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SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019 | NATIVE MAX MAGAZINE 1


HerStory Boutique & Gallery by Gwen www.HerStory.com 2 NATIVE MAX MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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Contents September/October 2019

Welcome to the Issue 003

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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BEHIND THE ISSUE

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WELCOME TO THE ISSUE

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MASTHEAD

check out what’s in this month’s issue see what it took to create the issue welcome message to the readers who’s all on our team

The Edge

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READY FOR FALL

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THE WEEKENDER

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THE MOMENT: ACCESSORIES

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STYLE WITH A STATEMENT

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RUNWAY RECAP

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ALL EYES ON: MIXED BLOOD CLUB

ribbon skirt, turtle necks, hats and graphic tees–what’s currently on our wishlist for Fall Diné photographer and NATIVE MAX contributor Kelly Bedoni brings us another look book for the weekend we rounded up a list of accessories and jewelry of the moment from some of our favorite designers and artists it’s time to invest in a new hoodie and t-shirt that’ll make your season more stylish featuring a mix of both veteran fashion designers and newcomers alike, this year’s SWAIA’s Haute Couture Fashion Show was certainly one to remember. The NATIVE MAX team was in attendance at the highlyanticipated fashion show in this issue, we have our eyes on Mixed Blood Club, a Métis-owned brand that serves up beautifully beaded jewelry and denim jackets

On the Cover 038

SIVAN ALYRA ROSE IS COMING FOR HER SPOT

a complete newcomer to Hollywood, she nailed her first gig and with that, made history becoming the first Native American to star in a leading role in a television series and shattered stereotypes along the way. And for Sivan, that was just the start

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ALL ABOUT REZ DOGS

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FALL INTO HAUTE COUTURE STYLE

Native American artist Chaz John’s latest exhibit is certainly unique and one to attend; it’s all about rez dogs. The NATIVE MAX team checks out the gallery opening and reception where we interviewed the artist about his newest installment of his REZ DOGS series the NATIVE MAX team traveled to Santa Fe, New Mexico and collaborated with SWAIA & Haute Couture Fashion Show for a high fashion editorial featuring indigenous designers and models


Behind the Issue

LEFT: Fashion designer Korina Emmerich getting her pieces ready for the Haute Couture editorial photoshoot. BELOW: Model Peshawn Bread getting her hair styled by Salon Cedar team.

Shooting the Mag This issue was caulk full of photoshoots! From Denver, CO to Santa Fe, our team members coordinated, directed and photographed photoshoots for the Fashion issue. The first photoshoot was with actress of “Chambers”, Sivan Alyra Rose, in Denver, CO. Acoma Pueblo designer Loren Aragon customdesigned and made a gown just for Sivan, in which the design fit Sivan’s personal gothic style. The location of the shoot was War Memorial Rose

Garden in Littleton, CO. Although it started raining (surprise!), it fit well with the theme of the shoot. The next photoshoot was in collaboration with SWAIA’s Haute Couture Fashion Show and was located in Santa Fe, NM. The location for prep, hair and makeup was made possible with the help of Shelby House who graciousy donated their space to our team. We shot around the space in various areas, including neighboring clothing store WMV Visvim.

Check out more BTS photos from the cover shoot online at NATIVEMAX.COM! RIGHT: Sivan on location at the shoot, which took place at War Memorial Rose Park in Littleton, CO.

ABOVE & RIGHT: Sivan Alyra Rose getting her makeup done by MUA Tryst Ellen.

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Shop Native Max Mags, Merch & More nativemax.com/shop nativemax.com

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Welcome to the Issue

We featured a list of our favorite designers and artists who create our favorite jewelry and accessories of the moment.

For this issue, we featured actress, model and artist Sivan Alyra Rose on the cover, who is wearing a custom ACONAV gown.

NATIVE MAX contributor and photographer Kelly Bedoni did a photoshoot at IAIA Museum of Contemporary Arts in Santa Fe, NM.

Welcome to the Issue!

W

elcome to the Fashion issue of Native Max Magazine! Of course, you can expect our style section The Edge full of excellent content! First up, we’re so happy to have partnered up with Diné-owned, Denver-based Badwinds Studio on our fall trend report stories: Ready for Fall and Style with a Statement. We also rounded up a list of accessories and jewelry of the moment by some of our favorite designers and artists for The Moment: Accessories. And we share our runway recap of this year’s SWAIA’s Haute Couture Fashion Show, including photos of our favorite looks on the runway.

