Vitamins & Supplements • Organic Juices & Smoothies

“Where our High Standards Meet Yours”

Communication

Fuel

OWNER INSTALLER SERVICE

Layout Services to Full Color Printing

(208) 437-0224

Florist

Rob’s Heating & Cooling

Printing & Design at the Miner

1335 HWY. 2 EAST, OLDTOWN, ID

Florist Florist

MOUNTAIN HARVEST HEALTH FOODS

KARDOS

218 High St. Priest River, ID 208-448-2941

Professional Dog & Cat Grooming Dog & Cat Boarding and Daycare “Your Pets Home Away From Home”

Flood Services

Priest River Glass

Printing

• Affordable Tax Service • Any Size Business • Bookkeeping • Payroll, Taxes

Lic# RIVERCE886B7

Heating/AC

Plumbing

Office Services

www.chandreafarms.com

Health Foods

WA. Contr. No. PRIESRG132NZ

Animal Boarding

Oldtown, ID • (208) 437-4822

Glass

208-448-2511

GET ON the road fast! Immediate Openings! Top Pay, Full Benefits, CDL-A, Doubles Required! Haney Truck Line, Call Now. 1-888414-4467. www.gohaney. com

ID License # RCT-1510 WA License # STUTEC *92306

AMERICAN SERVICES

Mon-Fri. 7-5 Sat 8-12

GORDON TRUCKING Inc. CDL-A Drivers Needed. Dedicated & OTR Positions Available! Consistent Miles, Benefits, 401k & EOE. Sign On Bonus! Recruiters available 7 days/ wk! Call: 866-725-9669

(509) 475-6476 alluringevents@live.com www.alluring-events.com

“Our Variety Shows”

Idaho RCE-12308 Washington-FLOORMI974J1

Commercial • Residential

509- 447-2244

Ben Franklin

Accounting/Tax Service

HELP WANTED -DRIVERS

Event Planning/Rentals

Construction

• General Contractor • Roofing • Siding • Room Additions • Decks • Foundations • Manufactured Home Set-up

Get fast relief for an upset budget with The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds. They work for others; they’ll work for you! Call (509) 447-2433.

WASHINGTON STATEWIDE ADS

Electrical Services

Construction

Inc.

NOW HIRING: Easy Work, Excellent Pay, Assemble Products From Home. No Selling. $500 Weekly Potential. Start Immediately. Info Call 1-985-646-1700 DEPT. WA-5990 Peoples Lifestyle

www.jakescimneysweep.com

Hwy. 2, South of Newport

Custom Homes

HELP WANTED

9

39102 N. Newport Hwy.

Cliff McDermeit 23810 E. Blanchard Rd., Newport

40 High St., Priest River, ID 208-448-0112

#1 Home Builder in Newport.

WASHINGTON STATEWIDE ADS

750 Kootenai Cut Off Road Ponderay ID 83852 Phone: 208-263-4867 william.r.thompson@ftr.com www.frontier.com

1707 W. Broadway, Spokane, WA www.deissnerlaw.com

The Remodeling Specialists!

BAJILLIONS STILL AVAILABLE for good R.E. Contracts, Notes and Annuities. Receiving Payments? It may be time to give us a call. Skip Foss 800-6373677.

BUSINESS DIRECTORY Attorney

9

WASHINGTON STATEWIDE ADS

7B

217 N State Ave. Oldtown, ID

Floral

Traditions

208-448-2611 866-973-7673 Priest River

Flowers Plants Chocolates Balloons Tuxedos Gifts

Newport

(509) 671-2276

Floral Plants Gifts Home Decor

Fleur de Lis Floral & Home

125 N. Washington Ave., Newport

509-447-4416

Heating/AC

• Heat Pumps • Geothermal

YOUR HEATING COOLING & REFRIGERATION EXPERTS RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL Carrier

• Furnaces • Radiant Heat

Wood Stoves - Gas Stoves - Pellet Stoves & Oil Furnaces Available • We Service All Major Brands • Air Leakage Testing Available

Installations • Service Free Quotes

Bonded • Insured • WA #AMERIEH901G

509-447-4962

24 Hour Service: 509-671-6952

Sawmilling

Mountain Mobile Sawmilling at Your Site!

208-304-3966 Save money by turning your logs into valuable lumber Call Matt Lemas for an Estimate

Well Drilling

Heating/AC Complete Heating, Cooling & Duct Systems

Gas Fireplaces & Inserts

(208) 448-1439

PRIEST RIVER FAMILY OIL

Delivering Propane & Fuel to All of Pend Oreille & Bonner Counties! Call us today!

208-437-3513

Since 1964

Bus: 208-437-4168 Cell: 208-946-6944 stevepitts@verizon.net

Propane, Lubricants, Filters and Fuel Additives Available On-Site

2459 Hwy.2 • Oldtown

218 Cedar St. Priest River, ID 208-448-1812

Internet

Painting

EVERYTHING INTERNET

WiFi - $36.95/Month Dial UP - Web Services Internet Telephone No contract required

LIBERTY PAINTING

Conscientious & Reliable

Interior Exterior Repaints New Construction

Priest River

(509) 447-3067 or 1-888-800-POVN (7686)

Larry Liberty (208) 437-3353

Storage

Toilets - Portable

Towing

Excess

Newport

Portable Chemical Toilets 2654 E. Hwy 2 • Oldtown, ID

• Towing • Lockouts • Jump Starts • Tire Changes • Recovery

PRIEST RIVER MINI STORAGE 5 Sizes

Resident Manager Highway 57 ~ 1 1/2 Miles from Hwy. 2 (208) 448-1273

Wrecking Yard

Portable Service

Rent by the day, week, biweekly, month

(208) 448-2290 Yard Care Need dependable help with YARDWORK?

Well Drilling & Pump Service

24 hr. Commercial/Public Card Lock Fuels INCLUDE: • Highway Diesel • Off-Road Diesel • Unleaded Gasoline HOME DELIVERIES INCLUDE: • Stove Oil • Furnace Oil • Highway Diesel • Off-Road Diesel • Unleaded Gasoline

Now Paying Top Dollar for your junkers Cars • Trucks • Machinery

TERI-FIC AUTO SALVAGE Newport (509) 447-2487 Chewelah (509) 935-4095

• Mowing • Trimming • Cleanup • Pruning • Flower Beds • Sprinkler Repair

Richard 16 years experience

Wild Coyote Lawn Services 208-610-1223

Licensed in WA & ID

Towing, LLC

509-447-1200

Washington & Idaho

Available 24/7

Yard Care

Lady Lawncare

Is your yard screaming for attention? We’ll scream back at a reasonable rate. 24 Years Experience

Full service yard care & spring cleanup e Fre tes m i a Est

Deb & Debbie 509-710-3976


8B

| JUNE 5, 2013



9

WASHINGTON STATEWIDE ADS

24

24

LOGGING TIMBER

DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www. paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com

C ARS AND TRUCKS

Oldtown Auto Sales

303 N. State Ave. • Oldtown

WE BUY LOGS AND TIMBER We gladly provide Consultation & Assistance for Manging your Forest Land

208-437-4011

www.oldtownautos.com

For information contact

Skyler Johnson - (509) 690-3127 Office (509) 738-4711

Let us Sell your Car, Truck or RV We charge 10% or a minimum of $200

2008 Ford F150 4x4 XLT $21,995 2005 Ford Escape $6,995 2003 Buick Park Avenue $6,995 1940 Dodge 4D Sedan $5,995 1953 Chev Belair 4D $4,995 2003 Ford Focus 4D $4,695 1997 Cadillac Deville $4,495 2007 Hyosung Motorcycle $2,995 1989 Ford F150 Truck 4x4 $2,995 1990 Isuzu Trooper $2,495 1990 Ford F250 4x4 $1,995 2002 Chev Express Van $1,995 2002 Tahoe 25ft Trailer $11,495 1984 Winnebago 27ft Motorhome $4,995 1949 John Deere Tractor $3,995 2013 Flatbed Trailer Car Hauler $1,295

24

LOGGING TIMBER

|| PUBLIC || NOTICES

• Letterhead • Envelopes • Business Cards • Flyers • Newsletters • Carbonless Forms • Labels • Cookbooks • Tickets • Resumes • Signs • Business Forms • Brochures • Menus • Maps • Programs • and More!

