Topsail Magazine - Winter 2020/21 Edition

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WINTER 2020-21 |

COMPLIMENTARY

LOV E OF LOC A L

OYSTERS The Oyster industry in North Carolina is growing thanks to local oyster farmers in the famous Stump Sound and surrounding waterways

CAMP DAVIS’ WWII WOMEN PILOTS

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SPINNING ON SUNSHINE

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LEA-HUTAFF ISLAND


At NHRMC and NHRMC Physician Group, we’re leading our community to outstanding health by looking deeper and working harder to find innovative ways to deliver great care. We’re bringing health screenings to area neighborhoods, offering free exercise and nutrition programs, and volunteering with community partners throughout our region. And we’re just getting started. Join us at NHRMC.org. Together, we can make healthier happen.


INTRACOASTAL REALTY

Serving the Topsail Island Area

At Intracoastal Realty, we have a high concentration of our market’s top performing agents whose local knowledge is unmatched. We are excited to serve all of your real estate needs from our Topsail Island location!

SANDY LEDBETTER 910-520-8683

MICHAEL FLUHARTY 240-500-4521

JIM WILLIAMS 910-264-2117

STEVE SMITH 910-471-9889

PAUL FORNWALD 910-465-3109

MISSY WRIGHT LEANNE CHURCHILL LINNEA BUTLER 304-543-4832 910-333-7887 928-951-1006

MAUREEN SIDBURY 757-270-2171

VICTOR MORGAN 410-271-5928

LISA BRITT, BIC 910-200-4941

MARIAN GREEN 919-244-0931

MICHAEL BENTON 910-616-4598

Contact one of our island experts today! 1 0 4 T R I T O N L A N E | S U R F C I T Y, N C 2 8 4 4 5 | 9 1 0 - 3 2 8 - 3 0 0 0 | T O P S A I L . I N T R A C O A S T A L R E A L T Y. C O M


TABLE OF CONTENTS

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WINTER 2020-21

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VOLUME 2, ISSUE 1

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43

PHOTO BY VICKY OLIVER

PHOTO BY ADAM HAWLEY - UNIQUE MEDIA DESIGN

FEATURES

DEPARTMENTS

IN EVERY ISSUE

30 LOVE YOUR LOCAL OYSTER

25 FOOD & DRINK

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In the famous Stump Sound and waterways beyond, local oyster farmers are contributing to the growing oyster industry in North Carolina.

The Corner, a new craft beer-focused restaurant in Surf City, is gaining in popularity after a rocky start amidst the pandemic.

By C. G. Layt

43 NONPROFIT

Share the Table feeds those in need in Pender and Onslow counties, and the need is growing.

36 A LAST SANCTUARY

Several organizations are working together to ensure that Lea-Hutaff Island remains an undeveloped, pristine habitat for birds and other animal and plant species.

47 THE PUB SCOUT

The Crooked Lotus makes a big impact on the coastal craft beer scene.

By Dalene Bickel

52 A PEEK INSIDE

Jesse and Mandy Zimmer’s Surf City home is all about the roof-top view.

57 BEHIND THE BUSINESS

While Deli Works may be in a challenging location, it proves that great food and hard work are the basis for restaurant success.

61 HISTORY

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PHOTO BY JAMES STEFIUK

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Women pilots known as WASPs served the country during World War II, many of them at Camp Davis in Holly Ridge.

65 HEALTH & FITNESS

Spinning on Sunshine brings mobile outdoor fitness classes to Topsail Island.

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

10 CONTRIBUTORS 12 NEED TO KNOW 14 TAGGED 17 SPIRITS

Apple and Brandy Toddy By Sandi Grigg

18 WHAT’S COOKIN’ She-Crab Soup By Sandi Grigg

20 ONLINE EXCLUSIVES 22 WHAT’S HAPPENED 69 SNIPPETS 71 BUSINESS PROFILE East Coast Sports

72 TIDE CHART 73 ADVERTISERS INDEX 74 CAPTURE THE MOMENT


DOING WH AT WE DO BEST

Since 1969

Century 21 Action, Inc. has been a Topsail Area/Southeastern North Carolina market leader for over 50 years. We’re known for delivering award winning quality service through the most knowledgeable, best trained, and experienced sales team in the region. Customer satisfaction is always our prima goal and it is pursued Relentlessly. primary Whether you’re Buying or Selling, put the region’s best Real Estate Team to work for you. #RelentlessResults.

 518 Roland Avenue Surf City, NC, 28445

 800-760-4150  century21topsail.com


About

Winter 2020-21 Issue — Volume 2, Issue 1 CEO/PUBLISHER: Justin Williams DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT: Sandi Grigg

Publishing Quarterly

COPY EDITOR: Molly Harrison

25,000 copies printed each issue 14,000 copies directly mailed to area homes

CONTRIBUTING GRAPHICS: Paula Knorr Teresa Kramer Elizabeth Dale Niemann ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES: George Jacob Brian Wilner

Top sai l Ma gaz

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS: Megan Deitz Laura Glantz Adam Hawley Vicky Oliver Shay Perna James Stefiuk Studio 910 Productions Anita Tingle Unique Media & Design

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Dalene Bickel Kate M. Carey Ashley Daniels Kurt Epps Pat Fontana Christine Gonzalas Sandi Grigg Molly Harrison Melissa Slaven Warren Edward Wills Brian Wilner

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FOUNDER: B.J. Cothran

Want to advertise? ads@TopsailMag.com Have a story idea? edit@TopsailMag.com Are you a writer or photographer? freelance@TopsailMag.com 910.207.0156 TopsailMag.com

E Q A publication of Carolina Marketing Company, Inc.

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PUBLISHED BY: CAROLINA MARKETING COMPANY, INC. PO Box 1361, Leland, NC 28451 (910) 207-0156 • info@TopsailMag.com Reproduction or use of the contents in this magazine is prohibited.

©2020-21 Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. strives to bring correct, accurate information that is published in the magazine. However, Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. cannot be held responsible for any consequences resulting from errors or absences. Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. also cannot be held responsible for the services provided by any and all advertisers in our publications. All material in this magazine is property of Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. and may not be reproduced without authorization from the publisher. Topsail Magazine – A Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. publication is published four times per year and is distributed to residents and businesses in Pender & Onslow County, NC, to subscribers and to select areas of New Hanover County, NC. Interested in back issues, subscriptions or advertising? Contact us at (910) 207-0156 or info@TopsailMag.com.

About the cover: Photographer Anita Tingle captured our cover image of oysterman Matthew Schwab. As owner of Hold Fast Oyster Co., an oyster farm in the New River, Schwab is included in writer C. G. Layt’s story about local wild and farm-raised oysters, including those from the renowned Stump Sound. Find the article on page 30.


Serving Topsail Island for Over 25 Years!

Winter 2020-21

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PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Focused on the Positive As we close out 2020, I know I am not alone in saying that this has been an unpredictable and interesting year. I could go on and on about all the difficulties that have happened and will continue to happen, but you already know what those would be. So, to focus on the positive, I think it’s better to bring up how awesome it is to see our communities coming together, to see people helping each other and checking in on one another in these difficult times. It has been refreshing this year to see people offering their support for nonprofit organizations. Nonprofits rely heavily on big, in-person fundraising events such as dinners, lunches, galas and festivals, all which have not been possible this year. I was curious as to how some of these organizations were going to handle this predicament, and each one has seemed to figure it out with new ideas like virtual events, comedic t-shirts and online auctions, to name a few. Of course these organizations did not raise the money this year that they have in previous years, which is why right now it’s so important to give what you can. Whether you give money or time, pick an organization that means something to you and help them. They need it now more than ever. We have had a challenging year here at Topsail Magazine. Our small staff has stepped into various roles outside of our regular duties to keep us going. Lots of learning, understanding and growing has taken place. We are ecstatic to be here bringing you local stories from our community, and we hope that you feel the same. The key to us staying around is that our readers support our advertisers. Tell them you saw them in Topsail Magazine. Tell them you appreciate them supporting the magazine so that we can bring these stories and information to you. Without them we can’t produce this print publication, run our online stories or post on our social media (please follow us on Facebook and Instagram if you haven’t already!). We hope you enjoy this issue of Topsail Magazine. From tasty local oysters to the beauty of Lea-Hutaff Island, from the history of WWII women pilots known as WASPS to the many great deeds of Share the Table and so much more, we offer stories that reflect the history, culture, people and natural beauty of the Topsail area and the information you need to best enjoy your time here. We love the Topsail-area communities and appreciate everyone’s ongoing support!

Publisher@TopsailMag.com

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Topsail Magazine

PHOTO BY MEGAN DEITZ

Justin Williams Owner/Publisher


Jeff James

Winter 2020-21

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CONTRIBUTORS

Kurt Epps, a.k.a. The PubScout CONTRIBUTING WRITER AND PHOTOGRAPHER

I am a retired English teacher, a veteran of 37 years in the high school classroom, and I have also served as an adjunct professor at the college level. I’m a multiple awardwinning writer and have won national recognition for my coverage of the craft beer industry, in which I’ve been immersed since 1996. An expert at beer and food pairing, I emcee dinners, host public and private tutored beer tastings and evaluate and review beer bars, breweries, brewpubs and pubs, as well as restaurants with good beer menus. I encourage the responsible enjoyment of beer, and my favorite quote comes from Jim Koch of the Boston Beer Co.: “All beer is good; some beer is better.” My mission as The PubScout is to locate and write about the “better.”

Pat Fontana CONTRIBUTING WRITER

I am a business writer and communications workshop leader. My business, WordsWorking, and my recently published book, Talk to Me Like I’m a Human, focus on improving workplace communications, concentrating on the fundamentals of human interactions. I developed, write about and train on the concept of REAL Communications, encouraging others to communicate with Respect and Empathy, paying close Attention and Listening with intent. I can be reached at pat@words-working.net.

Vicky Oliver CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

I grew up in Virginia, moved here almost 10 years ago and can’t imagine leaving. Now based out of Sneads Ferry, I am a Topsail-area photographer and also work for a general contractor, which I really enjoy. I met my husband six years ago and we have two spoiled pups. My husband surfs, and when we met, I started using my camera again, staying on the shoreline watching him catch waves through my lens. This beautiful island led me to find my passion for art again and indulge in it through photography. I specialize in families, weddings, couples and maternity. I also offer senior sessions, dance portraits, corporate portraits and commercial photography. I strive to capture the emotions you’re feeling and exuding. My goal is to create an experience that you’ll always remember.

