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Since 2011, Nationwide’s sports sponsorship events, including the Memorial Tournament, have raised more than $26 million for the hospital. We believe in pitching in to help wherever and whenever we’re needed, starting in our own backyard.

insurance | banking | retirement

Nationwide, the Nationwide N and Eagle and Nationwide is on your side are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. © 2018 Nationwide CPR-0593AO (04/18)

MAY 28 – JUNE 3, 2018

For your many sides, there’s Nationwide.

THE OFFICIAL MAGAZINE OF THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT PRESENTED BY NATIONWIDE

Your philanthropic side will appreciate that, for more than 60 years, Nationwide® and Nationwide Children’s Hospital have joined forces to bring quality health care to children from around the world, regardless of their ability to pay.

THE MEMORIAL

For your making kids all better side.

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THANK YOU FOR HELPING KIDS EVERYWHERE. Thank you to the Nicklaus family, our dedicated volunteers and Tournament presenting sponsor Nationwide for generously supporting the Memorial Tournament Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Center for Perinatal Research at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. With your support, our physicians and scientists are working hand-in-hand to save the tiniest of premature babies like Amayah. And what we learn through our research discoveries here is helping newborns everywhere. As America’s largest neonatal care and research network, you make it possible for us to give families what they need most. Hope.

Visit us at NationwideChildrens.org/Memorial.

Hale Irwin 2018 Memorial Tournament Honoree


ROBERT T. JONES, JR. 1976

WALTER HAGEN 1977

FRANCIS D. OUIMET 1978

GENE SARAZEN 1979

BYRON NELSON 1980

HARRY VARDON 1981

GLENNA COLLETT VARE 1982

TOMMY ARMOUR 1983

SAM SNEAD 1984

CHARLES “CHICK” EVANS 1985

ROBERTO DE VICENZO 1986

TOM MORRIS, SR. & TOM MORRIS, JR. 1987

PATTY BERG 1988

JIMMY DEMARET 1990

BABE ZAHARIAS 1991

JOSEPH C. DEY, JR. 1992

ARNOLD PALMER 1993

MICKEY WRIGHT 1994

WILLIE ANDERSON 1995

JOHN BALL 1995

JAMES BRAID 1995

HAROLD HILTON 1995

J.H. TAYLOR 1995

BILLY CASPER 1996

GARY PLAYER 1997

BOBBY LOCKE 2002

KATHY WHITWORTH 2002

JULIUS BOROS 2003

BILL CAMPBELL 2003

SIR HENRY COTTON 1989

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT HONOREES 1976–2018

PETER THOMSON 1998

BEN HOGAN 1999

JACK NICKLAUS 2000

PAYNE STEWART 2001

LEE TREVINO 2004

JOYCE WETHERED 2004

CARY MIDDLECOFF 2005

BETSY RAWLS 2005

SIR MICHAEL BONALLACK 2006

CHARLIE COE 2006

LAWSON LITTLE 2006

HENRY PICARD 2006

PAUL RUNYAN 2006

DENNY SHUTE 2006

DOW FINSTERWALD 2007

LOUISE SUGGS 2007

TONY JACKLIN 2008

RALPH GULDAHL 2008

CHARLES BLAIR MACDONALD 2008

CRAIG WOOD 2008

JACK BURKE, JR. 2009

JOANNE CARNER 2009

SEVERIANO BALLESTEROS 2010

NANCY LOPEZ 2011

TOM WATSON 2012

RAYMOND FLOYD 2013

ANNIKA SÖRENSTAM 2014

JIM BARNES 2014

JOE CARR 2014

SIR NICK FALDO 2015

DOROTHY CAMPBELL 2015

JEROME TRAVERS 2015

WALTER TRAVIS 2015

JOHNNY MILLER 2016

LEO DIEGEL 2016

HORTON SMITH 2016

GREG NORMAN 2017

TONY LEMA 2017

KEN VENTURI 2017

E. HARVIE WARD 2017

JOCK HUTCHISON 2018

WILLIE TURNESA 2018

WILLIE PARK, SR. 2014


ROBERT T. JONES, JR. 1976

WALTER HAGEN 1977

FRANCIS D. OUIMET 1978

GENE SARAZEN 1979

BYRON NELSON 1980

HARRY VARDON 1981

GLENNA COLLETT VARE 1982

TOMMY ARMOUR 1983

SAM SNEAD 1984

CHARLES “CHICK” EVANS 1985

ROBERTO DE VICENZO 1986

TOM MORRIS, SR. & TOM MORRIS, JR. 1987

PATTY BERG 1988

JIMMY DEMARET 1990

BABE ZAHARIAS 1991

JOSEPH C. DEY, JR. 1992

ARNOLD PALMER 1993

MICKEY WRIGHT 1994

WILLIE ANDERSON 1995

JOHN BALL 1995

JAMES BRAID 1995

HAROLD HILTON 1995

J.H. TAYLOR 1995

BILLY CASPER 1996

GARY PLAYER 1997

BOBBY LOCKE 2002

KATHY WHITWORTH 2002

JULIUS BOROS 2003

BILL CAMPBELL 2003

SIR HENRY COTTON 1989

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT HONOREES 1976–2018

PETER THOMSON 1998

BEN HOGAN 1999

JACK NICKLAUS 2000

PAYNE STEWART 2001

LEE TREVINO 2004

JOYCE WETHERED 2004

CARY MIDDLECOFF 2005

BETSY RAWLS 2005

SIR MICHAEL BONALLACK 2006

CHARLIE COE 2006

LAWSON LITTLE 2006

HENRY PICARD 2006

PAUL RUNYAN 2006

DENNY SHUTE 2006

DOW FINSTERWALD 2007

LOUISE SUGGS 2007

TONY JACKLIN 2008

RALPH GULDAHL 2008

CHARLES BLAIR MACDONALD 2008

CRAIG WOOD 2008

JACK BURKE, JR. 2009

JOANNE CARNER 2009

SEVERIANO BALLESTEROS 2010

NANCY LOPEZ 2011

TOM WATSON 2012

RAYMOND FLOYD 2013

ANNIKA SÖRENSTAM 2014

JIM BARNES 2014

JOE CARR 2014

SIR NICK FALDO 2015

DOROTHY CAMPBELL 2015

JEROME TRAVERS 2015

WALTER TRAVIS 2015

JOHNNY MILLER 2016

LEO DIEGEL 2016

HORTON SMITH 2016

GREG NORMAN 2017

TONY LEMA 2017

KEN VENTURI 2017

E. HARVIE WARD 2017

JOCK HUTCHISON 2018

WILLIE TURNESA 2018

WILLIE PARK, SR. 2014


THANK YOU FOR HELPING KIDS EVERYWHERE. Thank you to the Nicklaus family, our dedicated volunteers and Tournament presenting sponsor Nationwide for generously supporting the Memorial Tournament Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Center for Perinatal Research at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. With your support, our physicians and scientists are working hand-in-hand to save the tiniest of premature babies like Amayah. And what we learn through our research discoveries here is helping newborns everywhere. As America’s largest neonatal care and research network, you make it possible for us to give families what they need most. Hope.

Visit us at NationwideChildrens.org/Memorial.

Hale Irwin 2018 Memorial Tournament Honoree


Amayah

36 weeks old


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P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

CONTENTS

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

4

42

15

THE WEEK’S EVENTS/THE MEMORIAL ON TV

18

ABOUT THOSE WHO MAKE THEIR MARK IN THE GAME A message from Memorial Tournament Founder and Host Jack Nicklaus

20

COMMUNITY COMMITMENT A message from Nationwide CEO Steve Rasmussen

22

ATTENTION TO DETAIL MAKES MEMORIAL SPECIAL A message from General Chairman Jack Nicklaus II

26

THE HEART OF THE MATTER BY BOB BAPTIST Nationwide Children’s Hospital treats the littlest of patients with great care while comforting the whole family

34

MILITARY AND VETERANS APPRECIATION The Memorial welcomes our Armed Forces

38

THE CAPTAINS CLUB The distinguished group that guides the Memorial Tournament

42

FINDING HIS PLACE BY JAIME DIAZ Hale Irwin might not have been as flashy or accomplished as his peers when he began his career, but his self-knowledge, grit and determination made him one of golf’s ultimate winners

67

TWO RESPECTED CHAMPION GOLFERS HONORED BY JOHN ANTONINI The Memorial recognizes two of golf’s great players

26

ON THE COVER: Hale Irwin (right) accepts the Memorial Tournament trophy from Jack Nicklaus after his 1985 victory. PHOTO: THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT ARCHIVE


THE POWER OF POSITIVE ENERGY

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79 THE MEMORIAL CLUB Securing the Tournament’s future 82 THE MEMORIAL GOLF JOURNALISM AWARD: A LOVE FOR THE WRITTEN WORD BY JOHN STREGE As a 2018 Memorial Golf Journalism Award recipient, Larry Dorman started covering golf’s greatest— including the Golden Bear—in the ’70s

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

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THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

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202

“WRONG RON,” RIGHT GUY BY JEFF BABINEAU Ron Balicki, a kind man and thorough journalist, brought a level of attention to college golf that had previously been lacking, making friends along the way

94 HE DOES IT HIS WAY BY JIM McCABE He may come across as aloof and unemotional, but Jason Dufner, the 2017 Memorial Tournament winner, is calm and cool when it comes to managing his golf game 108 ON THE REBOUND BY GARY VAN SICKLE After a record-breaking 36-hole start, Jason Dufner sank on Saturday only to rise again on Sunday to win the 2017 Memorial 116

FROM OUT OF THE SAND BY DAVID SHEDLOSKI With one of the most iconic shots in golf’s modern era, Paul Azinger holed out from a greenside bunker on 18 to surge past his best friend Payne Stewart in the 1993 Memorial

124

A LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT BY DAVID SHEDLOSKI There’s more than just a major sense of satisfaction that comes from claiming victory in the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide, as many past winners can attest 139 HOLE BY HOLE 180

124

PHOTOS BY JIM MANDEVILLE

IN THE BEGINNING BY DAVID SHEDLOSKI Sixty years ago this July, a bright-eyed, blonde- haired, college freshman made his tour debut at Firestone Country Club

190 ESSAY: A NEW AGE OF GOLF BY RON GREEN, JR. With no single player dominating in the majors after the reign of Tiger Woods, an era of youthful parity is taking hold 202 FICTION: AND THE FOG LIFTS

BY DAN O’NEILL

The game of golf serves as a catalyst to stir some great memories among a pair of strangers 214 1976-2017 The Memorial Tournament Past Winners 216 REFLECTIONS A celebration of golf in verse

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An annual stop on the PGA TOUR, the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide is One of US. See why forward-thinking organizations like the Memorial Tournament excel as One of US at columbusregion.com/OneofUS.

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the memorial tournament presented by nationwide committees & staff Founder and Host

Jack W. Nicklaus President

General Chairman

Chairman Emeritus

Steven C. Nicklaus

Jack W. Nicklaus II

Pandel Savic

THE CAPTAINS CLUB

Peter Alliss • Paul Azinger • Judy Bell • Sir Michael Bonallack • O. Gordon Brewer, Jr. • The Hon. George H.W. Bush • Sir Sean Connery A.S. (Sandy) Dawson • Tim Finchem • Trey Holland • Juli Inkster • Hale Irwin • Tony Jacklin • Ken Lindsay • H. Colin Maclaine Charles S. Mechem, Jr. • Barbara Nicklaus • Andy North • Hisamitsu Ohnishi • Gary Player • Judy Rankin • Fred S. Ridley Johann Rupert • Carol Semple Thompson • Tom Watson Advisory Board: Lance Barrow • Peter Bevacqua • Mike Davis • Jay Monahan EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Jack Nicklaus • Jack Nicklaus II • Steve Nicklaus • Larry Dornisch • Lon Fellenz Nicholas LaRocca • Dan Maher • Chad Mark • Andy O’Brien • Dan Sullivan Emeritus: Pandel Savic VICE CHAIRMEN

Donald “Ric” Baird III • Todd Bork • Chris Campisi • John Ciotola • Jeff Logan Nate Miles • Chip Neale • Dayna Payne • Tom Welker Emeritus: David L. Barnes • Alphonse P. Cincione • Richard R. Corna • James R. Fabyan John Keith • Paul B. Long, Jr. • H.M. “Butch” O’Neill P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

CHAIRS, DIRECTORS AND ADVISORS

Rich Aldridge • Sheriff Dallas Baldwin • JoAnn Bigler • Jeff Bordner • Dave Brooks • Lt. David Buttler • Debby Cacchio • Lt. Eric Caudill Ann Clark • Tony D’Angelo • Tim Doran • John Ensign • Lt. Steve Farmer • Brett Febus • Mark Fruehlich • Sgt. Thomas Gallagher Rob Geis • Chief Deputy Jim Gilbert • Jay Gray • Chris Hale • Everett Hall • Paul Heller • Deputy Chief Steve Hrytzik • Chris Johnson • Bob Laird Sheriff Russ Martin • George W. McCloy • Deputy Dave McMannis • Sean Mentel • Ann Miles • Barb Miles • Tony Mollica • John Montgomery Tom Nolan • Jillian Obenour • Cpl. Justin Paez • Dave Peters • Ken Peters • Tina Quinn • Daryll Rardon • Bill Reynolds • Charles Ruma L. Jack Ruscilli • Dr. James Ryan • John Scott • Bill Shulack • Todd Sloan • Jeff Stavroff • Barb Stieg • John Stieg • Chief Gary Vest Chief Heinz von Eckartsberg • Jan Wallace • Ike Wampler • Bob Warner • Chris Welker • Sgt. Christopher Wheeler • Chief Deputy Pat Yankie Emeritus: Jim Bean • Mark Brown • Phil Campisi • Vern Krier • Scotty Patrick • John Pavlick • Silas W. Thimmes • Carol Young NATIONWIDE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL COMMITTEE

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

10

2018 Chair

2019 Chair Elect

Miranda Roberts

Michelle Francisco Captains

Anne Bogenrief • Dick Curtis • Beth Czekalski • Angie Fallon • Julie Seiple • Erin Vinci • Marcy Williams Committee

Amy Andrews • Jennifer Bollinger • Beth Branstiter • Paula Brose • Christy Charvat • Lisa Colosimo • Suzanne Colwell • Christina Copeland Patty Dixon • Paula Ferguson • Beth Fitzgerald • Lynda Gage • Jean Gans • Lauretta Godbout • Courtney Grant • Terri Heaphy • Susan Houser Ann Otte Hunger • Holly Hykes • Michele Joseph • Travis Kerzee • Heather Landers • Donna LeCrone • Susan Long • Nancy Minton Jessica Ossege • Meg Patten • Marigale Rice • Kelly Rogers • Jennifer Russel • Michelle Scott • Teri Slick • Julie Walburn • Joyce Wimmers • Sally Wood TOURNAMENT ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

Director, Marketing & Community Relations

Director, Sales

Executive Director

Director, Activation

Director, Communications

Tournament Administrator

Heather Ditty

Paul Howard

Dan Sullivan

Susan Hosket

Tom Sprouse

Chris Stiffler

Tournament Coordinator

Admissions Coordinator

Associate, Sales

Executive Assistant

Marketing Coordinator

Operations, HNS Sports Group

Denise McBride

Elaine Leffel

Kelsey Beckenhaupt

Mary Peterson

Kristina Khalili

Kip McBride

muirfield village golf club President

General Chairman

Jack W. Nicklaus

Jack W. Nicklaus II

CAPTAINS OF MUIRFIELD VILLAGE GOLF CLUB

Jack W. Nicklaus (1980-81) • Ivor H. Young (1981-82) • Robert S. Hoag (1982-83) • Pandel Savic (1983-84) • Jack Grout (1984-85) Edwin D. Dodd (1985-86) • John F. Havens (1986-87) • John H. McConnell (1987-88) • H.M. “Butch” O’Neill (1988-89) James E. Nolan, Jr. (1989-90) Fritz Schmidt (1990-91) • Richard F. Chapdelaine (1991-92) • Ken Bowden (1992-93) • James R. Fabyan (1993-94) • Dr. Russell L. Bowermaster (1994-95) Barbara Nicklaus (1995-96) • Jack Hesler (1996-97) • David G. Sherman (1997-98) • Alphonse P. Cincione (1998-99) • David L. Barnes (1999-2000) Dr. Robert J. Murphy (2000-01) • David J. Harris (2001-02) • Charles R. Carson (2002-03) • Kerry F.B. Packer (2003-04) • Richard R. Corna (2004-05) Silas W. Thimmes (2005-06) • Charles S. Mechem, Jr. (2006-07) • Carol Young (2007-08) • Paul B. Long, Jr. (2008-09) • John G. Hines (2009-10) George McCloy, Sr. (2010-11) • Phil Campisi (2011-12) • Frank Bork (2012-13) • L. Jack Ruscilli (2013-14) • Jeff Logan (2014-15) Tom Welker (2015-16) • Dr. John R. Evans (2016-17) • Dr. William E. Sloan (2017-18) DEPARTMENT HEADS

Director, Grounds Operations

Head Golf Professional

General Manager & Chief Operating Officer

Chief Financial Officer

Chad Mark

Larry Dornisch

Nicholas LaRocca

John Jankovic

Executive Chef

Director, Membership

Director, Villa Operations

Clubhouse Manager

Executive Housekeeper

Stephen Demeter

Sandi Karnes

Mike McKee

Nick Smithson

Vicki Miller

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5/3/18 9:56 AM


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Since partnering with the PGA TOUR in 2008, CDW has used technology to help connect players, fans and journalists to the game. By powering the revolutionary ShotLink scoring system, CDW enables real-time score tracking, in-depth statistical analysis and instant availability of player data across the globe. Countless stats are captured each week via the ShotLink Scoring System powered by CDW. When Gary Woodland plays on the PGA TOUR, statistical data can be used to track his shots around the course and help improve his game. Learn more at www.cdw.com/pgatour.

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Schedule Of Events

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

David Shedloski CREATIVE & PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

Larry Hasak ART DIRECTOR

Matt Ellis MONDAY, MAY 28 AND TUESDAY, MAY 29

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

14

WEDNESDAY, MAY 30

Practice Rounds Military and Veterans Appreciation Day Junior Golf Day Nationwide Invitational at the Memorial – 7:30 a.m. Memorial Honoree Ceremony: Hale Irwin Jock Hutchison • Willie Turnesa Driving Range – 2:30 p.m. Jack Nicklaus Golf Clinic: Driving Range – 4 p.m. Junior Golf Clinic: Safari Golf Club – 5:30 p.m. THURSDAY, MAY 31

Round One FRIDAY, JUNE 1

Round Two SATURDAY, JUNE 2

Round Three

Debbie Falcone PRODUCTION MANAGER

Melody Manolakis CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

John Antonini • Jeff Babineau Bob Baptist • Jaime Diaz Ron Green, Jr. • Jim McCabe Dan O’Neill • David Shedloski John Strege • Gary Van Sickle PHOTOGRAPHY

Alamy Photo • AP Images Getty Images Irwin Family Archive Jim Mandeville • Bo Maupin the Memorial Tournament Archive PGA TOUR Images • USGA ILLUSTRATION

Glenn Harrington (Honoree portraits) Michael Witte PUBLISHED BY

SUNDAY, JUNE 3

Final Round Trophy presentation at the 18th green following play

6189 MEMORIAL DRIVE, SUITE 300 DUBLIN, OHIO 43017 • 614-764-4653 HNSSPORTS.COM

Television Viewing Times

GOLF CHANNEL

PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER

THURSDAY, MAY 31..................2:30-6:30 p.m. (Replays 7:30-11:30 p.m.; 11:30 p.m.-3:30 a.m.)

Dan Sullivan

FRIDAY, JUNE 1.........................2:30-6:30 p.m. (Replays 7:30-11:30 p.m.; 11:30 p.m.-3:30 a.m.; Saturday 4:30 a.m.-6:30 a.m.)

ADVERTISING SALES

Dan Sullivan • Susan Hosket Paul Howard

SATURDAY, JUNE 2................ 12:30-2:45 p.m.

SUNDAY, JUNE 3...................... Noon-2:15 p.m.

MAGAZINE PRODUCTION

CBS SPORTS and DIRECTV

Heather Ditty • Kristina Khalili

SATURDAY, JUNE 2............................. 3-6 p.m. (Replays 7 p.m.-midnight; Sunday 1-6 a.m. on Golf Channel)

SUNDAY, JUNE 3............................ 2:30-6 p.m. (Replays 7 p.m.-midnight; Monday 1-6 a.m. and 1-6 p.m. on Golf Channel)

GETTY IMAGES/ CHRIS CONDON/PGA TOUR

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

Practice Rounds

ASSOCIATE EDITOR


MAYBE IT’S NOT THE

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EVERY THING GROWS HERE.

DUB L IN OHIO U S A .GOV


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FROM THE FOUNDER AND HOST

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

About Those Who Make Their Mark in the Game

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

18

I HAVE ALWAYS EMBRACED every opportunity I have had to connect with fans, and the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide gives me a uniquely special platform to do that every year. After all, we created the Memorial to bring world-class golf to the good people of Central Ohio. The opportunity afforded me each year in this letter is another way I am able to reach out to our patrons and share my thoughts about this event, this great game, and the outstanding people who have contributed to its rich history and who continue to shape golf’s future. Some of these individuals impact the game through the way they have governed or the way they have competed. Few embody what I admire in a competitor more than Hale Irwin, our 2018 Honoree. Hale is one of the toughest competitors I have ever known, whether it was on the football field at Colorado or on the golf course. He's always been a steely eyed, fiery competitor, and I've always admired and respected him for that. I consider the U.S. Open the complete examination of a golfer and one of the game’s sternest tests, so if you want to do a mental tally about Hale Irwin’s heart, guts and determination, you need say only this: three-time U.S. Open champion Hale Irwin. Or, I might opt for: two-time Memorial Tournament winner Hale Irwin. Keep in mind, Hale, the Memorial winner in 1983 and ’85, also possessed great talent to go with his competitive fire. He was a wonderful striker of the ball and understood his game. The same athleticism and work ethic that once made Hale an

MEM18_JACK_LETTER_v2.indd 18

all-conference defensive back and Academic All-American, allowed him to become arguably the most accomplished senior golfer in history—a record 45 wins to go along with 20 PGA TOUR victories. Outside the ropes, Hale has always been a man of tremendous integrity, with a wonderful dedication to family. I will never forget the beautiful letter Hale and his wife Sally wrote to me after I won the 1986 Masters. Hale Irwin is a class individual and a welcome addition to our distinguished list of past Honorees. Joining Hale as Honorees are two greats from the past, Jock Hutchison and Willie Turnesa. Jock won a pair of major championships and several other events. Among his biggest claims to fame was serving as one of the first Honorary Starters at the Masters, when he joined Fred McLeod in 1963. Willie Turnesa was one of seven brothers to play the game, but he was the only one who remained an amateur. His record includes a pair of U.S. Amateur titles and a British Amateur. Another friend who has made a mark in golf in myriad ways is Fred Ridley, who has served on our Captains Club for a number of years. Fred won the 1975 U.S. Amateur—coincidentally on the same James River Course of the Country Club of Virginia where I played in my first U.S. Amateur at age 15. Fred’s victory led to us being paired together the following year at the Masters, as it is tradition to pair the reining Masters winner with the U.S. Amateur champion. Fred has such a deep-rooted love and respect for the game, and over the years he has grown into one of golf’s most respected leaders and voices—first at the U.S. Golf Association and now at Augusta National Golf Club, as the new Chairman

5/1/18 6:15 PM


OPPOSITE: JIM MANDEVILLE; ABOVE: GETTY IMAGES/AUGUSTA NATIONAL

Columbus and the surrounding Central Ohio communities. The fans, volunteers and businesses here play such an important role in our success, and Barbara and I can never thank all of you enough for your decades of generosity and good will. In closing, let me share how excited we are to present to you the 43rd edition of the Memorial. With a terrific field and a golf course in great condition, we expect another memorable week of competition here at Muirfield Village Golf Club. It should be fun to watch the Tournament unfold, and I look forward to Sunday evening when we add another fine player to our list of winners. Thank you, and enjoy the week.

19 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

of Augusta National and the Masters Tournament. He became the eighth chairman of the club but the first who competed in the Masters. His selection was well deserved. We are proud that Fred remains on the Captains Club, and we look forward to his input for many years to come. Another task I greatly enjoy is my annual nod of deep gratitude to Nationwide and its CEO Steve Rasmussen for support of the Tournament. It is largely because of Steve and his dedication for what we are trying to do at the Memorial Tournament that we enjoy so much success in raising dollars for Nationwide Children’s Hospital and the Nicklaus Children’s Health Care Foundation. Through our special alliance, all of the Memorial’s proceeds are earmarked for helping children here in Greater Columbus. Our status among PGA TOUR events has been elevated because of Nationwide, but more important, we are able to help more children and families in need. Finally, we could not accomplish all of our goals without the unwavering support of the good folks of Greater

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

Jack Nicklaus and Fred Ridley stride down the fairway on the 14th hole at Augusta National Golf Club during the 1976 Masters Tournament.

JACK NICKLAUS Founder and Host the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide

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5/1/18 6:15 PM


A LETTER FROM NATIONWIDE

Community Commitment WELCOME to the 2018 Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide. Nationwide is proud to be part of the 43rd playing of the Tournament, and our associates P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

and partners are excited to once again experience one of the greatest weeks in golf.