Need HOP Poles!! Printing & Design Call today for info at the Miner (509) 447-2433 421 S. Spokane Ave • Newport, WA

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE:

Jasper Post Mill, Inc. Buying B i llodge d pole pine. . . Top Prices Paid on 6” & Smaller in Diameter Hwy. 41, Blanchard, Idaho 208•437•4411 or 509•238•6540

Miner THE

Online

No matter where you are on the globe, your community goes with you.

PU B LI C

Your Right to Know

LEGAL SERVICES

20

||

LOGGING TIMBER

THE MINER

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant womenandpeoplesecuring custody of children under 18. The newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising or real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800927-9275. (31tf)

Miner subscribers have free access all the time. (509) 447-2433

www.pendoreillerivervalley.com

BLANKET WASHINGTON

2013134 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE PURSUANT TO THE REVISED CODE OF WASHINGTON, I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned trustee will on the 14th day of June 2013, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. at inside of the front door of the Pend Oreille County Superior Courthouse, 229 South Garden Avenue, Newport, Washington 99156, in the County of Pend Oreille, State of Washington,, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in the County of Pend Oreille, State of Washington, to wit. PLEASE SEE THE ATTACHED EXHIBIT A, PARCEL NO. 443107.51.0016 AND 443107.51.8016, which is subject to that certain deed of trust a Deed of Trust recorded January 17, 2008, under instrument number 20080296040, from DANA K. MOREY, a single person and STEVEN THOMAS MOREY, a married man as his sole and separate property, as Grantors, TO: FRONTIER TITLE & ESCROW, to secure an obligation in favor of EQUITY TRUST COMPANY, Custodian FBO JAMES S. McGIVERN, CESA, as to an undivided Thirteen and One-Third Per Cent (13 1/3%) interest as a tenant in common, EQUITY TRUST COMPANY, Custodian FBO THOMAS P. McGIVERN , CESA, as to an undivided Thirteen and One-Third Per Cent (13 1/3%) interest as a tenant in common, EQUITY TRUST COMPANY, Custodian FBO JAMES R. McGIVERN, HSA, as to an undivided Nineteen and One-Third Per Cent (19 1/3%) interest as a tenant in common, and JAMES M. McGIVERN, as to an undivided Fifty-Four Per Cent (54%) interest as a tenant in common. A new Trustee was appointed thereunder by instrument recorded January 23, 2013, under instrument number 20130314126, re-recorded under instrument 20130314170, the County of Pend Oreille, State of Washington. II. No action commenced by the

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Call The Miner Today! . . . 447-2433

Your right to know and be informed of the functions of your government are embodied in public notices. In that self-government charges all citizens to be informed, this newspaper urges every citizen to read and study these notices. We strongly advise those citizens seeking further information to exercise their right of access to public records and public meetings. Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The default for which time this foreclosure is made is as follows: Monthly Payments: Three (3) monthly payments at $324.95 each for December 1, 2012, January 1, 2013 and February 1, 2013 $974.85, Three (3) late charges of $150.00 each for monthly Payment not made within 5 days of its due date$450.00,Three (3) monthly service charges of $12.05 per month to Allegro Escrow, Inc.$ 36.15, Accrued Interest $5,468.73, TOTAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS, LATE CHARGES, MONTHLY SERVICE CHARGES, AND ACCRUED INTEREST: $6,929.73, b. Default other than failure to make monthly payments: Hazard Insurance, if unpaid; 2012 and 2013 Real Estate Taxes, if unpaid; IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal $32,220.63, together with interest as in the note provided from the 26th day of September 2012, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on the 14th day of June 2013. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by the3rd day of June 2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before the 3rd of June 2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated by the Grantor any time after the 3rd of June 2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale by the grantor or his successor in interest or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the principal and interest plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or deed of trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the beneficiary or trustee to the grantor or his successor in interest at the following address: NAME ADDRESS Dana E. Morey 1 Deer Creek Lane Newport, WA 99156, Steven Thomas Morey 11 Deer Creek Lane Newport, WA 99156, Dana E. Morey 7838 Hwy 211 Newport, WA 99156, Steven Thomas Morey 2767 Bandy Rd, Priest River, ID 83856, Steven Thomas Morey 35985 HWY 41 Oldtown, ID 83822, Elizabeth M. McBride, P.S. Corp. 1201 N. Ash, Ste 101 Spokane, WA 99201, Cynthia L Deleon 15812 E. Indiana, Ste 200 Spokane, WA 99216, Residents of Property Subject to Foreclosure Sale 11 Deer Creek Lane Newport, WA 99156; by both first class and certified mail on the 23rd day of January 2013, proof of which is in the possession of the trustee; and the Grantor or his

successor in interest was personally served on the 24th day of January 2013, with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the trustee has in his possession proof of such service or posting. VII. The trustee whose name and address is set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under him of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the trustee’s sale. [ONLY IF APPLICABLE UNDER RCW 61.24.040(9) X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants and tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants and tenants by summary proceedings under the unlawful detainer act, chapter 59.12 RCW.] If you are a tenant or subtenant in possession of the property that was purchased, pursuant to Section 4 of this act, the purchaser at the Trustee’s sale may either give you a new rental agreement OR give you a written notice to vacate the property in sixty (60) days or more before the end of the monthly rental period. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. THE LAND REFERRED TO IN THIS GUARANTEE IS SITUATED IN 1HE COUNTY OF PEND OREILLE, STATE OF WASHINGTON, AND DESCRIBED BELOW: That portion of the North half of the Southeast quarter of Section 7, Township 31 North, Range 44 E.W.M., Pend Oreille County, Washington, described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast comer of said Section 7; Thence North 00”07’3S” East along the East line of said Section 7, a distance of 504 feet; Thence South 89º59’40” West a distance of 939.37 feet; Thence North 00º15’00” West a distance of 1,280.09 feet to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; Thence South 89º57’00” West a distance of 819.16 feet; Thence South 71°10’00” West a distance of 214.81 feet, more or less, to the center line of Deer Creek as existing on September 1, 1971; Thence Northerly along the centerline of Deer Creek to an intersection with the Easterly line of State Road No. 311 (formerly No. 6B) a distance of 115 feet, more or less; Thence North 27º43’00” East along the East right of way line of said State Road No. 311, a distance

