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THE VOICE OF PEND OREILLE COUNT Y SINCE 1901

Wednesday, April 24, 2013

www.pendoreillerivervalley.com

PUD power from Boundary left out of license

BY JANELLE ATYEO OF THE MINER

NEWPORT – When the new license was issued for Boundary Dam last month it came without one major provision that directly affects how much Pend Oreille County residents pay for power. The Pend Oreille Public Utility District has filed for a rehearing with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on the license provision that allows the PUD to purchase 48 megawatts of power from Boundary at the price it costs to produce it. This is the majority of power used by Pend Oreille County residents and is why they enjoy one of the lowest rates in the country. Because the Boundary Project is so much larger than the PUD’s Box Canyon

OF THE MINER

SANDPOINT – Attorneys representing leaseholders at Priest Lake have filed suit in 1st District Court seeking review of rate increases on leases for state-owned lakefront property at Priest Lake. The average amount of the rate increases over last year is 84 percent. Leases for some properties cost as much as $35,000 annually. All 353 leases at Priest Lake expire at the end of this year, the end of a 10-year lease. The new

75¢

project, power costs are lower. “It would have a very significant impact on rates,” said Mark Cauchy, Pend Oreille PUD’s Director of Regulatory and Environmental Affairs. Because the district has agreements in place with Boundary Dam owners Seattle City Light, the 48 MW exchange will continue through the new license – for the next 42 years. “We know there’s going to be different players at the table in the 42 years so we really want to get that thing in writing,” said Curt Knapp, president of the PUD board of commissioners. Cauchy said it’s a pretty unique agreement, something that the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission MINER PHOTO|DON GRONNING

SEE PUD, 2A

Lease increases prompt lawsuits at Priest Lake BY DON GRONNING

Volume 110, Number 12 | 2 Sections, 16 Pages

leases will be staggered, and be for shorter time periods. The state had the properties appraised and increased the leases in most cases. The annual leases for 2014 range from about $7,200 a year to $35,000, according to the Idaho Department of Lands. The lease money goes into an endowment that is used for education. The land was originally given to the state by the federal government. The lease amount is 4 percent of the appraised value annually. SEE LEASE, 2A

Learning the bases These members of the Cougars T-Ball team were getting some instruction on basic principles of baseball during practice Friday, April 12 from coach Brett Reedy at the Sadie Halstead Middle School baseball field in Newport. Here, they’re pointing out third base.

Cast your fishing lines on Saturday Fishing season opens in Washington lakes NEWPORT – Lowland lake fishing season officially opens in Washington Saturday, April 27. Several hundred lowland lakes – stocked with millions of fish – will be open for a six-month season. Fishing in Idaho is open year round, though licenses are required in both states at all times. “The start of the lowland lakes

season is the biggest fishing day of the year,” said Phil Anderson, director of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. “Lakes in every county are wellstocked, so families can keep travel costs down by enjoying good fishing close to home.” To participate, anglers must have a current Washington freshwater fishing license valid through March 31, 2014. Licenses can be purchased online

at https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov; by phone at 1-866-246-9453; or at license dealers across the state. A list of vendors is online. Freshwater fishing licenses cost $29.50 for resident adults 16 to 69 years old. Fifteen-year-olds can buy a license for $10.25, and seniors 70 and older can buy an annual freshwater fishing license for $7.50. Children 14 years of age and younger do not need a fish-

ing license. WDFW fish hatchery crews have been stocking 17 million trout and kokanee in lakes on both sides of the Cascades. Those fish include 2.3 million catchable trout, 160,000 jumbo trout weighing up to 11 pounds apiece, 52,000 triploid trout averaging 1½ pounds apiece, and millions of smaller trout that were stocked last year that have grown to catchable size.

Hard time at the Pend Oreille County Jail Sheriff takes ‘no nonsense’ approach to incarceration BY DON GRONNING OF THE MINER

MINER PHOTO|DON GRONNING

Inmates Jacob Freuh, left, and Shane Johnson display the prepared meals that are served at the Pend Oreille County Jail. Pend Oreille County Sheriff Alan Botzheim has made several changes in the way the jail is operated, including taking away television and serving meals prepared by Washington State Correctional Industries in Airway Heights.

NEWPORT – It’s lunchtime at the Pend Oreille County Jail and inmates Jacob Frueh and Shane Johnson are helping out. They are trustees – inmates who have proven themselves trustworthy to the jailers and are allowed out of their cells to help out with things such as serving meals. It is a break from the monotony of jail time. Prisoners are locked in cells 23 of 24 hours a day. All trustees have been sentenced. Frueh is serving time for driving while license suspended, Johnson for felony eluding.

|| Corps, Kalispels study if dam operations can cool downstream waters OLDTOWN – In an effort to improve water temperature for threatened bull trout and other species, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Kalispel Tribe of Indians are studying the effects of Albeni Falls Dam operations on downstream water temperatures. Corps scientists are evaluating data and refining models for possible operational adjustments. In the future, they may schedule an experimental release of water from the dam at Oldtown, which would occur after Labor Day. A date has not been set and may not occur in 2013. The water temperature study is focused on late summer operations in August and September when river temperatures can be lethal for some aquatic species, particularly bull trout

B R I E F LY

and native westslope cutthroat trout. The study is part of the July 2012 agreement between the tribe, Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation and the corps. While the corps is also working to understand the potential effects of a release of water before Labor Day, there aren’t currently plans to start a summertime release. Changing operations before Labor Day – should it be considered in the future – would require analysis to ensure it meets environmental regulations. The process would also call for additional public input.

County jobless rates down to 13 percent OLYMPIA – It’s still one of the highest in the state, but the Pend Oreille County unemployment rate dropped to 13 percent in March from 14 percent the month before. Ferry County had the highest rate at 14.2 percent. Grays

Prisoners eat meals that are prepared at the prison in Airway Heights. That’s a change. Meals used to be prepared at the jail in Newport. Now they come frozen. On Friday, breakfast consisted of a butterhorn pastry, cereal with powdered milk and applesauce; lunch was sandwiches, chips and a muffin; and dinner was breaded chicken fritters, beans and rice. “Sometimes it seems like the amount of calories is low,” Frueh says. The chicken fritters dinner had 430 calories and breakfast had 540 calories. Jail officials say the diet is approved by a state nutritionist and meets state standards.

Food policy saves money The frozen food is far less expensive than the food that was prepared on site before

Pend Oreille County Sheriff Alan Botzheim ordered the change. The Airway Heights meals cost $1.62 a day per prisoner, instead of the $3.34 a day per prisoner the jail used to pay. There is less food wasted, and it saves the county money – although not as much as Botzheim originally thought, because the number of prisoners has increased from an average of 26 per day to 29. It is still a substantial amount of money. Botzheim says the county saved nearly $10,000 on what it has spent since the first of the year. He says the county spent $20,804 through April 16 on food. Under the old menu, the county would have spent more than $30,000, he said. SEE JAIL, 2A

||

Harbor was the next highest at 13.1 percent, and Stevens tied Pend Oreille at 13. Spokane County has a rate of 9.1 percent as of March. In Washington, the seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 7.3 percent, just lower than the nationwide rate of 7.6 percent. County rates are not seasonally adjusted.

Legislators connect with telephone town hall OLYMPIA – Seventh Legislative District residents are encouraged to participate in an upcoming telephone town hall hosted by their legislators: Sen. John Smith and Reps. Shelly Short and Joel Kretz. The hour-long community conversation will take place Tuesday, April 30, at 7 p.m. Individuals wishing to participate should call 1-877-2298493 and enter pin number 15429 when prompted.

Kretz, a 10-year veteran of the House of Representatives, explained the feedback received from constituents during the calls is invaluable. “Telephone town halls offer residents the chance to ask questions, voice their opinions and share their ideas with us – and the best part is that they don’t even have to leave their houses to participate,” Kretz, R-Wauconda. The 7th District team hosted a tele-town hall a few weeks after this year’s legislative session began in January. With the regular session set to adjourn April 28, Short, R-Addy, said this teleforum will give residents a review of the past four months and get their feedback on how they want to be represented. “In order to best represent northeast Washington, we need to hear what’s working and what’s not working,” Short said. “We’ve made some good progress this session, but there is always more work that needs to be done.”

SPORTS 1B-3B - RECORD 4B - POLICE 4B - OPINION 4A - CLASSIFIEDS 5B-8B - PUBLIC NOTICES 7B-8B - DOWN RIVER 7A - LIFE 6A - OBITUARIES 4B


2A

| APRIL 24, 2013

The Newport Miner Serving Pend Oreille County, WA

Fred J. Willenbrock Publisher

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CO N N EC T W I T H U S The Miner Online

FROM PAGE ON E 

PUD | 48 MW covers general service load FROM PAGE 1

(FERC) doesn’t typically deal with when it is licensing hydro projects. “FERC is trying to make their life simpler,” Knapp said. “You’d hope that if it was in the last license and no one contested it that it would continue on,” Cauchy said. Back before the original Boundary license was issued in 1961, the PUD was looking to build a smaller dam at Z Canyon that would produce 356 MW. The district filed a lawsuit to stop the construction of Boundary, but the Supreme Court sided with Seattle. The agreement to sell the PUD 48 MW of Boundary power at cost was mitigation for that. It addressed a portion of the adverse socio-economic impacts that Pend Oreille County has suffered due to the award of the Boundary license to Seattle City Light, according to a press release from the PUD. The agreement kept the PUD from contesting City Light’s original license. The PUD negotiated new agree-

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cost resource.” That 48 MW serves the general service customers in Pend Oreille County – your average household and businesses. It covers the entire load except for some times of peak usage during the winter months. Ponderay Newsprint uses most of the power produced at the PUD’s Box Canyon Dam, located 17 miles upstream from Boundary. Ponderay also uses some power purchased on the market, which is usually at a higher price. Even with the at-cost power from Boundary, rates for PUD customers are expected to increase. With Boundary’s new 42-year license, the cost of power is expected to increase from $5.48 per megawatt hour to $14.20. This summer, PUD rates are expected to go up 2.5 percent. Of that, 1 percent is a reflection of the increasing Boundary power costs. The PUD commissioners will consider a 1.5 percent increase tied to Box Canyon rates. If approved, the charge per kilowatt hour would increase by about a tenth of a cent.

Visiting times, conditions

Visitors are allowed at the county jail three times a week, for no more than a half hour at a time. Visiting hours are 6-8 p.m. Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. Depending on staffing, they may be canceled or shortened. Visitors need to sign up between 4:30-5 p.m. the day of the visit.

They need to show valid government issued identification. Photocopies or expired identification is not accepted. No more than three people at a time can see a prisoner. Visitors are screened for warrants. People with extraditable or Pend Oreille County warrants are arrested. People with non-extra-

ditable warrants are turned away. There is a dress code. Visitors are required to have shoes and proper underwear. No steel toed shoes or boots are allowed. For women, skirts must be mid-thigh length or longer. They will be turned away for inappropriate clothing.

JAIL | State now paying for its prisoners FROM PAGE 1

Botzheim has also instituted other changes that have brought in money. Under previous administrations, the county did not charge the state to house prisoners, he said. Now the state is under contract to pay $75 a day to house state Department of Corrections prisoners. The county also charges the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the U.S. Border Patrol. Botzheim estimates the county has received about $7,000 for housing state prisoners this year. “Before we got nothing,” he said, “and we paid for their medical.” The county also has a contract with the city of Newport to house city prisoners. The city pays salary and benefits for a corrections officer. Botzheim, a lifelong county resident, is a Republican who was elected to his first term as sheriff in 2010. He has worked for the sheriff’s office for more than 20 years. He said he didn’t realize the county wasn’t getting paid for state prisoners when he first took office.

Changing the jail culture The changes at the jail aren’t all about money, though. “We’re trying to change the culture of the jail,” Botzheim says. When Capt. Steve Higgins took over as jail captain in June 2012, the first thing he did was do away with television in jail, which were mainly used to watch videos, since there was no cable television and reception for broadcast TV was poor. Higgins, who spent 21 years working for the Department of Corrections, most of it at the state’s Monroe Correctional Complex, said the televisions were dangerous. “The televisions could be used for weapons,” he said. They could be thrown. They could be dismantled. Prisoners made devices called stingers out of them to heat coffee. The cords could be tripped over, or worse. Some prisoners don’t mind the lack of television. “After you get used to it, you don‘t miss it,” Johnson, the jail trustee, says. Televisions are allowed in state prisons, but they are bolted down

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ments for the power when Seattle began their relicensing process and removed a clause requiring that the Boundary Power be available only when all of Box Canyon Power is used in the county. This cleared the way for the PUD to sell the power in the future. The request for rehearing was filed with FERC Friday, April 19. FERC has 30 days to respond, acknowledging the filing and indicating that they will act on it, but the timeline isn’t definite after that. “It leaves it open to take as long as they want,” Cauchy said. While PUD customers are set to get their 48 MW for the next 42 years, omission of the power assignment in future licenses for Boundary will affect the availability of low-cost power for Pend Oreille County. “Our rates are based on getting that Boundary Power because the cost is so much lower than Box Canyon,” Cauchy said. Boundary is a larger project and has more leeway to soak up expenses such as mitigation work, he said. “It’s our lowest

and prisoners pay for them, he said. Botzheim said removing the televisions was a sensible thing to do. “It made no sense that we took their shoelaces and belts but left television cords,” Botzheim said. Prisoners could trip over the cord and sue the county, he said.

More criminal charges now While there have been more assault cases brought against prisoners, Botzheim and Higgins don’t think it is because there are more incidents than before. It’s just that now, they are being reported and charged as crimes. One inmate is facing a felony assault charge for allegedly slapping away the hand of a jailer who was breaking up a fight. Another was recently sentenced for throwing toilet water on a guard. A prisoner was convicted of attacking another prisoner. Charges of fraud were referred to the prosecutor after jailers said an inmate falsely claimed a medical condition to get favorable treatment on meals. “We’re taking a no nonsense approach,” Botzheim said. That is different than before, Botzheim said. There have been altercations before, but now they are being submitted to prosecutors and charges brought. Botzheim says the changes are about safety and accountability. Higgins says when he worked at Monroe, there was zero tolerance for touching a correctional officer. Sentenced prisoners automatically get their sentence reduced by a third for good behavior. Currently there is no procedure to take away good time, as it is called. The state system has a procedure in which the prisoner can contest the allegation that leads to revocation of good time, Higgins says. The county has no such procedure, so nobody gets good time taken away. Instead charges are referred to the prosecutor. The county is working on developing such a procedure.

Medical for prisoners costly In addition to feeding prisoners, the county has to provide and pay for their medical needs.

It is no small consideration. Prosecutors released a prisoner who was gravely ill on his own recognizance after previously holding him on $50,000 bond because they didn’t want the county to foot the bill for his medical costs. Botzheim says the county is talking with the Newport Hospital and Health Services about having a physician or physician’s assistant come to the jail to see prisoners regularly. As it is now, prisoners are taken, one at a time, to the clinic or hospital. For emergencies, an ambulance is called. For routine care, an appointment is made for prisoners. For the fiscal year from July 2011 through June 2012, ambulances were called four times at a cost of $3,084, there were 167 medical appointments costing $8,701 and 35 outpatient hospital visits that cost $10,685. That totals $22,471 for medical costs, taking into account a substantial discount for the medical appointments and hospital visits. Without the discounts, the cost would have been well over $47,000. It would save the jail staff time to have medical people come to the jail, as well as reduce the chance of escape, Higgins says. With 10 corrections officers staffing the jail, the facility is understaffed by two Higgins says. The jail, originally a 14-bed facility, now has a capacity of 31, mostly in two-man cells. There are two six-bed cells and two cells for female prisoners. When there are more than 31 prisoners, or more than four women, the inmates sleep in “boats,” small beds on the floor. Last Friday, there were 28 prisoners in jail. Of these, 16 are pre-trial inmates, 10 are serving sentences and two are Department of Corrections prisoners. They are charged with a variety of offences, ranging from murder and sex crimes to driving on a suspended license and probation violations. Botzheim says that prisoners who haven’t been in the Pend Oreille County Jail before the changes don’t know the difference. “They think this is how jail is,” he said.

THE NEWPORT MINER

Newport chamber board calls for visitor center contractor NEWPORT – With the busy tourist season approaching, the Greater Newport Area Chamber of Commerce board of directors decided last Monday, April 15, to stop directly managing the visitor and information center and called for proposals to contract out the work. Apparently the board has discussed the issue during the past few months because of the amount of work it takes to keep the center open. Chamber President Steve Shumski said some board members wanted completely out of organizing the volunteers and other duties such as distributing information. He said they felt it has been a big part of the problem getting what they want from the paid executive director’s time. They have had three executive directors in the past two years. Shumski said the executive director does nothing but visitor center work from May to September. They work in the office where the visitor center displays and public restrooms are located. The chamber building is located on Pend Oreille County Historical Society property. The building was built with state grants and donations in 1996 by a group of community leaders, including chamber members. An agreement was signed at the time by the chamber – which agreed to operate a visitor center and office in the building – and historical society – which provided the land for $1. It was also designed to provide office space for the county economic development district staff but the department has never used it. Historical Society President

Friday

Saturday

Sunday

64/33

69/41

64/36

59/34

Sunny with light Mostly sunny wind with light wind

66/39

Partly sunny

Cloudy, a 20% chance of rain

Monday

Sunny, a chance Partly sunny of rain showers

61/33

Tuesday

Cloudy, rain possible

65/38

Source: National Weather Service and Accuweather.com, Newport, WA

SEE CHAMBER, 7A

LEASE | Applications to bid come with April 30 deadline FROM PAGE 1

There are cases where the annual lease went down but in most cases they were increases, sometimes dramatically. In one case, the lease was increased nearly $14,000, from a little over $10,000 in 2013 to $24,000 in 2014 on property appraised at $602,000. Denny Christenson, president of the Priest Lake State Lessee’s Association, says the valuations on which the leases are based are fundamentally flawed. “They have so many flaws, they can’t be salvaged,” he says. There are significant factual errors in the appraisals, he says, including pictures of the wrong cabins included some cases. Emily Callihan, spokesperson for the Idaho Department of Lands, says the flaws have to not only be factual, they must affect the value. A wrong picture of the cabin may not affect the value, for instance, she says. It will be up to the Land Board to decide. Christenson says the Priest Lake State Lessee’s Association represents 322 of the 354 lessees and has filed suit in 1st District Court to have judicial review of the state’s rate increase. Lessees have until April 30 to submit an application for the expiring cottage lease sites. “We’ve recommended that lessees file an application,” he said, along with a $250 filing fee. The application is not a commitment to lease but does reserve the right to lease. Callihan isn’t so sure it doesn’t commit the lessee to renew.

T H I S W E E K’S FO R EC A ST

Wednesday Thursday

Evelyn Reed said they will review the chamber’s new direction for the visitor center at their next regular meeting in May. They have been discussing the intentions of the lease agreement and how they believe the thousands of visitors can best be served. The chamber has yet to find a new executive director to replace Valorie Hein who left the chamber the end of March, and the office remains closed. Hein was the third executive director in two years. She replaced Barry Steward when he resigned in May 2012. He had held the position since February 2012, replacing Krista Dinatale, who started the position in early March 2011. The chamber usually opens the office from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Thursday during winter hours. The hours are extended during the summer and cover weekends. Last year they had maintained the supervision of the visitor center but had the Pend Oreille River Tourism Alliance find and train the volunteer hosts. PORTA has been designated the county tourism organization. Last year, the chamber received $1,000 from the city of Newport’s hotel motel tax collection for the visitor center operations. They also receive $200 a month from the county hotel motel tax collections for visitor center work. In the past, the visitor center has had from 3,000 to 6,000 visitors in a summer season. Shumski said the board feels the

April 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

April 30 is also the deadline for people to submit applications to bid on the leases, a process called a conflict auction. If somebody does bid on the lease, an auction will be held later this summer, Christenson said. Callihan says only the people who have applied by April 30 will be allowed to bid. The lease is for the land only. The buildings and other improvements are owned by the leaseholder. If the leaseholder does not renew the lease or does not win the auction, the state can demand the improvements be removed. Another problem, according to Christenson, is that at the height of the market, in 2008-2009, before the recession, the right to lease was traded. Some people paid as much as $500,000 for the right to renew the lease, he said. Currently that right is not worth anything, he maintains. “The game has changed,” he said. An Idaho Supreme Court Ruling last year removed protections the lake site lessees had. Now they must compete with others for the right to lease. So far there has only been one conflict bidder, Callihan says. The state would like to sell or exchange all the land eventually, everyone agrees. Callihan says the number of properties offered for sale or exchange will depend on market conditions. Christenson says the state is only going to sell a dozen properties a year. “That isn’t going to drain the swamp very fast,” he said. He says he knows of three land swaps, two for timberland and one for commercial property.

L A ST W E E K

High 48 49 54 54 55 59 47

Low Precip. 28 - 24 - 23 - 30 .09” 37 .39” 37 .01” 29 .13” Source: Albeni Falls Dam

L A ST Y E A R This week last year saw some rainy days. Two days collected about a quarter inch apiece. Highs ranged from 73 to 56, and lows were between 53 and 33.


THE MINER



Prospective fiber customers come with questions

BR I E FLY Huckleberry at Priest Lake development progressing SANDPOINT – Developers of the Huckleberry at Priest Lake planned unit development, located about 15 miles north of Coolin, are seeking to subdivide some parcels into single family residential lots. The development was approved in 1996. Now the Huckleberry Bay Company is asking to subdivide a 165-acre common area lot into nine singlefamily residential lots, plus a smaller common area. The short plat is known as Sandy Shores Ridge. The nine new lots would range from 0.82 to 1.35 acres with a common area planned for the remaining 154 acres. In another request for Cedars at Huckleberry Bay, the company wants to divide a 163-acre parcel into eight family lots between 0.8 and 2.28 acres with about 138 acres remaining. The Bonner County Commissioners will hold a hearing on the two requests Thursday, May 2, at the Panhandle Health District conference room, 322 S. Marion Ave., Sandpoint. The planning and zoning commission recommended approval at its April 4 meeting. The public will have a chance to comment during the hearing. The Sandy Shores hearing will begin at 1:30 p.m. with the Cedars at Huckleberry Bay hearing at 2:15 p.m.

Northern Lights to hold annual meeting SAGLE – Northern Lights Inc., the utility that serves North Idaho, will have its 78th annual meeting Saturday, May 4, at Sagle Elementary School, 550 Sagle Road. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. with the membership meeting at 10 a.m. The purpose of the meeting will be to hear and pass upon reports covering the previous fiscal year and transact such other business as may properly come before the meeting. A $25 energy credit will be awarded to NLI members that register at this year’s Annual Meeting with one credit per voting membership. There will be elections for Director District 7, which includes the Priest River area. Districts 1 and 5 had positions up for election as well, but only one candidate was nominated in those districts, so no election will be held. District 1 includes the Priest Lake area, where Eric Anderson was nominated for the post. District 5 serves the northeast corner of the Panhandle, into Montana. Don Vickaryous was nominated there. Ten Northern Lights scholarships will be presented during the meeting as well.

Three locally sponsored bills on their way to governor’s desk OLYMPIA – April 17 was the final day for the two houses of the Legislature to consider bills approved by the opposite house. Three of the bills sponsored by Seventh District Sen. John Smith, R-Colville, will soon become law after passing unanimously in the House of Representatives. Senate Bill 5806 will repeal an obsolete timber-tax credit – something that Smith says has needed to be done since a change in 2004 made privatelyowned timber exempt from property tax. “No one has used the tax credit since 2007 and I think it is a good practice to get rid of obsolete laws,” he said. Senate Bill 5593 will establish a new deadline to apply for property-tax exemptions, helping county governments to project property-tax revenue collections and streamline their processes. Through a pilot program set up in Senate Bill 5709, Washington State University’s energy program will determine if densified biomass fuel is a viable option as a heating source to reduce schools’ operating expenses.

