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Global Trading Game Students become geologists, miners, economic advisors, and international traders as they analyze their country’s resources and needs and trade with other countries to enhance their country’s economic position and environmental quality.

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Grade Levels:

Pri Ele

Int

Elem

Elementary

Sec

Secondary

Pri Ele

Int

Intermediate

Sec

Subject Areas: Science

Social Studies

Math

Language Arts

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NEED Mission Statement

Teacher Advisory Board Shelly Baumann Rockford, MI

Barbara Lazar Albuquerque, NM

Constance Beatty Kankakee, IL

Robert Lazar Albuquerque, NM

Amy Constant Raleigh, NC

Leslie Lively Porters Falls, WV

Nina Corley Galveston, TX

Mollie Mukhamedov Port St. Lucie, FL

Regina Donour Whitesburg, KY

Don Pruett Jr. Sumner, WA

Linda Fonner New Martinsville, WV

Josh Rubin Palo Alto, CA

Samantha Forbes Vienna, VA

Joanne Spaziano Cranston, RI

Michelle Garlick

Gina Spencer Virginia Beach, VA

Robert Griegoliet Naperville, IL

Tom Spencer Chesapeake, VA

Viola Henry Thaxton, VA

Jennifer Trochez MacLean Los Angeles, CA

Bob Hodash DaNel Hogan Tucson, AZ Greg Holman Paradise, CA Linda Hutton Kitty Hawk, NC Matthew Inman Spokane, WA

The mission of The NEED Project is to promote an energy conscious and educated society by creating effective networks of students, educators, business, government and community leaders to design and deliver objective, multisided energy education programs.

Teacher Advisory Board Statement In support of NEED, the national Teacher Advisory Board (TAB) is dedicated to developing and promoting standardsbased energy curriculum and training.

Permission to Copy NEED materials may be reproduced for non-commercial educational purposes.

Energy Data Used in NEED Materials NEED believes in providing the most recently reported energy data available to our teachers and students. Most statistics and data are derived from the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s Annual Energy Review that is published yearly. Working in partnership with EIA, NEED includes easy to understand data in our curriculum materials. To do further research, visit the EIA website at www.eia.gov. EIA’s Energy Kids site has great lessons and activities for students at www.eia.gov/kids.

Joanne Trombley West Chester, PA Jen Varrella Fort Collins, CO Jennifer Winterbottom Pottstown, PA Carolyn Wuest Pensacola, FL Wayne Yonkelowitz Fayetteville, WV

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Printed on Recycled Paper

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Global Trading Game


Global Trading Game Table of Contents Global Trading Game was developed by The NEED Project and the Ohio Energy Project.

ƒƒStandards Correlation Information

4

ƒƒOverview of Activity

5

ƒƒTeacher Guide

6

ƒƒGame Construction

9

ƒƒJob Descriptions and Actions

11

Statistics*

ƒƒCountry Profiles

12

ƒƒCountry Comparison Chart

18

ƒƒCIA World Factbook

ƒƒCountry Comparison Chart Teacher Key

19

ƒƒEnergy Bucks Master

20

ƒƒCommodity and Impact Symbols Masters

21

ƒƒImpact Data Sheet

57

ƒƒGeologist Map

58

ƒƒImpact Worksheet

59

ƒƒInternational Trade Center Master

60

ƒƒGame Boards

61

ƒƒEvaluation Form

63

ƒƒEIA International Energy Statistics ƒƒThe World Bank *The facts and figures used to represent the countries in this game are compiled from the organizations listed above for consistency. Many entities, organizations, and countries have different metrics for measuring the data sets used in this game, and NEED has utilized the agencies above to ensure data that is consistently reported. In some cases, it is possible that facts and figures have been slightly adjusted to assure the game plays as intended. For an enhanced activity, encourage your students to source the data for their assigned country following game play. Discuss reputable sources for data and compare differences between game materials and their research.

© 2015 The NEED Project

8408 Kao Circle, Manassas, VA 20110

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Standards Correlation Information www.NEED.org/curriculumcorrelations

Next Generation Science Standards ƒƒ This guide effectively supports many Next Generation Science Standards. This material can satisfy performance expectations, science and engineering practices, disciplinary core ideas, and cross cutting concepts within your required curriculum. For more details on these correlations, please visit NEED’s curriculum correlations website.

Common Core State Standards ƒƒ This guide has been correlated to the Common Core State Standards in both language arts and mathematics. These correlations are broken down by grade level and guide title, and can be downloaded as a spreadsheet from the NEED curriculum correlations website.

Individual State Science Standards ƒƒ This guide has been correlated to each state’s individual science standards. These correlations are broken down by grade level and guide title, and can be downloaded as a spreadsheet from the NEED website.

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Overview of Activity

Students work cooperatively in six groups, each of which is assigned an unnamed country. Each country has varying types and amounts of the following commodities: money, energy resources, industry, technology, and workforce. The students become citizens of their country and are provided with background information to use as the students identify their country’s strengths and weaknesses, discuss the standard of living, and what they would like to change about their nation. The teams are then given game boards and game pieces for their countries. The game pieces represent various assets. Each group member chooses one of four occupations that play significant roles in the country’s ability to advance in the game. The occupations are geologist, miner, economic advisor, and international trader. Each team also receives a plastic bin that contains a plot of land that represents their country and its assets. Students begin to role-play their occupations. The geologists draw a map of the plot, then use straws to probe the earth and locate buried energy resources. The miners simulate a surface mine by removing each layer of sediment, then remove the energy resources from the soil. The geologists and miners work together to reclaim the land by replacing the layers as they found them.