During our team’s trip to Santa Fe, NM, we stopped by Native artist Chaz John’s exhibit “REZ DOGS II” and opening reception. And coordinated an haute couture fashion editorial photoshoot and had the opportunity to capture photos throughout the small city’s swankiest spots and shops. Lastly, the highlight of our issue is Sivan Alyra Rose gracing our cover. A complete newcomer to Hollywood, she nailed her first gig and with that, made history becoming the first Native American to star in a leading role in a television series and shattered stereotypes along the way. And for Sivan, that was just the start.

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PROMOTION

KELLY HOLMES Founder @kellycamilleholmes Executive Assistant Tatiana Ybarra EDITORIAL Managing Editor Jacqueline Lina Brixey Staff Writer Rhonda “Tree” Mangan Staff Writer Johnnie Morris Staff Writer Kelly Bedoni CREATIVE Director of Photography Zoe Friday Web Director Celeste Terry Staff Photographer Viki Eagle

Copyright Native Max & Other Media Ventures All rights reserved. All material in Native Max Magazine is wholly copyright and reproduction without the the written permission of the Publisher is strictly forbidden. Neither this publication nor its contents constitute an explicit endorsement by Native Max of the products or services mentioned in advertising or editorial content. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure accuracy, Native Max shall not have any liability for errors or omissions. We've done our best to acknowledge all photographers. In some instances photos have been provided to us by those who appear editorially and we have their permission in each case to use the images. We apologize if anything appears incorrectly. It will be a genuine mistake. Please let us know and we can give you a mention in the next issue.

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The Edge

Ready for Fall Ribbon skirt, turtle necks, hats and graphic tees–what’s currently on our wishlist for Fall.

PLUS: READY FOR FALL THE WEEKENDER THE MOMENT: ACCESSORIES

Ribbon skirt, Glamyr; $150; herstorybygwen. com Hat, sweater, shoes, socks & belt, model’s own

STYLE WITH A STATEMENT RUNWAY RECAP ALL EYES ON MIXED BLOOD CLUB nativemax.com

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The Edge

Model: Zenetta Zepeda (Diné & Sicangu Lakota) Earrings, Glamyr; $65; herstorybygwen.com

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The Edge

On Stolen Land V-neck Tee, Badwinds Studios; $20; www.redbubble. com/people/jnelson

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The Edge

Recognize Indigenous, Badwinds Studios, $20; www.redbubble.com/ people/jnelson Purse, HerStory by Gwen, prices vary; www.herstorybygwen. com

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The Edge

The Weekender Diné photographer and NATIVE MAX contributor Kelly Bedoni brings us another look book for the weekend. PHOTOGRAPHY: KELLY BEDONI STYLING: KELLY BEDONI & KINSALE HUESTON

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The Edge

T-shirt: Indigenous Goddess Gang Silver leather belt: Maya Stewart Leather bracelets: Maya Stewart Denim bag: Maya Stewart Model: Kinsale Hueston (Diné)

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The Edge

T-shirt: Indigenous Goddess Gang Black/bronze Grid Top: The Fife Collection Leather bracelets: Maya Stewart Leather bag: Maya Stewart

Shoot Location: IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts in Santa Fe, NM

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The Edge

THE MOMENT:

We rounded up a list of accessories and jewelry of the moment by some of our favorite Native designers and artists.

Kotah Bear As newlyweds, enrolled members of the Diné (Navajo) tribe, Kotah (Tábąąhá - Water’s Edge Clan) and Missy (Hashtł’ishnii - Mud Clan) often traveled from their home in Alpine, Utah to visit their family and friends on the Navajo reservation. Surrounded by beautiful and authentic works of art created by tribal members, Kotah and Missy saw a need to showcase and support the handiwork of Native American artisans. This need was particularly apparent when shopping online and through social media. They decided to empty their bank account to purchase as much jewelry as possible. They named

their company Kotah Bear, after Kotah’s childhood nickname, and never looked back! Currently, they work closely with artisans primarily from the Navajo and Pueblo tribes to bring authentic, handmade Native American jewelry and other goods to the attention of their Instagram followers [@kotah. bear]. Kotah and Missy say “We feel so appreciative that we can share gorgeous handcrafted items from our culture and help support the livelihood of living Native American artisans. Axhé’hee’ (thank you) to the talented artisans and axhé’hee’ (thank you) to our customers.”

