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M

90 years

THE MUR R AY STATE

NEWS

of excellence

October 12, 2017 | Vol. 92, No. 7

REPORTS ON THE RISE State responds to grim sex crime reality

Lindsey Coleman

Assistant News Editor lcoleman7@murraystate.edu

Sabra Jackson Staff writer

sjackson30@murraystate.edu

Reported sex-related crimes at Murray State are increasing this semester, but lawmakers are vowing to step up efforts to combat this state-wide problem. On Monday, Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear addressed Western Kentucky University students in support of Domestic Violence Awareness Month, saying he refuses to live with the reality of nearly one in two Kentucky women experiencing sexual violence in their lifetime. Through a $3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Justice, Beshear said the Kentucky Attorney General’s office will receive federal funds for the creation of a unit devoted to seeking justice for the victims of sex-related crimes who have been denied justice “for far too long.” Beshear said the funds will be used for investigating sexual assault cases, hiring another Kentucky State Police detective focused on sexual assaults and paying for testing more rape kits. According to the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN), women in college are three times more likely to be sexually assaulted than the average woman. RAINN also reported 11.2 percent of all students experience rape or sexual assault through physical force, violence or incapacitation. The Murray State Police Department crime logs show nine sex-related crimes reported on campus so far this semester, all of which were committed by an acquaintance of the victim. Though these nine sex-related crimes have been reported this semester thus

far, there has been a total of 15 already in 2017, tying the number reported for all of 2016. In 2014, ten total cases of sex-related 10 crimes were reported and 13 were reported in 2015.

EDUCATION AND RESPONSE

Abigail Cox, coordinator of the Women’s Center and University Counseling Services, said while the university sees an increase in reporting, it does not mean sexually violent crimes have risen. “Increased reporting is a positive trend as it is indicative of an increased awareness of reporting options and resources for survivors,” Cox said. Cox emphasized bystander intervention when she attended 25 classes in the past academic year to educate students on the following topics: advocacy, when a student might need advocacy and why advocacy is important. “This increased awareness leads directly to increased reporting and utilization of support services,” Cox said. Cox said bystander intervention is being introduced to middle schools and high schools through The Green Dot program. “Parents can reinforce these messages by encouraging their child to be an active bystander, not just in relation to sexual violence, but bullying harassment, bigotry, etc.,” Cox said. Murray State University has counseling services available for sexual assault victims through Sexual Assault Response Team, the Murray State University Police Department, University Counseling Services, the Women’s Center and the Purchase Area Sexual Assault Center.

REPORTS AND WARNINGS

“We have made it a very purposeful action on our part, at the police department and the university in general, to

make reporting easier, to make people more aware of how they can report, why they should report and it was intentional,” James Herring, chief of police at the Murray State Police Department, said. When he was hired at the police department, he said he made it his goal to make it easier for students to report assaults and other instances that occur on campus. While some students may feel unsafe about the perceived increase of sexual assaults, Herring said these reports should make them feel safer because the process for reporting has gotten easier. “We feel like the reporting is the first step in getting resources and getting institutional support to back up the student and say, ‘Hey, we are here for you,’” Herring said. Each time a sexual assault is reported to anyone at the university, it must be reported to the police department. Each report then goes into a process to evaluate whether it should be issued as a timely warning. This process can be found in the ‘Handbook for Campus Safety and Security Reporting’ on the Murray State Police Department website. Students are encouraged to read each timely warning to gain information on how to prevent sexual assaults. “You have students who see these required timely warnings come out, and they are not reading what it says,” Herring said. Timely warnings include facts such as 72 percent of sexual assaults involve people who know each other. Herring said this information is included to warn students about who they know and spend time with. “The information in the timely warnings is often overlooked, but it provides information that is important for staying safe,” Herring said.

2 9

REPORTED CASES OF SEXUAL ASSAULTS ON CAMPUS FILED CRIMINAL COMPLAINTS

OUT

OF

ON CAMPUS SEX-RELATED CRIMES BY CLASSIFICATION

1

SEXUAL ASSAULT

4

SEXUAL ABUSE

3

RAPE

1

SODOMY

SEXUAL ASSAULT

Any type of sexual contact or behavior that occurs without the explicit consent of the recipient.

SEXUAL ABUSE

Sexual contact by forcible compulsion or without consent

RAPE

Penetration without consent

SODOMY

Deviate sexual intercourse by forcible compulsion or without consent

Graphic courtesy of Savanna Hatfield & Austin Gordon

All statistics have been compiled from the Murray State Crime and Fire Logs and the 2017 Annual Campus Security and Fire Safety Report.

Pension crisis could cost university $4.7 million Ashley Traylor News Editor

atraylor@murraystate.edu

Changes to the Commonwealth’s underfunded pension system loom over colleges and universities, as these changes would hit their already strained operating budgets. “The anxiety level on our campus is very high because of the uncertainty,” Jackie Dudley, vice president of finance and administrative services, said. “It’s just unrest and uneasiness for someone that you might look at that is 55 to 60 years old thinking ‘I might be retiring in a few years.’ You’re in a position now to think ‘I don’t even know what I’m going to get in a few years.’” Gov. Matt Bevin hired PFM consulting group to analyze the state’s retirement plan, and they made recommendations to solve the pension crisis. Gov. Bevin plans to call a special legislative session this month to discuss PFM’s suggestions and reform the plan. While lawmakers have yet to decide how to reduce the deficit, colleges and uni-

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versities could be facing an increase in the amount of pension contributions they are currently paying in for faculty and staff. The pension crisis could potentially take revenue away from other campus priorities. Dudley said currently for every dollar an employee makes, Murray State contributes 49.47 cents to the state’s retirement system. She said that number is proposed to increase to 84 cents for every dollar an employee makes. If that occurs, Dudley said it will cost the university approximately $4.7 million in expenditure that they are not incurring today. The budget challenges also come at a time when Kentucky public universities have already faced limited budgets and steep cuts to higher education. The contribution rates have not been approved for the upcoming fiscal year, but doubling the rate will have an impact on Murray State. Dudley said the increased expenditure will impact university decisions on salary raises, priorities the institution funds

