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90 years

THE MUR R AY STATE

M

NEWS

of excellence

October 19, 2017 | Vol. 92, No. 8

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THE EXPECTATION OF FEAR Gun violence leads to increased safety measures

Destinee Marking || Staff writer dmarking@murraystate.edu Local law enforcement officers are encouraging individuals to run, hide and fight if ever caught in a mass shooting situation. Murray State Police Chief of Police James Herring said he encourages Murray State community members to visit the department’s website, which outlines the procedures for active shooter situations and other emergency situations. “The Murray State Police teach the Run-Hide-Fight program developed and promoted by the FBI,” according to the website. Run-Hide-Fight promotes escaping the situation when this is a safe option, hiding in a quiet, dark room or fighting the active shooter if your life is in danger. Herring said the department evaluates incidents that occur across the country and learns from them. “For instance, we are reviewing our written orders with officers now regarding the search and transport of prisoners after the Texas Tech police officer was killed,” Herring said.

Two of the most recent mass shootings garnering widespread media coverage took place in Las Vegas, Nevada and in Edgewood, Maryland. On Oct. 1, 59 people were killed and 241 people were injured during a shooting at a concert. On Oct. 18, at least three people were killed and two people were injured during a shooting at a business park. Devin Parrish, senior from Ledbetter, Kentucky, said the shooting in Las Vegas was upsetting for him. “Immediately after the news broke, I knew it was going to be bad,” Parrish said. “I wasn’t looking forward to the fallout of it.” Parrish said the incident made him think about things differently here in Kentucky. He said he imagined what the scene would look like if someone carried out the Las Vegas incident here, but he said he realizes there is a point when he would not be able to do anything about it. Calloway County Sheriff Sam Steger said individuals are justified in being scared and anxious following recent events. Steger said a main concern right now is the possibility of a copycat situation.

He said there are individuals out there who hear this is the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history and could be planning to duplicate the event. “People should be more vigilant now than, probably, ever,” Steger said. “I always encourage people to be alert to your surroundings. What people tend not to do is call and tell us about something suspicious because they’re scared they’re going to offend somebody or misjudge somebody.” Besides being alert and reporting suspicious behavior, Steger said he does not know if there is a solution to this violence. Steger said individuals with the intent to harm will always find ways to obtain weapons and carry out violence, but he does support strict and strong background checks on individuals purchasing weapons. “If we’re going to make improvements, that’s where the improvements would be,” Steger said. In the current system, Steger said people can buy weapons and then sell them without the buyer re-registering the weapon, and he believes this should be changed.

To stay safe in situations involving an active shooter, Steger said no matter if it occurs indoors or outdoors, people should locate exits and run. He said sometimes when people are caught indoors, exits are limited, so the next option is to seek cover. In both indoor and outdoor situations, Steger said getting on the ground and acting dead is also a way to stay safe. Steger said if caught in a situation and law enforcement has not arrived yet, he supports individuals using their own weapons to protect themselves. “I’m a firm believer that you should always protect yourself, but I’m also a believer in justifying the use of deadly force,” Steger said. If people decide to take action, Steger said it is important they put their weapons down and hands up when they see police arrive. After incidents such as the one in Las Vegas, local law enforcement increases security presence at local events in an attempt to ease people’s worries. Hope Harbor Church in Murray is having an active shooter training on Sunday, October 22 at 10:30 a.m. Hope Harbor Church is located on KY-94.

‘We have delivered on the promise’ Governor Bevin releases plan to fix the ailing pension system

Ashley Traylor News Editor atraylor@murraystate.edu

Gov. Bevin and GOP legislators unveiled on Wednesday, ‘Keeping the Promise,’ the plan they say will fix the $64 billion pension debt in the Commonwealth. “For months and months, we have been hashing out in great detail how we’re going to deliver on the promise of saving the pension system,” Bevin said. “Everybody wants it to be done. Everybody knows it needs to be done. It’s easy to talk about doing it. It’s harder to actually come up with a document and a bill to allow it to happen.” Upon releasing highlights of the plan, Bevin said the state will continue to meet the obligations to current and retired employees, including teachers. He met with several educational and retirement organizations for “their voices to be heard” about the pension system. Bevin said in the past, legislators did not meet their ob-

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ligation to contribute to the pension fund, which resulted in the multi-billion deficit the state now faces. Bevin said it will take the next 30 years for the system to be fully funded but that this is a step in the right direction. “We’ve got a good, good bill,” Bevin said. “And it will take time. Sure, everyone wishes we could get it taken care of in 3, 5 or 10 years.” Bevin said to meet the needs of the public workforce, the pension cannot be a quick fix because it would violate promises.

Kentucky Teacher Retirement System (KTRS)

The proposed plan would move new Kentucky teachers to a 401(k)-type plan instead of the current pension system. As for current teachers, those with 27 years of service would also be moved to a 401(k)-type of plan. However, Bevin said he recognizes that K-12 teachers do not pay into Social Security and therefore their plans (for

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those with 27 years or more of service) would be more generous than other state employees to compensate. Teachers who have less than 27 years of service but more than five years will remain in the defined benefit plan (pension system) until they meet the full unreduced retirement eligibility (27 years of service or age 60). Current teachers with less than five years of service in the pension system will have the option to transfer to the new 401(k)-type plan. Bevin said he is not going to raise the retirement age for teachers as suggested by the PFM consultants. “We’re not going to do that,” Bevin said. “We’re going to meet every promise that was made to everybody. We’re going to remove all of that concern. We’re not going to change anything for any retiree. We’re not going to change anyone’s retirement dates. We’re going to allow everyone in the retirement system to continue on. We’re going to

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honor the people who are hazard duty folks by recognizing that is a different job than most of the rest of us have in government. We are going to protect everybody at every turn.” One benefit that teachers were hoping would not be eliminated, was, in fact, put on the chopping block. Currently, teachers can use unused sick days throughout their career to boost their pension benefits. School districts will be able to continue to provide payment for up to 30 percent of a retiring member’s accumulated sick leave. Sick days will translate into enhanced retirement benefits for those retiring on or before July 1, 2023. After that date, teachers can no longer ‘cash in’ their unused sick days. Another change proposed in the plan would be to suspend cost of living adjustments for current retirees for five years. Teachers who retire in the future will not be eligible for a cost of living adjustment until they have been in retirement

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for five years. Bevin did say that there would not be a reduction for any previously granted cost of living adjustments.

