Discover Magazine Spring 2022

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SPRING 2022

CONTACT DISCOVER

Get in touch. We would love to hear your questions, comments and ideas. The National Trust for Jersey The Elms La Chève Rue St Mary Jersey JE3 3EN Telephone 01534 483193 enquiries@nationaltrust.je

MAKING IT HAPPEN DESIGN & PRODUCTION TEAM The Idea Works Limited Regency House Regent Road St Helier Jersey JE2 4UZ Telephone 01534 755400 info@theideaworks.com

EDITORIAL TEAM Donna Le Marrec and Charles Alluto. Contributors: Jonathan Renouf, John Pinel, Charlie Malet de Carteret, Ben Spinks, Sara Lampitt, Jersey Water, Conrad Evans, Jon Rault, Cris Sellares, Robin Kelly, Jon Parkes, Erin Cowham, Catherine Ward, Simone Springett, Sarah Hill, Appin Williamson, Freddie Watson

PHOTOGRAPHS Credits to: Paul Marshall, The Jersey Catch, Societe Jersiaise, John Lord, John Ovenden, Visit Jersey and the Jersey Evening Post. Front Cover: Morel Farm by John Lord ©2022 – Discover Magazine is published by The National Trust for Jersey. The publisher, editor and authors accept no responsibility in respect of any errors, omissions, misstatements, mistakes or references. Correct at the time of print February 2022

Discover is printed using only paper from FSC/ PEFC suppliers from well managed forests. This magazine can be recycled and we encourage you to do so at your recycling point. Passing the magazine onto a friend counts as recycling too.


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In this issue

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P12

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VIEW FROM THE TOP Jonathan Renouf

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IN THE NEWS

P12 MOREL FARM A to Z

P16 ENJOYING HEAVY METAL Matthew Slocombe MA FSA IHBC, SPAB Director

P18 NEW RESERVOIR FOOTPATH Grands Vaux Valley’ Trail & Walking In Springtime

P20 LANDSCAPES St Ouen's Pond

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P22 LANDSCAPES The Trust Makes A Splash

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P24 LANDSCAPES Can We Re-Wild Jersey?

P26 LANDSCAPES Why Do We Need A Marine Park?

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P32

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P40 P32 SPOTLIGHT ON Charlie Malet De Carteret

P34 ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

P38 ENJOY The Silent Garden Puppet Show

P40 ENJOY

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Butterfly Theatre Returns To The Georgian House

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WHY BUY LOCAL How To Choose Seafood Guilt-Free

P44 MEMBERSHIP Everybody Needs Good Neighbours

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CORPORATE PARTNERSHIPS Delivering Staff Benefits In Spades!

P47 EVENTS Dates for the Diary

DISCOVER | 3


D I S C O V E R | V I E W F R O M T HE T OP

View from The Top JONATHAN RENOUF

COUNCIL MEMBER - NATIONAL TRUST FOR JERSEY

“Population growth and its natural environment and

T

here is a famous line in the (1963) film, "The Leopard": “If we want things to stay as they are, things will have to change.” (Great film by the way!)

The comment is made by a member of the ruling class in Sicily as profound social and economic changes are sweeping the island in the 19th century. It says that to preserve that which you most value, you need to adapt. Just resisting change doesn’t work in the face of great social movements. This raises interesting questions for the National Trust for Jersey. At heart we are a conservative organisation: “Our vision is to permanently protect Jersey’s natural beauty, rich wildlife and historic places for everyone to enjoy and visit”. But what happens when the mission to protect and conserve comes up against huge economic and social change? Perhaps nowhere is that tension felt more profoundly 4 | DISCOVER

than around the issues of economic growth and population policy. We’re at a tipping point. Population has risen rapidly over the last 20 years, and without decisive political action, will rise significantly again. The Bridging Island Plan assumes population growth of around 1000 a year for the next 5 years. It proposes adding 10% to the island’s housing stock within just 5 years. And there’s no end in sight after that. Will it realistically be possible to protect our countryside, wildlife and heritage under this kind of building onslaught? The Trust works through the planning system to oppose developments that threaten the countryside and support those that enhance it. We can continue to resist individual developments, but at some point the retort comes: well, where would you put all the houses we need?


D I S C O V E R | VIEW F R O M THE TO P

impact on the landscape” Similarly, it becomes harder and harder to protect wildlife habitats as population numbers rise. Sheer weight of numbers means that paths become eroded, previously isolated habitats lose their remoteness. Pressure on wildlife increases. How should the Trust respond? Should we be more involved in the political debate over population? To what extent is it plausible to keep defending the countryside through the planning system when the planning system is designed to respond to housing need? There are tensions here that are not easy to resolve. The one thing that unites everyone in the Trust is the urge to protect and enhance the environment. Stepping beyond this unifying mission is fraught with difficulty. Not all members would agree with taking a more interventionist stance on highly political topics such as population policy. There are difficult trade-offs to be made.

Ultimately my view is that we need a vision that goes beyond protection. We need to say something about the context in which protection takes place. At the very least we can say that it is harder to pursue our mission in an island of 120,000 people than in an island of 110,000 people. That doesn’t mean to say we need to take the lead in campaigning against further big population increases. It does mean that we should be brave enough to say very clearly what the consequences for pursuing our objectives will be if we continue along our present path. Otherwise “the things we want to stay as they are” will start to disappear.

DISCOVER | 5


IN THE NEWS

Inthe N_ ews

HEDGE FUND MEETS TARGET IN THIRD YEAR

The National Trust for Jersey has just completed its third consecutive year of hedge planting all testament to the landowners and to the valuable assistance provided by The Jersey Royal Company. Maintenance is ongoing and our new Volunteer Coordinator, Dom Lambert, will ensure that progress continues. We have had an amazing group of volunteers who have given their considerable time and effort – so enormous thanks to them. Over the last 3 winters a total of 58,300 hedging whips, with a small proportion of trees, have been planted, equating to 27 miles of hedgerow planted to date. 6 | DISCOVER

Conrad Evans, the project coordinator, is grateful for the work of corporate and keen conservationists and commented “The old adage of “many hands make light work” is very pertinent to this task, as seeing miles of recently planted hedgerow is quite daunting. We are looking for more people to come and assist the happy band of volunteers that I have dubbed The Hedgerow Helpers.” This year the focus area is between Grève de Lecq and Le Mourier Valley with field boundaries being planted to join up the two wooded areas in St Ouen and St Mary in the Crabbé area. The Trust received £26,000 from the

Countryside Enhancement Scheme for tree whips and labour costs as well as support from the Roy Overland Charitable Trust for staff salary expenses. This funding has resulted in 11,300 hedging whips being planted, measuring 8.5 km or just over 5.5 miles so far this year. Further consultation will take place about were we can plant additional hedgerows and with the ongoing support of our members, the public, our corporate members and private individuals the Hedge Fund project can hopefully continue to develop throughout the Island.


IN THE NEWS

New Team Members Join The Trust We are delighted to welcome three new team members to the Trust; Alex Buxton, Dominic Lambert and Lynda Firkins. Alex has joined the Lands Team as a Countryside Ranger and supports the team in conserving and maintaining the Trust’s land and footpaths together with undertaking wildlife surveys and working with volunteers. Before joining the Trust Alex studied Animal Behaviour at Plymouth University and went on to work with conservation projects focussed on surveying migrating and breeding bird populations. Alex enjoys undertaking behavioural observations of the wildlife using our sites and sharing this with our members via social media. , In addition by observing how species are using the land in its care the Lands Team can make more informed steps to protect them, either by extending habitat or raising awareness. Alex enjoys the opportunity to work outdoors for the larger part of her working day and sees this as a perk which compliments her interest in long-distance hikes which she has undertaken in countries such as Nepal. Alex enjoys working collaboratively with different groups which creates a diverse working environment. The Trust looks after some of the most iconic spaces in Jersey, and Alex feels

that being a part of that undertaking is very rewarding on many levels. Dominic has taken up the role of our Volunteer Co-ordinator Ranger which was made possible by the receipt of a grant from the Community Foundation. His role incorporates similar attributes to a Countryside Ranger in terms of carrying out practical conservation on the Trust’s land, from assisting in tree planting, path maintenance, tree work and habitat management (ponds, meadows, woodlands). But Dom's main objective is to engage with the community from various backgrounds such as corporates, charities and individuals who may wish to get involved in conservation. This acts as a means of socialising in an outdoor environment at the same time as learning about wildlife and conservation. Prior to joining the Trust Dominic was completing his MSc in Island Biodiversity and Conservation with Exeter University in Jersey, which allowed him to hear about the role and then apply for it. Dominic volunteered with Conrad Evans on the hedge fund project which gave him an introduction and insight into the work of the Trust and enabled him to demonstrate his knowledge and experiences gained through studying countryside management and ecology. Dominic enjoys introducing the public to various habitat management

practices such as hedge laying and coppicing as well having in depth discussions over a coffee about current conservation matters globally and island based. You may see Alex or Dominic around and about working on our sites andso please do feel free to say hello and have a chat with them. Lynda joined the Trust as our Membership and Office Administrator based at The Elms. Her role comprises processing and managing the membership database, acting as the first point of contact for our members as well as managing the hiring of Le Câtel Fort and Le Don Hilton. She also has a logistical role to ensure the smooth operation of the office on a daily basis. Before joining the Trust Lynda worked for 20 years in the tourism industry as a receptionist for Jersey Pearl and then responsible for marketing at Jersey Goldsmiths. Latterly Lynda worked in a local dental practice. When Lynda saw the advert for the role at the Trust she jumped at the chance as she was ready for a change and being a member and supporter of the Trust she knew it was where she wanted to be. Lynda thrives in a busy environment and enjoys meeting and helping people. She admits no two days are the same since starting her role but thoroughly enjoys the variety and providing a warm welcome to visitors to The Elms. DISCOVER | 7


IN THE NEWS

New woodland planting opportunity gifted to the Island

The Cotils at Bouley Bay donated by Mr & Mrs Bradstock Le Don Bradstock – Bouley Bay. The Trust is enormously grateful to Anna and Rupert Bradstock, who have kindly donated to the Trust a 4.3 vergée area of sloping land on Bouley Bay Hill With the blessing of Anna and Rupert, the Trust have devised a new woodland planting plan, which incorporates areas of scrub, trees and transitional heathland pockets, that will be in keeping with the existing wooded areas and landscape. The steep slope, which was formerly used for potato growing, has already been cleared and the Trust hopes to start planting trees this year, to mark the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee. A planning application, which includes the Trust’s planting plan, has been submitted to the planning department for change of use and the outcome remains pending.

Gradient of the cotils and the surrounding woodland 8 | DISCOVER


IN THE NEWS

puffin Tails

After many months of planning and putting everything in place for the construction of the Willow Puffins, we have been given the go ahead, and works will finally start in the first week of February. The first phase of the construction will actually involve creating a steel inner frame which will support the willow which will be weaved on top, creating the shape of two puffins with their bills touching (‘billing’ as it is known). In collaboration with the Birds On The Edge project, we are lucky to be working alongside

teams of metal specialists and willow artists, as well as structural engineers, designers, health and safety consultants, and the always dependable Geomarine, who will lay out pockets of foundations for the sculptures. These will be reversible to ensure that they can be removed when the sculpture’s ‘natural lifespan’ comes to an end. Most of the construction and willow work will be carried out of sight, with the statues being installed at Plémont when they are almost completed. It is hoped that the statues will serve

as the starting point of a Seabird Trail that we aim to establish along the footpath between Plémont and Grève de Lecq, alongside information boards, a web page with information on Puffins and other seabirds. The unveiling ceremony will also allow us to celebrate the ‘Arrival of the Puffins’ for many springs to come. Keep an eye out for further updates on the sculptures, the Seabird Trail, and the ‘Arrival of the Puffins’ celebration day.

DISCOVER | 9


IN THE NEWS

DISCOVER IS GOING DIGITAL! In order to be more sustainable and save on postage and printing costs, we are hoping that many of our members will be happy to receive digital copies of the Discover magazine.

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However we appreciate that not all of our members have email addresses and some members may prefer a printed version, if so, please could you let us know that you still wish to receive your copy in the post.

Discov er

Please call us on 483193 or, if you have email, please email discover@nationaltrust.je requesting a copy. DISC

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the late David Hammond.

The Trust is extremely grateful to be the sole beneficiary of the estate of the late David Hammond. Mr Hammond very kindly bequeathed his modern house and contents to the Trust to sell and for the proceeds to be used to support the Trust’s ongoing conservation work.

10 | D I S C O V E R

We have also been able to share this wonderful legacy in a small way by donating clothing to The Salvation Army and furniture and household items to Durrell and Acorn. Mr Hammond was a talented carpenter and many of his tools are now being used by our Properties team in our workshop at The Elms and out on site.