PHOTOS COURTESY OF KOTAH BEAR

Turquoise rings, prices vary; kotahbear.com

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Turquoise beauty cuff, $650; kotahbear.com

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The Edge

Molina Jo Parker Learning beading from her mother, Molina Jo Parker (Oglala Lakota) comes from five generations of Lakota artists who’ve inspired her to continue their family tradition. Part of that inspiration also comes from listening to music. Each piece has a song or album associated with its creation. Molina primarily works with size 13 Czech glass beads, elk hide, high quality crystals and met-

als. In a time where many beadwork artists are using acrylic gems and rhinestone banding, she feels her unique work stands apart in quality of materials and workmanship while maintaining the integrity of her creative expression.

Beaded earrings, prices vary; https://squareup.com/store/ molinas-lakota-beadwork

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MOLINA JO PARKER

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The Edge

DinĂŠ Metalworks Jeff DeMent is a DinĂŠ jewelry designer and metalsmith living in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He spent 16 years in the military performing combat and anti-terrorism operations, before being injured in the line of duty. After being medically discharged from the military in 2014 he started working with turquoise and silver, learning traditional tufa casting, to reconnect with his culture and find himself. For Jeff, life has come full circle, from innocent childhood to military combat, death, destruction and violence, and now an opportunity to bring beauty and a sense of peace back into the world through traditional Navajo Silversmithing. DeMent holding his latest creation: traditionally Tufa-casted bead necklace made from seven-and-ahalf ounces of sterling silver and one ounce of 18K gold, with 3D-designed, 3D-printed, molded and lost wax casted bead caps, finished with a handmade and fabricated chain, and a Tufa-casted adjustable length clasp. $8,450.00; dinemetalworks. com 18 NATIVE MAX MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

PHOTO COURTESY OF JEFF DEMENT

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The Edge

House of Howes Sarah Agaton Howes is an Anishinaabe artist, teacher, designer, and community organizer from Fond du Lac Nation in Minnesota. She is widely known for her moccasins, beadwork, and regalia classes connecting community through art. As an Eighth Generation Inspired Natives collaborator, Sarah brings together the Ojibwe timeless tradition with contemporary design to make heirloom usable art. Gifts Upon the Water Vessel Tote, $120; houseofhowes. com

PHOTO: HOUSEOFHOWES.COM

Willie Lightning Ridge purse, $420; kanaine.com

Kanaine Sydelle Harrison (Cayuse, Walla Walla & Yakama) is a mom, partner, student and maker of fine goods and apparel. Harrison creates designs inspired by the wild western lifestyle

she grew up with and the street style that she loves. Each piece is sourced, cut, crafted, packaged and shipped from Sydelle’s home studio in the Willamette Valley of Oregon.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF KANAINE

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The Edge

Style with a Statement

It’s time to invest in a new hoodie and t-shirt that’ll make your season more stylish.

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The Edge

Model: Jared Abe (Diné) Settler, Please Slim Fit Tee, Badwinds Studios, $15; www.redbubble.com/people/ jnelson

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The Edge

Print Hoodie, Herstory by Gwen, $29.99; www.herstorybygwen.com

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The Edge

Featuring a mix of both veteran fashion designers and newcomers alike, this year’s SWAIA’s Haute Couture Fashion Show was certainly one to remember. The NATIVE MAX team was in attendance at the highlyanticipated fashion show. PHOTOGRAPHY: KELLY BEDONI

Runway Recap

BY: KELLY HOLMES

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The Edge

Catherine Blackburn Jewelry designer Catherine Blackburn (Dene & English River First Nation) was one of a few Canadian First Nations designers who showcased in the Haute Couture Fashion Show at Santa Fe Indian Market. She showcased her newest collection “New Age Warriors” on the runway.

See more of Catherine Blackburn at www.catherineblackburn.com.

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The Edge

Decontie & Brown Based in Maine, Decontie & Brown is a jewelry and fashion studio led by married duo Donna Decontie Brown (Penobscot/Algonquin) and Jason Brown (Penobscot). At the Haute Couture Fashion Show, their latest looks presented beautiful and trendsetting designs incorporated with Native American influence. One show-stopping look of Decontie & Brown’s was the red fire-y look donned by two-spirit performance artist and educator Geo Soctomah Neptune.

See more of Decontie & Brown at www.decontiebrown.com.

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The Edge

Delina White Native American apparel designer and beadwork artist Delina White (Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe) is a mixed media artist who loves to incorporate delicate lines and forms that her Anishinaabe ancestors began innovating in the 1600s. At this year’s Haute Couture Fashion Show, she showcased new pieces such as her signature contemporary ribbon skirts, floral-print frocks and unique earrings made of bark.