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and tuition rates. “We can’t increase tuition to that magnitude,” Dudley said. “There’s just absolutely no way. We can’t put funding on the backs of students. You can’t increase it to that magnitude and we won’t, but then you have to find a way to deal with it. That will be program prioritization, and it will be efficiencies we continue to fund and identify. It will be new revenues, and it will be to some degree cuts in operating budgets. This is an overriding issue for us this year.” Because the pension crisis is consuming revenue that could be spent on campus, Dudley said the state schools gathered to discuss breaking away from the state pension plan. The model would be similar to the contribution plans at the University of Kentucky and University of Louisville, which do not participate in the state plan but have their own optional retirement plan (ORP). At the University of Kentucky, employees contribute 5 percent of their base salary to the retirement system, and

@TheMurrayStateNews

the university contributes 10 percent of the employee’s base salary, according to their benefits and retirement website. The University of Louisville has two contribution plans employees can choose from: a 403(b) retirement plan and two 457(b) deferred compensation plans. In the 403(b) plan, the university contributes 7.5 percent of the employee’s base salary and the employee has the option to contribute or not. If the employee makes additional contributions to the retirement plan, the university will match up to 2.5 percent. The deferred compensation plan, 457(b), allows employees the option to defer compensation on a pre-tax basis through payroll deduction. If Murray State broke away from the state pension system, the university would have a school-operated defined contribution program, where an employee contributes a percentage of their base salary and the employer would contribute a flat rate. Dudley said new hires would not have the option to partici-

@MurrayStateNews

pate in the state pension plan, only the university’s defined contribution program. Current university employees who are under the state’s retirement plans would not be able to opt out of those programs for the school-operated plan. Murray State has two pension systems: Kentucky Education Retirement System (KERS) and Kentucky Teacher Retirement System (KTRS). All faculty at Murray State fall under KTRS. A faculty member then has the choice between a defined benefit plan or a defined contribution plan. Faculty under the KTRS plan can choose a defined benefit plan, or an optional retirement plan. For a defined benefit plan, an employee and an employer make contributions to the retirement system, and when the employee retires, he or she receives the same payment for life. In contrast, an ORP means they will not join the state system. An ORP is a defined contribution plan and the employee could set up their own ‘tax shelter’ or 401K plan. For a defined contribution plan,

an employee and an employer make a contribution and that is invested in the market. Right now under the ORP option, Murray State is contributing 8.74 percent of an employee’s salary to their defined contribution plan. If the university were to elect a school-operated plan, it could avoid the 84 percent contribution rate that is proposed by PFM for the state-funded program. The contribution rate is legislatively set at 8.74 percent currently, but Dudley said there is the possibility that schools will be able to adjust the rate if they move to a school-operated program. For years, the state has not appropriated and invested money into the pension for it to remain fully funded, resulting in the state having only 37.4 percent of the money to pay retirees. “That’s one of the contributing factors that we had that we’re having to pay the price for now because prior legislation decisions were made,” Dudley said. “It’s going to be a tough year.”

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The News

Page 2

October 12, 2017

News Editor: Ashley Traylor Assistant News Editor: Lindsey Coleman Page Designer: Savanna Hatfield Phone: 270-809-4468 Twitter: MurrayStateNews

News

Murray State’s 94 years in the making Lindsey Coleman

Assistant News Editor lcoleman7@murraystate.edu

In 1923, Murray Normal School opened its doors with 87 students enrolled. Years later the school became a university, gained several buildings and faculty and is now home to more than 10,000 students each year. In a Facebook post commemorating the university’s progress, President Bob Davies said the school’s conception was a glorious start to what is now one of the preeminent universities in the Commonwealth, the southern region and the country. Murray Normal School, which opened on September 24, 1923, occupied four rooms and the auditorium in Murray High School (now Murray Middle School). Davies said on the day of the opening, students were greeted by seven faculty members, University President John W. Carr and Garland Murphy, secretary for the college. At the time, Rainey T. Wells, founder and second university president, said that the “new school in Murray will cast its shadow and nourish every other interest in the community, and it, in turn, will be richly rewarded and supported by the community in its own efforts to become one of [the best], if not the finest college in the Commonwealth.” Davies said he is proud to say Murray State is casting its shadow and growing each and every day. “Yes sir, Dr. Wells, we are one of [the best], if not, the

Photos courtesy of Pogue Library

On the left, university administration dedicate the statue of former university president Rainey T. Wells, circa 1925. On the right is the original layout of the Murray State Normal School, where the quad sits today. finest college in the Commonwealth,” Davies said. Helen Roulston, assistant professor of English and Philosophy, has taught at Murray State for over 50 years. She worked in the same department as her husband, saw the times when smoking in buildings on campus was commonplace and taught many film and literature courses. She said the biggest change for her is the “mixed blessing” of technology. She reminisced about teaching film classes and using projectors, VHS tapes, DVDs and now streaming. “We didn’t have computers when we came here. We just

used typewriters,” Roulston said. “People had to go to the library and actually read books and so on. That changed considerably over the years.” One area of interest for her is traveling and appreciating diversity. She said stories of her travels around the world often come up in class. Over the years, she said she has noticed an increase in international students in her classes. For Roulston, the students make teaching worthwhile. “I don’t know if anything quite stays the same,” Roulston said. “But I’ve always had good students.” In 1920, the General Assem-

bly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky authorized an educational commission to report the status of the public school system in the Commonwealth. The commission found that teacher training schools were necessary, thus Murray Normal School was founded. At the time, Kentucky Governor Edwin P. Morrow said, “Education is an investment. Ignorance is a tax. Hold fast to the good. Take no backward steps.” On March 8, 1922, Morrow signed a bill authorizing the establishment of two normal schools in Kentucky for “the training of white elementary teachers.”