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For the eighth consecutive year, Nationwide is partnering with Jack Nicklaus and the Memorial Tournament to help raise funds and awareness for the life-saving care and research performed at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Generous contributions enable the hospital to provide critical care for young patients here in Central Ohio and across the globe regardless of their ability to pay. Nationwide’s support and partnership with the hospital spans more than 60 years and continues to grow. And our longstanding relationship with the Tournament reflects Nationwide’s support and commitment to the community. Making a difference for families and our communities has been part of Nationwide’s culture since we were founded in Columbus in 1926. It’s that commitment that drives our mission to help consumers and businesses protect what’s most important and build a secure financial future. Through the years, we’ve worked with many community partners to help improve the quality of life in Central Ohio—a history we proudly share with the Memorial Tournament. Your continued support of the Memorial Tournament and Nationwide Children’s Hospital helps ensure we can make a difference for generations to come. Thank you! Nationwide is On Your Side®.

STEVE RASMUSSEN Chief Executive Officer Nationwide


The return on our investment is often quite small. We believe that all kids deserve a bright future. That’s why Nationwide® has supported Nationwide Children’s Hospital for more than 60 years, and we’re proud to have partnered with Jack Nicklaus and the Memorial Tournament to raise nearly $9.5 million for Nationwide Children’s Hospital since 2011. Help us help kids everywhere. Consider making a donation at NationwideChildrens.org/giving.

Nationwide, the Nationwide N and Eagle and Nationwide is on your side are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. © 2018 Nationwide CPR-0594AO (04/18)


FROM THE GENERAL CHAIRMAN

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

Attention to Detail Makes Memorial Special

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BY ITS NATURE, golf is a game where the smallest of details can make the difference between winning and losing and can separate great players from good ones. If football is considered a “game of inches,” golf would be a game of millimeters. I don’t know if anyone paid more attention to the details than my father. Jack Nicklaus was always considered a brilliant strategist and manager of his game. That same attention to detail made my father one of the world’s premier golf course designers—a career that inspired me to follow the same path—and, over the course of 42-plus years, one of the game’s finest tournament hosts. When my father opened Muirfield Village Golf Club in 1974 and introduced the Memorial Tournament two years later, he left nothing to chance to make sure that he was bringing one of the world’s finest golf tournaments to his Central Ohio hometown. Here we are preparing for the 43rd Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide, and I am just as much in awe today as I was that very first year. I think of all the great winners we’ve had here, the exciting finishes, the millions of dollars we’ve raised for charity—more than $30 million for Central Ohio charities, including $18.5 million for Nationwide Children’s Hospital—and the lives that we’ve touched along the way. Our entire family is proud of what this Tournament has come to represent. Its excellence truly mirrors what my father consistently displayed throughout his career. A lot of folks helped along the way, including thousands of volunteers, millions of wonderful fans, and one tremendous partner in Nationwide. And I would be remiss to not point out the role my mom has played in making this event what it is. The Memorial has been a team effort by and a partnership between Barbara and Jack Nicklaus. There is one more group of people who has made a major contribution to our mission over the years—a group you rarely hear much about but one whose actions speak volumes. They have helped my father since the very beginning, and they have done so out of respect for him and for their devotion to the game. I’m talking about the Captains Club. This distinguished group of individuals has advised on the conduct of the Memorial Tournament since its inception, and they have gathered annually to discuss and address the

most important issues in our game. My father, with input from Joseph C. Dey, the first commissioner of the PGA TOUR, created the Captains Club to ensure that the Tournament would benefit from their expertise and wisdom in matters that might arise. The Captains Club also selects our Tournament Honorees. Playing legends Gene Sarazen, Byron Nelson and Arnold Palmer served on the Captains Club, as have former U.S. President Gerald R. Ford and former Augusta National Golf Club Chairmen Clifford Roberts and Hord Hardin. The current list of Captains Club members includes the 41st President of the United States George H. W. Bush, actor Sir Sean Connery, former PGA TOUR Commissioner Tim Finchem and major champions such as Gary Player, Tom Watson and Andy North. I just marvel at the number of leaders in golf, business and other pursuits who have volunteered their time. There is nothing else like it in the game of golf, which is another reason the Memorial Tournament is such a special event. The work of the Captains Club this year has resulted in the selection of three more worthy individuals as Honorees. Please join me in congratulating Hale Irwin, who always has been a good friend to my dad, our family and to the Memorial Tournament— and who graciously agreed to join our Captains Club last year. I also send best wishes to the families of the men we honor posthumously— Jock Hutchison and Willie Turnesa. I am eager to find out who our Captains Club selects to honor next year, perpetuating this wonderful tradition. It’s a tradition that makes us truly unique among the hundreds of golf tournaments around the world, and I hope that our fans have enjoyed it as much as we have. Have a wonderful week and enjoy the golf.

JACK NICKLAUS II General Chairman the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide


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MEMORIAL BENEFACTION

THE HEART OF THE MATTER NATIONWIDE CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL TREATS THE LITTLEST OF PATIENTS WITH GREAT CARE WHILE COMFORTING THE WHOLE FAMILY, AS THE PORTZLINE FAMILY LEARNED FIRST HAND

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

by Bob Baptist

Grace Portzline underwent open-heart surgery as an infant at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

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THER THAN the sudden, sobering responsibility of being parents for the first time, Aaron and Kate Portzline didn’t feel undue cause for concern when they were told, the day after their daughter Grace was born at Nationwide Children’s Hospital, that she had a heart murmur. “They said, ‘It’ll probably close. Don’t worry about it,’ ” Kate recalled. “And she wasn’t showing any signs of distress, so they released us and said come back in eight days.” Eight days later, they were met by a cardiologist, Dr. Douglas Teske, whom Aaron remembers as having “the most soothing voice I ever heard.” Very matter-of-factly, Teske informed them Grace would need surgery in a few months. Kate thought she had misheard him. “I thought he was saying, ‘Some children have to go through this, but you don’t, so see you later.’ I really did. “Remember?” she said, looking at her husband. “We were both like, ‘What did he just tell us?’ “But then I asked him, ‘What are you saying?’ and he said, ‘Well, she’ll need open-heart surgery in about five months.’

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MEMORIAL BENEFACTION

“And then the whole world kind of stopped, and he left us alone in the room for a while to freak out. And then we went home, and I didn’t take my eyes off her for five months.”

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GRACE WAS BORN October 18, 2001, with a condition known as tetralogy of Fallot, named for a French physician, Étienne-Louis-Arthur Fallot. A paper he published in 1888 detailed the four heart abnormalities responsible for causing socalled “blue baby syndrome,” in which newborns may exhibit breathlessness when crying or have a blue tint to their skin around their fingertips, toes and lips that is caused by a lack of oxygenated blood cells reaching those areas. The condition is present in about one in 2,000 babies. During her first five months, Grace exhibited neither of those symptoms, her parents said, and while feeling what Kate Grace, shown here with mom Kate, was born with the heart condition described as a “dark cloud” over their tetralogy of Fallot, which was diagnosed soon after birth at Nationwide heads because of the impending surgery, they were able to enjoy Children’s. About one in 2,000 babies are born with this condition. their new arrival. “You would never have guessed she wasn’t healthy,” Aaron said. she was stabilized and her parents were allowed to take her home. “She just did what babies do,” Kate said—so much so that when “There’s so many ups and downs,” Kate said. the day finally came for them to return to Nationwide Children’s for Through it all, though, she remembers the nurses in the NICU the surgery, Kate was in denial. Nationwide Children’s Hospital is being “passionate, understanding and comforting” to the extent the primary beneficiary of charitable proceeds from the Memorial that Kate felt they cared for her daughter as Tournament presented by Nationwide via if she were their own. It’s the kind of care a special alliance with the Nicklaus Chil“GRACE WAS THERE OVER parents and their children receive daily at dren’s Health Care Foundation. EASTER, AND I CAME IN Nationwide Children’s. “I was like, ‘Why are we taking her in “Grace was there over Easter, and I there? They’re going to open her up, and EASTER DAY AND HER came in Easter Day and her nurse had givthey’re wrong because she’s perfect.’ It was NURSE HAD GIVEN HER A en her a sponge bath and put a little bow bizarre,” she said. SPONGE BATH AND PUT in her hair and put her in an actual little Grace was, outwardly, perfect: 8 outfit instead of her [hospital] gown,” Kate pounds at birth, healthy skin coloring and, HER IN AN ACTUAL LITTLE said. “I didn’t have a dry eye the whole apart from the congenital defects, a strong OUTFIT… I DIDN’T HAVE A time I was there that day. The nurse was heart muscle, her parents were told. SurDRY EYE THE WHOLE TIME like, ‘It’s Easter and I wanted to do somegery was necessary, though, because, left thing special.’ ” untreated, tetralogy of Fallot can result in I WAS THERE THAT DAY.” delayed growth and development, heart — KATE PORTZLINE ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ failure and, in some cases, death. Grace’s surgery, which was performed by Dr. Terry Davis, lasted eight hours. GRACE IS 16 NOW and doing typical teenGrace remained in the hospital’s Neonatal ager things. She recently completed her Intensive Care Unit for nine days—and they were not without comsophomore year at Granville High School, where she is in Spanish plications. She endured a brain seizure caused by a blood protein Club and Young Life. She has a part-time job and, for now, she is imbalance one day—“That was the scariest part, for sure,” Aaron thinking of a career in child psychology. said—and a buildup of fluid in her lungs a few of days later before The biggest difference between her and her friends is that every

PORTZLINE FAMILY

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✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶


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10 to 15 years for the rest of her life she’ll have to undergo surgery to replace the pulmonary valve in her heart. The defective valve she was born with was removed during her initial surgery in 2002, and it was not replaced until her second open-heart surgery in 2015. She can have future replacements completed via a catheter. During the second surgery, 13-year-old Grace was able to help calm her parents’ fears.They remember anxiously approaching her to ask how she was doing as she was prepped for surgery, and her looking around and saying, “It’s just like ‘Grey’s Anatomy’!” It’s her favorite television show. “She’s a pretty mellow kid,” Kate said. The surgical team took photographs of her heart during the fourhour procedure and asked Grace if she’d like to see them. She took them up on their offer. “Pretty cool,” Grace said. “I have them on my phone.” “You have them on your phone?” Kate said. “OK, that’s weird.” Grace lived without a pulmonary valve for 13 years, her parents

were told, “because the heart is still growing … you don’t really need one unless you’re really exerting yourself,” Aaron said. “They wanted her heart to be full size before they fitted her with one.” Growing up without one, Grace had difficulty keeping up with the pack in gym class. She couldn’t play sports, but that was OK because “I’ve never been into them,” she said. Her teachers and fellow students were aware of her condition, so it was never a problem. It wasn’t until she had the valve implanted in 2015 that she realized how the rest of the world breathes. Before, any exertion on her part had resulted in labored, heavy breathing that doctors likened to the effect of “running up a sand dune.” After the surgery, the difference was an eye-opening experience. “Even walking across the room,” Grace noted, “is noticeably easier now.” Bob Baptist retired from The Columbus Dispatch in 2015 after 37 years as the newspaper’s golf writer. He covered every Memorial Tournament from 1978 through 2014.

PORTZLINE FAMILY (3)

Grace, left, at age 16, and at 13, right, during a second open-heart surgery in 2015, at Nationwide Children’s. Below: Kate, Grace and Aaron this Christmas.

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INNOVATORS IN PHILANTHROPY A New Approach to Helping Kids Everywhere The need is clear. Children are facing unprecedented health disparities. Behavioral health issues are on the rise. Pediatric research is significantly underfunded. Our work is more needed than ever. Nationwide Children’s Hospital celebrates these forward-thinking Corporate Partners who are helping us take on some of the biggest challenges in pediatrics with aspirational results. Together we are helping kids everywhere.

To read more of their stories, visit NationwideChildrens.org/Partners

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Heart transplant, pictured at age 3

Thank You to Our National Partners


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P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

THE MILITARY

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MILITARY & VETERANS APPRECIATION DAY WEDNESDAY, MAY 30

RECOGNIZING EXCEPTIONAL PEOPLE is one of the primary missions of the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide. That’s why active and retired members of the U.S. Armed Forces are honored each year at Muirfield Village Golf Club with a day of free admission to the Tournament to watch world-class golf and join in the celebration of the Tournament Honorees. It also gives all of us a chance to simply say to them,

“ Thank You.” PHOTO: THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

5/3/18 3:56 PM


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T H E C A P TA I N S C L U B ,

PETER ALLISS Three-time British PGA champion; eight-time Ryder Cup player; international television golf commentator.

PAUL AZINGER Winner of the Memorial Tournament and the PGA Championship in 1993; winning 2008 U.S. Ryder Cup captain.

JUDY BELL Former President of the USGA (1996-97); Curtis Cup player and captain.

SIR MICHAEL BONALLACK Former Secretary and Captain of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews; five-time British Amateur champion.

O. GORDON BREWER, JR. Chairman of Pine Valley Golf Club; twice U.S. Senior Amateur champion.

THE HONORABLE GEORGE H.W. BUSH Former President of the United States of America.

SIR SEAN CONNERY Academy Award-winning actor; contributor to golf and charity.

A.S. (SANDY) DAWSON Past Captain of The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews (2013-14).

TIM FINCHEM Former Commissioner of the PGA TOUR (1994-2016).

TREY HOLLAND Former President of the USGA (2000-02).

JULI INKSTER Hall of Fame golfer with 31 LPGA Tour wins, including seven major championships.

HALE IRWIN Three-time U.S. Open champion and two-time winner of the Memorial; owns record 45 wins on PGA TOUR Champions.

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BACK GROUND PHOTO: BO MAUPIN

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

an international group of authorities on the game of golf, has advised on the constitution and conduct of the Memorial Tournament since its inception in 1976. One of the Captains’ primary tasks is to select the person or persons in whose honor the Memorial Tournament is played each year. For this year’s 43rd Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide they have selected Hale Irwin, Jock Hutchison and Willie Turnesa. All members of the Captains Club give of their time on an honorary basis, and, as always, Memorial Founder and Host Jack Nicklaus and the Executive Committee are grateful for their contributions to the Tournament’s success.

5/2/18 10:55 AM


TONY JACKLIN 1969 British Open and 1970 U.S. Open champion; member of the World Golf Hall of Fame.

KEN LINDSAY Former President of the PGA of America (1997-98).

H. COLIN MACLAINE Former Captain of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews.

CHARLES S. MECHEM, JR. Commissioner Emeritus of the Ladies Professional Golf Association.

BARBARA NICKLAUS Recognized as the “First Lady of Golf” and a tireless worker for charitable causes.

ADVISORY BOARD

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JOHANN RUPERT Chairman of the South African Tour and Chairman of the South African Golf Development Board.

CAROL SEMPLE THOMPSON Accomplished amateur player and former member of the USGA Executive Committee.

JUDY RANKIN Winner of 26 LPGA events; member of the World Golf Half of Fame; ground-breaking television golf analyst.

TOM WATSON Hall of Fame golfer and eight-time major champion; ardent supporter of junior golf development.

Peter Bevacqua CEO, PGA of America

Jay Monahan Commissioner, PGA TOUR

RETIRED CAPTAIN James Ray Carpenter DECEASED CAPTAINS W. Ronald Alexander • John D. Ames • J. Paul Austin William C. Battle • Peggy Kirk Bell • William C. Campbell Sir John Carmichael • Howard L. Clark • Bing Crosby • Joseph C. Dey, Jr. Charles Evans, Jr. • The Honorable Gerald R. Ford • William Ward Foshay Isaac B. Grainger • James Grimm • Hord Hardin • Jay Hebert Totten P. Heffelfinger • Bob Hope • Frederick E. Jones George H. Love • David Marr • Gerald H. Micklem John D. Montgomery, Sr. • Byron Nelson • Will F. Nicholson, Jr. James L. O’Keefe • Arnold Palmer • William J. Patton Eugene Pullia • Bernard H. Ridder, Jr. • Clifford Roberts Gene Sarazen • Harton S. Semple • Sir Iain Stewart • Philip H. Strubing F. Morgan Taylor, Jr. • Richard S. Taylor • Robert W. Willits Herbert Warren Wind • John W. Winters, Jr.

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FRED S. RIDLEY Chairman of Augusta National Golf Club. 1975 U.S. Amateur champion and former President of the USGA (2004-05).

GARY PLAYER South African winner of more than 150 tournaments around the world.

Mike Davis Executive Director, USGA

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ANDY NORTH 1978 and 1985 U.S. Open champion; television golf analyst for ESPN.

HISAMITSU OHNISHI Vice Chairman of the Japan Golf Tour Organization; a leader in the development of Japan’s professional golf tour and founder of one of its premier events.

Lance Barrow Coordinating Producer, CBS Sports

5/2/18 10:58 AM


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MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT HONOREE

HALE IRWIN MIGHT NOT HAVE BEEN AS FLASHY OR ACCOMPLISHED AS HIS PEERS WHEN HE BEGAN HIS CAREER, BUT HIS SELF-KNOWLEDGE, GRIT AND DETERMINATION MADE HIM ONE OF GOLF’S ULTIMATE WINNERS

PGA TOUR IMAGES/CHRIS CONDON

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IRST IMPRESSIONS LINGER, which is why golf has long played catch up with Hale Irwin. It took a while for the game’s watchers to realize that the player who from afar could come across as Clark Kent possessed a few hidden powers, a golfing man of steel, of sorts. In part, he was a victim of timing. When Irwin began winning major championships in the 1970s, touring pros had begun going the extra marketing mile to be as well-known as athletes in team sports. Besides winning tournaments, possessing as many signature traits as possible needed to be part of the package—things like distinctive clothing, a catchy nickname, an outsized personality, or maybe a power game. Being truly great made the rest less necessary, but that was Jack Nicklaus territory. Arnold Palmer, past his prime, remained in a category of cool all his own. Pretty much everyone else was looking for an identity. Irwin presented a branding challenge. He wore glasses. For a time, he complemented them with orthodontic braces. He might have presented a fit profile at 6 feet, 175 pounds, but he played small ball—straight and mostly drama free—with a taciturn manner that the super-agent at the time, Mark McCormack, called “the introspective Bachelor of Science, who brought an almost scholarly detachment to the business of golf.” In his interviews, the earnestly articulate Irwin could sometimes drop in a “hence,” or an “if you will.”

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F

by Jaime Diaz

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

FINDING HIS PLACE

5/1/18 9:50 AM


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one that has grown closer in philosophy to that of his favorite athlete, Byron “Whizzer” White, who burst out of Colorado in the 1930s as a running back that would lead both the NCAA and the NFL in rushing as well as being a Rhodes scholar, all as a prelude to serving more than 30 years as a justice on the Supreme Court. “While athletics are a manufactured

Above: Irwin, pictured with his parents, Hale and Mabel, and brother Phil. He refers to his parents as part of the “greatest generation” who gave him a solid Kansas upbringing that included participation in a variety of sports. Opposite: Irwin the football player at the University of Colorado.

environment, there comes a moment when you stand face to face with doing,” White once said. “The moment—perhaps a fraction of a second—comes when you either do or you don’t.”

Irwin has the inner satisfaction of knowing that, often, he did. He took getting a degree seriously enough that he was Academic All-American three times at Colorado, where he graduated with a degree in business administration while excelling at two Division I sports. In 2007, he gave the commencement speech to the university’s graduating seniors. “Was I a brilliant student? No,” he laughs. “But I was diligent with my studies, doing things like reading my homework assignments twice. As a freshman, I really worked hard, probably a bit frightened that I wouldn’t be able to cut it in the outside world if it came to that. Getting a degree was important.” Irwin concedes that his analytical inclinations made him a headier and more effective performer. In football, he began as a two-way player at quarterback and defensive back, positions for which enhanced knowledge and intuition about the other team’s offense and defense contributed to winning. In golf, he was a methodical course manager with a keen sense of his own capabilities. He was known as a golfer with few if any weaknesses, one who played “smart golf,” which was not coincidentally the title of his 2001 instruction book. Irwin also talks smart, capturing the essence of the game of golf with a flair and depth that has given him a deservedly prominent place in the golf canon. “Golf is the loneliest sport,” is how he began an extended assertion that ranks among the game’s most profound. “You are completely alone with every conceivable opportunity to defeat yourself. Golf brings out your assets and liabilities as a person. The longer you play, the more certain you are that a man’s performance is the outward manifestation of who in his heart, he truly thinks he is.”

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The irony was that few golfers, if any, had more team sport bona fides—or was a more fiery pure jock—than Hale Irwin. He grew up in the harsh Kansas/ Oklahoma prairie a raw-boned all-around athlete who became a two-time All-Big Eight free safety at the University of Colorado in 1965 and 1966 at the same time he was winning the 1966 NCAA individual title as a golfer. Who, in the rugged spirit of Theodore Roosevelt’s famous 1910 speech at the Sorbonne, relished the pressure and opportunity of being “the man in the arena.” “I seemed to perform better when the stakes were higher, the courses were harder, the moment was bigger,” says Irwin, looking back on his half-century of professional golf. “That seemed to make me find my place.” Such superhero stuff is how he won all three of his U.S. Opens (his last at age 45 in 1990 at Medinah made him the championship’s oldest winner) among his 20 PGA TOUR victories. It was how he built a 13-5 record in five Ryder Cups. And his competitive motor burned as hot or hotter after he turned 50, when he went on to win a record 45 PGA TOUR Champions titles. Those results are why Irwin was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 1992, and why he’s the Honoree for this year’s Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide. If Irwin held a grudge over the lack of recognition he received in his prime, he might look upon such honors as insufficient make-up calls. And there was indeed a time when being overlooked exposed the Great Plains-sized chip he carried on his shoulder. “Maybe I’ll come out tomorrow on a pogo stick,” he cracked in 1974 when asked about his anonymity. “Maybe they’ll notice me then.” But at 72, Irwin has a perspective built on the gratitude for what sports gave him,

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IRWIN FAMILY ARCHIVE (5)

MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT HONOREE


MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT HONOREE

though I didn’t really out-talent anybody. Walk up and down the practice range, everybody has talent. But there are some people who make it with something else. Call it intestinal fortitude. Call it tenacity. Call it confidence. Call it whatever you want. Basically, never giving up. It abounds everywhere in locker rooms. That’s what I had. My effort was equal or beyond my competitors. You might outplay me. But you won’t out-try me.” It comes down to a word Irwin didn’t mention—grit.

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Above: Hale Irwin shows his mother Mabel his trophy for winning the 1966 Colorado State Amateur Championship. Right: Irwin watches the direction of a putt during his victory.

Golf writers understood that while better-known players were quoted more often, Irwin could be counted on to produce original thought with substance, sometimes on the fly. Once for a 2009 Golf Digest story about how mentally tough players perform under pressure, I approached Irwin at his car as he was about to leave the golf course. Though clearly in a hurry and slightly annoyed at the interruption, he paused for a moment, perhaps accessed a familiarity with “twisters” that were part of where he grew up in Kansas, and came up with an inspired metaphor. “I liken it to finding the eye of the hurricane and staying in that center, where it’s calm,” he said. “That eye can be big or it can be small, but as long as you’re in it, you’re OK. Step out of it just a bit, and it gets real active real quick.” Having spun gold, he drove off. Irwin knows so much because the subject he studied most deeply and best was himself. “I didn’t learn to play golf really well until I learned who I was as a person,” says Irwin, who never worked with a swing

MEM18_IRWIN_7.indd 46

coach nor a sports psychologist. “What made me tick. From my background, which I couldn’t change, it was a big learning curve for me, maybe a little bigger learning curve than most.” What he knows most about himself is that he’s competitive. That’s his wheelhouse, the advantage he believes made the most difference. “My competitive instinct is such that I’ve never accepted that someone is going to be better than I am,” Irwin says. “Even

IT’S SAID that geography is history. Irwin spent his early years first in the open spaces and often harsh weather of the Great Plains, and later in the shadow of the Rockies. He describes his father, also named Hale, as a quiet man who nonetheless was warm. He sold mining equipment to lead and zinc mines and traveled extensively. A good athlete himself, the senior Irwin always found time to play catch with his son. “When he came home from a trip, I’d get two gloves and a ball, and he’d no sooner get out of the car than I’d throw him the glove, and we were going to play catch,” says Irwin. “Never once did he turn me down.” His mother Mabel was a friendly, vivacious people-person who was known at the University of Colorado for the breaks she would give students in need as a receptionist in the school’s financial aid office. As he talks about his parents, Irwin mentions that he is looking at some photos taken when he was a boy with his mother and father. “They remind me of who I am, and where I come from, and they ground me,” he says. “My parents were really solid people, very much part of the greatest generation. It didn’t take a lot of money to make them happy. They just had that work ethic. They sacrificed for me, and I never wanted for anything in my life. All they asked is that I worked hard, and gave everything your best. And didn’t start something you couldn’t finish.” Growing up in tiny Baxter Springs, Kan., near the border of Oklahoma and Missouri, sports were central to Irwin’s daily life and identity. His favorite was actually

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MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT HONOREE “WHEN I WAS PLAYING FOOTBALL, I FELT LIKE MY LIFE WAS ON THE LINE EVERY PLAY. … MUCH OF THAT IS INGRAINED AND STILL FOLLOWS ME, AND I TOOK THAT MENTALITY INTO GOLF.”

