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OUTLOOK | PG 9

ARTS | PG 14

TEXTING WHILE DRIVING BAN STUDENTS STRUT CATWALK COULD EXTEND TO ALL AGES FOR 'I WEAR AFRICA' SHOW Current laws keep only people under the age of 21 from texting while driving.

The show, a part of 2011's Africa Week, aimed to dispel stereotypes associated with African fashion.

THE MANEATER THE STUDENT VOICE OF MU SINCE 1955 • TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011 • VOLUME 77 ISSUE 42 • WWW.THEMANEATER.COM

Lecture series seeks high-profile speakers “ A committee of MU staff and administration will select speakers. MEGAN HAGER Staff Writer

Chancellor Brady Deaton announced the university had endowed $1.3 million to a lecture series honoring former Sen. Kit Bond, R-Missouri on Monday. The lecture series will become a permanent fund for the university and is meant to provide a forum for nationally and internationally recognized leaders to

True/False draws 27,000

We wanted to find a way to honor (Sen. Kit Bond). There was no way he could just steal silently into the night.

John Danforth

Formner Missouri senator

express the importance of issues regarding economics, science, political and security policy.

See GIFT, page 6

UM PRESIDENT SEARCH

UM System presidential search firm named The university will pay $120,000 for the firm’s services. The committee tasked with finding the next UM System president selected a search firm Monday to aid in the hunt for the university’s next chief executive. The UM System presidential search committee, which added 20 new members last week, named Greenwood/Asher & Associates as the firm of choice. “We’re pleased to have two former professors and university

presidents who own this firm lead our search,” Board of Curators Chairman Warren Erdman said in a news release. “Jan Greenwood and Betty Asher have more than 30 consultants and affiliates who also have a solid understanding of the needs of higher education. They will provide valuable support as we cast a wide net in search for the best local Missouri, national and international candidates.” Asher had attended Friday’s search advisory meeting. The team of consultants has completed more than 1,000 searches for a number of higher education institutions, academic health centers, inter-

collegiate athletics and nonprofit and for-profit businesses. Among these searches are for the UM-Kansas City and Missouri University of Science and Technology. The firm was responsible for former UM System President Elson Floyd’s relocation to the presidency of Washington State University. The firm also offers consulting and training for a vast range of topics. “There’s a lot of buzz out there already on this search,” Greenwood said in the news release.

See FIRM, page 6

SARAH HOFFMAN/SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Volunteer Carolyn Magnuson participates in the March March parade as part of the True/False Film Fest on Friday. About 27,000 people attended the documentary film festival. Visit themaneater.com for several photo slideshows from the festival.

Dead end Bill restricting minimum for student wage passes through House curator proposal MINIMUM MISSOURI HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

ALLISON PRANG Associate Editor

WAGE HISTORY

IN MISSOURI A look at the minimum wage in Missouri during past years.

$8.00

$7.25 $7.00

$5.50

$6.65 $7.25 $6.55

$5.85

Missouri Minimum Wage

2010

2009

2008

$5.15 2007

$5.00

$5.15

2006

$6.00

Federal Minimum Wage

ASHLEY LANE | GRAPHICS ASSISTANT

The Missouri House of Representatives voted 92-60 Monday to cap Missouri’s minimum wage at the federal minimum wage level. The bill, House Bill 61, essentially reverses a voter-sponsored initiative to have the minimum wage move with inflation. The House’s decision comes at a time when legislators are also working to overturn Proposition B, another voter-supported initiative imposing stricter regulation of dog breeders. In 2006, a majority of Missouri voters voted for the state’s minimum wage to move with inflation even if it meant exceeding the federal minimum wage. The bill’s sponsor Rep. Jerry Nolte, R-Gladstone, said restricting

the minimum wage from exceeding the federal minimum wage will keep Missouri businesses competitive with businesses in neighboring states. “There are many small businesses hanging on by their fingernails,” Nolte said. “I think we need to make sure that we are protecting those small businesses particularly since that is where the majority of job creation occurs is in those businesses.” Rep. Mary Still, D-Columbia, said she voted against the bill to cap minimum wage at the federal level for this reason. “Well over 70 percent of Missouri voters recognized the need to raise the minimum wage,” Still said. Still said those who voted in favor of the bill are standing on the side of large businesses as opposed to their constituents.

See WAGES, page 6

Opponents cited “a lack of experience” as a major reason against a voting student curator. The Missouri House of Representatives voted down an amendment to allow for a voting student curator to reside on the UM System Board of Curators on Monday. The Board of Curators, which serves as the executive board for the four-campus university system, has one student representative but does not give the student the right to vote on board decisions. The amendment to House Bill 174 was voted down by a

See CURATOR, page 6

INSIDE BREAK IN AT SORORITY

A freshman was arrested on burglary charges after breaking into the Kappa Delta sorority house last week. PG. 9, OUTLOOK

TRIBUNE LOSES 25% OF ONLINE READERSHIP The Columbia Daily Tribune's numbers for online pageviews are down a quarter since the implementation of its paywall Dec. 1, 2010. PG. 11, OUTLOOK

THEMANEATER.COM Go online for a photo slideshow on the "I Wear Africa" slideshow and our Word on the Street podcast on women in college athletics.

News................................... 3 Outlook.............................. 9 Forum.............................. 12 Arts.................................. 14 Sports............................... 16


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TU ES DAY, MARC H 8, 2011 — THE MANEATER

ETC.

An overview of upcoming events, weather and more Reach us by e-mail at maneater@themaneater.com

Top Online

1 2 3 4 5

OutTakes

THE MANEATER PETER YANKOWSKY/ STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Meet ‘Faurotious:’ Contest chooses name for bronze tiger NORML panel calls for marijuana legalization

Joe Meyer and Marcie Mueth race for the finish early Saturday at the annual Walt’s Bicycle Marathon.

Web Update: Tigers fall short against No. 2 Jayhawks Missouri ranks among nation’s worst carbon dioxide polluters Editorial: Campus needs to stand together against sexual violence

Contact us: 573.882.5500

Reporters for The Maneater are required to offer verification of all quotes for each source. If you notice an inaccuracy in one of our stories, please let us know. In the March 4 issue of the The Maneater, there was an error in the article “10 new campus street signs replaced since August.” The Maneater reported current MU street signs meet new federal regulations for streets with speed limits greater than 25 miles per hour, which will take effect in 2012. In actuality, the signs do not yet meet these standards, and new signs will be phased in upon necessity during the next year. The Maneater regrets the error.  In the March 4 issue of The Maneater, there was an error in the article “Right-to-work debate comes to Missouri.” The article stated state Sen. Kurt Schaefer, R-Columbia, was a Democrat. Schaefer is a Republican. The Maneater regrets the error.

Events + Weather TUESDAY 8 Duo Avanzando Concert 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Whitmore Recital Hall Fine Arts Building

Rain High: 51 Low: 43

WEDNESDAY 9

THURSDAY 10

Mommy and Me Yoga 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Memorial Union N208

“Diversity in Action” 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. Memorial Union S206

Campus Writing Program 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Conley House

Shack Showdown 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. The Shack, MU Student Center

Rain High: 45 Low: 30

Mostly sunny High: 51 Low: 32

0216 Student Center • Columbia, MO 65211  573.882.5500 (phone) • 573.882.5550 (fax) maneater@themaneater.com www.themaneater.com The Maneater is the official student publication of the University of Missouri-Columbia and operates independently of the university, student government, the School of Journalism and any other campus entity. All text, photos, graphics and other content are property of The Maneater and may not be reproduced without permission. The views and opinions expressed herein are not necessarily the views of the University of Missouri or the MU Student Publications Board. The first copy of The Maneater is free, each additional copy is 25¢. I have a Bos-dar.

Zach Toombs, Editor-in-Chief Lyndsie Manusos, Managing Editor Travis Cornejo, Kaylen Ralph, Steven Dickherber, Alicia Stice, News Editors Zack Murdock, Projects Editor Ryan Schuessler, Forum Editor Abbey Sussell, A&E Editor Zach Mink, Sports Editor Emily Willroth, MOVE Editor Natalie Cheng, Multimedia Editor Aimee LaPlant, Online Development Avenly Jones, Online Assistant Nick Agro,  Photo Editor Eric Dundon, Production Manager Jimmy Hibsch, Assistant Editor Maura Howard,  Production Assistant Ashley Lane, Graphics Assistant Megan Pearl, Copy Chief Emily Willroth, Rachel Kiser, Jimmy Hibsch, Abby Spudich, Tony Puricelli, Jared Grafman, Copy Editors Jessie Lueck, Emily Willroth, Malory Ensor, Sean McWay, Casey Purcella, Designers Molly Paskal, Business Manager Sarah Callen, Sales Manager Katie Weber,  Nationals Accounts Pierce Courchaine,  Promotions Manager Haley Arndt, Graphic Designer Miranda Eikermann, Premiere Accounts Luke Moore, Katie Artemas, Courtney Ledo, Chelsea Harlan, Jacklyn Krupp, Advertising Account Representatives Becky Diehl, Adviser


TUESDAY, M A R C H 8 , 2 0 1 1 — T H E M A N E AT E R

NEWS

NEWS

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Coverage of organizations, events and issues important to the university Reach University News Editor Travis Cornejo at tcornejo@themaneater.com and Student Organizations Editor Kaylen Ralph at kralph@themaneater.com

Black Women Rock! hosts first Black Homecoming queen JIMMY HIBSCH Associate Editor Rapper Missy Elliott and actress Raven-Symoné were honored in BET’s “Black Girls Rock!” program in November. Saturday evening, 26 Columbia and MU women were awarded the same honor at MU’s own adaptation, called “Black Women Rock!” “When I saw that, I just immediately felt right after the show that it was something that would fit perfectly into the community,” junior Dreana Johnson said. “We should just honor black women who aren’t recognized for their hard work and achievements.” And with that, Johnson made the idea a reality at MU. “This year we’re bringing that home to Mizzou,” hostess Brittany Vickers said. “We’re bringing it to that black woman that’s right next door. She may be your classmate. She may be your professor. She may be that girl who you see everywhere but you’ve never gotten to meet. Well tonight, you will meet her and we will tell you why she rocks.” Despite giving birth to her son her sophomore year, recent MU alumna LaNee Bridewell stayed in school. Two years later, she walked across the stage at graduation with her son in hand. For her perseverance, Bridewell

was awarded with the “Trailblazer” award. “It’s amazing to be standing here,” Bridewell said. “Some of you might know my whole life story and some of you might not, but I just feel blessed and honored to be standing here. Thank you for recognizing that in me.” Throughout the evening, Vickers and fellow hostess Modupe Idowu asked the audience members to stand and say why they rock. “My name is Taylor Young, and I rock because I’m the first woman in my family to go to college,” freshman Taylor Young said. Numerous audience members stood and voiced their appreciation for the program. “I’m so jittery because this is so awesome,” junior Aris Williams said. “You all are awesome.” But many audience members said the most awesome part of the night was the appearance of MU’s first Black Homecoming queen Jill Young-Menears. She was awarded the “2011 Black Women Rock Award” and was the keynote speaker. Young-Menears wasn’t easy for Johnson to get in touch with, but after a few Google and Facebook searches, Johnson began speaking with YoungMenear’s son. A week later, plans were in motion for Young-Menears to return to MU. “Mizzou was a school that my

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARCUS MAYES

Jill Young-Menears, MU’s first Black Homecoming queen, watches students perform on stage during Saturday’s “Black Women Rock!” event. Throughout the night, 26 Columbia and MU black women were honored with awards.

father was denied entry to just 20 years before I came here because of the color of his skin,” Young-Menears said. “In my household, for me to come to this school was really a very major thing that happened. For him, it was amazing because it broke the

color barrier.” Throughout the night, the event was referred to as the “first annual.” With an audience as enthusiastic and supportive as Saturday’s, Johnson said there’s no way the event couldn’t be held in the future.