The normal school officially opened on Sept. 24, 1923. As the normal school got its start, students could pay four to six dollars for room and board, which was the best option, seeing as there was no way to commute across rivers except by ferries, and none of the streets in the city of Murray were paved yet. But there was a train service which saw six passenger trains in and out of Murray daily. Construction crews broke ground on Oct. 15, 1923 for the building of Wrather Auditorium. Wilson Hall was contracted in 1924 and originally housed the college’s gymnasium. The space is now the

home of the Murray State News. In 1928, Lovett Auditorium was completed, and at the time, it was the largest auditorium in Kentucky, seating approximately 3,000. Enrollment increased from 565 in the fall of 1945 to over 7,000 students in the early 1970s, while faculty rose from 8 in 1923 to 412 in 1971. In June 1966, almost fifty years after the school opened, it became a university by action of the General Assembly. Now Murray State is home to approximately 10,000 students representing over 50 countries, 47 states and almost every county in Kentucky.

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The News

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October 12, 2017

Sports Chalice Keith/The News

Sports Editor: Bryan Edwards Assistant Sports Editor: Blake Sandlin Page Designer: Rosalyn Churchman Phone: 270-809-4481 Twitter: MSUSportsNews

WITHERS REWRITES HISTORY Senior forward becomes Murray State’s all-time leading goal scorer.

Gage Johnson Contributing writer gjohnson17@murraystate.edu

In front of the Murray State home crowd on Thursday Sept. 28, senior forward Harriet Withers scored her 35th career goal, breaking the women’s soccer career goal record of 34 goals that was previously held by Theresa Reedy (2001-2004). At 17:55 of play in the Racers’ contest with Southeast Missouri State, the senior forward was able to use her left foot to curve the ball around the defender and into the back right corner of the goal. Of all the goals Withers has scored, her 35th career goal is one she won’t forget. “It’s obviously really cool to have the record, but it’s always about the team for me,” Withers said. “As long as we’re getting the win, that’s what really matters.” Withers also said her love for soccer has shaped her into the player she has become today. “I love to come out and play, and I love the team atmosphere,” Withers said. “I love being

out there, and I’m a competitive person. I like to play and like to score so that’s what I’m going to try and do. It’s these girls out here, though, that are my biggest motivation. It’s this team, it’s the coaches, it’s the university and the support. I’m really sad it’s my senior year. But it’s my love for the sport that drives me a lot, and I will continue to love it.” Withers has rewritten the record books more than once this season. On Sunday, Sept. 24 at Jacksonville State, the senior forward broke another of Reedy’s records by tallying the 82nd point of her career, topping the previous record of 81. She also claimed the school record for most game-winning goals this season with 11. Head Coach Jeremy Groves is currently in his fourth season as coach of the Racers. Withers being one of Grove’s first recruits, has been with him from the start and he is extremely proud of what she has accomplished in her four years as a Racer. “I’m proud of her that she has gotten there,” Groves said. “She’s done a great job for us, and she’s worked hard. She’s a great kid. A lot of people don’t see all of the other things that she does. She’s always the first to be picking up

gear, or helping with food when we’re on the road. The stats and her play speaks for herself obviously but I don’t think a lot of people see the other kind of things. She’s very humble. She shows no arrogance. I think if there’s probably a model person you want to be around, she is one.” Her fellow teammates agree with Coach Groves, that not only is Withers a talented player, she is also the ideal teammate. “It’s great,” senior defender Nyomi Devine said. “She’s a really good player. We know we can always trust her to get the job done.” Withers has won the OVC Offensive Player of the Year two years running, and is in contention for a third. She can improve her case for that if she manages to move up from her spot as the eighth leading scorer this season in the NCAA. Withers is inching toward another Murray State record as well. After scoring her 12th goal of the year, she is now one goal away from tying the single season record for goals scored. She will have the opportunity to tie and break that record when the Racers take on the Governors of Austin Peay at 3 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 12 at Cutchin Field.

HARRIET WITHERS CAREER STATISTICS GAMES PLAYED

GOALS

ASSISTS

TOTAL

2014

20

6

2

14

2015

21

11

7

29

2016

17

8

4

20

2017

12

12

1

25

TOTAL

70

37

14

88 Rosalyn Churchman & Austin Gordon/The News


The News

Sports

Page 4

October 12, 2017

Kaufmann digs first career OVC Honor Keenan Hall Staff writer

khall16@murraystate.edu

Sophomore libero Alex Kaufmann has been a vital key for the Racer volleyball team. She holds down the back row as one of the teams best defensive players. Kaufmann is from Woodstock, Illinois, where she played with current teammate, sophomore outside hitter Rachel Giustino. Kaufmann was appointed captain three times on her volleyball team at Marion Central Catholic, holds a school-record 1,311 digs and contributed to a state championship in 2015. Giustino has been one of Kaufmann’s longest teammates since her early childhood. They were a dynamic duo at Marion Central Catholic. Giustino said Kaufmann is more than the best player she’s played with but also one of her closest friends. “I have to say she’s my best friend because that’s going to make me biased,” Giustino said. “I think Alex is the best volleyball player I’ve ever played with. Besides coach [Dave] Schwepker. She works harder than anyone else. She is always doing little things that people don’t notice. Being a back-row player she doesn’t always get a lot of the glory, so I think this is super awesome that she’s getting some credit for her hard work.” This season, Kaufmann recorded her career high in digs with 19 in a win against Eastern Illinois. She then broke her own record the night after. Kaufmann tallied 30 digs, a new career high, in a five game rematch against SIUE. Kaufmann was voted defensive player of the week in the OVC for the first week. The libero plays an interesting role on a volleyball court: libero is a position term for back row player, and their task on a volleyball court is to secure the

back line of their team’s play area. A libero is not allowed to block or attack the ball. The libero wears an opposite color jersey from the rest of their teammates, so they can be identified easily by the opposing team. They are also usually skillful defensive players. Racers’ senior middle blocker Olivia Chatman praised Kaufmann and her play so far this season. Chatman said Kaufmann’s keen sense of focus provides relief for the team. “It’s so great I don’t even worry if I miss a block personally, because I know I have Alex there to pick me up,” Chatman said. “She’s always there; she’s always hustling sideline to sideline to get every ball. She goes all

out for everything. I have all my faith in her.” Kaufmann said volleyball has been commonplace in her life from a young age. “I’ve been playing since I could walk because my dad coached before I was even born,” Kaufmann said. “Competitively, I started playing when I was twelve.” Kaufmann said her successful play boils down to her ability to lock in and focus on the task at hand. “Something that helps me a lot is we’ve been doing a team prayer and that really calms me down,” Kaufmann said. “Staying positive, not letting the distractions of the crowd who’s here, who are we playing, just forgetting about all those distractions and remembering to play the game that I love.”