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Above: Irwin attends an awards ceremony where he was named Colorado’s top collegiate athlete for 1966. He finished his college career at the University of Colorado by winning the 1967 NCAA Division I Championship (right).

baseball. “Commerce, Oklahoma, was just down the road, so it was Mickey Mantle country,” says Irwin, who like the young Mick grew up a crack shortstop. But Irwin would excel in football after his family moved to Boulder when he was 14. As the option quarterback on his Boulder High School team that won the state title his senior year, Irwin earned a full scholarship down the road at the University of Colorado. After a shoulder injury in his sophomore year, Irwin switched to defense full time. “Which was lucky, because my temperament was perfect for defense. I liked the goal of stopping the other team from doing what they wanted to do and the intensity that required.” While at

Colorado he had nine career interceptions and was a captain on two teams that won the Big Eight Conference. Although he was never drafted by an NFL team, Irwin joined White and Anderson when he was voted to the school’s all-century team.

“Hale Irwin is one of the toughest competitors I have ever known, whether it was on the football field at Colorado or on the golf course, where he fought and scrapped for every stroke he could get,” Nicklaus says. “He’s always just been a tough competitor, a fiery competitor, and I’ve always admired that about Hale. When you’re coming down the stretch and you’ve got Hale Irwin as your opponent, you better be playing well, because he’s going to give it everything he’s got.” The level Irwin attained in football, combined with his historic exploits in golf, makes him, in combination, perhaps the most accomplished athlete in two sports among golfers, exceeding Ellsworth Vines, who won Wimbledon in tennis and reached the semifinals of the 1951 PGA Championship, and John Brodie, an NFL All-Pro quarterback who won on the PGA TOUR Champions. Irwin knows football shaped him in ways different from his peers. In a 1991 interview at the Memorial Tournament, he said: “I was generally the smallest guy on the field. I couldn’t outrun anybody, so I had to do a lot of little things better, like hit harder pound for pound. I had to give full effort every play, never relax, or I knew I could get wiped off the field. When I was playing football, I felt like my life was on the line every play. I think there is a probability that much of that is ingrained and still follows me, and I took that mentality into golf.” Irwin came to the game through his father, a 12 handicap who played the Baxter Springs public 9-holer, which featured sand greens. By age seven, Hale started going out

ABOVE: GETTY IMAGES/DENVER POST; BELOW: IRWIN FAMILY PHOTO

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

— HALE IRWIN —


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THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

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with his dad, who’d fashioned some cut-off clubs with grips made of electrical tape for his son. The appeal of golf, especially during long, hot summers, was that Hale could do it on his own. “Baseball was my game, but our town barely had enough kids to form a little league, so it was often hard to get a pickup game or even find someone to play catch with,” Irwin remembers. “So, golf became my companion, something I could do alone. My mom would drop me off with a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, and I’d spend the whole day at the course, playing and practicing.” Totally self-taught, Irwin didn’t break 70 until he was 14. But even as he gave other sports more attention, he was deeply connected to the game. “No matter what else I was doing, golf stayed in my head. The game just intrigued me. I remember taking a snap wrong in football practice and bending my little finger way back, and when I got home I was in a panic to check if I could still swing a club. It was always in my mind as maybe a future.” A definite maybe. Irwin won some Hale and Sally Irwin met during their junior year at the University of Colorado and wed in 1968.

MEM18_IRWIN_7.indd 50

local and regional junior and scholastic tournaments, but nothing on the national level. He qualified for the 1966 U.S. Open as an amateur and made the cut to finish tied for 61st place, but by his senior year of college he’d yet to win the kind of major amateur tournament that would signal a decision to give pro golf a try. As he was running out of opportunities, he beat many bigger-name players to win the 1967 NCAA Championship at an old-fashioned A.W. Tillinghast-designed course, Shawnee on the Delaware. “Did I expect to win? No,” he says. “The

truth is, my whole career I never expected to win, ever. I might go into a tournament with confidence. But never, ever have I gone in saying, ‘Hey, I’m better than these other guys.’ For one thing, that cocky attitude is something I’ve always hated, and I didn’t want to give my opponents more reason to want to beat me. But I just always felt that the opponent I had to worry about was myself, and I couldn’t control anyone else.” Irwin remembers the third round, in which he shot 65, as perhaps the most important of his life. “I made nine birdies, a hole in one, four pars and four bogeys. It took me out of the pack and into the lead,” he says. “The last round was really hard conditions. I didn’t play particularly well and shot a 78 and still won by two. To hold on in the final round while not playing well, it helped my development and gave me something I’d draw on later. The main thing was that I beat the best that the college game had to offer, which was the catalyst to make that final step toward being a professional golfer.” ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ SHORTLY AFTER GRADUATION, Irwin wed the former Sally Stahlhuth, who he had met in college at a sorority function during their junior year. Soon after, he turned pro and got through Qualifying School on his first try. The couple went out on the TOUR in a Pontiac Bonneville bought specifically because it had a very large trunk, and which sometimes served as sleeping quarters. For two years Irwin got into tournaments through Monday qualifying, which allowed those who made cuts automatically into the next tournament. His economic need, precarious status, inner desperation to prove himself and take-no-prisoners athletic temperament gave Irwin an ultra-serious approach that was noted by his peers. “We were broke. It was survival. Back then when you hit the road, you had to learn life lessons very quickly. How to get from

LEFT: IRWIN FAMILY ARCHIVE; ABOVE: GETTY IMAGES/DENVER POST

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Above and right: Irwin won his first U.S. Open in 1974 at Winged Foot Golf Club in New York. Top right: Irwin captured the Memorial Tournament twice, in 1983 and 1985.

point A to point B then point C. Then how to get the ball into the hole. Then how to get out of town and get to the next place.” It took time for Irwin to stop reacting to the game’s frustrations like a football player. “On the field, you can use getting mad to hit someone harder on the next play. In golf, you have to accept and move on. I got mellower, although I’ve never been the mellowest. Which is mostly an asset. I don’t mind showing emotion. It keeps the anger from staying locked up, where it can do some damage. People criticized Tiger for getting mad. I think it’s part of what made him great. I learned how to get rid of the excess and channel the rest.”

MEM18_IRWIN_7.indd 52

Irwin’s main challenge was that in his early years, he simply wasn’t that good. “I came to the TOUR from nowhere, the back

door, the side door, but not the front door,” he says. “I had to learn how to play at the same time I was trying to make a living. I had the intestinal fortitude, and there must have been something good about my game that got me this far. But I had to learn so many other things. And there were flaws in my swing that had to be addressed. “I tried to learn from observing the best but also from journeymen. Then it was, ‘OK, what of those things that other people did that were good are things that I can do?’ That got rid of the clutter. It was ‘OK, George Archer was 6-6, but he does this one thing that might work for me.’ I loved George Knudson’s tempo, and Gene Littler’s simplicity. Could I incorporate that? That’s how I learned how to play.” He honed a style built on ball control and bogey avoidance. Not long, but straight. Fairways and greens. No glaring weaknesses through the bag. A U.S. Open player in the making. He got his first victory in 1971, at Hilton Head, a young course designed by Pete Dye with help from Nicklaus that required precision. He won there again two years later for his second victory. “I had learned how to be a good iron player, and it was giving me a reputation as a guy who played tough courses well,” Irwin says. “I’ve never minded difficult courses. They seemed to bring out my competitive instincts.” Among his peers, Irwin gave off a smoldering intensity. He was compared to a lone

ABOVE LEFT: GETTY IMAGES; ABOVE RIGHT: THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT ARCHIVE

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MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT HONOREE

“… I’VE FOUND THE MOST SUCCESSFUL PEOPLE FIND THEIR OWN WAY THROUGH LIFE. THAT’S KIND OF THE MENTALITY YOU HAVE TO DRAW ON. I HAVE NO REGRETS ABOUT TAKING THAT COMPETITIVE APPROACH.”

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Above: Irwin won his second of three U.S. Opens in 1979 at Toledo’s Inverness Club. Left: Irwin’s eagle on No. 13 at Inverness on Saturday gave him a five-stroke lead going into Sunday’s final round and eventually he earned the cover of that week’s Sports Illustrated.

wolf on the hill, and he doesn’t disagree. “The lone wolf theory, that might be mimicked by every successful person,” he says. “You look at the really successful people and what they’ve done, and they’ve kind of marched to their own beat. It doesn’t

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have to be that way away from the golf course, where it’s easier to have friends and associates. But when it comes time to get into the thing that they do best, whether in the boardroom or the golf course or wherever, I’ve found the most successful people find their own way through life. That’s kind of the mentality you have to draw on. I have no regrets about taking that competitive approach.” Indeed, Irwin feels it was crucial to his being so well suited to the world’s toughest tournament, the U.S. Open. He had done respectably at Merion in

1971 in his first Open as a pro, and then at Pebble Beach in 1972 and Oakmont in 1973. When he arrived at Winged Foot in 1974, he felt a kinship. “It was a beast, with rough at least 6 inches high and sometimes a foot,” he said. “You had to keep the ball in the mown area, and under the hole on the greens. I knew my accuracy game would be an asset. “And I thought, ‘I have something others didn’t have. Through football, I’ve been here where something or someone is bigger and tougher and better than I am.’ That was how I saw Winged Foot. If there was a golf course made for a person like me, it was Winged Foot.” Starting the final day a stroke behind Tom Watson in the last group, Irwin birdied the ninth to take the lead and grimly hung on. He reacted with deep emotion to making a 10-foot par save on the 17th hole but still wasn’t sure if he led by one or two when he stepped to the 18th tee. Digging deep, he drove into the fairway and then hit one of the best shots of his life, a 2-iron right over the flag to 20 feet. He two putted for a winning total of 7-over 287 to beat Forrest Fezler by two. “That 2-iron was under extreme conditions for me,” Irwin says. “I’d never won a major championship or even seriously contended in one. When you hit a shot like that to seal the deal, you feel pretty darn good about it, and the feeling lasts.” Irwin had won 10 PGA TOUR titles by the time he came to the 1979 U.S. Open at Inverness Club in Toledo. His eventual

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— HALE IRWIN —

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Above: Irwin (standing behind the trophy held by Captain Dow Finsterwald) was a member of the victorious 1977 U.S. Ryder Cup team, which included Memorial Founder and Host Jack Nicklaus. Right: Irwin congratulates Seve Ballesteros on his hard-fought win at the 1979 British Open at Royal Lytham and St Annes. Far right: Irwin (left) and teammate Tom Kite line up a shot during the 1979 Ryder Cup at The Greenbrier in White Sulphur Springs, W. Va.

two-stroke margin was provided by the shot of the championship, a 2-iron on the 523-yard par-5 13th on Saturday that left him a 5-foot putt for eagle. His 67 gave him a five-stroke cushion starting the final day, and he coasted home. When the Open returned to Winged Foot in 1984, Irwin’s mastery in the championship appeared to have returned as well. He opened with rounds of 68-68-69 to take a three-stroke lead. But Sunday proved an occasion when he could not find the eye of the hurricane. He shot a final-round 79 to finish sixth in what he calls the greatest disappointment of his career. “More than anything else, my father was dying of cancer, and I thought it would be wonderful to give him a victory,” Irwin says. “I just made it too big, and I didn’t perform. It was sad. I felt like I’d let him down. But that feeling subsided. My dad was never a talkative man, but in the months before he died we had our best conversations. He told me about the tough parts of his life growing up during World War I and going through

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the Depression, things he’d perhaps wanted to shield me from. But I’m so grateful we had those times.” By 1990, Irwin was 45 and seemingly on the downside. He had not won since the 1985 Memorial Tournament, the second of his two wins at Muirfield Village Golf Club. Instead, he concentrated on his design business, which has built more than two dozen courses. He quietly reassessed his career at the end of 1989, looking back on the tournaments he had won and what he had been working on. “It refreshed my outlook and made me realize I still had the desire to compete. Once 1990 got underway, I could feel my game starting to gel.” The USGA granted him a special exemption into the U.S. Open at Medinah, near Chicago. “That was important to me.

My first thought: ‘I want to make their pick look good. I want to play well.’ ” He played well but not exceptionally the first three rounds, and with nine holes to play, he was five strokes out of the lead. “I was focused on getting into the top 15 to be exempt for next year,” he says. “On the 11th tee, I saw I was one stroke out of that position. My goal was to play 1 under from there. Then I birdied 11, so I re-goaled myself to top 10. Then I birdied 12 and 13 and thought top five. But also, that this is getting interesting. And then I birdied 14, and I’m one shot back. So, I get myself mentally reset. And I parred 15, 16 and 17, and I’ve got one more chance on the 18th. The

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Finishing an hour before the leaders, Irwin played the last eight holes of the 1990 U.S. Open at Medinah in 5 under par, setting him up for a Monday playoff against Mike Donald that Irwin won in 19 holes.

leaders are one hour behind me. Not to say they can’t extend their lead, but it’s hard to play back there.” After his approach to the par 4, Irwin had an undulating 45-footer across the green. “When it went in, it was enlightening,” he says. “I had played the last eight holes of the U.S. Open 5 under par. I’d extended myself beyond what I thought I was capable of doing. So I was ecstatic.” Irwin’s spontaneous reaction was to run around the 18th green high-fiving fans like a card going through bicycle spokes. “People thought that was a little out of character for me,” Irwin told Guy Yocom of Golf Digest in 2003. “The fact is, when I’m excited or on the go, my instinct is to run. I grew up running everywhere I went—to the golf course; to baseball, basketball and

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ABOVE LEFT: USGA; BOTTOM AND TOP: GETTY IMAGES (2)

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titles in 2000 at Saucon Valley in Bethlehem, Pa.

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football practice; to the library and school. Everywhere.” The next day, before his playoff with Mike Donald, Irwin woke up after a restless night and felt flat. He fell behind early, and with Donald playing steadily, he was still two strokes behind on the 16th hole, a difficult dogleg left with an uphill second shot. After a drive a shade too close to the dogleg, Irwin bent a 2-iron around a tree from 200 yards to an uphill green. It stopped 7 feet from the hole. “That shot was probably better than the one at Winged Foot or Inverness,” he says. He made the right-toleft slider. When Donald bogeyed the 18th hole, they went to the first, where after a wedge approach pin high, Irwin had a 10-footer to win. “On putts like that, you have to eliminate the do-or-die,” Irwin says. “It can’t be that momentous. Even though it is. But you have to convince yourself it’s not.” He learned that lesson at the 1976 Florida Citrus Open. After a terrible first round in which he was under the weather, Irwin was thinking of withdrawing but heard his father’s voice say, “don’t start something you can’t finish.” He somehow shot 64 on Friday, then two 66s on the weekend to enter a playoff with Kermit Zarley. After two holes, play was called because of darkness and they returned in the morning. Zarley promptly made a 30-footer for birdie, leaving Irwin with a 15-footer to stay alive. Sally and Hale Irwin celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary this September.

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“I thought my heart was going to jump out of my chest, so much that I actually thought, ‘I’m going to have a heart attack and die right here,’ ” Irwin remembers. “But I stepped away, and somehow shut down all that nervousness and anxiety and let muscle memory take over and put it right in the center of the hole. You boil it down to just putting the ball in the hole, regardless of everything else. If you get hung up on all that other stuff, you forget what’s important. Then I won the fourth extra hole.” As he was reading the putt at Medinah, Irwin had another vision. “For whatever reason, I remembered a video of Nicklaus at Merion at the World Amateur in 1960. He was all hunched over a putt, and the wind blew his cap off, but he didn’t budge. And I remember thinking, ‘that’s the kind of concentration you have to have.’ ” Irwin made the putt. After the trophy ceremony, he and Sally drove four-and-ahalf hours home to St. Louis. He got on a

Former Memorial Golf Journalism Award winner Jaime Diaz is a Golf Channel analyst.

IRWIN FAMILY ARCHIVE; ABOVE: GETTY IMAGES

Irwin won the second of his two U.S. Senior Open

plane to New York the next morning, and by the next Sunday had won at Westchester. “Your body has huge reservoirs of energy,” he says. In June of 1995, Irwin turned 50 and was rejuvenated by his decision to play on the then Senior Tour. “I wanted to establish myself as a senior player and pick up the momentum that I felt I still had. And I did, and just kept rolling.” Over the next 12 years, Irwin won 45 times, 16 more than the previous high of 29 by Lee Trevino. He still plays a fairly regular schedule on the PGA TOUR Champions but has no problem admitting that the raging fire within has finally quelled. “Priorities change,” he says. “I have grandkids I dearly love. I love raising money for the Children’s Hospital of St. Louis [more than $15 million so far and counting], and there are now more things important to me than chasing a golf ball. That’s a step backward from the competitive arena. And if you take even half a step back, you can feel the field go by you. “My life before was to play golf at a reasonable level. Now, whatever life I have left, I want to share it with my wife and family.” The lone wolf is fine. That misunderstood first impression? No problem. It turns out that it’s the last impression that matters, and Hale Irwin couldn’t have hoped for a better one.

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hale irwin’s career record 1974

U.S. Open

1979

U.S. Open

1990

U.S. Open

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PGA TOUR VICTORIES

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1971

Sea Pines Heritage Classic

1973

Sea Pines Heritage Classic

1975

Atlanta Classic, Western Open

1976

Glen Campbell-Los Angeles Open, Florida Citrus Open

1977

Atlanta Classic, Colgate Hall of Fame Classic, San Antonio Texas Open

1981

Hawaiian Open, Buick Open

1982

Honda Inverrary Classic

1983

the Memorial Tournament

1984

Bing Crosby National Pro-Am

1985

the Memorial Tournament

1990

Buick Classic

1994

MCI Heritage Classic

PGA TOUR CHAMPIONS VICTORIES

1995

Ameritech Senior Open, Vantage Championship

1996

American Express Invitational, Senior PGA Championship

1997 Senior PGA Championship, MasterCard Championship, LG Championship, Las Vegas Senior Classic, Burnet Senior Classic, BankBoston Classic, Boone Valley Classic, Vantage Championship, Hyatt Regency Maui Kaanapali Classic 1998 Toshiba Senior Classic, Senior PGA Championship, Las Vegas Senior Classic, U.S. Senior Open, Ameritech Senior Open, BankBoston Classic, Energizer Senior Tour Championship

1999 Nationwide Championship, Boone Valley Classic, Ford Senior Players Championship, Ameritech Senior Open, Coldwell Banker Burnet Classic

1997

2000

Nationwide Championship, BellSouth Senior Classic at Opryland, U.S. Senior Open, EMC Kaanapali Classic

1999

Senior Skins Game, Wendy’s 3 Tour Challenge (with Jack Nicklaus, Tom Watson)

2000

Our Lucaya Senior Slam

2001

Siebel Classic in Silicon Valley, Bruno’s Memorial Classic, Turtle Bay Championship

2001

Senior Skins Game

2002

Senior Skins Game

2002

ACE Group Classic, Toshiba Senior Classic, 3M Championship, Turtle Bay Championship

2003

Office Depot Father/Son Challenge (with Steve Irwin)

2005

Wendy’s 3 Tour Challenge (with Jay Haas, Craig Stadler)

2003

Kinko’s Classic of Austin, Turtle Bay Championship

2004

Liberty Mutual Legends of Golf, Senior PGA Championship

2005

Turtle Bay Championship, Outback Steakhouse Pro-Am, Wal-Mart First Tee Open at Pebble Beach, SAS Championship

2007

MasterCard Championship

OTHER VICTORIES

1974

World Match Play Championship

1975

World Match Play Championship

1978

Australian PGA

1979

South African PGA, World Cup of Golf (individual title; team title with John Mahaffey)

1981

Bridgestone Classic

1982

Brazilian Open

1986

Bahamas Classic

1987

Fila Classic

1995

Wendy’s 3 Tour Challenge (with Ray Floyd, Jack Nicklaus)

1996

Lexus Challenge (with Sir Sean Connery)

Senior Slam

1998 Senior Match Play Championship, Wendy’s 3 Tour Challenge (with Gil Morgan, Larry Nelson)

AMATEUR VICTORIES

1963 Colorado High School State Championship 1967 NCAA Division I Championship OTHER CAREER HIGHLIGHTS

Ryder Cup 1975, ’77, ’79, ’81, ’91

Presidents Cup 1994 (playing captain)

PGA TOUR Champions Player of the Year 1997, 1998, 2002

PGA TOUR Champions leading money winner 1997, 1998, 2002

Charles Schwab Cup 2002, 2004

Ambassador of Golf Award 2009

Will F. Nicholson Jr. Award 2012

Inducted into Colorado Golf Hall of Fame 1974

• Inducted into World Golf Hall of Fame 1992 • Inducted into University of Colorado Hall of Fame 2002

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MAJOR CHAMPIONSHIP VICTORIES


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Irwin during his 1979 U.S. Open victory at Inverness Club.

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MEMORIAL HONOREES

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

67 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

TWO RESPECTED CHAMPION GOLFERS HONORED by John Antonini

ILLUSTRATION BY GLENN HARRINGTON

EDITOR’S NOTE: In an effort to ensure that prominent and accomplished golfers who are

deceased receive the recognition they deserve by the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide, the Captains Club for the last several years has been identifying distinguished figures from the past for designation as Tournament Honorees. This year, the Captains Club has chosen to honor Jock Hutchison and Willie Turnesa. Hutchison won two major championships, the 1920 PGA Championship and the 1921 Open Championship, and helped start a tradition in a third when he and Fred McLeod became the first honorary starters at the Masters in 1963. Turnesa, a life-long amateur who had six brothers who played professional golf, twice won the U.S. Amateur, in 1938 and ’48. He also claimed the 1947 British Amateur and came home to a ticker tape parade in his native New York. The following pages briefly chronicle their accomplishments, which were significant not only as personal achievements, but also as contributions to the rich history of the game of golf.

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MEMORIAL HONOREES

JOCK HUTCHISON

T H E M E M O R I A L TO U R N A M E N T

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T

HE LIST OF GOLFERS who have won professional tournaments at Augusta National and the Old Course at St. Andrews resonates with golf history. Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, Sir Nick Faldo, Seve Ballesteros, Sam Snead and Zach Johnson complete the list of Masters and Open champions. Add Jock Hutchison’s name and the roster is complete. Hutchison won The Open Championship in 1921 at St. Andrews and the inaugural Senior PGA Championship at Augusta National in 1937. He was so highly regarded at Augusta that in 1963 he became one of two men—with Fred McLeod— to become the first honorary starters of the Masters. “Leading off the Masters is the greatest honor we can ever have,” Hutchison said in a 1963 interview. “I would rather do this than win a tournament.” Hutchison would know. His résumé includes two major titles, as well as wins in two Western Opens, two Senior PGA Championships and a quasi-U.S. Open in 1917 when the championship was canceled during World War I. Born in Scotland in 1884, Hutchison moved to the U.S. in his teens. He became a PGA professional in the 1910s and by the end of the decade was contending in majors. After runner-up finishes in the 1916 U.S. Open and PGA Championship, he won the 1917 National Patriotic Open. (With America fighting in World War I, the U.S. Golf Association conducted the Patriotic Open instead of the U.S. Open and prize money was donated to the Red Cross.) Hutchison became an American citizen in 1920, the same year he won his first major,

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Jock Hutchison holds the Claret Jug as he sails home to America from his native Scotland after winning the 1921 Open Championship at St. Andrews.

USGA

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

SCOTTISH-BORN JOCK HUTCHISON USED HIS SWEET SWING TO WIN MAJORS AND THEN TO START OFF THE MASTERS TOURNAMENT

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MEMORIAL HONOREES

jock hutchison’s career record MAJOR CHAMPIONSHIP VICTORIES 1920 PGA Championship 1921 The Open Championship OTHER PGA TOUR VICTORIES 1918 Florida West Coast Open 1920

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Illinois Open Championship, Western Open 1921 White Sulphur Springs Open, North and South Open 1922 Columbia Country Club Open, Although Hutchison was an American citizen when he won the Open Championship in 1921, he was born in St. Andrews, Scotland.

Northern California Open 1923 Western Open, Illinois PGA 1925

beating James Douglas Edgar, 1 up, in the final of the PGA Championship at Flossmoor (Ill.) Country Club. The victory concluded a stellar month for Hutchison, who earlier won the prestigious Western Open before finishing second in the U.S. Open. The following year, Hutchison traveled to Great Britain with a group of U.S. golfers, the trip promoted by Golf Illustrated for the purpose of having an American presence in the 1921 Open Championship. No U.S.-based player had ever won the Claret Jug until Hutchison beat Roger Wethered in a playoff. It was a unifying victory with the Brits also claiming a piece of the champion. As the Glasgow Herald noted, although Hutchison “had come over disguised as an American,” he was born in St. Andrews. Described as “nervous as a mosquito” by golf writer Herbert Warren Wind, Hutchison “walked around restlessly between shots. He sweated profusely and took to waving his arms in the air to dry them.” But then Wind watched him swing and said, “Jock could play one plus-perfect hole after another,

each shot, like mountain views in Switzerland, seemingly more breathtaking than the one that went before.” A witty man—Bobby Jones said Hutchison would have won more if he had more of a Scottish dourness—“Hutch” was shown pretending to drink from the Claret Jug in film of the Open’s award ceremony. The celebration, however, was somewhat muted because he used clubs that the R&A believed had deeper grooves. But Hutchison broke no rules. The governing body’s 1920 ban on his heavily ribbed clubs took effect July 1, 1921, six days after the Open. Hutchison was the head pro at the Glen View Club in Illinois for more than 30 years, and after 14 wins on the PGA TOUR, he added the 1937 and 1947 Senior PGA Championships—the latter at age 62—to his list of victories. When he wasn’t leading off the Masters, Hutchison spent his retirement years wintering in Florida. He died in Evanston, Ill., on September 27, 1977, at age 93, and was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 2011.