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of 460 feet; Thence North 89°55’00” East, a distance of 859.66 feet, more or less, to a point which bears North 00°15’00” East from the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; Thence South 00°15’00” West a distance of 436.25 feet, more or less, to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. Being Lot 16 of Deer Creek Acres, an unrecorded plat in file with the Pend Oreille County Engineer. TOGETHER WITH that portion of the North half of the Southeast quarter of said Section 7 described as follows: Commencing at the Southeasterly comer of said Southeast quarter; Thence South 89º59’40” West along the Southerly line of said Southeast quarter a distance of 940.50 feet; Thence, leaving said line, North 00º15’00” East, 1,784.09 feet; Thence South 89°57’00” West 630.20 feet to the Point of Beginning; Thence South 65º49’32” West 238.21 feet; Thence South 79°14’40” West 182 feet, more or less, to the center of Deer Creek; Thence Northerly along the center of said Deer Creek, 61 feet, more or less, to a point which bears South 89°57’00” West 188.96 feet and South 71°10’00” West 215 feet, more or less, from said point of beginning; Thence leaving said centerline North 71°10’00” East 215 feet, more or less, to a point which bears South 89º57’00” West 188.96 feet from said point of beginning; Thence North 89º57’00” East 188.96 feet to the Point of Beginning. Being a portion of Lot C of Deer Creek Acres, an unrecorded Plat on file with the Pend Oreille County Engineer and designated as Lot C-1 by the Pend Oreille County Assessor. Published in The Newport Miner May 8 and June 5, 2013. (14, 18)

________________ 2013151 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington Chapter 61.24, et seq. First AM 7591023 Grantor(s): Hillis Clark Martin & Peterson P.S., Successor Trustee Beneficiary: HomeStreet Bank Grantee(s): Debbie L. Jackson Legal Description (abbreviated): Complete legal within document SW Quarter of Section 17, Township 30 North, Range 44 East of Willamette Meridian Assessor’s Tax Parcel Identification No(s): 443017300004 Reference No. of Related Documents: 20050280024 THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording dated on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Telephone: (877) 8944663 W e b s i t e : w w w. d f i . wa.gov/consumers/home-

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o w n e r s h i p / p o s t _ p u rchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Telephone: (800) 5694287 Website: www.hud.gov/ offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=s earch&searchstate=WA&f ilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: (800) 6064819 Website: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee will on June 14, 2013, at the hour of 11:00 AM, at the main stairs of the Old City Courthouse, 625 W. 4th St., City of Newport, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the real property, situated in the County of Pend Oreille, State of Washington, which property is legally described as follows: EXHIBIT A Legal Description PARCEL NO. 1 A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 30 NORTH, RANGE 44 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, PEND OREILLE COUNTY, WASHINGTON MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: B E G I N N I N G AT A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE HIGHWAY NO. 2 SAID POINT BEING OPPOSITE STATE HIGHWAY STATION 814 + 70.00 (PER SR 2 RIGHT OF WAY MAP DATED AUGUST 31, 1967); THENCE SOUTH 6° 57’ 27” EAST (PERPENDICULAR TO THE CENTER LINE OF SAID STATE HIGHWAY) 630.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 89° 11’ 05” WEST 990.69 FEET; THENCE NORTH 60° 57’ 27” WEST 524 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID STATE HIGHWAY NO. 2; THENCE EASTERLY, ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID STATE HIGHWAY NO. 2, 989 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 17 MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 17, THENCE NORTH ON THE NORTH-SOUTH CENTER LINE OF SAID SECTION 2100 FEET THENCE WESTERLY ALONG A LINE PARALLEL TO THE SOUTH LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER SECTION 17 A DISTANCE OF 550 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG A LINE PARALLEL TO THE NORTH-SOUTH CENTER LINE OF SAID SECTION 17 TO AN INTERSECTION WITH THE SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE HIGHWAY NO. 31 (FORMERLY NO. 2 AND NO. 20) THENCE WESTERLY ALONG SAID SOUTH RIGHT OF WAY LINE TO AN INTERSECTION WITH THE WEST LINE OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 17; THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG SAID WEST LINE A DISTANCE OF 630 FEET; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS, AND UTILITIES, UNDER AND ACROSS A TRACT OF LAND 30

FEET IN WIDTH BEGINNING AT THE EXISTING ACCESS AT A POINT ON SAID STATE HIGHWAY NO. 2 AND EXTENDING WEST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTY TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE S O U T H E R LY A L O N G THE WEST LINE TO THE SOUTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE EASTERLY ALONG THE SOUTH LINE THEREOF A DISTANCE OF 1,040.69 FT. the postal address of which is commonly known as: 321452 State Route #2, Newport, Washington  99156, which property is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated March 10, 2005, and recorded in the Official Records of Pend Oreille County, Washington on March 16, 2005, under Recording No. 20050280024, from Debbie L. Jackson, an unmarried individual, as grantor, to Pend Oreille Title Company, a Washington corporation, as trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. (“MERS”), as beneficiary, solely as nominee for Windermere Mortgage Services Series LLC, a Delaware series limited liability company, as lender (the “Deed of Trust”), the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MERS to HomeStreet Bank (“Beneficiary”), by Assignment of Deed of Trust recorded in the Official Records of Pend Oreille County, Washington on December 21, 2012, under Recording No. 20120313830. Hillis Clark Martin & Peterson P.S., is now “Trustee” by reason of an Appointment of Successor Trustee recorded in the Official Records of Pend Oreille County, Washington on January 17, 2013, Recording No. 20130314070. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The defaults for which this foreclosure is made are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts that are now in arrears: Monthly payments of $1,144.44, due on July 1, 2012 through February 1, 2013 $9,155.52 Late charges of $39.90 each for monthly payments due on July 1, 2012, through January 1, 2013 $279.30 Inspection fees: $36.00 Unapplied funds to be credited towards the account: ($60.41) TOTAL MONTHLY PAYMENTS, LATE CHARGES, AND OTHER AMOUNTS IN ARREARS: $9,410.41 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: Principal Balance, $180,021.40, together with interest as provided in the Note or other instrument secured from June 1, 2012, and such other costs and fees as are due under the promissory note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on June 14, 2013. The defaults referred to in paragraph III must be cured by June 3, 2013 (11 days before the CONTINUED ON 9B


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CONTINUED FROM 8B sale) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before June 3, 2013 (11 days before the sale date) the default as set forth in paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after June 3, 2013 (11 days before the sale) and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following addresses: Debbie L. Jackson 321452 State Route #2 Newpor t, Washington  99156 John Doe, Unknown Spouse of Debbie L. Jackson 321452 State Route #2 Newpor t, Washington  99156 by both first class and certified mail on January 4, 2013, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on January 5, 2013, with said written Notice of Default or the written notice of default posted in a conspicuous place on the Property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. To the best of the Trustee’s knowledge and belief, grantors are not active members of the United States military forces. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060 and the Helping Families Save Their Homes Act of 2009. XI. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Sale status may be accessed at http://ts.hcmp. com. DATED this 11th day of February, 2013. TRUSTEE: HILLIS CLARK MARTIN & P E T E R S O N   P. S . /s/ Julie B. Hamilton By: Julie B. Hamilton 1221 Second Avenue, Suite 500

Seattle, Washington 98101-2925 Telephone: (206) 6231745 Published in The Newport Miner May 15, and June 5, 2013. (15, 18)