“I’m actually ecstatic with how it went,” Johnson said. “I don’t even know how many times I cried. A lot of people came up to me and told me they were very inspired, and that is what the whole purpose of the program was.”

Five of 120 D1A athletics directors are women.

sage of Title IX. “The background required for serving as an athletics director demands a breadth of experience in business and fundraising,” UT Women’s Athletics Director Christine Plonsky said in an e-mail. “I believe women did not gravitate to that area in significant numbers until the last 10 years.” Plonsky said UT administration wanted the women’s program built and maintained by women who were familiar with and passionate about women’s sports. Freshman volleyball player Molly Kreklow said the reason there aren’t as many woman Athletics Directors could be because the time requirements and stress of the job would make having a family difficult for women. “I definitely think they’d be as capable,” Kreklow said. “I just know for me personally I probably wouldn’t want that position because I think it’s just so time consuming if you wanted to have a family or if you wanted to have kids.” According to their staff directories, most Big 12 programs have women in about a third of administrative positions in their sports departments. MU falls in the middle of the pack. UT has one of the highest rates in the Big 12. “I know the leadership on our campus is dedicated to finding the top people to bring in our leadership positions, and so as they do that all people will

be considered,” Reesman said. “There is a real effort on campus to make sure that our search processes are very inclusive and open and have diverse candidate pools.” In 2006-2007 (the most recent data), there were more than 402,793 NCAA athletes and 43 percent of these were women. “I think in terms of the number of athletes, I’m sure it’s pretty even, but the coverage is not proportional,” freshman Amartya Bagchi said. “I think traditionally D1 sports have been mainly a boys club because you look at the popular sports, and it’s like men’s football and men’s basketball, and that’s what gets all the hype.” The highest paid Athletics Director in the Big 12 is Joe Castiglione from the University of Oklahoma, who makes $700,000 annually. The lack of women in these high paying positions could further contribute to the wage gap in America. A report released Tuesday, about women in America from the White House said women still earn less than men and this could in part be because women are still concentrated in lower-paying occupations than men. “I believe in the future, there will be many, many more qualified and interested women seeking and getting AD posts,” Plonsky said.

Administration joins Women hold 4 percent of ‘One Mizzou’ campaign D1A athletics director jobs JIMMY HIBSCH Associate Editor A new administrative involvement in the “One Mizzou” campaign will expand the program’s reach but will also tweak some of its original plans, Missouri Students Association President Eric Woods said. Last week, Chief Diversity Officer Roger Worthington informed Woods that MU wants to make One Mizzou, a diversity initiative launched after the Hatch Hall graffiti incident, a university-sanctioned program. “What that comes with is a lot of resources and the potential to kind expand this from a small student initiative to a large university-backed initiative,” Woods said. The logo will be different than the original one decided upon a few weeks ago. Woods said MU’s involvement in the campaign requires the logo fall under university standards in terms of font, color and design. But he said the elements of the design will be mostly similar to what the students decided. “The thought behind this is that we want the campaign to be something that the university is able to market to prospective and current students,” Woods said. “To do that, logos have to meet certain university standards. We’re working with them to get that done.” Representatives from the Legions of Black Collegians were somewhat relieved to hear of this, as the organization wasn’t initially fully supportive of the design, LBC spokeswoman Ashley Edwards said. “Originally, we had a problem with the logo,” Edwards said. “We felt that it wasn’t diverse enough, and

people didn’t know what that meant. Pretty much what it came down to was that it looked like everything else in the bookstore — tiger print. If you think about it, if it looks like everything else, that is the exact opposite of diversity.” But after the initial skepticism concerning the logo, LBC is fully supportive of the program, Edwards said. “We don’t really have a problem with it, but we just need to know that it’s going to happen,” Edwards said, in reference to the campaign in general. Because MU is making the program “official,” it will be conducted on a much larger scale, Woods said. Originally, the One Mizzou banners were intended to hang in the Student Center. Now, with the new administrative support, the banners will hang around the rotunda of Jesse Hall, as well. In addition, an even larger banner might be hung from the columns. Also growing in size is the launch of the campaign. Tentatively, the launch will take place outside of the Student Center. Throughout April, numerous events will occur affiliated with One Mizzou. Some events will correspond with Black Love Week, Greek Week and the Graduate Education Week, all which occur during the third week of April. Additionally, Maya Angelou will speak on campus as a part of the campaign. “We’re trying to think of events that exemplify the diversity and community themes that we’re trying to promote,” Woods said. All of these ideas are still tentative, as the task force will continue to meet, Woods said.

KATE GRUMKE Staff Writer Almost 40 years after the passage of Title IX, which promoted gender equality in educational athletic programs, and almost 30 years after the NCAA included women’s sports, women hold just a bit more than 4 percent of athletics director positions in Division One programs. “While it seems like there have been women in athletics for many years now those people have to progress through the system,” MU Executive Associate Athletics Director Sarah Reesman said. “We’re seeing that more and more with the number of women in administrative positions in athletics departments, and they’re certainly gaining the experience necessary now to actually be the athletics director.” Out of 120 D1A athletics directors, five are women. Reesman said this could be because women are still gaining experience necessary to take these jobs. In the Big 12, the closest thing to having a woman in the role of athletics director is at the University of Texas, which has both Women’s and Men’s athletics directors. The school created a women’s athletics department in 1973 in response to the pas-

Visit themaneater.com for a Word on the Street podcast about women in the Big 12 athletic director position.


TU ES DAY, MARC H 8, 2011 — THE MANEATER

NEWS

The following investigations are in progress, and the following people were arrested or issued summons, according to police reports.

College Avenue

Conley Ave

2

Pi Kappa Phi Indecent exposure, resisting arrest Burnham Road

1

Student Recreation Complex Resisting arrest and possession of Rollins Street alcohol by a minor by consumption

Hitt Street

2. STUDENTS REPORTEDLY EXPOSED GENITALS OUTSIDE OF PI KAPPA PHI Two MU students were arrested outside Pi Kappa Phi fraternity

5. SUSPECT CHARGED WITH SECOND-DEGREE PROPERTY DAMAGE CPD officers arrested 25-year-old Chad Livingston after responding to a reported property damage incident Saturday night. Officers arrived at Deja Vu Comedy Club, located at 405 Cherry St., at about 11:40 p.m. Wieneke said witnesses told the officers a man, Livingston, had damaged another car on the club’s parking lot. Wieneke said the officers learned the suspect went to the bar to find some friends and became angry and rowdy over some personal issues. The officers determined he was intoxi-

4

Memoir Purchase or possession of alcohol by a minor, possession of false identification

MU’s Campus

3

Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans’ Hospital Hospital Drive Driving while intoxicated, leaving the scene of an accident

cated. They learned he had kicked a stranger’s car, causing damage to it, and arrested the suspect. Livingston is charged with second-degree property damage.  — Kelsey Maffet and Tony Puricelli of The Maneater staff

Monk Street

1. STUDENT CHARGED WITH POSSESSION, RESISTING ARREST A student was arrested early Thursday outside the Student Recreation Complex on multiple charges, including resisting arrest. In an e-mail, MU Police Department Capt. Brian Weimer said sophomore Scott Gartland appeared intoxicated at about 12:30 a.m on Rollins Street near the recreation center when an officer on foot patrol saw him. When the officer tried to restrain him, Gartland ran away. Weimer said Gartland, 18, was caught and arrested on suspicion of resisting arrest and possession of alcohol by a minor by consumption.

3. SUSPECT CHARGED WITH FLEEING THE SCENE OF AN ACCIDENT Ethan Roetemeyer, 22, faces charges for driving while intoxicated and leaving the scene of a motor vehicle accident early Friday morning. At about 1:20 a.m. CPD officers received a call reporting an accident outside the Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans’ Hospital. Witnesses reportedly told police a silver BMW had struck a fence and then left. CPD spokeswoman Jill Wieneke said in an e-mail the officers learned a deputy had located a vehicle matching that description on Providence Road near Reactor Field. Officers located the vehicle and found Roetemeyer behind the steering wheel. According to Wieneke, the officers determined Roetemeyer was intoxicated. The suspect was slumped over the wheel. The Boone County Sheriff ’s Department arrested Roetemeyer on charges of driving while intoxicated, and CPD officers arrested

5

Deja VuLocust Street Comedy Club Second-degree property damage

Hitt Street

the BLOTTER

4. FOUR SUSPECTS CHARGED WITH UNDERAGE DRINKING AT MEMOIR Four suspects face charges for possession of false identification and purchase or possession of alcohol by a minor after an incident early Saturday morning. Edgar Reyna, 20; Christian Franta, 19; Matthew Schneider, 19, and Tyler Winn, 20, were issued citations and released after the incident. At approximately 12:40 p.m. CPD officers found the suspects in possession of alcohol while conducting a business check inside Memoir. Wieneke said the officers noticed the suspects appeared to be underage and began acting uncomfortable with the police presence. The officers approached the table where the four were located and asked for their identification. All four used fake IDs to enter the bar, Wieneke said.

Broadway

South Ninth Street

DEPT.

Roetemeyer for leaving the scene of an accident.

Fourth Street

POLICE

house Thursday night on indecent exposure charges. Weimer said an MUPD officer on foot patrol saw sophomores Daniel J. Schmitz and Aaron Harden exposing their genitals at about 11:45 p.m. outside the fraternity house. Schmitz ran from officers when confronted, Weimer said. Harden and Schmitz, both 20, were arrested on suspicion of indecent exposure. Schmitz was also charged with resisting arrest.

Providence Road

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ASHLEY LANE | GRAPHICS ASSISTANT

If you have information on these crimes, you may contact Crime Stoppers at 875-TIPS. All calls are confidential. If a court authority later proves innocence of a charge stated in the Blotter, contact The Maneater to request an updated entry.

Check out Word on the Street podcast: Women as Big 12 Athletic Directors

Students on campus discuss the underrepresentation of women in administrative positions for Big 12 athletics programs.

at www.themaneater.com


TUESDAY, M A R C H 8 , 2 0 1 1 — T H E M A N E AT E R

NEWS

5

MU CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Hospital radiothon raises funds, shares stories The event raised $225,375. GARRETT RICHIE Staff Writer The MU Children’s Hospital raised $225,375 during its twoday radiothon Thursday and Friday. During the two-day event, The Eagle/93.9 FM, KAT Country/94.3 FM, Clear 99 FM/99.3 FM and Y107/106.9 FM broadcasted live from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. both days in the hospital lobby, while volunteers answered phones and accepted donations. MU Health Care spokesman Matt Splett said the radiothon helps to raise money while sharing the stories of children who received care at MU Children’s Hospital. “Radiothon is an event we host every year to share some of the miracle stories our patients have,” Splett said. “We have patients from Children’s Hospital come to radiothon to share their lifesaving stories about the remarkable care they’ve received from our hospital.” Among those sharing stories was Renee Luebbering, the mother of Cassidy-Rae Luebbering, who was diagnosed with cerebral palsy and quad-

riplegia when she was 6 months old. Luebbering credits the Children’s Hospital for how well Cassidy-Rae, now 4, has done over the past few years. “The doctors and the nurses, they have done so much for us,” Luebbering said. “Our daughter would not be here without them today. They are a part of our family now.” Luebbering described Cassidy-Rae as the “happiest little girl,” with a sparkling smile and a sassy side. She said her daughter has continued to amaze doctors with her progress. “If it was not for Children’s Hospital and Children’s Miracle Network, she would not be doing the amazing and beautiful things that the doctor never thought that she would,” Luebbering said. The Children’s Hospital’s success in helping Cassidy-Rae motivated Luebbering to donate her time to the hospital. “Because of everything that these doctors and nurses have done for us, I’m trying to give back,” Luebbering said. Splett credits the success and operation of radiothon to the event’s volunteer force. “We have a tremendous support group of volunteers that make radiothon happen at Children’s Hospital,” Splett said. “We have dozens of vol-

COURTESY OF MU HEALTH CARE

Radiothon volunteers hold the $225,375 check at the completion of the Children’s Miracle Network Radiothon on Friday. The radiothon, which took place Thursday and Friday, benefitted the MU Children’s Hospital.

unteers that come in every hour to answer phones and collect donations.” Along with the stories the children and their parents share during radiothon, Splett said hospital doctors and staff also go on-air to talk about the hospital.

