North Brunswick County - Summer 2019 Edition

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Summer 2019

EXTREME E N I L A N E ADR s world-class e d vi ro p rk a P X M County Line h Carolina. rt o N rn e st a e th u training in so

C O M PL IM E N TA RY

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THE MAN BEHIND BEACH & BARN

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

D FEATURES

FEATURES

SUMMER 2019 D VOLUME 13, ISSUE 4

74 PHOTO BY MARK STEELMAN

51 THE CBD CRAZE

Everyone is talking about CBD. What is it? Where does it come from? By Johanna Colburn Hamilton

56 CONVERSATION & CURIOSITY Rusty Meador talks about his lifestyle brand, Beach & Barn. By Jason Frye

64 A BRIDGE TO SAFETY

A new connection between law enforcement training programs at Brunswick Community College benefits students and increases the community’s overall safety. By Annesophia Richards

74 REIMAGINING REAVES CHAPEL Thanks to Cedar Hill/West Bank Heritage Foundation, N.C. Coastal Land Trust and a grant from The Orton Foundation, one of the Cape Fear region’s most historically significant African American structures will be a community center once again. By Annesophia Richards

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North Brunswick Magazine

PHOTO BY MEGAN DEITZ

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97 2019 REAL ESTATE GUIDE

A sampling of what’s in our 2019-20 edition of Brunswick New Homes & Real Estate, coming to newsstands this summer.


Summer 2019

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

D IN EVERY ISSUE D DEPARTMENTS

46

PHOTO BY JAMES STEFIUK

87

PHOTO BY MEGAN DEITZ

23 IN EVERY ISSUE 16 PUBLISHER’S NOTE

129 AD INDEX

18 CONTRIBUTORS

130 CAPTURE THE MOMENT

By Justin Williams

Meet the contributors to North Brunswick Magazine

23 WHAT’S HAPPENING

Upcoming events you won’t want to miss

31 BUSINESS BUZZ

Keeping up with the local business scene

36 ONLINE EXCLUSIVES

Extras you’ll only find online

Our directory of advertisers

A contest for NBM readers. Photo by Channing Hatcher

DEPARTMENTS 41 SOUTHBOUND

What you’ll find in the Summer 2019 edition of our sister publication, South Brunswick Magazine.

45 SPIRITS

Boozy Banana Milkshake by Sandi Grigg

110 BUSINESS PROFILES

Mulch & More; Paul Whitehead Allstate Insurance; Livingston Creek Farmers Harvest, LLC; Tropical Smoothie Café By Sandi Grigg and Melissa Slaven Warren

46 WHAT’S COOKIN’ Pesto Pasta Salad By Sandi Grigg

83 PEOPLE

Hope Harbor Home Shelter Manager Beverly Pigott, now in her 70s, never wants to retire from helping women and children. by Jo Ann Mathews

87 ACROSS THE COUNTY

County Line MX Park in Bolton is making a name for itself in the motocross world. by Melissa Slaven Warren

114 SNIPPETS

Happenings on the local scene

114

120 FACES & PLACES

123 WHAT’S HAPPENED

What’s been going on around town

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North Brunswick Magazine

PHOTO BY WILL PAGE PHOTOGRAPHY

Port City Shakedown at Brunswick Forest, North Brunswick Chamber of Commerce Block Party Business After Hours


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Learn more at NovantHealth.org/OrthoSpineBrunswick

© Novant Health, Inc. 2019 5/19 • ECA-434299

Summer 2019

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North Brunswick Magazine – Summer 2019 Volume 13, Issue 4 CEO/PUBLISHER: Justin Williams DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT: Sandi Grigg COPY EDITOR: Molly Harrison CONTRIBUTING GRAPHICS: Paula Knorr Teresa Kramer Elizabeth Dale Niemann

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES: Lee Ann Bolton George Jacob

SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT COORDINATOR: Lensey Wilson

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS: Megan Deitz Laura Glantz Brent Gallant Wendy Hunt Matt McGraw Will Page Bill Ritenour Mark Steelman James Stefiuk

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Johanna Colburn Hamilton Jason Frye Sandi Grigg Jo Ann Mathews Annesophia Richards Melissa Slaven Warren Lensey Wilson PUBLISHED BY: CAROLINA MARKETING COMPANY, INC. PO Box 1361, Leland, NC 28451 (910) 207-0156 • info@northbrunswickmagazine.com Reproduction or use of the contents in this magazine is prohibited.

© 2019 Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. strives to bring correct, accurate information that is published in the magazine. However, Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. cannot be held responsible for any consequences resulting from errors or absences. Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. also cannot be held responsible for the services provided by any and all advertisers in our publications. All material in this magazine is property of Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. and may not be reproduced without authorization from the publisher. North Brunswick Magazine – A Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. publication is published four times per year and is distributed to residents and businesses in North Brunswick County, NC, to subscribers and to select areas of New Hanover County, NC and Horry County, SC.

About the cover: Summer 2019

EXTREME ADRENALINE ass provides world-cl County Line MX Park North Carolina stern training in southea

C O M PL IM E N TA RY

THE CBD CRAZE

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North Brunswick Magazine

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THE MAN BEHIND BEACH & BARN

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REIMAGINING REAVES CHAPEL

Megan Deitz captured this action-packed photograph of a rider at County Line MX Park in Bolton. Not far from Lake Waccamaw, County Line MX Park is a world-class motocross track with national American Motorcyclist Association sanctioned races on its roster and a staff of former pro trainers. Writer Melissa Slaven Warren tells us all about this unique local park starting on page 87.


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14 NORTH BRUNSWICK

NBM M A G A Z I N E Reader/Advertising Services Subscriptions Want to subscribe to NBM? Subscriptions are $15.99 per year and include 4 issues of NBM. Subscribe safely online using PayPal, credit or debit card at NorthBrunswickMagazine.com/subscribe. Call our office at (910) 207-0156 or email us at subscribe@NorthBrunswickMagazine.com to request a subscription.

Back Issues When available, back issues of NBM can be purchased for $5. Call or email us for information.

Letters We welcome your letters and comments about NBM. Send your letters to PO Box 1361, Leland, NC 28451 or email them to info@NorthBrunswickMagazine.com. When sending your letters, keep in mind they may or may not be published in a future issue of NBM. The publisher reserves the right to make the final decision.

Writing Opportunities We are always willing to consider freelance writers and article ideas. Please send suggestions or inquiries to North Brunswick Magazine, Attn: Editor, PO Box 1361, Leland, NC 28451. Or email us at edit@NorthBrunswickMagazine.com.

Change of Address If you move, please submit your new and old address to North Brunswick Magazine at info@NorthBrunswickMagazine.com.

Advertising Interested in advertising in NBM? Please contact us to set up a meeting with an Account Executive. Our main office number is (910) 207-0156, or you can email us at advertise@NorthBrunswickMagazine.com.

Marketing Services Carolina Marketing Company, Inc. provides a wide range of marketing services. This includes advertising design services, custom publications, mailing services and more. Contact our office for additional information or to set up a meeting with a Marketing Consultant.

NorthBrunswickMagazine.com Visit us online at the above website. With any additional questions, call us at (910) 207-0156. 14 14

North Brunswick Brunswick Magazine Magazine North


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PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Welcome to the Busy Season

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North Brunswick Magazine

PHOTOS BY MATT MCGRAW

It’s that time of year again, friends! You can tell it is officially summer not only because of the warming weather, but also because of the increasing numbers of people around here. The businesses are getting busier by the day, the hotels are filling up, and the traffic on the roads is thick. For locals it’s a bittersweet time; an increase in visitors means it takes us longer to get around town and that we can’t always get a seat in our favorite restaurant, but on the other hand we all know that our visitors are the backbone of our local economy. Visitors, we welcome you! One great thing about tourism in Brunswick County is that it creates future residents. The vast majority of Brunswick County residents did not grow up here. Which means at some point they visited here, put their money into the local economy (and annoyed the locals with driving around and not knowing where they were going), and they liked it so much they decided to make a home here. If you’re one of those people considering a move to Brunswick County, you’ll appreciate our real estate section in this issue. This is where we showcase the statistics on top agents and builders from the previous year and publish our new homes map. This is a segue into our annual publication Brunswick New Homes & Real Estate, which will hit the stands this summer. Don’t miss that publication as it gives you a breakdown on statistics from all areas of Brunswick County, articles on local neighborhoods and builders, and interviews with local residents who have relocated here from other parts of the country. If you are interested in ordering a copy, just visit us online at LifeinBrunswickCounty.com and click on the Brunswick New Homes and Real Estate banner on the right side to have a copy mailed to you. Our annual real estate section isn’t the only thing you will be reading about in this issue. As you saw on the cover, we have a story about the County Line MX Park in Bolton, just one of the many unique opportunities for sports enthusiasts in the region. We have a story about a partnership between N.C. Coastal Land Trust and Cedar Hill/West Bank Heritage Foundation to restore Reaves Chapel, one of the most historically significant African

Director of Business Development Sandi Grigg, Publisher Justin Williams and Account Executives George Jacob and Lensey Wilson attending one of five trade shows this year.

American structures in the region. And we introduce you to some of the locals, like Rusty Meador, who founded the lifestyle brand Beach & Barn, and Beverly Pigott, the shelter manager at Hope Harbor Home and a true inspiration on how to serve others. At our office, we have had an unbelievably busy spring. Between January and June, we had eight deadlines for our various publications — North Brunswick Magazine, South Brunswick Magazine, Brunswick New Homes & Real Estate, Wilmington Today and Discovery Maps. In addition to that, we attended five trade shows and continued to try to provide you with fresh content on our website and via our social channels every day. I hope that you are enjoying what we are providing for you. As always, don’t hesitate to reach out directly to me with feedback. Thanks for reading and happy summer!

Justin Williams CEO/Publisher Publisher@NorthBrunswickMagazine.com


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CONTRIBUTORS

Jason Frye CONTRIBUTING WRITER

I travel the world looking for the best things I can find to eat and drink. Along the way I find interesting people around every corner. When I’m not traipsing the globe, I’m here at home working on a travel guide to North Carolina, a road trip guide to the Blue Ridge Parkway or writing stories for VisitNC.com, North Brunswick Magazine, Walter and CruiseCritic.com Follow my adventures on Instagram, where I’m known as @BeardedWriter.

Sandi Grigg DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT / FOOD EDITOR

Growing up in a small town in the foothills of North Carolina and attending the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, I always dreamed of living on the coast. After earning my degree in marketing/branding, I moved to Wilmington ,and the life my spouse and I have created for ourselves is a blessing beyond words. Together we enjoy kayaking the Cape Fear, fishing the shores of Carolina Beach and picking up seashells and shark’s teeth. At home I love to cook and write recipes, play with our dogs and take on DIY home improvement endeavors. Being a part of the Carolina Marketing Company team has showed me that you really can enjoy your job. I am truly grateful to have a career I love in the city I aspired to be in. Life is grand!

Annesophia Richards CONTRIBUTING WRITER

After spending a decade as an English teacher in Florida, I moved to Wilmington three years ago to be closer to family. I now spend my time freelance writing and raising my two small, very energetic children. I love exploring all that makes North Carolina such a beautiful state, and I also enjoy travelling as much as my family and time allow. My writing appears in various parenting and local publications. In my free time I tend to read or go for a run, and I also love to compete in creative writing contests. I have received awards for several pieces of flash fiction. My ability to tell a good tale is a talent that I use nightly when tucking my kids in with a bedtime story.

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What sets

INTRACOASTAL REALTY

Apart

The Intracoastal Realty brand has been recognized as a hometown favorite for over 40 years. We have a high concentration of our market’s top performing agents whose local knowledge is unmatched in the areas in which they serve, and they have the results to prove it. Our reputation in, and in support of, our communities is something that is held in high regard by our agents and clients. It is something that has taken 43 years to build, but never something we take for granted.

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NORTH BRUNSWICK COUNTY NUMBERS & INFO

NEW TO THE AREA? Get more information and other numbers at NorthBrunswickMagazine.com

Where is the post office?

How do I get cable, phone or internet access?

Leland Ace Hardware (910) 383-6688 117-B Village Rd., Leland, NC 28451

Atlantic Telephone Membership Corp. (910) 754-4311 (phone, cable or internet)

Leland Post Office (910) 371-9013 1123 Village Road NE, Leland, NC 28451-8479 Winnabow Post Office (910) 253-5576 6351 Ocean Hwy. E (Hwy. 17 South) Winnabow, NC 28479-5559

Where is the nearest grocery store? Aldi on Ploof Rd (off of Hwys. 74/76) (855) 955-2534 9410 Ploof Rd SE, Leland, NC 28451 Food Lion on Village Road (off of Hwy. 17) (910) 371-1951 309 Village Road NE, Leland, NC 28451 Food Lion (off of Hwys. 74/76) (910) 383-1467 1735 Reed Road NE, Leland, NC 28451 Harris Teeter (Waterford Commercial Center) (910) 371-3944 2021 Old Regent Way, Leland, NC 28451 Lowes Foods (Villages at Brunswick Forest) (910) 371-5544 1152 E. Cutlar Crossing, Leland, NC 28451 Piggly Wiggly on Village Road (off of Hwy. 17) (910) 371-2696 112 Village Road NE, Leland, NC 28451 Walmart (910) 383-1769, (910) 383-1872 1114 New Pointe Blvd., Leland, NC 28451

Where are the nearest Hospitals? Brunswick Novant Medical Center in Bolivia (910) 721-1000 240 Hospital Drive NE, Bolivia, NC 28422 New Hanover Regional Medical Center in Wilmington (910) 343-7000 2131 S. 17th Street, Wilmington, NC 28401

Where is the library? Leland Library (910) 371-9442 487 Village Road, Leland, NC 28451

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AT&T (888) 436-8638 (phone, internet) Spectrum (844) 674-0398 (phone, cable or internet)

Where is the nearest drug store? CVS/pharmacy (Villages at Brunswick Forest) (910) 371-1464 1132 East Cutlar Crossing, Leland, NC 28451 CVS/pharmacy (Village Road) (910) 371-0794 117A Village Road, Leland, NC 28451 Family Pharmacy (Clairmont Shopping Center) (910) 371-3181 112-G Village Road, Leland, NC 28451 Walgreens (in Magnolia Greens) (910) 371-0233 1019 Grandiflora Drive, Leland, NC 28451 Walgreens (Village Road) (910) 371-1806 319 Village Road NE, Leland, NC 28451

Where are the town halls located? Belville Town Hall (910) 371-2456 63 River Road, Belville, NC 28451 Leland Town Hall (910) 371-0148 102 Town Hall Drive, Leland, NC 28451 Navassa Town Hall (910) 371-2432 334 Main Street, Navassa, NC 28451 Northwest Town Hall (910) 655-5080 4889 Vernon Road, Leland, NC 28451 Sandy Creek Town Hall (910) 655-3153 114 Sandy Creek Drive, Leland, NC 28451

How do I get involved in the community or volunteer? (910) 253-2412 www.volunteer.brunsco.net


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WHAT’S HAPPENING

Camp Create

Downtown Sundown Concert Series

Fridays through August 31 Wilmington’s signature summertime concert series returns for its 14th season at Riverfront Park in front of the Federal Courthouse. The free concerts are from 6:30 to 10 pm and feature both local performers and touring bands.

Camp Create

June 10 to August 9 Week 1 - Theatre Week 2 - Painting/Drawing Week 3 - Clay Week 4 - Dance

June 28

20 RIDE — Calabash fried Zac Brown tribute

Week 5 - Theatre

July 5

HEY JOHNNY PARK — Foo Fighters for you

Week 6 - Create All

July 12 RED ZEPPELIN — Been a long time since you rock and rolled? July 19

E AGLEWING — Live life in the fast lane with this Eagles tribute band

July 26

WRONG WAY — Sublime and uplifting

August 2 SUGGESTING RHYTHM — Peace, love and Grateful Dead August 9

42 — Viva la vida!

