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The Newport Miner

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THE VOICE OF PEND OREILLE COUNT Y SINCE 1901

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

www.pendoreillerivervalley.com

Volume 110, Number 3 | 2 Sections, 20 Pages

County has more money than anticipated

Receives more than $500,000 last day of year BY DON GRONNING OF THE MINER

NEWPORT – Pend Oreille County ended up with $629,000 more than it budgeted for in 2012, mostly because of a $512,000 payment received Dec. 31, county treasurer Terri Miller said. “Basically, this is like a windfall,” she said. Most of the money – $385,000 – came from deferred sales and use tax from a large project and covered about an eight-year period, she said. On big projects, a business can defer paying a sales and use tax until the end of the project, which is what happened, she said. Instead of having $620,000 remaining in the current expense fund for 2012, the county had nearly

$1.25 million. ticipated sales and use tax money that was probably Other sources included a larger than anticipated coming and they voted in mid December to use the sales and use tax collection and unbudgeted revmoney for cash reserves. The board has also talked enue. about using the funds for building maintenance and The county used $200,000 to bring the cash repair. reserves fund back up to $1 The county also moved some money million. The county set a “Basically, this is like a around in the 2012 and 2013 budgets folgoal of keeping reserves at $1 lowing a public hearing Feb. 5. windfall.” million because that is what “Anytime there are revenues or expenses it costs to cover payroll and that aren’t budgeted, you need a suppleTerri Miller keep the county operating mental budget hearing to make them a part for two months. Because of of the budget,” auditor Marianne Nichols Pend Oreille County Treasurer budget problems, the cash said after the meeting. She said there were flow reserve had dropped to three such hearings for the 2012 budget, $800,000. Some years when including the Feb. 5 hearing. the fund dropped to zero, they would have to borrow Along with Nichols and Miller, Jill Shacklett, data to meet payroll and other expenses. processing coordinator for the auditor’s office, went Miller told the commissioners about some unanover the adjustments with county commission-

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ers Mike Manus and Steve Kiss during the Feb. 5 hearing. County commissioner Karen Skoog was in Olympia testifying before the Legislature. Nobody from the public showed up at the meeting and testified. Following the hearing, commissioners passed resolutions to change both the 2012 and 2013 budgets. For 2012, the county used $99,500 from the current expense fund to pay loans made to other funds, including $25,000 to growth management and $50,000 to emergency management services. The county used a $4,000 water trails grant from the Economic Development Council to pay for office supplies and things such as signs for the Pend Oreille River water trail. An additional $400 was used to pay for personnel SEE COUNTY, 2A

Emergency helicopters now land at PNC PNC’s landing pad is lighted 24 hours a day and is kept plowed of snow in the winter. USK – Emergency medical Pearman compiled the GPS locahelicopters can now land at tion, photos and a list of hazPonderay Newsprint near Usk, ards, including some overhead which gives a centrally located wires, and submitted them to and safe access point for those Life Flight, a medical helicopter needing medical transport company. The goal is to tie assistance. Pearman’s son, Joe, Perry Pearman, emergency services worked at the mill the fire chief at over the summer and throughout the the paper mill painted a giant H in and a member of county with the mill. the landing area. South Pend Oreille This is a free serFire and Rescue, vice that both Life Perry Pearman said emergency Flight and MedStar PNC Fire chief command vehicles can use. The mill has carry a list of EMTs working at its about 10 locations gate 24 hours a day throughout the county where that have communication with emergency helicopters can land the 911 dispatch center, giving to transport patients to area even easier access to emergency hospitals. The list includes inservices. formation about any hazards at Pearman said the goal is to tie each location the pilots need to emergency services throughbe aware of when they land. SEE PNC, 2A BY MICHELLE NEDVED OF THE MINER

COURTESY PHOTO|WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

This yearling female from the Diamond Pack in Pend Oreille County was photographed in June 2010.

Wolves not a problem in Pend Oreille

Salecky takes pride in health job

Legislation focuses on controlling wolves that attack livestock BY MICHELLE NEDVED OF THE MINER

Plans to come home to northeast Washington

NEWPORT – While wolves in Washington are on the forefront of legislative and county debate, conflicts with the recovered animals in Pend Oreille County are non-existent. Pend Oreille County is home to three confirmed wolf packs – Smackout, Salmo and Diamond, and there’s a possible unconfirmed pack, Ruby Creek, also in the area. But there have been no cases of livestock depredation in the county, and most reported sightings of the animals are unconfirmed. Wildlife agent Severin Erickson, of Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, said there is plenty of wildlife in Pend Oreille County for the wolves to feed on. This keeps them from attacking livestock. He’s seen video and photographs from wildlife cameras of wolves mingling with free range cattle, both living together without any attacks. Erickson explained that wolves don’t naturally have a taste for cattle. They prefer deer and elk. If a dead cattle carcass is left out,

COURTESY MAP|WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH AND WILDLIFE

Three confirmed wolf packs are located in Pend Oreille County, and a fourth is suspected. There have been no reported cattle predations, however, and wolves have SEE WOLVES, 2A been seen mingling peacefully with cattle.

|| Meeting addresses fate of Hospitality House NEWPORT – An open meeting is set for Tuesday, Feb. 26, to discuss the future of the Hospitality House senior center in Newport. The meeting is from 5:30-7 p.m. at 216 S. Washington Ave. The Hospitality House is in need of volunteers to take over for an aging board of directors. Anyone interested in helping out or with ideas should attend. The board has decided to close the doors in October if the community shows no new interest.

Rural Resources receives grant for job training COLVILLE – Rural Resources Community Action, which serves Pend Oreille, Stevens, Ferry and Lincoln counties, recently received a $74,375 grant from Inland Northwest Community Foundation to provide job train-

B R I E F LY

ing and work experience opportunities to teens and adults. Rural Resources hopes to increase participation in its on-the-job training and workforce experience programs. The training program targets unemployed or under-employed adults while the workforce experience program pays youth for up to 200 hours of work at a nonprofit or public sector worksite and assists them in earning a diploma or GED, gaining basic work skills, or to access post-secondary training. “Funding for these programs is at its lowest in 10 years, but demand for assistance has stayed steady,” said Greg Knight, executive director of Rural Resources. “Youth and young adults aged 16-24 have reached record highs for unemployment rates. Washington State has been ranked in the bottom 10 for youth employment

point to our behaviors,” Salecky said, especially smoking. Salecky, 65, announced her BY DON GRONNING retirement after nearly 15 OF THE MINER years as head of the state’s Department of Health. OLYMPIA – Prevention is an During her time as head important concept in public of DOH, Washington’s health, according to outgoing adult smoking rate has Washington State Secretary dropped 30 percent, and of Health Mary Salecky. Salecky youth smoking rates are Salecky says whether it down by half; childhood is through vaccination, eating vaccination rates are the highest and exercising better or stopping in years. smoking, people can take steps Smoking has been one of the to improve their health and help more persistent problems she has prevent disease. “Almost all our chronic diseases SEE SALECKY, 2A

||

rates.” The grant is a result of the Building Community Philanthropy Initiative launched by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in 2012. Inland Northwest Community Foundation received $350,000 through the program for use in eastern Washington counties.

ORVs may get the run of more roads OLYMPIA – Hoping to clear up rules for just where people can ride their off road vehicles, the Washington Legislature is considering a bill to open more roads to ORVs. House Bill 1632 had a hearing before the transportation committee Feb. 11. It would open any public road with a speed limit of 35 mph or less to ORVs. Currently, cities with a population of less than 3,000

can designate roads where ORVs can run, as many north Pend Oreille County towns have done. Counties can do the same. Norris Boyd, chairman of the Pend Oreille County Republican Party, noted that ORV recreation brings in tourism dollars. “We’re tired of watching people drive through Newport to go to Idaho to play on their ATVs and snowmobiles,” he said. The bill would also increase the age of those allowed to operate an ORV from 13 to 16 years, and operators must have a valid drivers license. New under the law, ORV owners would be required to purchase a metal license plate for the back of the vehicle, similar to those used in Idaho. Revenue would be used to engineer for mixed use roads, erect signage, and law enforcement.

SPORTS 1B-2B - RECORD 5B - POLICE 5B - OPINION 4A - CLASSIFIEDS 6B-10B - PUBLIC NOTICES 8B-10B - DOWN RIVER 9A - LIFE 3B - OBITUARIES 4B-5B


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| FEBRUARY 20, 2013

The Newport Miner Serving Pend Oreille County, WA

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FROM PAGE ON E 

WOLVES | Meeting in Cusick Feb. 26 Feb. 26 at the Cusick Community Center, 107 First Ave.; Feb. 27 at however, and wolves feed on it, the Colville Ag Trade Center, 317 they can develop the taste. W. Astor Ave.; and Feb. 28 at the The gray wolf is still listed as Okanogan Public Utilities District endangered in Washington state, office meeting room, 1331 Second and is federally listed in the westAve. N. ern two-thirds of the state. Wolves With calving season underway, were once common throughout the meetings will give livestock much of the state, but declined owners the chance to talk directly rapidly from being aggressively with state wildlife managers about killed during the expansion of wolves and their impacts on ranching and farming between ranching operations. WDFW had 1850 and 1900. They were elimiheld a series of meetings earlier nated as a breeding species by the this year, but their location raised 1930s. the ire of Seventh District legislaWith federal “We have had an increased tors. and state pro“We were pretty tections, wolves number of people calling disgusted with the are back. Idaho us since the wolves have fact that somehow now has a the department been in Washington. hunting prothought that havgram to control Everyone – (even) from ing ‘wolf recovery’ populations meetings in Sedowntown Spokane. and Washattle, Olympia and You’ve got to take it all ington has a Spokane would management with a grain of salt. A be sufficient for plan. receiving public “We have had lot of coyotes are being input on the state’s sighted as wolves.” an increased wolf recovery number of peoand manageple calling us ment efforts,” said Severin Erickson since the wolves WDFW Wildlife Officer Rep. Joel Kretz, have been in R-Wauconda. Washington,” Kretz joined Rep. Erickson said. “Everyone – (even) Shelly Short, R-Addy, and other from downtown Spokane. You’ve lawmakers in pressuring WDFW got to take it all with a grain of to hold the additional meetings in salt. A lot of coyotes are being northeast Washington so the desighted as wolves.” partment could receive firsthand Ten wolf sightings have been input about living with wolves. reported in Pend Oreille County WDFW has funding available to since 2010. These included footsupport cost-sharing agreements print sightings and howling refor preventative measures that ports. Most actual sightings were can help minimize problems with cleared and explained as either wolves, according to Stephanie wolf-hybrid pets or other domestic Simek, WDFW wildlife conflict animals. manager. Those practices include The Wedge pack, located in reducing attractants by disposing Stevens County, was eliminated of livestock carcasses, installing by WDFW when the pack’s alpha special fencing, using protected male was killed just south of the areas for calving and lambing, Canadian border this past fall. The and using range riders to haze pack had been attacking livestock wolves away from livestock. from the herd of the Diamond Sixteen livestock producers have M Ranch in northern Stevens signed cooperative cost-share County. From July to September, agreements to date, Simek said. wolves had killed or injured at It was unknown at press time if least 17 calves and cows from the any of those are from Pend Oreille herd. County. WDFW will hold three public The number of confirmed gray meetings next week to discuss wolves and wolf packs in Washwolf-livestock conflict manageington nearly doubled over the ment. The meetings will be from last year, according to a WDFW 6-8 p.m., and are scheduled for survey. The survey confirms at FROM PAGE 1

least 51 wolves in nine packs with a total of five successful breeding pairs. The actual number of wolves in the state may be closer to 100, as two additional packs are suspected and lone wolves are rarely counted in surveys. The Senate Natural Resources and Parks Committee last week approved two bills that would reduce the restraints on landowners and county legislative authorities from lethally removing a wolf posing an immediate threat to livestock and/or domestic animals. Both bills have been sent to the Rules Committee for floor-vote consideration. Substitute Senate Bill 5187 would allow livestock-owners, their family members and employees to trap or kill gray wolves without a permit from WDFW if their livestock or domestic animals were being attacked. The wolf must be an immediate threat to livestock and other animals and if a wolf is killed and is not found to have been an immediate threat, the taking of that wolf would violate WDFW rules. Mitch Friedman of Conservation Northwest would prefer the legislature take a look at improving non-lethal management techniques in order to deter wolves from attacking livestock and domestic animals. “Wolves aren’t angels or devils; they can respond favorably to management techniques,” he said. A second proposal, Senate Bill SB 5188, would permit county legislative authority to lethally remove wolves attacking livestock based on three conditions: the wolf or wolves had attacked livestock on private property on at least two occasions; the attacks present a pattern that pose an imminent threat to private property or commercial livestock operations, and DFW has yet to take action to prevent these threats. Prime sponsor of both bills, Sen. John Smith, D-Colville, claimed that these bills, if enacted into law, would bolster the rights set out by the founders’ in the Second Amendment. The House companion bill to SB 5187, HB 1991, is scheduled for an executive session Thursday, Feb. 21, in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee.

PNC | Mill employees on local fire districts

H OW TO CO N TAC T U S

COURTESY PHOTO|PERRY PEARMAN

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The helicopter landing zone at Ponderay Newsprint can be seen in the lower left-hand side of this photo. Also marked are the hazardous wires helicopter pilots must look out for as they land.

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FROM PAGE 1

The Miner Online

out the county with the mill. About a half dozen mill employees are members of fire districts in the county, including Fire District No. 2, South

www.pendoreillerivervalley.com MOBILE EDITION www.pendoreillerivervalley. com/m.htm FACEBOOK www.facebook.com/ MinerNews TWITTER www.twitter.com/MinerNews

In 2005, the state, including Pend Oreille County, voted to encountered. keep all bars, restaurants and While that rate has slowly workplaces smoke free, an initiacrept back up, Washington is still tive she applauded from a public ranked among the states with the health standpoint. fewest smokers. She says antiShe wasn’t so happy about ansmoking campaigns have yielded other initiative voters approved results. last fall, a measure legalizing “There are many less hospitalmarijuana use for adults. izations for heart and lung disLike Inslee, Salecky recognizes ease,” she said. For help quitting, that voters approved the marijuapeople can toll-free Washington na initiative. But in most cases, Tobacco Quit Line at 1-800-QUIT- marijuana use will involve smokNOW or visit www.quitline.com. ing. Smoking, she says, presents Salecky says the benefits of stop- a health hazard, no matter what ping smoking happen quickly. the substance. “The body reacts almost imme“It’s very important to undiately,” she said, with improvederstand that smoke is smoke,” ment in blood pressure and better she said. “Smoke in the lungs is heart and lung function. harmful.” Salecky has served under three She says this is an area where Democratic governors: Mike education, especially of young Lowry, Gary Locke and Chris people, can make a difference. Gregoire. Salecky will stay on Education is also key to prethe job until Gov. Jay Inslee finds venting gun violence, she said. someone to replace her. Making sure a loaded gun isn’t Salecky got her start in public left where a child can get it is health as head of the Northeast important. Tri-County Health District. She “Our approach is for parents to says she intends to continue her know to lock it up and to separate public service. “I’m planning guns and ammunition,” she said. some sort of state service,” SalShe acknowledges that guns are ecky told The Miner. a part of society, especially rural The amount of money the society. Storing them properly state spends on public health has can prevent a death that would dropped since the financial crisis come too soon, she said. of 2008. That has Prescription “It’s very important to a very real effect, drug abuse is understand that smoke Salecky said. an area she has There are fewer had to contend is smoke. Smoke in the people to follow up with. She says lungs is harmful.” on things such as more people die food born illnesses from prescrip-Mary Salecky and whooping tion drugs cough, for instance. Retiring Secretary of Health on than die in car There is less money marijuana legalization wrecks. to educate about Under a health issues, law passed in including basic things such as 2011, the DOH has developed a making sure there isn’t standdatabase to monitor prescriping water in which mosquitoes tion drugs that are likely to be breed. Mosquitoes are a source of abused. things such as West Nile virus. The purpose of the PrescripSalecky says she has followed tion Monitoring Program is to with interest the Healthy Newimprove patient care and stop port program run by the Newprescription drug misuse by colport Health Services and Health lecting all the records for SchedServices Foundation. That is a ule 2, 3, 4 and 5 drugs. good example of a private orgaThis information is then made nization stepping up to promote available to medical providers health, she said. Such things will and pharmacists as a tool in be needed to make up the loss of patient care. government funding. The Department of Health is Salecky has regularly kept also involved in licensing health track of what happens in northcare professionals. She oversees east Washington, including Pend the licensing of 38,000 nurses, Oreille County. physicians and other professionShe is a regular reader of The als, as well as emergency manNewport Miner. She has mainagement. tained her home on the Tiger Inslee says Salecky has made a Highway in Stevens County for difference in her time as head of 39 years, she said. She attends DOH. Downriver Days and was at Pend “Thanks to Mary, Washington Oreille County’s 2011 centennial is a healthier place to live and celebration, in costume no less. raise a family,” Inslee said in a Salecky has dealt with a varinews release. ety of public health issues over Salecky said she plans to visit her career, from influenza, to Pend Oreille County and to be smoking to gun violence. involved in local programs.

FROM PAGE 1

FROM PAGE 1

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CO N N EC T W I T H U S

SALECKY | Gov. Inslee will appoint replacement at DOH

COUNTY | Some used to pay shoreline consultant

By Mail at 421 S. Spokane Ave. Newport, WA 99156 By FAX: (509) 447-9222 * 24-Hours Comments or Information By Phone: (509) 447-2433  Our editors and writers welcome your calls to discuss issues, coverage or story ideas. By E-Mail: minernews@povn.com

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THE NEWPORT MINER

Pend Oreille, Fire District No. 4, and the Kalispel Fire Department. “It’s kind of this club we’ve got going,” Pearman said. The landing site has been used about six times since its

inception this past summer. Pearman pointed out because of the remote location, the mill can be seen from the sky for many miles. “I think it’s really worked well,” Pearman said.

T H I S W E E K’S FO R EC A ST

benefits for a drug enforcement officer. For 2013, the county had to budget $400,000 to account for the local sales and use tax money received at the end of the year, as well as $46,000 in revenue from the rural drug task force. The $400,000 went to a reserved ending fund balance. The drug task force money goes to salary, benefits and overtime for a deputy. Other adjustments to the 2013 budget included: • Transferring $50,000 from a counseling obligated fund to

the counseling general fund. The counseling obligated fund was closed. • Accounting for $85,000 in local real estate excise tax revenue in the capital project fund. The county will spend $65,000 on emergency heating ventilation and cooling system work and $64,000 to remodel the counseling service basement. • Transferring $5,000 from the timber fund to pay into the growth management fund. That money will be used to pay the consultant for the shoreline management program.

L A ST W E E K

Wednesday Thursday

Friday

Monday

A 40 percent Snow likely chance of snow before 1 p.m.

Saturday

Sunday

Mostly cloudy, then sun

Tuesday

39/23

41/29

39/26

37/21

39/26

41/24

39/19

A 30 percent A 40 percent A 50 percent Partly sunny chance of snow chance of snow chance of snow Source: National Weather Service, Newport, WA

Feb. High Low Precip. Snow 12 39 33 13 47 25 14 43 25 15 51 23 16 37 27 .01” .3” 17 46 25 18 42 25 Source: Albeni Falls Dam

L A ST Y E A R Highs got to 47 on Feb. 22, and lows were between 32 and 17 this week last year. Rain fell two days during the week, and Feb. 25 saw an inch of new snow.


THE MINER



FEBRUARY 20, 2013 |

Assault conviction gets two days in jail

BR I E FLY Library board begins strategic planning

NEWPORT – The Pend Oreille County Library Board of Trustees will meet one hour early this month, Thursday, Feb. 28, at 4 p.m. for an in-service for strategic planning. The meeting will be held in the PUD Box Canyon conference room in Newport. The board will also hold an in-service for the same purpose Saturday, March 9, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the same location. The PUD building is located at 130 N. Washington Ave.

BY DON GRONNING OF THE MINER

Hospital board meets one week early NEWPORT – The Newport Hospital and Health Services board of directors is meeting a week early this month. The meeting is set for Thursday, Feb. 21 at 4 p.m. in the Sandifur meeting room in the basement of Newport Hospital.

Lake Pend Oreille fishery meeting scheduled SANDPOINT – The Lake Pend Oreille Fishery Recovery Task Force and the Idaho Department of Fish and Game will host an informational “state of the lake” public meeting to discuss the status of fish populations in Lake Pend Oreille and the progress of the fishery recovery effort. The meeting is scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 21 from 6-8:30 p.m. at the Ponderay Events Center by the Bonner Mall north of Sandpoint. The meeting is open to anyone with an interest in the lake. Following the presentations, there will be a question and answer session as well as time for informal discussion after the meeting. Presentations will summarize the results of the 2012 predator removal efforts, status of kokanee and bull trout populations, and recap the recent rule changes. In addition, biologists will present results of a recent genetic assessment of the rainbow trout population, comparing the fish from Pend Oreille to those in Kootenay Lake, B.C., where the population originally came from. For more information, contact IFG at 208-769-1414. Individuals with disabilities may request meeting accommodations by contacting Jim Fredericks at the number above or 1-800-3772529 (TDD).

Church wants to expand at Edgemere SANDPOINT – The Bonner County planning and zoning commission will consider a request from the Edgemere Seventh-day Adventist Church for a conditional use permit to allow for the addition of classrooms and a sanctuary to the church, located on Vay Road. A public hearing is set for Thursday, March 7 at 5 p.m. in the first floor conference room of the county’s administrative building, 1500 Highway 2, Sandpoint. The 5-acre site is located about 9 miles southeast of Priest River, in Section 1, Township 55 North, Range 4 West, B.M. The property is zoned Rural-5. The public is encouraged to comment. Comments can be sent to the planning department at 1500 Highway 2, Suite 208, Sandpoint, ID 83864; faxed to 208-265-1463 or emailed to planning@co.bonner.id.us.

Planning commission approves shoreline permit CUSICK – The Pend Oreille County Planning Commission voted Feb. 12 to conditionally approve a shoreline permit for Karl Hanson to do a riverbank stabilization project on Alaska Lane in Cusick. Guy Thomas cast the sole no vote on the project, according to community development director Mike Lithgow. The project uses about 30 cubic yards of riprap to stabilize the riverbank along the Pend Oreille River to prevent erosion. Lithgow said the Old Sacheen Lake Resort Vacation Rental is on the agenda for the March 12 planning commission meeting. Chris Swanson will seek approval for the vacation rental. located at 5291 Hwy. 211.

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COURTESY PHOTO|TAMMY ALLISON

Youth Emergency Services will be moving to this office space at 316 W. Second St. in Newport. The smaller building will be a clothing closet to provide used clothing to teens in need.

YES youth program finds a home

Volunteers, donations needed BY JANELLE ATYEO OF THE MINER

NEWPORT – The local organization that serves homeless kids has a new home of its own. Youth Emergency Services (YES) will be moving into a converted house on Second Street in Newport after working out a rental agreement with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians. The tribe owns two houses where YES will relocate. The main house formerly housed All Faz’s Bookkeeping, which recently moved to a storefront on Washington Avenue. The smaller house will serve as a spot to store donated clothing and personal items YES provides to teens in need. “We’re revved. This is a big thing,” YES volunteer Tammy Allison said. This weekend, teens from the YES program will start painting the interior of the buildings. Some of the artistic teens plan to do a mural on one wall. “It’s not just our building, this is their building,” Allison said. “We want it to reflect part of them.” YES is looking for volunteers to help with some of the fixes at the new office. Those with carpentry skills are needed. Some flooring work needs to be done. YES has been sharing an office

with Pend Oreille Crime Victim Services. The organization will be moving to its new home as soon as possible. They’re seeking donations of new or used items to help furnish the place. On the list is office furniture, locking filing cabinets for confidential material, shelving for the kitchen, a kitchen table, a refrigerator and microwave. To arrange a time to drop off donations, contact Y.E.S. director Judy Lee at 509-671-7293, contact Allison at 719-659-4357, or Toni at 509-671-7425. Allison was thrilled with the outpouring of support the organization got from the community at Christmas time. They collected necessities for more than 100 teens. Since then, cases for a number of teens have been closed. The YES program currently has about 80 kids under its umbrella, and all of the beds at foster homes are full. Organizers are looking for more families to open their doors to homeless teens. Allison said being a host home doesn’t have to be a long-term commitment of two or three years. Some kids need a place to stay for shorter spans of time while custody cases go through the court. Sometimes kids need a temporary respite home for just a couple weeks.

YES’s wish list

Desks Desk chairs Conference table chairs Locking file cabinets Waiting room furniture Refrigerator Microwave Shelving Small kitchen table with chairs To donate, contact Judy Lee at 509-671-7293. Volunteers are needed to help YES teens in other ways as well. Allison suggests people share their skills by offering to mentor teens. It could be as simple as spending an afternoon showing someone how to change oil on a car or giving guidance on how to apply for college and financial aid. YES’s long term goal is to create a safe house for teens in need, a place for them to study and get a shower if need be. While the new YES location will provide a place for teens to access the Internet and find programs to help them, it’s more of headquarters for the organization than a safe house. In the meantime, YES is working on getting its non-profit status. “We’re really starting to come together and stand on our own,” Allison said.

Party leaders react to State of the Union BY JANELLE ATYEO OF THE MINER

NEWPORT – President Obama gave his annual State of the Union address to Congress Tuesday, Feb. 12, touching on many issues that are top on the minds of Americans today. Local party leaders pointed out a few topics that struck a Boyd chord with them. “I’m all about the working class family. I would like to see Pend Oreille County grow,” said Dallas Johnson, the new chairman of the county’s Democratic Party. Johnson is Johnson a third generation Newport resident, and he says he’s interested in promoting local issues. He noted a few things the president mentioned will help Pend Oreille County. Obama spoke about the need to update the county’s aging infrastructure, including roads and bridges. Johnson said improving our roads and city streets, as well as our railroad, will help the area. Obama said the nation has added new jobs, but more needs to be done to ensure the government encourages free enterprise. Johnson has lived in Newport most of his life, but said he went away for different jobs “because they just weren’t here.” He pointed out that the county’s unemployment rate is still high – 11.8 percent in December. “We’ve always been a depressed

area. When I was a kid, we had the mill and other things. Economic times are driving a lot of that out,” Johnson said. “A lot of times, the jobs weren’t here, and

we need to fix that.” He’d like to see the county bring in small to medium-sized busiSEE LEADERS, 6A

Children’s Storytime Starting

March 1st • • • New Day & Time Fridays at 11am

• • • Story & Crafts!

Newport Public Library

(509) 447-2111 116 S Washington • Newport

NEWPORT – A man who pled guilty to fourth degree assault was sentenced to time served – two days in jail – with 362 days in jail suspended, and will have to pay about $2,000 restitution for knocking down another man and kicking him. Based on a plea arrangement, Ralph K. Gray, 28, of Metaline Falls, was convicted of fourth degree assault for his role in the May 2012 incident when he appeared before Pend Oreille County Superior Court Judge Pat Monasmith Thursday, Feb. 14. Deputy prosecutor Dolly Hunt told Monasmith she agreed to the plea arrangement because that was what the victim wanted. She said he was more concerned that he not have any further contact with Gray. “He said he wasn’t a vindictive guy,” Hunt said. He wasn’t looking for more jail time for Gray, she said. Defense attorney Barrett Scudder said Gray could have made an argument for self-defense. Scudder said the victim showed up after having drank a bottle of wine and made inappropriate comments to Gray. “Mr. Gray probably shouldn’t have hit him,” Scudder said, but added that the victim should have been charged with disorderly conduct. Gray said he was remorseful about what happened.

“I wish I could apologize to him,” Gray said. But the no contact order prevented that, he said. Monasmith didn’t buy the self-defense argument. He said if the plea arrangement had not been agreed to, he would have sentenced Gray to more time in jail. “This was not self defense,” he told Gray. Gray could have walked away or called the police instead of striking the victim and kicking him while he lay on the ground. “You put the boots to him while he lay on the ground. That is felonious behavior,” Monasmith said. “You got a break here.” According to the probable cause report, the incident occurred after the victim was cleaning swords he collects on his porch and was told Gray made a threat. He went to confront Gray about the threat and Gray knocked him down. When he got up, Gray knocked him down again and started kicking him. Two people witnessed Gray strike and kick the victim, according to the report, and a deputy found two large puddles of blood in the street when he arrived. Gray will pay an estimated $2,000 in restitution to the victim for the injuries the victim suffered. The exact amount will be set later. Gray was also ordered to pay a $500 victim assessment fee. There was no fine.