LEGION OF BLACK COLLEGIANS

“Children’s Hospital doctors, nurses and staff also do the interviews and share a little bit about their jobs and how they take care of sick and injured children,” Splett said. Luebbering said the MU Children’s Hospital is the best

imaginable place for CassidyRae to be receiving treatment. “This is the best place to bring your child if your child has any medical issues or disabilities,” she said. “We love this hospital so much that we wouldn’t want to take her anywhere else.”

UM PRESIDENT SEARCH

Legion of Black Collegians wins 20 members join search for new UM System president awards at Big 12 conference Next year’s conference will be at University of Oklahoma.

enhance their respective organizations,” Big XII Steering Committee member Lakeisha Williams said. The conference included workshops, a MARIE MANDELBERG career fair, keynote speakers and multiple Staff Writer social events. The workshops ranged from focusing on women and their role in the world The Legion of Black Collegians won two to males and how to be a better black male awards at the 34th Annual Big XII Conference leader. on Black Student Government, held Feb. 24 Edwards said her favorite part of the conthrough Feb. 27. ference was seeing Soledad O’Brien speak. The conference is a chance for members “She was absolutely amazing,” Edwards from both Big 12 schools and non-Big 12 said. “She was inspirational and she knew her schools’ black student audience. She knew governments to interact that we were young and meet each other. This people, and she knew year, 45 schools were in It’s important to have these our struggles of attendance. undergrad and she kinds of conferences because Multiple awards were related it all to us.” there are issues unique to begiven out to the black stu“It’s impordent governments pres- ing a black student leader that tant to have these deserve to be adequately adent at the conference. kinds of conferOne of the two dressed." ences because there awards won by the are issues unique to LBC was given to the Lakeisha Williams being a black student Freshman Action Team, Big XII Steering Committee member leader that deserve which works to bring to be adequately together black freshmen on campus. addressed,” Williams said. “It gives them something to be immediLBC President Lisa White said her ately involved in,” LBC spokeswoman Ashley favorite part of the conference was everyEdwards said. “It gets them acclimated in the one else’s enjoyment. White said the LBC and helps form them into members.” hardest part was transporting all of the F.A.T. was required to submit a booklet, students to and from the hotel without showcasing the events they held through- any problems. out first semester and mini-biographies about Next year, the conference will be held at the each freshman. University of Oklahoma. The second award given to the LBC was “We’ve already received calls for help,” Outstanding Big XII Council of the Year. The Edwards said. “They have already gotten LBC compiled a booklet, much like F.A.T., cre- started, so it’s really nice to hear they aren’t ated a movie to give background and history procrastinating on this.” of the organization and filled out an applicaEdwards said her hopes for the conference tion for a scholarship, which was awarded to next year is to get more students to attend. the entire organization. “It’s always hard to get people to pay and “The main purpose of the conference register for something when they are staying is to provide student leaders with substan- where they are,” Edwards said. “Since we are tial skills in which they can use to better going away, I think we will get more people themselves as leaders, as well as use to to register.”

The committee met for the first time Friday. JIMMY HIBSCH Associate Editor

Representatives from MU will fill six of the 20 spots in the newly formed UM System presidential search committee’s advisory panel. “These members were nominated from their various groups and campuses,” UM System Board of Curators Chairman Warren Erdman said. “They represent a wide variety of stakeholders of the university, and were all nominated through a wide variety of their constituent nomination organizations.” The advisory committee consists of alumni, retirees, faculty, management and student government leaders. The committee appointed some by the virtue of their office, and Erdman selected several others based on their nominations. Jordan Paul, Intercampus Student Council vice chairman and former Missouri Students Association president, was chosen as one of two students to participate in the committee. “We’re not entirely sure what we’re looking for,” Paul said. “That’s part of the point of the town hall forums. We’re going to sit down after those and try and reach a general consensus about what we’d like to see. My initial thoughts, personally, are that I like the business-savvy aspects.” In the midst of Friday’s thunderstorm, the committee met via teleconference. The majority of this meeting was conducted in closed session. At Friday’s meeting, Erdman laid down strict guidelines for the committee concerning the search process’ confidentiality. Members were instructed to forward all media inquiries to the university’s communications department. “They have certain confidentiality

requirements, and of course each one will decide how they want to handle these themselves,” Erdman said. This is in an effort to keep the candidates’ names completely secret, Erdman said. “Many of the best presidential candidates are currently employed elsewhere,” Erdman said. “If their name is made public, it could jeopardize their employment. The best candidates might not even allow themselves to be considered if they know that they aren’t going to be held in confidence.” A day prior, the system held the first of its seven forums intended to gauge public interest on presidential qualifications in Portageville. The second meeting was held Monday at UM — St. Louis. Another meeting is scheduled for March 14 at the Reynolds Alumni Center. MSA President Eric Woods encouraged students to attend Thursday’s forum even if they have nothing to say. He said their presence alone will show their concern for the search. “We are the university,” Woods said. “The System relies on our tuition for more than half of its revenues. If this is a person who is going to be administering us, we want to make sure this person has the students in mind. I think we’ve been spoiled the last couple years with Gary Forsee who has been a huge advocate for students. I don’t think it’s a bad thing to be spoiled.” Erdman requested the advisory committee members attend at least one of these meetings, and preferably their own regional forum. He hopes these forums will result in a greater comprehensive opinion of the qualities the System president should embody. As for what exactly these qualities are, Erdman has one he thinks is most important. “A passion for the University of Missouri,” Erdman said.


OUTLOOK | PG 9

ARTS | PG 14

TEXTING WHILE DRIVING BAN STUDENTS STRUT CATWALK COULD EXTEND TO ALL AGES FOR 'I WEAR AFRICA' SHOW Current laws keep only people under the age of 21 from texting while driving.

The show, a part of 2011's Africa Week, aimed to dispel stereotypes associated with African fashion.

THE MANEATER THE STUDENT VOICE OF MU SINCE 1955 • TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011 • VOLUME 77 ISSUE 42 • WWW.THEMANEATER.COM

Lecture series seeks high-profile speakers “ A committee of MU staff and administration will select speakers. MEGAN HAGER Staff Writer

Chancellor Brady Deaton announced the university had endowed $1.3 million to a lecture series honoring former Sen. Kit Bond, R-Missouri on Monday. The lecture series will become a permanent fund for the university and is meant to provide a forum for nationally and internationally recognized leaders to

True/False draws 27,000

We wanted to find a way to honor (Sen. Kit Bond). There was no way he could just steal silently into the night.

John Danforth

Formner Missouri senator

express the importance of issues regarding economics, science, political and security policy.

See GIFT, page 6

UM PRESIDENT SEARCH

UM System presidential search firm named The university will pay $120,000 for the firm’s services. The committee tasked with finding the next UM System president selected a search firm Monday to aid in the hunt for the university’s next chief executive. The UM System presidential search committee, which added 20 new members last week, named Greenwood/Asher & Associates as the firm of choice. “We’re pleased to have two former professors and university

presidents who own this firm lead our search,” Board of Curators Chairman Warren Erdman said in a news release. “Jan Greenwood and Betty Asher have more than 30 consultants and affiliates who also have a solid understanding of the needs of higher education. They will provide valuable support as we cast a wide net in search for the best local Missouri, national and international candidates.” Asher had attended Friday’s search advisory meeting. The team of consultants has completed more than 1,000 searches for a number of higher education institutions, academic health centers, inter-

collegiate athletics and nonprofit and for-profit businesses. Among these searches are for the UM-Kansas City and Missouri University of Science and Technology. The firm was responsible for former UM System President Elson Floyd’s relocation to the presidency of Washington State University. The firm also offers consulting and training for a vast range of topics. “There’s a lot of buzz out there already on this search,” Greenwood said in the news release.

See FIRM, page 6

SARAH HOFFMAN/SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Volunteer Carolyn Magnuson participates in the March March parade as part of the True/False Film Fest on Friday. About 27,000 people attended the documentary film festival. Visit themaneater.com for several photo slideshows from the festival.

Dead end Bill restricting minimum for student wage passes through House curator proposal MINIMUM MISSOURI HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

ALLISON PRANG Associate Editor

WAGE HISTORY

IN MISSOURI A look at the minimum wage in Missouri during past years.

$8.00

$7.25 $7.00

$5.50

$6.65 $7.25 $6.55

$5.85

Missouri Minimum Wage

2010

2009

2008

$5.15 2007

$5.00

$5.15

2006

$6.00

Federal Minimum Wage

ASHLEY LANE | GRAPHICS ASSISTANT

The Missouri House of Representatives voted 92-60 Monday to cap Missouri’s minimum wage at the federal minimum wage level. The bill, House Bill 61, essentially reverses a voter-sponsored initiative to have the minimum wage move with inflation. The House’s decision comes at a time when legislators are also working to overturn Proposition B, another voter-supported initiative imposing stricter regulation of dog breeders. In 2006, a majority of Missouri voters voted for the state’s minimum wage to move with inflation even if it meant exceeding the federal minimum wage. The bill’s sponsor Rep. Jerry Nolte, R-Gladstone, said restricting

the minimum wage from exceeding the federal minimum wage will keep Missouri businesses competitive with businesses in neighboring states. “There are many small businesses hanging on by their fingernails,” Nolte said. “I think we need to make sure that we are protecting those small businesses particularly since that is where the majority of job creation occurs is in those businesses.” Rep. Mary Still, D-Columbia, said she voted against the bill to cap minimum wage at the federal level for this reason. “Well over 70 percent of Missouri voters recognized the need to raise the minimum wage,” Still said. Still said those who voted in favor of the bill are standing on the side of large businesses as opposed to their constituents.

See WAGES, page 6

Opponents cited “a lack of experience” as a major reason against a voting student curator. The Missouri House of Representatives voted down an amendment to allow for a voting student curator to reside on the UM System Board of Curators on Monday. The Board of Curators, which serves as the executive board for the four-campus university system, has one student representative but does not give the student the right to vote on board decisions. The amendment to House Bill 174 was voted down by a

See CURATOR, page 6

INSIDE BREAK IN AT SORORITY

A freshman was arrested on burglary charges after breaking into the Kappa Delta sorority house last week. PG. 9, OUTLOOK

TRIBUNE LOSES 25% OF ONLINE READERSHIP The Columbia Daily Tribune's numbers for online pageviews are down a quarter since the implementation of its paywall Dec. 1, 2010. PG. 11, OUTLOOK

THEMANEATER.COM Go online for a photo slideshow on the "I Wear Africa" slideshow and our Word on the Street podcast on women in college athletics.

News................................... 3 Outlook.............................. 9 Forum.............................. 12 Arts.................................. 14 Sports............................... 16


T UESDAY, MARC H 8, 2011

NEWS

7

SALLY FRENCH/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Attendees of Kappa Delta’s Spaghetti Dinner dine Sunday at the Kappa Delta house. The event was a fundraiser to benefit Coyote Hill and Prevent Child Abuse America.