APRIL 24, 2013 |

BY JANELLE ATYEO OF THE MINER

NEWPORT – The time is nearing for getting fiber to the home service through the Pend Oreille PUD’s new network. The public utility district’s Community Network System division held a Broadband Festival last week, allowing prospective customers to talk with Internet service providers. They came with questions, mainly wondering what it would cost them. The PUD sets wholesale rates – $35 per month for the first year, plus $5 per port for additional services such at IPTV or VOIP phone service. Service providers serve as a middleman and add on overhead costs and profits of their own. Three service providers set up at last week’s Broadband Fest: Concept Cable and POVN have been providing Internet service in the area for years, and iFiber is new in town but not new to the fiber game. Newport-based Exbabylon was also on site to talk about the technical support they offer. Judi Fox of the Diamond Lake area was trying to decide which service provider to go with. She wanted to know if bundling services – Internet, phone and television – would save her money. “We pay too much,” she said of their current service. She was interested mainly in

Internet service, while her husband, John Fox, cares more about TV, she said. Wendy and Ron Banka wanted to know about prices, and Internet speed is important to them too. They live in the Diamond Lake area and use a wireless service, they said. They use the Internet to do their banking, pay bills and send emails, and Ron said he’s tired of waiting 15 minutes for pages to download. POVN’s operations vice president Melanie Jones said most people she talked to wanted to know when service would be available. That all depends on the PUD crews stringing the fiber line. The Sacheen Lake area will be ready first, while Newport and north may take until late summer. During the Broadband Fest, POVN handed out applications for service along with their flyers. Jones is still gathering those up and didn’t have an answer for how many sign-ups they got as a result of the festival. At their booth, they demonstrated Exbabylon’s Smart TV converter and showed how Hulu Plus works for watching TV shows over the Internet. POVN at first wasn’t interested in getting into the IPTV game, but Jones said they’re now talking about partnering with a provider, but it’s not for sure yet. At the festival she said there was a split between people who want IPTV and those who don’t watch TV. The Ephrata-based company,

3A

Knapp named WPUDA president OLYMPIA – Pend Oreille PUD Commissioner Curt Knapp was elected president of the Washington Public Utility Districts Association (WPUDA). He was among PUD commissioners from four public utility districts who assumed top leadership positions for 2013-2014 as elected Thursday, April 18. The new officers include two PUD Commissioners from the west side of the state and two from the east side. Representing the east along with Knapp is Chelan County PUD commissioner Dennie Bolz, who was elected secretary. From the west, Pacific County PUD Commissioner Diana Thompson was elected vice-president, and Lewis County PUD Commissioner Ben Kostick was elected to serve a second term as treasurer. The officers serve on the association’s executive committee and board of directors, providing oversight and recommendations in support of WPUDA’s mission, representing 27 not-for-profit, community-owned public utility districts and one-joint operating agency, Energy Northwest. “My focus this year will be to work with the members of WPUDA to collaboratively promote and protect the interests of our customer-owners and ensure that PUDs continue to have the ability to provide safe, reliable and affordable, not-for-profit services,” Knapp said. Knapp

MINER PHOTO|JANELLE ATYEO

Judi Fox, second from left, talks with PUD administrative assistant Amy Smock, during the broadband festival put on at the PUD’s fiber showroom last week. Fox was there looking at options for bundling services such as Internet, phone and television.

iFiber, has been offering service through the Grant County PUD’s fiber network since 2005. CEO Kelly Ryan said he saw the same excitement last week that he experienced when Grant County was getting ready to launch its network. “Those are the moments you live for,” he said. He said the Broadband Fest gave them a chance to show the community what type of services they provide. He said they took a lot of applications for service, more than they were expecting. He didn’t want to disclose an exact number, but said it was into the hundreds.

They brought eight employees to cover the event, and Ryan said they were all busy talking to prospective customers. He credits the PUD for getting the ratepayers well informed. People came with a lot of great questions, he said. They wanted to know about details such as data caps and when they’ll be able to get hooked up. He said iFiber plans to work closely with the PUD to keep people informed about when their hub is ready for service.

Citizen’s alertness leads to arrests

CUSICK – A woman checking on her mother’s vacant home Wednesday, April 17, encountered a man and woman who ran from the area of the house and garage of the home located north of Cusick. She reported a burglary in prog-

|| CO R R EC T I O N S || Because of reporting errors, there were mistakes in last week’s story about the North Country Clothing Shop. On Saturday the store is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. GJG Jeans are made in Los Angeles. Co-owner Lynnette Elswick was the controller for the hospital, not the financial officer. The grand opening is May 18. We regret any confusion this caused. Copies of Pend Oreille County’s Shoreline Master Program are not available at the Newport Library, although they are available at the other Pend Oreille County Library branches. In Newport, they can be seen at the Department of Community Development at the county building. It was incorrectly reported in last week’s story about the SMP comment period that they were available at the Newport Library. We regret any confusion this caused.

ress to the Pend Oreille County Sheriff’s Office and watched the couple run to a gravel pit on the rural property and get into a gray Dodge truck. She made an attempt to block their vehicle, but they sped off, driving around her, according to a press release from the sheriff’s office. The woman followed and continued to update dispatch before losing sight of the suspects as they continued to speed through a work zone. With assistance for the Washington State Patrol and the Kalispel Tribal Police,

the deputies located the suspect vehicle and occupants near Flowery Trail Road. Although it was determined they hadn’t entered the woman’s residence, a fuel tank reported stolen from a different site was found in the back of the vehicle, according to the press release. Deputies arrested Justin D. Ackaret, 32, of Deer Park and Charity M. King, 38, of Newport for criminal trespass and possession of stolen property. Ackaret was also charged with reckless endangerment and held on a Department of Corrections warrant for escape.

Kindergarten Registration & Open House

Thursday May 2nd 12:00 pm - 6:00 pm

BUYING CEDAR LOGS Delivered into Naples, Idaho & Swan Lake Landing, St. Maries, Idaho

Trevor Favaro 208-290-4547

Bring: Birth Certificate & Shot Record 447-0656

“The Plantman” Returns

ANNUAL LINCOLN DAY DINNER

Wednesday, May 1st

Public Invited

Hanging Baskets Planters Perennials Geraniums Fruit Trees

Petunias Berries Roses Strawberries

Mother’s Day Specials

Northern Flowers Garden Center Westgate Plaza by Subway

509-954-2904 • 208-946-9855

SATURDAY, APRIL 27TH Cusick American Legion Hall Meet and Greet 11:30

BBQ Beef and Chicken Lunch at Noon $ 10 per person Come meet and share your ideas and concerns with your Elected Officials CALL FOR TICKETS (509) 447-0694 Sponsored by: THE PEND OREILLE COUNTY REPUBLICAN PARTY


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| APRIL 24, 2013

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Viewpoint



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THE NEWPORT MINER

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LE T T E R S POLIC Y We welcome letters to the editor. Letters should be typed and submitted to The Miner and Gem State Miner office no later than 5 p.m. Friday for publication the following Wednesday. No letter will be published unless it is signed by at least one individual, even if the letter represents the view of a group. The letter must include a telephone number and address for confirmation of authenticity. Letters should be no longer than 300 words. The Miner reserves the right to edit to conform to our publication style, policy and libel laws. Political letters will not be published the last issue prior an election. Letters will be printed as space allows.

Internet sales tax necessary evil

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ike many of the original Internet fantasies, the idea that it is free is being tossed out as fast as the hulahoop. Although it is a fabulous new communication vehicle, it costs to build and maintain. And more important to realize is the fact that the governments and businesses that rely on income to survive can’t start doing it for free. The most recent change that is needed and on the horizon is sales tax being paid on Internet purchases to the state where the buyer lives. Internet companies have an unfair advantage over local stores now because they don’t have to charge sales tax. And those sales taxes help pay for the services that the buyer depends on. Under a bill that is moving in the Senate, states could force Internet retailers to collect sales taxes. Now states can require only brick and mortar stores to collect sales taxes on online sales, if the store has a physical presence in the state. The bill would allow states to require online retailers to collect state and local sales taxes for purchases made over the Internet. The sales taxes would be sent to the states where buyers live. This won’t kill the Internet but will level the playing field for small businesses that have stores. It will also maintain the needed tax revenue for services without creating new taxes. It should have been the law on the first day of online shopping. Nobody would have thought twice about it. But since it has been a free loophole some are protesting now because they don’t want to start paying taxes again. It isn’t too late to correct this mistake. --FJW

One man who gave politics a good name There’s a hit new movie this for Brooklyn, “I’d have to meet spring, “42,” the story of how my maker some day, and if he in 1947 Jack Roosevelt Robinasked me why I didn’t let this son made baseball history and boy play, and I said, ‘Because he American history by breaking was black,’ that might not be a the color barrier to become satisfactory answer.” a Brooklyn Dodger and the GUEST Chandler went on: “I first black man to play in OPINION just decided it (excludBY MARK SHIELDS ing African-Americans the Major Leagues. WWW.CREATORS.COM It is also the story of from the sport) wasn’t Branch Rickey, the genjust. It wasn’t decent. eral manager of the Dodgers, It wasn’t fair, and I was going to who in his lonely commitment end it.” to desegregate baseball, chose Of Jackie Robinson, Chandler Robinson, a star in four sports said: “He had a chip on his – football, basketball, track and shoulder, and I don’t blame him baseball – at UCLA before enter- for that because he thought ing the Army and being comeverybody was against him, and missioned a second lieutenant. nearly everybody was.” Rickey believed, rightly, that How good a politician was Jackie Robinson had the couraHappy Chandler? In American geous self-discipline required to history, there have been nine endure the hate, hostility and different governors who, when isolation that awaited him in presented with a vacant U.S. the grandstands, locker rooms, Senate seat to be filled, have restaurants and hotels of pregone through the scripted ritual civil-rights America. of resigning as governor in orBut one American hero gets der to have the “new” governor short shrift in this good new then appoint him (all nine were movie. His name: Albert B. men) to the U.S. Senate. Not “Happy” Chandler. A native of surprisingly, voters dislike this Corydon, Ky., veteran of World charade, and eight of the nine War I and a graduate of his governors who arranged their home state university’s law own Senate appointments have school, he was a rising political been defeated in the next elecstar – a state senator at 32, lieu- tion. The only exception: Gov. tenant governor at 33, governor Happy Chandler, who in 1939 at 37 and U.S. senator at 41. effectively had himself appointHappy Chandler left the U.S. ed to the Senate and went on to Senate in 1945, when the ownwin Kentucky Senate elections ers of the then-16 Major League in 1940 and 1942. teams elected him to be comSo Chandler understood the missioner of baseball. The game risk he was taking by ignoring had been lily-white for eight the owners and by welcoming decades, and when the owners Jackie Robinson to baseball. later met for two hours in secret He was fired by the owners in at New York’s Waldorf Astoria 1950, but Don Newcombe, the to deal with Branch Rickey’s great Dodgers pitcher, would unwelcome push to integrate speak eloquently of when Chanthe game, they voted 15-1 dler had stood up for blacks, against Rickey and for continincluding Robinson, Roy Camued racial segregation. Nobody panella and himself: “Happy much expected Chandler, a self- Chandler cared when it wasn’t described “Confederate” who fashionable to give a damn had governed a state where the about black baseball players.” races were by law separated, to How about that, sports fans? rock the boat. A successful politician who was But that is exactly what a genuine American hero. the commissioner did. As he To find out more about Mark later explained his decision to Shields and read his past coloverturn the owners’ vote and umns, visit the Creators weballow Jackie Robinson to play page at www.creators.com.

Web story comments policy

The Miner staff invites readers to comment on select stories on our Web site, www.pendoreillerivervalley. com. Commentators have the option of adding their name or writing anonymously. The Miner staff will review each comment before it is posted and reserves the right to omit or edit comments. If you want to comment only to our writers and editors let us know that you do not want your comment published.

|| The Democrat delusion To the editor: Liberal slaves, I can read one of your first paragraphs and always know you are the great author of such fine delusion and illusions of the reflection of the Great Left Liberal Control Party. What I don’t understand, my good friend and neighbor, is how you can continue to believe in a party that is led by the Great Shim Sham Man himself? Does it not bother you that he looked into the camera and proceeded to outright lie? He lied about Ben-Ghazi. He made fools out of his worshippers and sheep who bought his snake man oil! I know I can trust Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodger, R-Wash. because she has honor, principles and virtues. Patty and Maria, our great U.S. Senators, voted to sign away our very freedoms to the UN. I ask you, my dear friend and neighbor, are you an American first or are you a Democrat first? Until you awaken from this delusion then maybe you will understand the difference between control and protection, until then our country will continue down the path of slave master and slave. We have the slave masters, war mongers and the treasure holders who then treat us as the slaves. Out of “us” we have 113 million taxpayers supporting 202 million people. Out of the 202 million, we have 60 million receiving benefits from the government. We also have 50 million on food stamps. The debt clock says we have 90 million not in the labor force. Now throw in all those huge public retirement packages (80 trillion plus). All those people are slaves out of fear for the check in the mail. We will not solve our issues unless we see the truth in the

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reflection of what’s happening to the great home of America! -Donna Lands Newport

Unions need thanks, not blame To the editor: To blame public unions for “Our Great American Home” collapsing is both misguided and exasperating. With very little effort this issue can be researched via either Google or the public library. I agree our country is in financial trouble, but understand that conducting two unfunded off budget wars, tax breaks (predominantly for wealthy), as well as implementing an unpaid for Medicare pharmaceutical program, that was more a gift to Big Pharma than assistance to elderly people, ate at our foundation. Forbes, a financial magazine, reports that large U.S. corporations and extremely wealthy are stashing trillions of dollars in offshore accounts to avoid paying income and payroll taxes to Our Great American Home. These often illegal accounts, valued between 21 and 34 trillion dollars, substantially spreads structural damage to Our Home. Enormous profits in tax avoidance (cheating) to the segment of the U.S. banking industry that facilitates these shady accounts in financially unregulated nations including South Africa, Switzerland and Cayman has rapidly grown. Those entities and individuals who undertake this devious financial method of off shoring profits or wages earned in the United States to avoid paying their fair share of taxes leave small businesses and working class households to pay their tax bill. Thus, placing the blame for our excessive public debt on public employees unions is dishonest.

RE ADERS’ POLL RESULTS

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In recent weeks, North Korea’s leader has threatened a nuclear attack against the U.S. Are North Korea’s threats a real concern this time?

It’s impossible for North Korea to reach the U.S. mainland with its missiles. But we should stand up to protect South Korea if it comes to it.

The U.S. needs to back off. North Korea is not going to give up its nukes in negotiations.

4% 13% 30% 9% 26% 17%

This is posturing to show the new leader means business. He’ll settle down eventually.

Total Votes: 23

Yes, and the U.S. needs to make a preemptive strike.

The U.S. should have responded long ago to stop the country’s crimes against humanity.

There’s no threat. This is just normal diplomacy for North Korea. They are brilliant manipulators.

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LE T T E R S

Asking hospital workers, first responders; including 911 workers, teachers, road department workers, counselors and service providers, prison guards, plus many others to take the blame for weakening Our Home is wrong in so many ways. We should be praising these hardworking individuals who not only serve us in countless ways, but do so at a financial sacrifice to their families. These union workers, who are our neighbors, should be fairly compensated and thanked, not condemned. -Gayle Cain Cusick

Hello vagueness, goodbye Fourth Amendment To the editor: On Friday, with a 288-127 vote, our House passed the Cyber Information and Protection Act (CISPA) that allows our government entities to acquire our data without a warrant, should a private company holding your data hand it over. Though not yet law, this bill would allow private sector firms to search personal and sensitive user data of ordinary U.S. residents to identify “threat information,” which can then be shared with other private firms and the U.S. government – without the need for a court-ordered warrant. This means any telecom company or technology company (like Facebook, Twitter, Google), including your cell service provider, would be legally able to hand over vast amounts of data to the U.S. government and its law enforcement – for whatever purpose it deems necessary – and face no legal reprisals. The key hook is, despite numerous amendments (some added under a veil of secrecy) and changes, this bill contains no requirements that personal data, including some very private, like health records or banking information should be converted to an anonymous form before sharing it with the government. In a word, this means our individual data could and would be able to be visible to the prying eyes of our “friendly” government.

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How stealthy is the guise of “cyber security” feigned by this bill? U.S. firms voluntarily handing data along a one-way street to the U.S. government effectively means the Fourth Amendment does not apply; it’s not snooping if it was handed to the government on cyber security grounds. We’ve voted for people who apparently wish to know every detail of our lives. For what purpose? We know how it’s advertised, but this snake oil is sold by politicians whose lips move. We already know what that means. Wake up neighbors! This bill is dangerously vague. Raise your hand and be heard. Call your write your congress people! -Judson Lightsey Newport

Obama disrespected Thatcher To the editor: Two things happened last week that upset me. First, Mr. Obama showed his disrespect for Margaret Thatcher. The woman turned around the economy of England, which was in total shambles by the previous socialist leadership. She made the English economy very strong in her 12 years as the first female Prime Minister of England. She was elected four times by her people. She also, along with Ronald Regan, won the cold war against Russia. What did Mr. Obama do? He refused to send any envoy to her funeral. He said he was too busy with a domestic agenda, i.e. gun control, to send anyone, even though he sent three diplomats to Hugo Chavez’s funeral. Obama loathes Britain, a view embedded into him from his socialist upbringing. Notice his refusal to acknowledge U.K’s right of the Falkland Islands. Also his first act in the White House was to remove the bust of Winston Churchill, a present from the U.K. Next, his present to the Queen on his first visit to England was a tape of his speeches. Can anybody be more clueless or narcissistic? The second thing was the gun control treaty with the

R E A D E R S’

SEE LETTERS, 5A

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Visit The Miner Online to answer our readers’ poll question through Monday afternoon. Find it on the left-hand side of the page at www. PendOreilleRiverValley.com. The results will be printed next week on this page. You need not be a subscriber to participate. If you have ideas for future readers’ poll topics, submit them to minernews@povn.com.

It’s predicted to reach the mid-60s by later this week, meanwhile, the Midwest is still being pummeled by snowstorms. Do you think we’ll see any more snow this spring? It’s spring in the Northwest. Of course we will! Not a chance. We’re ready to usher in summer. We do, and I’m heading to Mexico.


THE MINER



APRIL 24, 2013 |

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LETTERS | FROM PAGE 4A

U.N., which would give the U.N. control of our right to bear arms in this country. It would give the control to the violent dictators of the U.N. Our own Senator Patty Murray, D-Wash. voted for it. Luckily, it was defeated this time. President Obama and Senator Murray and other progressives don’t get it. We do not need or want the dictators of the U.N. dictating to us how to run our country. -Richard Miller Newport

Thanks for highway clean up To the editor: Thank you to all the inmates for cleaning up Highway 41 on Idaho Hill. You all did a great job! -Susan Rodden Oldtown

Taxes not the problem To the editor: We should take exception to the guest opinions of our Washington state representatives Joel Kretz and Shelly Short. Their contention that all Washingtonians are hardworking taxpayers is false. The same is said about gun owners being law-abiding. Paying taxes doesn’t make you hard working and buying a gun

doesn’t make you law-abiding. Playing these word games, it would follow that all politicians (including our representatives) are liars and corrupt. Our representatives then suggest that taxes are linked to job creation. That if we could stop Democrat politicians from reaching for our wallets and stopped government waste, we would have more jobs. Kretz and Short contend that our high 10-15.1 percent unemployment rate is caused by tax uncertainty or overtaxing employers. Using their logic the only thing keeping lumber mills from reopening is high taxes. They apparently believe that people would start or expand businesses on the sole basis of paying fewer taxes. Our representatives then suggest that we don’t need any new taxes or tax increases. The Seventh District receives more than it sends to the state and federal government in taxes. How do the taxes collected from two taxpayers per mile of road pay for that road? The same goes for hospitals, schools, water treatment, public safety, etc. We don’t

have enough rural taxpayers to pay for the level or amount of government that we get. We rely on the redistribution of taxes from higher population districts to supplement our low tax base. Frankly, I wish our governor and Westside Democrats would completely turn their funding noses up at red Eastern Washington and make us pay our own way for all of our government services. That would be a good starting point for challenging the far-fetched tax theories of our district’s representatives. -Pete Scobby Newport

Put worker safety first To the editor: We were lucky this year, just as we have been in the previous few years. Pend Oreille County had no recorded deaths from workplace incidents. That hasn’t always been the case and we can’t count on holding that record in the future – but we can try. April is the month when we traditionally honor those who have died at work. This year on

Saturday, April 27, the Spokane Regional Labor Council will honor Workers Memorial Day with a ceremony at 11 a.m. at Spokane’s Mission Park. Giving honor to these fallen workers is the least we can do. It isn’t something we expect to happen – we expect to get up, go to work and return home safely to our family and friends. But too often, it just doesn’t happen that way. In our county the type of work we do, mining, resource extraction and manufacturing, the risk of hazards is great. According to the Bureau of Land Management, pollution from U.S. mining operations ranks number one among all industries in total toxic releases. There is also a huge push to reduce the toxic effects of silica and combustible dust on worker health. Both of these toxins are by-products of industries right here in Pend Oreille. More than 40 years ago the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) and mine safety law were passed promising workers the right to a safe job. Since then,

workplace deaths and injuries have declined significantly, but this didn’t happen just because laws were passed. It happened because workers and their unions fought and demanded action from employers and the government. It continues to work because workers and their unions still fight to strengthen protections, to police

companies that break the rules, to ensure the public knows what hazards they are exposed to and to prevent cover-ups when companies decide to put profits over worker safety. -Beth Thew Spokane Regional Labor Council, AFL-CIO SecretaryTreasurer

Copper • Brass • Aluminum Stainless • Aluminum Cans Batteries • Radiators

We also recycle Cardboard • Iron Newspaper

PAYING CASH!* *In accordance with WA State Law.

DU-MOR RECYCLING N 6404 Perry • Spokane, WA (509) 489-6482 One block north of Francis, 14 blocks east of Division

Yard & Craft Sale Calispel Grange Leclerc Road

Sat., May 4th Yard Sale Treasures Handmade Magnetic Jewelry Fishermen Treasures Christmas Decorations and More

509-447-2782

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Sexual Violence Prevention and Education Campaign p g

National Denim Day USA April 25th

All day on April 25th, we ask everyone to wear denim jeans or denim day pins. Let’s protest against rape, violence, and childhood sexual abuse in our community and around the world. History of Denim Day:

In Italy, 1999, an 18 year old woman was picked up by her driving instructor. He drove her to an isolated place, forced her out of one pant leg and raped her. The case is taken to court and he is convicted. He appealed to the Supreme court where the case was dismissed and overturned. The court argued that since she wore tight jeans, she must have helped him take them off, so therefore it wasn’t rape but consensual sex. Enraged by this injustice, the women of the Italian Parliament protested by wearing jeans. News of this case made its way to the organization, Peace over Violence, in Los Angles where Denim Day USA was born as a campaign against sexual violence and victim blaming.

Need more info: Call Pam at POCVS at 509-447-2274 POCVS has Denim Day Buttons


THE MINER

Lifestyle



BR I E FLY Rummage sale to benefit scholarship program NEWPORT – The Pend Oreille Players Association will hold a rummage sale and bake sale Saturday, May 11 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., with proceeds to benefit the scholarship fund and the summer theatre camp programs. Donations may be dropped off at the playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave. in Newport, during business hours: Monday, Wednesday or Friday from noon to 5 p.m. To donate items for the sale, contact Gail at 509-447-2750 or the playhouse at 509-671-3389.