Conservation district improving financial condition Auditors express concerns BY JANELLE ATYEO OF THE MINER

NEWPORT – The Pend Oreille Conservation District discontinued most of its operations between January and November 2011 due to funding reductions. During that time, the district went from operating on revenues of nearly $461,000 per year, to an annual budget of $47,000 with a staff of volunteers. Since then, the district has been repaying debts and looking for ways to increase revenue. After the most recent audit by the state, which occurs every three years, auditors discussed concerns over the

district’s financial condition. They performed an accountability audit of district books from 2009 and 2011, focusing on financial condition, billings, cash receipting, compliance for grants, open public meeting minutes and surplus property. A report was released Feb. 11. The district ended 2008 nearly $55,000 in the hole. POCD maintained a line of credit to meet its cash flow needs while awaiting grantor reimbursements. To avoid additional draws on the line of credit, the district had it converted to a term loan in June 2011 with a principal balance of $48,866. Since then, the district has paid the debt down $10,000, in SEE CONSERVATION, 5A

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4A

| FEBRUARY 20, 2013

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O U R

Viewpoint

 O PI N I O N

THE NEWPORT MINER

A hydropower Renaissance

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New media needs attention

Government is overstepping our rights

hurt small business

To the editor: I really like Pete Scobby’s letter. He was right on every point in my opinion. Here’s the real scoop. When you own a piece of property, you own the space above and the space below said property. That’s a fact! Therefore if our government wants to send their drones over us without a warrant to enter our property then they are essentially trespassing and those government workers ought to be fined, fired and/or imprisoned. They are ignoring our Constitutional rights of unfair and unreasonable searches. The government, as much as they want to believe, does not have the right any time they want to enter your property! Mike Lithgow and Tom Metzger want that right but they are not granted that right by our Constitution! As a business owner, seeing how they just want to destroy this community and the tourism trade is appalling! I still am in shock that they even wanted to be named as the insured. What kind of scam is that? They wanted to set hours of operation? Maybe they wanted keys to the guy’s business too. Then maybe Tiki Sneaky Tom and Striky Mikey could sneak into the business in the middle of the night too, and do whatever they saw fit. This is way wrong and we as a community need to send a signed letter to Secretary of the State as a Community Complaint. Every business owner ought to be in The

To the editor: The president has proposed raising the federal minimum wage, and Republicans respond with how it will hurt small business and cause job loss. CEO pay on the other hand has increased 1,000 times over what the average company worker makes per hour. Some CEOs make more than 10,000 times the average company worker. The transfer of wealth to the top 1 percent continues while workers live in poverty. These people are not takers, but work over 40 hours a week, and often more than one job. We cannot let people starve or die from a lack of medical care and still say we are a compassionate society. Republicans keep ranting about spending, but what they really want is for the government to abandon citizens that don’t have wealth. At the same time they want to exploit workers to become super wealthy. We must decide where the money comes from for a compassionate society. Either pay workers a living minimum wage or have them enrolled in government social programs like food stamps and medical care. The prices of goods and services are not reduced by lower labor rates. Decades of cheap labor rates have only led to record profits for corporations. Raising the minimum wage will bring millions of workers out of poverty, and only slightly raise the price of goods and ser-

When Grand Coulee Dam was completed in 1942, it was called the “Eighth Wonder of the Modern World.” With its 151 mile-long reservoir and ability to produce 6,809 megawatts of electricity, no one could imagine a bigger or more powerful dam – and no one realized the scope of economic development that lowcost, reliable hydropower would create. Actually someone did. China. This GUEST year, China OPINION completed its gargantuan DON C. Three Gorges BRUNELL hydroelectric ASSOCIATION OF project with WASHINGTON triple the BUSINESS PRESIDENT power generation of Grand Coulee. The controversial project is the largest dam in the world. The Chinese government defends it and other proposed hydro projects as critical to curbing disastrous flooding on the Yangtze River and generating electricity needed to power China’s economic growth. New mega dams are also planned on the Amazon and Mekong rivers. What’s behind this renaissance of hydropower? First, hydropower produces no greenhouse gases and generates large amounts of electricity in one spot. The electricity produced by the Three Gorges Dam is equivalent to the output of 15 nuclear reactors. The comparison to wind and solar power is even more striking. It takes thousands of acres of wind turbines and solar panels to produce an equivalent stable supply of electricity, and that generation occurs only when the wind blows or the sun shines. Second, electricity powers manufacturing which, in turn, creates economic growth and family-wage jobs. Like wind and solar, it is clean energy but it is more reliable because water is stored behind the dams, available for use on demand. In Peru, former President Alan Garcia believes his country can increase its electricity generation eight-fold by harnessing the tributaries to the Amazon River. In turn, Peru would use the power to expand its manufacturing and agriculture base and export a big chunk of that electricity to neighboring Brazil and Chile. Peru is one of the world’s fastest-growing economies, averaging 6 percent GDP growth since

SEE LETTERS, 5A

SEE BRUNELL, 5A

F

or sometime we have put covering the infrastructure of new communication media in our communities at the top of the news list just like we did roads. So when a cell tower, fiber backbone, cable system and Internet network were being built we put the news in The Miner. But that isn’t really enough to understand how this technology is dramatically changing how we communicate and ultimately how it shapes a local story. We probably need to explain that and everyone else, including parents and schools, need to grasp it fast and teach the outcomes. I started thinking about this last week while standing in a rental car shuttle bus, holding a metal bar so I wouldn’t fall down, on our way to Seattle International Airport. Across from me seated, was a man in his late 40s with an airport operations uniform and knit cap talking on a cell phone. He firmly told the person on the line (obviously his daughter) that what he saw on her Facebook page – particularly what her “friends” posted – made her look bad. She obviously was telling him as he nodded his head, that it didn’t mean what he thought. He told her it didn’t matter what was intended but what did matter is what it appeared to say to the world. He said he loved her and ended the call. He wasn’t surprised that the older guy next to him and I were listening. He was glad to have someone to talk to; old school social media, I guess. We all looked like dads. He said: “She is 18 years old and can make her own choices but they sure don’t always make the right ones.” He went on to say employers look at the social media sites and they last forever. The guy next to him said people of all ages seem to ignore that and we all nodded. I didn’t tell them that I was a newspaper guy but was thinking with a little guilt that this was fertile ground for information. I still remember a local coach telling me how he looks at Facebook pages of players to see if there was an alcohol party over the weekend. He found a few and suspended a few players. An attorney told me they also get the goods on people like witnesses for the opposition from their social media ranting. Employees post complaints about the job, relationships, friends and family without a second thought about it being sent to thousands and never really getting scrubbed from worldwide memory. The boss, the girlfriend and the mom get to see it all. This isn’t just a Facebook issue. Emails might seem part of a closed loop but think about how easy it is to bounce them from one person to the next. Say something bad about someone and send to it to a friend who can send it on. Public officials are just catching on to the fact that their emails at work are public records, including emails sent to them. So who should be concerned other than the creators of these personal messages being seen by the world? We think everybody. But only parents and schools can really educate young people about this. It is part of the new and exciting world. Nobody wants to go back but using some mental gatekeepers and making every word accurate before posting should be important again.

-Fred J. Willenbrock Publisher

Many cons to Interior Secretary appointment When President Obama nominated Sally Jewell of Kent for Interior Secretary Feb. 6, you would think that he had located the real Wonder Woman. The 56-year-old CEO of Recreational Equipment Inc. (REI) was “A Jewell of a Pick” for “the massive job that makes her, by and large, the landlord of the Western United States,” The Seattle Times gushed editorially. She was “an inspired choice,” echoed Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., chairman of the Energy and Natural Resources Committee. Former U.S. Rep. Norm Dicks, longtime member of the House Appropriations Interior subcommittee, told The Times he was “pleasantly surprised” and she was picked because “she doesn’t have a controversial political record that critics can pick apart.” Thomas Kieman, president of the National Parks Conservation Association and Initiative for Global Development on whose board Mrs. Jewell serves, said, “When Sally speaks, people listen.” The League of Conservation Voters, Natural Resources Defense Council and the Western Energy Alliance, American Rivers and Trout Unlimited all applauded. And what does this job she’s deemed so

right for amount to? According to the newspapers, the Interior Department is responsible for more than 500 million acres of public lands, from Yellowstone National Park to the Lincoln Memorial. It administers the Endangered Species GUEST Act. It oversees OPINION the Bureau of Land ManageADELE ment and is FERGUSON responsible for CORRESPONDENT leasing rights to oil, coal, gas and heavy metals even when found under land managed by other departments. It has more than 70,000 employees. And her qualifications? She has been an oil industry engineer, a commercial banker, and is known for her work with environmental and conservation groups. She won the 2009 Rachel Carson Award for Environmental Conservation from the Audubon Society, and squelches criticism that the president hasn’t any women in

SEE FERGUSON, 8A

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LE T T E R S

Howards Follies is a true gem To the editor: To anyone who has somehow missed seeing Howard’s Follies over the last 10 years, too bad. You have my deepest sympathy. I did not see them all, so too bad for me, but I will never, ever forget “Our Cow Town” (2008). I could even compete with “Blazing Saddles” re-runs – simple pure fun you hate to see end. Many, many thanks to all the crew and cast, and most specially to Howard and Nancy Wilden. What a gem, and what a gift these productions have been for those who have attended. -Dwight and Eloise Opp Newport

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R E A D E R S’

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Diamond Lake Inn owners’ corner because this could happen to you. I think Mike Lithgow has gotten carried away with corruption and power and he is no longer looking out for this community! Our new elected commissioners need to truly examine how our planning commissioners and our planning director have been operating! They are corrupt in my opinion. The planning commissioners ought to be voted in and not appointed by corrupt un-elected officials who want their egg money and you the business owner can’t make yours the honest way! -Donna Lands Moonlight RV Park LLC

Higher minimum wage won’t

P O LL

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Visit The Miner Online to answer our readers’ poll question through Monday afternoon. Find it on the left-hand side of the page at www. PendOreilleRiverValley.com. The results will be printed next week on this page. You need not be a subscriber to participate. If you have ideas for future readers’ poll topics, submit them to minernews@ povn.com.

Bonner County commissioner Joyce Broadsword, who took the seat just this past January, announced her resignation this week. She plans to take a position with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare. Last year, Pend Oreille County commissioner Laura Merrill resigned her seat for a position with the Washington Association of Counties, and Washington Sen. Bob Morton, R-Kettle Falls, resigned his seat for retirement.

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RE ADERS’ POLL RESULTS

How do you feel about the end of Saturday mail service?

I pay all my bills online because it’s faster and easier. Soon, almost all snail mail will go by the wayside.

I’m angry I won’t be getting my mail on Saturday. This will slow down my personal business.

Do you think elected officials should be required to fulfill their term of office? Yes. They ask voters to support them and make a commitment they should fulfill. It also costs the taxpayers to train them. Yes. It breaks all campaign promises when they leave their position early.

I don’t trust online bill pay. Ending Saturday mail service means I’ll have to plan further ahead.

It depends. Changing positions isn’t a good reason, but age is. No. Elected officials need to work in positions they see will best benefit the public.

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Total Votes: 28

I check my mail only a few days a week anyway. I won’t notice the change.

18% 43% 14% 7% 18% The Postal Service is not a business. It’s a service for the people and it shouldn’t be expected to make money. They need to continue Saturday service.


THE MINER



FEBRUARY 20, 2013 |

5A

CONSERVATION | FROM PAGE 3A

just more than 18 months. “Although the district’s financial condition shows some improvement, limited cash reserves may affect its ability to meet financial obligations and operating expenses,” auditors wrote in a letter to the board of supervisors dated Jan. 30.

BRUNELL | FROM PAGE 4A

the turn of the century. Garcia’s plan is to use energy, particularly electricity, to diversify its economy, spur investments in manufacturing, create jobs and increase wages. Halfway across the world, the Laotian government is proposing a network of 11 dams on the low-

“We continue to look at ways to cut our monthly costs and increase our revenue. The board of supervisor’s have put into place several policies that limit the type and amount of purchases that may be made in any one month without prior approval,” the district responded. POCD was established March

15, 1949, to provide conservation and educational services about natural resources to the general public. Its five-member board of supervisors appoints a district administrator to oversee daily operations. Terry Holloway was appointed district administrator in 2012, replacing Veronica Douglas. The board currently consists of Ralph

Christiansen, Michele Masuen, John Floyd, George Stuivenga and Randy Leestma. The district extended credit to an employee’s spouse to purchase a surplus truck. The Washington State Constitution prohibits the lending of credit, except for the necessary support of the poor. The district entered into a contract, which allowed

for $500 down and 10 monthly installment payments of $366, including interest, until the remaining balance of $3,500 was collected. The board has reviewed the constitution article and said they will refrain from lending credit. Auditors also noted concerns about payments not being

recorded on district receipts and deposits not being made within 24 hours of receipt. The board has since approved a cash deposit policy and resolved not to maintain a petty cash fund in the office. The state will review the status of these items in next audit. Prior audits have been free of findings.

er Mekong River, similar to our Columbia and Snake River hydro network. China already has dams along the upper Mekong and is building more. Laos’ centerpiece is the mammoth and controversial 1,260 megawatt Xayaburi dam on the lower reaches of the Mekong River. Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam say the dam violates a 1995 treaty for shared

use and management of the Mekong River Basin. Still, Laos is pushing ahead because of the dam’s potential to spur economic growth. We often overlook the importance of hydropower in our state. Roughly three-quarters of our electricity comes from our dams. Low-cost, reliable hydropower is the foundation of our

state’s manufacturing sector, and it heats and lights schools, hospitals, nursing homes, office buildings and homes throughout the state. In fact, our hydropower advantage offsets other higher costs in Washington. Even so, some people think we should remove the dams, particularly the four dams on the lower Snake River.

But those dams are integral to our river transportation system, and they produce the electricity that pumps irrigation water into Eastern Washington vineyards, orchards and fields. Removing them will cripple our economy and kill jobs. Unlike the controversial Xayaburi and Three Gorges dams, our Columbia and Snake River

network did not cover millions of acres of farmlands and forest, nor did they displace millions of people. Over the years, we have learned to balance fisheries, flood control, power production, transportation and irrigation needs. We should realize that we have what the rest of the world is seeking: a reliable source of clean, affordable, renewable energy.

Pend Oreille County I have followed with interest the Inn at the Lake controversy. While not a proponent of larger government, as a business owner I know it is necessary to comply with county regulations. The taxes I pay and the building permits I have purchased pay for the services I receive and I pay them willingly because I am a citizen here and a neighbor to all. I find it fascinating that Inn at the Lake owners were opposed to other lake rentals by Diamond Lake property owners but refused to comply with county requirements for their own business. This does not speak well of the Cagianuts as citizens of our county and neighbors to the people at Diamond Lake. I commend Prosecutor Tom Metzger for doing the right thing. I commend Mike Lithgow for trying to work with the owners but

finally doing what he thought was right also. While I always hope a small business will be successful, I think the Cagianuts over estimate the impact that the closing of their business will have on residents of this county. -Janet Reed Newport

to meet and share interests and different activities, even though participation is dwindling – bingo, pinochle, coffee hour, potlucks. Even though we say senior center, everyone is welcome. Time for changes! Feb. 26, from 5:30-7 p.m. at the Hospitality House, we are having a public meeting to have input on the direction the Hospitality House should go with new ideas and new physical energy and resources. The board of directors has made the decision to close the Hospitality House in October (when the lease is up) if there is not enough interest and commitment from the community to keep it open. Come join us on a special evening. -Karen Rothstrom Newport

LETTERS | FROM PAGE 4A

vices. Jobs will not be lost because employers will meet customer demand or sales and pay the minimum wage. Our congresswoman will oppose an increase in the minimum wage on the basis that it will hurt small businesses. She is wrong as those businesses don’t hire based on taxes or labor rates. No business is going to turn away customers because of a higher minimum wage. Starving your workers won’t increase sales as those workers and their extended families are also customers. -Pete Scobby Newport

Planners responded well to inn To the editor: As a small business owner in

Hospitality House needs a change

To the editor: The meaning of a senior citizen has changed and so must the direction of the Hospitality House. The Hospitality House – Council of Aging provided services 45 years ago that now Rural Resources provides to seniors: Meals on Wheels, housing assistance, transportation, etc. But it still provides a place for friends

Thank You

L

ife teaches us man many many things, one of those things is that the most humbled heart h is revealed when you are broken and you don’t have the str strength to stand up. Another is the most grateful heart comes when you aare broken, on the ground and one by one hands from every direction aare reaching out to hold you, to help you up. We are so blessed to live in this community and to be surrounded by our family and friends who have been the voice, the hands and the heart rt to get done what we could not. The cards, the calls, the prayers; we thank ank you. Words can not express how grateful our family is for the support ort and help from all those people who put so much time and effort into nto Jake’s funeral service. In this time of grieving so many of you came me forward and made possible our last wish for Jake. It was a beautiful ful service that reflected every part of him. Our most sincere “Thank you,”

Tom and Kim MacArthur, Rhonda and Pete Valdon, Amy and Shawn wn Volquardsen, Richele and Chris Levins, Jessie and Jade MacArthurr

‘Good ol boys’ ruining our economy To the editor: How can we let this stand? Looks like ‘The good Ol’ Boys win again’! The county and especially its commissioners should be assisting people investing in the county, not railroading them out at the behest of NIMBY (not in my backyard) public officials. How in the world do we get investment in tourism and economic development when this kind of nonsense is condoned by our elected officials? As the operator of a small business I can tell you how hard is to do business in the county and the state under the best of conditions. What has happened at The Inn at the Lake is appalling and just wrong. If this is the county’s idea of proper community development

ETHEL THOMAS 12/20/1922 - 02/08/2013

She was a lady. She loved her family. She loved her friends. She lived her life with few regrets, an abundance of fun, and lots of laughter. She loved to laugh. Born in Bowmont, Idaho on December 20, 1922, to Emroy and Etta Mae Smith, Ethel Thomas passed away in Hayden, Idaho, on February 08, 2013. Always a hard worker, as a young woman, she worked her way through Beauty School in Nampa, Idaho, and then owned three beauty shops. Later, with her husband of nearly 50 years, John, successfully owned and operated two businesses - The Moyie Club and Cafe in Moyie Springs, Idaho, and the Crossroads Restaurant and Lounge in Usk, Washington. Ethel was preceded in death by her husband, John, her parents, two brothers, and two sisters. She is survived by two daughters - Pat (and John D.) Hankey and Mary Ann Manus. Also surviving her are five grandchildren, five great grandchildren and two great, great grandchildren. We loved her so much words can never say. But

God loved her too so he took her away to his kingdom in heaven where there is peace and rest, no problems or worries but only the best. Her troubles are over. No worries or cares and she’ll dwell like a Queen at the top of the stairs. Her memory is precious and with us shall remain forever and always till we meet again. We loved her dearly and will miss her greatly but will always remember her patience and kindness, her enthusiasm for life, her positive attitude, her smile, her hugs and kisses, and her beautiful flowers. You will forever be in our hearts. We love you.

I could not stay another day, To laugh, to love, to work or play. Tasks left undone must stay that way. I found peace at the close of the day.

Vaagen Bros. Lumber, Inc.

WE ARE BUYING LOGS!

If my parting has left a void, Then fill it with remembered joy. A friendship shared, a laugh, a kiss, Ah, yes, these things I too will miss.

• We’re buying saw logs and chip logs. Competitive Prices, High Value!

Be not burdened with times of sorrow, I wish you the sunshine of tomorrow. My life’s been full, I savored much, Good friends, good times, a loved one’s touch.

• We have foresters on staff to help with your timber management needs. • We are also buying and selling timberland.

“Adding value to the forest for people, products, and the environment”

and management we are doomed. Timber industry will never be same as it was 50 years ago, no light industry to speak of, mining gone .. what’s left? Does community development mean no tourism? I know Mr. Lithgow wants to preserve our “Rural Lifestyle” but we need business here in order to make a living and prosper. We have a huge opportunity to create a great tourism destination here but who will invest when “The good Ol’ boys” are the judge, jury and in this case executioner, I mean prosecutor. In regards to Mr. Willenbrock’s editorial last week, about the need to promote tourism, where are these tourists going to stay? Maybe Lithgow will let them stay at his house? Mr. Metzger’s house? -Frank Marmo Newport

Call Now.

Colville: 509-684-5071 Usk: 888-445-1732

I’m Free

Don’t grieve for me, for now I’m free. I’m following the path God laid for me. I took His hand when I heard Him call, I turned my back and left it all.

Perhaps my time seemed all too brief, Don’t lengthen it now with undue grief. Lift up your heart and share with me, God wanted me now; He set me free.


6A

| FEBRUARY 20, 2013



Ownership, goals change at Concept Cable Wayne Antcliff buys television and Internet cable company from father BY FRED WILLENBROCK OF THE MINER

NEWPORT – The only cable company in the Newport-Oldtown-Priest River area for more than a decade is changing hands. But unlike Anticliff most small independent cable providers these days it isn’t being sold to a giant national company. In fact, Concept Cable is staying privately owned and in the family. Wayne Antcliff, 52, and his wife, Lila, finalized the purchase agreement with his father, Keith, early this year. He is also continuing changes to the company as it morphs into what he calls a network service provider versus just a television provider. Antcliff isn’t new to Concept. He said he had an ownership interest with his father when they built the company starting in the early 1990s while there was another cable company serving the area. He left in 1995 to work in cable contracting across the United States. He returned to work with his father in 2007 starting as operations manager and later president. Customers will still see Wayne in the bucket truck or climbing a pole, he said. But he will also be working harder on the business side of the company as it competes with a myriad of new options people in this market now have, with more on the way.

Keith, 80, who lives in Spokane, will serve as advisor to the company. He will take a bit more time off, enjoy life a little more and just plain not work so hard, his son said. Two longtime employees of the company have left, Sandy Blinn and Doris Dahl. They have added some new faces and promoted Jason Reese to lead technician, giving them seven staff members including Wayne’s wife, Lila, who will be doing bookkeeping for the company. Antcliff said the transition to digital, IP and Internet products has changed the purpose and mission of cable companies. Cable companies now provide the Internet pipeline to get to those services. Over the years, Concept has built a network of coaxial and fiber lines to homes and businesses in the Priest River, Oldtown, Newport and Diamond Lake areas. They have also developed some wireless Internet capabilities. Along with their office in Newport, they have several acres near Newport High School where their television satellite receivers are located. They are also currently one of the biggest commercial customers of the Pend Oreille Public Utility District’s fiber optic network. Utilizing it to connect their customers to the Internet in Spokane. Antcliff said their bandwidth usage has increased more than 20 times since 2007. They have added equipment to increase potential Internet speeds over cable of 50 megabits per second download and 20 Mb/s upload or what he calls “Comcast” speeds. It will be available to higher end users soon and will reduce the load on

THE MINER

Adult motorcyclists want ‘right’ to crash (or not) without helmet

all their Internet customers. Antcliff is also changing the way he receives Spokane television signals and distributes them to his market. This will allow them to have better signals in all weather as well as offer all the Spokane region digital signals. The technological advances far outpace the ability to keep up in the industry, he said. So careful planning and implementation of new and better services has been done in stages. He said he hopes to keep that company plan going. Concept has developed a new fiber network they are testing in Priest River and Oldtown that will help connect EMS, fire, law enforcement, schools and cities into a network, Antcliff said. They are also involved in the Priest River Development Corporation’s development of a fiber network to their business park and the adult education school in the old JD Lumber office.

Senate bill requires protective headgear for under-18 riders BY KYLEE ZABEL WNPA OLYMPIA NEWS BUREAU

OLYMPIA – Universal helmet laws are a violation of the Fourteenth Amendment, argued one supporter of a bill introduced in the Senate Transportation Committee Jan. 31 that would require only motorcyclists younger than 18 to wear helmets. Some are opposed due to safety concerns. The proposed legislation would require only that riders younger than 18 wear helmets while operating motorcycles. Anyone 18 and older would legally be allowed to ride without protective headgear. While some see it as controversial and highly dangerous, Sen. Don Benton, RVancouver, the primary sponsor,

said this bill is nothing new. There are only 19 states in the U.S. and the District of Columbia, including Washington, that enforce universal helmet laws. Idaho does not have a helmet law. As groups and fellow legislators voiced their concerns with the notion that citizens would not be as cautious if helmets were optional, Benton said, “I patently disagree with that assumption.” “Fatalities are not age-discriminate,” said Capt. Rob Huss of the Washington State Patrol. Huss is opposed to the bill and said that Washington had not seen a decline in motorcyclerelated fatalities during recent years. Repealing the existing law, which requires each motorcyclist to wear a certified helmet, “would move us backward as a state,” he said.

David Devereaux of Washington Confederation of Clubs, claimed that maintaining universal helmet laws constitutes conflict with an individual’s freedoms and is in violation of the 14th Amendment because, he said, motorcyclists are not equally protected under law when it comes to helmet-certification standards. Safety standards are set by the Department of Transportation and the Snell Memorial FoundaSEE HELMET, 7A

CARD OF THANKS I want to thank every one for the cards, money, donations for the auction and the personal help to put the benefit on for me. I truly appreciate what was done. Thank you so much! Kay Haskell

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Senate Democrats launch state income tax proposal New tax would replace state property tax, reduce sales tax BY KYLEE ZABEL WNPA OLYMPIA NEWS BUREAU

OLYMPIA – Senate CoalitionMajority Leader Rodney Tom, D-Bellevue, chastised Democrat members for playing politics and not taking the will of Washingtonians seriously by introducing five fiscal reform bills before the Senate Ways and Means Committee Thursday, Feb. 14. One, Senate Bill 5166, would eliminate the state’s portion of the property tax and create a state income tax. The legislation would also reduce the state’s retail sales tax from 6.5 to 3.5 percent. While it received a public hearing, comments made by Tom indicated that the legislation would not move forward in the Senate this session. Legislation sponsor Sen. Mara-

lyn Chase, D-Shoreline, believes that an income tax is the appropriate response to the slowly improving economy and high rate of unemployment. “Until our people, the workforce, have enough disposable income in their pockets to go out to our brick-and-mortar stores to buy durable goods, we are not going to have economic recovery, given our present tax structure,” she said. “I think it’s crucial that people begin to understand that consumption drives our system.” The state’s revenue relies heavily on property, business and occupation (B&O) and sales taxes. Forty-three states levy a personal income tax, with the exception of Washington, Nevada, South Dakota, Wyoming, Alaska, Florida and Texas. Only seven of the 43 states have a flat-rate income tax. Forty-five states collect a sales

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LEADERS | FROM PAGE 3A

nesses in the manufacturing or technology industry. The aspect of the speech that most stuck out to Pend Oreille County Republican Party chairman Norris Boyd was government spending. “We’re still talking about raising taxes and spending more money,” he said. “The mathematics just doesn’t work. We just can’t keep borrowing against the future.” Obama said it’s a bad idea to prevent cuts to defense spending by making cuts to Medicare and Social Security benefits. Boyd disagrees. He said the proposed cuts to the defense budget are scary. Meanwhile, he doesn’t like the concept that those entitlement program are sacred, saving them from any spending cuts. “It just doesn’t make sense to me. They’ve got problems, and we need to fix them,” he said. Obama acknowledged that the biggest driver of the county’s

long term debt is the rising cost of health care for an aging population. He called for “modest” reforms and said the Affordable Care Act is helping slow the growing costs of health care. “I believe we had to start somewhere,” Johnson said. “Part of the health care act has already helped people,” he added, noting that young adults are now covered under their parents’ plans and those with pre-existing conditions are finding it easier to get coverage. Boyd feels that Obamacare is just making things more complicated. He’s working with his business on the transition and said the change is scary and they’re not sure how to plan. Looking to the future, Obama’s talk about improving family’s access to preschool education stuck out to Johnson. “If we have a good program in place, it helps the families keep working and be able to send their kids to school, which will set them up for success,” he said.

Animals in need of a good home will be featured in this section on the first and third week of each month, thanks to these advertisers and The Miner Newspaper. These pets can be adopted from the Priest River Animal Rescue, Hwy 2, across the street from Mitchell’s Grocery Store in Priest River. Hours are 11 to 4, 208-448-0699. Please visit our web site to view all available adoptions at www.pranimalrescue.org

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THE MINER



Teens may get voteregistration privilege House committee narrowly nods support for registration at driver licensing office BY KYLEE ZABEL WNPA OLYMPIA NEWS BUREAU

OLYMPIA – Legislation that would allow teens 16 and 17 to preregister to vote while applying for their driver’s license passed out of committee on a 6-5 vote. House Bill 1279, termed the Young Voter Registration Equality Act, would help engage high school students and soon-to-be adults in the political process, declared primesponsor Rep. Steve Bergquist, D-Renton. It would also increase accessibility to voter registration, he said. But Rep. Vincent Buys, RLynden, claimed that the bill is not a matter of access since Washington provides online voter registration. Supporters of the bill said its passage was important to upholding democratic standards. Many concerns, however, were expressed. Buys noted that technical glitches could allow ballots to be sent to preregistered, non-eligible voters. Katie Blinn of the Secretary of State’s office said that while these types of problems can be addressed with advanced technology, a fair share of human input is needed to process the computer program, increasing the risk of non-eligible persons receiving a ballot. And with the need for more personnel or an increase in man-hours comes a higher price tag. Others are concerned about the mobility of 18-year-olds and the cost of sending voters’ pamphlets and ballots to persons

who no longer live at the same residence when they registered at ages 16 or 17. While 16- and 17-year-olds are among the most stable in terms of moving trends, 18- to 24-year-olds are the most mobile. Bergquist stated, however, that a majority of his 12thgrade students are 18 during an election cycle and, therefore, eligible to vote. There are also questions about whether preregistration would actually increase voter turnout among young adults. For the national election that took place this past November, 49 percent of youth (ages 18 to 29) voted country-wide. In Washington, about 80 percent of registered youth turned out. In spite of the concerns with the legislation, arguments made against the bill irritated Rep. Reuven Carlyle, D-Seattle. “It’s incredibly hard for me to feel anything other than a sense of frustration that we are seemingly afraid of a wave of young people charging into our electoral system,” he said. Blinn maintained that the Secretary of State’s office is concerned about increased costs this bill could bring. She urged that if the bill passes, lawmakers also provide appropriate funding for the program. There would be no cost to the internal functioning of the Secretary of State’s office or DOL, but counties may have to modify their voter registration management system for preregistered teens, which could accrue additional costs. Eight other states and the District of Columbia have similar laws that provide people at least 16 years of age to preregister to vote.