_________________ 2013163 SURPLUS MATERIAL FOR SALE PUBLIC UTILITY DISTRICT NO. 1 OF PEND OREILLE COUNTY The Public Utility District No. 1 of Pend Oreille County has declared the following as no longer necessary, material to, or useful in the operations of the District and, therefore, surplus to the needs of the Public Utility District: Sullivan Powerhouse and Associated Land The Property is located on Highway 31, Metaline Falls. The 1911 Powerhouse is a two story brick building with approximately 4,800 square feet. The building sits on 12 acres of land, most of which is on a steep slope. An access easement will be included to enable future timber harvest. The building itself has a covenant relating to its historical classification and management. The property may be viewed by appointment. Please contact Mark Cauchy, (509) 447-9331. The District wishes to evaluate buyers proposed terms and conditions, creditworthiness, as well as other factors in determining the most qualified and best bid, and that bid must meet state and federal law requirements, including historical requirements. The District reserves the right to reject any or all bids and determine the final successful bidder based on its sole determination. Sealed bids will be received at the PUD offices, 130 N. Washington, PO Box 190, Newport, WA. 99156, or at Box Canyon Dam Visitors Center, 7492 Hwy. 31, PO Box 547, Ione, WA. 99139 until 3:00 p.m., June 17, 2013. Indicate “Sealed Bid” on the outside of the envelope. The bids will be opened June 19, 2013 and successful bid awarded at the June 25, 2013, Board meeting. Karen Willner Clerk of the Board Published in The Newport Miner May 22, 29, June 5 and 12, 2013. (16-4) ___________________ 2013165 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PEND OREILLE Case No.: 13 - 4 00021 - 4 Probate Notice to Creditors (RCW 11.40.030 ) In the Estate of: Grace T. Griffin, Deceased. The person named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this Estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner provided by RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representatives or the Personal Representatives’ attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim; and filing the original of the claim with the Court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representatives served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.040.020(1) (c); or (2) Four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is

forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of first Publication: May 22, 2013 Personal Representatives: Ralph Griffin Attorney for Personal Representative: Linda J. Mathis Address for Mailing or Service: 301 W. Spruce St, Suite B Newport, WA 99156 /s/ Linda J. Mathis Linda J. Mathis Attorney for Personal Representative WSBA#16495 Published in The Newport Miner May 22, 29 and June 5, 2013. (16-3)

_____________ 2013172 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PEND OREILLE NO. 13-2-00053-5 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION ROBIN A. HALL Plaintiff, vs. TERESA A. REED and JOHN DOE REED, wife and husband and wife, and the marital community composed thereof, Defendants. THE STATE OF WASHINGTON TO THE SAID DEFENDANTS, TERESA A. REED and JOHN DOE REED: You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty days after the 22nd day of May, 2013, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled court, and answer the complaint of the plaintiff Robin A. Hall, and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorneys for plaintiff Robin A. Hall at their office below stated; and in case of your failure so to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint which has been filed with the clerk of said court. This lawsuit arises out of personal injuries and damages as a result of the motor vehicle accident which took place on March 22, 2012. DATED this day of May, 2013. CRAIG SWAPP & ASSOCIATES By: Wesley D. Mortensen WSBA No. 39690 Attorney for Plaintiff 16201 E. Indiana Avenue, Suite 1900 Spokane Valley, WA 99216 (509) 252·5037 (509) 252-5038 FAX Published in The Newport Miner May 22, 29, June 5, 12, 19, and 26, 2013. (16-6)

_________________ 2013176 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PEND OREILLE Case No.: 13-4-00022-2 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.0(0) In the Estate of: HAROLD CHARLES SEEBER II, Deceased. The person named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this Estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner provided by RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representatives or the Personal Representatives’ attorney at the ad-

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dress stated below a copy of the claim; and filing the original of the claim with the Court. The claim must be presented within the later of; (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representatives served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.040.020(1) (c); or (2) Four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: May 29, 2013. Personal Representatives: Gregory C. Seeber Attorney for Personal Representatives: Linda J. Mathis Address for Mailing or Service: 301 W. Spruce St, Suite B Newport, W A 99156 /s/ Linda J. Mathis Linda J. Mathis Attorney for Personal Representative WSBA #16495 Published in The Newport Miner May 29, June 5 and 12, 2013. (17-3)

_________________ 2013181 PUBLIC NOTICE The Pend Oreille County Library District is seeking bids for construction to the District Office. The construction consists of 2 offices, open conference area, and a clerk area. There will be a site visit/ walk through at 10:00 A.M. on June 13, 2013. Published in The Newport Miner May 29 and June 5, 2013. (17-2)

_________________ 2013146 NOTICE OF PUBLIC TIMBER SALE Department of Natural Resources will auction timber to the highest bidder. Contract terms and bidding information is available by calling Northeast Region at (509) 684-7474 or by visiting the Region Office at Colville or Product Sales & Leasing Division, Olympia. Bidding information may also be obtained at the County Auditor’s office. Bidding begins at 10:00 a.m. at the on June 18, 2013. MUDDY MADNESS, App. No. 089223, approximately 35 miles by road Northeast of Colville, WA. on part(s) of Sections 7, 8, 16, 17, 18, 20 and 21 all in Township 37 North, Range 42 East, Sections 36 all in Township 38 North, Range 42 East, W.M., comprising approximately 7,421 Mbf of Timber. Minimum acceptable bid will be $1,172,000.00. This sale is Export Restricted. POWER TOWER SORTS App. Nos. 089534-089542, Approximately 18 miles west of Newport, WA on part(s) of Sections 8, 9, and 16 all in Township 31 North, Range 43 East, W.M., each log sort to be sold individually. Minimum accepted bids listed are set at delivered log prices. Sort #1 approximately 1,752 tons DF/WL peeler/sawlogs 7-10” minimum acceptable bid $70.00/ton; Sort #2 approximately 3,040 tons DF/ WL peeler/sawlogs 11”+ minimum acceptable bid $80.00/ton; Sort #3 approximately 1,593 tons LP/GF/ WH/ES/AF/WP and nonchuckable DF/WL sawlogs 7-10” minimum acceptable bid $65.00/ton; Sort #4 approximately 6,508 tons LP/GF/WH/ES/AF/WP and non-chuckable DF/WL sawlogs 11”+ minimum acceptable bid $65.00/ ton; Sort #5 approximately 4,576 tons WRC sawlogs 5”+ minimum acceptable bid $140.00/ton; Sort #6 ap-

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proximately 140 mbf WRC Poles class 6-35’ & better minimum acceptable bid $900.00/mbf; Sort #7 approximately 1,331 tons all species except PP & WRC chip & saw 5-6” minimum acceptable bid $50.00/ ton; Sort#8 approximately 549 tons all species except WRC Utility 2”+ minimum acceptable bid $25.00/ tons; Sort #9 approximately 403 tons Dead DF/WL/ Green Paper Birch 6”+ minimum acceptable bid $29.00/tons. This sale is Export Restricted. PYRAMID PASS SORTS App. Nos. 088196-088205, approximately 24 miles northeast of Usk, WA on part(s) of Section 24 and 26 all in Township 35 North, Range 44 East, W.M. Section 18 and 20 all in Township 35 North, Range 45 East, W.M., each log sort to be sold individually. Minimum accepted bids listed are set at delivered log prices. Sort #1 approximately 11,256 tons DF/WL peeler/ sawlogs 7-10” minimum acceptable bid $70.00/ ton; Sort #2 approximately 8,985 tons DF/WL peeler/ sawlogs 11”+ minimum acceptable bid $80.00/ ton; Sort #3 approximately 436 tons PP sawlogs 6-10” minimum acceptable bid $35.00/ton; Sort #4 approximately 811 tons PP sawlogs 11”+ minimum acceptable bid $69.00/ ton; Sort #5 approximately 5,630 tons LP/GF/WH/ES/ AF/ and non-chuckable DF/ WL sawlogs 7-10” minimum acceptable bid $65.00/ ton; Sort #6 approximately 4,297 tons LP/GF/WH/ES/ AF and non-chuckable DF/ WL sawlogs 11”+ minimum acceptable bid $65.00/ ton; Sort #7 approximately 2,284 tons WRC sawlogs 5”+ minimum acceptable bid $140.00/ton; Sort #8 approximately 105 mbf WRC Poles class 6 or better 35’+ minimum acceptable bid $900.00/mbf; Sort #9 approximately 8032 tons all conifer species except PP and WRC chip & saw 5-6” minimum acceptable bid $50.00/tons; Sort #10 approximately 8,973 tons all conifer species except WRC Utility 2”+ minimum acceptable bid $25.00/ tons; This sale is Export Restricted. Published in The Newport Miner June 5 and 12, 2013. (18-2)