Similar to teachers, there will be no reduction in cost of living adjustments for current retirees and no change to the retirement age for employees who fall under the KERS. Most employees will remain in their defined benefit plan, unless they were hired after July 2014 because they are currently enrolled in a cash balance program, rather than a pension. Those employees who were hired after 2014 are considered Tier 3 employees, and Bevin said these employees will immediately roll over into a 401(k)-type plan. New employees will also fall under a 401(k)-type plan. Under KERS, Tier 1 and Tier 2 employees on a defined benefit plan will continue to accrue full unreduced retirement eligibility. When they reach 27 years

of service, they will be placed under the new 401(k)-type plan. Employees will also be required to make an additional 3 percent contribution to fund the retirement health care program. Bevin will call a special session within the next month to vote on the plan. If passed, it would go into effect on July 1, 2018. Bevin did not reveal his plan to fund this new system but said that is something lawmakers will consider in the regular session in January. For now, he believes this plan will ‘keep the promise’ made to every state employee. “When you have a plan that fulfills every promise, that delivers on everything that is contractually required, that addresses every single person and takes into consideration both what is legally and morally appropriate, and that even when it’s done everybody is slightly unhappy with, you know you have the right plan, and we have the right plan,” Bevin said.

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Kentucky Employee Retirement System- Nonhazardous (KERS-NH)


The News

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October 19, 2017

News Editor: Ashley Traylor Assistant News Editor: Lindsey Coleman Page Designer: Savanna Hatfield Phone: 270-809-4468 Twitter: MurrayStateNews

News

Transfer students face credit hour dilemmas Sabra Jackson || Staff writer sjackson30@murraystate.edu

A transfer student from Western Kentucky University is struggling to stay on track for graduation, after seven credits did not transfer to Murray State, making her a year behind her classmates. Lauren Campbell, junior from Hopkinsville, Kentucky, transferred to Murray State as a sophomore, but her classification according to the university was a freshman. “It put me almost a semester behind because of some other things like having to retake classes because of things not transferring right,” Campbell said. Campbell is not the only student who has found herself in a tight spot with transfer credits, as this is a national problem for college students. The Government Accountability Office released a report that revealed 43 percent of college credits are lost when undergraduate students transfer institutions. According to a U.S. World Report, over a third of college students will transfer throughout their college career, some may move several times. Maria Rosa, director of the Transfer Center, said a policy through SACS, Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, states Murray State must accept credits from regionally accredited institutions. Rosa said when students carry their credits over to Murray State, there is a process to see how their cred-

its can be assigned to other courses such as general electives. Each course is compared to those of Murray State via the course description. If the course matches, the credits are given. “The first time we are evaluating a course in anything that’s in the major specific areas, we are working with faculty in the departments to make that decision,” Rosa said. “We are using their expertise.” Rosa said they also look at the syllabus and course sequencing to see how courses match-up. For example, if Murray State is teaching a sequence of seven classes and the student is transferring from an institution that is teaching the course in five classes, the transfer center evaluates the course to see how much is taught in those five classes compared to seven classes. “We work with the department to massage that to figure out if we can make further adjustments, so it’s a process,” Rosa said. The transfer center works with students to evaluate the course description. If a student feels as though they have credits that did not transfer but meet a course description offered at Murray State, Rosa said they can go into the transfer center and discuss the situation with them. “So typically I will go through those fall courses with them and say ‘okay, show me where this should be working into your major,’” Rosa said.

Rhiannon Branch/The News

Students courses must be equivalent to Murray State’s classes to apply to their Racer audit. “So it’s really just looking at them one-by-one.” Rosa encourages students to look into course substitution within the major to allow their credits to work toward their benefit. While about 43 percent of students encounter transferring problems, many transfer students do not face issues with their college credit. Eli Liske, Murray State alum from Covington Illinois, transferred from Rend Lake College. He said all his cred-

its transferred and he actually had too many. “Too much transferred,” Liske said. “I couldn’t use them all.” Liske came in as a junior, but because of his credits, he was considered a senior. Liske said nine students he knew of that transferred in at the same time as him and all of their credits transferred with ease. Raylee Smarr, senior from Versailles, Kentucky, said all of her credits transferred

when she made the transition from Bellarmine University. Smarr said there were a few credits that turn into elective credits, but she was grateful toward her advisor at Murray State for making the transition smooth. “I had a really good time with my advisor,” Smarr said. “She did a good job with integrating me into the program.” Smarr transferred to Murray State because she decided to go into communication disorders, and she

said Murray State has a good program. “I like that [Murray State] is really educationally inclined. They work one-onone with you,” Smarr said. “You’re not a number, you’re a name.” With the process being easy, Smarr said it has made it better to focus on her academics. “I think that being easily integrated in made it less stressful, which made me focus on other things,” Smarr said.

University information security team goes phishing Destinee Marking Staff writer

dmarking@murraystate.edu

The Murray State information security team is promoting awareness about phishing attacks that can put faculty, staff and students in danger. Duane Dycus, senior security analyst, said the information security team, with the help of the service desk and other technicians on campus, randomly chose 10,000 active faculty, staff and student accounts to send fake phishing emails to. “Phishing scams are designed to steal consumers’ personal information,” according to Murray State’s support site. “They often use doctored and fraudulent email messages to trick recipients into divulging private information, such as credit card numbers, account usernames, passwords, and even social security numbers.” The email warned the recipient his account would be locked if he did not log into MyGate. A link to MyGate was provided,

Rhiannon Branch/The News

When a student opens the phishing link and logs on to their MyGate, this messages appears on the screen. but clicking on the link took the recipient to a fake site that looks similar to the official MyGate. If the recipient entered his username and password, he was redirected to a training page that explained phishing attacks and

how to avoid them in the future. “Over the past few years, the phishing attacks that target our email accounts have gotten more sophisticated,” Dycus said. “As a result, we’ve seen a rise in the number of

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students and employees who fall victim to them. In response, we decided to do more in promoting awareness about phishing attacks and scams, while simultaneously providing training to people.”