Chalice Keith/The News

Redshirt freshman wide receiver Sylvaughn Turner attempts to catch the ball while being defended by an Austin Peay defender.

Football looks to build off win over Martin Blake Sandlin

Assistant Sports Editor bsandlin1@murraystate.edu

Bryan Edwards/The News

Sophomore libero Alex Kaufmann was honored as OVC Defensive Player of the Week for the week on Sept. 25.

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Murray State football will be riding momentum from their first conference win when they welcome Eastern Illinois to Roy Stewart Stadium on Saturday. Late-game heroics by junior kicker Gabriel Vicente propelled the Racers to a 13-10 victory over UT Martin. Vicente nailed a 32-yard field goal as time expired to beat the Skyhawks – the first time the Racers have overcame their conference rival since 2003. Head Coach Mitch Stewart echoed the significance of the Racers’ second victory of the season. “It was a big win for us and a big win for this program,” Stewart said. “Obviously it’s something we haven’t been able to do in a long time, since 2003 going down there and winning. I’m very excited that the grittiness the team showed, the toughness the team showed and the competitiveness.” The Racers, now 2-4, will look to build upon last weekend’s win when they meet Eastern Illinois, who sit at 4-2 and are currently undefeated in OVC play at 3-0. Murray State will have their hands full against a Panthers squad that sits atop the OVC standings. Eastern Illinois is coached by four-year Head Coach Kim Dameron, who will be returning to his old stomping grounds after serving as a defensive coordinator for Murray State from 1993-1995. Dameron’s team has built their reputation early off resilient play, as they’ve claimed all four of their wins by a narrow margin of just three points or less. The team has raced out to their best conference start since 1996. The Panthers’ subtle, yet efficient, play style isn’t lost on Stewart, who said Eastern

Illinois will come into the game poised to compete. “They’re going to be topnotch prepared,” Stewart said. “They’re top-notch coached; Kim Dameron does a tremendous job there. The thing about them is that they’re very sneaky. You don’t hear much about them.” The Panthers will likely continue utilizing a two-quarterback playbook, as both junior Bud Martin and freshman Scott Gilkey Jr. lead the dual charge for Eastern Illinois. In the Panthers’ last game against Tennessee Tech, Martin threw for 206 yards and three touchdowns, while Gilkey pitched in 62 yards of his own to lead the team to a 24-23 win. Gilkey’s upside lies within his prowess on the ground, as the freshman quarterback has amassed 289 rushing yards and five touchdowns this season to lead his team. While the Racers will surely face a challenge against the conference-leading Panthers, Stewart said his team will have a good shot at extending their win streak to two if they can maintain consistency on the defensive end. “At the end of the day, defensively, I think those guys have done a tremendous job of doing what we do, figuring out the right formula for our personnel and trying to create turnovers,” Stewart said. “And if we continue to do that, then we’ll continue to give ourselves a chance, especially if we can continue our progress offensively.” The key variable dependent on the Racers’ offensive success will be junior quarterback Shuler Bentley. Bentley’s stellar 243 yards passing and a touchdown was pivotal in the team’s win last weekend against UT Martin. Bentley has been battling a shoulder injury in recent weeks, but returned to will the Racers to their first victory in five games.

One of the biggest questions regarding Murray State’s offense this season has been it’s rushing deficiencies, but the team took their first steps to answer those questions after a statement performance by junior Nolan Nichols. Nichols has seen limited reps throughout the year, but was pivotal in Murray State’s win, leading the team in rushing with 43 yards. Stewart commended Nichols performance last Saturday, and said his physical, power-running style will be key for the Racers in the coming game. “We’ve got to put him in,” Stewart said. “The thing about it is, Nolan knows who he is. He’s not a 60-yard back, he’s not a 50 or 40-yard back. If he gets loose, he’s got about 30-yards in him at best, then someone’s going to catch him. But what he does do, is he falls forward.” Nichols will be hoping for a repeat performance with increased reps against Eastern Illinois so he can deliver his touted aggressive running to a run game that’s been depleted so far this season. “I feel like I bring a toughness to the running game,” Nichols said. “It all starts with the offensive line – they give me a hole and I take it. I don’t try to dance around, I just get straight downhill and try to get positive yards. That’s what I’m going for.” One facet of Murray State’s attack that isn’t depleted, however, is their kicking. Vicente was awarded the OVC Co-Specialist of the week last week for the second time this season, and fans can expect the junior to play a continued role against Eastern Illinois, as the Racers lead the OVC in made PATs and field goals this season. The Racers will look to move to 2-1 in OVC play and knock the Panthers off their perch when they kick-off at 3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 14 at Roy Stewart Stadium.


The News

Page 5

October 12, 2017 Features Editor: Emily Williams Assistant Features Editor: Nick Erickson Page Designer: Rachel Solomon Phone: 270-809-5871 Twitter: MSUNewsFeatures

Features Photo courtesy of Shelby Murphy

Shelby Murphy, serving in a children’s home in Uganda through her study abroad experience.