August 16

ZZ’S BEST — Lookin’ sharp, lookin’ for love

Week 7 - Clay Week 8 - Create All

Camp Create will fill your child’s summer with the arts and self-expression. During each week, campers will explore a variety of art forms, take part in a field trip and enjoy games and social time. Select weeks will focus heavier on a single artform to give campers a more indepth experience. Camps will be in session at 8:30 am to 5:30 pm Monday through Thursday and from 8:30 am to 3 pm on Fridays. Information: townofleland.com/camp

August 23 BREAKFAST CLUB — The 80s just like you remember August 30

DEPARTURE — Take a journey with us

Information: wilmingtondowntown.com/events/downtownsundown

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WHAT’S HAPPENING

Uncultured Comedy

June 21 Get ready for a night full of giggles as Leland Cultural Arts Center presents Uncultured Comedy featuring a hilarious group of comedians. Doors open at 6:30 pm. Information: townofleland.com

Farm Day

June 22 Enjoy a day filled with food and family fun at Taylor’s Blueberry Farm. This year Port City Que will have a food truck at the event, and Peppermint the clown will be painting faces. Check out various vendors, meet the Brunswick County Sherriff ’s department Impact Unit and pick fresh blueberries. There will also be a blowup slide, pony rides and a petting zoo for the little ones. Farm day will run from 9 am until 4 pm. Be sure to try the muscadine slushies and blueberry ice cream! Information: facebook.com/taylorsblueberryfarm

NC 4th of July Festival

July 4 The North Carolina 4th of July festival in downtown Southport features a variety of events including a naturalization ceremony, a flag-raising ceremony, a veteran recognition ceremony, more than 100 arts and craft booths, food vendors, a parade, live stage entertainment, fireworks, an art show, a car show, voter registration, children’s games

Farm Day at Taylor’s Blueberry Farm

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and more! Information: (901) 457-5578; nc4thofjuly.com

Airlie Gardens Concert Series

July 5 & 19, August 2 & 16, September 6 & 20 Dust off your chairs, coolers and picnic baskets for Airlie Gardens’ Concert Series. General admission tickets must be purchased in advance. Members do not need tickets, only a membership card. Free shuttles start running at 5 pm from the New Hanover County Government Center, 230 Government Center Drive west entrance. July 5

WILMINGTON BIG BAND — Big band/swing

July 19

SIGNAL FIRE — Reggae

August 2

MASSIVE GRASS — Bluegrass

August 16

BIBIS ELLISON — Pop/Covers

September 6

JACK JACK 180 — Pop/Rock/Alternative

September 20

L SHAPE LOT — Americana

Information: airliegardens.org

Seaglass Salvage Market

July 19 to 21 August 16 to 18 Seaglass Salvage Market is an indoor/outdoor once a month


WHAT’S HAPPENING

presented by Leland Cultural Arts Center will surely put on a rocking good show! Doors open at 6:30 pm. Information: townofleland.com

Jazz at the Mansion

July 11 Bellamy Mansion Museum in downtown Wilmington will host Jazz at the Mansion featuring a performance by the Duke Ladd Band. The event is held from 6:30 to 8 pm. Bring blankets and chairs. Beer, wine and snacks will be available for purchase. This is a rain or shine event and will be moved into the mansion in case of bad weather. Information: (910) 251-3700; bellamymansion. org/jazz-at-the-mansion.html

Wilmington’s Summer Consignment Event

Seaglass Salvage Market NC 4th of July Festival

July 11, 12 & 13 Stop by the only summer consignment event in Wilmington and shop for incredible bargains on infant, child, teen and maternity items such as clothes, shoes, toys, furniture, infant gear, bedding, books, electronics, outdoor and sports equipment and so much more. This is the largest event of its kind in the area. Public sale hours are: Thursday, July 11, 8 am to 7 pm Friday, July 12, 8 am to 7 pm Saturday, July 13, 9 am to 2 pm Information: (910) 338-9488

Purse Bash

“meet the maker” market. Local vendors sell handmade, homemade, resale and retail. Many items are up-cycled, recycled and re-purposed, including furniture and home decor. You will also find beautiful handmade products as well as new and retail items. There is a free coffee bar and food trucks at each market, with outdoor seating. Information: (910) 239-7709; seaglasssalvagemarket.com

On the Border

July 12 If you have never had the chance to see the Eagles live, On the Border is the next best thing. The Eagles Tribute Band

July 18 A chance to win purses. Yes, you read it right! North Brunswick Chamber of Commerce will host its Ladies Night Purse Bash on July 18. Tickets are required and include a light dinner, a cash bar, a silent auction and the chance to win designer purses. Doors open at 5:30 pm, and drawings start at 6 pm. Information: (910) 383-0553; nbchamberofcommerce.com

Art Buzz Kids Happily Ever After Summer Camp

August 12 to 16 Wine & Design Leland will wrap up the summer with a Happily Ever After Art Buzz Summer Camp. The camp will begin Monday and finish on Friday. Campers will explore creative arts, create art pieces of their own and enjoy social time. All campers are encouraged to wear art-friendly clothes and bring a snack, lunch and water. Information: (910) 399-7874

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WHAT’S HAPPENING

Duplin’s 43rd Annual Grape Stomp

August 14 Join Duplin Winery for the 43rd Annual Grape Stomp celebration from 1 to 6 pm in Rose Hill. There will be live music you can dance to, exclusive wine tastings and a grape stomping contest. Festival-goers get a chance to stomp grapes with their bare feet, and the best ones will have an opportunity to participate in a stomp off for a Duplin prize! Information: duplinwinery.com

Leland Under the Lights

August 17 Leland Under the Lights is an annual car show put on by the North Brunswick Chamber of Commerce. It raises money for the chamber scholarship and education fund. This car show is a wonderful and fun event for people of all ages! It’s held at the Villages of Brunswick Forest from 3 to 9 pm. Information: nbchamberofcommerce.com

Miles Atlas at Compass Pointe

August 30 Miles Atlas is made up of a group of guys who have played in many bands together in the past. Their music is a wide variety of rock, R&B, pop, alternative and Americana. Don’t miss this fun concert starting at 7 pm in Compass Pointe. Information: Compass Pointe Facebook

North Carolina Honey Festival

September 7 & 8 The mission of the North Carolina Honey Festival is to highlight the significance of bees in our environment, celebrate honey and honey products, encourage beefriendly practices, and promote beekeeping in all of North Carolina’s regions. Whiteville was selected to host the festival as an official bee city, with a growing beekeeping community. Don’t miss out on this fun-filled day of bee exhibits, food, honeybee product vendors and community fellowship. Information: nchoneyfestival.com

Community Day

September 8 The Children’s Museum of Wilmington will host the third annual Community Day sponsored by Waffle House. Admission is free, and attendees can enjoy face

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WHAT’S HAPPENING

painting, balloon making, snacks, chances to win tickets to future events and more. This event was extremely successful last year, and the museum is partnering with local organizations to make sure this year is even better! Information: playwilmington.org/communityday2018

Leland Founders Day

September 14 Celebrate the Town of Leland’s birthday with a grand party for the entire community. This special event is for all ages and is held at the Leland Municipal Park. There will be live entertainment, food trucks, a carnival, arts and craft vendors, business vendors, fireworks and more. Information: (910) 408-3092; townofleland.com

RISE Up 2019 Race Series

September 21 “RISE Up” to support three wonderful nonprofits serving our community. The race series began in April and will finish in November. In September racers will take on the 2 and 4 mile “Merry go Run” race. The event is held in Brunswick Forest and sponsored by the Leland Lady Runners, Journey to Heal Ministries and the Carousel Center. Participants will get RISE Up Series swag, which includes a head wrap, knee high socks and finisher medals. Information: runsignup.com/Race/NC/Leland/ RISEUpRaceSeries

Novant Health Oceanside Family Oktoberfest 15K & The Joyce Irish Pub 5K

September 29 Experience a race course unlike any other travel through the beautiful community of Brunswick Forest on paved running trails, through the scenic Meadow Park, across wooden bridges and over a 1/3-mile boardwalk through a nature area. This course is fast, flat and full of amazing views. Information: 5starraceproductions.com/races/

Juice, Jazz & Java

October 7 North Brunswick Kiwanis Club presents its 5th annual Juice, Jazz & Java gala. Enjoy a sumptuous buffet dinner created by Art and Event Caterers (Purple Onion) and dance to lively music provided by DJ Dennis M. Shockley. Enjoy a cash bar with wine and beer. All the proceeds will be used to fund programs supporting the needs of children in Brunswick County. The event runs from 6 to 10 pm. Information: (973) 670 3155; northBrunswickKiwanis.org

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North Brunswick Magazine


BUSINESS BUZZ

Waterford Again Named Community of Excellence Waterford Master Residential Association (WMRA) has for the second time been chosen as a Community Associations Institute (CAI) Community of Excellence. The North Carolina chapter of this international organization, dedicated to building better communities, presented this award to only five community associations on March 22 in Charlotte. This honor recognizes the work of volunteer leaders and management professionals whose contributions exemplify excellence in self-government, leadership and stewardship in the previous year. Waterford, a residential development of 1,010 single-family homes in Leland, was recognized by the judges for its stellar response to two significant natural disasters in 2018, involving multiple volunteer committees and coordinated by leadership facing exceptional and urgent challenges. Community associations, commonly referred to as homeowner associations (HOAs), are self-governing bodies whose success is dependent on the commitment of resident volunteers and the competence of their elected leaders. This recognition from CAI demonstrates Waterford Master Residential Association’s continued community association excellence. Waterford is off U.S. Highway 17 in Leland, mere minutes from downtown Wilmington, and on 17 miles of shoreline that frame sparkling canals, ponds and a lake. Current and potential homeowners can be assured that the existing high standard of fiscal, strategic and communication management will be maintained, thus contributing to the inherent value of the community.

First Renewable Energy Smart Load Center Coming to Wilmington

month during their annual meeting. Even when solar and grid power are both available, the intelligence built into the Smart Load Center gives preference for using someone’s own, selfgenerated solar power by switching as many breaker circuits to solar as it can at that time. Other features of the Smart Load Center include communication with electronic devices, peak demand control, real-time appliance power usage, battery technology agnostic, energy usage tracking and programmable time-of-use operations. Cape Fear Solar is currently the first solar installer with Smart Load Center technology. Once full production begins, the Smart Load Center will be available to other solar installers throughout the United States.

Brunswick Electric to Send Local High School Students to Washington, D.C Brunswick Electric Membership Corporation (BEMC) has selected two high school students to participate in the Electric Cooperative Youth Tour in Washington, D.C., in June. Representing Brunswick County will be North Brunswick High School junior Bailey Cameron Smith, daughter of Jerry and Barretta Smith of Leland. Representing Columbus County will be East Columbus High School junior Treasure Sierra Spaulding, daughter of Robert and Josephine Spaulding of Clarkton. Bailey and Treasure will join 1,800 peers from across the United States for a week-long adventure, where they will meet their Congressional Representatives and Senators and tour historic sites and museums. They will also establish a minicooperative during the week, gaining valuable insight into the cooperative business model and how it works.

H2GO’s Brian Griffith Earns Utility Management Certification

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Koolbridge Solar recently announced the first-ever renewable energy Smart Load Center, a one-of-a-kind intelligent breaker box that pairs with solar panels, giving the ability to prioritize solar energy as the main source to power a home. It also minimizes reliance on the electrical grid and creates a method to truly harness the unlimited power from the sun. Koolbridge Solar sold the very first renewable energy Smart Load Center to John Donoghue, president of Cape Fear Solar Systems, last

Brian S. Griffith, wastewater superintendent of Brunswick Regional Water and Sewer H2GO, has earned the Utility Management Certification (UMC) credential from the Water University and North Carolina Rural Water Association (NCRWA). The UMC is the highest professional credential in the utility industry. Only 700 utility professionals — less than one percent of all utility professionals in the world — have earned the UMC. To be designated as UMC certified, an applicant must have a minimum number of years’ experience in water and wastewater management and have completed a minimum number of hours Summer 2019

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At NHRMC and NHRMC Physician Group, we’re leading our community to outstanding health by looking deeper and working harder to find innovative ways to deliver great care. We’re bringing health screenings to area neighborhoods, offering free exercise and nutrition programs, and volunteering with community partners throughout our region. And we’re just getting started. Join us at NHRMC.org. Together, we can make healthier happen. 32

North Brunswick Magazine


BUSINESS BUZZ

Tim Milam of Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage Honored by Peers and Colleagues

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

In recognition of his service to the community and contributions to the real estate profession, Tim Milam, president of Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage, was recently inducted into the Wilmington-Cape Fear Home Builders Association’s (WCFHBA) Hall of Fame. The achievement, which was announced at the 33rd annual Parade of Homes awards banquet, was the result of a vote by local real estate industry officials and power players. Milam has been a pillar of the Wilmington real estate community since 1997, when he purchased what was then known as Sea Coast Realty from his brother Paul. Having successfully grown the brokerage to a network of more than 590 real estate agents, across 20 offices in southeastern North Carolina, he has earned a reputation for his focus on ethical business practices, professionalism and straightforward approach to management. Milam is well known for emphasizing that the role of the leaders and managers at Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage is to work for the agents, to provide them with the resources and tools they need to effectively serve their clients. He is also widely known for his frequent donations of time and service to the community, with his latest charitable outreach effort on May 9 at Waterman’s Brewery, where he served as

a celebrity bartender at a fundraiser for the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

PBC Design + Build Welcomes Maggie Pinson Maggie Love Pinson has joined the sales and design team at PBC Design + Build, and her focus will be on new homes in Brunswick County. Pinson’s career in the building industry began in Wilmington in 2014, where her dedication quickly blossomed as she found a passion for new home design and construction. Her natural ability to serve clients and develop relationships pairs well with her attention to detail in shaping the architecture of a home. She looks forward to a long career working with the team at PBC. As the real estate market continues to encourage local and out-of-state buyers alike, there continues to be an opportunity for growth in Brunswick County. The Brunswick County Association of Realtors just released the latest on Brunswick County’s position in the market, noting: “Brunswick County’s residential real estate market opened 2019 in strong fashion, according to the latest statistics released by the Brunswick County Association of REALTORS®. January’s total sales volume was the second-highest in 10 years, trailing only January 2018.” As homeowners remain interested in settling in Leland, and even are more interested in the planned communities of Brunswick Forest and Compass Pointe, Pinson hopes to capitalize on the desire for a superior custom home focusing on quality and design. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

of specialized professional development; these experiences are scored in a formula to ensure that experience and training meet a minimum requirement. The applicant must then pass a stringent examination in water and wastewater system management. In order to maintain the certification, individuals must undertake ongoing professional development and activities in water and wastewater system management. Brian has served in the water and wastewater industry for more than 14 years, obtaining the highest certifications in wastewater, water distribution, collections and backflow testing. Brian’s hard work and committed attitude also led him to manage H2GO’s safety program and take lead of the safety committee, earning him the Water Environment Federation’s George W. Burke, Jr. Safety Award in 2017. H2GO recognized Brian for his achievement at their regularly scheduled board of commissioners meeting on February 19. Additionally, NCRWA recognized Brian at the NCRWA Annual Conference in May and published his name in an upcoming issue of NCRWA’s magazine, The Tarheel Pipeline.

Public Meeting Held for Navassa Superfund Site Federal and state officials together with Multistate Trust representatives held a public meeting regarding the KerrMcGee Chemical Corp/Navassa Superfund site on March 26. Topics included results of environmental investigations completed in 2018, activities planned for 2019 and marketing of the site for sale and reuse. The meeting took place at the Navassa Community Center.

ATMC Launches MergeTV, Internet Streamed TV ATMC announced the launch of a new app-based streaming service, MergeTV, which will allow their residential customers Summer 2019

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BUSINESS BUZZ

to stream the ATMC cable TV lineup over an ATMC internet connection on a variety of devices without the need for a digital cable box. MergeTV is compatible with a variety of streaming devices including Amazon Fire TV Sticks, Android streaming devices, Android smart TVs, Android mobile phones and tablets, iPhones, iPads and laptops. The service includes new features like Start Over and Look Back, which allow viewers greater flexibility to watch all of their favorite shows. MergeTV also includes 15 hours of cloud DVR storage and the ability to record over a dozen shows at the same time with an option for up to 300 hours of total DVR storage available. MergeTV gives customers the ability to customize their viewing experience in a variety of ways and have programming content recommended based on their viewing preferences. The platform will also feature ATMC’s most extensive library of free video on demand content.

Reverse Osmosis Treated Water on Track for December 2021 Brunswick County Commissioners recently received an update from its consultant, CDM Smith, on the progress of its work to bring reverse osmosis treated water to Brunswick County. Reverse osmosis treated water will be available in Brunswick County by late 2021 — pending state permit approval, securing the approximately $90 to $100 million needed for the treatment upgrade, and construction completion. Brunswick County announced that the entire project, including the 12-milliongallon-a-day treatment expansion, is planned to be substantially complete in June 2022, with final completion in September 2022. The design phase of the project is nearing 50 percent completion, the firm told commissioners, and a 60 percent milestone is on-schedule to be delivered. After announcing the treatment selection last year, the county first anticipated construction beginning in June 2019, but later announced construction will begin January 2020. Updates to the existing Northwest Water Treatment Plant system, which require a nearly 4-mile contaminant pipeline that discharges into the Cape Fear River, cannot be installed without state approval. Brunswick County is in the midst of re-applying for state-level funding assistance. Last month, the State Water Infrastructure Authority denied its $27.7 million assistance. Failing to establish contaminant levels exceeded (GenX and other perfluorinated compounds are not yet regulated) was listed as one reason for the denial.

Lower Cape Fear Hospice Named a 2019 Hospice Honors Elite Recipient Lower Cape Fear Hospice received the 2019 Hospice Honors Elite recognition from HEALTHCAREfirst at the National 34

North Brunswick Magazine

Hospice and Palliative Care Organization’s Leadership and Advocacy Conference in Washington, D.C. Each year, HEALTHCAREfirst conducts a review of the Hospice Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) survey results, which ask hospice patients’ caregivers and families about their satisfaction with hospice services and other feedback. Hospices receive a score on 24 quality indicator measures, and the review compares each individual hospice’s performance score for each measure to the national performance score based on all hospice information available. Hospice organizations that score above the national HEALTHCAREfirst performance score on 20 of the 24 evaluation questions receive the Hospice Honors designation. Organizations that score above the national HEALTHCAREfirst performance score on all 24 of the evaluated questions receive the prestigious Hospice Honors Elite recognition. Lower Cape Fear Hospice (LCFH) scored above the national performance score on all evaluation questions during the October 2017 to September 2018 evaluation period. LCFH’s South Carolina branch, Mercy Care, received the 2019 Hospice Honors recognition, meaning it scored above the national performance score on at least 20 of the 24 evaluation questions during the October 2017 to September 2018 evaluation period. LFCH Mercy Care serves Horry, Georgetown and Marion counties. LCFH and LCFH Mercy Care are the only local hospice providers to have received either the Hospice Honors or Hospice Honors Elite recognition. LCFH serves more than 700 hospice and palliative patients a day and more than 6,000 families per year. Thanks to the generosity of donors, LCFH provides $1 million in care and services not covered by a reimbursement source each year. No one is ever refused care based on ability to pay.

Eight LCFH Nurses Recognized at Nurses Day Celebration During National Nurses Week Eight Lower Cape Fear Hospice nurses were recognized at the 23rd annual Nurses Day Celebration at UNCW. The celebration, held each year during National Nurses Week, recognizes working and retired nurses. Those who have been nominated for recognition are celebrated, as are nursing scholarship nominees. This year’s nurse honorees from Lower Cape Fear Hospice included Admissions Nurse Jean Butts, Registered Nurse Megan Cartrette, Registered Nurse Kristy Fulks, Registered Nurse Sarah Gwathmey, Registered Nurse Ponee Lowery, Registered Nurse Diane Lozier, Registered Nurse Rebecca Reeves and Registered Nurse Annie Smith.