Illinois PGA 1926 Illinois PGA 1928 Florida West Coast Open OTHER VICTORIES 1916 Pennsylvania Open 1917 National Patriotic Open 1937 Senior PGA Championship 1947 Senior PGA Championship OTHER CAREER HIGHLIGHTS Honorary Starter, the Masters Tournament 1963-73 Inducted into PGA of America Hall of Fame 1958 Inducted into World Golf Hall of Fame 2011

USGA (2)

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MEMORIAL HONOREES

WILLIE TURNESA

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

W

ILLIE TURNESA’S career trajectory would not transpire today. Imagine having six older brothers who are all golf professionals, only to have them forbid you from entering the family business. Yet, that’s exactly what happened to Willie. In Depression-era America, sport—

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golf in particular—was not a high-paying vocation. So Turnesa’s brothers discouraged him from becoming a golf professional by pooling their earnings to pay his college tuition. It was a generous gesture made in the name of financial security, but also, perhaps, to appease their father, who didn’t understand how six of his sons were earning a

living in such an ignoble profession. So while Joe, Mike and Jim became touring professionals and combined to win 23 PGA TOUR events, including Jim’s 1952 PGA Championship, and Phil, Frank and Doug became teaching pros, Willie was a career amateur. By many accounts he was the best golfer of the bunch, and in some circles he is considered golf ’s second-greatest career amateur behind only Bob Jones. Born in 1914, Willie Turnesa was the youngest son of Vitale and Anna—there also were two daughters—who came to the U.S. from Italy. The family lived next to Fairview Country Club in Elmsford, N.Y., where Vitale worked as a greens keeper. Though their father never played the game, the boys caddied at Fairview, built a makeshift course in their backyard and eventually became elite players. But playing for pay wasn’t in the cards for young Willie. “It wasn’t easy making a living, even as a top pro, at that time,” Pauline Sparling, Willie’s daughter, told The New York Times in 2001. “They told him, ‘You can’t do this,’ and they pooled their money to send him to college.” A degree from Holy Cross University didn’t keep Willie from finding fame on the golf course. He is one of seven players to win multiple U.S. Amateurs and also a British Amateur. After Willie won his first U.S. Amateur in 1938 by an 8-and-7 margin over Pat Abbott at Oakmont Country Club, Vitale was unmoved. “Why shouldn’t he win?” was the elder Turnesa’s oft-repeated response. “All he does is play golf.” A strong putter—Turnesa only threeputted once in the 1938 Amateur—he got more help during the week from a club that inspired his nickname. Gene Sarazen had only recently popularized the sand wedge

USGA

WILLIE TURNESA FOLLOWED HIS SIX BROTHERS INTO GOLF, BUT CARVED HIS OWN PATH BY REMAINING AN AMATEUR

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MEMORIAL HONOREES

willie turnesa’s career record MAJOR AMATEUR VICTORIES 1938 U.S. Amateur 1947 British Amateur 1948 U.S. Amateur OTHER NOTABLE AMATEUR VICTORIES

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

1933

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

74

and Turnesa was initially reluctant to use one, choosing instead to blast from bunkers with a 9-iron. But a higher-lofted club was necessary at Oakmont, where the ball sat lower in the furrowed sand. So Turnesa switched clubs, and he got up-and-down from Oakmont’s bunkers 13 times in the final, leading to not only national glory, but also to the fabulous nickname of “Willie the Wedge.” Turnesa called his amateur victories, “crowns without coins.” After a stint in the U.S. Army during World War II, he won two more major trophies. He beat Dick Chapman, 3 and 2, in the final of the 1947 British Amateur, and one year later won his second

U.S. Amateur, this time vanquishing Raymond Billows, 2 and 1, at Memphis Country Club. He was also a member of three victorious U.S. Walker Cup teams, once as playing captain, in 1951. Perhaps Willie Turnesa’s greatest legacy is the Westchester Golf Association’s Caddie Scholarship, which has awarded more than $10 million in scholarships to more than 2,000 students over the last 50 years. He died on June 16, 2001, at the age of 87 in Sleepy Hollow, N.Y., less than five miles from his childhood home. John Antonini is a researcher and writer for Golf Channel and golfchannel.com.

Westchester Amateur 1936 Westchester Amateur 1937 Westchester Amateur, Met Golf Association Amateur 1938 Westchester Amateur, New York Amateur 1946 William Rice Hochster Memorial 1948 William Rice Hochster Memorial 1950 William Rice Hochster Memorial 1957 Met Golf Association Stroke Play 1958 William Rice Hochster Memorial, Met Golf Association Stroke Play OTHER CAREER HIGHLIGHTS

Above: Willie Turnesa receives the Havemeyer Trophy for his 1938 U.S. Amateur victory from USGA president A.M. Reid (right) as runner-up B. Patrick Abbott looks on. Below: A golf ball and wedge used by Willie Turnesa.

1953 Walker Cup 1947, ’49, ’51 Walker Cup captain 1951 President, Metropolitan Golf Association President, New York State Golf Association Co-Founder, Westchester Golf Association Caddie Scholarship Fund Inducted into New York Sports USGA (2)

Hall of Fame 1990

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PHILANTHROPY

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P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

IN 1986 THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT ENDOWMENT was established to allow the Tournament to plan prudently for the future and to continue the development and maintenance of needed facilities. Funds generated from the endowment are used to provide new and better facilities for spectators and fans and to assure the Tournament’s support of several worthwhile charities. The members of the Memorial Club are:

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

78

EVAN J. ANDREWS HAROLD P. ANDREWS STEPHEN P. ANDREWS GREGORY ANTHES WILLIAM E. ARTHUR ABNER H. BAGENSTOSE DONALD “RICK” F. BAIRD DONALD “RIC” F. BAIRD III CURT BANGLESDORF DAVID L. BARNES TIMOTHY J. BATTAGLIA C. RICHARD BECKETT WILLIAM BRADLEY BENNETT ROBERT W. BOICH TODD E. BORK BARRY G. BOYLES GEORGE P. BRAY JAMES G. BROCKSMITH, JR. FRED C. BROWN JAMES B. BURKE CHAD N. CACCHIO RONALD E. CALHOUN THOMAS L. CAMPBELL PHILIP D. CAMPISI CRAIG CASSADY RICHARD F. CHAPDELAINE ANTHONY T. CHAPEKIS JOHN J. CHIMENTO JOSEPH A. CHLAPATY GRANT CHRISTMAN RALPH R. CIOFFI DAVID CLARK STEPHEN B. CLARK PETER M. CLARKSON JOSEPH P. COCHRAN RICHARD T. COCHRAN JACK J. CONIE III RICHARD R. CORNA JEG A. COUGHLIN, SR. WILLIAM P. CSEPLO MILLARD M. CUMMINS DOMINIC J. CURCIO WILLIAM N. DABBELT ARTHUR J. DeCRANE SCOTT E. DeSANO JON P. DIAMOND JAMES DIDION ALVA N. DOPKING, JR. THOMAS B. DYER JAMES L. EHRET DANIEL G. EMMENEGGER, JR. JOHN S. ENSIGN JOHN R. EVANS T. WILLIAM EVANS PHILIP G. FANKHAUSER BRETT A. FEBUS S. TREVOR FERGER

LARRY J. FOX WILLIAM H. FRANZ TAKEO FUKUI R. WILLIAM GARDNER ROBERT P. GARDNER JOSEPH J. GASPER JOHN B. GERLACH, JR. CATHY GERRING LEONARD GORSUCH THOMAS A. GOSNELL KIM D. GREAVES LOWELL "ROCKE" GREER BRUCE R. HAGUE FRANK D. HARMON JOHN R. HARPER ALBERT J. HART, JR. THOMAS A. HASSFURTHER W. HENRY HAUSER JOHN F. HAVENS LEO J. HAWK LAWRENCE J. HAYES PAUL G. HELLER MILAN B. HERCEG YOSHIHIRO HIDAKA KOKI HIRASHIMA WILLIAM E. HOBAN RALPH E. HODGES THEODORE J. HOST J. PATRICK HUBER JOHN B. HUTCHENS J. LAWRENCE HUTTA JAMES T. HUTTA MARTIN INGLIS VICTOR D. IRELAN PETER J. JOCHUMS C. LEE JOHNSON JILL EVANS JOHNSON THOMAS B. JOHNSON FRITZ KAISER JAMES R. KARPAC KEN ARMEN KAZARIAN NEIL E. KELLEY JOHN P. KENNEDY JOHN W. KESSLER BENJAMIN T. KING SAMUEL B. KING JAMES M. KOSTELAC THOMAS C. KRUSE JOHN KUCHARCZYK ROBERT A. LANDTHORN RICHARD S. LANGDALE DAVID P. LAUER PETER J. LAVERTY LARRY L. LIEBERT JEFFREY D. LOGAN PAUL B. LONG, JR.

PAUL B. LOYD, JR. CHERYL W. LUCKS JACK E. LUCKS CHRISTIAN D. MAHER DANIEL M. MAHER DONAL H. MALENICK STEPHEN J. MANGUM JAMES P. MANOS ROBERT J. MASSEY JAMES A. MAXWELL, JR. MICHAEL W. McCARTY GEORGE W. McCLOY RUSTY McCLURE JOHN P. McCONNELL DAN R. McFARLAND JOHN W. McKITRICK LAWRENCE A. McLERNON ROBERT D. McNEIL JOHN T. McNICHOLAS ROBERT S. MEEDER URBAN MEYER VAIL K. MILLER CAMERON MITCHELL DAVID J. MLICKI JACK MOLL THOMAS E. MOSURE SIGMUND MUNSTER MICHAEL R. MURNANE MASAO NAGAHARA DENISON “CHIP” NEALE, JR. BARBARA NICKLAUS JACK W. NICKLAUS JACK W. NICKLAUS II STEVEN C. NICKLAUS THOMAS E. NOLAN DANIEL M. O’BRIEN H.M. “BUTCH” O'NEILL RICHARD G. ORLANDO TERENCE A. OSBORN NILES C. OVERLY PETER PARAS, JR. WILLIAM D. PARKER JOHN W. PARTRIDGE, JR. MICHAEL C. PASCUCCI ROBERT D. PATRELLA DAYNA PAYNE RAY M. PEREZ DARYL L. PETERMAN LOYAL M. PETERMAN CECIL J. PETITTI II MARK PHELAN PERRY E. PIPES BENJAMIN B. PRICE WILLIAM B. PRICE GARY L. RACEY H.R. “BUSS” RANSOM

STEPHEN S. RASMUSSEN MERWIN J. RAY FRANK R. RAYMOND C. MICHAEL REARDON ADAM RICHARDS DAVID V. RICHARDS WILLIAM E. ROBERTS JEFFREY A. ROBY BRADLEY H. ROSELY ANDREW J. ROTH THOMAS A. RUMFOLA L. JACK RUSCILLI LOUIS V. RUSCILLI ROBERT A. RUSCILLI, JR. MICHAEL D. RYAN BRIAN P. SAVAGE PANDEL SAVIC MARTIN L. SAVKO RONALD E. SCHERER GREGORY E. SCHNEIDER GARY L. SCHOTTENSTEIN JOHN J. SCOTT III KEVIN SHANAHAN STEVEN P. SHEPARD J. ROBERT SIERRA CHARLES M. SIMON WILLIAM E. SLOAN SAMUEL E. SMILEY DOUGLAS A. SMITH JEFFREY H. SOPP SCOTT W. STEARNS DAN STERGIOU ERIC STEWART JEFFREY L. STEWART JOHN C. STIEG NORMAN C. STRAKER JOSEPH W. TAYLOR DAVID T. TERRY RAYMOND J. TESNER JERRY L. TRABUE CHARLES C. UNGUREAN BRUCE L. VOR BROKER WAYNE C. WALKER RAY C. WASIELEWSKI THOMAS B. WEIHE ALFRED J. WEISBROD KENNETH J. WESTERHEIDE RANDY WILCOX JEFF WILKINS EVAN A. WILLIAMS R. MAX WILLIAMSON JAMES L. WILMERS JOHN O. WINCHESTER MICHAEL A. WOLCOTT JIM D. WRIGHT TROY WRIGHT

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THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

82

A LOVE FOR THE WRITTEN WORD

“WRONG RON,” RIGHT GUY

AS A 2018 MEMORIAL GOLF JOURNALISM AWARD RECIPIENT, LARRY DORMAN STARTED COVERING GOLF’S GREATEST—INCLUDING THE GOLDEN BEAR—IN THE ’70S

RON BALICKI, A KIND MAN AND THOROUGH JOURNALIST, BROUGHT A LEVEL OF ATTENTION TO COLLEGE GOLF THAT HAD PREVIOUSLY BEEN LACKING, MAKING FRIENDS ALONG THE WAY

by John Strege

by Jeff Babineau

T

HE JACK NICKLAUS BEAT, for the golf writer of The Palm Beach Post or Miami Herald during the playing career of the 18-time major winner, was less a job than a privilege, a front-row seat to history with backstage access to the man making it. Larry Dorman understood this better than anyone, perhaps. A 2018 Memorial Golf Journalism Award recipient, Dorman held both positions, one in the late 1970s, the other in the ’80s, before continued on page 84

Dorman is a past president of the Golf Writers Association of America.

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R

ON BALICKI was incredibly kind and generous, a man who lived by the axiom that once you shake hands with someone, he no longer is a stranger. A friend once described him as “a man with no sharp edges.” For three decades, Balicki, who died in the spring of 2014 just shy of his 66th birthday, was a writer for Golfweek magazine. For a majority of those years, telling stories about the college game was a niche that Balicki, this year’s Memorial Golf Journalism Award continued on page 88

Ben Hogan, left, and Ron Balicki at a Ben Hogan Award dinner.

LEFT: LARRY DORMAN; RIGHT: BALICKI FAMILY

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

THE MEMORIAL GOLF JOURNALISM AWARD

5/1/18 7:19 PM


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THE MEMORIAL GOLF JOURNALISM AWARD

PREVIOUS RECIPIENTS OF

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

84

1982 Bernard Darwin Herb Graffis O.B. Keeler Henry Longhurst Grantland Rice 1983 Charles A. Bartlett Pat Ward-Thomas 1984 Tom Scott Herbert Warren Wind 1985 Charles Price 1986 Will Grimsley 1987 Leonard Crawley 1988 Bob Harlow 1989 William D. Richardson 1990 Percy Huggins 1991 Dick Taylor 1992 Jack Whitaker

2000 Dave Anderson Renton Laidlaw Nick Seitz 2001 Leonard Kamsler Michael McDonnell Tom Ramsey Robert Sommers 2002 Kaye Kessler 2003 Al Barkow 2004 Marino Parascenzo 2005 Jim McKay 2006 Sadao Iwata 2007 Frank Chirkinian 2008 Ken Bowden 2009 Dai Davies Tom Place 2010 Ron Green, Sr. 2011

1993 Peter Dobereiner

Art Spander

1994 Dan Jenkins

Dave Kindred

1995 Jim Murray

Bob Verdi

1996 Bob Green 1997 Furman Bisher 1998 Michael Williams 1999 Bob Drum Ronald Heager Peter Ryde Lincoln A. Werden

MEM18_JOURNALISM_6.indd 84

2012 2013 2014 Jaime Diaz 2015 Doc Giffin 2016 Rhonda Glenn John Garrity 2017 Jerry Tarde

Larry Dorman first met Jack Nicklaus when he covered a 1973 golf clinic in Boca Raton, Fla.

(Dorman, continued from page 82)

moving on to a stint as the golf writer for National Sports Daily and two terms as the golf writer for The New York Times, between which he was a senior vice president with Callaway Golf. “If you’re in the business and you get recognized by an award with Jack Nicklaus’ name on it, I don’t think you can get any better than that,” Dorman says. “You can’t get any better than Jack Nicklaus as a golfer, as a man.” The Memorial Golf Journalism Award recognizes those “who have served their profession with conspicuous honor and made a major contribution and impact on golf journalism.” It was Dorman’s privilege, but it was an earned one. “I always felt like Larry was the best pure newspaper golf writer of my time,” said Golf Channel’s Tim Rosaforte, a former Palm Beach Post golf writer himself. “He had this incredible ability to write creatively on deadline. But he wasn’t just a great writer. He was a great reporter.” His talent was born of his love of the written word that had its roots in Mrs. Vargas’ fifth-grade class at St. Michael the Arch Angel Grammar School in Miami. “She was a Cuban refugee,” he says. “She spoke the most precise English of probably anyone in that school, including the nuns from Dearborn, Michigan. She was an influence in learning precise English, how to diagram sentences and how to use the language. Then I went to an all-boys Catholic high school. Brother Edmund Sheehan taught

Latin. From that I learned etymology. And I just loved it all.” Dorman’s first professional job was as a features writer for The Palm Beach Post. “It was an unbelievable job. I got to write about swamp buggy races, alligator farms, all that kind of stuff.” A year of teaching school followed. He returned to journalism at The Albuquerque Tribune, where he covered cops and city hall, then was offered a job covering golf and Florida State football for The Palm Beach Post, the same beats he was given when the Miami Herald hired him in 1980. “There were so many great writers [in the area] to emulate at that time,” he says, mentioning specifically Tom Archdeacon of the Miami News and Bernie Lincicome of the Sun-Sentinel in Fort Lauderdale. “Tom Archdeacon, he could write some genius pieces. I’m in the same building as this guy, trying to compete with him. “When you’re surrounded with that kind of quality you either get better or you can’t be there.” Dorman quickly proved he belonged, though he had to overcome a shaky start with Nicklaus. He recalls the first time he met him, at a clinic the Golden Bear was doing in Boca Raton. “He has since needled me about the article I wrote,” Dorman said. “I was kind of star struck, I have to admit. I was overwhelmed. This was about the time he had grown the hair out and was a pretty attractive figure. I put in there something about swooning soccer moms. “He said, ‘Larry, that was ridiculous.’ But

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5/3/18 11:47 AM


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THE MEMORIAL GOLF JOURNALISM AWARD

I’ll tell you this much. He could Stature, as it were, that was tell at the time that I was a little recognized by his peers, to the bit overwhelmed. So what he did, extent that Nicklaus had peers. I’d ask him one question, and he At the Jackie Gleason Inverrary just started talking and talking Classic in 1978, Dorman, a neoand talking.” phyte golf writer, was sitting in Dorman, semi-retired and the locker room with Lee Treliving in Bonsall, Calif., recalled vino, “trying to get a quote out covering a U.S. Open qualifier in of him,” he said, when Nicklaus 1983 when Nicklaus caddied for happened by. He and Trevino his son Gary. “Jack miscounted exchanged banter, after which the clubs,” Dorman says. “It cost Nicklaus went to his locker. Gary a few strokes and he missed Trevino looked over at Dorman and Eli Callaway at Pine Valley Golf Club. Dorman worked for the cut. The way Jack handled it, Nicklaus who was unlacing his Callaway Golf during a 10-year break from his journalism career. well, he could have been really shoes. “Let me tell you someembarrassed. But he said something,” Trevino said to Dorman. thing that relieved all the tension. “That guy right there? He’s the greatest to ever lace them up.” “He was so good at diffusing situations. He would always talk, “That’s the way it turned out,” Dorman said. no matter how he played, and he’d put a pretty good perspective on it. I don’t think I’ve come across anyone in all of sports who had John Strege is a veteran of more than 20 years with Golf Digest and that kind of stature, who was that even-keeled a person, who knew is the author of five golf books, most recently the bestseller, 18 Holes exactly how to handle situations and be a human being. It was inwith Bing: Golf, Life, and Lessons From Dad, co-authored with credible to me the way he was.” Nathaniel Crosby.

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potential trouble, but also introduced him to the game of golf. For that, he was forever grateful. Throughout his life, Balicki stayed co-honoree (with former New York Times writer Larry Dorman), heavily involved in charity work, be it assisting youths (he’d hand owned all to himself. out winter coats at Christmas) or joining his wife Debbie with He traveled the globe to cover the world’s biggest pro tournavolunteer pet rescue efforts at their home in ments, but he far more enjoyed writing about Mount Ida, Ark. the fast-charging college game, chasing stories Balicki never had the means to go to colabout future PGA TOUR stars such as Phil lege, so he entered the Air Force, where he Mickelson, Justin Leonard, David Duval and was a standout shortstop on a traveling baseTiger Woods during their rise as amateurs. ball team out of Duke Field Air Force Base in Balicki delivered attention to the college Crestview, Fla. By then, he started to grow game that it never before had received. more serious about another passion: writing. “He worked hard to tell the world about He wrote all the time. Balicki wrote sciencethe great things happening in college golf, and fiction stories. He wrote poems and song lyrics. he made countless friends in the process,” said “I can never remember a time,” says DebMike Holder, the legendary former men’s golf bie, “when Ron wasn’t writing.” coach (and current athletic director) at OklaWhen he was 10, Balicki even mailed some homa State. “He made all of us look forward Ron Balicki, left, and University of Arizona golf coach Rick Larose song lyrics he’d written to a recording studio. to each issue of Golfweek to find out what was celebrate the team’s 1992 NCAA The studio cut a 45 vinyl record and mailed happening in our sport.” Division I Championship victory. it back to him—along with a bill. “His Mom Golf and Ron Balicki were good for each freaked out,” said Debbie, laughing, “and she other. Balicki grew up in the tough Corbin had to call and explain that Ron was just a little kid.” Heights Housing Project in New Britain, Conn., in an inner-city After the Air Force, Balicki worked in the Florida Panhandle atmosphere that festered with gang activity. His involvement as sports editor at The Playground Daily News, and in the early with the Boys Clubs of America not only steered him away from

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BALICKI FAMILY

(Balicki, continued from page 82)

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’80s, he took a chance by moving to Winter Haven, Fla., to join at the start of a tournament week, “It always felt, ‘OK, Ron’s here. a golf magazine just getting off the ground. Golfweek started as a We’re all ready to go.’ Florida publication and transitioned into one that now covers the “He was wonderful to be around and is very sadly missed,” game internationally. Early on, Balicki was the main writer deliverGlenn said. ing the big stories. In 2010, Balicki was the first non-coach to be inducted into In covering the college game, Balicki became the magazine’s the Golf Coaches Association of America’s Hall of Fame. And just introduction to so many of the game’s future in this past year, a scholarship for aspiring stars. He got to know parents and entire famyoung journalists has been established in his ilies, and he was invited to weddings. When name through the GCAA along with his many Oklahoma State’s Rickie Fowler made the deindustry friends. cision to leave college early to turn pro in 2009, Shortly before his death in 2014, while in he first had one call to make; he phoned Balicki. the hospital near home in Arkansas, Balicki One of Balicki’s best qualities was his received a picture of coaches, players and self-deprecating nature. He’d predict winofficials wearing green ribbons at the Arizona ners at the many U.S. Amateurs and NCAA State Invitational to show him they all were Championships that he attended and proudly thinking about him. His wife asked Ron what embraced a moniker he’d earned years earlier the gesture meant to him. Balicki also covered the game’s biggest making inaccurate football picks while writ“I feel proud,” he said. “I feel my work has stars, like the late Arnold Palmer. ing in Fort Walton Beach: Wrong Ron. Always had value. I feel I’ve made a difference. And it with a smile, players and coaches would beg Wrong Ron not to pick feels really good.” them to win. Ron Balicki made a difference. As he always liked to say, “Not When big events happened, he was always at the table, an intebad for a Polish kid from the projects.” gral part of golf ’s family. Longtime Northeast Amateur tournament director Denny Glass said when Balicki showed up on the grounds Jeff Babineau is a freelance writer based in Orlando, Fla.

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PROFILE

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

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HIS WAY

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HE MAY COME ACROSS AS ALOOF AND UNEMOTIONAL, BUT JASON DUFNER, THE 2017 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT WINNER, IS CALM AND COOL WHEN IT COMES TO MANAGING HIS GOLF GAME

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by Jim McCabe UE THE MUSIC as our story opens with a scene from Jason Dufner’s apartment at Auburn University in the late 1990s. “Don’t worry… about a thing, ’Cause every little thing gonna be all right. Don’t worry… about a thing, ’Cause every little thing gonna be all right.”

Whoa, there. Cut. Bob Marley music? Indeed, says someone who was there—David Kahn, a kid from Solon, Ohio, who crossed paths with Dufner in the North Coast Junior Tour days of the early 1990s and later at Auburn. “Marley was always on the stereo. I can vividly place myself back on that couch hearing [those lyrics],” Kahn said. Don’t laugh about the music, either. Kahn said it was the perfect backdrop given what Dufner provided to a freshman out of his comfort zone. PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES/ROBB CARR

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Jason Dufner hoists the Wannamaker Trophy after his win at the 2013 PGA Championship at Oak Hill Country Club.

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2017 MEMORIAL WINNER

✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ Dufner was humming the Marley music in June of 2017, but the way he went about his business over the final 36 holes of The Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide didn’t surprise those who have taken the time to get to know him. From five ahead through 36 holes to four behind following a third-round 77, Dufner blitzed the back nine in 32 on Sunday to shoot 68 and storm to a three-stroke victory. A roller-coaster of emotions, you might suggest? Think again. Dufner doesn’t do emotions. “The biggest key to success out here [on the PGA TOUR] is not the playing aspect a lot of times, but how do you handle

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Jason Dufner’s win in the 2017 Memorial Tournament marked his fifth PGA TOUR victory.