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jobs would be lost by 2016 due to the impact an income tax would tax ranging from an average of have on businesses, according to 2 to 10 percent, and most states an economic model created by have property taxes, typically the Beacon Hill Institute of Sufadministered by local jurisdicfolk University in Boston. tions. But the executive director While the legislation aims to of the Economic Opportunity eliminate the state’s share of Institute, John Burbank, said property tax, used primarily for that Washington’s current tax education, counties would constructure just isn’t equitable. tinue to levy local property taxes In the current system, lowto support municipal and county income families pay 17 percent services. Local sales tax also of their income in taxes, middleis excluded from the proposed income families pay 10 percent legislation. and the top 1 percent contribAn estimated $1.3 billion utes about 2.8 percent. Essentialin revenue would be acquired ly, the poor are paying a greater within this current “They either need to get share of biennium if an income their net tax were to be institut- serious … or they need to earnings. ed. In the 2015-2017 get out of the way.” Accordbiennium, $6.6 billion ing to would be expected. the act’s Sen. Rodney Tom, D-Bellevue In 2010, $8.8 bilgraduated lion was collected in On Senate Democrats three-rate FROM PAGE 6A

property taxes and about 54 percent of that revenue is spent on public schools. The state sales tax is responsible for roughly 50 percent of the state’s general fund. If the bill were to take effect, the state would lose an estimated $1.05 billion for fiscal year 2015 and $2 billion in 2016, according to the legislation’s fiscal note. While proponents said that the income tax would provide a more reliable source of revenue to the state, opponents said that more jobs would be destroyed and small businesses would take a hit. “The voters of this state have repeatedly said that they do not want a state income tax,” Tom said, “yet here we go again hearing the same old proposals aimed at taxing our small-business owners out of business and taking every last dime out of the pockets of middle-class families.” Jason Mercier of the Washington Policy Center claimed that 67,810 private and public sector

FEBRUARY 20, 2013 |

structure, in which higher earners pay a higher tax rate, families with an income higher than $120,650 would pay $3,574 in taxes plus 6 percent of the excess over $120,650. Burbank said that the proposed tax structure would increase taxes for millionaires by about $50,000. In 2010, voters rejected Initiative 1098, which would have imposed an income tax on those in the top 1 percent, by a 65 percent margin. “If all they (Senate Democrats) want to do is introduce one ridiculous tax proposal after another, then I guarantee they are wasting their time,” Tom said. “They either need to get serious and work with us on creating jobs, reforming education and producing a sustainable budget, or they need to get out of the way.” Fiscal issues are beginning to creep into the legislative process as the deadline for introduction of legislation looms Feb. 22.

D E AT H

Jean Bowman Lowry Newport

Jean Bowman Lowry, a longtime Newport resident, passed away Sunday, Feb 17 at Newport Long Term Care. She was 96.

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A memorial service will be held Saturday, Feb. 23 at 11 a.m. at the United Church of Christ in Newport. A full obituary will appear in next week’s paper. Sherman-Knapp Funeral Home in Newport is in charge of arrangements.

HELMET | FROM PAGE 6A

tion. The standard helmet-reliability test is determined by two guided falls per helmet head-form onto a fixed steel anvil, according to the Snell Memorial Foundation. The mechanical energy generated during the test is assessed and the severity of impact is determined. The Snell model certifies all sizes of helmets that are able to withstand 150 joules/110 joules of mechanical energy. Devereaux argued that, because certification labeling is so ambiguous and labeling requirements and sizes are of public knowledge, law enforcement cannot tell by visual observation on the roadway whether a helmet being worn by a motorcyclist is certified or not. Also, if a motorcyclist is pulled over on suspicion of wearing a non-certified helmet, law enforcement does not have criteria to judge, in that moment, whether the helmet is certified, he maintained. “The Washington law goes too far and it is too much of an intrusion on our individual liberties and rights,” he claimed. If Washington voters are able to pass legislation allowing civil liberties such as same-sex marriage and the legalization of recreational-use marijuana, that negates “the paternalistic instinct of government to control us,” he said. Continuing, he said, rhetorically, “Then why not allow

motorcyclists to have the freedom of choice in how they protect themselves while riding?” Donnie Landsman of ABATE of Washington also stated that requiring a helmet creates a false sense of security. Richard Bright, a veteran and resident of the Fourteenth Legislative District, agreed. “Fatalities go up because people think they’re invincible with a helmet,” he said. Health concerns remain for motorcyclists involved in accidents. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), wearing a helmet reduces the crash-fatality rate by 37 percent. Dave Overstreet of AAA Washington encouraged committee members not to pass the bill, saying that not wearing a helmet makes a motorcyclist three times more likely to suffer traumatic brain injury in the event of an accident. But Government Relations Specialist for the Washington Road Riders Association, Larry Walker, said that no crash is ever safe; therefore, arguments made in an effort to protect motorcyclists from harm are misleading. “We’re buying into the idea of safer crashing,” he said. “There’s no such thing as a safe crash.” SB 5143 has not been scheduled for an executive session, at which time committee members would be able to decide if the bill would pass out of committee.


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| FEBRUARY 20, 2013



THE MINER

Conditions right for invasive mussels

Senate bill would repeal unfunded family medical leave insurance House bill adds funding, expands coverage for working families BY ZOEY PALMER WNPA OLYMPIA NEWS BUREAU

OLYMPIA – Paid medical leave for new parents may remain an unfulfilled goal if a bill in the state Senate becomes law. Senate Bill 5159, sponsored by Sen. John Braun, R-Chehalis, would repeal of Washington’s Family and Medical Leave Insurance Act (FLI), which requires employers to pay $250 per week to employees who are on family leave. Two other bills, one in each house, are proposed that would expand FLI coverage. Reflecting on SB 5159, Braun told members of the Senate Committee on Commerce and Labor in a public hearing last week, “This Act was one of good intentions, but it’s one that we never properly funded.” FLI was passed in 2007, but implementation was delayed in 2009 and again in 2011 because funding to start the program could not be secured. FLI is still unfunded, but is slated to go into effect in 2015 if not repealed. Washington currently provides unpaid leave for new parents, including adoptive parents, under the Washington Family and Medical Leave Act of 2006 (FLA). FLA is an extension of a similar federal law. The federal Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 guarantees 12 weeks of unpaid medical leave for both parents, while Washington’s law can provide up to 24 weeks depending on medical needs. Both laws also cover leave taken to care for a seriously ill family member and ensure that the employee

may return to work in the same position or a position of equal responsibility, pay and benefits. Neither the federal law nor Washington’s FLA law provide paid family leave. Women and immigrants especially need paid family leave, said Emily Murphy of the immigrant advocacy group OneAmerica, because they disproportionately work in fields where pay and benefits are low, such as retail, construction and hospitality. “Family and medical leave insurance is critical for our members who give their lives to their jobs, working for decades in grueling physical conditions,” Murphy said. Some business-owners say that having the law in place, but unimplemented, is an uncertainty that makes hiring new workers unattractive. They want it removed. “They don’t know what it’s going to cost, they don’t know how it’s going to be funded, they don’t know if they’re going to be taxed or how much they would be taxed; it is an unknown,” said Gary Smith, Independent Business Association executive director. Erin Shannon, Small Business Director for the Washington Policy Center, a conservative think-tank which supports repeal, said that businesses may cut non-mandated benefits to make up for the cost of mandatory paid family leave benefits. According to Sen. Karen Keiser, D-Kent, who sponsored the 2007 FLI bill, the program would cost $11-13 million to set up and benefits would be paid for through a one-cent-per-hour premium paid by employees, similar to worker’s compensation.

FERGUSON | FROM PAGE 4A

his new cabinet. OK, now that we have reviewed some of the frosting on the cake, let us turn to the Wall Street Journal for an assessment not hitched to kissing the President’s aft. Her selection was an easy call for the president because, writes Kimberley Strassel, “The president knows he can rely on Ms. Jewell to do for the federal government exactly what she’s done at an activist level: Lock up land, target industries, kill traditional jobs.” There are companies that strive to be environmentally responsible, says WSJ, and there is a different category, bordering on the radical extreme which use investor dollars to wage open green activism. REI is among those. Ms. Jewel “has been central to campaigns that have squelched thousands of jobs in the name of environmental purity.” “REI, for instance, actively supported the Clinton-era Roadless Area Conservation Rule, which in 2001 locked up a third

“It’s just like an insurance plan,” Keiser said. Explanations differ for why FLI has been on the books for six years without being funded. Some, such as Keiser, blame political infighting combined with the Great Recession, which greatly hurt state income. Others say the Legislature simply lacks the political willpower to pay for the program. Kris Tefft of the Association of Washington Businesses, which supports repeal, is in the latter camp. “In 2009, when the program was originally set to come into existence, the Legislature hit the snooze button,” he said. “In 2011, the Legislature hit the snooze button again.” Former Gov. Chris Gregoire’s proposed budget, most of which current Gov. Jay Inslee is likely to adopt, also does not fund FLI. Tefft said this means the Legislature will “simply unplug the alarm clock,” which amounts to de facto repeal. Many opponents of the bill say that FLI should be kept as law until funding can be found. Mike Elliot, a small business owner, said at the hearing, “I want to have something like this available for my employees as my small business grows.” Two other states besides Washington – California and New Jersey – currently have paid family leave laws. According to Sarah Francis of MomsRising, an advocacy group for women and families, 177 countries have some form of paid maternity leave, but the United States is not one of them. The bill was passed out of committee during an executive session on Monday, Feb. 5. Its next stop is the Senate Rules Commit-

|| Jacob T. Fultz

of all national forests, dealing another blow to logging and mining. REI’s well-heeled clientele ultimately got 58 million acres of ‘pristine’ walking trails. Western loggers got to tell their kids they no longer had a job.” REI’s bigger influence, however, says the WSJ, has come from funneling money to radical groups via the Conservation Alliance, a foundation that saw 77 oil and gas leases halted in Utah, 55,000 acres put off limits to oil and gas jobs in Colorado, the destructions of functioning dams and the removal of new acres from any business pursuits. It saw to lock up of half of Alaska’s national Petroleum Reserve. “She knows that there’s no contradiction between being good stewards of the land and our economic progress,” the president said. Ms. Jewell’s history, says the WSJ, “is instead proof that she believes no such thing.” (Adele Ferguson can be reached at P.O. Box 69, Hansville, WA 98340)

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tee, which decides whether the bill moves to the Senate floor for consideration. Keiser is currently sponsoring a new bill that would expand the FLI program to pay two-thirds of an employee’s pay up to a maximum of $1,000 per week for up to 12 weeks of family or medical leave. If passed, SB 5292 would raise the premium to $2, which may be shared between employee and employer. It has not been scheduled for a hearing. Its House companion bill, HB 1457, had a public hearing Feb. 5. Puget Sound Advocates for Retirement Action board member Frank Irigon said during that hearing that as more Washingtonians reach retirement age, “our kids now have the responsibility of caring for an elder in addition to the responsibilities to their own children and their jobs.” He added, “Family and medical leave insurance is part of the solution to a looming crisis in elder care.” Francis also testified in support of the bill. Steve Neighbors, chairman of the TERRA Staffing Group, a Washington temp agency, opposes HB 1457 as well as the original FLI program. “It’s just another tax, another labor expense,” he said. Programs like FLI also constrain businesses, said Neighbors. “When all employers have to do the same thing, you take away opportunity, you take away creativity, and everybody looks the same,” he told the committee. Also speaking in opposition were Tefft, Smith and Shannon.

Air Force Airman Jacob T. Fultz graduated from basic military training at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. He is a 2012 graduate of Timber- Fultz lake High School, Spirit Lake, the son of Christian Fultz of Spirit Lake. The airman completed an

PORTLAND – In a presentation to the Northwest Power and Conservation Council Wednesday, Feb. 13, Portland State University researchers who have been studying the potential for freshwater mussels to take hold in the Columbia River Basin say water chemistry and temperature are sufficient, if not ideal, to support the invasive species that have wrecked havoc in lakes and rivers from the Midwest to the Southwest. Locally, the state of Idaho and a group at Diamond Lake has set up boat inspection stations to check vessels for mussels and other invasive species. The Pend Oreille River eventually joins the Columbia. “The results underscore the importance of the boat inspection programs and other efforts in our states to keep mussels out of Northwest waters,” council chairman Bill Bradbury said. Dime-size zebra and quagga mussels adhere to boat hulls and submerged structures, including dams and dock pilings, and form thick hard mats of shells that can not only block water passage but also disrupt the environment by depleting nutrients for other species and ruining fish habitat. In the right conditions of water temperature and calcium content, the mussels grow voraciously. They are transported from place to place primarily on infested watercraft. Mussel infestation is a significant concern for states and dam operators in the Northwest. The council’s independent economic advisory board estimates that the potential cost of controlling an infestation and cleaning hydropower and fishpassage facilities if the mussels take hold here would easily be in the tens of millions of dollars per year – and hundreds of millions

S E RV I C E

intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force.

Tyler W. Rux Army Staff Sgt. Tyler W. Rux has returned to the U.S. after being

N OT E S

To all our friends and family for your kindness, prayers, cards, flowers, food and words of support during our time of sadness. Gerald leaves us with many great memories and will live in our hearts and memories forever. A special thank you to the wonderful staff at Life Care Center, Luther Park Assisted Living and Valley Vista in Sandpoint who took such good care of Gerald during his time of need. Thank you to the Ranch Club, Father Day, Saint Catherine Church, Bill Exworthy, Dennis Veltri and Sherman Knapp Funeral Home.

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deployed overseas at a forward operating base to serve in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Operation Enduring Freedom is the official name given to antiterrorism military operations involving U.S. troops and allied coalition partners. Active duty and reserve component members from all branches of the U.S. armed forces have been deployed to serve in South, Southwest and Central Asia, the Arabian peninsula, the Horn of Africa, islands in

Thank You

in total costs to protect lakes and rivers, inspect and decontaminate infested watercraft, and address other impacts. “We found that 68 percent of the mussels raised in untreated Columbia River water gained weight – they grew. This does not bode well for the Columbia,” said researcher Brian Adair, a Portland State graduate student. Adair and the Portland State research team focused their research on quagga mussels. They collected mussels from a dock in Lake Mead, Nev., and submerged them in buckets of untreated Columbia and Willamette river water. Then they gradually adjusted two critical growth factors for mussels – calcium concentrations and water temperature – and observed how the mussels reacted. In the research setting, optimal growth of quagga mussels occurred at calcium concentrations between 35 and 50 milligrams per liter of water, and temperatures of 64-68 degrees Fahrenheit. Calcium concentrations and water temperature in the Columbia River vary throughout the year from about 12-22 milligrams of calcium per liter, and from 37-76 degrees Fahrenheit. The researchers also tested several types of surface coatings to see how well they inhibited mussel growth. Such coatings, painted on submerged surfaces, present a slick surface that can either prevent mussel attachment or be more easily cleaned of mussels and other undesirable organisms with high-pressure water. The coatings are not toxic, but they are expensive – about $130 per square meter. Panels of several material – treated and untreated concrete, and steel – were submerged in the Columbia River water.

the Pacific and Europe. Rux is an infantry squad leader assigned to the 4th Airborne Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. He has served in the military for eight years. He is the son of Ken and Cindy Rux of Colstrip, Mont. His wife, Amanda, is the daughter of Tod and Peggy Loutxenhiser of Newport. The staff sergeant is a 2001 graduate of Newport High School.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY DR. SEUSS

Celebration at

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116 S Washington • Newport

The family of “Beaver” Gerald Martin Linda, Jerry, Kerry Jo and Families Department of Homeland Security Customs and Border Protection U.S. Border Patrol Spokane Sector 10710 N. Newport Hwy Spokane, WA 99218

Request for Quotes; Horse Boarding Metaline, WA area The United States Border Patrol is seeking bids from interested parties to provide boarding facilities for up to 4 horses to be used by the Metaline, WA, Border Patrol station. Dates: April 1, 2013 to March 31, 2014, with possible yearly options to extend from April 1, 2014 thru March 31, 2018. Bids must be received No Later Than 3pm March 5, 2013. Bid must include cost to board each horse per month. Boarding requirements are included in the formal Request for Quotes and Statement of Work. Obtain a copy for the “Request for Quotes” and “Statement of Work” from your local U.S. Border Patrol office at: Metaline: 105 Hwy 31, Metaline, WA., PH: 509-446-1037 Or Contact: US Border Patrol, Attn: Procurement, 10710 N. Newport Hwy, Spokane WA 99218; PH: 509-468-3869. The vendor must be less than a 30 minute, one way, driving distance from the Border Patrol station, or the station’s area of operation. The winning vendor will be required to have a local business license (if required), Federal ID number, obtain a Dunn and Bradstreet number, and register in the governments System for Award Management (SAM.gov) This will require direct/electronic deposit of your payments. The winning vendor and all employees must be legal U.S. residents and are subject to a criminal history, and background investigation. ALL of this will only be required IF YOU ARE AWARDED THE CONTRACT.

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THE NEWPORT MINER

North Pend Oreille

NEWS FROM NORTH PEND OREILLE COUNTY INCLUDING IONE, METALINE & METALINE FALLS



FEBRUARY 20, 2013 |

Cutter Theatre seeks new director METALINE FALLS – After four months being led by volunteers, the Cutter Theatre in Metaline Falls is accepting applications for an executive director. The complete job description and application information is available at the Cutter office during regular business hours, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to noon. The deadline for applications is Feb. 28 at noon. Besides completing the application form and submitting a resume, the Cutter is requesting a personal letter of application explaining the individual’s strengths and interest in the position. The position of executive director is a complex one, according to Tara Leininger, who is chairwoman of the hiring committee. “This individual has to have strong organizational skills, maintaining a complex office, and managing a myriad of events and other business entities within the facility,” she said, adding that executive director also has to be an individual who can work with a diverse array of people. “From the board of directors, the other Cutter employees, volunteers, and the people who come to

the Cutter for any number of reasons, the executive director has to be a real people person,” Leininger said. The executive director duties may include preparing grants, working with the bookkeeper and facility director, helping arrange for party rentals, assisting children arriving for Artscape, or making sure that volunteers are ready for that night’s theatre performance. A full job description is available at the theatre. The position is 40 hours per week with a starting salary of $11 per hour. Leininger said that the job description for the executive director has gone through some major changes since the last time the position was open, but that the work at the Cutter is rewarding and never dull. As a non-profit organization, the challenges facing the Cutter are ever changing, she said. With Leininger’s help as artistic director, Kim DiRienz filled in as interim executive director after Susan Harris stepped down to save money for the non-profit theater. For more information about the application process for the executive director position, contact the Cutter Theatre at 509-446-4108 or 302 Park St.

|| N O R T H P E N D O R E I L L E CO U N T Y E V E N T S WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20 Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Metalines Library Basic Computer Class: 11 a.m. to Noon - Ione Library, Call 509-442-3030 For Reservations Weight Watchers: 6 p.m. Weigh in 6:30-7 p.m. meeting - Ione Assembly of God Ione Town Council: 7 p.m. Clerk’s Office THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21 Story Time: 11 a.m. - Ione Library North Pend Oreille Lions: 7 p.m. - Ione Train Depot FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 Story Time and Crafts: 10:30 a.m. - Metalines Library Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. - Ione Senior Center SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23

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TO

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Metalines Book Group: 10:30 a.m. - Metalines Library ‘Jennie’s Tiger’ Book Discussion: Noon - Metalines Library MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25 Pend Oreille Fire District No. 2 Board: 10 a.m. - Fire Station 23, 390442 Highway 20, Ione Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Metalines Library TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26 Story Time: 11 a.m. - Ione Library WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27 Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Metalines Library Basic Computer Class: 11 a.m. to Noon - Ione Library, Call 509-442-3030 For Reservations Weight Watchers: 6 p.m. Weigh in 6:30-7 p.m. meeting - Ione Assembly of God

CO N TAC T

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WASHINGTON

Federal

President Barack Obama (D) The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Washington DC 20500 Comments: 202-456-1111 Switchboard: 202-456-1414 E-mail: president@whitehouse.gov Sen. Maria Cantwell (D) 511 Dirksen Senate Bldg. Washington DC 20510 202-224-3441 http://cantwell.senate.gov Local: U.S. Courthouse 920 W. Riverside, Suite 697 Spokane WA 99201 509-353-2507 Sen. Patty Murray (D) 173 Russell Senate Office Bldg. Washington DC 20510 202-224-2621 http://murray.senate.gov/ Local: 10 N. Post St. Suite 600 Spokane WA 99201 509-624-9515 Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R) Fifth Congressional District 2421 Rayburn House Office Building Washington DC 20515 202-225-2006 www.mcmorrisrodgers.house.gov Local: 10 N. Post St. Suite 625 Spokane WA 99201 Spokane: 509-353-2374 Colville: 509-684-3481

State

Governor Jay Inslee Office of the Governor PO Box 40002 Olympia, WA 98504-0002 360-902-4111 Relay operators for the deaf or hard of hearing, dial 7-1-1 www.governor.wa.gov Legislative District 7 Sen. John Smith (R) 115B Irv Newhouse Building P.O. Box 40407 Olympia WA 98504-0407 360-786-7612 E-mail: john.smith@leg.wa.gov Rep. Joel Kretz (R) 335A Legislative Building P.O. Box 40600 Olympia WA 98504-0600 360-786-7988 E-mail: kretz.joel@leg.wa.gov Home Office: 20 N. Main St. Omak, WA 98841 509-826-7203 Rep. Shelly Short (R) 204 Modular Building A P.O. Box 40600 Olympia WA 98504-0600 360-786-7908 E-mail: short.shelly@leg.wa.gov Home office: 147 North Clark Ave. Suite 5 Republic WA 99166 509-775-8047 Washington Legislative Hotline 1-800-562-6000 (in session, weekdays 8 a.m.-noon, 1-4:30 p.m.) Legislative homepage: http://www.leg. wa.gov

9A

Talk about depression in weekly series IONE – A seven week series on depression recovery is beginning at the Ione Community Center Thursday, Feb. 21 at 6:30 p.m. In a program sponsored by the Seventh-day Adventist Church of Ione, a DVD series of Dr. Neil Nedley will present “Identifying Depression and Its Causes.” The public is invited to attend. Nedley believes that depression is reversible and does not have to be tolerated as a livelong condition with miserable effects. The program aims to help people find the help they need to feel rested and have a renewed energy level. For more information, call 509-445-0401. The following week’s topic is on the “secret weapon” for helping treat depression and disorders that throw off circadian rhythm. That discussion will be Feb. 28 at 6:30 p.m. at the community center.

COURTESY PHOTO|RICK STONE

Fire 2 hires paramedic Pend Oreille County Fire District No. 2 has hired a paramedic. Justin Baker was chosen from six applicants. He comes from Cowlitz County Fire District 6 in Castlerock where he has worked both as a volunteer and paid firefighter for the last six years. Baker received his formal paramedic training from NCTI in Vancouver, Wash. He will work at the district’s administration office, Fire Station 23 at 390442 Highway 20. His work hours will be 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Slow chase ends in arrests of burglary suspects OLDTOWN – Bonner County Sheriff deputies used a spike strip to stop a vehicle that fled at speeds of 15-45 mph Saturday, according to a press release from the Pend Oreille County Sheriff’s Office. Harry D. Lashbrook, 49, of Newport and Christopher D. O’Neel, 44, of Spokane Valley were arrested approximately a mile west of Priest River on Highway 2. Pend Oreille County Sheriff deputy Kevin Olsen had been following the pair, after responding to a burglary alarm. Bonner County deputies were called as the vehicle traveled into Idaho. Pend Oreille sheriff deputies suspect the pair in two burglaries 10 days apart at a Bead Lake Drive residence. A vehicle, UTV utility vehicle and other miscellaneous items were reported stolen in a burglary Feb. 5.

The homeowner had installed a burglar alarm after that burglary. On Saturday, Feb. 16 around 5 a.m. the burglar alarm went off. While deputies were responding, they received an alert from dispatchers to be on the lookout for a red pickup pulling a flatbed trailer with ATVs and a snowmobile. Olsen, the lead investigator on the Feb. 5 burglary, spotted a red truck pulling a trailer traveling south on LeClerc Road. He recognized the off-road vehicles on the trailer as similar to those he saw in a garage while investigating in the Bead Lake burglary. An attempt to stop the suspect vehicle using lights and sirens resulted in a short, slow speed chase. When the suspects were arrested, miscellaneous items located in the suspect vehicle were consistent with items stolen in the Feb. 5

burglary, according to the press release. In Idaho, Lashbrook faces charges of driving without privileges, eluding a peace officer, possession of methamphetamine and possession of stolen property. O’Neel was charged with possession of stolen property and possession of a controlled substance. Bail was set at $30,000 for Lashbrook and $20,000 for O’Neel. They are being held at the Bonner County Jail. They will also face burglary charges in Washington.

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10A

| FEBRUARY 20, 2013



Broadsword resigns for Health and Welfare position Mental health issues top her new job priority list

on changing the nature of the board of commissioners, alleviating some of the tension that had BY MICHELLE NEDVED formed between commissionOF THE MINER ers and other county officials. Broadsword said there’s already SANDPOINT – After barely a change in atmosphere in the two months in office, Bonner administrative building, with emCounty commissioner ployees smiling more and more Joyce Broadsword cooperation. is resigning to take “I hope the governor will choose a position with the someone who will help with Idaho Department of that,” she said. Health and Welfare. Broadsword is the District 1 The former four-term commissioner, serving Algoma, Idaho State Senator Careywood, Cocolalla, Dover, will resign effective Broadsword Edgemere, Gamlin Lake, Kelso, Feb. 28 to take the job Sagle, Southside, Washington of regional director of Health and and Westmond. Welfare. The current Region 1 The Republican said she did not director, Ron Beecher is retiring. actively seek the position of reBroadsword defeated incumgional director, but was recruited bent Cornel by Health “It became clear I could Rasor in and Welfare the primary director Dick do more to help people in election last Armstrong. northern Idaho by accepting spring and Broadsword then defeated the job as your new Region 1 served as independent Director – and that’s why I got vice-chaircandidate woman of Steve Johnson into public service in the first the Senate in November’s place.” Health and general elecWelfare tion. Committee -Joyce Broadsword County while in the commission- Bonner County Commissioner Legislature. ers in Idaho “In worksubmit their ing with resignations to the county audiSenator Broadsword in the Legtor. Broadsword hasn’t officially islature, her commitment to imsubmitted her resignation. She prove the lives of Idaho citizens told The Miner county clerk/audi- became quite clear to all of us,” tor Marie Scott is out ill and won’t Armstrong said. “She knows the return until the end of February. health and human service issues The seat will be filled according of Idaho and has a proven record to Idaho Statute. The county’s for getting things done. We are Republican Central Committee very excited about having her on will submit three candidates to board in this critical leadership the governor within 15 days of position.” Broadsword’s resignation. The Broadsword told The Miner governor will then have 15 days she thought long and hard about to appoint one of those three to the decision to leave the board the seat, who will remain in office of commissioners and it wasn’t until the position is next up for an easy decision. Ultimately, election, in 2014. her concerns for mental health Broadsword said she thinks reform are what pushed her newly elected commissioner toward the state position. Cary Kelly has a good handle “I had concerns about leaving

Opting out of Growth Management Act on table

my post on the Commission, but it became clear I could do more to help people in northern Idaho by accepting the job as your new Region 1 Director – and that’s why I got into public service in the first place,” Broadsword said in a press release. Broadsword told The Miner that the nation, and Idaho in particular, is suffering from a rise in suicide rates. She said Idaho is near the top of the list countrywide and with shootings occurring in Connecticut, Colorado and Arizona, she sees a need to expand mental health coverage. While the tragedies have focused the nation’s attention on gun control, Broadsword sees it more of a mental health issue. The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq are also contributing to post traumatic stress disorder and suicide. “There’s a drastic need for beds for those in crisis,” Broadsword said. Her position with Health and Welfare won’t be supervisory. It’s rather a special tasks position that will help her work with the mental healthcare system and “help move that discussion toward improving treatment,” she said. She would like to see more regional treatment facilities, rather that just two to serve the entire state. “The timing stinks,” she said. She asked Health and Welfare if they could wait for her to take the position, to give her a few more weeks or months on the board of commissioners, but they couldn’t wait. As regional director, Broadsword will serve Idaho’s 10 most northern counties, including Bonner. She’ll also serve as the tribal liaison. “That’s important too, but to me it’s that work I can do with the mental health boards (that will make the biggest impact),” she said.

