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ISSUE 116 DISTRIBUTED WITH THE MALTA INDEPENDENT ON SUNDAY

FEBRUARY 2019

FEBRUARY 2019 ISSUE 116

THE STORY OF ROSE

Feast on pies, puddings, tarts, cakes, bakes, desserts Design from Malta, San Francisco & Barcelona


Marina Street, PietĂ

2149 2149

satariano.com


Marina Street, PietĂ

2149 2149

satariano.com


T&F EDITORIAL

FEBRUARY 2019

F

ood is about so much more than mealtimes: the sights and sounds of a food market, the feel of ingredients as you cut, stir, and knead them by hand, the tempting scent of sweet or savoury baking, and the pleasure of the food itself, whether enjoyed alone or in the company of family and friends. In this issue of Taste&Flair, Michael Diacono and Ryan Vella kick off 2019 with homely, wintry dishes that are warmly satisfying. Some of their pies, puddings and tarts can be made ahead, perfect for a lazy family weekend at home. Livia Tabone’s cakes, scones, and brownies delight the eye and are meltin-the-mouth delicious. Drizzled with lemon curd, topped with fresh fruit, flavoured with tea, and dressed with dark and white chocolate, they’ll have Megan Mallia you reaching out for more. You’ll enjoy Claire Borg’s vegan food whether you are a vegan by accident or by design. Her recipes transform the dull and boring image of restricted eating with tasty and tempting dishes. In a month filled with roses, Megan Mallia looks at the history of a flower that has wound its way into art, literature, and cuisine. Lovely to look at and soft to touch, roses add a pleasant scent and flavour to food and drink and our collection of sweet recipes show you how. In our design section, we feature contemporary projects from Malta, Barcelona, and San Francisco. The Barcelona project is a family home inspired by the city’s culturally vibrant life,with an Afro-contemporary feel that mixes raw woods with metals and soft tactile suedes with smooth and shiny surfaces. In San Franciso, we take a look inside – and outside - an architect’s home. Built in the 1920s at the top of Telegraph Hill, the designer-owned home was remodelled around a central staircase leading up to a roof deck with panoramic views that include the famed Golden Gate Bridge. There’s much to be enjoyed in this issue and we look forward to bringing you more next April. The next issue of Taste&Flair will be out on 7th April 2019

The sTory of rose

Feast on pies, puddings, tarts, cakes, bakes, desserts Design from Malta, San Francisco & Barcelona

All communication about Taste&Flair magazine should be directed to Corinne Vella at corinne.vella@gmail.com PUBLISHER

The Daphne Caruana Galizia Foundation c/o 56 Melita Street, Valletta VLT1122, Malta EDITORIAL BOARD

Paul Caruana Galizia Andrew Caruana Galizia Matthew Caruana Galizia EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Corinne Vella

ART DIRECTOR

Ramon Micallef +356 9949 1418 ram@box-design.net ADVERTISING MANAGER & EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTOR

Sean Ellul +356 7921 0705 or 21 345 888 ext 123 sellul@independent.com.mt ADVERTISING ASSISTANT

Christine Mifsud +356 21 345 888 ext 138 cmifsud@independent.com.mt PRODUCTION MANAGER

André Camilleri

PRODUCTION ASSISTANT

Conrad Bondin

PREPRESS & PRINTING

Print It

Distributed with The Malta Independent on Sunday*. The Malta Independent on Sunday is published by Standard Publications Ltd tel +356 21 345 888 *The surcharge on The Malta Independent on Sunday, or any charge for this magazine is retained by Standard Publications Ltd.

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ISSUE 116 FEBRUARY 2019

Livia Tabone’s beetroot & orange Marmalade Cake See feature starting on page 30. Photo by Brian Grech

Editorial

ISSUE 116 distributed with the malta independent on sunday


Sole Distributors: Carmelo Abela Marketing Ltd, Triq L-Intornjatur, Imriehel By-Pass, Birkirkara. t. +356 2148 0201 | e. info@abelamkt.com


T&F CONTENTS

CONTENTS

FOOD

ART & DESIGN

15

Pies, puddings, and tarts by Michael Diacono and Ryan Vella

30

Spectacular sweets Livia Tabone’s cakes and bakes

Golden dream Seville orange marmalade

Budapest Claire Borg’s market tour

The story of rose Megan Mallia on a perennially favourite flower

Very vegan Claire Borg’s creative take

63

86 97

Designer’s home Hilltop in San Francisco

Contemporary design Barcelona apartment

112

50

New into old The Coach House

45

42

76

Exhibition Oriental visions: from dreams into light

Rick Lighthelm

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ISSUE 116 FEBRUARY 2019


T&F SOUP

SERVES

HEALTHY, QUICK AND EASY CHICKEN AND RICE SOUP INGREDIENTS

2 chicken quarters 1 white onion 2 small leeks 2 large potatoes 2 carrots 2 tomatoes 1 stick of celery or a few bay leaves to taste 3 litres of water 120g wholegrain rice extra-virgin olive oil salt and pepper chili pepper to taste

10

1. Boil the wholegrain rice for half the cooking

time given on the packet, strain and put aside. 2. Chop the onion and leeks and fry gently in extra-virgin

olive oil with a pinch of salt and black pepper. When the onion has turned golden brown, add the chicken quarters and sear on both sides. Next, shred the chicken meat and add to a saucepan, together with the onion, leeks, chopped potatoes and carrots and grated tomatoes and cover with plenty of water. Add salt to taste. 3. When it comes to the boil, add the rice and

cook for the remaining cooking time. Serve hot with a little chilli pepper to taste.

ISSUE 116 FEBRUARY 2019

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Open on Su

Carte ndays & Chars Tarxien in Fgu ra

...for all the family 2256 2256

info@chainmarket.com www.chainmarket.com


T&F PROMOTION

In The Kitchen… at

Le Bistro

Le Bistro’s new chef Stefan Mejlak is bringing an exciting menu to the popular St Julian’s eatery, with a focus on fresh, seasonal fare and dishes to suit every diet. e Bistro – housed within the Radisson Blu Resort, St Julian’s – has long been known as a restaurant that delivers on every level. From the beautiful view looking right out to sea, to the constantlychanging menu that is always fresh, seasonal and pleasing, it makes for an excellent dining choice, whatever the company or occasion. And now Le Bistro is getting even better, thanks to chef Stefan Mejlak taking the helm, perfecting what’s on offer and introducing a new menu. There is no doubt that chef Mejlak has a wealth of experience in the kitchen. He didn’t actually plan to have a career in catering but, having given the sector a try when he was just 16, he found he absolutely loved it. “Those early days of endlessly peeling potatoes weren’t necessarily full of fun but I soon found myself really enjoying making food for people,” he says. “I like catering because it’s like working in art and design. There are constant challenges. You have to keep learning to stay at the top of your game.” Stefan first joined Le Bistro kitchen when he was 20 and he says he feels like he grew up there. “I enjoyed working with all the different chefs, absorbing knowledge from them, and being in a busy environment. It’s always been a popular restaurant, and that certainly hasn’t changed today.” So, after an active few years where he took on a vast range of culinary challenges – including the opening of a new à la carte restaurant and later a role within a hotel’s main kitchen – Stefan says he’s thrilled to be back at Le Bistro – this time at its helm. “I feel like I am back at home,” he smiles. “And I absolutely love what Le Bistro stands for – fresh, local food that evolves over the days and months to reflect what’s in season, and which is available all day from noon to 10.30pm. Plus we have options to suit all tastes, including delicious meat dishes, fish, and pasta, and plenty of vegetarian and vegan options.” And although he’s busy working on the new Le Bistro menu which will be unveiled soon, Stefan has found time to discover his favourites on the current menu. “That would have to be the slow-cooked lamb on a bed of savoy cabbage in a red wine jus,” he says. “It’s delicious, and I highly recommend it for your next visit. “Meanwhile, I certainly hope that people have an amazing time at Le Bistro, and that they enjoy the experience – from the warm bread served with our homemade kunserva and garlic butter, all the way up to the desserts made by our pastry chef Erin. And if you haven’t been yet, now’s the time to give us a try,” he adds with a smile.

Every dish is made using only the freshest local ingredients.

A wide selection of Vegan dishes to complement the a la carte menu.

Le Bistro's famous Pulled Hbejza.

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PROMOTION T&F

Both indoor and outdoor dining is available.

Le Bistro is open daily from noon to 10.30pm. To book your table, call on 21374894 or visit www.lebistromalta.com. Free parking is available to diners on a first-come, first-served basis.

Chef Stefan Mejlak

Make sure to leave room for these delicious, freshly made desserts.

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COMFORT FOOD T&F

PIES, PUDDINGS AND TARTS

Start 2019 with a selection of wintry, stay at home kind of dishes which are warming, flavoursome and satisfying. Some of these recipes might seem a bit fiddly, but crack open a bottle and get cooking. They are worth the effort. Michael Diacono, chef patron, and Ryan Vella, sous chef at Giuseppi’s Bar and Bistro. PHOTOGRAPHY AND STYLING: BRIAN GRECH, ASSISTED BY STEPHEN AZZOPARDI

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T&F COMFORT FOOD

Chicken, aubergine & pie pie Rich shortcrust pastry encasing a tasty filling - what’s there not to like?

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SERVES

6

PASTRY

800g plain flour • 370g unsalted butter, cold and diced ½ tsp salt • 6-8 tablespoons cold water FILLING

1 aubergine, cut into 1cm cubes • 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 tablespoon butter • 2 leeks, cleaned and chopped into 2cm dice 200g pancetta, diced • 2 carrots, peeled and diced • 8 boneless chicken thighs, cubed Salt and pepper • a few thyme sprigs • 1 glass Madiera • 100g fresh breadcrumbs 80g grated pecorino • a handful of parsley, chopped 2 eggs, lightly beaten • sesame seeds to top


COMFORT FOOD T&F

1. Place the flour into a food processor

3. Meanwhile heat the extra virgin

5. Divide the pastry into 2 - one

and blitz. Add salt and the cubed butter and process till the mixture resembles breadcrumbs, then add just enough water to bring together. Remove to a lightly floured surface and use your hands to knead gently. Form the dough into a firm ball and wrap it in plastic bag. Place the bag in the fridge to rest for at least 1 hour.

olive oil and butter together. Add the leeks, pancetta and carrots. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring often. Add the chicken and season. Stir fry till coloured then add some thyme and the Madeira wine. Let the mixture reduce, then turn off the heat and let it cool completely.

piece of approximately 700g and the other of about 400g.

2. Place the cubed aubergine onto a

large baking tray. Drizzle with extra virgin olive oil and some water. Season with salt, then bake at 200C for 20 minutes till browned.