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2013147 NOTICE OF PUBLIC TIMBER SALE Department of Natural Resources will auction timber to the highest bidder. Contract terms and bidding information is available by calling Northeast Region at (509)684-7474 or by visiting the Region Office at Colville or Product Sales & Leasing Division, Olympia. Bidding information may also be obtained at the County Auditor’s office. Bidding begins at 10:00 a.m. at the on June 20, 2013. WINDY JIM FIT SORTS App. Nos. 089841-089847, approximately 32 miles northeast of Colville, WA on part(s) of Section 16 and 36 all in Township 38 North, Range 42 East, W.M., Section 16 in Township 39 North, Range 42 East, W.M. and Section 36 in Township 38 North, Range 41 East, W.M., each log sort to be sold individually. Minimum accepted bids listed are set at delivered log prices. Sort #1 approximately 2,088 tons DF/WL 7-10” sawlogs/peelers minimum acceptable bid $70.00/ton; Sort #2 approximately 610 tons DF/WL 11”+ sawlogs/ peelers minimum acceptable bid $80.00/ton; Sort #3 approximately 2,511 tons AF/WH/GF/ES/LP/WP and non-chuckable DF/WL 7-10” sawlogs minimum acceptable bid $65.00/ton; Sort #4 AF/WH/GF/ES/LP/ WP and non-chuckable DF/ WL 11”+ sawlogs minimum

acceptable bid $65.00/ton; Sort #5 approximately 823 tons WRC 5”+ sawlogs minimum acceptable bid $140.00/ton; Sort #6 approximately 15,936 tons all conifer species except WRC & PP 5-6” minimum acceptable bid $50.00/ tons; Sort #7 approximately 4,338 tons all conifer species except WRC 2”+ utility minimum acceptable bid $25.00/tons. This sale is Export Restricted. SKOOKUM FIT SORTS App. Nos. 089356-089359, approximately 7 miles northeast of Usk, WA, 4 miles west of Newport, WA and 4 miles south of Newport, WA on part(s) of Section 36 all in Township 34 North, Range 44 East, W.M., Section 16 and 36 in Township 31 North, Range 45 East, W.M., each log sort to be sold individually. Minimum accepted bids listed are set at delivered log prices. Sort #1 approximately 3,566 tons GF/LP/ PP/WP/WH 7-10” sawlogs minimum acceptable bid $65.00/tons; Sort #2 approximately 1,113 tons LP/ WH 11”+ sawlogs minimum acceptable bid $65.00/ tons; Sort #3 LP/PP/GF/WP/ WH 5-6” sawlogs minimum acceptable bid $50.00/ tons; Sort #4 All conifer species except WRC 2+ utility minimum acceptable bid $25.00/tons. This sale is Export Restricted. Published in The Newport Miner June 5 and 12, 2013. (18-2)

_________________ 2013167 NOTICE OF MEETING The Pend Oreille County Library District Board of Trustees will be holding a planning meeting with staff on 12 June 2013 from 9:30 A.M.-11:00 A.M. The meeting will be held at the Pine Ridge Community Church Hall. Published in The Newport Miner June 5, 2013. (18)

_________________ 2013175 CALL FOR BIDS Sealed bids will be received through Monday, June 17, 2013, 11:00 a.m., bids will be opened by the Selkirk School Board of Directors for Milk products at the June Regular Board of Directors Meeting on June 17, 2013. Approximately 21,000 half-pints 1% Grade A homogenized milk, approximately 20,000 halfpints nonfat chocolate milk, and approximately 5,000 half-pints lowfat strawberry milk. All milk must meet U.S.D.A. standards. For bid information and bid forms please contact the Selkirk School District at (509) 446-2951, or P.O. Box 129, Metaline Falls, WA 99153. The Board of Directors reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Nancy Lotze Superintendent and Board Secretary Published in The Newport Miner June 5 and 12, 2013. (18-2)

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2013182 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PEND OREILLE No. 13-4-00024-9 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.080) In the Estate of: MARIE KNUTSON, Deceased. The person named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this Estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner provided by RCW 11.40.070 by serv-

ing on or mailing to the Personal Representatives or the Personal Representatives’ attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim; and filing the original of the claim with the Court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representatives served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.040.020(1) (c): or (2) Four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: June 5, 2013. Personal Representatives: KRISTINE WOLD Attorney for Personal Representatives: LINDA J. MATHIS Address for Mailing or Service: 301 W. Spruce St, Suite B, Newport, WA 99156 /s/ Linda J. Mathis Linda J. Mathis Attorney for Personal Representative WSBA #16495 Published in The Newport Miner June 5, 12, and 19, 2013. (18-3)

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2013183 ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS M E TA L I N E FA L L S TRANSMISSION MAIN 2013 PROJECT Contract No. 13-016 Bid Opening Date: Thursday, June 27, 2013 Sealed bids will be received by the Pend Oreille PUD No. 1, located at 130 N Washington, Newport, WA 99156, until 2:30 PM, Thursday, June 27, 2013, for the Metaline Falls Transmission Main 2013 Project in the Metaline Falls, WA. Base Bid will include the construction of approximately 6,150 lineal feet of 12” C-900 PVC waterline including valves, fittings, appurtenances, and replacement of a small existing sampling building with a pre-fabricated concrete building. Bid Alternate #1 will include the construction of approximately 1,320 lineal feet of 8” C-900 PVC waterline including valves, fittings, and appurtenances. Bid Alternate #2 will include the slip lining of approximately 3,500 lineal feet of existing steel pipe with 12” HDPE. Availability of Bidding Documents: Bona fide general contractors may obtain the contract documents on CD at the office of the Pend Oreille PUD #1, 130 N. Washington, Newport, WA 99156. Please contact the PUD Contractor Administrator, Eileen Dugger, at (509) 447-9345. The documents are also available for review at the following locations: Welch Comer Engineers, 350 E. Kathleen Ave., Coeur d’Alene, ID 83815, (208) 664-9382 Spokane Regional Plan Center – 209 N. Havana St., Spokane, WA 99202, (509) 328-9600 Associated General Contractors, Spokane – E. 4935 Trent, Spokane, WA 99206, (509) 534-1446 Bid security: All bid proposals shall be accompanied by a bid proposal deposit in cash, certified check, cashier’s check, or surety bond in an amount equal to five percent (5%) of the amount of such bid proposal. Should the successful bidder fail to enter into such contract and furnish satisfactory performance bond within the time stated in the specifications, the bid proposal deposit shall be forfeited to the Pend Oreille Public Utility District #1.