Boundary Dam supervisor retires Johnson will remain involved with county EDC BY JANELLE ATYEO OF THE MINER

METALINE – Before retiring from his position at Boundary Dam Project this past fall, Lonnie Johnson put in more than 43 years working on hydropower projects for Seattle City Light. He said his retirement, official Nov. 2, 2012, is about taking Johnson some “me” time. But he’s still keeping busy as chairman of the Pend Oreille Economic Development Council (EDC). “I’m happy to help where I can,” he said. He believes the EDC is in a place now where it can be very effective. “I see it as being a real asset to the county,” he said. Johnson just turned 60. Though he can’t believe he’s “middle aged” now, he said he’s feeling great. “All is good in my world,” he said. Johnson grew up on Seattle City Light’s Skagit River Hydroelectric Project when his dad worked there. Johnson began his own career there, then came across the state to Boundary Dam in 1999. Jim Collen, who was manager at the time, asked him to come help out as they rebuilt the dam’s turbines. “I expected to be here six or seven years, and that turned into a few more,” Johnson said. As generation supervisor at Boundary, for many years Johnson was the sole management at the dam. When Collen retired at the end of the turbine rebuild, the position was refilled, and Johnson was responsible for the management oversight. For about two years from late 2008 to 2010, Jay Pickett – who

THE NEWPORT MINER

worked for a short time last year “The West side kind of lost as general manager of the Pend its appeal to me,” he said. “It’s Oreille Public Utility District – grown too much.” filled in as the manager whose The same goes for the Johnduty was to oversee Boundary son’s youngest son, Kirk. Like his as well Lucky Peak Dam near dad, he grew up on the Skagit Boise. project, commuting 40 miles When City Light hires Johneach way to attend school. son’s replacement, the plan is to “It’s a wonder the kid even once again have a dual manager turned out,” Johnson said jokto oversee both Boundary and ingly. Lucky Peak. City His son decided Light has advertised “I’m happy to help he also likes the for the position and small town area, where I can.” is planning interand he and his wife views. joined his parIn the meantime, Lonnie Johnson ents in Metaline. Johnson said other Former Boundary Dam Another son of the Boundary employ- Generation Supervisor Johnsons lives with ees have been put in his wife in Sedrocharge to take up his Woolley. position. Looking back on “We’ve got some really capable his years with Seattle City Light, folks there now,” he said. Johnson said he spent a lot of Johnson said he has some oftime in a position of responsibilfers for other jobs, but he’s not ity. He enjoyed it and felt like he considering them too seriously. thrived on that. But it’s time to He and his wife plan to stick step back, he said. around north Pend Oreille “I’m liking the me time,” he County now that they’ve made said. “I’m enjoying being respontheir home here. sible for myself now.”

Skoog, Merrill testify that small counties need out BY DON GRONNING OF THE MINER

OLYMPIA – Bills that would allow small counties to opt out of the Growth Management Act are making their way through both the state House of Representatives and Senate. The bills affect counties with populations smaller than 20,000. Pend Oreille County has a population of about 13,000. It is one of four counties that would be affected by the legislation. Columbia, Ferry, Garfield are the others. Pend Oreille County voluntarily opted into planning under the Growth Management Act in 1990. The House bill (HB 1224) is sponsored by Rep. Joel Kretz, R-Wauconda, who sponsored a similar bill in 2011. The Senate bill (SB 5636) is sponsored by Sen. John Smith, R-Colville. “The bill is the same as it was a couple years ago, except for one change,” Kretz told the state House of Representatives local government committee Feb. 8. Language was put into the bill that would require cities to vote yes or no on opting out, if a county wanted to do so. That’s different than the 2011 bill. “They could just not act and block the county from (opting out),” he said. “The only change is that they would have to give it a thumbs up or thumbs down.” Counties would have to hold a public hearing before commissioners voted on whether to opt out. The 2011 bill died in committee. It was opposed by then county commissioner Diane Wear, who said at the time that she feared it would affect the county’s ability to get funding from the state. In last fall’s election, Karen Skoog defeated Wear, a Democrat, for the District 1 seat on the county commission. Skoog and former commissioner Laura Merrill, who now is a lobbyist for the Washington State Association of Counties, both testified before committees in the state House and Senate in favor of current legislation. They are both Republicans. Skoog testified on behalf of the Pend Oreille County commissioners on Feb. 8 and Feb. 18. She said the county had enough planning, with the Kalispel Tribe, the PUD, the Bonneville Power Administration and others engaged in planning. The county has a comprehensive plan, a shoreline management plan and has opted in to the Voluntary Stewardship Program. “I believe we have an abundance of plans,” she said. “What we don’t have is a lot of growth. Or jobs. Or extra time or money in our county budget and our planning department.” Merrill, who resigned her county commission seat midterm to go to work for the Washington State Association of Counties, said that WSAC supports the bills because they favor local control.

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“Our underlying principals “I think the sticking points are speak to local control and local the same place they’ve been for options and this is an optional probably 20 years or so, in terms bill,” she told the house commit- of compliance with the Growth tee. Management Act, particularly She said the time and money for critical areas and resource spent on appeals is very expenlands designations,” she said. sive for small counties. The act requires counties desigThere were some environnate and protect certain critical mental areas and resource problems, “I believe we have an lands from developespecially ment. 20 years abundance of plans. What we Rep. Vincent Buys, don’t have is a lot of growth. R-Lynden, asked ago in Stevens Putney just what Or jobs” County, growth there was Sen. to manage in small -Karen Skoog Smith told counties. the Sen- Pend Oreille County Commissioner “It may not be ate comhappening right mittee. now or as fast as It was thought that the Growth in other places in the state, but Management Act would help there is growth happening,” with these problems, but that’s Putney said. not how it turned out, he said. Darcy Nonemacher of the “You go to the same commuWashington Environmental nities today and they still have Council also testified against the same issues,” he said. “Optthe bills. She said the Growth ing into growth management Management Act has been an didn’t fix the problems, all it important law to ensure patdid was punish all of the people terns of growth that make sense. who were doing things right She said an important part of throughout the county.” the law has been to give local April Putney of Futurewise communities flexibility in plantestified against the bills in both ning for growth. committees. She said compreThe law also provides clear hensive planning was needed. and consistent objectives for The Growth Management Act long term planning, Nonemrequires the state to have a long acher said. The bills undermine term planning in transportathat, she said. tion, housing, design and comIf county commissioners vote munity planning, Putney said. to opt out, they couldn’t get She said Futurewise was hoping back in for at least 10 years, to get changes in the bills so according to the legislation. they could support it. They would be required to adopt She was asked what the stickdevelopment regulations to ing points were by Rep. Larry conserve agricultural, forest and Springer, D-Kirkland. mineral resource lands.

Power Production Manager The District is seeking a well-qualified individual to oversee all operation and maintenance functions at the District’s Box Canyon hydroelectric facility, located just north of Ione, WA. Responsibilities will also include all related production, storage and pumping facilities owned and operated by the District. Qualified candidates should have a thorough working knowledge of industrial/hydroelectric plant operations, maintenance, and design; experience with major capital improvement projects; knowledge of high voltage electrical systems, including substations and transmission; and, the ability to effectively supervise craft and other support staff. Individual must be able to successfully interact with other District staff, contractors, outside agencies and the public. A Bachelor’s Degree in Engineering or other equivalent discipline, along with ten (10) years of progressively more responsible experience in a related setting (including management) is required. A Professional Engineering (P.E.) license is strongly preferred. An employment application is available at www.popud.org. Please mail the application, along with a resume and cover letter, to PO Box 190, Newport, WA 99156, Fax (509) 447-9091 Attn: Human Resources. E-mail submissions may be sent to: pboxleitner@popud.org. Salary DOQ, outstanding benefit package. The District is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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THE MINER

Sports



FEBRUARY 20, 2013 |

1B

OT loss puts Lady Spartans out

BY MICHELLE NEDVED OF THE MINER

COURTESY PHOTO|WENDY PETTIS

Selkirk senior Michael Haskins, top, gets a hold on his opponent at the state tournament this past weekend. Haskins wrestled his way to third place in the 170-pound class.

Three thirds for Selkirk

Rangers place at state wrestling tournament BY JANELLE ATYEO OF THE MINER

TACOMA – Three wrestlers from the Selkirk team brought home third place medals from the 25th annual Mat Classic this past weekend. All three boys who placed – Michael Haskins, Garet Sax and Tristan Chantry – started with a win in their first match Friday, Feb. 15, but were knocked out in their second match when they came up against the wrestler

Sax

Chantry

who would eventually take the championship. A loss sent each of them to the consolation bracket where they dominated. Haskins, a senior, started his third trip to state with a first-round win by pin. He lost his second match to Pomeroy senior Wyatt Jenkins, who went on to take the state title at 170 pounds.

In the consolation bracket, it was all wins for Haskins. He won a 5-4 decision then pinned a sophomore from Wilbur in just 28 seconds. That earned Haskins his second third place medal. He was third at 160 pounds last year at state. Haskins plans to join the military after graduation. Another Selkirk senior, Sax, won one by pin, then took a loss to Raymond junior Hunter Borden. In the consolation bracket, Sax wrestled back, winning two by pin to take third place, his best yet. Last year, Sax was SEE SELKIRK, 10B

NAMPA – The Priest River girls basketball team lost to Bonners Ferry in overtime Friday, ending their trip to the 3A State Tournament at Skyview High School in Nampa. Priest River had beat Bonners Ferry the two times they played during the regular season, but Priest River was the only Intermountain League team to beat the Badgers. The game was tied at the end of the first quarter, and Bonners pulled ahead in the second to lead 17-9 at the half. Priest River, however, rallied in the third and tied it up in the third with nine points, while holding Bonners to just one. Both teams scored 14 in the fourth quarter, sending the game into over time. Bonners Ferry couldn’t be stopped, however. They scored 13 in OT while keeping Priest River to three. Steffie Pavey led Priest River with 12 points. Kelsie Fink scored seven, Melissa Trost scored six, Jill Weimer scored four and Karly Douglas and Kelsey Bradbury each scored three. Bonners Ferry went on to play Marsh Valley Saturday and won 48-34, giving the Badgers third place at state. Snake River and Filer played in the championship game with Snake River coming out on top 51-34 for the title of state champions. Priest River had faced Snake River in the first round of state on Thursday, Feb. 14. Priest River lost 43-30. Snake River dominated from the beginning, leading 25-15 at the

MINER PHOTO|JASON DUCHOW / JASON DUCHOW PHOTOGRAPHY

Priest River’s Jill Weimer puts up two in the key when Priest River played Bonners Ferry Friday, Feb. 15 at the state tournament. Priest River lost 45-35 in overtime.

half. They added six to their lead with 16 in the third and won took the win even after Priest River outscored them 5-2 in the fourth. Pavey scored 10 for Priest River. Fink scored six, Weimer added five, Douglas scored four, Bradbury three and Trost added two.

Priest River is losing seven seniors this year: Anna Luckey, Trost, Pavey, Allysa Deal, Bradbury, Whitney Urmann and Fink are all graduating. Priest River finished their regular season at the top of the Intermountain League, 6-0 in league play and 16-9 overall.

Thompson takes home state medal BY JANELLE ATYEO OF THE MINER

TACOMA – Josiah Thompson earned a medal at the state wrestling tournament this past weekend, placing seventh at 182 pounds. The Cusick junior wrestled with the Newport team for the second year, as Cusick does not have a wrestling program. He was the only one to qualify for state. Thompson won his first match of the tournament Friday with a 15-5 decision. That put him up against Cruz del Angel, a junior from Kiona-Benton. del Angel pinned him at the 1 minute mark and went on to win his next two matches for the state title. In the consolation bracket, Thompson won a 4-1 decision, COURTESY PHOTO|JOYCE MONTGOMERY

Cusick senior Lauren Nelson puts the shot up and draws the foul Saturday, Feb. 16. The Lady Panthers lost to Columbia in the last minutes of the game.

Cusick girls end bid to state BY MICHELLE NEDVED OF THE MINER

DEER PARK – The Cusick girls basketball team won’t be going to state this year. They lost Saturday, Feb. 16 to Columbia (Hunters) 4239, ending their run to the state tournament during the Northeast District 1B basketball tournament in Deer Park. The Panthers had beat Wellpinit handily Wednesday, Feb. 13, sending them to their final loser-out game Saturday. Also playing Saturday for a bid to state were Wilbur-Creston and Republic. WC came out on top and will join Columbia at state this weekend. Columbia takes on Colton Friday, Feb. 22 at 1 p.m. at Walla Walla High School. WC plays Moses Lake Christian at 6 p.m. at Eastmont High School. Saturday’s game against Columbia was a close one throughout. Cusick had a strong first quarter, leading 15-6 at the end, but Columbia rallied in the second and pulled ahead by one by the half, 23-22. Cusick managed 11 points

in the third to Columbia’s eight, leading by two, but couldn’t hold on for the win. Columbia outscored Cusick 11-6 in the fourth for the three-point win. Chelsea Samuels led Cusick with 13 points and Nalene Andrews scored eight. Lauren Nelson, Kaleigh Driver, Haley Adams and Jessica Nelson each scored four and Alajah Henry threw in two. Wednesday’s game against Wellpinit ended in Cusick’s favor. The Panthers dominated the court, winning 63-43. They led 10-4 at the end of the first quarter and 29-17 at the half. Cusick outscored Wellpinit 34-26 in the second half for the win. Caytlin Nenema scored 17 for Cusick, followed by Adams with 15. Lauren Nelson, Samuels and Andrews each scored eight, Nelson added five and Henry scored two. Cusick will graduate four senior players this year: Lauren Nelson, Samuels, Adams and Nelson. Cusick finished their season leading the Northeast 1B North League, 10-2 in league play and 20-4 overall.

but lost his next match. In his final match, he won a 3-0 decision over Jake Yorgesen, a junior from Wahluke. The 25th annual Washington State 1A Mat Classic was held at the Tacoma Dome Feb. 15-16. On the podium with Thompson were a couple of his Northeast A League competitors. Riverside senior Dustin Crabtree placed third, and Freeman sophomore Markus Goldbach was fifth. Granger was the top 1A team this year with 153 points. Quincy had 105.5, and Castle Rock 101. Of the league teams, Chewelah tied Omak for 15th with 48 points, Riverside was 19th with 42, Lakeside was 21st with 31, Freeman 22nd with 30.5, and Medical Lake came in at 24th with 23 points.

Loss knocks Selkirk boys out of tourney BY DON GRONNING OF THE MINER

DEER PARK – The Selkirk Rangers boys basketball team were defeated 52-41 in a loser out game in the District 7 tournament at Deer Park Wednesday, Feb. 13. Ranger coach Kelly Cain said the team fell behind in the first quarter and could never make up the gap, although they battled back to make a game of it. “We were within three at one point in the third quarter,” he said. But Valley Christian rallied for the win. The Rangers played Valley Christian for their first and last games of the season, coming up short both times. Cain said the Rangers were a far better team by the end of the season. “They came a long ways,” he said. The team was long on height but short on experience. They were without a single senior and started a couple freshmen. Selkirk played three games in the district playoffs. Before losing to Valley Christian, the Rangers knocked

off defending champ Almira/CouleeHartline and lost to Wellpinit, the No. 1 team from the Northeast 1B South league, during the district playoffs. Wellpinit finished second in the district tournament and Valley Christian finished third, claiming the last seed to state. Odessa-Harrington won the tournament. He said the Rangers didn’t shoot particularly well against Valley Christian, but played pretty good defense. After getting off to a slow start, trailing 18-9 after the first quarter, the team held Valley Christian to nine in the third quarter and 11 in the fourth. Avery Miller scored 20 for the Rangers, to lead all scorers. Cain said he is proud of his team. The Rangers played hard in all three district games and even in the losses, battled back to made a game of it. “The team really came together,” he said. “I’m looking forward to next year.” The Rangers finished the year with a 10-2 league record and were 14-7 for the season.

COURTESY PHOTO|WENDY PETTIS

Wrestling for Newport, Cusick junior Josiah Thompson, top, takes on a 182-pound opponent at the state tournament this past weekend. Thompson placed seventh.

Chewelah misses state bid OMAK – There won’t be any Northeast A League teams at the state boys basketball tournament this year after Chewelah lost 7341 to Cashmere Saturday, Feb. 16. Okanogan, Brewster and Cash-

||

S P O R T S

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20 Priest River Boys Basketball at Districts: 8 p.m. - Lakeland High School THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21 Priest River Boys Basketball at Districts: 5:30 p.m. - Lakeland High School FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 Spring Sports Practice Begins: Priest River Priest River Wrestling at Idaho

mere will go on to play at state. Chewelah had beaten Lakeside 53-50 to get into the loser out game with Cashmere. Okanogan defeated Brewster to take the bidistrict tournament title.

C A LE N DA R

||

State 3A Tournament: 9:30 a.m. - Pocatello SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 Priest River Wrestling at Idaho State 3A Tournament: 9 a.m. - Pocatello Priest River Boys Basketball at State Play-in: TBA - McCall MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25 Spring Sports Practice Begins: Newport, Cusick, Selkirk

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2B

| FEBRUARY 20, 2013

SPORTS

Spartans send 10 to state

Tough loss for Cusick boys

Priest River third at districts

BY DON GRONNING

BY JANELLE ATYEO

OF THE MINER

Badger William O N D EC K: Gaspar at 220. AT STATE OF THE MINER Four Spartans TOURNAMENT won their conFriday and RATHDRUM – Two Priest River solation match- Saturday, Feb. wresters are district champions, es to make it to 22-23 taking the championship over state. Freshman other Intermountain League Joe Irvine was third at 98 pounds, wrestlers in their respective junior Luke Soumas at 126, Bret weight classes this Fink took third at past weekend. 182, and senior Josh Senior Tyler Popkin Karkoski was third at won at 132 pounds, 220 after winning by beating out his own default. teammate, freshman Bonners won the Greg Fitzmorris, in team title by 1.5 the finals. Senior points. The Badgers Brian Fink won at Popkin Brian Fink had 215.5 to Tim170 pounds, taking berlake’s 214. Priest Timberlake’s Forrest River was third with Herring in a 6-2 deci172, and Kellogg sion. scored 169.5. Bonners Ferry and Bonners will send Timberlake proved 12 wrestlers to state, to be the top Interincluding senior mountain League Fitzmorris Hopkins Blaine Invernon at wrestling teams this 138 pounds, who will season, but Priest be trying to claim River will still send his third state title. 10 of its boys on to Timberlake will send the state tournament 11 wrestlers on. this weekend. Three Spartans just Wrestling at Lakemissed out on a trip land High School to state. Brad Schaper Friday and Saturday, Hudson (113), Joey Day (126) Irvine Feb. 15 and 16, the and Nick Petek (160) boys tried to place placed fourth. in the top three to Matches start at earn a trip to the big 9:30 a.m. Friday and tournament. wrap up by 6:30 p.m. Placing second for Wrestling resumes at Priest River was se9 a.m. Saturday, and nior Dallas Hopkins the parade of athletes at 145 pounds, Gabe Soumas and the finals start at Karkoski Bellah at 195 and 3:30 p.m. sophomore Tristian Hudson Not pictured: Admission for the tournaat 220. All three lost by first- Bellah ment is $28 or $15 per day. round pin. The champions Bret Fink Senior citizens and students were Kellogg’s Chris Vergobbi pay $18 for a tournament at 145, Bonners Ferry wrestler pass or $10 per day. Kids 6 and Carman Krichbaum at 195, and under get in free.

THE MINER

stopping him,” Bluff said. The Panthers couldn’t get in an offensive rhythm going after DEER PARK – The Cusick boys halftime, he said. basketball team saw their season “We went cold in the second come to a close with a 56-53 half,” Bluff said. He said the loss to defending state champion Panthers missed some shots in the Almira/Coulee-Hartline Wednes- second half, but that really wasn’t day, Feb. 13. the difference. “They ended our season a little “It wasn’t just missing a couple earlier than we wanted,” Cusick shots,” he said. “We were just uncoach JR Bluff said. “It was a able to create our own luck.” tough loss.” ACH clamped down on Cusick’s It was only the Alec Bluff, holding “The first half they third game the him to 11 points. Panthers lost all had to play our game. “They played him season. man to man most of The second half we He said the the game,” Bluff said. Panthers played had to play theirs.” Seniors Ryan pretty well in the Sample and Derrick JR Bluff first half. TakBluff had a good game, ing a 36-23 lead Cusick Coach he said. into the halftime Chad Browneagle break. and Alec Bluff led scor“We were able to keep them ing for Cusick, with 11 each. Ryan off balance,” Bluff said. “Chad Sample scored 10, Jes Brazda Browneagle and Ryan Sample scored eight, Quentin Montgomplayed an awesome first.” ery scored six points and Derrick The second half didn’t go as Bluff scored four. well. JR Bluff says he will gradu“The first half they had to play ate four seniors – Bluff, Sample, our game,” Bluff said. “The second Brazda and Cutshall. He expects half we had to play theirs.” most his other players to return. Bluff said Cusick concentrated “We should have a good crew on defending 6-foot-4 Thunder back,” he said. Wellhausen. The Panthers ended the year “Most of our effort went into with a 19-3 record.

Spartans get win in first round of district playoffs BY DON GRONNING OF THE MINER

RATHDRUM – The Priest River

boys basketball team finished the regular season strong, with two home wins and a win in the first round of the 3A District 1 tour-

Strike three for Newport baseball? Spring sports practice beginning BY JANELLE ATYEO OF THE MINER

NEWPORT – High school athletes will begin practice for spring sports within the week, but after two years with low turnout, Newport High School may not have a baseball team if there’s not enough interest. It hasn’t been determined yet if the Grizzlies will play baseball this

spring. The school has not hired a head coach yet, and athletic director Jamie Pancho said they’re not sure if they’ll have enough boys to field a team. In the last two years, turnout has been low with just 12 and 13 players on the roster. Shawn Henry, who previously coached in Deer Park and at Northwest Christian, was the head coach for one season last year. In Washington practice for spring SEE SPRING, 10B

NEA league teams out of girls state tournament OMAK – The Caribou Trail League dominated Northeast A League teams this past weekend in the District 6/7 playoffs, and no girls basketball team from Newport’s league will be going to the state tournament. Okanogan beat Riverside 6922 Friday, Feb. 15 in a loser out game. Cashmere also beat Lakeside Friday, 48-44. The previous

week, Freeman and Newport lost to Riverside and Lakeside, respectively, ending their berth to state. On Saturday, Okanogan beat Cashmere 56-46 and will continue on to state as the No. 3 seed. Brewster beat Chelan Saturday, Feb. 16, 67-45. Both will continue on to state, with Brewster in the first seed and Chelan at No. 2.

MINER PHOTO|DON GRONNING

Priest River’s Cam Riley gets fouled but still grabs the rebound while Dalton Sommer looks in a game at Priest River Thursday, Feb. 14. Priest River beat Bonners Ferry in the last Intermountain game of the season 45-35.

|| BOYS BASKETBALL TUESDAY, FEB. 12 Priest River 53, St. Maries 52 St. Maries 13 11 17 11 – 52 Priest River 16 8 18 11 – 53 St. Maries: Joiner 13, Stapleton 4, Bedwell 9, Michael 3, Ryle 2, Posselt 0, Feasline 2, Linnemeyer 15, Cordell 4, Gertje 0. Priest River: Akre 5, Riley 13, Linton 0, Sommer 8, Reynolds 0, Stelow 15, Nunley 0, Koch 7, Low 0, White 0, Duley 0, Roland 5.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13 District 7 Tournament at Deer Park Valley Christian 52, Selkirk 41 Valley Christian 18 14 9 11 – 52 Selkirk 9 14 10 8 – 41 Valley Christian: Gage 12, Dickinson 4, N.Cox 14, Marchant 10, Hirschel 0, B.Cox 4, Piersol 6, Segalla 2. Selkirk: Avey 0, Cain 5, Mailly 5, A.Miller 20, Dawson 5, Batiste 0.

Valley Christian 52, Selkirk 41 Valley Christian 18 14 9 11 – 52 Selkirk 9 14 10 8 – 41 Valley Christian: Gage 12, Dickinson 4, N.Cox 14, Marchant 10, Hirschel 0, B.Cox 4, Piersol 6, Segalla 2. Selkirk: Avey 0, Cain 5, Mailly 5, A.Miller 20, Dawson 5, Batiste 0.

Almira/Coulee-Hartline 56, Cusick 53 Cusick 18 18 8 9 – 53 Almira/Coulee-Hartline 15 8 16 17 – 56 Cusick: Sample 10, Shanholtzer 0, Bauer 3, Rankin 0, D. Bluff 4, Brazda 8, A. Bluff 11, Browneagle 11, Montgomery 6, Cutshall 0. Almira/Coulee-Hartline: Da. Isaak 12, Dr. Isaak 6,

Evans 0, Johanson 3, Bohnet 0, Wellhausen 25, Hunt 10, Beardsley 0, Thompson 0, Dormeier 0, Reece 0.

THURSDAY, FEB. 14 Priest River 45, Bonners Ferry 35 Bonners Ferry 13 3 8 11 – 35 Priest River 9 13 13 10 45 Bonners Ferry: Price 3, Bennett 0, Skeen 3, Ky. Rice 2, Pluid 3, Woods 7, Evans 0, Moe 4, Farrens 14, Ko. Rice 0. Priest River: Akre 12, Riley 7, Linton 0, Sommer 3, Reynolds 3, Stelow 2, Nunley 0, Koch 15, Low 3, White 0, Duley 0, Roland 0.

GIRLS BASKETBALL WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13 Cusick 63, Wellpinit 43 Cusick (20-4, 10-2) 10 19 20 14 – 63 Wellpinit (11-12, 6-4) 4 13 12 14 – 43 Cusick: L. Nelson 8, Samuels 8, Driver 0, Adams 15, J. Nelson 5, Nenema 17, Henry 2, Balcom 0, Andrews 8. Wellpinit: I. Antone 8, K. Antone 10, A. Colvin 9, J. Colvin 0, D. Flett 8, R. Flett 0, Kieffer 3, Marcellay 0, Parr 0, Stearns 5, Thatcher 0, Wynecoop 0.

THURSDAY, FEB. 14 Snake River 43, Priest River 30 Snake River (1-0, 0-0) 10 15 16 2 Priest River (16-9, 6-0) 12 3 10 5

– 43 – 30

Snake River: Pilster 2, Shelley 17, Baldwin 0, Polatis 0, Reyes 0, Higgison 0, Bair 9, Peace 2, Goff 0, Coby 7, Mortensen 0, Lund 0. Priest River: Douglas 4, Trantum 0, Luckey 0, Weimer 5, Trost 2, S. Pavey 10, A. Pavey 0, Deal 0, Bradbury 3, Summers 0, Fink 6.

FRIDAY, FEB. 15 Bonners Ferry 45, Priest River 35

COURTESY PHOTO|JOYCE MONTGOMERY

Cusick senior Ryan Sample goes up against Almira/Coulee-Hartline in a game District 7 Tournament game at Deer Park Wednesday, Feb. 13. ACH won 56-53, ending Cusick’s season.

S P O R T S

SCO R E BOA R D

Priest River (16-9, 6-0) 5 4 9 14 3 – 35 (OT) Bonners Ferry (18-6, 3-3) 5 12 1 14 13 – 45 (OT) Priest River: Douglas 3, Luckey 0, Weimer 4, Trost 6, Pavey 12, Pavey 0, Bradbury 3, Summers 0, Fink 7. Bonners Ferry: Skeen 9, MacDonald 6, Merritt 6, Kelly 0, Woods 13, Merrifield 4, Davis 0, Minor 2, Oxford 5, Everhart 0.

SATURDAY, FEB. 16 Columbia 42, Cusick 39 Columbia (15-8, 9-3) 6 17 8 11 – 42 Cusick (20-4, 10-2) 15 7 11 6 – 39 Columbia: Williams 8, Keedy 0, Larrew 5, Williams 14, Flett 0, Black 0, McCrea-Wynne 2, Jones 13. Cusick: L.Nelson 4, Samuel 13, Driver 4, Adams 4, J.Nelson 4, Nenema 0, Henry 2, Balcom 0, Andrews 8.

WRESTLING FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, FEB. 15-16 3A District 1-2 at Lakeland Team scores: 1, Bonners Ferry, 215.5. 2, Timberlake, 214. 3, Priest River, 172. 4, Kellogg, 169.5. Championship: 98: Ryan Starr (TL) d. Aaron Smith (BF) 7-5. 106: Dailyn Johnson (TL) won by default. 113: Rocco Wingfield (TL) p. Dillon Grafton (TL) 3:43. 120: Blake Ivie (Kel) p. Robert Jenkin (Kel) 0:38. 126: Kody Hongslo (TL) p. Tucker Figueroa (Kel) 2:45. 132: Tyler Popkin (PR) p. Greg Fitzmorris (PR) 6:00. 138: Blaine Invernon (BF) won by forfeit, Casey Jerome (Kel). 145: Chris Vergobbi (Kel) p. Dallas Hopkins (PR) 0:32. 152: Anthony Skeen (BF) p. Tyler Badertscher (TL) 2:51. 160: Quinn Cummings (BF) p. Tucker Day (Kel) 2:35. 170: Brian Fink (PR) d. Forrest Herring (TL) 6-2. 182: Kenneth Berry (Kel) p. Jonathan O’Brien (Kel) 0:59. 195: Carman Krichbaum (BF) p. Gabe Bellah (PR) 0:35. 220: William Gaspar (BF) p. Tristin Hudson (PR) 0:35. 285: Morris McAllister (BF) p. Jonathan Gaspar (BF) 6:00. Consolation: 98: Joe Irvine (PR) p. Jayce Hunt (Kel)

||

2:58. 106: none. 113: Jaeger Schnuerle (BF) p. Brad Schaper (PR) 1:39. 120: Chase Erickson (BF) p. Addison Janshen (TL) 2:27. 126: Luke Soumas (PR) p. Joey Day (PR) 6:00. 132: Val Jon Oldfield (TL) p. Chase Stevenson (Kel) 3:25. 138: Bradley Erickson (TL) p. Tyson Boorman (BF) 4:09. 145: Parker Davis (BF) d. Tristan Roth (TL) 7-3. 152: Josh Miller (BF) d. Layne Stevens (TL) 7-5. 160: Anthony Reimer (TL) p. Nick Petek (PR) 2:15. 170: Davin Wadsworth (Kel) p. Travis Beck (BF) 2:56. 182: Bret Fink (PR) p. Steven Tranthum (TL) 2:32. 195: Drew Johnson (TL) won by default. 220: Josh Karkoski (PR) won by default. 285: none.