NEWPORT – People are invited to get information on how high school students can earn college credits during an information night Monday, April 29, at the Newport Education Center at 1204 W. Fifth St. in Newport. High school students who are juniors and seniors can earn college credits through the Running Start program while still completing high school. Classes are tuition-free when students take 15 credits or less. At the information night, high

Lincoln Day dinner set for Saturday

NEWPORT – The best of local art open juried show will be held Saturday through Tuesday, April 27-30, at Create Arts Center in Newport. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. A reception will be held at Create Saturday, April 27, from 5:30-7 p.m. Refreshments will be served. Admission is free. The Evergreen Art Association has chosen the best works in a variety of media. Sixty art pieces are in the show, which was juried by Stan Miller, nationally known artist from Spokane. Along with the art show, Miller, a member of the American Watercolor Society, will host a landscape in watercolor workshop Saturday, April 27, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The cost is $60. Call Robert at 509671-1539 to register.

Tracey Singer in concert for one night SACHEEN LAKE – Tracey Singer will take the stage for one night only at the Circle Moon Theater Friday, April 26. A turkey dinner catered by Owen’s Deli and Grocery will be served at 6:30 p.m. with the show starting at 7 p.m. Tickets are $25, or for those wishing to see the show only with no dinner, the cost is $12 for adults or $10 for seniors and children. “Tracey has the charisma and charm of Michael Feinstein and an absolutely knockout voice,” organizers said.

school students and parents meet current Running Start students to hear firsthand about their college experiences. Newport center staff also will be available to explain how students can enroll in the program. Running Start college credits transfer to most four-year state colleges, and most classes are tuition-free, allowing families to save on college expenses. For information, contact Running Start liaison Kris Cornelis at 509-279-6973.

MINER PHOTO|DON GRONNING

Walking the big dog Stormy Turner watches the Newport boys high school soccer match while walking Mozer, the family’s 6-year-old St. Bernard dog Tuesday, April 16 in Newport. Mozier seems more interested in something besides the soccer match.

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William H. Cook Navy Seaman Recruit William H. Cook, son of Kim M. Taft of Metaline and David R. Cook, of Bunker, Mo., recently completed U.S. Navy basic training at Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Ill. Cook is a 2010 graduate of Selkirk High School. During the eight-week program, Cook completed a variety of training which included

classroom study and practical instruction on naval customs, first aid, firefighting, water safety and survival, and shipboard and aircraft safety. An emphasis was also placed on physical fitness. The capstone event of boot camp is “Battle Stations.” This exercise gives recruits the skills and confidence they need to succeed in the fleet. Battle Sta-

Newport students take fifth at Math is Cool competition SPOKANE – Fifteen students from Sadie Halstead Middle School in Newport took part in the Math is Cool competition held at St. George’s School in mid March. Newport brought home a fifth place plaque for their finish among the 19 schools. Four separate teams made up of fifth and sixth graders participated in a variety of individual

and group contests in which math is used to find solutions, including problem solving, calculations and real life situations. Newport’s highest scoring team consisted of Megan Vaughn, Zach Hein, Jessie Dillon and Matthew Burkett. Megan Vaughn was the top scorer for Newport and placed 13th out of the 206 individual participants.

tions is designed to galvanize the basic warrior attributes of sacrifice, dedication, teamwork and endurance in each recruit through the practical application of basic Navy skills and the core values of honor, courage and commitment. Its distinctly ‘’Navy’’ flavor was designed to take into account what it means to be a sailor. CALVARY CHAPEL NEWPORT

“Where The Sheep Go To Be Fed” 409 S. Spokane • Newport Sunday Morning 10 a.m. (509) 939-0676 CalvaryNewport@aol.com / 97.3 FM “I am the bread of life. He who comes to me will never go hungry, and he who believes in me will never be thirsty.” John 6:35

“Where Jesus and Real Life Meet.” Worship Time: Sunday 10:30 a.m. at the Newport High School Real Life Ministries office, 420 4th St. Newport, WA - Office Phone: (509) 447-2164 or Toll Free (877) 997-1200

PINE RIDGE COMMUNITY CHURCH

DALKENA COMMUNITY CHURCH • VILLAGE MISSIONS S.S. ~ 9:30 • Worship ~ 11 a.m. Family Night, Wednesday ~ 7 p.m. (Bible and Youth Clubs) Pastor Sandy Strait - 509-447-3687

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH of Diamond Lake Corner of North Shore Road and Jorgens Road Informal Family-style Worship Sundays 10:00 a.m. 509-671-3436

CHURCH OF FAITH

COURTESY PHOTO|SADIE HALSTEAD MIDDLE SCHOOL

These Sadie Halstead students participated in the Math is Cool competition in Spokane. Pictured in the front row: Ms. Jessica Mouser, left, Dylan Ralston, Chelsea Hansen, Megan Vaughn and Cydni Lewis. In the middle row are Zander Adams, left, Jessie Dillon, Elizabeth O’Neal, Zach Hein, Matthew Ragsdale and Faith Rosen, and in the back row are Maquenzie Arnold, left, Tabitha Horton, Matthew Burkett, Racine Balow and Alexis Polensky.

Buddhist abbey plans retreat for youth NEWPORT – This summer, Sravasti Abbey invites young adults to hit the pause button. The Tibetan Buddhist monastery is hosting a weeklong youth retreat this summer to encourage people to stop the hurry and look inside their hearts. Young adults ages 18 to 29 are invited to explore Buddhism through Dharma teachings by Venerable Thubten Chodron, discussions with like-minded peers, and offering service on Sravasti’s gardens and woodlands outside of Newport. The retreat runs from June 24 through July 1. Participants will UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST 3rd and Spokane St., Newport, WA Worship Service ~ 10:00 a.m. Church School ~ 10:00 a.m. Nursery Care Available Rev. Russell Clark 447-4121 newportucc@conceptcable.com www.newportucc.org

REAL LIFE MINISTRIES

1428 1st Street West Sunday School ~ 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship ~ 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays: Girls Club, ages 9 to 12, 5:30 to 7:00 pm Soul’d Out Youth, ages 13 thru 19, 6:00 pm Pastor Mitch McGhee 447-3265

Share your life events for free NEWPORT – The Newport and Gem State Miner Newspapers are looking to share your life events with the community. Submit births, weddings and engagements to The Miner for publication at no charge. The Miner can be reached at 509447-2433, minernews@povn. com or visit www.pendoreillerivervalley.com online, or stop by the office at 421 S. Spokane in Newport.

In addition to speaker workshops, the hospital will provide free skin cancer screenings, weight checks, BMI checks, and blood pressure screenings. The NHHS lab will also offer a reduced price for A1c, blood pressure, and cholesterol panels. Sharps container exchange and prescription drug disposal will be available, as well. For more information go to the Newport Hospital Foundation website at www.phd1.org or call the foundation office at 509-4477928.

Information on college for high school students April 29

BLANCHARD – The Creative Spirits of Spirit Valley art auction and dinner is set for Saturday, May 4, at 6 p.m. at the Blanchard Community Center, 685 Rusho Lane. The evening includes a silent art auction; lasagna dinner with salad, bread and cheescake by cook Don Bishop; wine and microbrews for sale by the glass; and live music by Bill Parsons. The cost is $12. For more information, call 208-437-1037.

Art show this weekend

6A

Get health information Saturday NEWPORT – Newport Hospital and Health Services is hosting a health fair Saturday, April 27, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. This year’s speaker series includes: “Skin Cancer,” by Dr. Tim Chavis, NHHS Surgeon, “Diabetes and Exercise,” by Tina Batsch, MT-ASCP, NHHS lab supervisor and Club Energy fitness instructor, A.C.E. Certified, “Death with Dignity” by Dr. Clay Kersting, NHHS Physician, and “Dementia’s Impact on Families,” by Michele Page, RN, BSN; NHHS River Mountain Village Manager.

Support creativity with art auction

CUSICK – Pend Oreille County Republicans will hold their annual Lincoln Day dinner Saturday, April 27, at noon at the American Legion in Cusick. Since the Legislature is still in session, local representatives likely won’t be able to attend according to organizers. As of last week, party chairman Norris Boyd was still for confirmation from Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash. The dinner also includes awards recognizing local volunteers from the Republican party.

APRIL 24, 2013|

36245 Hwy 41, Oldtown, ID Sunday School 9 a.m. Sunday Services - 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wed. - Bible Study 6 p.m. Pastor Jack Jones Church Office 208-437-0150 www.churchoffaitholdtown.com

Community Church Directory CATHOLIC MASSES

stay on site. For more information, visit www. sravastiabbey.org/programs/ youngadults.html, call 509-4475549 or email office.sravasti@ gmail.com. Place your classified or display ad with The Miner and it will appear in both newspapers - The Newport Miner (Pend Oreille County) and The Gem State Miner (West Bonner County). All for one good price. Call (509) 447-2433 for details. SPRING VALLEY MENNONITE CHURCH

4912 Spring Valley Road Sunday: 9:45 a.m. Worship Service 11 a.m. -- Sunday School (509) 447-3588

NEWPORT FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

“Sharing Christ As He Is, With People As They Are” 2nd & Spokane Sts 447-3846 9 a.m. Sunday School 10:15 a.m. Worship Service 11:30 a.m. Fellowship Time September - May AWANA - Tuesday 5:30 p.m. The Immortals (13-High School ) Thur. 7-9 Pastor Rob Malcolm

NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH

4 Miles South of Newport, Hwy. 2 Sun.: 9:30 Sun. School, 10:30, Worship, 6 p.m. Evening Service Sun. & Wed. at Pastor’s house. Jams 5 pm 2nd Saturdays Pastor, Walt Campbell: 447-5101

HOUSE OF THE LORD

Newport: St. Anthony’s, 447-4231 612 W. First St., Sun. - 11 a.m. Usk: St. Jude’s River Rd., Sat. - 5p.m. Ione: St. Bernard’s, 802 - 8th St., Sun. - 2nd & 4th - 8:00 a.m. Metaline Falls: St. Joseph’s, 446-2651 -- 406 Park St., Sun., 1st, 3rd & 5th - 8:00 a.m.

754 Silver Birch Ln. • Oldtown, ID 83822 ‘’Contemporary Worship’’ Sun. ~ 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. “United Generation Church” Youth Group Wednesday 6 p.m. Jeff & Robie Ecklund, Pastors • 437-2032 www.hotl.me

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTISTS

1 mile S. of Newport on Hwy. 2 • 447-3742 Pastor Rob Greenslade Sun. School 9:45 a.m. • Worship 11 a.m. Evening Worship 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Weds. 6:30 p.m.

Diamond Lake Church 326002 Hwy. 2, West of Newport Head Elder Dale French, (509) 447-4565 Newport Church - Corner of Lilac Lane & Hwy. 20 North Pastor Ron Fleck (509) 447-4755 Sat. Morning Services Sabbath School 9:30 • Worship 11:00 NACS THRIFT SHOP (509) 447-3488 PO Valley Church School (208) 437-2638

NEWPORT SOUTHERN BAPTIST CHURCH

AMERICAN LUTHERAN CHURCH E.L.C.A.

332801 Hwy. 2, P.O. Box 653, Newport Pastors Matt & Janine Goodrich Sunday School 9 am Worship Service 10 am (509) 447-4338


THE NEWPORT MINER

North Pend Oreille

NEWS FROM NORTH PEND OREILLE COUNTY INCLUDING IONE, METALINE & METALINE FALLS



APRIL 24, 2013 |

7A

Volunteer sought to direct Cutter’s summer play METALINE FALLS – The Cutter Theatre is seeking a student director for this summer’s production “Murder Me, Murder Me Not,” a murder mystery farce. The cast consists of three

women and three men. The Cutter has volunteers to help mentor someone and help with casting, set building and costuming. All that’s needed is a director. Rehearsals must start by June

|| N O R T H P E N D O R E I L L E CO U N T Y E V E N T S

||

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24 Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Metalines Library Basic Computer Class: 11 a.m. to Noon - Ione Library, Call 509442-3030 For Reservations Weight Watchers: 6 p.m. Weigh in 6:30-7 p.m. meeting - Ione Assembly of God

SATURDAY, APRIL 27 Metalines Book Group: 10:30 a.m. - Metalines Library ‘Lumberjacks in Love’: 7:30 p.m. - Cutter Theatre

THURSDAY, APRIL 25 Story Time: 11 a.m. - Ione Library

TUESDAY, APRIL 30 Story Time: 11 a.m. - Ione Library

FRIDAY, APRIL 26 Story Time and Crafts: 10:30 a.m. - Metalines Library Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. Ione Senior Center ‘Lumberjacks in Love’: 7:30 p.m. - Cutter Theatre

WEDNESDAY, MAY 1 Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Metalines Library Basic Computer Class: 11 a.m. to Noon - Ione Library, Call 509442-3030 For Reservations Commissioner Kiss Office Hours: 3-6:45 p.m. - Ione Library Weight Watchers: 6 p.m. Weigh in 6:30-7 p.m. meeting - Ione Assembly of God Ione Town Council: 7 p.m. Clerk’s Office

CHAMBER | FROM PAGE 2

executive director’s job is to work with the business community. They want that person out in the community, he said. According to the chamber newsletter, they are: “seeking proposals from chamber members who wish to physically host and operate the day-to-day functions of the current visitors’ center that serves the communities of Newport, Diamond Lake, Cusick, Usk and Oldtown. “Under the terms of its lease, the Pend Oreille Historical Society maintains that the chamber is prohibited from allowing goods or merchandise to be sold at the visitors’ center – the Pend Oreille County Historical Society, operating the museum and associated gift shop, retains exclusive rights in this respect.” Shumski said the chamber will retain ultimate responsibility and oversight of the visitors’ center. The proposals can be for doing the work either at the current visitors’ center or at another location such as a business. Candidates will have the opportunity to earn up to $200 per month for performing this function. The contract would run for seven months from May to December. Proposals are due by 5 p.m. Friday, May 3.

|| C O R R E C T I O N || The Selkirk Booster Club golf tournament will be at the Pend Oreille Golf Course in Metaline Falls June 15. An article in last week’s edition of The Miner reported the wrong location. We regret any confusion this may have caused.

Let’s Go Fishing

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MONDAY, APRIL 29 Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Metalines Library

17 with a four day a week evening rehearsal schedule for six weeks. Evening performances are scheduled for Friday, July 26, and Saturday, July 27, during Down River Days weekend. Pickup rehearsals are the week of Aug. 26 through Aug. 29 with 7:30 p.m. evening performances Friday, Aug. 30, Saturday, Aug. 31, and a 2 p.m. matinee Sunday, Sept. 1, during the Affair on Mainstreet celebration.  The Cutter will provide room and board for the director, but

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cannot offer a salary. If interested or for more information about the play, email the theatre at cutter@potc.net or call 509446-4108. To apply, submit a letter of interest to the Cutter office and include a one-page short resume of theater related experience.

See next weeks paper for partial listing

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Fri., April 26 Sat., April 27 Fri., May 3 Sat., May 4 7:30 pm Tickets $1200 Reservations Encouraged

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8A

| APRIL 24, 2013



Priest River Young Women night Saturday left my team for that period of time, OF THE MINER but I feel it would have been at the expense of the dreams of my 12 PRIEST RIVER – Six young teammates.” women will compete for the title of Trost said she hopes the state Distinguished Young Women Satprogram will consider rescheduling urday night, April 27, on the Priest to a summer month in the future so River Junior “It is not about being athletes won’t be discourHigh stage. The aged from participating event, formally better than others. or having to make a known as choice like she did. Competition’s true Junior Miss, Pavey went to Idaho begins at 7 p.m. purpose lies within.” Falls for a weeklong state Tickets are $8, program with 35 other Steffie Pavey available at contestants from around the door, and 2013 Priest River’s Distinguished Idaho. Natalie Stoker of program books Young Woman Idaho Falls was named are $2 apiece. the Distinguished Young In the runWoman of Idaho and ning for this year’s scholarship awarded $6,050 in cash scholarprogram are: Brittany Krampert, ships. Savanah Bullard, Daranie Melton, Pavey shared some thoughts Cortney Robinson, Anna Pavey about competition in her farewell and Abriana Thompson. All are statement: “… It seems competition juniors at Priest River Lamanna at moments is misunderstood. It is High School, except Thompson not about being better than others. attends House of the Lord Christian Competition’s true purpose lies Academy in Oldtown. within. Striving to be the best indiAt last year’s program, Melissa viduals that we can be is authentic Trost was named Priest River’s competition.” 2013 Distinguished Young WomSign-ups for this years program an. But since she was unable to attook place in January, and since tend the state competition this past then, this group of six teens has September, she relinquished her been working weekly with the Distitle to runner up Steffie Pavey. tinguished Young Women commit“I made a very hard decision in tee to prepare for the talent compeSeptember: I chose to not go to the tition, as well as the physical fitness State DYW competition so that I and self expression portions of the wouldn’t let my volleyball team program. Chairwoman Shirley down,” Trost said. “I could have Sands said they also work on speech followed my personal dream and and interviewing techniques. BY JANELLE ATYEO

’S COME DANCE AWAY YOUR SPRING FEVER

THE NEWPORT MINER

HOT BOX

Special deadline Tuesdays 2 p.m. ABANDONED VEHICLE SALE R&B Towing South, 141 Classic Lane, Elk, Washington 99009. 1999 Chevy truck. VIN# 1GCEK14W4XE163820. Sale: April 26th, 2013. 12:05 p.m. Public viewing: 9:00 a.m.- 12:05 p.m. (12) TEMPORARY FOOD SERVICE WORKER 3 HOURS PER DAY, MONDAY-FRIDAY 11:00 A.M.-2:00 P.M. POSITION ENDS JUNE 13, 2013. The Newport School District is accepting applications for the above position. Applications accepted through noon, Wednesday, May 1, 2013. Additional information and applications may be obtained by calling the Newport School District at (509) 447-3167 or by visiting www.newport.wednet.edu. Equal opportunity employer. (12) HUGE YARD SALE Cleaning shop, basement, closets, etc. Boat/ trailer/motor, camping & recreation equipment, office equipment, kitchen & bedroom stuff. Too much to list. Something for everyone! Thursday/ Friday/ Saturday (April 25-27) 8:00-4:00. 401 North Quail Avenue, Newport. Watch for signs. (12p) OLDTOWN AUTO SALES We buy clean used cars and RV’s. See our complete inventory online at www.oldtownautos.com.(51HB-tf) FREE INFORMATION WILLS, TRUSTS AND AVOIDING PROBATE Thursday, May 9th from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Denise Stewart Law Office, 301 South Washington Avenue, Suite A, Newport. Coffee and cookies provided. Call (509) 447-3242 to reserve a spot as seating is limited. (10HB-4)

HYPNOSIS Stop smoking/ lose weight now. Individual or groups. Purposeful Life Mastery Coaching. Dr. Douglas Rigg P.h.D., CHt, (509) 589-0638. (7-tf) ALL YOU CAN EAT PANCAKE BREAKFAST Davis Lake Grange. First Saturday of every month, 8:00 to noon. Corner of Turner Road and Baker Lake Road (Dalkena area). $5.00 adults, $3.50 12-5, under 5 free. (12p) DID YOU MISS IT? You won’t miss a thing when you subscribe to The Miner. Save $14.50 a year and receive it in your mail every Wednesday. (509) 447-2433. (47HB-altTF) 99% INTERNATIONAL WORKERS DAY RALLY May 1 at noon. Highway 2 and South Washington, across from Seeber’s. (509) 447-2563 for information. (12p) FREE SHOWING MOVIE “MATEWAN” May 1st, 1:30 p.m. Rotary Park, Oldtown (across bridge). The Battle of Matewan in May, 1920, in small West Virginia company coal town. Critically acclaimed, rated 4 stars. Lunch provided by the 99%. (509) 447-2563 for information. (12p) CHEWELAH’S 4TH ANNUAL COMMUNITY YARD SALE! Over 35 sale locations! Saturday May 4th, 9:00 a.m.- 3:00 p.m. www.chewelahyardslae.com Enjoy a day full of bargain hunting fun! (12HB-2p) JUNK FROM MY TRUNK Vintage junk show June 22nd. Vendor space available. Must be vintage, collectible, antique, repurposed, etc. Highway 2 between Diamond Lake and Newport. (509) 589-0097. (12HB-4) TIME TO ORDER Butcher hogs. Krogh Livestock. (509) 447-4632. (8HB-4)

FLOATING Connect-A-Dock for personal watercraft. 2 years old, great shape. $2100. Will deliver to northeast Washington, north Idaho. (509) 2600290. (10HB-4) FRONTIER VILLAGE FLEA MARKET Gently used items, handmade goods, arts and crafts, yard decor and more. Come see our vendors! May 3rd, 4th, 5th, and second weekend each month, June- October. 1/4 mile south of Diamond Lake. Frontier Village. www.frontiervillage.org. (509) 671-6668. (11HB-3p) VENDORS/ CRAFTERS/ FARMERS Affordable spaces available May 3rd, 4th, and 5th. Also second weekend each month June- October. Frontier Village Flea Market, Diamond Lake. www.frontiervillage. org. (509) 671-6668. (11HB-3p) THE COTTAGE GARDEN NURSERY Opening Saturday, April 27th. Hours: Monday- Saturday, 9:00-5:00, Sunday 10:00-4:00. 791 Spring Valley Road, Newport. (509) 447-0897. (12p) CITY WIDE GARAGE SALE MAY 4TH Need an indoor location? $25.00/ space at CREATE, 900 West Fourth, Newport. (509) 447-9277. (11HB-2) EVERGREEN ART SHOW Artists’ Reception. Saturday, April 27, 5:30-7:00 p.m. Create Arts Center, 900 West 4th, Newport. Refreshments. Free. (12p) FELLOWSHIP BUILDER COMPANY Building beautiful additions and remodels. Call for free estimates or references from past projects. Russ Bell (509) 671-0937. (12HB-4) Read The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds.

LIKE WEEKENDS? Thank organized labor! Celebrate International Workers Day, May 1st. Pend Oreille County Democrats. (12) ALICE IN WONDERLAND Come see this Friday/ Saturday 7:00 pm, Sunday 3:00 p.m. Pend Oreille Playhouse, Newport. www. pendoreilleplayers.org (509) 6713389. (10HB-3p) CATTLE PASTURE WANTED Must be fenced and have water source. 10-70 Pairs. (509) 939-8831/ (509) 954-5668. (10HB-4p) Y.E.S. LUMBER RAFFLE 189 PIECES - 2X6X12 TICKETS $2.00 EACH OR 3/$5.00 DRAWING MAY 18, 2013 Tickets available at: Owen’s, Seeber’s, Country Lane, Michael’s NAPA, Black Rose, Treasures A-Z, Anastasia’s, Bling & Sparkles, Kitchen Shoppe, Life Prep Academy, Choppers Hair Design, Audrey’s, Station 241, My Sister’s Cottage and Y.E.S. office, 316 West Second, Newport. (12HB-2) FOR SALE Upright freezer, $150. Full bed, $100. 2 chest of drawers, $50 each. Maple desk and chair, $75. 2 occasional tables (cherrywood) $40 each. 8-1/2 foot brown couch, $75. Sewing table, $70. Large cherrywood hutch, $700. Small sideboard and mirror, $150 both. (208) 437-3578. (12p) ROAD ATLAS Current, detailed road atlas, spiral bound with laminated cover. Pend Oreille County, Washington $30.00. Bonner County, Idaho $35.00. Sold at The Miner Newspapers, 421 South Spokane Avenue, Newport. (509) 447-2433.(12HB-alt tf) Need something at a good price? Try The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds.