Time 2-3 50-minute class periods

2Preparation ƒ1 ƒ hour (+/-), items can be re-used once prepared

Grade Levels ƒElementary, ƒ grade 5 ƒIntermediate, ƒ grades 6-8 ƒSecondary, ƒ grades 9-12

ACTIVITY

MATERIALS NEEDED

Game Construction (page 9)

ƒ12 ƒ Plastic spoons ƒ30 ƒ Plastic drinking straws cut in half ƒ6 ƒ Plastic storage containers, approximately 12” x 16” x 8” ƒ1 ƒ 50 Pound bag of sand ƒ1 ƒ 25 Pound bag of small aquarium gravel ƒ12 ƒ Rocks approximately 2”- 3” in diameter ƒ6 ƒ Craft sticks ƒ30 ƒ Marbles or 1” pieces of wood ƒ1 ƒ Timer with alarm ƒ6 ƒ Sturdy envelopes 9” x 12” ƒ6 ƒ Sets of 20 sheets of paper (8½” x 11”), each set a different color ƒOPTIONAL: ƒ To construct game boards and signs, you will need 13 8½” x 14” sheets of colored paper (all the same color)

Day One (page 6)

ƒCountry ƒ packets in envelopes, see pages 9-10 ƒMasters, ƒ pages 11 and 18 ƒClass ƒ set of the student worksheet, page 57

Day Two (page 7)

ƒAssembled ƒ country bins ƒOld ƒ newspaper or tablecloths ƒCountry ƒ packets ƒGeologist ƒ Maps ƒInternational ƒ Trade Center sign (optional) ƒGame ƒ boards (optional)

Meanwhile, the advisors and traders organize the number of each commodity with which their country begins the game. The goal of the game is then revealed—to finish with exactly five of each of the commodities: energy resources, industry, technology, and workforce. Students buy, sell, and trade on the global market to attain the goal. The economic advisors analyze the country’s resources and decide what needs to be bought, what is available to sell, and what would be best to trade. Economic advisors also decide what they are willing to pay for each commodity, and for what price they are willing to sell their commodities. The game continues with two trading rounds. After each trading round, the economic advisors organize the acquired commodities and plan for the next round. When the second trading round is completed, the teams are asked to compare their country’s current status to its status at the beginning of the game. Each team then learns that each commodity has impacts on the country. The students assess possible positive and negative impacts of each of the commodities and resources. The third trading round has the added goal of controlling the number of impacts made upon the country. Some countries must negotiate to reduce impacts while still maintaining the goal of five of each commodity. Usually the game results with more than one team meeting their goals. It can then be revealed to the teams that each of the countries represents a real country in the world. Brief descriptions of the real world countries are included on the country profile sheets and Country Comaprison Chart. Geography Connection: As the real countries are revealed, the teams must locate the countries on a world map, or do a report on their country. © 2015 The NEED Project

8408 Kao Circle, Manassas, VA 20110

*Please see page 3 for an important note regarding statistics used in this game.

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Teacher Guide

Day One  Materials ƒCountry ƒ packets in envelopes, see pages 9-10 ƒJob ƒ Descriptions and Actions master, page 11 ƒCountry ƒ Comparison Chart master, page 18 ƒImpact ƒ Data Sheet, page 57

2Preparation ƒDivide ƒ the class into six groups. ƒAssemble ƒ country packets. ƒMake ƒ copies of the Impact Data Sheet. ƒPrepare ƒ copies of the masters for projection.

Procedure 1. Give an overview of the Global Trading Game, as follows: ƒEach ƒ of the six teams represents a different country. ƒEach ƒ country, just as in the real world, has different amounts of money, industry, people, and other resources. These commodities and resources have positive and negative impacts. ƒEveryone ƒ will have a job that is important to the country’s ability to advance in the game. 2. Distribute a country packet to each group and an Impact Data Sheet to each player. Explain that prior to playing the game, each team must understand its country’s unique strengths and weaknesses, assets and needs. 3. Instruct the teams to remove the country profiles and comparison charts from their envelopes. As they read about their country, use the questions below to help students guide their reading. Project or display for student use. ƒWhat ƒ are three strengths of your country? ƒWhat ƒ are three weaknesses of your country? ƒUsing ƒ the Country Comparison Chart, how does your country compare to the other countries in the game? 4. Have each student complete the Impact Data Sheet. 5. Using the master of the Country Comparison Chart, review and define the country profile categories. For example: ƒPopulation: ƒ Abundant population can be an advantage by contributing to a strong labor force. It can also be a disadvantage by increasing pollution and/or energy consumption. ƒClimate: ƒ Weather can be a factor in obtaining and consuming energy resources. 6. Display the Job Descriptions and Actions master as you describe the occupations. After you have reviewed the occupations, have each student choose an occupation. 7. Explain the procedure for playing the game on Day Two and have the students return the packets to you. 8. For some students, a discussion about some of the statistics may be helpful. Ensure your students understand Btu (British thermal unit), Quads (Q), and gross domestic product per capita (GDP/capita). You may also need to review literacy rate and differences between types of governments.

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Global Trading Game


Day Two  Materials ƒAssembled ƒ country bins ƒOld ƒ newspaper or tablecloths ƒCountry ƒ packets in envelopes ƒEnergy ƒ resource cards (set aside) ƒJob ƒ Descriptions and Actions master, page 11 ƒGeologist ƒ Map, page 58 ƒInternational ƒ Trade Center sign, page 60 (optional) ƒGame ƒ boards, pages 61-62 (optional)

2Preparation ƒPlace ƒ students into their groups again and review the activities and discussion that took place in the last session. ƒMake ƒ a copy of the Geologist Map for each group. ƒPrepare ƒ game boards, signs, and masters as needed.