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WE HELP BUILD

5-STAR REVIEWS FOR TOPSAIL

VACATION RENTALS

Happy guests

are repeat guests! Sweet Dreams Linens, Inc. provides Topsail Island vacationers and property owners with Resort Quality Linens, Top of The Line Beach Gear, Baby Equipment, House Accessories, Outdoor Fun & Games, Welcome Kits, and so much more! Our goal is to help vacationers, property owners, and property management companies be successful with all aspects of vacation fun, while making it fast, easy, and affordable. We make it easy for you to provide top of the line, in-demand amenities that will leave your guests raving!

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SweetDreamsLinen.com

910.328.5312

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NEED TO KNOW

New to the area?

Find more information and numbers at TopsailMag.com

Where are the nearest emergency rooms? NHRMC EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT NORTH

151 Scotts Hill Drive Wilmington, NC 28411 (910) 662-9000 ONSLOW MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

317 Western Boulevard Jacksonville, NC 28546 (910) 577-2240 PENDER MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

507 E. Fremont Street Burgaw, NC 28425 (910) 259-5451

Where are the nearest drug stores? REALO DISCOUNT DRUGS

15441 US Highway 17, Suite 801 Hampstead, NC 28443 CVS/PHARMACY

13461 N.C. Highway 50 Surf City, NC 28445 (910) 329-0484 PUBLIX PHARMACY AT ARBORETUM IN SURF CITY

2765 N.C. Highway 210 E. Hampstead, NC 28443 (910) 803-6010 WALMART PHARMACY

420 Fun Center Drive Hampstead, NC 28443 (910) 803-6003

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Topsail Magazine

HARRIS TEETER PHARMACY

LOWES FOODS OF HAMPSTEAD

203 Alston Boulevard Hampstead, NC 28443 (910) 329-0711

17230 U.S. Highway 17 Hampstead, NC 28443 (910) 270-6300

JOHNSON DRUG HAMPSTEAD

FOOD LION IN HAMPSTEAD

17230 U.S. Highway 17 Hampstead, NC 28443 (910) 270-2223

14564 U.S. Highway 17 Hampstead, NC 28443 (910) 270-9703

CVS/PHARMACY AT HAMPSTEAD

PUBLIX AT ARBORETUM IN SURF CITY

14636 U.S. Highway 17 Hampstead, NC 28443 (910) 270-2970

2765 N.C. Highway 201 E. Hampstead, NC 28443 (910) 329-1000

VILLAGE PHARMACY OF HAMPSTEAD

WALMART NEIGHBORHOOD MARKET

14057 U.S. Highway 17, Suite 100 Hampstead, NC 28443 (910) 319-6050

420 Fun Center Drive Hampstead, NC 28443 (910) 803-6001

CVS/PHARMACY

SURF CITY IGA

1309 N.C. Highway 210 Sneads Ferry, NC 28460 (910) 327-2052

106 S. Topsail Drive Surf City, NC 28445 (910) 328-3961

SNEADS FERRY FAMILY PHARMACY

FOOD LION IN SNEADS FERRY

1016 Old Folkstone Rd #214 Sneads Ferry, NC 28460 910-327-2454

965 Old Folkstone Road Sneads Ferry, NC 28460 (910) 327-2067

Where are the nearest grocery stores?

Where are the post offices?

FOOD LION IN SURF CITY

213 Holly Street Holly Ridge, NC 28445

13601 N.C. Highway 50 Surf City, NC 28445 (910) 329-1163 HARRIS TEETER

203 Alston Boulevard Hampstead, NC 28443 (910) 329-0711

HOLLY RIDGE

SURF CITY

13567 N.C. Highway 50, Suite D Holly Ridge, NC 28445 HAMPSTEAD

121 Dan Owen Drive Hampstead, NC 28443


NEED TO KNOW

SNEADS FERRY

2001 N.C. Highway 172 Sneads Ferry, NC 28460 TOPSAIL BEACH

714 S. Anderson Boulevard Topsail Beach, NC 28445

Where are the town halls located? SURF CITY TOWN HALL

201 Community Center Drive Hampstead, NC 28443 (910) 328-4131 TOPSAIL BEACH TOWN HALL

820 S. Anderson Boulevard Topsail Beach, NC 28445 (910) 328-5841 NORTH TOPSAIL BEACH TOWN HALL

2008 Loggerhead Court North Topsail Beach, NC 28460 (temporary location at: 1000 N. C. Highway 210 Sneads Ferry, NC 28460) (910) 328-1349 HOLLY RIDGE TOWN HALL

212 N. Dyson Street Holly Ridge, NC 28445 (910) 329-7081 HAMPSTEAD PENDER COUNTY ANNEX

15060 U.S. Highway 17 Hampstead, NC 28443 (910) 270-6704 PENDER COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

805 S. Walker Street Burgaw, NC 28425 (910) 259-1200 ONSLOW COUNTY GOVERNMENT CENTER

234 NW Corridor Boulevard Jacksonville, NC 28540 (910) 989-3000

How do I get cable, phone or internet access? SPECTRUM

(844) 674-0398 AT&T

(888) 436-8638 CENTURYLINK

(910) 260-5830 See something missing? Shoot us an email: New@TopsailMag.com

Winter 2020-21

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@thetravelingmermaid_  Surf City, North Carolina Winter 2020-21

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Call 910.332.3800 or visit EmergeOrtho.com to request an appointment online. Outside referrals are welcome. 16

Topsail Magazine

Emerge Stronger. Healthier. Better.


SPIRITS

Toddy

For Your Body

Soothe your winter chills with this heavenly, cinnamon-infused cocktail. BY SANDI GRIGG

am not much of a brandy drinker, but when I do partake, it is almost certainly in the winter time. There is something about brandy that makes my whole body feel warm and toasty. I enjoy this cocktail best by the fire or with family and friends on a cold evening. The recipe makes six drinks so it is perfect for sharing. This warming cocktail is a delightful way to start or end your evening. Most often I refer to it as a Toddy for Your Body, but that lends to the assumption that it is some kind of medicine. The classic hot toddy contains a shot of whisky, a teaspoon of honey and a dash of fresh lemon, topped with boiling water … or at least that is how my grandmother always fixed it. Although this version of a hot toddy is more pleasurable than the original, I doubt it has any healing qualities unless you drink a few extra and then you will be feeling no pain. If you are craving a simple recipe that tastes complex, try this toddy. Just prop your feet up by the fire, sit next to a loved one and be thankful for your health.

APPLE AND BRANDY TODDY Makes 6 drinks

INGREDIENTS 1 750 ml bottle of sparkling cider 1 cinnamon stick (6 extra for garnish) 2 tablespoons honey 6 ounces brandy Chopped apples for garnish

METHOD Place the cider in a saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the cinnamon stick and honey and bring to a simmer. Remove from heat and set aside for 5 minutes to infuse. Divide the brandy among serving glasses. Top with the cider mixture and serve immediately. Garnish with chopped apples and extra cinnamon stick.

Winter 2020-21

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WHAT’S COOKIN’

The South’s Most Sublime Soup A coastal restaurant staple, rich and elegant She-Crab Soup can be easily made at home.

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BY SANDI GRIGG PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMES STEFIUK

She-Crab Soup is commonly found on menus in coastal Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia. The origin is disputed, but wherever it came from, it is muchappreciated here in the South. The first time I ever had this soup was in Savannah, Georgia, when visiting friends. We were downtown exploring when we found a restaurant right on the river. They were known for their She-Crab Soup so I had to try it. The creamy, bisque-like texture and tasty bits of crab was dreamy and delicious. The name She-Crab Soup implies that all the meat in the soup is from female crabs; however, that is not necessarily the case, at least not in my recipe. You can find many variations of this recipe, but in many original versions the crabs carrying roe (eggs) were used, which were obviously females. The roe is said to add more flavor so that less salt is needed. For my recipe, I did not use only females carrying eggs — instead, I purchased already-picked crab meat and I incorporated salt into the soup. Feel free to purchase female crabs from your local fish market to incorporate crab roe. However, to me, roe is a bit too fishy, and I don’t want the extra work of cleaning crabs. By the way, do you know how to tell if a blue crab is male or female? The females will have red tips on their claws, as if they had their nails painted red. You can also flip the crabs over and look at their apron (belly) — females will have a larger rounded apron indention while the males have a long, pointy apron indention. This is a very elegant and delicate recipe. You can serve it as a main course or as an appetizer. Either way, it’s a great way to make your guests feel special.

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WHAT’S COOKIN’

She-Crab Soup Serves 4

INGREDIENTS ½ cup butter ½ sweet onion, diced 1 celery stalk, diced 1 sprig thyme 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg 3 Tablespoons flour 4 cups half and half ½ teaspoon salt Juice of 1 lemon 1 teaspoon hot sauce ½ teaspoon freshly ground pepper 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce ¼ teaspoon paprika Dash of Old Bay seasoning 1 pound cooked lump crabmeat ¼ cup sherry wine Oyster crackers Parsley for garnish

METHOD You will need an immersion blender or food processor. In a large stock pot or Dutch oven, melt the butter over medium heat. Add onion, celery and thyme and cook until the onions and celery are soft. Reduce heat to medium-low, whisk in the flour and continue to cook about 5 minutes, stirring constantly. Stir in the Old Bay, nutmeg, black pepper and paprika. Once the spices become aromatic, add the sherry and increase the heat to medium, bringing it to a simmering boil. Cook about 10 minutes, constantly stirring. Add the half and half and cook for another 15 minutes. Remove the thyme sprig. Puree the soup with an immersion blender (or transfer to a food processor) and blend until smooth. Stir in the lemon juice, hot sauce and Worcestershire and season with salt. Gently stir in the crab meat and serve hot with oyster crackers. Garnish with parsley.