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CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

A DAY FOR THE DOGS by Jo Ann Mathews

Dog competitions in jumping, swimming and diving have captivated sports fans and dog lovers since they were featured in the late 1990s. The Purina Incredible Dog Challenge began in 1997, and ESPN included DockDogs Canine Aquatics Competition in 1999 as part of its Great Outdoor Games.

Today numerous organizations around the world offer canine sports events, and one of them, DockDogs, Inc., which bills itself as The World’s Premier Canine Aquatics Competition, came to Brunswick Forest June 1 and 2.

holds about 250 events each year. Several teams (a team is comprised of the handler and the dog) competed at Brunswick Forest in three different events: Big Air, Extreme Vertical and Speed Retrieve.

Brian Sharenow, vice president of the company, explains that DockDogs

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10 REASONS TO LOVE PILATES by Lensey Wilson

I hate to admit that before I ever tried Pilates, I already had my mind made up that it was not for me. I really didn’t even have a clue what it was. I thought it was a form of yoga using a machine instead of a mat, and I knew I wouldn’t like it.

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CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

But when I heard that Club Pilates will be opening in Leland in June, I wanted to see what Leland’s new gym was going to be all about. So a few weeks ago I decided to give Club Pilates in Wilmington a shot. It’s no secret that I don’t like working out, but I have to say that I loved Pilates from that very first class.


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PHOTO BY MATT MCGRAW

PORT CITY SHAKEDOWN DELIVERS THE DANCE PARTY by Lauren Krouse

Do you just want to let loose, belt out your favorite songs and dance like nobody’s watching? You can when Port City Shakedown plays at Brunswick Forest.

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MOMS WE LOVE by Lensey Wilson

“It’s been a wild ride,” says mother and business owner Amber Lanier.

An award-winning, seven-piece party band, Port City Shakedown guarantees lots of dancing, singalongs and fun. A lively mix of male and female musicians, the band was built to entertain, which is why they’re a popular act for wedding receptions, private parties, corporate events and festivals. They get the fun started and keep it going from the first song to the encore (which, according to many reviews, guests will beg for).

THEY GET THE FUN STARTED AND KEEP IT GOING FROM THE FIRST SONG TO THE ENCORE...

Seven years later she moved to Leland. After spending years designing weddings and events for family and friends, in 2007 she decided to take the plunge and open her own floral and event styling business. Designs by Amber Lanier, Floral and Event Styling provides fresh floral creations and decor for all occasions.

“We strive to make every performance an energetic singalong, party-like-it’s-1999, blowout dance party,” says Tim Meyer, the band’s drummer and manager. Port City Shakedown’s greatest hits range the ‘50s right up to the current chart toppers, anything from Michael Jackson and Justin Timberlake to classics like “Killing Me Softly” by the Roots, “At Last” by Etta James and “Respect” by Aretha Franklin. And they add their own creative touches, too.

Originally from Raleigh, North Carolina, Lanier relocated to Wilmington in 1998 with her mind set on pursuing a career in the film industry. As a set dresser for productions filmed in Wilmington and Charleston, she learned the elements of design from some of the best production designers and set decorators in the business.

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FOURTH OF JULY JELL-O SHOOTERS by Sandi Grigg

Show your patriotism this Fourth of July with these fruity red, white and blue shooters. This is a fun and easy make-ahead Jell-O shooter that is sure to please a crowd of patriotic adults. These are great for Fourth of July celebrations by the beach or pool or any social gathering. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

SUPPORT THE GIRLS

by Lensey Wilson

This spring Kelli Belton gave ladies a reason to get an early start on spring cleaning and clear out that overflowing drawer of bras. With a heart for giving back to her community, Benton, owner of Sea Glass Salvage Market, invites a local nonprofit organization to set up at her market each month.

I made these appealing American flag shooters for our friends, and they were impressed. The first response I got was, “Ohhh, these are pretty, how did you make them?” It was quite easy, and with lids they travel well. This boozy recipe was inspired by the patriotic popsicles I used to enjoy as a child. By layering berry-flavored Jell-O with fruity liquor, you can satisfy your sweet cravings while getting a little buzzed at the same time. Have a fun and festive Fourth of July – and while you’re partying let’s remember why we’re celebrating in the first place. To all of our service men and women, present and past who have fought for our freedom, we salute you!

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“I usually find the 501(c) online and contact them to see if they are available,” Benton says. “If they are, I ask them to set up at the market as an outside vendor so they can give out information to the community.”

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CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

In 2017 she stumbled upon I Support the Girls and at first glance knew it was an organization that she wanted to support. I Support the Girls is a nonprofit organization that provides bras and feminine hygiene products to women in need both nationally and internationally. “No woman should ever have to choose between food and things like a bra or feminine hygiene products,” Benton says. |

WHERE THERE’S A NEED, THERE’S A LION by Jo Ann Mathews

Irwin Siegelwax, past district governor and current club organizer for Brunswick County Lions Clubs, recounts an experience he encountered at a Christmas in July event 20 years ago. When he gave a wallet to a 10-year-old boy, the boy looked at him and said, “Thank you for coming.” The child’s sincerity moved Siegelwax to become more involved with the Lions Club. “I never thought I’d get as involved as I am,” he says. A Calabash resident, Siegelwax is determined to organize a North Brunswick Area Lions Club to include Leland, Belville, Winnabow, Navassa and the other surrounding towns. Lions Clubs International requires each club to have 20 members to be officially recognized. Thus far, 14 people have signed up for the North Brunswick Area Lions Club. An informational meeting was held on Wednesday, March 20 from 6 to 7 p.m. at The Bridge Presbyterian Church in Leland. 38

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SOUTHBOUND

SOUTH BRUNSWICK MAGAZINE WHAT’S GOING ON IN OUR SISTER PUBLICATION

Daring to Dream Summer 2019

| SouthBrunswickMag

Brunswick County filmmaker Sheena Vaught is proving that creativity can be the path the success.

azine.com

By Denice Patterson

EAPPLE VANILLA RES RISE THE PIN AS TEMPER ATU PINKIES UP ! PS YOU COO L ... KEE ICLE AMS DRE

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Welcome, Friends! Harness the power of the pineapple to welcome your summer guests with a dreamy blended cocktail.

A New Leader for Literacy

A Way to Change

Louis Washington takes over the role as president of the Brunswick County Literacy Council board of directors.

Brunswick County Detention Center personnel and volunteers help inmates improve their lives. By Ed Beckley

By Jo Ann Mathews

The pineapple is known as the symbol of welcome and I was raised believing that pineapples were a Southern sign of hospitality and friendship. Over Memorial Day weekend my spouse and I entertained friends at our lake house. It was hot outside, and we wanted to offer a drink that was quenching and offered the element of Southern hospitality. We created this cocktail with a few summertime ingredients and a blender. With just one sip we were all transformed to the tropics.

“I couldn’t imagine not being able to read,” Washington says. “I helped her get where she was going. That was my introduction to someone who actually could not read.”

PHOTO BY ED BECKLEY

More than 40 years ago Louis Washington saw a young woman crying on a street corner near Center City in Philadelphia. He stopped to ask how he could help. The lady explained that she was going to a job interview but couldn’t read the street signs to find her way there.

By Sandi Grigg

PHOTO BY BRENT GALANT

PHOTO BY LAURA GLANTZ

s Sip r e m m u S

Local filmmaker Sheena Vaught knew from the age of 8 that she was a creator. This is only natural because she was raised in a family of artists — her mother is an art teacher at West Brunswick High School and her father is a graphic designer.

Just before Christmas, President Trump signed into law a bipartisan criminal justice reform bill named the First Step Act. Among other benefits, the new law boosts prisoners’ access to life improvement programs designed to help them stay out of jail in the future. Interestingly, the Brunswick County Detention Center has been offering these kinds of programs for several years, and there are plans for even more of them in the near future.

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Life is better

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“We have been patients of Blue Wave for over a dozen years. Before coming under their care, we both had been apprehensive of dentists due to bad experiences elsewhere in our lives. However, Dr. Biggerstaff and the staff at Blue Wave could not have changed our views more dramatically. The advancements in care, the time they spend with you, the technology, and their personal, caring attitude are far superior to anywhere else we have ever been. One of our daughters was entering dental school several years ago, and they offered guidance to her and to us before and during the program, and kept up with her progress throughout. Now she is a pediatric dentist, and I am sure she is every bit as caring as they are due to their help and support. We certainly appreciate their practice, and our smiles have never been better due to their excellent work.�

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SPIRITS

Not Your Mother’s Milkshake

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Rum, vodka and banana liqueur spike an all-time favorite summertime treat. BY SANDI GRIGG

We all have a fond childhood memory of getting a really thick and creamy milkshake, usually from an old trading post or soda shop. Well, this recipe is just like that, but with plenty of booze for an adult version.

Boozy Banana Milkshake

I grew up in the foothills of North Carolina and during the weekends my family and I would ride motorcycles with our friends through the mountains. We would stop at every ice cream shop that oozed rustic mountainous nostalgia. If it had a picnic table, an oak tree or an old plow out front with a sign that said “ice cream” — we pulled in to chill our palates. I will never forget when I was about 17 years old, cruising the curves of the Blue Ridge with our regular motorcycle group, when we stopped somewhere outside of Black Mountain at an old post office. It had a sign swinging out front indicating they offered beef jerky, boiled peanuts and ice cream. The inside resembled

Makes two drinks

that of an old bank, and the entrance had a bell that rang when slapped by the door. On the left wall was a diner-style bar with stools where they served ice cream and milkshakes. We all ordered a different flavor, and I got the banana milkshake. It was so thick and creamy, it was to die for! I can’t say I had ever had a banana milkshake until then. To this very day I make my own version of that banana milkshake, except now I incorporate an alcoholic flair by using 99 Bananas, vodka and Blue Chair Bay Banana Rum Cream. It is not a good idea to enjoy this treat and then ride a motorcycle, but it would pair nicely at the beach or by the pool on a hot summer day.

INGREDIENTS 2 peeled bananas 2 ounces 99 Bananas liqueur 1 ounce vodka 3 ounces Blue Chair Bay Banana Rum Cream 2 large scoops of vanilla ice cream 2 cups of ice METHOD Add all the ingredients into a blender and blend till smooth.

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WHAT’S COOKIN’

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North Brunswick Magazine


WHAT’S COOKIN’

T

Summery Salad

Chilled pasta salad is the perfect make-ahead dish for all of your outdoor meals this summer. BY SANDI GRIGG | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JAMES STEFIUK

The season is upon us for picnics, outdoor parties, concert tailgates and days by the pool and beach. For these outdoor events we need food that is easy to eat, travels well and is filling. I have the perfect dish that will draw a hungry crowd. Last month, a group of us went to Raleigh to enjoy a Zac Brown Band concert. We decided we were going to tailgate and that we would each bring something to complete a meal. One couple brought a grill and served grilled sausages and peppers on rolls. Another couple brought a variety of chips and dips. Knowing that I would be traveling and arriving to set up, the last thing I wanted to do was prepare something in the parking lot. I opted to bring a delicious and well-rounded pasta salad. I kept it in the cooler until we arrived, and once the sausages and peppers were done, I just whipped it out and was ready to serve. Best of all, this flavor-packed pasta salad just gets better the longer it sits.

Personally, I think preparing food for people is a way to say, “I care and took the extra step to make something for us.” With this dish, I got to convey that message without having to actually put a lot of time in it! Even so, my friends were impressed with the vibrant colors and personal touch of the pre-made dish. With the incorporation of pasta, cheese, vegetables, nuts and pesto, this pasta salad is filling and tasty. I have tried it with gluten-free pasta and it held up just as well. In the past I have made my own pesto, but for the sake of a quick, tasty and easy dish, for the tailgate I elected to just buy the pesto and the salad lacked no luster. This pasta salad is superb all by itself for a quick summer meal or as a covered dish to an outdoor party. So before you buy a bag of chips or sign up to bring sodas, think about serving this easy, make-ahead and filling pasta salad.

Pesto Pasta Salad Serves 6 to 8 INGREDIENTS 12 ounces fusilli pasta 6 ounces crumbled feta 3 stalks chopped green onions 16 ounce jar of marinated mushrooms 2 ounces toasted pine nuts 15 ounce can of peas 8.5 ounces julienned sun-dried tomatoes 8 ounces pesto sauce 1 teaspoon olive oil 1 teaspoon sugar Salt and pepper

METHOD Boil and drain pasta as directed and set aside to cool. Toast the pine nuts in a hot cast-iron skillet over medium heat in the olive oil for about 2 minutes, being careful not to burn the nuts, then remove from heat. In a large bowl, mix pasta, nuts, feta, drained peas, pesto, mushrooms (with 2 tablespoons of the juice), sundried tomatoes, olive oil, sugar and salt and pepper to taste. Let marinate in the refrigerator for 20 minutes or longer and serve cold.

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North Brunswick Magazine


COMMON COMMON FOODS FOODS TOXIC TOXIC TO TO DOGS DOGS

CHOCOLATE CHOCOLATE

ALCOHOL ALCOHOL

Chocolate Chocolatecontains containsaacompound compound calledtheobromine, theobrominewhich whichdogs dogscan called can absorbtheir through their absorb through gastrointestinal gastrointestinal tracts and canstress put tract. This can put damaging damaging stress and on their liver and on cantheir leadliver to serious can lead to serious problems, health problems, including death. including death.

Alcohol Alcoholhas hasthe thesame sameeffect effecton on dogs as it does humans. TheThe effect on humans. effect on ondogs dogsisisamplified amplifiedbecause becauseofof their theirsmaller smallersize. size.Alcohol Alcoholcan cancause cause vomiting, vomiting,central centralnervous nervoussystem system depression, depression,coma comaand anddeath. death.

NUTS NUTS Nuts end weakness, Nutscan cancause causehind hind-end weakness, vomiting, vomiting,diarrhea, diarrheaand andsometimes sometimes pancreatitis. pancreatitis.Consuming Consumingas aslittle littleas as 1 1gram gramofofmacadamia macadamianuts nutsper per pound poundofofaadog’s dog’sbody bodyweight weightcan can cause causethese thesesymptoms. symptoms.

AA message message from from your your friends friends atat GRAPES GRAPES && RAISINS RAISINS Grapes canbe be Grapesand andraisings raisins can highly highlytoxic toxicto tosome somedogs dogsand and can cancause causevomiting, vomiting,abdominal abdominal pain, painand andkidney kidneyfailure. failure.

ONIONS ONIONS

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Onions Onionscontain containdisulfide disulfideand and sulfoxides sulfoxides,both bothofofwhich whichcan can cause causeanemia anemiaand anddamage damagered red blood bloodcells. cells.

Stop Stopby byanytime anytimefor fornutritional nutritionaladvice adviceand and f ree f reesamples samplesfor foryour yourdog dogand andcat catto totry try

CAFFIENE CAFFEINE

XYLITOL XYLITOL

FATTY FATTY FOODS FOODS

Due to their effects stimulants, Due its effect as aasstimulant, caffiene caffeinecan cancause causerapid rapidheartbeat, heartbeat, vomiting, death. vomiting,seizures, seizures and even death.

Xylitol Xylitolisisaacommon commonfood foodadditive additive categorized categorizedas asaasugar sugaralcohol. alcohol.ItItisis used usedas asan anartificial artificialsweetener sweetenerinin candy, candy,gum, gumand andtoothpaste. toothpaste.ItItcan can cause causehypoglycemia, hypoglycemia,seizures seizuresand and liver liverfailure. failure.

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commonly known as CBD, is one of the cannabinoids that is found in the hemp plant, a member of the cannabis plant family. From cannabis, there are more than 60 cannabinoids, and CBD is the most commonly used for its health benefits. With cannabidiol, you can be sure that there are zero psychoactive effects. CBD oil has become a popular remedy in treating many health ailments. Using CBD has been shown to reduce anxiety and depression and may even help treat acne due to its anti-inflammatory properties. Based on recent scientific studies, CBD oil may be effective in reducing pain associated with diseases like multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. For those with cancer, it may even provide a natural alternative for pain and symptom relief. Research has also shown that CBD may be used to effectively treat symptoms related to epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease and slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Though more human studies are needed, CBD may benefit heart health in several ways, by reducing blood pressure and preventing heart damage. Some studies also suggest that CBD may be an effective treatment for diabetes, substance abuse and mental disorders. “We started selling CBD oil three months ago to much success in all five of our locations,” says Cindy Kent, owner of Vapor Shack in Leland. “The feedback from the community has been amazing!” Kent says Vapor Shack has numerous repeat customers who tell her the number one benefit from 52

North Brunswick Magazine

CBD oil has been for the relief of anxiety. The second most common benefit is for pain relief. “One repeat customer who suffered from severe arthritis in her wrist found relief within two to three weeks of taking CBD oil,” Kent says. “She doesn’t even need to take over-the-counter painkillers anymore.” Other customers have reported to Kent that their sleep has improved, as CBD oil puts them in a better REM state. “We do our due diligence to make sure all the CBD oil we sell is CO2 processed with no added chemicals or solvents,” Kent adds. Over 10,000 years ago, hemp was one of the first plants spun into fiber, and it is also one of the fastest growing plants in popularity around the world. Farmers grew hemp in North Carolina from the Colonial era until the 1940s, when WWII created a need for hemp fibers for textiles, rope and other war essentials. The Controlled Substances Act of 1970 put a complete halt to legitimate hemp cultivation in the United States by making cannabis a Schedule 1 drug — and industrial hemp with it. Growing hemp in North Carolina, like everywhere else in the nation, became strictly illegal. Congress gave hemp and CBD oil a boost last December when they passed the Agriculture Improvement Act of 2018 (better known as the 2018 Farm Bill.) The act legalized the growing of cannabis plants that contain 0.3 percent or less of THC. The 2018 Farm Bill removed hemp from the Controlled Substances Act, which means that it is no longer a controlled substance under federal law. Interest in CBD oil has only increased after that. PHOTO BY LAURA GLANTZ

CANNABIDIOL,


‘‘

‘‘ PHOTOS BY LAURA GLANTZ

One repeat customer who suffered from severe arthritis in her wrist found relief within two to three weeks of taking CBD oil. She doesn’t even need to take over-the-counter painkillers anymore.