Dycus said out of every individual who opened the email, nearly 35 percent logged into the fake MyGate and were then presented with the training page. He said this number is concerning, but those who made the mistake were presented with information that benefits them. “By demonstrating a phishing attack through a real-world example, we are confident that some individuals who completed the exercise will now avoid being a victim to a malicious email in the future,” Dycus said. When it comes to real phishing emails, Dycus said individuals can contact the service desk to inquire about the legitimacy of emails they are not sure about. He said he encourages people to forward spam emails to abuse@murraystate.edu. Dycus said if an individual has provided their username and password to a fake website, they should immediately change all Murray State passwords or any other accounts that use the same password.

To avoid falling victim to phishing attacks, Dycus said if a message seems suspicious, take the time to analyze it: analyze who sent the email and the URL it asks the recipient to go to. He said individuals should opt for manually typing out the URL instead of clicking on links. Makayla Knight, sophomore from Franklin, Kentucky, said receiving the email reminded her how cautious internet users have to be. Knight said she clicked the link in the email, but decided not provide her username and password. She said she noticed the URL was incorrect. The URL of the fake MyGate page was murraystated.com, so she immediately closed the page. “It’s really scary how easily someone can hack and scam people in today’s society,” Knight said. To learn more about identifying and avoiding phishing attacks and to see examples of common emails individuals receive, visit the Murray State support site (support. murraystate.edu).


The News

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October 19, 2017

Sports Soccer rises in the rankings Sports Editor: Bryan Edwards Assistant Sports Editor: Blake Sandlin Page Designer: Rosalyn Churchman Phone: 270-809-4481 Twitter: MSUSportsNews

Gage Johnson Staff writer

gjohnson17@murraystate.edu

Bryan Edwards/The News

Senior forward Harriet Withers winds back to shoot the ball against Austin Peay.

Murray State soccer can finish the regular season undefeated in OVC play and potentially receive an at-large bid for the NCAA tournament with wins against Eastern Illinois and Southern Illinois-Edwardsville this weekend. The Racers improved to 11-1-2 overall and 6-0-2 in conference play with wins over Austin Peay and Belmont last weekend. The upcoming games have huge implications in regards to tournament rankings. One win or two ties for Murray State this week would give them the regular season OVC title outright, but if they fail to do so, it opens the door for Tennessee Tech or Eastern Kentucky to take the regular season title. Murray State is currently sitting at 27th in the RPI rankings, the highest rank in program his-

Graphic courtesy of Rosalyn Churchman/The News

Statistics compiled from OVC Sports.

tory. A win in both of the next two games could help the Racers crack the top 25 in the rankings, and could earn them an at-large bid for the first time in school history. This means that regardless of how they fare in the OVC tournament, they could still play in the NCAA tournament. Head Coach Jeremy Groves said he likes his team’s chances at earning that chance to play in the postseason, but wants the focus to be on the present. “I’ve liked our focus with our team throughout the season,” Groves said. “We can’t let the stuff like tweets about RPI and stuff like that get to us. “ Murray State will take on Eastern Illinois in the first of two home matchups this week. The Panthers come into the game struggling in conference play. They have yet to win in OVC play with a record of 0-8-1 and an overall record of 5-11-2. The stakes will be raised in the second of two matchups

during the week against Southern Illinois-Edwardsville. Last season, the Cougars defeated the Racers in the OVC tournament title game with a goal with 12 seconds remaining in overtime. Southern Illinois-Edwardsville comes in at 6-6-2 and a conference record of 4-2-1. Sophomore forward Emma Heise said she’s excited for the chance to compete for a title and get revenge this weekend. “If anything, I think we’re just excited because we know what’s ahead of us and we know we’re doing well, and that we need to clinch just one more game,” Heise said. “I think Sunday’s game has a place in us that we’re a little bitter about, and we want to get back at them and show them that we deserve this title.” Murray State will matchup against Eastern Illinois at 3 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 19, and at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 22, with both games being played at Cutchin Field.

Graphic courtesy of Rosalyn Churchman/The News

Statistics compiled from NCAA.

Tennis finishes fall season Cory Sharber

Contributing writer csharber@murraystate.edu

The fall season for Murray State’s women’s tennis team has concluded and now they will await the start of their spring season. During the fall, the Racers competed in the Austin Peay, Central Arkansas, and Southeast Missouri Invitationals. Head Coach Jorge Caetano said he was pleased with the effort the Racers made during the season. “It was good overall,” Caetano said. “We improved in a lot of things, but there’s still a lot of things that we need to work on. At least we’re not making the same mistakes.” Their performance during the Southeast Missouri Invitational stuck out the most to Caetano. “The last tournament was the one which we played our best tennis. You could see the difference in their focus and the way they motivated each other.” Many of the teams faced in the tournaments compete in the Ohio Valley Conference. Caetano said the OVC won’t be much different from years past.

“I think it’s going to be very similar to last year,” Caetano said. “The other teams have some very good players, but others lost a lot of their players. It’s going to be a good year. It’s going to be fun.” Caetano is still working out some of the kinks within the team. Helping his younger players develop is one of his goals. “When you’re younger, the players are big hitters or grinders,” Caetano said. “In college, everyone does a bit of both. You have to find a balance. We’re being patient, looking for the right chance to attack.” Caetano is focusing on the decision making with the Racers this fall season saying, “Make your decision. Don’t change it. Be okay if you make a mistake if you’re trying to do the right thing.” Health is also something the Racers are looking to improve, as they have been plagued with injuries throughout the season. Junior Hannah Rikard of Eddyville, Kentucky, has been dealing with shoulder problems and freshman Aarja Chakraborty of Gautam Budh Nagar, India, is currently sidelined with a stress fracture in her foot.