Rejection of Bids: The right is reserved to reject any and all bids and to waiver informalities in the bidding. The Pend Oreille PUD No. 1 is an equal opportunity and affirmative action employer. Small, minorityand women-owned businesses are encouraged to submit bids. All work performed on the project will be subject to Washington State prevailing wage rates. A Pre-bid Conference will be held at 11:00 a.m. on June 14, 2013. Interested parties should meet at the Circle Motel, 15802 Hwy 31, Metaline Falls, WA. 99153. For information or questions regarding this project, please contact Steve Cordes, P.E. at Welch Comer & Associates, Inc., (208) 664-9382. Published in The Newport Miner June 5 and 12, 2013. (18-2)

_________________ 2013189 NOTICE OF ACTION Pursuant to 43.21C RCW, notice is hereby given that Pend Oreille County did on April 29, 2013 receive a complete Joint Aquatic Resource Application (JARPA) and SEPA Environmental Checklist prepared by Pend Oreille PUD #1 to install a streambank stabilization project on Power Lake. Pend Oreille County has issued a Mitigated Determination of Non-Significance for this project. This MDNS is issued under WAC 19711-350; the lead agency will not act on this proposal for 14 days from May 28, 2013. Comments must be submitted by June 11, 2013. This application will be heard by the Pend Oreille County Planning Commission on June 11, 2013 in Cusick at the Community Center @ 6:00pm. The submitted application and related documents may be examined by the public between 8:00 AM & 4:00 PM at the County Courthouse, Lower Level, 625 W. 4th, Newport, WA 99156, (509) 447-4821 and also on our website at www.pendoreilleco.org. Contact: Todd McLaughlin, Natural Resource Planner, tmclaughlin@pendoreille. org. Required Permits: Hydraulic Project Approval, Substantial Shoreline Development Permit, & approval from the Corps of Engineers. Date of Permit application: April 29, 2013 Date of Determination of Completeness: April 29, 2013 Date of Notice of Application: April 29, 2013 Date of Threshold SEPA Determination: May 28, 2013 Published in The Newport Miner June 5, 2013. (18)

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2013193 PUBLIC NOTICE – CITY OF NEWPORT Notice of Vendor Roster and Small Works Roster Pursuant to Ordinance No. 957, the City of Newport maintains a Vendor Roster for purchasing materials, supplies and equipment, as well as a Small Works Roster for public works projects involving the construction, alteration, repair or improvements of public facilities. Once on the roster, contractors and vendors need not resubmit an application. Applications for either roster may be obtained from the City of Newport, 200 S. Washington Ave., Newport, WA  99156 or by telephone at (509) 447-5611. Published in The Newport Miner June 5, 2013. (18) CONTINUED ON 10B


10B

| JUNE 5, 2013

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5 Rotary Club: 7:15 a.m. - Oldtown Rotary Park Overeaters Anonymous: 7:30 a.m. - Pineridge Community Church, 1428 W. First St., Newport, use back entrance Newport TOPS: 9 a.m. - Newport Eagles Fiber Arts Knitting and Spinning Group: 9 a.m. - Create Arts Center, Newport Computer Basics for Adults: 10 a.m. to Noon - Newport Library Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.: 402 S. Washington Ave., Newport Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Blanchard Library Weight Watchers: 11 a.m. Weigh in and 11:30 to Noon meeting - Camas Center for Community Wellness, Usk Al-Anon - Noon - American Lutheran Church Pinochle: 1 p.m. - Priest River Senior Center Calispel Post 217: 6 p.m. - American Legion in Cusick Priest River TOPS: 6 p.m. - Priest River Free Methodist Church Priest River Animal Rescue: 6 p.m.: 1710 9th St., Priest River

BASIC Meeting: 6 p.m. - Blanchard Community Center Pend Oreille Rock and Gem Club: 7 p.m.: 508 Quail Loop, Newport Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. Hospitality House in Newport THURSDAY, JUNE 6 Priest River Food Bank Open: 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. - Priest River Senior Center Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.: 402 S. Washington Ave., Newport Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Priest River Library Open Painting Workshop: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. - Create Arts Center, Newport Duplicate Bridge: 12:30 p.m. Hospitality House in Newport Loosely Knit: 1-3 p.m. - Calispel Valley Library, Cusick After School Readers Club: 3 p.m. - Priest River Library Celebrate Recovery: 5:30 p.m.: 754 Silverbirch Lane, Oldtown, House of the Lord Pend Oreille Kids Club: 6 p.m. Pend Oreille Mennonite Church Bingo: 6 p.m. - Priest River Senior Center Pinochle: 6 p.m. - Hospitality

T H E

House in Newport Eighth Grade Promotion: 6:30 p.m. - Priest River Junior High Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. Blanchard Community Church Newport Masonic Lodge: 7:30 p.m. FRIDAY, JUNE 7 Last Day of School: West Bonner School District Blanchard TOPS: 8:30-10 a.m. Blanchard Community Church PRM-Advocates for Women: 9:30-11 a.m. - Cornerstone Mall, Oldtown Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.: 402 S. Washington Ave., Newport Iris Garden Open: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.: 205 N. Craig Ave. Story Time: 11 a.m. - Newport Library Davis Lake Grange: 6 p.m. - Davis Lake Grange ‘Those Were the Days’ Spring Chorale: 6:30 p.m. - Circle Moon Theater Al-Anon: 7-8 p.m.: 119 Main St., Suite 204, Room 16, Priest River. Call Jan 208-946-6131 Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting: 7 p.m. - Priest River

|| CONTINUED FROM 9B 2013153 2013 MRSC ROSTERS SMALL PUBLIC WORKS ROSTERS and CONSULTING SERVICES ROSTERS The Municipal Research and Services Center of Washington (MRSC) hereby advertises on behalf of local government agencies in Washington State, including - but not limited to - cities (Titles 35 RCW and Title 35A RCW), counties (Title 36, RCW), port districts (Title 53, RCW), water and sewer districts (Title 57 RCW), school districts and educational service districts (Title 28A RCW), fire districts (Title 52 RCW), transit agencies (Ch.35.73 RCW), and public utility districts (Title 54 RCW), for their projected needs for small public works $300,000.00 or under and consulting services throughout 2013. Interested businesses may apply at any time by visiting the MRSC Rosters website at www.mrscrosters.org. For questions about MRSC Rosters, email mrscrosters@mrsc.org. SMALL PUBLIC WORKS ROSTERS: Service categories include construction, building, renovation, remodeling, alteration, repair, or improvement of real property as referenced in RCW 39.04.155. Sub-categories can be viewed in the MRSC Rosters website. CONSULTING SERVICES ROSTERS: Service categories include architectural, engineering, and surveying services as referenced by Chapter 39.80 RCW, as well as other personal and professional consulting services. Subcategories can be viewed in the MRSC Rosters website. Currently subscribing local governments who have their Small Works Roster and Consultant Roster hosted in the MRSC Rosters shared database: Aberdeen School District #5, Alderwood Water & Wastewater District, Bainbridge Island Fire Department, Bainbridge Island Metropolitan Park & Recreation District, Belfair Water District #1, Bellingham Public Development Authority, Benton County, Benton County Fire District #5, Benton County Fire District 6, Benton PUD, Birch Bay Water & Sewer District, Bremerton Housing Authority, Cascade Valley Hospital and Clinics (Snohomish County Public Hospital District No. 3), Cedar River Water & Sewer District, Central Kitsap Fire and Rescue, Central Pierce Fire & Rescue, Central Whidbey Island Fire and Rescue, Chelan County, Chelan County FPD 6,