TRAP SHOOTING SUNDAY, FEB. 17 Winter Trap League Week 7 Newport Gun Club Singles: Dan Reijonen 24, Mark Deinhardt 24, Nick Larson 23, Duane Randolph 23, Pam McLam 23, Henry Williamson 22, Brad Bare 22, Dan Schaeffer 22, John Hankey 22, Greg Seeber 22, Phil Flack 21, Steve Patton 21, Bud Leu 20, Handicap: Duane Randolph 23, John Hankey 23, Dan Reijonen 22, Mark Deinhardt 22, Brad Bare 21, Rob Linton 21, Greg Seeber 21, Phil Flack 21, Pam McLam 21. Doubles: Rob Linton 46, Dan Schaeffer 45, Greg Seeber 44. 27 yard:Dan Schaeffer 23, Mark Deinhardt 19, Nick Larson 19, Bud Leu 17. Continental: Pam McLam 22, Brad Bare 21, Dan Schaeffer 21, Greg Seeber 21, Nick Larson 21, Bud Leu 21. Juniors: Amy Reijonen 10.

Metaline Falls Gun Club Shooters: 50 16-yard: Bill Ware 25, Jeff Miller 25, Rob Kline 23, Skip Luhr 23, Bruce Gagliardo 23. Ladies: Tiara Kline 23, Diane Luhr 21, Lisa Enyeart 19. Youth: Brad Sargent 18, Braydon Taylor 18, Klayton Lyons 16, Ty Taylor 13. Handicap: Bill Wade 24, Keith Enyeart 22, Larry Jungblom 22. Continentals: Johan Mayhoffer 22, Rob Kline 20, Bill Wade 20, Ken Gert 19.

BOWLING

nament held Monday, Feb. 18, at 15 points. Cam Riley scored 13 Lakeside High School. on the night, Sommer got eight The Spartans beat Kellogg 56points, Jimmy Koch scored seven 47 in the district game Monday. and RC Akre and Zack Rowland They will advance to each got five. play Timberlake for The teams had batthe district champion- O N D EC K: tled back and forth all ship Wednesday, Feb. VS. TIMBERLAKE night, with Priest River 20 at 8 p.m., with the WEDNESDAY, Feb. leading by three at the winner of that game 20, 8 p.m. end of the first quarter. going to the state St. Maries came back tournament. The loser of that to take tie the game at the end of game will play a loser out game two quarters. Thursday, Feb. 21, at 5:30 p.m. at Priest River led by one at the Lakeland for the right to compete end of three and held on for the in a play-in game in McCall. win. The Spartans led beginning to Two nights later against Bonend against Kellogg, leading 26ners Ferry, the Spartans started 13 at the half. They slow, but picked held Kellogg to five It was the rubber match up steam and points in the first for the two schools, who rolled over the quarter and eight in Badgers 45-35 had played twice earlier in the last the second. Kellogg closed to in the season, each Intermountain within seven but League game couldn’t make up winning a game. of the season the first half deficit. Thursday, Feb. It was the rubber match for 14. the two schools, who had played Bonners drew first blood and twice earlier in the season, each kept going, taking a 13-9 first winning a game. quarter lead. But Priest River got Dalton Sommer had a gamestarted in the latter part of the high 23 points for the Spartans. first quarter and kept up the moIn an exciting home game mentum, outscoring the Badgers Tuesday, Feb. 12, the Spartans 13-3 in the second quarter, to needed to make at least one of lead 22-16 at the half. two free throws with less than a Bonners scored a little more in two seconds remaining to tie the the third quarter, but the Spargame with St. Maries. tans still added five points to the Senior Cole Stelow hit them lead and won by 10. both, giving the Spartans a 53Koch had a game high 15 52 win. points in the game, with Arkre Stelow finished the night with scoring a dozen.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 13 Lucky Ladies Team Turtles Country Lane Golden Girls Bling and Sparkles Morning Glories Stateline Tavern

Won 57 53 46 43.5 43.5 33

Lost 35 39 46 48.5 48.5 59

High game scratch: Jackie Zorica 225. High game handicap: Jackie Zorica 252. High series scratch: Jackie Zorica 539. High series handicap: Kim Gibbs 640. High team game scratch: Turtles 656. High team game handicap: Country Lane 806. High team series scratch: Turtles 1,913. High team series handicap: Turtles 2,357. Converted splits: Marcia York 3-6, Kim Gibbs 5-10, Sharon Clark 3-10, Lenny Miller 4-5, Cathy Norenberg 4-7-10, Liz Pope 3-10, Pat Shields 2-7, 2-7, Sherry Loveridge 9-10, Jackie Zorica 3-10, Esther Wilkinson 27, 3-10, 5-7.

Wednesday Night Loopers Team McCroskey Defense Action Auto Pend Oreille Marine OK Lanes Pooch Parlor McCroskey Atty @ Law Club Rio H & D Diesel

Won 330.5 330.5 330.5 316.5 315 312.5 281 278.5

Lost 294.5 294.5 294.5 308.5 310 312.5 344 346.5

High scratch game: Jeff Huling 269. High handicap game: Jeff Huling 272. High scratch series: Jeff Huling 625. High handicap series: Gordon Batsch 695. High team scratch game: McCroskey Atty @ Law 922. High handicap game: Pooch Parlor 1,074. High team scratch series: Pooch Parlor 2,617. High handicap series: Pooch Parlor 3,142.

THURSDAY, FEB. 14 Thursday Niters

Team OH $#!+ OK Lanes Wilkinson Rental Country Lane Plain Nasty’s Club Rio Pooch Parlor 4 Amigos Wanna Bees

Won 59 53.5 48.5 47.5 43.5 41 39 36

Lost 33 38.5 43.5 44.5 48.5 51 53 56

High score game team: OK Lanes 705. High handicap game team: Plain Nasty’s 867. High score series team: Country Lanes 1,969. High handicap series team: OH $#!+ 2,552. High score game: Rod Hilden 235, Pam Nichols 186. High handicap game: Ron Hilden 262, Diana Hilden 237. High score series: Rod Hilden 627, Pam Nichols 515. High handicap series: Rod Hilden 708, Pam Nichols 638.

FRIDAY, FEB. 15 Friday Night Leftovers Team The Lakers Timber Room Newport Equipment Cusick Tavern Screamin 4 Ice Cream Party of Four O.K. Lanes Weber Enterprises EZ-Rider San Souci Sandbaggers Gutter Gang Team Twelve

Won 57.5 55.5 54.5 50 49.5 48.5 48 46 45.5 43 42 28

Lost 38.5 40.5 33.5 46 46.5 47.5 48 50 50.5 43 54 56

High scratch game: Jim Loveridge 237, Sharon Reed 202. High handicap games: Virgil Shields 262, Julie Masciandaro 283. High scratch series: Bill Tremaine 611, Sharon Reed 483. High handicap series: Jim Loveridge 683, Julie Masciandaro 717. Converted splits: Brian Hilzer 2-7, Pat Shields 2-7, John Jacobson 5-7.


THE MINER

Lifestyle



BR I E FLY Put your yard to work for you USK – The third class in the Growing Your Groceries gardening series is set for Tuesday, Feb. 26 from 6-8 p.m. at the Camas Center for Community Wellness in Usk. Speakers for this part of the WSU Kalispel Tribal Extension program include WSU Master Gardener Dixie Chichester, who will talk about planning landscapes, incorporating edibles into the landscape, and designing yards that help shelter houses from wildfires. Carol Mack of WSU Extension will lead a discussion about the variety of woodland creatures anxious to share the harvest and some ways to discourage them. Participants are encouraged to bring extra seeds to share for a seed exchange. The registration fee of $5 or $45 for the entire series. Participants are encouraged to purchase a $14 book, “Gardening in the Inland Northwest,” which will serve as the textbook for the series. To register call 509-4472401 or email cmack@wsu.edu. This class is also part of the Pend Oreille County training program for WSU Master Gardeners. The next class in the series is Raised Beds, Containers, and Garden Planning; Groceries on Trees.

Spaghetti feed benefits scholarship fund BLANCHARD – The annual Blanchard spaghetti lunch to benefit the Sarah Jones Memorial Scholarship Fund is set for Saturday, Feb. 23, at 12:30 p.m. at the Blanchard Community Center. The cost is $6 for adults, $3 for children 10 and older and $1 for children under $10. Everyone is welcome. Questions can be directed to Elsie at 208-437-0246.

Gonzaga students recognized for academics SPOKANE – A number of local students earned placement on Gonzaga University’s president’s list and dean’s list for fall semester 2012. Students must earn a 3.7 to 4.0 grade-point average to be listed on the president’s list. They includes Terra Donley of Cusick, Chelsea Linton of Priest River and Jonathan May of Newport. Students must earn a 3.5 to 3.69 grade-point average to be listed on the dean’s list. They include Sammantha Teele of Newport and Rikki Miller of Elk. Gonzaga University is a private Catholic, Jesuit, and humanistic university providing education to more than 7,800 students. Situated along the Spokane River near downtown Spokane, Gonzaga offers 75 fields of study, 25 master’s degrees, a doctorate in leadership studies, and a Juris Doctor degree through its School of Law.

Spirit Lake resident makes dean’s list BILLINGS, Mont. – Rocky Mountain College has released its dean’s honor list for fall semester 2012. Cooper Simpson of Spirit Lake was among the 246 honor students who earned a 3.6 to 4.0 grade point average. Founded in 1878, Rocky Mountain College is a private comprehensive college offering more than 27 liberal arts and professionally oriented majors. RMC has a population of approximately 1,000 students. RMC also offers professional studies in aviation, equestrian and physician assistant programs. Masters degrees are offered in accountancy, physician assistant and educational leadership.

Share your life events for free

NEWPORT – The Newport and Gem State Miner Newspapers are looking to share your life events with the community. Submit births, weddings and engagements to The Miner for publication at no charge. The Miner can be reached at 509447-2433, minernews@povn. com or visit www.pendoreillerivervalley.com online, or stop by the office at 421 S. Spokane in Newport.

FEBRUARY 20, 2013 |

Local author to discuss ‘Jennie’s Tiger’ CUSICK – Local author Eva Gayle Six, who wrote “Jennie’s Tiger: A Woman’s Pioneering Stand in an Untamed Corner of Washington State” will be visiting Pend Oreille County’s four libraries to discuss her book. The story is based on the lives of Jennie and Wes Wooding who homesteaded at Tiger in the late 1800s. Six actually lives on the property that was homesteaded by the Woodings. She researched the people and events that took place during the late 1800s and up to 1923. The novel is filled with local historical accounts written in a fictional manner with much of the action and true life characters based on stories “ripped from the headlines” by the local paper of the time, and still cur-

MINER PHOTO|DON GRONNING

Concentrating on coloring Stormie Tucker, 2 ½, concentrates on coloring Valentine cards during her first time at the library. She was at the Newport Library for story time Thursday, Feb. 14. Her mother says she normally just gets her books for her but decided to bring Stormie on this day. She enjoyed it.

Spokane book market makes stop in Newport NEWPORT – A former Newport resident is hoping to inspire his community by exposing people to new ideas through books. Stan Orr, owner of The Reading Room bookstore on Garland in Spokane, will be visiting Newport Saturday, March 2 with a selection of new and used books, music CDs and other oddities for sale. He’ll set up at the Hospitality House, 216 S. Washington Ave., from noon to

4 p.m. “I have created this business as a project for reading and exploring other writers and the world, as a literacy project. The vision is far reaching,” Orr said. He plans to bring a selection of books on history, politics, art, architecture, travel, children’s, science fiction and cooking. He said there is also a smattering of natural health books from

the 1970s. Orr left the Newport area in the early 70s to travel the world in the performing arts. He spent time in the Seattle restaurant business and opened small coffee houses before returning to Spokane. “I grew up in (Newport), and I remember how I would have liked something like this to breeze into the town – the traveling bookseller,” Orr said.

Area ready to welcome swans USK – Hundreds of swans migrate through the Pend Oreille River Valley in February and March, resting and feeding on Calispell Lake during the journey to their breeding grounds. Spend a day celebrating these birds at the annual Tundra Swan Festival, set for March 16 at the Camas Center for Community Wellness in Usk. In the event co-hosted by the Natural Resources Department of the Kalispel Tribe of Indians and the Pend Oreille River Tourism Alliance (PORTA), a number of speakers will talk about swans, and you’ll have the opportunity to watch them on Calispell Lake, which is designated as an Important Birding Area. Registration is open through March 8 via PayPal. Space is limited. The cost, including lunch, is $10 for adults and $5 for children 12 and under. Participants will gather at the Camas Wellness Center, 1981 N. LeClerc Road, travel via bus to Cal-

ispell Lake at 10 a.m., and return to the Camas Center for lunch by noon. Presenters during lunch are: • Gary Blevins of Spokane Falls Community College, who will talk about what the Audubon Christmas Bird Count data tells us about how climate change is affecting bird population, • Bart George, wildlife biologist with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians, who will discuss the Selkirk Mountains Forest Carnivore Survey for 2012-2013, • Matt Berger, wildlife project manager for the Kalispel Tribe, who will give an update on the Kalispel Tribal Lands bobolink 2012 project, which is being done in cooperation with Audubon Washington, and • Mike Lithgow, director of Pend Oreille County’s community development department, who will give a talk, “Birds on the Water: Legends of the River.” For more information, visit www. porta-us.com/birding for down-

Riverside plans all-school reunion RIVERSIDE – A Riverside allschool reunion is being planned for Saturday, May 18 in the multipurpose room at Riverside High School. This year, the alumni are honoring the 50- and 60-year graduates from the classes of 1953 and 1963. Those planning to attend should RSVP with the number attending and your year of graduation by May 1. Contact Lynn Myers at

P.O. Box 672, Mead, WA 99021 or 509-465-0664 or 509-710-8263. The event will start at 10:30 a.m. with a catered barbecue lunch served at noon. There will be three meats, two salads, barbecue beans, rolls, coffee, punch and dessert for $20 per person. Make checks payable to Lynn Myers. For more information, contact Myers or call Ray and June Fields at 509-465-4071.

Story time changes day, time at Newport Library NEWPORT – Children’s story time is changing days and times at the Newport Library. Beginning March 1, stories

and crafts will be held Fridays at 11 a.m. This is a change from 1 p.m. on Thursdays.

loads of the agenda, maps, lodging, what to bring list, swan/birding links and video.

CALVARY CHAPEL NEWPORT

“Where The Sheep Go To Be Fed” 409 S. Spokane • Newport Sunday Morning 10 a.m. (509) 939-0676 CalvaryNewport@aol.com / 97.3 FM “I am the bread of life. He who comes to me will never go hungry, and he who believes in me will never be thirsty.” John 6:35

PINE RIDGE COMMUNITY CHURCH

1428 1st Street West Sunday School ~ 9:15 a.m. Morning Worship ~ 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays: Girls Club, ages 9 to 12, 5:30 to 7:00 pm Soul’d Out Youth, ages 13 thru 19, 6:00 pm Pastor Mitch McGhee 447-3265

DALKENA COMMUNITY CHURCH • VILLAGE MISSIONS S.S. ~ 9:30 • Worship ~ 11 a.m. Family Night, Wednesday ~ 7 p.m. (Bible and Youth Clubs) Pastor Sandy Strait - 509-447-3687

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH of Diamond Lake Corner of North Shore Road and Jorgens Road Informal Family-style Worship Sundays 10:00 a.m. 509-671-3436

CHURCH OF FAITH

36245 Hwy 41, Oldtown, ID Sunday School 9 a.m. Sunday Services - 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wed. - Bible Study 6:30 p.m. Pastor Jack Jones Church Office 208-437-0150 www.newportchurchoffaith.com

rent, Newport Miner. Free copies of the book are available to read and return and several copies may be checked out. Six will visit the libraries on the following dates: • Metalines Library at the Cutter Theatre – Saturday, Feb. 23 at noon with a potluck pioneer luncheon, call 509-446-3232, • Ione Library – Tuesday, March 5 at 7 p.m. with pioneer desert reception to follow, call 509-442-3030, • Newport Library – Thursday, March 14, 3 p.m. with refreshments, call 509-447-2111, • Calispel Valley Library in Cusick – Saturday, March 16 at 10 a.m. with locavore Pend Oreille County food to be served, call 509-445-1215.

Local families needed for exchange students NEWPORT – International Student Exchange Programs is seeking local host families for international high school boys and girls. The students, 15 to 18 years of age, come to the U.S. for the high school year or semester. These personable and academically selected exchange students are conversant in English, bright, curious and anxious to learn about this country through living as part of a family, attending high school and sharing their own culture and language with their newly adopted host family. The exchange students arrive

from their home country shortly before school begins and return at the end of the school year or semester. Each student is fully insured, brings his or her own personal spending money and expects to contribute to his or her share of household responsibilities, as well as being included in normal family activities and lifestyles. The students are well screened and qualified by the exchange program. Families can choose their students from a wide variety of backgrounds, nationalities and personal interests. For more information call 1-800-733-2773.

Wine, microbrew tasting supports libraries PRIEST RIVER – The Friends of the West Bonner Library District are holding their annual wine and microbrew tasting and auction Sunday, March 3 from 4-7 p.m. in the Beardmore Building on Main Street

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST 3rd and Spokane St., Newport, WA Worship Service ~ 10:00 a.m. Church School ~ 10:00 a.m. Nursery Care Available Rev. Russell Clark 447-4121 newportucc@conceptcable.com www.newportucc.org

REAL LIFE MINISTRIES

“Where Jesus and Real Life Meet.” Worship Time: Sunday 10:30 a.m. at the Newport High School Real Life Ministries office, 420 4th St. Newport, WA - Office Phone: (509) 447-2164 or Toll Free (877) 997-1200

3B

Community Church Directory CATHOLIC MASSES

in Priest River. Tickets are $15 are available at the Priest River Library, also located on Main Street. This is the 12th annual event and proceeds support the Priest River and Blanchard libraries. SPRING VALLEY MENNONITE CHURCH

4912 Spring Valley Road Sunday: 9:45 a.m. Worship Service 11 a.m. -- Sunday School (509) 447-3588

NEWPORT FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

“Sharing Christ As He Is, With People As They Are” 2nd & Spokane Sts 447-3846 9 a.m. Sunday School 10:15 a.m. Worship Service 11:30 a.m. Fellowship Time September - May AWANA - Tuesday 5:30 p.m. The Immortals (13-High School ) Thur. 7-9 Pastor Rob Malcolm

NEW TESTAMENT CHURCH 4 Miles South of Newport, Hwy. 2 Sun.: 9:30 Sun. School, 10:30, Worship, 6 p.m. Evening Service Sun. & Wed. at Pastor’s house. Pastor, Walt Campbell: 447-5101

HOUSE OF THE LORD

Newport: St. Anthony’s, 447-4231 612 W. First St., Sun. - 11 a.m. Usk: St. Jude’s River Rd., Sat. - 5p.m. Ione: St. Bernard’s, 802 - 8th St., Sun. - 2nd & 4th - 8:00 a.m. Metaline Falls: St. Joseph’s, 446-2651 -- 406 Park St., Sun., 1st, 3rd & 5th - 8:00 a.m.

754 Silver Birch Ln. • Oldtown, ID 83822 ‘’Contemporary Worship’’ Sun. ~ 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. “United Generation Church” Youth Group Wednesday 6 p.m. Jeff & Robie Ecklund, Pastors • 437-2032 www.hotl.me

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTISTS

1 mile S. of Newport on Hwy. 2 • 447-3742 Pastor Rob Greenslade Sun. School 9:45 a.m. • Worship 11 a.m. Evening Worship 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Weds. 6:30 p.m.

Diamond Lake Church 326002 Hwy. 2, West of Newport Pastor Clinton Schultz, (509) 447-4565 Newport Church - Corner of Lilac Lane & Hwy. 20 North Pastor Ron Fleck (509) 447-4755 Sat. Morning Services Sabbath School 9:30 • Worship 11:00 NACS THRIFT SHOP (509) 447-3488 PO Valley Church School (208) 437-2638

NEWPORT SOUTHERN BAPTIST CHURCH

AMERICAN LUTHERAN CHURCH E.L.C.A.

332801 Hwy. 2, P.O. Box 653, Newport Pastors Matt & Janine Goodrich Sunday School 9 am Worship Service 10 am (509) 447-4338


4B

| FEBRUARY 20, 2013

FOR THE RECORD ||

Thomas A. Blodgett Spokane

Thomas A. Blodgett of Spokane passed away due to cancer Feb. 9 in Yuma, Ariz. He was 79. Mr. Blodgett was born June 14, 1933, Blodgett in Chicago to James Allen Blodgett and Sarah E. (Wilson) Blodgett. He attended Hamilton Elementary in Spokane, John Rogers High and Washington State University. He married Barbara (Preston) Blodgett June 18, 1955, in Spokane. Mr. Blodgett served in the U.S. Army, then Army Reserves for 17 years. He worked at the family business, Blodgett Mercantile until 1965 when he went to work as a representative for AH Robins Pharmaceuticals (now Pfizer). He retired from Wyeth Pharmaceuticals in 1993. He enjoyed hobbies in electronics and computer technology. He vacationed with family on the Pend Oreille River property at Kent Creek, purchased in 1977. He lived there with his spouse after retiring, until 2001 in a dome home he built. He is survived by his wife of 57 years, Barbara; daughter Lisa Marcoux of Perryville, Md.; son, J. A. Blodgett of Deer Park; daughter Susan Blodgett of Spokane; daughter, Jill Revere of Chandler, Ariz.; sister Nancy Stein of Spokane, formerly of Newport; cousins, Dan Blodgett of Green Valley, Ariz., and Ann Heineman of Spokane; numerous nieces and nephews; and 26 grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his father and mother. A celebration of his life will be held in Spokane in July. A date has not yet been determined. The family suggests memorial contributions to Hospice of Yuma, www.hospiceofyuma.com.

Marie M. (Dahlen) Knutson Newport

Marie Margarethe Knutson passed away Thursday, Feb. 14 at Kootenai Medical Center in Coeur d’Alene. She was 91. She was born June Knutson 1, 1921, in Bonners Ferry. Her parents, Hartvig and Ingrid Dahlen emigrated from Norway to Bonners Ferry where Marie and her four brothers, Arne, Harold, Ivar and Helge were born before her mother Ingrid’s untimely death in 1924. In 1927, the family moved to Newport, where they built the home that Marie lived in for almost 80 years. She graduated from high school in 1938. She served as the caregiver for her father and four brothers since age 12 when she also began teaching Sunday school at American Lutheran Church, of which she is a charter member. She married Karl Knutson, who preceded her in death. She was a devoted mother to their daughters, Ingrid, Kristine and Karlene. Mrs. Knutson was very involved in the community and loved her 30 years working at Kimmel Drug. She took delight in all things Norwegian. She enjoyed playing bridge, baking, church activities, crossword puzzles, was an avid reader but most of all enjoyed her family and friends. Her home was constantly filled with laughter and the coffee pot was always on. She is survived by daughters Kristine and her husband David Wold of Hayden, and Karlene Widner of Clinton, Utah; brothers, Arne and wife Charlotte Dahlen of Poulsbo, Wash., and Harold Dahlen of Spokane; numerous nieces and nephews; son-in-law Cary Smith of Oldtown; granddaughters Ingrid, Katie, Lindsay and Hillary and their husbands, Eli Yates, Casey Morrisroe, Richard Siver and Chad Small; Kirsten Widner, Kari Nuttall, and grandson Rick Widner and his wife Karen. She was a proud “G.G.” to 13 great-grandchildren, all of whom adored her. She is preceded in death by her parents,

O B I T UA R I E S husband Karl, brothers Helge and Ivar, and daughter, Ingrid Smith. Mrs. Knutson’s life was filled with faith, family and friends to the very end. The funeral service will be Saturday, Feb. 23 at 2 p.m. at the American Lutheran Church, 332801 State Road 2, Newport. Burial will be at the Newport Cemetery. Memorials may be sent to the American Lutheran Church. Yates Funeral Home, Coeur d’Alene Chapel is entrusted with the care of final arrangements. Visit Mrs. Knutson’s memorial and sign her online guestbook at www.yatesfuneralhomes.com.

Gary Ellersick Newport

Gary Ellersick died at home with his wife by his side Feb. 12 from lung cancer. He was 68. Born June 8, 1944, Mr. Ellersick was a life-long Ellersick resident of Newport. He graduated from Newport High School and joined the Washington Army National Guard in 1962. He attended Spokane Community College then had a career with Safeway for 36 years. After retiring from Safeway in 2004, he drove long-haul truck for six years, then school bus for a short time. He loved nothing more than his family and with them he enjoyed many vacations, time outdoors on the river, hunting and fishing. Mr. Ellersick is survived by Jennifer (Johnsen) who has been his wife and best friend for 34 years; son Daniel Ellersick and his wife Amber and their children Judith, 6, and Jett, 3, of Los Banos, Calif.; son Todd Ellersick of Seattle; and daughter Amy O’Boyle, and her husband and three sons of Maryland; daughter Alison Cory and her son of Dupont, Wash.; sistersin-law Sandy Ellersick, Debbie Hopkins, and Cindy Casey; and many beloved nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents George and Louise Ellersick and brother Donald Ellersick. A memorial service was held at the American Lutheran Church in Newport, Monday, Feb. 18. In lieu of flowers a donation may be made to the American Lutheran Church in Newport or Hospice of Spokane. Sherman-Knapp Funeral Home in Newport is in charge of arrangements. Family and friends are invited to sign the online guestbook at www.sherman-knapp.com.

Marion Heckenlively Oldtown

Marion Heckenlively passed away at the age of 84 Feb. 2 in Newport following a bout of pneumonia. Family said she was Heckenlively ready to rejoin her beloved husband, who preceded her in death last June. Mrs. Heckenlively was born Marion Ell Owens Dec. 8, 1928, in the tiny East Texas Panhandle town of Mobeetie. The second youngest of eight children born to Thomas and Gertrude Owens, she grew up on the family farm and attended Mobeetie High School, where she excelled athletically in basketball and softball. She graduated with the class of 1946. Shortly after graduation, she moved to Lemoore, Calif., where she worked for Dr. Floyd Lees and married Alfred Ramos. The couple divorced soon after the birth of their daughter, Toni, in 1954. She moved to Oak View and went to work at Rains Department Store in Ojai. She married Clarence “Heck” Heckenlively in 1957 and they moved to Ventura, where the family grew over the next decade with the births of sons Steven, Chuck, Jim and Erik. She also helped raise her stepson, Danny. The family returned to Oak View after the birth of their youngest son. Taking care of her children was Mrs. Heckenlively’s fulltime job for several years, but once they were in school she en-

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tered the field of nursing, working first at St. Joseph’s Convalescent Hospital in Ojai and later as a private homecare nurse for a family in Santa Barbara. She loved the outdoors and shared Heck’s hobbies of rock and bottle collecting. Weekends often found the family searching local beaches and bluffs for petrified whalebone or Indian beads, or exploring the deserts and ghost towns of Southern California and Nevada in search of agate or old glassware. She was a member of the Ventura Gem and Mineral Society for many years, and created several award-winning pieces of lapidary work. She was a “tomboy” her entire life and proud of it. She loved to camp and fish, and was a wiz at organizing food and clothing for a week in the Sierras for eight people. But she was also well versed in the domestic arts. She was a talented seamstress; a great traditional Southern cook (no one could beat her fried chicken, biscuits and gravy or peach cobbler); she crafted small, delicate crocheted ornaments and large, ornate macramé pieces; and she loved her flower garden, especially her prized peonies. Mrs. Heckenlively suffered a brain aneurysm in 1966 that nearly took her life. She astounded the doctors, who said she wouldn’t make it. She not only survived, but eventually regained limited use of her right arm and leg, then learned to compensate sufficiently with her left to pass her driver’s test and return to work. Marion and Heck retired in 1988 and moved from Southern California to 10 rustic acres near Oldtown. She loved the beauty, the isolation, and the snowy winters. She endured further serious health challenges in the last decade of her life, yet she never lost her optimism, her resilience or her sense of humor, family said. She never indulged in self-pity. It took very little to fill her heart with joy: visits from her children and grandchildren, and such simple pleasures as sitting outside in the sunshine or going for long drives through the countryside. In addition to her children and their spouses, Mrs. Heckenlively is survived by her stepdaughters, Jill and Judith; 20 grandchildren and great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews. A private service will be held in California at a later date. For information, call 559-287-9010 or 509-6717493. Sherman-Knapp Funeral Home in Newport is in charge of arrangements. Family and friends are invited to sign the online guestbook at www.shermanknapp.com.