“At one point, it was four of the nine injured. That’s the most important thing for us; to get healthy,” Caetano said. Despite these setbacks, Caetano has kept his focus on having a successful season with a specific goal in mind. “Our main goal is to win the OVC,” Caetano said. “We need to start winning our matches. We lost some last year that we felt like we should have won. I think we lacked some experience that we’ll have this year. Once we can get the results, our confidence is going to grow and we’re going to play better and better every day.” Sophomore Claire Chang of Kaohsiung, Taiwan, was a player Caetano is looking to see this season. “I’m excited to see Claire,” Caetano said. “It’s her second year and she’s injury free. Even with the injury last year, she was all-conference second team last year.” The team will be out of action until January, when they head to an invitational in Florida right before the spring semester starts. Six teams will be competing in the tournament, including Troy University, Central Arkansas, Louisiana Tech and West Florida.

Chalice Keith/The News

Schläpfer aims high in 2017 Cory Sharber

Contributing writer csharber@murraystate.edu

Chalice Keith/The News

Junior Barbara Schläpfer posted a career-high this Sunday, capping a 595 against West Point.

After posting a career-high 595 in air rifle this past Sunday against Army West Point, junior Barbara Schläpfer said she is looking to continue her success and help the Murray State rifle team win a national championship. “The goal, as a team, is to win the national championship,” Schläpfer said. “That’s the main goal.” Schläpfer, from Gais, Swit-

zerland, is the only international student on the Murray State rifle team. As a transfer student majoring in engineering physics, she’s had to overcome some obstacles along her path to competing for a top-ranked rifle program. Schläpfer said her college education in Switzerland was much different than that of the United States. “I was in college in Switzerland a year before I came here. You have lectures that sometimes include 500 students. It’s not like a commu-

nity; it’s like a job. It took me awhile to get used to it,” Schläpfer said. Schläpfer’s path to Murray State almost didn’t come to fruition. She played soccer growing up, but a detrimental injury forced her to chase another dream. “I started off playing soccer, but then I had a knee injury,” Schläpfer said. “They told me that I had to stop for a year, so I was looking for something else to do. My uncle was a coach. He told me to come try it out. I did it for one season,

and I was good.” After that season, she was hooked. Schläpfer attempted to compete in both soccer and rifle, but ultimately, rifle became her focus. “I was good in soccer, but I was more successful in rifle,” Schläpfer said. “When you’re good, you normally don’t stop. You try to get better.” That success has followed Schläpfer to Murray State, as she has been a first-team All-American and All-OVC.

see RIFLE, Page 4


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Sports

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October 19, 2017

Graphic courtesy of Rosalyn Churchman/The News

Women’s golf wins, Men finish third in tournaments DJ Pigg

Staff writer dpigg@murraystate.edu

The women’s golf team scored another victory this week at the University of Louisiana Monroe Fred Marx Invitational. The Racers’ top five players finished in the top-15, and four finished in the topeight. The win counts as their second team win in just four tournaments this Fall. Murray State jumped to a commanding lead in the first 36 holes with scores of 303305 to head into the second day of the tournament with a 13-shot lead in front of host school, the University of Louisiana Monroe, who posted scores of 311-310, and South Alabama University, who shot 321-313. The team’s momentum carried into the third and

final round to shoot 306 for a 914 total which extended the margin for a 19-stroke win. Following the Racers’ performance was the University of Louisiana Monroe (933), South Alabama University (937), Lamar University (940), and McNeese State University, which rounded out the top-five with a 955 total. Linnette Holmslykke, junior from Vejle, Denmark, grabbed another top-three finish with scores of 77-7575, and was followed by Moa Folke, senior from Tranas, Sweden, who had rounds of 76-76-77 for a tied fourth place finish. Lucila Puente Rodriguez, sophomore from Sevilla, Spain, finished with scores of 76-79-75 to finish tied for sixth-place, Jane Watts, junior from Versailles, Kentucky, with posting rounds of 74-78-79 and finishing tied

for eigth-place, and Belen Amoros Benet, freshman from Valencia, Spain, who rounded out the top-five finishing in a tie for 14th. Head Coach Velvet Milkman credits the team’s success to the gamut of talent they have on the roster. “We have great depth,” Milkman said. “That’s what it takes to go out and win team titles like this. I think this win will pay great dividends coming into this weekend. There will be plenty of competition in Louisville, and I think this is what the girls needed before we leave Thursday.” The Racers have three days before leaving for Simpsonville, Kentucky, to play in the University of Louisville’s Cardinal Cup at the University of Louisville Golf Club this Saturday, Oct. 21, and Sunday, Oct. 22.

MEN’S GOLF

The men’s golf team played their way to a thirdplace finish this week at Austin Peay’s Intercollegiate tournament in Dickson, Tennessee. Murray State played well enough to end the first 36 holes with a five-shot lead with rounds of 292-287. Behind the Racers were UT Martin with scores of 292292 and Missouri State which carded scores of 291-295. Head Coach Eddie Hunt was extremely pleased with the way his team played the first day of competition. “The conditions Monday weren’t the best,” Hunt said. “It was a little cold and pretty windy, so to come out and shoot three over for 36 holes as a team was just really good.” The men were unable to hold onto the lead, however,

Fall Intramurals in full swing RIFLE Gage Johnson Staff writer

gjohnson17@murraystate.edu

There are countless ways to get involved on Murray State’s campus. Intramural sports are a huge part of those many opportunities, and are underway this semester. Even if you haven’t yet, you can sign up for intramurals by getting involved with the athletic director at a fraternity, an organization that has an independent team such as the Baptist Campus Ministry, or your residential college. Adam Warren, who has been the Athletic Director at White College for the past three years, has loved being a part of intramurals and has enjoyed being able to bring people together through sports.