Some of his more personal effects including his dictionary are being used in day to day administrative life at the office. The property is in the process of being sold and the Trust will provide updates of how this valuable bequest will be used in due course

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Le Don Keyworth update spring 2022

IN THE NEWS

In July 2021 the Trust sold a two vergée parcel of land in Rozel to the neighboring household, after securing long term protection from development, by activating a comprehensive protective covenant. Le Don Keyworth, also known as Le Côtils de Terroir, was donated to the Trust in 1978 by Charles Maurice and Ethel Mary Keyworth, which at the time, was within the ownership of the property called “Côte d’Azur” at the time of sale. The owner’s intention was to safeguard the garden and undeveloped landscape for perpetuity and the only way to achieve this at the time was through outright gift. However, in 1984 the National Trust for Jersey Law was passed enabling third parties to put restrictive covenants in place to achieve the same objective. With this in mind the Trust’s Council took the decision to sell the land whilst protecting it through a covenant. The released equity has been ring fenced and will be used to acquire an area of coastline at some point in the future.

This enables the Trust to afford protection to more coastline whilst still respecting the donor’s wishes. The future acquisition will be known as Le Don Keyworth. The relatively small parcel of land is largely domestic lawn and contains some specimen Common Oak trees and a few ornamental varieties reflecting its garden usage. It also includes elements of woodland which links the land to more tree covered areas, owned by Rosel Estates and Rozel Inn . The new owners of the property, now called Seacliff, are developing the building into an eco-friendly family home, which will seek to harmonise with and makes most of the surrounding woodland, and views of Rozel Bay and French coastline. Whilst the initial acquisition of the garden and subsequent sale are both unusual scenarios for the Trust, the decision involves a degree of pragmatism as the site

in question was an isolated parcel of land which had been leased to the adjacent dwelling for a number of years. This decision secures continuing landscape protection whilst providing an opportunity to safeguard more of Jersey’s precious coastline interest. To enable the protective covenant to be put in place, the Trust’s Conservation Officer and Lands Manger photographed and tagged every significant tree, to create a record of the sites current condition. This information was then collected in a schedule and formed an integral part of the contract of sale. Any future development proposals for the land will now need to be reviewed and agreed with the Trust’s Council.

Finally if you have any areas of coastline that you would consider selling to the Trust then please do contact us at enquiries@nationaltrust.je D I S C O V E R | 11


Morel Farm a to Z

D I S C O V E R | M O R E L FARM A T O Z

BY ROBIN KELLY PROPERTIES MANAGER

A for ARCHES

Morel Farm is famous for its double roadside arches. The main arch bears the date 1666 – the year of the Great Fire of London.

B for BELFRY

At the gable end of the old potato store is a small belfry, containing a

D for DOORKNOCKER

The front door of the farmhouse welcomes visitors with this unique doorknocker.

E for EXPLORE & ENJOY

Behind a tall granite wall, guests will be able to explore the delights 12 | D I S C O V E R

ship’s bell inscribed with “John Morel 1837”. This probably refers to Jean Morel who married Marie Mauger and whose portraits have been gifted to the Trust. Because of the bell gable, the potato store is more commonly referred to as The Chapel, although it has never been used as such.

C for COBBLES

of Morel Farm’s Walled Garden. The design is in the planning stage at present, but we envisage a wildflower meadow with winding paths cut through the flowers and grasses. A few benches here and there will allow guests to enjoy peaceful moments.

F for FIRE

The courtyard is covered with large rounded cobbles. One story has it that the stones were gathered by the farmer from the beach, along with vraic, and laid in this iconic farmyard.

On 1st May 1917, a fire broke out in the Bakehouse. Due to a plentiful supply of water from a nearby brook, the fire was quickly extinguished. The damage was fairly extensive although covered by insurance.


D I S C O V E R | MOREL FAR M A TO Z

G for GOATS

H for HOLIDAYS

Thanks to a Government Fiscal Stimulus grant, Morel Farm is undergoing a programme of restoration, converting three of the buildings into holiday accommodation. We look forward to welcoming our first guests this summer.

Miss Morel left several historic photographs of the interior of the farmhouse to the Trust. These give a fascinating insight into how the house looked many years ago.

J for JERSEY PRESS

husband’s care, she sold her family home to Jean Morel and the property became known as Morel Farm.

M for MOREL FAMILY

Many people will remember Sid and Dulcie Poingdestre and their flock of Golden Guernsey goats, which at 25 head, was the largest in the Island. They bred the prize-winning strain of Mildmay Golden goats and many Jersey Goat Society shows were held over the years at the farm.

Over the years, the Trust has been kindly gifted several Jersey mahogany linen presses. We hope that these can be used in the bedrooms at Morel Farm.

K for KIDNAP

At the age of 14, Jeanne Langlois married Josué Falle. In September 1778, she was kidnapped by a Mr Bushell. Several years later, after having been restored to her

L for LIMEPOINTING

Lime is a soft, porous material that allows moisture to evaporate from the walls of a building. It allows for movement and thermal expansion and contraction. It is being used at Morel Farm to repoint areas such as the walls and fireplaces.

L for INTERIORS

Members of the Morel family have owned Morel Farm from about 1560. They were of Huguenot descent, fleeing to Jersey from the anti-Protestant regime in France. The house was gifted to the Trust in 1939 by Arthur Morel and the additional land was gifted by his daughter in 2004. The painting is of John (Jean) Morel and is in the Trust’s possession. Jean Morel died in 1875 and was the last member of the Morel family to live at the Farm. D I S C O V E R | 13


Morel Farm a to Z

D I S C O V E R | M O R E L FARM A T O Z

CONTINUED

N for NEWSPAPERS

One of the highlights was Princess Anne’s visit to the farm in October 1984.

Those members of the public who looked round Morel Farm at the Trust’s Open Day in September 2021, may well have seen the scrapbooks kept by Miss Morel. These contain a wide selection of newspaper articles, clipped out over the years.

O for OVEN

Q for QUIRKY

R for RENOVATION

One of the quirky features at Morel Farm are the pigsties which form part of the Bakehouse. These were incorporated within the building, with the pigs being able to shelter inside the Bakehouse itself but also having enclosed runs outside, protected by gates. 14 | D I S C O V E R

The Bakehouse contains an old bread oven which will be restored as part of the renovation works.

The Trust applies the principles of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB) to the work we do, repairing a property with the minimum loss of historic fabric and respecting the age and imperfections of the original construction.

P for PRESSOIR

The pressoir contains a wonderful granite cider apple crusher. Next to it is a more modern cider press. These remained in use until the 1970’s.

The historic panelling in the parlour was added in the 18th Century. Both the panelling and the herringbone parquet flooring are in good condition and will need only a very light touch.


D I S C O V E R | MOREL FAR M A TO Z

S for SUSTAINABILTY

As the Trust has done on other projects, emphasis is being placed on sustainability for the future. The introduction of car and bicycle charging points, air source heat pumps and grey water recycling provide a template for how one of the Island’s oldest properties can be adapted to meet our goals of reaching carbon neutrality by 2030.

T for THATCH

The main roof of the farm was originally thatched and was linked to a thatched roof over the stables. The photo shows Mr Charles Vallois, the tenant of the farm at that time. The

W for WINDOWS

Each of the old single-glazed sash windows in the house has been carefully removed, the timber assessed for rot and damage, with new sections of wood spliced in as necessary. Re-glazing is in hand, using recycled panes of glass from the Trust’s stocks.

X for XMAS

We think Morel Farm will be the

thatch was replaced by corrugated iron, which remained in place for about 80 years. Eventually, in 1957, after an appeal for funds, the Trust was able to replace the corrugated iron with Jersey pantiles. When removing the corrugated iron, it was discovered that some of the thatch still remained in place.

U for UNDISTURBED

Although Morel Farm is a building site at the time of writing, there are some areas which will remain undisturbed. The stables and the pressoir will not be changed and will be open for guests and visitors to view.

perfect place to spend Christmas. Sleeping up to twelve people, families and friends can spread out between the three houses.

Y for YELLOW

The interiors are being designed by the team at Ash Interiors who have put together a series of mood boards. These feature soft pinks, creams, greens, blues and even some “mellow yellow”!

V for VALLOIS

At the time of the Bakehouse fire in 1917, the farm was tenanted by Charles Vallois who lived at the farm with his wife and her nephew, George Le Feuvre. Mr & Mrs Vallois had been at Morel Farm for a few years before the fire began. George took over the tenancy when his uncle and aunt retired. George Le Feuvre Jnr and Susan Hampshire were photographed during the filming in 1972 of “Neither the Sea nor the Sand” with many scenes being filmed at Morel Farm.

Z for ZZZZS

Sleep in comfort in the new beds at Morel Farm….. Mattresses for the beds have been supplied by local family firm, Simmons and padded headboards are being made by local upholsterer, Roger Baudin. The new beds include a king-sized bed with a 2” cooling memory foam layer supported by 1,500 pocket springs and a mahogany sleigh bed, so guests can relax in comfort and style. D I S C O V E R | 15


D I S C O V E R | E NJ O YI NG HEAV Y M ET AL

Enjoying Heavy Metal

Lead has acquired a toxic reputation. We have unleaded petrol, leaded-free water pipes and non-lead gun shot. Even leaded lights are often now stickon substitutes. But lead is an endlessly versatile material that’s been invaluable to traditional construction for centuries. It’s also endlessly recyclable. Lead has been used in buildings since Roman times. It can be found holding glass in windows, conducting and collecting rainwater, and bridging gaps between surfaces as flashings and soakers. Lead roofs and gutters are made by laying sheets of the metal onto timber boards. Carefully

evolved lead working details, including upstands and rolls, ensure that the sheets integrate to produce a fully weatherproof surface. Lead sheets can be milled or cast. Cast lead is produced by the ancient method of pouring and levelling the molten metal onto a carefully prepared bed of sand. Old lead was once frequently re-cast on site. Health and safety regulations now make this a workshop operation and also require that lead workers are regularly blood tested to guard against any excessive toxic build-up. Sheets of lead come in a variety of weights indicated by a code number - code 8, for

Making a rainwater hopper head with a wooden former and lead sheet. 16 | D I S C O V E R

,

A IHBC mbe MA FS co lo S w e h tt Ma or SPAB Direct

instance, is commonly used for larger sheets in historic building repairs and indicates that the lead is of a thickness to weigh approximately 8lb per square foot (40Kg/M2) There is a long and continuing tradition of marking lead, sometimes officially and sometimes less formally. Lead roofs sometimes have cast plaques but historic graffiti left by workers and casual visitors is often found – the softness of the material invites embellishment. Despite the immense durability of lead that can allow it to survive on a roof for many generations,

A cast lead plaque, naming churchwardens and leadworker.


DISCOVER | ENJOYING HEAVY METAL

A stepped lead gutter behind a parapet wall as with all covering materials some deterioration eventually occurs. Mostly this is at joints and junctions since, over time and with repeated natural heating and cooling, large sheets of lead have a tendency to “creep” down a roof slope. Occasionally lead deteriorates from below not above. Underside corrosion is by no means a new phenomenon - in fact the whitish deposits, mainly formed of lead carbonate, were sometimes used in traditional paint making – but it can cause a roof to fail.

A selection of traditional lead working tools in box wood

Where localised deterioration of lead has occurred, patch repair is possible. Patches, and the construction of other details such as rainwater spouts, require lead burning. This has, in the past, been the cause of some disastrous historic building fires. Lead burning is now banned on many old buildings, but with extreme vigilance it can still offer a useful repair and maintenance technique.

An ancient lead hopper, retaining traces of historic painted decoration. Lead rainwater goods and statuary were often painted D I S C O V E R | 17


DISCOVER | G PU RF AFNDS I N S V AU X RE S ERV OIR FOOT P AT H

Grands Vaux Reservoir Footpath J

ersey Water have exciting plans for a new multi-use pathway through their land north of Grands Vaux Reservoir into the wider network of Green lanes and footpaths. This supports the Government of Jersey’s countryside access strategy and enhancement of the Island’s active travel network, enabling safe travel by walking, cycling and other active modes between St Helier, St Saviour and Trinity

The scheme is designed to remove the current storage units, tidy-up, re-landscape and re-wild the area to provide improved ecology and habitats, future opportunities for improved public amenity and to improve the setting of the listed German bunker. Work is due to start during 2022, coinciding with the Company’s 140th Anniversary. Jersey Water has delivered safe, high-quality water to Islanders and their businesses for over 140 years. Water is at the heart 18 | D I S C O V E R

of island life, not only are we reliant on the environment for the provision of water, how we operate has a direct impact on nature and the world around us. The Company aims to have a positive impact on the environment and the Island community.

As part of the plans, which were subject to planning application and subsequently approved, 1km of track north of the reservoir will be converted into a wide meandering path open for everyone to enjoy. The pathway starts at the top of the reservoir and runs through to La Rue au Baili in lower Trinity. Work will include moving current plant equipment which is stored there to a central depot, replacing fencing and the open areas will be converted to meadow. People will be able to discover areas of the Island which have until now, been inaccessible to the public. It’s a wonderful opportunity to walk safely through this beautiful area which links up to the National Trust circular nature walk ‘La Commune’.