Iva “Margaret” Ross Newport

Iva “Margaret” Ross passed away Feb. 8 in Newport at the age of 98. She was born May 5, 1914, in Arkansas and married Glenn Ross Ross in 1934 in Arkansas. They had one son, Virgil (and wife Aurora), who passed away in 1982. They had two daughters, Alice Munroe McMullen and Joyce (and husband Delvin) Tucker. Mrs. Ross was proud of her many years as an licensed practical nurse at Sacred Heart Medical Center in Spokane. She was passionate about her garden, houseplants, crocheting and knitting. She and Glenn spent 11 winters in Quartzite, Ariz. He passed away in 1990. She is survived by her two daughters and numerous grandchildren, great- and greatgreat-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. A memorial service in her honor will take place Saturday, Feb. 23 at 2 p.m. at Newport Southern Baptist Church, 52 Sitton Road and Highway 2, Newport. In lieu of flowers, the family asks you consider donating to Youth Emergency Services in Newport, www. yesteensupport.org.

SEE OBITS, 5B

P O LI C E

Editor’s note: The police reports, taken from dispatch logs provided to The Miner by law enforcement agencies, are not intended to be an exact report but rather a comprehensive list of police calls in Pend Oreille and West Bonner counties. Dispatch also fields calls for the Kalispel Tribe property in Airway Heights. Certain police calls are generally omitted because of space constraints. These include but aren’t limited to ambulance calls for illness, unfounded alarms, traffic stops, dogs at large, abandoned vehicles, 911 hang–ups and civil standbys. All dispositions for the police reports are assumed to be active, assist or transfer at press time. The police reports are updated each weekday on The Miner Online.

PEND OREILLE COUNTY Monday, Feb. 11 ACCIDENT – Sullivan Lake Rd., report of gray pickup over the bank, no one appears to be with the vehicle. ACCIDENT – Hwy. 20, report of logging truck dropped logs and both lanes are blocked. ARREST – S. Garden Ave., Newport, Ruben Doreteo Lopez, 45, was arrested on a local warrant. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Sunvale Lane, Ione, report that person saw a vehicle in driveway at neighbor’s cabin. HARASSMENT – Makai Lane, Newport, report that known male continues to call complainant after she has asked him to stop. Tuesday, Feb. 12 TRAFFIC OFFENSE – LeClerc Rd. N., report of logging trucks going over the road restriction speed limits. MALICIOUS MISCHIEF – Stohr Rd., report of mailboxes smashed overnight. THEFT – Hwy. 20, report of propane tanks missing. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Hwy. 31, respondent believes someone continues to come into apartment when she is gone. FOUND PROPERTY – N. Washington Ave. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE VERBAL – Pines Rd., report of male yelling and refusing to leave. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Hwy. 31 Wednesday, Feb. 13 SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Deer Valley Rd., report of black Ford Ranger extended cab looking in mailboxes. ARREST – N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights, Scott M. Pierre, 49, was arrested on tribal warrants. BURGLARY – Hwy. 2, report of storage units broken into. ARREST – Hwy. 2, Chad Michael Rogers, 37, of Spokane, Justin Michael Meckler, 20, of Oldtown and Gabriel Conrad Ashby were arrested for local warrants. FIRE – Hwy. 2, report of vehicle on fire. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Main St., report of ceiling tile moved, respondent is concerned someone is in ceiling. ACCIDENT – Hwy. 20, report of rocks in the roadway. ERRATIC DRIVER – Hwy. 20, vehicle reported for erratic lane travel.

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20 Pend Oreille Economic Development Council: 8:30-11 a.m. Cusick Community Center Diamond Lake Water and Sewer District Board: 10 a.m. - District Office Pend Oreille County Park Board: 2 p.m. - Cusick Community Center Fire District No. 4 Commissioners: 6 p.m. - Dalkena Fire Station THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21 Public Hospital District No. 1 Board: 4 p.m. - Sandifur Meeting Room, Newport Hospital Bonner County Planning and Zoning Commission Workshop: 5 p.m. - Bonner County Administrative Building, Sandpoint South Pend Oreille Fire & Rescue: 7 p.m. - Station 31, 325272 Highway 2, Diamond Lake MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25 Pend Oreille County Commissioners: 9 a.m. - Pend Oreille County Courthouse

ACCIDENT – Hwy. 20, report of two-vehicle accident. Thursday, Feb. 14 THEFT – W. Walnut St., Newport SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Driskill Rd., report that subject received a call reporting someone named is at his house damaging things. THEFT – Hwy. 20, report that two propane tanks were stolen. AGENCY ASSIST – Hwy. 211, deputy out with stolen trailer. ARREST – N 1st Ave., Jacob Wayne Conner, 22, of Ione was arrested for fourth degree assault domestic violence. TRAFFIC OFFENSE – W. 7th St., report of black Honda and white Honda speeding in area and drifting around corners. ASSAULT – S. Garden Ave., Newport, report that inmate assaulted officers. DRUGS – S. Garden Ave., Newport THREATENING – W. 7th St., report that subject is making threatening remarks. Friday, Feb. 15 THEFT – N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights, officers located a vehicle that was taken without permission. BURGLARY – Bigfoot Rd., Newport, report of residence burglarized and appears the vehicle is missing too. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCE – W. Walnut St., report of male subject attempting to steal a 30 pack of beer. DISTURBANCE – S. Garden Ave., Newport, report that male tried to assault another male. MALICIOUS MISCHIEF – Spring Valley Rd., report that mailbox was smashed this afternoon, has happened before about three weeks ago. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE – W. Pine St., Newport, report that female was punched in the face by her son. ARREST – Tai Leon Ward, 27, of Newport was arrested for second degree assault, interfering with reporting domestic violence and a probation violation. Saturday, Feb. 16 SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Scotia Rd., report that suspicious subjects were on the property but left 10 minutes ago. THEFT – W. Blackwell St., report that someone stole complainant’s husband’s medications. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Baker Lake Rd., Newport, report that person found child porn on a phone. ANIMAL BITE – W. Pine St., Newport, report that a child was bitten in the face by a dog. ACCIDENT – Hwy. 2, Newport, report if one vehicle rollover accident, possible injuries. ATTEMPT TO LOCATE – Hwy. 2, Newport, report that possible stolen vehicle was seen at business and headed into Newport. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE – W. 7th St., Newport, report that female was slapped by a male subject. ACCIDENT – McKenzie Rd., Usk, report of vehicle partially off the road with lights on, possibly a slide off.

PU B LI C

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Sunday, Feb. 17 SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – N. Warren Ave., Newport, report of male subjects chasing after complainant, they are in a Toyota pickup and a Suburban. ERRATIC DRIVER – Hwy. 2, report of cream colored semi-truck speeding and swerving in the lane. SUSPICIOUS CIRCUMSTANCES – Kent Creek Lane, Newport, report of male subject on complainant’s porch and he has been asked to leave but he says there are people at the bottom of the driveway that want to kill him. ARREST – S. Scott Ave., Newport, Eric Matthew Gruner, 27, of Newport was arrested for violation of a protection order and unlawful imprisonment. ARREST – Vanessa Anne Marion, 47, of Spokane was arrested for bail jumping.

WEST BONNER COUNTY Monday, Feb. 11 No reportable incidents. Tuesday, Feb. 12 RECKLESS DRIVING – Hwy. 2, Priest River, a Sandpoint man was cited and released for reckless driving. Wednesday, Feb. 13 LITTERING – Peninsula Rd., Priest River HUNTING AND FISHING VIOLATIONS – Cougar Ridge Lane, Priest River CUSTODIAL INTERFERENCE – 3rd St., Priest River Thursday, Feb. 14 ARREST – Hwy. 41, Oldtown, David Evans of Newport was arrested for driving without privileges. ARREST – Hwy. 2, Priest River, Darla L. Ingalls of Sandpoint was arrested for driving without privileges and second offense no insurance. Friday, Feb. 15 No reportable incidents. Saturday, Feb. 16 ARRESTS – Hwy. 2, Oldtown, Harry Lashbrook, 49, of Newport was arrested for driving without privileges, eluding a peace officer, possession of methamphetamine and possession of stolen property. Christopher O’Neel, 44, of Spokane Valley was arrested for possession of stolen property, possession of a controlled substance and forgery. FOUND PROPERTY – Summer Rd., Priest River CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES – Rena Rd., Oldtown, report of drugs in the area. ARREST – Hwy. 2, Priest River, Michael Fowler, 44, of Nine Mile Falls, was arrested for trafficking heroin, possession of Schedule 2 narcotics and possession of marijuana. Sunday, Feb. 17 BURGLARY – S. 2nd St., Priest River ARREST – Railroad Ave., Blanchard, Keith Rabidue, 24, of Blanchard, was arrested for aggravated assault and disturbing the peace. RECKLESS DRIVING – Dufort Rd., Priest River

M E E T I N G S

Newport School Board: 5 p.m. District Office TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26 Bonner County Commissioners: 8:45 a.m. - Bonner County Administrative Building Pend Oreille County Commissioners: 9 a.m. - Pend Oreille County Courthouse Wolf-Livestock Conflict Meeting: 6-8 p.m. - Cusick Community Center, 107 First Ave. Pend Oreille Planning and Zoning Commission Workshop: 6 p.m. Cusick Community Center

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Pend Oreille County Republican Central Committee: 6 p.m. - Cusick Community Center Pend Oreille County Republican Party: 7-8:30 p.m. - American Legion, Cusick WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27 Tri-County Economic Development District: 11 a.m. - TEDD Conference Room, 986 S. Main, Suite A, Colville West Bonner County School Board: 6 p.m. - District Office, Priest River

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FEBRUARY 20, 2013 |

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FROM PAGE 4B

Kenneth R. Lenderman Blanchard

port High School, 1400 W. Fifth St., Newport. Sherman-Knapp Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. Family and friends are invited to sign the online guestbook at www. sherman-knapp.com.

Kenneth R. Lenderman of Blanchard passed away Feb. 10, at the age of 71. Pamela Elizabeth Madden He was born Nov. 1, 1941, and Oldtown was a loving and kind husband to Judith R. Lenderman for 38 years. Pamela Elizabeth Mr. Lenderman was a good friend Madden of Oldtown and father to six children: four passed away Feb. 12, daughters, Tonja, Brenda, Shelly surrounded by her and Cindy, and two sons, Adrian family. She was 60. and Jake. He was also cherished Born the youngest Opa and Poppy to 14 grandchildren of six children to Bill Madden and five great-grandchildren. A and Louise Mathews celebration of his memory is set for on Aug. 8, 1952, family Saturday, Feb. 23 at 2 p.m. at Newsaid she will be greatly

missed for her spunky storytelling and her huge heart. She was preceded in death by her soul mate Butch and beloved son Dwayne. She is survived by one brother Richard Mathews, daughter Nina and husband David, son Gary and wife Angie, daughter Jeannie, her 11 grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, and many family members and friends who will all miss her dearly. The family will be holding a celebration of life party to honor her Wednesday, Feb. 20. Sherman-Knapp Funeral Home in Newport is in charge of arrangements. Family and friends are invited to sign the online guestbook at www.sherman-knapp.com.

|| WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20 Rotary Club: 7:15 a.m. - Oldtown Rotary Park Overeaters Anonymous: 7:30 a.m. - Pineridge Community Church, 1428 W. First St., Newport, use back entrance Fiber Arts Knitting and Spinning Group: 9 a.m. - Create Arts Center, Newport Newport TOPS: 9 a.m. - Newport Eagles Master Chef Cooking Series: 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. - Blanchard Community Center Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Blanchard Library Weight Watchers: 11 a.m. Weigh in and 11:30 to Noon meeting - Camas Center for Community Wellness, Usk Al-Anon: Noon - American Lutheran Church Pinochle: 1 p.m. - Priest River Senior Center Priest River TOPS: 6 p.m. - Priest River Free Methodist Church North Idaho Pattern Racers 4-H: 6 p.m. - Cornerstone Supply, Oldtown Family Library Night: 6-7:30 p.m. Stratton Elementary Priest River Animal Rescue: 6 p.m.

- 1710 9th St., Priest River Veterans of Foreign Wars Post/ Auxiliary: 1 p.m. - Priest River VFW York Rite of Freemasonry: 6:30 p.m. - Spirit Lake Temple Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. Hospitality House in Newport THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21 Priest River Food Bank Open: 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. - Priest River Senior Center Preschool Story Time: 10:30 a.m. Blanchard Library Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Priest River Library Open Painting Workshop: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. - Create Arts Center, Newport Pend Oreille River Arts Alliance: 11 a.m - Various Locations Duplicate Bridge: 12:30 p.m. - Hospitality House in Newport Loosely Knit: 1-3 p.m. - Calispel Valley Library, Cusick Story Time: 1 p.m. - Newport Library After School Readers Club: 3 p.m. Priest River Library Celebrate Recovery: 5:30 p.m. 754 Silverbirch Lane, Oldtown, House of the Lord

T H E

W E E K

Gracelynn Irene Benson

Kira Loriann Vodder was born Jan. 30 at 12:37 p.m. to Colby Vodder and Britiea Smith of Coeur d’Alene. She weighed 6 pounds, 6 ounces and measured 19 ½ inches long, delivered at Kootenai Medical Center in Coeur d’Alene. She joins brother Skyler. Grandparents are the late Darren Vodder of Republic and Sherry Caudill of Post Falls. Great-grandparents are Larry Vodder and the late Lori Vodder of Arlington, Wash., and Jerry and Linda Falwey of Metaline. Great-great-grandparents are the late Jack and Phyllis Taft of Metaline, and great-great-grandmother is Eunice Falwey of Kettle Falls. She also has an uncle Richard Hodges of Hayden. Maternal grandmother is Trina Smith and aunt Clyera Smith of Coeur d’Alene.

Gracelynn Irene Benson was born Feb. 8 at 3:56 p.m. to Nancy and Devon Benson of Spokane. She weighed 7 pounds, 15 ounces and measured 20 ½ inches long, delivered at Newport Hospital by Dr. Kraus. She joins sister Cherry and brothers Jaydon, Mackalister and Emmit. Grandparents are Edward and Cleo Benson, Dennis Peabody and Deborah Trombley.

A H E A D

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22 Blanchard TOPS: 8:30-10 a.m. Blanchard Community Church PRM-Advocates for Women: 9:30-11 a.m. - Cornerstone Mall, Oldtown Happy Agers Meeting and Potluck: Noon - Priest River Senior Center Al-Anon: 7-8 p.m. - 119 Main St., Suite 204, Room 16, Priest River. Call Jan 208-946-6131 Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting: 7 p.m. - Priest River VFW

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 24 Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. Hospitality House

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Tucker James Low Tucker James Low was born Feb. 2 at 2:36 p.m. to Rose and Travis Low of Newport. He weighed 8 pounds, 8.5 ounces and measured 21 ½ inches long, delivered at Newport Hospital by Dr. Ragsdale. Grandparents are Larry and Nancy Sauer and Butch and Cindy Low.

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Happy Agers Card Party: 1 p.m. Priest River Senior Center Frosty Fest: 1-3 p.m. - Priest River City Park AA Meeting: 5 p.m. - Cornerstone Building, Selkirk Way, Oldtown Set Free Northwest Meal and Worship: 6:30 p.m. - Conerstone Building Behind Ace Hardware, Oldtown

CONFUSING PLANS. RANDOM PENALTIES. PROMOTIONAL RATES.

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Kira Loriann Vodder

Blanchard Book Talk: 5:30 p.m. Blanchard Library Pinochle: 6 p.m. - Hospitality House in Newport Pend Oreille Kids Club: 6 p.m. Pend Oreille Mennonite Church Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. Blanchard Community Church Newport Masonic Lodge: 7:30 p.m. - Newport

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23 Women’s AA: 9:30 a.m. - Create Arts Center, Newport Spaghetti Luncheon Scholarship Fundraiser: 12:30 p.m. Blanchard Community Center

B I R T H S

5B

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25 Priest River Food Bank Open: 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. - Priest River Senior Center Hospitality House Potluck: Noon - Hospitality House in Newport Blanchard Grange Potluck: 6:30 p.m. - Blanchard Grange Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. - Pend Oreille Bible Church in Cusick Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. Blanchard Community Church

Priest River Library Usk Community Club Meeting: 12:30 p.m. - Usk Community Hall Writers Group: 2 p.m. - Create Arts Center West Bonner Library Story Hour: 2:45 p.m. - West Bonner Library in Priest River Weight Watchers: 5:30-6 p.m. Weigh in and 6 p.m. meeting Pineridge Community Church, 1428 W. First St., Newport Overeaters Anonymous: 5:45 p.m. - Pineridge Community Church, Newport, use back entrance Pinochle: 6 p.m. - Calispel Valley Library, Cusick Belly Dance Fitness: 6:30-7:30 p.m. - Create Arts Center, Newport Bingo: 6:30 p.m. - Newport Eagles Spirit Lake Visions, Inc.: 7 p.m. 5525 New Hampshire St., Spirit Lake Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. St. Anthony’s Church Spirit Lake Lodge No. 57: 8 p.m. Spirit Lake

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26 Blanchard Spinners: Blanchard Community Center Priest River Book Talk: 10 a.m. -

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27 Rotary Club: 7:15 a.m. - Oldtown Rotary Park Overeaters Anonymous: 7:30 a.m.

- Pineridge Community Church, 1428 W. First St., Newport, use back entrance Newport TOPS: 9 a.m. - Newport Eagles Fiber Arts Knitting and Spinning Group: 9 a.m. - Create Arts Center, Newport Story Time: 10:30 a.m. - Blanchard Library Weight Watchers: 11 a.m. Weigh in and 11:30 to Noon meeting - Camas Center for Community Wellness, Usk Priest River Lioness: 11:30 a.m. Priest River Senior Center Sacheen Ladies of the Lake: Noon - Various Locations, call President Maria Bullock at 509998-4221 Al-Anon: Noon - American Lutheran Church Pinochle: 1 p.m. - Priest River Senior Center Knitting Class: 2-4 p.m. - Create Arts Center, Newport Priest River TOPS: 6 p.m. - Priest River Free Methodist Church Spirit Lake Historical Society: 6:30 p.m. - Call 208-623-5626 for locations Alcoholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. Hospitality House in Newport


6B

Classifieds

| FEBRUARY 20, 2013



THE MINER

TO PLACE YOUR AD, CALL US TODAY AT (509) 447-2433 All ads appear in

THE NEWPORT MINER

2

HELP WANTED

2

HELP WANTED

STATE MINER

[West Bonner County]

On the Internet at

www.pendoreillerivervalley.com

To place your ad, call 447-2433 email: minerclassifieds@povn.com

Mon. thru Fri.., 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. or come in to The Office at 421 S. Spokane Ave., Newport. Mail to 421 S. Spokane Ave., Newport, WA 99156

Deadlines

Monday at 4:30 p.m. Late Ads until Tuesday 2:00 p.m. In The Hot Box.

Rates

First 20 Words plus bold, centered head . $11.00/Week Each Additional Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50¢ ea. Special: 2 Weeks Consecutive Run . . . . 3rd Week Free Hot Box - First 20 Words plus bold, centered head . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14.00/Week Each Additional Word . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65¢ ea. Classified Ads require pre-payment

Free ads

•Items for Free: One week run only, 20 words or less. Offer limited to One Free Ad per Week. • Found Ads: Items found will be run one time FREE, 20 Words or less.

Payment terms

All classified ads require pre-payment. We accept Visa and MasterCard.

Classified Display Ads

$8.75 Per Inch. Deadline: Monday, 4:30 p.m. Add a color logo or picture .....................$5.00/Week

Statewide Classified

Reach more than 1,100,000 Homes in 115 Washington State Community Newspapers. One Week, up to 25 Words, Prepaid - $195- 25 Words, $8 each additional. •Reach 325,000 Homes in 48 Idaho State Community Newspapers. One Week, up to 25 words prepaid $125. Deadline: 12 days before publication.

Acceptability

The Miner reserves the right to edit, reject or reclassify any advertisement.

Corrections

Please check your ad the first time it appears and immediately report any error to the Classified Department. We regret that we cannot be responsible for more than a one-time incorrect insertion if you do not call the error to our attention.

I N DE X 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Personals Help Wanted Business Services Work Wanted Lost and Found Child Care & Preschool Business Oportunities Misc. For Sale Washington Statewide Advertising 10 Rentals Wanted 11 Housing For Rent 12 Storage For Rent 13 Real Estate For Sale

2

HELP WANTED

USK GENERAL STORE Usk, Washington. Cook for Burger Hut. Apply within. Applications, resume and work references required. Any questions (509) 6716304. Ask for Debbie. (1-3p) Find it fast in The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds.

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

Real Estate Wanted Mobile/Mfg. Homes Commercial Property Yard Sale Misc. Wanted Boats & Motors Cars & Trucks Motorcycles Recreational Vehicles Machinery, Tractors Logging Timber Farm & Ranch Animals for Sale Notices

2

HELP WANTED

Classified Ads Now in Full Color CARS & TRUCKS

2008 TOYOTA RAV4, 53,000 miles, red, 4WD, automatic, cruise, tachometer, 4 speakers, AM/FM/CD, PW, PM PDL, rear window defrost, car seat anchors, large cargo area, perfectly maintaine d, immaculate, $14,000. 208-888-3355.

Just add $500 for a colored picture

509-447-2433

minerclassifieds@povn.com

Seattle City Light Tour Guide $17.77 – 18.47/hour Are you at least 18? Do you enjoy making presentations and speaking in public? Would you be willing and able to work holidays, weekends and in varying weather and terrain conditions? Do you have a valid driver’s license? If the answer to all four questions is “yes”, Seattle City Light is looking for a temporary tour guide for the Boundary Hydroelectric Project from Memorial Day through Labor Day. For a more information and to apply, visit www.seattle.gov/jobs by 2/26/13. The City of Seattle is an Equal Opportunity Employer that values diversity in the workforce.

2

HELP WANTED

Kaniksu Village Apartments

[Pend Oreille County]

and GEM

2

Fish Biologist III (Habitat Restoration) The Kalispel Tribe of Indians in Usk, Washington is seeking a full time Fish Biologist III (Habitat Restoration). Shuttle service from North Spokane to Usk available for position. The annual pay range for this position is from $43,388.80 to $48,812.40 per year (depending on experience).This is a four day a week schedule (Mon-Thurs) with GREAT benefits!!! This position is open until filled. Qualifications: Demonstrated ability to plan and carry out complex projects to completion while working independently or as a member of a project or interdisciplinary team. Qualifying background must include specific experience in managing large budget, high visibility fisheries habitat restoration projects in a multi-agency, multicultural environment; Strong collaborative and diplomatic skills. Ability to build long-term positive working relationships with a wide variety of stakeholders and coworkers including; department managers, departmental employees, Tribal members, funding agency representatives, regulatory agency representatives and other government and Tribal entities; Must possess excellent verbal and written communication; Must have a working knowledge of Columbia Basin resource management issues, especially with regard to the Federal Columbia Power System and its impact on anadromous and resident fish resources, economies and cultures; Knowledge of how various factors (hydrology, soils, vegetation, geology, land use) interact to produce stream channel morphology, and the ability to apply that knowledge to design, implementation, and evaluation of habitat restoration projects and stream channel reconstruction; Knowledge of surface/groundwater hydrology, water storage relative to geomorphic characteristics of stream channel, and floodplain/riparian plant ecology; Ability to identify native and non-native resident fishes of the Pend Oreille watershed and familiarity with their life histories; Excellent organizational and planning skills; Must have strong quantitative and computing skills; word processing, spreadsheet/databases, GIS, data management and statistical software; Must have experience operating or supervising the operation of heavy machinery. For further information and full job description or to apply online, please visit our website at www.kalispeltribe.com Or Applications may be obtained at the Kalispel Tribal Office front desk at 1981 N. LeClerc Rd., Usk, WA 99180. We exercise Indian Preference and are an Equal Employment Opportunity employer

MAINTENANCE PERSON Reliable person needed to perform routine maintenance for 22 unit apartment complex. Must be knowledgeable in: electrical, plumbing, sheetrock, painting, tile, grounds keeping. Able to work independently, order parts from catalog. Troubleshooting skills helpful. Minimum wage,10 hours/week. This position does not offer an apartment. Serious inquiries only. Must pass application screening to be considered. Apply at: Kaniksu Village Apartments 109 E. 5th Ave. (Rental Office) Metaline Falls, WA 99153 509-446-4100 9am-3:30 pm M-F

HELP WANTED

RESIDENT CARE MANAGER Life Care Center of Sandpoint Full-time position available. Must be an Idaho-licensed nurse with at least two years of longterm care experience. Will work Monday through Friday and occasional weekends in admissions. We offer great pay and benefits in a team-oriented environment. Vickie O’Connor, 208-265-9299 | 208-265-9710 Fax 1125 N. Division St. Sandpoint, ID 83864 Vickie_O’Connor@LCCA.com Visit us online at

LCCA.COM. EOE/M/F/V/D – 38209

Place your classified or display ad with The Miner and it will appear in both newspapers - The Newport Miner (Pend Oreille County) and The Gem State Miner (West Bonner County). All for one good price. Call (509) 447-2433 for details.

THE WATER PROFESSIONALS

Every day is Sale Day in The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds.

Lic. # FOGLEPS095L4

3

• WELL DRILLING • PUMPS • WATER TREATMENT

99% Customer Satisfaction A+ BBB Rating 30+ Years in Business

(1-800) 533-6518 www.foglepump.com

11

HOUSING FOR RENT

BUSINESS SERVICES

3 BEDROOM TRAILER No pets. Lazy Acres Trailer Park. Newport. (208) 4374502. (7-tf)

TrussTek, Inc. Trusses - Our Only Business

Engineered Roof & Floor Trusses Bill • Ed • Marcus • Ted • Jeff

Office (208) 267-7471 1-800-269-7471

TENANTS...

Need a home? Rental Homes Available Northern Pines Real Estate Services 509-447-5922

www.nprents.com

Kaniksu Village Apartments 1 Bedroom Apartments Income Limits Apply EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

109 E. 5th Ave.

Metaline Falls, WA

(509) 446-4100 TDD

1-425-562-4002

PROFESSIONAL SERVICE DIRECTORY

You too can Advertise Weekly for only $8.00 Call 447-2433 ATTORNEYS Law Office of Denise Stewart

Wills, Trusts, Probate, Medicaid, Business 301 S. Washington Ave., Suite A, Newport, WA (509) 447-3242

CHIROPRACTIC

Molly Phillips, LICSW, CMHS, GMHS

The Newport School District is accepting applications for two Newport High School Assistant Track coaches. Application closes at noon, Friday, February 22, 2013 or until filled by qualified applicant. Additional information and applications may be obtained by calling the Newport School District at (509) 447-3167 or visit our website at: www.newport.wednet.edu Equal Opportunity Employer.

BUSINESS SERVICES

JOB OPENING Advertising Sales Consultant at The Newport and Gem State Miner Newspapers. Telephone and in person newspaper advertising sales. Possess excellent communication skills, enthusiasm and success driver a plus. Full time. Salary, commission and medical benefits. Send resume and cover letter to: Miner Community Newspapers, 421 South Spokane Avenue, Newport, Washington, 99156 or email: theminer@povn.com

(509) 447-0505 Or Stop By 1624 W. 7th • Newport

COUNSELING

NEWPORT HIGH SCHOOL TWO ASSISTANT TRACK COACHES

3

• No Experience Necessary • Equal Opportunity Employer

Ryan Leisy, DC - (509) 447-7111 1821 N. LeClerc Rd., #1, Cusick, WA 99119

Newport School District

HELP WANTED

Bus Drivers needed for the current year!

Camas Center Medical & Dental Services

Applications now being accepted for immediate opening for 911 Dispatch/Call Receiver exam applicants. This exam will establish an employment list for the Stevens County Sheriff’s E911 Communications. A detailed job description and application can be obtained at the Stevens County Commissioners office at 230 E Birch, Colville, WA. (509) 684-3751. Application available under the employment listings at www.co.stevens.wa.us.

2

Licensed Counselor, Many Insurances Accepted 415 W. Walnut, Newport, WA -- (509) 671-0226

DENTIST Newport Dental Center

James G. Cool, D.M.D. Family Dentistry -- Evening Hours 610 W. 2nd -- (509) 447-3105 • 800-221-9929

Wayne Lemley, D.D.S.