“The thing I enjoy most about being AD is being able to allow all people the opportunity to play in some capacity and seeing people having fun and enjoying these sports,” Warren said. “Bringing people together through sports is a huge part of what I do. I know people that have married people they met through intramural sports. People have become best friends through this, and countless other relationships have been built through intramural sports.” Intramural has already begun, with softball’s season closing last week. Elizabeth College took both the men’s and women’s league championships, with the men beating Sigma Chi 6-3, and the girls defeating White College 1-0. This is

the third year in a row that the Elizabeth College men’s team has won the title. Katie Bellville of the Elizabeth College women’s team is a huge fan intramural sports and loves the aspect of playing with friends. “All my friends are in intramurals and it is just a great way to interact with others and meet new people while having fun,” Bellville said. There are plenty of other sports in the fall to participate in such as golf, bowling, ping pong, a swim meet, the homecoming 5k run and flag football which kicks off this week. Practice flag football scrimmage games were held on Monday evening, with the first regular season games starting Tuesday evening on Oct. 17.

From Page 3

She was also selected as the OVC Freshman of the Year during the 2015-16 season. Despite amassing numerous accolades in her collegiate career, Schläpfer’s drive to improve has not faltered as a result of her success. She said her dedication to perfecting her craft is driven by a goal of constantly one-upping herself. “Rifle is all about challenging yourself,” Schläpfer said. “I like to prove to myself that I’m better than I think I am.” When watching the shooting sport, many people simply see the aggregate scores of teams and the points they put up, but Schläpfer said, for her, the sport serves as much more than a simple number or statistic.

as they posted a 295 for the final round which left them one shot out of a tie for first between the Skyhawks (289) and the Bears (287) who finished at a 873 total in front of Murray State’s 874. The Racers were led by Austin Knight, a sophomore from Hopkinsville, Kentucky, who grabbed his first win in his collegiate career. Knight posted low scores on the first day with rounds of 73-67 to go four-under par for the first 36 holes. He had the low round of the day which left him a shot off the lead going into the final round Tuesday. Knight followed his play Monday with a two-under par 70 to beat Auburn University’s Ryan Knop by one shot, and hold off UT Martin stand-out, Hunter Richardson, by two shots. Along with Knight’s med-

alist honors, Avery Edwards, sophomore from Paducah, Kentucky, grabbed his fourth top-10 finish in just five tournaments this fall with scores of 69-74-74 to finish tied for 9th place. Hunt said although it was disappointing to give up the lead, there are definite positives going forward for his team. “We just have to take the good with the bad,” Hunt said. “We wish we could have played as well as the first day and came out with a win, but we are still improving as a team. Avery has played very well all Fall so far, and Austin is really starting to play well again.” The Racers hope to continue their momentum into next week’s tournament on Monday, Oct. 23 hosted by Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama.

“People only see numbers,” Schläpfer said. “They don’t understand what it actually means. After a match, if I see my target, I can tell you what I did with every single shot.” Schläpfer and her teammates’ meticulous commitment to their sport has them in a position to give any team in the nation a run for their money. As the fourth-ranked team in the NCAA, Schläpfer said her team is constantly striving to improve. “We have a lot of good

shooters, and sometimes it is hard for Coach to choose the five people in the squad,” Schläpfer said. “That’s a good thing; it never lets you rest, so you always try to get better.” “The goal, as a team, is to win the national championship,” Schläpfer said. “That’s the main goal.” Schläpfer and the rest of the Murray State rifle team will compete in a tri-match against No. 2 TCU and No. 15 Jacksonville State on Oct. 22 at 9 a.m. at the Pat Spurgin Rifle Range.

October 24:

THE GREAT WALL

October 31:

CHICKEN LITTLE

November 7:

EVERYONE’S HERO


The News

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October 19, 2017 Features Editor: Emily Williams Assistant Features Editor: Nick Erickson Page Designer: Rachel Solomon Phone: 270-809-5871

Features

A legacy perseveres Changes to the Kyle D. Rogers Scholarship open doors for Sigma Chi Emily Williams Features Editor ewilliams15@murraystate.edu

A Sigma Chi, a Laker Band percussionist, the voice of the Lady Racers, a brother, a son, a friend – these are just a few of the ways you could describe Kyle Rogers, a Murray native who lost his life in 2015 after an explosion at the Silver Trails Distillery in Marshall County. Changes have been made to the Kyle D. Rogers Memorial Scholarship which was set up after Kyle’s passing to honor him and to help Murray State students like him. The main changes to the scholarships deal with who is awarded the honor within the brotherhood of Sigma Chi, as well as a new bottle of LBL Moonshine hitting Murray store shelves this week, that will benefit the scholarship itself. Rhonda Rogers, Kyle’s mother, said there are two different scholarships set up in memory of Kyle, under one fund. The first scholarship is awarded to a Calloway County Laker Band senior that will be attending Murray State the following year. No changes were made to this scholarship. The second scholarship, however, has undergone changes beneficial to Sigma Chi brothers. Formerly, since the scholarship was first set up in Calloway County, the scholarship had to be awarded to only a Calloway County graduate within the Sigma Chi fraternity. “It’s been set up for two years and in the past two years, we haven’t had anybody

from Calloway High that is Sigma Chi,” Rogers said. Now, the scholarship is not limited to just a Calloway County alumnus within the fraternity but to any active, good-standing member of Sigma Chi, no matter where they attended high school. Rogers said they were able to come up with enough money to set up an endowed fund. She said to start with, they still have a certain amount that they have to reach, but once it becomes self-sufficient they can begin giving out scholarships off of the interest. Rogers said as far as the new LBL Moonshine to benefit the scholarship goes, there are only 250 bottles and all of them are numbered. She said the bottles are two year-aged. “This has gone way beyond what we ever thought it would be,” Rogers said. “We’ve had people who have donated and held fundraisers. It’s just been awesome. Kyle would have been thrilled.” Quenton Robertson, sophomore from Murray and the first recipient of the Kyle D. Rogers Memorial Scholarship said it was awarded to him at the Calloway County High School Band Banquet in the Curris Center Ballroom in 2016. “I heard about the scholarship from my band directors as they were telling the whole band,” Robertson said. “I was extremely involved with music and the band, so I got the necessary paperwork for the scholarship.” Robertson said while he never had the chance to meet Kyle personally, he knew of him through mutual friends. “Even though I didn’t personally know him, from what