The proposed track is a wide meandering open path for everyone to enjoy


D I S C O V E R | GRA ND S VA UX RESERVOIR FO O TPATH

Spring and Autumn Walking Festivals and the Annual Guided Walking programme Jersey Water has once again kindly agreed to support the National Trust for Jersey’s walking activity in 2022. This will include the Spring Walking Festival which is taking place from 6th to 10th April and its sister event in the autumn as well as the guided walks which take place regularly every month. A programme detailing all of the walks for the spring festival will be sent out to members in due course. Last year 411 members participated in the regular guided walks and 857 in the walking festivals. Walking was one of the reasons why many new members joined the Trust as the walks

are free and really are the best way of enjoying the coast and countryside and learning more about the island we live in. All of the walks feature on the Trust website and are led by qualified Blue and Bronze Badge guides. Members can enjoy intertidal walks, heritage trails, nature walks, explore Trust sites and lands and even an evening stroll on the ‘dark side’! Every year the programme expands to include new walks and guides. For those that would rather walk under their own steam, there are self-guided routes on the Activity Hub https://www.nationaltrust.je/ walks/

Walking Through Spring Festival 6 to 10 April

D I S C O V E R

E N J O Y

P R O T E C T

Kindly supported by

D I S C O V E R | 19


D I S C O V E R | L A N D S C A P ES - S T OU E N 'S P ON D

St Ouen's Pond BY JON RAULT

CONSERVATION OFFICER

Ponds in good condition are precious places that provide habitat and resources for a rich diversity of native wildlife. However, ponds are also fragile habitats that are highly sensitive to a range of adverse impacts that can act to upset their delicate ecological balance. With a surface area of approximately 5 hectares, St Ouen’s Pond is the largest expanse of naturally occurring freshwater water in Jersey. The pond itself is the central feature of a wider wetland that comprises a rich interconnected matrix of reedbed, fen, wet woodland and wet meadow habitats. This wider wetland in turn forms part of La Mare au Siegneur nature reserve, a site of high biodiversity conservation value as recognised in local legislation through its designation as a Site of Special (ecological) Interest (SSI). Yet beneath the surface, all is not well at the pond. Like shallow bodies of freshwater the world over, the ecological condition and conservation value of St Ouen’s Pond is largely determined by the quality and quantity of water flowing in to the pond from further up the 20 | D I S C O V E R

HABITAT REPORT SPRING 2022

catchment. In areas untouched by human activities the nutrient supply derived from the catchment depends on the natural fertility of the local rocks or glacial deposits, and the soils derived from them. Unfortunately, intensification of agriculture has resulted in many water bodies receiving elevated quantities of nutrients and silt from run-off on agricultural land. Other potential sources of pollution including fuel spills, leaking slurry and septic tanks and perfluorooctane sulphonate (PFOS), a constituent of fire-fighting foam previously used at Jersey airport, also pose threats to freshwater habitats in St Ouen’s Bay. Another issue known to negatively impact upon the ecological condition of freshwater habitats is turbidity. This is particularly problematic in relatively large, shallow, water bodies like St Ouen’s Pond, where wind and wave action act to stir up bottom sediment. By reducing the amount of light penetrating the water, turbidity causes a reduction in the growth and abundance of submerged aquatic plants (macrophytes).

At St Ouen’s Pond the issues of turbidity and reduced macrophyte abundance are thought to have been exacerbated by the introduction of Common Carp Cyprinus carpio, because as they forage these fish churn up bottom sediments and uproot macrophytes. The intense predation pressure associated with large numbers of Carp can also dramatically reduce the abundance of invertebrates and amphibians. While the large size and fighting spirit of Common Carp makes it a popular fish with recreational anglers, this species is not native to the British Isles, rather, it was introduced sometime during the Middle Ages to provide an additional source of food. Although the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) lists this species as vulnerable to extinction within its native range, it is known to be highly invasive and is associated with far reaching negative consequences in the many locations worldwide where it has been introduced. Indeed, the IUCN Invasive Species Specialist Group (ISSG) includes Common Carp in its list of ‘100 of the World’s Worst Invasive Alien Species’.


D I S C O V E R | LA ND SCA PES - ST O U EN 'S PO N D

Sadly, a combination of the issues highlighted above are likely to have contributed to a decline in macrophyte abundance and a deterioration of the ecological condition and biodiversity value of the aquatic habitat at St Ouen’s Pond. In freshwater lakes and ponds, macrophytes and algae compete with each other for available nutrients. While these habitats are complex and dynamic, water bodies considered to be in favourable ecological condition tend to be dominated by macrophytes. However, where conditions have caused macrophyte abundance to decline, the various species of algae present in the water column come to dominate. This can be particularly problematic where nutrient levels are elevated due to agricultural activities further up the catchment. Written records demonstrate that St Ouen’s Pond has been dominated by algae rather than macrophytes since at least the 1980's. As aquatic plant abundance has declined it is likely that the native invertebrates, fish, amphibians and birds that ultimately depend upon aquatic plants for food or refuge have also been negatively impacted. A lack of vegetation within which to find refuge is also known to reduce the abundance of zooplankton, tiny creatures that feed on algae and thus help to prevent algal blooms. A further phenomenon that points to St Ouen’s Pond as currently being in an unfavorable condition is the occurrence of periodic fish kills, with two such events having occurred within the last decade. These events happened in late summer and autumn, when water levels are low and temperature tends to be high. The most recent event occurred last October (2021), and while the exact cause remains unclear, the most likely explanation is that it was caused by a combination of low levels of dissolved oxygen and toxic levels of blue-green algae (cyanobacteria). Just as humans need oxygen to breathe, aquatic life needs sufficient amounts of oxygen dissolved in the water to survive. Dissolved oxygen depletion can occur for a number of reasons, but the primary cause is abundant algae and phytoplankton. Algae abundance peaks during late summer and autumn, particularly during periods of warm sunny weather. During the nighttime hours, these photosynthetic organisms consume oxygen through respiration, causing dissolved oxygen levels to drop. Additionally, as algae and phytoplankton die, the process of decomposition requires significant amounts of dissolved oxygen. When

algal blooms are dense, or a die off occurs suddenly, the result can be a fish kill event. Temperature is also an important factor because temperature establishes a maximum oxygenholding capacity of water. High water temperatures reduces this holding capacity. In addition, fish are cold blooded which means their body temperature is regulated by the water they inhabit. Warm water increases their need for oxygen by accelerating metabolic rate. Dead fish were first observed last October by the Trusts ranger team while undertaking annual management in the reedbed surrounding the pond. Water parameter monitoring undertaken at the time indicated that dissolved oxygen was dropping to very low levels during the night. Two aeration units were immediately installed which no doubt helped in this respect. Despite the Trusts response, over 100 fish are known to have perished during the event. By far the worst affected species was Roach Rutilus rutilus, however small numbers of deceased Carp and Bream Abramis brama, and as a single European Eel Anguilla anguilla

were also encountered during daily surveys undertaken at the time. Jersey Water also very kindly assisted by attending the scene to collect water samples. Subsequent analysis of these samples identified blue-green algae (cyanobacteria), blooms of which can be highly toxic, as being present in abundance. Thanks to the generous support of the Jersey Community Foundation, this year the Trust will be undertaking a comprehensive assessment of the condition of St Ouen’s Pond. While the Trust has minimal control over some of the issues that appear to be holding the pond in an unfavorable condition, it is hoped that the detailed information gathered will inform future management by greatly increasing our understanding of the current condition of the pond and the relative importance of the contributing factors responsible. World Environment Day 2021 marked the start of the UN Decade on Ecological Restoration, and one of the ways the Trust is looking to play its part is by doing everything in its power to restore St Ouen’s Pond to a more favourable condition.

Fish kill events occurred at St Ouen’s Pond in 2013 and 2021.

A priority species for conservation that inhabits St Ouen’s Pond, The European Eel Anguilla anguilla, is classified as critically endangered on the Red List of the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN). D I S C O V E R | 21


D I S C O V E R | L A N D S C A P ES - T HE T RU S T M AKES A S P LASH

The Trust makes a splash Erin Cowham

Senior Education Officer

The need for a new pond at The Elms has been talked about for some time, as many of the ponddipping sites we have used for our education activities are rich biodiverse areas, thus sensitive to disturbance. So how do we continue to encourage children to enjoy, discover, and really value the wonders of the natural world whilst balancing the sensitivities of wildlife? In a 2016 citizen-science project in the UK, entitled ‘Ponds for Life’, participants showed improved attitudes towards pond wildlife and greater environmental consciousness by the end of study. Indeed it was my own childhood explorations of the natural world and encounters with wildlife that drove me to study and work in conservation. There is something enchanting about dipping a net into an underwater world and discovering monstrous-looking dragonfly larvae, or the motionless black jelly-blobs of tadpoles that spring back to life when you return them to the water.

22 | D I S C O V E R

An experience that sadly not all local children have access to.

of our hardworking volunteers and volunteer co-ordinator Dominic Lambert.

Moreover freshwater habitats are in decline globally and locally, and ponds can triple the number of rare plant species in the area, plus have the potential to reverse local biodiversity decline. Furthermore, their sediments and plants absorb carbon dioxide, so help mitigate climate change.

The build took our volunteers and members of our Lands team just over three days during last November to complete. Digging and removing the soil at the deepest section (over a metre deep) presented the greatest challenge. Then in spring we planted out the plants sourced by the Botany Section, with help from our Power Rangers.

Fortunately, The Elms Walled Garden offered the perfect space for a new pond, which already houses a smaller pond, insect hotels and a pollinator patch. The Jersey Ecology Trust Fund offers grants for projects that meet local educational needs and benefit the Island’s biodiversity, and we were fortunate enough to be awarded funding for our pond materials. We received an outpouring of local support; Skinner Skips Ltd removed excavated materials at no charge, Rozel Shipping purchased topsoil, the Botany Section of the Société Jersiaise scoured the countryside and propagated local pond plants, and last but definitely not least, we had the help

With this amazing new resource, we are looking forward to offering pond-dipping to local children in spring - summer 2023. In the meantime, we are eagerly watching the pond for the arrival of new animal residents.

You don’t need a large pond in your garden to benefit wildlife and attract interesting animal visitors, even a mini-pond in a bucket will do the trick. Like our pond, maintenance should be completed during the winter months when wildlife is less active, however you can create and plant a new one during spring.


How to create a Mini-Wildlife Pond

D I S C O V E R | LA ND SC A PES - B IR D R IN GIN G

1

Find a suitable container – have a look around your house or garden to see if there is anything you can upcycle, even an old washing-up bowl will work, as long as it is watertight and wide at the top to allow animals to get in and out. If it does have holes, use some pondliner to seal it.

2

Choose a place which is light but not in full sun (so it doesn’t overheat), then bury your mini-pond up to its edge or build a ramp.

3

Line the bottom with clean gravel and some rocks and make a small sloping pile of rocks at one side for animals to get in or out.

4

Fill with rainwater, or tapwater with some ‘tapsafe’ added to remove the chemicals.

5

Choose 2 or 3 pond plants. Put them in small aquatic planting baskets with some gravel and aquatic compost first. You will want at least one submerged plant (to oxygenate the water) and a tall one (for insects such as dragonflies to land on), we suggest the following plants: Water Forget-Me-not (Myosotis scorpiodes) – shallow Water starwort (Callitriche stagnalis) - oxygenator Flowering rush (Butomus umbellatus) – deep water Curled pondweed (Potamogeton crispus) – oxygenator Hornwort (Ceratophyllum dermersum) - oxygenator

6

Sit back and wait for the news to spread amongst the nearby wildlife of your new mini-pond. Please don’t introduce any animals from other ponds, as this could spread disease Don’t worry nearby animals will quickly find it on their own.

One plant that reaches out of the water, e.g. Iris or flowering rush

Oxygenating plants i.e. curled pondweed or hornwort

Use stones to create a slope for animals to climb in and out

Things you will need: A watertight container

7

If you would like to build a bigger pond, or identify the animals that you discover in your mini-pond, check out our ‘Creating a Wildlife Pond’ and ‘Hop to It’ activities in our online Activity Hub at www.nationaltrust.je/activity-hub.

Pond plants Spade Old bricks, rocks and pebbles

D I S C O V E R | 23


DISCOVER | P LA U NDS F F I NCSA P E S - CAN WE RE -WILD J E RS EY

Can we re-wild C

an we re-wild Jersey? What does that even mean? On an island that measures 9x5 miles, with around 110,000 people, is there anything left to re-wild?

There is barely a square metre of Jersey which does not have someone standing on it at some point in the year. Maybe a few of the most inaccessible areas of the coast, a hidden patch on large, private estates or the odd corner of an abandoned field, but on the whole, Jersey is a very human influenced patch of real estate.