See more of Delina White at www.iamanishinaabe.com.

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The Edge

Korina Emmerich EMME, a NY-based womenswear and accessory brand by designer Korina Emmerich, was a highlight of the fashion show. Her designs featured her colorful work which is known to reflect her indigenous heritage stemming from the Coast Salish Territorybased Puyallup tribe. Emmerich’s showcase also featured jewelry by Gwich’in designer Tania Larsson. Our summarization of EMME’s showcase? Major winter-wear inspo.

See more of Korina Emmerich at www.emmerichny.com. See more of Tania Larsson at www.tanialarsson.com. nativemax.com

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The Edge

Lesley Hampton Anishinaabe and Mohawk fashion designer Lesley Hampton debuted her Spring/Summer 2020 collection, entitled The Preface, at the fashion show. The collection is dedicated to the memory of all missing and murdered MĂŠtis, First Nations and Inuit women, girls and 2SLGBTQQIA people. The Preface featured pieces in bright colors and romantic cuts.

See more of Lesley Hampton at www.lesleyhampton.com.

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The Edge

Margaret Roach Wheeler Artist, sculptor and designer Margaret Roach Wheeler (Choctaw & Chickasaw) is an awardwinning weaver who balances fashion and art. Her showcase at Haute Couture Fashion show featured warm, unique textiles and designs.

See more of Margaret Roach Wheeler at www.margaretroachwheeler.com.

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The Edge

Pamela Baker Fashion designer Pamela Baker (Kwaguilth & Sqaumish) was another First Nations designer to come from Canada to showcase at Haute Couture Fashion Show. Baker’s lineup featured capes, coats and dresses with Haida designs and sheer fabric.

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The Edge

Patricia Michaels Multi-talented and well-known fashion designer and artist Patricia Michaels (Taos Pueblo) is known for her haute couture, jewelry, wall art and accessories. A local favorite, Michaels’ showcase at the fashion show certainly left the audience in awe (and in tears); not only did Michaels’ designs close the show, she ended the fashion show with a performance art piece dedicated to Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Children.

See more of Patricia Michaels at www.patricia-michaels.com.

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The Edge

Sho Sho Esquiro Haute couture fashion designer Sho Sho Esquiro (Kaska Cree & Dene) is well-known for her meticulous attention to detail and mixing of materials such as carp leather, seal skin, lynx fur, floral beadwork, fabric, furs and shells. A veteran fashion designer of fashion shows, Esquiro’s 6-looks-showcase consisted of fierce frocks and bold coats.

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The Edge

Shy Natives Up and coming lingerie brand Shy Natives, founded by sisters Jordan and Madison Craig (Northern Cheyenne), made their runway debut and kicked off their collection at the Haute Couture Fashion Show. Some of the pieces they showcased consisted of bra and panty sets, one-pieces, sheer skirts, t-shirt dresses and a canvas tote.

See more of Shy Natives at www.instagram.com/shynatives.

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The Edge

All Eyes on:

Mixed Blood Club For this issue, we have our eyes on Mixed Blood Club, a Métis-owned brand that serves up beautifully beaded jewelry and denim jackets. 34 NATIVE MAX MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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The Edge

Rose Hoops, $105 CAD; mixedbloodclub.com

Rose Gold Triangle Dusters, $105 CAD; mixedbloodclub. com

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The Edge

Mixed Blood Club finds the delicate balance between honoring ancestral traditions and creating modern and relevant limited edition pieces. From creating jewelry to vintage beaded denim, Mixed Blood Club provides collectors with the opportunity not only invest in pieces for their wardrobes but also to invest in the preservation, revitalization, and evolution of Métis beadwork. Mixed Blood Club’s beadwork artist Julia Caron

Vander Meer is a descendant of the Red River Métis. Her ancestors fought in the Northwest Resistance; she grew up with stories of resistance and resilience. She spent her undergrad at Emily Carr University and the following decade developing a distinct contemporary Métis aesthetic that eventually led to the creation of Mixed Blood Club. She is an artist, mother, and wife.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF MIXED BLOOD CLUB

Beaded Vintage Denim Jacket, $385 CAD; mixedbloodclub. com

Rose Gold Circular Dusters, $105 CAD; mixedbloodclub. com

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On the Cover

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A complete newcomer to Hollywood, she nailed her first gig and with that, made history becoming the first Native American to star in a leading role in a television series and shattered stereotypes along the way. And for Sivan, that was just the start.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ZOE FRIDAY