Saturday April 27th • 9pm-1am LIVE MUSIC BY KICHO TAP BEER $2.00 - DRINK SPECIALS NO COVER Main St., • Priest River, ID

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For rules, regulations and registration, please visit www.kalispeltribe.com/northern-pike ONSITE REGISTRATION AT: Cusick boat launch & Metaline Waterfront Park


1B

| APRIL 24, 2013

Sports



THE MINER

Ranger softball wins four on week

BR I E FLY Spartan basketball awards listed PRIEST RIVER – The Priest River Spartans boys basketball team award winners were announced. For the varsity, Cam Riley and Dalton Sommer got co-MVP honors, Cole Stelow was named Defensive MVP, Thomas Reynold was named Best Teammate and RC Akre and Jimmy Koch got the Coaches’ Award. On junior varsity, Jalen Griffin was named Defensive MVP and Eric Mortenson was MVP. Alex Carey was named Most Improved and Levi Maltba got the Spartan Award. For C squad, Mason Clark was MVP, Brandon Campbell was Most Improved and Jason Oliver received the Coaches’ Award.

COURTESY PHOTO|PATTI CUTSHALL

Cusick’s Ryan Sample steals third base in the Panther’s win over Curlew Tuesday, April 16 at Cusick. He slid in under the tag and was safe. Cusick won both games of the doubleheader.

Cusick baseball gets two wins over Curlew

Rangers perform well in league SPRINGDALE – The Selkirk Rangers track and field kids performed well at the Northeast B League meet in Springdale Tuesday, April 16. Full results were not available. Rangers coach Rebekah Boyle said six of the 13 kids posted personal records for the day, and several placed in the top three. Cusick also competed but did not have results posted. Cusick and Selkirk were both at the Priest River Invite Saturday. See separate story. The teams will be at a league meet Thursday, April 25, hosted by St. George’s School at North Central High School. Events start at 3:30 p.m. Cusick and Selkirk compete at the Riverside Invite Saturday, April 27 at 10 a.m. Another league meet is set for Tuesday, April 30 at 3:30 p.m., hosted by Valley Christian at the old University High School facility.

Idaho wants comments on elk plan revision BOISE – Idaho Fish and Game is planning a series of open house meetings to discuss the ongoing elk management plan revision. Learn about the process, ask questions of Fish and Game’s wildlife managers, and share thoughts about statewide management direction. Plan objectives are still in draft form. The first regional open house meeting is in the Panhandle region Thursday, May 2, 3-7 p.m. at the regional office, 2885 W. Kathleen Ave., Coeur d’Alene. Idaho’s current elk management plan is more than 12 years old. Starting in late 2011, Fish and Game launched an effort to revise and update that plan. Strategies in the plan will be driven by public expectations and changes in elk populations. Revisions are based largely on a survey of Idaho elk hunters and in part on changes in habitat, predation and agricultural depredation conflicts. Comments are due by May 31. They may be submitted during public meetings; to wildlife managers at regional offices; by email to idfginfo@idfg.idaho.gov or by mail to Elk Plan Comments, P.O. Box 25, Boise, ID 83707.

Cusick golfers play first 18 holes CUSICK – The Cusick golfers had their first 18-hole league matches last week. Considering that all but one from the team, Jacob Tesdahl, is new to the sport, they’ve been progressing quite well, coach Jim Sattleen said. Tuesday, April 16, the boys played at Fairways at Medical Lake. Tesdahl led the Panthers with a 110. Marcus Sheridan shot a 125, Dakota Schubert 127 and Zayne Arnell 134. Playing at Deer Park Monday, April 22, they boys improved: Tesdahl shot a 103, Sheridan 121, Schubert 127 and Arnell 119. The boys play a nine-hole match in Chewelah Wednesday, April 24. They’ll host a league 18-hole match Tuesday, April 30, at StoneRidge in Blanchard.

“Then in the top of the seventh good start with two runs scored inning, they scored two runs,” in the first inning. The offense Hamilton said, to tie the game. was connecting with the ball, CUSICK – The Cusick Panthers In the bottom of the seventh, Hamilton said, with 14 hits in all. baseball team won both games of Cusick’s John Cutshall walked “Eight of our nine starters a doubleheader against Curlew to get on base, then stole got hits,” he said. “Eight of our nine Cutshall pitched the Tuesday, April 16. a base to get into posiThe Panthers ran away with tion to score. Michael starters got hits.” entire game, strikthe first game 11-2 and had the Konkright came to bat ing out 11, walking second game in hand until the with two outs and hit one and giving up Tell Hamilton fifth inning. a long fly to right field, one hit. “We were up 9-3 going into the driving in Cutshall and Cusick Coach “He pitched refifth inning, Cusick coach Tell winning the game. ally well,” Hamilton Hamilton said. Then the team “It was an exciting game,” said. had a series of errors – fielding Hamilton said. Cusick got 11 hits, with Sample and A number of hitting a triple. Along with Sammental O N D EC K: Cusick batters got ple, Gavin Peterson, and Tyson errors, VS. ST. MICHAEL’S Friday, April 26, 2 p.m. hits in the second Shanholtzer got two hits. like game and several The wins were the first of the throw- AT SELKIRK TUESDAY, April 30, 2p.m. got multiple hits, year for the Panthers and come ing including Ryan as the season is winding down to the Sample, who hit preparing for post-season play. wrong base – that opened the a double. Sample also closed out They have a 2-8 record. door for Curlew. the game in the sixth and sevThey played Wilbur-Creston “They scored six to tie the enth inning as pitcher, allowing at home after deadline Tuesday, game,” Hamilton said. no hits. Derrick Bluff pitched the April 23. Cusick scored two runs in the first part of the game. They will play St. Michael’s Fribottom of the fifth inning to The first game wasn’t as draday, April 26, at 2 p.m., followed take back the lead. Neither team matic, with Cusick leading start by a game at Selkirk Tuesday, scored in the sixth inning. to finish after getting off to a April 30, also at 2p.m. BY DON GRONNING OF THE MINER

Grand slam for Cusick softball ters, and gave up six hits. Savage and Balcom pitched and OF THE MINER Cusick won game two 7-1 with Adams caught. The loss went to Shanelle Savage pitching and Bal- Savage. COLUMBIA – Cusick’s softball com and Adams sharing catching Adams went three for three team won two games at Columduty. Savage gave up five hits with bia Saturday, April 20, helped by six walks and 16 strikeouts. SEE CUSICK, 3B Haley Adams with her grand slam Adams was two home run over the fence in game for two at bat with one. anGame one went O N D EC K: other to Cusick 15-2. VS. ST. MICHAEL’S Friday, home Adams led the April 26, 2 p.m. run. way at the plate, Savage going three for AT NORTHPORT TUESDAY, had a four. Sarah Martin April 30, 2 p.m. triple was four for five and with a triple and two three RBIs. walks Val Keogh Even with that, coach Dan was 2 for 2. Savage said their bats were a little Playing at home sluggish. The Panther defense Tuesday, April played well and gave up only one 16, Cusick won error in two games. one and lost one “I’m happy about that,” he said. against Curlew. Brianna Balcom pitched and Game one went COURTESTY PHOTO|TAMI YARBER Reigan Allen caught. Balcom had to Curlew with Haley Adams hit a grand slam against Columbia Saturday. six strikeouts, waked eight bata score of 14-4. Cusick won Game 1 of the doubleheader 15-2. BY JANELLE ATYEO

Individuals stand out at league meet BY JANELLE ATYEO OF THE MINER

COLVILLE – Newport had a league meet in Colville last week against Kettle Falls and Chewelah. The Grizzlies were missing too many of their main athletes to have a chance at winning the meet, coach Rory Axel said, but the team kept it close with some really good performances. Senior Zack Chantry set personal records in the 100, finishing second, and the 200, taking first. He continued with a second place in the 400 with another personal record of 56.17. Senior Scott McMeen was the ironman of the meet, Axel said. He won the 800, 1,600 and the 3,200 and brought the four-

by-400 relay home in first. Marissa Hofstee set a personal record of 13.56 as she won the 100-meter dash and then helped the four-by-200 relay to first place at a time of 2:01. She O N D EC K: jumped into VS. RIVERSIDE the 3,200 WEDNESDAY, meters and April 24, 3:30 p.m. got second just to get AT RIVERSIDE points for the INVITATIONAL team, coach Saturday, April 27, Axel said. 10 a.m. Johanna Lucas, a VS. LAKESIDE foreign WEDNESDAY, exchange May 1, 3:30 p.m. student from Germany, ran her first 400-meter race

and won in 1:17. Fellow foreign exchange student Carol Sperling has become a starting member of the 400 relay and the four-by-200 relay, helping both teams to personal records and first and second place finishes. The Grizzlies were at the Priest River Invite Saturday. See separate story. Newport will have its first home track meet of the year Wednesday, April 24, at 3:30 p.m. Riverside will be visiting for a league meet. The Grizzlies compete at Riverside Saturday, April 27 for the Riverside Invitational, starting at 10 a.m. Next Wednesday, May 1, Newport is back at home for a league dual with Lakeside, also at 3:30 p.m.

IONE – The Selkirk Rangers second inning, although they fastpitch softball team won two were still up 5-1 at the end of five doubleheaders last week, beatinnings. ing Republic Tuesday, April 16, Anderson pitched the second and Northport Friday, April 19. game, striking out six and not The Rangers played at Repubwalking anyone. She gave up lic, winning 10-1 and 17-1. one run on four Kirbi Anderson pitched in hits. the first game, striking out 12 O N D EC K: The Ranger ofand giving up one run on two AT REARDAN fense continued hits. TUESDAY, April to roll, scoring Jessika Reiber led the team 30, 3 p.m. 12, while holdon offense, going 3 for 4 and ing Republic driving in two runs. Josie scoreless. Miller had two hits for the RangReiber had two hits and played ers. Savanah Christman drove well behind the plate despite sufin three with a base clearing fering an injury to her hand on a triple in the fourth inning. play at the plate in game one. Other Rangers with singles Abiona Carrasco, Josie Miller, included Anderson, MacKenzie and Ellie Grass each had a McAnerin and Ellie Grass. double and a single for Selkirk. In game two, Selkirk’s offense Anna Kotzian added a pair of started a little slow. They left the bases loaded in both the first and SEE RANGERS, 3A

Priest River holds on for win against Kellogg BY DON GRONNING

back to work on our mistakes,” Schultz said. NEWPORT – The Priest River Wyatt King pitched the first Spartan baseball team four inwithstood a late game rally O N D EC K: nings, by Kellogg to win 12-9 in AT KETTLE FALLS, Thursday, throwing an Intermountain League April 25, 4 p.m. six strikegame played Tuesday, April outs and 16 at Kellogg. AT SANDPOINT TUESDAY, giving up Spartan coach Mark April 30, 4 p.m. two runs Schultz said Priest River and three hit well and the pitchers hits. He pitched well, but the defense fell walked one. apart late in the game. Jake Perkins relieved him. The Spartans were up 11-2 go- Perkins got batters to hit some ing into the fifth inning. ground balls but the defense “Defensively, we played well didn’t make the plays, Schultz for four innings and we didn’t said. Dalton Sommer finished off finish the game like we would the game with four strikeouts in like to,” Schultz said. an inning and two thirds. The Spartans scored in the Priest River batters performed top of the fifth, then watched well, with R.C. Akre going 2-3 Kellogg score seven runs in the with three RBIs. Tyler Barber last three innings. Priest River went 3-5 with 3-5, with two finished the game with seven doubles and three RBIs. errors. “We got the win and will go SEE PRIEST RIVER, 3A OF THE MINER

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S P O R T S

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24 Newport, Cusick Golf vs. Chewelah and Medical Lake: 2 p.m. - Fairways Newport Track vs. Riverside: 3:30 p.m. - Newport THURSDAY, APRIL 25 Priest River Boys Golf at Bonners Ferry: 2 p.m. - Bonners Ferry Selkirk Baseball at Reardan: 3 p.m. - Reardan Selkirk Softball at Reardan: 3 p.m. - Reardan Selkirk and Cusick Track at League Meet: 3:30 p.m. Hosted by St. George’s at North Central High School Priest River Softball at Kettle Falls: 3:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Kettle Falls Priest River Baseball at Kettle Falls: 4 p.m. - Kettle Falls Newport Boys Soccer at Lakeside: 4 p.m. - Lakeside FRIDAY, APRIL 26 Newport Girls Golf at Chewelah Invite: 10 a.m. - Chewelah Cusick Baseball vs. St. Michael’s: 2 p.m. - Cusick Cusick Softball vs. St. Michael’s: 2 p.m. - Cusick Priest River Track at Timberlake Invite: 3 p.m. - Spirit Lake SATURDAY, APRIL 27 Newport, Cusick, Selkirk Track at Riverside Invitational: 10 a.m. - Riverside Priest River Baseball vs. Bonners Ferry: 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. - Priest River

C A LE N DA R

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Newport Baseball at Riverside: 11 a.m. - Riverside Priest River Softball vs. Bonners Ferry: 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. - Priest River MONDAY, APRIL 29 Newport Boys Soccer at Districts Round 1: TBA Newport Softball at Riverside: 3 p.m. - Riverside TUESDAY, APRIL 30 Cusick Golf at League Meet: 11 a.m. - StoneRidge Golf Course Cusick Baseball at Selkirk: 2 p.m. - Selkirk Cusick Softball at Selkirk: 2 p.m. - Selkirk Priest River Golf at Timberlake: 2 p.m. - Timberlake Selkirk and Cusick Track at League Meet: 3:30 p.m. - Valley Christian Priest River Softball at Sandpoint: 4 p.m. and 5:45 p.m. Sandpoint Newport Softball vs. Kettle Falls: 4 p.m. - Newport Newport Baseball vs. Kettle Falls: 4 p.m. - Newport Priest River Baseball at Sandpoint: 4 p.m. and 5:45 p.m. Sandpoint WEDNESDAY, MAY 1 Northeast A League Boys Soccer at Districts: TBA Newport Golf vs. Lakeside: 2 p.m. - StoneRidge, Blanchard Newport Softball at Lakeside: 3 p.m. - Lakeside Newport Track vs. Lakeside: 3:30 p.m. - Newport

208-448-2311

Albeni Hwy. • Priest River Washington Customers Call Toll Free 1-800-440-8254


THE MINER

SPORTS 

APRIL 24, 2013 |

2B

Newport girls fall to Medical Lake, beat Bonners Ferry NEWPORT – The Newport girls fastpitch softball team took a 9-5 win over Bonners Ferry last week, after falling 22-10 to Medical Lake earlier in the week. Tuesday, April 16, a wild 15run third inning by Medical Lake did in the Grizzlies, who were ahead 4-3 at the top of the inning before things deteriorated. Newport had nine errors in the game. The Grizzlies managed to score another six runs in the fourth and fifth innings but the Cardinals added four of their own in the bottom of the fourth to force the game to be called because of

the mercy rule. score in the first inning. Newport Newport got 10 runs on 10 followed up the second inning hits, with Margaret Abercromwith scores in the third and fifth bie hitting a home run. Bianca innings. Bonners Ferry had a Sanchez and four run rally in the Rene Peters got O N D EC K: fourth inning. two hits. Rene AT RIVERSIDE MONDAY, Newport has a 2-10 Peters pitched Northeast A League April 29, 3 p.m. and Jenson Kirkrecord and is 3-11 wood caught. VS. KETTLE FALLS Tuesday, overall. The Grizzlies April 30, 4 p.m. The Grizzlies hosted bounced back Freeman Tuesday, against Bonners April 23 after The Ferry Thursday, April 18, leading Miner went to press. A game at start to finish for a 9-5 win. Riverside was rescheduled for A big second inning gave the Monday, April 29 at 3 p.m. The Grizzlies a solid lead. They scored girls host Kettle Falls Tuesday, six in that inning, following a April 30 at 4 p.m.

MINER PHOTO|JANELLE ATYEO

Selkirk’s Georgie Shafer, left, Newport’s Arielle Walden, and Priest River’s Jill Weimer battle it out in the 100-meter hurdles. Walden won with Shafer and Weimer following.

Spartan girls win home meet Priest River boys second BY JANELLE ATYEO OF THE MINER

PRIEST RIVER – It was a good day to be a Spartan Saturday, April 20. Performing in front of a home crowd, the Priest River girls won the Priest River Invite and the boys were second to Bonners Ferry. All Pend Oreille County schools competed as well. Newport girls were fourth and boys were fifth in the team standings. Selkirk girls finished fifth, and both Cusick teams got on the board, scoring four points apiece. The Priest River girls took six firsts. Amber Trantum won the 100-meter dash with teammate Steffie Pavey in second. Erica McCracken won the 800 with a season-best finish. Pavey took gold in the 1,600 and 3,200. She had her personal best time in the longer race, finishing in 12 minutes, 50.10 seconds. Beth Bykerk won the shot put and was second in discus. Jill Weimer took first in the high jump. The Spartan boys had their share of placers. Dallas Hopkins took first in the 400 with his 1980s mullet look, complete with sweatband. Diamond Robinson was second in the 800 with a PR time of 2:12.91. Josh Marks scored some more distance points by placing second in the 3,200, and teammate Jason Oliver took third. The area’s best hurdlers battled it out. Newport senior Arielle Walden proved she’s still tops with a 15.75-second finish in the 100-meter high hurdles. Selkirk junior Georgie Shafer was second at 17 seconds flat, and Priest River junior Jill Weimer came in at 18.10. Shafer won the 300s. Coach Rebekah Boyle was proud that her team from one of the

smallest schools in attendance placed in the top half of the girls team. “Their hard work is paying off in a big way,” she said. Several Ranger athletes had huge PRs, including Shafer, who did triple jump for the first time and took second at 31 feet, 8 inches. Guyla Boyle knocked nine seconds off her time in the 800-meter run as one of three eighth graders on the team. She was sixth out of 13 girls, running a 2:49. Other placers for Selkirk included the girls 800 meter and 1,600 meter relays that MINER PHOTO|JANELLE ATYEO took fourth place. Aley Cusick junior Darunee Gunplemjan, an exchange Curran was sixth in shot student from Thailand, throws shot at the Priest River put and eighth in discus, Invite Saturday, April 20. and Patricia Story was seventh in the 400. been nicknamed the “Anchorman” Cusick placers making the top as he has brought the team back 10 included Quinton Montgomin race after race, making up leads ery, who took seventh in the 200, of 50 to 80 yards in almost every eighth in the shot and ninth in meet this year. discus. Nolan Finley was eighth in McMeen had a win of his own long jump and ninth in the 400. in the 800 with a season best Baylie Brown made the finals in 2:10. Other standouts for Newport discus and took ninth. Bridget included Josh Truitt was second in Fountain was eighth in the 300 the 300 hurdles, fourth in the 200, hurdles. fifth in the 100. Sophomore Rocky Newport’s boys relays did well. McDaniel just missed 40 feet in The four-by-100 team of Zack the triple jump with a season’s best Chantry, Kaben Hastings, Brendan of 39 feet, 10 inches and a silver Geary and Colten Worley to first. medal. Eric Cunningham continThe four-by-200 was second, as ues to improve in the throws as he was the four-by-four, and the sprint got a bronze medal in the discus. medley team won with Worley, For the Grizzlies girls team Geary, Chantry and Scott McMeen Walden won long jump and triple as the anchor finishing with a jump. Kylin Brown took third in 50-yard lead. The same guys came high jump. Erin Rednour was back in the four-by-400 with silver second in pole vault at 7 feet. The and a season’s best. McMeen has sprint medley team was second.

A tale of two games for Newport soccer able to strengthen our NEWPORT – Newport’s boys attack soccer team came up against and do two very different teams this what we past week: Lakeside, the leadwanted ers who are undefeated in to do,” the Northeast A League, and the coach Riverside, who has yet to win a said. “Its game. The Grizzlies won over the pretty Rams, but lost to Lakeside. hard to Playing at home Tuesday, come April 16, Newport took a 4-0 from a loss to the Lakeside Eagles (8-0 four zero in league and 9-3 overall). Newdeficit.” MINER PHOTO|DON GRONNING port (3-4 and 6-6) was missing It was Newport’s No. 8 Jordan Hoadley pushes back against a Lakeside two of their starters. Daniel another defender at Wednesday’s home game. Newport kept them scoreFoust was sick, and the starting story less in the first half, but lost 4-0. goal keeper was out for academic when the reasons. Grizzlies Matthew Solis and Alex Young Newport held them scoreless traveled to Riverside (0-7, 0-10) took turns in goal. Solis made for the first half, playing very Thursday, April 18. Newport five saves and Young made evenly, but within won 7-0. three. the first 10 minO N D EC K: “We definitely had “The team’s coming together,” utes of the second, AT LAKESIDE THURSDAY, everything working the coach said. “We just keep the Grizzlies got April 25, 4 p.m. against Riverside,” playing better and better every a goal scored on Person said. game we have.” them. The four AT DISTRICTS MONDAY, Newport had its The boys hosted Medical Lake goals came in April 29, TBA key players back, and (4-3, 7-6) Tuesday, April 23 after rather quick sucthey were able to The Miner went to press. It was cession. take advantage of a the last home game of the season Early on Newport was able weak Riverside defense. and therefore senior night with to keep possession and play “It made a big difference,” the game played at Don Ellersick on Lakeside’s half of the field. Person said. Stadium. They play an away Grizzlies coach Jerry Person Andrew Thompson scored in game Thursday, April 25, a said Lakeside changed some the first minute of play off a Greg rematch against Lakeside that things on their attack, and it Vaughn assist, then Vaughn begins at 4 p.m. confused the Grizzly defense. scored later in the first half with “We’re going to try to give The defenders were leaving a an assist from Erik Person. Perthem a mark in their loss colman unmarked, he said. By the son scored another hat trick of umn,” coach Person said about time Newport was able to sub his own and had one assist in the the undefeated Eagles. out their sweeper and make the second. Thompson got a second District play begins Monday, needed adjustments, Lakeside goal, and Todd Balentine added April 29. Lakeside has secured had four goals. one. Newport had 14 shots in all, “Unfortunately, we were not compared to Lakeside’s nine. SEE NEWPORT, 3A BY JANELLE ATYEO OF THE MINER

Spartan girls trample Bonners BY JANELLE ATYEO

Tigers best Lady Spartans SPIRIT LAKE –Priest River’s with only two hits and one walk. softball team lost both games of In the second game, Priest Rivthe doubleheader at Timberlake er started out a lot better. Ayonna Saturday, April 20. Coach Ron Lentz hit her fourth home run of Kruse said it was disappointing, the year with a three-run blast but had higher to left field. Priest hopes for their O N D EC K : River was up 6-5 home game with VS. KELLOGG WEDNESDAY, until the bottom of the Tigers Tuesday. April 24, 4 p.m. the sixth when the Results were not Tiger’s No. 6 hitter available before AT KETTLE FALLS Thursday, Katie Malloy hit The Miner went to April 25, 3:30 p.m. an opposite field press. two-run home run Timberlake won VS. BONNERS FERRY, Satur- to go ahead. The the first game 8-1. day, April 27, 11 a.m., 1 p.m. game ended 7-6. Kruse said that for Priest River had some reason they AT SANDPOINT TUESDAY, a much easier time couldn’t figure out April 30, 4 p.m., 5:45 p.m. when they travtheir ace pitcher, eled to Kellogg Sidney Malloy. In Tuesday, April 16. the 11 innings she pitched, the The Spartans won 11-1 in six Spartans managed only three innings. base hits. Coach Kruse said it was prob“She wasn’t overpowering but ably the best complete game she did a good job of changing they’ve played so far. Despite the speeds,” he said. cold and flurries, the girls were Priest River put the ball in play, focused and showed some great but it seemed like everything was mental toughness, he said. right at a defender. Brittany Krampert pitched To their credit they made all well again, the one run was the plays they needed to make, unearned, Kruse added. “Kellogg Kruse said of the opposing team. is a pretty good hitting team but Priest River made several errors she kept them off balance, inducthat led to runs, but the Tigers ing seven weak ground balls for also hit very well. The Spartans outs to go along with her five didn’t generate much offense strikeouts,” he said.