4. Add the aubergine to the

cooled chicken mix together with the breadcrumbs, cheese and parsley. Mix very well then add the eggs, but keep some back to use later as a glaze for the top.

6. Heat the oven to 190C/Mk5 7. Roll out the larger piece of pastry

and use it to line a 30cm pie round pie case. Fill with the cold chicken mix. Roll out the 2nd piece of pastry and cut it into strips. Use it to form a lattice pattern over the pie. Trim the edges and press together. Use the reserved egg to glaze the pastry and sprinkle sesame seeds over the top. 8. Bake for 40 to 45 minutes

till golden brown.

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T&F COMFORT FOOD

SERVES

Globe artichoke, broad bean and fennel loaf I like to buy raw bread dough from my baker and use it in many ways, but this is certainly one of my favourites. YOU WILL NEED

1kg raw Maltese bread dough from a good baker 4 large artichokes extra virgin olive oil 2 fennel bulbs, cleaned and sliced (as you would an onion) 4 cloves garlic chilli pepper 500g shelled broad beans salt and pepper 100g peas a good handful of parsley, chopped 40g pine nuts Bottarga to serve (optional)

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1. Clean the artichokes from the outer

bracts, trim the stalk and peel the base. Cut into quarters and place into a bowl of water with some lemon juice. 2. Heat about 6 tablespoons of extra

virgin olive oil in a large pot. Add the sliced fennel and chopped garlic. Stir fry for about 5 minutes to soften then add the drained artichokes. Mix well. Add some chilli and the broad beans. Season with salt and pepper. Add 250ml of water. Stir, cover and simmer gently for about 20 to 25 minutes till the vegetables are tender. Add the

peas and chopped parsley and cook for a further 5 minutes. Leave to cool before adding the pine nuts. 3. Heat the oven to 200C/mk6. 4. Oil a large 28cm round cake tin.

Place the dough into it and use damp hands to spread out and up the sides leaving a well in the middle. Fill with the artichokes mix. Brush the edges with olive oil and bake for 40 minutes till well risen. Remove from the oven, cool slightly and serve with shaved bottarga to garnish.

8


! e v o m d o Go

Attard & Co. Food Ltd. Tel: 21 237555 facebook.com/attardcowines


T&F COMFORT FOOD

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COMFORT FOOD T&F

Steak & Ale Pudding This is really easy to prepare and quite dramatic to serve in the middle of the table on a cold Sunday for lunch. The pudding can be made on the Saturday, leaving Sunday morning nice and easy. SERVES

4

PASTRY

500g self-raising flour 250g shredded suet 1 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon baking powder 300ml ice cold water

2. Butter a 1.5 litre pudding bowl.

Roll out ž of the pastry on a well floured surface and use to line the bowl, making sure that you leave at least 1cm overhang all around. 3. Carefully pour out the sauce from

FILLING

1 large onion, chopped 50g lardo, cubed 100g pancetta, cubed 2 tablespoons olive oil 600g stewing steak, cut into 3cm dice 2 tablespoons flour 1 teaspoon mustard powder 3 parsnips, peeled and cubed 500ml milk stout 300ml beef stock 4 thyme sprigs and 2 bay leaves

the beef into a small saucepan and keep it aside. Fill the lined basin with the filling then add about 100ml of the reserved sauce. Fold the overhang over and brush with water. Roll out the rest of the pastry into a round shape and use it to cover the pudding. Press down around the edge to seal. 4. Cut a round piece of baking paper

and butter it well. Place butter side down over the pudding then cover with a double layer of foil. Tie with string to secure. Your pudding is now ready for steaming. 5. Place a round cookie cutter into a

pot large enough to hold the pudding basin comfortably and place the pudding onto this. The cutter acts as a trivet and protects the bottom of the bowl from the intense heat. 6. Fill up the pot till ž up the basin.

1. Heat a pot and add the onion, lardo

and pancetta. Stir fry for 5 minutes, then remove to a bowl. Mix the flour with the mustard powder and use it to coat the beef cubes. Add the olive oil to the pot and add the beef. Brown the meat all over before returning the fried onion mix to the pot. Add the parsnips, stout, stock and herbs. Bring to the boil then cover, lower the heat and simmer gently for about 90 minutes till the meat is tender, then remove the pot from the heat and let it cool.

Place onto the heat and bring to the boil. Lower the heat, cover the pot and steam for 2 hours always topping up with water as needed. 7. To serve, run a knife around

the edge and turn out onto a warmed serving plate. Serve with the reheated reserved sauce.

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COMFORT FOOD T&F

Monkfish, black olive and chive pastries

Living in Rabat has many advantages, not least a great baker round the corner and a wonderful pastizzerija around the other corner. In this recipe, we used pastizzi dough. YOU WILL NEED

800g raw pastizzi dough • extra virgin olive oil 2 onions, peeled and sliced • Chilli (as much as you dare) 4 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped • salt and pepper 500g monkfish, diced (or other white fish fillet) 100ml dry white wine • 8 black olives, chopped grated rind of ½ lemon • 150g cheddar, grated 1 teaspoon fennel seeds • 2 tablespoon chopped chives

MAKES

12

1. Heat the extra virgin olive oil in a large frying pan and add

the sliced onions. Cook for 8 minutes, then add the garlic and chilli. Fry for 2 minutes. Toss in the diced fish. Season, stir, then add the wine. Leave to reduce, then turn off the heat, let the mixture cool and then add the rest of the ingredients. 2. Heat the oven to 220C/ mk7. 3. Cut the pastry into 12 portions and roll out into

circles. Fill each one with stuffing and shape using your hands. Place onto baking paper lined trays. Cook for 25 minutes till golden and flaky.

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T&F COMFORT FOOD

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COMFORT FOOD T&F

Quail & Rabbit pies SERVES

10

Rich, tasty, satisfying and sumptuous, this dish is a pain to prepare but worth the effort. For the shoot we made small portionsized pies and so used ditalini pasta. If making a large single timballo, you may use a larger shape like macaroni or rigatoni. JUS

100ml olive oil 500g beef trimmings 8 chicken wings 300ml dry white wine 100ml dry vermouth 2 bay leaves 1 onion, peeled and finely chopped 1 carrot, peeled and finely chopped 2 large sprigs of local celery, chopped leaves and all FILLING

1kg pasta (ditalini or macaroni) 50g dried porcini mushrooms, soaked in warm water 100ml extra virgin olive oil 2 onions, finely chopped 400g boneless quail meat, chopped 400g boneless rabbit meat, chopped 100g chicken livers, chopped 300g chicken or duck hearts, chopped 300g guanciale, cubed salt and pepper 200ml dry white wine 10 eggs, hard boiled. You will only need the yolks, roughly chopped 150g grated Parmesan 600g short crust pastry 400g puff pastry 1egg, lightly beaten to glaze butter to grease

1. Start off by preparing the jus and

3. Heat the olive oil in a large pot

and fry the onions till soft. Add the chopped quail and rabbit and cook for 10 minutes before adding the livers and hearts. Season. Drain the porcini (keep the soaking water), chop them and then add to the pot. Cook, stirring often, for 5 minutes, then add the guanciale and wine. Reduce the wine and then add the reserved porcini water. Cook down for 10 minutes. 4. Add the jus and the hard

boiled eggs. Mix in gently. Turn off the heat and set aside. 5. Boil the pasta in plently of

salted water for just over half the recommended cooking time. Drain and cool with cold water. 6. Now either butter a 25cm round,

12cm high dish or 10 dariole moulds. 7. Roll out the short crust pastry

on a floured surface till about 4mm thick and use it to line your prepared dish. Leave a small overhang. 8. Mix the pasta with the sauce and add

the grated cheese. Check the seasoning and adjust, if necessary. Spoon the mixture into the pastry-lined dish.

preheating the oven to 180C/mk4.

9. Roll out the puff pastry on a floured

2. Heat the oil in an oven-proof casserole

surface till about 5mm thick. Brush the overhang with egg wash.

dish. Add the beef trimmings and fry for a few minutes to brown well all over. Pour in the wine and vermouth. Add the herbs and vegetables. Cover and place into the oven for 1 hour. Strain through a large sieve and leave to collect all the juices. Discard the trimmings and vegetables.

10. Cover with the puff pastry and press down on the edge to seal well. Trim. Brush all over with egg wash and prick with a fork several times. 11. Bake at 200C/Mk 6. Small pies will take about 20/25 minutes while a large one would need about 40/45 minutes.

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T&F COMFORT FOOD

Lemon Curd Puddings

SERVES

8

I love desserts that have lemon as the main star, such as a classic lemon tart or a lemon meringue pie, but in the cold of winter a hot pudding served with loads of whipped cream is a sure winner. LEMON CURD

grated rind and juice of 4 large locally-grown lemons 300g sugar • 8 large eggs 200g unsalted butter PUDDING

You will need 8 dariole moulds 35x60mm COOKING SPRAY

1 sliced loaf of toasting bread 200g unsalted butter, softened but not melted 8 teaspoons raspberry jam 75ml limoncello 400ml fresh cream, whipped

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1. Place the sugar and lemon rind

into a large heat-proof bowl. Crack the eggs into a bowl and mix with the lemon juice, then add to the sugar. Mix well. Cut the butter into little cubes and add to the egg mix. Place over a pot of boiling water, and stirring continuously, cook till thickened. This should take about 10 to 12 minutes. Remove from the heat and cool.

Cut thick strips to line the sides. Place a round of bread to cover the base of each mould then use the strips to line. Place a teaspoon of jam into each followed by a tablespoon of lemon curd. Use the trimmings to make a thin layer of bread. Add another tablespoon of curd then cover with the larger rounds of bread. Drizzle the puddings with the limoncello. Cover with baking paper then with foil.

2. Coat your moulds well with cooking

3. Heat oven to 180C/Mk 4. Warm

spray. Remove the crust from the sliced loaf and butter each slice generously. Cut 8 rounds to fit the bases and larger ones to cover the tops. Keep the trimmings.

the puddings for 20 minutes then turn out. Dust with icing sugar and serve with the whipped cream.


COMFORT FOOD T&F

Baked Custard Tart These are so simple to make, yet totally yummy. TART CASE

800g plain flour 100g cocoa powder 400g sugar 200g unsalted butter, cold and cut into cubes 2 eggs milk if needed FILLING

500ml cream 200ml milk 150g sugar 1 vanilla pod 3 eggs 4 egg yolks

SERVES

10-12

1. Prepare the pastry by sifting the

3. Place the cream and milk into a pot.

flour and cocoa together into a large mixing bowl. Add in the sugar. Rub in the butter. Lightly beat the eggs, then add to the mix. Bring together and add just a little milk if needed. Do not over knead. Wrap the dough in plastic and rest it in the fridge for at least 1 hour.