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ONLINE EXCLUSIVES

D EXTRAS YOU WILL ONLY FIND ONLINE D TOPSAILMAG.COM

SHOP LOCAL. IT MATTERS. The It Matters Where You Shop campaign encourages shoppers to support local businesses, which are struggling in the midst of COVID. Burgaw Chamber of Commerce, Burgaw Tourism, Greater Topsail Area Chamber of Commerce and Pender County Tourism have launched a new campaign called It Matters Where You Shop to raise awareness of the importance of sustaining local businesses. | CONTINUE READING ONLINE

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SMOKIN’ IN HOLLY RIDGE When Anthony Bowman, aka Smoky Tony, opened his new restaurant in Holly Ridge, the area was in the midst of the coronavirus lockdown. by Pat Fontana

Bowman was not deterred and, in fact, says that the initial takeout business really helped launched his namesake restaurant into the success it has already become. Smoky Tony’s was originally planned as a restaurant in Wake Forest, North Carolina, just north of Raleigh. Bowman had been cooking smoked meats for more than 20 years and had just retired from a long career with Verizon. He was ready to launch his new career but for various reasons, it was not to be in Wake Forest. | CONTINUE READING ONLINE

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SUMMER HAS KICKED THE BUCKET Topsail Steamer owner Danielle Mahon has declared “Summer has kicked the bucket! Time to celebrate with a Bay Bucket!” by Brian Wilner

At two coastal North Carolina locations, one in Surf City and one in Wrightsville Beach, and a new location in Ocean City, New Jersey, Topsail Steamer offers call-in, online and walk-in ordering for takeout. Topsail Steamer also delivers — anywhere in the United States! You can actually get one of these tasty seafood buckets delivered next day anywhere you like. | CONTINUE READING ONLINE 20

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ONLINE EXCLUSIVES

D EXTRAS YOU WILL ONLY FIND ONLINE D TOPSAILMAG.COM

AN ANNIVERSARY WAITING FOR A CELEBRATION Excitement, challenges and adjustments have become the norm at Arbor Landing in Hampstead. by Pat Fontana

When the senior living community celebrated its two-year anniversary in August, the staff and residents could not celebrate. “We haven’t been able to do anything at all,” says Devon Parish, Arbor Landing’s director of community relations. She adds excitedly, though, “When this is ever over, we’re going to have a huge celebration.” At that point, they will celebrate their success in providing quality senior living to the Hampstead community as well as the end of the coronavirus.

be able to come back in the building and spend time with their loved ones once again. | CONTINUE READING ONLINE

When the pandemic is over, it will mean that families will

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A HELPING HAND New Estuary Home Care is brand new in Hampstead. by Melissa Slaven Warren

Owner and director Jessica Puttbach just opened the business, which offers three basic home care programs: 24/7 care, assistance with daily living and Alzheimer’s care. What is also new is Puttbach’s approach to home care. Having managed a home care company previously, she is “very familiar with the industry and all its challenges, so we do things a little differently,” Puttbach says. “I personally do all the recruiting because I want to ensure that we hire the best caregivers possible. We’re looking for experienced, reliable professionals who truly have the compassion to care for others.” | CONTINUE READING ONLINE

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CLOSE CLASSMATES Two generations of Burkees are studying together at Cape Fear Community College. by Alex Riley

When Nick Blair first looked over his class roster for Design Process, the Cape Fear Community College instructor figured there had been an inputting error when the name John Burkee was listed twice. “I thought they had made a mistake and signed him up twice,” Blair says. “Then I saw they had different student numbers.” There was no mistake. It was just a Burgaw father-son duo looking to continue expanding their knowledge. | CONTINUE READING ONLINE

| Winter 2020-21

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WHAT’S HAPPENED

Coastal Home Store Grand Opening

park. So far, the project has raised more than $4,500. Kiwanis Club of Hampstead held a Pathway of Honor dedication for Sydney and Hazel McCoy at Kiwanis Park on October 10. For more information, visit Kiwanis Club of Hampstead at facebook. com/hampstead.kiwanis.

Wild Child Art Studio Grand Opening CONTRIBUTED PHOTO CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Coastal Home Store in Hampstead, in conjunction with Greater Topsail Area Chamber of Commerce, held a grand-opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony on September 24. Coastal Home Store sells home decor and goods and gifts. You’ll find the new store at 17007 U.S. Highway 17 in Hampstead.

Porch & Nest Grand Opening

Wild Child Art Studio, in conjunction with Greater Topsail Area Chamber of Commerce, held its grand-opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony on October 1. Wild Child Art Studio, located at 14888 U.S. Highway 17 in Hampstead, offers art classes and workshops for all ages, including Clay Classes, and has an on-site gallery.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Share the Table Celebrates 10 Years

Porch & Nest in Wilmington, in conjunction with Greater Topsail Area Chamber of Commerce, held its grand-opening and ribbon-cutting ceremony on September 23. The shop offers furniture, home décor and gifts. It is located at 10250 U.S. Highway 17 North in Wilmington. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Kiwanis Club Honors Fundraiser Organizer

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CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Several years ago, NC Spot Festival Queen Sydney McCoy started a fundraising project at Kiwanis Park in Hampstead. Her brickengraving sidewalk project raised funds for the NC Spot Festival Scholarship Program and renovations and future projects in the

Share the Table is celebrating a decade of helping those in need in the community. During that time Share the Table has expanded its offerings from one free weekly community meal serving 20 people per week to serving more than 1,000 people a week today. Now they also provide a food pantry and backpack program and have added other services such as a household ministry and federal food distribution. Share the Table is so grateful to all its volunteers, donors and the Food Bank of CENC.


HOME Home Is Where The Heart Is. It's Where Love And Laughter Abound. It's Where Memories Are Made.

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Home-Made

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FOOD & DRINK

Craft Beer Reboot The Corner, a new craft beerfocused restaurant in the old Hopsail Island location in Surf City, is gaining in popularity after a rocky start amidst the pandemic.

A

BY KURT EPPS, THE PUB SCOUT PHOTOGRAPHY BY VICKY OLIVER

“A hero will rise.” So went the trailer for the blockbuster movie Gladiator. The Ridley Scott classic, released in April 2000, still appeals to millions of movie fans. But this story is not a movie review. It is, rather, the story of a building’s rebirth and the pluck and drive of two young heroines with the vision and energy to take a plunge into cloudy waters, waters that got even cloudier — if not downright muddy — when COVID-19 showed up. The building in question once housed a neat craft beer bar and bottle shop called Hopsail Island, which closed its doors in January. They were not closed for long, as Jane-of-all-trades

Roxy Treweek, co-owner of The Corner, serves one of the 15 beers on tap.

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FOOD & DRINK

Roxy Treweek and entrepreneur Clarissa Grant saw an opportunity for a craft beer place that served food and began their journey in that very same month. They changed the vision and the name of the place to simply The Corner, and the move is paying off. With a food menu that has won raves from owners of other businesses on the island and a maintenance of those craft beer offerings, Treweek is watching business grow.

The bar was practically full at 4 pm when Dave and I rolled in, which is pretty impressive because on Mondays The Corner doesn’t even open until 4 pm. So somebody — the locals, likely — knows something. We found out that one of the reasons is the sandwiches The Corner offers along with that craft beer. Treweek shared that every Signature Sammie is named for a ’90s hip hop artist, and her recommendation to us was the Notorious ITL. Winter 2020-21

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FOOD & DRINK

Their tap offerings vary from stout to cider to fruited gose, and many solid N.C. breweries are on their beer menu. It was good to see OIB’s own Makai Brewing represented, too. Apart from the variety of the beer, the quality of the food and the size of the 4 pm crowd, what impressed this writer most was Treweek’s unquenchable enthusiasm for her vision. The sparkle in her eye and the excitement in her voice when discussing her plans and dreams — both hallmarks of successful businessfolk — was unmistakable. The Corner has a very usable outdoor section that in more comfortable weather will see lots of visitors, and she would love to expand the kitchen. “But we have to

I never listened to the work of its namesake, but if it was as good as this Notorious ITL, he must have won awards for something. Dave and I split one, then ordered a Hot Ham and Swiss that was equally good. Both had a special Corner sauce that helped to make the sandwiches special. generate what we can with what we have for now,” she says. In addition to the 15 craft beers on tap, The Corner prides I’m waiting for Treweek to come up with another Signature itself on its Boozy Milkshakes, frozen drinks and Classic Sammie, a sandwich named the Maximus. You remember: My Cocktails, all the brainchildren of Treweek, a former Classic name is Maximus Decimus Meridius, commander of the Armies Cocktail bartender with 10 years of of the North, General of the Felix experience. The UNCW undergrad/ Legions, loyal servant to the true Webster University grad also does emperor, Marcus Aurelius. Father to a Want to go? digital marketing for startup murdered son, husband to a murdered companies. She and Grant decided to wife. And I will have my vengeance, The Corner NC Craft Beer + Eatery have food in their place because they in this life or the next. 2660 N.C. Highway 210, Suite 5, Surf City understood that it’s hard to attract Sounds like a great hero sandwich (910) 803-2325 business without it. thecornersurfcity.com to me. And a hero will rise.  28

Topsail Magazine


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LOV E YOUR LOC A L

Oysters

O

In the famous Stump Sound and waterways beyond, local oyster farmers are contributing to the growing oyster industry in North Carolina.

Oysters grown in Stump Sound are often featured in seafood restaurant menus and have bragging rights for being the tastiest on the Eastern Seaboard. Is that folklore or is there some truth to it? “It’s because they’re so fat,” says commercial fisherman and lifelong Snead’s Ferry resident Joseph Huie. “It has got to be the salinity of the water and the type of bottom they grow in,” he adds. “They are a real fat oyster, and they have a unique taste. I’ll put Stump Sound oysters up against any oysters growing in the United States. I’ve eaten oysters out of Texas, out of Maryland and Virginia, they just can’t compete with these Stump Sound oysters.” Huie says the good reputation for Stump Sound oysters probably dates back to the 1950s and ’60s, from Davis 30

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BY C. G. LAYT

Oyster House at Tar Landin (now defunct). Another local oyster house, Grant’s Oyster House in Snead’s Ferry, has been selling them, with a host of other seafood, since 1939. “I remember Daddy would catch 50 bushels of oysters a day and would get $1 to $1.25 per bushel in the mid-’60s,” Huie says. He noted that last year a bushel out of the boat sold for around $50. When the temperature drops, the oysters start to fatten up, Huie says. “The outside will be as big as your hand, and inside they look creamy. They look like a stick of butter in there.” Huie has put his oyster tongs aside to work the last year and a half for the state in cleaning up hurricane debris. The N.C. Coastal Federation tried to hire fishermen for the clean-up to help them out following crop losses after Hurricane Florence.

“We had 20 to 40 inches of rain here, and the river was closed after Florence,” Huie says. “I used to have a clam house open, but 80 to 90 percent of our clams died here in New River on account of the storm, because there was so much rain water. It hurt the oysters too, but they survived better than the clams.” He says there has never been a cleanup like this before. “We’re picking stuff up from Fran and Bertha from back in the late ’90s off these barrier islands,” he says. He estimates that so far, the clean-up crew has hand removed more than 224 tons of debris, most of it hidden in the woods of barrier islands. He has noticed while cleaning this summer that the wild oysters seem to be making a strong comeback, and says the season, which runs about October 15 through March 31, looks to be a good one.