Classroom Management Tip: Depending on how you conduct the game, it may be necessary to instruct the geologists and miners to work on reclaiming their land simultaneously with the trading rounds so that all students feel busy during the entirety of the game. It may also be helpful to add a step where each geologist and miner need to inspect other countries’ reclamation efforts to make sure these jobs are done satisfactorily.

Procedure 1. Redistribute the country packets to the student groups. 2. Have the students discuss in their groups what they learned about their country on Day One. Place the country bins at the International Trade Center for distribution later in the game. 3. Using the Job Descriptions and Actions master, have the students recall the job they chose and review and discuss the different roles. 4. Have the economic advisors sort the industry, technology, and workforce cards from their country packet, and organize them on the game boards. If you are not using the game boards, have the students place the cards into three rows. Tell students they will get their energy resource cards upon the completion of mining. Set these pieces aside and only distribute them to teams after they have mined all the resources for their country. 5. Call the geologists and miners to the International Trade Center to collect their country’s bin and old newspaper or tablecloth. Provide each group with a Geologist Map. Give them the following instructions: ƒGEOLOGISTS: ƒ Observe the plot of land and make a sketch of the landscape on the map, labeling any hills or changes in the landscape. The large rocks represent hills and the sticks represent valleys. Use the straws to probe the soil for energy resources buried there, then mark on the map the location of any energy resources you find. ƒMINERS: ƒ Carefully remove the earth layer by layer, and set each layer aside on the newspaper or tablecloth. Use the geologist map to locate the energy resources. When you find the energy resources, bring them to the facilitator and exchange them for energy resource cards. Return the energy resources to the bin and give the cards to your economic advisor. As the traders and advisors do their jobs, you must work with the geologists to restore the plot of land. 6. Advise the economic advisors and international traders to prepare for the trading rounds. Give them the following instructions: ƒECONOMIC ƒ ADVISORS: Develop a strategy to allow your team to end up with exactly five of each of the commodity cards. Decide what needs to be bought and how much the team is willing to pay for it, and what needs to be sold and at what price. ƒINTERNATIONAL ƒ TRADERS: Use the economic advisor’s strategy and your ability to negotiate to obtain the commodities your country needs and trade the commodities you don’t need during the trading rounds.

© 2015 The NEED Project

8408 Kao Circle, Manassas, VA 20110

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www.NEED.org

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7. Explain the rules for trading: ƒTrading ƒ may occur only at the International Trade Center. ƒOnly ƒ the international traders may buy, sell, and trade commodities. ƒIf ƒ trading is done by anyone other than a trader, or in any place other than the International Trade Center, the teams must forfeit the next round of trading. ƒIf ƒ any trading is done before or after the trading signal, the teams must forfeit the next round of trading. 8. Give a warning, then signal the start of Round 1 trading. Allow 90 seconds for trading, then signal the end of the round. 9. Remind students of their end goal. Have the students regroup for two to three minutes to allow the economic advisors to create a strategy for the next round of trading. 10. Conduct Round 2 trading for 90 seconds. 11. At the conclusion of the second round, have the students return to their groups and complete the Impact Worksheets in their country packets. An impact is an effect on the environment as a result of energy production/consumption, industry, technology, or the workforce. Briefly discuss the definition and examples of impacts. 12. Have the students reveal all of the game cards to discover the impacts. 13. Explain that in the last trading round, teams must still attempt to obtain five of each kind of card, but must also try to end up with 21 or fewer impacts. OPTIONAL: It is a challenge for everyone to end up with 21 or fewer impacts, but possible. You might choose to make it easier, if you want everyone to win, by changing the number of impacts to 23, or make it impossible for everyone to win by lowering the impacts to 19. 14. Allow two to five minutes for the teams to form a new strategy for the final round of trading based on the number of impacts they have. 15. Signal the start of the final trading round. Allow three minutes for trading, then signal the end of the round. 16. Review the activity with the students using the Summary Questions listed below. 17. Evaluate the activity with the students using the Evaluation Form on page 63 and return the evaluation to The NEED Project.

? Summary Questions ƒHow ƒ many countries met the goal of five of each commodity card with 21 or fewer impacts? ƒWhat ƒ are some reasons a country might have trouble meeting that goal? ƒDo ƒ you think the reasons for struggles in this game could occur in real countries? ƒIn ƒ reality, what resources and impacts would countries want to increase and decrease?

 Extensions ƒRefer ƒ to the country profiles on pages 12-17. State key information from each country profile and ask the students to guess which real country their profile represents. As an extension, have students locate that country on a world map. Refer to the Teacher Key on page 19 for the actual countries with their profile information. NOTE: Please refer to page 3 for an important note regarding facts and figures used in this guide. ƒTo ƒ increase the challenge, add a cost to the reclamation process. Countries will need to pledge and set aside an amount of cash to fund reclamtion. If you wish you can also assess fines if reclamation does not occur to the satisfaction of the geologists and miners from around the globe.

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Game Construction

Note About Game Construction: Construction of the game can be lengthly. However, country packets, country bins, and game boards can all be re-used after initial preparation.