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‘‘

‘‘

Our farm has been in my wife’s family for several generations, and we feel very fortunate to have the land to be able to maximize all the benefits of growing hemp, not only for our family, but for others.

As demand for CBD grows, and the stigma lessens with the removal of hemp from the list of illegal drugs, we can expect a large boom in its sales and manufacturing. Currently, more than 30 nations grow industrial hemp as an agricultural commodity, which is sold on the world market. In the United States, production is strictly controlled under existing laws. Currently the sale of CBD in food, drinks and animal food violates state and federal law. CBD oils, tinctures and topical products are allowed as long as they’re sold without health claims. The idea is that you can let oils and tinctures dissolve under your tongue instead of swallowing them — so they aren’t officially considered food. North Carolina is positioned to become a leader in the nation when it comes to hemp production. Congress passed The Agricultural Act of 2014, which allowed states to create agricultural pilot programs to let farmers experiment with hemp for research purposes. The act opened up some muchneeded leeway, allowing states like North Carolina to set up industrial hemp cultivation in a tightly regulated research capacity. In 2016 North Carolina approved an Industrial Hemp Pilot Program, which would allow a select few farmers

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with N.C. hemp permits to begin planting industrial hemp under the oversight of the N.C. Industrial Hemp Commission, the N.C. Department of Agriculture & Consumer Products, N.C. State University and N.C. A&T University. “We believe strongly in the health benefits of hemp, not only for our bodies, but for the earth as well,” says Moses Frazier, owner of Grateful Green Farms in Ocean Isle Beach. “Our farm has been in my wife’s family for several generations, and we feel very fortunate to have the land to be able to maximize all the benefits of growing hemp, not only for our family, but for others.” Many agricultural experts hope that industrial hemp will provide opportunities to struggling family farmers in North Carolina. The State Department of Agriculture is seeking changes in state law to help boost the industry even more, such as allowing the state Board of Agriculture to regulate CBD production in North Carolina. The industry is projected to keep growing. In 2019 CBD retail sales in the United States will reach an estimated $1 billion. Keep an eye on hemp and CBD. With sales like that, this is an industry that is only going to keep growing. 


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Rusty Meador founded Beach & Barn in 2009 as a carpentry business; it then evolved into an apparel company that fully embraces the laid-back spirit of coastal country life. 56

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Conversation &

Curiosity Rusty Meador talks about his lifestyle brand, Beach & Barn.

BY JASON FRYE | PHOTOGRAPHY BY MEGAN DEITZ

“A client said to me one day, ‘Carpentry is hard, why not sell your hats and t-shirts?’ But I didn’t know hats and t-shirts; I did know he was right – carpentry is hard, tiring work – and I knew his kids were bugging him to ask me for a hat and a t-shirt, so I figured I was doing at least one thing right,” says Rusty Meador between bites of a fish taco. He’s wearing a Beach & Barn hat, of course, and the logo, a surfing rooster, stands out like a beacon in the restaurant. He sees people he knows and they jokingly tell him, “Nice hat;” strangers say the same.

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CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS.

Prior to founding Beach & Barn, Rusty Meador learned the value of hard work while spending time at his grandmother’s home and working in the construction industry. His biggest supporters are his wife, Erica, and his two children.

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‘‘

Back in 1994, his father was transporting a boat up the Intracoastal Waterway when it broke down at Atlantic Marine and, as he says, ‘the family’s been here since.’

Was that where Meador’s lifestyle and apparel brand, Beach & Barn, started? The moment when the seed was planted, buried deep and waiting for water and light to urge it to grow? Maybe. Or maybe Beach & Barn has been in him for a long time. A young Rusty Meador sits on his grandmother’s porch. His horizon is mountains, undulating waves of them stretching to the horizon. They grow blue with distance and at the farthest point they seem to be one with the sky. Behind him comes the sound of tearing and the smell of cut grass and sweet corn. He turns to his grandmother and she hands him an ear. In three swift motions he’s shucked the ear; in a fourth he’s cleaned it of silk but now he struggles to break the stub of stalk and free the ear. He’s tired. Today they’ve picked and put up snap peas and walked through rows of corn twice his height and picked two big baskets. He grips the ear in one hand, the twist of silk and leaves and the stalk and twists as he bends them away from one another, finally it breaks and he drops the ear into one basket, the handful of green into another. 58

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“I feel good with that memory,” he says. “I grew up in Martinsville, Virginia, not too far from the North Carolina line, but my grandmother lived on a farm near Roanoke. When we’d visit her, we worked — shucking corn, snapping peas, picking beans — and spent a lot of time sitting on the porch.” Martinsville’s a mill town, a furniture town, a place where a good work ethic is a must, and Meador’s got that in spades. He grew up working, he worked in college, and work brought his family to North Carolina. Back in 1994, his father was transporting a boat up the Intracoastal Waterway when it broke down at Atlantic Marine and, as he says, “the family’s been here since.” It started with one sister. He’d visit her and they’d explore Wilmington. At the time the film industry was big and the allure of it irresistible. “I remember telling my sister, ‘One day I gotta live here,’ so it was no surprise my wife and I ended up in this part of North Carolina.” Before Meador and his wife arrived, another sister moved


Comfortable and stylish — Beach & Barn recently launched a line of premium polos and t-shirts.

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to town. Now, with his parents and two sisters here, Meador felt the pull to put down roots in Wilmington. He and his future wife were on an Amtrak adventure from Albuquerque to Seattle and somewhere along the way he looked out at the countryside and back to her and asked, “Do you want to move to Wilmington when we’re done?” She did and they did, arriving in 1999, living in Wilmington for a few years, then moving to Lanvale Trace in 2003. “When I moved to the area I was filled with delusions of film industry grandeur. So that’s one thing that pulled me here; the other was my mother, she was sick and that made the move a no-brainer: I needed to be near her and near my family,” says Meador. There was no film job. Even though the industry was booming, film work was only slightly easier to come by then as it is now, so Meador’s interest in carpentry was stoked by stints building film sets, and he later found more steady work framing houses on Wrightsville Beach until 2009. “That’s when it all dried up. In 2009 I was laid off and I wasn’t sure what to do for a little while, then I opened a carpentry and handyman business called Beach & Barn.” Young Rusty Meador dozes in the back seat of the family car, chin falling to chest as he sleeps for a minute or two before forcing himself awake. It’s vacation, the beach, but vacation doesn’t start until he sees the lights of the Myrtle Beach Pavilion brighten the sky. Soon, he thinks to himself, soon I’ll see the lights and then it’s nothing but sand and waves and vacation. Beach & Barn comes from two memories that inform who Meador is today: escapes from everyday life to his grandmothers’ mountain farm in Virginia and family trips to Myrtle Beach. The beach, the barn, they’re part of him, they instilled a work ethic in him and gave him just as strong a drive when it comes to leisure time. Beach & Barn does that too, but subtly. The logo alone is mysterious — Why is that chicken riding a surfboard? What’s it mean? What is Beach & Barn? — and in that mystery people find their own meaning, which is part of Meador’s master plan when it comes to the brand. He calls it “cogitative marketing,” inspiring people to think and question and identify with a brand on their own terms. “When I started Beach & Barn — the construction business — I spent a lot of time developing the brand. Who did I want to be? What did I want to say? I think everyone has Citizen Kane moments in their life, the moments that really speak to them, and I wanted to speak to two things that I hold important, so Beach & Barn was born. And the logo, well, it’s a rooster on a surfboard, how better to say Beach & Barn than that?” Meador says. Hats, stickers, shirts all adorned with his logo grew

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popular. Clients asked for them, he traded with construction industry reps and fellow pros, he made a new design, it got popular too. He worked and built, constructed and handymanned until one day he remembered what that client said: “Carpentry is hard, why not sell your hats and t-shirts?” “So I called him. He knew I was onto something but he knew he had part of the puzzle too: logistics. He knew warehouses and shipping and how to really grow the business. It was a natural fit.” It wasn’t long before Meador stepped away from the table saw and stepped to the sewing table, and by 2015, he was working Beach & Barn — the apparel and lifestyle brand, not construction — full time. Today things are a little different. The business outgrew a handful of designs (and now has more than 100 color and styles in their shirts alone, not to mention stickers, tumblers, hats and you-name-it), outgrew the house, outgrew its sole employee, and has taken on a life of its own. Beach & Barn doesn’t rely on Meador’s design eye, instead they have a full-time product designer and developer with a Patagonia pedigree (and Patagonia is one of those brands Meador looks 62

North Brunswick Magazine

up to for how they’ve built a brand based on integrity, a solid core of products, and a loyal customer base, all things he wants — and is earning — for Beach & Barn), and with help from his partners, the company is building their wholesale side (look for select designs in Redix soon), launching a sub-brand (Center Console, focused on boating lifestyle), and they have a new cut-and-sew polo coming out. “This new polo we have, the fabric is phenomenal, the design looks sharp, and we went through plenty of prototypes to get it right,” he says. “The polo and our new Agricoastal t-shirt they’re our first premium products. We’re so excited to see the response from our new polo.” The response will doubtless be the same as the one he’s seen in traffic a thousand times. At red light after red light, Meador says he sees the folks in the car behind him looking around, scowling, but then they see the sticker — the rooster riding the surfboard — and a smile breaks across their face. “That smile took them someplace. It stirred up some memory they’d forgotten or some emotion that’s been buried. That’s Beach & Barn.” 


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A Bridge to Safety A new connection between law enforcement training programs at Brunswick Community College benefits students and increases the community’s overall safety. BY ANNESOPHIA RICHARDS

|

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MEGAN DEITZ

A

As the population of Brunswick County grows, so does the community’s need for increased safety and security. For more than two decades, Brunswick County Community College’s Basic Law Enforcement Training (BLET) program has successfully produced highly trained and qualified law enforcement officer candidates. As a way to further meet the needs of local law enforcement agencies, this past year the college added an associate degree program in Criminal Justice Technology. Working together, the programs aim to train and prepare more highly skilled officers to better the community. Now in its second semester, the Criminal Justice (CJ) Technology program gives students not yet old enough to enter the BLET program the chance to obtain a certificate or complete the entire two years of coursework and receive their degree. At the age of 20, graduates can

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BLET cadets Michael Endicott (sitting) and Gundula Love (Kneeling) learn skills that are essential to beginning a career in law enforcement.


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2019 BLET cadets, back row left to right: Billy Wilson, Michael Endicott, Allen Frye, Paul Solomon, Willie McRae, Timothy Shaw, Kaleb Babson. Front row left to right: Travis Murray, Gundula Love, Patrick McGee, Romondo McEachern, Bryan Sutton, Cajuan Marlowe, Gage Sutton, Courtney Milligan, Kevin Reiter, Christian Jackson, Eric Gonzalez.

then transition into the BLET program well prepared and ready for success. “These two programs really compliment and piggyback off one another,” says BLET Director Lieutenant Obbie Blanton. “To help prepare our students, our new two-year Criminal Justice curriculum will give them some experience and background in law enforcement, so that when they go into BLET, they have a deeper understanding of what’s expected of them.” As the majority of law enforcement agencies now require their officers to have completed some form of higher education, the new CJ Technology program offers the county’s law enforcement officers who haven’t yet acquired their associate degree a means to do so. In order to meet the needs of these students, the college offers the majority of its criminal justice courses online, and BLET courses run exclusively on weeknights and weekends, thus allowing students who wish to change careers the ability to work full time and still complete their classes. “It’s the mission of Brunswick County Community College

BLET cadets Michael Endicott and Gage Sutton enact real-life situations they will encounter as officers. Summer 2019

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Hands-on training prepares BLET cadets for real-life situations they will encounter as law enforcement officers. Clockwise from above: Willie McRae and Eric Gonzalez. Christian Jackson, Kevin Reiter. Left to right: Kaleb Babson, Gage Sutton, Instructor Sgt. Greg Gowin, Michael Endicott and Christian Jackson. Kaleb Babson and Gage Sutton. Assistant BLET Director James D. Smith, Criminal Justice Technology Director Lisa Fields and BLET Director Obbie M. Blanton.

to meet the needs of our community, and our community has said there’s a need,” says Director of Public Relations and Marketing London Schmidt. “The Brunswick Sheriff ’s Office has vacancies, and they need qualified, trained individuals who might currently be working during the day because they’re supporting a family. So by offering these online, evening and hybrid classes, we’re working collaboratively to provide highly skilled individuals to fill those roles, which makes us a safer community.” When Blanton took over the BLET program in the beginning of 2018, he and Assistant Director James D. Smith made it their goal to employ more law enforcement officers from the Brunswick County area as instructors. As experts in their field, many current instructors came through the program themselves, and they have now returned to the college with experience gained from working in the community. These officers are able to share real-life knowledge about topics ranging from the use of firearms to 68

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techniques of traffic law enforcement, hazardous materials, juvenile law, drivers training and patrol techniques. “What they teach is what they specialize in, so in that way they give us the intel of what they’re expecting their new officers to learn and know,” says CJ Technology Program Director Lisa Fields. “So what we’re able to offer our students is that personal touch and real life experience side of this.” Clarissa Reece went through the BLET program 10 years ago and has since returned as an instructor. She appreciates how well her instructors prepared her for her career in law enforcement, and she now enjoys the opportunity do the same by inspiring new recruits. “Because I was working full time during the day, the night program allowed me to further my future and my career,” Reese says. “My instructors, all current or prior law enforcement officers, were very knowledgeable in their fields and passionate about their work.” Blanton believes that having a good working relationship


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Sgt. Greg Gowin (center) instructs BLET cadets Michael Endicott (left) and Kaleb Babson (right).

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It’s up to each individual to find their niche, and then when they get out into the field decide if they want to go into law enforcement or corrections or maybe to law school.

with local law enforcement agencies is critical to the success of the BLET and CJ Technology programs. In the fall of 2018 the college partnered with Brunswick County Sheriff ’s Office to provide campus security. The BLET program advisory board is also currently made up exclusively of local law enforcement officers. “Our programs really do feed to and feed off of local law enforcement agency needs,” Fields says. “In this aspect we’re bridging our community to our college to our workforce.” Thanks to the state’s Career and College Promise initiative, local high school students can enter the CJ Technology program and start earning college credits. They then have the option of receiving a certificate or completing the entire

68 hours to obtain their degree. Classes on topics such as juvenile delinquencies, criminal law and substance abuse give students a taste of the different career possibilities available to them in the future. “It’s up to each individual to find their niche, and then when they get out into the field decide if they want to go into law enforcement or corrections or maybe to law school. It’s a growing field and there are all sorts of different avenues,” Fields says. Transitioning into the BLET program after completing the CJ Technology program makes a student more marketable to law enforcement agencies upon graduation. Having a twoyear degree means a candidate is eligible for certification Summer 2019

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Cadet Michael Endicott

BLET Gym/Training Facility

Cadets Gundula Love (standing) and Michael Endicott 72

North Brunswick Magazine

upon passing the state exam, and he or she can then apply for a sworn position with a local law enforcement agency. Students come from neighboring counties such as Pender, Columbus, Bladen and New Hanover, and they are able to complete the program in just less than eight months. Upon graduation, the majority of candidates choose to stay and work right in Brunswick County. “It benefits the community when someone who’s from here comes back to work here, because they know the area and are more familiar with the clientele they’ll come in contact with because of their history in this community,” Fields says. At the end of each program, many top BLET graduates seek employment with the Brunswick County Sheriff ’s Office. First Sergeant Chris Raynor says that his office continues to be pleased with the candidates who join their team from Brunswick Community College. “The quality of the individuals who successfully complete this training has been so impressive that the Brunswick County Sheriff ’s Office routinely displays recruiting efforts in order to adopt the best certified officers from this program,” Raynor says. Blanton and his team believe the new connection between BLET and the CJ Technology program means that Brunswick Community College now has more to offer students than ever before. Working together, the two programs will continue to increase the community’s overall safety by training qualified officers who are well prepared to serve and protect county residents. “Our BLET and CJ Technology programs are both strong, the people here at Brunswick Community College are great, and all the support we’ve received has been amazing,” Blanton says. “We’re continuing to grow, and I don’t see where it’s going to end just yet.” 


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Reimagining Reaves Chapel

Thanks to Cedar Hill/West Bank Heritage Foundation, N.C. Coastal Land Trust and a grant from The Orton Foundation, one of the Cape Fear region’s most historically significant African American structures will be a community center once again. BY ANNESOPHIA RICHARDS PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK STEELMAN

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S All Things Pretty 6 3 6 1 O c ea n H w y E . S te . 5 Wi n n a b ow, N o r t h C a ro l i n a 2 8 47 9 ( 6 78 ) 5 0 2 - 9 8 9 8 î‚Ş

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S

Some of Al Beatty’s fondest memories of growing up in the town of Navassa are the times he spent at the modest white church known as Reaves Chapel. A short walk from his childhood home, Reaves Chapel served as a community place of fellowship, celebration and worship. Each spring, Beatty and other children in town would gather at the church in the afternoons to play, socialize and prepare for their Easter speeches. If someone died in the community, the news spread by the ringing of the church bell. Revival meetings would bring in nearly a hundred people, filling the small structure to its capacity. In honor of the church’s rich history of community traditions and cultural significance, Beatty is now

leading the efforts to preserve the legacy of Reaves Chapel for generations to come. In the antebellum era, rice plantations lined the banks of the Cape Fear River. Slaves known as the Gullah Geechee people had been brought in from coastal Africa to cultivate the land, and most remained living in the area even after the Civil War ended. In the late 1800s, a group of former slaves from Cedar Hill Plantation built Reaves Chapel, which has since become one of the oldest landmarks of Gullah Geechee heritage in southeastern North Carolina and is an integral part of the area’s African American history. The end of the 19th century saw a shift in major transportation mode from the river to inland roads. To

Coastal Land Trust Executive Director Camilla Herlevich, Coastal Land Trust Director of Stewardship and Community Conservation Jesica Blake, Cedar Hill/West Bank Heritage Foundation President Al Beatty and Cedar Hill/West Bank Heritage Foundation Treasurer Henry B. Robbins work together to preserve the legacy of Reaves Chapel.