When we talk about our countryside, we talk about farmland and we talk about semi-natural habitats. Seminatural habitats are places like the sand dunes at St Ouen, the heathland at Les Landes and the woodlands at St Catherine's. These are Jersey's largest patches of habitat and we call them semi-natural because they are heavily modified and influenced by human activity. 24 | D I S C O V E R

Whilst we no longer cut gorse and heather for fuel and animal bedding, we do take our dogs and our bicycles across these areas, introducing huge amounts of nutrients through dog faeces and disturbing wildlife and eroding fragile soils with our bicycles. These activities are counterproductive to nature conservation and preserving our wildlife, yet on such a small island, we need to retain access to the countryside for our health and our wellbeing, which we will always place above the health and wellbeing of our island's wildlife. These semi-natural habitats are places of remarkable biodiversity - that is the wealth of plants and animals which survive in them. Jersey compares remarkably well with similar sized areas of the UK for the rich diversity of our natural world, despite being a little island. We should be justifiably proud of the efforts that our conservation organisations go to in order to protect and preserve this natural

and cultural heritage and to limit the ever increasing speed at which we are losing species of wildlife. Could we do better? Yes very much we can. Those pockets of semi-natural heathland and woodland are isolated from each other by the development of our homes and our infrastructure and by the large areas of farmland which do not provide suitable conditions for wildlife or permit public access to half of our island. Read any literature about wildlife friendly gardening and it will tell you to let a corner of your garden become 'untidy'. This means letting weeds (that is - wildflowers) grow. It means don't cut on a regular basis, but let things grow up and provide cover and pollen and nectar. It means letting things become 'untidy'. It means providing a little shelter and letting the soil organisms thrive to regenerate the soil, providing a little food chain in the corner of your garden for wildlife to visit.


D I S C O V E R | LA ND SCA PES - CA N WE RE-W IL D JER S EY

Jersey? For the health of our environment, which includes human health as we are not separate from the natural world on which we depend, we need to be wildlife friendly on a landscape scale. We need less land under intensive agriculture regimes and we need more crop rotation. The soil needs a rest and we need more regenerative agriculture to repair the damage that 150 years of intensive potato growing has caused to the same fields year after year. We need better, thicker hedgerows to provide food and shelter to our wildlife and to connect the areas of the island's habitats which have become isolated. We need tree planting on small patches of land and in the corners of fields to create pockets of habitat as stepping stones for our wildlife. We should extend our heathlands and restore our sand dunes and provide public access to the increased area of wildlife friendly habitat. Jersey has large areas of bracken and almost all of these bracken patches will grow trees if they are

BY JOHN PINEL

COUNCIL MEMBER NATIONAL TRUST FOR JERSEY

managed correctly. Indeed, many of these bracken patches are naturally regenerating woodland, but often with a limited number of tree species. If we gave nature a helping hand and did some additional planting in those areas, future generations will benefit from a richer, more diverse countryside and larger areas of semi-natural habitat. All of which contributes to a robust natural environment which nurtures and supports humankind, as much as the other native wildlife on our island. Any gardener can help by inviting wildlife into their garden and we can all help by supporting our nature conservation organisations to continue to protect our island's wildlife and by our behaviour when in the countryside. Can we re-wild Jersey? We may not become as wild as the Amazon, but we can do a great deal to make Jersey a richer and more attractive land, both for nature and for ourselves.

.ve kindly donated an IPad for Hedge Fund Manager, Conrad Evans to keep track of all the important tree planting data. The Hedge Fund Project is a huge success and with the help of our Corporate Partners extensive maintenance of the newly planted 45,000 whips is now a regular feature of the employee calendar.

We need less land under intensive agriculture regimes and we need more crop rotation. The soil needs a rest and we need more regenerative agriculture to repair the damage that 150 years of intensive potato growing has caused to the same fields year after year.

D I S C O V E R | 25


D I S C O V E R | W H Y DO WE N EED A M ARIN E P ARK?

26 | D I S C O V E R


Why do we need a Marine Park?

D I S C O V E R | W H Y D O W E NEED A MAR IN E PAR K ?

Appin Williamson,

Jersey Project Manager for Blue Marine Foundation (BLUE) Blue Marine Foundation (BLUE) is a marine conservation charity working to create a Marine Park in Jersey’s waters. Established in 2010, BLUE works across a variety of projects, all with the aim of restoring the ocean to health. These projects range from securing marine protected areas, restoring habitats, connecting people with the sea, pursuing legal challenges, conducting investigations and media campaigns to prevent highly unsustainable practices. BLUE have projects globally that all fall under the same mission: to see 30 per cent of the ocean protected by 2030 and the other 70 per cent managed sustainably.

Since 2010, BLUE has: •

Secured commitments to protect over four million square kilometres of ocean

Established models of sustainable fishing in Lyme Bay

Protected marine habitats around the UK from trawling and dredging

Challenged unsustainable fishing practices in the Indian Ocean

Helped Plymouth declare the UK’s first National Marine Park.

A Jersey Marine Park would cover an area of over 30 per cent of Jersey’s waters and would be closed to bottom-towed fishing gear (dredging and trawling). The proposed Marine Park would cover Jersey’s shallow water habitats. These provide food, shelter and act as spawning and nursery grounds for other species. Species that also play a huge role commercially in Jersey’s seafood, such as crab, lobster and scallops. Beyond the marine conservation designation, BLUE also want to champion low impact fisheries on the Island. This could include developing initiatives such as a seafood scheme that highlights to consumers that their seafood is lowimpact (i.e. caught using static gear such as pots, rod and line or diving). It’s hoped that such a scheme would also see fishermen receive a fair price for their catch.

BLUE has supported similar schemes through their work with fishing communities in Lyme Bay, where Lyme Bay Reserve, an MPA (Marine Park Area) closed to bottomtowed fishing gear, was designated in 2008. Within this MPA, local fishermen operate under a voluntary code of conduct, operating static gear and working to sustainable potting levels. Ecological surveys have shown seven times more pink sea fans (generally considered to be a good representative of an area that can provide habitat for many other species), over four times more juvenile lobsters and seven times more scallops within Lyme Bay Reserve. Fishermen operating under the voluntary code of conduct sell their catch under the ‘Reserve Seafood’ label. Over a decade later, results have been hugely positive. On-land, socio-economic studies have demonstrated that the fishermen operating under the ‘Reserve Seafood’ scheme have the lowest levels of stress and the highest income, compared with local fishermen not taking part in the scheme. This work has been crucial in demonstrating that fishing can thrive and co-exist within MPAs. Not only that, but conservation works best when fishermen are not only involved in the process, but take a leading role in informing the future of their fishery. Jersey’s opportunity for a Marine Park has benefits that extend beyond conservation and fisheries. Designation of a Marine Park could highlight to people on-island and abroad that Jersey hosts a stunning array of shallow marine habitats worth protecting. It would provide opportunities for people to get outside and into the sea, forging a stronger sense of connection. One initiative BLUE is developing to do just that is a snorkel trail, offering an opportunity to explore the beauty and diversity that lies beneath the waves. Despite their educational and recreational benefits, few snorkel trails exist in the UK. To help showcase Jersey’s unique marine environment, boost ecological awareness and encourage interest in diving and snorkelling activities around the Island, BLUE is working with partners to create a safe and informative snorkel trail. It’s hoped that this initiative enables outdoor experiences that improve community health, connectedness and wellbeing. The trail will encompass education outreach and citizen science programmes, fostering the next generation of marine and climate scientists. D I S C O V E R | 27


Jersey's National

D I S C O V E R | L A N D S C A P ES - J ERS E Y'S N AT ION AL P ARK EXTENSION

Karin Taylor, Planning & Heritage Adviser and Former Head of Planning at the Nati

I

n February 2009 consultation on a proposed national park for Jersey took place as part of the review of the 2002 Island Plan. Later on that year, on 4th October, over 7,000 islanders formed the historic “Line in the Sand” to demand greater protection for Jersey’s coastline, which had experienced increased harmful development. The Jersey Coastal National Park (JCNP) was duly defined in the 2011 Island Plan and has remained a relevant policy for determining planning applications

The spatial extent of the Coastal National Park was based on what was perceived to be the most valuable and sensitive coastal landscape, as defined in the 1999 Countryside Character Appraisal undertaken by Land Use Consultants. This broadly comprised the coastal plain and escarpment of St Ouen’s Bay and Les Quennevais, the cliffs and headlands of the north and south west coasts, the enclosed valleys of the north coast and St Martin, coastal 28 | D I S C O V E R

heath and dunes at La Commune de Gouray, and the offshore reefs and islands of les Écréhous, les Minquiers, the Paternosters and les Dirouilles. For the most part the National Park boundary was therefore narrowly defined, ending at the mean highwater mark and excluding all bays and intertidal areas. Whilst protecting the defined area from development, it has proved woefully inadequate in terms of preventing harmful impact upon the designated area and within important coastal areas not included within the boundary. Apart from the more extensive area of the National Park at St Ouen’s Bay, the tightly-defined area has given insufficient scope to investigate opportunities for landscape and biodiversity protection or to facilitate the appreciation and enjoyment of the coastline. The National Trust for Jersey has consistently campaigned for better protection of the coast, especially

through a wholesale review of the defined area and of the policies to be included in the review of the Island Plan. The Trust was pleased when indeed a review was commissioned as part of the evidence base for the bridging Island Plan from independent consultants Fiona Fyfe Associates. Building on previous work comprising the Jersey Integrated Landscape and Seascape Character Assessment, the consultants carried out a thorough review of the existing boundary and examined the entire coastline.

The intention was to: • Ensure that the coastline – and its setting – both landward and seaward, are fully protected •

To define a protected area that meets international (IUCN) requirements for a Category V Protected Landscape or Seascape 1


Park Extension

D I S C O V E R | LA ND SCA - IJERSEY L PA R K IOSN S PPES OTL G H T O' SNNA | TIONA NEW COUNC IL EXTEN MEMBSER

Photo by Paul Marshall

onal Trust UK reviews the latest developments

Review the spatial definition of the CNP to ensure that it is soundly based and provides a clear, consistent and unambiguous boundary to the CNP

Explore the potential to introduce an integrated approach to spatial planning and management in both the terrestrial and marine environments

Work on the JCNP Review was guided by a Steering Group on which the National Trust was represented by Chief Executive Charles Alluto, and public consultation took place through a workshop event and as part of the general consultation on the draft Bridging Island Plan. The consultants’ report was published by the Minister for the Environment in February 20212 and the proposals for the expanded JCNP went forward

into the draft Bridging Island Plan and were considered at the Public Examination in November2021. The Inspectors recommended in favour of the proposed expansion of the National Park and supported the proposed boundary. Whilst the Bridging Local Plan still has to complete its formal processes towards adoption, support for the expanded JCNP is a shot in the arm for the protection of Jersey’s coastline and for many of our iconic and most precious views – especially the bays, beaches and other intertidal areas that currently lack adequate protection and have been blighted by ugly development as a result. Furthermore, if the proposed extension and associated policies do proceed into the final, adopted version of the Plan, they will give protection also to the settings of the JCNP and indeed other heritage assets, which has been lacking up to now.

The Coastal National Park Boundary Review was commissioned as part of the evidence base for the new Island Plan

1 Dudley,N (2013) Guidelines for Applying Protected Area Management Categories; Best Practice Protected Area Guidelines Series No 21 IUCN https://www. iucn.org/content/guidelines-applying-protected-areamanagement-categories-0 2 https://www.gov.je/news/2021/pages/CoastalNationalParkReview.aspx#:~:text=26%20February%202021,associated%20intertidal%20and%20 marine%20areas. D I S C O V E R | 29


D I S C O V E R | L A N D S C A P ES - LE M OU RIER V ALLEY

New Woodland Projects – Present and Future

Le Mourier Valley – This winter saw the third and final year of the planting phase of the Le Mourier Valley Woodland project, sponsored by Jersey Electricity and Jersey Water. The trees have been planted on land belonging to the Trust, the Crown and Jersey water in response to the islands recognition of the climate crisis and to help the island sequester more of the carbon it releases into the atmosphere. The project also aims to reforest part of Le Mourier Valley in an effort to increase the islands amount of woodland cover and habitat for the benefit of wildlife. To date, 4,246 trees have been planted over a 4.2 Hectare (23.5 vergée) area, adding to an already existing and established woodland and integrating marginal agricultural land and steep bracken covered slopes. Tree species planted include: Common Oak, Ash, Sweet Chestnut, Rowen, Hazel, Wild Cherry, Bird Cherry, Silver Birch, Larch, Scots Pine, Sallow, Monterey Pine and Black Pine. The species chosen have been selected for a number of criteria, including durability in exposed locations, provision of seeds, pollen, or fruits for wildlife and seasonal cover and nesting opportunities for birdlife. While most are native species, a number including: Rowen, Monterey Pine and Larch are not, but have been selected due to other characteristics that are hoped to provide advantages for trees growing in a highly exposed setting. 30 | D I S C O V E R

Sadly some trees, such as Ash and Sweet Chestnut, have importation bans due to disease but the Trust has been fortunate enough to be supplied by a number of local supporters, who have grown and reared saplings from local seed, and so these can now be planted as part of the scheme. With all the trees in the ground, the next phase of the project is maintenance to ensure as many survive as possible. This will entail the following:: Mulching – Adding a “doughnut” of seasoned woodchip around each planted tree. This supresses weeds, helps retain moisture in the soil and kick starts the woodland biology in the soil. Weeding – Each guard must be lifted and weeded, to prevent the roots of grasses and competitive plants, out competing the trees for water and nutrients. Supressing bracken growth, to prevent smothering, will also be required in some cases. Replacements and repairs – The exposed position of Le Mourier means that the new trees have to face some pretty extreme conditions during winter gales. Sometimes guards and stakes are blown over and need up-righting. Watering – Recent dry hot springs have made it harder to establish trees at the critical early stages, when they are vulnerable to drought. We try to water every tree during its first year, while the roots are still small and are expanding.