Matthew Schwab of Hold Fast Oyster Co. grew up on the Chesapeake Bay and now farms oysters in the waters of southeastern North Carolina.

PHOTO BY ANITA TINGLE

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Anyone wanting to try their hand at tonging some wild oysters is free to do so. Any non-licensed fishermen are allowed a bushel of oysters per day for personal use.

Farming is Farming

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Oystermen with Three Little Spats Oyster Company at work on the Stump Sound.

down, but they aren’t dead. “They are pretty much the only animal product people eat that is still alive,” Schwab says. “Some people don’t want to think of it that way, but technically they are hibernating, which is why in wintertime, growth really slows down.” Schwab farms oysters 10 miles north of Stump Sound. “My farm is in Stone’s Bay near Camp Lejeune rifle range,” he says. “I love my growing area, the New River, it’s very unique. I have the opinion that Stump Sound is slightly overrated. But there are a lot of oyster farms in that region right now and they work very hard.” PHOTOS BY SHAY PERNA

The oyster farming industry has a lot of similarities to dirt farming, and a lot of the terminology is similar with seed (1/4 inch or less sized baby oysters) and grow out (raise to maturity) as examples. “People have this idyllic view of what we do, that we swim around in the water taking care of oysters, but it is a lot of hard work,” says Evan Gadow of Three Little Spats Oyster Company. The Gadows have a big farm on both sides of Permuda Island. They have close to two million oysters in their waters. “Most oyster farmers have 5 acres of water they lease from the state; we have over 63 acres,” he explains. “And like having more land, with more water you have to manage it properly to be able to grow.” Aquaculture farmers have to meet a certain quota to retain leases, and the state rules are stringent. “Whenever you harvest any form of shellfish, you have to fill out trip tickets, which adds a paper trail of harvesting and selling,” Gadow says. “If you are leasing, it shows you are hitting your quota. It’s also used for tracking wild oysters, to see how a certain area is producing.” The length of time for growing out oysters varies. One batch of seed could take three or four months, another could take three 3 years. “It’s genetics, where you got ’em,” Gadow says with a laugh. “Some oysters are just slower than others. Unfortunately.” Matt Schwab of Hold Fast Oysters explains the culling process and the hibernation of the oysters: “With the extended N.C. growing season, we get a large chunk of our crop being ready in about 10 months. In Nova Scotia, Canada, it can take almost two years to get to harvest size. Because of the water temperatures.

“Oysters are density dependent,” Schwab continues. “When we get them, we get them at about ¼ inch, or a little smaller, we’ll put 5,000 seed in a cage. By the time they are 3-inch harvest size, there are about 800 in a cage. As they grow, you are constantly sorting them by size and working them.” Oysters hibernate in the winter, and their growth slows

The Season and the R month Myth There’s a difference between wild harvested and farmed oysters. The wild oysters are limited to the October through March or April time frame, but the farmed are not.


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“Farmed oysters don’t reproduce the same way wild oysters do, so we can harvest year-round,” Schwab says. “We sell all summer, year-round, 24/7/365.” The myth that you shouldn’t eat oysters in months that don’t end in R or in the summertime goes back to wild oysters. “They reproduce in summer, and to limit the impact on the wild stock, the state would not allow harvesting in summer, so the oysters had a chance to replenish,” Schwab explains. He says that is why the wild summer oysters are so watery, because all their energy is going into reproduction. “Whereas the farm-raised are genetically sterile,” he says. “They don’t reproduce, so all they do is eat and grow. In the summertime they just as full and meaty as they are in the winter.” However, the flavor of the farmed oysters does change with the season. “They are filter feeders and they eat phytoplankton, green algae,” Schwab says. “Seasonally that changes, and that’s how oysters get their flavor. It can change a lot summer to winter.” People not wanting to eat oysters in summer is a problem for oyster farmers. “That’s the bane of our industry, that people think they’re unsafe to eat in the summer,” Schwab says. “It is very rare for someone to get sick, but it could happen any time of the year, if you pull an oyster out in the winter and leave it out of water.”

Touring the farms on the N.C. Oyster Trail, consumers will get an idea of the variation of oysters throughout the state. “North Carolina has so many different aquatic coastal ecosystems,” Gadow explains. “An oyster gets its flavor from the water. Sound oysters have that nice balance between the taste of salty, buttery and fat. That balance is why people love Stump Sound oysters so much … All up and down the coast there are so many combinations of fresh and salt water. If you think of it, Pamlico estuaries are completely different from what we have down here and different from what you have in Morehead.” The Three Little Spats farm has already had a couple of visitors enjoying the Oyster Trail. The Oyster Trail could be an eco-tourism boon for coastal towns, at least as far as seafood sales go. Another plus for the state is the clean-up work the little bivalve mollusks do themselves. “Oyster farming is the most

We’re not sure who made that comparison first, but the launching of the N.C. Oyster Trail is working to make it a reality. In May 2018 three N.C. senators sponsored a bill to encourage the growth of the oyster industry. The costatement by senators Norm Sanderson, Bill Cook and Harry Brown said, “Our goal is for North Carolina to become the ‘Napa Valley’ of oysters and to become a $100 million industry in 10 years.” Three Little Spats Oyster Company farm is one of the initial 10 farm members listed on the N.C. Oyster Trail site (ncoysters.org), a combined project of the N.C. Coastal Federation, Sea Grant and the Shellfish Association. “The Oyster Trail has put some of the bigger farms on the website,” Gadow says. “You can book tours and buy oysters up and down the coast. It’s kind of like how Napa Valley has their wine tours, we have an oyster tour. They just started a website. There are just a few farms on there right now, and we’re one of the first. It is a huge deal for all of us.” 34

Topsail Magazine

Schwab and his first mate harvest oysters in New River.

environmentally friendly form of farming and producing food,” Gadow says. “It has a net positive effect on the environment. A full-grown adult oyster filters 50 gallons of water a day. It takes crap out of the water and turns it into something useful.” Gadow is quick to recognize the work of fisherman Lena Ritter for the work she did to preserve the Permuda Nature Reserve, where he works, and saving it from the hands of developers. “She was a very staunch supporter of saving the water quality of the island,” he says. “She was a hero.” If you’d like to know more about oysters in North Carolina, including the farms, farmers and Oyster Trail, visit ncoysters.org. 

PHOTOS BY ANITA TINGLE

The Napa Valley of Oysters


FOUR Great REASONS TO LIST YOUR HOME 1. Buyers Are Actively Searching Now is the time to take advantage of the buyer activity currently in the market so you can sell your house in the most favorable terms. 2. There Are Not Enough Homes for Sale Compared to this time last year, Active Listings are down. 3. The Process Is Going Quickly According to the latest Origination Insights Report from Ellie Mae, the time needed to close a loan is just 49 days. 4. Its Time to Move Up You’ve likely spent much of the last six months in your current home. Perhaps you now realize how small it is, and you need more space. Bottom Line: The housing market is primed for sellers in our area. Now is the time to connect with your Intracoastal Realty Neighborhood Specialist. If the timing is right for you and your family...

The market is calling your name!

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A LAST

SANCTUA Several organizations are working together to ensure that Lea-Hutaff Island remains an undeveloped, pristine habitat for birds and other animal and plant species. BY DALENE BICKEL PHOTOGRAPHY BY ADAM HAWLEY

ccessible only by boat, Lea-Hutaff Island offers 5,641-acres of sandy shoreline, beach dunes and tidal marsh. This 4-mile oasis between Topsail and Figure Eight islands is one of the state’s last remaining uninhabited and undeveloped barrier islands. Colonial waterbirds such as pelicans, egrets, herons, terns, skimmers and gulls nest here by the thousands. Other avian visitors include black-billed plovers, American

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oystercatchers, greater yellowlegs, willets, sanderlings, semipalmated sandpipers and short-billed dowitchers — to name just a few. Lea-Hutaff Island offers a rare and much-needed sanctuary to these birds that are frequently threatened by habitat loss, sea level rise and human disturbance. Because of this, the island has been designated as one of North Carolina’s Important Bird Areas (IBAs) by Audubon North Carolina.

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The Town of Surf City would like to invite you to explore all that our town has to offer! Whether you’re a local or just visiting for the week, you’ll be sure to find your adventure at one of our 36 public beach access, parks & playgrounds, Community Center, Welcome & Event Center, off-leash Bark Park, Disc Golf Course, and so much more! Share your pictures with us on social media using #SurfCityParks

Winter, Spring, Summer or Fall, Surf City’s got it all! No matter the season, Surf City hosts events for the whole family to enjoy. Throughout the year, be sure to check out some of our annual events including our Easter Egg Hunt, Movies in the Park, Bridge Jam, Independence Day Celebration, Fall Fest, and Christmas Tree Lighting!

Surf City Parks & Recreation offers athletics and programs for everyone! Whether you’re looking to get fit, get creative, or just get moving, we’ve got just what you need! For more information on what we are currently offering, please visit SurfCityParksandRec.com

www.SurfCityNC.gov 38

Topsail Magazine


“ North Carolina Coastal Land Trust deems the conservation of Lea-Hutaff Island a priority and over the past several years has begun purchasing private lots...

TWO BECOME ONE Lea and Hutaff Islands were originally separate land formations divided by Old Topsail Inlet. That changed in 1998 when a storm eradicated the inlet and geographically united the two privately owned properties. Lea Island (closest to Topsail Island) was purchased in 1918 by J. H. and Pearl Lea of Hampstead. Hutaff Island (closest to Figure Eight Island) was purchased in 1925 by George Hutaff of Wilmington. Whereas Hutaff Island remains in the same private family trust, Lea Island has experienced ownership changes and minor development over the years. According to Bert Lea, Jr., his grandparents purchased the island for fishing purposes. Recognizing the allure of the island to others, they erected several small huts and rented them.

Lea remembers his mother sending him over to the island in a jon boat as a young teenager to post notices on the doors of each of the fishing huts. “It was in the days of squatter’s rights, and my family wanted to make sure we retained the properties,” Lea says. “We charged a dollar per year for use of the huts, and the notices instructed the men to either mail their payments or drop them off at the fish house.” The fish house he’s referencing is the former J. H. Lea & Sons Seafood along U.S. Highway 17 in Hampstead, now Atlantic Seafood.” The Lea family owned the island until the late 1960s, when Lea’s uncle, who was to eventually inherit the property, died unexpectedly. In order to provide for his children, the family sold the island to a man from Virginia Beach and put the proceeds in a trust fund for the children.