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“THE BIGGEST KEY TO SUCCESS OUT HERE IS NOT THE PLAYING ASPECT A LOT OF TIMES, BUT HOW DO YOU HANDLE THE ADVERSITY? HOW DO YOU HANDLE THINGS WHEN THEY’RE NOT GOING GREAT?” — JASON DUFNER

the adversity?” said Dufner. “How do you handle things when they’re not going great? How do you handle the bad?” After a turbulent 27-hole stretch— Saturday’s third round, Sunday’s front nine—in which Dufner made nine bogeys and one double-bogey against five birdies to seemingly cough up the Tournament, he showed his quintessential calm. With birdies at Nos. 10, 12, 15 and 17, he took it back.

Impressively, he did it against the challenge of two younger stars (Rickie Fowler, T-2, three back; Justin Thomas T-4, four back) and in front of a host who knows a thing or two about grit. “I’ve been part of losing a lead like that,” said Jack Nicklaus, “and I’ve been part of the other side. Jason knows [Round 3] wasn’t good. He said he was ticked off. But he went off [Sunday] and got out of his [own] way and just played golf.” The final scorecard read two eagles (including a hole-out from 175 yards at the par-4 18th in Round 2), 21 birdies, 10 bogeys, and one double-bogey. Hardly the way he would have drawn it up, but no way was it a swing of emotions. Dufner doesn’t do emotions. It’s just not in his DNA to get overly excited or outwardly upset. Longtime Auburn coach Mike Griffin watched the 2017 Memorial on TV and assures you he can read beneath the surface when it comes to a man who left such an indelible mark on the Auburn college community. “What a win that was for him. An Ohio kid, getting to walk up and have

PGA TOUR IMAGES/ KEYUR KHAMAR

“Jason did his part to make everyone feel welcome and at home. I think that his easy-going, Southern-style demeanor was something everyone on the team liked to be around. “There never seemed to be a worry in his head.”

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Above: Jason Dufner (bottom row, far left) with his 1999Auburn University golf team. Below: Auburn honored Dufner with a street named for him after his PGA Championship win in 2013. Right: Dufner joined the Auburn golf team as a walk-on during his freshman year.

the greatest golfer of all time—himself an Ohio kid—hand you the trophy?” Griffin said. “Man, how that made Jason proud. It meant so much to him, maybe as much as his major championship [the 2013 PGA Championship].” If you watched Saturday’s 77 and figured another high number would follow on Sunday, it’s because you don’t know Dufner like Griffin knows Dufner. Not that it was a quick study, mind you. “I misinterpreted who he was early on,” Griffin said. “I noticed that when he was in contention, he was interested. But if he wasn’t in contention, I thought he wasn’t interested. Players used to stick around to chip and putt after a match, but I noticed that Jason [when he didn’t play well] didn’t.”

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It bothered Griffin—until he discovered the truth. “Jason didn’t just disappear because he didn’t care. Quite the opposite. He would sneak away to find a quiet place to bang balls, and he would practice the rest of the day. He’s one of the hardest workers I ever met, stubborn as hell; he literally dug his golf game out of the dirt.” ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ A LONG LINE OF PEOPLE did not have the luxury of coaching Dufner, as did Griffin, so they likely don’t appreciate the flavor of

this man who was born in Cleveland and remains connected to his native state. What becomes the storyline with fans and so many in the media—that Dufner is aloof and detached—isn’t accurate, and it grossly overshadows what should be the side of his story that resonates. To wit: On a PGA TOUR jam-packed with former junior and collegiate phenoms, Dufner is the outlier you should embrace. He barely caused a stir while playing junior golf in Ohio, didn’t attract college scholarship offers that appealed to him, made Auburn’s squad as a walk-on, and paid his dues with 123 Web.com Tour starts across seven seasons. True, phenoms supply the sexy and dramatic rides. Meteoric rises pump our sports adrenaline. But doing it the old-fashioned way still matters. In this “look-at-me” world, Dufner subscribes to an old-school manual and let’s his game point the way. “To be honest, I take a lot of pride in that,” he said. “I created my own story. Never, honestly, have I been given anything.” So, while the 41-year-old Dufner acknowledges that his marquee wins at the 2017 Memorial Tournament and 2013 PGA Championship are career highlights, “walking on at Auburn is right up there.” He said it emphatically, but without the emotion. Dufner doesn’t do emotions. He does, however, make an inspiring impression. “The first time I met him was when he showed up [in the fall of 1996] for the walk-on qualifier I had every year,” Griffin said. “Jason didn’t just win, he walked away with it.” Dufner didn’t get into any matches that fall, “and I think he was a little upset with me,” said Griffin, but he played well in his first start in the spring semester in Hawaii. “And the rest, as they say, is history.” Just don’t go looking for a history of significant wins and record-setting achievements. Dufner’s collegiate career was “hot and cold,” said Griffin, which is not dissimilar to what he had done as a junior golfer back in the early-to-mid 1990s. By then, Dufner had moved to the Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., area with his mother, though he returned to northeast Ohio to spend summers with his father. “I liked the game and played a lot with my grandfather

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2017 MEMORIAL WINNER

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and father,” said Dufner. “But I didn’t play competitively till I was 14. I didn’t really get into it ’til I was 16 or 17.” Dufner’s junior career mirrored his college days—some good, some not so good— but there was always something about him. Kahn, two years younger, sensed it. When as a red-shirt freshman at Auburn he reconnected with Dufner, then a junior, Kahn got an even closer look. “He was quiet, disciplined and a hard worker,” Kahn said. “He never complained,

Top: Jason Dufner holds the trophy after his win in the Nationwide Tour 2006 LaSalle Bank Open at The Glen Club in Illinois. Middle: Fans of “Duf” in attendance at The Northern Trust at Glen Oaks Club last year. Above: Dufner won the 2012 Zurich Classic of New Orleans at TPC Louisiana in a twohole playoff against Ernie Els. Left: Dufner is presented with the trophy by former President Bill Clinton after winning the 2016 CareerBuilder Challenge In Partnership with The Clinton Foundation at the Stadium Course at PGA West.

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went about his business and strived to get better every day. His attitude was contagious. It is great to see Jason’s success; it’s always good when it happens to good people.” Not that Kahn predicted PGA TOUR success for Dufner. “His ball-striking was as pure as any, but at Auburn, being a strong Division I program, nearly every guy on our team had the physical skills for the next level,” said Kahn. “Jason was definitely a solid player but didn’t catch my eye like a few others. The ones I thought were destined for the TOUR didn’t make it.” Dufner, of course, did. “Crazy,” laughs Kahn, now a partner in a successful golf course design company in Phoenix. Griffin chuckles, too, only he tried to tell his players that Dufner had “it,” whatever “it” is. “So funny, but our players would compete against other players and not play with their teammates,” said Griffin. “I would tell the guys, ‘You don’t understand how good Jason is.’ ” The Maxwell, a tournament co-hosted by Oklahoma and Oklahoma State, is unique in that all five team members play in the same pairing, so Griffin remembers Dufner fading his drive behind a tree on a dogleg right. “The play was down the left and four of my guys were there,” said Griffin. After they played their approaches, they got over to watch Dufner, who nixed the prudent chip-out and took aim at a shot through the tree. “They said, ‘Coach, aren’t you going to say something?’ ” Griffin said. “I said, ‘Guys, this is Jason. Just wait.’ Sure enough, he smacked it into the tree and the ball came back at his feet. “Jason lined up again and the kids said, ‘Coach, aren’t you going to say something?’ I told ’em, ‘This is Duf. Let him go.’ He hit a brilliant shot through the trees up to 6 feet, made the putt for par and walked away like nothing had happened.” Griffin laughs, only this time the coach does say something. “That’s who Jason was and it’s who he is to this day,” said Griffin, who occasionally crosses paths with Dufner, as they both reside in Auburn, Ala. “He was trying to figure himself out.”

MIDDLE: GETTY IMAGES ANDREW REDINGTON; LEFT: GETTY IMAGES/JEFF GROSS; RIGHT: GETTY IMAGES/DARREN CARROLL

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2017 MEMORIAL WINNER

“ONE OF THE BEST THINGS I’VE DONE IS SURROUND MYSELF WITH PEOPLE WHO ARE BETTER THAN ME. IT’S PUSHED MY DESIRE TO BE ON THEIR LEVEL.” — JASON DUFNER

✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ Dufner figured out, was a strength. He didn’t make it onto the PGA TOUR until he was 27 and after a quick exit, he made it back to stay at 30. A secret: “One of the best things I’ve done is surround myself with people who are better than me,” Dufner said. “It’s pushed my desire to be on their level.”

Auburn University volunteers pack food for children for the Jason Dufner Charitable Foundation, whose mission is to end childhood hunger in Lee County, Ala .

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2017 MEMORIAL WINNER

him, Dufner figures it’s his ability to comprehend his swing that provides the fuel. “I’ve always been a student of the golf swing and have always wanted to know what makes a golf ball go straight,” he said. “For me to be competitive, I had to understand the nuts and bolts.” No surprise, but Dufner embraces Ben Hogan as a mentor of sorts. He read Hogan’s Five Lessons while in high school, and unlike so many of his peers who learned the game at a private country club, Dufner polished his with a head buried in a book. The guess is Hogan, who died in 1997, would undoubtedly approve of Dufner’s quiet, no-nonsense demeanor. Dufner’s choice to entrust his swing to Chuck Cook probably would please Hogan, too, and ditto those video shoots he does with Steve Elkington, a vintage ball-striker, and Jack Burke, Jr., arguably one of the greatest teachers and straightest shooters the sport has ever known.

“I’VE ALWAYS BEEN A STUDENT OF THE GOLF SWING AND HAVE ALWAYS WANTED TO KNOW WHAT MAKES A GOLF BALL GO STRAIGHT. FOR ME TO BE COMPETITIVE, I HAD TO UNDERSTAND THE NUTS AND BOLTS.” — JASON DUFNER

The decision to play his golf on visits to Florida at The Bear’s Club is no accident. Griffin is right; Dufner takes pride in his Ohio roots and the kinship to Nicklaus, the Memorial Founder and Host. When he recorded the first of his five PGA TOUR wins

in 2012, Dufner received a congratulatory note from Nicklaus that he saved. He played on the U.S. Presidents Cup team at Muirfield Village in 2013. Now, he has another cherished memory, the “special conversation and warm handshake” with Nicklaus following the Memorial win. Impressive, all of it, yet Dufner remains flavorfully true to himself. “I would text back-and-forth [with him] when he got on TOUR,” Griffin said. “I’d write up a real elaborate paragraph and Jason would send back a text saying, ‘Thanks.’ “Then, after a while he’d get real verbose and say, ‘Thanks, coach.’ ” Words don’t make the man. Actions do. Jim McCabe covered golf for more than 20 years with the Boston Globe and Golfweek. He is a senior manager in the communications department at the PGA TOUR.

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2017 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT RECAP

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ON THE REBOUND AFTER A RECORD-BREAKING 36-HOLE START, JASON DUFNER SANK ON SATURDAY ONLY TO RISE AGAIN ON SUNDAY TO WIN THE 2017 MEMORIAL by Gary Van Sickle

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ABOVE: GETTY IMAGES/SAM GREENWOOD; OPPOSITE: PGA TOUR IMAGES/KEYUR KHAMAR

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ROLLER COASTER makes your heart race, your nerves raw, your breath hard to catch, and sometimes you have to close your eyes because you’re afraid to watch. That also describes the 2017 edition of the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide. It featured sharp turns, rises and falls, thrills, spills, chills and battles of will. Forty-year-old Jason Dufner emerged as the winner after a Memorial Tournament that was a compelling mix of moments you couldn’t miss and moments you couldn’t watch. “Duf,” as his PGA TOUR pals call him, played stellar golf for two days amassing an imposing five-shot lead going into the third round. He was something to see for the first 36 holes, posting a 14-under-par Left: Jack Nicklaus, 130 aggregate total, a Tournament Founder and Host of the Memorial Tournament scoring record. Fourteen under at presented by Nationwide, mighty Muirfield Village Golf Club? congratulates Jason And he made it look easy? Amazing. Dufner after he became the second Ohio native Then came Saturday, and it was to win the Memorial. time to look away. Dufner struggled The first, of course, was to a third-round 77 and went into the Nicklaus. final round four strokes behind leader Daniel Summerhays. Luckily, it’s a given in roller-coaster behavior that what goes down comes back up. Dufner saved some of his best shot making for the final nine, posted a 68 and won the Memorial by three shots in the most surprising turnaround since, uh, a certain recent Presidential election. That’s how your Memorial winner went from the equivalent of worst to first on a weekend that won’t soon be forgotten. “Saturday was not my best day,” Dufner admitted after his victory, “but I had to get over it quick. A lot of things can happen. I knew I was still in the mix.” Give the 2013 PGA Championship winner bonus points for staying positive after a disastrous round, but history was hardly on his side. The last time a player overcame a third-round 77 and still

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Rickie Fowler, who was in contention until the final few holes on Sunday, finished in second place.

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A second-round 74 didn’t help and he missed the cut by a mile— triumphed? Dust off the mothballs—it was Sir Nick Faldo at the five shots. Johnson is no wordsmith, but he has a way of cutting to 1989 Masters Tournament. the core of an issue. “I hate missing cuts,” he said. This was no ordinary Memorial Tournament, in other words, It was OK to watch another Johnson, though—Zach, a former if there is such a thing. Dufner, who grew up in suburban Ohio, Masters and British Open champion. He birdied four of his final near Cleveland, before going to college at Auburn University and five holes just to sneak inside the cutline. relocating to Alabama, became only the second Ohio native to win Zach didn’t work his way into conthis Tournament. "THAT'S MUIRFIELD VILLAGE. tention, but other well-known players The first was a fellow named Jack Nicklaus. A TRAIN WRECK CAN HAPPEN did. Dufner’s surprising third-round struggles not only allowed SummerThe week’s spills started early, even AT ANY MOMENT. hays to vault into the lead, but the likes before the first tee shot. Northern Ireof 2013 Memorial winner Matt Kuchar, land’s Rory McIlroy, a four-time major FROM THE FIRST HOLE Bubba Watson, Rickie Fowler and Justin champion, pulled out of the event to TO THE 18TH HOLE, Thomas now were in close pursuit. make sure his rib injury wouldn’t keep “That’s Muirfield Village,” Summerhim out of the U.S. Open, too. Former THERE'S A DOUBLE-BOGEY hays said of Dufner’s fall. “A train wreck British Open winner Justin Rose withIN THERE SOMEWHERE." can happen at any moment. From the drew due to a sore back, and Paul Casey first hole to the 18th hole, there’s a doubegged off because of a foot injury. — DANIEL SUMMERHAYS ble-bogey in there somewhere.” The field was still a strong one that Summerhays probably wished he included world-No. 1 Dustin Johnson. hadn’t been so prophetic. In Sunday’s Though he had his own issues. Johnson finale, his three-shot lead was gone after four holes. Two-and-awas on an impressive roll with three straight wins until he slipped half hours’ worth of rain delays dragged out the suspense. There on a staircase in Augusta, Ga., hurt his back and pulled out of the was a four-way tie for the lead at one point, and it was anyone’s Masters. The Memorial was his fourth tournament appearance tournament. after that mishap, and Muirfield Village figured to be a course he Fowler faded when he missed the 14th green and made bogey would dominate. Cue the blindfolds now, folks. Johnson opened and then failed to birdie the par-5 15th. Thomas was one stroke with 78, his first round without a birdie in almost four years.

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2017 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT RECAP

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1 2 4 6 1 0 1 3 1 5 1 9 2 2 2 5 3 1 3 5

Jason Dufner Rickie Fowler Anirban Lahiri Justin Thomas Matt Kuchar James Hahn Kevin Kisner Kyle Stanley Bubba Watson Daniel Summerhays Jamie Lovemark Graham DeLaet Kevin Streelman Jordan Spieth Jason Day Marc Leishman David Lingmerth Shane Lowry Jim Herman Harold Varner III Pat Perez Ricky Barnes Phil Mickelson Ross Fisher Bill Haas Peter Uihlein Brett Coletta Stewart Cink Bud Cauley Byeong Hun An Adam Scott Brooks Koepka Padraig Harrington Jonas Blixt Patrick Cantlay Jason Kokrak Ben Martin Grayson Murray Charl Schwartzel

65 70 74 67 69 74 70 74 71 66 69 73 73 66 75 70 65 72 70 73 70 70 70 73 73 76 72 72 75 68 76 69 71 75 71 73 71 72 70

65 66 70 71 70 72 69 67 68 69 69 67 69 72 71 70 74 68 74 71 72 77 70 69 69 69 69 73 67 72 66 73 71 69 72 67 74 71 71

77 72 69 69 67 65 70 71 68 68 70 73 67 71 67 72 71 70 67 70 69 69 72 70 71 68 72 68 70 71 71 71 72 70 74 70 71 71 71

68 70 65 72 73 69 71 68 73 78 73 68 73 73 70 71 73 73 73 70 73 69 73 73 73 73 73 73 74 75 74 74 73 73 71 78 72 74 76

275 $1,566,000 278 $765,600 278 $765,600 279 $382,800 279 $382,800 280 $281,663 280 $281,663 280 $281,663 280 $281,663 281 $217,500 281 $217,500 281 $217,500 282 $174,000 282 $174,000 283 $143,550 283 $143,550 283 $143,550 283 $143,550 284 $113,100 284 $113,100 284 $113,100 285 $90,480 285 $90,480 285 $90,480 286 $66,410 286 $66,410 286 $66,410 286 $66,410 286 $66,410 286 $66,410 287 $52,744 287 $52,744 287 $52,744 287 $52,744 288 $42,891 288 $42,891 288 $42,891 288 $42,891 288 $42,891 Jason Dufner and Jack Nicklaus share the spotlight with the Memorial Tournament trophy.

Dufner raises his arm in victory after sinking his final putt on the 18th green at Muirfield Village.

off the lead through 12, but missed a 4-foot birdie putt at 13 and an 8-footer at 14, then fanned an iron shot way right of the 15th green and made par, followed by a bogey at the par-3 16th. Watson suffered bogeys from the back bunkers at the 12th and 16th holes, the latter ending his chances. The contenders probably felt they beat themselves, but really, it was Dufner’s superb play on the closing nine that was the difference. He hit it tight at the 10th for an easy birdie, rolled in a 10-footer for birdie at the 12th and two-putted from 40 feet for the birdie at the 15th that gave him the lead for good. At the 17th, Dufner dropped a wedge shot to 3 feet to give himself some breathing room. He needed it because Jason’s Wild Ride took another unexpected turn at the 18th. Dufner’s drive found nasty rough just short of the fairway bunker. He gouged it out but didn’t escape the rough. He got his third shot onto the green, 30 feet away and no sure two-putt on Muirfield Village’s slick putting surfaces. He was playing with Fowler, who still had half a chance if he could make birdie and pressure Dufner into another mistake. That’s when Dufner, not known for his putting prowess, poured in a 32-foot putt for par and added a roundhouse air-punch. Then he smiled, gave a two-finger wave, picked his ball out of the cup and fist-bumped his caddie. That putt made Fowler’s chip moot. “He looks like his heart isn’t beating,” Watson said of the typically placid Dufner. Maybe he really was that calm. Or maybe Dufner, after his fifth career win, was just happy to finally step off this roller coaster. Gary Van Sickle, president of the Golf Writers Association of America, has covered golf since 1980.

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LEFT: /PGA TOUR IMAGES/CHRIS CONDON; ABOVE: PGA TOUR IMAGES/ KEYUR KHAMAR

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

THE 2017 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT PRESENTED BY NATIONWIDE FINAL RESULTS

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RETROSPECTIVE: 1993 MEMORIAL

25 years ago…

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

From o u t of the

SAND

WITH ONE OF THE MOST ICONIC SHOTS IN GOLF’S MODERN ERA, PAUL AZINGER HOLED OUT FROM A GREENSIDE BUNKER ON 18 TO SURGE PAST HIS BEST FRIEND PAYNE STEWART IN THE 1993 MEMORIAL by David Shedloski

W

INNING the 1993 Memorial Tournament was one of the most satisfying victories of Paul Azinger’s career, produced by a shot that is one of the most memorable in the history of the event. But at the time it felt awkward, too, defeating his good friend Payne Stewart with a dagger of a stroke on the 72nd hole. And there also was plenty of pain that went with it. Searing pain. The kind that tells you something is very wrong. His right shoulder had been aching for weeks when he shot four rounds The shot seen round in the 60s at Muirfield Village Golf Club. His 72-hole aggregate score of 68the world: Paul 69-68-69—274 was achieved with what Azinger describes as “one of those Azinger hits out of a bunker on 18 to win rare ball-striking weeks that you only get a few times.” Just two months later, the 1993 Memorial when he won the New England Classic, the pain in his shoulder was so great Tournament. he couldn’t put his scorecard in his back pocket. But he could still swing a club, and in August at the PGA Championship at Inverness Club in Toledo he beat Greg Norman in a playoff for his only major title. What no one knew at the time was that on Friday of that week his doctor had recommended he undergo a biopsy on the shoulder. When he won the PGA, Azinger asked to delay it. “I was going to be playing the Grand Slam, the Skins Game and the Ryder Cup,” Azinger recalls. “So I put it off as long as I could.”

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P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

RETROSPECTIVE: 1993 MEMORIAL

Paul Azinger was three strokes back from Payne Stewart going into the final round of the 1993 Memorial Tournament. Below: Arnold Palmer was the 1993 Memorial Honoree. Below right: Both Azinger and Stewart found the left greenside bunker on 18 on Sunday, but after Azinger’s remarkable hole out, Stewart three-putted and slipped to third place.

Dummy from the 1992 Memorial Tournament included the traditional appearance of The Ohio State University Marching Band as well as the Tournament Founder and Host signing autographs.

What they discovered after the Skins Game was terrifying; lymphoma, a curable form of cancer—but cancer, nonetheless—was the diagnosis. And though he would return to competitive golf the following August in time to defend his PGA title after a brutal regimen of radiation and chemotherapy, Azinger never really was the same golfer. He finished in the top 10 in majors just three times thereafter, and registered only one more TOUR title, the 2000 Sony Open in Hawaii. (An aside: Azinger won by seven shots in Hawaii, the largest margin of his career, using a belly putter, the first player to win with a club now outlawed by golf ’s ruling bodies.) There were other conquests to come, however, most notably his successful captaincy of the U.S. Ryder Cup team in 2008 at Valhalla Golf Club in Louisville, Ky. The Americans, missing an injured Tiger Woods, were decided underdogs at Jack Nicklaus-designed Valhalla, but Azinger employed a unique “pod system” in organizing the squad, and his positive demeanor and enthusiasm further

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inspired them in a 16 ½ to 11 ½ rout of the Europeans, the largest margin of victory for the U.S. since 1981. “My whole idea was to create an environment where they could be comfortable. And that’s the key now,” says Azinger, a longtime Florida resident who has played on five U.S. national teams, including one Presidents Cup, in 2000. “There was no clutter in their minds. They got in those small groups and they knew what to

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4/27/18 8:15 PM


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1 Paul Azinger

68 69 68 69 274 $252,000

2 Corey Pavin

69 70 69 67 275 $151,200

3 Payne Stewart 69 66 67 74 276

$95,200

4 Greg Norman

68 68 74 67 277

$50,750

67 70 73 67 277

$50,750

Jay Haas

67 70 72 67 277

$50,750

Brad Faxon

69 69 70 69 277

$50,750

Fred Couples

67 68 73 69 277

$50,750

Jim McGovern 67 71 69 70 277

$50,750

Jumbo Ozaki

10 Bill Glasson Davis Love III

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

12 Jeff Maggert

66 72 69 71 278 $36,400 73 72 68 67 280

$28,350

John Cook

67 73 71 69 280

$28,350

Michael Allen

70 72 70 68 280

$28,350

Wayne Levi

68 69 72 71 280

$28,350

16 Fuzzy Zoeller

71 69 73 68 281 $22,400

Dudley Hart

67 71 70 73 281 $22,400

Vijay Singh

71 69 68 73 281 $22,400

19 Greg Twiggs

70 69 71 72 282

$18,200

Kenny Perry

67 74 69 72 282

$18,200

Ben Crenshaw 70 69 71 72 282

$18,200

22 Phil Mickelson 73 70 72 68 283

$14,560

D.A. Weibring

72 70 72 69 283

D. Hammond

66 76 69 72 283

$14,560

75 69 71 69 284

$10,920

70 72 73 69 284

$10,920

Scott Hoch

71 70 73 70 284

$10,920

Mark Weibe

69 71 73 71 284

$10,920

Bobby Wadkins 68 72 72 72 284

$10,920

120 THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

69 69 68 72 278 $36,400

25 David Frost Joey Sindelar

$14,560

30 Phil Blackmar

69 74 72 70 285

$8,890

Grant Waite

69 72 74 70 285

$8,890

70 69 74 72 285

$8,890

Rocco Mediate 69 71 73 72 285

$8,890

Brian Claar

Azinger celebrates his Memorial win with wife Toni, daughters Josie (left) and Sarah Jean, and Host and Founder Jack Nicklaus.

do, what to expect, they helped each other. It all worked all about as well as it could.” So did the ’93 Memorial, where Azinger trailed Stewart by three strokes after 54 holes. He still was a stroke back heading to 18 when both found the left greenside bunker with their approach shots. Stewart, who died in a plane crash in 1999 after winning the U.S Open (Azinger delivered his eulogy), got unlucky twice: His drive ended up in a divot and his approach buried in the bunker, from where he blasted out to 8 feet above the hole. Azinger, though he had little room to work with, felt confident as he settled his feet into the sand for a shot of about 25 feet. “We stayed with friends that week in one of the villas behind the driving range, and every night I practiced bunker shots until dark. It got to where I was slapping them so good that I could slap it about 3 feet with loads of spin and almost stop it dead,” he recalls. “I got in that bunker and it looked like an easy shot. For everybody else it probably looked hard because it was on the short side, but that’s what made it so easy for me.” So, he slapped it out as planned. His ball barely cleared the lip of the bunker, and then skidded right and trickled into the hole. He fell to his knees in the bunker in elation and relief, and in the aftermath called it, “the bunker shot of my life.” A stunned Stewart ended up three-putting for a closing 74 and 276 total, slipping to third behind Corey Pavin, who closed with a sharp 67. A large group tied for fourth at 277 included Norman and Fred Couples, whose careers include Memorial wins, with The Shark, a Memorial Honoree, winning it twice. “It was a weird feeling,” Azinger says of the biggest comeback of his career, “because Payne and I were close. I wanted to beat him badly, but not when he had a three-shot lead, because you know how he is going to feel to lose that lead and you’re his buddy and you’re playing with him. It was kind of tough because I didn’t know how to feel about it.” While crediting his friend for his fine play, Stewart let Azinger know how he felt about the results, shoving an unpeeled banana in one of his loafers before he left the grounds. A locker room attendant alerted Azinger to the prank. “Few people know about that,” Azinger says. “I never told Payne if he got me or not. I never let on one way or the other.” Azinger, 58, who launched a broadcasting career in 2004 with ABC Sports (teaming in the 18th tower with Sir Nick Faldo, another Memorial Honoree) and currently serves as lead analyst for FOX Sports on U.S. Golf Association championship telecasts, still basks in the glow of his victory at Muirfield Village. A member of the Tournament’s esteemed Captains Club, Azinger said he considers it one of his top achievements in a career that features 12 PGA TOUR titles. “It was an achievement I was thrilled to have,” said Azinger, who is an avid fisherman and motorcycle enthusiast. “I feel like winning Jack’s Tournament puts you in some pretty exclusive company— great company, frankly.” And it was a win as thrilling as any in Memorial history. Author of five books, including a history of Scioto Country Club, David Shedloski is editorial director of The Memorial.