D I S C O V E R | C CA GA LLERIES SUMMER EXHIB ITIO N 2022

CCA Galleries Summer Exhibition 2022 C

CA Galleries International are inviting visual artists to apply to take part in the 2022 Jersey Summer Exhibition now in its 6th year.

The Summer Prize and the Rural Jersey Landscape Award The winner of the Summer Prize is offered a solo show at the gallery and the prize is awarded to the artist that the judges agree exhibited the most accomplished piece of work. 2021’s winner was local photographer, Will Lakeman. Last year’s judges included artist and TV personality Vic Reeves.

Land and seascapes that have been selected for the Jersey Summer Exhibition are also eligible for the RURAL Jersey Landscape Award and this is where The National Trust for Jersey is involved. The Trust sits on the panel of judges (alongside the other sponsors Rural Magazine and BCR Law) and the Trust provides the 2nd prize which is a weekend retreat in Le Catel Fort high above Greve de Lecq Bay and perfect as a place to paint en plein aire or to enjoy for small family get togethers and summer barbeques.

Artists of all mediums are invited to apply through www. ccagalleriesinternational.com Applications open Friday 4th February. The application deadline is Thursday 31 March. All visual art forms are welcome, including original prints, paintings, drawings, architecture, sculpture, film and photography. CCAI accept applications from artists with links to the island who may be working elsewhere as well as Channel Island artists.

D I S C O V E R | 31


D I S C O V E R | S P O T L I G HT

SPOTLIGHT ON

CHARLIE MALET DE CARTERET – COUNCIL MEMBER AND CHAIRMAN OF THE TRUST’S DEVELOPMENT APPLICATIONS PANEL Bio

Charlie was born in Jersey in 1960 and went to prep school at St Michael’s Preparatory School. Thereafter, he went on to Winchester College and Magdalene College, Cambridge where he took a degree in Modern and Medieval Languages. He started training as a Chartered Accountant with Price Waterhouse in London. After qualifying he continued working in the profession in London and Jersey. Charlie returned to Jersey in 1992 and has lived here ever since. His subsequent career was in the trust industry, ending up working for Sanne Group for 15 years as a director in their private client division. Since his retirement in 2018, Charlie has kept himself busy with the renovation of St Ouen’s Manor and cataloguing the extensive library and archive at the Manor. Charlie and his wife Georgina have six children between them and are thrilled to be able to spend increasing time with their grandchildren both in Jersey and, covid-permitting, in London.

32 | D I S C O V E R

National Trust for Jersey

Charlie has been a long-standing member of NTJ and has a particular affinity for and interest in Jersey’s history and environment. The Line in the Sand campaign in 2009 was a particularly important moment, and the subsequent establishment of the Coastal National Park in the 2011 Island Plan was a major step forward in preserving the features of the landscape which make Jersey such a unique and beautiful place to live and visit. Charlie took a particular interest in the campaign to save Plémont and was delighted when this was finalised in 2014. At around that time Georgina was asked to join the Trust’s Council and subsequently became President. The Trust and its plans became a regular topic of conversation around the dinner table over the following years and so when Georgina mentioned that a vacancy had arisen on the Development Applications Panel Charlie jumped at the opportunity.

Development Applications Panel

The Panel meets at The Elms each week to review the various planning applications which have been received in the previous week. The Panel takes a particular interest in applications which may have an adverse impact in the Coastal National Park, the Green Zone or on listed buildings and their settings. Our principal objective is to ensure that planning applications are dealt with in accordance with the provisions of the Island Plan. If the Panel has any comments on or objections to an application, we set these out in a letter to Planning, and this appears as a public comment on their website to be taken into account when they consider the application. In the event that a matter is referred to the Planning Committee, we consider attending the public Committee meetings to make verbal representations in support of our objections.


DISCOVER | SPOTLIGHT

Question & Answer Glass or granite. Do you prefer modern structures or more traditional buildings? Traditional. (Someone who lives in a 700year old Manor house could hardly say modern!). However, modern structures play such an important role in everyday life that the quality of their design really matters. The exhibition staged last year by the Association of Jersey Architects to celebrate its 60th anniversary was a reminder of how good some modern architecture can be. Coast or countryside? Coast. Jersey’s coastline, with such a wide variety of views and seascapes, provides inspirational spaces for all to enjoy. Big cities or little parishes/small towns? Little parishes/small towns. (But with the occasional trip to the big city!) What is your favourite architectural period? The 1930s. I think that buildings from this period work particularly well in a seaside setting such as Jersey’s. I particularly love the deco buildings designed by Arthur Grayson. Favourite building in Jersey? El Tico. This is a wonderful building, designed by Richard Le Sueur Architects and opened in 2009. It sits so well in its surrounding environment and works beautifully in performing its function with style and flair. Favourite building that you have seen on holiday or whilst working elsewhere? The Barcelona Pavilion designed in 1929 by Mies van der Rohe. If you had a magic wand and could dispose of one building in the Island what would it be?

Favourite vista? Looking down over St Ouen’s Bay from L’Etacq.

Photo by Glen Perotte

Union House in Union Street. I think that this is one of the least attractive buildings in the Island.

D I S C O V E R | 33


D I S C O V E R | A G M & DIN N ER

Annual General Meeting and Annual Dinner

34 | D I S C O V E R


T

D I S C O V E R | A G M & D IN N ER

he Annual General Meeting will take place on Friday 29th April in the Orangery at La Mare Wine Estate at 6pm followed by the annual dinner in The Winery. Our speaker this year is William Kendell

William read law at Cambridge University and completed an MBA at INSEAD in Fontainebleau. He was awarded an honorary doctorate from the University College Suffolk. In his twenties he had short careers as an army officer, a barrister and an investment banker. Over nine years he built up The New Covent Garden Soup Company and he and several colleagues then bought the embryonic Green & Black’s from its founder and grew it to an international brand. He is a Trustee of The Grosvenor Estate and director of its Food and Ag Tech division which invests in areas such as regenerative agriculture, vertical and insect farming. William farms organically and conventionally in East Anglia. He is an active environmentalist and a campaigner for better food and rural issues. He is President of The Suffolk Wildlife Trust. William lives in coastal Suffolk, where he is a Deputy Lieutenant, with his wife and two daughters.. To book your place for the annual dinner and to review menu options please go to www. nationaltrust.je/events or complete and return the enclosed form and post to Donna Le Marrec, National Trust for Jersey, La Cheve Rue, St Mary, JE33EN enclosing a cheque for £35 made payable to ‘National Trust for Jersey’.

D I S C O V E R | 35


E N J O Y | JÈRRIAISE

Combein qu’ou connaîssiz Jèrri? (How well do you know Jersey ?) BEN SPINK, Head of the Jèrriais Teaching Service. Tchiquefais1, when I’m teaching eune clâsse du Jèrriais2, I throw in a little geography quiz to test my students’ knowledge of our island. I’ll be lé preunmié3 to admit that it can be quite tricky, since we are more accustomed to seeing les vèrsions Françaises4 of Jersey’s place names alentou d’l’Île5. All the same, I can’t help but feel somewhat saddened by how disconnected we have become to la tèrre6 beneath our feet, both literally and metaphorically. So I share with you a small selection of place names that, when you know the Jèrriais meaning, reveal much more about Jersey than their equivalents in Angliais7. Believe me, the following is but eune papillote dé né8 on the tip of a fascinating iceberg and, if it interests you, I urge you to delve deeper into the wonderful array of place names we have on offer in our p’tite9 but historically rich island. We all know where Les Quennevais is, but I wonder how many of us know that the Jèrriais words Les Tchennevais tell us that it’s a place where hemp was once grown, primarily to supply the ship building industry with material from which to make rope. Have you ever thought about where Le Squez or Lé Stchez gets its name? It’s a small stream that dries up en Êté10, from the Jèrriais verb s’tchi, to dry.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Sometimes A Jèrriais class The first The French versions Around the Island The ground English A snowflake Little In summer

36 | D I S C O V E R

En Ville11, the Royal Square is well known to all Jersey folk, but perhaps less well known is the Jèrriais name, Lé Vièr Marchi, or the old market, which gives us a greater insight into the history of this important part of the townscape of St Hélyi12. The royal theme continues into King Street, but if we know that it’s called La Rue d’Driéthe in Jèrriais, we can see that it has not always been Jersey’s principal shopping street. This accolade once fell to La Grande Rue (Broad Street), hence La Rue d’Driéthe was literally the ‘road behind’ the main street. We also have our fair share of spooky haunts in Jersey. For example, Crack Ankle Lane near Sandybrook in St Peter is known as La Ruette à la Vioge13 in Jèrriais, with La Vioge14 being the word for a ghost or scarecrow-like monster, who supposedly lived in this eerie lane, preying on the injured pedestrians by taking them to his cave and eating them! Strange spirits might also be found lurking around Lé Betchet ès Cats15 or La Vallette au Meutre16. So what could the solution be to this disconnect from our local environment? Why, learning Jèrriais of course! I can honestly say that, in the quatre ans17 since I began learning our native language, I’ve learned more about Jersey than in the previous quarante18! For me, Jèrriais is like la clié19 to a precious treasure trove of delights just waiting to be discovered, right under nos pids20. Did I mention lessons are completely free? What are you waiting for?!

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

In town St Helier Little road of the monster Ghost, monster The plot of land of the cats Murder Valley Four years Forty The key Our feet


Activities to Try…

E N J O Y | A C TIVI TIES TO TR Y

The Trust’s practical workshops arealways popular and enable members to learn a new skill and have fun trying. Workshops take place in our historic buildings such as the Pressoir at The Elms and 16 New Street. Many events are members only but if not, there is always a price reduction for members of the Trust – so another reason to encourage others to join.

and homemade cake in the Pressoir. Participants will take home their obelisk and the skill and know how to make more! Meeting Point: The Elms Time: 10.00 am – 1.00pm Price: £30 For Members to include refreshments

Saturday 9 April

LEARN HOW TO MAKE ‘JERSEY WONDERS’

Les Mèrvelles dé Jèrri Come along to the Pressoir at The Elms and learn the art of making ‘Jersey Wonders’ with Jenny Le Maistre. Jersey housewives traditionally cooked their wonders as the tide went out. If they cooked them on an incoming tide, the fat in which the wonders were cooked would invariably overflow the pan! Meeting Point: The Elms Time: 2.00pm – 4.00pm Price: £15 for Members to include refreshments

Join local florist Claire Evans from Eden by Claire – Flowers by Design and learn how to make a beautiful flower display using locally grown peonies, ranunculis and other spring flowers. This workshop aims to be as environmentally friendly as possible with no sight or sound of oasis foam! Bring along a favourite container to create a stunning display.

Sunday 20 March

PAINTING /UPCYCLING WORKSHOP

Come along to The Elms and enjoy an afternoon of learning how to sand, paint and upcycle with Deborah de Jesus from Decorare using Frenchic paints. Deborah will teach you everything you ever wanted to know about upcycling and restoring furniture and painting wooden pieces and pre-loved objects. You will paint a beautiful bird box for your garden as an entrée into the world of ‘Frenchic’… Meeting Point: The Elms Time: 2.00pm – 4.00pm Price: £45 for Members to include refreshments and a bird box.