Netflix’s Hidden Gems The 5 documentaries you need to see Nick Erickson Assistant Features Editor nerickson@murraystate.edu

Though textbook studying might not be everyone’s forte, many college students still find time to gain knowledge through other means. Documentaries are immensely popular this year among students and Netflix is a particularly good source for watching content. Here is a handful of the most fascinating and in-depth documentaries the streaming service has to offer. Photo contributed by Rhonda Rogers

Kyle Rogers performing in the percussion section during his time in Racer Band. I heard he was an admirable person with a great heart,” Robertson said. “This scholarship helped me afford college, which is helping me to pursue my career of becoming an engineer and allowing me to follow my passion for music even further with Racer Band.” Robertson said he is very grateful for the scholarship, more so than others because of how close Kyle’s life was to people he knows and holds dear and because he believes he and Kyle shared many interests. Logan Bogard, freshman from Murray and the second recipient of the Kyle D. Rogers Memorial Scholarship said the scholarship has helped him to purchase his textbooks. “I am most definitely grateful to Kyle for this scholar-

ship,” Bogard said. “While it is incredibly unfortunate that he is no longer with us, his name is now carried on through this scholarship, and I could not be more grateful for it.” “Kyle was the biggest fan of Murray State you could ever have,” Rogers said. Rogers said it is very important for Sigma Chi brothers who wish to apply for Kyle’s scholarship to specify that they are a member of the Sigma Chi Fraternity on the dropdown menu while applying online. For students who do not wish to buy a moonshine bottle but want to donate money to the cause, contact Abby Hensley, Director of Development, in the Foundation Office at ahensley2@murraystate. edu or (270) 809-3131. for additional information.

AMANDA KNOX (2016)

After her roommate was found gruesomely murdered studying abroad in late 2007, 20-year-old Amanda Knox was found guilty and imprisoned. Filmed over the course of five years, the documentary does not so much set out to prove or disprove Knox’s innocence but rather sheds light onto how the media blew the case out of proportion. Showcasing of interviews with Knox and even her prosecutor, it’s a whirlwind of a story.

TOWER (2014)

The 1966 clock tower shooting at the University of Texas is an event often forgotten from the public’s mind. Filmmaker Keith Maitland set out to bring attention to the event, and through his animated reenactment of the massacre it feels as relevant and horrific as ever. For his-

tory buffs, this documentary is both insightful and thought-provoking.

MAN ON WIRE (2008)

In 1974, high-wire walker Philippe Petit tested the limits, sneaking onto the World Trade Center, stringing a cable between the tops of the two towers and spent almost an hour walking back and forth between the two buildings. Comprised of footage and harrowing re-enactments of the event, this film will both unease those with a fear of heights and amaze with Petit’s incredible feat.

BEING ELMO: A PUPPETEER’S JOURNEY (2011)

Many are familiar with the children’s characters on Sesame Street, but most are unaware of those behind the puppets. In this documentary, meet Kevin Clash, the puppeteer who created and performed as the beloved Elmo for many years. From the poverty line to becoming a cult icon, Clash shows there’s more than meets the puppet.

EXIT THROUGH THE GIFT SHOP (2010)

The famous and anonymous graffiti artist Banksy created a documentary a few years back following a street artist by the alias of Mr. Brainwash. Debated by the public whether or not the entire film is a hoax, it is nonetheless an enthralling view into the brooding art world and all of the dirty secrets it holds.

The digital expansion reigns on Murray State JMC professor gains fresh experience at Nashville’s Channel 5 Sydni Anderson Staff writer sanderson33@murraystate.edu

A Murray State professor spent three weeks in Nashville gaining hands-on experience in television production. Leigh Wright, assistant professor in journalism and mass communications, was selected as a National Association of Television Program Executives (NATPE) Educational Foundation grant recipient. Wright was stationed at Nashville’s Channel 5, learning the ins-out-outs of television production and even doing some field work. Greg Pitts, NATPE Educational Foundation Director of Faculty and Student Programs said the program works to provide fresh experiences for faculty. He said faculty who have completed the summer development grant return to campus with updates on current professional practices, which are transmitted to students. “Some programs hire faculty with strong educational credentials but limited firsthand industry experience,” Pitts said. “The summer grant can be a good experience for any professor wanting a refresher on current news or programming operations.” Wright said she chose Channel 5 because it is a local TV station that has employed several Murray State

alumni. She said the station has a good reputation as an excellent newsroom and has won a lot of awards. “I thought it was a great way for me to get some good experience going back into a newsroom, working right alongside them and seeing how things have changed since I got out of the business in 2009,” Wright said. Wright said she is expected to teach multimedia and social media along with regular journalism. She said the grant was a good way to go and see how a TV newsroom works in the digital age. “Some of my key takeaways were that the industry is going digital,” she said. “Everything that we’re doing – there’s so much more content online. Reporters have to be able to write for the regular broadcast platform, the traditional newscast, but they’re also continually putting their stories online and on social media.” Wright said reporters are now expected to produce content for social media and a lot of that content is being produced through their phones with apps like iMovie and Videolicious. She said she had already been using some of these apps in her classroom and felt validated to see what she’s teaching is being used in the industry. “Just being back in the industry and being back in the newsroom – no mat-

ter whether you are TV or newspaper – I saw that news is still news and how you have to go about it hasn’t changed,” Wright said. “You still have to go and get the story and you may have to do more digging and being persistent but it just hasn’t changed.” Wright said reporters are still trying to tell the basic story but now distribution channels are different. Wright said her experience stems from print journalism and to teaching broadcast journalism she has to first teach it to herself. She said it was important to get into the newsroom to see how broadcast journalist actually produce stories. “For part of the past week or so of my time there, I went out with one of the morning show MMJs,” Wright said. “She would shoot her package and I would just shoot right alongside her and do interviews. Then I would come back to the station and put the package together using Adobe Premiere just like she was doing.” Wright said they worked together on their individual packages and the multimedia journalist would give both critique and feedback as Wright edited. She said she learned a lot from the journalist on the editing process and deadlines. “They gave me a lot of great feedback on voicing, writing, editing, etcetera,”

Photo contributed by Leigh Wright

Professor Wright working in the field and collaborating with reporters at Channel 5.4. Wright said. At the end of the program, Wright submitted a report of her experience to the NATPE Educational Foundation. Pitts said Wright’s report was rich in details of her experiences at the Nashville station. “One of our board members declared it was the best report he’d read all summer from a faculty participant,” Pitts said.