Complete Family Dentistry & Orthodontics 424 N. Warren Ave., Newport -- 447-5960 Toll Free 877-447-5960

Camas Center Medical & Dental Services 1821 N. LeClerc Rd., #1, Cusick, WA 99119 (509) 447-7111 - (509) 445-1152 fax

HEALTH CLINICS Kaniksu Health Services Priest River Medical Clinic

Family Practice, Minor Emergencies Behavioral Health Mon. & Wed., 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tue. & Thu., 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Fri. 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (208) 448-2321

Camas Center Medical & Dental Services 1821 N. LeClerc Rd., #1, Cusick, WA 99119 (509) 447-7111 - (509) 445-1152 fax

HYPNOTHERAPY Purposeful Life Mastery Coaching

Dr. Douglas Rigg, P.H.D., CHt Registered Hypnotherapist Stop Smoking, Weight Loss, Motivation Individual and Groups - 509-589-0638

MASSAGE THERAPY Harmony Healing Arts Center Gloria Campbell -- 448-2623 47 10th -- Priest River

Cedar Mountain Massage Therapy

Lois A. Ernst, Licensed Massage Therapist 322 S. Washington -- Newport -- 447-3898

The Willows - Massage & Bodywork Studio Judy C. Fredrickson, RN, LMP Newport -- (509) 671-7035

OPTOMETRIST Newport Vision Source

Drs. Michael & Cheryl Fenno 205 S. Washington -- 447-2945

PHYSICAL THERAPY Priest River Rehab Services

A Service of Bonner General Hospital Tim Gray, P.T. -- 448-4151 Mon.-Wed.-Fri. - 9-5 • Tues. & Thurs. 9-4

Core Physical Therapy

at Club Energy • Newport Loren Munson MSPT • (509) 671-3122 Monday thru Friday By Appointment

PODIATRIST -- FOOT SPECIALIST Douglas K. Monson, D.P.M.

Patients seen at Newport Hospital twice a month 509-926-2848 -- Call for appointments

PRINTING Printing & Design . . . at The Miner

We Have a Million Ideas for Our Customers! 421 S. Spokane, Newport -- 447-2433

REAL ESTATE N.E. Tri County Health District 447-3131 -- 1-800-873-6162 605 Highway 20, Newport

Richard Bockemuehl

Century 21 Beutler - Waterfront Office (509) 321-1121 • Cell (509) 951-4390


THE MINER



11

11

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2 BEDROOM 2 bath mobile between Priest River and Newport. No pets. $425/ month plus $425 deposit. (208) 6609271. (1-tf) 1200 SQUARE FEET 2 bedroom, 1 bath. First plus deposit, includes water/ sewer/ garbage. Priest River. (208) 448-1823.(1-tf) DOUBLEWIDE 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom, 2 car garage, office, Pend Oreille River lot 12 miles north of Newport. $700/ month plus $600 deposit. Sewer and water paid. No smoking, no pets. (509) 447-4629. (1-3)

TWO BEDROOM Apartment, Newport. Laminate floors in living room & kitchen. Utilities paid. $450/ month $300 deposit. (509) 589-0750. (1-3p) OLDTOWN 3 bedroom, 1 bath, fenced yard, storage shed. $650/ month (509) 671-7746. (1-4p) NEWPORT Clean 3 bedroom, 2 bath, new carpet, fenced yard, centrally located. Rent $750 plus deposit. No HUD. (509) 671-0458. (2-4p) ONE BEDROOM In Idaho east of Newport on Highway 2. $450/ month, 1st and last plus $375 deposit. References. (208) 290-3867. (2-4)

DIAMOND LAKE AREA Custom home. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, attached garage. No pets. $725/ month (208) 610-6870.(3-3p) 203 NORTH CALISPEL Clean, 2 bedroom 1-1/2 bath, washer dryer hook up $550/ month $550 deposit negotiable. Close to Newport schools. (509) 447-4685. (3-3p) NICE SPIRIT LAKE Duplex for rent. 2 bedroom, 1 bath, 900 square feet. $525 monthly rent/ $525 deposit. No pets! (208) 691-7952. (3-3p)

HOUSING FOR RENT

Every day is Sale Day in The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds. Read them every day.

HOUSING FOR RENT

12

HOUSING FOR RENT

9

STORAGE FOR RENT

9

WASHINGTON STATEWIDE ADS

ADOPTION

NEWPORT

Enter at Hwy 41 and 1st Street

ADOPT -- Adoring couple,TV Exec and Lawyer, Love, Laughter, Art and Outdoor Adventures await miracle baby. Expenses paid. 1-800-562-8287.

Lighted & Secure In-Town Location

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

MINI-STORAGE (509) 447-0119

13

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

NEWPORT 319 South Cass. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 2 kitchens, attached garage, one storage shed/ garage. Newly refinished wood floors, newly painted inside and out. Asking $98,500.00. (509) 445-1153. (2-3p)

Get fast relief for an upset budget with The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds. They work for others; they’ll work for you! Call (509) 447-2433.

FEBRUARY 20, 2013 |

Miner want ads work.

9

WASHINGTON STATEWIDE ADS

ANNOUNCING THE New Global Opportunity. If you missed out on the Dot Com Boom, Don’t Miss Out on the Current Global Boom. www.GlobalBoom.biz.1800-865-2192.

START NOW! Open Red Hot Dollar, Dollar Plus, Mailbox, Discount Party, $10 Clothing Store. Teen Store. Fitness Center from $53,900 Worldwide! www. DRSS31.com. 1-800-5183064.

EVENTS-FESTIVALS

9

WASHINGTON STATEWIDE ADS

ANNOUNCE your festival for only pennies. Four weeks to 2.7 million readers statewide for about $1,200. Call this newspaper or 1 (206) 634-3838 for more details.

CASH NOW for Good Notes, Top Dollar from Private investor. Yes, Bajillions Available for quality Contracts, Mortgages, Annuities, Inheritance. Receiving Payments? Call Skip Foss 1-800-637-3677

FINANCIAL

FOR SALE

ATTEND COLLEGE online from home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice. *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified.. Call 866-483-4429. www. CenturaOnline.com

LOCAL PRIVATE INVESTOR loans money on real estate equity. I loan on houses, raw land, commercial property and property development. Call Eric at (800) 563-3005. www.fossmortgage.com

Get fast relief for an upset budget with The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds. They work for others; they’ll work for you! Call (509) 447-2433.

Get fast relief for an upset budget with The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds. They work for others; they’ll work for you! Call (509) 447-2433.

ANGEL MADE Pies -- Jenny Hoff & Jeff Swartz 509-8933773. In support of A.L.S. Gifts-Valentine, Easter & Holidays. Delivered free in Spokane/ or shipped w/charge. Baked goods, pies -- Call for seasonal menu. Candy-Truffles, 3x10 gift box, $10. Home made by angels for angels with A.L.S. On Facebook friend us. Read The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds.

EDUCATION/CAREER TRAINING

ATTN: COMUPUTER Work. Work from anywhere 24/7. Up to $1.500 Part Time to $7.500 Full Time. Training Provided. www.WorkServices8.com

WASHINGTON STATEWIDE ADS

7B

BUSINESS DIRECTORY Give your important Business Message 100% Market Coverage in 3 publications for only $14.50 a week

Accounting/Tax Service

Animal Boarding

218 High St. Priest River, ID 208-448-2941

Automotive

Automotive

Licensed in Washington and Idaho Specializing in Social Security & Personal Injury FREE Initial Consultation

Professional Dog & Cat Grooming Dog & Cat Boarding and Daycare “Your Pets Home Away From Home” 1335 HWY. 2 EAST, OLDTOWN, ID

50%

509-462-0827

10 Minute Oil Change

No Appointment Necessary Free Vacuum & Window Wash

OFF Wills

(509) 447-0120

We Offer: • Brakes • Engine • Air Conditioning Performance • Oil Changes • Electronics • Engine Repair • Diagnostics • Transmission • Steering & Repair Suspension • Full Service • Exhaust Service Mon-Fri 8am-5pm

1707 W. Broadway, Spokane, WA www.deissnerlaw.com

Hwy. 2, South of Newport

40 High St., Priest River, ID 208-448-0112

Concrete

Construction

Construction

Digital Photos

Dog Boarding

Spokane Rock Products

CLARK CONSTRUCTION

On Budget On Time EVERY TIME!

Do-It-Yourself Digital Photo Center 4x6 30¢ 5x7 79¢ 8x10 $249 CD $149

CHANDREA FARMS

39102 N. Newport Hwy.

Elk, Washington

#1 Home Builder in Newport.

41 Homes built in the city since 1974

509-447-5209 or (509) 671-0171 Lic. # CLARKC*110CG

(509) 292-2200

Owners Bob & Jane Clark

Equipment

Flood Services

BONNER SAW & POWER EQUIPMENT

Open: Tuesday - Friday 8:30-5:30 Saturday 8:30-2:00 Closed Sunday & Monday

Model Home By Appointment

WATER

CLEAN-UP DRY OUT RESTORE

Floors & More, Inc Husqvarna • Jonsered and Echo Chain Saws 682 High St., Priest River (208) 448-1522

Inc.

Custom Homes

Kevin Johnson 24/7 Emergency Service 208-255-9580

Specializing in Custom & Log Home Construction “Lodge Logs” Log Home Dealer Foundations, Framing, Siding, Roofing, Decks, ETC. www.dependable-contracting.com

Jim 208-660-9131 ID#RCE-1494

WA #DEPENCI913N4

Flood Services

HOUSE FLOODED - BROKEN PIPE?

Flood Dryout Services Mold Inspection & Remediation Remodeling & Repairs Friendly Pre Purchase Home Inspections Insurance Claims Consulting Brooks Swanson (CMI) (CMRC) General Contractor RCT-13983

ALLAMA5940N5

(208) 448-2950

Idaho RCE-12308 Washington-FLOORMI974J1

AMERICAN SERVICES

Glass

Health Foods

Heating/AC

Priest River Glass

MOUNTAIN HARVEST HEALTH FOODS

Rob’s Heating & Cooling

Commercial • Residential

Priest River

Mon. - Fri. 9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Sat. 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

robs-heating-cooling@hotmail.com

1-800-858-5013

208-448-2095 100 McKinley • Priest River

LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED WA & ID

208-448-2511 WA. Contr. No. PRIESRG132NZ

Internet

EVERYTHING INTERNET

WiFi - $36.95/Month Dial UP - Web Services Internet Telephone No contract required

Painting

Plumbing

LIBERTY PAINTING

KARDOS

Conscientious & Reliable

Interior Exterior Repaints New Construction

(509) 447-3067 or 1-888-800-POVN (7686)

Larry Liberty (208) 437-3353

Veterinary

Veterinarian

PEND OREILLE VETERINARY CLINIC

THE ANIMAL DOCTOR

Licensed in WA & ID

Quality veterinary care for your pets and barnyard friends.

Dan Herrin D.V.M. (208) 437-2800

(208) 437-2145 Small & Large Animal Medicine & Surgery Brian Dockins DVM

(208) 610-5747 (208) 437-0174

217 N State Ave. Oldtown, ID

Lic#KARDOP*051K6 KARDOTS055NB

Journeyman Plumber Senior &Vet Discounts

Well Drilling

Well Drilling & Pump Service Since 1964

Bus: 208-437-4168 Cell: 208-946-6944 stevepitts@verizon.net

509- 447-2244

www.jakescimneysweep.com

Electrical Services

RCE

River City Electrical

Quality Electrical Services at affordable prices

FREE Estimates Matt Dahlin

Event Planning/Rentals

Alluring Events Sarah Webb Complete Event

• Coordination • Rentals • Linens • Chair Covers • Creative Design • Fresh Floral

Oldtown, ID • (208) 437-4822

(509) 671-2276

www.chandreafarms.com

Lic# RIVERCE886B7

(509) 475-6476 alluringevents@live.com www.alluring-events.com

Florist Florist

Florist

Fuel

Fuel

Floral

Traditions

208-448-2611 866-973-7673 Priest River

Flowers Plants Chocolates Balloons Tuxedos Gifts

Newport

Floral Plants Gifts Home Decor

Fleur de Lis Floral & Home

125 N. Washington Ave., Newport

509-447-4416

Heating/AC YOUR HEATING COOLING & REFRIGERATION EXPERTS RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL Carrier

• Furnaces • Radiant Heat

Wood Stoves - Gas Stoves - Pellet Stoves & Oil Furnaces Available • We Service All Major Brands • Air Leakage Testing Available

Installations • Service Free Quotes

Bonded • Insured • WA #AMERIEH901G

509-447-4962

Heating/AC Complete Heating, Cooling & Duct Systems

Gas Fireplaces & Inserts

(208) 448-1439

24 Hour Service: 509-671-6952

Priest River

Printing

Recycling

Printing & Design at the Miner Layout Services to Full Color Printing

509-671-7855

Cliff McDermeit 23810 E. Blanchard Rd., Newport

Cell 509-710-8939

• Heat Pumps • Geothermal

• Natural & Organic Foods • Herbs, Vitamins & Supplements • Organic Juices & Smoothies

Operating Since 1980 Professional, Experienced, Friendly Service Clean, Inspect, Masonry Repair Licensed and Bonded

“Our Variety Shows”

OWNER/INSTALLER/ SERVICE

WINDSHIELDS WHILE-U-WAIT Mon-Fri. 7-5 Sat 8-12

Ben Franklin

Dog Boarding & Training Family Atmosphere

Chimney Sweep

Jake’s Chimney Sweep

Attorney at Law

(208) 437-0224

Concrete • Sand • Gravel

Carpet

Dustin Deissner

Office Services • Affordable Tax Service • Any Size Business • Bookkeeping • Payroll, Taxes

Attorney

“Where our High Standards Meet Yours” Corner of Hwy 2 & Spokane Ave. (509) 447-2433

Now Paying Top Dollar for your junkers Cars • Trucks • Machinery

TERI-FIC AUTO SALVAGE Newport (509) 447-2487 Chewelah (509) 935-4095

Delivering Propane & Fuel to All of Pend Oreille & Bonner Counties! Call us today!

208-437-3513

 LEAD ES TOP PRIC  BRASS PAID  COPPER  ALUMINUM  STAINLESS STEEL ACTION Recycling/ Phoenix Metals, Inc. E. 911 Marietta (East of Hamilton) (509) 483-4094

24 hr. Commercial/Public Card Lock Fuels INCLUDE: • Highway Diesel • Off-Road Diesel • Unleaded Gasoline HOME DELIVERIES INCLUDE: • Stove Oil • Furnace Oil • Highway Diesel • Off-Road Diesel • Unleaded Gasoline Propane, Lubricants, Filters and Fuel Additives Available On-Site

2459 Hwy.2 • Oldtown

218 Cedar St. Priest River, ID 208-448-1812

Home Loans

Insurance

Robin Malsbury

Amanda Kasper

Mortgage Loan Originator NMLS 114135

• VA • FHA • USDA

509-447-5626 800-476-1168 Newport, WA

Storage

CASH REWARD

Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Wrecking Yard

PRIEST RIVER FAMILY OIL

MPA, BA Agent/Owner

Office [509] 724-2121 Mobile [720] 883-4250 akasper@amfam.com www.amfam.com

Toilets - Portable

Excess

Portable Service

PRIEST RIVER MINI STORAGE 5 Sizes

Resident Manager Highway 57 ~ 1 1/2 Miles from Hwy. 2 (208) 448-1273

Portable Chemical Toilets 2654 E. Hwy 2 • Oldtown, ID Rent by the day, week, biweekly, month

(208) 448-2290

DON’T MISS A CUSTOMER! Give your important Business Message 100% Market Coverage in 3 publications • NEWPORT MINER • GEM STATE MINER • MINER EXTRA

$14.50 A WEEK • 509-447-2433


8B

| FEBRUARY 20, 2013



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FOR SALE MISCELLANEOUS SAWMILLS from only $3997.00 -- Make and Save Money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills. com 1-800-578-1363 Ext. 300N ATTRACT MONEY and Success Like a Magnet! To get your free “Money Making Secrets Revealed” CD, please call 425-296-4459. HELP WANTED -DRIVERS DRIVERS -- Looking for Job Security? Haney Truck Line, seeks CDL-A, hazmat, doubles required. Offering Paid Dock bumps, Benefits and Paid Vacation! 1-888-414-4467. www. gohaney.com DRIVERS -- Inexperienced/ Experienced. Unbeatable career Opportunities. Trainee, Company Driver, Lease Operator, Lease Trainers. (877) 369-7105 www.centraldrivingjobs.com DRIVER --Qualify for any portion of $0.03 quarterly bonus: $0.01 Safety, $0.01 Production, $0.01 MPG. Two raises in first years. 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com LEGAL SERVICES DIVORCE $155. $175 with children. No court appearances. Complete preparation. Includes custody, support, property division and bills. BBB member. (503) 772-5295. www. paralegalalternatives.com legalalt@msn.com REAL ESTATE COLFAX -- RIVERFRONT. 9 acres was $75,000 now only $39,500. Lender Repo sale. Beautiful valley views, quiet country road with electric. Excellent financing provided. Call UTR 1-888-326-9048. Read The Newport Miner and Gem State Miner Classifieds.

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Your Right to Know

Your right to know and be informed of the functions of your government are embodied in public notices. In that self-government charges all citizens to be informed, this newspaper urges every citizen to read and study these notices. We strongly advise those citizens seeking further information to exercise their right of access to public records and public meetings. 201315 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PEND OREILLE No. 10-2-15445-6 SUMMONS FOR PUBLICATION [RCW 4.28.110] RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., BANK OF AMERICA, NA., successor by merger to BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP F K A C O U N T RY W I D E HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, and FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, Plaintiffs, v. JOHN LANHAM and HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF CHARLES LANHAM, Defendants. The State of Washington to the said defendant HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF CHARLES LANHAM: You are hereby summoned to appear within sixty days after the date of the first publication of this summons, to wit, within sixty days after the 16th day of January, 2013, and defend the above entitled action in the above entitled court, and answer the complaint of plaintiffs Recontrust Company, N.A., Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP, and Federal National Mortgage Association and serve a copy of your answer upon the undersigned attorney for plaintiffs at her office below stated; and in case of your failure so

PUBLISHER’S NOTICE: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant womenandpeoplesecuring custody of children under 18. The newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising or real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800927-9275. (31tf)

BLANKET WASHINGTON

to do, judgment will be rendered against you according to the demand of the complaint, which has been filed with the clerk of said court. A lawsuit has been started against you in the Superior Court of Pend Oreille County by plaintiffs Recontrust Company, N.A., Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP fka Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, LP, and Federal National Mortgage Association for declaratory relief and to quiet title in Plaintiff’s favor in the property commonly known as 4961 North Shore Diamond Lake Road, Newport, Washington 99156. DATED this 16th day of January, 2013. ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.S. Kathleen Allen, WSBA No. 19655 Attorney for Plaintiffs Published in The Newport Miner January 16, 23, 30 February 6, 13 and 20, 2013. (50-6)

_________________ 201320 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. TS No.: WA-12512262-SH APN No.: 14655 453006 52 9019 Title Order No.: 1 2 0 1 7 6 8 5 8 - WA - G N O Grantor(s): JOSETTE HANSON, ROBERT HANSON, RUSSELL BELL, ALICIA G. BELL Grantee(s): MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR MOUNTAIN WEST BANK Deed of Trust Instrument/ Reference No.: 2006 0290065 I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, the undersigned Trustee, will on 3/1/2013, at 10:00 AM At the main stairs of the Old City Courthouse, 625 W. Fourth Street in the City of Newport, WA 99156 sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable in the form of credit bid or cash bid in the form of cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale the following described real property, situated in the County of PEND OREILLE, State of Washington, to-wit: LOT 12 BLOCK “B” DIAMOND HEIGHTS, ACCORDING TO THE RECORDED PLAT THEREOF, IN BOOK 4 OF PLATS, PAGE 2, PEND OREILLE COUNTY, WASHINGTON. EXCEPT THAT PORTION CONVEED TO THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN DOCUMENT NO. 216285. More commonly known as: 652 DIAMOND DR, NEWPORT, WA 99156 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 11/14/2006, recorded 11/15/2006, under 2006 0290065 records of PEND OREILLE County, Washington, from ROBERT B. HANSON AND JOSETTE HANSON , HUSBAND AND WIFE, AND RUSSELL BELL

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AND ALICIA G. BELL, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as Grantor(s), to FRONTIER TITLE and ESCROW, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR MOUNTAIN WEST BANK, as Beneficiary, the beneficial interest in which was assigned by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR MOUNTAIN WEST BANK (or by its successors-in-interest and/ or assigns, if any), to Fannie Mae (“Federal National Mortgage Association”). II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust/Mortgage. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay when due the following amounts which are now in arrears: $32,222.03 IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: The principal sum of $217,637.63, together with interest as provided in the Note from the 7/1/2011, and such other costs and fees as are provided by statute. V. The above-described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. Said sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on 3/1/2013. The defaults referred to in Paragraph III must be cured by 2/18/2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 2/18/2013 (11 days before the sale) the default as set forth in Paragraph III is cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashiers or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after the 2/18/2013 (11 days before the sale date) and before the sale, by the Borrower or Grantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance by paying the principal and interest, plus costs, fees and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME ROBERT B. HANSON AND JOSETTE HANSON, HUSBAND AND WIFE, AND RUSSELL BELL AND ALICIA G. BELL, HUSBAND AND WIFE ADDRESS 652 DIAMOND DR, NEWPORT, WA 99156 by both first class and certified mail on 7/2/2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served, if applicable, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale

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on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenantoccupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date of this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877894-4663) or Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/consumers/homeownership/ post_ purchase_ counselors_ foreclosure.htm. The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287 or National Web Site: http://portal.hud.gov/hudpor tal/ HUD or for Local counseling agencies in Washington: http://www.hud.gov/ offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=s earchandamp;searchstate =WAandamp;filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: 1-800-6064819 or Web site: http:// nwjustice.org/what-clear. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. Dated: 10/25/2012 Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington, as Trustee By:

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Tricia Moreno, Assistant Secretary Trustee’s Mailing Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington C/O Quality Loan Service Corp. 2141 Fifth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101 (866) 645-7711 Trustee’s Physical Address: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 19735 10th Avenue NE, Suite N-200 Poulsbo, WA 98370 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://wa.qualityloan.com TS No.: WA-12512262-SH A-FN4319309 01/30/2013, 02/20/2013 Published in The Newport Miner January 30 and February 20, 2013. (52,3)

_________________ 201322 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE SALE File No.: 7037.93218 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Grantee: David P.Guilliams and Carla R. Guilliams, husband and wife Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2008 0299131 Tax Parcel ID No.: 433733529031 Abbreviated Legal: LOT: 27A PEND OREILLE SUNVALE ACRES Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. I. On March 1, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. inside the main lobby of the Hall of Justice, 229 South Garden Avenue in the City of Newport, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Pend Oreille, State of Washington: Lot 27A, Pend Oreille Sunvale Acres, According to the Recorded Plat thereof, Pend Oreille County, Washington. Commonly known as: 331 West Joyner Drive Ione, WA 99139 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 09/15/08, recorded on 09/29/08, under Auditor’s File No. 2008 0299131, records of Pend Oreille County, Washington, from David P Guilliams and Carla R Guilliams, Husband & Wife, as Grantor, to First American Title, as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 11/16/2012 Monthly Payments $18,744.87 Lender’s Fees & Costs $382.41 Total Arrearage $19,127.28 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $506.25 Title Report $576.74 Statutory Mailings $10.00 Postings $70.00 Total Costs $1,162.99 Total Amount Due: $20,290.27 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $131,922.08, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 08/01/11, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of

sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on March 1, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 02/18/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 02/18/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 02/18/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS David P Guilliams 331 West Joyner Drive Ione, WA 99139 Carla R Guilliams 331 West Joyner Drive Ione, WA 99119 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 04/18/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and on 04/18/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www. USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 11/16/2012

Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 980090997 Contact: Heather L. Smith (425) 586-1900. (TS# 7037.93218) 1002.213506File No. Published in The Newport Miner January 30, February 20, 2013. (52,3)

_________________ 201336 SUPERIOR COURT OF WASHINGTON COUNTY OF PEND OREILLE Case No. 13-4-00003-6 PROBATE NOTICE TO CREDITORS In. Re. The Estate of Doyle H. Hunt, Deceased. Probate Notice to Creditors (RCW 11.40.030) The personal representative named below has been appointed and has qualified as personal representative of this estate. Persons having claims against the decedent must, prior to the time such claims would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitation, serve their claims on the personal representative or the attorneys of record at the address stated below and file an executed copy of the claim with the Clerk of this Court within four months after the date of first publication of this notice or within four months after the date of the filing of the copy of this Notice with the Clerk of the Court, whichever is later or, except under those provisions included in RCW 11.40.011 and 11.40.013, the, claim will be forever barred. This bar is effective as to the claims against both the probate assets and nonprobate assets of the decedent. Date of filing copy of 1/30/13 Date of first publication 2/6/13. /s/Donald H. Hunt Donald H. Hunt c/o Douglas D. Lambarth P.O. Box 366 Newport, WA 99156 509-447-3036 Published in The Newport Miner February 6, 13, 20, and 27, 2013. (1-4)

_________________ 201348 PUBLIC NOTICE Sacheen Lake Water and Sewer District, Sheila Pearman, District Manager, 8272 Fertile Valley Rd Newport, WA 99156, is seeking coverage under the Washington State Department of Ecology’s Construction Stormwater NPDES and State Waste Discharge General Permit. The proposed project, Sacheen Lake LID #3 Wastewater Collection and Treatment Project 2013, is located at 8272 Fertile Valley Road, Newport in Pend Oreille county. This project involves 30 acres of soil disturbance for Utilities construction activities. Stormwater may be discharged to Sacheen Lake and Deer Creek. Any persons desiring to present their views to the Washington State Department of Ecology regarding this application, or interested in Ecology’s action on this application, may notify Ecology in writing no later than 30 days of the last date of publication of this notice. Ecology reviews public comments and considers whether discharges from this project would cause a measurable change in receiving water quality, and, if so, whether the project is necessary and in the overriding public interest according to Tier II antidegradation requirements under WAC 173-201A320. Comments can be submitted to: Department of Ecology Attn: Water Quality Program, ConCONTINUED ON 9B


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struction Stormwater P.O. Box 47696, Olympia, WA 98504-7696 Published in The Newport Miner February 13 and 20, 2013. (2-2)

________________ 201349 PUBLIC NOTICE In accordance with RCW 39.80, Pend Oreille County Public Hospital District #1 (“District”) is announcing its requirements for consultants interested in providing architectural, engineering, and related professional services for the 18-month duration following the submittal due date. The scale, duration, and number of projects are uncertain and the District may or may not have a need for all services during this time period. However, current planning includes the need for consultants to support small-scale, as well as, large-scale projects including maintenance, capital, major maintenance, renovation and improvement projects. When the District has projects they will screen and select prospective consultants from data provided under this announcement. Consultants interested in providing services to the District must submit the following hard copies: (1) Letter of interest identifying ALL applicable categories for which your firm is submitting, (2) One set of materials indicating areas of service and qualifications,

and (3) Standard Form 330 Part II, only (not Part 1) One copy of the firm’s Statement of Qualifications should be submitted to Newport Hospital and Health Services, ATTN: Kim Manus, CFO, 714 W. Pine Street, Newport, WA 99156 and must be received by 4:00 p.m. on Monday, March 4, 2013. (For questions, please contact Kim Manus, CFO, at kim.manus@ nhhsqualitycare.org). The District encourages Statements of Qualifications from minority and women-owned firms. Please identify if any employee of your firm has a personal/non-professional relationship with any District employee Published in The Newport Miner February 13 and 20, 2013. (2-2)

________________ 201347 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE SALE File No.: 7023.102582 Grantors: Northwest Trustee Services, Inc. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. successor by merger to Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc. Grantee: Kellie Tanksley Ref to DOT Auditor File No.: 2003 0269910 Tax Parcel ID No.: 443227519023/12485 Abbreviated Legal: Lot 2, Block 2, Replat of the Replat of Ponderay Shores, Pend Oreille County, WA Notice of Trustee’s Sale Pursuant to the Revised Code of Washington 61.24, et seq. THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE

THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission Telephone: Toll-free: 1-877-894-HOME (1-877-894-4663). Web site: http://www.dfi.wa.gov/ consumers/homeownership/post_purchase_counselors_foreclosure.htm The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-569-4287. Web site: http://www.hud. gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/ index.cfm?webListAction= search&searchstate=WA& filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotline for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys Telephone: Toll-free: 1-800-606-4819. Web site: http://nwjustice. org/what-clear. I. On March 22, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. in-