Sunday 12 June

SPRING FLORISTRY WORKSHOP

Meeting Point: The Elms Time: 2.00pm – 4.00pm Price: £45 For Members to include refreshments

Booking Essential. Please go to www. nationaltrust.je/events

Saturday 14 May

WILLOW GARDEN OBELISKS

Join environmentalist and ‘Little Green Man’ Alcindo Pinto in the orchard at The Elms and learn how to make a garden obelisk out of natural materials such as hazel or willow. Enjoy a cup of tea

All of the activities on this page are discounted for National Trust for Jersey Members. If you are not already a member of the Trust, please consider supporting us. Membership of the National Trust for Jersey starts at £35 per annum and you can join online: https://www.nationaltrust.je/ membership2021/ D I S C O V E R | 37


E N J O Y | L E A R N W I T H T HE AT RE

Learn with Theatre

THE SILENT GARDEN PUPPET SHOW T

his summer, Butterfly’s experienced team of storytellers and puppeteers are on hand to deliver a brand new puppet show inspired by the Trust’s latest children’s book, The Silent Garden, written by local author Penny Byrne. Using a brilliant mix of skilful puppetry and storytelling, the production tells the tale of two children who convince their grandparents to transform their barren garden into an oasis for wildlife. Featuring native creatures, brought to life in puppet form, the show delivers a strong environmental message for youngsters - including the importance of introducing suitable plants for pollinators into the garden and how to make space for mammals, insects and birds so as to create a healthy ecosystem. In order to encourage as many children as possible to participate, the Trust has programmed ten in-school puppet shows for Year One students, and fifteen performances at Le Moulin de Quétivel for the public – to include a workshop and an immersive walk through St Peter’s Valley Woods Le Don Gaudin. ‘Our work has a positive impact on children; incorporating the arts into learning enriches young people’s educational experiences and promotes confidence, communication, creativity and collaboration. In this latest show, we are excited to be working with the National Trust and author Penny Byrne to raise awareness of environmental issues including loss of wildlife habitats.’ Carla-Marie Metcalfe, Creative Producer, Butterfly

The Silent Garden Puppet Show kindly supported by

runs from Monday 11 July – Sunday 24 July. For ticket information, see page 54

38 | D I S C O V E R


Photo by Stephen Candy Photography

E N J O Y | LEA RN WITH THEATR E

Beth Greenwood performing with one of her puppets

Beth graduated from Arts Ed in 2015 and has been working extensively in theatre, especially children’s theatre, ever since. She has worked with Butterfly for a number of years, performing in Butterfly’s 2019 production of ‘Secrets Unlocked’ at 16 New Street and running drama and storytelling workshops for young people from the UK to Borneo. A talented theatre maker, Beth has a passion for puppetry. She makes all of her own puppets – not only for her own shows but also commissions for other companies. Beth uses reused and recycled materials to build her puppets, and wherever possible makes them sturdy and safe enough to ‘meet’ her young audiences ‘up close’ – both before, during and after the show. Her most recent project, ‘To the Forest’, involves pre-school-age children telling and acting out their own stories based on an array of natural objects.

Photo by Greta Mitchell Photography

Beth Greenwood Puppeteer, Butterfly

Beth Greenwood’s ‘Moonbird’ puppet, created for Handprint Theatre’s 2019 production for deaf and hearing families at the Edinburgh Fringe

D I S C O V E R | 39


E N J O Y | B U T T E R F L Y T HEAT RE

BUTTERFLY THEATRE RETURNS TO THE GEORGIAN HOUSE There is no better way to involve an audience than to actually involve them! In The Georgian House’s latest immersive production, theatregoers are invited to leave their opera glasses at the door and pick up a bidding paddle as they launch themselves into a live auction. Destitute lawyer, Philippe Journeaux, has fallen on hard times and has no other option than to auction off the contents of his family home, 16 New Street. As bidders assemble to claw over his priceless collection of fine art and antiques, the auction is cut short when a dead body is discovered. As bumbling detective Baptise Boivin arrives on the scene to investigate, members of the audience become suspects as Boivin attempts to unmask the murderer. Described as comedy / murder mystery / immersive theatre and

40 | D I S C O V E R

live auction rolled into one, ‘Going Once, Going Twice, Dead…!’ is a collaboration between Butterfly’s Creative Producer, Carla-Marie Metcalfe, and Trust Museums Manager, Catherine Ward, who commissioned the show to attract new audiences to 16 New Street. ‘It is hoped that the show will attract a more diverse audience including first time visitors. In addition by performing the show “promenadestyle” around the house, there is a really good opportunity to showcase as much of the historic building as possible. Audience members will be encouraged to participate due to the live auction element, as well as highlighting New Street’s unique collection of furniture and artefacts.'

The theatre production has been made possible due to the generous support of The Jersey Community Foundation, who awarded funds from the Channel Islands Lottery to support the project. More than 100 complimentary tickets will be given to local community groups and over 350 complimentary tickets to Key Stage 4 & 5 students, allowing the Trust to shares its historic buildings with the wider community.

‘GOING ONCE, GOING TWICE, DEAD!’ runs from Monday 28 March – Tuesday 5 April. For ticket information, see pages 48 & 49.


E N J O Y | BUTTERF L Y THEATR E

Carla-Marie Metcalfe Creative Producer, Butterfly After studying drama at Beaulieu Convent, Carla-Marie went on to train as an actor at Arts Ed. She joined Butterfly in 2014, playing Mabel Chiltern in Oscar Wilde’s ‘An Ideal Husband’ at 16 New Street and Cecily Cardew in ‘The Importance of Being Earnest’ at 16 New Street. After 7 years as an Associate Producer, CarlaMarie became Creative Producer of Butterfly in 2021. During the past year Carla-Marie has been instrumental in developing Butterfly Online and Butterfly Education and Training Programme. ‘It is so great to be back at 16 New Street for our fourth show, and what a show to return with! We have had an incredible response from our Jersey audiences for our comedy shows in the past, so this custom-written immersive comedy will be just what people need following a difficult couple of years!’

D I S C O V E R | 41


D I S C O V E R | F I S H L O CAL

How to choose seafood guilt-free Freddie Watson, Project Officer Blue Marine Foundation (Blue) In Jersey, we are lucky to have a good supply of fresh, local seafood. If you want to make better choices when it comes to buying seafood, here are some simple tips to follow:

EAT LOCAL

Make sure the seafood you are buying is local. Buying local guarantees a fresher product with superior taste, often travelling from sea to plate in under 24 hours. When you buy local, you’re also helping our local economy to grow. Jersey’s fishing industry directly supports over 180 jobs, from fishermen to growers, merchants and fishmongers. With the impacts of Brexit and competition from larger boats we should be doing every bit we can to support them. Imported seafood is also likely to have a higher carbon footprint than locally grown or caught seafood. Some locally grown shellfish such as oysters can actually store carbon! If you want to buy local seafood, check out the ‘Jersey Alternative Fish Market’ on Facebook. You can usually find seafood being advertised just hours after it has been caught, which is how buying seafood should be!

IN SEASON

Much like fruits and vegetables, fish and shellfish have seasons. We are used to eating wild garlic in spring, strawberries in the summer, pumpkins in autumn and brussels sprouts in winter,

42 | D I S C O V E R

yet seafood seasonality often slips through the net. Fish stocks migrate in and out of waters, resulting in periods when they are abundant and periods when they are non-existent. The modern world with advanced global distribution networks and freezing technologies have masked the seasonality of our fish stocks, making it easy for us to eat whatever fish we feel like. In Jersey, spider crabs move inshore in spring, mackerel is plentiful in the summer and oysters and scallops carry us through winter. Traditionally fishermen fish with the seasons, targeting different species in harmony with the weather and the natural movements of stocks. The bass fishery in Jersey is closed during February and March to protect stocks during their spawning season. This time of year, however, is perfect for catching large pollack, a delicious but underappreciated whitefish and close relative to cod! In the winter months lobsters, an important fishery in Jersey, are berried (carrying eggs). Unfortunately, Jersey doesn’t restrict fishing of berried lobsters, so be sure to avoid buying lobsters in the winter so that stocks can breed.

Sticking to a seasonal seafood diet has many benefits. It supports diverse and resilient fisheries where fishing effort is distributed more evenly across species and removes the focus on exploiting single stocks. Buying fish, like pollack for example, helps take pressure off fisheries such as crab and lobster, that are heavily targeted yearround. It also helps fishermen to buffer against threats such as climate change and increasing market uncertainty. Don’t be afraid to try something new!

LOW-IMPACT

Choosing seafood caught using low-impact fishing methods is another great way to reduce the environmental impact of your seafood diet. Low-impact fishing methods generally mean ‘static’ fishing gear. These types of fishing gears have less of an impact on the fragile sea floor and often result in lower rates of by-catch and mortality when compared to ‘mobile’ fishing methods such as trawling and dredging. Potting, netting, rod and line, hand diving and even spearfishing are all types of static fishing. Luckily in Jersey, the vast majority of our fleet use static fishing gears and any locally caught crab, lobster and bass will


D I S C O V E R | FIS H L O CAL

be caught using these low impact methods. Nearly 50 per cent of our scallops are caught through hand-diving, so they are readily available. This is one of the most sustainable forms of fishing and Blue Marine Foundation has created a Jersey Hand Dived label to promote local hand dived scallops. Look out for the label and ask for hand dived scallops in restaurants and when buying from fishmongers.

GET INFORMED!

It can be tricky to know whether or not your choice of seafood ticks all these boxes. Jersea.je are doing a great job to create awareness around sustainable fish choices, making it easier for people to make informed decisions. They also post recipes and plan to release instructional cooking videos! However, the easiest way to make sustainable decisions is to ASK! When ordering seafood from a restaurant or fish monger, don’t be afraid to ask if it’s local, if it’s in season and how it has been caught. Or if there is a seasonal seafood that you can’t see on the counter or on the menu, then ask why. We live in a demand driven world and questions like these might just make a difference on our little island.

Here’s a delicious 30-minute pollack recipe to spark some inspiration, courtesy of Jamie Oliver.

·· ·· ·

Ingredients

Baby new potatoes Skinless pollock fillets, from sustainable sources Higher-welfare Parma ham Ripe cherry tomatoes, on the vine Olive oil

Method

1. Preheat the oven to 190oC/gas 5. 2. Parboil the potatoes for 5 minutes in salted boiling water, drain and steam dry. 3. Season the fish with sea salt and black pepper, then wrap in ham. 4. Place in a baking dish with the tomatoes and potatoes. Season again and drizzle with oil. 5. Bake in the oven for 12 to 18 minutes, depending on the thickness of the fillets. Check the fish with a skewer and cook for another minute or so if it’s not done. Serve. D I S C O V E R | 43


EVERYBODY NEEDS GOOD NEIGHBOURS

E N J O Y | MEMBERSHIP

S A R A L A M PI T T

VICE PRESIDENT NATIONAL TRUST GUERNSEY

T

he National Trusts of Guernsey and Jersey have enjoyed a meaningful and supportive relationship for over sixty years, with reciprocal arrangements benefitting all between our sister islands. The last couple of years have prevented our annual catch ups, but we were very pleased to pay a surprise visit to NTJ’s impressive Black Butter Festival last October, when we stirred the bachin and enjoyed meeting NTJ volunteers, members and staff.

It is a notable tribute to your beautiful island that, although we could have travelled further afield, we were very drawn to visit Jersey. Everything felt familiar, we were not too far from home and we enjoyed a muchneeded change of scene. It’s a fact that recently, we Channel Islanders have definitely travelled more between our islands, mostly free from the hassle, uncertainty and avoiding an outright international travel ban. Since 1960, the National Trust of Guernsey has been preserving some of Guernsey’s finest landscapes and properties. National Trust for Jersey visitors may already be familiar with many of the miles of pathways which weave through our Trust land – always in places of outstanding natural beauty. For built heritage, the Trust manages eleven heritage properties, four of which are open for visitors to enjoy. The Fermain Tower and Les Caches Farm are award-winning. 44 | D I S C O V E R

Set in the heart of the Island, The Folk and Costume Museum at Saumarez Park is the Trust’s most longstanding visitor attraction, evolving from a oneroomed Guernsey Kitchen exhibition established in the 50’s, into an entire museum depicting Guernsey life since the 1800’s. Exhibitions are housed in original outbuildings, nestled around a splendid cobbled courtyard. Each year, the Founders’ Room hosts Trust events, including Art at The Park, a whole season of exhibitions by established artists and a Summer Exhibition for aspiring artists. Concerts, craft exhibitions and private events are held in the courtyard, finishing each year with the very popular Museum Christmas Shop and Christmas Courtyard Market. Followers of fashion will enjoy a visit to the annual Costume Exhibitions also at The Folk and Costume Museum. Dating from the Georgian period to within the last thirty years, the exhibitions are

unique to Guernsey and unique to the Channel Islands. A stroll up to The Victorian Shop and Parlour at 26 Cornet Street, St Peter Port, is a worthwhile trip for Victoriana fans housed within a medieval merchant town house. Caro Drake, Manageress and also our Costume Curator, has created an intriguing shop within a museum stocked with goods to suit all tastes, visitors of all ages and where tasteful contemporary meets romantic nostalgia. Haberdashers, sewers and textile creatives will love the historic artefacts displayed and unique items for sale, giving an historic nod to the property’s turn of the 20th century Le Poidevin’s Haberdashery. For those who love being by the coast in solitude and nature, Fermain Tower is a must-do during the shoulder months. For high summer days, in company and for warm sea swimming, it is also a gift of a place.


E N J O Y | M EMB ER S HIP

The Tower is available to hire as a selfcatering holiday home throughout the year and offers endless opportunities for nature lovers, walkers, stargazers and those who wish to step into a slower and more peaceful way of life. For walkers wishing to visit a heritage property en route to some of Guernsey’s finest cliff walks and National Trust of Guernsey lands, we suggest Les Caches Farm situated in the peaceful hamlet of Les Villets, Forest. The only restored traditional Guernsey Farmhouse and outbuildings open to the public is available to hire, but for visitors wishing to take time out in nature with a book, with a picnic, at an orchard table, we guarantee meadows, huge skies and the powerful sound of nature. The exceptional light, peacefulness and quiet sense of heritage at Les Caches Farm is arresting. For lovers of a warm sunset, the best outdoor seats can be found along the west face of The Walter Langlois Barn

where, after a long hot day, the granite barn wall becomes a stone radiator against which to lull away the day and enjoy a beautiful sunset.

without GPS navigation, all of which have been set up by NTG’s invaluable Geocache volunteer Claire Hyland.