 Materials ƒ12 ƒ Plastic spoons ƒ30 ƒ Plastic drinking straws cut in half ƒ6 ƒ Plastic storage containers approximately 12”x 16”x 8” ƒ1 ƒ 50 Pound bag of sand ƒ1 ƒ 25 Pound bag of small aquarium gravel ƒ12 ƒ Rocks approximately 2”- 3” in diameter ƒ6 ƒ Craft sticks ƒ30 ƒ Marbles or 1” pieces of wood ƒ1 ƒ Timer with alarm ƒ6 ƒ Sturdy envelopes 9”x 12” ƒ6 ƒ Sets of 20 sheets of paper (8½” x 11”) each set a different color ƒOPTIONAL: ƒ To construct game boards and signs, you will need 13 8½” x 14” sheets of colored paper (all the same color)

2Preparation 1. Choose one color paper for each country. You will use this color for the game pieces and energy bucks. For example, the energy bucks and game pieces for Country #1 will be on blue paper, Country #2 on yellow, etc. The originals for the game pieces are found on pages 21-56. A page of impacts follows each of the commodity pages. The top right or left corner designates each page to a certain country. 2. Copy the game piece pages with the impact symbols on the back so that each game piece is two-sided. 3. Copy and cut energy bucks for each country using the color for that country and the template on page 20. Each country requires a different number of copies, as reflected in the chart below: COUNTRY

NUMBER OF COPIES

NUMBER OF BUCKS

1

3

23,000

2

1

5,000

3

3

20,000

4

4

25,000

5

2

10,000

6

3

17,000

4. Using the same color paper as the game pieces and energy bucks, make six copies of the Country Profiles for each country, found on pages 12-17, one copy of the Geologist Map on page 58, and one copy of the Impact Worksheet on page 59. 5. Using the same colored paper, make six copies of the Country Comparison Chart for each country, found on page 18. Prepare a copy of the Country Comparison Chart to project. 6. Prepare a copy of the Job Descriptions and Actions master found on page 11 to project. 7. Cut and laminate the energy bucks and playing cards. Laminate the Country Profiles and Country Comparison Chart, if desired.

© 2015 The NEED Project

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Procedure 1. Create a teacher packet, including: ƒThe ƒ energy resource cards for all the countries—each country in a separate envelope ƒA ƒ copy of the Teacher Key (page 19) ƒCopies ƒ of the Job Descriptions and Actions and the Country Comparison Chart masters (optional) 2. Organize the country materials on page 9 into the 9”x 12” envelopes for each country. Label each envelope 1–6 to correspond with the country number. Place the following into each country’s envelope: ƒEnergy ƒ bucks ƒIndustry, ƒ technology, and workforce cards (excluding energy resource cards) ƒCountry ƒ Profile sheets ƒCountry ƒ Comparison Chart ƒImpact ƒ Worksheet ƒ2 ƒ Spoons ƒ10 ƒ Drinking straw halves 3. Create plastic bins representing plots of land for each country. Number the bins 1–6. Each plot of land contains a certain number of energy resources that can be mined. The marbles or wood pieces represent energy resources. Use the following list as a guide to place the correct number of energy resources in each country’s bin: ƒCountry ƒ 1 ƒCountry ƒ 2 ƒCountry ƒ 3 ƒCountry ƒ 4 ƒCountry ƒ 5 ƒCountry ƒ 6

7 4 1 10 5 3

4. Bury the energy resources by filling each plastic bin with three inches of sand, then two inches of aquarium rocks or small pebbles. 5. Place two large rocks and one craft stick on the surface of each plot of land. The rocks represent hills and the craft stick represents a valley. The layout of these features need not be identical. OPTIONAL: Enlarge and copy the INTERNATIONAL TRADE CENTER sign (page 60) onto 8½” x 14” colored paper. Laminate for durability. Enlarge and copy the two game boards (pages 61-62) onto 8½” x 14” colored paper. Laminate each game board for durability.

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MASTER

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Job Descriptions and Actions

Geologists Make a map of the plot of land. Mark hills and differences in landscape. Locate your country’s energy resources by probing the soil using a straw. Mark promising sites with a straw. Assist the miners in reclaiming the land after it is mined. Use your map as a guide.

Miners Mine your energy resources using the surface mining method and the Geologist Map. Remove each layer of earth until you reach the energy resources. Use the tools to mine the energy resources. You may not touch them with your hands until they are on the surface. Bring all mined energy sources to the facilitator or your teacher to receive energy cards when you hear the signal. Work with the geologists to reclaim the land.

Economic Advisors Develop a trading strategy. Decide how many cards your country needs and how much you are willing to pay for them. Decide how many cards you can trade and what other countries should pay or trade for them. Use the Country Comparison Chart to learn about the other countries. Explain your strategy to your international traders and tell them what your cards are worth.

International Traders Persuade other countries to buy, sell, and trade what your country has or needs. At the signal, report to the International Trade Center. You will have 90 seconds to conduct your business during each of the two trading sessions. At the end of each trading session, return to your economic advisors, and give them the cards and money for the next strategy sessions.

Š 2015 The NEED Project

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Country Profile 1

SIZE

3,806,000 square miles; about half of the size of Russia

POPULATION

318.9 million; average life expectancy is 80 years. There are about 84 people per square mile.

ECONOMY

This country currently has one of the strongest economies in the world. The standard of living is considered high, but emphasis on technology has caused people without an education to make less money. Gross domestic product per capita is $54,000.

INDUSTRY

This country has many different types of businesses and more factories than most other countries. It produces petroleum products, steel, motor vehicles, telephone service, chemicals, electronics, food, consumer goods, lumber, and mining.

ENERGY

This country consumes 95.1 quads of energy per year and imports almost 17 percent of the energy it uses. Just over 76 percent of the country’s electricity generation is fossil fuels, while nearly 10 percent comes from nuclear energy, and almost 8 percent from hydropower. The remaining 6 percent is produced by geothermal, wind, biomass, and solar sources.