The Spartan outfield did well running down some high fly balls in the swirling winds, which included sophomore Aimee Warren playing her first varsity game in left field. Destiny Day, another sophomore, moved in to play shortstop for the injured Kelsie Fink, and showed off  her strong arm gunning out runners at first. She also had a two RBI triple and then stole home. Ayonna Lentz went three for four at the plate, just missing her fourth home run of the year with a line drive to left that hit the fence. Erika Nelson had some timely hitting, going three for four with three RBI’s, and Alyssa Deal also had two hits and scored two runs. The Spartans hosted Timberlake Tuesday, after The Miner went to press. They will makeup a doubleheader against Kellogg at home Wednesday, April 24, that was previously rained out. The first game begins at 4 p.m. They travel to Kettle Falls Thursday, April 25, to play at 3:30 p.m., host Bonners Ferry Saturday, April 27, at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. and then travel to Sandpoint Tuesday, April 30 to play at 5:45 p.m.

OF THE MINER

BONNERS FERRY – The Bonners Ferry girls might have had the upper hand in the relays, but the Priest River Lady Spartans won all but three of the individual events at the league dual in Bonners Tuesday, April 16. Priest River won the team standings 86-60. Senior Steffie Pavey won all four of her events: the 100 and 200 meters as well as the 800 and 1,600. Jill Wiemer won three events: the 100-meter high hurdles, high jump and triple jump. Beth Bykerk took the two

throwing events by several feet. in the 800 and won with a time Only Priest River girls comof 2:13.20. Josh Marks won the peted in the 3,200, and Kinya 3,200 in 11:19. Morrison won with a time of 13 Two of Priest River’s relays minutes, 48 seconds. The girls won, the sprint medley and the also won the 400. 800-meter relay O N D EC K: In the field events, freshman with a time of AT TIMBERLAKE Nick Burns improved his long 2:05. INVITE Friday, jump by more than a foot and The Bonners April 26, 3 p.m. won at 17 feet, 1.5 inches. boys beat Priest Jacob McDonald was the only River 89-57, but pole vaulter to make it to 11 the Spartans placed well. They feet. made up the entire top half of The Spartans hosted the Priest the placers in the 100-meter River Invite Saturday. See sepadash. Andy Meyer led them rate story. all with a personal best 11.84 Next up, the Spartans attend seconds. the Timberlake Invite Friday, Diamond Robinson had a PR April 26 at 3:30 p.m.

Selkirk nine splits with Northport BY DON GRONNING OF THE MINER

IONE – The Selkirk Rangers baseball team hosted Northport Thursday, April 19, where they won a game and lost a game against the visiting Mustangs. Selkirk lost the first game 8-5, despite the hitting of Dominic Cain and Avery Miller, who had two doubles each. Ray Davis and Emery Maupin also hit doubles. “The boys hit the ball well,” Selkirk coach Pete Whittekiend said. Selkirk led 2-1 going into the fourth inning, when Northport

scored a pair of runs. The Ranginning to tie the game at 4-4. ers scored a run of their own to “Stephen Avey scored the wintie the game in the bottom of the ning run in the bottom of the inning. Northport continued sixth,” Whittekiend said. their scoring spree Cain pitched a solid with two more runs in O N D EC K: game, he said. the fifth. AT REARDAN “Brandyn Ross and Selkirk answered THURSDAY, Emery Maupin each had with a run in the sixth April 25, 3 p.m. four quality at bats in the but Northport scored second game,” Whitthree runs in the seventh inning. tekiend said. Selkirk managed another run Selkirk has a 4-6 Northeast but couldn’t pull out the win. 1B League recored and is 6-6 In the second game, Selkirk overall. led most of the way after jumpThe Rangers will travel to ing out to a 4-1 lead. Northport Reardan for a game Thursday, rallied with a run in the fifth and April 25. That game will start at two runs in the top of the sixth 3 p.m.


3B

| APRIL 24, 2013



THE MINER

CUSICK | Home game set for Friday FROM PAGE 1B

with a home run. Allen and Cassidy Hansen had the only other hits for Cusick. They each had a double. Cusick won game two with a score of 16 to 15. Savage pitched and Balcom caught.

Balcom and Allen both went five for five and both scored three runs each. Adams had a triple. Allen had two doubles. Savage and Cassidy Hansen each also had double in the game. Hansen got the game winning RBI in the bottom of the seventh inning

with a single scoring from Allen. The Panthers hosted WilburCreston Tuesday, after The Miner went to press. They host St. Michael’s Friday, April 26, at 2 p.m. and then travel to Northport Tuesday, April 30, to play at 2 p.m.

PRIEST RIVER | Boys lead league at 5-1 FROM PAGE 1B

“We really hit the ball well early in the game,” Schultz said. Priest River leads the league with a 5-1 Intermountain League record and is 8-2 over-

MINER PHOTO|DON GRONNING

Jacob Satterlee pitches for the Grizzlies early in a home game against Medical Lake Tuesday, April 16. Medical Lake won 12-0.

Grizzly baseball improving, still not winning

BY DON GRONNING OF THE MINER

NEWPORT – The Newport Grizzlies baseball team played twice at home last week, losing 12-0 to Medical Lake and 14-3 to Bonners Ferry. Tuesday, April 16 they played Medical Lake for the second time. Newport coach Sam Castro said the team still has errors, but that is to be expected of a team with so many inexperienced players. Medical Lake hit scored 11 in the opening inning. “Our pitching and defense improved and we allowed one run after that,” Castro said. Seth Hervey relieved Jacob Satterlee the third inning, getting out three batters with six pitches,

Castro said. In the fourth inning, Hervey gave up a run but only faced four batters, he said. “These are the signs of improving I have been waiting for,” Castro said. Kyle Jack- O N D EC K: son, Jeremiah AT RIVERSIDE DeVerna and SATURDAY, April Homer Mer27, 11 a.m. rinan all got hits for the Grizzlies. Newport played Bonners Ferry Thursday, April 18 at home, finishing in the short end of the 14-3 score. The Bonners Ferry game was one of the Grizzlies most competitive games of the season. The teams both scored in the first inning and the game was still tied going into the bottom of the

|| BASEBALL TUESDAY, APRIL 16 Cusick 11, Curlew 2 Curlew 000 110 0 2 1 4 Cusick 200 522 x 11 14 5 Tresham, Fanning (4) and Beedle; Cutshall a n d G . P e t e r s o n . W - C u t s h a l l . L- Tr e s h a m . HITS: Curlew-J. Brown. Cusick-J. Peterson 2, Shanholtzer 2, Bluff, Sample 2, Cutshall 2, Konkright 2, Gould 2, Sheridan. 2B-J. Brown, Sample, Cutshall.

Cusick 12, Curlew 11 Curlew Cusick

030 060 2 11 11 6 050 420 1 12 11 6

M e t c a l f a n d B e e d l e ; B l u f f, S am p l e ( 6 ) and G. Peterson. W-No Decision. L-Metcalf. HITS: Curlew-Metcalf, G. Brown, Fanning, Knapp, Beedle 3, Grumbach 2, Elizondo 2. Cusick-G. Peterson 2, Shanholtzer 2, Bluff, Sample 2, Cutshall, Konkright, Sheridan, E. Peterson. 2B-Metcalf, Sample.

Republic 7, Selkirk 3 Selkirk Republic

001 020 0 3 4 3 400 300 x 7 10 2

Cain, Weiss (4) and Ross; Leonard a n d We l l e r. W - L e o n a r d ( 5 - 0 ) . L- C a i n . 2B-Selkirk, Maupin; Republic, Leonard, Fritts.

Selkirk 1, Selkirk 0 Selkirk Republic

000 000 1 1 1 0 000 000 0 0 3 2

A. Miller and Ross; Fritts and Helms. W-A.Miller. L-Fritts (3-2).

Medical Lake 12, Newport 1 Newport 000 00 0 3 5 Medical Lake 1101 00 12 17 1 Satterlee, Hervey (4) and Slocum; Wagner, Sunde (3), Kelly (5) and Petek. W-Wagner. L-Satterlee. HITS: Newport-Jackson, Deverna, Merrinan. Medical Lake-Kelly, Wagner, Doemain 3, Paulson 2, Kissack 3, Petek 2, Cransban, Steimrietz 3, Sersig. 2B-Doemain. 3B-Doemain, Paulson.

Priest River 12, Kellogg 9

Priest River Kellogg

124 410 0 12 11 7 200 023 2 9 6 2

King, Perkins (5), Sommer (6) and Barber; Silva, Berman (4) and Jerome. W-King (2-2). L-Silva. HITS: 2B-Kellogg-Wallace: Long, Berman; Priest River: Barber 2, King 2.

W- Woods, Unrugh L-Hunt Hits- BF 2-B, Wood, Unrugh, Umpenhoal. N- 2-B Hunt (2), Krogh, Merriman.

010 220 3 8 9 2 200 101 1 5 6 2

A. Miller, Weiss (6) and Ross; Johnson and Masters. W-Johnson (5-3). L-A. Miller. HITS: 2B-Nor, Burke. Sel, Cain, Davis, A. Miller 2. HR-Nor, Hedrick.

Selkirk 5, Northport 4 Northport Selkirk

100 012 0 4 3 5 202 001 0 5 4 4

Konkler and Hedrick; Cain and Ross. W-Cain. L-Konkler (4-2). HITS: 2B-Nor, Burke. Sel, Cain, Maupin.

SOFTBALL TUESDAY, APRIL 16 Selkirk 10, Republic 1 Selkirk (6-2, 6-2) Republic (0-4, 0-4)

131 23 10 8 1 000 01 1 2 5

Statistics: Anderson and Reiber; Braley and Ruggo. W-Anderson. L-Braley. HITS: 3B-Selkirk, Christman.

Selkirk 17, Republic 1 Selkirk (6-2, 6-2)

002 227 4

Republic (0-4, 0-4)

000 010 0

Priest River 11, Kellogg 1 Priest River (8-2, 3-0) 330 203 11 13 3 Kellogg (0-2, 0-1) 001 000 1 4 3

17 17 1

Medical Lake 22, Newport 10 Newport (2-11, 2-10) 130 33 10 10 9 Medical Lake (6-5, 6-5) 12(15) 40 22 11 2 Statistics: Peters and J. Kirkwood; K. Wegner and Keister. W-K. Wegner. L-Peters. HITS: NewportSanchez, Peters 2, N. Abercrombie, C. Kirkwood, J. Kirkwood, A. Abercrombie, Poisel, Madison 2. Medical Lake-K. Wegner, Keister, Stanfill, Troutt 3, Cheevers, M. Wegner 2, Hornby. 2B-K. Wegner, M. Wegner, Hornby, Peters 2. HR-N. Abercrombie (1).

000 0 0 3 5 500 10 15 11 5

Cox and Gilmore; Anderson and Reiber. W-Anderson (8-2). L-Cox. 2B-Selkirk, Miller, Grass. 3B-Selkirk, Miller, Couch, Anderson 2.

Selkirk 10, Northport 0 Northport Selkirk

000 00 0 1 2 041 50 10 12 1

Gousen and Gilmore; Anderson and Reiber. W-Anderson (9-2). 2B-Selkirk, Anderson, Reiber, Couch. 3B-Anderson.

SATURDAY, APRIL 20 Intermountain League at Timberlake Timberlake 8, Priest River 1 Timberlake 7, Priest River 6

of her closest competitor. Sydney Hearnden finished fifth with a 115. Murphy said Elaine Gamma and Tiffany Huang were also in the mix. The golf season is winding down.

“There are only two more league matches,” Murphy said, “then regionals.” Murphy said Newport has a solid chance of qualifying three boys and three girls to the regional tournaments.

against the Caribou Trail League or if just the top team will go. “That first game will be critical to us,” Person said. “It would be nice to win them both. That’s our goal, and I think it’s within our grasp.”

and Carrasco singled to load the bases. Miller followed with a two run double and Couch hit a two run triple as Selkirk took a 5-0 lead after the first inning. In the bottom of the fourth inning, the Rangers exploded with a power surge including three triples and a double. Miller had three hits in the game. Abiona Carrasco had three singles. Anderson had two triples with four RBI’s. Couch had a triple and Grass, a freshman, hit a two run double. In game two, Selkirk scored 10 runs on a dozen hits. Reiber had

two singles and a double. Anderson added a triple and a double, and Couch a single and a double. McAnerin, another freshman, pounded a double and Christman, Carrasco, Anna Kotzian and Grass each added singles as the game ended in the fifth inning with a score of 10-0. Selkirk has a 8-2 record and is second in the Northeast 1B League, behind St. Michael’s. The Rangers hosted St. Michael’s Tuesday, after The Miner went to press. They travel to Reardan to play Tuesday, April 30, at 3 p.m.

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GOLF TUESDAY, APRIL 16 Boys golf at Colville Participating teams: Chewelah, Kettle Falls, Newport Team results Chewelah 459, Kettle Falls 489, Newport NS Individual results 1, Anderson (New) 79; 2, Olson (Chw) 82; 3, Long (Chw) 82; 4, Chalmers (Chw) 89; 5, Paiva (KF) 91.

Team results: Chewelah NS, Kettle Falls NS, Newport NS Individual results: 1, Wiese (New) 84; 2, McMillan (Chw) 99; 3, Pugh (Chw) 107; 4, Johnson (Chw) 111; 5, Hearnden (New)115.

FRIDAY, APRIL 19 Chewelah Boys’ Invitational at Chewelah Golf and Country Club, Par 72 Team results: Rossland 327, Chewelah 329, Chelan 338, Deer Park 334, Lewis and Clark 346, Mt. Spokane 349, Mead 358, North Central 360, Ferris 364, Cheney 374, Kettle Falls 377, Colville 380, University 387, Quincy 391, Rogers 414, West Valley 432, Lakeside 437, Medical Lake 516. Individual results: 1, Cowell (Che) 74. 2, Snyder (DP) 74. 3, Anderson (New) 75. 4, Moroney (Ros) 7. 5, Whitsett (NC) 79.

BOYS SOCCER

Anderson wins finishes third at Chewelah Boy’s Invitational NEWPORT - Gage Anderson, a Newport senior, finished third in a field of about 100 golfers at the Chewelah Boy’s Invitational, held Friday, April 19. “He shot a 75,” Newport coach Jim Murphy said. “He played really well.” Spencer Siemsen and Dean Ownbey also played well, Murphy said. Earlier in the week at a Northeast A League match in Colville against golfers from Chewelah and Kettle Falls, Anderson won first with a 79. His closest competitor shot an 82. Spencer Siemsen shot a 106 and Dean Ownbey a 107. Courtney Wiese dominated the girl’s competition with an 84. “That’s really good,” Murphy said. She was 15 strokes ahead

singles. Christman had a three run double. Katie Couch and Anderson each had a single as the Rangers saw all nine starters record RBI’s. Anderson pitched two shutouts against Northport, with the Rangers winning 15-0 and 10-0 at home. “The Ranger defense made some good plays behind her,” Selkirk coach Cathy Enyeart said. The offense came out swinging from the first inning of the first game. Christman led off with a single, Anderson walked,

Girls golf at Colville

Curlew 14, Cusick 4 Cusick 16, Curlew 1

Selkirk 15, Northport 0 Northport Selkirk

FROM PAGE 1B

155

Statistics: Anderson and Reiber, Nichole (7); Rollins and Ruggo. W-Rollins. L-Anderson. HITS: 2B-Selkirk, Christman, Carraseo, Reiber, Kotzian, Miller.

way, they’ll be up against Medical Lake. The winner of that game will go on to play Lakeside for the district title May 1. It hasn’t been nailed down yet whether two teams will go on to regionals

RANGERS| Girls explode in bottom of fourth

SCO R E BOA R D

Statistics: Krampert and Lentz; Yergler and Specht. W-Krampert (6-3). L-Yergler. HITS: 2B-Lentz. 3B-Day.

THURSDAY, APRIL 18 Bonners Ferry 14, Newport 3 Newport 100 20 3 4 1 Bonners Ferry 120 56 14 8 2

FRIDAY, APRIL 19 Northport 8, Cusick 5 Northport Selkirk

the No. 1 spot in league and will get a bye in the first round of districts. It’s looking like Newport will be in second or their place, most likely third. Either

S P O R T S

game that starts at 4 p.m. On Tuesday, April 30, they will go to Sandpoint for another non league game, a doubleheader, with the first game starting at 4 p.m.

NEWPORT | District soccer playoffs near FROM PAGE 1B

fourth inning, when Bonners scored five to take the lead. Newport got four hits against the Badgers. Tyler Hunt, who also pitched, led the way with two doubles. Merriman and Austin Krogh also got hits for the Grizzlies. Newport, which has a 0-11 record, had a single error charged to them. The Grizzlies played Freeman after deadline Tuesday, then will take on Riverside Saturday, April 27 in an away contest, starting at 11 a.m. Newport played Freeman at home after deadline Tuesday, April 23. They will play an away doubleheader with Riverside Saturday, April 27, with the first game starting at 11 a.m.

all. The Spartans played Timberlake after deadline Tuesday, April 23.Priest River will travel to At Kettle Falls, Thursday, April 25, for a non league

TUESDAY, APRIL 16 Northeast A League at Newport Lakeside 4, Newport 0 Scoring: First half - None. Second half - 1, Lak, Constant, 48:00. 2, Lak, Carrol, 56:00. 3, Lak, Williams, 61:00. 4, Lak, Dewey, 70:00. Shots - Lakeside 14, Newport 8. Saves - Lakeside, Lahue 8. Newport, Young 14.

Shots: Newport 14, Riverside 9. Saves: Newport: Solis 5, Young 3; Riverside: Redmond 3.

TRACK AND FIELD TUESDAY, APRIL 16 Intermountain League at Bonners Ferry Boys team scoring: Bonners Ferry 89, Priest River 57. 100: 1, Meyer (PR) 11.55. 2, Nelson (PR) 12.25. 3, Taylor (PR) 12.26. 200: 1, Dinning (BF) 27.05. 2, Bennett (BF) 27.99. 3, Malakowski (PR) 28.15. 400:  1, Reoch (BF) 55.85. 2, Hopkins (PR) 56.10. 3, Rice (BF) 58.01. 800: 1, Robinson (PR) 2:13.12. 2, Cossairt (BF) 2:15.96. 3, Reoch (BF) 2:19.85. 1,600: 1, Reoch (BF) 4:48.87. 2, Cossairt (BF) 4:54.43. 3, Oliver (PR) 5:12.99. 3,200: 1, Marks (PR) 11:19.10. 2, Oliver (PR) 11:19.82. 3, Murdock (PR) 13:20.32. 110 high hurdles: 1, Rice (BF) 16.80. 2, Dement (PR) 18.89. 3, Stone (BF) 19.03. 300 hurdles: 1, Rice (BF) 44.33. 2, Nelson (PR) 47.60. 3, Stone (BF) 48.19. 400 relay: 1, Priest River 49.08. 1,600 relay: 1, Bonners Ferry 3:54.05. 4x200 Meter Relay 1, Bonners Ferry 1:46.76. 1600 Sprint Medley 1, Priest River 4:04.40. High jump: 1, Rice (BF) 6’ 0”. 2, Nelson (BF) 5’ 4”. 3, Merrifield (BF) 5’ 2”. Long jump: 1, Burns (PR) 17’ 1.50”. 2, Merrifield (BF) 16’ 10”. 3, Nelson (BF) 15’ 3.50”. Triple jump: 1, Rice (BF) 38’ 1”. 2, Hopkins (PR) 36’ 5.50”. 3, Nelson (BF) 32’ 5.50”. Pole vault: 1, McDonald (PR) 11’ 0”. 2, Merrifield (BF) 10’ 6”. T3, Dufrene (BF) 9’ 6”, Rapp (BF) 9’ 6”. Discus: 1, Krichbaum (BF) 112’ 0”. 2, Swanson (BF) 103’ 8”. 3, Rice (BF) 101’ 6”. Shot put: 1, Krichbaum (BF) 40’ 5”. 2, Swanson (BF) 34’ 4.50”. 3, Ellis (BF) 30’ 8”.

Girls team scoring: Priest River 86, Bonners Ferry 60. 100: 1, Pavey (PR) 13.71. 2, Munson (BF) 13.82. 3, French (PR) 13.84. 200: 1, Pavey (PR) 28.67. 2, French (PR) 30.17. 3, Marks (PR) 31.61. 400:  1, Tucker (BF) 1:04.71. 2, Merrifield (BF) 1:07.64. 3, McCracken (PR) 1:10.97. 800: 1, Pavey (PR) 2:34.42. 2, Young (PR) 2:48.50. 3, Palacios (BF) 2:54.42. 1,600: 1, Pavey (PR) 5:53.85. 2, McCracken (PR) 6:19.63. 3, Morrison (PR) 6:20.23. 3,200:  1, Morrison (PR) 13:48.74. 2, McCracken (PR) 14:04.66. 3, Young (PR) 15:16.45. 100 high hurdles: 1, Weimer (PR) 17.23. 2, Mendenhall (BF) 17.96. 3, Maggi (BF) 18.68. 300 hurdles: 1, Mendenhall (BF) 52.33. 2, Carey (PR) 1:01.24. 3, Johnson (PR) 1:17.20. 400 relay: 1, Bonners Ferry 55.65. 800 relay: 1, Priest River 2:05.45

1,600 relay: 1, Bonners Ferry 4:37.84. 800 Sprint Medley 1, Bonners Ferry 2:12.68. High jump:  1, Weimer (PR) 4’ 10”. 2, Blackmore (BF) 4’ 8”. 3, Rice (BF) 4’ 4”. Long jump: 1, Tucker (BF) 14’ 10.5”. 2, Trantum (PR) 14’ 10”. 3, Clark (PR) 13’ 7”. Triple jump: 1, Weimer (PR) 32’ 7”. 2, Trantum (PR) 30’ 4”. 3, Clark (PR) 29’ 7.75”. Pole vault: 1, York (BF) 7’ 6”. 2, Kelly (BF) 7’ 6”. 3, Urbaniak (BF) 7’ 0”. Discus: 1, Bykerk (PR) 95’ 8”. 2, Schuman (BF) 93’ 6”. 3, Trantum (PR) 82’ 0”. Shot put: 1, Bykerk (PR) 35’ 0.5”. 2, Schuman (BF) 30’ 9.50”. 3, Trantum (PR) 25’ 3.50”.