Add the sugar. Slice the pod down the middle lengthways and scrape out the seeds. Place both the pod and seeds into the cream. Place on the heat and warm gently till it reaches boiling point.

2. Lightly grease a 30cm flan dish. Heat

oven to 180C/Mk 4. Sift cocoa over your work surface and roll out the pastry. Line the flan dish with the pastry leaving an overhang all around. Cover with baking paper and fill with baking beans or rice. Bake for 10 minutes then remove the weights and paper and bake for a further 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and lower the oven temperature to 120C/mk1

4. Meanwhile, crack the eggs into a

large bowl and add the egg yolks. Whisk lightly. Pour the hot cream through a fine sieve onto the eggs, whisking all the time. It might help to have someone to assist at this point as it is very important to stir continuously. 5. Pour the custard into the baked pastry

and very carefully transfer to the oven. It might be easier to fill the tart in the oven. Bake for 40 minutes till just set. 6. To serve, sprinkle with sugar

and burn using a blow torch to create a crunchy, caramel glaze.

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PROMOTION T&F

Wine Maker Profile

FAOUZI ISSA

Domaine Des Tourelles I

wine making process while still preserving the authentic taste of Lebanon’s “terroir”. These techniques along with fruit from 99 acres of ancient, organically cultivated and dry-farmed vineyards make Domaine des Tourelles one of the finest boutique wineries in the Middle East. Available in over 10 countries, including Malta, Domaine des Tourelles remains a must to enter the charming world of Lebanese wines.

n recent years, Lebanon’s passion for wine has become synonymous with their culture. A passion, Faouzi Issa, coowner and winemaker at the 150-year old Domaine des Tourelles embodies in all its entirety. Founded in 1868 by French adventurer François-Eugène Brun, Domaine Des Tourelles is now one of the most highly acclaimed and oldest wineries still operating in Lebanon. The Brun Family owned and operated the winery up until the last descendant died in 2003, when it was then taken over by two local families the Issa and Issa el-Khoury families. Today, this bekka valley estate is run by Faouzi and his sisters alongside Émile Issa-El-Khoury. Bringing the knowledge and experience he gained from having previously worked at the Chateau Marguax in Bordeaux and René Rostaing in the Rhone, Faouzi introduced a handful of new practices in the vineyards and cellar, embodying a minimal intervention approach. In fact, they only use indigenous yeast for fermentation, fermenting the white and rose wines in stainless steel vats while the red wines ferment and rest in the concrete vats that line the walls of this historic winery. These concrete vats are very rare in Lebanese wineries but provide the best biological for a natural

Faouzi Issa will be coming to Malta to host P.Cutajar’s first Wine and Dine event of 2019, in collaboration with Ali Baba. Guests will be treated to a 5-course meal prepared by Chef Patron Hany Harb and wine carefully selected from Domaine des Tourelles to complement each dish. Learn more about P.Cutajar’s upcoming Wine & Dine events on their Wine Club Malta Facebook page.

ISSUE 116 FEBRUARY 2019

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T&F TEATIME

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ISSUE 116 FEBRUARY 2019


TEATIME T&F

Spectacular

SWEETS

Livia Tabone’s cakes are a carnival of colour and flavour that will have you reaching out for more. PHOTOGRAPHY AND STYLING: BRIAN GRECH

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T&F TEATIME

Lemon Layer Cake WITH GINGER CURD This makes a stunning centerpiece but is surprisingly easy to prepare.

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TEATIME T&F

CAKE

360g butter, at room temperature 360g sugar 6 eggs 360g self raising flour zest from 3 lemons 2 teaspoons ground ginger FROSTING

100g icing sugar, sifted 1 tablespoon lemon juice 2 packs of cream cheese 1 jar good quality store-bought lemon curd thumb-size piece fresh ginger, finely minced TO DECORATE

icing sugar fresh lemon zest

1. Begin by preheating the oven to 180 degrees, then

grease and line three 20cm cake tins with baking paper. 2. To make the layer cake, in the bowl of your electric

mixer, combine the butter, sugar and lemon zest and beat until light and fluffy, scraping down the sides of the bowl as necessary. Next add the eggs slowly, one at a time and beat until all the egg is incorporated. Sift the flour on top of the mixture and fold in gently. 3. Pour the cake mix evenly into the tins and

bake for about 25-30 minutes or until the sponge springs back when lightly pressed. Set aside to cool completely, then remove from the tins. 4. To make the frosting, in a medium bowl combine

the cream cheese, icing sugar and lemon juice and beat with a fork until well combined. Sift in more icing sugar according to taste, if desired. Transfer your minced ginger into the jar of lemon curd and stir well. 5. To assemble the layer cake, place the base layer onto

a cake stand and apply an even spread of cream cheese frosting, then spread the curd over the cream cheese. Repeat the process with the second layer. Place the third cake layer onto the top of the cake and simply dust with icing sugar and sprinkle on the lemon zest.

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T&F TEATIME

CHERRY ALMOND

Bakewell Tart Serve this warm or at room temperature

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TEATIME T&F

FOR THE PASTRY CASE

225g plain flour, plus extra for dusting 150g butter, chilled and cubed 25g icing sugar 1 egg, beaten TART FILLING

180g butter, softened 180g caster sugar 3 eggs 180g ground almonds 200g cherry jam TO DECORATE

Handful of fresh cherries 25g flaked almonds, toasted icing sugar to dust

1. For the pastry, measure the

flour and icing sugar into a bowl and rub in the butter using your fingertips until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs. Add the egg and keep kneading to form soft dough. Place the pastry into a clean plastic bag and let it rest in the fridge for 20 minutes or so. 2. On a lightly floured surface, roll

out the pastry to the thickness of 6mm, then drape it into a buttered 23cm loose-bottomed tart pan. Return it to the fridge for 20 minutes. 3. Heat the oven to 180 degrees.

Prick the pastry base all over with a fork, line it with baking parchment and fill it with baking beans. Bake for 15 minutes, then remove the baking beans and parchment and cook for 5 minutes more. Remove the pastry shell from the oven and set it aside. 4. While the pastry case cools

slightly, prepare the filling. Beat the butter and sugar together until they are light and fluffy. Beat in the eggs, one at a time, then stir in the ground almonds. Spread the jam over the base of the pastry case, then spread the almond filling evenly on top of the jam and level it out with a spatula. 5. Bake for 35–40 minutes until the

filling is firm and golden brown, then transfer the tart to a wire rack to cool. When ready to serve, sprinkle over the toasted almonds, dust with icing sugar and dot the cherries around the tart to decorate.

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T&F TEATIME

BEETROOT & ORANGE

Marmalade Cake FOR THE CAKE

180g butter 180g sugar • 3 eggs 180g self-raising flour 2 heaped tablespoons thick-cut marmalade zest of one orange a heaped tablespoon of beetroot powder (available from all good health shops) TO DECORATE

70g icing sugar, sifted 1 teaspoon beetroot powder tub of cream cheese half a jar of thickcut marmalade fresh orange slices

1. Heat the oven to 180 degrees and grease and

line a loaf tin with baking parchment. 2. Beat the butter and sugar with an electric whisk until

pale and fluffy then beat in the eggs one at a time. Fold in the flour and beetroot powder until just incorporated. Add the marmalade and orange zest, and mix again. 3. Transfer the mixture into your lined baking

pan and level out the surface. 4. Bake the cake for 45-50 minutes until well risen, then leave to

cool slightly in the tin before turning out onto a wire rack. Once the cake has cooled completely, transfer it to your serving plate. 5. Next prepare the frosting by adding the icing sugar and beetroot

powder together and mixing well to get an even colour. Add the mix to a large bowl together with the cream cheese and beat with a fork until well blended. Add a splash of milk to loosen the frosting, if necessary. 6. Spread the frosting onto the surface of the cake, then

dollop generous spoonfuls of marmalade over the cream cheese, decorate with fresh orange slices and serve.

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T&F TEATIME

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TEATIME T&F

Dark Chocolate BROWNIES WITH BLACKBERRIES FOR THE BROWNIES

145g salted butter, cubed 200g sugar 75g cocoa powder 2 tablespoons of warm water 2 eggs 60g plain flour FOR THE FROSTING

60g unsalted butter, at room temperature 30g cocoa powder 250g icing sugar, sifted 3-4 tablespoons milk TO DECORATE

1 punnet of blackberries

1. Line an 8�x8� brownie pan

with baking paper and preheat the oven to 180 degrees. 2. Place the butter in a microwave-

safe bowl and microwave for about 1 minute until it has completely melted. Immediately add the sugar, cocoa, and warm water, whisking vigorously with a handheld whisk. 3. Next, whisk in the eggs, one at a

time, and keep whisking for a minute or so until the mixture thickens. Finally add the flour and whisk again until all the flour has turned chocolatey. 4. Tip the brownie mix into the pan and

level out the top. Bake for 30 minutes or until the top has formed a shell while the centre remains moist. Set the brownie cake aside on a wire rack until completely cooled before attempting to lift it out onto a chopping board. 5. In the meantime, prepare the

frosting. Add the butter to the bowl of your stand mixer and beat until smooth. Sift in the cocoa powder and icing sugar and beat on low speed, gradually increasing the speed until a smooth consistency is reached. If the icing is too thick, gradually add the milk, bit by bit, until the mixture reaches the desired consistency. 6. Spread the frosting onto the large

brownie square, then using a long sharp knife cut the frosted brownies into smaller squares or rectangles. Arrange the slabs of brownies on a serving plate and decorate with blueberries. For a frosted effect, store a few of the blueberries in the freezer and put them on the brownies just before serving.

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T&F TEATIME

Matcha Tea and White Chocolate SCONES

A new twist on an old teatime favourite, serve the matcha scones fresh out of the oven and drizzled with white chocolate, or let them cool down and then split them and spread the cut side with cream cheese and lemon curd. FOR THE SCONES

350g plain flour 4 teaspoons baking powder 2 tablespoons matcha powder pinch of salt 4 tablespoons sugar 85g cold butter, cubed 150g plain full-fat yogurt 4 tablespoons full-fat milk 50g white chocolate chunks TO DECORATE

50g white chocolate, cut into small squares

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1. Preheat the oven to 220C. 2. Put the flour, salt, matcha, baking

powder, sugar and butter into a food processor and whizz until the butter is completely blended in. Alternatively, rub the mentioned ingredients between your finger tips until you achieve the same end result. The mixture should resemble coarse bread crumbs. 3. Tip the mix into a large bowl and

make a well in the middle. Measure out the yogurt and milk into a microwavesafe bowl and heat in the microwave for 1 minute until hot and curdled. Tip the yogurt into the well of the dry ingredients and work quickly, using a cutlery knife, to cut the flour mix into the milk. It’s important not to over mix. As soon as the mixture’s combined, stop mixing.