Kappa Delta fundraiser dinner attendance up

The proceeds went to Prevent Child Abuse America and Coyote Hill.

goes to Prevent Child Abuse America and the local beneficiary Coyote Hill, which is a safe home for abused and neglected children,” freshman Natalie Curtis said. “I thought the KD girls did an excellent job and the spaghetti was awesome.” Coyote Hill is a local organizaSARAH CLANCEY tion that provides professional fosStaff Writer ter care for abused and neglected Kappa Delta began its annual children, currently occupying three philanthropy week with a spaghetti traditional homes that house up to dinner Sunday night at the Kappa eight children at a time, according to the news release. Delta house. “It is a safe place for kids who More than 700 people attended the dinner, up from 601 attendees have been in abusive situations to last year, Kappa Delta Philanthropy go,” Davison said. The money raised from the event Chairwoman Laura Davison said. Kappa Delta advertised the will help stock the newly constructevent to the city of Columbia in ed fourth house with essentials, such part through advertisements in high as bath towels and kitchen supplies. “They don’t have appliances or schools and churches. “It was nice to have it at our furniture in the house yet, so the money we raised house, because goes to support it is simple that,” Davison and because said. it gives mem- I attended, because the The philanbers of the money goes to Prevent thropy week will c o m m u n i t y Child Abuse America who may have and the local beneficiary conclude with the Wingman never been in Coyote Hill, which is a event Saturday. a fraternity or sorority house safe home for abused and According to the news release, the a chance to neglected children. event consists of come in and O ly mpi c - s t y l e see it,” Davison Freshman Natalie Curtis games called said. “Wing-onAccording to a news release, tickets were $5 a-String,” “Bobbin’ for Wings” and for all-you-can-eat spaghetti, meat- “Hot Sauce Slip-n-Slide.” “It’s a very messy event,” Davison balls, garlic bread, beverages and dessert. Tickets could be purchased said. Sixteen teams of Greek life orgain advance or at the door. There was a lunch shift from 11 a.m. to 3 nizations, residence halls and other p.m. and a dinner shift from 4 p.m. groups have signed up to compete in Wingman. The games start at 11 to 7 p.m. All proceeds from the dinner will a.m. on Reactor Field. Families from Coyote Hill go to benefit both Coyote Hill and Prevent Child Abuse America, its attended the dinner and will serve as honorary coaches for the Wingman national philanthropy. According to the news release, teams Saturday. “It is a good reminder of why we Kappa Delta raised more than $12,000 last year throughout the are doing this and the purpose of doing a philanthropy,” Davison said. week for these organizations. Davison said 80 percent of the proceeds will go to Coyote Hill and Visit themaneater.com for the remaining 20 percent will go to a slideshow from the Prevent Child Abuse America. Kappa Delta spaghetti night. “I attended, because the money

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2011 Campus Master Plan 1:30 p.m., March 10 Columns D&E, Reynolds Alumni Center Be a part of the changing face of Mizzou. Join Linda Eastley, MU’s campus planner, as she presents Mizzou’s 29th master plan and first Climate Action Plan.

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TUESDAY, M A R C H 8 , 2 0 1 1 — T H E M A N E AT E R

OUTLOOK

OUTLOOK

9

Regional and national news with student views Reach Crime Editor Alicia Stice at astice@themaneater.com and City, State and Nation Editor Steven Dickherber at sdickherber@themaneater.com

ON CAMPUS, AROUND THE NATION A collection of top stories from student newspapers across the nation Nevada students arrested on conspiracy charges UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA — Nye County sheriffs arrested University of Nevada, Reno students Tyler Coyner and Matthew Miller early Tuesday on charges including conspiracy and grand larceny, according to a statement from the Nye County Sheriff ’s Office. A recent Nye County Sheriff ’s Office investigation revealed Coyner allegedly altered his Pahrump Valley High School grades after illegally gaining access to a Nye County School District system password, according to the statement. The alleged grade changes qualified Coyner as salutatorian of his graduating class, according to the statement. Coyner also allegedly altered the grades of 12 Pahrump Valley High School students, including Miller. Coyner and Miller were booked in the Nye County Sheriff ’s Office Detention Center, but have since been released on bail. — The Nevada Sagebrush Don Weinland

Three Columbia University fraternities to lose houses, remain on probation for three years COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY — Pi Kappa Alpha, Psi Upsilon and Alpha Epsilon Pi will lose their houses and have only probationary recognition from the university for the next three years after a December drug bust, according to the Division of Student Affairs. Dean of Student Affairs Kevin Shollenberger met with the presidents of each fraternity on Thursday evening to issue the decision, which has been in the works since December, when four students from the fraternities were arrested for selling drugs on campus. Loren Berman, a fraternity member, said he and other Greeks feel the decision against the fraternities was unfair. “The people who weren’t involved are getting penalized for what a few people did,” he said. — The Columbia Spectator Sarah Darville, Leah Greenbaum and Karla Jimenez

Guest lecturer warns of impending climate change OHIO UNIVERSITY — Michael Glantz, Director of the Consortium for Capacity Building at the University of Colorado, held a lecture Wednesday where he cautioned students climate change is occurring faster than predicted. Glantz said he feared the same climate-related problems continue to recur because there is a hesitancy to act on them, particularly by the developed nations contributing the most. Glantz said he is hopeful the younger generation of academics will help make an international change. “The young people now are the ones who want to do something about it. The youths are going to kick-start this thing,” Glantz said. “Otherwise it really is going to hell.” — The Post Tristan Navera — Compiled by Lauren Bale, Staff Writer

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY GRANT HINDSLEY

The Missouri House will vote on two bills that would extend the texting while driving ban to people of all ages. Current laws keep only people under the age of 21 from texting while driving.

Texting while driving bills would extend ban to drivers of all ages Two bills banning texting while driving are expected to pass through the Missouri House of Representatives after a hearing in the House Committee on Crime Prevention last week. In 2009, State Sen. Ryan McKenna, D-Jefferson County, passed Senate Bill 701 banning text messaging while operating a motor vehicle on Missouri’s highways for any person 21 years old or younger. SB 701 dictates individuals can be pulled over solely for texting and driving, and it is considered a moving violation. Rep. Tom Shively, D-Shelbyville, is sponsoring House Bill 93 to prohibit individuals of any age from texting and driving. “When we passed the bill, I said, ‘This isn’t fair, let’s just take this age part out,’” Shively said. “I don’t think that age should apply because those of us over 21 shouldn’t be texting either.” Shively said he added a provision that he wanted to present regarding newer

vehicles with the ability to transcribe “If they can’t technically pull you over what a person is saying into text message for (texting), how are they going to prove form. He said it is different if a person is it?” sophomore Jennifer Windmann said. not actually typing. “I don’t think anyone should text and “In a lot of newer vehicles you can drive, and if it is going to be a law, it use voice commands to take over, and I shouldn’t be that you have to be over a think that should be exempt, because it certain age to do it.” is not considered texting while driving,” Colona said he was skeptical about the Shively said. Senate Bill but he looked at the statistics Rep. Mike Colona, D-St. Louis, wrote for drivers under age 21 and saw that they House Bill 317 to prevent individuals were at the greatest risk for injury while from being pulled driving. over solely for texRep. Rodney ting while driving. Schad, R-Versailles, “If you talk to I don’t think that age should Chairman of the the officers on the apply because those of us over 21 House Committee streets trying to shouldn’t be texting either. on Crime enforce this, they State Rep. Tom Shively Prevention, said run into two issues: D-Shelbyville the committee first, ‘Is the driver had a hearing last 19 or 22? How can week discussing we tell?’ Also, ‘Are they texting or not both bills. He said despite the recent texting?’” Colona said. increase in texting while driving, the Colona said officers run into the issue committee hopes that there will be a of probable cause with texting and driv- reduction in texting and driving after ing cases, so they pull people over for these bills pass. other things like rolling a stop sign or Schad said he expects the bills to be weaving in and out of traffic. supported and pass through committee.

An MU freshman was arrested early Thursday after a break-in incident at the Kappa Delta sorority house. At about 3 a.m. Thursday, a Kappa Delta resident called the Columbia Police Department about possible intruders in the house. The resident initially reported three men inside the house, but CPD spokeswoman Jill Wieneke said officers were only able to locate freshman James Tyra running out of the back of the house. “Officers searched the area but did not locate the other two,” Wieneke said in an e-mail. Tyra, 19, was arrested on suspicion of first-degree burglary but charged with first-degree trespassing. He was released from the Boone County Jail on Friday after posting $500 bond.

Wieneke said the suspects’ motiva- es for years, and vice versa, to steal comtion is still under investigation, and posite photos, etcetera, as part of reguthere was no mention of alcohol being lar Greek ‘traditions,’” Wieneke said. involved. “These activities are not as “I think due to the recent harmless as they used to be sexual assault on campus because of increased fear of and the strange case we had crime and law enforcement last week, there is fear that taking the matter more the motive in this case was seriously.” sexual in nature,” Wieneke Wieneke said that, other said. “There is no informathan seeing the intruders, tion we have that supports it appears the caller had no that.” interaction with the susWieneke said these incipects. Nothing was taken dents are not uncommon from the house and no other in Greek communities, JAMES TYRA arrests have been made in but they can lead to legal the case. consequences. “As many people know, young men — Kelsey Maffett, have been ‘breaking into’ sorority housstaff writer

ANA STOCK Staff Writer

Kappa Delta burglary ends in arrest


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OUTLOOK

11

Council bids farewell to Watkins After five years as city manager, Bill Watkins will officially retire March 11. NICHOLE BALLARD Staff Writer City Manager Bill Watkins was honored for his 22 years of service in Columbia during the Columbia City Council meeting Monday night. Watkins will officially retire Friday. As city manager, Watkins was responsible for all city operations and implementing policies and programs. The city manager is an all-encompassing authority on officer and employee appointments for the city of Columbia, according to the city’s website. In addition, Watkins served as an unofficial adviser to council members. His experience and knowledge weighed heavily with council decisions from proposing a budget to approving allocations of funds. An MU alumnus, Watkins utilized a master’s degree in public administration to serve the public in various city government agencies. He has held two city manager positions, one in Illinois and another in Ohio, in addition to his five-year stint in Columbia, according to the city’s website. “It meant a lot to me to come into the government of a city with a steady hand,” Mayor Bob McDavid said. Department of Economic Development Director David Kerr recognized Watkins’

contribution of helping establish the first certified site for economic development in the state. Missouri has recognized Columbia for providing consistent standards regarding the availability and development of potential areas of the city. Kerr said Columbia is unique in having two sites of economic development. “It’s quite an accomplishment to have a certified site,” Kerr said. “We have officially announced today that Columbia now has a second site. Not only are they the first, but they are the only metropolitan area or city to have two certified sites.” Watkins has four children with his wife Kathy, who passed away Feb. 22, succumbing to an eight-year battle with breast cancer, the website stated. During his last council meeting Monday night, Watkins advised council members to help with the burden of homeowners on maintaining sewage system. He urged them to assist homeowners with money to meet the standards of sewer drains causing sewage to back up into people’s homes. “That’s a pretty good hardship,” Watkins said. “The idea that we would help pay for or defer payments at a reasonable interest rate, I think, would have a positive impact on people.” Plans for the Avenue of the Columns, which have been in the works since 1992, were also approved. The project is a streetscape plan regarding remodeling Eighth Street from the columns downtown and connecting them in a similar style to the columns on campus.

NICHOLE BALLARD/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Mayor Bob McDavid presents an award of appreciation to retiring city manager Bill Watkins at the start of the City Council meeting Monday. Watkins announced his retirement a year ago after 22 years of service to Columbia.