TECHNOLOGY

This country is very successful in space exploration, chemistry, electronics, lasers, plastics, and computers. Robots have replaced human assembly lines in many factories.

RESOURCES

The country has energy resources of coal, natural gas, petroleum, and uranium. Other resources include copper, lead, phosphates, bauxite, gold, iron, mercury, nickel, silver, tungsten, zinc, and timber.

ENVIRONMENT This country is one of the largest producers of carbon dioxide in the world. It burns fossil fuels, which can cause air pollution. Other issues are nuclear waste disposal, water pollution, air pollution, acid rain, and lack of freshwater resources in parts of the country. The country is working to improve air and water quality and protecting its native plants and animals. GOVERNMENT Multiparty democracy, constitution-based federal republic CLIMATE

The extreme northern part of the country experiences long, cold winters and short, cool summers. The extreme south is semi-tropical with no noticeable change in seasons. The eastern part of the country is humid, and the western part is very dry. The majority of the country is temperate with mild winters and warm summers.

AUTOMOBILES 404 per 1,000 people LITERACY RATE 99 percent

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Country Profile 2

SIZE

1,269,538 square miles; one-third the size of the United States

POPULATION

1.2 billion; average life expectancy is 68 years. There are about 950 people per square mile.

ECONOMY

This country has the third largest economy in the world. About half of the people are farmers, but the service industry, specifically information technology services, is also a major area of the workforce. Portions of the population do not have enough food and medicine, and some do not have indoor bathrooms. Many challenges exist in the economy, including a lacking infrastructure, high population, corruption, and high spending, but the country continues to be integrated into the global economy. Gross domestic product per capita is $5,800.

INDUSTRY

The major industries are producing clothing, chemicals, food, transportation equipment, cement, mining, petroleum, machinery, software, and medicines.

ENERGY

This country uses 23.9 quads of energy per year. About 34 percent of that energy is imported from other countries. Almost 68 percent of the country’s electricity is generated from fossil fuels, about 2 percent from nuclear, and another 30 percent from hydropower and other renewable sources. This country converts a large portion of waste into energy. This country experiences power shortages often.

TECHNOLOGY

This country’s scientists work to improve power generation and distribution so that the people can have more reliable electricity. They are also working on better telephone and road systems. Robots are seldom used because there is a large labor force that needs jobs. Software, machinery, and pharmaceutical technology are highly researched and developed here. It is the second largest user of cellular technology despite its poor infrastructure.

RESOURCES

This country is the fourth largest coal producer in the world. It also has iron ore, mica, bauxite, titanium, chromite, natural gas, diamonds, petroleum, limestone, rare-earth elements, and arable land.

ENVIRONMENT The biggest challenge is soil erosion. To feed the large population, forests have been cut down for farming and animal grazing. This lack of trees causes flooding. Other concerns are groundwater pollution and air pollution. Throughout the country, tap water is unsafe to drink due to sewage and pesticide run-off. GOVERNMENT

Federal republic

CLIMATE

The mountains in the north are permanently frozen due to their altitude. The west coast is a tropical rain forest and is always hot and wet. The center of the country is semi-desert, which is hot with very little rain. The majority of the country is hot, but has seasonal rainfall, creating dry and wet seasons.

AUTOMOBILES 13 per 1,000 people LITERACY RATE 71 percent

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Country Profile 3

SIZE

145,882 square miles; about the size of California

POPULATION

127.1 million; average life expectancy is 85 years. There are about 871 people per square mile.

ECONOMY

This country has the fourth largest economy in the world. The people are hard working and there is a large computer industry. The people don’t eat a lot of beef or chicken because there isn’t land to raise farm animals. Most people eat seafood, so the fishing industry is very strong. Most of the people are well fed, receive good health care, and have access to computers. Gross domestic product per capita is $37,800.

INDUSTRY

This is one of the world’s largest producers of motor vehicles. Steel and other metals, electronic equipment, machine tools, ships, chemicals, clothes, and food are all produced by this country. This country is known for being very productive and efficient.

ENERGY

This country uses 20.3 quads of energy each year, and imports about 92 percent of it from other countries. Transportation fuels are typically bought from other countries. The electricity it generates mostly comes from fossil fuels (87 percent), but hydropower (8.5 percent) and other renewable sources (4 percent) are also used. It is the largest importer of coal, LNG, and the second largest importer of petroleum. This country recently reduced its use of nuclear energy for electricity generation. Nuclear energy now makes up a very small percentage of this country’s electricity generation.

TECHNOLOGY

This country has made many improvements in fuel-efficient automobiles, robotics, communications, cancer research, biotechnology, high-speed trains, and electronics. Some work has been done with communications satellites.

RESOURCES

This country has very few mineral resources. The main natural resources are fish and seafood.

ENVIRONMENT The number one challenge is air pollution from power plants. Other problems include acid rain and water pollution, both of which are threatening to fish and sea animals. This country’s appetite for fish and tropical timber is contributing to the depletion of these resources. GOVERNMENT Parliamentary government with a constitutional monarchy CLIMATE

The weather is temperate with hot, humid weather in the summer and cool temperatures in winter. Most of the land in this country is very mountainous.

AUTOMOBILES 463 per 1,000 people LITERACY RATE 99 percent

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Country Profile 4

SIZE

772,204 square miles; about one-fifth the size of the United States

POPULATION

27.3 million; average life expectancy is 75 years. There are about 35 people per square mile.