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CUSTOM DRESS BY ACONAV

MAKEUP BY TRYST ELLEN

HAIR BY JUANA TORIVIO

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On the Cover

ivan Alyra Rose in a word is prodigy. Anything she does is with brilliance; she secured the leading role of Sasha Yazzie in “Chambers” as a newcomer to Hollywood, and her talent and craft certainly spill off the screen as she recently organized her first art exhibit in Los Angeles. Raised in the San Carlos Apache reservation–her favorite spot in the desert–in southwestern Arizona by her mother and grandmother, Sivan credits her rough childhood for her compassion and confidence she exudes. “My roots are there, and I’m very proud of that,” she says. “I have a deep love for my identity and community.” Her journey to acting is a story she loves because it’s all still so new. The response from fans for “Chambers” has been genuine praise. It also demonstrated the immense talent Sivan had as she was a newcomer who held her own and solidified her passion for acting. Her first taste of the craft was when she starred in a short student horror film “The Entrada,” filmed by Sac & Fox filmmaker Mark Lewis, back when she attended college at IAIA in Santa Fe, NM. “I played a mean gallery curator that was so unlike me, but I found so much satisfaction in creating a character,” she explains. Sometime later, after relocating and living in Los Angeles for a couple of months, Sivan decided to pursue acting further. To Sivan, Los Angeles is not a comfortable place to live, and the entertainment industry is not a comfortable place to be. “There’s a lot of scars and hurt here because of its fierce nature. My path is not like anyone else, and no one’s path is like mine, but I love that a community full of love and support has grown from the hard times and young indigenous talent is being recognized all around us, and it’s a beautiful thing.” Sivan’s first gig in LA was American Film Institute short film “Running Shadow”. Then, she auditioned for “Chambers,” an American supernatural horror web television series created by Leah Rachel that was set to air on streaming service Netflix. After she approached Sarah Eagle Heart, the executive director of Natives in Philanthropy, to be her manager, Sivan auditioned for the lead role of Sasha Yazzie in “Chambers.” “I’m grateful my stars aligned to allow me the opportunity of a role like ‘Chambers’” Sivan auditioned because of the importance of who Sasha was to her was too great of an opportunity to pass up. Sivan auditioned once and didn’t get the callback. But it wasn’t until two days before the callback date that the casting director called her saying they changed their minds and wanted Sivan to come back in. “My head exploded; my heart stopped. I was so excited!” Sivan had just landed the role of Sasha Yazzie in “Chambers” and was about to make history. Now Sivan is at a point where she’s unstoppable as she can accomplish goals she’s never thought possible before. “I find a lot of humility that now when I say I want to have an art gallery, a runway, or an exotic vacation, that those are real thoughts. I couldn’t dream like that when I was younger.” She continues, “I only hope to continue to blaze down my path and do what I can to make this industry more accessible and more realistic of a goal to pursue as a career in Indian Country. I am 19 years old and have a lot to learn, but I have a lot of heart, and I am smart, so I’m fine with the way things are going right now.” I sit down with Sivan during our visit in Santa Fe, New Mexico during the 98th annual Santa Fe Indian Market, which is one of her favorite events to attend. In between a photoshoot promoting the Haute Couture fashion show, market events, and the fashion show, we find time to ask the actress and budding model questions about her journey of pursuing acting and art, and what she plans on setting her sights on in the future. Thank you, Sivan for taking the time to sit down with us during this busy Santa Fe Indian Market weekend. About your childhood, what were some life lessons you learned along the way?