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keep parishioners from having to travel all the way down to the riverbanks for service, the congregation decided to make the church more accessible by relocating it. “A group of men in the community got together to physically move the church using the resources they had: logs, oxen, mules and horses,” Beatty says. “They picked the church up and rolled it out on a roughly two or three mile journey to its current location on Cedar Hill Road.” The chapel’s new location and name came from Edward Reaves, a formerly enslaved man who donated his land to the congregation. The church served the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) denomination for almost a century. However, dwindling attendance and structural disrepair left the building completely abandoned by 2006. Shortly after, Beatty felt called to lead the efforts to give the chapel new life. “I knew the last people in the community who attended the church, so it was impressed on me to continue the legacy of Reaves Chapel,” he says. “This church is important to me because growing up, it was the church where we did our Easter speeches. On the afternoon of Easter Sunday, the children would have all prepared a few words related to the resurrection of Christ, and we would each go up to the pulpit in front of the crowd and say our speech.” Reaves Chapel also served as an assembly spot during times of

Prior to it’s abandonment in 2006, Reaves Chapel served as a church, events center and concert hall. It was especially important during the segregation era when African Americans were not allowed to gather in many places.

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‘‘

‘‘

...the ringing of the church bell let you know something was going on. I’m hoping that when we cut the ribbon on the restored church,

we will ring t he bell once again.

segregation. African Americans weren’t allowed to gather in many places or attend major events in the area, so the church took on the role of event center and concert hall. “We had noted speakers and entertainers come perform at Reaves Chapel,” Beatty recalls. “Since we didn’t have telephones, the ringing of the church bell let you know something was going on. I’m hoping that when we cut the ribbon on the restored church, we will ring the bell once again, because I’m looking forward to that.” In 2013 Beatty and other community members formally joined forces to help save the church. They formed the Cedar Hill/West Bank Heritage Foundation, then partnered with N.C. Coastal Land Trust and began petitioning the AME Church for release of Reaves Chapel. In March of 2019 the Coastal Land Trust purchased the church with funding

provided by the Orton Family Foundation, an organization devoted to assisting small cities and towns with community planning efforts. “When we learned about the connection of Reaves Chapel to the communities founded by the descendants of enslaved people who worked on the antebellum rice plantations, we were glad to get involved,” says Camilla Herlevich, executive director of the Coastal Land Trust. “Now that the Coastal Land Trust owns Reaves Chapel, our goals are to stabilize and repair it, and then to restore it as a historic and cultural site.” According to Beatty, the first step in preserving the church is to stabilize its foundation and roof. Once the building is structurally sound, the restoration team can begin restoring the inside and outside of the building. In the interim, both the Cedar Hill/West Bank Heritage Foundation and the Coastal Summer 2019

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Land Trust are striving to raise money to fund the restoration efforts. “We’ve partnered with the town of Navassa and are petitioning with the town of Leland to help us with the church,” Beatty says. “We’re going to associate with Leland’s Rice Festival next year, because we are a part of that history since the people who built the church came from rice plantations. We are also in talks with the Historic Wilmington Foundation, who have endorsed our efforts, and we’re going to try to work with them as a true partner to get direction on how to restore the church.” Having been decommissioned from the AME Church, Reaves Chapel will never again be used for traditional worship services. Instead, it will serve as a location for weddings, celebrations and other community events. As it’s one of the oldest churches in southeastern North Carolina, the hope is that Reaves Chapel will soon be listed on the National Register of Historic Places. “With the restoration of this church, we are hoping to have a historical landmark that will be a legacy to the community,” Beatty says. “It’s important that our kids and the generations coming up behind us have an idea of the history concerning the enslaved community from the area.” 

Can You Help Save Reaves Chapel? Donations toward the Reaves Chapel Restoration Fund will help stabilize, repair and restore Reaves Chapel, one of the Cape Fear region’s most historically significant African American buildings. Donate online: coastallandtrust.org/reaves Mail a check: Cedar Hill/West Bank Heritage Foundation, P.O. Box 7253, Navassa, NC 28051 For more information: Coastal Land Trust, (910) 297-0196; Al Beatty, (910) 520-2517

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PEOPLE

Life Changer Hope Harbor Home Shelter Manager Beverly Pigott, now in her 70s, never wants to retire from helping women and children. BY JO ANN MATHEWS PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRENT GALLANT

B

Beverly Pigott isn’t sure when her position evolved from nighttime shelter crisis intervention to shelter manager at Hope Harbor Home. She does remember answering the newspaper ad that ran 30 years ago for someone to answer the phone from 8 pm until 2 am at the agency in Brunswick County that assists victims of domestic abuse. “I had domestic violence [in my marriage], but that didn’t bring me here,” she says from the sunny front room at the shelter. “A job did.” Pigott interlaces her fingers with their manicured nails and tilts her head slightly to the right. This subtle movement accentuates her gentle smile and draws eyes to her large loop earrings. She waits to give answers, never rushing, as if she has to digest the questions first. “I endured every kind of abuse you can think of,” she says

about her 10-year marriage. “I went through hell with him, but I survived it.” She says she has seen thousands of women come through the shelter, each with individual issues. “Some tell me, ‘I’m going back home because I can’t take care of these children. I need his support.’ I tell them, ‘You don’t have to do that. This I know because I did it.’” Pigott helps the women adjust to communal living in the four-bedroom, two-bath shelter. She’s intuitive about their problems and is able to counsel them on a myriad of topics, including hygiene. She says that one lady never combed her hair or cleaned up before coming to breakfast. Another brushed her teeth in the kitchen sink. Another told her that people weren’t sociable. She makes suggestions to get the women to think about how they act and how they can change. Summer 2019

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PHOTO BY JOANN MATHEWS

PEOPLE

Do you need help? Abuse can take many different forms including physical harm, threats and intimidation, emotional abuse and financial withholding and control. If you are suffering from abuse, please get help by calling the Hope Harbor Home 24-Hour Crisis Hotline: (910) 754-5856 or visit hopeharborhome.org. 84

North Brunswick Magazine

Lynn Carlson, executive director of Hope Harbor Home, says that clients often compliment Pigott on being a good listener. “She is incredibly perceptive about people and situations,” she says, adding that clients say Pigott has helped them break free of violent relationships. “If you have an issue, she has a story to relate to it,” says Jessie Holden, children’s advocate at Hope Harbor Home, says. “She’ll tell you like it is. She’s a wealth of knowledge. There’s nothing I can’t ask her.” Pigott grew up in Bolivia, the youngest of five. Her parents farmed tobacco, peanuts and vegetables, but she wasn’t interested in the family business. “Farming just never was my cup of tea,” she says. She wanted to be a lawyer. “I always saw them as being majestic. They are the people that can get things done.” That dream evaporated when she fell in love. She turned 18, graduated from Brunswick County Training School in Southport and married. Three children and 10 years later, the marriage ended. “He didn’t want to be married anymore, so I said, ‘Get a divorce,’” she says. By that time the couple had been to the courthouse a half-dozen times. “I broke his hand one time,” Pigott says. “I told the judge whatever it took to defend myself, this is


PEOPLE

what I’m going to do.” She explains that everyone knows she’s a fighter. “When I was younger, it was physical. I had fights at school.” She held grudges and was hostile, but “hate is a burden,” she says. “You can’t go around hating people and distrusting people. You have to be able to move on.” She prayed to change and forgive others, including her ex-husband. “It took about five years,” she says. “It seemed like one day the sky brightened.” After the divorce, her ex-husband paid alimony and child support, but Pigott knew the time would come when she’d have to support herself. She heard about a job as a custodian at South Brunswick High School. “I said, ‘I can do that.’” She applied and got the job the same day. Her mother assisted with child care, so Pigott felt confident working. Now, more than 40 years later, her son Johnny, 55, has three children, is married to Heather and is a psychology technician at Fort Bragg. Her daughter, Michelle, 50, is married to Wayne Gay and is a school resource officer in Polk County. Her son Sebastian, 45, is married to Tanja, has one son and works at Sunny Point. In her free time, Pigott walks the beach, either at Oak Island or at Atlantic Beach in South Carolina. She loves to read and her favorite book is the Bible. Although not a musician, she listens to Michael Jackson, Quincey Jones, Aretha Franklin, Smokey Robinson and others. Despite her roots in farming, she doesn’t garden. “As long as the Jolly Green Giant and Libby’s and all those people are hanging out on the shelves, that’s my garden,” she says. Pigott retired from the SBHS custodial job in 2004, but stayed on at Hope Harbor Home as the only shelter manager the agency has ever had. She says over the years the morale has remained positive at the shelter, and the physical appearance was updated, including the addition of a chain-link fence and locked gate for security purposes. “We haven’t had any excitement like people trying to get in who don’t belong and abusers tracking us down,” she says and credits law enforcement. “In the past [the shelter] was new to them, but now they have training,” she says. Pigott says she will stay at Hope Harbor Home forever. “I can’t see myself not being able to come here. I’d be lost,” she says. Pigott thought about retiring about 10 years ago, when she was 64. “But I said then, ‘Why would I want to do that? I like what I do. It’s not hard. I like the people, and I always feel like there’s something I can do. There’s something I can say to somebody that maybe will lead them in a different direction.’” 

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We love this town. Thanks, Leland. We love being here to help life go right ™ in a community where people are making a difference every day. Thank you for all you do.

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ACROSS THE COUNTY

Hitting Pay Dirt County Line MX Park in Bolton is making a name for itself in the motocross world. BY MELISSA SLAVEN WARREN

|

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MEGAN DEITZ

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ACROSS THE COUNTY

I

In 2017 Todd Lewis and his wife, Karyn, purchased a motocross track not far from Lake Waccamaw and started a new chapter in their lives. After having managed the Calverton Motocross Training Facility in Long Island, New York, for eight years, they moved to North Carolina and purchased and reestablished County Line MX Park in Bolton, which had been closed by the previous owners for three years. Since its reopening in January of 2018, County Line MX Park has become a one-of-a-kind motocross training facility in the area and an AMA (American Motorcyclist Association) chartered club with multiple former pro trainers on staff. The park is on Green Swamp Road just off Highway 74/76. With American Motorcyclist

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Association sanctioned races on its roster, County Line MX Park is a national class motocross track. Interestingly, Lewis never rode motorcycles. His interest grew unintentionally when the owner of the boat dealership that Lewis worked for asked me him to take on a side project of managing his motocross track. Eventually, the side project became a full-time job, and he and Karyn built the fledgling track into a successful training facility. “I really began to enjoy the atmosphere, watching people ride, even working on the track and running the dozer and tractor,� he says. After eight years, the owner decided to do something else with the land, prompting the Lewis family to reevaluate their opportunities. Having a vested interest in the industry, they


ACROSS THE COUNTY

looked for a track of their own to purchase. That’s when they found County Line. When the sale of their house in Long Island closed on November 30, 2017, they moved to Bolton on December 1. County Line MX Park is a membership club, called the County Line Riders Club. Members pay a minimal daily ride fee to use the park. But it’s much more than a track for daily practice. County Line is an enviable training facility with a turn track that includes 10 left and right turns. There is a separate training track for children who want to learn how to ride. Training includes bike control turns, jumps and safety. “Safety is a priority for us,” Lewis says. County Line MX Park in Bolton is one-of-a-kind motocross training facility and an American Motorcyclist Association chartered club with multiple former pro trainers on staff.

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Todd Lewis (pictured at the track) and his wife, Karyn, opened County Line MX Park after having managed the Calverton Motocross Training Facility in Long Island, New York.

“We’re always vigilant about maintaining the track to keep it safe.” Lessons consist of four-hour classes and week-long clinics during the summer months. The summer clinics feature off- and on-MX bike training from start to finish line, as well as proper form and technique, corner drills, starts and jumps. Clinics are open to all ages, bike sizes and skill levels. Just recently, two of County Line’s young riders were invited to ride in the last Supercross of the season in Las Vegas. “It was a selection process that not only included their riding ability, but their school performance too,” Lewis says. All of the training programs at County Line prepare riders for the real track. This national class motocross track includes approximately two minutes of jumps

ranging from singles to a 135’ quad. There are plenty of turns and whoops and rhythm sections too. At the same time, the track is enjoyable and safe for riders of all levels from 50s to 450s. The track is also outfitted with a high-quality irrigation system to keep conditions ideal. Riders can put their training to the test in County Line’s races, held five or six times a year. In early June they hosted the AMA District 29 Race, with another race coming up on Labor Day of this year. You don’t have to be a rider to enjoy the motocross experience at County Line. “The community is always welcome to come watch the races,” Lewis says. They encourage people to come out and see what the sport is about. Not just for the locals, many of County Line’s members are from the Summer 2019

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ACROSS THE COUNTY

northern states. One of Lewis’s goals was to provide a track where they could host riders from up north during the fall and winter months when it’s too cold to train or practice there. “We have members that come there here from Vermont, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, Canada, and even as far away as France,” Lewis says. No different than with surfing or skate boarding enthusiasts, there’s a sense of solidarity on the track among fellow thrill seekers. That camaraderie also extends off the track with events like a members’ weekly barbecue. “We serve barbecue, burgers and hot dogs to the riders on Thursday evenings

County Line MX Park welcomes riders of all ages and skill levels. Benji Harris, Haven Johnson and Lincoln Snider (top right) hone their skills in a safe, familyfriendly environment.

after practice,” Lewis says. “We offer free water and snacks too.” The park also has some primitive camping spots available for members who want to turn their riding time into a weekend trip. The riders bond over food, laughs, advice and shared experiences. Friendships are formed, which is one of the main reasons the Lewis fell in

love with the industry. “We enjoyed the people,” he says. The Lewises strive to make County Line MX Park a family-friendly environment as well. They take pride in their youth-training programs. Their pro-level trainers will teach children ages 4 and older, and safety is always the emphasis on the track. “After a long day of training, the kids come up to see Miss Karyn for their popsicles and to visit Tiger,” Karyn says. Tiger is their 17-year-old colliemix and park mascot. Giving back to the community is very important to the Lewises. County Line hosts several fundraisers Summer 2019

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throughout the year. Karyn’s father, a former U.S. Marine from Camp Lejeune is ill with Parkinson’s disease. They hosted a Toys for Tots event where a lot of the riders came out from Camp Lejeune to participate. “I wanted to do something for my dad and the kids,” Karyn says. They also host the MXK Kids Riders Club made up of young motocross riders who raise money for St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital. Whether you’ve never been on a motocross bike or you’re a seasoned 94

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rider, County Line MX Park provides both a challenging and safe track. “We have 4-year-old riders to 80-year-old riders,” Lewis says. “It’s open to all different levels of riders.” The Lewises manage every aspect of the park. From driving the tractor around the track flattening ruts and monitoring the sprinkler system to keeping up with the landscaping and ensuring that Tiger is greeting riders as they come to practice, County Line MX Park is a family affair. 

Want to Ride? County Line MX Park 10632 Green Swamp Road S. Bolton (910) 448-3386 countylinemx.com The park is open Wednesdays through Sundays from 10 am to 6 pm. But during the week, it’s best to “call before you haul” because they’re often busy maintaining the track.


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Summer 2019

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BRUNSWICK

NEW HOMES & REAL ESTATE [ 2019-20 EDITION ]

The following is a sample of what’s in our 2019-20 edition of Brunswick New Homes & Real Estate. In addition to getting the publication at area real estate developments and builders, pick up the full copy at bulk locations from our racks this July at the following locations: OCEAN ISLE/SUNSET BEACH/ SHALLOTTE Lowes Foods at Ocean Isle Beach Publix at Ocean Isle Beach Food Lion at Sunset Beach Ingram Planetarium Shallotte Visitor Center Ocean Isle Fishing Center Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce Lowes Foods in Little River Callahan’s at Calabash

LELAND Harris Teeter at Waterford Lowes Foods at Brunswick Forest Port City Java at Waterford Port City Java at Brunswick Forest NHRMC Building at Brunswick Forest HWY 55 at Walmart Cross Creek Commons PT’S Grille North Brunswick Chamber of Commerce SOUTHPORT/OAK ISLAND Lowes Foods Port City Java Downtown Southport (outdoor rack at Margaret Rudd) Southport Visitors Center Southport-Fort Fisher Ferry Food Lion on Oak Island Southport Oak Island Area Chamber of Commerce

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2019-20 BRUNSWICK COUNTY

NEW HOMES MAP Whether you’re relocating to the area or just moving across town, whether you’re upgrading or downsizing or just want a change of scenery, there’s a house for you in northern Brunswick County. We’ve plotted the area’s subdivisions on this map and given you an idea of the price range in each neighborhood. Please keep in mind that the real estate market changes daily; therefore, some of the information in this section could change by the time you read this. Call or visit websites to verify information that is important to you. If you’re in the market for a house in northern Brunswick County, we think you’ll find this guide very helpful. Happy hunting!

01

04

08

Adair Park

Compass Pointe

Hearthstone

• Follow Highway 17 south. Take a left turn into the first entrance into Westgate onto Ocean Gate Plaza. Follow to Westgate Drive and take a left at the stop sign. Go straight after traffic circle and Adair Park will be on your left just off of Angels Drive.