Students serve the global community

Sydni Anderson Staff writer Photo courtesy of Two Arrows Photography

Laney Snider, co-owner of Ruby Branch Farms, prepares for the farm’s annual ‘Mums for Moms’ event that will continue this month.

sanderson33@murraystate.edu

Murray State alumni couple showcase success through mum farm

As planes departed from their respective ports this summer, some carried Murray State students heading to study abroad and experience new cultures. Mikayla Marshall and Shelby Murphy were two students who made the journey to a new country to serve communities abroad and gain the experiences of a lifetime.

Sydni Anderson Staff writer

MARSHALL’S TREK TO SOUTH AFRICA Marshall, a junior from

Cream of the crop sanderson33@murraystate.edu

In Franklin, Kentucky, a farm burst with reds, oranges, yellows and pinks as mums bloom to a balmy fall. Ruby Branch Farms is family-owned and has been nurtured by the hands of Laney and Drew Snider – Murray State alumni. Laney Snider graduated the spring of 2011 with a degree in agribusiness. She works full-time at Pinnacle Agriculture, a seed chemical fertilizer distribution company. Additionally, Laney is a co-owner and operator of Ruby Branch Farms with her husband Drew who she met at Murray State. Like Laney, Drew works another job as a precision technology specialist at Ohio Valley Insurance, a crop insurance company. Snider said when she and her husband moved to Franklin, he started taking over his family’s traditional row-crop

farm. “In that transition, we started talking about ways to diversify the farm and not just completely rely on staple green prices,” she said. Last year, Ruby Branch started an event called ‘Mums for Moms’ which they are continuing this month. Snider said the event is a tribute to breast cancer awareness month. She said this year there will be live vendors and outdoor music. Pink mums as well as pumpkins decorated with the breast cancer ribbon will be sold at the event. Snider said a portion of the sales will go to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. Drew had worked with growing mums during his time at Murray State. Snider said her husband pitched the idea of growing mums on the farm and the couple ran with it. In addition to the flowering plants, Ruby Branch raises flint corn on site but sells pumpkins, gourds, corn stalk bun-

dles and straw raised locally in Simpson County by Kentucky Proud certified farms. Snider said the couple handles their jobs and work at the farm through time management. She said they also have empathetic employers who understand their time needs to be directed down other avenues occasionally. “It’s a lot of time management and a lot of short nights and early mornings,” Snider said. At Ruby Branch, Snider manages daily operations, interactions with customers and marketing. Snider also writes a personal blog, which, most recently, features the progress the couple has made constructing a house. Snider said the blog started two years ago and is focused on the farm and the things that go on at Ruby Branch. She revealed that she was not born on a farm and said her work is on a learning curve. However, Snider said

she started the blog to share farming and agriculture from a farmer’s standpoint. “There’s just a lot of negativity that surrounds agriculture in our country right now,” Snider said. “I think it’s really important for farmers to share their own stories and not let other people share our story for us.” Alyx Schultz, associate professor in agricultural sciences taught Snider when she was a student at Murray State. Schultz said she still keeps in touch with the alumna. “We think the world of her mum farm, so we go over there every year,” Schultz said. “She and I have become friends because of it so we go over there a couple times a year to see the farm and see what they’re doing.” Schultz said she thinks the farm is a great use of Snider’s agribusiness degree. She said the farm is a showcase for the awesome things people can do in Kentucky.

Little by Little leaves unique mark on the local music scene Leigh Duncan Contributing writer hduncan4@murraystate.edu

On any given night around the local hangouts of Murray, it would not be unlikely to find yourself in the presence of unique, local talent. But what is it that distinguishes a local band from the pool of others performing late into the night for crowds of listeners? Little by Little, an acoustic four-piece straight out of Murray, is leaving their unique mark at several local venues in and around Murray. With the vibrations of Brent Smith’s bass strings and Chris Abell’s guitar mixing smoothly with the rat-atat of Patrick Ecklecamp’s drum beat, along with Kayla Little’s smooth voice pulling everything together in perfect harmony, the band’s sound is not one that can be easily forgotten. “It’s kind of my brainchild,” said Kayla Little, junior from Murray and lead vocalist for Little by Little. “I found Chris to play guitar with me. He’s the best guitar player I could find on campus. Then I found Brent, who is the best bass player on campus.” Little said during the formation period, the challenge was to find musicians that not only had the time but also the taste and feel of being able to play what their band plays. “I hit up Patrick, who was certainly just the guy for the

job,” said Chris Abell, senior from Owensboro, Kentucky, and guitarist for Little by Little. Thus, Little by Little was born. The band has faced some adversity since it’s formation. Finding balance between school and academics has been something the band has struggled with. “It definitely can be stressful,” said Abell “You’ve gotta get all your classes out of the way, then homework, then you rehearse for two hours at night. Then it’s 10 o’clock and you’re like, ‘Well I guess I go to bed now? Or do more homework,’” Abell said. The band has also struggled with finding places to perform outside of Murray. “Breaking onto the Paducah scene, that was something I was nervous about,” Abell said. He details that they started out playing at open mics for free at Mr. J’s and then moved up. “Word started getting around and people in Paducah started responding to our emails and giving us gigs,” said Chris. “Once you play at certain places in Paducah like JP’s and Paducah Beer Werks, other venues start wanting you to play there too.” Right now, the band is going through a period of rest but with promises to resume. Both Abell and Ecklekamp are nearing their senior recitals and with midterms coming up, they said scheduling conflicts

Photo courtesy of Chris Abell

Local acoustic four-piece, Little by Little, gives their best off-the-wall pose. are high. “We are still students,” Abell said. However, he says the band is still looking for booking opportunities up until December, stating that advance planning is vital. “I think the thing we’re most excited about is we’re working on a demo tape with five original tracks,” Abell said. The band is using the recording studio on Murray State’s campus to record their demo, with Justin Patton. Abell said the band is excited to have their original music on tape. The demo is planned to be

released towards the end of this semester, or at the start of the next. “It’s being done for the recording class on campus, so that’s the object of it,” said Brent Smith, junior from Booneville, Indiana, and bassist for Little by Little. He said that it should take the duration of the semester to record the demo. “I’d say look for it early spring semester,” Smith said. A full interview with the band as well as an exclusive performance of Little by Little performing their original song “Shine” can be found at TheNews.org.