ECONOMY

Much of this country’s money comes from selling oil to other countries. The majority of the oil production is by a stateowned company. People who work for the oil companies are very rich, but some of the people are very poor. Often, oil-related jobs go to foreign nationals. They have good health care and access to standard technology. Gross domestic product per capita is $52,800.

INDUSTRY

The main industries are oil production, petroleum refining, plastics, cement, petrochemicals, construction, fertilizer, industrial gases, chemicals, and commercial ship and aircraft repair. Almost everything is oil related. Most other materials, such as machinery, most food, cars, and clothing must be bought from other counties.

ENERGY

This country consumes 9.3 quads of energy per year, but produces 27.7 quads per year. It exports roughly 66 percent of the energy it produces to other countries. All of their energy and electricity (100 percent) is produced by fossil fuels.

TECHNOLOGY

Almost all technology is imported, especially the tools for refining oil. This country has recently begun to fund training and education in science and technology.

RESOURCES

This country has the world’s largest known reserves of oil. It also has reserves of natural gas, iron ore, gold, and copper.

ENVIRONMENT The biggest environmental challenges for this country are that it is running out of water and more and more land is becoming desert. The people are working hard to build machines and factories that can remove salt from seawater. There have also been oil spills near the coast, causing pollution. GOVERNMENT Monarchy CLIMATE

The weather of the country is harsh, dry desert with great extremes in temperature.

AUTOMOBILES 415 per 1,000 people LITERACY RATE 95 percent

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e

Country Profile 5

SIZE

471,008 square miles; about twice the size of Texas

POPULATION

48.4 million; average life expectancy is 62 years. There are about 103 people per square mile.

ECONOMY

This country is a middle-income, developing country, with a large supply of natural resources. It has a well-established modern infrastructure but struggles with unstable electrical supply and grid management. The stock exchange is the 16th largest in the world. Most of the country’s money is from mining. Some of the people are well fed, receive decent health care, and have access to standard technologies, but some of the people are very, very poor. Approximately 20 percent of its workforce is unemployed and lives in poverty. Gross domestic product per capita is $12,700, with stark inequality among its citizens.

INDUSTRY

The principal industries are mining, car assembly, metalworking, machinery, clothing, iron and steel, chemicals, fertilizer, commercial ship repair, and food. This country is the world’s largest producer of gold, platinum, and chromium.

ENERGY

This country consumes 5.7 quads of energy per year, but produces 6.3 quads. It exports about 10 percent of its energy to other countries. About 94 percent of its electricity generation is fossil fuels, 4 percent is nuclear energy, and 2 percent is hydropower and other renewables.

TECHNOLOGY

This country is working to advance its power demand and grid reliability. It has built new power stations to help manage electricity supply.

RESOURCES

This country has a lot of gold, chromium, coal, iron ore, manganese, nickel, phosphates, tin, uranium, gem diamonds, platinum, copper, vanadium, salt, and natural gas.

ENVIRONMENT The main challenge in this country is lack of water. Many rivers are polluted, so the government often asks, and sometimes forces, people to use less water. Also, it has challenges with air pollution, acid rain, and soil erosion, all of which are causing more land to become desert-like. GOVERNMENT Republic CLIMATE

The western half of the country is desert or semi-desert. The rest of the country is subtropical and has sunny days and cool nights.

AUTOMOBILES 108 per 1,000 people LITERACY RATE 94 percent

16

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Country Profile 6

SIZE

94,525 square miles; slightly smaller than Oregon

POPULATION

63.7 million; average life expectancy is 81 years. There are about 674 people per square mile.

ECONOMY

This country is one of the world’s great trading powers. This country is ranked in the top 10 in the world economically. The people are well fed, get good health care, and have access to advanced technology. Gross domestic product per capita is $37,700.

INDUSTRY

The main industries are machinery, equipment for power companies, factories and railroads, shipbuilding, aircraft, cars and car parts, electronics and communications, metals, chemicals, coal, petroleum, paper and paper products, food, clothing, and other consumer goods.

ENERGY

This country consumes 8.6 quads of energy per year, but it only produces 4.9 quads. It must import more than 40 percent of its energy from other countries. 76 percent of the electricity it generates comes from fossil fuels, just over 11 percent from nuclear energy, and roughly 13 percent from renewables, including hydropower. This country had once been a net exporter of fossil fuels but has recently begun relying on imports to balance production and consumption with declining reserves and concern for environmental impacts from drilling.

TECHNOLOGY

This country does a lot of research through the military and defense. People from this country developed steam-powered engines and discovered DNA. Other research includes astronomy, superconductivity, and lasers.

RESOURCES

This country has large reserves of coal, petroleum, natural gas, tin, limestone, iron ore, salt, zinc, clay, chalk, gypsum, lead, silica, slate, and arable land.

ENVIRONMENT This country is a world leader in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The government has also focused on reducing industrial, commercial, and household wastes that go into landfills. GOVERNMENT Constitutional monarchy and commonwealth realm CLIMATE

Temperate conditions with mild winters and warm summers are the standard; there is rain year round.