Police continue arrests in Columbia Daily undercover drug operation Tribune sees 25% Police are still looking for nine other suspects.

he wouldn’t be undercover anymore.” In late February, Columbia Police Department, Boone County Sheriff ’s Department, Mustang Drug Task Force SALLY FRENCH and the Fayette Police Department made six arrests on charges of delivery or manuStaff Writer facturing of narcotics, the first in a series Police arrested two more suspects on of warrants. March 1 in connection to a drug investi“Our biggest part of it was, because gation that involved the sale and distribu- most of the people involved with it were tion of illegal drugs, mainly cocaine. The from Columbia, making the arrests,” CPD Mustang Drug Task Force seized about 50 spokeswoman Jill Wieneke said. “It’s kind grams of crack cocaine during the inves- of a support role.” tigation. Police also had warrants for the arrests “There were a few other drugs, includ- of four other suspects who were already ing pills and marijuana, but 95 percent of in custody on other charges, a CPD news it was crack cocaine,” Mustang Drug Task release stated. Force Sgt. Shannon Jeffries said. “The idea behind a drug task force The Mustang Drug Task Force arrested is that drug rings have no jurisdictionWilliam A. Hill, 25, and Adrian L. Wright, al boundaries,” Jeffries said. “People in 21, of Columbia on suspicion of distribuColumbia go outside of Columbia to get tion and trafficking or sell dugs. They’re charges. not bound by juris“Those are investigations that came T here were a few other drugs, dictions like law from the MDTF including pills and marijuana, enforcements are.” Nine other susfrom one of our but 95 percent of it was crack pects are still wanted undercover officers, cocaine. for outstanding warwho made under- Shannon Jeffries rants related to the cover drug purchas- Mustang Drug Task Force Sgt. investigation. es from those indi“They’ll get their day in court and will viduals,” Jeffries said. be found guilty or not guilty,” Jeffries said. Some of those investigations lasted as “First time offense, they may get a probalong as one to two years. The Mustang Drug Task Force gets the majority of their tion. If they have a lengthy history, they leads from local law enforcement and may go to jail.” The Mustang Drug Task Force typically confidential tips. Most of the drugs that were found were does roundups like this once or twice a cocaine base or crack cocaine, Jeffries year. “Columbia does have an issue with said. In drug roundup investigations, arrests are typically made at once, rather drugs in the area,” Jeffries said. “I don’t know statistically if it’s more or less than than when a suspect is confirmed. “It protects the identity of the under- Jefferson City or Kansas City or even St. cover officer a lot more,” Jeffries said. “If Louis, but if you compare it with some of we immediately made an arrest right away, the smaller cities around it, it is a lot.”

drop in online views Publisher and editor Henry Waters III said he is pleased with the move.

Despite the drop-off in online readership, Waters said he is still pleased with the move to charge for online content. “We’re very pleased,” Waters said. “For one thing, we just can’t and don’t believe we should continue to provide expensive content and give it away.” ALLISON PRANG Waters said negative reader feedback over the paywall has died down since the Associate Editor beginning of its implementation. He said readers have mostly accepted The Columbia Daily Tribune’s online readership has dropped about 25 per- the decision. “Most of the comment was when we cent since the implementation of its first announced it, they said, ‘Of course online paywall Dec. 1, 2010, said Henry we understand this’,’” Waters said. Waters III, publisher and editor of the Columbia Missourian Executive Editor publication. Tom Warhover said The first 10 stories he initially had no a month are free to idea if more readers view, but after that, would move over W hen you start charging, it online readers are to the Missourian required to pay for a always goes down. We’re not subscription to access disappointed on that, because when the Tribune the people that are still started charging for additional content. looking are still interested. online content. Waters said he No statistics on expected the 25 perthe Missourian’s cent drop in online Henry Waters III Columbia Daily Tribune publisher online readership pageviews. were available, but “When you start Warhover said the publication has seen charging, it always goes down,” Waters said of the Tribune’s drop in online read- an increase in online readership in the ership. “We’re not disappointed on that, last three months. “There was kind of a core group, who, because the people that are still looking with the announcement of the Trib, said are still interested.” Waters said the Tribune has about they were going to jump over to the 2,000 readers paying in some form or Missourian and did,” Warhover said. He also said the Missourian has no another for content but that the exact numbers are hard to tell because some plans to charge for online content, aside online subscription fees for readers also from launching Kachingle, a type of subscribing to the print edition are not online tip jar where readers can contribdue yet. ute money.


12 FORUM

FORUM

THE MANEATER — TU ES DAY, MARC H 8, 2011

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FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

EDITORIALS REPRESENT THE MAJORITY OPINION OF THE MANEATER EDITORIAL BOARD

The fight for voting student curator is an admirable one

Since we realize we’ve beaten discussion on the proposal for a voting student curator to a pulp, we’ll only briefly touch on it here. An amendment to House Bill 174, which created the voting student curator position, was voted down in the Missouri House of Representatives on Monday. The discussion on this issue has been long and drawn out. Both sides got to present their points, and it finally came to a vote, which wasn’t in favor of UM System students. However, in their final remarks on the issue, legislators on both sides of the debate gave it one final go. Rep. Donna Lichtenegger, R-Cape Girardeau, said that, while the students were articulate in their arguments, they didn’t have broad enough insight to have a voting position on the board, since student curators only serve two-year terms. Rep. Stephen Webber, D-Columbia, stood up for students and our position on the voting student curator. He reminded Lichtenegger and other opponents to the amendment that Missouri representatives themselves serve only two-year long terms, and they craft and implement legislation at the state level. Webber gave an impassioned fight for the amendment and stood up for the reputability and legitimacy of the student voice in the UM System. We would like to thank him, as well as Rep. Mary Still, D-Columbia, for proposing and sticking to this legislation all the way through, even if it failed. Their fight was long and ultimately futile, but they remained consistent to the voice and intent of their constituents in Columbia. And for that, we thank them and other representatives who supported the idea of a voting student curator. Perhaps when new legislation is proposed, and the odds are it will be, the justified, rational idea that is a voting student curator will come to be.

Minimum wage vote shouldn’t have minimum legislative impact

For any student who’s ever held a job, the words “minimum wage” probably sound familiar. Obviously, most young workers start out earning this base salary. In Missouri, the minimum wage is $7.25 — identical to the mandated federal minimum wage. However, last week the Missouri House of Representatives chose to pass House Bill 61, which would restrict Missouri’s minimum wage from exceeding the federal minimum wage. Presently, the House is also working to overturn Proposition B, which was passed last year to control dog breeding facilities. What do both these legislative actions have in common? For starters, both House Bill 61 and the drive to overturn Proposition B are both in blatant contradiction to voterapproved propositions. That’s right. In 2006, a strong majority, more than 70 percent, of voters in Missouri voted for the state’s minimum wage to move with inflation, even if it exceeded the federal minimum wage. Last November, Missouri voters also voted to make Proposition B law in our state. So, why are legislators overturning Missouri voter-led initiatives? As a state, we need to stop putting money into ballot initiatives if our state representatives are just going to overturn them. They should be following voter intent and signing them into law. Essentially, it’s profoundly undemocratic. Elected representatives have no place to directly overturn a proposition after taking it to the public for a vote. Low voter turnout is in part to blame. By allowing elected officials to disregard voter intent so blatantly, we are allowing them to de-legitimize the democracy of our state. Specifically, House Bill 61 doesn’t even affect Missouri representatives, since none of them make minimum wage. Come election time for Missouri representatives, Missourians need to make it clear what voter intent is and that we do not appreciate representatives who disregard our democratic rights.

ILLUSTRATION BY RYLAN BATTEN

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Loopholes allow for illegal immigration As you are well aware, the student visa program, officially known as the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVP), is a centerpiece of our nation’s legal immigration system. This program provides America the chance to impart our core values to future generations of leaders around the world. It also provides American institutions of higher-learning with needed infusions of capital from students willing to pay full tuition for the opportunity to learn in this country. However, the SEVP can be manipulated by those with impure motives, something that not only jeopardizes the program’s ability to thrive, but also could threaten our nation’s security. I am particularly troubled by recent reports that the student visa program is being used by so-called “sham universities” to enable immigrants to enter our country

illegally. It has been reported that several institutions, although approved by the Departments of State and Homeland Security, are only in operation for the purpose of helping illegal immigrants game our legal immigration system. News reports in the past several months have exposed some particularly egregious examples of such “sham universities.” For example, in 2010 Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials in Los Angeles revealed that two schools claiming to provide Englishlanguage education were in fact front operations designed to get student visas for prostitutes from Russia, along with other ineligible foreigners. In January of this year, ICE agents performed a raid at TriValley University, in the San Francisco area. This unaccredited “university” was found to have charged over 1,500 foreign students over $5,000 per semester, while failing to provide any discernable education. In light of these deeply troubling examples, I respectfully request that you conduct a review to determine: 1) current procedures

that ICE and the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) have in place to detect risk factors for schools seeking SEVP certification; and 2) whether these procedures are adequate and the degree to which they are working. We would also welcome specific suggestions for improvements that can be made both at ICE and USCIS to improve the agencies’ ability to detect immigration fraud being perpetuated by a university. Ensuring that the SEVP is properly administered is critical, particularly when one takes into account the security risks that could follow from sham universities providing an outlet for certain foreigners to enter our country illegally. It also makes a mockery of the many colleges and universities who properly use the system when a few bad actors abuse it. We look forward to your thorough review of this program and your suggestions for how we can ensure it works properly. Thank you in advance for your attention to this important matter. — Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Columbia 202.228.6502

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TUESDAY, M A R C H 8 , 2 0 1 1 — T H E M A N E AT E R

YOUR

THOUGHTS? The Maneater’s online reader feedback was strong this week, given the variety of events on campus over the past week. Here are some of the Tweets we received. NORML panel calls for marijuana legalization. Shocker

—litcritter (litcritter) via Twitter

Possible tornado sighting near Ashland triggers MU sirens. Be safe! —BrooksideCoMo via Twitter Welcome to Twitter, Ashland. —Nathan Armer (ARMERN) via Twitter “Campus Needs to Stand Together Agasint Sexual Violence” Great editorial —RSVP Center (RSVPCenter) via Twitter From Facebook: MUPD continues its investigation into the rape outside Laws Hall Paul Love: Not to confound them but MUPD couldn’t figure out how to prosecute a MUPD officer found with child porn on his MUPD issued thumb drive, plugged into the MUPD laptop, sitting in the MUPD police cruiser he drove. What are the odds they will find a rapist or will prosecute him if it turns out he’s someone they like? From themaneater.com Column: Right to work laws unhelpful, unnecessary Brandon Cobbs: No citations at all in this piece. You should compare overall employment rates, GDP growth, and population growth in Right to Work States with forced unionism states. One thing you’re missing — if the unions truly are beneficial to the workers, then the workers will voluntarily decide to organize and pay dues. Forcing someone to pay dues to the union in order to hold a job is unAmerican.

“Well over 70 percent of Missouri voters recognized the need to raise the minimum wage.” — Rep. Mary Still, D-Columbia, on a 2006 voter-led initiative to adjust Missouri’s minimum wage with changes in inflation

Quoted and noted “It’s not the length of time, it’s the quality of the people that you get.” — Rep. Stephen Webber, D-Columbia, on Missouri representatives and student curators only serving two-year terms

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“The way that they see education is just very different than the way a typical American student sees education, which is very much so like an entitlement. This was something that these women definitely knew their whole lives that they wanted to do, but didn’t necessarily know how that was going to happen.” — Liz Bohannon, MU alumna and founder of Ssecko Designs

The opinions expressed by The Maneater columnists do not represent the opinions of The Maneater editorial board. SEX