Following the sale, the new owner divided Lea Island into approximately 40 residential lots. Several of the lots sold, but only three landowners ever constructed homes on their properties. Due to the nature of erosion, shifting sand and high winds during storms, all three have since been destroyed, returning the island to its natural habitat.

PRESERVATION AND CONSERVATION EFFORTS North Carolina Coastal Land Trust deems the conservation of Lea-Hutaff Island a priority and over the past several years has begun purchasing private lots whenever owners are willing to sell for fair market value … and whenever they have the funds available. Winter 2020-21

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It will still be a wonderful barrier island 10 years from now, but it won’t look exactly the same. And that’s how it’s supposed to be. WANT TO VISIT LEA-HUTAFF ISLAND? If you don’t own your own boat, Tuck’s Water Shuttle on Topsail Island offers transportation to and from Lea-Hutaff. For hours and pricing information, call (910) 616-7106.

WHO TO CONTACT IF YOU DISCOVER AN INJURED BIRD OR SEA TURTLE • SkyWatch Bird Rescue: skywatchbirdrescue.org • Possumwood Acres Wildlife Sanctuary: possumwoodacres.org • Sea Turtle Stranding Network: (252) 241-7367 • Audubon North Carolina can help when their biologists are present on the island: (910) 408-2288

WAYS YOU CAN HELP IF YOU VISIT • Do not disturb posted nesting areas. • Keep dogs on a leash. When running unleashed, dogs scare adult birds away from eggs and chicks, leaving them vulnerable to temperature stress and predators; frighten away resting birds during migration season; and dig up sea turtle nests. • Walk along the waterfront only. Many birds nest and roost within the protected interior. • Do not leave any trash on the island. • Contact your local legislators to request that funds be allocated to the N.C. Land & Water Conservation Fund to help purchase additional lots on Lea-Hutaff Island. 40

Topsail Magazine

According to N.C. Coastal Land Trust Director of Land Protection Janice Allen, the bids for public conservation dollars are highly competitive and available funds have diminished from a one-time high of $100 million to only about $10 million currently. The properties that the Coastal Land Trust has purchased to date have been transferred to the State of North Carolina Parks and Recreation Department to manage as a State Nature Area. This differs from a State Park in several ways, including that no public amenities such as picnic shelters or restrooms are provided. Audubon North Carolina also actively participates in the conservation of the island. Their biologists and volunteers seek to provide a safe place for the birds to

raise their young, weather the winter and refuel during migration. Toward that effort, they post signs during the spring and summer nesting seasons to alert visitors of sensitive habitat areas, monitor bird populations and help protect sea turtle nests. They also monitor plant life such as the endangered seabeach amaranth and the invasive beach vitex. “Audubon plans to work hard to make sure the island remains an undeveloped, pristine habitat,” says Ben Graham, communications manager of Audubon North Carolina’s Wilmington office. “That said, barrier islands are not supposed to be static; dunes and shorelines move. It will still be a wonderful barrier island 10 years from now, but it won’t look exactly the same. And that’s how it’s supposed to be.” 


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Topsail Magazine


NONPROFIT

A Fair Share for All Share the Table feeds those in need in Pender and Onslow counties, and the need is growing. BY ASHLEY DANIELS

PHOTO BY VICKY OLIVER

F

or most of us, it’s difficult to imagine days on end without a meal in front of us at the table. And that’s exactly why Dawn Ellis founded Share the Table 10 years ago. “A friend and I had been talking for years about doing a free community meal at Faith Harbor [United Methodist], and then God kept putting it on my heart to stop wasting time and do it,” Ellis says.

Today, the faith-based Share the Table nonprofit is supported by seven charter churches, community churches, civic organizations and local businesses in Pender and Onslow counties to provide free community meals, a food pantry and ongoing school backpack programs for thousands. “This is definitely my passion: getting food to the people who need it,” says Ellis, who serves as the nonprofit’s executive director.

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NONPROFIT

That need has dramatically increased over the last few months with the onslaught of COVID-19. In fact, according to Ellis, Share the Table’s distribution has increased by 62 percent. Additional changes caused by the pandemic because of safety issues include a switch to a drive-through food pantry service at two area locations for those in need and their Sunday community meals given out in takeout boxes rather than a sit-down setting. One service that remained constant over the summer was Share the Table’s MUNCH (Meals Until No Child Hungers) Backpack

distribution. They distributed 135 backpacks bi-weekly. Each backpack is stuffed with nutritious, child-friendly food for students enrolled at all three Topsail elementary schools and Topsail Middle School. “Now that school is back on a hybrid schedule, our plan is to get them to the kids at school in the middle of the week,” Ellis says. “If that doesn’t work, we’ll have to deliver them ourselves so we make sure the kids get the food.” The Share the Table pantry is stocked with (and always welcomes more) produce, fruit, canned goods, meat and more. The organization is PHOTO BY VICKY OLIVER

PHOTO BY VICKY OLIVER CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Topsail Magazine

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

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currently dedicated to focusing on offering healthier, diabetic-sensitive and gluten-free options for clients as well. Ellis shares that in the United States, there are 37.2 million people who are food insecure. According to Feeding America, the average food insecurity rate across the


NONPROFIT

PHOTO BY VICKY OLIVER

country is 11.5 percent. In the nonprofit’s service area of Pender and Onslow counties, however, rates are higher than the national average. Pender County is at 13.6 percent, and Onslow County is at 15.2 percent. Feeding America forsees an increase in food insecurity rates during the pandemic to 19.1 percent for Pender and 21.5 percent for Onslow. To combat those numbers, Share the Table partners with the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina and picks up food weekly from Walmart, Publix and Harris Teeter.

“That relationship is wonderful,” Ellis says. Monetary and food donations are always helpful and welcomed, of course. They’ve also initiated an Adopt-a-Shelf program in which local businesses or groups can pick one food item to keep stocked on a regular basis, either weekly or monthly. Another of their needs, Ellis says, is grant writers willing to work pro bono. “One thing we’ve actually been so blessed with is volunteers at this organization — that’s never been a problem for us,” she says. “It’s

amazing to see the people who are willing to support our cause.” With the oncoming holiday season and threat of a high-level pandemic recurrence, the need for donations is even greater. “Many of our clients who were already struggling are now unemployed,” Ellis says. “They either worked a full-time job or several part-time jobs in positions barely at minimum wage and now have no income, so we are seeing clients we have not seen in over a year and completely new clients. Any support is greatly appreciated!” 

CAN YOU HELP OR DO YOU NEED HELP? For more information on how to volunteer or donate to Share the Table or to use their pantry, child backpack or community meal services, visit sharethetablenc.com or call (910) 616-8897. Share the Table is located at 12395 N.C. Highway 50 in Hampstead.

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A Lotus Blooms in Snead’s Ferry The Crooked Lotus makes a big impact on the coastal craft beer scene. BY KURT EPPS — THE PUB SCOUT | PHOTOGRAPHY BY VICKY OLIVER

U

Upon entering The Crooked Lotus, a craft beer bar and wine emporium in Snead’s Ferry, I expect a fascinating story about the origin of its name. You know, rebirth from the mud, spiritual enlightenment, magical myths, powerful symbolism, etc. And the addition of the “crooked” adjective certainly had some major significance, I am sure.

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PUB SCOUT

The real story is fascinating, all right, but has nothing to do with any of those themes. My hunch about crooked is justified, though there’s nothing crooked about the place or its alpha-personality owner, Nicole Schmidt. The physical space is impressively designed — clean, comfortable, minimalist and supremely well-organized. Heck, there’s even a USB port under the far end of the bar that allows you to charge your device (which yours truly required after Waze chewed up a big chunk of battery on the ride up from OIB). I learned that Schmidt, with a background in interior design, is totally responsible for the look, layout and even the table booths of The Crooked Lotus, which was pretty neat. Though not half as surprising as learning

In addition to the more than 400 beers on her well-organized shelves, Schmidt has really good stuff flowing from the 18 taps on her wall.

The Schmidts, Brandon and Nicole, opened The Crooked Lotus in Sneads Ferry to serve as a coastal, casual watering hole with an emphasis on knowledge of great beer.

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cic·e·ro·ne /ˌsisəˈrōnē/ noun

A guide who gives information about antiquities and places of interest to sightseers.

As a child, Schmidt grew up around the bar in her dad’s basement and developed a love for the different flavors and nuances of beer. Later, she found the atmosphere at the now-closed Hopsail Island extremely attractive and dedicated herself to opening up her own place. She’s done a wonderful job of it, too, and her success speaks for itself. Like most places of its kind, business had been booming until COVID, which affected

everybody’s business. But it continues to improve daily. There is live entertainment, and food trucks also visit. There are plans to expand the deck. The Crooked Lotus has some wonderful beers for those with discriminating tastes, too. Just check the big boards, and Schmidt will pull you a half pour, a full pour or a flight —set in a specially crafted Lotus pad. Hint: If you’re a dark beer fancier, try

The title “Certified Cicerone®” is given to those individuals who

demonstrate that they possess a professional body of knowledge and essential tasting skills related to beer.

that Nicole “Nicold As Ice” Schmidt was once a force in the bruising sport of roller derby, until a serious ankle injury forced her temporary retirement. That seems to have been a blessing in disguise, because driven by ambition, Schmidt made the switch from tossing other women over a railing to tossing kegs under her taps and becoming a beer force in the little coastal town. “The only other place in town that carries beer is the Food Lion across the street, and I guarantee they don’t have what I have,” she says. True. In addition to the more than 400 beers on her well-organized shelves, Schmidt has really good stuff flowing from the 18 taps on her wall. And she not only knows how to pour them, she knows how to describe them, because she’s also a Certified Cicerone. In fact, every staff member at Crooked Lotus is required to achieve at least a Level One Beer Server certificate, and Schmidt pays for them to do it. Her deployed Marine husband and co-owner, Brandon, is also a Certified Cicerone.