Cheney Public Schools, City of Aberdeen, City of Airway Heights, City of Algona, City of Anacortes, City of Arlington, City of Auburn, City of Battle Ground, City of Bellingham, City of Black Diamond, City of Bonney Lake, City of Bremerton, City of Brewster, City of Bridgeport, City of Brier, City of Buckley, City of Burien, City of Burlington, City of Carnation, City of Castle Rock, City of Cheney, City of Chewelah, City of Cle Elum, City of Clyde Hill, City of Colfax, City of Connell, City of Covington, City of Des Moines, City of DuPont, City of Duvall, City of Edgewood, City of Edmonds, City of Enumclaw, City of Ephrata, City of Everett, City of Everson, City of Federal Way, City of Fife, City of Fircrest, City of George, City of Gig Harbor, City of Gold Bar, City of Grand Coulee, City of Granger, City of Granite Falls, City of Hoquiam, City of Ilwaco, City of Kalama, City of Kettle Falls, City of Kittitas, City of La Center, City of Lacey, City of Lake Forest Park, City of Lake Stevens, City of Lakewood, City of Langley, City of Leavenworth, City of Liberty Lake, City of Long Beach, City of Lynnwood, City of Maple Valley, City of Marysville, City of Medical Lake, City of Medina, City of Mill Creek, City of Millwood, City of Monroe, City of Moses Lake, City of Mount Vernon, City of Mountlake Terrace, City of Mukilteo, City of Newcastle, City of Nooksack, City of Normandy Park, City of North Bend, City of North Bonneville, City of Oak Harbor, City of Olympia, City of Omak, City of Orting, City of Pacific, City of Port Angeles, City of Port Orchard, City of Port Townsend, City of Poulsbo, City of Prosser, City of Puyallup, City of Quincy, City of Rainier, City of Ridgefield, City of Rock Island, City of Roslyn, City of Royal City, City of Ruston, City of SeaTac, City of Sedro-Woolley, City of Sequim, City of Shelton ,City of Snohomish, City of Snoqualmie, City of Soap Lake, City of South Bend, City of Stanwood, City of Sultan, City of Sumner, City of Tekoa, City of Toppenish, City of Tukwila, City of Tumwater, City of University Place, City of Vader, City of Vancouver, City of Waitsburg, City of Warden, City of Washougal, City of Woodland, City of Yakima, City of Yelm, Clark County, Clark County Fire District #13, Clark County Fire District 5, Clark Regional Wastewater District, Cle Elum - Roslyn School District No. 404, Coal Creek Utility District, Columbia

W E E K

County Fire District #3, Cowlitz County Fire District 6, Cross Valley Water District, C-Tran (Clark County Public Transportation Benefit Area), Darrington School District, Des Moines Pool Metropolitan Park District, Dieringer School District, Duvall-King County Fire District 45, East Jefferson Fire Rescue, Eastmont School District No. 206, Eastside Fire & Rescue, Edmonds Public Facilities District, Edmonds School District #15, Enduris Washington, Entiat School District 127, Ferry County, Ferry County Public Hospital District #1, Foster Creek Conservation District, Franklin County, Grant County, Grays Harbor County Fire Protection District No. 2, Hartstene Pointe Water Sewer District, Highlands Sewer District, Highline Water District, ICOM 911 (Island County Emergency Services Communications Center), Holmes Harbor Sewer District, Island County Fire District #1 (Camano Island Fire & Rescue), Jefferson County Fire Protection District No. 3, Juniper Beach Water District, Kapowsin Water District, Kent Fire Department Regional Fire Authority, Key Peninsula Metropolitan Park District, King Conservation District, King County Fire District No. 2, King County Fire Protection District #34, King County Fire Protection District #44, King County Fire Protection District #47, King County Water District #117, King County Water District #90, King County Water District No. 45, King County Water District No. 54, King County Water District No. 111, Kitsap Conservation District, Kitsap County, Kitsap County Consolidated Housing Authority, Kitsap County Sewer District No. 7, Kitsap Regional Library, Kittitas County Conservation District, Kittitas County Fire District No. 2 (dba Valley Fire & Rescue), Kittitas County Fire District #7, Kittitas County Fire Protection District 6, Klickitat Valley Health, Lacey Fire District 3, Lake Stevens Fire, Lake Stevens Sewer District, Lake Washington School District #414, Lake Whatcom Water & Sewer District, Lakewood Water District, Longview Housing Authority, Lynnwood Public Facilities District, Marysville Fire District, Mason County, Mason County Fire District 5 (Central Mason Fire & EMS), Mason County Fire District 9, Mason County PUD No. 1, Mason County Transit (MTA), McKenna Water District, Mercer Island School District #400, Midway Sewer District, Mukilteo Water and Waste-

PU B LI C

water District, North Country EMS, North County Regional Fire Authority, North Mason School District #403, North Whidbey Fire and Rescue, Northshore Fire Department, Northshore Utility District, Odessa Memorial Healthcare Center, Odessa School District, Okanogan Conservation District, Olympia School District, Olympic View Water & Sewer District, Orting School District #344, Othello Community Hospital (Adams County Public Hospital District No. 3), Pend Oreille County, Pend Oreille County Fire District #4, Pend Oreille County Fire District #8, Pend Oreille County Public Hospital District #1 d.b.a. Newport Hospital and Health Services, Peninsula Housing Authority, Peninsula Metropolitan Park District, Pierce Conservation District, Pierce County Library System, Point Roberts Water District No. 4, Port of Bremerton, Port of Brownsville, Port of Edmonds, Port of Everett, Port of Hoodsport, Port of Kalama, Port of Longview, Port of Mattawa, Port of Olympia, Port of Port Angeles, Port of Port Townsend, Port of Quincy, Port of Shelton, Port of Skagit, Port of Tacoma, Prosser Fire District 3, Puget Sound Educational Service District #121, Quincy School District, Renton School District, Ronald Wastewater District, Seattle Housing Authority, SedroWoolley Housing Authority, Shoreline School District, Shoreline Water District, Si View Metropolitan Park District, Silver Lake Water & Sewer District, Skagit County, Skagit County Sewer District #1, Skagit Transit, Skyway Water & Sewer District, SNOCOM, Snohomish Conservation District, Snohomish County, Snohomish County Fire District #1, Snohomish County Fire District #26, Snohomish County Fire District #3, Snohomish County Fire District #4, Snohomish County Fire District #5, Snohomish County Fire District #7, Snohomish County Housing Authority, Snohomish School District, Sno-Isle Intercounty Rural Library District, Snoqualmie Pass Utility District, South Kitsap Fire and Rescue, South Pend Oreille Fire & Rescue, South Pierce County Fire and Rescue - Pierce County Fire Protection District #17, South Whidbey Fire/ EMS, Spokane Conservation District, Spokane County Fire District 8, Spokane County Fire Protection District No. 13, Spokane Public Facilities District, Spokane Regional Clean Air Agency, Sunland

THE MINER

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A H E A D

VFW Open Mic: 7-9:30 p.m. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave., Newport Saturday, June 8 Eagles Golf Tournament: Ranch Club Pend Oreille Valley Farmers Market: 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.: 240 N. Union Ave., Newport Women’s AA: 9:30 a.m. - Create Arts Center, Newport Cusick High School Graduation: 10 a.m. - Cusick High School Kids Movie Club: 10 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. - Newport Library Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.: 402 S. Washington Ave., Newport Iris Garden Open: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.: 205 N. Craig Ave. Newport Graduation - Noon Newport High School Happy Agers Card Party: 1 p.m. Priest River Senior Center AA Meeting: 5 p.m. - Cornerstone Building, Selkirk Way, Oldtown Set Free Northwest Meal and Worship: 6:30 p.m. - Conerstone Building Behind Ace Hardware, Oldtown ‘Those Were the Days’ Spring Chorale: 6:30 p.m. - Circle Moon Theater