Frankfort, Kentucky is majoring in nonprofit leadership studies. She traveled to Cape Town, South Africa this summer for an organization called One Heart Source, a nonprofit working to end the inequality gap in South Africa. Marshall said the organization began in Tanzania but most of its efforts are focused in South Africa. “South Africa has one of the highest Gini coefficients in the world, which measures inequality in societies,” Marshall said. “Their whole thing is to bridge that gap. The hope is that the children that they’re mentoring and have in their program will go on to higher education.” She said the mentees who graduate can bring education back into their communities to hopefully help them grow economically and socially. Marshall was part of One Heart Source’s youth empowerment program and mentored two students. Marshall said she taught the children math and literacy. “We spent two hours with the kids getting to know them and having fun but I also taught them long division some days or grammar,” Marshall said. “The whole purpose was to give them that extra help they might need and to give them a safe place to go after school instead of just going and roaming the streets.” Marshall said she worked at the only government-funded school in a very impoverished area and had one student named Antonio who loved Beyonce. “My first day there he was quizzing me all about Beyonce and like ‘oh, do you actually know Beyonce songs’ and everything,” Marshall said. “Every day with them was just insane. Some days they were crazy and you had to round them up to get them to settle down but other days you just go along with it.” Marshall said one of her favorite experiences in South Africa was hiking up Table Mountain just in time for sunrise. “I went with one of the guys from my program and we started a little bit before 6 a.m. and it takes about two or so hours to get up this mountain,” Marshall said. “We made it up in an hour and a half, like booking it and sunrise is at 7:30 and we made it at like 7:20 something just in time to see the sun come through the mountains and that was insane.”

MURPHY GOES ‘BEYOND UGANDA’

Murphy, junior from Lyon County, is an organizational communications major who studied abroad in Bugiri, Uganda. Murphy sponsors two children in Africa so they can go to school. She began sponsoring her first child four years ago after going to a conference with her youth group.

“The Compassion International is who I sponsor my child through,” Murphy said. “They had their event table set up there and that’s when they gave me all the information and I started walking around and they had little pamphlets of kids so then I found one.” Murphy traveled through Paducah-based organization Beyond Uganda whose community development center is rooted in Bugiri. She lived in the children’s home where she was stationed for five weeks doing mission work and completing her studies for nonprofit. “I went over there initially to fill my internship and get a background with administration and nonprofit,” Murphy said. “But it turned into Beyond Uganda finding out that I do photography, videography and painting so it turned into service projects with them.” Murphy helped redo the Beyond Uganda office. She said she redid all the sponsorship photos on their website and took videos that will be shown at the organization’s banquet this fall.

BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS

Murphy said she only spent a day with her first sponsored child, a six-year-old boy, but visited the elementary school he just started at. She then started sponsoring another child named Diana through Beyond Uganda. “The girl that I sponsor with Beyond Uganda is in the children’s home so I kind of had that personal relationship with her,” Murphy said. Murphy said Diana would often hide food underneath her bed. “I thought it was hilarious,” Murphy said. “Sometimes when she was in a good mood she would come and share fruit with us from under her bed and no one would know where she got it.” Murphy said sponsoring a child involves a passion. “If you care for kids – or young adults even because they do offer those sponsorships – I think you have that in your heart to really go for it and commit,” she said. For Murphy, the trip was one of the best experiences of her life. “I wouldn’t trade it for anything,” she said.

THE PERKS OF TRAVELING ABROAD

Murphy said traveling abroad offers hands-on learning that a classroom can’t offer and allows students to build a network. “Whether it’s closer or further away it [the network] can always circle back and be helpful,” Murphy said. Marshall said her experience helped make her more conscious of inequality around the world and in America. “It made me more aware of how I act and how I perceive things and what I can do to end that inequality,” Marshall said. She said traveling abroad isn’t as out of reach as people think it is. She said students interested in experiencing new countries and cultures just have to make it a priority. “A lot of people look at my lifestyle and how I’ve traveled so much and they’re like ‘oh, I wish I could do that and I wish I had the money for that,’” Marshall said. “If it’s that important to you and you really want it and you really wish that you could do it, you’ll find a way.”


The News

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The News

Page 7

October 12, 2017

Opinion Editor: Tyler Anderson Page Designer: Tori Wood Phone: 270-809-5873

Opinion Our View

The vague game The staff editorial is the majority opinion of The Murray State News Editorial Board.

Connor Jaschen Editor-in-Chief • 270-809-6877 cjaschen@murraystate.edu

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College students are eerily adept at making things up as they go; the phrase “fake it ‘til you make it” comes to mind. And while it’s all fine and good for a student, we expect a bit more out of our nation’s leader. Unfortunately, our expectations continue to be dashed. Attorney General Jeff Sessions exacerbated this issue with his proclamation to “defend religious freedom” in a memo to federal agencies, fueling the debate over discrimination. The vagueness of the memo may be the most concerning issue, and has many civil rights groups calling foul. The 25-page document lists 20 guidelines which government agencies must now follow in order to ensure religious liberties are not infringed upon. We can agree that freedom of religion is an important part of our everyday lives; it ensures every citizen may worship (or not) as they see fit. The diversity of worship centers across the nation is a testament to the amendment’s effectiveness. However, Sessions has given largely free reign to federal employees of faith, leading to confusion over who may refuse to do their job, when, and to what degree. The guidelines do protect individuals based on race and sex, but the LGBT community

Autumn Brown/The News

has earned the right to be concerned. According to the memo, sex discrimination “does not encompass discrimination based on gender identity, per se, including transgender status.” The guidelines largely avoid naming certain

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The News 2609 University Station Murray State University Murray, Kentucky 42071-3301 murraystatenews@icloud.com Fax: 270-809-3175