SATURDAY, APRIL 20 Priest River Invite Boys team scoring: Bonners Ferry 130, Priest River 97, Stillwater Christian 91, Chewelah 90, Newport 84, Clark Fork 62, Liberty-Spangle 49, Kettle Falls 49, Lakeland 21, Cusick 4. 100:  1, McMullin (CF) 11.84. 200:  1, Bray (SC) 24.10. 400:  1, Hopkins (PR) 53.71. 800:  1, McMeen (New) 2:10.56. 1,600: 1, Erickson (LS) 4:55.48. 3,200: 1, Erickson (LS) 10:46.91. 110 high hurdles: 1, Miller (Che) 17.88. 300 hurdles: 1, Miller (Che) 43.32. 400 relay: 1, Newport 47.62. 1,600 relay: 1, Bonners Ferry 3:44.56. 4x200 Meter Relay--1, Stillwater Christian 1:40.34. 1600 Sprint Medley--1, Newport 3:51.91. High jump: 1, Collins (Che) 6-00. Long jump: 1, Bray (SC) 20-06. Triple jump: 1, Rice (BF) 40-09. Pole vault: 1, Brooks (CF) 12-00. Discus: 1, Brozik (Che) 122-06.50. Shot put: 1, Dodson (KF) 43-08.50. Girls team scoring:  Priest River 153.5, Bonners Ferry 139, Stillwater 97, Newport 77, Selkirk 48, Clark Fork 35.5, Kettle Falls 33, Lakeland 30, Chewelah 30, Liberty-Spangle 30, Cusick 4. 100: 1, Trantum (PR) 14.07. 200: 1, Jentz (SC) 27.34. 400:  1, Jentz (SC) 1:01.12. 800:  1, McCracken (PR) 2:39.87. 1,600: 1, Pavey (PR) 5:39.69. 3,200: 1, Pavey (PR) 12:50.10. 100 high hurdles: 1, Walden (New) 15.75. 300 hurdles: 1, Shafer (Sel) 50.21. 400 relay: 1, Bonners Ferry 56.88. 800 relay: 1, Bonners Ferry 1:53.60. 1,600 relay: 1, Bonners Ferry 4:26.50. 800 Sprint Medley--1, Clark Fork 2:04.95. High jump:  1, Weimer (PR) 4-10. Long jump:  1, Walden (New) 16-00. Triple jump: 1, Walden (New) 34-05. Pole vault: 1, Urbaniak (BF) 7-00. Discus: 1, Rainer (Che) 101-02. Shot put: 1, Bykerk (PR) 35-00.5.

SEE SCOREBOARD, 8B

THURSDAY, APRIL 18 Northeast A League at Riverside Newport 7, Riverside 0 Scoring: First half - 1, New, Thompson (Vaughn) 1:00. 2, New, Vaughn (Person) 20:00. 3, New, Person, 37:00. Second half - 4, New, Thompson (Person) 43:00. 5, New, Person, 46:00. 6, New, Balentine, 50:00. 7, New, Person, 65:00.

to friends and family who sent flowers, brought food, sent cards and extended their friendship and love to our Aunt Peggy Grimes. Thank you also to Sherman Knapp Funeral Home, Newport Hospital doctors and nurses, Long Term Care staff and St. Anthony Catholic Church. May your thoughtfulness find its way back to you.

The Family of Peggy V. Grimes

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4B

| APRIL 24, 2013

FOR THE RECORD ||

Aaron Abner Abbott Priest River

Aaron Abner Abbott passed away April 19 at the age of 88. Mr. Abbott was born March 28, 1925, in Osh Gosh, Neb., to David and Abbott Lucinda Abbott. In 1937 the family moved to Priest River where they had a family farm. In 1943 Mr. Abbot joined the Army. He served in World War II, including the campaigns of Ardennes, Rhineland and Central Europe. He was awarded a Distinguished Unit Badge, Victory and Good Conduct Metals, American Theater Service and European African Middle Eastern Service Medals. In1948 he married Midge Gibbs and they had a daughter, Marlene Abbott. In 1954 he married Betty MacLeod and they had six children; Earline, Earl, Johnnie, Abe, Aaron. In 1972 he married Jeanette Krizenesky and they were together for 40 years. Mr. Abbott worked in logging; the ship yards in Portland, Ore., as a welder; and night foreman at Merrit Brothers’ Lumber Co. He was talented with welding and metal work. He built his own wood and metal lathes and drill press. He enjoyed working with his hands. Mr. Abbott also farmed and had his dairy business delivering milk in the early morning hours to all of his customers. He and Jeanette were snowbirds and traveled for many years to the southern states. He loved the outdoors and spent many hours fishing, hunting and camping. He was a member for many years of the American Legion. He was preceded in death by his parents David and Lucinda; sisters Delores, Pauline and Juanita; brothers David and Kenneth; and son Earl. He is survived by his wife Jeanette, daughters Marlene Abbott, Earline (and Carl) Korchinowski, Chiree (and Ed) Nadolski, Pam (and Dennis) Veltri and sons Jonnie (Janice) Abbott, Abe (and Carol) Abbott and Aaron (and Gloria) Abbott; his nephew Roland (and Kathy) McWilliams ; special friends Charlotte Reynoso, Donna Reuter and Janet Enos; 14 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews. A graveside service will be held Thursday, April 25, at 11 a.m. at the Evergreen Cemetery in Priest River. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 2909, 113 Larch St., Priest River, Idaho 83856. Sherman-Knapp Funeral Home in Priest River is in charge of arrangements. Family and friends are invited to sign the online guestbook at www.shermanknapp.com.

Jerald Matthew Castillo Usk

Jerald Matthew Castillo passed away April 13 at the age of 49. Jay was born in Seattle Nov. 9, 1963, to Ernesto Castillo and Harriett Castillo. He is a member of the Castillo Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. He was raised in Mount Lake

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O B I T UA R I E S Terrace, Wash., in the Seattle area. He went to school at Mount Lake Terrace Junior High, got his GED at Seattle Indian Center. He loved listening to music, building models, drawing, being outdoors, reading books, watching sports, visiting with family and friends. He worked for more than 10 years for the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in Usk in the community development department. He was a devoted Dallas Cowboy fan. Castillo was always willing to lend a helping hand to those who needed it, friends and family said. He was a great friend to all who knew him, and he will be missed by all, they added. Survivors include his mother Harriett Conko-Castillo; sisters Carmelita “Carmen” Castillo, Linda Castillo, D Castillo, Gloria BirdCastillo, Evonne Conko; brothers Charles “Arlie” Castillo, Ernie “Butch” Castillo; nieces, Glenda Williams, Aiyana Freelander, Jalyna Castillo; nephews Christopher “William” Goodstriker (and Melissa), Emery “Ems” Williams, Theo Goodstriker, Raymond “Lil Ray” Castillo, and many more nephews, nieces, great-nephews and nieces. He was preceded in death by his father Ernesto Castillo, sister Annette Castillo, and brother Anthony L. Castillo. A Rosary was held on April 18 at Kalispel Community Building in Usk followed by funeral on Friday, April 19 at the Kalispel Cemetery in Usk. Sherman-Knapp Funeral Home in Newport is in charge of arrangements.  Family and friends are invited to sign the online guestbook at www.sherman-knapp.com.

Marie Francis Kinman Newport

Marie Francis (Ratcliff) Kinman passed away from cancer April 19 at the Newport Hospital. She was born on May 24, 1928, at Deaconess Hospital Kinman in Spokane to William F. Harwood and Dorothy Bell. She and her sister, Virginia, lived in Spokane for six years. When their parents divorced Marie and her sister lived with their Grandparents at Jewel Lake. They lived at Jewel Lake until 1939 when their mother married Paul Griesemer and they moved to Priest Lake for one year where their father worked in the woods. They lived in the logging camp for six months and in a house for six months. The girls graduated from the eighth grade at the one-room schoolhouse on Lamb Creek. The family then moved to Priest River where Marie and her sister completed their education. According to Marie’s sister, Virginia, “Marie and I had a great childhood, spending a lot of time with our grandparents at Jewel Lake. We were also very lucky to have Paul Griesemer as our father and he treated us just like we were his own children and showered us with lots of love.” Marie and her sister were very close and did everything together. Virginia loved her sister very much and will miss her dearly, she said. Ms. Kinman had a son, Roger, who was born in May 1945, when she met and married Russ Ratcliff in June 1946 at West Yellowstone, Mont. Work took them onto Leadville, Colo., where their son Wayne was born in October 1946. They

PU B LI C

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24 Tri-County Economic Development District: 11 a.m. - TEDD Conference Room, 986 S. Main, Suite A, Colville THURSDAY, APRIL 25 Public Hospital District No. 1 Board: 4 p.m. - Sandifur Meeting Room, Newport Hospital Pend Oreille County Library District Board: 5 p.m. - PUD Conference Room, Newport Priest River Airport Board: 6:30 p.m. - Priest River City Hall MONDAY, APRIL 29 Pend Oreille County Commissioners: 9 a.m. - Pend Oreille County Courthouse

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TUESDAY, APRIL 30 Bonner County Commissioners: 8:45 a.m. - Bonner County Administrative Building Pend Oreille County Commissioners: 9 a.m. - Pend Oreille County Courthouse Pend Oreille PUD Commissioners: Noon - Box Canyon Dam, Ione WEDNESDAY, MAY 1 Diamond Lake Water and Sewer: 10 a.m. - District Office, 172 South Shore Road Oldtown Urban Renewal District Board: 5:30 p.m. - Oldtown City Hall Fire District No. 4 Commissioners: 6 p.m. - Dalkena Fire Sta-

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then moved to Oakland, Calif., and their daughter, Sharon, was born November 1947. Shortly thereafter they moved back to Grandfather Ratcliff’s farm at Diamond Lake. Their son, Stanley, was born February 1950 and the family moved to a dairy farm on Coyote Trail where they lived for nine years. Ms. Kinman did everything from raising kids to baling hay, cutting and hauling pulpwood. While on the farm, Mickey was born in February 1953, and Darryl was born in August 1955. When the regulations for dairy farming changed, the family sold the farm and moved next door near the cemetery in Newport. While they lived there Melvin was born in March 1960. Ms. Kinman went to work at the Pennell fur farm, and several of her children followed in her footsteps. She divorced in 1969 and then went to work for the Pend Oreille County Road Department in the Engineering Department from which she retired on Sept. 30, 1991. In her retirement she loved to knit, crochet, work in her garden and play cards with her friends. She is survived by her sister, Virginia (and Hensley) Porter; her children Roger (and Lydia) Griesemer, Wayne (and Barbara) Ratcliff, Sharon (and Tom) Shining, Stanley (and Rosemarie) Ratcliff, Mickey (and Lisa) Ratcliff, Darryl (and Laura) Ratcliff, Melvin (and Laura) Ratcliff; 21 grandchildren and 28 great-grandchildren. In lieu of flowers you can make a donation to the Newport Food Bank, P.O. Box 1952, Newport, WA 99156. The memorial service will be at the Newport Cemetery June 1 at 2 p.m., followed by a reception at the Newport Eagles. Sherman-Knapp Funeral Home in Newport is in charge of arrangements. Family and friends are invited to sign the online guestbook at www.sherman-knapp.com.

Shirley Irene Wagner Stephenson Oldtown

Shirley Irene Wagner Stephenson of Oldtown passed away April 17 after an extended illness. She was 74. Her husband of 35 years was by her side. Mrs. Stephenson was born Nov. 11, 1938 in Forsyth, Mont., where she lived until the age of 10. She attended grade school in College Place, Wash., and graduated from Upper Columbia Academy in 1957. She married Ed Hall in 1958 and gave birth to three daughters: Tamara, Terri and Staci. The family lived in Mt. Vernon, Wash., where she attended Skagit Valley Community College and received her licensed practical nurses training. The next move was to Long Creek, Ore., in 1965 where Ed managed a cattle ranch. She adapted quickly to ranch life and caring for cows, chickens and lambs. In 1970 they moved to a larger ranch in Days Creek. The girls had their own horses and loved to ride. The family enjoyed ranch life and the girls couldn’t imagine a better setting for their childhood. Mrs. Stephenson did different jobs while there, including nursing at a local hospital, clinic work, and later managing a medical office. She also was school nurse and cook in the cafeteria at Milo Academy one summer. Students who SEE OBIT, 8B

M E E T I N G S

THE MINER

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tion No. 41 Diamond Lake Improvement Association: 6:30 p.m. - Diamond Lake Fire Station, Highway 2 Sacheen Lake Sewer and Water District Board: 7 p.m. - Sacheen Fire Station, Highway 211

Editor’s note: The police reports, taken from dispatch logs provided to The Miner by law enforcement agencies, are not intended to be an exact report but rather a comprehensive list of police calls in Pend Oreille and West Bonner counties. Dispatch also fields calls for the Kalispel Tribe property in Airway Heights. Certain police calls are generally omitted because of space constraints. These include but aren’t limited to ambulance calls for illness, unfounded alarms, traffic stops, dogs at large, abandoned vehicles, 911 hang–ups and civil standbys. All dispositions for the police reports are assumed to be active, assist or transfer at press time. The police reports are updated each weekday on The Miner Online.

PEND OREILLE COUNTY Monday, April 15 MALICIOUS MISCHIEF – S. Calispell Ave., reports of rocks thrown through multiple windows. IMMIGRATION HOLD – S. Garden Ave, Newport, Jose Luis Vega-Chacon, 24, was held in jail on an immigration hold. BURGLARY – Elmers Loop, Newport, report that the lock was broken off the cabin and items are missing. MALICIOUS MISCHIEF – N. Spokane Ave., Newport, report that vehicle was spray painted overnight. LOST PROPERTY – W. Walnut St., Newport, complainant reports lost a prescription of oxycodone in the parking lot. ARREST – S. Union Ave., Newport, Adam L. Kells, 27, of Newport was arrested on a Department of Corrections detainer. LITTERING – Overlook Drive, Newport, report that a large amount of trash was dumped on the side of the road. THEFT – Hwy. 2, report that wires running power to the fruit stand were stolen again. ARREST – Flowery Trail Rd., Ryan L. Dixon, 22, of Chewelah was arrested on a local warrant. SUSPICIOUS PERSON – Deeter Rd., Newport, person reports being flagged down by male walking. DRIVING WHILE SUSPENDED – N. Warren Ave, Newport, a person was cited and released for driving while suspended. ARREST – Houghton St., Ione, Danny Joe Bingham, 49, of Ione was arrested for resisting arrest and fourth degree assault domestic violence. Tuesday, April 16 SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – S. Union Ave., Newport, respondent saw male subjects in the alley using a sledgehammer on a canopy. THEFT – Monumental Way, Cusick, reported theft of camera. MALICIOUS MISCHIEF – N. Warren Ave., report of spray paint on vehicle overnight BURGLARY – S. Shore Diamond Lake, report of rental property broken into and several items stolen. ERRATIC DRIVER – Hwy. 20, report of white Ford, lane travel erratic. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – S. Garden Ave., report that female wants to speak to a deputy about a vehicle that came to her residence trying to sell vacuum cleaners. JUVENILE PROBLEM – Boundary Rd. S., report that 16-year-old male is throwing items around, broke mirrors. JUVENILE PROBLEM – W. Quail St., Newport, report that young female, about 2 years old, was found in complainant’s yard. JUVENILE PROBLEM – Hwy. 2, respondent said daughter was assaulted by another subject. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – W. 1st St., complainant said truck

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R E P O R T S

and trailer are parked at the gate that goes up to the water tower. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Hwy. 2, report that female came into store, showed clerk mace and made suspicious comment. Wednesday, April 17 THEFT – S. Shore Diamond Lake, reported theft of propane tanks. BURGLARY – Hwy. 20, report of possible burglary. THREATENING – Lone Pine Rd., report that male threatened complainant with a knife. FRAUD – Green Rd., report that check was returned twice, nonsufficient funds. VIOLATION OF PROTECTION ORDER – Regal Rd., report of party in order taking pictures of complainant as she drove past. TRESPASSING – W. Walnut St., Newport, report that male who was trespassed just left. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE VERBAL – S. Newport Ave., report that respondent heard screaming, crying and banging. ARREST – Raymond James Castillo, 19, of Usk was arrested on a warrant. ARREST – Justin David Ackaret, 32, of Deer Park was arrested on a Department of Corrections detainer, for reckless endangerment, criminal trespass and possession of stolen property. ARREST – Charity Mae King, 38, of Newport was arrested for criminal trespass and possession of stolen property. Thursday, April 18 BURGLARY – Bead Lake Rd., equipment shed broken into overnight. PROWLER – Greenhouse Rd., report of prowler overnight. DRUGS – W. 5th St., report of drugs and paraphernalia found. PHONE OFFENSE – Bead Lake Drive, respondent reports getting phone calls from unknown number. WANTED PERSON – Stanley Court., report of attempt to locate subject. JUVENILE PROBLEM – W. 5th St., report of out of control child kicking and hitting mother. THEFT – Elmers Loop, report that diesel fuel and security camera were stolen. WEAPON OFFENSE – Wolfe Mountain Rd., complainant states known male was shooting at him. SUSPICIOUS PERSON – Hwy. 211, report of man on the side of the road bent over holding stomach. TRESPASSING – Hwy. 2, report of trespasser on property. Friday, April 19 BURGLARY – Bayview Rd., report that lake cabin was broken into. TRESPASSING – Hwy. 2, report that male subject back on property and was told last night not to come back. MALICIOUS MISCHIEF – N. 2nd Ave., report that tenant damaged motel room. LITTERING – McCloud Creek Rd., report that garbage was dumped. ARREST – Main St., Peter F. Heinen, 21, of Usk was arrested for malicious mischief. HARASSMENT – E. 4th Ave., report of loud banging and yelling in apartment above. ARREST – W. 7th St., Ancil K. Humphrey II, 50, of Elk was arrested for driving under the influence. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCE – W. 5th St., report that respondent heard banging in the area. INTOXICATION – W. 6th St., report of intoxicated subject walking through the area. Saturday, April 20 SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – W Kelly Drive, report that subject is moving a mobile home out of the park without permits. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES

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– Hwy. 2, respondent believes he found his stolen snow blower from two years ago. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – W. Pine St., Newport ILLEGAL BURNING – Coyote Trail Rd., complainant believes neighbor is burning plastics. ERRATIC DRIVER – Hwy. 2, report of erratic speed and crossing white line many times. DRIVING WHILE SUSPENDED – W. 2nd St., respondent reports suspended driver. THEFT – S. Washington Ave., report of three gas cans taken from front yard. WEAPON OFFENSE – Duck Lane, complainant can hear gunshots in the area. TRESPASSING – S. Central Ave., report of intoxicated person in yard. Sunday, April 21 SUSPICIOUS VEHICLE – E. Circle Drive, Newport, report that black jeep appears to be checking mailboxes. THEFT – W. 6th St., Newport, report that vehicle was broke into last night and the stereo system and amps were stolen. BURGLARY – Davis Rd., Usk, person reports two out buildings were broken into sometime in the last month. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – S. Washington Ave., Newport, report that someone tried to cut the gas line to the complainant’s truck last night. THEFT – S. Washington Ave., Newport, report of tire missing from vehicle overnight. FOUND PROPERTY – W. Pine St., person reports finding a knife in the grass. SUSPICIOUS VEHICLE – Phay Rd., Elk, report of a car with the four-way flashers going has been parked there for a while.

WEST BONNER COUNTY Monday, April 15 DOMESTIC DISPUTE – Jachetta Cutoff, Priest River MISSING PERSON – Hwy. 57, Priest River FIRE – 4th St., Priest River, report of a vehicle fire. Tuesday, April 16 BURGLARY – Eastshore Rd., Coolin ARREST – Hoo Doo Loop, Oldtown, Gilbert Sonntag, 62, of Priest River was arrested for driving under the influence. Wednesday, April 17 ARREST – Hwy. 2, Priest River, Stephanie Ryals, 45, of Sandpoint, was arrested for possession of a controlled substance and driving under the influence. MOTORCYCLE THEFT – Kelso Lake Rd., Priest River DOMESTIC DISPUTE – Glidden Ave., Priest River Thursday, April 18 THEFT – E. Jackson Ave., Priest River Friday, April 19 BURGLARY – Ediah Rd., Spirit Lake DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE – Hwy. 2, Oldtown, report of a DUI driver. BATTERY – Hwy. 2, Oldtown, Audra Baldenegro, 33, of Oldtown, was arrested for aggravated battery. Saturday, April 20 ARREST – Hwy. 2, Oldtown, Levi Jordan Eleazer, 33, of Priest River was arrested for outstanding warrants. ARREST – Meadowdale Ave., Oldtown, Emily M. Sparrow, 31, of Oldtown was arrested for unlawful entry to a vehicle. Sunday, April 21 RECKLESS DRIVING – Hwy. 2, Oldtown

A U C T I O N -BLF3PPTFWFMU7JFX&TUBUFT

M AY 1 7 T H | 1 : 0 0 P M ( P T ) | K E T T L E FA L L S , WA

Two Beautiful Estates located on 20+/- Acres each and Offering Spectacular Views Overlooking Lake Roosevelt 63 Windy Ridge Lane Selling Absolute! | 18 Windy Ridge Lane

Elaine Sutter, WA RE Broker #18411; J.P. King Auction Co, WA RE Firm #2027; Lanny G. Thomas, WA Auctioneer #0002815.


5B

| APRIL 24, 2013

Classifieds



THE MINER

TO PLACE YOUR AD, CALL US TODAY AT (509) 447-2433 All ads appear in

THE NEWPORT MINER [Pend Oreille County]

and GEM

STATE MINER

[West Bonner County]

On the Internet at

www.pendoreillerivervalley.com

2

HELP WANTED

3

NURSE’S AIDE Certified/ Certified Nurse’s Aide to care for elderly diabetic woman weekends and some evenings. Pay is exceptional. Job begins June 1st. Please call (509) 671-3173 or email huntsuzie@ymail.com (12p)

Monday at 4:30 p.m. Late Ads until Tuesday 2:00 p.m. In The Hot Box. First 20 Words plus bold, centered head . $11.00/Week Each Additional Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50¢ ea. Special: 2 Weeks Consecutive Run . . . . 3rd Week Free Hot Box - First 20 Words plus bold, centered head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14.00/Week Each Additional Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65¢ ea. Classified Ads require pre-payment

208-267-7471 1-800-269-7471

• WELL DRILLING • PUMPS • WATER TREATMENT

99% Customer Satisfaction A+ BBB Rating 30+ Years in Business

Free ads

Lic. # FOGLEPS095L4

11

Get fast relief for an upset budget with The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds. They work for others; they’ll work for you! Call (509) 447-2433.

13

13

Statewide Classified

Acceptability

Laundry/Housekeeping Aide PRN position available. Laundry and housekeeping experience in a long-term care facility preferred. Apply to Kathy Best, Director of Housekeeping.

Classified Display Ads

$8.75 Per Inch. Deadline: Monday, 4:30 p.m. Add a color logo or picture .....................$5.00/Week Reach more than 1,100,000 Homes in 115 Washington State Community Newspapers. One Week, up to 25 Words, Prepaid - $195- 25 Words, $8 each additional. •Reach 325,000 Homes in 48 Idaho State Community Newspapers. One Week, up to 25 words prepaid $125. Deadline: 12 days before publication. The Miner reserves the right to edit, reject or reclassify any advertisement.

We offer great pay and benefits to full-time associates in a teamoriented environment.

Corrections

Please check your ad the first time it appears and immediately report any error to the Classified Department. We regret that we cannot be responsible for more than a one-time incorrect insertion if you do not call the error to our attention.

208-265-9299 | 208-265-9710 Fax 1125 N. Division St. Sandpoint, ID 83864 Brenda_Smith@LCCA.com Kathy_Best@LCCA.com Visit us:

LCCA.COM

I N DE X 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Personals Help Wanted Business Services Work Wanted Lost and Found Child Care & Preschool Business Oportunities Misc. For Sale Washington Statewide Advertising 10 Rentals Wanted 11 Housing For Rent 12 Storage For Rent 13 Real Estate For Sale

2

HELP WANTED

NOW HIRING Cooks, servers. Experience preferred. Excellent pay. Pub & Grill at StoneRidge. 355 StoneRidge Road, Blanchard. Apply in person Monday- Friday, 9:00-3:00. (10-3) Get fast relief for an upset budget with The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds. They work for others; they’ll work for you! Call (509) 447-2433.