Walkers will appreciate National Trust of Guernsey lands, located all around the Island with countryside routes and many paths along the South West Coast running inland and towards Pleinmont. A map of NTG places can be found at all of our public properties and is free to pick up. Please let us know if you would like us to post a copy. Links to our lands with details of walks can be found here https://nationaltrust.gg/ walks

If you happen to be visiting Guernsey at the start of July, please come along to our biggest annual event Lé Viaër Marchi, on Monday 4th July at Saumarez Park. Cancelled for the last two years, we are eager to restore Guernsey’s great gathering first started in 1970, based on the theme of an old Guernsey Market and always known to herald the start of Guernsey’s summer. Multi-generational crowds gather for a catch up, a cider, a bean jar and being part of a great party-throng.

If you are a Geocacher, our places feature on the worldwide Geocache Map and host some intriguing and ingenious caches. Since launching our sites six years ago, thousands of people have found off-the-beaten-track National Trust of Guernsey places. During the pandemic, so many people and families took long walks to places that would have been hard to find

National Trust of Guernsey warmly welcome National Trust for Jersey members, friends and family at all of our places and events. Our Channel Island relationship means a great deal and it is true to say that between us, we are looking after the past and ensuring a bright future for Channel Island heritage preservation. We hope to see you soon.. D I S C O V E R | 45


ENJOY |CORPORATE SPONSORSHIP

Corporate Partnerships Deliver Staff Benefits in Spades!

We are delighted that Apex Group, RBS International, Highvern and ARC have recently become corporate members of the Trust. Your interest and support is truly appreciated.

is particularly pertinent after the past two years and the impacts of the pandemic. These off site Trust based activities can really assist in re-building teams after the isolation afforded by virtual meetings and working from home.

It is indeed heartening that corporate partners are increasingly taking a real and active interest in the work of the Trust and in its cause by actively volunteering for a range of tasks including our ever increasing hedgerow management. Of course the benefits are twofold as employee engagement helps boost employee morale, improve team spirit and create a more positive workplace culture. This

Towards the end of 2021 we were able to help our corporate partners get their colleagues reconnected through volunteering and by running creative workshops. We are also looking forward to hosting a forthcoming staff and family Rock Pool Ramble in 2022

46 | D I S C O V E R

By becoming a corporate partner you not only increase employee loyalty and job satisfaction but

you can also attract future talent. Generation Y believe in giving back to the community through work so you can help make your business an attractive prospect by offering vibrant and fulfilling volunteer opportunities. Equally you could consider offering National Trust membership to every staff member. This would not only help the National Trust but it is an incredibly affordable staff benefit at only £35 per employee per annum.

For more details about the opportunities please contact Simone@nationaltrust.je


JOIN & GET INVOLVED

Events

We would like to encourage our members to book events online. This helps us not only to monitor ticket sales more effectively, but also helps to manage our limited resource within our small office team.

Of course if you would prefer not to book online you can telephone 483193 or call into the office between the hours of 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday. Log onto: www.nationaltrust.je/events D I S C O V E R | 47


JOIN & GET INVOLVED

march

Thursday 10 and Friday 11 March

SPRING MUSIC RECITAL AT 16 NEW STREET

Join Jonathan Hill, guest leader of the London Concert Orchestra and former lead violinist of Les Misérables, and pianist Nick Miller, Director of Music at St Margaret’s Putney, for an intimate recital at 16 New Street featuring works by Mascagni, Pärt, Bach, Elgar, Massanet, Kreisler, Paganini and Debussy. Meeting Point: 16 New Street Time: 19.30 – 20.30 Price: £12 for Members; £14 for NonMembers to include a drink on arrival Kindly supported by Ogier

Friday 18 March

SPRING IS JUST AROUND THE CORNER!

There is plenty of wildlife to discover on this route though old Gorey Village and the quiet country lanes of Grouville. We will be looking out for wildflowers in the hedgerows, listening to bird song and keeping our eyes peeled for Buzzard, Marsh Harrier, Kestrel and anything else which we may happen along. The views over Grouville Marsh towards the French Coast are spectacular on a clear day. Meeting Point: Long Beach car park, Grouville

48 | D I S C O V E R

Time: 10.00am Price: Free for Members; £10 for NonMembers Kindly supported by Jersey Water

Saturday 19 March

INTERTIDAL WALK WITH BOB TOMPKINS Enjoy this new walk from Le Hocq to Robins Bay and back with guide Bob Tompkins. It will include the usual mix of Marine Biology, Archaeology, Geology and bird life plus taking a look at the coastal strip and how it is subject to erosion. Wellies essential. Meeting Point: Le Hocq Slip Time: 12.30pm – 3.30pm Price: Free for Members; £10 for NonMembers Supported by Jersey Water

Sunday 20 March

PAINTING/UPCYCLING WORKSHOP

Come along to The Elms and enjoy learning how to sand, paint and upcycle with Deborah de Jesus from Decorare using Frenchic paints. Deborah will teach you everything you ever wanted to know about upcycling and restoring furniture and painting wooden pieces and preloved objects. You will paint a beautiful bird box for your garden as an entrée into the world of ‘Frenchic’…

Meeting Point: The Elms Time: 10.00am – 3.00pm Price: £45 for Members to include morning and afternoon refreshments and a bird box to take home for your garden. Please bring along a sandwich lunch.

Wednesday 30 & Thursday 31 March

LIVE THEATRE AT 16 NEW STREET: GOING ONCE, GOING TWICE… DEAD!

Grab yourself a bidding paddle and leave your opera glasses at the door as you launch yourself into a live auction at 16 New Street. Destitute lawyer, Philippe Journeaux, has fallen on hard times and has no other option than to auction off the contents of his family home. As bidders assemble to claw over his priceless collection of fine art and antiques, bidding is cut short when a dead body is discovered. As bumbling detective Baptise Boivin arrives on the scene to investigate, members of the audience become suspects as Boivin attempts to unmask the murderer. Meeting Point: 16 New Street Times: 2.00pm - 3.15pm; 6.00pm –7.15pm; 8.00pm –9.15pm Price: £15.00 for Members; £20.00 for Non-Members to include a drink on arrival Kindly supported by The Jersey Community Foundation with funds from the CI Lottery

Tickets must be booked on-line for all our events please visit www.nationaltrust.je/events


JOIN & GET INVOLVED

april

April (closed Mondays)

EXHIBITION AT LE MOULIN DE QUÉTIVEL: UNTIL YOU BECAME ME

This site-specific exhibition explores how water connects us to each other and our environment. After touring in Stroud and London, artists Karen Le Roy Harris and Miriam Sedacca bring their exhibition, which includes sculpture, installation and film to Jersey. The exhibition will be adapted to Le Moulin de Quétivel with a new soundscape created by Heather Ryall. It will also include a new film, supported by ArtHouse Jersey and shot on the island. Meeting Point: Le Moulin de Quétivel Time: 10.00am – 4.00pm Suggested donation: £4 Adults; £2 Children

Saturday 9 April

Friday 1 and Saturday 2 April

LIVE THEATRE AT 16 NEW STREET: GOING ONCE, GOING TWICE… DEAD! See Wednesday 30 & Thursday 31 March for details

Wednesday 6 – Sunday 10 April

SPRING WALKING WEEK

Enjoy a series of guided and self-guided walks around the Island including National Trust sites and properties. Enjoy themed walks such as wildflower walks, nature, bird tours, heritage and town trails. Visitors can enjoy ‘behind the scenes’ opportunities and visits to historic properties en-route. Price: Free for Members, £10 for NonMembers per walk Full programme to be produced in due course

Thursday 7 April

PETER LE ROSSIGNOL LECTURE – IN PURSUIT OF PLEASURE: ASSEMBLY ROOMS, PLEASURE GARDENS AND DEBAUCHED DIVERSIONS OF THE 18TH CENTURY Historian Peter Le Rossignol delves into the tempting array of decadent activities and pleasurable pursuits on offer during the Georgian age. Meeting Point: 16 New Street Time: 6.30pm –7.45pm Price: £8 for Members; £10 for Non-Members to include a drink on arrival Kindly Supported by Ogier

Thursday 8 April to Thursday 21

LEARN HOW TO MAKE ‘JERSEY WONDERS’ LES MÈRVELLES DÉ JÈRRI

Come along to the Pressoir at The Elms and learn the art of making ‘Jersey Wonders’ with Jenny Le Maistre. Jersey housewives traditionally cooked their wonders as the tide went out. If they cooked them on an incoming tide, the fat in which the wonders were cooked would invariably overflow the pan! Meeting Point: The Elms Time: 2.00pm – 4.00pm Price: £20 for Members to include refreshments

Tuesday 12th and Wednesday D I S C O V E R | 49


JOIN & GET INVOLVED

april

Tuesday 19th Wednesday 20th April

SPRING INTO ACTION SHARK EGG HUNT

Join our Education Officer on an Easter Egg hunt with a difference. Children will learn about local ray and shark species, and help gather scientific information for the Shark Trust’s national database on the species that we have in Jersey’s waters. (Real Easter Eggs are also up for grabs!) Meeting Point: Various Time: 11.00am - 12.00pm (16th) and 2:30pm - 3:30pm Price: £4 per child for Members. Kindly supported by Jersey Electricity

Wednesday 20th and Thursday 21st April

SPRING INTO ACTION – POLLINATOR PLANTS

Location: Victoria Tower Families are invited to join our education officer at Victoria Tower to learn all about pollinators, and select and sow seeds to grow their own at home. Bring home seed bombs or plugs to grow on and create your own Pollinator Patches (or even Pollinator Pots) that will become part of the growing Channel Island network of patches. Meeting Point: Victoria Tower (please park next to the Jersey Accommodation and Activity Centre and walk the short distance to the Tower) Price: £4 per child for Members Times: 10.00am – 11.00am Kindly supported by Jersey Electricity

Friday 29th April 13th April

NEWTS & NYMPHS – POND-DIPPING

Location: Frances Le Sueur Centre Families are invited to join our Education Officer for an exploration of the wildlife that resides under the surface of the pond at the Frances Le Sueur Centre. Time: 10:30am – 11:30am Meeting point: outside the Frances Le Sueur Centre Price: Free for Members - children to be accompanied by an adult Kindly supported by Jersey Electricity

Thursday 14th April 50 | D I S C O V E R

ROCKPOOL RAMBLE

Join our Education Officer for a guided walk to the low-water mark and an exploration of the creatures and their habitats. See what you can find…. Meeting Point: La Rocque Harbour Time: 11.30am - 1.00pm Price: Free for Members - children to be accompanied by an adult.. Parking: La Rocque Harbour Car Park Kindly supported by Jersey Electricity

Saturday 16th,

ANNUAL DINNER AT LA MARE WINE ESTATE

The National Trust for Jersey Annual Dinner for members and their guests will follow the Annual General Meeting. Our guest speaker for the evening will be William Kendell. Meeting Point: La Mare Wine Estate Time: 7.00pm–10.00pm Price: £35 to include a glass of Prosecco on arrival

Sunday 1st May

Tickets must be booked on-line for all our events please visit www.nationaltrust.je/events


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may

MAY DAY AT THE ELMS

Join the Helier Morris Men for dancing in the courtyard at The Elms and then enjoy a picnic underneath the blossom and music from Sonneaux in the orchard as we celebrate the start of the summer. Make a crown of willow and flowers and enjoy the music and dancing. Meeting Point: The Elms Time: 1.00pm to 4.00pm Price: £2.00 entry and £5 to create a willow crown. Please bring along a picnic.