Going ‘all the way’ not right for everyone Alex Pesek It feels silly for me to talk about a subject with a genesis that is unavoidably juvenile; for while the larger portion of what I have to say has substance, its discussion comes most generally from childlike reactions to something that, for most, is either unequivocally banal or potentially integral to their happiness or satisfaction. For me, however, this subject has more at stake, since questioning it has put me in a position of discomfort and uncertainty within relationships. So, since I’ve so far spoken abstractly, I’ll be as unambiguous about this as possible: my gut reaction to the concept of anal sex is one of disgust (although, to be fair with my words, this disgust has only to do with the act, and it’s not directed toward the community who participates in the act). I can’t define what my particular issue with anal sex is, since I am certainly comfortable with my body and presumably would be comfortable with

the body of my partner. And it’s not like I’ve never seen an ass in my life (I have one, of course). I simply have an intuition that tells me that something isn’t right about the act, that it should be avoided at all costs, that the participation in it is dirty, animalistic, not in the least sense ‘romantic.’ And to be frank, although I do have an ass and have seen asses other than my own, there seems to be something inherently wrong about using your ass for sexual pleasure. I honestly can’t move past the idea of butts being anything but butts. I am certainly in the minority on this matter, but I’m willing to stick to this position, since I can’t really change what seems inherently evident to me. So why does this matter, you might wonder. I certainly have the right not to participate, to abstain from the act and find other options. And complaining about the matter gives me no sexual gratification (it really doesn’t), so why dwell on it? Truthfully, the issue is not isolated just within the act, but extends more to my relationship with current and future partners, for whom anal intercourse might be a deal breaker, a sexual

need, a romantic act designed to enhance emotional intimacy. With these people, is it fair for me to request that anal sex never happen? And even if that’s not fair, and I do allow it to happen for the happiness of my partner, what if I never find satisfaction in it? And it really isn’t just these questions that bother me, since the implication of these questions extends beyond my own personal experiences. For me, and maybe for others in the gay community, the real issue is this: for homosexual men, intercourse is anal rather than penile-vaginal (although anal intercourse is an option for heterosexual couples), and this is obviously just because of our given biological tools. Using ambiguous terms, anal intercourse is the ‘furthest’ homosexual men can go with their partners; it requires (or at least should require) more comfort and devotion (and time to achieve both of those) than a simple hook-up. It’s ‘our version’ of intercourse and is thus treated with at least similar salience to heterosexual intercourse. Thus, if I choose to abstain from the act, and if I see no romantic value in it whatsoever,

on what can I actually place romantic value in terms of sexual activity? Am I supposed to just foreclose the possibility of sex ever being romantic because I’m not willing to move beyond high school-era playing around? Obviously romance exists outside of sex, and I don’t need sex to be wholly gratified in romance, but why should I be blocked out of a heightened romantic sexual experience, just because I’m not into the idea of only being able to put one peg in one hole? I don’t think I really have an answer to this question. Part of my ability to answer that question will come once I actually find someone worth the time and (dis) comfort of experimentation, someone willing to give and take when it comes to sex. I don’t think that the solution to this issue will be finding a physical replacement for anal sex; if anything, it’ll come down to me conceding to my partner. But even if the issue goes away just because I stop putting up a wall, that doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist or won’t continue to exist for some people who don’t feel comfortable having to show love through anal sex.

POLITICS: LEFT FOR DEAD

Obama should arm US agencies in Mexico Taeler DeHaes President Barack Obama met with Mexican President Felipe Calderon on March 2 and March 3 to discuss the relations between the two countries. In their fifth meeting, the two presidents discussed the recent WikiLeaks publication. Calderon said the leaks caused serious damage for U.S. ties with Mexico. A series of cables signed by the United States Ambassador to Mexico Carlos Pascual on Dec. 17, 2009, and Deputy Chief of Mission John Feeley on Jan. 29, 2010, reveal the concerns of U.S. officials in Mexico that “Mexico’s antinarcotics effort is plagued by poor coordination and rivalry among the country’s various security forces,” according to Fox News. The major topic of the presidents’ conversation concerned the death of Immigration and

Customs Enforcement agent Jaime Zapata. He belonged to the border agency and was shot and killed by Mexican drug cartels while unarmed. His partner Victor Avila was also injured by a shot to the back and is recovering in the U.S. The death toll from drug cartels increased 60 percent in 2010 to more than 10,000 people. Even more horrific: there have been more than 34,000 deaths since 2006 in drug cartel related incidents. The U.S. needs to arm its agents sent to Mexico. But Obama is completely against the idea. “There are laws in place in Mexico that say that our agents should not be armed,” Obama said, describing the U.S. role south of the border as an “advisory” one. He continued saying, “We do not carry out law enforcement activities inside of Mexico.” Did I mention that the gun that killed Zapata was purchased in Texas?

Now, let’s think about the Mexican government for a second. What kind of laws do they really have? What exactly is their government doing? Obama needs to stop embarrassing Americans on home soil. Reports of beheadings and shootings are prevalent; we should be trying to protect Americans from massacres. If we are allowed on Mexico’s land for homeland security, then we should be armed in case of an attack. Reversing Mexico’s veto on foreign agents carrying weapons is a “top priority of this White House,” a senior official, who requested to remain anonymous, told Fox News. Coming directly from their website, the ICE’s primary mission is to “promote homeland security and public safety through the criminal and civil enforcement of federal laws governing border control, customs, trade, and immigration.” With a budget of $5.7 billion, not only can we fund armed

weapons for ICE, but we need to fund weapons to protect our country. The ICE has more than 20,000 employees and is prominent in 47 foreign countries. Looking at the pictures on the ICE’s website, they are featured with guns and bullet proof vests. What does that tell you, Obama? America is funding the ICE to keep our country safe. There is no such thing as a peaceful drug lord or tranquil slaughtering. Please give these people weapons. The Obama administration plans on spending $500 million on Merida Initiative, which is helping the fight against drug trafficking in Mexico. The program has been going on since 2008 and will help train security officers and deliver equipment like helicopters. If we are funding our protection in other countries, we need to arm the ICE with proper equipment for their safety as well. Obama needs to work with Calderon on border safety to get rid of American deaths due to the blood bath in Mexico.


14 ARTS

TU ES DAY, MARC H 8, 2011 — THE MANEATER

A&E

Arts and Entertainment coverage on campus Reach Arts Editor Abbey Sussell at asussell@themaneater.com

ALBUM REVIEWS R.E.M: Collapse Into Now 4 out of 5 stars With its 15th proper studio album Collapse Into Now, R.E.M. has created something of a career retrospective. Rather than revamp its sound, as it has done for the past 10 years on records like Up and Accelerate, the band has embraced the sound it pioneered in the mid-80s and early 90s. Instead of sounding outdated and unoriginal, Collapse Into Now is a diverse set of tunes that makes R.E.M. sound as relevant as ever. Michael Stipe’s delivery in album-opener “Discoverer” has the swagger and urgency that people have come to love from the frontman, and many of the tracks that follow continue that trend. Peter Buck’s jangling, chiming guitar sounds as radical as it did on its 1983 debut Murmur, and Mike Mills’ harmonies are his best in recent memory. “Oh My Heart” and “It Happened Today,” which features Pearl Jam’s Eddie Vedder, are two of the band’s best songs to date, each dealing with daunting subject matter of loss, confusion and fate. But in true R.E.M. fashion, Stipe makes them sound hopeful and endearing. The addition of legendary singer-songwriter Patti Smith, as well as sex-obsessed electronic musician Peaches, on vocals brings a new dynamic to the band’s sound, which rarely features female vocals. When a band is still releasing material after 31 years, it’s natural to be apprehensive about new songs or records. It seems, though, R.E.M. has entered the realm of timelessness. “This place needs me here to start/this place is the beat of my heart,” Stipe achingly sings on “Oh My Heart.” I think he’s telling listeners that the world needs R.E.M., and after many listens to Collapse Into Now, I can only agree. — Eric Staszczak, reporter

Kurt Vile: Smoke Ring for My Halo 3.5 out of 5 Stars If Bob Dylan and Sheryl Crow had a kid together, it would be Kurt Vile. His music combines clever, whispering lines with a constant strumming that — if it weren’t for the fuzz — would almost sound country. Returning to the present with his fourth effort, Smoke Ring for My Halo, Vile cements his status as modern day staple of lo-fi heartland rock by producing some of the freshest and finest music of his career. Whereas previous efforts were glazed with layer of haze, Smoke Ring for My Halo carries a cleaner, crisper production that effortlessly balances with Vile’s causal voice. The memorably charming guitar in standout track “Jesus Fever” adds a breezy quality to the already likable song. The whole album shows Vile proving his knack for clever lyrics with songs like the contrasting “Peeping Tomboy” or “Puppet to the Man” where he sings the sadly potent lyric “By now you probably think I’m a puppet to the man / well, I’ll tell you right now, you best believe that I am.” Vile’s music has a tattered quality to it and gives impression that Vile’s had some character forming experiences. It’s wistful but wise - like that cowboy at the end of the bar that’s staring down regretfully at his whisky. It reflects the old dust-bowl feeling of desperation but with a more modern touch. Smoke Ring for My Halo is like a nice warm of cup of dark coffee. There’s a rich fullness to each song, and it keeps the same, strong consistency with each sip. Vile’s hushed vocals steam over his melodic guitar with just the right touch of sugar, and although it may not be the best cup of coffee, it’s still a pretty good cup of Joe. — Joel Samson Berntsen, staff writer

AFRICA WEEK

ASA stomps out fashion stereotypes The “I Wear Africa” fashion show concluded Africa Week. ALFRED COX Reporter For some, the words “African fashion” might conjure images of loincloths or turbans. The African Student Association aimed to dispel these stereotypes through the “I Wear Africa” fashion show Friday. The show was held in Mark Twain Ballroom at Memorial Union. A red carpet lined the floor and flags representing the countries of Africa circled the room. The “I Wear Africa” fashion show was one of the final events in “Africa Week,” a celebration of African culture, held by ASA. Models strutted to the thumping beats of African music. The show had two parts: the first included traditional African clothing such as caftans, dresses and scarves worn around the head. The second part was the modern African clothing portion, which included jeggings, draped scarves and t-shirts. ASA Vice President Yohana Ghirmazion said the event intended to disprove stereotypes of Africans and their attire. “The common perception of Africans and their clothing is that people wear loin-

cloths and sheets, that this is how we are and this is what we wear, which is a wrong misperception,” Ghirmazion said. Host Chiamaka Oji asked the crowed what they thought a typical African wore. To highlight common misconceptions, the ASA opened the show with men and women in loincloths, who shouted as if they were a part of an African tribe. Oji wore a well-fitting, black dress with a wrap around her head, but she said this was not her original outfit choice. “I had no Nigerian clothes with me, so I couldn’t showcase the different kinds of fabrics normal Africans wear,” Oji said. “But I liked what I had on because of the wrap that showed my culture.” The fashion show gave ASA more exposure and was a great ending to Africa Week, Grimazion said. Graduate student Juanita Kwarteng said she enjoyed how the show addressed preconceived notions about African culture. “I am proud that the ASA worked so hard to produce such a good show,” Kwarteng said.” “I loved the music, the clothing and the way they challenged myths of African culture through the overall presentation of the show.” Grimazion said it was difficult to choose her favorite piece of clothing in the show, because she loved them all. “There was so much to choose from — some pieces were created by us, but the

JAMES MILITELLO/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Junior Christine Munyikwa works the catwalk for “I Wear Africa” on Friday at Mark Twain Ballroom. The event displayed designer Kiarah Moore’s line of clothing as well as addressing the stereotypes attached to typical African attire.

traditional (clothes) were things we already owned,” Grimazion said. Oji said she was simply ecstatic to see people — African and Non-African — coming out to support ASA and the event. “Just to see people come

out to support us was great, because it showed us that our group is progressing,” Oji said.

“This was something that these women definitely knew their whole lives that they wanted to do but didn’t necessarily know how that was going to happen.” Sseko Designs officially started as a “not-just-forprofit” business in July 2009. Today the company employs a total of 17 women. The sandals can be bought online or through various retail partners throughout the country. In Columbia, the sandals are available at Swank and The Mustard Seed. Cameron Crake, who is the International Development Director in Kampala, Uganda, said she first got involved with Sseko Designs after buying her first pair of Sseko sandals. “I love that I get to work so closely with the girls,” Crake said. “The relationships and interactions I have with them have changed the way I think about economic development, management and my culture.”

Sseko Designs Country Director Julie Beckstrom said she has found her dream job. “I wake up every morning passionate about what I’ll be doing, even though it doesn’t look like a traditional job,” Beckstrom said. “Riding on motorcycles, exploring hectic African markets and working around regular power outages isn’t part of most typical jobs.” Crake said Bohannon’s success is admirable considering the challenge of running a business in Uganda. “Many people come to Africa and want to start projects but get discouraged by the challenges they face,” Crake said. “If Liz hadn’t been so determined to create a company to give these girls in Uganda an opportunity, Sseko would never have gotten off the ground.” Bohannon will speak at the annual Women’s Leadership Conference on March 19.

Visit themaneater.com for a slideshow from the “I Wear Africa” fashion show.