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My childhood was a bit rocky and caused me to develop a lot of survival instincts, but at the same time taught me to be a compassionate and honest human. Guess it makes sense to give what you wish others would give you. I am told that I am a confident person, sometimes I do not feel the most confidence, but I was always taught that you are the only person you can rely on. A lesson I would share is to be there for yourself, love yourself. When did you become interested in acting? I’ve always been a lover of films, and as I got older, I started reading screenplays. My first brush with acting came in college with a student horror short called “The Entrada.” It was a small crew, and I was hired to do the monster SFX [special effects] makeup when I wasn’t the supporting lead. An intimate set and more intermediate environment allow a lot of room for growth and education. I value those moments. What a lot of people don’t know is you’re also an artist, and you went to IAIA [Institute of American Indian Arts] first, what did you want to study? Studio arts! It’s been a long-time dream of mine to work as a professional artist. I hope to go back to school and get my Masters of Fine Arts. That’s a degree that sounds super artsy-fartsy. I like that. What are your chosen mediums? What inspires your art? My chosen mediums are painting on canvas, multimedia, and sculpture work. I’m inspired by many great abstract artists such as Andy Warhol, Jean Michele Basquiat, Piet Mondrian, Jackson Pollock, and I’m always inspired by artists every day. I am a sponge of visual stimulants. When did you hear about the casting for Sasha Yazzie in “Chambers”? How did you audition? I worked with a casting director to come about auditioning for “Chambers.” I felt a bit naїve and beginner considering I had two short films under my belt and Uma Thurman has, well, Uma Thurman. With my Tupac t-shirt and dirty white Vans, I tossed up any inhibitions I had and told myself to give an honest performance. A hop, skip and jump later, I am here. Crazy how things play out. What emotions did you go through when you found out you got the part? My brain melted and ran out of my nose; I couldn’t believe that I would now be an actress. To know that I was going to make history? Humbling. Scary, but humbling. What was filming like? How did you deal with working on your first big acting gig? Actors boot camp is the better title than “set.” I was submerged into a full intensive crash course on how to be a real Hollywood actress. I loved every second and took every chance I could to shed my old skin and take a dive into uncharted waters. Any oppositions or obstacles were dealt with head-on. This is my career now, and I love that I’m good at it. How did you prepare for your part in “Chambers”? Like a college student! I studied screenplays, watched movies,

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On the Cover

Earrings by ACONAV, www.aconav.com

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On the Cover

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On the Cover

Earrings by Nasty Gem, www.nastygem.com

reviewed, and broke down my scripts. I loved the prep stages. I hold a lot of my work up to a scholar’s standard by choice, and because at heart, I am a nerdy-super-brainiac-wiz-kid [laughs]. The story and the feel of the show get dark at times. Were you personally affected by this? How did you handle this? Since the beginning I knew that the show is a horror series, horror is horror and I am a big fan. So I expected a lot of mental chaos. You don’t scream and play with blood all day and not feel like your brain was put through the wringer. A lot of self-love and care was needed to persevere. Meditation, working out, creating art, writing, and reading. Rebalance, re-center, repeat. You mentioned before about not being able to film with a live coyote because of cultural reasons. What’s the story behind that? And were there other times where you either couldn’t film or be around something because of aesthetic reasons while shooting? On set, the wildlife department brought in a young coyote that was supposed to be in the scene. The scene in question is Sasha’s best friend Yvonne making a hospital visit to the disheveled girl who is seeing coyotes in the room. The real coyote scared me to my core; I heard my grandma in my head telling me that if I’m not careful, I could leave with some bad juju, so with grace, I explained to the director I can’t do the scene with the coyote in the room. We broke it up and filmed in a way that worked perfectly fine, but woof! I don’t mess with the desert! Is there a parallel between indigenous people and the people who participate in The Annex in the story? Do you agree? Did you notice any other similarities or meanings?

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I don’t necessarily think that it’s conformity, instead of a misguided venture of fulfillment. The participants of the Annex are all seeking to fill some void in their life. Voids caused using human harm; self-inflicted or otherwise. They try to fill the voids with pseudo-spirituality and a holistic environment. It’s not a secret why Ben Lefevre burns himself with sage; when you are not grounded in what you are being told, it’s not gonna “work.” Dead daughter? Isn’t Jesus picking up the phone? Try this stolen practice! Still nothing? Try harder! The Annex, to me, represents what colonization does best: profit from trauma. What was your experience like filming this show? My experience filming this show is one of growth and positive change; a long story I am witnessing be written. I’ll let you know when the book is done. Why is this opportunity so monumental for you and your career? Making history is something you don’t know you’re going to be apart of. This is monumental because it’s been a long time since Indian Country got excited over something as positive for the culture as “Chambers” is. This show has the potential of opening more doors for indigenous people in the entertainment industry. In your opinion, what are the next steps? Make native-curated content! Showcase native voices! Do! I wouldn’t wait around for E! News to make indigenous cultural appropriation their trending weekly topic, because who cares about E! News? I

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think the first step is forming the foundation of the indigenous entertainment industry, relying on indigenous hands. From your experience, what are the pros and cons of acting? The pros are as any job: money, status, and security. Acting has as many advantages as you’re willing to allow because a lot can be seen as unfavorable. It’s a beautiful craft that enables an individual to explore that multi-faceted dimensional box we lock ourselves in. However, as all good things, when caution goes to the wind, it can be harmful. If someone is considering acting as a career, I always tell them to work their ass off and go for it, but you better not cry that hard when the going gets tough. Do you plan on acting more? How about modeling? I have fallen in love with acting; this is something I want to nurture and craft into a legacy I can be proud of. As for art and modeling? Those are always with me. I see art in so many places; I create with an artist’s touch. Modeling is a bit vain of a career to some, but I could faint at the thought of being a living canvas for a great designer. Being told I’m pretty isn’t too bad either.