4. Tip the dough onto a floured surface

and sprinkle over 50g of the white chocolate chunks. With floured hands, fold the dough over a few times – just enough to achieve a smooth dough. With the help of a rolling pin, create a circle measuring about 4cm thick in height. 5. Using a large, sharp knife cut the circle

into quarters. Then cut each triangle in half. Transfer the scones onto a lined baking dish, spread evenly apart and bake until risen (about 12 minutes). 6. Once the scones are out of the oven

and cool to the touch, melt 50g of white chocolate in the microwave or in a heat proof bowl over a simmering pan of water. Using a teaspoon, generously drizzle the scones with white chocolate and serve immediately.


T&F PRESERVES

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PRESERVES T&F

GOLDEN DREAM PHOTO: BRIAN GRECH

The current crop of Seville oranges is perfect for home-made marmalade. Seal the jars while they’re still hot, then let them cool down properly. The marmalade will keep in a cool, dark place for up to 12 months while sealed, or for up to 6 weeks if stored in a fridge.

Plain marmalade 4 medium Seville oranges, unwaxed 2.75 litres of water 2 Kg sugar, warmed

1. Cut the oranges into quarters

Marmalade with scented water and almonds

and then slice them very thinly. Remove the seeds from the fruit and tie them into a small clean square of muslin. Soak the orange slices and cloth-wrapped seeds in water overnight in a glass or ceramic bowl.

6 Seville oranges 2 lemons 3.5 litres water 2.2 Kg sugar 60ml rosewater or orange blossom water 50g flaked almonds, toasted

2. The next day, tip the sliced fruit,

1. Cut and slice the fruit

cloth-wrapped seeds, and the now-flavoured water into a large pan. Set it on a medium heat until the liquid starts to boil. Reduce the heat and cover the pot, letting the liquid simmer until the fruit tenderises (around 45 minutes).

thinly, reserving the pips and soak both fruit and pips in water for up to 24 hours.

3. Now add 1 cup of warmed sugar

for every cup of fruit mix. Stir the mixture over a low heat until the sugar dissolves (around 5 minutes). Don’t let the liquid boil. While it simmers, remove any scum that rises to the surface using a draining spoon. 4. To check whether the marmalade’s

ready to set, scoop up some of the mix using a wooden spoon and tilt it back into the pan. If the marmalade drips off the spoon, let it cook for a bit longer. When it starts to fall off the spoon in thick sheets, test whether it’s reached setting point by dropping a dollop onto a cold plate and putting it in a freezer for 30 seconds. If the surface wrinkles when you push it with your finger, the marmalade’s ready for bottling.

2. Tip the fruit and liquid into a pan,

wrap the pips in a muslin bag and add to the pan. Bring to the boil and then lower the heat and simmer for 2 hours. Add the sugar and stir until it dissolves. Remove the bag of pips and squeeze it out into the pan to extract the pectin. Bring the pan back to the boil and let it continue boiling for 25 minutes or until the marmalade reaches setting point (test as in the previous recipe). 3. Remove the pan from the heat and

remove the frothy scum from the surface of the marmalade. Stir in the rosewater or orange blossom water and almonds and let the pan rest for 10 minutes. Skim the surface again and then spoon the marmalade into clean and warmed preserving jars.

5. Remove the pan from the heat,

skim any remaining scum from the marmalade’s surface, and discard the seed bag. Spoon the marmalade into clean, warmed jars and seal with waxed paper discs.

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TRAVEL T&F

TOURING BUDAPEST’S FOOD MARKETS Budapest is an absolutely gorgeous city for a short break. With cheap and regular flights from Malta, it’s a perfect getaway, and a wonderful destination for food lovers. TEXT AND PHOTOGRAPHY: CLAIRE BORG

Budapest turned out to be an exciting city full of delicious foods. Unless you have friends to show you around, or you have planned ahead, your first meal in Budapest is a bit hit or miss. In my case, it was a miss. Too tired and disorientated, you just fall into whatever looks decent but turns out to be anything but. After a disappointing first meal, I decided to transform my stay in the city and booked myself a foodie tour with Orsi, a guide who showed me the best of Budapest. We visited the most amazing local markets, where no one speaks a word of English, with lovely local people, smiling faces, and counters of home-made artisanal foods, home grown vegetables and glistening pickled vegetables.

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T&F TRAVEL

Sour cream is a big thing in the markets. Everything is smothered in it, even if it’s not part of the recipe. Smoked meats, paprika and chilli sausages (kolbasz) are another staple. Paprika is a very important ingredient, eaten sweet, hot and smoked. The pickled vegetables are a tempting selection of many different varieties. Little stalls sell just pickles from big tubs of pickled cabbage, to plums, tomatoes, baby cucumbers and baby watermelons. There are stalls selling traditional cakes and pastries; others selling root vegetables. I discovered parsley root – something I had never seen for sale anywhere – which is used in soups. Like paprika, peppers are a main ingredient in Hungarian cuisine. Long, round, sweet, hot, big, small, yellow, white, red and green, they’re piled in mounds on market stalls where the prices are right and the produce is genuine. The Great Market Hall targets tourists, with a top floor dedicated to food stalls where traditional home cooked food is served at a cheap price in cheap polystyrene plates. It doesn’t look like much, but the flavours are absolutely mind blowing: cabbage stew with sausage and peppers, cabbage rolls (Töltött Kaposzta), goulash, and chicken paprikash (Paprikás Csirke) are all washed down with a glass of cold local beer.

Claire’s recommendations Parenica: Smoked cheese from Slovakia. Gulyás leves: Goulash soup, with beef, potatoes, dumplings and spices.

Gomolya: White thick rubbery cheese, eaten fresh or grilled with seasonings.

Babgulyás: Heavy bean soup, with smoked pork meat.

Aged flavored cheeses: from cow and goat milk likely spiced either with chili, dill, garlic, pepper, dill, parsley or caraway seeds.

Gyümölcs leves: Cold fruit soup, usually made from cherries. Kovászolt uborka krém leves: Creamy cold pickle soup.

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Körözött: Cottage cheese spread with caraway seeds and paprika spice.

Töpörtyü: Fried pork skin that can be also served as a spread, Töpörtyűkrém. Száraz kolbász: Dried sausage that can be csípős (spicy) or csemege (not spicy/mild) and can be made out of pork, venison, or wild boar. Savanyúság: Pickled vegetables, on menus usually listed with the salads, can be cabbage, gherkin, different peppers, beetroot, baby watermelon, garlic, cauliflowers, etc. Lángos: Fried dough, usually eaten with sour cream, cheese and garlic.

Pörkölt: Hungarian stews, made with different bases like pork, venison, beef, chicken, mushroom, or wild boar. Paprikás: Stew with sour cream thickening, usually chicken, mushroom, pork or veal. Nokedli or Galuska: Small white dumplings, served as a side dish with stews or with eggs, Tojásosnokedli, or Sztrapacska, cottage cheese made from goats milk.  Lecsó: Hungarianstyle Ratatouille made with onions, tomatoes, and peppers and with sausage or eggs.


TRAVEL T&F

The stalls outside the market mostly served mulled wines, chocolates and gifts. However the two must-visits were stalls selling lángos and chimney cake. The lángos is a savoury deep fried dough topped with sour cream and shredded cheese. It tastes heavenly when fresh and properly cooked. The chimney cake, made of dough rolled onto a tube, sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar and toasted on hot coals is prepared, cooked and delivered hot to your hands in a few minutes. It takes its name from its chimney-like shape handed to you when it’s still smoking like, well, a chimney. Orsi and I visited a butcher which was more than a place to buy fresh meat. Some butchers in Budapest will cook your food too, offering grilled sausages and meats with salad. The blood sausage, duck liver sausage and traditional Budapest sausage were intensely flavoursome, served with a delicious mustard and bread. Unsurprisingly, Budapest cuisine is quite heavy and very meaty, and no part of any animal is wasted. Duck and goose livers are a big favourite and at meat counters you can find anything from duck heads to chicken feet Strudel shops were another favourite find. Yes, there really are shops selling nothing but strudel in many varieties, freshly baked and served warm: cherry and rice pudding, apple and blueberry, raspberry and poppy seed paste are among the flavours on offer. If you visit, I’d recommend hiring a personal guide. There’s so much to eat and not enough time to try it all. Take your time to enjoy Budapest. It’s best to come hungry.

Disznótoros: Different kinds of sausage are plain, liver and blood, pork, often served with a healthy portion of mustard, bread, pickles, boiled cabbage, or potatoes. Tarhonya: Couscous-style dumplings are usually served as a side dish with stews. It can also be main dish like Tarhonyáshús, mixed with boiled potatoes, grilled sausages and vegetables. Hortobágyi palacsinta: Savoury pancakes filled with chicken meat and served with paprika sauce and sour cream.

Rántott sajt: Deep-fried cheese, usually served with mayonnaise style sauce and rice.

Vadas marha: Steamed beef meat with sweet and sour creamy root vegetable sauce, is usually served with dumplings.

Pogácsa: Small scones with different seasonings, like cheese, cottage cheese, potato, sunflower seeds or dill.

Rántott: Means deep fried, like a Schnitzel, but it can include many things ranging from meats to vegetables. This is very popular in Hungary.

Palacsinta: Thin pancakes served with cottage cheese and apricot jam filling.

Sajtos rolo: Cheese roll pastry. Ishler: Round pastry covered with chocolate and filled with jam.

Töltött paprika: Peppers filled with minced meat and rice and steamed, are served with sweet, heavy tomato sauce and boiled potatoes. Hagymás rostélyos: Steak with mustard and garlic sauce served with fried thin onion rings.

Zserbo: Thin layers of pastry, apricot, walnut and chocolate. Flódni: Jewish cake with poppy seeds, walnut, apple and apricot. Dobos torta: Hungary’s most famous cake with rich cocoa butter cream and toffee.

Rétes: Strudel with various fillings like cabbage, apple, poppy seeds, cottage cheese and/or sourcherries. Kürtős kalács: Chimney cake, very sweet and heavy, rolled in different sugars, coconut, vanilla or walnut, etc.