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

EOE/M/F/V/D – 39719

Real Estate Wanted Mobile/Mfg. Homes Commercial Property Yard Sale Misc. Wanted Boats & Motors Cars & Trucks Motorcycles Recreational Vehicles Machinery, Tractors Logging Timber Farm & Ranch Animals for Sale Notices

2

HELP WANTED

REPORTER For award winning weekly community newspapers. Full time plus medical benefits. Excellent writing and organizational skills. Photography skills a plus. Must work well under deadlines. Send cover letter, resume to: The Miner Newspapers, 421 South Spokane Avenue, Newport Washington 99156 or minernews@povn.com (12tf)

HOUSING FOR RENT

3 BEDROOM TRAILER No pets. Lazy Acres Trailer Park. Newport. (208) 4374502. (7-tf) 2 BEDROOM 1 bath mobile between Priest River and Newport. No pets. Rent negotiable plus deposit. (208) 4374502. (8-tf) 1200 SQUARE FEET Cathedral ceilings. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. First plus deposit, includes water/ sewer/ garbage. Priest River. (208) 448-1823.(9-tf) $569 MONTH In Newport. 2 bedroom remodeled manufactured home. Water, sewer, garbage included. Small pet allowed. Deposit $550. (509) 496-9686. (10-3p) DIAMOND LAKE WATERFRONT On the beach! 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom, 2 car garage, washer and dryer. $800/ month. (509) 951-8886, (509) 447-3670. (10-3p) DOUBLEWIDE 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom, 2 car garage, office, Pend Oreille River lot 12 miles north of Newport. $700/ month plus $600 deposit. Sewer and water paid. No smoking, no pets. (509) 447-4629. (11-3p) TWO BEDROOM 2 bath house in Cusick. $650/ month. Good credit and references required. (801) 835-3440. (12-3p)

Cook Full-time position available. Culinary and/or food services experience in a long-term care facility preferred. Apply to Brenda Smith, Dietary Manager.

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

www.nprents.com

109 E. 5th Ave.

Metaline Falls, WA

(509) 446-4100 1-425-562-4002

www.foglepump.com

All classified ads require pre-payment. We accept Visa and MasterCard.

Northern Pines Real Estate Services 509-447-5922

TDD

(1-800) 533-6518

Payment terms

Need a home? Rental Homes Available

OPPORTUNITY

THE WATER PROFESSIONALS

EOE/M/F/V/D – 39408

HEALTHCARE OPPORTUNITIES Life Care Center of Sandpoint

TENANTS...

EQUAL HOUSING

LCCA.COM.

•Items for Free: One week run only, 20 words or less. Offer limited to One Free Ad per Week. • Found Ads: Items found will be run one time FREE, 20 Words or less.

HOUSING FOR RENT

1 Bedroom Apartments Income Limits Apply

Bill • Ed • Marcus • Ted • Jeff

Vickie O’Connor, 208-265-9299 | 208-265-9710 Fax 1125 N. Division St. Sandpoint, ID 83864 Vickie_O’Connor@LCCA.com Visit us

Rates

11

HOUSING FOR RENT

Kaniksu Village Apartments

Roof & Floor Trusses

Full-time positions available for all shifts. Must be an Idaho-certified nursing assistant. Longterm care experience preferred. We offer great pay and benefits in a teamoriented environment.

Deadlines

Fast, friendly service since 1990

$1000 sign-on bonus!

Mon. thru Fri.., 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. or come in to The Office at 421 S. Spokane Ave., Newport. Mail to 421 S. Spokane Ave., Newport, WA 99156

11

TrussTek

CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANT Life Care Center of Sandpoint

To place your ad, call 447-2433 email: minerclassifieds@povn.com

BUSINESS SERVICES

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

AVAILABLE May 1st, Newport. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, washer/dryer, covered parking, private patio and small yard. $600/ month. Call for information (208) 640-6771. (10-3p)

20

ECONOMICAL 2 bedroom apartment in Newport. Walking distance to all services. All utilities are included. Clean and well maintained. Includes range and refrigerator. No pets. No smoking. $535/ $400 deposit. References and background check required. (208) 660-2164. (11-3) Read The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds.

24

C ARS AND TRUCKS

Middle School Cross Country Coach for 2013-2014 School Year

The Newport School District is accepting applications for the above coaching position. Applications accepted through noon, Tuesday, April 30, 2013. Additional information and applications may be obtained by calling the Newport School District at (509) 447-3167 or by visiting www.newport.wednet.edu Equal Opportunity Employer.

Let us Sell your Car, Truck or RV We charge 10% or a minimum of $200

2006 Dodge Ram 2500 4x4 $26,995 2008 Ford F150 4x4 XLT $21,995 2003 Buick Park Avenue $7,995 1940 Dodge 4D Sedan $5,995 2000 Ford Ranger Pickup 2WD $5,495 1998 Dodge Durango 4x4 $4,995 2003 Ford Focus 4D $4,695 2002 Dodge Intrepid 26K Miles $4,695 1995 Cadillac Deville 96k $3,495 1995 Toyota 4Runner 4x4 $2,995 1995 Buick Lesabre 4D $2,695 1990 Ford F250 4x4 $2,495 2002 Chev Express Van $2,495 1999 Chev Metro 3D $1,995 1994 Ford Cargo Van $1,495 1971 Honda CT 90 Motorcycle $750 2002 Tahoe 25ft Trailer $11,495 1999 Kit 30ft 5th Wheel Trailer $9,995 1995 Layton 5th Wheel Trailer $7,995

24

24

LOGGING TIMBER

LOGGING TIMBER

Need HOP Poles!!

Call today for info

We gladly provide Consultation & Assistance for Manging your Forest Land and Marketing your Logs For information contact

Steve West - (509) 675-3472 Skyler Johnson - (509) 690-3127 James Sheck - (208) 582-2437

Jasper Post Mill, Inc. Buying B i llodge d pole pine. . . Top Prices Paid on 6” & Smaller in Diameter Hwy. 41, Blanchard, Idaho 208•437•4411 or 509•238•6540

Office (509) 738-4711 Fax (509) 738-4716

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY

You too can Advertise Weekly for only $8.00 Call 447-2433 ATTORNEYS Law Office of Denise Stewart

Wills, Trusts, Probate, Medicaid, Business 301 S. Washington Ave., Suite A, Newport, WA (509) 447-3242

CHIROPRACTIC Camas Center Medical & Dental Services Ryan Leisy, DC - (509) 447-7111 1821 N. LeClerc Rd., #1, Cusick, WA 99119

COUNSELING Molly Phillips, LICSW, CMHS, GMHS

Licensed Counselor, Many Insurances Accepted 415 W. Walnut, Newport, WA -- (509) 671-0226

DENTIST

“Your Premier Custom Home Builder”

James G. Cool, D.M.D. Family Dentistry -- Evening Hours 610 W. 2nd -- (509) 447-3105 • 800-221-9929 Complete Family Dentistry & Orthodontics 424 N. Warren Ave., Newport -- 447-5960 Toll Free 877-447-5960

Camas Center Medical & Dental Services 1821 N. LeClerc Rd., #1, Cusick, WA 99119 (509) 447-7111 - (509) 445-1152 fax

Kaniksu Health Services Priest River Medical Clinic

Family Practice, Minor Emergencies Behavioral Health Mon. & Wed., 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tue. & Thu., 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Fri. 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (208) 448-2321

(509) 447-5209 or (509) 671-0171

Camas Center Medical & Dental Services

Owners Bob & Jane Clark Model Home by Appointment Call for Estimates

Purposeful Life Mastery Coaching

Lic. # CLARKC*110CG

Place your classified or display ad with The Miner and it will appear in both newspapers - The Newport Miner (Pend Oreille County) and The Gem State Miner (West Bonner County). All for one good price. Call (509) 447-2433 for details.

WE BUY TIMBER & LOGS

Wayne Lemley, D.D.S.

#1 Home Builder in Newport. 41 Homes built in city since 1974

IN NEWPORT Retired couple will rent lower floor in their home to single person. Furnished bedroom, living room, includes range, refrigerator, television, internet access. No smoking. Personal references. $250. (509) 447-5209, (509) 671-0171. (12-3)

HOUSING FOR RENT

208-437-4011

www.oldtownautos.com

HEALTH CLINICS

Newport School District

RENT: NEWPORT 1 bedroom 1 bath apartment No smoking. No pets. Tenant pays electric. Owner pays water/ sewer/ garbage. $300 deposit, $300/ month. Donna (509) 671-1118. (11-3p) NEWPORT HOUSE Near schools and park. 3 bedroom, 1 bath with carport. $650/ month. 1st and last. $500 damage/ cleaning deposit. No smoking! No pets! Shawgo Brothers, LLC. (509) 550-9083/ (509) 447-2346. (11-3p) METALINE FALLS WASHINGTON Very nice, large 1 bedroom apartment, Jacuzzi tub, dishwasher. Post Office building. Water, sewer, garbage and internet included. $465/ month plus deposit. (208) 610-9220. Other rentals available. (11-3)

HOUSING FOR RENT

303 N. State Ave. • Oldtown

Newport Dental Center

Miner want ads work.

11

Oldtown Auto Sales

CLARK

CONSTRUCTION

LOGGING TIMBER

11

1821 N. LeClerc Rd., #1, Cusick, WA 99119 (509) 447-7111 - (509) 445-1152 fax

HYPNOTHERAPY Dr. Douglas Rigg, P.H.D., CHt Registered Hypnotherapist Stop Smoking, Weight Loss, Motivation Individual and Groups - 509-589-0638

MASSAGE THERAPY Harmony Healing Arts Center Gloria Campbell -- 448-2623 47 10th -- Priest River

Cedar Mountain Massage Therapy

Lois A. Ernst, Licensed Massage Therapist 322 S. Washington -- Newport -- 447-3898

The Willows - Massage & Bodywork Studio Judy C. Fredrickson, RN, LMP Newport -- (509) 671-7035

OPTOMETRIST Newport Vision Source

Drs. Michael & Cheryl Fenno 205 S. Washington -- 447-2945

PHYSICAL THERAPY Priest River Rehab Services

A Service of Bonner General Hospital Tim Gray, P.T. -- 448-4151 Mon.-Wed.-Fri. - 9-5 • Tues. & Thurs. 9-4

Core Physical Therapy

at Club Energy • Newport Gary Schneider PT • (509) 671-3122 Monday thru Friday By Appointment

PODIATRIST -- FOOT SPECIALIST Douglas K. Monson, D.P.M.

Patients seen at Newport Hospital twice a month 509-926-2848 -- Call for appointments

PRINTING Printing & Design . . . at The Miner

We Have a Million Ideas for Our Customers! 421 S. Spokane, Newport -- 447-2433

REAL ESTATE Richard Bockemuehl

Century 21 Beutler - Waterfront Office (509) 321-1121 • Cell (509) 951-4390




THE MINER

12

STORAGE FOR RENT

NEWPORT MINI-STORAGE (509) 447-0119 Enter at Hwy 41 and 1st Street

Lighted & Secure In-Town Location

13

16

NEWPORT 319 South Cass. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 kitchens, attached garage, one storage shed/ garage. Newly refinished wood floors, newly painted inside and out. Reduced price- asking $94,000.00. (509) 4451153. (10-3p)

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY in strip mall. Available immediately. 1200 square feet, 301 West Spruce Street, Newport. Lease negotiable. (509) 954-8467 or (509) 747-7134. (12-6p)

ADOPTION

EVENTS-FESTIVALS

FINANCIAL

ADOPT: Loving Family longs to provide Everything for 1st baby. Beaches, Laughter, Financial Security. Tina 1-800-933-1975. Expenses paid.

Miner want ads work.

Miner want ads work.

ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details. Miner want ads work.

LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (425) 803-9061. www.fossmortgage.com

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

9

APRIL 24, 2013 |

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

9

WASHINGTON STATEWIDE ADS

9

WASHINGTON STATEWIDE ADS

9

WASHINGTON STATEWIDE ADS

WASHINGTON STATEWIDE ADS

BAJILLIONS STILL AVAILABLE for good R.E. Contracts, Notes and Annuities. Receiving Payments? It may be time to give us a call. Skip Foss 800-6373677. Read The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds.

6B

9

WASHINGTON STATEWIDE ADS

HELP WANTED -DRIVERS WE VALUE our drivers as most Important Asset! You make us successful! Top Pay/Benefits Package! CDL-A Required. Join our team Now! 1-888-4144467. www.gohaney.com

BUSINESS DIRECTORY Give your important Business Message 100% Market Coverage in 3 publications for only $14.50 a week

Accounting/Tax Service

Animal Boarding

218 High St. Priest River, ID 208-448-2941

Automotive

Automotive

Specializing in Social Security & Personal Injury FREE Initial Consultation

Professional Dog & Cat Grooming Dog & Cat Boarding and Daycare “Your Pets Home Away From Home” 1335 HWY. 2 EAST, OLDTOWN, ID

50%

509-462-0827

10 Minute Oil Change

No Appointment Necessary Free Vacuum & Window Wash

OFF Wills

(509) 447-0120

We Offer: • Brakes • Engine • Air Conditioning Performance • Oil Changes • Electronics • Engine Repair • Diagnostics • Transmission • Steering & Repair Suspension • Full Service • Exhaust Service Mon-Fri 8am-5pm

Hwy. 2, South of Newport

40 High St., Priest River, ID 208-448-0112

Communication

Concrete

Construction

Construction

Construction

William Thompson

Spokane Rock Products

CLARK CONSTRUCTION

On Budget On Time EVERY TIME!

Concrete • Sand • Gravel

#1 Home Builder in Newport.

Jody R. Blakley General Contractor

39102 N. Newport Hwy.

(509) 292-2200

Owners Bob & Jane Clark

Dog Boarding

Electrical Services

Event Planning/Rentals

Equipment

Alluring Events

BONNER SAW & POWER EQUIPMENT

Send your dogs to the Farm to play while you are away!

We are celebrating 10 years of service for Pets and People, Too!

Elk, Washington

RCE

River City Electrical

Quality Electrical Services at affordable prices

FREE Estimates Matt Dahlin

41 Homes built in the city since 1974

509-447-5209 or (509) 671-0171 Lic. # CLARKC*110CG Model Home By Appointment

Sarah Webb Complete Event

• Coordination • Rentals • Linens • Chair Covers • Creative Design • Fresh Floral

Specializing in Custom & Log Home Construction “Lodge Logs” Log Home Dealer Foundations, Framing, Siding, Roofing, Decks, ETC. www.dependable-contracting.com

Jim 208-660-9131 ID#RCE-1494

WA #DEPENCI913N4

208-691-7670 www.generaljody.com ID: RCE-32759

WA: BLAKLCC880MC

Flood Services

WATER

CLEAN-UP DRY OUT RESTORE

Open: Tuesday - Friday 8:30-5:30 Saturday 8:30-2:00 Closed Sunday & Monday

Floors & More, Inc Husqvarna • Jonsered and Echo Chain Saws 682 High St., Priest River (208) 448-1522

Operating Since 1980 Professional, Experienced, Friendly Service Clean, Inspect, Masonry Repair Licensed and Bonded

Cliff McDermeit 23810 E. Blanchard Rd., Newport

509- 447-2244

www.jakescimneysweep.com

Contracting

Digital Photos

Stutes Construction

Do-It-Yourself Digital Photo Center 4x6 30¢ 5x7 79¢ 8x10 $249 CD $149

The Remodeling Specialists!

Inc.

Custom Homes

750 Kootenai Cut Off Road Ponderay ID 83852 Phone: 208-263-4867 william.r.thompson@ftr.com www.frontier.com

Dog Boarding & Training

Jake’s Chimney Sweep

Licensed in Washington and Idaho

1707 W. Broadway, Spokane, WA www.deissnerlaw.com

CHANDREA FARMS

Kevin Johnson 24/7 Emergency Service 208-255-9580

• General Contractor • Roofing • Siding • Room Additions • Decks • Foundations • Manufactured Home Set-up 208-448-1869 208-660-4087 Harold Stutes Priest River

Ben Franklin “Our Variety Shows”

ID License # RCT-1510 WA License # STUTEC *92306

Oldtown, ID • (208) 437-4822

Flood Services

Florist Florist

HOUSE FLOODED - BROKEN PIPE?

Flood Dryout Services Mold Inspection & Remediation Remodeling & Repairs Friendly Pre Purchase Home Inspections Insurance Claims Consulting Brooks Swanson (CMI) (CMRC) General Contractor RCT-13983

www.chandreafarms.com

Lic# RIVERCE886B7

(509) 475-6476 alluringevents@live.com www.alluring-events.com

Florist

Fuel

Fuel

Glass

Health Foods

Heating/AC

PRIEST RIVER FAMILY OIL

Priest River Glass

MOUNTAIN HARVEST HEALTH FOODS

Rob’s Heating & Cooling

Cell 509-710-8939 Newport

Floral Plants Gifts Home Decor

Fleur de Lis Floral & Home

125 N. Washington Ave., Newport

509-447-4416

Heating/AC Complete Heating, Cooling & Duct Systems

(509) 671-2276

Delivering Propane & Fuel to All of Pend Oreille & Bonner Counties! Call us today!

208-437-3513

(208) 448-1439

24 hr. Commercial/Public Card Lock Fuels INCLUDE: • Highway Diesel • Off-Road Diesel • Unleaded Gasoline HOME DELIVERIES INCLUDE: • Stove Oil • Furnace Oil • Highway Diesel • Off-Road Diesel • Unleaded Gasoline Propane, Lubricants, Filters and Fuel Additives Available On-Site

2459 Hwy.2 • Oldtown

218 Cedar St. Priest River, ID 208-448-1812

Insurance

Internet

The Amanda Kasper Agency Amanda Kasper

MPA, BA Agent/Owner

Gas Fireplaces & Inserts

Office [509] 255-3250 Mobile [720] 883-4250

EVERYTHING INTERNET

WiFi - $36.95/Month Dial UP - Web Services Internet Telephone No contract required

Priest River

amandakasper509@gmail.com

(509) 447-3067 or 1-888-800-POVN (7686)

Recycling

Sawmilling

Storage

CASH REWARD  LEAD  BRASS  COPPER  ALUMINUM  STAINLESS STEEL ACTION Recycling/ Phoenix Metals, Inc.

ES

TOP PRIC PAID

E. 911 Marietta (East of Hamilton) (509) 483-4094 Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Veterinarian

Mountain Mobile Sawmilling at Your Site!

208-304-3966 Save money by turning your logs into valuable lumber Call Matt Lemas for an Estimate

Well Drilling

THE ANIMAL DOCTOR Quality veterinary care for your pets and barnyard friends.

Dan Herrin D.V.M. (208) 437-2800

217 N State Ave. Oldtown, ID

Chimney Sweep

Attorney at Law

(208) 437-0224

General Manager Montana & Northern Idaho

Carpet

Dustin Deissner

Office Services • Affordable Tax Service • Any Size Business • Bookkeeping • Payroll, Taxes

Attorney

5 Sizes

Resident Manager Highway 57 ~ 1 1/2 Miles from Hwy. 2 (208) 448-1273

Wrecking Yard

Priest River

Mon. - Fri. 9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

robs-heating-cooling@hotmail.com

1-800-858-5013

208-448-2095 100 McKinley • Priest River

LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED WA & ID

Landscaping/Yard Services

Painting

Plumbing

Need dependable help with YARDWORK?

LIBERTY PAINTING

KARDOS

208-448-2511 WA. Contr. No. PRIESRG132NZ

• Mowing • Trimming • Cleanup • Pruning • Flower Beds • Sprinkler Repair

Richard 16 years experience

Wild Coyote

Well Drilling & Pump Service Since 1964

Bus: 208-437-4168 Cell: 208-946-6944 stevepitts@verizon.net

Priest River

Flowers Plants Chocolates Balloons Tuxedos Gifts

Heating/AC

• Heat Pumps • Geothermal

WINDSHIELDS WHILE-U-WAIT Mon-Fri. 7-5 Sat 8-12

Traditions

208-448-2611 866-973-7673

OWNER/INSTALLER/ SERVICE • Natural & Organic Foods • Herbs, Vitamins & Supplements • Organic Juices & Smoothies

(208) 610-5747 (208) 437-0174

Conscientious & Reliable

Interior Exterior Repaints New Construction

YOUR HEATING COOLING & REFRIGERATION EXPERTS RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL Carrier

• Furnaces • Radiant Heat

Wood Stoves - Gas Stoves - Pellet Stoves & Oil Furnaces Available • We Service All Major Brands • Air Leakage Testing Available

Installations • Service Free Quotes

Bonded • Insured • WA #AMERIEH901G

509-447-4962

24 Hour Service: 509-671-6952

Printing

Printing & Design at the Miner Layout Services to Full Color Printing

509-671-7855 Lic#KARDOP*051K6 KARDOTS055NB

“Where our High Standards Meet Yours” Corner of Hwy 2 & Spokane Ave. (509) 447-2433

208-610-1223

Licensed in WA & ID

Larry Liberty (208) 437-3353

Journeyman Plumber Senior &Vet Discounts

Toilets - Portable

Towing

Towing

Veterinary

Excess

Newport

Royal Towing Newport LLC

PEND OREILLE VETERINARY CLINIC

Portable Chemical Toilets 2654 E. Hwy 2 • Oldtown, ID

• Towing • Lockouts • Jump Starts • Tire Changes • Recovery

Newport

Small & Large Animal Medicine & Surgery Brian Dockins DVM

Lawn Services

Rent by the day, week, biweekly, month

(208) 448-2290 Yard Care

Lady Lawncare

Now Paying Top Dollar for your junkers Cars • Trucks • Machinery

AMERICAN SERVICES

Commercial • Residential

Portable Service

PRIEST RIVER MINI STORAGE

ALLAMA5940N5

(208) 448-2950

Idaho RCE-12308 Washington-FLOORMI974J1

Floral

Is your yard screaming for attention? We’ll scream back at a reasonable rate. 24 Years Experience

Full service yard care & spring cleanup

TERI-FIC AUTO SALVAGE

e Fre tes a m i Est

Newport (509) 447-2487 Chewelah (509) 935-4095

Deb & Debbie 509-710-3976

Towing, LLC

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9

WASHINGTON STATEWIDE ADS

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WASHINGTON STATEWIDE ADS

EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING ATTEND COLLEGE online from home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 866-673-6209. www.CenturaOnline.com FOR SALE MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $3997.00 -- Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills. com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N Place your classified or display ad with The Miner and it will appear in both newspapers - The Newport Miner (Pend Oreille County) and The Gem State Miner (West Bonner County). All for one good price. Call (509) 447-2433 for details.

|| P U B L I C N O T I C E S || Your Right to Know

Your right to know and be informed of the functions of your government are embodied in public notices. In that self-government charges all citizens to be informed, this newspaper urges every citizen to read and study these notices. We strongly advise those citizens seeking further information to exercise their right of access to public records and public meetings. 201399 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE SALE File No.: 7314.01823 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. GMAC Mortgage, LLC Grantee: Gina Tiberino, an unmarried person Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 20090303525 re-recorded on 1/06/2011 under Auditors File Number 20110307468

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant womenandpeoplesecuring custody of children under 18. The newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising or real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800927-9275. (31tf)

to correct Trustee Tax Parcel ID No.: 453113580020 Abbreviated Legal: PTN Lots 1 & 2, Blk 4, Laurelhusrt Add to Town of Newport Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877894-4663). Web site: http:// www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/post_ purchase_counselors_ foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Tollfree: 1-800-569-4287. Web site: http://www.hud.gov/ offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=s earch&searchstate=WA&f ilterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice. org/what-clear. I. On May 3, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Hall of Justice, 229 South Garden Avenue in the City of