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THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT ARCHIVE

RETROSPECTIVE: 1993 MEMORIAL THE 1993 MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT FINAL RESULTS

4/27/18 8:15 PM


PRESENTED BY

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P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

Tom Watson raises his arms in triumph in the 1996 Memorial Tournament, ending a nearly nine-year victory drought.

A LIF ACHIEVE GETTY IMAGES

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THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

125 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

IFETIME VEMENT A BIG WIN

THERE’S MORE THAN JUST A MAJOR SENSE OF SATISFACTION THAT COMES FROM CLAIMING VICTORY IN THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT PRESENTED BY NATIONWIDE, AS MANY PAST WINNERS CAN ATTEST

GETTY IMAGES

by David Shedloski

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A BIG WIN

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

Watson hugs his caddie Bruce Edwards after sinking a birdie putt on the 72nd hole to secure his second win in the Memorial Tournament.

T

HE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT presented by Nationwide is one of 48

events on a PGA TOUR slate in which any single event has its own mark of distinction and yet constantly strives to enhance its prestige. The Memorial always has been different. Since its inception in 1976, the event founded by Jack Nicklaus and staged on a captivating canvas established its identity as

one of the most esteemed and influential tournaments in golf. It is not a major. It is not a World Golf Championship. It is not a FedExCup Playoff

event. And so what? Those are designations, and designations do not, cannot, determine reputation or the level of prestige or the importance an event holds for each man who competes for its top prize. And winning at Muirfield Village Golf Club, persevering and prevailing at one of golf ’s most formidable layouts designed by Nicklaus himself, is a signature moment for many players. The Memorial, which 2009 British Open winner Stewart Cink calls, “the quintessential PGA TOUR event,” is a competitive happening that for the game’s top players holds deep meaning, a meaning that extends beyond the outstretched hand of the Tournament Founder and Host. To shake the hand of Jack Nicklaus, the 18time major winner, upon securing victory is

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a moment worth freezing in time. It is like reaching into the past and bringing forth the grand history of the game and forever making yourself part of that tapestry. And with that win comes a sense of accomplishment and satisfaction. It boosts the ego, buttresses a player’s belief in himself. It validates not only all of his hard work, but also that he just might be the

player he’s always wanted to become. “You win Jack’s Tournament, that’s a lifetime achievement right there,” said Paul Azinger, a former PGA champion who 25 years ago pulled off a miracle bunker shot on the 72nd hole to steal the 1993 Memorial Tournament from his best friend Payne Stewart. [See related story, page 116.] “Muirfield Village is as close to Augusta National that you are going to get when it comes to shots to play and green speeds, plus the conditioning. With all the riskreward out there, it takes a lot of courage to win a golf tournament on that course.” “My win at Muirfield Village meant everything to me,” added two-time major winner David Graham, the winner of the 1980 Tournament. “Winning at Jack’s event told me more about the player I was than when I had won the PGA Championship the year before. I know what kind of golf course Jack built; I’ve been a member since the beginning. So I understand as well

GETTY IMAGES

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5/2/18 12:38 PM


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A BIG WIN

“IN A WAY, WHEN YOU WIN JACK’S TOURNAMENT, YOU HAVE TAKEN THE BEST THAT HE HAS TO OFFER AND COME OUT ON TOP.”

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Barbara Nicklaus gives her husband Jack a congratulatory kiss after the Golden Bear registered one of his biggest victories in the 1977 Memorial.

as anyone that if you win the Memorial, you are capable of winning any tournament anywhere in the world.” A native of Australia who added the 1981 U.S. Open to his résumé, Graham calls the Memorial, “a big deal, and it always has been,” but not solely because Nicklaus hosts the Tournament. It’s also because the Golden Bear infused it with his ideas of what a great golf event should be. “From the design and conditioning of the golf course to the practice area, the locker rooms, the way players and fans are treated, it all reflects on a great man and a great player who knows what it means to win, what it takes, and therefore, understands the ingredients that go into putting a golf tournament on at an elite level.” Numerous winners of majors, including Nicklaus twice, in 1977 and 1984, populate the roll call of Memorial winners, among them multiple major champions Graham, Ray Floyd, Tiger Woods, Tom Watson, Hale Irwin, Greg Norman,

MEM18_ACHIEVEMENT_4.indd 128

Curtis Strange, Ernie Els and Vijay Singh.

“In a way, when you win Jack’s Tournament, you have taken the best that he has to offer and come out on top,” said Norman, last year’s Tournament Honoree. “All of his accomplishments as a play-

Tom Lehman not only won his first PGA TOUR title in the 1994 Memorial, but he also set the 72-hole Tournament scoring record that still stands today.

David Graham won two major titles, but his victory in the 1980 Memorial Tournament was no less special to the Hall of Famer.

er, all of his talents as a designer, his knowledge about winning major championships—that’s all rolled up in the challenge when you play Muirfield Village Golf Club. That’s sort of how I look at it. That’s a pretty good way of measuring yourself.” It’s no wonder, then, that many past champions take more than just tremendous satisfaction from a victory in the Memorial Tournament. As Floyd, the 2013 Memorial Honoree, said of his hard-fought victory in the 1982 Memorial Tournament, “The bigger wins stay with you.” And victory might feel big for different reasons, holding particular significance to each individual within the framework of elite-level achievement. Seven men have become first-time PGA TOUR winners at Muirfield Village, including Kenny Perry, whose 1991 breakthrough was the first of three Memorial victories, two behind Woods’ record cache. Justin Rose’s 2010 maiden win propelled him to a career that now includes the 2013 U.S.

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT ARCHIVE (3)

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

— GREG NORMAN

5/3/18 11:52 AM


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A BIG WIN

“THIS IS PROBABLY THE HARDEST GOLF TOURNAMENT TO WIN THAT I’VE EVER HAD. … ALL THE MAJORS I’VE WON … THIS IS SOMETHING ELSE FOR ME.”

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Four-time major champion Ray Floyd counts his 1982 Memorial victory as among his most significant, saying years later how big the win was to him.

Open title and an Olympic gold medal. But few finishes match the purity of Tom Lehman’s performance in 1994, when he set the Tournament scoring record of 20-under 268 with four straight impeccable rounds of 5-under 67. “This is the greatest moment of my life,” said Lehman, who a few weeks earlier had suffered a crushing defeat in the Masters. “There were times out there when the crowd was cheering and standing, and tears would well up in my eyes.” Some Memorial wins have resonated historically. Two, to be precise. The first came in 1977 when Nicklaus captured the first of his two titles at Muirfield Village. The victory was delayed until Monday because of inclement weather, but it was meaningful for several different reasons.

MEM18_ACHIEVEMENT_4.indd 130

The first TOUR player to host his own tournament, Nicklaus, of course, became the first to win his own event. The occasion was so momentous he thought of announcing his retirement right then and there until the wise counsel of his wife Barbara prevailed. “I don’t know how to express my feelings,” said the Golden Bear, who hadn’t won a tournament in his hometown in 20 years— the 1957 International Jaycees Junior Championship at Ohio State Golf Course. “This is probably the hardest golf tournament to win that I’ve ever had. It’s my biggest thrill in golf. All the majors I’ve won … this is something else for me. “Other than the major championships, I’d have to say that was the most meaningful win of my career,” he added. “It certainly meant a lot to

me at the time, and that hasn’t changed through the years. In some ways, it becomes more special.” With a 7-under 281 total, Nicklaus beat Hubert Green by two strokes and earned $45,000, which enabled him to become the first player in PGA TOUR history with $3 million in career earnings. Even more serendipitous, that victory became his 63rd of his career, moving

Kenny Perry trails only Tiger Woods in Memorial Tournament wins, capturing victories in 1991, 2003 and 2008.

him into second place all-time behind Sam Snead—and one win ahead of his longtime friend and rival Arnold Palmer. Fast forward to the 2012 Memorial Tournament, when Greg Norman, the 2017 Memorial Honoree, won the rain-shortened 1990 Memorial Tournament and then won again in 1995 over a regulation 72 holes.

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT ARCHIVE (3)

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

— JACK NICKLAUS

5/3/18 11:54 AM


CHAMPIONS CHAMPIONS CHAMPIONS


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Tiger Woods increased his record victory total at Muirfield Village to five with a two-stroke win ignited by a magical flop shot on the par-3 16th hole. Seemingly in trouble in deep rough behind the green, Woods executed what Nicklaus called “the most unbelievable gutsy shot I’ve ever seen,” that found the cup for one of his three birdies in the final four holes. The big-picture significance of the feat was that Woods tallied his 73rd career PGA TOUR title, tying Nicklaus’ mark. “He had to rub it in my face right here, didn’t he?” a laughing Nicklaus quipped. “No, if he was going to do it, I’d like to see it happen here.” “It’s awfully special to have Tiger Woods has provided several electric moments at Muirfield Village in winning five times.

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“FROM A SATISFACTION STANDPOINT, THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT STANDS AT THE TOP OF THE LIST.” — ROGER MALTBIE

won this event, and to do it here with Jack obviously there at 18,” said Woods, who finished at 9-under 279 and added to his Memorial wins in 1999, 2000, ’01 and ’09. “It’s awfully special for to players to have him there

The first Memorial Tournament in 1976 went four extra holes before Roger Maltbie emerged with the victory over Hale Irwin, who is this year’s Tournament Honoree and a two-time Memorial winner himself.

and to greet us after we finish.” Hale Irwin, this year’s Tournament Honoree, owns a pair of triumphs here, in 1983 and ’85. It’s no exaggeration that Irwin should have won a trio of trophies in Jack’s event, but Roger Maltbie edged him in the inaugural with a miracle par save during their playoff. A longtime NBC golf broadcaster, Maltbie still relishes his win over Irwin, aided by a gallery stake that stopped a wayward approach at the 17th hole. The ball caromed off the metal stake and onto the green where Maltbie matched Irwin’s par on the third playoff hole before winning the crown on the 18th hole in sudden death. “From a satisfaction standpoint, the Memorial Tournament stands at the top of the list. It’s been long remembered for how I won it, and that makes it really special,” said Maltbie, who won five times on TOUR. The loss stuck in Irwin’s craw until he exorcised the demons with a one-stroke victory over Ben Crenshaw, thanks to a final-round 69 and 7-under 281 total. “Roger got the break and made the most of it. That’s golf for you, plain and simple, Irwin

Curtis Strange won the 1988 Memorial, and then went on to win the U.S. Open two weeks later, the first of his two straight national championships.

said, remembering the spirit of ’76 that haunted him for a spell. “If you want the results to be different, then maybe that’s something you should take on and do yourself.” Irwin did just that by posting four sub-par rounds, a first in Tournament history. Though he won three U.S. Open titles and a record 45 tournaments

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT ARCHIVE (3)

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

A BIG WIN

5/3/18 11:56 AM


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A BIG WIN

Over 2,000 items on display – one of the greatest collections of golf memorabilia in the world!

The Exhibits Legends of Golf Decades of Nicklaus Major Championship Galleries Nicklaus Family Room

Where the greatest story in golf comes alive!

Memorial Tournament Gallery Nicklaus Design Gallery Art Gallery

2355 Olentangy River Rd. Columbus, OH 43210 (614) 247-5959

Hours of Operation Tue – Sat, 9am – 5pm nicklausmuseum.org

History of the Ohio State Men’s and Women’s Golf Programs

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The Ohio State University Turf Science and Management Program

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Special Exhibits Gallery

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Nicklaus Theater

Driving

toward the cure together. UnitedHealthcare is a proud supporter of the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide. With every drive and putt, they’re helping to chip away at barriers to children’s health.

on the PGA TOUR Champions, Irwin is proud to own two Memorial trophies. “It is definitely one of the high points in my career, given that the game’s best player hosts it and designed the golf course,” Irwin says. “The Memorial from day one has always been on a level just below the major championships and it remains there. It remains there because of all the things Jack brings to it and the quality of the tournament and the golf course. That win [in 1983], it was as meaningful as they come.” If ever there was a universally popular and epic victory at Muirfield Village, beyond the pair Nicklaus claimed, it would have to be Tom Watson’s 1996 triumph on a gray, damp afternoon that illuminated so much about the game of golf worth cherishing—perseverance, camaraderie, sportsmanship. A two-time winner and the Memorial Tournament Honoree in 2012, Watson had won in 1979 under the most difficult conditions when the weather was horrific—windy and cold, with temperatures on Friday plunging to 13 degrees. He emerged with a second Memorial title in ’96 at a time when winning had become exceedingly difficult for him. That latter victory, by two strokes over David Duval, was Watson’s first in nearly nine years spanning 141 starts, since the 1987 Nabisco Championship (now known as THE TOUR Championship). With a final-round 2-under 70, capped by a 15-foot birdie putt on the 72nd hole, Watson finished at 14-under 274 and then dedicated the triumph to his ailing father Ray, who at the time was in a hospital in Kansas City recovering from a stroke. “This is for you Dad,” were his first post-round words during a television interview. “It feels so good to win again,” Watson said. “The beauty and the agony of the game is that some days it is so easy and other days it is so tough. You adjust and you find a way to do it.” Seeking his first PGA TOUR title, Duval was disappointed, but mustered a measured and selfless assessment of the day: “I’m just getting started. My time will come. If I have to wait because Tom Watson wins the Tournament, that’s fine.” Perhaps no one was happier for Watson than the Tournament Host, who clasped Watson in a warm embrace beside the 18th green, bringing each man near tears. A handshake just wasn’t going to be enough. “I believe,” Nicklaus said, “it was the most thrilling win of any I’ve seen or accomplished myself in 10 years, from when I won the Masters in ’86 until now. It means an awful lot for the game of golf.” Writing at the time for Sports Illustrated, Jaime Diaz, a past winner of the Memorial Golf Journalism Award, summed up the proceedings with this observation: “When Watson looks back on his career, it’s doubtful he will find anything more memorable than what he did at the Memorial.” And he’d be far from alone. Author of five books, including a history of Scioto Country Club, David Shedloski is editorial director of The Memorial.

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RARE THE FIRST-EVER LS 500. LIVE IN THE NEW. FORM The LS 500 redefines what a luxury sedan can be. With intense styling like the F SPORT bolstered 28-way power front seats featuring leather trim with an exclusive perforated L-motif design. The LS 500 is also the first-ever twin-turbo Lexus, delivering 416 horsepower1 with a thrilling 4.6-second 0–60 time.1,2 And the new Lexus Multistage Hybrid system in the LS 500h delivers seamless acceleration and torque, without requiring a charge. This level of extravagance isn’t just rare. It sets a new benchmark.

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MU I RF I E L D V I L L AG E G O L F C LU B H O L E

B Y

H O L E THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

C O U R S E P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y J I M M A N D E V I L L E

139 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

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5/1/18 9:54 AM


MAY 28 – JUNE 3, 2018 COLUMBUS, OH ©2018 MILLER BREWING CO., MILWAUKEE, WI


1

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

141 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PAR 4 YARDS 470 H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2017

4.103 9TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

1976-2017

4.127 8TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

A SLIGHT DOGLEG RIGHT FROM AN ELEVATED tee to a wide fairway, which slopes from right to left. Bunkers in the driving area can catch a sliced or pushed drive, and a hook or pull might find a creek threading through the woods that line the left side of the hole. The green is the largest on the course, with four bunkers guarding it at left, right and rear.

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5/1/18 9:55 AM


WE BELIEVE YOUR BEST H EALTH IS ALWAYS WITH I N REACH

At OhioHealth, we believe health is an ongoing journey. One with its ups and downs, its challenges and its triumphs. We believe wellness and sickness are both part of a lifelong partnership, and that everyone could use an expert guide. At OhioHealth, we believe in working together to help you uncover your own power to be healthy. Find your partner in health at OhioHealth.com/WeBelieve. Š OhioHealth Inc. 2018. All rights reserved. FY18-165855. 04/18.


2

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

143 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PAR 4 YARDS 455 H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2017

4.105 8TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

1976-2017

4.167 2ND

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

A CREEK FLANKS THE ENTIRE RIGHT SIDE of the hole from 100 yards out and abuts the right edge and rear of the green, but challenging the right side of the fairway is the best play because trees impede the approach from a drive hit too far left, and the green is bunkered at front right and rear left. Accuracy is at a premium on one of the tougher par 4s.

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5/1/18 9:27 PM


Innovation is a game changer. Envisioning new possibilities takes a unique perspective.

Phil Mickelson KPMG Brand Ambassador

©2018 KPMG LLP, a Delaware limited liability partnership and the U.S. member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. Some of the services or offerings provided by KPMG LLP are not permissible for its audit clients or affiliates. NDPPS 768678


3

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

145 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PAR 4 YARDS 401 H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2017

4.064 11TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

1976-2017

4.060 14TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

A DOWNHILL DRIVE to a generous fairway, then an approach over a lake to a small, two-tiered green cut into a hillside. A drive too far left might find a creek running along the woods line, leaving nowhere to drop that permits a clear shot to the green. Water awaits the weak approach and sand the over-bold shot. One of Muirfield Village Golf Club’s most scenically spectacular holes and tougher than it looks.

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5/1/18 9:57 AM


supports the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide

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www.bobevansgrocery.com

Š2018 Bob Evans Farms, LLC.


4

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

147 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PAR 3 YARDS 200 H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2017

3.210 4TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

1976-2017

3.166 3RD

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

THIS FIRST OF THE FOUR par 3s slopes gently downhill to a long, narrow, heavily bunkered green cut into a hillside. The disaster area is the depression left of the green. Rolling hillsides framing the entire right side of the hole offer ideal viewing areas for spectators. A strong test of medium- to long-iron play.

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5/1/18 9:57 AM


Jack and Barbara Nicklaus and the Terlato family have partnered out of a shared commitment to quality, family and philanthropy to create Jack’s House.

LOOK FOR JACK’S HOUSE WINES AT A STORE NEAR YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE JACK’S HOUSE FOUNDATION AND HOW YOU CAN HELP, VISIT WWW.JACKSHOUSEFOUNDATION.ORG


5

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

149 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PAR 5 YARDS 527 H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2017

4.679 16TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

1976-2017

4.747 17TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

DOWNHILL AGAIN from the tee, between wooded hillsides to a wide, level fairway. Some 300 yards out, a creek bordering the left side of the hole swings into the fairway, which it then bisects all the way to the green. The creek finally becomes a moat around the entire left side of the green, which is bunkered at right and left rear. The green is small and one of the most undulating on the course.

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5/1/18 9:58 AM


RAISE THE BAR, AND PEOPLE WILL REMEMBER YOUR NAME. Throughout his legendary career and life, Jack Nicklaus raised the standard for excellence, winning a record 18 professional major championships and becoming one of the iconic figures of the last century. Today, he continues to demand the best for the courses he designs. That’s why when clients ask Mr. Nicklaus about the most reliable and innovative golf cars on the market, there’s one name that leads the way – E-Z-GO.®

See Mr. Nicklaus’ story at ezgo.com/RealResults

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REAL STORIES. REAL RESULTS.™ ©2015 E-Z-GO Division of Textron Inc. All rights reserved.


6

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

151 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PAR 4 YARDS 447 H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2017

4.133 7TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

1976-2017

4.092 12TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

A CLUSTER OF BUNKERS cut into the left hillside and a strategically placed fairway bunker to the right puts a premium on the tee shot. The ideal line is the left-center of the fairway, leaving a clear shot over water and sand to a medium-size green. A challenging hole that can require a long-iron or even a metalwood second shot when it plays against the wind.

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5/1/18 9:59 AM


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7

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

153 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PAR 5 YARDS 563 H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2017

4.605 18TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

1976-2017

4.767 16TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

AN EXPOSED, ELEVATED, bunker-lined, double-dogleg hole, reachable in two by only the longest hitters. A rough-grassed swale sweeps in from the right side across in front of the green. Bunkers guard the front left, right and rear right of the putting surface, which breaks severely off to the left towards a wooded ravine. Not an easy hole to birdie, but the farther left the conservative player is on his second shot, the easier his third becomes.

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5/1/18 10:00 AM


Mulligan.

makersmark.com WE MAKE OUR BOURBON CAREFULLY. PLEASE ENJOY IT THAT WAY. Maker’s Mark® Bourbon Wh­isky, 45% Alc./Vol. ©2018 Maker’s Mark Distillery, Inc. Loretto, KY


8

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

155 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PAR 3 YARDS 185 H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2017

3.038 13TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

1976-2017

3.078 13TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

BACK TO WOODED COUNTRY, this time dogwood, beech and hickory trees almost completely surround the shortest of the par-3 holes. The tee shot is appealingly downhill, but the plateau green is almost entirely surrounded by sand, including a pot bunker guarding the back left. The valley between tee and green adds to the difficulty of club selection by making the hole look longer than it is.

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5/1/18 10:01 AM


NetJets is proud to support the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide. To learn more about NetJets ownership, visit netjets.com or call a Private Aviation Concierge at 1-866-JET-0652.

NetJets is a Berkshire Hathaway company. Aircraft are managed and operated by NetJets Aviation, Inc. NetJets is a registered service mark. Š2018 NetJets IP, LLC. All rights reserved.


9

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

157 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PAR 4 YARDS 412 H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2017

4.095 10TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

1976-2017

4.108 11TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

ONE OF MUIRFIELD VILLAGE’S most challenging driving holes. Too far right from the tee and trees block the approach. Too far left and a steep, wooded hillside threatens even more serious trouble. The tilted green is spectacularly framed by a lake, a creek and a bold hillside and must often be approached from an angled lie, even off a good drive.

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5/1/18 10:03 AM


®

ENJOY YOUR DRIVE!


10

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

159 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PAR 4 YARDS 471 H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2017

4.203 5TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

1976-2017

4.157 5TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

COMPARATIVELY OPEN terrain and, along with the 15th hole, one of only two uphill drives at Muirfield Village. Sand guards both sides of the driving zone and a large, many-ďŹ ngered bunker fronting the green threatens the under-hit approach. A rugged hole demanding both power and precision, and one of the toughest par 4s on the second nine, especially when played into the wind.

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5/1/18 10:04 AM


Make the mark.

Discover the personal touch, the seamless service, and the expertise of our professionals. Be confident that your engagement will fully address your unique needs as a Plante Moran client. Robert Shenton

614-222-9064 Columbus office managing partner robert.shenton@plantemoran.com

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11

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

161 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PAR 5 YARDS 567 H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2017

4.808 15TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

1976-2017

4.899 15TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

RUNNING THE LENGTH of a lovely valley between high, wooded hills, this hole is the arena for a huge amphitheater capable of accommodating a great many spectators. The drive is enticingly downhill to a wide fairway, but a creek cuts diagonally across the fairway at about 320 yards from the tee, then hugs it on the right before swinging left again in front of the small, elevated green. An inviting hole to gamble on, but two perfect shots are necessary to get home.