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T&F TRAVEL

Hungarian Fried Bread A popular street food, lángos is a deep fried flat bread made out of dough, sometimes made with yoghurt, sour cream or milk instead of water to bind the dry ingredients, occasionally with sugar as well as salt. A potato variety is made boiled mashed potatoes mixed with the staple flour. Traditionally, lángos was baked like pizza, in a brick oven and close to the flames. (Láng is the Hungarian word for flame.) Now it is deep fried and served warm, topped with cheese, garlic butter or sour cream. You can easily find it at markets and street stalls in Budapest, but if you want to try making it at home, here’s an easy recipe. FOR THE BREAD – THIS MAKES ABOUT 10 PORTIONS

250ml water ½ teaspoon salt 7g dried yeast 300g all-purpose flour sunflower oil TOPPINGS

sour cream grated cheese garlic, finely chopped

1. Stir the salt into the water until it dissolves. Combine the flour and dried yeast in a bowl, make a well in the centre and pour in the salted water. 2. Stir the dry and wet ingredients together using a wooden spoon until they form a dough. If the mixture is sticky, add a little more flour. The dough is ready when it is smooth and no longer sticks to the sides of the bowl. 3. Cover the bowl with a clean cloth and let it stand for 30 minutes or until it doubles in size. 4. Tip the dough onto a floured surface and use your hands to stretch it out into a large square. Use a large biscuit cutter (10cm) or glass to cut the dough into rounds. Stretch each piece so that the centre is thinner than the edges. Place the stretched rounds on a floured surface for 30 minutes. 5. Heat the oil in a deep pan. When it boils, lower the dough rounds into the pan and fry until golden brown, turning the rounds over so they cook evenly on both sides. Remove the bread rounds from the oil immediately they’re cooked and place on kitchen paper while you finish cooking the rest. 6. Serve the bread rounds while still hot topped with chopped garlic, sour cream, or grated cheese.

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Succulent Sunday Lunch

Sunday is the perfect occasion to catch up with family and friends over an enjoyable lunch, and what better place than at The Phoenicia?

The Phoenix is now offering a delicious three course lunch menu including our succulent Sunday roast freshly carved at your table.

Discover our Sunday Lunch, book now!


T&F NATURE

SWEET

ROSE Lightly perfumed, soft-hued and gently bobbing in a light breeze, the ‘best and dearest flower that grows’ is the rose, as watercolour artist Cicely Mary Barker once said.

TEXT AND RECIPE PHOTOGRAPHY: MEGAN MALLIA • RECIPES: CORINNE VELLA

Photo: STK

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NATURE T&F

T

he rose – sweet to look at and soft to the touch, if you do not count the thorns – has been loved for centuries for more than its aesthetic qualities. Indeed, it is beautiful because it is steeped in history and has, with time, wound its way into art, literature and cuisine. Perhaps it is so because the rose captures the heart of all who look upon it. No other flower, it seems, has stolen the hearts of so many so greatly. Roses have seen time pass through their long history and were once used to actually tell the time too. The Swedish naturalist, Carl Linnaeus reconceived the mechanics of the clock and created a round garden split into twelve sections, which told the time as accurately as a regular clock. He planted each section with a different type of flower which opened and shut at particular times of day: wild roses were planted to mark five in the morning, primroses to mark six in the evening. Gertrude Jekyll, a British horticulturist born in the middle of the nineteenth century was a rosarian at heart, famed for her beautiful and untamed rose gardens, so aesthetic and pleasing to the senses because of their unmanicured look. Even if one has never heard of Jekyll, they have undoubtedly heard of the English rose. Its scientific name is Rosa ‘Gertrude Jekyll’. She took to garden design after her eyesight began to fail and she could no longer continue her painting and silver engraving. But her painter’s hand was far from lost. Jekyll once wrote that “planting ground is painting a landscape with living things”. She had a strong opinion about how roses could screen ugliness, as she herself put it. “What a splendid exercise it would be,” she wrote, “if people would only go round their places and look for all the ugly corners, and just think how they might be made beautiful by the use of free-growing roses.” Long before Jekyll’s time, the ancient Persians adored the rose and, perhaps, no other poets before or after have captured the love of the rose more passionately. In the fourteenth century, the medieval poet Hafiz wrote, “Earth rivals the Immortal Garden during the rose and lily’s reign”. He also saw in the rose comfort and tenderness in hard times, saying, rather poignantly, “Upon the thorny stalks of family grief | A rose shall bloom”. It is interesting to note the etymology of the English word ‘paradise’: the word stems from the Persian word for ‘walled in’, pairidaēza. The ancient Persian garden must have seemed like a

small paradise, a patch of heaven on earth. Surrounded by high walls for an element of enchantment and secrecy, the Persian rose Rosa centifolia bloomed in every nook and cranny, between fountains, trees and all forms of classical gardenalia, marking the changing of the seasons and the passage of time. Cultivating roses for their perfume is attributed to the Sassanids, the last pre-Islamic Persian empire. By extracting rose perfume from attar of roses – the natural oil found in the flower – using steam to distill the scent from crushed rose petals, created rose water as a by-product. In Persian times, this was known as golāb, from gul for rose and ab for water. Rosewater, perfumed with the scent of rose petals, has been treasured and used throughout history. Centuries ago, Avicenna, a celebrated Persian doctor, sought to cure heartbreak with a phial of rose water cordial mixed with hints of pomegranate, saffron, egg yolks and – for those who could really afford it – crushed gems or pearls. He believed this special rose concoction could lift the spirit and enlighten the soul once again. This served as the inspiration for the love potion, which emerged much later and found its way into the hands – and hearts – of Europeans, and is thought to be the origin of the association of romance with roses. Today, rose water is no longer associated with alchemy. One glance at the cosmetic shelf in a shop will tell you that the water has become a prime ingredient in most beauty products, prized for its scent and, in its purer forms, for its soothing and antiinflammatory properties. When made at home, the rose petals are left to soak in distilled water (boiled water left to cool) for a couple of weeks in a sunny patch, then a clear and scentless alcohol such as vodka is added to act as a preservative. The beauty of the rose extends beyond its aesthetics and skincare. For centuries, it has been used to lend a sweet flavour to dishes, putting down perfumed roots in Middle Eastern, Indian and Chinese cuisine. Added to cakes, pudding, biscuits and jam, the possibilities of perfumed sweets are endless. Rosehips are equally wonderful, making a delicious syrup. Although you will need to collect quite a few rosehips to make the syrup, the results are worth it. High in vitamins A, C and E, they are perfect for the cold season. Rick Lighthelm ISSUE 116 FEBRUARY 2019

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T&F NATURE

SERVES

6

Medjool dates with nuts and rose petals These are delicious served with cardamom coffee (there’s a recipe in Taste&Flair’s Christmas issue). You can find dried rose petals at Middle Eastern groceries or in the spice section of larger supermarkets.

YOU WILL NEED

12 medjool dates – buy the freshest you can find whole almonds, toasted and unsalted pistachio nuts dried rose petals

1. Wash and trim the dates. Use a sharp

knife to slice the dates from end to end, remove the kernels, and open the dates. 2. Fill six dates with almonds and

six with pistachios. Tuck a few dried rose petals around the nuts and press the dates lightly to close them. 3. Arrange the dates on a dish and

serve sprinkled with rose petals.

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T&F NATURE

Apple and rose petal jam Rose petal jam will last for up to 12 months in properly sealed jars, or 6 weeks after opening. YOU WILL NEED

8 medium apples 2 large roses, unsprayed and thoroughly washed 1 1/3 cups fine sugar, warmed 4 cups water 2 teaspoons rose water flaked almonds, toasted (optional)

1. Remove the petals from the roses, wash them thoroughly

and spread them out on a clean kitchen cloth to dry. 2. Wash the apples thoroughly to remove any

residue from the skins. Remove the stems and cores and chop the apple flesh roughly. 3. Put the chopped apples in a pan with the

water and simmer for around 45 minutes. The apples should break down into a purée. 4. To filter the purée, use a strainer bag or a large square

of clean muslin. Ladle the purée into the bag or into the centre of the muslin cloth (you can tie the ends of the cloth together to form a bag). Hang the bag over a heatproof bowl and allow the mixture to drip through. This will take several hours, so leaving it overnight is ideal. 5. When all the liquid has drained through, discard the pulp

and pour the liquid into a pan and add 1 1/3 cups of sugar. Stir over a low heat until the sugar dissolves, then turn up the heat to bring the liquid to a boil. Let the mixture boil until it reaches setting point. Stir it frequently and use a draining spoon to remove any scum that rises to the surface. 6. To test whether the jam has reached setting point,

drop a dollop of the mixture onto a cold plate and put it in the freezer for half a minute. If the surface of the jam wrinkles when you touch it, it’s reached setting point. 7. Remove the pan from the heat, skim the surface

of the liquid, and stir in the rose water. Then tip in the rose petals and toasted flaked almonds (optional) and stir gently to distribute them evenly. 8. Allow the jam to cool slightly, then pour

it into clean, warmed jars and seal.

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T&F NATURE

Rosewater and cardamom pears

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NATURE T&F

SERVES

6

These are usually served warm but in warmer weather, they make a refreshing dessert if allowed to chill properly first.

YOU WILL NEED

6 large pears 400ml rosewater 300g caster sugar 14 cardamom pods, crushed chopped pistachio nuts (optional) rose petals, washed (optional)

1. Use a pot wide and deep

enough for the pears to cook upright, covered in water. Fill the pot with boiling water and set it on a medium heat to keep the water simmering. 2. Add the rosewater and

sugar. Crush the cardamom pods and add them to the pot. Turn down the heat and let the mixture simmer lightly for 20 minutes. 3. Meanwhile, peel the

pears, leaving the stems in place. Use a sharp knife to remove the cores from the base of the fruit. 4. Place the pears upright

in the simmering pot. They should be completely covered with the poaching liquid. To stop the pears falling over, put a ceramic mug in the centre of the pot and arrange the fruit around it. Poach gently for around 30 minutes or until tender, then remove them from the poaching liquid and set them aside. 5. Arrange the warm pears on

a serving dish, dressed with a little of the poaching liquid and scattered with chopped pistachio nuts. For effect, serve individual portions on a bed of fresh pink rose petals.

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T&F NATURE

Rosehip syrup Use this as dessert flavouring or diluted as a drink.

YOU WILL NEED

900g rosehips 2.25 litres of water 500g sugar

1. Boil the water, coarsely mince the

rose hips and drop them into the water. Bring the water back to boiling point, remove from the heat and set the pan aside for 15 minutes. 2. Pour the infusion through a fine

cloth draped over a heatproof bowl. Put the residue back in the pan, add 750ml of boiling water and let the pan stand for 10 minutes. Then drain the liquid through the cloth into the bowl. 3. Tip the clarified infusion into

a clean pan and boil it down to a third of its volume. Add the sugar, stir to dissolve, and boil for 5 minutes. Pour the hot syrup into warmed clean bottles, seal them immediately, and allow them to cool.