The News

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The News

Page 7

October 19, 2017

Opinion Editor: Tyler Anderson Page Designer: Tori Wood Phone: 270-809-5873

Opinion Our View

Justice for all The staff editorial is the majority opinion of The Murray State News Editorial Board.

Connor Jaschen Editor-in-Chief • 270-809-6877 cjaschen@murraystate.edu

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Autumn Brown/The News

It’s becoming increasingly common for faculty, staff and students here at Murray State University to receive emails titled “Timely Warning,” most of which alert us to a reported sex crime. While these reports are nothing to celebrate, they may signal a shift in cultural awareness which has many implications. According to reports made last week by The Murray State News, “there has been a total of 15 [sex-related crimes reported] in 2017, tieing the number reported for all of 2016.” Note that this statistic is simply the number of reports made, not the actual number of incidents. But what does this steady increase in reporting, both at Murray State and in the nation, really mean for victims? In the past two decades, the social stigma which comes with publicly acknowledging oneself as a victim of a sex crime has become less prevalent. It’s still there, lurking in comment sections across the internet and cheap tabloids. But it’s becoming more common for both everyday people and celebrities alike to come forward about their experiences. The most recent example of this is the movement surrounding the fallout of Harvey Weinstein’s long history of intimidation and sexual misconduct being outed to the public. Most of these individuals never reported their experiences due to intimidation, the possibility of hurting their career or public shaming. This barrier is finally dissipating as more women and men find our society is attempting to evolve beyond victim blaming. A growing list of accusers against Weinstein,

including Ashley Judd and Rose McGowan, may be the catalyst needed to push this cultural shift even further. This is a much-welcomed change, though it has come too late for some. Kesha Sebert, known simply as Kesha, came forward with another high-profile case of alleged sexual abuse against her producer, Dr. Luke. Unfortunately, as she didn’t feel the public would be on her side, Kesha did not pursue this until much too late. So, even though resources are being provided both locally and nationally for these victims, why are so few pursuing legal action? It may be that there is a disconnect between public opinion and legal options available to these individuals, especially directly after these events occur. Sexual assault forensic evidence (SAFE) kits are becoming more widely available, though awareness is still low. Often, this evidence isn’t even thoroughly examined in an appropriate time frame by law enforcement, resulting in further legal difficulties for victims. So despite the increasing amount of resources, people still don’t feel as if the legal system affords the accuser enough immediate rights to pursue action against the accused. This makes the most vulnerable in our society even more so to violence and sex crimes. Activists, leaders and lawmakers have a lot of catching up to do if all citizens are to feel safe, and in moments of crisis, armed with the confidence of knowing they are not alone and certainly not forgotten.

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Cheers & Jeers

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SEE ABOVE FOR DETAILS

Cheers to ... Sweater weather

Jeers to ... Delayed printing changes

Look, we deserve it. It’s been hot, humid and everything in between for months. To be able to walk across campus without sweating through your clothes is a welcome change. Most of us won’t mind finally trading in tank tops for bomber jackets. But please, leave the latte shaming at home.

Printing is possibly one of the most frustrating processes at Murray State, and many were looking forward to the changes advertised across campus. Though for the time being it seems we’ll be stuck with the copy card and loose change system. This has been in the works for a while, but looks as if we’ll be waiting even longer.

Cheers to ... Wild Mountain Bakery & Cafe

Jeers to ... Wi-Fi exploits

We’ve been vocal about the sparse dining options on, and around, campus, so it’s nice to see a local eatery find a new home closer to the university. It has grown to be a staple for locals and visitors alike. Gigabites had its appeal, and will be missed by many, but change isn’t always a bad thing.

Your passwords aren’t as secure as you thought. A bug in the WPA2 security function, which encrypts and secures data, can lead to hackers and schemers getting your sensitive information. It’s not easily exploitable, but also not easy to fix. Nothing to lose sleep over, but I’d think twice about using your neighbor’s Wi-Fi.

Making Headway

A note to professors Dylan Doyle Contributing writer ddoyle2@murraystate.edu University professors: worry not, I come in peace. However, we need to have an honest chat about grading and class difficulty. Let’s get the ugly truth out of the way first: some classes are too hard and others too easy. This isn’t always your fault. After all, most of you are paid an insubstantial amount of money to teach complex and nuanced material, often to a group of already overworked students. It’s a tough job, and we salute you for it. But even so, I have friends (mostly science majors, admittedly) which some instructors seem to believe are superhuman. For example, one such friend spends nearly endless hours each week studying and seeking help outside of class, only to receive a grade lower than the last. This wouldn’t be a problem if she were the only one. In fact, she scores right around the class av-

erage most of the time. But if your class average for an exam is below a D, the problem might not be your students. The problem just might be the exams or classroom techniques. There is definitely something maddening about a professor berating a class, of which a majority have failed an assignment, and offering nothing but “it’s supposed to be hard! The MCAT won’t be a cakewalk!” Some classes are harder than others and some material is outright complex. Even so, the cardinal sin of a college professor is to disregard the effort students are putting into their work. If you have a classroom of students bombing exam after exam, it may be time to reconsider the approach to the material. Or maybe it’s because students feel as if they don’t have many places to turn to when they’re struggling. Murray State University tries to avoid this issue by requiring professors to maintain physical office hours, but this doesn’t solve every problem. Reminding students to seek assistance, encour-

aging them to create peer groups within classes to aid in studying and utilizing the gradebook function in Canvas so students can accurately track their progress are easy ways to help everyone out. Not every student will take advantage of these opportunities, and that’s solely their decision. College is challenging, and it is supposed to be. However, it should not be difficult for the sake of seeing students struggle. I am not saying every class should be easy or every student should get an A; that’s the quitters way out. I also understand that school is (at least in part) about separating wheat from chaff. It can be a bit depressing knowing exactly how many Murray State students don’t make it to graduation, though. But if you are not careful swinging that scythe, you can chop down all the wheat with the chaff and be left with a barren field and nothing to harvest. Just keep in mind students expect a challenge, but not unrealistic expectations which hinder their education and growth.