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PUB SCOUT

the Blue Blaze/Black Blaze Milk Want to go? Stout at just 5% ABV, or the 9.2% Koi Pond Wicked Elf Porter. Then you can try to figure out what’s The Crooked Lotus bringing the heat in that beer. 1283 N.C. Highway 210, (Schmidt and I eventually did.) But Unit G, Sneads Ferry for a real heat treat, New Anthem’s (910) 741-0692 11% Roadside Prophet — with Facebook: @thecrookedlotus poblano, jalapeño, serrano peppers and vanilla — will light your fire. The Crooked Lotus also offers ciders, hard seltzers and a cyser. Even a gruit beer is available during my visit. I realize I led this piece with a tease about the origins of The Crooked Lotus name, and I never provided the answer. But it’s better you hear (or see the evidence) directly from Nicold As Ice. Just don’t get bumped over the railing into the crowd while looking, because she still does roller derby.  50

Topsail Magazine


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A PEEK INSIDE

Up on the Roof

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Jesse and Mandy Zimmer’s Surf City home is all about the roof-top views. BY MELISSA SLAVEN WARREN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY STUDIO 910 PRODUCTIONS

With miles of beautiful traditional coastal homes that extend from one end of Topsail Island to the next, what do you do when you want a modern beach house with clean lines and no design excess but can’t find one? You design your own — at least that’s what Jesse and Mandy Zimmer did. Distinctively nestled on the second row in Surf City, the house at 106 Charlotte Avenue is the only one of its kind in the area and boasts unmatched, unobstructed views where guests can experience breathtaking views of the sunrise over

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the Atlantic Ocean and sunsets over the Intracoastal. With no architectural design background, Jesse Zimmer just knew what he wanted in a house. He drew his inspiration from the contemporary style. “I’m a plain lines kind of guy,” he says. “I worked with Mike Howington of Howington Building Group to make it happen.” The first thing you notice about the house is the roof, or lack of one, so to speak. Among its gabled neighbors, this house features a flat rooftop that doubles as a 950-square-


A PEEK INSIDE

The backyard offers a private pool with a heater, a hot tub, a cabana with seating, fans and lighting, and an outdoor shower.

foot deck, the perfect gathering place, morning or evening, to watch the sun. “I don’t think there is anywhere else on the island that can compete with the views,” Zimmer says. The only semblance of a roof is the one on the elevator shaft of the upper deck, which supplies the substrate for another unique feature of the home: a simple message of support and appreciation to the military men and women who routinely fly overhead that reads “Thanks for your service.” With helicopters, Osprey and other military aircraft flying overhead from surrounding military bases like Marine Corps Air Station New River, Camp LeJeune, Cherry Point Marine Corp Air Station and Seymore Johnson Air Force Base, Zimmer wanted to pay tribute to them. But, he admits, “I’m not sure if it’s big enough for them to see. It always seems like when you are at the beach the planes fly so low.” Zimmer’s personal homage is fitting for an area already rich in military history with Operation Bumblebee, the secret U.S. missiles testing projected that operated on the island during the 1940s and nearby Camp Davis, where the WASP, Women Airforce Service Pilots, were trained to

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A PEEK INSIDE

The 3,700-square-foot house boasts six bedrooms, four and a half baths, a theater room, and a large open living and dining room space.

fly American military aircraft for important radar deception missions over the coast of Topsail Island. In addition to the rooftop message, Zimmer is installing a flag on the roof of the cabana by the pool. The house on Charlotte Avenue was finished in March 2020 and became available for vacationers to rent in May. It boasts 3,700 square feet of well-appointed rooms and entertainment spaces including six bedrooms (two of which are masters), four baths, two half baths, a theater room, and a 54

Topsail Magazine

large open living and dining room space. The backyard offers everything, a private pool with a heater, a hot tub, a cabana with seating, fans and lighting, and an outdoor shower. It might seem like nothing can top all the amenities — except those amazing rooftop views. From this single spot, you can see the Intercoastal Waterway, the ocean and the Surf City Bridge and pier. Check it out for yourself at roofviews.com. 


A PEEK INSIDE

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BEHIND THE BUSINESS

Good Eats While Deli Works may be in a challenging location, it proves that great food and hard work are the basis for restaurant success.

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BY EDWARD WILLS | PHOTOGRAPHY BY SHAY PERNA

When Josh and Sara Parrish were looking to open a restaurant in 2019, they found a gem in an unusual location: a former nursing home that had been converted to retail and office space. Since then, Deli Works has found success serving breakfast and lunch to hungry Topsail-area residents. “We knew the area had a lot of potential for growth, but it was not established yet,” says Josh, 37,

who has been working in restaurants since he was 13. He has, among other things, been a general manager at Ruby Tuesday and Texas Roadhouse restaurants in Wilmington and Jacksonville. He notes that the new housing developments and business growth in the Topsail area helped attract them here when starting their restaurant.

Deli Works is growing a strong customer base at its location in Holly Ridge. Winter 2020-21

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BEHIND THE BUSINESS

Want to go? Deli Works 325 Sound Road, Holly Ridge (910) 803-0356 Facebook: @deliworksnc 58

Topsail Magazine

Deli Works is in Holly Ridge, across the road from the town’s community center and near the municipal building. The repurposed, one-story, red-brick building is also home to 10 other businesses, including a company that makes gift baskets, a marriage and family therapist and a storm restoration company. The 1,200-square-foot kitchen and dining area of the former Holly Ridge Assisted Living came equipped with a refrigerator, stove, prep table and more than $80,000 in kitchen equipment, so the couple was able to start the restaurant with no loans and no

investors. An outdoor patio is available. “It’s the food quality that keeps people coming back,” Josh says. “They may not expect much because of the location, but they are pleasantly surprised.” Josh oversees a hard-working, reliable staff of four and keeps his eye on all food going out of the kitchen. Almost all items, including soups, dressings, and bread, are made in house. The menu offers hot and cold sandwiches, paninis and breakfast platters. Vegetable sandwiches, salads and other health-conscious choices are


BEHIND THE BUSINESS

available, too, thanks to Sara, who is a dietitian with New Hanover Regional Medical Center. Even with the pandemic crisis, Josh says business is growing. “We’re growing slowly, but we’re growing,” he says. He estimates that 95 percent of his business comes from locals who live within 2 miles of the restaurant. Because of this base, Deli Works is not dependent on the summer season beach traffic.

The former nursing home building has its challenges. It has no visibility from heavily traveled Highway 17 and had no outside signage when they opened. Since then they’ve added signage and use social media as much as possible. With 1,500 followers on Facebook, Josh notes, “We get so many people in here who saw our food online.” The restaurant is open 6 am to 3 pm Monday through Saturday. It is closed Sunday. Those hours require Josh, who lives in Porters Neck, to arrive by 5 am and work at least until 5:30 pm. The schedule allows the father of 1-year-old Dax and 4-year-old Eva to spend time with his children each night and Sundays, something that is precious to him. “I’d close before I had to work Sundays. Sunday is family time,” he says. As for the future, Josh is planning to launch a food trailer. Using Deli Works as a base, he plans to serve food at local bars, festivals and other events. 

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HISTORY

WWII’s Fly Girls Women pilots known as WASPs served the country during World War II, many of them at Camp Davis in Holly Ridge. BY DALENE BICKEL | PHOTOGRAPHY BY SHAY PERNA

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Walking along Topsail Island’s beachfront is generally a peaceful experience, particularly during the off-season. It’s difficult to imagine a time when the sky was filled with war planes and the air rife with the staccato of antiaircraft artillery fire. Yet that’s exactly what occurred almost 80 years ago during World War II. At that time, the island was largely uninhabited, providing the U.S. Army with the perfect location to train its antiaircraft artillery gunners. Between 1941 and 1945, in an effort to protect the North Carolina coast from potential enemy attack, the U.S. Army erected antiaircraft guns in the sand and learned how to accurately aim at moving airborne targets.

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HISTORY

WOMEN ENTER THE WAR EFFORT As the war heated up and increasing numbers of American pilots were needed on the front lines, the government accepted Nancy Harkness Love’s request to open an experimental female pilot training program called the Women’s Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron (WAFS) as well as Jacqueline Cochran’s Women’s Flying Training Detachment (WFTD). On August 5, 1943, the WAFS and WFTD programs merged into the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP). To say that women nationwide were excited about these opportunities is an understatement. It is reported that 25,000 women applied to participate in the programs, and 1,830 were accepted. Each woman already possessed a civilian pilot’s license and then underwent seven months of ground school and basic training at Sweetwater Army Air Field (aka Avenger Field) in Texas before being assigned to 120 different Army Air Bases throughout the United States, including Camp Davis in Holly Ridge.

IN THE LINE OF FIRE According to literature from Topsail Beach’s Missiles and More Museum, WASPs flew 78 different types of aircraft (including the B-29). In addition to ferrying planes from base to base across the country, their orders also included the highly dangerous job of towing targets. As Clifford Tyndall explains in his book Greetings from Camp Davis, “Most of the aerial antiaircraft targets were attached to tow planes with a 2,400-foot cable. The lengthy cable was necessary to ensure a margin of safety from the large caliber weaponry used by antiaircraft troops during these exercises.” WASPs also flew tow targets, which resembled wind socks, at night “to give searchlight crews practice picking up enemy raiders in the darkness.” Amazingly, none of the women were shot down by the gunners at Topsail, although there were some close calls and at least one reported stray bullet strike.

LIFE FOR WASPS ON BASE David Stallman, in his book Echoes of Topsail, offers a glimpse of what life was like for the female pilots stationed at Camp Davis: “For those first 30 or so WASPs, in an army base of 100,000 men, there was much ogling and male attention … [but] for the most part, the 62

Topsail Magazine


HISTORY

women were remembered as pretty aggressive and tough.” They were also independent. Stallman quotes one WASP as saying, “Our Air Force had no Officer’s Club at Camp Davis and we were not very welcome at the Antiaircraft Officer’s Club, so we would fly to other bases for dinner and dancing.”

UTILIZED BUT NOT RECOGNIZED Women pilots followed the orders of military officers, lived on military bases, wore military uniforms and accepted life-threatening risks to participate in the top-secret WASPs program. Nevertheless, the WASPs officially remained civilian employees. This meant that although they received a salary ($150 per month during training and $250 after graduation), they nevertheless had to purchase their own food, uniforms, housing and transportation to training and back home again once their service ended. According to additional literature from the Missiles and More Museum, the 38 WASPs who died nationwide while in service to our country, including three from Camp Davis, “received no recognition, no honors, no benefits, no gold stars, and no American flag was allowed to be draped over their coffins.” In fact, it wasn’t until 1979 that WASPs received official veteran’s status. These brave and resourceful women served passionately and wholeheartedly until the U.S. Army Air Force disbanded the WASP program in 1945. At that time, all the female pilots were sent home and replaced by the returning male pilots. Several of these women went on to work as civilian flight instructors, and some continued to fly planes recreationally. It wasn’t until 1982 that women were allowed to become U.S. Air Force pilots, and it wasn’t until 1993 that they were permitted to once again fly combat aircraft. 