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DOK Malta DOK Gozo A success story

Wines of Distinction DOK Malta • DOK Gozo IGT Maltese Islands dokmaltadokgozo dokmaltadokgozo.gov.mt

Brought to you by


T&F PROMOTION

VINTNERS’

VIEWS A year since the DOK Malta, DOK Gozo – Wines of Distinction Campaign was launched, we catch up with some of the vintners who are the key players behind the labels DOK Malta, DOK Gozo and IĠT Maltese Islands: Joseph Walker for Maria Rosa Wine Estate, Jeremy Cassar for Marsovin, Karl Chetcuti for Meridiana Wine Estate and Joseph Spiteri from Ta’ Mena Estate.

Joseph Walker - Maria Rosa Wine Estate

How long have you been in this sector? How did you get started in winemaking? Maria Rosa Wine Estate Joseph Fenech, who is now eighty-three years old, followed his father, who used to produce wine from grapes grown in the family’s fields for their own consumption. Eventually, this got bigger and in 2008 the first bottles went on the market. Marsovin Next year Marsovin will celebrate its hundredth anniversary. The founder of the winery, Chev. Anthony Cassar, started off as a small wine merchant and producer in the heart of Qormi. It was his passion and love for winemaking that drove him to grow and continuously strive for better quality. Meridiana Wine Estate I have been in this sector for seven years now. However, Meridiana Wine Estate has been producing premium wines since 1997. Ta’ Mena Estate Fifteen years. Our family has been involved in winemaking since 1936 and we wanted to upgrade and produce wine in a more professional way.

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Jeremy Cassar - Marsovin

As a vintner Which is your which is your favourite kind favourite/most of wine? challenging part Maria Rosa Wine Estate of the winemaking The Cabernet Sauvignon is our favourite, followed process? Why? by the Syrah. Maria Rosa Wine Estate The major grape for us is the Sirakużan, but our favourite is the Cabernet Sauvignon. In 2014, we received a Gold Medal in Bergamo for the Riżerva 2008. The most challenging part is producing a white wine from a red grape.

Marsovin I believe you should not limit yourself to a favourite type of wine. The beauty of wine lies in its variety. That being said, I am also very happy with the results we have achieved over the past years with our indigenous varieties Marsovin - Girgentina and Ġellewża. My favourite part of the I believe in these varieties winemaking process is the creation and our ability to produce of a new wine, the entire process world-class wines out of of innovating and experimenting them if managed correctly. with a new grape variety, and a new technique. It is this part of Meridiana Wine Estate the work that I do, that I believe It depends on the situation helps to keep on raising the and what kind of food is on quality standards of our wines. the table. Personally I love white wine. I truly enjoy a nice Meridiana Wine Estate unoaked Chardonnay or a We enjoy various moments like crisp Vermentino, but I also bud-burst and harvest time. As for love a well-made Merlot. the most challenging time, I would say it’s when we are preparing the Ta’ Mena Estate final blends of our various wines. Dry red wine. Besides being an important time, it is the last process before putting the final product on the market. Ta’ Mena Estate The best part is the blending because it is the moment we produce the flavours that we want to deliver to our customers.


PROMOTION T&F

Joseph Spiteri - Ta’ Mena Estate

Karl Chetcuti - Meridiana Wine Estate

Which grape variety features most in your wines? Maria Rosa Wine Estate The Sirakużan is the variety that features mostly in our winery as it covers 75% of our fields. Marsovin Chardonnay for whites and Merlot for reds. These varieties adapt very well to the Maltese climate and can produce very good-quality wines, though as time goes by we are using the Ġellewża and Girgentina even more. Meridiana Wine Estate For white wines definitely Chardonnay, and for red wines, we use a lot of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot. Ta’ Mena Estate Vermentino, Chardonnay, Merlot and Cabernet Franc.

Are there any What does methods or DOK and IĠT specifications mean to you? that characterise Maria Rosa Wine Estate For us producing DOK & IĠT your wines? Maria Rosa Wine Estate We believe that making a white wine from a red grape gives our winery a special characteristic. To our knowledge, we are the only winery that produces such wine. Marsovin We produce a large variety of wine styles from Amarone style to full-bodied barriqueaged reds and Méthode Traditionelle sparkling wine. Due to the size of our winery and the expertise we employ, as well as the nearly 100 years of experience that we have, we believe that we have the skills to produce a large range of wines with many different styles. Meridiana Wine Estate A lot of painstaking work is done in the vineyard to ensure we have the highest quality of the grapes. We also work very closely with the farmers from whom we purchase grapes. Ta’ Mena Estate Our processes give our wines their character.

wines shows the commitment to good-quality wines. Marsovin It is a way of giving extra peace of mind to the consumer that apart from us as a winery, there is also a third party involved who guarantees the high level of quality of Maltese wines. For as long as the standards are maintained and the consumer appreciates the hard work that Maltese wineries go through, then I believe it is very important for the Maltese wine sector. Meridiana Wine Estate DOK is a certificate of quality which also reflects the hard work involved in growing the best grapes possible to produce premium-quality wines. It’s recognition of the overall quality of the work we do. Ta’ Mena Estate Maltese certification of our wines which, unfortunately, lacks understanding by the consumer.

Any future goals? Maria Rosa Wine Estate Our future goals are to increase production and maintain the good quality of our wines. Marsovin To continue producing better and better wines and eventually start exporting our wines outside of Malta, something which, unfortunately, the EU has not assisted the Maltese wineries to achieve. Meridiana Wine Estate We will strive to keep improving the quality of our wines and to keep our many customers satisfied with our products. Ta’ Mena Estate Concentrating more on exports since, unfortunately, distributors and catering outlets in Malta are more interested in promoting cheap imported wine to make more profit. There will come a day when they will regret this, since one can fool someone for some time but not all the time.

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TASTE T&F

very vegan

Claire Borg’s menu, bursting with colour and flavour, will please vegans and non-vegans alike. The food styling and photography are hers too.

Vegan? Boring some might say. Well, it can be. So I took up the challenge of creating dishes that will keep vegans happy and also satisfy everyone else. Understanding that many follow special diets because of restrictions in what they can eat, as a lifestyle choice, to rebel against a system or even for consciousness, this is a collection of recipes that I have truly enjoyed making.

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TASTE T&F

Thai Spiced Carrot Soup YOU WILL NEED

1.3Kg carrots 1 onion 1 potato 2 pieces of fresh garlic 1 teaspoon Thai yellow curry paste (adjust the amount according to taste) 1 small piece ginger, peeled 1 pinch mint leaves 1 pinch fresh coriander a few leaves of fresh basil 2 steams lemon grass 2 tablespoons sunflower oil 1 tin coconut milk 1.2 litres boiling water salt and pepper (or chilli) as needed

SERVES

4

1. Peel, wash and chop the vegetables. 2. In a large pot, heat the oil, then

add the onion. Cook gently for a few minutes, then add the garlic and curry paste. Stir together for a few seconds until the curry paste loosens and the ingredients start to release their aroma. 3. Add the chopped herbs, the ginger,

the lemon grass sticks, and the carrots and potato. Stir everything together. 4. Next, add the coconut milk and then

the boiling water. Season with salt, cover and simmer for around 40 minutes. 5. Remove the lemon grass stems. Using

a stick blender, blend the mixture until smooth. Serve this sprinkled with some seeds or toasted coconut flakes.

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Chia and Spinach Hummus YOU WILL NEED

1 can chickpeas • ¼ cup olive oil a generous handful of spinach leaves 2 tablespoons chia seeds juice of 1 lemon • 1 teaspoon tahini a sprinkle of ground cumin • 1 pinch salt TO SERVE

vegetable crudités bread • savoury biscuits

1. Rinse the chickpeas and drain well. 2. Place all the ingredients in either a

food processor and blend until smooth. Alternatively, use a stick blender. 3. Serve the paste with crudités,

bread or biscuits of your choice.

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TASTE T&F

Roasted Cauliflower and Quinoa Salad SERVES

4

YOU WILL NEED

1 small cauliflower olive oil • salt • turmeric cumin • coriander • pepper 1 cup red quinoa, cooked  ½ cup brown lentils, cooked beetroot • peppers • carrots broccolo romanesco • parsley mint • basil • coriander juice of ½ a lemon

1. Wash and cut the cauliflower into pieces. Place it into a

large bowl and drizzle with some olive oil. Add a sprinkle of turmeric, cumin, coriander and ground black pepper, and also some salt. Toss well, and place on a baking tray. 2. Roast in a hot oven set on 180 degrees for about 20

minutes or until just starting to caramelise at the edges. 3. Meanwhile, mix the cooked quinoa and the cooked lentils.

Add any raw vegetable you might have at home - I used raw beetroot, coloured peppers, carrot, broccolo romanesco. Make sure you chop or dice the vegetables very finely. 4. Mix the vegetables with the lentils and quinoa.

Chop the herbs and add some to the mix. Blend the rest with olive oil and lemon to use as a dressing. 5. Cool the cauliflower, and mix it in with the rest of the

ingredients. Dress the salad and season to taste. 

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Pasta with Kale and Walnut Pesto SERVES

4

YOU WILL NEED

a small bunch of curly kale 100g walnuts (keep a few kernels aside for the pasta) ½ cup olive oil 1 clove garlic, peeled salt and pepper as needed 100g pasta per person

1. Wash the kale. Cut out the

centre rib of each leaf and then roughly chopping the leaves into small pieces. 2. Place in a bowl and add

the remaining ingredients. Use a hand held blender or food processor to blend until smooth.  3. Heat a few tablespoons

of olive oil in a large pan. Add the pesto and warm gently to release the aroma of the garlic. Add some extra kale leaves (finely chopped) if you want to give more texture to the dish. 4. Add the cooked pasta, toss

together, season and add some walnuts before serving. 5. Tip - if you want a creamier

pasta, very finely dice a potato and add it to the cold water before cooking the pasta. The potato will start to cook and by the time the pasta is ready it will crumble and melt, giving a creamier texture to the dish.

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LET’S LIVE CLEAN A cleaner, environment friendly clean. One less thing on your plate!