The News

News

Page 8

October 19, 2017

University welcomes diversity speaker Katlyn Mackie Staff writer

kmackie2@murraystate.edu

“Whether you are a student leader who stands up for what you believe and know to be right, whether you are a faculty member who notices the exclusion of women or whether you are someone who protests broadly, innovators are always leading with courage,” Damon Williams said. A conversation surrounding equality on Murray State’s campus sparked as Damon Williams, a keynote speaker and author of several books, delivered a lecture about diversity and inclusion on Oct. 13. Williams is regarded as one of the nation’s most dynamic and innovative leaders and has served as a keynote speaker and thought leader to more than 300 institutions globally. He is currently the senior vice president for programs, training and youth development for the Boys and Girls Club of America.

INNOVATE DIVERSITY

The first idea Williams presented was how to innovate diversity, which he said is the greatest nationwide social challenge. He said people must talk about issues of diversity, equity and inclusion in a way that strives to change the status quo rather than maintain it. Williams discussed five skills from “The Innovator’s DNA,” a book by Jeff Dyer, Hal Gergersen and Clayton Christensen, that beg the question, “What makes an innovator an innovator?” Williams said the first two characteristics of innovators are always questioning the world and finding solutions to problems anywhere. The third characteristic is engaging other innovators in order to cultivate ideas. Williams gave the example of Steve Jobs remaining in Silicon Valley, California, despite being fired from Apple, be-

cause it is where innovation was happening. Williams said innovators also understand they must have a bias toward action, learn to experiment with new ideas and then take those ideas to scale, the fourth and fifth characteristic. “If you do the same thing you have always done, you will find yourself having the same result,” Williams said. Williams said a sixth characteristic that innovators in the area of diversity, equity and inclusion must have is courage. “Courage to look beyond conviction, courage to ask big questions, and courage to ask ‘how do we really go the extra mile and stand out,’” Williams said.

THE FRAMEWORK OF DIVERSITY

The reason we need to innovate diversity, Williams said, is because the framework is constantly shifting and evolving. Williams said diversity used to just be about headcount, meaning the degree to which our campuses are represented by African Americans and by women in levels of leadership. He said it is still a part of the narrative of diversity, but the conversation has continued to expand as has the framework. Williams referred to certain aspects in our world that are shifting the conversation in powerful ways as “the perfect storm of dynamics.” Two of these aspects is technology and social media. Williams said we live in an era where everything is connected and as a result, anything that happens is broadcast immediately. “If there is an incident involving an African American male and the police, it gets broadcasted immediately,” Williams said. “If there is something that happens on campus, it gets broadcasted immediately. There are no secrets anymore because things move around the world very quickly all the time.”

Williams said another aspect is the emergence of a global economy. He said people cannot simply educate those with great privilege, but educate those in vulnerable circumstances. “Trump Lash” – a term Williams coined to describe President Trump’s multiple executive actions – has also succeeded in shifting the conversation of diversity, elevating it in ways never seen before. He said the news surrounding DACA, immigration, Title IX, gender equality and transgender service members has made discussion about diversity, equality and inclusion unavoidable. Generational differences have also contributed to changing the conversation. He said baby boomers, Gen Xers, millennials and centennials are all part of diversity innovation. “The new conversation of diversity is how do we prepare you to lead, collaborate and compete in a diverse global world,” Williams said.

STUDENT REACTION

John Skinner, vice president of Black Student Council, said Williams had more unique viewpoints and a broader perspective than he originally expected. “When we go out into the real world to work, this is something we can bring with us and not just have… here on campus,” Skinner said. He also said it is important for students to hear this so they take an “extra step back” when making decisions about diversity issues. Whitney Hardison, president of Black Student Council, said she really enjoyed Williams’ lecture because it fits in well with the message of BSC. Hardison hopes William’s speech inspired students to speak up about diversity. “If nobody speaks up, then nothing gets fixed,” Hardison said.

Lori Allen/The News

Wild Mountain Bakery is set to open in early November, according to the owner.

Out with the old, in with the new Sabra Jackson Staff writer

sjackson30@murraystate.edu

Students may be missing their morning coffee from Gigabytes on the way to class, but it won’t be long before you can grab your coffee and homemade pastry from Wild Mountain Bakery and Cafe. Wild Mountain Bakery and Cafe is moving locations from off the court square in downtown Murray into Gigabytes old location, after it closed in September. Gigabytes was located across from Sparks Hall near Gear Up Cycles. Karen Guse, owner of Wild Mountain Bakery and Cafe, said she hopes the store will pull more university clientele.

“We don’t get hardly any students down here [court square], so that is a market that we have not really attempted much,” Guse said. With a lease at the court square coming to an end late November, Guse said she is hopeful the cafe will open at the new location at the beginning of November. Wild Mountain Bakery and Cafe opened three years ago after Guse and her husband moved to the area from West Virginia. Guse had a bakery in West Virginia located in her basement and had a successful baked goods stand at farmers markets. After opening a successful bakery close to West Virginia University’s campus, Guse decided to open a bakery when

her husband was offered a job at Murray State. Guse said the move is because of a few reasons, two being due to lack of parking and clientele. “That’s one of the main reasons people don’t come down here,” Guse said. “They are afraid to park.” Connor Moore, fifth year student from Boyd, Illinois, said he is sad to see Gigabytes close. “It’s a local business,” Moore said. “Anytime Murray State has a local business that closes, it hurts the community. I would rather see local business thrive.” Moore said the cafe was a hangout, where there were five or six people each time he went in.

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