Sandals send Ugandan women to school

Liz Bohannon created Sseko Designs to help Ugandan women go to universities. ALEXIS HITT Staff Writer

As soon as Liz Bohannon graduated from MU, she moved to Uganda. There she met a group of women who could only dream of the chance for a university education. The women were from impoverished areas of the country where many women were not able to make enough money to attend university. “It seemed completely ridiculous to me that these women who were so bright and really committed and had already shown a lot of promise and success could potentially go back to their villages and not go onto university,” Bohannon said.

B ohannon b egan brainstorming an idea to send these women to university. “We landed on sandals, which is totally random,” Bohannon said. “I’ve never had any particular interest or affinity towards footwear.” That fall, Sseko Designs began informally. The first three girls were hired on a simple verbal agreement — if they made sandals from local Uganda products for the next nine months, they would contribute to the local economy and have the opportunity to attend university. As the next nine months continued, the company ended up making more than enough money from the sandals to send the three women to secondary education. “The way that they see education is just very different than the way a typical American student sees education, which is very much so like an entitlement,” Bohannon said.


TUESDAY, M A R C H 8 , 2 0 1 1 — T H E M A N E AT E R

ARTS

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TRUE/FALSE FILM FEST

Volunteers carry True/False Film Fest ALEXIS HITT Staff Writer For the eighth year, True/False Film Fest transformed downtown Columbia, bringing together the community with films, speakers, events, parties and live music. But what makes the event run smoothly each year are the hundreds of volunteers. “We have people who give up their entire weekend to really bend over backwards to make this fest go,” Missouri Theatre venue captain Kanani May said. “I know that all of the core staff really understands that. They’re so grateful for the volunteers, and they do so much to express their appreciation.” May has been working at True/ False since its inception. Before she assumed the position as a venue captain, May was the house manager of the Missouri Theatre. Being a juggernaut volunteer, May is required to put in at least 40 hours throughout the weekend. But between prep work, meetings and walkthroughs, May estimated putting in approximately 50 to 60 hours during the weekend. “I don’t really keep track,” May said. “I just know I put in some organization time before the fest and then live here for the entire weekend once it gets underway.” Working at the largest venue at

the fest, May stressed the need for her staff to run like clockwork to get the guests in and out since they have the same amount of time as smaller venues to do so. Senior Tim Pfeiffer also volunteered at the Missouri Theatre. Pfeiffer worked as a venue op and helped out with the “Q” system. Pfeiffer said he’s been seeing films at True/False since he was a freshman, and last year he and a friend decided to volunteer because they loved it so much. “I really like films,” Pfeiffer said. “I’m glad that Columbia has its own film scene. Every year, everyone gets excited about it, and I get excited about it. People come from all over, and we all just see really cool documentaries.” Globe Theatre house manager and Stephens College alumna Katie Hays has been around True/ False since its beginning, but this is her first year officially volunteering for the festival. Hays said she really enjoyed her time working as a volunteer. She likes the people she’s gotten the opportunity to meet and the perks of being a juggernaut volunteer, such as getting into events early. “I think it’s really cool that people would want to come to this small town in Missouri and hang out for a weekend,” Hays said. “Columbia is really quirky, and True/False absorbs all these quirks that Columbia has and real-

SARAH HOFFMAN/SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Q Queen Cynthia Sampson blows bubblegum Friday outside The Blue Note. Q Queens are responsible for handing out wait list Q cards to non-pass holders who wish to purchase a ticket an hour before the film.

ly exemplifies them.” Without the volunteers, Hays said, True/False would just be a mere idea and not the festival it is today. “The entire idea (of True/False) from the beginning has been incredibly fascinating,” May said.

“I know Paul (Sturtz) and David (Wilson) through Ragtag, and they have such a tremendous vision not only for (True/False), but for what it brings to our Columbia community and what it contributes to the film community.” True/False Film Fest progresses

and improves every year, May said. “The excitement about the fest grows each year, and I just love it,” May said. “When the fest is nearing its end and we’re all exhausted, it all doesn’t matter. It just makes you want to come right back and do it again next year.”

Emerging Artist Showcase Belly dancers gyrate their spotlights MU musicians hips, love their bodies Five finalists preformed in the annual Emerging Artist Showcase Monday night.

choir, but missed performing so much that she decided to come back for a performance degree. She said she still hasn’t completely gotten over her nerves. “I’ll always say that I’m not (nervous), but you get the butterflies,” Baughman said. “I try JOEL SAMSON BERNTSEN to turn it into positive energy.” Staff Writer Next up was violinist Matheus Souza, from Londrina, Brazil. He has played violin Jesse Auditorium hosted some of MU’s for more than 16 years and was inspired to most talented musicians in the School of play the violin because of his older brother, Music’s Emerging Artist Showcase on Sunday who started playing when he was seven. “I saw (my brother playing) and thought it evening. The annual showcase auditioned students in early February through a com- was cool,” Souza said. “You know those little mittee of seven judges. Four to five finalists brother things, where you’re like, ‘I wanna do are selected to play at the showcase each year; what you’re doing too.’” Souza has been playing since he was four five were selected this year because of a tie and said he couldn’t imagine his life without in scores. Freshman Grace Lyden, a solo pianist who music. After Souza, another Brazilian musician has played for more than 13 years, was the took the stage, this time in the form of voice first to perform. “I tell people: They play competitive performer Luciana Tavares Martins. Martins sports, I play competitive piano,” Lyden said. has won multiple prizes in the past for her “Not that it’s nearly as intense, but the prac- singing and is working on a master’s in vocal performance. Martins said while singing may tice schedule is very demanding.” Lyden’s schedule involves practicing for not bring her riches, it was what she loves. “I know that I will four hours each day. die poor, but (singing) is She was the only freshman soloist I tell people: They play competitive something I do because I love it,” Martins said. to audition for the “It’s the most important showcase and wasn’t sports, I play competitive pianos. thing in my life. I just expecting to make Grace Lyden love it.” the cut considering Freshman The Anemoi other graduate level pianists had auditioned. But then she got an Saxophone Quartet was the last to be featured “oh-my-gosh congratulations text” from one in the showcase. Featuring Dan Cox, Dillon of her friends saying that she had been one of Dains, Caleb Shannon and Chad Tucker, the quartet formed during the fall and has been the few selected musicians to play. “I was just shocked,” Lyden said. “I never performing since. Eva Szekely, head orchestrator of the thought they would pick me because I’m younger than everyone else who’s in it and showcase and professor of music, said a pernot as experienced, so I was surprised - and formance in Jesse Auditorium is preparation for life as a professional musician. really, really excited.” “The experience of being able to perform The second performer was female singer Melissa Baughman, who is pursuing a mas- in different-sized spaces with different acouster’s degree in vocal performance. Baughman tical properties is one that basically mimics took a six-year break from singing to teach real life,” Szekely said.

The dancers performed as part of the Union Arts Council spring dance sequence. KATE GRUMKE Staff Writer

Bells tinkled to sultry eastern music Thursday as belly dancers from Moon Belly Dance Studio gyrated and shimmied. The event was part of the spring dance sequence, sponsored by the Union Arts Council, held in Stotler Lounge in Memorial Union. It featured two troupes of belly dancers, who swung their hips for an audience of students and community members. The dancers ranged from high school age to middle age and were all women from the Moon Belly Dance Studio, which is located in the North Village Arts District on Saint James Street. “All of our chairs were filled up for the most part and there were lots of people that came in and out in the back and that’s exactly what we want to happen,” UAC President Mary Karl said. “Lot’s of random people came that didn’t necessarily know about it otherwise until they saw it, so I think the venue worked perfect, the event went well.” The dancers wore sparkly, beaded blue skirts that accentuated their hip movements and the music they were dancing to. “I thought the use of tempo and synchronization between all of the dancers was really interesting,” freshman audience member Robert Otte said. The dancers balanced swords on their chins, dropping into the splits, while still supporting the swords, to applause and cheers from the audience. There was also a performance from a smaller group

of dancers using finger cymbals to create their own beat over the drum-heavy music. Moon Belly Dance Studio Director Kandice Grossman, said belly dancing is one of the oldest forms of dance, originating in the Mesopotamian area at the beginning of civilization. “Gyrating the pelvis and moving the hips is ancient,” Grossman said. Grossman also said the art form is a great way for women to love themselves and feel empowered. “I love to see a new student watching themselves in the mirror, because you’ll start to see this thing happen, and it’s almost a sense of amazement as they watch their bodies move in these new beautiful ways,” Grossman said. “It’s just such a sensual, beautiful set of moves and so when women practice them they just start to feel more beautiful and sensual.” For information about belly dancing and taking classes, visit moonbelly.org. The first class is free. “It’s a lot of fun to get together on a weekly basis and dance with each other,” Grossman said. “It’s a little bit of everything, I think that’s why I love it so much.” The point of the event, and of the UAC, is to bring art to the campus and to Columbia. “I think it’s important to hold Union Arts Council dance sequence events like this, because the community has a lot of art love, but I don’t feel like the university does,” Karl said. The UAC spring dance sequence will feature two more dance performances this semester, and hopes to increase the number of performances next semester, Karl said. UAC also hopes to expand their programs to promote more art love at MU. “We have art competitions, we might be doing a fashion show, and maybe a poetry slam,” Karl said. “We have a lot going on, lots of possibilities.”


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TU ES DAY, MARC H 8, 2011 — THE MANEATER

SPORTS JAKE’S TAKES

Jake Kreinberg

Tigers’ shot at revenge slips away This was it. This was the game that would redeem Missouri’s season. Defeating Kansas alone would qualify as a good season for some, but add in the fact that the Tigers were on a two-game skid and staring at an even conference record with another loss, and the game seemed monumental for MU’s postseason fortunes. The fans knew it. Before Mizzou Arena’s doors opened, the line of students snaked around the building, each one hoping to witness Missouri’s first victory over its rival in two years. They were ready. The players overslept. It’s been documented how this team excels at home while struggles (mightily) outside Columbia. What I tend to notice are the Tigers’ careless errors in hostile environments — it seems they get lost in the moment. In front of the most raucous home crowd all season, everyone except Laurence Bowers and Marcus Denmon were again caught up in the moment. There was 5-foot-10 inch Phil Pressey, whose best days are ahead of him, trying to dribble into three Jayhawks easily a foot taller than him. There was Ricardo Ratliffe failing to grab a rebound, then carelessly fouling the Jayhawk who outmuscled him for it. There were Justin Safford and Kim English lobbing up air balls despite having open looks. And then there were more fouls. I was a little surprised at Safford’s performance. If there were ever a game for him to succeed, it was this one. After being honored as the only senior on the team, during which his game against KU last year was highlighted, he came out flat. Just like everyone else, he settled for jump shots. He was complacent. Which brings me to Ratliffe. Ricardo was billed as the interior presence Missouri needed to achieve consistent success. Despite asserting himself against lesser competition, he often shies away from more intimidating foes. Don’t get me wrong; his fade-away baby hook shot is a thing of beauty. But he rarely goes straight up or toward the basket to draw contact. In fact, Ratliffe hasn’t attempted a free throw in Missouri’s last three games. Think about that. Finally, there’s Kim English. We’ve seen him at his best (2009 NCAA Tournament), but why are his best days behind him? The problem, I think, is that he tries too hard. He expected to be the go-to guy on this team. But when the shots weren’t falling, he didn’t know what to do. He tried even harder, before attempting to figure out where he belonged on this team. And he still doesn’t know. English needs to take a step back (figuratively, not literally), and play sound fundamental basketball-enough with the fancy passes, off-balance jump shots, and ticky-tack fouls. Move around. When the lane is open, take it. Don’t become complacent. Don’t think that others are just going to become open. Do something. You are a part of a motion offense. There is a degree of predictability to the Big 12 referees. When Kansas was drawing many a foul to start the second half, I knew the Tigers would get their turn, especially at home. But the team never took advantage until it was too late. They settled, just as they have in previous losses. Despite a similar record last year, I still felt optimistic about Missouri’s chances in the postseason because of their style of play. This year, I don’t hold that same level of optimism. Maybe it’s because the team has such a schizophrenic behavior. Maybe it’s because their upperclassmen have regressed. Or maybe it’s because when the Tigers are on the big stage, they look lost.