TheNews.org The News welcomes commentaries and letters to the editor. Submissions should be 600 words or less, and contributors should include phone numbers for verification. Please include hometown, classification and title or relationship to the university. The News reserves the right to edit for style, length and content. No anonymous contributions will be accepted. All contributions should be turned in by noon on Monday of each week via email to janderson49@murraystate.edu. Contributions to The News are the opinion of the author and not that of The Murray State News. The News strives to be the university community’s source for information. Our goal is to present that information in a fair and unbiased manner and provide a free and open forum for expression and debate. The News is a designated public forum. Student editors have authority to make all content decisions without censorship or advance approval. The paper offers a hands-on learning environment for students interested in journalism. The campus press should be free from censorship and advance approval of copy and its editors should develop their editorial and news policies. The News is prepared and edited by students and is an official publication of Murray State University. The first copy is free. Additional copies are available for 25 cents at 111 Wilson Hall.

groups and who’s rights may be infringed upon on account of one’s religion; considering the current administrations animosity towards acceptance and change, it comes as no surprise transgendered individuals have been singled out as an example. Religious liberty is already protected under the constitution. Worship centers aren’t being shuttered. The government isn’t censoring individuals due to their faith. So what was the purpose of the memo? Much like most of the administrations actions, it’s likely an attempt to appeal to the voter base which put them into power. And with approval ratings steadily falling, it’s not hard to see why. The vagueness of the guideline’s limitations is as important as what is addressed, and though the memo doesn’t have the power to codify these guidelines into law, it does leave one big question: who should get to decide when, and under what pretenses, they do their job? Freedom to worship and share your beliefs is a cornerstone of our constitution and a right which should not be infringed upon. But where will the line between religious liberty and discrimination be drawn? We haven’t received a tweet with that answer just yet.

Looking Forward

A tree hugger’s lament Tyler Anderson Opinion Editor janderson49@murraystate.edu The current presidential administration has done little to hide its disdain for environmental concerns. From assigning ex-oil executives to the presidential cabinet to withdrawing from the Paris Climate Accord, the health of the environment and millions of people have been put in jeopardy. Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem they will change course anytime soon. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt announced Monday he would oversee the withdrawal of the Clean Power Plan (CPP). Established during former President Barack Obama’s administration, it provided guidelines as to exactly how much carbon pollution power plants could emit. Although controversial, it was the first step towards regulating the industry’s waste. According to reports by the Union of Concerned Scientists, power plants emit up to “40

percent of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions.” Any reduction of that number would be beneficial. Also, air pollution hurts people as much as the environment. Those with asthma are particularly vulnerable to pollution, and lung cancer is a threat after long-term exposure to irritants. It should be an easy decision: develop more efficient and ‘cleaner’ energy technologies to adapt to manmade climate change. Conspiracy theorists, (most) conservative lawmakers and a small, but vocal, sect of the general population have denounced the research supporting such a conclusion as heresy and Un-American. They are convinced more than 95 percent of environmental scientists are plotting to destroy the free world and capitalism through regulation of pollution. The evidence has been documented and is readily available; some refute the facts on principle alone, others choose to stay ignorant to avoid blame. But this most recent move is just one among many to undermine de-

cades worth of work dedicated to protecting and preserving the environment. The decision to withdraw from the CPP is done under the guise of reviving the coal industry, long since past its prime, but still a major source of Kentucky’s power. Renewable energies and new environmental technologies are closing the gap, and though coal is cheap, it’s slowly falling out of favor. Our state has been hit hard by this shift; those in the Appalachian region once relied heavily on coal production, but late-generation miners are living a much different reality than their ancestors. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 was a bipartisan effort to improve infrastructure, energy efficiency and health care in the area. It helped, but much like a band aid on a stab wound, it can’t mend the real issue. President Donald Trump’s administration has worked tirelessly to nullify or amend anything associated with the previous administration. The Paris Climate Accord was touted

as being the greatest measure taken by such a large number of countries to combat climate change; the CPP aimed to hold the energy industry accountable for its contribution to pollution. Each would provide endless benefits. Protecting our natural resources shouldn’t be a partisan issue. Decades of irresponsible stewardship has caused irreversible damage. No amount of money in the pockets of the nation’s wealthiest warrants the issues which have arisen from careless consumption. Our generation, and those following us, will bear the brunt of climate change. We are often dismissed as self-absorbed and entitled, but our adolescence was the product of endless war and the smart device revolution. We have seen the worst and the best the land of the free has to offer. We understand right and wrong is never black and white. But now we’re vocal, and we must protest actions which threaten to backtrack on decades of sustainability initiatives.

Between You and Media

Console wars Rachel Wood Contributing writer rwood7@murraystate.edu Nintendo’s newest console has taken the internet by storm – yet the console itself isn’t exactly new. The Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES) Classic, which hit shelves in September of this year, is being marketed as a more compact version of the original SNES, which was released in the United States in August 1991. Nintendo’s recent marketing strategy has centered on capitalizing on nostalgia. The company’s most recognizable characters, including Link from “The Legend of Zelda” and Nintendo’s mascot Mario, have been part of their brand since the 1980s. In fact, almost every major character in Nintendo’s catalogue of games made their first appearance in either the late 80s or early 90s; most have also appeared in new games within the past two years. New Intellectual Property (IP), or games which involve a completely new roster of characters, has been catalogue cornerstones for rivals Sony and Microsoft, but it is not something Nintendo usually invests in. And it’s easy to see why – if a console preloaded with classic games is flying off of the shelves for $80, why would they need to invest creative energy in creating new items?

For most major industry players, the video game marketplace relies on innovation, but I think Nintendo has cornered its market via exclusivity. Unlike other developers, Nintendo has held on tight to its IPs and has kept them around for decades. Because of this reluctance to share their property, there’s practically nonexistent cross-platform play; so, if you want to enjoy the newest Zelda game,

If you’re in the mood for nostalgia...

you’ll be doing so on a Nintendo system. Because of this niche role in the gaming market, Nintendo’s consoles may never be a major contender in the console war between the PlayStation and the Xbox. Nintendo has learned to set itself apart by relying on this unique strategy, and so far, it’s working.