• Located on Highway 74/76 in Leland

• Located on Lanvale Road, about 1 mile off Highway 17 on left

• Approx. 6 miles from downtown Wilmington • Homes from the $200s • Centex.com

• Approx. 9 miles from downtown Wilmington • Lots from the $90s, homes and townhomes from the high $300s

05 Grayson Park • Located off of Highway 17 on Maco Road / Highway 87 N.

02 The Bluffs on the Cape Fear • Follow Highway 74/76 west towards Whiteville. Take the Leland exit onto Mt. Misery Road. Take a right onto Mt. Misery Road and proceed 3 miles. Turn right onto Dogwood. Take your first right into the entrance of The Bluffs on the Cape Fear and proceed to guard gate. • Approx. 15 miles from downtown Wilmington • TheBluffsNC.com • Contact: The Bluffs, (866) 725-8337 • Home sites from the $70s, homes from the high $300s

03

• Approx. 8 miles from downtown Wilmington • Contact: Sales Office, (910) 332-8504

• Located on Highway 17 south • Approx. 6 miles from downtown Wilmington • Contact: Brunswick Forest Realty, (910) 371-2434 • BrunswickForest.com • Home sites from $70s, townhomes from the $300s, homes from the mid $300s

North Brunswick Magazine

• HearthStoneHomesNC.com • Homes from $280s

09 Kincaid Place at Mallory Creek Plantation • L ocated off Highway 133, 4 miles from Highway 17

• Homes from the $200s

• Approx. 8 miles from downtown Wilmington

06

• Homes from $235,900

10

The Grove at Mallory Creek Plantation

Lanvale Forest

• Located off Highway 133, 4 miles from Highway 17

• L ocated on Lanvale Road 1.2 miles off Highway 17

• Approx. 8 miles from downtown Wilmington

• Approx. 8 miles from downtown Wilmington

• MalloryCreekNC.com

• Homes starting from the low $200s

• Homes from the mid $200s

07

11 Lily Pond • Located on Lincoln Road

Hawkeswater at the River

• Approx. 8 miles from downtown Wilmington

• Located on Highway 133 next to Belville Elementary School

• Homes starting from the $200s

• Approx. 2 miles from downtown Wilmington • Homes from $228,900

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• Contact: Lisa Smiraldi (910) 782-2804

• GraysonParkNC.com

• Contact: (910) 332-8501

Brunswick Forest

• Approx. 5 miles from downtown Wilmington


This Brunswick County new development map is NOT to scale and is designed to give readers an approximate idea of where the new home community locations. Prices in real estate can change often. Please check with your real estate professional for the most up-to-date pricing.

12

13

Lincoln Place

Magnolia Greens

• Located on Village Road • Approx. 7 miles from downtown Wilmington

• Located on Highway 17 south just past Waterford, across from Walmart

• Town homes starting from the $160s

• Approx. 5 miles from downtown Wilmington • Single-family homes from $200s, townhomes from $190s, condos from $150s

14 The Pines at Mallory Creek Plantation • Located 3.5 miles from the Leland exit on Highway 133 south • Approx. 6 miles from downtown Wilmington • Contact: Sales Office, (910) 332-8501 • MalloryCreekNC.com • Homes from the $230s

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15

20

25

The Retreat at Mallory Creek

Southview Park

Wedgewood at Lanvale

• Located between Mallory Creek Plantation and Brunswick Forest. 3.5 miles from the Leland exit on Highway 133 south. Take a right onto Mallory Creek Drive. Travel 1.5 miles and community is on the left

• Located on Leland School Road just off Highway 74/76 and Mt. Misery Road

• Located on Lanvale Road

• Approx. 7 miles from downtown Wilmington

• Contact: Stevens Fine Homes, (910) 332-8513

• Homes from the $200s

• WedgewoodNC.com

• Approx. 9 miles from downtown Wilmington • Homes start at $273,900

• Homes from $196,900

21 Sunrise Terrace

16 • Located off River Road SE

• Located off Village Road. From Wilmington, take first Leland exit. Take right onto Village Road and follow about 2.5 miles and neighborhood is located on the left.

• Approx. 3 miles from downtown Wilmington

• Approx. 6 miles from downtown Wilmington

• Homes start in $530s

• Homes from $199,900

RiverBend at Hawkeswater

17

The Forest at Mallory Creek

• Located off Lanvale Road NE. From Highway 17 turn on Lanvale Road NE. Turn left onto Olde Lanvale Road NE. Turn right on W. Highcroft Drive NE. Turn left on Avington Lane.

• Located off Highway 133, 4 miles from Highway 17. Take a right onto Mallory Creek Drive. Travel 1 mile and community is on the left

• Approx. 7 miles from downtown Wilmington

• Homes from $209,900

• Approx. 9 miles from downtown Wilmington

• Homes from $199,900

• Located off Highway 74/76. From Wilmington, take Mt. Misery Road exit off of 74/76. Take a right onto Mt. Misery Road and travel for about 4 miles, and turn left onto Cassadine Court to enter Windermere Estates.

27 Windsor Park • L ocated on Highway 74/76 behind the Industrial Park, just past the second Leland exit on your right • Approx. 10 miles from downtown Wilmington

23

Sessoms Way

Tyler’s Cove at Mallory Creek Plantation

• Located on Village Road. From Wilmington, take first Leland exit. Take right onto Village Road and follow about 2 miles and neighborhood is located on the left.

• Located off Highway 133, 4 miles from Highway 17

• Homes from the $160s

Windemere

• Homes starting at $190,900

SeaBrooke

• Approx. 5 miles from downtown Wilmington

26

• Approx. 6 miles from downtown Wilmington

22

18

• Approx. 5 miles from downtown Wilmington

• Single-family homes from $140s

• Approx. 8 miles from downtown Wilmington • Contact: Kelly Sloop, (910) 617-3081 • Homes from $219,900

19

24

Shoreline at Westgate • Located in Westgate off Highway 17 behind Walmart Shopping Center • Approx. 5 miles from downtown Wilmington • Brick Villas from the $170s

Waterford of the Carolinas • Located on Highway 17 south across from Walmart • Approx. 5 miles from downtown Wilmington • T russtBuilderGroup.com/Waterford • Homesites start from the $70s; homes from $200s

For assistance with new homes or resales in any of these communities please feel free to contact the supporters of this section: Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage, (910) 371-1181

Karen Schwartz, (910) 431-9395

James Diaz, (910) 524-2562

Sean Skutnik, (910) 279-1016

Michelle Gurrera, (910) 233-5556

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TOP 10 BUILDERS IN BRUNSWICK COUNTY, NC FOR 2018 From January 1, 2018 - December 31, 2018 Ranked by total number of permits pulled

Rank

Number of permits pulled

Builder Name and Contact Information

D.R. Horton

1121 Military Cutoff Road Suite C-322, Wilmington, NC 28405 (910) 821-8553 • DRHorton.com President: Brian Gardner

258

Bill Clark Homes

127 Racine Drive, Suite 201, Wilmington, NC 28403 (910) 350-1744 • BillClarkHomes.com President: Bill Clark

148

Logan Homes

60 Gregory Road, Suite 1, Belville, NC 28451 (800) 761-4707 • LoganHomes.com President: D Logan

144

Trusst Builder Group

481 Olde Waterford Way #100, Leland, NC 28451 (910) 371-0304 • TrusstBuilderGroup.com President: Shawn Horton

114

True Homes

5051 Main Street Unit #13, Shallotte, NC 28470 (910) 754-6314 TributeHomesUSA.com

89

06

Stevens Fine Homes

2922 Orville Wright Way, Suite 110, Wilmington, NC 28405 (910) 794-8699 • StevensFineHomes.com President: Craig Stevens

75

07

Kent Homes & AWK Corporation

1721 Allens Lane, Suite 102, Wilmington, NC 28403 (877) 256-5313 • KentHomes.net President: Dan Kent

75

Pyramid Homes

5022 Wrightsville Avenue, Wilmington, NC 29403 (910) 392-7201 • BuildPyramid.com President: Chris Stephens

53

Southern Homebuilders

108 N. Kerr Avenue, # K3, Wilmington, NC 28405 (910) 799-0192 • SouthernHomeBuildersInc.com President: Leon Skinner

42

Hagood Homes

1908 Eastwood Rd # 328, Wilmington, NC 28403 (910) 256-8284 • HagoodHomes.com President: Jim Kenny

35

01 02 03 04 05

08 09 10

Source: Stats compiled by M.O.R.E (Market Opportunity Research Enterprises®) and are based on permits pulled between January 1, 2018- December 31, 2018.

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TOP 10 TEAMS & TOP 10 INDIVIDUAL AGENTS IN THE LELAND AREA FOR 2018

Composed from zip codes 28451 & 28479 | January 1, 2018 - December 31, 2018 Ranked by total sales volume

RANK

TEAM NAME

AFFILIATION

SALES VOLUME

TOP 10 TEAMS (Comprised of multiple agents on a team) 1

Karen S Schwartz

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage

$25,412,690

2

Buddy Blake

RE/MAX Essential

$13,774,078

3

Michelle D Gurrera

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage

$6,720,072

4

Tom C Gale

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage

$5,513,020

5

Jeff Domin Realty Group

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage-Midtown

$4,361,700

6

Keith M Beatty

Intracoastal Realty Corp

$3,685,940

7

Team KBT Realty

Keller Williams Realty

$3,422,168

8

Sean N McGovern

Keller Williams Realty

$3,293,840

9

Regina M Drury

Regina Drury Real Estate Group

$3,131,600

10

Shane Register Team

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage -Midtown

$2,867,066

TOP 10 INDIVIDUAL AGENTS (Comprised of agent individuals) 1

James M Diaz

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage - Leland

2

Columbus Creekmore

Carolina Plantations RE- Leland

$9,545,350

3

Sean Skutnik

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage - Leland

$5,528,836

4

Eric F Sabourin

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage

$4,876,885

5

Eden M Gillam

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage - Leland

$4,362,700

6

Michelle C Taylor

EXP Realty

$3,715,090

7

Nolan D Payne

Carolina Plantations RE- Leland

$3,410,181

8

Melissa J Borrelli

Carolina Plantations RE- Leland

$3,408,990

9

Kelly M Sloop

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage - Midtown

$3,123,493

10

Brenda F Prather

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage - Leland

$2,986,137

Source: Statistics compiled from Brunswick County and Cape Fear Realtors MLS

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$14,482,598


Home James Realty T R U S T

O U R

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TOP 20 OVERALL SALES IN THE LELAND AREA FOR 2018

Composed from zip codes 28451 & 28479 | January 1, 2018 - December 31, 2018 Ranked by total sales volume

RANK

TEAM NAME

AFFILIATION

SALES VOLUME

1

Jerry L Helms

Brunswick Forest Realty, LLC

$89,997,015

2

Karen S Schwartz

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage-Leland

$25,412,690

3

Kathy L Mottolo

D.R. Horton, Inc.

$18,623,921

4

James M Diaz

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage-Leland

$15,821,248

5

Buddy Blake

RE/MAX Essential

$13,774,078

6

Steve J Triola

Compass Pointe Realty, LLC

$12,187,040

7

Shawn C. Horton

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage-Leland

$11,461,778

8

Aaron D Dickey

D.R. Horton, Inc.

$10,623,034

9

Billy A Saffo

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage-Leland

$9,859,276

10

Columbus Creekmore

Carolina Plantations RE- Leland

$9,545,350

11

Ahmad Noura

D.R. Horton, Inc.

$7,204,510

12

Jennie Stevens Team

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage

$7,118,184

13

Michelle D Gurrera

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage

$6,720,072

14

Melanie C Gardner

Compass Pointe Realty, LLC

$6,317,551

15

Sean Skutnik

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage - Leland

$5,528,836

16

Tom C Gale

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage

$5,513,020

17

Eric F Sabourin

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage

$4,876,885

18

Eden M Gillam

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage - Leland

$4,362,700

19

Jeff Domin Realty Group

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage-Midtown

$4,361,700

20

Michelle C Taylor

EXP Realty

$3,715,090

Source: Statistics compiled from Brunswick County and Cape Fear Realtors MLS

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Trusst Builder Group

Now Making House Calls Now building in Brunswick Forest, Compass Pointe, Whiskey Branch, Hearthstone, Magnolia Greens, Palmetto Creek, RiverLights, St. James Plantation, Waterford, Winding River and your neighborhood.

TrusstBuilderGroup.com 910.371.0304

Summer 2019

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TOP 25 REGIONAL SALES FOR 2018

Composed from the Cape Fear Region | January 1, 2018 - December 31, 2018 Ranked by total sales volume

RANK

TEAM NAME

AFFILIATION

1

Keith M Beatty

Intracoastal Realty Corp

$95,008,557

2

Jerry L Helms

Brunswick Forest Realty

$89,997,015

3

Vance B Young

Intracoastal Realty Corp

$85,328,425

4

Team KBT Realty

Keller Williams Realty

$45,472,314

5

Hank Troscianiec

Keller Williams Realty-Brunswick County

$42,685,125

6

Carla D Lewis

Intracoastal Realty Corp

$41,533,525

7

Buzzy M Northern

Intracoastal Realty Corp

$38,232,074

8

Kim S Anderson

Art Skipper Realty Inc.

$44,977,403

9

Buddy Blake

RE/MAX Essential

$33,715,350

10

Jessica Edwards Team

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage

$33,489,319

11

Tom C Gale

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage

$33,362,187

12

Michelle L Clark

Intracoastal Realty Corp

$32,927,282

13

Frances Warner Real Estate

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage

$32,443,851

14

Cronick & Associates

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage

$32,353,649

15

The Cameron Team

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage

$31,465,490

16

Shane Register Team

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage

$31,284,048

17

Shawn C Horton

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage-Leland

$29,784,700

18

The Cheek Team

Keller Williams Realty-Brunswick County

$29,355,800

19

Team Hardee Hunt and Williams

Hardee Hunt & Williams

$29,661,750

20

Nick Phillips

Landmark Sotheby’s International Realty

$29,616,864

21

Wade G Jurney

WJH LLC

$27,905,205

22

The Rising Tide Team

Intracoastal Realty Corp

$26,844,895

23

Aimee Freeman

Keller Williams Realty

$26,715,599

24

Robin L Campbell

Clark Family Realty

$26,709,588

25

Karen S Schwartz

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage-Leland

$25,886,590

Source: Statistics compiled from Brunswick County and Cape Fear Realtors MLS

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SALES VOLUME


TOP 10

REASONS TO LIST WITH AIMEE & CO.

PRICE Homeowners who sell their homes on their own typically generate $46,000 less than homesowners who work with a Realtor*. ACCESS TO BUYERS

TIME

Through the Multiple Listing Service, professional contacts, and their own database of prospects, Realtors can help you reach the widest range of customers.

Realtors have the time and expertise to handle open houses, showings, inspections, and the dozens of other tasks that would take you away from your work and regular routine.

MARKETING EXPERTISE

EXPERIENCE HANDLING PAPERWORK

Realtors know the best way to advertise to attract buyers, plus they can use the marketing muscle of their brokerage to promote your home.

Buying or selling a home involves reams of paperwork that can be hard to understand. Realtors thrive in this world.

KNOWLEDGE OF NEIGHBORHOOD

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Realtors know local communities and can help you find a replacement home in the nicest neighborhood and with the best schools.

Realtors can evaluate your home and suggest improvements to get your maximum value, and they’re skilled at handling showings to generate a positive response.

ADVICE AFTER CLOSING

NEGOTIATION SKILLS With years of barganing experience and expert understanding of the market, Realtors can help you close the deal at the price and terms you want.

An experienced Realtor will continue to support you as questions pop up after the deal is done.

KNOWLEDGE OF SERVICE PROVIDERS

Realtors can refer you to their network of top-quality lenders, lawyers, inspectors and repair people to make sure you get the best result in every stage of your deal.

AimeeAndCo.com (910) 317-0828


Paul Whitehead – Allstate Insurance

N

o job is too big or too small for Paul Whitehead. Beginning with humble roots of working in the fast-food industry, Whitehead worked his way into management. From there he continued perfecting his managerial skills as a life insurance agent, followed by becoming the general manger of a building company. About three years ago, he returned to the insurance industry and joined Leland’s Allstate office. Whitehead became an agent because he wanted to help protect what’s important to others. His Allstate team specializes in auto, homeowners, motorcycle and life insurance. “At my agency, my staff and I strive to provide great service to anyone who walks in,” he says. “I find great pleasure in assisting residents and welcoming new faces to our bustling community.” Whitehead says he is is glad to be part of a healthy and quickly expanding population. After residing in Wilmington for 17 years, he noticed the growth and burgeoning business opportunities available in

Paul Whitehead: Allstate Insurance 1107 New Pointe Boulevard, Suite 8, Leland; (910) 338-5686; agents.allstate.com/usa/nc/leland

North Brunswick Magazine

Business Profile BY SANDI GRIGG

woodland, which provides visitors a chance to hike, camp, bike the trails, fish and take in the beautiful flora and animals. The produce market features locally grown fruits, jams and vegetables, much of which comes from their land. The seafood market has a large variety of locally caught fresh seafood and farm-fresh eggs gathered from their coops. Every day Danny wakes up before daybreak, goes to the gym and shines his boots like the good U.S. Marine he was and will always be. But he can’t wait to return to The Creek. The Grahams are proud members of their local chamber of commerce, Got To Be NC and the N.C. Agritourism Association. Livingston Creek Farmers Harvest is open from 9 am to 6 pm daily and is closed on Christmas Day.