macabre and dark attitudes. The dress! The dress was structured, sexy, and sleek. Everything and more without the flash. That’s how I like to think I carry myself. You once mentioned you see yourself as not a role model but more of an example that someone can make it. Why is that? What is your advice to native youth? I am not a role model; I am not trying to raise someone else’s kid. However, I think I can be an inspiration to those who wish to pursue their dreams. My vice grip on personal freedom and self-love are what people are attracted to, but past that, be yourself! Congratulations on your first art exhibit! Do you have any upcoming projects or gigs we should be watching out for? My first gallery exhibition, “Blood & Diamonds,” happened this September! Art is a piece of me that has been with me since I can remember, and I will always work in art. As for anything else, expect the unexpected! I like to have fun.

Explain your love of fashion and style. Loren Aragon of ACONAV designed a dress for you for the cover, how did he embody your fashion style? Fashion and style are a love that I’ve fed with magazines, boutique trips, and hours of documentaries. Fashion and style are another art form; designers are artists with a specialty tool. ACONAV understood my alternative glamour goth aesthetic, Morticia Addams in her youth if you will. My love for textile and technique meet with

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Follow along Sivan’s journey of film, art and fashion on her Instagram at @sivanalyrarose.

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All About Rez Dogs Native American artist Chaz John’s latest exhibit is certainly unique and one to attend; it’s all about rez dogs. The NATIVE MAX team checks out the gallery opening and reception where we interviewed the artist about his newest installment of his REZ DOGS series. BY KELLY HOLMES 48 NATIVE MAX MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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TOP LEFT: Artist Chaz John with his painting “Rez Dog fights Turkey Vulture protecting Blue Bird Flour”, which features his own rez dog Spagetts. Chaz’s exhibit features a mixture of acrylic on canvas, sculptures and an art installation with real rez dog bones and frybread. (All photos: courtesy)

N

ative American artist Chaz John (Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska & Mississippi Band Choctaw) is known for his opaque and raw images, producing quickly lined and illuminated mixed media drawings and paintings to capture what he calls, “indigenous poetry in the face of conflict.” Chaz often blurs the lines of conceptual, performance, and traditional 2D work. Interested in the formation of the modern myth and poetic reification, Chaz’s work is often accessible, layered with subversion and always conveys a sense of indigenous humor. Originally from Topeka, Kansas, Chaz resides in Santa Fe, New Mexico where his latest exhibition “REZ DOGS II” is currently taking place at Ellsworth Gallery (located at 215 E. Palace Ave. in Santa Fe). Chaz’s exhibit opened up with a reception that took place on Friday, August 9th. The artist’s Q&A discussion was moderated by Santa Fe-based Native American artist Erica Lord, who has had works in the Smithsonian and the Institute of American Indian Arts Museum. From the beginning of his 2018 artist’s residency with Ellsworth Gallery until now, Chaz’s work has consistently toyed with the upending of established hierarchies–whether animal or material–to arrive at a place in which the rez dog reigns supreme, placed on a marble pedestal. Rez Dogs II is Ellsworth’s second front-of-house exhibition for Chaz and, like any sequel, it presents a vibrant and dynamic development in plot and theme. In addition to shifts in tonality and technique, Chaz has increased the vast array of traditional media and approaches he employs. Chaz’s work nativemax.com

co-opts tropes of Western culture, often seen as empty symbols of class consumption, repurposing them to honor the rez dog. From the chiaroscuro and dynamism of his palette to the addition of gilded Rococo frames and ceramic figurines, Chaz’s inspirations from the Western canon range from Caravaggio and through the Baroque, to the interior decoration of the, landed gentry of the British aristocracy. Chaz’s work breaks through this mere play with hierarchy and form to raise more critical questions, such as that of hyper-domestication. The wild, free-roaming rez dogs have been adopted ‘into the family’ to such a degree that they are ensconced in the most rustic and genteel of settings. Yet the rez dogs in Chaz’s most massive canvases remain defiant, wild at heart. Neither wild nor pets, they are somewhere in-between. There is a push-and-pull of domestication at play that mirrors questions surrounding the dynamics of assimilation. Chaz notes that many of the compositions have an oddly postapocalyptic air to them; there are no people present in his work. Have the rez dogs assimilated to, and perhaps surpassed, the human? What might the landscape of a Rez Dogs III look like? Certainly pay a visit to Chaz’s REZ DOGS II exhibit, which is on display until October 15 at Ellsworth Gallery in Santa Fe, NM. It's also worth noting Chaz’s exhibit is “rez dog-friendly”: not only do Chaz’s paintings hang closer to the ground for dogs, he painted in shades of blues, yellows and grays, the colors dogs can see. SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019 | NATIVE MAX MAGAZINE 49