AUTOMOBILES 463 per 1,000 people LITERACY RATE 99 percent

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8408 Kao Circle, Manassas, VA 20110

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www.NEED.org

17


MASTER

Electricity Generation by Source

e 84

318.9 million

3,806,000

Country 1

$5,800

950

1.2 billion

1,269,538

Country 2

$37,800

871

127.1 million

145,882

Country 3

$52,800

35

27.3 million

772,204

Country 4

$12,700

103

48.4 million

471,008

Country 5

$37,700

674

63.7 million

94,525

Country 6

Imports over 40% of energy used

$54,000

Exports about 10% of energy produced

8.6 quads

High

5.7 quads

4.9 quads

Middle

9.3 quads

6.3 quads

76.0%

Very high for most, Very low for some

20.3 quads

27.7 quads

93.6%

11.2%

High

23.9 quads

1.6 quads

100%

4.3%

4.8%

Low

95.1 quads

15.9 quads

87.0%

0%

1.5%

High

Country Comparison Chart

Size (Square Miles) Population Density (People per square mile) Gross Domestic Product per Capita (PPP)* Standard of Living

Annual Energy Use (quad = quadrillion Btu) 79.2 quads

67.9%

0.5%

0%

8.0%

Imports about 34% of Imports about 92% of Exports about 66% of energy used energy used energy produced

Energy Production

76.3%

2.1%

8.5%

0.6%

Imports almost 17% of energy used

Fossil Fuels

9.8%

17.7%

0%

Energy Balance

Uranium (nuclear)

7.6%

4.0%

Hydropower

12.3% 6.2%

99%

Other Renewables (biofuels, waste, solar, etc.)

94%

71%

95%

99%

99%

Literacy Rate

Leader in air pollution reduction

Environmental Issues

Air and water pollution, acid rain, over fishing

Lack of water, desertification, pollution

Acid rain; air, water and soil pollution

Water conservation and pollution, desertification, erosion, soil, pollution

Soil erosion, deforestation, pollution, exposure to disease, lack of clean water

Global Trading Game

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$54,000

84

318.9 million

3,806,000

United States

Country 1

$5,800

950

1.2 billion

1,269,538

India

Country 2

$37,800

871

127.1 million

145,882

Japan

Country 3

Very high for most, Very low for some

$52,800

35

27.3 million

772,204

Saudi Arabia

Country 4

Middle

$12,700

103

48.4 million

471,008

South Africa

Country 5

High

$37,700

674

63.7 million

94,525

United Kingdom

Country 6

4.9 quads

Imports over 40% of energy used

76.0%

Exports about 10% of energy produced

High

Imports about 34% of Imports about 92% Exports about 66% of energy used of energy used energy produced

Low

Imports almost 17% of energy used

6.3 quads

11.2%

8.6 quads 27.7 quads

4.3%

93.6%

9.3 quads 1.6 quads

0%

100%

4.8%

20.3 quads

15.9 quads

0.5%

87.0%

1.5%

23.9 quads

79.2 quads

2.1%

67.9%

0%

8.0%

95.1 quads

9.8%

76.3%

8.5%

0.6%

5.7 quads

High

Teacher Key

Country Name

Size (Square Miles) Population Density (People per square mile) Gross Domestic Product per Capita (PPP)* Standard of Living Energy Balance Annual Energy Use (quad = quadrillion Btu)

Fossil Fuels

17.7%

0%

Energy Production

Uranium (nuclear) 7.6%

4.0%

Hydropower

12.3%

6.2%

99%

Other Renewables (biofuels, waste, solar, etc.)

94%

71%

95%

99%

99%

Literacy Rate

Leader in air pollution reduction

Environmental Issues

Air and water pollution, acid rain, over fishing

Lack of water, desertification, pollution

Acid rain; air, water and soil pollution

Water conservation and pollution, desertification, erosion, soil, pollution

Soil erosion, deforestation, pollution, exposure to disease, lack of clean water

Technology

Industry

Energy Resource

7

8

11

7

5,000

12

1

2

4

20,000

5

8

8

1

25,000

1

2

4

10

10,000

2

3

2

5

17,000

3

6

5

3

Number of Cards

Workforce

23,000

Energy Bucks

19

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e

Electricity Generation by Source


20

Global Trading Game


COUNTRY 1 RESOURCES

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21


COUNTRY 1 RESOURCE IMPACTS

22

Global Trading Game


COUNTRY 1 INDUSTRY

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23


COUNTRY 1 INDUSTRY IMPACTS

24

Global Trading Game


COUNTRY 1 TECHNOLOGY

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25


COUNTRY 1 TECHNOLOGY IMPACTS

26

Global Trading Game


COUNTRY 1 WORKFORCE

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27


COUNTRY 1 WORKFORCE IMPACTS

28

Global Trading Game


COUNTRY 2 RESOURCES

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COUNTRY 2 RESOURCE IMPACTS

30

Global Trading Game


COUNTRY 2 INDUSTRY/TECHNOLOGY

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31


COUNTRY 2 INDUSTRY/TECHNOLOGY IMPACTS

32

Global Trading Game


COUNTRY 2 WORKFORCE

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33


COUNTRY 2 WORKFORCE IMPACTS

34

Global Trading Game


COUNTRY 3 RESOURCES

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35


COUNTRY 3 RESOURCE IMPACTS

36

Global Trading Game


COUNTRY 3 INDUSTRY

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COUNTRY 3 INDUSTRY IMPACTS

38

Global Trading Game


COUNTRY 3 TECHNOLOGY

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COUNTRY 3 TECHNOLOGY IMPACTS