PHOTO BY LAURA GLANTZ

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BY SANDI GRIGG

Leland. In 2007 he moved into Jefferson Landing, where he still lives with his beagle/jack Russell terrier. He takes pride in his neighborhood and is grateful the community offers so many amenities. A believer of maintaining a healthy work-play balance, he enjoys playing golf, listening to live music, watching sports and soaking up the sun by the pool or beach. Whitehead visits his son, Christopher, and daughterin-law, Emily, who live in North Carolina as well as welcomes them to visit here a few times a year. They also travel to Cape Cod, Whitehead’s hometown, once a year together to visit family and friends. However, he says, “I am always eager to return to Brunswick because this is now where I call home.” He looks forward to helping others live their best lives here in Brunswick County.

Livingston Creek Farmers Harvest, LLC nyone who dreams of getting out of the rat race and living off the land will appreciate Danny and Yolanda Graham’s story. Owners of Livingston Creek Farmers Harvest, the Grahams live in Freeman, North Carolina, a small farming community outside of Wilmington. They not only grow their own fruits and vegetables but also operate a produce market, seafood market, craft shop and more. Danny was born and raised in Freeman and has always had an intense love for soil and plants. A certified master gardener, he dreamed of growing and selling his own vegetables one day. After leaving a career working for a large corporation, he noticed an Intracoastal Realty sign on 2.5 acres of abandoned property on his way home from church in the fall of 2013. After rushing a good faith offer for the acreage that included a century-old farmhouse, Danny and Yolanda were able to purchase the property. They were originally told the farmhouse would need

Business Profile

to be torn down, but Danny and Yolanda saw the home’s character and felt it needed to be restored. They named it “Tressie’s” after Danny’s mother. Danny began selling vegetables from his truck and trailer on the land while also building the produce market and restrooms. In addition to bringing life back to the farmhouse, they also built a seafood market, a craft shop and pens for animals. Now, Livingston Creek Farmers Harvest sits on more than 100 acres of untouched

Livingston Creek Farmers Harvest, LLC 49 Harvest Circle, Freeman (910) 655-4333; livingstoncreek.com


Mulch & More

Business Profile BY MELISSA SLAVEN WARREN

A

PHOTOS BY LAURA GLANTZ

beautiful landscape is much more than the design and aesthetics that create curb-appeal envy. The essence of any landscape begins and ends with the quality and selection of the plants and hardscape materials that go into it. Mulch & More in Winnabow is a family-owned, one-stop shop that has everything a homeowner or pro could need when it comes to landscape supplies. “No one else has everything in one spot like we do,” says owner Jason Gaver. “We’ve got what our clients are looking for.” Their product offerings focus on variety. With mulch, stone, pine straw, soil, sand, flagstone, stepping stones, edging, garden walls, a full line of Belgard pavers and accessories, irrigation products and EZflow drainage systems, Mulch & More can supply the necessities for just about any project. Though they are a wholesale and resale business for landscape supplies, they have built a network of landscapers and design professionals who they are proud to recommend for installation and design services. If a client has no idea how much product to order for their landscape plan, Mulch & More will come out and measure, at no cost, to determine the right amount. They also deliver six days a week. Mulch & More already had a successful track record of 15 years when Gaver purchased it two years ago. After serving nine years in the U.S. Navy testing combat ships, Gaver and his wife, Tiffany, made the decision to leave the Washington, D.C., area and move to Brunswick County, where Tiffany grew up. Gaver says the idea to buy Mulch & More was a case of being in the right place at the right time. In the past two years, Gaver has doubled Mulch & More’s footprint. According to him, the business has grown 100 percent year over year. They’ve increased the products carried by two-thirds and added an on-site plant nursery. They became an authorized Belgard dealer which greatly expanded and enhanced the different type of decorative stone products they could offer. “And we carry every type of mulch you can imagine,” Gaver says. “We have everything that the big box stores carry, plus bagged products.” Gaver attributes the success of Mulch & More to the friendly attitude and unparalleled knowledge of his staff. “We know people can go anywhere,” he says, so he and his staff strive to deliver a consistent, individualized customer experience. Whether it’s a homeowner who needs a few paver stones or a professional client looking for irrigation and drainage systems for a commercial project, they’ve got it covered. “We want people to know that we’re locally owned,” Gaver says. “I enjoy growing the business and becoming more ingrained in the community. Mulch & More believes in being good stewards. They donate products to local food banks and schools that are creating community gardens. When Gaver isn’t serving his clients or his country — he’s in the Air Force Reserves — he and his wife and their two-yearold daughter, Eleanor Grace, spend time together at the beach. “It’s why we’re here,” he says. Mulch & More 39 Edgewood Lane NE, Winnabow (910) 253-7663; mulchandmorenc.com

Summer 2019

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4311 Old Ocean Hwy Bolivia, NC 28422 Lisa Witthar, MSW, LCSW William Joshua Johnson, MSN, FNP-C Ann H. Lynch, PA-C

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North Brunswick Magazine


Coastal Spine Institute

Leland | Belville | Navassa | Northwest | Sandy Creek | Winnabow | Maco | Phoenix | Town Creek

BY SANDI GRIGG Dr. Kevin Cahill

D

r. Kevin Cahill founded the Coastal Spine Institute in Brunswick County this year after practicing in Charlotte for five years with one of the largest neurosurgery groups in the country. After completing his neurosurgical training at Harvard, Dr. Cahill successfully completed a post-residency fellowship in minimally invasive and complex spine surgery at the University of Miami. He is the only spine fellowship trained neurosurgeon in the region and is an expert in minimally invasive spine surgery and outpatient spine surgery. He has even been an innovator in the field of spine surgery by helping develop less-invasive solutions for complex spine problems and is the inventor of a novel surgical power tool used nationwide for spine surgery. At the Coastal Spine Institute, Dr. Cahill is committed to developing a more personalized experience for spine sugery patients. He believes that a specialized spine surgery practice will offer the highest quality spine surgical care to the patients of Brunswick County and

Business Profile

surrounding communities. “We are 100 percent committed to delivering highquality spine surgery,” he says. The Coastal Spine Institute is patient focused with an emphasis on personalized care. “We strive to deliver the most personalized and highly specialized care,” Dr. Cahill says. The patients and staff know each other by name. The staff knows that spine surgery is a serious decision and usually a treatment of last resort. Dr. Cahill recognizes that spine surgery is very much an art, and that there are many different

options and techniques available for patients, and he sees firsthand the power of his work. “We love seeing patients get better after spine surgery,” Dr. Cahill says. When he’s not working, Dr. Cahill enjoys open-water swim races can often be found swimming in the ocean and Intracoastal Waterway in the early mornings. Coastal Spine Institute, PC 610 Ocean Highway W., Supply (910) 356-6100; coastalspineinstitute.com

Enhancing Enhancing Enhancing the the the quality quality quality ofoflife oflife lifefor forfor all all all residents residents residents Enhancing the quality life for all residents by leading and advancing the economic development of our area and promoting business activity

. . . that's our mission! Business Expo Leland Under the Lights Car Show Bikes, Boots & BBQ Veteran’s Day Breakfast Quarterly Mail Out to All Members Monthly Business After Hours

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Business Profile

Tropical Smoothie Cafe

BY SANDI GRIGG

f you have been to Tropical Smoothie Cafe in Waterford, then you have most likely run into Chief Tropical Officer Brandon Korman or his wife, Deena. Although they own three locations (Midtown Wilmington, Porters Neck and Leland), they are very hands on with their brand, employees and customers. Brandon says, “Our passion and commitment to our team members and our customers sets us apart.” What began as a single location on the beach in Destin, Florida, in 1997 has grown to be a lifestyle brand for people looking for healthy alternatives to fast food. Now Tropical Smoothie serves great-tasting, nutritious food and smoothies at more than 750 locations in the United States. “We inspire a healthy lifestyle by serving amazing food and smoothies with a bit of tropical fun,” Brandon says. As part of the franchise approach, customers can grab a lei as they enter the doors and are greeted with vibrant tropical colors, a laidback atmosphere and music that instantly transports them to the tropics. Tropical Smoothie Cafe offers breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks and caters for groups of 10 to more than 300. You can even order through their mobile app or online. Fundraising and volunteer work is important to Brandon, Deena and the staff. They feel it is important to make a difference within the local community. Brandon says his philosophy is to “Stay focused, hungry, humble and willing to listen.” Tropical Smoothie Cafe 143 Poole Road, Unit B, Belville (910) 765-1144; tropicalsmoothie.com

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PHOTOS BY LAURA GLANTZ

I


SNIPPETS

PHOTOS BY WILL PAGE PHOTOGRAPHY

Cape Fear CREW Announces 2019 Awards of Excellence Winners

Cape Fear CREW, part of the national network of Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW), recently honored individuals and businesses with their 2019 Awards of Excellence. The first in the region to focus on the rapidly growing commercial real estate sector, the awards recognize excellence and leadership in commercial real estate in the Cape Fear Region. The event was held at the Wilmington Convention Center and was led by Cape Fear CREW President Connie Ronner of SunTrust.

THE 2019 AWARDS FINALISTS ARE: Economic & Community Enhancement: South Front Placemaking: Ogden Market Place Best Interior: The Nir Family YMCA Creative Marketing: The Downtown Trolley Career Advancement for Women: The YWCA Lower Cape Impact Award Winner: Beth Pancoe Beth Quinn Excellence Award: Dana Pellizzari Cape Fear CREW extends its appreciation to Mayor Bill Saffo of the City of Wilmington for his remarks and for announcing the winners at the event, to 2019 CREW Network President Elect Christine Gorham of Caddis for her opening remarks and to their panel of judges: Steve Yost, president of North Carolina’s Southeast Regional Economic Development Partnership; Dana Fisher, executive director at North Brunswick Chamber of Commerce; Susi Hamilton, secretary for the N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources; and Erin Sterling Lewis, AIA principal in situ studio immediate past president AIANC. Summer 2019

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SNIPPETS

Papi’s Chicken Opens in Leland bothers were eager to open the doors to the community following the ribbon cutting. The menu offers quarter, half and whole charbroiled rotisserie chickens, each served with a choice of two of their 15 sides. Papi’s also serves aguas frescas such as horchata and herbal lemonade and three beers on draft. For dessert, the menu offers tres leches cake, alfajores and dulce de leche turnovers.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

Located at 1108 New Pointe Boulevard in Leland’s Westgate community, Papi’s Chicken is a Peruvian-style rotisserie chicken restaurant with a fast-casual concept that seats 110 guests. Owners Alex, Eddie and Oscar Zaragoza held its official ribbon cutting on March 5, with North Brunswick Chamber of Commerce ambassadors and employees along with family and friends. The Zaragoza

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North Brunswick Magazine


SNIPPETS

North Brunswick Chamber of Commerce’s Kids Expo The inaugural Kids Expo, North Brunswick Chamber of Commerce’s new event geared towards the next generation of entrepreneurs and business owners, took place on May 4 at the Belville River Park. The event offered kids ages 8 to 17 an opportunity to create, develop and market a product or service that they are passionate about. Adults were not allowed to help sell or market the child’s products or service. There was no application fee, and groups or individuals were able to participate. Participants were grouped into four age categories based on the age of the oldest participant in any group of entrants.

KIDS EXPO PRIZE WINNERS WERE:  Most Original Business Idea

Ages 7 to 10 Lana Cable - Rainbowls Ages 11 to 12 Adison Milligan - Skye Scraps Ages 13 to 17 Porter Reynolds - Creative Elements  Highest Business Potential

Ages 7 to 10 Jack Kupinski - Jack’s Prints Ages 11 to 12 Sydney Beliveau - Koala Krafts Ages 13 to 17 Ava Williams and Katelyn Bennion K & A Essential Products  Best/Most Creative Booth Presentation

Ages 11 to 12 McKenny Reynolds - Port City Sweets Ages 13 to 17 years Chloe Scott and Jordan Sturtz Reverie Design Co.

CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

Ages 7 to 10 Lana Cable - Rainbowls

Summer 2019

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SNIPPETS

CommWell Health Ribbon Cutting and Open House Ceremony

PHOTOS BY CHRIS STEVENSON

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

ComWell Health held a ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house at its new facility in Bolivia on April 16. Guests enjoyed tours of the facility, which is located at 4811 Old Ocean Highway. ComWell currently serves six counties with its 16 locations and has been in Bolivia for about 10 years. The new facility will offer medical and behavioral health services. Their program for the uninsured offers patients the ability to pay based on their household income. ComWell Health believes their excellence tomorrow is always greater than their excellence today.

LA Classic Charity Golf Tournament With a shotgun start, the 9th Annual LA Classic Charity Golf Tournament kicked off at noon on April 25. Hosted by Leland Area Rotary, the event was held at Cape Fear National at Brunswick Forest, and the weather was perfect. More than 30 teams registered to play, and proceeds from this event were donated to Coins for Alzheimer’s Research (CART) and supported local club 118

North Brunswick Magazine

services, including food distribution programs for North Brunswick’s hungry children. The tournament offered three competitive flights, which included ladies only, seniors only and others. Complimentary beverages were offered all day long, and following the tournament there was a pig pickin’ with sides and dessert. Leland Area Rotary thanks sponsors First Citizens

Wealth Management, Josh London – State Farm, Signature Wealth Strategies, Walmart, Swell Vision Center, Parkway of Wilmington, Meineke Car Care Center, Carolina Shores Car Wash, Keller Williams, Bloomin’ Crazy Nursery and Carolina Plantations Real Estate as well as all the donors, players and volunteers who made this event successful for another year.


Celebrating

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FACES & PLACES

Port City Shakedown at Brunswick Forest

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Jane and Ed Kosteva

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Kathy Tiberia, Marilyn Angello, Joe Tiberia, Joe Angello

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PHOTOGRAPHY: BILL RITENOUR

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Lisa Myers, Suzie Shepard, Dorothy Dambakly

Jane and Randy Coleman

Port City Shakedown band

Eoin Smyth, Alice Renales, Gael Lynch, Lucy Smyth, Sally Barnes


FACES & PLACES

North Brunswick Chamber of Commerce Block Party Business After Hours

Bill Hadesty & Frank Williams

Grace Young & Tyler Wittkofsky

Susan Cruse & Martha Jackson

Taylor Hawke & Jennifer Jordan

Chris Stevenson & Suzanne West

Joseph DeLuca & Diana Reiman

Luke Hoffman, Brian Boone & Ed Boone

Whitney Leonard & Marcell Hatten

Dana Fisher, Edwin Pagan & Marie Felix

Iris Boone, Emily Miller & Donnell Ainsworth

Paul Whitehead & Sandra Wall

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WHAT’S HAPPENED

NBHS JROTC Wins in Regional Competition

New Turf for High School Football Fields During the February 19 Brunswick County Schools Board of Education Operations Committee Meeting, board members unanimously approved moving forward with replacing all three high school football fields with artificial turf. The funding comes from the Capital Reserve Fund, which is designated for major construction projects. Once completed, numerous girls’ and boys’ sports programs will be able to use the same high-quality field during their respective sports seasons. The fields are expected to be complete in time for the fall sports season.

Another Successful Prom Closet

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

The North Brunswick High School JROTC Rifle Team placed second in the JROTC Regional Service Championship held in Anniston, Alabama. Twenty-six teams from across the country took part in the two-day competition. Several of the team members scored a personal best. Justin Asbury was the number one shooter out of 111 shooters, with a score of 553 out of 600. Jennifer Buenrostro finished seventh with a score of 541. On day two, Katherine Kelly shot her personal best with a score of 539. The cadets who participated include Justin Asbury, Katherine Kelly, Jennifer Buenrostro, Ashley Buenrostro and Christian Flores with 1st SG, U.S. Army (Ret) George Williams.

are paid in full by funding from the state, private donors and the Brunswick County Schools Board of Education.

The annual Prom Closet held at South Brunswick High School is an overwhelmingly successful community event. It took place on March 21 in the SBHS choir room. Prom Closet is for all girls in the county in search of a prom or 8th grade formal dress, shoes and accessories. There is no charge for anything.

Wilmington Boys Choir Expands Age Range Brunswick County Students Headed to Governor’s School Five local students have been named as Governor’s School State Finalists for 2019 and will be attending the residency program this summer in the subject areas selected to the colleges listed by their names: 1) E mma Babson (ECHS) in Choral Music at Salem College in Winston-Salem 2) B rayden Williams (SBHS) in Natural Science at Meredith College in Raleigh 3) I sleigh Sharpe (WBHS) in Dance at Meredith College in Raleigh 4) M ason Hon (WBHS) in Natural Science at Salem College in Winston-Salem 5) B enicio Costales (WBJHS) in Social Science at Salem College in Winston-Salem The students will be attending the Governor’s School Program from June 16 to July 24 with a mid-session break from July 4 to 7. N.C. Governor’s School is considered the most respected leadership, academic and artistic residency program for talented high-school students. All tuition costs

Wilmington Boys Choir is now accepting an expanded age range to include boys ages 7 to 17. This officially took effect beginning March 19. Wilmington Boys Choir rehearses on Tuesday evenings at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church (16th & Market streets) and performs four to six times per year. The choir sings many styles of music: Anglican choral music written specifically for boy choirs, classical, folk tunes, music from various religions, pop standards, etc. The boys come from all religious backgrounds or no religion at all. Tuition is free, but they ask each family to donate any amount to their annual fund.