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5/1/18 10:05 AM


JONES TOPSOIL_TEMPLATE_Layout 1 4/25/14 12:41 PM Page 1

ย‰ย”ย‡ย‡ยย‡ย”ยŽยƒย™ ย™ยย•วกย„ย”ย‹ย‰ยŠย–ย‡ย”ฦชย‘ย™ย‡ย”ย•วก ย‘ยย‡ย•ย‘ ย‘ย’ย•ย‘ย‹ ย‘ ยŽย„ย”ย‹ยย‰ย•ย‹ย–ยŠย‘ยย‡ย–ย‘ย›ย‘ย— อ•-อœ อ•-อœอ”อ”-    วค


12

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

163 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PAR 3 YARDS 184 H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2017

3.254 3RD

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

1976-2017

3.144 7TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

MUIRFIELD VILLAGE GOLF CLUB’S favorite hole among photographers features the course’s largest lake. The tee shot is played from a wooded hillside entirely across water to a two-tiered, kidney-shaped green cut into another hillside and set diagonally to the line of play. Bunkers flank the right front and rear left of the green. Miss it and the ball will generally find either sand or water.

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5/1/18 10:06 AM


13

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

165 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PAR 4 YARDS 455 H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2017

4.064 11TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

1976-2017

4.112 10TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

THE DRIVE IS DOWNHILL TO LEVEL GROUND, through a wooded chute to a narrow but normally fastrunning and gently curving fairway. Finding the right half of the fairway sets up the best angle into the long and narrow green, which runs away from the player. Bunkers stretching almost the full length of the green on either side demand a precise approach shot, generally with a mid- to long-iron.

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5/1/18 10:07 AM


The Ultimate Driving Machine®

ACCELERATE TO EXCELLENCE. BMW Financial Services proudly supports the Memorial Tournament presented by Nationwide.

At BMW Financial Services, we recognize that the best service comes from the best people. So here’s a big thank you to our retailers for your dedication and partnership. Warm congratulations and thanks to our Associates for making BMW Financial Services one of Central Ohio’s “Best Places to Work.”1 Together, we’re committed to providing our customers with services and products that go Beyond the Drive.™ Based on employee workplace surveys commissioned by Columbus Business First.

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14

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

167 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PAR 4 YARDS 363 H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2017

3.941 14TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

1976-2017

4.113 9TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

ANOTHER DOWNHILL TEE SHOT, once again into a wide, tree-lined valley. About 245 yards from the championship tee, a creek emerges from the left woods to border the fairway for some 40 yards before angling across it and then on down to flank the right side of the green. The green is long and narrow and heavily guarded left by several bunkers. A definite birdie opportunity, but only for the very accurate player. THE MEMORIAL

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167

5/1/18 10:08 AM


15

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

169 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PAR 5 YARDS 529 H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2017

4.664 17TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

1976-2017

4.685 18TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

AN INTRIGUING PAR 5 cut arrow-straight through the heart of a forest. The ideal drive is to the crest of the hill, from where the long hitter should be trying to get home in two. Thwarting him will be the steep slope fronting the green, a couple of deep bunkers and the small size of the target—not to mention the trees crowding in left and right. There will be many birdies here, but there also will be some disasters.

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5/1/18 10:09 AM


SHARE A

FOR THE BEST SUMMER YET ©2018 The Coca-Cola Company.


16

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

171 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PAR 3 YARDS 201 H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2017

3.367 1ST

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

1976-2017

3.155 6TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

REDESIGNED IN 2010 for the Presidents Cup 2013, Jack Nicklaus turned a fine par 3 into a more challenging and visually intimidating hole featuring a pond guarding the length of the green on the left. The putting surface is smaller than the original, and it has been turned horizontally to the teeing ground. A front hole location is very difficult sitting between the water and two bunkers.

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5/1/18 10:11 AM


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“Through my company, we have been in business with Southwest Greens designing custom putting greens for homes since 2004. Based on our success, I decided to take the natural grass out of my back yard and install Golden Bear Turf, not only for my putting green, but also for a general recreation area and an ornamental lawn area for me and my family to enjoy.” JACK NICKLAUS,18-time Major Championship Winner, world’s leading golf course designer

1-877-260-7888 • www.southwestgreens.com


17

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

173 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PAR 4 YARDS 478 H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2017

4.185 6TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

1976-2017

4.157 4TH

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

STRETCHING 478 YARDS, this strong hole offers a stiff test off the tee. Twenty yards separate two bunkers midway up the fairway, leaving a mid- or short-iron to the green. A lay-up off the tee leaves a mid-iron, or, depending on the wind, a long-iron approach to the green. The green itself is slightly elevated with bunkers along the right and back left. An approach to the left side of the green allows for an easier putt.

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5/1/18 10:12 AM


18

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

175 P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

PAR 4 YARDS 484 H O L E

S T A T I S T I C S

2017

4.279 2ND

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

1976-2017

4.240 1ST

AVERAGE SCORE DIFFICULTY

AN INVITING DOWNHILL DRIVE leads to an ample fairway, though bunkers threaten at the corner of the dogleg to the right. A long drive hit too far left can find the creek threading the tree line or can be blocked by a cluster of black walnut trees. The approach is uphill across a swale to a large two-tiered green bunkered at front left, front right, left and rear right. A spectacular finishing hole capable of accommodating more than 20,000 spectators.

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.

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JACK’S TOUR DEBUT

P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

IN THE BEGINNING SIXTY YEARS AGO THIS JULY, A BRIGHT-EYED, BLONDE-HAIRED COLLEGE FRESHMAN MADE HIS TOUR DEBUT AT FIRESTONE COUNTRY CLUB by David Shedloski

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N A HUMID and partly cloudy day in northeast Ohio, in a bluecollar industrial town known primarily as the manufacturing hub for automobile tires, one of the most significant tournaments in the development of America’s professional golf tour began. The date was July 3, 1958, and the tour—the entity that would become today’s PGA TOUR—was in Akron, Ohio, for the fifth edition of the Rubber City Open Invitational at Firestone Country Club. Among the professionals vying for the $22,000 purse were Sam Snead, Billy Casper, Julius Boros, Doug Ford and reigning U.S. Open champion Tommy Bolt. Also present was defending champion Arnold Palmer, golf ’s newest sensation after winning his first Masters title in April.

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level was relatively thin. Until, that is, he won the Trans-Mississippi Amateur. Nicklaus plowed through the field at Prairie Dunes Golf Club in Hutchison, Kan., and in the final he registered a 9 and 8 victory over Dick Norville of Oklahoma City by “smacking the ball 300 to 325 yards,” according to an Associated Press report. (As an aside, Nicklaus eliminated the Indiana State champion in the semifinals. Urbana, Ohio, native Pete Dye wasn’t then a renowned course architect, just a fine amateur golfer. But he was no match for his fellow Buckeye, trailing throughout and falling 3 and 2.) On July 1 the Akron Beacon Journal published a feature story on “Ohio’s hottest amateur,” who “can be expected to give the pros a run for the 1958 championship” at Firestone. “The blond crew-cut youth appears to be confident of his ability and a great golf future has been predicted for him,” the article read. Nicklaus’ teacher, Jack Grout of Scioto Country Club, was on record saying, “Wherever he plays— and that includes Akron—he’ll play well.” To pile on, Alex Redl, the Firestone head professional, chimed in. “I wouldn’t be surprised to see him give the pros a good tussle for the title.” Under the klieg lights of such enormous expectations, Nicklaus didn’t blink. He was paired in the first two rounds with Jerry Magee, a rookie from Canada, and Charlie Sifford, the four-time National Negro champion. Sifford, who had won the Long Beach Open in 1957, was not a member of the tour because the PGA retained its “Caucasian-only” membership rule until 1961, but he was a popular figure, and wire stories reported that he and Nicklaus drew one of the largest galleries when

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

And a highly touted, hugely talented Ohio State freshman made his tour debut. Jack Nicklaus already had played in two U.S. Open championships when he was one of several amateurs granted an exemption into the Rubber City Open Invitational. His second U.S. Open start was barely a month before appearing at Firestone, and as the youngest player in the field at sweltering and windswept Southern Hills Country Club in Tulsa, Okla., he had finished in a tie for 41st while Bolt emerged with a wire-to-wire victory. Then as now, the U.S. Open is conducted by the U.S. Golf Association and not under the tour’s purview. In 1958, the 40 events that comprised the tour, including the Akron stop, were managed by the PGA of America’s Tournament Players Division. (The PGA TOUR was not created until 1969 when it split from the PGA of America in a move spearheaded by Nicklaus and Palmer.) Nicklaus doesn’t recall the particulars of his invitation to Firestone, but he does remember his form at that time, which was exceptional. “I felt ready to compete in that environment,” he said. “I was starting to play some pretty good golf.” He had been playing good golf for quite some time, but what he meant was that his game was transitioning into a higher gear. Although he had won the National Jaycees Championship the previous year—at Ohio State’s Scarlet Course—his résumé on a national

Opposite: Jack posed for a photo during his debut at Firestone. Above: A newspaper clipping and the Rubber City Open Invitational Amateur Trophy Nicklaus was awarded for finishing as low amateur.

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his club four times during the second round of the Pepsi Open in they teed off with Magee for their opening round at 9:45 a.m. East Norwich, N.Y., and then picking up and storming off the course With five birdies and one bogey on the 6,635-yard layout, after nine holes when he four-putted from 2 feet. The outburst ocNicklaus opened with a 4-under 67. Only four of the 136 other curred just two weeks after capturing his first major at Southern players scored lower. Art Wall and Ed Griffiths, the reigning Ohio Hills and declaring himself a changed man. Winner of the inaugural Open champ, paced the field with 65s. Rubber City Open in 1954, Bolt was on his best behavior at FiresNicklaus recalls hitting it off with Sifford immediately, and so tone, having learned he was facing a suspension. did Jack’s father Charlie, who bought cigars for But he couldn’t help testing the mettle of his Sifford before the second round. They became young playing partner. lifelong friends, perhaps in part because what“I remember Tommy putting his arm ever stogies Charlie bought must have been around me walking down the first hole. ‘Don’t to Sifford’s liking. He fired a 64 to go with an you worry, Jackie boy, old Tommy will take care opening 70. Nicklaus, meanwhile, “the darling of you.’ He was giving me the business right off of the gallery,” according to wire service reports, the bat,” said Nicklaus, who populated the day’s cruised along in 66, and found himself in a fourfinal threesome with Bolt and Wall. “I missed six way tie for second place at 9-under 133, just a 3-foot putts on the front nine, little short things. stroke behind Wall. He got rid of me fast on that front nine. It’s part The runner-up to legendary Moe Norman of the education of a golfer.” in the 1956 Canadian Amateur before turning Nicklaus slid to a 76, while Bolt scraped it pro, Magee, who was 24 at the time, felt like a around in 71 and Wall had a 68. third wheel in the group despite a pair of solid The education continued on the drive back 70s. But he told reporters he didn’t mind beto Columbus, only this time it was Jack’s pretty cause, “Jack and Charlie were hot.” Those two Nicklaus was paired in the third girlfriend Barbara Jean Bash who was learning rounds still are seared in Magee’s memory. The round with Tommy Bolt, who was a few things. As Jack was bemoaning a poor apowner of Coral Creek Golf Course in Fisherville, the reigning U.S. Open champion. proach shot on the 13th hole, Barbara’s head was Ontario, Magee’s impression of Nicklaus was swimming. She still was learning the game. “I’m one of genuine awe. thinking, ‘The 13th hole? I don’t remember the 13th hole.’ ” Barbara “Even then Jack could hit shots that no one else could hit,” recalled, laughing at that memory. “How am I supposed to rememMagee said by phone recently. “Boy, could he play. His shots with a ber what kind of shot he hit? This is never going to work.’ ” 2-iron were 20 feet higher, at least, than anyone I saw playing. No Obviously, she figured it out. And they figured it out. Jack and one could hit shots like that consistently with the long irons. For Barbara will be married 58 years on July 23rd of this year. someone who could play a little, that kind of mark of excellence stood out immediately to me. “But the quality of his shots wasn’t the only thing I noticed,” added Magee, 85, who played the tour until 1968. “I liked his demeanor. He operated with a high degree of intent and concentration. He was just a kid, but the way he approached each golf shot, you could see that he was different, even from most of the other pros.” While it was clear that Nicklaus knew how to play the game, he still had much to learn about tour competition. The fiery Bolt, who earned two nicknames—“Thunder” and “Terrible Tommy”—because of his tempestuousness, was about to introduce the Ohio kid to a thing called gamesmanship. Prior to arriving in Akron, the former Army sergeant from Oklahoma had been levied a $500 fine after throwing Jack and Barbara Bash met during their freshman year at The Ohio State University.

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LEFT: JACK NICKLAUS MUSEUM ARCHIVE; ABOVE: HISTORIC GOLF PHOTOS

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P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

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Above: Jack Nicklaus (back row, second from left) poses with the rest of the 1959 U.S. Walker Cup team that competed at Muirfield, in Scotland. Right: The Golden Bear, with Barbara and sons Steve and Jack II, after his fourth PGA Championship victory in 1975 at Firestone Country Club’s South Course.

For the final round, Nicklaus drew a pairing that included amiable Julius Boros, the 1952 U.S. Open winner. Like Snead, Boros possessed a swing tempo that his peers envied. Nicklaus had played an exhibition with Snead before the third round of the Ohio Open in 1956, and Nicklaus was able to simulate Snead’s tempo and blazed to a 64 at Marietta Country Club on the way to a stunning victory in a field mostly comprised of professionals. By the end of the final round at Firestone, he was imitating Boros “for a month,” he said. It sure didn’t hurt him as he carded 33-35 for a 68 that left him at 7-under 277 and tied for 15th place, eight behind Wall, who topped Athens, Ohio, native Dow Finsterwald in a playoff. Bolt finished at 274, Sifford 275, and with three straight 68s Palmer rallied for 276 to tie for 12th. Nicklaus beat the next nearest amateur finisher by 13 strokes. The result was a harbinger, not only of what Nicklaus would accomplish in his career, but also of his prospects at Firestone

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over the coming years. Among his six wins on the South Course was the 1975 PGA Championship, which he secured while driving back and forth daily from Columbus, just as he did in 1958. The commute was necessary in 1975 because Nicklaus was in the midst

LEFT: JACK NICKLAUS MUSEUM ARCHIVE; ABOVE: USGA

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of final preparations for the Columbus Pro-Am at Muirfield Vilabroad, in Scotland, at a course called Muirfield. And it yielded his lage Golf Club on the Monday following that PGA. The Columbus first invitation to the Masters. Pro-Am served as a preview for the inaugural Memorial Tournament Before those events occured, however, there was another semin 1976. Nicklaus also won the World Series inal moment. Two months after departing of Golf on Firestone’s North Course in 1976, Firestone, Nicklaus was invited to play in an COUPLED WITH HIS when it was an official PGA TOUR event. exhibition at Athens (Ohio) Country Club PLAY IN THE “This has been a pretty special place honoring Finsterwald, who had won that for me,” the Golden Bear said in 2013 after year’s PGA Championship. In addition to U.S. OPEN AND HIS receiving the Ambassador of Golf Award Nicklaus and former OSU standout HowTRANS-MISS TITLE ... that year from Northern Ohio Golf Chariard Saunders, Finsterwald asked his best ties at Firestone CC during the World Golf friend on tour to attend. That was Arnold NICKLAUS’ SUPERB Championships-Bridgstone Invitational — Palmer, who was on his way to his first EFFORT AT FIRESTONE 23 years after Barbara was similarly recogmoney title with earnings of $42,607.50. nized. “I have so many great memories of More than 10,000 fans were on hand, and OPENED A DOOR Firestone and all the years I played here. they witnessed quite an afternoon. It startINTEGRAL TO THE I loved coming up here. I loved playing ed with Nicklaus reaching the first green the golf course. It suited my eye. It suited with a poke of more than 330 yards to win ADVANCEMENT OF my game. I always said, ‘I don’t care what’s the long drive contest that ignited a 4-unHIS CAREER… going on. I’m going to get to Firestone, and der 68. It ended with Palmer torching the I’ll be able to play well there.’ ” course record with a 62, thanks to eight Nicklaus later would enjoy other ties to birdies and an eagle. the facility. Following his win in the inauThe Nicklaus-Palmer Era was dawning. gural World Series of Golf in 1962, the Golden Bear befriended a And the tour, as golf fans already had glimpsed in Akron, was about Firestone employee named Scotty Brubaker, and together they colto undergo seismic changes. laborated on creating a golf ball that was sold in Firestone stores. “It was one of the largest-selling golf balls, the Jack Nicklaus Ball, and I Author of five golf books, including a history of Scioto Country Club, played with it for years and years and years,” Nicklaus said. “It was David Shedloski is editorial director of The Memorial. an inexpensive ball, but it was a great experience having the association with Firestone.” And in 1985, Nicklaus’ design company oversaw a renovation of the South Course, which hadn’t been touched since Robert Trent Jones transformed it into the famed “Monster” in preparation for the 1960 PGA Championship. Coupled with his play in the U.S. Open and his Trans-Miss title, along with, perhaps, his upset victory in the 1956 Ohio Open, Nicklaus’ superb effort at Firestone opened a door integral to the advancement of his career—selection by the USGA to the 1959 Walker Cup team. As Nicklaus wrote in his autobiography, My Story, he didn’t think he’d done enough to earn a spot, admitting, “those seemed like pretty slim credentials for a place on a national team.” His inclusion afforded him his initial exposure to golf

Dow Finsterwald Day in 1958 at Athens Country Club featured (from left): Howard Saunders, former two-time Big Ten champion, Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer and Finsterwald, who had recently won the PGA Championship.

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ABOVE: FINSTERWALD FAMILY ARCHIVE

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In 2017, at the ripe old age of 24, Justin Thomas won his first major— the PGA Championship— in only his second year on the PGA TOUR.

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ESSAY

WITH NO SINGLE PLAYER DOMINATING IN THE MAJORS AFTER THE REIGN OF TIGER WOODS, AN ERA OF YOUTHFUL PARITY IS TAKING HOLD

GETTY IMAGES/ ROSS KINNAIRD

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EAR THE END of a sticky, sweaty August afternoon at the Quail Hollow Club in Charlotte, N.C., 24-year-old Justin Thomas stood on the 18th green admiring the silver Wanamaker Trophy that came with winning the 2017 PGA Championship. The trophy presentation went on for a while as tournament officials were recognized, thanks were made to various groups and television beamed a short interview with the new champion

around the world. Standing in a crowd on the edge of the green were Jordan Spieth and Rickie Fowler with their respective girlfriends. Their PGA Championship had ended earlier, giving them time to shower, change into jeans and t-shirts and grab a beverage to

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by Ron Green, Jr.

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Friends on and off the golf course (from left) Justin Thomas, Rickie Fowler and Jordan Spieth even vacation together.

sip while watching their friend absorb the first few blissful minutes of having won a major championship. They have been there for one another and with one another before, whether at trophy presentations or on boys trips to the Bahamas. It was never this way with Jack and Arnie or Tiger and Phil, not in their primes anyway, but this is a new day, a new time and a new generation. Weeks later, when a hurricane threatened South Florida, Thomas would store the Wanamaker Trophy in a safe at Fowler’s house in the neighborhood they both share. That Sunday afternoon in Charlotte, Spieth and Fowler stood in a crowd watching Thomas pose for photographs and say his thank-yous, the way he has waited for them. Talking to reporters while they waited, both Spieth and Fowler expressed their happiness for Thomas, whose 2017 season vaulted him into a new orbit within the game. As the short interview ended, Fowler started toward Thomas but turned back to reporters. “My time is coming,” Fowler said, referencing his as yet unrequited pursuit

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IN A GAME THAT HAS BEEN DEFINED BY DIFFERENT GENERATIONS OF EXCEPTIONAL PLAYERS, IT LOOKS AND FEELS AS IF GOLF IS IN THE BLOSSOMING OF ANOTHER ERA…

of a major championship victory. He was smiling as he said it. In a game that has been defined by different generations of exceptional players, it looks and feels as if golf is in the blossoming of another era, a post-Tiger Woods time frame that is still unfolding. It is dramatically different from what came before, a decade or so when Woods unleashed his scorched-earth fury on anyone who dared

challenge him. It was different with Tiger, who singularly defined his generation, rearranging the expectations of everyone else by the might of his accomplishments. Woods was good enough and dominant enough that Phil Mickelson, with five major championships and more than 40 PGA TOUR victories, was never the best player of his time. In recent years, as Spieth, Fowler and Thomas have asserted themselves alongside their slightly older contemporaries Rory McIlroy, Dustin Johnson, Jason Day and Justin Rose, the breadth of brilliance has expanded. A convincing argument can also be made that the depth of quality is at an all-time high, though advancements in equipment and fitness have fundamentally changed the game and how it is played. Today’s players may lack the shot-making skills of Lee Trevino or Nick Faldo, but they have been raised on a game that emphasizes power and putting while minimizing the artistry of their predecessors. Brooks Koepka is a perfect example of the modern

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A NEW AGE OF GOLF

HISTORY OF THE OFFICIAL WORLD GOLF RANKING NUMBER ONE POSITION (AS OF APRIL 29, 2018 — BRACKETED FIGURE = NUMBER OF TIMES AT WORLD NO. 1)

Jim Furyk, left, and Tiger Woods at the 2006 Ryder Cup in Ireland, are part of the old guard.

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player, capable of overpowering a 7,800yard U.S. Open course while still having the ability to convert the opportunities his muscle provides him. That is not a criticism of Koepka but a recognition of the game’s continuing evolution. It is still too soon, the faces and résumés too fresh, to know how the players of this generation will fit into the game’s timeline. It could be like the extended period that spanned the late 1970s and into the mid1980s when the game lacked a dominant force. Hale Irwin, Larry Nelson and Curtis Strange collected multiple major championships, but theirs sometimes felt like a collective exceptionalism. Their time isn’t compared to the Nelson-Hogan-Snead era or the changing challenges that faced Jack Nicklaus, from taking down Palmer to fighting off Trevino, Watson and Player. Perhaps that is because Americans never fully appreciated the genius and magnetism of Seve Ballesteros. He was transcendent, and his legacy was fully defined by a generation of European players—Bernhard Langer, José María Olazábal, Sandy Lyle, Ian Woosnam and others—who were inspired by him. Woods inspired the current generation, several of whom had not started grade school when he won the 1997 Masters. They know him from Sunday afternoons in front of the television, YouTube highlights or,

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PLAYER

FROM/TO

68 67 66 65 64 63 62 61 60 59 58 57 56 55 54 53 52 51 50 49 48 47 46 45 44 43 42 41 40 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15

Dustin Johnson Jason Day (3) Jordan Spieth (4) Jason Day (2) Jordan Spieth (3) Jason Day Rory McIlroy (7) Jordan Spieth (2) Rory McIlroy (6) Jordan Spieth Rory McIlroy (5) Adam Scott Tiger Woods (11) Rory McIlroy (4) Luke Donald (4) Rory McIlroy (3) Luke Donald (3) Rory McIlroy (2) Luke Donald (2) Rory McIlroy (1) Luke Donald (1) Lee Westwood (2) Martin Kaymer Lee Westwood (1) Tiger Woods (10) Vijay Singh (3) Tiger Woods (9) Vijay Singh(2) Tiger Woods (8) Vijay Singh (1) Tiger Woods (7) Davids Duval (2) Tiger Woods (6) David Duval (1) Tiger Woods (5) Ernie Els (3) Tiger Woods (4) Ernie Els (2) Tiger Woods (3) Greg Norman (11) Tiger Woods (2) Greg Norman (10) Ernie Els (1) Tiger Woods (1) Greg Norman (9) Tom Lehman Greg Norman (8) Nick Price Greg Norman (7) Nick Faldo (4) Fred Couples (2) Nick Faldo (3) Fred Couples (1) Ian Woosnam

14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Nick Faldo (2) Greg Norman (6) Nick Faldo (1) Greg Norman (5) Seve Ballesteros (5) Greg Norman (4) Seve Ballesteros (4) Greg Norman (3) Seve Ballesteros (3) Greg Norman (2) Seve Ballesteros (2) Greg Norman (1) Seve Ballesteros (1) Bernhard Langer