201307 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE I. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S. will on March 8, 2013 at 10:00 am at the main stairs of the Old City Courthouse, 625 W. Fourth Street, in the City of Newport located at Pend Oreille County, State of Washington, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, payable, in the form of cash, or cashier’s check or certified checks from federally or State chartered banks, at the time of sale, the following described real property, situated in Pend Oreille County, State of Washington, to-wit; LOTS II AND 12 IN BLOCK 24 OF THE FIRST ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF lONE. PEND OREILLE COUNTY, WASHINGTON. which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated December 18,2001, recorded December 26, 2001, under Auditor’s File No. 20010261119 records of Pend Oreille County, Washington, from Timothy C Porter and Christine E Porter, Husband and Wife, as Grantor, to Pend Oreille County Title, A Washington Corporation, as Trustee, to secure an obligation in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor-ininterest by purchase from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as beneficiary. The sale will be made without any warranty concerning the title to, or the condition of the property. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: i) Failure to pay the following amounts, now in arrears: Delinquent Monthly Payments Due from 4/1/2012 through 11/1/2012: 5 payment(s) at $681.06 3 payment(s) at $562.94 Total: 5,094.12 Accrued Late Charges: $ 62.79 Recoverable Balance 70.00 TOTAL DEFAULT $5,226.91 ii) Description of Action Required to Default Cure and Documentation Necessary to Show Cure Delinquent general taxes for Proof of Payoff Deliquent taxes for 2011 and 1st half 2012, plus interest and penalties Evidence/Proof must be provided that the delinquency has been brought current. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is: $20,524.14, together with interest from March 1, 2012 as provided in the note or other instrument, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statute. The sale will be made without warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances on March 8, 2013. The payments, late charges, or other defaults must be cured by February 25, 2013 (11 days before the sale date) to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before February 25, 2013 (11 days before the sale date) the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, or other defaults, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. Payment must be in cash or with cashier’s or certified checks from a State or federally chartered bank. The sale may be terminated any time after February 25, 2013 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): See ‘Mailing List’ attached here to and incorporated herein by this reference. Timothy C Porter S 120 7th St lone, WA 99139 Christine E Porter S 120 7th St lone, WA 99139 Timothy C Porter P.O. Box 232 lone, WA 99139 Christine E Porter P.O. Box 232 lone, WA 99139 Timothy C Porter 120 S 7th Ave

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side the main lobby of the Hall of Justice, 229 South Garden Avenue in the City of Newport, State of Washington, the undersigned Trustee (subject to any conditions imposed by the Trustee) will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at time of sale, the following described real property “Property”, situated in the County(ies) of Pend Oreille, State of Washington: Lot 2 in Block 2 of the Replat of the Replat of Ponderay Shores, Plat Book 3, Page 208, Records of the Auditor of Pend Oreille County, Washington. Commonly known as: 71 Open Skies Newport, WA 99156-9137 which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated 07/17/03, recorded on 07/24/03, under Auditor’s File No. 2003 0269910, records of Pend Oreille County, Washington, from Kellie Tanksley and Dennis Tanksley, wife and husband, as Grantor, to H and L Services, Inc., as Trustee, to secure an obligation “Obligation” in favor of Wells Fargo Home Mortgage Inc., as Beneficiary. *The Tax Parcel ID number and Abbreviated Legal Description are provided solely to comply with the recording statutes and are not intended to supplement, amend or supersede the Property’s full legal description provided herein. II. No action commenced by the Beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the Obligation in any Court by reason of the Grantor’s

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or Borrower’s default on the Obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The Beneficiary alleges default of the Deed of Trust for failure to pay the following amounts now in arrears and/or other defaults: Amount due to reinstate by 11/15/2012 Monthly Payments $23,690.45 Late Charges $925.82 Lender’s Fees & Costs $3,339.40 Total Arrearage $27,955.67 Trustee’s Expenses (Itemization) Trustee’s Fee $775.00 Title Report $338.94 Statutory Mailings $25.00 Recording Costs $14.00 Postings $70.00 Sale Costs $0.00 Total Costs $1,222.94 Total Amount Due: $29,178.61 Other known defaults as follows: IV. The sum owing on the Obligation is: Principal Balance of $45,175.52, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument evidencing the Obligation from 12/01/09, and such other costs and fees as are due under the Obligation, and as are provided by statute. V. The Property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the Obligation as provided by statute. The sale will be made without representation or warranty, express or implied regarding title, possession, encumbrances or condition of the Property on March 22, 2013. The default(s) referred to in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances costs and fees thereafter due, must be cured by 03/11/13 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a

discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time before 03/11/13 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in paragraph III, together with any subsequent payments, late charges, advances, costs and fees thereafter due, is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after 03/11/13 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire balance of principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust, plus costs, fees, and advances, if any made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written notice of default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address(es): NAME AND ADDRESS Dennis Tanksley 71 Open Skies Newport, WA 99156-9137 Dennis Tanksley 1219 East Glencrest Drive Spokane, WA 99208-9793 Kellie Tanksley aka Kellile Rice 71 Open Skies Newport, WA 99156-9137 Kellie Tanksley aka Kellile Rice 1219 East Glencrest Drive Spokane, WA 99208-9793 Dennis Tanksley 1742 East Sanson Spokane, WA 99207 by both first class and certified mail, return receipt requested on 10/05/12, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and

lone, WA 99139 Christine E Porter 120 S 7th Ave lone, WA 99139 by both first class and certified mail on August 20, 2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on August 20, 20 I 2, with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth will provide in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objections to this sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. If the Trustee’s Sale is set aside for any reason, the submitted bid will be forthwith returned without interest and the bidder will have no right to purchase the property. Recovery of the bid amount without interest constitutes the limit of the bidder’s recourse against the Trustee and/or the Beneficiary . XI. NOTICE TO ALL PERSONS AND PARTIES WHO ARE GUARANTORS OF THE OBLIGATIONS SECURED BY TILLS DEED OF TRUST: (I) The Guarantor may be liable for a deficiency judgment to the extent the sale price obtained at the Trustee’s Sale is less than the debt secured by the Deed of Trust; (2) The Guarantor has the same rights to reinstate the debt, cure the default, or repay the debt as is given to the grantor in order to avoid the trustee’s sale; (3) The Guarantor will have no right to redeem the property after the Trustee’s Sale; (4) Subject to such longer periods as are provided in the Washington Deed of Trust Act, Chapter 61.24 RCW, any action brought to enforce a guaranty must be commenced within one year after the Trustee’s Sale, or the last Trustee’s Sale under any deed of trust granted to secure the same debt; and (5) In any action for a deficiency, the Guarantor will have the right to establish the fair value of the property as of the date of the Trustee’s Sale, less prior liens and encumbrances, and to limit its liability for a deficiency to the difference between the debt and the greater of such fair value or the sale price paid at the Trustee’s Sale, plus interest and costs. XII. NOTICE THIS NOTICE IS THE FINAL STEP BEFORE THE FORECLOSURE SALE OF YOUR HOME. You have only 20 DAYS from the recording date on this notice to pursue mediation. DO NOT DELAY. CONTACT A HOUSING COUNSELOR OR AN ATTORNEY LICENSED IN WASHINGTON NOW to assess your situation and refer you to mediation if you are eligible and it may help you save your home. See below for safe sources of help. SEEKING ASSISTANCE Housing counselors and legal assistance may be available at little or no cost to you. If you would like assistance in determining your rights and opportunities to keep your house, you may contact the following: The statewide foreclosure hotline for assistance and referral to housing counselors recommended by the Housing Finance Commission: Telephone: (1-877-894-4663) Website: http://www.commerce.wa.gov/site/1356/default.aspx The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development: Telephone: (1-800-569-4287) Website: http://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/fc/index.cfm?webListAction=search&sear chstate= WA&filterSvc=dfc The statewide civil legal aid hotIine for assistance and referrals to other housing counselors and attorneys: Telephone: (1-800-606-4819) Website: http://nwjustice.org/what-clear EFFECTIVE DATE: November 5, 2012 BISHOP, WHITE, MARSHALL & WEIBEL, P.S., Successor Trustee /s/ William L. Bishop, Jr. William L. Bishop, Jr. 720 Olive Way, Suite 1201 Seattle, WA 98101 (206) 622-7527 Published in The Newport Miner February 6 and 20, 2013. (1,3)

on 10/05/12 Grantor and Borrower were personally served with said written notice of default or the written notice of default was posted on a conspicuous place on the real property described in paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee, whose name and address are set forth below, will provide in writing to anyone requesting it a statement of all costs and trustee’s fees due at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the Grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor of all their interest in the Property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS - The purchaser at the Trustee’s Sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the Grantor under the Deed of Trust (the owner) and anyone having an interest junior to the Deed of Trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant-occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. The trustee’s rules of auction may be accessed at www.northwesttrustee.com and are incorporated by this reference. You may also access sale status at www.northwesttrustee.com and www. USA-Foreclosure.com. EFFECTIVE: 11/15/2012 Northwest Trustee Services, Inc., Trustee Authorized Signature P.O. BOX 997 Bellevue, WA 98009-0997 Contact: Vonnie McElligott (425) 5861900. (TS# 7023.102582) 1002.229883-File No. Published in The Newport Miner February 20 and March 13, 2013. (3,6)

_________________ 201350 PUBLIC NOTICE The Pend Oreille County Library District Board of Trustees have changed the time of the regularly scheduled Board Meeting from 5:00 P.M. to add in service to accommodate for Strategic Planning to 4:00 P.M. On 28 February 2013 at the PUD Box Canyon Conference Room Published in The Newport Miner February 20 and 27, 2013. (3-2)

________________ 201352 PUBLIC NOTICE Mitigated Determination of Non-Significance Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 33241-510 The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) issued a Mitigated Determination of Non-Significance (MDNS) under the State Environmental Policy Act Rules (Chapter 197-11 WAC) for the following project: Muddy Madness Timber Sale No. 89223, harvest of 410 acres located approximately 35 miles east of Colville in Pend Oreille County, Washington; Sections 7, 8, 16,17,18,19,20,21, and 29, all in Township 37 North, Range 42 East, W.M. and in Section 36, Township 38 North, Range 42 East, W.M.

A completed environmental checklist and other information are on file with the agency. The Department of Natural Resources has determined this proposal will not have a probable significant adverse impact on the environment. Copies of the MDNS are available from the SEPA Center, P.O. Box 47015, Olympia, Washington 98504-7015, (360) 9021634 or by visiting the DNR website at WWW.DNR. WA.GOV/. The public is invited to comment on this MDNS by submitting written comments to the SEPA Center at SEPACENTER@ WADNR.GOV or P.O. Box 47015, Olympia, Washington 98504-7015 within the fourteen day comment period as indicated on the MDNS. Published in The Newport Miner February 20, 2013. (3)

_________________ 201353 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE SALE THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANYTHING OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. AMENDED NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE I..NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned Trustee, Washington Foreclosure Services, Inc., will on the 22nd day of March, 2013, at the hour of 10:00 a.m., inside the main entrance of the Pend Oreille County Courthouse, 625 W. 4th, Newport, Washington, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder, payable at the time of sale, the following real property, situate in the County of Pend Oreille, State of Washington, to-wit: That part of the Southeast ¼ OF THE Southeast ¼ of Section 7, Township 37 North, Range 43 EWM described as follows: Beginning at the intersection of the West line of State Road No. 20 (formerly Nos. 6 and 31) and the North line of the County Road between Sections 7 and 18 in said Township; thence, West along the North line of said County Road, 522 feet; thence North 208.7 feet; thence East 522 feet, more or less, to the West line of said State Road No. 20; thence, South on the West line of said State Road No. 20 to the point of beginning. EXCEPT therefrom that portion thereof described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of said property; thence West along the North line thereof, 220 feet; thence, South 100 feet; thence, East 220 feet, more or less, to the West line of said State Road No. 20; thence North 100 feet, more or less along said State Road to the point of beginning. Also known as Parcels A and B of Record of Survey No. 2367 described as follows: Parcel A: Commencing at the intersection of the west right-of-way line of State Highway No. 31 and the north right-of-way line of “Greenhouse Road” County Road No. 27020; thence N 89°46’10” W along said north right-of-way a distance of 235.84 feet, to the point of beginning; thence continuing along said rightof-way N 89°46’10” W a distance of 291.72 feet; thence N 00°11’26” W, 212.36 feet; thence N 89°48’49”E, 291.72 feet; thence S 00°11’24” E, a distance of 214.99 feet to the point of beginning; situate in the County of Pend Oreille, State of Washington. (Parcel No. 433707520006) Parcel B: Beginning at the intersection of the west right-of-way line of Highway No. 31 and the north right-of-way line of “Greenhouse Road” County Road No. 27020; CONTINUED ON 10B


10B

| FEBRUARY 20, 2013



THE MINER

Adams headed to Great Falls GREAT FALLS, Mont. – Haley Adams, a senior at Cusick High School, has accepted a volleyball scholarship to the University of Great Falls. She plans to pursue a degree in exercise science or agricultural business at the private Adams

university, according to a news release. Adams was a starter in volleyball, basketball and softball at Cusick. The volleyball team was conference champions for four years and Adams was named to the all-league first team and was named the league’s most valuable player last season.

With a 3.75 grade point average, Adams is a member of the National Honor Society. She is also a member of the Pend Oreille Bible Church. Adams said the getting the scholarship was rewarding. “This process taught me not only to never ever give up on my goal, but to continue to take it to the next level and that I did,”
 she said.

SELKIRK |

COURTESY PHOTO|JAMIE PANCHO

FROM PAGE 1B

fourth at 170 pounds. He’ll join the Navy after graduation. Chantry followed his brother’s footsteps from last year, being an eighth grader wrestling at state. He was the youngest in his 106-pound weight bracket, and he wrestled his way to a third place medal. He won his first match by pin, but lost his second on a 15-0 technical fall to the eventual champion, sophomore Trent Skelton of Liberty Bell. In the consolation bracket, Chantry won his first match with a 45-second pin, then took freshman Austin Stauffer of Davenport in another first round pin to earn third place. “Tristan wrestles in a strong weight class, so for an 8th grader to place as high as he did it is pretty awesome,” coach Keith Saxe said, adding that “Tristan is a good strong wrestler. We will diffidently be seeing his name in the years to come.” Senior Emery Maupin won his first match at 138 pounds, but lost his second to sophomore Emmett Fink of Liberty Bell, who went on to claim second. Maupin lost a 6-3 decision in the consolation bracket

to take fifth place. Coach Saxe said Maupin wrestles in one of the toughest weight classes there is. Freshman Cody Hoffman, wrestling at 160, won one match in the consolation bracket, but lost a 10-3 decision in his final match to take fifth place. He was the only freshman in a class with mostly juniors and seniors, and Saxe said he’s one of the fastest moving wrestlers in the league. He plans to come back next season with more experience. Ranger Joey Dickinson was also the lone freshman in the 195-pound class. He lost two decisions. As a first year wrestler, coach Saxe said Dickinson improved after each match. Selkirk sent six wrestlers and one alternate – freshman Justin Chantry, who was injured at regionals – to state from their 11-person team. The Rangers were sixth as a team, scoring 53 points. Liberty Bell won the team title with a giant lead of 112 points to second place Lake Roosevelt with 79. The team will be losing four seniors, whom Saxe has coached since they were in the Little Guy Wrestling program. “They have become like family,

they are all very good friends,” he said. “I know that the hard work that they put into wrestling will help in their future.” For those returning, Saxe thinks the experience will give them a good chance to make it to state, including the team’s lone girl wrestler, Alena Heath. At the state tournament, coach Saxe was recognized as the 1B/2B Coach of the Year. Each year at the district league tournament they nominate their league Coach of the Year, at the regional tournament they each nominate their Regional Coach of the Year, then at the State Tournament each league votes on the Coach of the Year for their league. Coach Saxe was honored to accept this award, he said, thanking his assistant coaches, Rob Hoffman, Dusty Hoffman and Kenny Weiss, as well as his family and the community for their support. Saxe started the Selkirk wrestling team along with Jerry Spalding in 2005-06 after 15 years of not having a high school team. He said he plans on coaching for a few more years. “I like working with the team and I love the sport of wrestling,” he said.

|| CONTINUED FROM 9B thence N 89°46’10” along said north right-of-way, a distance of 235.84 feet; thence N 00°11’24”W, 114.49 feet; thence N 89°49’49” E, 220.25 feet to the west right-of-way line of State Highway No. 31; thence southeasterly along said right-of-way through a curve to the left with a delta of 01°09’35”, a radius of 5790.00 feet, a length of 117.20 feet, and a chord dimension of S 07°50’02” E, 117.18 feet to the point of beginning; situate in the County of Pend Oreille, State of Washington. (Parcel No. 433707449008) Which is subject to that certain Deed of Trust dated October 22, 2001, and recorded on October 24, 2001, under file number 20010260287, records of Pend Oreille County, State of Washington, from Robert L. Foy and Cynthia A. Foy, husband and wife, as Grantors, CLS, Escrow, Inc., as Trustee; to secure an obligation in favor of CLS Mortgage, Inc., a Washington corporation, as to an undivided 43.6% interest; Duane P. Carroll and Beatrice Carroll, husband and wife, as to an undivided 26.4% interest; Jack Horder and Corazon P. Horder, husband and wife, as to an undivided 10% interest; and the Hattenberg Family Revocable Living Trust, dated September 10, 1996, as to an undivided 20% interest, as Beneficiaries; with subsequent Assignments of Deed of Trust recording under file nos. 2 0 0 7 0 2 9 1 8 4 0 , 20010260424 and 20010260416, assigning said beneficial interest of said Deed of Trust to Roanld G. Schoenberger, a married man, as his separate property, as to an undivided 27.6% interest; Borrego Management Company, LLC, a Washington Limited Liability Company; The Hattenberg Family Revocable Living Trust dated September 10, 1996, as to an undivided 20% interest, and Duane P. Carroll and Beatrice Carroll, husband and wife, as to an undivided 26.4% interest; and James K. Kla-

vano, as to an undivided 26% interest. Washington Foreclosure Services, Inc., was appointed Successor Trustee under file no. 20120313071. II. No action commenced by the beneficiary of the Deed of Trust is now pending to seek satisfaction of the obligation in any court by reason of the Borrower’s or Grantor’s default on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust. III. The default(s) for which this foreclosure is made is/are as follows: Failure to pay the monthly payments from April 1, 2010, in the sum of $2,558.46 per month; late charges from April 2010 in the sum of $255.84 per month. IV. The sum owing on the obligation secured by the Deed of Trust is $137,072.99 principal, together with interest as provided in the Note or other instrument secured from the 17th day of May, 2010, and such other costs and fees as are due under the note or other instrument secured and as are provided by statute. V. The above described real property will be sold to satisfy the expense of sale and the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust as provided by statue. The sale will be made without warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances on March 22, 2013. The defaults in Paragraph III must be cured by the 11th day of March, 2013 (11 days before the sale date), to cause a discontinuance of the sale. The sale will be discontinued and terminated if at any time on or before the 11th day of March, 2013 (11 days before the sale date), the default(s) as set forth in Paragraph III is/are cured and the Trustee’s fees and costs are paid. The sale may be terminated any time after the 11th day of March, 2013 (11 days before the sale date), and before the sale by the Borrower, Grantor, any Guarantor, or the holder of any recorded junior lien or encumbrance paying the entire principal and interest secured by the Deed of Trust plus costs and fees, and advances, if

any, made pursuant to the terms of the obligation and/ or Deed of Trust, and curing all other defaults. VI. A written Notice of Default was transmitted by the Beneficiary or Trustee to the Borrower and Grantor at the following address: Allan Enyeart, P. O. Box 221, Ione, WA 99139; Joan Enyeart, P. O. Box 221, Ione, WA 99139; Cheryl Winther, P. O. Box 334, Ione, WA 99139; Resident of Property Subject to Foreclosure, 2111 Highway 31, Ione, WA 99139; by first class and certified mail on the 10th of October and 26th day of October, 2012, proof of which is in the possession of the Trustee; and the Borrower and Grantor were personally served on the 11th day of October, 2012, with said written Notice of Default or the written Notice of Default was posted in a conspicuous place on the real property described in Paragraph I above, and the Trustee has possession of proof of such service or posting. VII. The Trustee whose name and address are set forth below will provide, in writing to anyone requesting it, a statement of all costs and fees at any time prior to the sale. VIII. The effect of the sale will be to deprive the grantor and all those who hold by, through or under the Grantor, of all of their interest in the above-described property. IX. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the sale pursuant to RCW 61.24.130. Failure to bring such a lawsuit may result in a waiver of any proper grounds for invalidating the Trustee’s sale. X. The name and address of the Trustee: Washington Foreclosure Services, Inc., 2206 N. Pines Road, Spokane, WA 99206; (509) 892-0270. XI. NOTICE TO OCCUPANTS OR TENANTS The purchaser at the Trustee’s sale is entitled to possession of the property on the 20th day following the sale, as against the grantor under the deed of trust (the owner) and anyone having

PU B LI C

an interest junior to the deed of trust, including occupants who are not tenants. After the 20th day following the sale the purchaser has the right to evict occupants who are not tenants by summary proceedings under Chapter 59.12 RCW. For tenant occupied property, the purchaser shall provide a tenant with written notice in accordance with RCW 61.24.060. DATED this 17th day of December, 2012. Washington Foreclosure Services, Inc. By: Vicky L. Armstrong, Vice-President, Successor Trustee, P. O. Box 14796, Spokane, WA 99214 (509) 892-0270 Published in The Newport Miner February 20 and March 13, 2013. (3,6)

_________________ 201354 NOTICE OF APPLICATION Pursuant to County Development Regulations, notice is hereby given that Pend Oreille County did on February 04, 2013, receive a complete Joint Aquatic Resources Permit Application from Seattle City Light, and did on February 05, 2013 issue a Determination of Completeness to construct a replacement boat launch at the Boundary Dam tailrace. (FILE NO. SCUP-13-001), Location: Pend Oreille River, Boundary Dam, Metaline Falls, WA 99153. An Environmental Checklist under the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) was prepared by the applicant and a DNS was issued by Seattle City Light on January 27, 2013. Any person desiring to express their views or to be notified of the action taken on this application should contact the Pend Oreille County Community Development Department. The submitted application and related file documents may be examined by the public between 8:00 AM & 4:30 PM at the Pend Oreille County Courthouse, Lower Level, 625 West 4th, Newport, WA 99156, (509) 4474821. The documents can also be found on the Pend Oreille County website

Seventh grade team undefeated These Newport seventh graders won the Post Falls AAU League boys basketball championship, going 12-0. Pictured are Dylan Ralston, left, Kade Zorica, Danny Bradbury, Robby Owen, Owen Leslie, Koa Pancho, Tyler Hill, Justin Gill and Rylan Hastings. Not pictured is Kyle Malsbury. They were coached by Rob Owen and Jamie Pancho.

SPRING | FROM PAGE 2B

sports starts Monday, Feb. 25. The Newport girls softball team will have a new coach. John Mullaley, a former Priest River coach, will lead the team. He was an assistant coach last year under Veronica Douglas, who coached for two years. The team will be meeting in the gym Monday, Feb. 25. For the second year, Rory Axel will head Newport’s track and field team. They will be meeting in the cafeteria Monday. The boys soccer program will be in its fourth season under head coach Jerry Person. They’ll be starting their practices at the elementary school from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Monday. Golf, under coach Jim Murphy will not be starting until March 11.

Priest River In Idaho, winter sports are still

N OT I C E S

underway as the wrestling team heads to state this weekend and the boys basketball team is at districts. But already, the first day of practice for spring sports is Friday, Feb. 22. Spring sports at Priest River Lamanna High include baseball, softball, track and field and golf. Any athletes who are planning on participating in spring sports and have not participated in a sport yet this year need to turn in their paperwork by Friday, Feb. 22. All freshmen, and juniors need to have physicals, along with any student who has never participated in a sport. Paperwork is available in all offices. Sign-up sheets for baseball, softball, track and golf are in the front office at the high school.

Cusick Head coaches for Cusick’s spring sports remain the same as last year. Tell Hamilton will coach

baseball, Dan Savage softball, Franklin Pope track and field, and Jim Sattleen golf. Sign-up sheets are posted at school. Each coach will determine their pre-season meeting time and place, usually during lunch in an available classroom.

Selkirk At Selkirk, student-athletes will not be allowed to practice until the coach has received the appropriate signed forms including a signed athletic code and sports physical. Homeschooled students must also meet all of the requirements. Last year’s Lady Rangers softball team was third at state. Their coaching team of Cathy Enyeart, Andy Anderson and Craig Larson will be back this year. The team is holding their annual fundraiser breakfast March 10 at the high school. Selkirk will also have baseball and track.

||

(www.pendoreilleco.org) under County Services/ Community Development/ Planning Commission. Contact: Todd McLaughlin, Natural Resource Planner. Written comments from the public may be submitted to Pend Oreille County no later than March 07, 2013. The Pend Oreille County Planning Commission will be hearing this Shoreline Conditional Use Permit Application on March 12, 2013 at 6:00pm in the Cusick Community Center, 111 S. First Ave., Cusick, WA R e q u i re d P e r m i t s : Shoreline Conditional Use Permit (Pend Oreille County), Hydraulic Project Approval (WDFW), Federal Permit (Army Corps) Dated: February 05, 2013 Published in The Newport Miner February 20 and 27, 2013. (3-2)

________________ 201355 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF WASHINGTON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF PEND OREILLE NO. 13-4-00004-4 Probate Notice to Creditors (RCW 11.40.030) In the Matter of the Estate of: James E. Fossum Deceased. The Personal Representative named below has been appointed as Personal Representative of this estate. Any person having a claim against the decedent must, before the time the claim would be barred by any otherwise applicable statute of limitations, present the claim in the manner as provided in RCW 11.40.070 by serving on or mailing to the Personal Representative or the Personal Representative’s attorney at the address stated below a copy of the claim and filing the original of the claim with the Court in which the probate proceedings were commenced. The claim must be presented within the later of: (1) thirty days after the Personal Representative served or mailed the notice to the Creditor as provided

under RCW 11.40.020(1) (c); or (2) four months after the date of first publication of the notice. If the claim is not presented within this time frame, the claim is forever barred, except as otherwise provided in RCW 11.40.051 and 11.40.060. This bar is effective as to claims against both the decedent’s probate and non-probate assets. Date of first publication: February 20, 2013 /s/Belinda L. Fossum Belinda L. Fossum Personal Representative c/o McGrane & Schuerman /s/Charles P. Schuerman Charles P. Schuerman Attorney at Law 298 South Main #304 Colville, Washington 99114 509 684-8484 Published in The Newport Miner February 20, 27, and March 6, 2013. (3-3)

________________ 201356 COMBINED NOTICE OF APPLICATION AND ACTION Pursuant to County Development Regulations, notice is hereby given that Pend Oreille County did on February 15, 2013 received a complete Joint Aquatic Resources Permit Application, RGP 7, and SEPA Environmental Checklist from Timothy and Beverly Walter, and did on February 15, 2012 issue a Determination of Completeness for a recreational dock project on the Pend Oreille River. (FILE NO. SSDP-13-003), Location: Within Sect. 29, T35N, R44E WM, 405381 Hwy 20, Cusick, WA 99119. An Environmental Checklist under the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) was prepared by the applicant on February 15, 2013, and the county has issued a Determination of Non-Significance for this project. The optional DNS process is being used and this may be the only opportunity to comment on the environmental impacts for the proposal. Any person

desiring to express their views, or to be notified of the action taken on this application should contact the Pend Oreille County Community Development Department. The submitted application and related file documents may be examined by the public between 8:00 AM & 4:30 PM at the Pend Oreille County Courthouse, Lower Level, 625 West 4th, Newport, WA 99156, (509) 447-4821 and also on our website at www.pendoreilleco.org. Contact: Todd McLaughlin, Community Dev. Natural Resource Planner. Written comments from the public may be submitted to Pend Oreille County no later than March 07, 2013. The Pend Oreille County Planning Commission will be hearing this Substantial Shoreline Development Permit Application on March 12, 2013 at 6:00pm in the Cusick Community Center, 111 S. First Ave., Cusick, WA Required Permits: Hydraulic Project Approval (WDFW), Shoreline Substantial Development Permit (Pend Oreille County), Federal Authorization Dated: February 19, 2013 Published in The Newport Miner February 20 and 27, 2013. (3-2)

________________ 201358 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Pursuant to County Development Regulations, notice is hereby given that Pend Oreille County did on Nov. 28, 2012, receive a complete Vacation Rental Permit Application, and SEPA Environmental Checklist from Chris Swanson, and did on Dec. 17, 2012 issue a Determination of Completeness for “Old Sacheen Lake Resort Vacation Rental”. Location: Within Sect. 30, T31N, R44E WM, 5291 Hwy. 211 Newport, WA 99156. The Pend Oreille County Planning Commission will be hearing this Conditional Use Permit Application on March. 12, 2013 at 6:00pm in the Cusick Community Center, 111 S. First Ave.,

Cusick, WA Required Permits: Conditional Use Permit (Pend Oreille County) Dated: Feb. 15, 2013 Published in The Newport Miner February 20, 2013. (3)

_________________ 201359 STATE OF WASHINGTON D E PA R T M E N T O F ECOLOGY Notice of Application to Appropriate Public Waters Take Notice That John Adolfson of Spokane, WA of Jan. 30, 2013, under Application No. S3-30682 filed for permit to appropriate public waters, subject to existing rights, from two points of diversion; one from an unnamed spring and one from the Pend Oreille River, tributary to the Columbia River, in the amount of 0.044 of a cubic foot per second, each year, for continuous domestic supply & seasonal irrigation of one acre. The sources of the proposed appropriation are both located within Government Lot 6 (SE1/4SE1/4) of Section 5, Township 38 N., Range 43 E.W.M., in Pend Oreille County. Protests or objections to approval of this application must include a detailed statement of the basis for objections; protests must be accompanied by a fifty- ($50.00) dollar recording fee and filed with the Department of Ecology, at the address shown below, within thirty (30) days from February 27, 2013. State of Washington Department of Ecology Water Resources Program - ERO PO Box 47611 Olympia, WA 985047611 Published in The Newport Miner February 20 and 27, 2013. (3-2)

Newport Miner  

Newspaper covering the Pend Oreille River Valley

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