Discussion of Overcrowding in Brunswick County Schools During recent meetings with parents and community members to show a proposal to relieve overcrowding at Belville Elementary, concerns about transportation and traffic were brought up, along with the requests to be more involved in the process of potential changes to school lines. The proposal to shift about 150 students in the Mallory Creek area from the Belville district to the Town Creek district came after Brunswick County Schools staff studied current and projected student households and transportation Summer 2019

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WHAT’S HAPPENED

routes that would be safe and secure for daily use to and from schools. Their findings: • Mallory Creek had 145 Belville Elementary students • Waterford had 33 Belville Elementary students • Magnolia Greens had 32 Belville Elementary students • Brunswick Forest had 27 Town Creek Elementary students

• One elementary proposal included moving about 150 students from the Belville District to Town Creek and about 40 students from Town Creek to Bolivia Elementary. • The second elementary proposal did not include the +/- 40 student reassignment to Bolivia Elementary, and board members approved moving forward with it to show at the two informational meetings. • Both proposals decreased Belville overcrowding as soon as the 2019-20 school year. Rising 5th graders and their siblings would be able to stay at Belville as long as they could find transportation. The proposal involving Bolivia Elementary was rejected because the students would pass Town Creek Elementary to get to Bolivia Elementary. Because of the legitimate concerns and valid questions regarding student reassignment for the upcoming school year, the school board has directed the superintendent and his staff to continue work on developing boundaries for the new Town Creek Middle School, which is slated to open August of 2020 and to further study the impact of redistricting for elementary schools. There will be no student reassignment for the 2019-20 school year. Additionally, the need for a new school was solidified by parent and community input during the meetings. The administration is continuing to look for ways to address issues of school overcrowding and tremendous residential growth in the north while being fiscally responsible and minimizing disruptions to learning. While there is no definitive timeline for public review and input for any new redistricting proposals at this moment, BCS plans to provide ample time and notification for public meetings to ease the concern that there is lack of transparency throughout the process.

SECU Foundation Awards $10,000 Scholarship to Jordyn Semone Rascoe State Employees’ Credit Union (SECU) members via the 124

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CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

They concluded that there were not enough students in Waterford, Magnolia Greens and Brunswick Forest to have a significant impact on overcrowding at Belville Elementary, so staff focused on the large student population in Mallory Creek. The School Board members looked at two proposals on the elementary school level and one for middle schools.

SECU Foundation recently presented a $10,000, fouryear college scholarship to Jordyn Semone Rascoe, a senior at North Brunswick High School. The scholarship was awarded for study at UNC-Charlotte, part of the 16-campus University of North Carolina System. Funded by Credit Union Members, the $10,000 People Helping People Scholarship recognizes the recipient’s community involvement, leadership, character, integrity and scholastic achievement. The funds are provided for tuition and university-approved educational expenses over eight consecutive semesters.

Summer Meals Program Offered The Summer Meals Program for kids and teens is offered in Brunswick County to any child who needs a meal during the summer vacation. The program is open to all children ages 18 and younger. The program will be held at the following locations: South Brunswick, North Brunswick, West Brunswick:

June 3 to August 8, Monday through Thursday. 8:15 to 9:15 am breakfast. 11:15 am to 12:30 pm lunch Belville Elementary, Bolivia Elementary:

June 3 to August 8, Monday through Thursday. 8 to 9 am breakfast. 11:15 am to 12:30 pm lunch Cedar Grove Middle, Leland Middle, South Brunswick Middle, Shallotte Middle, Waccamaw School:

June 3 to June 7, Monday through Thursday. 8:30 to 9:45 am breakfast. 12 to 12:45 pm lunch Jessie Mae Monroe Elementary, Virginia Williamson Elementary:

July 8 to July 25, Monday through Thursday. 8:30 to 9:15 am breakfast. 12 to 12:45 pm lunch There is no cost or enrollment paperwork. Should the dates or locations change, updates will be posted at bcswan.net as well as on the Brunswick County Schools social media outlets.

Art League of Leland Meeting The Art League of Leland (ALL) invited artists and art enthusiasts to its April 18 meeting for an opportunity to network with other ALL members and to share a piece of artwork during informal round-table sessions. Guests were welcome to participate in the meet, greet and share sessions.


WHAT’S HAPPENED

Attendees included beginning artists, experienced artists and those who wanted to learn more about art and the local art scene; it was an opportunity to get to know fellow members and network with other like-minded individuals. Michael Williams, curator of the Black on Black Project exhibition at the Leland Cultural Arts Center, discussed the featured exhibition. Curating exhibitions, events and programs aimed at encouraging dialogue between all members of the community, the Black on Black Project creates space for the community to try to understand the voices of those who have not been heard. It believes that artists possess the kind of empathy that can transform communities.

chance for the little girls to feel magical and spend quality time with their male family member, mentor or role model, whether that is her father, grandad, uncle, older brother or friend. The mentors step up, participating in games and dancing and even having their face painted to match their princess. The Little Princess Ball would not be possible without support from partners including Brunswick County Parks and Recreation and Brunswick Senior Resources. More than 35 volunteers including CIS and Brunswick County Parks and Recreation staff, families and friends worked hard to make sure the event was a success.

Brunswick County 4-H launches TeenCORE Club

Charter Day School Wins Big at Science Olympiad

Belville’s Annual Founders Day This year’s Belville’s Founders Day took place in conjunction with North Brunswick Chamber of Commerce’s inaugural Kids Expo. This year the charity recipient was North Brunswick County Animal Services Medical Division, with proceeds from the raffle helping fund medical services for animals at the shelter. The celebration took place at the Brunswick Riverwalk Park with vendors, food, crafts and music.

Little Princess Ball The annual Little Princess Ball sponsored by Communities In Schools (CIS) and Brunswick County Parks and Recreation had another magical year. Each February the Little Princess Ball is held for girls in kindergarten through fifth grade accompanied by an adult male role model. Little princesses came dressed in their prettiest dresses, ball gowns and favorite princess costumes. Little girls in sparkly shoes, princess slippers with tiaras and bright smiling faces filled the Brunswick Center in Southport and the Brunswick Center at Stone Chimney Place in Supply. It was a special afternoon filled with dancing, balloons, food, face painting, games, and memories to last a lifetime. Hundreds of girls and their male role models danced, laughed and made memories. Refreshments were provided, and every girl took home their very own tiara with streamers. The Little Princess Ball is a

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

For the eighth year Charter Day School competed in the Regional Science Olympiad held at The University of North Carolina at Wilmington. Charter Day School students Ava Bazonski and Stephanie Guto won gold medals for finishing first in the Science Olympiad JV “Battery Buggy” category. Charter Day School scored top ten rankings in 14 separate events. Charter Day School is one of four public charter schools managed by The Roger Bacon Academy, Inc., founded in 1999 by education pioneer Baker Mitchell.

Brunswick County 4-H has launched 4-H TeenCORE. The core elements of growing future leaders are to get them involved in the community, show them different opportunities and teach them basic life skills. TeenCORE specifically aims to give Brunswick County teenagers the skills and experiences to be college or career ready. The principles of TeenCORE include: Community: Youth need to have the opportunity to connect

with and learn from local leaders and business owners. Opportunity: Provide youth the with opportunities to explore

different career and/or college paths. Ready: Provide youth the resources and skills to be college or career ready. Engaged: Our future citizens need to be engaged and involved

in their local communities. TeenCORE encourages youth to take an active leadership role in their community and in their own professional lives. The first TeenCORE meeting was attending a Leadership Lecture Series event at UNCW to hear Derreck Kayongo, a Ugandan refugee and found of the Global Soap Project, share his story and presentation called Harnessing Your Power to Create Change. He encouraged the audience to find a way to make a positive difference in their small corner of the world. Another

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North Brunswick Magazine

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WHAT’S HAPPENED

TeenCORE meeting was a field trip to a Shelton Herb Farm located in Leland. On this trip Margaret Shelton showed the teens around her farm and shared her experience as an entrepreneur and tips for those interested in in managing their own business. She also expressed the importance of networking and making contacts in your field of interest.

Applications to participate in the 2019–20 Leadership Brunswick County program will be available in late July.

Catherine Kennedy Home Foundation Awards Grant to Good Shepherd Center

Seven Graduate from Leadership Brunswick County

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Velva B. Jenkins of Velva Jenkins Consulting & Associate, LLC, gave an inspiring keynote address during the 2018–19 Leadership Brunswick County Graduation Ceremony. Her message focused on the importance of listening and how effective leaders use this necessary skill to reach their goals. Leadership Brunswick County is a program sponsored by Brunswick Community College, North Brunswick Chamber of Commerce Southport Oak Island Chamber of CommerceWelcome Center and Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce to develop corps of informed, committed and qualified individuals capable of providing dynamic leadership for Brunswick County. It is designed to identify highly motivated, emerging leaders and educate them about the needs of our community as well as the dynamics of social and economic changes. To graduate from Leadership Brunswick County, participants were required to attend an orientation retreat, a minimum of six sessions from the eight sessions held between October and April, attend the All County Chamber Business Networking After Hours Hosted by Brunswick Community College and three additional chamber or Community College functions. They were also divided into three groups and required to work together to complete a project in Brunswick County. The 2018–19 Leadership Brunswick County graduates are: Nancy Ashmore, Novant Health Orthopedic and Spine; Benjamin Frazier, The State Port Pilot; Mariah Hayes, CresCom Bank; Eric Holloman, Brunswick Community College; Nicholas J. Leger, Atlantic Coast Law Firm; April Scott, Brunswick Community College Small Business Center; and Elizabeth Wassum, Brunswick Community College.

Catherine Kennedy Home Foundation awarded Good Shepherd Center $15,000 at an awards ceremony on April 30. The grant will be used to support food and shelter programs for the region’s senior citizens. The funds will be used to provide supportive services such as healthy meals and food, transportation, case management and an individualized plan to return to housing. Previous grants from the foundation have supported hunger and nutrition programs as well as health and wellness initiatives for Good Shepherd’s elderly guests. Catherine Kennedy Home Foundation was created with the intent of supporting, through charitable grants, those qualified nonprofit charitable organizations or groups engaged in activities meeting the needs and enriching the lives of the elderly in southeastern North Carolina by providing physical, social, and spiritual services.

BEMC Announces College Scholarship Winners Each year Brunswick Electric Membership Corporation (BEMC) awards two $5,000 scholarships to graduating seniors: one from Brunswick County and one from the Columbus County area. Recipients for 2019 are Luke A. Conner from North Brunswick High School, son of Kevin and Andrea Conner of Leland, and Elizabeth G. Blosser from South Columbus High School, daughter of John and Sherry Blosser of Nakina. This popular scholarship program garnered 37 qualified applicants from all area high schools. Luke and Elizabeth were selected based on a combination of academic achievement, participation in community and school activities, SAT scores, letters of reference and a 1,500-word essay on the topic of cooperation among cooperatives.

BEMC Awards Grants to Local Nonprofits Forty projects have been selected from a field of more than 70 applicants to receive funding from the Community Grant program at Brunswick Electric Membership Corporation (BEMC). Grants totaling $47,000 will go to projects to be implemented in both Brunswick and Columbus counties. Now in its 17th year, BEMC’s Community Grants program awards up to $2,500 to groups that provide family service programs, civic and community programs, cultural and arts programs, emergency services, and community development activities. All funding is the direct result of items sold at the co-op’s equipment auction held at its annual membership meeting each September.

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ADVERTISERS INDEX Advertiser

Phone# Page#

Advertiser

Phone# Page#

4ever24fit..........................................................................................910-399-4760 126

Intracoastal Realty Corporation............................................910-256-4503 19

AA Self Storage............................................................................ 910-408-1600 50

J & K Home Furnishings............................................................ 843-249-1882

Aesthetic Dentistry........................................................................910-371-5965 21

Josh London — State Farm Insurance................................910-383-1303 86

Aimee & Co — Keller Williams..............................................910-506-3049 109

Legacy Homes by Bill Clark.......................................................910-363-1682 26

Airlie Gardens................................................................................ 910-798-7700 82

Leland Ace Hardware..................................................................910-383-6688 73

American Mini Storage............................................................. 910-383-6500 66

Leland Christian Academy.......................................................910-371-0688 40

Art Catering & Events.................................................................910-755-6642 112

Leland Veterinary Hospital...................................................... 910-371-3440 14

ATMC.......................................................................................................844-755-1814 60

Livingston Creek Farms.............................................................910-655-4333

Austin Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery....................................910-769-1605 76

Local’s Tavern...................................................................................910-769-1289 60

B2 Home Inspections...................................................................910-378-1950 102

Luxe Home Interiors Waterford...........................................910-371-0464 73

Bianchi Brickyard Supply...........................................................910-454-4445 90

Markraft Cabinets........................................................................ 910-793-0202 102

Bill Clark Homes.............................................................................. 910-350-1744 27

McNeil & Co. Interior Design.................................................. 910-799-7994 IBC

BlueWave Dentistry.......................................................................910-383-2615

42 & 43

McPherson’s Acme General..................................................910-655-4006 85

Boys & Girls Homes of NC..........................................................877-211-5322 128

Move with McKinley Properties, LLC / Nest Realty....910-467-2056 35

Brodee Dogs.......................................................................................910-523-5121 66

Mr. Appliance.......................................................................................910-796-1118 40

Brunswick County Dept. of Social Services......................910-253-2112 95

Mulch & More...................................................................................910-253-7663

Brunswick Electric Membership Corporation.............800-842-5871 9

New Hanover Regional Medical Center.......................... 910-342-3400 BC

Brunswick Forest............................................................................910-371-2434 4 Brunswick Forest Veterinary Hospital...............................910-777-2107 95

NHRMC Physician Group — New Hanover Medical Group.................................................. 910-254-1033 32

Brunswick Organizing Solutions...........................................910-477-3768 70

Niche. Décor & Gifts.....................................................................910-769-8839 90

CAMS.....................................................................................................877-672-2267 63

North Brunswick Chamber of Commerce..................... 910-383-0553 113

Capeside Animal Hospital.........................................................910-383-2100 48

North Brunswick Chiropractic ................................................910-371-1200 92

Carolinas Oral and Facial Surgery.........................................910-762-2618 92

Novant Health...................................................................................910-754-5988 11

Charlie Graingers — Leland.....................................................910-399-7722 55

Paul Whitehead — Allstate........................................................910-338-5686

Cherubini Orthodontics............................................................... 910-371-2323 73

PC Solutions.......................................................................................910-371-5999 70

Club Pilates........................................................................................910-725-6190 12

Pinnacle Storage ...........................................................................910-408-1394 22

Coastal Dance Academy........................................................... 910-833-8308 48

Port City Java ..................................................................................910-383-2429 50

Coastal Insurance...........................................................................910-754-4326 70

P.T.’s Grille.........................................................................................910-399-6808 95

Coastal Integrative Health......................................................... 910-408-1778 15

Purple Onion.....................................................................................910-755-6071 112

Coastal Spine Institute............................................................... 910-356-6100

55, 113

Raymond James Financial Solutions, Inc......................... 910-371-0366 14

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage................................. 910-371-1181 17

Rhodes Law Offices, PLLC....................................................... 910-383-3610 40

CommWell Health..........................................................................877-935-5255 112

RJB Tax Associates, LLC...........................................................910-338-3001 122

Complete Dental Leland..............................................................910-663-1223 5

Robert G. Merz, CPA, P.C...........................................................910-383-6644 50

Computer Warriors......................................................................910-399-3797 76

Sandalwood Shoppes.................................................................910-408-1800 122

Cucalorus Festival....................................................................................................... 92

Sandpiper Pediatrics...................................................................910-207-0777 12

Curley Implants & General Dentistry.................................910-463-2267 IFC

Sean Skutnik, Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage....910-279-1016 44

Darby Home Inspection.............................................................. 910-777-3232 119

Seaside Wellness of Shallotte................................................910-754-2273 95

Dead Crow Comedy......................................................................910-399-1492 55

Seidokan Karate..............................................................................910-616-7470 86

Domin & Schwartz Real Estate Group

Select Bank & Trust........................................................................910-371-3041 66

Coldwell Banker Sea Coast Advantage............................910-202-3638 101

Shuckin’ Shack Oyster Bar.........................................................910-221-5522 63

Dwelling Place Interiors...............................................................910-859-1165 82

Smithfield’s Chicken N Bar-B-Q............................................ 910-371-6900 39

Elevate...................................................................................................910-434-6815 80

Splish Splash Dog Wash.............................................................910-399-3426 48

EmergeOrtho...............................................................................800-800-3305

6&7

Swell Vision Center......................................................................... 910-408-1116 128

Family Dog Naturals....................................................................910-859-7405 49

Sweyer Property Management.............................................910-256-3031 119

Farm Bureau Insurance.................................................................. 910-371-2111 80

The Bluffs..........................................................................................866-383-2820 96

First Bank............................................................................................910-383-3955 30

The Winds......................................................................................... 800-334-3581 126

Four Seasons Dry Cleaners......................................................910-859-8394 82

Tina Lee Massage Therapist & Health Coach.................910-233-5615 119

Franklin Rouse - State Farm Insurance..............................910-371-5446 86

Town Creek Trading Post....................................................... 678-502-9898 76

Ganey Byrd Dunn Insurance Group.......................................910-371-1988 63

Tropical Smoothie Café...............................................................910-765-1144 114

Go Store It............................................................................................ 910-371-2331 85

Troy Williamson — On Q Financial........................................910-262-2613 86

Harrington Village Apartments.............................................910-408-1644 3

Trusst Builder Group..................................................................910-371-0304 107

Holmes Security Systems..........................................................910-793-4181 80

Turf Medic...........................................................................................910-769-2818 122

Home James Realty.................................................................... 910-524-2562 105

UPS Store............................................................................................ 910-383-1401 44

Hwy 55 Burgers Shakes and Fries........................................910-371-2707 128

Wilmington Health.........................................................................910-371-0404 44

28 & 29

48, 110

13, 111

40, 110

Wine & Design.................................................................................910-399-7874 60

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CAPTURE THE MOMENT

PHOTO CAPTURED BY CHANNING HATCHER

Have you captured the moment? If so, email your photos to capture@northbrunswickmagazine.com. If we choose your photo to be published on this page, you will win $25. 130

North Brunswick Magazine


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At NHRMC and NHRMC Physician Group, we’re leading our community to outstanding health by looking deeper and working harder to find innovative ways to deliver great care. We’re bringing health screenings to area neighborhoods, offering free exercise and nutrition programs, and volunteering with community partners throughout our region. And we’re just getting started. Join us at NHRMC.org. Together, we can make healthier happen.


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