WANT TO LEARN MORE? The Missiles and More Museum in Topsail Beach features an in-depth WASPs exhibit as well as displays about other local historical events. Call (910) 328-8663 or visit missilesandmoremuseum.org or its Facebook page for updates about opening days and times. The museum is located at 720 Channel Boulevard in Topsail Beach.

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HEALTH & FITNESS

A New Way to Workout Spinning on Sunshine brings mobile outdoor fitness classes to Topsail Island. BY KATE M. CAREY PHOTOGRAPHY BY MEGAN DETIZ

Spinning on Sunshine owner Danny Blowe leads the North Topsail Beach Fire Department in a high-energy training program.

D Danny Blowe took his passion for fitness, added the breeze-filled eastern North Carolina coast and launched Spinning on Sunshine mobile outdoor training on Topsail Island in August. He pulls up with a trailer full of Kaiser spinners and striders and loads up highenergy music for a 65-minute outdoor class designed to meet your fitness goals. He wants you to ride into the sunset or sunrise — or a time that’s convenient for you. “Our class lineup includes spin, spin/ stride circuit, spin/brick and a starter class,” Blowe says. “We do circuit training with striders, cycles, full-body workouts, low weight and stretch bands, some calisthenics and a five-minute beach run.” Classes include modifications to accommodate a variety of fitness levels. Every class is set to positive, motivating music and led by a certified spin and group fitness instructor. “We mix it up to have different intensity or high-calorie burn, whatever folks want,” Blowe says. Classes can be almost anywhere. Recent classes were in Onslow County Pines Park and at Beach Access 2. The North Topsail Winter 2020-21

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HEALTH & FITNESS

Beach Fire Department signed up for a 12-week progressive training program. Those classes are also open to other participants, Blowe says, but if a class with fit firefighters seems daunting, not to worry. “We meet you where you are — beginner, intermediate, advanced — you control the system,” he says. “You choose the intensity of the workout, listen to your body and we’ll help you modify and adapt to your skill level.” Spinning on Sunshine takes advantage of the beautiful coastal environment. “Most of us who live in a coastal environment do so because we love the outdoors,” Blowe says. “We want to be outside as much as possible — swimming, biking, running. There’s often a nice breeze, and it’s all very motivating.” Besides working out in a great outdoor location, they can help

participants train for events like a 5K or Ironman. A lifelong fitness enthusiast, Blowe had a career in law enforcement and corporate security. Last year he began working on the concept of mobile outdoor fitness to share his passion with others. As a long-time Ironman competitor, he knows how to train, eat 66

Topsail Magazine

Most of us who live in a coastal environment do so because we love the outdoors. We want to be outside as much as possible... it’s all very motivating.

well and stay healthy. He has since earned ISSA fitness credentials to share his knowledge and will soon have his personal coaching credentials. “I don’t know if there’s anything else like this,” he says. “I think my model is unique. I just followed my passion. My whole mission is promoting fitness and

healthier lifestyles. I enjoy being healthy and wanted to share that.” North Topsail Beach Fire Chief Chad Soward appreciates the attention Blowe gives to individual fire fighters. “Danny is providing a great service to our guys by creating workouts that are low impact on the joints but are


HEALTH & FITNESS

Danny Blowe creates lowimpact workouts that are tailormade for North Topsail Beach Firefighters.

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HEALTH & FITNESS

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providing high cardio and complete body fitness,” Soward says. “Danny also does an excellent job at tailoring the workouts to the individual’s level of fitness.” James Hunter, a firefighter participating in the classes, agrees with Soward. “As firefighters we face some of the same challenges as the general public when it comes to staying fit and healthy during the COVID pandemic,” Hunter says. “Our town’s leadership values thinking outside the box to find and implementing solutions, and Danny’s service has been a fantastic solution.” Hunter invites the public to join the firefighters in one of their sessions. “Don’t take our word for it! Join us during one of our sessions, get a great workout in and learn more about our department and our amazing group of firefighters.” Onslow County Parks and Recreation Department will continue to offer the classes in the winter, says Jason McCray, athletic program supervisor. “Feedback on the classes has been positive, and we are interested in offering this program in as many places as Mr. Blowe would like to offer it. We want all of Onslow County to have the

opportunity to participate in this great program.” To further spread his enthusiasm for fitness and a healthy lifestyle, Blowe writes a blog on the website. A recent post focused on hydration, including recommendations from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine of a daily fluid intake for healthy adults living in a temperate climate is about 15.5 cups for a male and 11.5 cups for a female. He recommends two to three big gulps of water every 10 to 20 minutes. Classes are cancelled in case of inclement or unsafe weather, and a full refund or a new booking is offered. Since Blowe is a full-time resident, classes will continue year-round (he advises dressing appropriately for the weather). “We’re a local, family ownedbusiness,” Blowe says. “My wife and I live on the island. We love it here.” 

Want to workout? Spinning on Sunshine To register and buy a single class or a multi-class pass, visit spinningonsunshine.com. Special rates are provided for first responders. For questions call (910) 886-6343.


SNIPPETS

Fun and Funds for Firefighters A recap of the successful benefit for the Surf City Firefighters Auxiliary. By Brian Wilner

 On a perfect October Friday evening in Surf City, Jason and Beverly Simas of Shuckin’ Shack Oyster Bar held a fundraiser benefiting the Surf City Firefighters Auxiliary. With live music from Ernie “The Mayor” McCallister and a great turnout, they were able to raise $2,500! Sparky the Firedog provided entertainment and photo ops, and everyone was able to meet some of the local firefighters while enjoying a cold beverage and some delicious food. The raffles and giveaways kept the interest high throughout the night as the temperatures dropped and the sweatshirts came out. Bob Phiel won $540 in the 50/50 raffle and then donated the proceeds back to the auxiliary. Coming together and supporting our dedicated and hardworking firefighters only strengthens an already strong community. The nonprofit Surf City Firefighters Auxiliary supports the Surf City Fire Department and their families emotionally and financially. They procure items for the firefighters, such as custom PPE, face masks, furniture for the station, holiday meals and more. They also have an education responsibility to the community. If you weren’t able to make the fundraiser and would like to make a donation to the Surf City Firefighters Auxiliary, please contact Tracy Meyer at surfcityfireaux@gmail.com.

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What Is The Dark Web? Written by The Computer Warriors, Inc. Many security companies are now offering ‘dark web’ scans as part of their security packages. In the article below, we’ll discuss what the dark web is and what these scans mean.

Wilmington \ Jacksonville \ Leland \ Camp Lejeune 70 Topsail Magazine


East Coast Sports

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hat’s the best way to have fun at the beach? Let the locals show you how to do it. The Medlin family, which has been living on Topsail Island for four generations, loves helping people make the most of their time on the island. Their store, East Coast Sports, is the place to get what you need for great outdoor experiences and building memories. “The beach is our life, and we love the natural environment of the island,” says Chris Medlin, who manages the familyowned business with his wife, Chaundel. “We are eager to share our knowledge of the island and fishing tips so that our customers can have the absolute best time possible. We are passionate about helping others enjoy themselves and live their best lives … island style.” East Coast Sports is a one-stop shop for a day of outdoor fun, specializing in fishing gear, sporting goods and outdoor gear as well as high-quality brands of clothing, shoes and accessories for the entire family. They carry brands such as Costa, Columbia, Salt Life, Local Boy, Hey Dudes, Penn, Shimano, Yeti and more, and they offer such

Business Profile BY MOLLY HARRISON

things as beach games, volleyball nets, beach equipment, bodyboards, floats, life jackets, boat equipment and gifts. They can also help with fishing advice and charter information. Their mission is to provide an enjoyable shopping experience with helpful assistance. “Our family-friendly environment and large variety of outdoor retail selections allow everyone to find what they are looking for,” Medlin says. “Our staff is always eager to assist and make our customers feel welcomed.” No matter who helps you in the store, rest assured it will be someone who loves fishing and outdoor activities and is excited to tell you what they know. Stop by East Coast Sports, and they will get you hooked up. Most of the year their hours are 7 am to 9 pm Sunday through Thursday and 7 am to 10 pm on Fridays and Saturdays; hours may change in fall and winter. East Coast Sports 409 Roland Avenue, Surf City (910) 328-1887; eastcoastsports.com

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NEW RIVER INLET TIDES

January Febr uary D a t e

High Tide AM Time (EST)

Low Tide PM

Height Time (ft) (EST)

AM

PM

Height Time Height Time Height (ft) (EST) (ft) (EST) (ft)

1

8:52

3.5

9:10

2.4

2:19

-0.2

3:25

-0.1

2

9:34

3.4

9:57

2.4

3:03

-0.1

4:06

-0.1

3

10:19

3.3

10:47

2.5

3:52

-0.1

4:49

-0.1

4

11:07

3.1

11:43

2.7

4:46

0.0

5:35

-0.1

5

---

---

12:00

2.9

5:46

0.0

6:24

-0.1

6

12:43

2.8

12:58

2.7

6:53

0.1

7:17

-0.2

7

1:46

3.0

2:00

2.6

8:05

0.1

8:13

-0.2

8

2:49

3.2

3:04

2.4

9:17

0.0

9:10

-0.3

9

3:51

3.5

4:07

2.4

10:24

-0.1

10:08

-0.4

10

4:50

3.7

5:08

2.4

11:24

-0.2

11:05

D a t e 1 2 3

High Tide AM Time (EST) 10:00 10:47 11:38

Low Tide PM

Height Time (ft) (EST) 3.2 3.0 2.7

Mar ch

10:28 11:22 ---

AM

PM

Height Time Height Time Height (ft) (EST) (ft) (EST) (ft) 2.9 3.0 ---

3:42 4:36 5:35

-0.4 -0.3 -0.1

4:19 5:04 5:52

D a t e

High Tide AM Time (EST)

Low Tide PM

Height Time (ft) (EST)

AM Height (ft)

Time (EST)

PM Height Time Height (ft) (EST) (ft)