Feb. 20, 2017 - March 27, 2016 - Feb. 19, 2017 Nov. 8, 2015 - March 26, 2016 Oct. 18, 2015 - Nov. 7, 2015 Sept. 27, 2015 - Oct. 17, 2015 Sept. 20, 2015 - Sept. 26, 2015 Sept. 13, 2015 - Sept. 19, 2015 Sept. 7, 2015 - Sept. 12, 2015 Aug. 30, 2015 - Sept. 6, 2015 Aug. 16, 2015 - Aug. 29, 2015 Aug. 3, 2014 - Aug. 15, 2015 May 18, 2013 - Aug. 2, 2014 March 25, 2013 - May 17, 2014 Aug. 12, 2012 - March 24, 2013 May 27, 2012 - Aug. 11, 2012 May 6, 2012 - May 26, 2012 April 29, 2012 - May 5, 2012 April 15, 2012 - April 28, 2012 March 18, 2012 - April 14, 2012 March 4, 2012 - March 17, 2012 May 29, 2011 - March 3, 2012 April 24, 2011 - May 28, 2011 Feb. 27, 2011 - April 23, 2011 Oct. 31, 2010 - Feb. 26, 2011 June 12, 2005 - Oct. 30, 2010 May 22, 2005 - June 11, 2005 April 10, 2005 - May 21, 2005 March 20, 2005 - April 9, 2005 March 6, 2005 - March 19, 2005 Sept. 5, 200 - March 5, 2005 Aug. 15, 1999 - Sept. 4, 2004 Aug. 7, 1999 - Aug. 14, 1999 July 4, 1999 - Aug. 6, 1999 March 28, 1999 - July 3, 1999 June 14, 1998 - March 27, 1999 May 17, 1998 - June 13, 1998 May 10, 1998 - May 16, 1998 April 12, 1998 - May 9, 1998 Jan. 11, 1998 - April 11, 1998 Sept. 7, 1997 - Jan. 10, 1998 July 6, 1997 Sept. 6, 1997 June 29, 1997 - July 5, 1997 June 22, 1997 - June 28, 1997 June 15, 1997 - June 21, 1997 April 27, 1997 - June 14, 1997 April 20, 1997 - April 26, 1997 June 18, 1995 - April 19, 1997 Aug. 14, 1994 - June 17, 1995 Feb. 6, 1994 - Aug. 13, 1994 July 19, 1992 - Feb. 5, 1994 April 5, 1992 - July 18, 1992 March 29, 1992 - April 4, 1992 March 22, 1992 - March 28, 1992 April 7, 1991 - March 21, 1992 Feb. 3, 1991 - April 6, 1991 Oct. 14, 1990 - Feb. 2, 1991 Sept. 2, 1990 - Oct. 13, 1990 Aug. 20, 1989 - Sept. 1, 1990 April 2, 1989 - Aug. 19, 1989 March 26, 1989 - April 1, 1989 Nov. 13, 1988 - March 25, 1989 Nov. 6, 1988 - Nov. 12, 1987 Oct. 30, 1988 - Nov. 5, 1987 Nov. 29, 1987 - Oct. 29, 1987 Nov. 22, 1987 - Nov. 28, 1986 Sept. 14, 1986 - Nov. 21, 1986 April 27, 1986 - Sept. 13, 1986 April 6, 1986 - April 26, 1986

NO. OF WEEKS

63 47 20 3 3 1 1 1 1 2 54 11 60 32 11 3 1 2 4 2 40 5 8 17 281 3 6 3 2 26 264 1 5 14 41 4 1 4 13 18 9 1 1 1 7 1 96 44 27 81 15 1 1 50 9 6 7 54 20 1 19 1 1 49 1 61 20 3

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more recently, their interactions with him as an assistant captain on Ryder Cup and Presidents Cup teams. Hand them a list of Woods’ career achievements and their jaws gradually drop. Through any prism, it is almost overwhelming. Woods’ success was such that it muted the achievements and broke the spirit of others. For all that Ernie Els and Davis Love III have accomplished, there is the inevitable question of what might they have done had Woods not come along. The case can be made that this is the generation Woods spawned. Consider this: The 2006 U.S. Ryder Cup team had no player in his 20s. Woods was the only 20-something on the 2004 Ryder Cup and 2005 Presidents Cup teams. A decade later, there were six 20-somethings on the 2017 U.S. Presidents Cup team. In 2017, the season’s last two major championships were won by 24-year olds— Thomas and Spieth. Players younger than 25 won 18 times on the PGA TOUR in 2017, easily the most ever by the youngest group of players. Expand the group to all TOUR players younger than 30, and they accounted for 58 percent of the victories (28) on the 2016-17 TOUR season. When Thomas won five PGA TOUR events in the 2016-17 season, he joined Spieth, Day and Vijay Singh as the only players not named Tiger Woods to win five times in a season since Nick Price did it in 1994. Woods, it should be noted, has done it 10 times. “I doubt you’ll see a dominance like [Woods] maybe ever again in the game. I just think guys are learning, guys are getting stronger. Athletes are going to golf,” Spieth said. “Guys are winning younger, playing more fearless, even in major championships, and I just think that it’s so difficult now. I think it was probably equally as difficult then, I can’t speak to it, but I wouldn’t get your hopes up for a domination like that whatsoever. I think it’s going to be a very exciting time going forward of guys

Rickie Fowler had changed from his golf attire to a t-shirt and shorts to sit inside the ropes and cheer along his friend and PGA winner Justin Thomas.

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“I THINK IT’S GOING TO BE A VERY EXCITING TIME GOING FORWARD OF GUYS THAT ARE GOING TO BE PLAYING AND BATTLING AGAINST EACH OTHER.” — JORDAN SPIETH

that are going to be playing and battling against each other. You’ll see a group of 10 to 12 guys over the next 15, 20 years that are going to have a lot of different competitions that come down the stretch. And it’s different than one person being the guy to beat.” That is because Woods was that much better than everyone else. The understandable celebration of Thomas’ five-victory

season brought back into focus the measure of Woods’ dominance. Woods was voted the Jack Nicklaus Award as PGA TOUR Player of the Year in 2013 when he won five times—and it was considered a good but not great season for him. Measuring today’s generation against Woods and other generations is difficult because it may still be a cresting wave. It’s easy now to look at Woods run at No. 1 in the world—a total of 683 weeks (that’s 13.1 years)—and feel as though the recent spate of changes at the top of the world rankings diminishes the achievement. It does not. Only 20 players have achieved the No.1 ranking and whether a player is there for one week (Tom Lehman) or 95 weeks (McIlroy), it’s a career-defining achievement. Since Woods surrendered the No. 1 spot in August 2013, there have been 12 changes atop the world rankings. From 1999 through late 2010, the top spot changed hands six times. Whether it’s Thomas

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or Jon Rahm or McIlroy trying to regain his former perch, expect continued turnover at the top of the world rankings, reinforcing the notion that the current generation is blessed with abundant young talent. “It wasn’t long ago—only 10 years ago or so—everybody was writing, ‘Where are all the 20-year-olds?’ Nobody in their 20s was winning tournaments. Now it’s nothing but kids. “It’s so cyclical,” Curtis Strange, a former No. 1 himself, said. “A superstar doesn’t fall out of trees every other day. … We’re so quick to judge. As somebody who was at it for 25 or 30 years, you have to give these kids time and let them see what their careers produce. Yeah, they all have talent, but how good will they be? We need to give them another 10 or 15 years.” Major championship victories have, for good reason, come to define the careers of the best players. Nicklaus won 18 professional major championships. Woods has won 14. They are the sun and the moon in the game’s universe and everyone else is, at best, a distant star. When they were winning majors, Nicklaus and Woods were so efficient and so consistent that they effectively eliminated the opportunity for others to build their major championship trophy collections. When Nicklaus and Woods were ascending or descending, it felt as if there were more majors to go around. A total of 28 players won majors from 1990 through 1999, and Woods had only two of them. Faldo won four majors in the ’90s and he is considered an all-time great. Rory McIlroy has already won four majors since 2010 with eight more to go in this decade. Spieth has three majors, as many as Price won in the ’90s and Mickelson and Padraig Harrington won in the 2000s. It’s fair to assume that Johnson, Day, Thomas and Koepka are likely to win more majors. How many more is the question. Generations are defined by their best players. In the case of this generation, that means McIlroy and Spieth, with various others chasing them. For all those two have done, there is the equally tantalizing

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“THEY’VE ALL KIND OF BROKEN THROUGH TO THE MAJOR WINNING CIRCLE… I TRULY BELIEVE A BUNCH OF THEM ARE GOING TO WIN SIX, SEVEN, EIGHT MAJORS.” — ERNIE ELS

prospect of what they might still do. McIlroy won’t turn 30 until May 2019, and Spieth won’t be legally old enough to return a car (age 25) until later this summer. Ben Hogan was 34 years old when he won his first major. Mickelson was also 33 years old when he finally broke through and won the 2004 Masters. In this age of instant everything, the measure of a golf career—particularly the collective measure of a generation—cannot be hurried. Fowler may have come into 2018 without a major championship victory, but that doesn’t mean five years from now he won’t have as many or more than Spieth. Maybe it’s Thomas who goes on a tear in the majors or maybe Johnson picks up two or three more. Then again, 18 players have won their one and only major championship since 2010 suggesting a parity that is difficult to escape.

“It’s going to be interesting now. They’ve all kind of broken through to the major winning circle except for Rickie. We’re going to have to see now how they move forward. I truly believe a bunch of them are going to win, six, seven, eight majors. It’s who’s going to take it further,” Ernie Els said. That is the intriguing piece of this unfinished puzzle. Where does it go from here and who leads the way? Time will provide the perspective, but it will be the players who determine where this generation fits compared to previous generations. Spieth and McIlroy have different strengths, but both play with an ageless brilliance that has allowed them to achieve what they have. For a time, McIlroy seemed destined to be the face of this generation. More recently, Spieth has become that player. Maybe Thomas, the classic modern power player, puts his own time stamp on this group of players. Maybe it’s Rahm or maybe this generation, with its social media presence and its sense of camaraderie, becomes golf ’s version of an all-star ensemble cast in a movie with meaty, memorable parts for everyone. It will take time to properly judge the impact of today’s generation of players, but, as Fowler alluded to at Quail Hollow last summer, the time has come for them to make their case. Ron Green, Jr. is a senior writer at Global Golf Post and has been writing about golf for more than 30 years.

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THE GAME OF GOLF SERVES AS A CATALYST TO STIR SOME GREAT MEMORIES AMONG A PAIR OF STRANGERS by Dan O’Neill Illustrations by Michael Witte HELPS BREACH AN IMPENETRABLE WALL

S HE PULLED into the all-too-familiar parking space, Ben wrestled with the thoughts lingering in the back of his mind, pushing their way forward. With each passing day, each weekly visit, they gained traction, uninvited but unavoidable. It was another Wednesday and the clouds gathered. It had been more than a year since they last dissipated, since the last connection, and he couldn’t help but wonder if they might never dissipate again. It had been over a year of Wednesday visits to the Sunrise Senior Caregiving Center. Ben would enter the yellow brick building, as drab on the outside as it was on the inside. He would proceed to the room, introduce himself all over again and spend the next several hours searching. The silver-haired man, now in his mid-70s, would listen unaffected, his mind somewhere else, somewhere distant, out of reach. Ben would talk about the kids, mention relatives and current events. He would flip through a scrapbook, read from a favorite author, describe his day at work … but the needle never moved. The despairing expression never changed. So they would turn on the television, “The Price Is Right” or “Dr. Phil,” and sit there, mostly in silence. Time would pass, maddeningly slow and painfully uninterrupted. And the thoughts in Ben’s head would press ever forward. He had moved back home, leaving a career-elevating position at the prestigious club in New Jersey to take the opening at the golf club down the road, largely because of its close proximity. He cleared his Wednesday calendar so he could continue to visit, continue to try. He had accepted disappointment, over and over again. But now, as he pulled into the parking space on yet another Wednesday, as those disparaging thoughts advanced, he struggled to push back. Maybe it was time he accepted reality … maybe it was hopeless.

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“Or maybe,” he considered, clutching on to one last thread of optimism, “Just maybe …” As he walked through the row of glass doors to the front desk, Dr. Moss was waiting, a firm right hand extended. “Good afternoon, Mr. Caldwell,” said the erudite physician, a clipboard in his left hand, pressed to the chest pocket of his white lab coat. “I thought I might meet you here just to go over some things. As you know, regulations don’t normally allow for patients to leave the facility grounds.”
 Ben embraced the hand with his own as he acknowledged the managing director’s concerns. “Yes, yes, I understand,” said Ben, the appropriate tone of compliance in his voice. “I appreciate your reservations, doctor. The club is just down the road and, I assure you, I’ll take full responsibility. Should anything

THE SILVER-HAIRED MAN SAT ALONE IN THE GREEN UPHOLSTERED CHAIR, PEERING OUT THE WINDOW, SUNLIGHT POURING IN THROUGH THE SPOTTED WINDOW PANE.

go wrong, I will call you immediately and have him back in no time.” Dr. Moss lowered the clipboard to a less formal height and peered over his reading glasses. “We don’t know for certain how he’ll react, Ben,” he advised. “I caution you not to get your expectations up. He’ll be out of his

element. It’ll be disorienting and confusing. He could become fearful, even hysterical.” Ben nodded again. “I know, I know,” he said. “Trust me, I won’t do anything to upset him. But I have to try, doctor. I have to try.” “Still,” Dr. Moss concluded, resuming a more authoritative stance, “I’m sending an attendant with you,” motioning to the staff member standing nearby. “He’ll know how to respond.” With that, Ben and the attendant proceeded around the corner and down a long corridor to the room. They paused a moment to knock, then entered. The silver-haired man sat alone in the green upholstered chair, peering out the window, sunlight pouring in through the spotted window pane. Ben introduced himself once again. “How are you today, sir?” he asked, not

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expecting a reply. “I thought maybe we could do something different this morning. It’s so beautiful out there. Maybe you’d like to go for a ride?” The man looked up at Ben briefly before returning his gaze to the window. There was no objection to the proposal, nor was there an endorsement. There was no tell to decipher, no change in his demeanor, no predisposition revealed in the sullen eyes. The silver-haired man was focused on a more pressing matter, one that never seemed fully resolved. “We’ll be back in time to water the plants won’t we?” he said, speaking to Ben as he would any other member of the facility’s staff. “That plant needs watering. It hasn’t been watered for days.” In fact, the spider plant on the nightstand had been watered the day before, as it had the day before that and the day before that. But when he wasn’t asking to go

THE MAN LOOKED UP AT BEN BRIEFLY BEFORE RETURNING HIS GAZE TO THE WINDOW. THERE WAS NO OBJECTION TO THE PROPOSAL, NOR WAS THERE AN ENDORSEMENT. THERE WAS NO TELL TO DECIPHER, NO CHANGE IN HIS DEAMEANOR…

home, asking about lunch, the silver-haired man was preoccupied with the plant. He obsessed over its upkeep, repeatedly suggesting it lacked attention. In truth, it was being suffocated with attention. “You have to water those regularly, you know,” he added, waving an admonishing finger.

“Of course,” Ben nodded, helping the man to his feet and leading him toward the door. “We won’t be gone long. We’ll be back in plenty of time to water the plants.” With the attendant climbing in back, Ben helped the silver-haired man into the passenger seat of the car. As they backed out of the space, a look of uncertainty became more evident on the man’s face. “Where are we going?” he asked. “I don’t know if we should be leaving …” “It’s all right,” the staff attendant in back reassured the man, leaning forward to put a hand on his shoulder. “Don’t worry, sir,” Ben added, helping with the seat belt. “Everything is fine. We’re not going far.” They made a right out of the parking lot and headed down the two-lane road. Along the ride, the silver-haired man was uneasy, erect in his seat, squeezing the armrest. His eyes surveyed the passing terrain

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“…A VERY WISE MAN of white picket fences and red-brick homes, searching for something familiar, something comforting, something safe. A mile-and-a-half passed quickly before Ben turned left into the stately entrance of Cross Creek Golf Club. He cruised past the decorative gates and up the long asphalt drive, which were outlined in blossoming white dogwoods, and pulled into the parking space marked, “Reserved Parking for Head Professional.” As the attendant helped the silver-haired man out of the car, Ben went around back and popped the trunk. He reached in to grab the faded canvas bag with brown-leather trimming, a golf bag that had seen better days but—Ben reflected—never one more important. Slinging the clubs on his shoulder, Ben clutched the silver-haired man by the arm and slowly led the way through the oversized front doors of the English Tudor clubhouse. “Good morning, gentlemen. Beautiful day isn’t it?” said a well-dressed man, adjusting his tie and stepping from a desk in the foyer. “Allow me,” he added, opening the doors to the great living room. “Oh, and

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I KNOW ONCE TOLD ME IF YOU HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO MAKE SOMEONE HAPPY TODAY, DO IT. THE WORLD NEEDS MORE HAPPINESS.”

I wanted to thank you again for the help yesterday, Ben. I couldn’t have gotten those tables moved without you.” “No need for thanks, Edward,” Ben said, then added with a wink, “good for the back, helps build the golf muscles you know.” The three men passed a well-appointed sitting area, where an elegant oak mantel hung atop a rustic stone hearth. Sitting on the camelback sofa, a middle-aged woman looked up from her magazine and called out: “Can’t wait for our session tomorrow, Ben. I’ve been using that grip change, and I have to say, I’m hitting the ball with much more consistency. You’re a genius!” Ben was quick with a self-effacing

response. “Don’t be silly,” he said. “That’s all you, Mrs. Hansen. You obviously have been practicing; you deserve all the credit. By the way, I really enjoyed working with your son the other day. You should be proud. He’s quite a young man.” Joan Hansen beamed as she turned back to her magazine, savoring the thoughtful comment about her oldest boy. As they walked on, the silver-haired man looked at Ben curiously and broke his impassive silence. “My, you certainly seem to have a way with people.” “Well, a very wise man I know once told me,” Ben explained, “If you have the opportunity to make someone happy today, do it. The world needs more happiness.” Across the expansive flagstone patio, they walked, surrounded by green lawns, sculptured landscaping and the captivating quilt of the golf course beyond. Off to one side, the practice range cut a wide swath across the sprawling landscape, each of its stations marked with a pyramid of white golf balls and a bag stand. At the far end, a solitary figure hit balls to the distant flags. After each swing, the man stopped to check his posture, the position of his hands, and the draw of his cigar.

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Ben led the party to the adjacent putting green, helping the silver-haired man to a seat on the wooden bench and setting the golf bag down alongside him. “Do you play golf?” he asked, reaching into the satchel to fetch the Titleist Bulls Eye putter, which showed its age with a rich, dark patina. “Would you like to try putting a few?” The silver-haired man squirmed in his seat, abruptly out of sorts and contrary to the idea. He looked up at Ben, protest evident in his eyes. “No, I ... I don’t ... my balance isn’t very good,” he pleaded. “ I really ... I ... think we should be heading back now. … My plants need watering.” “It’s all right,” Ben said, helping the reluctant man to his feet and coaxing him onto the putting surface. He handed over the putter, put his hands on the skittish man’s hips and dropped three balls at his feet. “Just give it a try. I won’t let you fall.”

WITHOUT HESITATING, HE PULLED ANOTHER BALL INTO HIS STANCE, LOOKED UP BRIEFLY TO STUDY THE PATH, AND WITH UNFALTERING TEMPO, ROLLED ANOTHER JUST TO THE OPPOSITE EDGE.

Feeling the putter in his hands, the silver-haired man’s disposition shifted. He adjusted his hold, allowing the grip of the club to rest in the lifelines of his palms, overlapping the index finger of his left hand over the little finger of his right. He bent at the waist, raised his eyes to the white pin 20 feet away and stroked the putt. The ball rolled to the right edge of the hole, just short.

Without hesitating, he pulled another ball into his stance, looked up briefly to study the path, and with unfaltering tempo, rolled another just to the opposite edge. Ben let go of the man’s hips. He didn’t need the anchor, and he didn’t even notice. “You know, the moment you try to make a putt, you’ll miss it every time,” the silver-haired man said, without breaking concentration over his next attempt. And with that, he stroked another putt, pouring the third ball to the front of the cup and watching it drop in. As it did, the attendant sitting quietly nearby jumped to his feet, disbelieving what his eyes had just observed. “Yes, it’s just like Jack Nicklaus used to say,” the silver-haired man continued, now uninhibited as he strolled across the green to retrieve the balls. “It’s about confidence, feel and square contact.” Ben fought to contain his composure.

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He had to be careful to temper his emotions, not overreact, not overwhelm the silver-haired man. To do so might send him in a different direction, cause him to recoil, push him farther away. But there was no denying the transition he had witnessed, the years that just vanished right before his eyes. “Here young man, why don’t you try a few,” the silver-haired man said, offering up the putter. Now it was Ben who looked apprehensive, unable to concentrate. He took the club, steadied himself and rolled a few putts. The stroke was purposeful, uncomplicated, almost identical. “Say, you do that very well; very well indeed,” the man said. “Yes, well, I had a very good teacher,” Ben replied, looking at the man, studying his response more intently. “We spent a lot of time together on the practice greens, and he always made it fun. I owe an awful lot to him.”

Ben then decided to push the envelope, just a bit. He asked the silver-haired man if he would like to move over to the range, take a few full swings. “Well, I guess we should give it a try, right?” the silver-haired man. “I’m feeling pretty limber today.” Ben grabbed the bag and they walked across the manicured lawn to the range. Setting the clubs down, Ben pulled out the old MacGregor 7-iron, plucked a few balls off the pyramid and demonstrated. Each swing was effortless. Each ball skyrocketed off the tarnished club-face, arched toward the distant flag and landed softly nearby. “That’s a lovely swing, young man,” said the silver-haired man, ever more comfortable in his surroundings. “Looks like you’ve done this before.” “That’s very kind, sir, thank you,” Ben answered. “This man I was telling you about, he always used to say, ‘The only time you use force with a golf club is when you’re

putting it back in the bag,’ ” The silver-haired man smiled with approval. At the same time, Ben pulled a few more balls off the pile and offered up the club. “Would you like to try a few?” At this point, the silver-haired man was only too happy to try. He positioned a ball at his feet and, with a similarly fluid swing, sent it soaring skyward, pausing to watch as it gracefully parachuted to the target. With a look of delight, he cuddled several more balls and launched several more shots, each with the same natural motion. And as he did, the attendant huddled with Ben. Their excitement was palpable but mitigated by prudence. “This is remarkable,” the attendant said. “I’ve never seen him this alert and this active. But we shouldn’t overdo it; we should think about going back now.” Ben didn’t argue, but made one more request: “Please, just a little while longer.

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We’ll just stop in the grill for a refreshment. Then we can go.” With that, the three men left the range and returned to the clubhouse, making their way through the patio doors, through the living room and into the grill on the opposite side of the foyer. With a hand on the silver-haired man’s shoulder, Ben led the party to a particular table in the back corner of the room, where several framed pictures and golf memorabilia adorned the walls. No sooner had they sat than a waiter appeared. Ben greeted him warmly. “Hello Jeffrey, good to see you. I think we’ll just have something to drink, if you don’t mind. Make mine an iced tea,” he said, and looked across the table. “Just water for me,” the attendant added quickly.

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HE STARED AT THE PICTURE, SUDDENLY AWARE, SUDDENLY AWASH IN MEMORIES AND EMOTIONS. HE KNEW THE GAME OF GOLF— OF COURSE HE DID.

Both men then looked at the silver-haired man, who didn’t hesitate to speak up: “And I think I’ll have an Arnold Palmer,” he said, with a satisfied grin. Ben and the attendant looked at each other, incredulous.

“You know what an Arnold Palmer is, don’t you?” the silver-haired man added. “Oh yes sir,” the waiter replied. “Coming right up.” As they sat at the table, awaiting the drinks, the silver-haired man thanked his companions for bringing him out. His conversation was more lucid than it had been in months, his demeanor more vibrant. He was no longer locked in the dark closet of Alzheimer’s. The door was cracked open. Ben told him more stories about himself, about the times he spent with his mentor, the man who took him golfing, who taught him so many things about himself and about life. “It must be someone who is very proud of you, young man,” the silver-haired man said. “Tell me, is it someone you still see, someone you stayed in touch with? Perhaps it’s someone I know, eh? I would like to meet him. Tell me, who is it?” Before an answer could come, the silver-haired man’s attention wandered to the framed picture on the wall, just over Ben’s shoulder. It was an image of two men, posed arm and arm, holding a silver trophy with the inscription: “Ohio Golf Association Father-Son Tournament, First Place, 2006.” Then it happened, all at once. He stared at the picture, suddenly aware, suddenly awash in memories and emotions. He knew the game of golf—of course he did. Those neglected old clubs that felt so comfortable in his hands, they were his own. And sitting across the table with him was the boy he raised and played golf with countless times, the young man who became an accomplished player and respected teacher, the man of whom he was so proud. “My God,” he said, looking down. “Benjamin.” “That’s right.” Ben replied, the tears welling up in his eyes. “It’s you, Dad. “It’s been you all along.” Dan O’Neill was an award-winning feature writer and columnist for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch from 1985-2017. He currently is an editorial consultant for FOX Sports.

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P R E S E N T E D B Y N AT I O N W I D E

The Memorial Tournament Past Winners

ROGER MALTBIE 1976

JACK NICKLAUS 1977

JIM SIMONS 1978

TOM WATSON 1979

DAVID GRAHAM 1980

KEITH FERGUS 1981

RAYMOND FLOYD 1982

HALE IRWIN 1983

JACK NICKLAUS 1984

HALE IRWIN 1985

HAL SUTTON 1986

CURTIS STRANGE 1988

BOB TWAY 1989

GREG NORMAN 1990

KENNY PERRY 1991

DAVID EDWARDS 1992

PAUL AZINGER 1993

TOM LEHMAN 1994

GREG NORMAN 1995

TOM WATSON 1996

VIJAY SINGH 1997

FRED COUPLES 1998

TIGER WOODS 1999

TIGER WOODS 2000

TIGER WOODS 2001

JIM FURYK 2002

KENNY PERRY 2003

ERNIE ELS 2004

BART BRYANT 2005

CARL PETTERSSON 2006

K.J. CHOI 2007

KENNY PERRY 2008

TIGER WOODS 2009

JUSTIN ROSE 2010

STEVE STRICKER 2011

TIGER WOODS 2012

MATT KUCHAR 2013

HIDEKI MATSUYAMA 2014

DAVID LINGMERTH 2015

WILLIAM McGIRT 2016

JASON DUFNER 2017

DON POOLEY 1987

THE MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT

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