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BIODEGRADABLE BOTTLE


T&F TASTE

Roasted Purple Sweet Potato Salad YOU WILL NEED

1 large purple sweet potato 1 handful radishes ½ tin chick peas, rinsed and drained 50g cashew nuts fresh dill 1 handful songino (corn salad) leaves olive oil apple cider vinegar dijon mustard

YOU WILL NEED SERVES

2

1. Peel and dice the sweet potato, drizzle with some olive oil

1 mango 1 pack baby spinach leaves ¼ red cabbage 2 tablespoons sesame seeds, toasted juice of ½ a lemon ½ teaspoon sesame seed oil 4 tablespoons olive oil 1 tablespoon sweet chilli sauce salt and pepper

SERVES

4

1. Peel and slice the mango and set aside. Very

and salt and roast in a hot oven. When ready, set aside and cool.

carefully, slice the red cabbage very thinly.

2. Slice the cooked chunks in half to

2. To make the dressing, whisk the chilli sauce, oils and

reveal the beautiful vivid colour. 3. Slice the radishes and set aside. 4. Make the vinaigrette by mixing the oil, vinegar and mustard. 5. Pour the dressing over the green salad

leaves and then arrange the salad on a plate with all the remaining the ingredients.

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Mango, Spinach & Red Cabbage Salad

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lemon juice together. In a large bowl toss together the red cabbage and the dressing and rest for a few minutes. 3. When ready to serve, mix in the mango and the

spinach, sprinkle with sesame seeds (toast lightly for more flavour) and toss all together.


TASTE T&F

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Attard & Co. (Food) Ltd.

facebook.com/attardcofood


TASTE T&F

Vegan Coconut and carrot cake topped with Ranier Cherries The Ranier cherry fruit topping can be substituted with any other fruit of your choice. FOR THE CAKE

100g ground almonds • 200g plain flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda • 250g sugar 75g descicated coconut 2 medium carrots, grated 100g chia seeds • juice of 1 lemon 1 small ripe banana • 1 ripe persimmon 200ml vegetable oil • 200ml coconut milk - 200ml FOR THE FILLING

150g dessicated coconut 70g icing sugar coconut milk - as needed

1. Preheat the oven to 180C (160C if fan

operated) and line three 6” cake tins. 2. In a large bowl sift together the flour, baking

powder and bicarbonate of soda. Add the sugar, coconut, chia seeds and grated carrots. Mix well. 3. In another bowl mix the banana,

chopped persimmon, oil, coconut milk and lemon juice. Blend until smooth. Pour the liquid into the dry mix and fold in. 4. Divide the batter between the three

cake tins and bake in the preheated oven for about 30 minutes or until set. Let the cakes cool in their tins. 5. To make the filling, mix the coconut and sifted

icing sugar together and slowly pour in a little bit of some coconut milk, mixing it in well. Keep adding coconut milk a little at a time and mixing it in until the mixture comes together. It should be thick enough to spread without being runny. 6. Place the three cake layers side by side,

top each one with filling and then stack the layers one by one. Finish off the cake with a topping of yellow Ranier cherries.

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T&F URBAN DESIGN

THE

C O A C H

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URBAN DESIGN T&F

H O U S E The Coach House was shortlisted for the 2018 World Architecture Festival New Into Old category in Amsterdam and won the Din l-Art Helwa prize for Architectural Heritage, Prix d’Honneur and Overall Categories Silver Medal in 2017. ARCHITECTS: AP PHOTOGRAPHY: ALEX ATTARD CYRIL SANCEREAU JULIAN VASSALLO

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T&F URBAN DESIGN

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he Coach House is a Grade 1 scheduled property located in the historical heart of the town of Balzan, on the edge of the Urban Conservation Area. There is little historical information available about the property, which is thought to have always served as a service building connected to the adjacent Palazzo Bosio. The palazzo was built in the 18th century for Vincenzo Bosio, Commandator of the Knights of the Order of St John of Jerusalem, as his own residential quarter. The Coach House refers to an outer set of buildings immediately adjacent to the palazzo, probably predating the construction of the main palazzo.

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T&F URBAN DESIGN

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ome of the rooms on the ground floor, including a large millroom and an adjacent room with corbels, have ceilings more than 4m high, which probably predate the palazzo. Various features show that these rooms were used as a service building, specifically an area where animals were kept. One of the main rooms within the upper floor of the Coach House originally formed part of the palazzo. The programme of the project was organised around the need to preserve the functional nature of the pre-existing building while accommodating the requests of the new owners. It also had to respond to the pressures on the site from both adjacent development and the historical connection with Palazzo Bosio.

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SALE UP TO 50% OFF


T&F URBAN DESIGN

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URBAN DESIGN T&F

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he original property had fallen into disuse and the lack of maintenance had left it in a severely dilapidated state. Most of the apertures were missing, many of the stone walls did not have any mortar joints, and there was extensive biological growth due to the humid environment. To turn what used to be a onestorey service building into a home, an extension was designed and grafted onto the perimeter wall of the pre-existing structure. The well-defined approach to the project was, first of all, the restoration of the fabric of this humble yet historic, valuable property.

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T&F URBAN DESIGN

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ll extensions and their structural interventions were carried out in a way to ensure the protection of the existing building and the reversibility of new additions, wherever possible. The volume of the main extension sits exactly on the perimeter of the pre-existing building. A new staircase – an independent sculptural structure which is self-supporting and constructed from solid steel plates – was built as a connection between the old and new structures and their different levels. The modern extension of the building incorporates a ‘woven’ stone façade that combines contemporary minimalism with vernacular building technologies.

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BOV PERSONAL LOANS

THE CHOICE IS ALWAYS YOURS Whatever you choose you can bring your decision to life with a Bank of Valletta Personal Loan. All loans are subject to normal bank lending criteria and final approval from the Bank. The term of the loan must not go beyond retirement age. More information is available from www.bov.com or contact 2131 2020. Issued by Bank of Valletta p.l.c., 58, Triq San Ĺťakkarija, Il-Belt Valletta VLT 1130 Bank of Valletta p.l.c. is a public limited company regulated by the MFSA and is licensed to carry out the business of banking in terms of the Banking Act (Cap. 371 of the Laws of Malta).


T&F INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

T E L E G R A P H

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H I L L


INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE T&F

R E S I D E N C E

San Francisco, CA

OWNER CASS SMITH ARCHITECTURAL TEAM DESIGN PRINCIPAL, CASS SMITH PHOTOGRAPHERS CESAR RUBIO AND MOLLY DECOUDREAUX

Cass Calder Smith is an internationally recognised American architect. He and his firm, CCS Architecture, are known for high-profile restaurant designs, residential, commercial and hotel architecture in San Francisco, California, and New York City.

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INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE T&F

C

ass Smith’s own residence in San Francisco is a 2400 square foot, three-unit building on an 18x60 foot lot near Coit Tower on Telegraph Hill. Originally built in the nineteen twenties as a three-story, three unit building covering the front half of the plot over a six-car garage, the building now covers the entire plot.

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T&F INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

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he expansion was made possible due to the acquisition of a permit variance to maximise the building’s depth and height towards the rear alley. As an example of dense urban infill, the increased building envelope allowed for new floor plans resulting in a reorganisation of the entire interior into an ‘urban home’ – where space was maximised for luxury, views capitalised for drama, and light used for warmth.

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A flair for design

Kitchens by Joinwell. For design, quality, service. Benefit from up to 30% off all kitchens this month. Book your appointment. www.joinwell.com.mt +356 2278 2000

info@joinwell.com.mt Mill Street Qormi QRM 3102


T&F INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

T

hrough a strategic layering of floor levels organised around the original central stair, the top portion of the building is a 1600 square-foot, multi-floored home, while the lower floors consist of two studio apartments – one front and one back. At the top of the stairs is a roof deck, which is the building’s only outdoor space, with panoramic views that expand to include Coit Tower, the Golden Gate Bridge, and the Marin Headlands.

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T&F INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

A

lthough this project is modest in means and materials, it is the intrigue of living up high and taking advantage of the city views that distinguishes it as a place exemplary of Telegraph Hill.

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EASIPIK 121118

FREE 24/7 PARCEL LOCKERS STOP WAITING IN LINE & START SAVING YOUR TIME easipik@maltapost.com | www.maltapost.com/easipik


CONTEMPORARY DESIGN T&F

INTERIOR DESIGN: ARRCC

Drawing inspiration from Barcelona’s culturally vibrant life, this family home has an Afro-contemporary feel with raw wood mixed with metals, suedes and high-gloss surfaces. A palette of rich, quality materials adds integrity and authenticity to the space.

BARCELONA APARTMENT

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T&F CONTEMPORARY DESIGN

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he apartment in Barcelona occupies an entire floor of the building. It functions as both an urban retreat and family home, and enjoys a large exterior terrace. The layout is planned for entertainment as well as family life, using the space practically and efficiently. The interior architecture and design offer open, connected living while shielding interior and exterior spaces from the neighbouring buildings for privacy. Each room has its own character with rich textures and polished raw materials. The design is homogenous, with stained oak woods, bespoke vertical brass screens, contemporary cladding and lacquered panelling. The look is minimalistic and modern ambience with masculine and feminine finishes throughout.

Furnishing is an eclectic mix of carefully curated pieces combined with personal artworks from the owners’ collection. “We wanted to create an intimate, warm and moody interior that we found was common in a lot of high-end boutique stores,” says ARRCC partner and project leader Mark Rielly. “Masculine colours and darker woods provide clues to the African rhythms. To build on this, we took a relaxed approach to curved shapes, adding draped leather sofas and details such as the vintage endocrine coffee table.” 98

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I

nternally, a highlight is the customdesigned suspended brass screening with triangular perforated cut-outs inspired by African beading. The screen is visible as an entrance feature separating the entrance lobby from living areas,� adds Rielly. The feature timber ceiling which runs down the rear of the dining table allowed ARRCC to highlight one of the client’s important artworks which anchored the space and created a focal point in the length of the open-plan living room.

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5412 7556 7556 7890 7890 3456 3456 5412 5125

VALID DATES

LEE M CARDHOLDER

Credit

5412 7556 7556 7890 7890 3456 3456 5412 5123

VALID THRU

06/18 06/18

LEE M CARDHOLDER

Debit

5412 7556 7556 7890 7890 3456 3456 5412

5412

VALID 06/18 THRU 06/18

LEE M CARDHOLDER

EXPIRES END

4000 1234 1234 5678 5678 9010 9010 4000 4000 GOOD THRU

12-16 12-16

CARDHOLDER NAME

4000 1234 1234 5678 5678 9010 9010 4000 4000 GOOD THRU

CARDHOLDER NAME

Lombard Bank Malta p.l.c. ... always in your interest! www.lombardmalta.com

Head Office: 67 Republic Street Valletta Malta


CONTEMPORARY DESIGN T&F

I

n the main bedroom, faceted marble ledges live alongside feminine geometric wall lights. The space has decor trimmings of distressed leathers and plush suedes and soft cream window drapes. This creates a cohesive fluidity and luxurious warmth throughout the room. The main bathroom is layered with beautiful Antolini marble slabs separated by integrated brass strips. The mirror is elegantly suspended in a similar brass material which is bold as well as weightless. The bathroom has a spa-like effect with a timeless design.