Visit themaneater.com for audio from the post game press conference.

Comprehensive coverage of Missouri athletics, by students, for students Reach Sports Editor Zach Mink at zmink@themaneater.com.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Kansas defeats Missouri 70-66 The Tigers shot 29 percent from the field and 13 percent from long range in the game JOHN MONTESANTOS Staff Writer The Jayhawks came into Mizzou Arena on Saturday and did something that no Tiger opponent has done all season: beat Missouri at home. Going into the Border War, the No. 24 Tigers were a perfect 17-0 at home. But the No. 2 Jayhawks ended that run with a narrow 70-66 victory in Columbia. The home team kept it close, despite shooting at 29 percent, its percentage of conference play. Three-point land was barren, as the Tigers shot just three of 23 from deep. Forcing turnovers and drawing fouls kept Missouri in it.

STALE SHOOTING The Missouri Tigers fell to the Kansas Jayhawks on Saturday, and next play Texas Tech in the first round of the Big 12 Tournament.

team field goal percentage

29% 13%

17 of 58

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3 of 23

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MICHAEL DIXON

1 of 9

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1 of 5 KIM ENGLISH Jr. guard

MARCUS DENMON

4 of 12

JESSIE LUECK | GRAPHIC DESIGNER

GRANT HINDSLEY/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Junior guard Kim English takes a moment on the floor of Mizzou Arena during the Tiger’s home game Saturday. The Tiger’s lost 70-66 to the Jayhawks, marking their first and only home loss of the season.

The Tigers were 29 of 35 from the charity stripe on 26 Jayhawk fouls. They also won the turnover battle 24 to 12, with 13 of those Kansas giveaways coming 6on steals. Junior forward Laurence Bowers was a force on both ends of the floor, accounting for five of those Missouri steals and leading all scorers with 22 points. The lanky junior also grabbed a team-high 10 rebounds for his first double-double of Big 12 play. Bowers effort on the boards made little difference as the Jayhawks outrebounded the Tigers 48 to 28, including 16 on the offensive end. Junior forward Thomas Robinson dominated the paint for the visitors. The 240-pound big man finished with 15 points and a game-high 13 rebounds. Junior forwards and twin brothers Marcus and Markieff Morris also grabbed a combined 18 boards. Coach Mike Anderson saw his team lose the battle inside, especially in the second half.

“It seemed like all of a sudden they started hitting the paint,” Anderson said. “It was a five-rebound edge for them at halftime and that turned into 20. The war was won in the paint, and I thought in the second half they really stuck it to us there.” Although the Jayhawks controlled the paint, scoring nearly half of their points inside (34), the Tigers failed to establish an outside game. Junior guard Marcus Denmon finished with 19 points on just four of 12 shooting, and that was one of the better marks. The Jayhawks jumped out to a seven point lead from the opening tip and never looked back. Neither team shot well to start, and they were well on their way to the 51 total fouls. Nearly half of Missouri’s first half points came from the free throws. The Tigers ended the half on an 11-2 run and a last-second tip in from Bowers to make it 32-31 at the break. It was more of the same in the second half. Kansas led by as many as 15 points, but Missouri

refused to go away. The Tigers cut the deficit to four with just over a minute left before Kansas senior guard Tyrel Reed iced the game with a corner three. Reed recalls the play call from the timeout beforehand. “We were in the huddle, and I told coach I was going to knock it down,” Reed said. “He said ‘make the shot,’ so I was happy about that.” The Tigers fall to .500 in conference with their third straight loss (8-8), enough to earn them the No. 6 seed in the Big 12 Tournament. Missouri will play No. 11 Texas Tech at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday. Bowers explained the team’s plan for the postseason. “Win,” he said. “We can’t let it be a carryover. We played with super energy tonight and did a lot of good things, but we also couldn’t make a shot. We have to go into Kansas City with the mindset that this could possibly be our last game.” Visit themaneater.com for audio from the post game press conference.

BASEBALL

Missouri baseball returns home for action-packed schedule NATE ATKINS Staff Writer At this time of the year in Columbia, the smell of freshly cut grass intermingling with the aroma of ballpark brats can only mean one thing: Missouri Tiger baseball is back in full-swing at Taylor Stadium. Absent only of the ideal blueskies setting, Taylor Stadium played host to UIC this past weekend in the Tigers’ return to their home mound. Although the 40-degree overcast failed to offer the warmest of welcomes, the Missouri coaches, players and fans made themselves more than cozy in the stadium they call home. “It was definitely good to

be back at home, in front of our own crowd and in our own backyard,” senior infielder Jesse Santo said. The Tigers returned to take their lumps in a chilled and rainy weekend series with the visiting UIC. The Tiger bats seemed to match the cold environment in dropping two of the three games of a series cut short by Friday’s opening night rain-out. “We’re all cold,” coach Tim Jamieson said. “It’s more about the choices you make. We have to be tougher.” Some of the players reflect Jamieson’s approach of making an effort to ignore the cold. “I don’t really feel the cold weather,” freshman pitcher Rob Zastryzny said. “I’m not really

used to it, coming from South Texas. (But) I didn’t really focus on it.” The targeted toughness will have to come now for the Tigers to have success on their home field. A unique blocked schedule sets the Tigers up with five series’ and 18 games over a 24-day span. Following this weekend’s visit from UIC, the Tigers will play host to Gonzaga, Le Moyne, Central Michigan, Central Arkansas and Oklahoma – all before the calendar turns to April. Many of the Tigers fans embrace the extended stay at home. “It’s always nice to play at home, when you get in front of your home crowd,” senior right fielder Jonah Schmidt said. “We

get to practice here every day. You feel real comfortable playing here, so it’s always nice.” With only three more short home stands totaling 11 games remaining after the current stretch concludes, the time is now for the Tigers to make the most of playing at Taylor Stadium. “When you’re at home, you want to protect your house,” Zastryzny said. The Tigers find themselves struggling to heat up on their own at just 3-7, having dropped all three series’ thus far. An attempt to turn the corner must come right at home – and that’s exactly how the Tigers want to turn things around. As Jamieson put it, “It’s always best to play at home.”


TUESDAY, M A R C H 8 , 2 0 1 1 — T H E M A N E AT E R

SPORTS

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Emotions high as Tigers close season Senior RaeShara Brown became the 29th Tiger to score 1,000 career points. PAT IVERSEN Staff Writer When the final buzzer ended the Missouri women’s basketball team’s win over Iowa State on Saturday, senior RaeShara Brown could hardly contain her excitement. The guard raced across the court to embrace fellow senior Jasmyn Otote, sharing the moment with her closest teammate in the final home game of their careers. “Not everybody gets to come play college ball with their best friend,” Brown said after the game, before pausing to fight back tears. “Me and Jaz have been through a lot. To be able to go out like that, it was an amazing feeling, and I had to let her know that.” Senior night is usually an emotional affair, but Saturday night’s 49-48 victory over Iowa State was an emotional roller coaster from start to finish. After the seniors were honored at midcourt before tip-off, the Tigers battled the Cyclones in a back-and-forth affair that came down to the last play of the game. Junior Christine Flores said the underclassmen fought hard for the seniors that night.  “We want to give this to them,” Flores said. “It feels good for everybody, but I can’t imagine being a senior and going out like this. It’s something special, and we wanted to give that to them.” The night had added importance for Brown. With a layup in the first half, Brown became the 29th player in Missouri women’s basketball history to reach 1,000 points in a career. After the game, she admitted she had a hard time fighting back emotions during the game. “I was fighting emotions coming through that tunnel when they were calling my name,” Brown said. “Coach (Pingeton) almost made me break down, I had to hold it together then. After the game, I got into it a little more with

PETER YANKOWSKY/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Senior guard Jasmyn Otote calls for a timeout during the Tigers’ game against Iowa State on Saturday at Mizzou Arena. The Tigers defeated the Cyclones 49-48.

Jaz and Coach P. I guess there’s more emotion left, so we’ll have to see how that goes.” Brown wasn’t the only senior who played well in the final game, as Shakara Jones and Otote both combined for 13 points on the night. Coach Robin Pingeton called Otote “unselfish,” and Brown expressed praise for her best friend’s performance. “It’s not easy when you’re supposed to be a shooter and you have hard nights shooting the ball,” Brown said. “She does so many other intangible things for our team. She made some great, great plays on defense tonight, and I couldn’t be more happy for

her to come out and contribute the way she did today. In what has been an up-and-down year for the rebuilding Tigers, Pingeton said senior night was a big stepping stone for her team. “For our program today, where we’re at, this is so much bigger than the box score,” Pingeton said. “This is about our seniors laying the foundation for the future of our program as we try to continue to climb our way out of the trenches. I couldn’t be more proud of the way that our senior class has led this team.”

A matchup with Texas awaits the Tigers on Tuesday in the opening round of the Big 12 tournament. Brown said that she’s happy with her senior season, no matter how it ends. “I wouldn’t trade it for the world,” Brown said. “The wins and losses, when you get older, you’ll forget about them. You won’t remember this game or this game but what you will remember is the relationship you built with the people on your team, and I can take that with me forever. I’m not disappointed in this year at all, and I loved every minute of it.”

Tiger gymnasts get into character during routines Each gymnast takes on a different character to add life to each performance. RYAN HOOD Staff Writer

PETER YANKOWSKY/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Sophomore Lauren Swankoski performs on the beam Friday at the Hearnes Center. Swankoski earned her career-high score Friday with a 39.225.  

Dancing and tumbling are two key components of college gymnastics. The Missouri gymnastics squad adds an additional nuance to the sport — gymnast characters. Gargoyles, spider monkeys and superheroes are just a few of the characters that play a critical role in the success of Tiger gymnastics. Each Tiger gymnast has her own character, a role to embody while performing. The gymnasts attempt to fulfill their role both mentally and physically, much like actors in a movie. Junior Mary Burke’s character is a superhero. While performing her floor routine, Burke envisions herself fighting crime and saving the day. Physically, Burke acts the part as well by throwing elbows and tumbling into superhero poses. “Having the character is something to think about while performing. The goal is to embody the traits of the charac-

ter,” Burke said. “The character makes the performance more fun for me and hopefully more entertaining for the crowd.” In addition to Burke’s superhero, other characters on the team include a Broadway character, a cartoon character, a gargoyle and a spider monkey. Assistant coach and team choreographer Amy Smith is the mastermind behind implementing the character aspect into the girls’ routines. Smith, a former All-American gymnast at the University of California — Los Angeles, was introduced to the idea of acting out a role while tumbling from her college coach. “From my experience I thought it gave routines more depth, and the character made it much easier on me as an athlete,” Smith said. Sophomore Tori Howard echoed the sentiments of her coach. “Having the character empowers you. It’s as if you’re not the one dancing, the character is instead,” Howard said. “You can go all out as a different character. You’re not even yourself.” Howard’s character is Maria from “West Side Story”. Howard performs her floor routine to a compilation of songs from West Side Story, music conducive to a very showy, older style of dancing, which is exactly

how the sophomore performs. The gymnasts’ characters are designed to match the music they perform to, in addition to their personality. When paired well, this leads to successful routines for the Tigers. “If they love the music and the idea behind it, the performance is going to be fantastic, which makes my job 10 times easier,” Smith said. “When they really love the combination and want to perform it for their routine, it all comes together very well.” Coach Rob Drass couldn’t be more pleased with the impact Smith and her unique techniques have had on the gymnasts. He gives Smith, whom he regards as “one of the best choreographers in the business,” free-reign when it comes to the character selections, pointing out “that’s her baby.” Drass believes the addition of a character to play helps to alleviate pressure off the gymnasts. “It gives them an alternate persona, which allows them to be more comfortable in some of their movements and helps them project a theme for the routine,” Drass said. “It works, and it works well. The kids understand it, and it’s something we will continue to do.”


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COMICS

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The Maneater -- Volume 77, Issue 42