40

Global Trading Game


COUNTRY 3 WORKFORCE

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COUNTRY 3 WORKFORCE IMPACTS

42

Global Trading Game


COUNTRY 4 RESOURCES

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43


COUNTRY 4 RESOURCE IMPACTS

44

Global Trading Game


COUNTRY 4 INDUSTRY/TECHNOLOGY/WORKFORCE

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COUNTRY 4 INDUSTRY/TECHNOLOGY/WORKFORCE IMPACTS

46

Global Trading Game


COUNTRY 5 RESOURCES

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COUNTRY 5 RESOURCE IMPACTS

48

Global Trading Game


COUNTRY 5 INDUSTRY/TECHNOLOGY/WORKFORCE

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COUNTRY 5 INDUSTRY/TECHNOLOGY/WORKFORCE IMPACTS

50

Global Trading Game


COUNTRY 6 RESOURCES

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51


COUNTRY 6 RESOURCE IMPACTS

52

Global Trading Game


COUNTRY 6 INDUSTRY/WORKFORCE

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53


COUNTRY 6 INDUSTRY/WORKFORCE IMPACTS

54

Global Trading Game


COUNTRY 6 TECHNOLOGY

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55


COUNTRY 6 TECHNOLOGY IMPACTS

56

Global Trading Game


e

Impact Data Sheet

What are three strengths or assets of your country?

1. _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ 2. _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ 3. _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ What are three weaknesses or needs of your country?

1. _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ 2. _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ 3. _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________

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e

Geologist Map

Draw your country map below.

58

EAST

WEST

NORTH

SOUTH

Global Trading Game


e

Impact Worksheet

As a group, try to think of one positive impact and one negative impact of increasing each commodity, then the impacts of decreasing each commodity. Fill in the blanks below with your answers.

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INTERNATIONAL TRADE CENTER

Global Trading Game

60


INDUSTRY

TECHNOLOGY

GAME BOARD

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WORKFORCE

ENERGY RESOURCE

GAME BOARD

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Global Trading Game Evaluation Form State: ___________

Grade Level: ___________

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National Sponsors and Partners American Electric Power Arizona Public Service Arizona Science Center Armstrong Energy Corporation Association of Desk & Derrick Clubs Audubon Society of Western Pennsylvania Barnstable County, Massachusetts Robert L. Bayless, Producer, LLC BP America Inc. Blue Grass Energy Boulder Valley School District Brady Trane California State University Cape Light Compact–Massachusetts Chevron Chugach Electric Association, Inc. Colegio Rochester Columbia Gas of Massachusetts ComEd ConEdison Solutions ConocoPhillips Constellation Cuesta College Daniel Math and Science Center David Petroleum Corporation Desk and Derrick of Roswell, NM Dominion DonorsChoose Duke Energy East Kentucky Power Eastern Kentucky University Elba Liquifaction Company El Paso Corporation E.M.G. Oil Properties Encana Encana Cares Foundation Energy Education for Michigan Energy Training Solutions Eversource Exelon Foundation First Roswell Company FJ Management. Inc. Foundation for Environmental Education FPL The Franklin Institute Frontier Associates Government of Thailand–Energy Ministry Green Power EMC Guilford County Schools – North Carolina Gulf Power Gerald Harrington, Geologist Granite Education Foundation Harvard Petroleum Hawaii Energy ©2015 The NEED Project

Houston Museum of Natural Science Idaho Power Idaho National Laboratory Illinois Clean Energy Community Foundation Independent Petroleum Association of America Independent Petroleum Association of New Mexico Indiana Michigan Power – An AEP Company Interstate Renewable Energy Council James Madison University Kentucky Clean Fuels Coalition Kentucky Department of Education Kentucky Department of Energy Development and Independence Kentucky Power – An AEP Company Kentucky River Properties LLC Kentucky Utilities Company Kinder Morgan Leidos Linn County Rural Electric Cooperative Llano Land and Exploration Louisiana State University Cooperative Extension Louisville Gas and Electric Company Maine Energy Education Project Massachusetts Division of Energy Resources Michigan Oil and Gas Producers Education Foundation Miller Energy Mississippi Development Authority–Energy Division Mojave Environmental Education Consortium Mojave Unified School District Montana Energy Education Council NASA National Association of State Energy Officials National Fuel National Grid National Hydropower Association National Ocean Industries Association National Renewable Energy Laboratory Nebraska Public Power District New Mexico Oil Corporation New Mexico Landman’s Association Nicor Gas – An AGL Resources Company Northern Rivers Family Services North Shore Gas NRG Energy, Inc. Offshore Energy Center Offshore Technology Conference Ohio Energy Project Opterra Energy Oxnard School District Pacific Gas and Electric Company

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Paxton Resources PECO Pecos Valley Energy Committee Peoples Gas Petroleum Equipment and Services Association Phillips 66 PNM Providence Public Schools Read & Stevens, Inc. Renewable Energy Alaska Project Rhode Island Office of Energy Resources River Parishes Community College RiverQuest Robert Armstrong Roswell Geological Society Salt River Project Sandia National Laboratory Saudi Aramco Science Museum of Virginia C.T. Seaver Trust Shell Shell Chemicals Society of Petroleum Engineers Society of Petroleum Engineers – Middle East, North Africa and South Asia David Sorenson Southern Company Space Sciences Laboratory of the University of California Berkeley Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development–Energy Division Tioga Energy Toyota Tri-State Generation and Transmission TXU Energy United States Energy Association University of Georgia United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey University of Nevada–Las Vegas, NV University of North Carolina University of Tennessee University of Texas - Austin University of Texas - Tyler U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy–Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy–Wind for Schools U.S. Department of the Interior–Bureau of Land Management U.S. Energy Information Administration West Bay Exploration West Virginia State University Yates Petroleum Corporation

Profile for NEED Project

Global Trading Game  

Students become geologists, miners, economic advisors, and international traders as they analyze their country’s resources and needs and tra...

Global Trading Game  

Students become geologists, miners, economic advisors, and international traders as they analyze their country’s resources and needs and tra...