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Fall into Haute Couture Style The Native Max Magazine team traveled to Santa Fe, New Mexico and collaborated with SWAIA & Haute Couture Fashion Show for a high fashion editorial featuring indigenous designers and models.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ZOE FRIDAY

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HAIR & MAKEUP BY SALON CEDAR

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Model: Peshawn Bread. Clothing by Korina Emmerich. Jewelry by Tania Larsson. Shoot location: WMV Visvim.

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Model: Fawn. Clothing by Korina Emmerich. Jewelry by Tania Larsson. Shoot location: WMV Visvim.

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Model: Sivan Alyra Rose. Clothing by Korina Emmerich. Jewelry by Tania Larsson. Shoot location: WMV Visvim.

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Look/cape/choker by Catherine Blackburn.

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Look/cape by Catherine Blackburn.

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Look/headpiece by Catherine Blackburn.

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Clothing by Korina Emmerich. Jewelry by Tania Larsson. Shoot location: WMV Visvim.

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Clothing by Korina Emmerich. Jewelry by Tania Larsson. Shoot location: WMV Visvim.

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On the Cover

Clothing by Korina Emmerich. Jewelry by Tania Larsson. Shoot location: WMV Visvim.

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Clothing by Korina Emmerich. Jewelry by Tania Larsson. Shoot location: WMV Visvim.

Major credit to Amber Dawn Bear-Robe of SWAIA and Audrey Rubenstein of METTA Agency for assistance in coordinating the photoshoot. Also thank you to Shelby House for providing a space for prep. 62 NATIVE MAX MAGAZINE | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2019

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Counting Young Children in the 2020 Census Counting everyone once, only once, and in the right place An estimated 5 percent of kids under the age of 5 weren’t counted in the 2010 Census. That’s about 1 million young children, the highest of any age group. We need your help closing this gap in the 2020 Census. Here’s what our research tells us about why young children are missed and what you can do to help make sure they are counted.

Common situations where young children aren’t counted

How you can help?

Emphasize that the census counts everyone where they live and sleep most of the time, even if the living arrangement is temporary or the parents of the child do not live there.

If the child truly spends equal amounts of time between two homes, count them where they stayed on Census Day, April 1. Coordinate with the other parent or caregiver, if possible, so the child is not counted at both homes.

If it’s not clear where the child lives or sleeps most of the time, count them where they stayed on Census Day, April 1.

Explain to service providers and families that responding to the census helps determine $675 billion in local funding for programs such as food stamps (also called the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program or SNAP), the National School Lunch Program, and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). When children are missed in the census, these programs miss out on funding that is based on the number of children counted.

Explain that filling out the census yourself, on your own schedule, is easier than having to respond when a census worker knocks on your door. Remind these households that the form should only take about 10 minutes to fill out and can be done online or over the phone, in addition to mailing it back.

Encourage moms with young children to ask other household members to count them and their children on the form if others live in the household.

Emphasize that parents should include babies on census forms, even if they are still in the hospital on April 1.

Encourage facilities providing services to newborns to remind parents about the importance of counting their children on the census form.

Highlight the fact that the census form only takes about 10 minutes to complete, and parents can fill it out online or over the phone in addition to paper at a time that works best for them.

The child splits time between two homes. The child lives or stays with another family or with another relative such as a grandparent.

The child lives in a lower income household.

The child lives in a household with young parents or a young, single mom.

The child is a newborn.

Connect with us

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Profile for Native Max Magazine

Native Max Magazine - September/October 2019  

Welcome to the Fashion issue, featuring actress, model and artist Sivan Alyra Rose, the actress who made history with her lead role in “Cham...

Native Max Magazine - September/October 2019  

Welcome to the Fashion issue, featuring actress, model and artist Sivan Alyra Rose, the actress who made history with her lead role in “Cham...

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