However, despite reusing the same characters and similar story lines, Nintendo is constantly improving their adventure games, platformers and role-playing games. Their consoles, which have innovative controls and designs, have also made huge moves in the industry. The company is creating such high-quality products that it doesn’t seem to matter that some are simple remasters and rehashes of old material. Some developers have attempted to mirror this approach with console exclusives, but the fact remains that Nintendo has forged a unique relationship between their property and consumers that isn’t easily replicated. Nintendo’s strategy isn’t a bad one for the industry, despite their lack of new IPs to offer. By keeping their classic franchises at the head of their games, they have the opportunity to innovate new gameplay techniques without an extreme amount of risk because of their franchise’s following. And when Nintendo starts innovating, it forces other developers, like Sony and Microsoft, to follow suit. If you’re in the mood for nostalgia, definitely consider picking up a SNES Classic. This is a great opportunity to relive some classic titles bundled together on one system. A retro take on the video game experience isn’t groundbreaking for Nintendo, but it sure seems to be working.


The News

News

Page 8

October 12, 2017

Downtown business grows Destinee Marking Staff writer dmarking@murraystate.edu For one small business in Murray, supporting local talent and building friendships with fellow business owners is valued. Southern Soul Boutique on the court square in downtown Murray is now selling handmade decorative items from The Frosted Farmhouse, as well as supporting the business on social media. “As soon as we saw their booth at Trends N Treasures we knew that Marni’s style fit in perfect with Southern Soul,” an Instagram post by Southern Soul read. “There is so much time, effort and love put into each piece and that’s what makes every piece so unique!” Marni and Shane Ausenbaugh started The Frosted Farmhouse nearly six months ago, creating and selling home decor and custom items. The business started with one question. “The way this started was I’d come up with something and I’d ask my husband, ‘Can you build that?’” Marni said. They make and sell custom items and home decor, such as paintings, wall pieces and “spindle sticks,” which are repurposed old chairs and tables

made to look like decorative pieces. They also make tables and lamps from items like barn wood and radios. Marni describes these pieces as “modern farmhouse.” As a business owner, Marni said she values making her clients’ houses feel like home, while also building relationships with them. “In our day and age, it’s important for girls being able to connect. It doesn’t matter what age,” Marni said. The day Southern Soul Boutique posted about The Frosted Farmhouse on Instagram, Marni said many college girls were liking the post and visiting her page in return. She said she is proud to market to young women getting ready to decorate their first homes. For now, Marni and Shane said they are not interested in owning their own brick and mortar store because Shane already manages his own business, and Marni values time at home. Instead, other businesses sell The Frosted Farmhouse items in their stores. Shane Ausenbaugh said he did not have high expectations when they started the business, but is joyed by how many shops are calling them, wanting to sell their items. “It’s amazing how it’s taking off,” Shane said.

Rhiannon Branch/The News

Southern Soul is located at 109 South 4th Street in Murray and offers a wide variety of clothes, shoes and home goods, with a 15 percent discount for MSU students. Nine stores throughout Tennessee, Illinois and Kentucky sell their items. Stores in Kentucky include Trends N Treasures, Katie J’s and 2

Chicks & A Farmer. In addition to other businesses selling their items, Marni is working on perfecting The Frosted Farmhouse Etsy shop (https://

www.etsy.com/pt/shop/TheFrostedFarmhouse), so people can order items online. Marni and Shane are hosting an open house for The

Frosted Farmhouse on Nov. 4 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at their home located in Mayfield, Kentucky at 1150 Oak Grove Church Road.

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it’s ee www.TheNews.org

Mckenna Dosier/The News

Beaver Dam rest stop is set to reopen on Jan. 26, 2018.

Beaver Dam rest stop reopening Connor Jaschen Editor-in-Chief

cjaschen@murraystate.edu

Beaver Dam rest stop is scheduled to reopen on Jan. 26, 2018. The popular rest stop on Wendell H. Ford Western Kentucky Parkway marks the halfway point between Murray and the Lexington and Louisville metro areas. For many students, this rest stop location was one of the few between school and home. Zach Scott, junior from Versailles, Kentucky, travels the Western Kentucky Parkway and said having the rest stop back in business is invaluable for students from the Lexington and Louisville metro area. “Thank God its getting reopened,” Scott said. “Having it reopened up again just makes it a whole lot easier for people traveling home.” Martin and Bayley, Inc. is now under

contract with the Finance and Administration Cabinet for the next 20 years “to renovate, fit up, reconstruct, operate and maintain general merchandise and fuel service operations,” according to a press release from the Finance and Administration Cabinet. When the rest stop closed on Jan. 8 of this year, over a dozen jobs were lost. The new operators expect to employ up to 20 associates, according to the press release. Martin and Bayley, Inc.owns the Hucks chain of gas stations, with 116 convenience stores across five states. While the specific brand of the rest stop hasn’t yet been addressed, Jim Whetstone, vice president of real estate for Martin and Bayley, Inc., said many of the same Hucks products will be stocked. “The store will have six well-lit pumps and 12 fueling stations,” Whestone said. “Inside the store, customers will find

Huck’s pizza, our famous fried chicken, amazing fresh bakery, and our freshly prepared ‘Grillin’ Zone’ grill items. These choices are coupled with our convenient drive-thru window, trademarked ‘Bigg Swigg’ fountain drinks, and our exceptional timer-brewed gourmet coffee program, ‘Daybreak Café’.” Secretary of the Finance and Administration Cabinet, William M. Landrum III said the rest stop will operate “24 hours by 7 days a week by 365 days a year.” “It will be a convenient spot for the whole family to get refreshments, use the facilities, and fill their gas tank,” Landrum said. The contract between Martin and Bayleys, Inc. and the Finance and Administration Cabinet has the ability to be extended up to thirty years. Until the rest stop reopens, the closest exit where students can find food and gasoline is U.S. 231 Beaver Dam exit 73.

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