N OT I C E S

Iris Garden Open: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.: 205 N. Craig Ave. Newport Youth: 4 p.m. - Sadie Halstead Middle School Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. Hospitality House MONDAY, JUNE 10 Country Breakfast: 7-11 a.m. Blanchard Community Center Evergreen Art Association: 10 a.m. - Riverbank Restaurant Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.: 402 S. Washington Ave., Newport Hospitality House Senior Potluck - Noon - Newport Fireworks Fundraising Auction: 5-9 p.m. - Ranch Club, Priest River Habitat for Humanity: 6 p.m. Sandifur Room, Newport Hospital Young Lives Club for Pregnant and Teen Moms: 6 p.m. - Hospitality House, Newport. Call 208691-2920 Priest River Lions: 6:30 p.m. Priest River Senior Center Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. -

Blanchard Community Church Blanchard Grange Meeting: 7 p.m. - Blanchard Grange Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. - Pend Oreille Bible Church in Cusick TUESDAY, JUNE 11 Blanchard Stitchers Quilting Group: 10 a.m. - Blanchard Inn Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.: 402 S. Washington Ave., Newport Last Day of School: 11 a.m. Release - Cusick Writers Group: 2 p.m. - Create Arts Center Weight Watchers: 5:30-6 p.m. Weigh in and 6 p.m. meeting Pineridge Community Church, 1428 W. First St., Newport Pinochle: 6 p.m. - Calispel Valley Library, Cusick Belly Dance Fitness: 6:30-7:30 p.m. - Create Arts Center, Newport Bingo: 6:30 p.m. - Newport Eagles Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. St. Anthony’s Church ‘Those Were the Days’ Spring Chorale: 7:30 p.m. - Circle Moon Theater Spirit Lake Lodge No. 57: 8 p.m. Spirit Lake

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Water District, Sunnyside Housing Authority, Tacoma School District #10, The Greater Wenatchee Regional Events Center Public Facilities District, Thurston County, Thurston County Fire Protection District #17, Town of Beaux Ar ts Village, Town of Cathlamet, Town of Conconully, Town of Coulee City, Town of Coulee Dam, Town of Coupeville, Town of Creston, Town of Eatonville, Town of Hunts Point, Town of Ione, Town of La Conner, Town of Lyman, Town of Mansfield, Town of Marcus, Town of Northport, Town of Odessa, Town of Reardan, Town of Riverside, Town of Rosalia, Town of Skykomish, Town of South Prairie, Town of Springdale, Town of Steilacoom, Town of Waterville, Town of Wilbur, Town of Wilkeson, Town of Woodway, Town of Yacolt, Town of Yarrow Point, Tukwila School District No. 406, Tumwater School District #33, Valley Regional Fire Authority, Vashon Island School District, Vashon Sewer District, Waitsburg School District, Washougal School District 06-112, Waterville School District #209, West Sound Utility District, Whatcom County Rural Library District, Whatcom Transportation Authority, White River School District #416, William Shore Memorial Pool District, Woodinville Water District, Yakima Valley Libraries. Some or all of the local governments listed above may choose to use the MRSC Rosters to select businesses. Master contracts for certain types of work may be required. In accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, these local governments hereby notify all businesses that they will affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises as defined at 49 CFR Part 26 will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids or proposals in response to any invitations and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, national origin, or sex in consideration for an award. Published in The Newport Miner June 5, 2013. (18)

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SUNDAY, JUNE 9 Museum Open: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.: 402 S. Washington Ave., Newport

2013190 NOTICE OF ACTION Pursuant to 43.21C RCW, notice is hereby given that Pend Oreille County did on April 25, 2013 receive a complete Joint Aquatic Resource Application (JARPA) and SEPA Environmental Checklist prepared by Pend Oreille PUD #1 to install new power poles in shoreline jurisdiction on LeClerc Creek Rd N. (MP 11.6 – MP 13.6). Pend Oreille County has issued a Mitigated Determination of Non-Significance for this project. This MDNS is issued under WAC 19711-350; the lead agency will not act on this proposal for 14 days from May 28, 2013. Comments must be submitted by June 11, 2013. This application will be heard by the Pend Oreille County Planning Commission on June 11, 2013 in Cusick at the Community Center @ 6:00pm. The submitted application and related documents may be examined by the public between 8:00 AM & 4:00 PM at the County Courthouse, Lower Level, 625 W. 4th, Newport, WA 99156, (509) 447-4821 and also on our website at www.pendoreilleco.org. Contact: Todd McLaughlin, Natural Resource Planner, tmclaughlin@pendoreille. org. Required Permits: Hydraulic Project Approval, Substantial Shoreline Development Permit, & approval from the Corps of Engineers. Date of Permit application: April 25, 2013 Date of Determination of Completeness: May 02, 2013 Date of Notice of Application: May 06, 2013 Date of Threshold SEPA Determination: May 28, 2013 Published in The Newport Miner June 5, 2013. (18)

________________ 2013191 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR PEND OREILLE COUNTY NO. 13-4-00025-7 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) Estate of MARIE KINMAN Deceased. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed me as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and

(b) In the manner provided in RCW 11.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 1l.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: June 5, 2013. /s/ Darryl Ratcliff Personal Representative Darryl Ratcliff 37424 N. Rayona Ln, Newport, WA 99156 Published in The Newport Miner June 5, 12, and 19, 2013. (18-3)

________________ 2013192 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON FOR PEND OREILLE COUNTY No.13-4-00026-5 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS (RCW 11.40.030) Estate of PHILIP P. KLEWENO, Deceased. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE The above Court has appointed me as Personal Representative of Decedent’s estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must present the claim: (a) Before the time when the claim would be barred by any applicable statute of limitations, and (b) In the manner provided in RCW I 1.40.070: (i) By filing the original of the claim with the foregoing Court, and (ii) By serving on or mailing to me at the address below a copy of the claim. The claim must be presented by the later of: (a) Thirty (30) days after I served or mailed this Notice as provided in RCW 11.40.020(1)(c), or (b) Four (4) months after the date of first publication of this Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time period, the claim will be forever barred except as provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective for claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication of this Notice: June 5, 2013. /s/ Cheryl Allen Cheryl Allen, Personal

Representative Denise Stewart Attorney at Law PLLC PO Box 301 Newport, WA 99156 Published in The Newport Miner June 5, 12, and 19, 2013. (18-3)

_________________ 2013194 NOTICE OF CALL FOR BIDS COUNTY OF PEND OREILLE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT NEWPORT, WASHINGTON Sealed Bids will be received by the County of Pend Oreille at the County Commissioners Office, located in the Pend Oreille County Courthouse at 625 West Fourth Avenue, Newport, Washington, until 10:00 AM Monday June 17, 2013 and will then and there be opened and publicly read for the purchase of Chip Seal Oil. Bid Proposal, may be obtained from the Pend Oreille County Public Works. Department, Road Division, P.O. Box 5040, Newport, Washington 99156, Bids are to be submitted in a sealed envelope addressed to: THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, COURTHOUSE, NEWPO RT, WASHI NG TO N 99156 with “BID FOR Pend Oreille County 2013 Chip Seal Oil Bid, written on the outside. Pend Oreille County, in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2002d to 2002-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, subtitle A, Office of the Secretary, Part 21, nondiscrimination in federally assisted programs of the Department of Transportation issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into, pursuant to this advertisement, minority business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color or national origin in consideration for an award. The bids which will be received are for the Pend Oreille County 2013 Chip Seal Oil Bid. Bids will be for supplying and delivery of HFE 150. Dates and location for delivery are listed on the bid sheet. Published in The Newport Miner June 5, 2013. (18)


Newport Miner Newspaper