BLANKET WASHINGTON

|| Newport, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Pend Oreille, State of Washington: Lots 1 and 2, EXCEPT the west 72 feet of said two lots, in Block 4, Laurelhurst Addition to the town of Newport, according to the recorded plat thereof, Pend Oreille County, Washington; Together with the West half of the vacated alley adjoining said lots. Commonly known as: 820 West Spruce Street Newport, WA 99156 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 10/26/09, recorded on 11/02/09, under Auditor’s File No. 2009-0303525 rerecorded on 1/06/2011 under Auditors File Number 20110307468 to correct Trustee, records of Pend Oreille County, Washington, from Gina Tiberino, an unmarried person, as Grantor, to Pend Oreille Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for American Financial Resources, Inc., a New Jersey Corporation, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for American Financial Resources, Inc., a New Jersey Corporation its successors and assigns to GMAC Mortgage, LLC, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 20120312782. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 12/18/2012 Monthly Payments $19,826.68 Late Charges $792.92 Lender’s Fees & Costs $158.50 Total Arrearage $20,778.10 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $725.00 Title Repor t $576.74 Statutory Mailings $10.00 Recording Costs $15.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,396.74 Total Amount Due: $22,174.84 IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $136,829.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 04/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition

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of the Property on May 3, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 04/22/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 04/22/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 04/22/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Gina Tiberino aka Gina Elizabeth Guay 820 West Spruce Street Newport, WA 99156 Unknown Spouse and/or Domestic Partner of Gina Tiberino aka Gina Elizabeth Guay Newport, WA 99156 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 10/31/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 10/31/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www. USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 12/18/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997

THE MINER

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Contact: Nanci Lambert (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7314.01823) 1002.232359File No. Published in The Newport Miner April 3 and 24, 2013. (9,12)

________________ 2013116 PUBLIC NOTICE In the Superior Court of the State of Washington for the County of Pend Oreille SHARI JAYLENE HICKS, PETITIONER, vs. DAVID NOEL HICKS, RESPONDENT. Cause No. 01-3-000047 The State of Washington to the said Shari Jaylene Hicks: You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this motion, to wit, within sixty days after the 10th day of April, 2013, and defend the above-entitled action in the above-entitled court, and answer the motion of the respondent David Noel Hicks and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorneys for respondent David Noel Hicks, at her office below stated; and in case of your failure so to do, relief will be granted according to the motion, which has been filed with the clerk of said court to modify and terminate order for protection. EOWEN S. ROSENTRATER 108 N. Washington St., Suite 402 Spokane, WA 99201 Published in The Newport Miner April 10, 17, 24, May 1, 8 and 15, 2013. (10-6)

_________________ 2013118 IN THE SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON In and for the County of Spokane No.: 13-4-00480-3 Probate Notice to Creditors In the Estate Of: Sheehan Greis, Deceased The person named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this Estate. Any person having a claim against the Decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the Court. The claim must be presented within the later of: 1) thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.40.020(3); or 2) four months after the date of first publication of the Notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the Decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: APRIL 10, 2013 (Pend Oreille County) PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: ROBIN AHRENS DATED this 10th day of April 2013. MALPASS LAW OFFICE, P.S. Lisa Malpass Childress, WSBA #34057 Attorney for Personal Representative 1212 N. Washington, Suite 120 Spokane, WA 99201

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Published in The Newport Miner April 10, 17 and 24, 2013. (10-3)

_________________ 2013121 PUBLIC NOTICE The meeting day of the Pend Oreille County Fire District #6 Commissioners shall be changed from 7:00 P.M. on the second Monday of the month to 7:00 P.M. on the 2nd Tuesday of the month. Meeting to be held at the 7572 LeClerc Road Station, Newport, WA 99156. Meeting will revert to original day of 7:00 P.M. on the second Monday for the August meeting. Published in The Newport Miner April 17 and 24, 2013. (11-2)

_________________ 2013123 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PEND OREILLE Case No.: 13-4-00014-1 Probate Notice to Creditors (RCW 11.40.030) In the Estate of: Dorothy Lydia Frost, Deceased. The person named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this Estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner provided by RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representatives or the Personal Representatives’ attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim; and filing the original of the claim with the Court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the Personal Representatives served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW 11.040.020(1) (c); or (2) Four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. Date of First Publication: April 17, 2013 Personal Representatives: Kenneth Smith Attorney for Personal Representatives: Linda J. Mathis Address for Mailing or Service: 301 W. Spruce St., Suite B, Newport, WA 99156 /s/ Linda J. Mathis Linda Mathis Attorney for Personal Representative WSBA #16495 301 W. Spruce St., Suite B Newport, WA 99156 (509) 447-5929, Fax: (509) 447-5858 Published in The Newport Miner April 17, 24 and May 1, 2012. (11-3)

_________________ 2013122 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE SALE File No.: 7037.94834 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Grantee: Dennis W Schmidt and Margaret A Schmidt, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2009 0300232 Tax Parcel ID No.: 453130020002 Abbreviated Legal: GOV’T LOT 2 LESS E 400 FT S OR RD & WILSON’S Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR

HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/ consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287. Web site: http://www.hud. gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/ index.cfm?webListAction= search&searchstate=WA& filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice. org/what-clear. I. On May 24, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Hall of Justice, 229 South Garden Avenue in the City of Newport, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Pend Oreille, State of Washington: That portion of Government Lot 2 in Section 30, Township 31 North, Range 45 East of the Willamette Meridian, Pend Oreille County, Washington, lying South of Deer Valley Road, except the East 400 feet of said Government Lot 2. Commonly known as: 6972 Deer Valley Road Newport, WA 991568727 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 01/07/09, recorded on 01/14/09, under Auditor’s File No. 2009 0300232, records of Pend Oreille County, Washington, from Dennis W Schmidt and Margaret A Schmidt, husband and wife, as Grantor, to Pend Oreille Title Company, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. solely as nominee for Freedom Mortgage Corporation, its successors and assigns, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Freedom Mortgage Corporation, its successors and assigns to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, under an Assignment/Successive Assignments recorded under Auditor’s File No. 20120311971. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following

amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 01/09/2013 Monthly Payments $32,107.21 Lender’s Fees & Costs $560.35 Total Arrearage $32,667.56 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $543.75 Recording Costs $17.00 Total Costs $560.75 To t a l A m o u n t D u e : $33,228.31 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $175,862.75, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 02/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on May 24, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 05/13/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 05/13/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 05/13/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Dennis W Schmidt 6972 Deer Valley Road Newport, WA 99156 Margaret A Schmidt 6972 Deer Valley Road Newport, WA 99156 Dennis W Schmidt 6931 Deer Valley Road Newport, WA 99156 Margaret A Schmidt 6931 Deer Valley Road Newport, WA 99156 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 06/20/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 06/20/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the CONTINUED ON 8B


THE MINER



Commission approves hunting rules OLYMPIA – The Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission adopted 17 new hunting rules during a public meeting April 1213 in Olympia. The commission, a ninemember panel appointed by the governor to set policy for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), approved the new hunting rules after holding a public hearing March 1 in Moses Lake and reviewing written comments received earlier this year. One new regulation approved by the commission will allow bow hunters to use electronically illuminated arrow nocks, which can be helpful in finding and retrieving arrows. Other new rules will: Restore archery hunts for antlerless elk in Yakima County, specifically in game management units 352 (Nile) and 356 (Bumping). Expand the boundaries of Elk Area 4941 to help address elk-damage issues in the Skagit River Valley. Rescind the five special hunting permits previously available for the Tieton bighorn sheep herd, which WDFW recently eliminated to prevent the spread of a deadly outbreak of pneumo-

|| CONTINUED FROM 7B Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www. USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 01/09/2013 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.94834) 1002.220339File No. Published in The Newport Miner April 24 and May 15, 2013. (12, 15)

_________________ 2013126 SUPERIOR COURT, STATE OF WASHINGTON, COUNTY OF SPOKANE No. 13-4-00412-9 Amended Probate Notice to Creditors RCW 11.40.030 In the Matter of the Estate of: ROY EUGENE SIMS, Deceased. The personal representative named below has been appointed as personal representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the personal representative or the personal representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the court. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) Thirty days after the

nia. Restrict importation of dead game animals from Missouri, Texas and Pennsylvania, which are among a number of states with deer and elk populations known to harbor chronic wasting disease. All 17 hunting rules approved by the commission will be included in the 2013 Big-Game Hunting pamphlet.

|| SPORTS || SCOREBOARD FROM PAGE 3B

BOWLING THURSDAY, APRIL 18 Thursday Niters Team OH $#!+ OK Lanes Wilkinson Rental Country Lane Club Rio Pooch Parlor 4 Amigos Plain Nasty’s Wanna Bees

Won 84 72.5 69.5 64.5 63 57 52.5 49

Lost 44 55.5 58.5 63.5 65 71 75.5 79

High score game team: OK Lanes 686. High handicap game team: 4 Amigos 865. High score series team: OK Lanes 1,904. High handicap series team: Wanna Bees 2,475. High score game: John Bushby 215, Evie Logan 185. High handicap game: Gordon Batsch 257, Evie Logan 243. High score series: John Bushby 632, Evie Logan 522. High handicap series: Gordan Batsch 693, Evie Logan 696. Converted splits: Pinky Ownbey 5-6, Shirley Ownbey 5-7.

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personal representative served or mailed the notice to the creditor as provided under RCW11.40.020(3); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. The bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and nonprobate assets. The initial Probate Notice to Creditors RCW 11.40.030 had the date of First Publication as March 28, 2013. The date is Amended to be : April 24, 2013. /s/ Alica Sims Alica Sims Personal Representative Address: P.O. Box 1393 The Dalles, OR 97058 Douglas, Eden, Phillips DeRuyter & Stanyer, P.S. /s/ Brent T. Stanyer Brent T. Stanyer Attorney for Personal Representative 717 West Riverside Avenue, Suite 1500 Spokane, WA 992013923 Published in The Newport Miner April 24, May 1 and 8, 2013. (12-3)

_________________ 2013127 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Pend Oreille County did on April 22nd, 2013, receive a complete application from Steve & Doreen Robbins requesting a variance from the Pend Oreille County Building Regulations (Chapter XX.84), to construct an addition to a single family residence and a garage closer than five feet to the side property line. This proposal is substantially different from the previous variance application submitted in 2012. The Pend Oreille County building regulations require all structures to be placed/ constructed at least 5 feet from the side property line. location: Tax 6 Lot 18; Within Sec. 1, T30N, R44E, WM (111 Woodland Dr.). Any person desiring to express their views or to be notified of the action taken on this application should contact the Community Development Dept. A copy of the complete file may be examined by the public between 8:00 AM & 4:30 PM at the Courthouse, Lower Level, 625 West 4th,

APRIL 24, 2013 |

|| have learned of her death have commented about what a great cook she was. After separation from her husband, she and the girls moved to Tillamook, Ore., where she was a special duty nurse. It is not surprising that she chose that location; she has always loved the ocean. Some time later at a UCA reunion, Prince Stephenson and Shirley became reacquainted and were married 42 days later. Prince saw a good thing and didn’t waste any time claiming it, family said. The two families merged nicely and have fond memories of times together. Shirley and Prince lived in Coeur d’Alene before moving to the Priest Lake/Oldtown area. She adapted well to the early hours of a logger. She told her sister many times that being married to Prince made her know what it was like to be really loved. They have had a wonderful relationship, and Prince cared for her so tenderly throughout her illness, family said. Mrs. Stephenson had many interests. She loved her church and enjoyed serving in any capacity. She loved her garden and her yard. She loved flowers and always had many varieties in her yard. She enjoyed cooking and collecting recipes. Tea parties and Sabbath dinners with company were always fun for her. She collected shoes, both in her size and in miniature. But her favorite collection, after tea

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Newport, WA 99156, (509) 447-4821. Contact: Mike Lithgow, Community Development Director. Written comments from the public may be submitted to the County no later than 4:30 PM May 9th, 2013 after which a public hearing will be held at 6:00pm May 14th 2013 in Cusick at the Community Center. Dated: April 22nd, 2013 Published in The Newport Miner April 24, 2013. (12)

_________________ 2013128 NOTICE OF APPLICATION AND ACTION Pursuant to 43.21C RCW, notice is hereby given that Pend Oreille County did on April 22, 2013 receive a complete SEPA Environmental Checklist with supplemental documents (Site Plans) prepared for the Dawson Landing Expansion Project. Locations: 116 Elizabeth Ave., Ione, WA 99139. Any person desiring to express their views or to be notified of the action taken on this application should contact the County Community Development Dept. Pend Oreille County has reviewed the proposed project for probable adverse environmental impacts and expects to issue a Determination of Nonsignificance (DNS) for this project. The optional DNS process in WAC 19711-355 is being used. This may be your only opportunity to comment on the environmental impacts of the proposed application. Written comments on the SEPA checklist must be submitted to Pend Oreille County no later than May 09, 2013. The submitted application and related documents may be examined by the public between 8:00 AM & 4:30 PM at the County Courthouse, Lower Level, 625 W. 4th, Newport, WA 99156, (509) 447-4821 and is available on the Pend Oreille County website: www.pendoreilleco.org. Contact: Todd McLaughlin, Natural Resource Planner, tmclaughlin@pendoreille. org. Required Permit(s): Grading and Fill Permit (POC) Date of permit application: April 22, 2013 Date of determination of completeness: April 22, 2013 Date of notice of application and action: April

22, 2013 Published in The Newport Miner April 24 and May 1, 2013. (12-2)

_________________ 2013129 NOTICE OF APPLICATION AND ACTION Pursuant to 43.21C RCW, notice is hereby given that Pend Oreille County did on April 22, 2013 receive a complete SEPA Environmental Checklist with supplemental documents (JARPA, Design Report, Site Plans) prepared for the Pend Oreille PUD #1 Stream Habitat Restoration Projects. Locations: Middle Branch LeClerc Creek, White Man Creek, and North Fork Calispell Creek. Any person desiring to express their views or to be notified of the action taken on this application should contact the County Community Development Dept. Pend Oreille County has reviewed the proposed project for probable adverse environmental impacts and expects to issue a Determination of Nonsignificance (DNS) for this project. The optional DNS process in WAC 19711-355 is being used. This may be your only opportunity to comment on the environmental impacts of the proposed application. Written comments on the SEPA checklist must be submitted to Pend Oreille County no later than May 09, 2013. The submitted application and related documents may be examined by the public between 8:00 AM & 4:30 PM at the County Courthouse, Lower Level, 625 W. 4th, Newport, WA 99156, (509) 447-4821 and is available on the Pend Oreille County website: www.pendoreilleco.org. Contact: Todd McLaughlin, Natural Resource Planner, tmclaughlin@pendoreille. org. Required Permit(s): Critical Areas Approval (POC), Hydraulic Project Approval (WDFW), Section 401 (WA DOE), Federal Authorization (USACE & USFS) Date of permit application: April 22, 2013 Date of determination of completeness: April 22, 2013 Date of notice of application and action: April 22, 2013 Published in The Newport Miner April 24 and May 1, 2013. (12-2)

O B I T UA R I E S

pots and tea cups, was anything strawberry – dishes, canisters, towels, rugs, pictures, anything with a strawberry was hard for her to pass, and was a thankful gift to her. Her final months were spent at Aspen Springs Assisted Living where she received excellent care from the staff there. She enjoyed many visits from friends while there. The Newport Seventh-day Adventist Church was so attentive to her needs while still at home – visiting, bringing meals, cleaning house, helping with firewood, providing transportation, and frequent phone calls. Bonner County Hospice has been wonderful tender support for Shirley and Prince, family added. They give thanks to the Newport Church and to Ann, Lisa, Andy and Pat of Hospice. Mrs. Stephenson is survived by her loving husband of 35 years, William “Prince” Stephenson; her mother, Pearl Cullen; her sisters Diane Wagner Wells and Dorothy Wagner Snodgrass; her brothers Robert Wagner and Lloyd Wagner; her daughters Tamara Hall da Silva and Terri Hall Haskins; her stepchildren William Stephenson and Margee Stephenson Llewellyn; nine grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her father, Eugene Wagner, and her youngest daughter, Staci Hall Burnham. Memorial services will be held on Saturday, April 27 at 4 p.m. at the Newport Seventh-day Adventist Church, 777 Lilac Lane, in Newport. The family asks that memorial contributions in her name be sent to Laymen Ministries of St. Maries, 414 Zapada Road, St. Maries, Idaho 83861. Sherman-Knapp Funeral Home in Newport is in charge of arrangements. Family and

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friends are invited to sign the online guestbook at www.shermanknapp.com.

Alvan “Al” Whittekiend Newport

Alvan “Al” C. Whittekiend passed away April 4 at the age of 63. He was born Sept. 13, 1949. He was retired from the U.S. Army Special Forces Whittekiend CW4, Rangers, Combat Dive and Combat Dive Supervisor trainer and assaulter C/3/7 SFG, quiet professional. He also worked for the U.S. Department of State Narcotics Affairs Section in Lima, Peru. Family said they will remember him for his kind and steadfast love and devotion to his wife Erika and their three boys, the respect and attention he displayed to all of his family, friends, fellow NAS workers and SF brothers. He loved working Tarapoto farm and looked forward to beating cancer so he could teach sons to fish in the Northwest. Whittekiend was preceded in death by his father Forest and brother Glenn. He is survived by loving wife Erika and precious sons Les, 13, Forest, 9, and Glenn, 7. Also surviving him his his mother Jeannette, Momita Cleme, Papito Miguel, brother Les (and Marie), sister Cheryl (and Michael), brother Virgil, and seven nieces and nephews. A memorial was held at Crossover Church, 16825 N. Highway 2 Saturday April 20. Sherman-Knapp Funeral Home in Newport is in charge of arrangements. Family and friends are invited to sign the online guestbook

T H E

W E E K

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24 Rotary Club: 7:15 a.m. - Oldtown Rotary Park Overeaters Anonymous: 7:30 a.m. - Pineridge Community Church, 1428 W. First St., Newport, use back entrance Newport TOPS: 9 a.m. - Newport Eagles Fiber Arts Knitting and Spinning Group: 9 a.m. Create Arts Center, Newport Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Blanchard Library Weight Watchers: 11 a.m. Weigh in and 11:30 to Noon meeting - Camas Center for Community Wellness, Usk Priest River Lioness: 11:30 a.m. - Priest River Senior Center Al-Anon: Noon - American Lutheran Church Sacheen Ladies of the Lake: Noon - Various Locations, call President Maria Bullock at 509-998-4221 Pinochle: 1 p.m. - Priest River Senior Center Priest River TOPS: 6 p.m. - Priest River Free Methodist Church Spirit Lake Historical Society: 6:30 p.m. - Call 208623-5626 for locations Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. - Hospitality House in Newport THURSDAY, APRIL 25 Priest River Food Bank Open: 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Priest River Senior Center Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Priest River Library Crime Stopper Tips: 11 a.m. - American Lutheran Church, Newport Open Painting Workshop: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. - Create Arts Center, Newport Duplicate Bridge: 12:30 p.m. - Hospitality House in Newport Loosely Knit: 1-3 p.m. - Calispel Valley Library, Cusick After School Readers Club: 3 p.m. - Priest River Library Celebrate Recovery: 5:30 p.m. - 754 Silverbirch Lane, Oldtown, House of the Lord Pinochle: 6 p.m. - Hospitality House in Newport Pend Oreille Kids Club: 6 p.m. - Pend Oreille Mennonite Church Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. - Blanchard Community Church FRIDAY, APRIL 26 Blanchard TOPS: 8:30-10 a.m. - Blanchard Community Church PRM-Advocates for Women: 9:30-11 a.m. - Cornerstone Mall, Oldtown Story Time: 11 a.m. - Newport Library Happy Agers Meeting and Potluck: Noon - Priest River Senior Center Tracey Singer in Concert: 6:30 p.m. - Circle Moon Theater ‘Alice in Wonderland’: 7 p.m. - Pend Oreille Playhouse, Newport Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting: 7 p.m. Priest River VFW Al-Anon: 7-8 p.m. - 119 Main St., Suite 204, Room 16, Priest River. Call Jan 208-946-6131 SATURDAY, APRIL 27 Women’s AA: 9:30 a.m. - Create Arts Center, Newport Pinterest Party: 10 a.m. - Calispel Valley Library Evergreen Art Juried Show: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. - Create Arts Center Healthy Habits, Healthy Lives Wellness Fair: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. - Newport Hospital

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at www.sherman-knapp.com.

Christy Ann Martin Newport

Christy Ann Martin passed peacefully at home near Newport, surrounded by her loving husband and daughters April 15, after a courageous battle with cancer. She Martin was 60. Mrs. Martin was born May 10, 1952, to Walt and Helen Winter of Odessa, Wash. A self taught artist from an early age, she has always amazed family and friends with her endless talents – from her beautiful paintings and handiwork, her love of gardening and amazing work with irises, to her magic in the kitchen. She was a warm and loving soul, who even in her battle with cancer, found the time to make hats for others fighting the disease. Family said they will cherish the memories and lessons she has left us with, and not be saddened when we think of her. “She has not left us, only gone on ahead of us,” they said. She was preceded in death by her sister, Donna, and her brother, Neil, as well as many friends and family. There will be a celebration of her life May 11 at her home. Family and friends are welcome to come and join in the celebration her amazing life, they said. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to: Priest River Animal Rescue, Baskets for Babies, or the Newport Food Bank. Sherman-Knapp Funeral Home in Newport is in charge of arrangements. Family and friends are invited to sign the online guestbook at www.sherman-knapp.com.

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Happy Agers Card Party: 1 p.m. - Priest River Senior Center AA Meeting: 5 p.m. - Cornerstone Building, Selkirk Way, Oldtown Set Free Northwest Meal and Worship: 6:30 p.m. Conerstone Building Behind Ace Hardware, Oldtown ‘Alice in Wonderland’: 7 p.m. - Pend Oreille Playhouse, Newport Distinguished Young Women Scholarship Program: 7 p.m. - Priest River Junior High SUNDAY, APRIL 28 Evergreen Art Juried Show: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. - Create Arts Center ‘Alice in Wonderland’: 3 p.m. - Pend Oreille Playhouse, Newport Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. - Hospitality House MONDAY, APRIL 29 Country Breakfast: 7-11 a.m. - Blanchard Community Center Evergreen Art Juried Show: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. - Create Arts Center Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. - Blanchard Community Church Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. - Pend Oreille Bible Church in Cusick TUESDAY, APRIL 30 Evergreen Art Juried Show: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. - Create Arts Center Weight Watchers: 5:30-6 p.m. Weigh in and 6 p.m. meeting - Pineridge Community Church, 1428 W. First St., Newport Pinochle: 6 p.m. - Calispel Valley Library, Cusick Priest River Museum Mystery Dinner: 6 p.m. Beardmore Building Bingo: 6:30 p.m. - Newport Eagles Belly Dance Fitness: 6:30-7:30 p.m. - Create Arts Center, Newport Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. - St. Anthony’s Church WEDNESDAY, MAY 1 Rotary Club: 7:15 a.m. - Oldtown Rotary Park Overeaters Anonymous: 7:30 a.m. - Pineridge Community Church, 1428 W. First St., Newport, use back entrance Fiber Arts Knitting and Spinning Group: 9 a.m. Create Arts Center, Newport Newport TOPS: 9 a.m. - Newport Eagles Computer Basics for Adults: 10 a.m. to Noon - Newport Library Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Blanchard Library Weight Watchers: 11 a.m. Weigh in and 11:30 to Noon meeting - Camas Center for Community Wellness, Usk Al-Anon: Noon - American Lutheran Church Pinochle: 1 p.m. - Priest River Senior Center Calispel Post 217: 6 p.m. - American Legion in Cusick BASIC Meeting: 6 p.m. - Blanchard Community Center Priest River Animal Rescue: 6 p.m. - 1710 9th St., Priest River Priest River TOPS: 6 p.m. - Priest River Free Methodist Church Pend Oreille Rock and Gem Club: 7 p.m. - 508 Quail Loop, Newport Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. - Hospitality House in Newport


Newport Miner