-0.4

1

8:54

3.4

9:18

3.4

2:42

-0.5

3:07

-0.5

-0.4

2

9:40

3.2

10:08

3.5

3:33

-0.5

3:49

-0.5

-0.3

3

10:28

2.9

11:01

3.5

4:27

-0.4

4:35

-0.4

4

11:20

2.6

---

---

5:26

-0.2

5:25

-0.3

4

12:20

3.1

12:35

2.5

6:41

0.0

6:46

-0.3

5

1:24

3.1

1:40

2.3

7:53

0.0

7:46

-0.2

6

2:31

3.2

2:49

2.2

9:07

0.0

8:50

-0.2

7

3:37

3.3

3:57

2.2

10:15

0.0

9:55

-0.3

8

4:39

3.4

5:00

2.3

11:16

-0.1

10:57

-0.5

9

5:36

3.5

5:56

2.4 12:09 PM -0.2

6:28

3.5

6:47

2.5

---

---

5

12:00

3.4

12:20

2.4

6:31

0.0

6:23

-0.2

6

1:05

3.3

1:28

2.2

7:42

0.1

7:28

-0.1

7

2:15

3.2

2:42

2.2

8:56

0.1

8:39

0.0

8

3:25

3.2

3:52

2.2

10:04

0.1

9:50

0.0

-0.3

9

4:28

3.3

4:54

2.4

11:02

0.0

10:53

-0.1

11:53

-0.4

10

5:24

3.3

5:47

2.6

11:52

-0.1

11:48

-0.2

12:57

-0.3

11

6:13

3.3

6:33

2.8

---

---

12:35

-0.1

12:37

-0.2

1:14

-0.2

11

5:45

3.8

6:04

2.5

---

---

12:20

-0.3

10

12

6:38

3.9

6:57

2.6

12:00

-0.5

1:11

-0.4

11

7:15

3.5

7:33

2.7

12:45

-0.4

1:40

-0.3

12

6:56

3.3

7:15

2.9

12

7:58

3.4

8:17

2.7

1:33

-0.4

2:21

-0.3

13

7:36

3.2

7:54

3.0

1:21

-0.2

1:50

-0.2

14

9:13

3.1

9:31

3.0

3:03

-0.2

3:23

-0.1

15

9:48

2.9

10:06

3.1

3:43

-0.1

3:54

-0.1

16

10:23

2.7

10:42

3.0

4:22

-0.1

4:25

0.0

17

10:58

2.5

11:20

3.0

5:02

0.1

4:57

0.1

18

11:35

2.3

---

---

5:44

0.2

5:31

0.2 0.3

13

7:28

3.8

7:48

2.6

12:53

-0.5

2:00

-0.4

14

8:16

3.7

8:36

2.6

1:44

-0.5

2:46

-0.3

15

9:02

3.5

9:24

2.6

2:33

-0.4

3:31

-0.3

16

9:47

3.3

10:12

2.5

3:22

-0.3

4:14

-0.2

17

10:32

3.0

11:00

2.5

4:11

-0.1

4:56

-0.1

18

11:16

2.7

11:50

2.5

5:02

0.1

5:38

0.0

19

---

---

12:01

2.4

5:56

0.2

6:20

0.1

13

8:40

3.3

8:59

2.8

2:19

-0.4

2:59

-0.3

14

9:19

3.1

9:39

2.7

3:02

-0.3

3:35

-0.2

15

9:57

2.8

10:20

2.7

3:46

-0.1

4:10

-0.1

16

10:34

2.6

11:02

2.7

4:30

0.0

4:44

0.0

17

11:14

2.3

11:47

2.6

5:17

0.2

5:21

0.1

19

12:00

2.9

12:15

2.1

6:30

0.3

6:10

11:57

2.1

---

---

6:08

0.3

6:01

0.2

20

12:46

2.8

1:03

2.0

7:22

0.5

6:56

0.4

12:36

2.6

12:46

1.9

7:06

0.4

6:47

0.3

21

1:39

2.7

2:00

1.9

8:22

0.5

7:52

0.4

20

12:42

2.5

12:50

2.2

6:55

0.4

7:03

0.2

18

21

1:37

2.5

1:43

2.0

7:59

0.4

7:50

0.2

19

22

2:32

2.6

2:39

1.9

9:03

0.4

8:39

0.2

20

1:32

2.6

1:45

1.8

8:11

0.5

7:42

0.3

22

2:41

2.7

3:05

1.9

9:27

0.5

8:57

0.4

23

3:26

2.7

3:36

1.9

10:02

0.4

9:30

0.2

21

2:33

2.6

2:48

1.8

9:16

0.4

8:42

0.3

23

3:45

2.8

4:10

2.0

10:28

0.4

10:04

0.3

24

4:16

2.8

4:28

1.9

10:54

0.3

10:19

0.1

22

3:32

2.7

3:49

1.9

10:14

0.4

9:41

0.2

24

4:45

3.0

5:09

2.3

11:20

0.3

11:07

0.1

25

5:03

3.0

5:16

2.0

11:40

0.2

11:07

0.0

25

5:39

3.1

6:00

2.6

---

---

12:06

0.1

26

5:47

3.2

6:01

2.1

12:22 PM

0.0

11:52

-0.2

26

6:28

3.3

6:49

3.0

12:03

-0.1

12:49

-0.1

27

6:29

3.3

6:43

2.3

---

---

1:02

-0.1

-0.3

28

7:11

3.4

7:25

2.4

12:37

-0.3

1:40

-0.2

29

7:52

3.5

8:08

2.6

1:21

-0.4

2:19

-0.3

30

8:33

3.5

8:52

2.7

2:06

-0.4

2:58

31

9:15

3.4

9:38

2.8

2:53

-0.4

3:37

23

4:27

2.9

4:43

2.1

11:04

0.2

10:37

0.0

24

5:16

3.1

5:31

2.3

11:48

0.1

11:28

-0.2

25

6:01

3.3

6:17

2.5

---

---

12:28

-0.1

26

6:45

3.4

7:01

2.8

12:17

-0.3

1:08

-0.3

-0.3

27

7:28

3.5

7:46

3.0

1:05

-0.5

1:47

-0.4

-0.4

28

8:10

3.5

8:31

3.2

1:53

-0.5

2:26

-0.5

27

7:15

3.4

7:36

3.3

12:56

-0.3

1:30

28

8:00

3.5

8:22

3.6

1:48

-0.4

2:11

-0.4

29

8:46

3.4

9:09

3.8

2:38

-0.5

2:53

-0.5

30

9:32

3.3

9:58

4.0

3:30

-0.6

3:36

-0.5

31

10:20

3.1

10:49

4.0

4:22

-0.5

4:22

-0.5

*TIDE CHARTS ARE ACCURATE TO THE BEST OF OUR KNOWLEDGE. IF YOU ARE CHECKING TIDES FOR NAVIGATIONAL PURPOSES, PLEASE VERIFY THESE TIMES WITH ANOTHER SOURCE.

72

Topsail Magazine


ADVERTISERS INDEX

Advertiser

Phone# Page#

Advertiser

Phone#

Page#

1-800-Pack Rat........................................ 800-722-5728 64 Intracoastal Realty Corporation................... 910-328-3000 35 Access Realty............................................ 910-329-9800 BC Intracoastal Realty Corporation AnA Builder’s, Inc...................................... 910-329-9819 BC Suzanne Altobello...................................... 910-405-2586 64 Beach Furniture Outfitters Inc..................... 910-803-0455 7 Intracoastal Realty Corporation Topsail Area Agents.................................... 910-328-3000 3 Bill Clark Homes....................................... 910-550-1167 13 Carolina Coast Contracting.......................... 910-328-6400 9 Intercoastal Mortgage, LLC......................... 910-338-1748 26 Kinco, Inc................................................. 910-803-0695 51, 68 Century 21 Action - Scott Erickson................ 910-612-5312 5 Coastal Carolina Real Estate....................... 910-329-1133 9 Legacy Homes by Bill Clark ....................... 910-550-1167 18 Lewis Realty Associates, Inc.— Beth Dudley.... 910-470-5481 56 Coastal Home Store................................... 910-821-1390 64 NHRMC Physician Group............................ 910-254-1033 2 Coastal Insurance...................................... 910-754-4326 42 Oliver’s Photography.................................. 910-650-4633 49 Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage.......... 910-328-5626 23 Pierpan Dentistry....................................... 910-270-1222 46 Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage Elizabeth Simmons.................................... 910-526-2571 73 Quarter Moon............................................ 910-328-4969 63 Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage RJB Tax Associates.................................... 910-338-3001 56 Holly Hobbs.............................................. 415-748-8227 46 Sea Star Academy..................................... 910-803-0710 68 Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage Tanner Gray............................................... 910-547-9618 29 Shuckin’ Shack......................................... 910-803-2037 46 Computer Warriors..................................... 910-238-2277 70 Southern Roots Grille................................. 910-803-0773 24 Surf City Dental......................................... 910-329-0298 60 Coral Cottage Boutiques............................. 910-650-2891 24 Surf Dog Bites & Brews.............................. 910-541-2358 51 Crew Insurance.......................................... 910-329-3691 51 DDT Outlet................................................ 910-329-0160 55 Sweet Dreams........................................... 910-328-5312 11 East Coast Sports...................................... 910-328-1887 71 The Topsail Island Trading Company............ 910-328-1905 33 Edward Jones - Karen Jerabek..................... 910-270-3634 41 Topsail Steamer......................................... 910-328-2645 56 Town of Surf City....................................... 910-328-4131 38 EmergeOrtho............................................. 910-332-3800 16 Treasure Realty.......................................... 800-762-3961 IBC Future Homes........................................... 910-270-3313 41 Unique Media & Design Inc........................ 910-526-7926 60 Guaranteed Rate........................................ 910-617-3135 42 Harmony Pet Spa....................................... 434-426-5678 73

Winter 2020-21

73


CAPTURE THE MOMENT

PENNIE — OUR GOLD AT THE END OF THE RAINBOW Photo captured by Misty Steffee

HAVE YOU CAPTURED THE MOMENT? If so, email your photos to capture@topsailmag.com. 74

Topsail Magazine


Sales and Vacation Rentals

The leader in vacation rental management and oceanfront sales on Topsail Island

Experts On and Off The Island

TreasureRealty.com

800-762-3961

1950 NC Hwy 172 Sneads Ferry, NC 28460

14061-B NC Hwy 50 Surf City, NC 28445

Trusted Local Experts Serving Topsail Island and Mainland Communities Since 1990 Winter 2020-21 75


Whether you BUILD, BUY, or RENT... Let A’n’A Builder’s and Access Realty be

Your Key to Coastal Living! SOLD for $825K

SOLD for $800K

Fast Growing Real Estate Team!

Over $12 Million SOLD in 2020!

Visit us at our NEW office location at 14223 NC Highway 50 in Surf City!

Commercial & Residential Builder Call us at 910-329-9819

www.AnABuilders.com

Sales, Rentals, & Property Management Call us at 910-329-9800

www.AccessTheBeach.com