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#WeAreOrange Follow our story

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On the road, we are orange. To us, orange is more than just a colour, it is in our DNA, engineered through years of EXPERIENCE, unrivalled standards in EXCELLENCE, and unique expertise in the way that we offer a total transport and logistic solutions We are this promise WE ARE ORANGE delivering Your cargo, whatever it is, from wherever, to anywhere you want it We specialise in Road, Rail, Ocean and Air

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CONTEMPORARY DESIGN T&F

I

n the kitchen, the streamlined elements of textured wood and charcoal stone are in keeping with the apartment style. In the surrounding circulation spaces, dark wood wraps onto the walls contrasted with Venetian plastering on the opposite walls. Further bespoke features include the contemporary take on an African fire element on a faceted ledge in the TV lounge, the playful carbon fibre organic dining table, OKHA vases by renowned glass blower David Reade, and the jewel-like chain lights which add a feminine touch. A sensuous organic timber sculpture curves like a snake to soften the crisp edges of the space.

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he landscaped roof terrace creates refuge from the heat in Barcelona, and is ideal for entertaining. Custom-designed umbrella canopies inspired by the tree-lined avenue of Passeig de Gracia – create visual privacy and provide screening from the neighbours. A double-volume vertical garden wall adds to landscaping, while the smoky mirrors under the bar reflect the greenery and give a further sense of space. “From an inter ior designer ’s perspective, what may be trouble-free to the eye came with great complexity,” says ARRCC director Jon Case. “We had to adhere to elements of the original plan including a historical hexagon-shaped central courtyard. Our solution to this tricky shape was to open the design up and reflect elements of this shape throughout the apartment.”

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Surfacing the most beautiful spaces Marble | Quartz | Engineered Stone | Granite | Patterned Tiles | Quartzite | Ceramic | Engineered Wood Halmann Vella Ltd, The Factory, Mosta Road, Lija. LJA 9016. Malta T: (+356) 21 433 636 E: info@halmannvella.com

www.halmannvella.com


T&F CONTEMPORARY DESIGN

W

ith details crafted to captivate a n d m o v e , i t ’s e a s y t o understand why the West African apartment owner returns to this Cape-Town based design team for each new project. A global entrepreneur with a keen eye when it comes to architecture and design, he knows precisely what home fits to his lifestyle. The space evidently shows that every ARRCC layout and design is consistently well thought out, with technical intelligence in the interior design combined with a good ‘eye’ in artwork and bespoke décor selection that suitably flatters each space. From planning to implementation the studio creates life-enhancing spaces that reflect both client and location.

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DISCOVER YOUR STYLE

MON - FRI 9AM - 8PM SAT 9AM - 6PM SUNDAYS & PUBLIC HOLIDAYS 10AM - 6PM


T&F TRENDS

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1. A truly unique Maltese culinary experience in the heart of Mosta, Ta’ Marija Restaurant encourages you to savour creative Maltese and Mediterranean cuisine. With more than 50 years of experience, the family run restaurant offers an elegant, warm and informal ambience with a quality friendly service. Open 7 days a week for lunch and dinner, with Maltese themed nights with folk dancers, mandolins and guitars every Wednesday and Friday and an allinclusive buffet on Saturday nights and at Sunday lunches for only €30, with regular live shows and entertainment. For bookings tel: 21434444, www.tamarija.com 

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2. Meridiana Wine Estate is spread over 19 hectares in Ta’ Qali. Almost all of the 140,000 bottles of D.O.K. wines produced annually are sold in Malta. Meridiana’s wine selection includes Isis Chardonnay, Astarte Vermentino, Melqart Cab Sauv / Merlot, Bel Syrah, Nexus Merlot and Celsius Cab Sauv Reserve. The Fenici range is made of a White, a Rose and a Red, three lovely easy to drink wines which, apart from Meridian’s renowned quality, also offer great value for money. www. meridiana.com. mt Trade Enquiries: S Rausi Trading, tel: 2133 0447, info@srausi.com 

3. The Phoenix Restaurant, inspired by the grand cafés of Europe, is known for its elegant charm. The carefully crafted menu uses only the finest ingredients thus putting the joy of food at the centre of any dining experience. Here one can bask in the sun out on the Terrace with its sweeping garden views all the way to Marsamxett Harbour. Open for lunch and dinner, The Phoenix Restaurant eagerly awaits your visit. The Phoenicia Malta. Tel: 2122 5241, dine@phoeniciamalta. com, www. phoeniciamalta.com

4. San Michel – official water for the GIG Malta Marathon. The GIG Malta Marathon will this year be taking place on Sunday, 24th February and San Michel is once again confirmed as the official water for Malta’s largest and most popular athletic activity. A growing number of Maltese and foreign runners and walkers participate in this activity every year, which starts in Mdina and ends at the Sliema Ferries. The general public is encouraged to support the runners along the route and cheer them at the finish line. Visit www. maltamarathon.com for more information.

5. New at Joinwell is the Lave tableware collection by Villeroy & Boch. Contributing to a recent trend for pottery but taking on a modern twist, each piece within the new Lave collection is unique. Available in blue or grey, this collection is both functional and ergonomic, without compromising design and subtle aesthetics. Available now at Joinwell Home, located within the Joinwell Showroom in Mill Street, Qormi.


TRENDS T&F

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6. Yanzi by Artemide. Yanzi is a lightweight composition of graphic signs. Balanced structures, such as branches or perches, support multiple stylised figures to provide a variety of versions and qualities of light. They are iconic swallows with a brushed brass body. Yanzi is an open system, ideal for creating lightweight compositions and light landscapes that animate any space with an elegant poetic attitude. Available at Elektra Ltd.

7. Rooibos, strawberry & vanilla Infuso by Twinings. The naturally sweet flavour of strawberries and rich notes of vanilla are combined with the refreshing herbal taste of rooibos in this delicate infusion. With its warming, russet colour, it’s ideal for drinking any time when you need a soothing taste. The ‘Infuso’ range is an ideal option for those looking for a treat that is both delicious and good for you.

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8. OLYMPUS Halloumi grilling cheese. Traditional grilling cheese from Cyprus made from a mixture of pasteurised lamb milk and goat milk. Moderately salty with an average fat content and thick consistency. Excellent for grilling, frying in a pan, and deep frying. Excellent in salads as well as with grilled vegetables. For a special Mediterranean flavour, experience serve halloumi with cooked watermelon pieces and mint vinaigrette. Trade Enquiries: Attard & Co. Food Ltd, tel: 2123 7555, facebook. com/attardcofood

9. Easy and FREE collection of all your online purchases. Easipik offers a 24/7 network to collect your shopping from a number of lockers which are conveniently located around Malta. You can easily pick up your shopping on your way home from work, during your lunch break, or simply when running your chores on the weekend. This service is now free of charge. Terms and conditions may apply.

10. MOSCATO D’ASTI DOCG. The Damilano Wine Company is one of the oldest wineries in Barolo. Their Moscato D’Asti DOCG boasts a bright golden colour with scents of peach, sage, lemon, honey and apricot. The wine expresses a sweet taste with pleasant acidity and pairs well with desserts. Its persistent, delicate aroma is reminiscent of freshly squeezed grapes. Its vibrant bouquet shows best when this wine is served at 8°C in a goblet-shaped glass. Trade Enquiries: Attard & Co. Food Ltd, tel: 2123 7555. facebook. com/attardcowines

11. Treat yourself to an afternoon tea at Thistle Lounge Bar within Urban Valley Resort. Discover a sumptuous selection of homemade treats including housesmoked pastrami, in-house chutneys and the classic scones and jams. Escape the hustle and bustle of city life and experience the unique oasis of tranquillity offered by the beautiful natural landscape of Wied Ghollieqa, located off the Kappara Junction, direction San Gwann. With its stylish design, Thistle Lounge Bar creates a unique atmosphere for afternoon tea. Tel: 2138 5926, info@ urbanvalleyresort.com

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T&F LAST LOOK

Oriental Visions: From Dreams into Light Musée Marmottan Monet, Paris 7 March-21 July 2019 CURATED BY EMMANUELLE AMIOT-SAULNIER, DOCTOR IN ART HISTORY

T

he dawn of the industrial era saw the emergence of orientalism, which lasted throughout the nineteenth century and spread throughout Europe. At the beginning of the twentieth century, the avant-garde movements were inspired by these experiences and invented a new art form that bordered on abstraction, influenced by the Orient. Oriental Visions: From Dreams into Light provides fresh insight into this art form. Held in a private mansion that houses the Paul Marmottan collections, the exhibition features around fifty masterpieces from major European and American public and private collections including the Musée du Louvre, Musée d’Orsay, Musée des Augustins in Toulouse, the Städtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus und Kunstbau in Munich, the ThyssenBornemisza Collection in Madrid, Amsterdam’s Rijksmuseum, and the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute in Williamstown. Following many studies and previous exhibitions, the exhibition itinerary focuses on the Mediterranean ‘orient’, that of the French colonial empire and is divided into two principal sections: the human figure and the landscape. The two approaches, initially represented by La Petite Baigneuse (Small Bather, 1828, Musée du Louvre, Paris) by Ingres and Paul Klee’s Innenarchitektur (Interior Architecture, 1914, Von der Heydt Museum, Wuppertal), complement one another throughout the itinerary

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres La Petite Baigneuse, also know as Intérieur de harem 1828 Oil on canvas Paris, musée du Louvre, département des Peintures, acquis en vente publique sur les arrérages du legs Poirson, 1908 Photo © RMN-Grand Palais (musée du Louvre) / Michel Urtado © Succession H. Matisse

The next issue of will be out on 7th April 2019 with The Malta Independent on Sunday.

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For advertising, contact Sean Ellul on +356 7921 0705 or 21 345 888 ext 123 sellul@independent.com.mt


Marina Street, PietĂ

2149 2149

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ISSUE 116 DISTRIBUTED WITH THE MALTA INDEPENDENT ON SUNDAY

FEBRUARY 2019

FEBRUARY 2019 ISSUE 116

THE STORY OF ROSE

Feast on pies, puddings, tarts, cakes, bakes, desserts Design from Malta, San Francisco & Barcelona

Profile for The Malta Independent

Taste & Flair February 2019  

Taste & Flair February 2019  

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