Saturday 7 May

OPEN MILLING

Visit the only remaining working watermill on the Island and experience the whole milling process from start to finish. Join the rangers as they open the sluice gates, admire the ancient waterwheel as it springs into action and meet our very own miller and his wife who are milling the Trust’s unique stoneground flour. Meeting Point: Le Moulin de Quétivel Time: 10.00am – 4.00pm Price: Free for Members & Under 6s; NonMembers £4 / £2

Saturday 14 May

WILLOW GARDEN OBELISKS

Join environmentalist and ‘Little Green Man’ Alcindo Pinto in the orchard at The Elms and learn how to make a garden obelisk out of natural materials such as hazel or willow. Enjoy a cup of tea and homemade cake in the Pressoir. Participants will take home their obelisk and the skill and know how to make more! Meeting Point: The Elms Time: 10.00 am – 1.00pm Price: £35 to include refreshments

Tuesday 17 & 24 May

TOTS’ TALES AT THE MILL

Bring your little ones to the mill for a special storytelling and play session just for them. Every session will be delivered in an interactive format, encouraging your child to take part and learn stories through drama, action, songs and roleplay. Suitable for children aged 6 months - 4 years. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Meeting Point: Le Moulin de Quétivel

Times: 1.15pm – 2.00pm Price: £3 per child for Members; £5 NonMembers; Free entry for accompanying adults and Under Ones Kindly Supported by Ogier

Saturday 28 May– Wednesday 1 June

#LOVENATURE FESTIVAL

The National Trust for Jersey is staging its annual environment festival #LoveNature over the beginning of the May half term. Set in and around St Ouen’s Bay in Jersey’s National Park and at other Sites of Special Interest owned by the Trust, the event coincides with and showcases the open afternoon at Le Noir Pré to see the wild orchids in all their glory. Participants are invited to enjoy a long weekend of all things ‘green’ such as scenic walks, bird tours, dawn chorus and sunset activities, rockpool rambles, bug safaris, and a host of other wildlife activities. Full programme to be produced in due course Kindly supported by Jersey Electricity

Saturday 4 June D I S C O V E R | 51


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june

ROYAL ST PETER’S VALLEY

Find out about St Peter’s Valley’s Royal heritage at Jersey’s only remaining working watermill, Le Moulin de Quétivel. Discover why the King’s tenants living in the parish of St Brelade were required to grind their grain at Quétivel in the Middle Ages and who was living at the Mill when Queen Victoria visited St Peter’s Valley in 1859. Various events are planned to celebrate the Platinum Jubilee including a presentation in the kitchen and a guided walk to two more Royal mills: Gargate and Gigoulande. Gift shop open and refreshments available. Meeting Point: Le Moulin de Quétivel Times: 10.00 am – 4.00pm Price: Free entry for Trust Members and Under 6s; Non-Members £4 / £2

Tuesday 7 June

TOTS’ TALES AT THE MILL

Bring your little ones to the mill for a special storytelling and play session just for them. Every session will be delivered in an interactive format, encouraging your child to take part and learn stories through drama, action, songs and roleplay. Suitable for children aged 6 months - 4 years. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

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Meeting Point: Le Moulin de Quétivel Times: 1.15pm – 2.00pm Price: £3 per child for Members; £5 NonMembers; Free entry for accompanying adults and Under Ones Kindly Supported by Ogier

Sunday 12 June

SPRING FLORISTRY WORKSHOP

Join local florist Claire Evans from Eden by Claire – Flowers by Design and learn how to make a beautiful flower display using locally grown peonies, ranunculi’s and other spring flowers. This workshop aims to be as environmentally friendly as possible so no oasis foam! Bring along a favourite container to create a stunning display. Meeting Point: The Elms, La Chève Rue, St Mary Time: 2.00pm – 4.00pm Price: £45 for Members to include refreshments

Tuesday 14 June

TOTS’ TALES AT THE MILL

Bring your little ones to the mill for a special storytelling and play session just for them. Every session will be delivered in an interactive format, encouraging your child to take part and learn stories through drama, action, songs and role-

play. Suitable for children aged 6 months - 4 years. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Meeting Point: Le Moulin de Quétivel Times: 1.15pm – 2.00pm Price: £3 per child for Members; £5 NonMembers; Free entry for accompanying adults and Under Ones Kindly Supported by Ogier

Friday 17 and Saturday 18 June

SUNSET CONCERTS AT MONT GRANTEZ

Enjoy live music in the beautiful setting of the natural amphitheatre at Grantez overlooking St. Ouen’s Bay. Bring a picnic and enjoy fantastic live music as the sun sets. Friday night sees Giles Robson and his London Band playing the Blues. On Saturday international Vocalist Jessica Lloyd Chays will perform. This is the ultimate way to experience the delights of Jersey at this very special time of year Meeting Point: Mont Grantez, St Ouen Time: 5.30pm – 9.00pm Price: £10.00 for Members, £15.00 for Non-Members and £5.00 for children over 5 years. All income from ticket sales goes towards the Coastline Campaign and we aim to protect a further 1000 vergees by 2036.. Parking: (Limited parking so please consider walking, cycling or using public transport). Kindly supported by JE3.Com

Tickets must be booked on-line for all our events please visit www.nationaltrust.je/events


JOIN & GET INVOLVED

july

Saturday 18 June

TRINITY LANES AND FOOTPATHS

Enjoy a wonderful stroll around the small lanes and coastal paths near Bouley Bay with Bob Tompkins. From the carpark off of La Vielle Charrière enjoy a lovely walk around the small lanes and footpaths in Trinity down to Bouley Bay Hill and its scenic views before following the coastal footpath back. Meeting Point: La Vielle Charrière Time: 2.00pm – 4.00pm Price: Free for Members £10.00 Non Members Kindly supported by Jersey Water

Tuesday 21 June

TOTS’ TALES AT THE MILL

Bring your little ones to the mill for a special storytelling and play session just for them. Every session will be delivered in an interactive format, encouraging your child to take part and learn stories through drama, action, songs and roleplay. Suitable for children aged 6 months - 4 years. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Meeting Point: Le Moulin de Quétivel Times: 1.15pm – 2.00pm

Price: £3 per child for Members; £5 NonMembers; Free entry for accompanying adults and Under Ones Kindly Supported by Ogier

Friday 24 June

JUDITH QUERÉE’S GARDEN

Enjoy a visit to Judith Querée’s stunning award winning garden nestled in the depths of rural St. Ouen. An RHS partner, the garden is small, but jam packed with over 2000 mainly herbaceous perennials from all over the world; all nurtured in accordance with organic principles. There is a large and beautiful bog garden, woodland plants and a Clematis in flower trailing somewhere in the garden every day of the year. Judith has created the garden from scratch over the years and around every corner of the garden and in the meadows you will find sculptures which they collect. The tour of the garden will end with homemade cake and tea on the patio. Meeting Point: St Ouen’s Parish hall with a short stroll to the garden. Time: 2.00pm – 4.00pm Price: £25 for members to include afternoon tea.

Tuesday 28 June

TOTS’ TALES AT THE MILL

Bring your little ones to the mill for a special storytelling and play session just for them. Every session will be delivered in an interactive format, encouraging your child to take part and learn stories through drama, action, songs and roleplay. Suitable for children aged 6 months - 4 years. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Meeting Point: Le Moulin de Quétivel Times: 1.15pm – 2.00pm Price: £3 per child for Members; £5 NonMembers; Free entry for accompanying adults and Under Ones Kindly Supported by Ogier

Thursday 29 and Friday 30 June

SUMMER MUSIC RECITAL AT 16 NEW STREET Join Jonathan Hill, guest leader of the London Concert Orchestra and former lead violinist of Les Misérables, and pianist Nick Miller, Director of Music at St Margaret’s Putney, for an intimate recital at 16 New Street Meeting Point: 16 New Street Time: 19.30 – 20.30 Price: £12 for Members; £14 for NonMembers to include a drink on arrival Kindly Supported by Ogier D I S C O V E R | 53


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july & august

Friday 1 to Friday 31 July

30 BAYS IN 30 DAYS

Jump in this July and swim in a variety of bays throughout the month. A fun way of making the most of our beautiful island and the feeling of having achieved something in the summer rather than it just flying by. Sea swimming has proven benefits for health and wellbeing and participants can visit new places or those bays they haven’t visited for years. Sea swimming makes you feel alive and loving life! Join the group swim at the start of the month then decide where and when to swim, joining the final group swim at the end of the month Meeting Point: There will be a launch event and celebratory swim in St Brelade’s Bay on Friday 1st July at 6.00pm and on Sunday 31st July at 4.30pm. We also hope to stage a mid-month swim at La Rocque. All details to be advertised nearer the time.

Wednesday 20, Thursday 21, Friday 22, Saturday 23 and Sunday 24 July

THE SILENT GARDEN PUPPET SHOW

The Trust’s brand new children’s book, featuring Cyril the Squirrel and Friends, is brought to life as an enchanting puppet show staged at Jersey’s only remaining working watermill. Using a brilliant mix of skilful puppetry and live action, the 54 | D I S C O V E R

show tells the story of two children who convince their grandparents to transform their barren garden into an oasis for wildlife. Meeting Point: Le Moulin de Quétivel Times:10.00am - 11.00am; 12.30pm 1.30pm; 3.00pm - 4.00pm Price: Prices £5 Children and £10 Adults (Members) and £6 Children and £12 Adults (Non Members) Kindly Supported by Ogier

21st July – 2nd September

SUMMER HOLIDAYS

The school summer holidays will see the weekly return of Bug Safaris at some exciting new locations, Rockpool Rambles and Waste-Free Wednesdays at The White House with our Education Officer. We will also be offering moth-trapping and spider-hunting at Victoria Tower throughout the summer holidays. Kindly supported by Jersey Electricity.

AUGUST

Tuesday 2 August

TEXTILE ART WITH BEVERLEY SPECK

Come along to the White House in St Ouen’s Bay and enjoy a stitching project with a bee theme…! Meeting Point: The White House (Le Don Hilton) Time: 6pm – 9pm Price: £20 for Members to include refreshments.

Saturday 13 August

INTERTIDAL WALK WITH BOB TOMPKINS Enjoy this tidal walk from La Hocq to Icho Tower and back with guide Bob Tompkins. It will include the usual mix of Marine Biology, Archaeology, Geology and bird life plus taking a look at the coastal strip and how it is subject to erosion. 3.5 hrs and wellies will be needed. Meeting Point: Le Hocq Slip Time: 1:30pm – 5:00pm Price: Free for Members; £10 for NonMembers Supported by Jersey Water

Wednesday 17 August

LA VEIL’YE

Enjoy an evening of music, poetry and storytelling at Le Câtel Fort overlooking Grève de Lecq Bay with Sonneaux and other performers. La Veil’ye is a traditional ‘get together’ from temps passé when families would have supper and sing and tell stories. Meeting Point: Le Câtel Fort Time: 7:00pm – 9:00pm Price: £10 for Members to include a supper of Jersey cabbage Loaf and a selection of cheeses. Bring your own drinks and crockery/cutlery.

Tickets must be booked on-line for all our events please visit www.nationaltrust.je/events


The Hedge Fund Investing in wildlife by planting new hedgerows across the Island.

About The National Trust for Jersey – Our vision is to protect Jersey’s natural beauty, rich wildlife and historic places for ever and for everyone. If you are a local resident, please support our work by becoming a member.

A Gift for Nature

www.nationaltrust.je

The Bulb Fund

Looking for a gift that is a little different for a friend or relative who cares about the natural environment? Then why not choose one of our ‘Gift for Nature Cards? A £5 Card purchases 1 metre of a hedge, or buy 30 spring bulbs for a £10 card. The £25 card ensures that one native tree is planted and cared for on your behalf by the National Trust for Jersey.

Investing in wildlife by planting new bulbs across the Island.

About The National Trust for Jersey – Our vision is to protect Jersey’s natural beauty, rich wildlife and historic places for ever and for everyone. If you are a local resident, please support our work by becoming a member.

www.nationaltrust.je

Choose between: £5 will enable the Trust to plant and maintain 1 metre of hedge

The Tree Fund Investing in wildlife by planting native trees across the Island. About The National Trust for Jersey – Our vision is to protect Jersey’s natural beauty, rich wildlife and historic places for ever and for everyone. If you are a local resident, please support our work by becoming a member.

£10 will enable the Trust to plant and maintain 30 bulbs

www.nationaltrust.je

£25 will enable the Trust to plant and maintain 1 Native Tree

These gift cards are truly the gift that keeps on giving, protecting and saving… Email for further details at enquiries@nationaltrust.je

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Telephone 01534 483193 | email: enquiries@nationaltrust.je | www.nationaltrust.je | Twitter: @NatTrustJersey


SPRING 2022

CONTACT DISCOVER

Get in touch. We would love to hear your questions, comments and ideas. The National Trust for Jersey The Elms La Chève Rue St Mary Jersey JE3 3EN Telephone 01534 483193 enquiries@nationaltrust.je

MAKING IT HAPPEN DESIGN & PRODUCTION TEAM The Idea Works Limited Regency House Regent Road St Helier Jersey JE2 4UZ Telephone 01534 755400 info@theideaworks.com

EDITORIAL TEAM Donna Le Marrec and Charles Alluto. Contributors: Jonathan Renouf, John Pinel, Charlie Malet de Carteret, Ben Spinks, Sara Lampitt, Jersey Water, Conrad Evans, Jon Rault, Cris Sellares, Robin Kelly, Jon Parkes, Erin Cowham, Catherine Ward, Simone Springett, Sarah Hill, Appin Williamson, Freddie Watson

PHOTOGRAPHS Credits to: Paul Marshall, The Jersey Catch, Societe Jersiaise, John Lord, John Ovenden, Visit Jersey and the Jersey Evening Post. Front Cover: Morel Farm by John Lord ©2022 – Discover Magazine is published by The National Trust for Jersey. The publisher, editor and authors accept no responsibility in respect of any errors, omissions, misstatements, mistakes or references. Correct at the time of print February 2022

Discover is printed using only paper from FSC/ PEFC suppliers from well managed forests. This magazine can be recycled and we encourage you to do so at your recycling point. Passing the magazine onto a friend counts as recycling too.