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The Lovett School Upper School Fine Arts Curriculum

The Lovett School Vision for Learning Lovett offers experiences that inspire our students to love learning. We encourage them to think critically, communicate effectively, engage creatively, and collaborate purposefully. We provide the opportunities and resources that help our students develop independence and self-direction and extend their learning beyond the walls of the classroom as they grow intellectually, emotionally, physically, aesthetically, morally, and spiritually.


800 - Foundations of Art Course Description Grades: 9-11 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Fall/Spring/Summer This course includes beginning drawing, printmaking, and painting instruction. The student explores drawing techniques, composition, the elements and principles of design, linocut techniques, and painting with acrylics. The curriculum is designed to guide the student progressively toward competent skill and ability. The projects and assessments allow the student to demonstrate this understanding of concepts and in-class instruction. Students use their creative skills, art-making techniques, unique point of view, and self-expression to communicate and empathize with the viewer through their original artwork. Being able to synthesize intentional ideas into the students’ projects allows them to grow emotionally, aesthetically, and intellectually. Essential Questions 1. What is art? 2. Why do skills and the understanding of theory make art better? 3. How do you use skills and understanding to be a better artist? 4. How do you encourage students to attempt mastery of an artistic medium? Why is it necessary? 5. Are the artist’s tools essential in creating certain types of art, clay/ceramics, paint/painting, camera/photography? 6. Will a balance of skill, understandings of media, and critiques allow students to create independently as an artist? 7. Will students be able to create conceptual work and understand the impact of their artwork? Assessment 1. A rubric is designed for each project that includes the following items: understanding, craftsmanship/skills objectives, values/shading, proportions, overall performance documentation, and effort. 2. Students will use the technique of class critiques to discuss their creative process at the completion of each project. They are asked to defend their work by answering a series of questions that reflect their strengths and weaknesses. Classmates also initiate a conversation about each artist’s strength and weaknesses, further challenging the student. This process is essential to the young artist to grow in ability, craftsmanship, and connection with the viewer. 3. Students must meet deadlines; tardiness in completion will result in the deduction of percentage points in grade. 4. See Unit #3 below for a description of an assessment and how it assesses critical thinking, communication, creativity, and/or collaboration. Skills Benchmarks Students will: 1. Demonstrate that they can draw a three-dimensional space and shape from any point of view by applying the science of perspective.


2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Demonstrate that they can create a correct composition. Learn and demonstrate their understanding of several principles and elements of design. Demonstrate their understanding of light and shadow. Apply their understanding of color and formal properties. Demonstrate their understanding of color using paint.

Units 1. Draw 3-D​, ​by Doug Dubosque - Students will complete the text during the first 4-5 weeks of the semester. 2. Perspective - Students learn how to draw in perspective using a picture plane. Students will begin by using specific techniques to observe and draw their understanding of 3D space. They will then work from photographs and on location in the school, drawing first a large open space and then an entrance or hallway. 3. Observational Drawing - Students learn how to draw traditional still life arrangements using observational techniques. Students practice identifying proportions, sighting angles, creating form through changes in value, blending colored pencils, and developing a cohesive composition. Students must think ​critically​ to identify the appropriate shapes and proportions of the objects in front of them. Students think creatively​ to capture the color and value range of the objects. Students are assessed on how they can ​visually communicate​ their still life based on composition, scale, and representational techniques. Additionally, students are assessed on how they ​verbally communicate​ (oral and written) their subject, design process, and strengths/weaknesses of the final drawings. 4. Color Theory a. Students learn the colors on the color wheel and how to mix these colors; primary, secondary, and tertiary colors; and warm/cool colors, neutral colors, and complementary colors. b. Students will learn how to mix a balance of water and acrylic paint. c. Students will learn how to paint a straight line. d. Students will copy a masterpiece using these skills. 5. Printmaking - Students will be introduced to printmaking using a linocut technique. Students will carve a lino-block with a design that uses linear perspective.. They will also practice their color theory skills when layering different colors of inks. Textbooks and Resources DuBosque, Doug (1998) ​Drawing 3-D: A Step by Step to Perspective Drawing​. Peel: Cincinnati. Updated September 2018


802 - Drawing Course Description Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Fall/Spring Prerequisite: 800 - Foundations of Art Advanced Drawing will allow the student to explore many different genres of drawing, including advanced and technical perspective drawing at on and off-campus locations, drawing still life subjects to a photographic level, figure drawing, and the techniques of pen and ink. This course will use different drawing materials, including pencil, pen and ink, conte, colored utensils, and watercolor. Students will also have opportunities to explore Wacom tablets and digital drawing techniques. These are skills and ideas that will strengthen the artist’s understanding of space and design and will help the artist create clear, educated, and mature artwork. Students who enjoy drawing and want to add a drawing aspect to their portfolio will appreciate this course. Note: This course may be repeated ​once​ for credit. Priority will be given to first-time students. Students taking Drawing for the second time will continue to master skills in understanding and applying approaches to drawing. Students will practice color theory, expand their knowledge of drawing techniques and tools, and create a cohesive series of work. This series of works is created based on a thesis or concept designed by the student. Instructors then customize a curriculum that combines the interests of the student with additional advanced drawing techniques. Essential Questions 1. What is a good drawing? 2. What skills and understanding of theory make for better art? 3. Why is it necessary to attempt mastery of an artistic medium? 4. What balance of skill, understandings of media, and critiques allows students to create independently as an artist? 5. Will students be able to create conceptual work and understand the impact of their artwork? Assessment 1. A rubric is custom designed for each project that includes the following items: understanding, craftsmanship/skills objectives, values/shading, proportions, and overall performance documentation, and work ethic in during studio time.. 2. Students create an essay of at least 30 sentences that explains the process, final product, and reflection of students’ artwork. Students are asked specific questions about their creative process for their project. The essay should reflect both the areas in the process that have been successful and those areas that still have room for improvement. 3. Students must meet deadlines; tardiness in completion will result in the deduction of percentage points in grade.


4. Daily conferences are held with each student during the studio work days. Students are assessed on how they use their time in and outside of class to complete the project objectives. 5. Students complete homework drawings in a sketchbook to practice skills related to in-class projects and to keep improving their drawing coordination. 6. Students will use the style of class critiques to discuss their creative process at the completion of each project. They are asked to defend their work by answering a series of questions that reflect their strengths and weaknesses. Classmates also initiate a conversation about each artist’s strength and weaknesses, further challenging the student. This process is essential to the young artist to grow in ability, craftsmanship, and connection with the viewer. We will use many different tools to assess student grades. Including all of the following: homework grades that have clear objectives for students to demonstrate, daily conferences about students’ pace with the project deadline, rubrics custom-made to the assignments, written reflections that respond to direct questions about a students process with the objectives of the lesson and progress with achieving concepts, and finally a formal group critique where students present their work and receive feedback from classmates and teacher. Here is an example of a project and a formal critique. Class Critique: At the end of the Final Project ( Unit 5 ), students will prepare a statement about the process of their work. They will introduce their final product to the class by including how they feel about the project’s evolution. For example, they would include the development of the learned techniques, execution of design, and areas in their work that show strength and weakness. Students are expected to use vocabulary from the learned techniques of the assignment as well as use the art-making terms of principles and elements of design. They are scored on how they prepare this statement. This can be found on the handout, Critique Worksheet. This part of the formal critique is an exercise in ​critical thinking, communication skills, and public speaking. After this introduction is given to the class, their classmates are asked to comment on the students work. Other classmates are all asked to share at least one thing that they enjoy about the project that is being presented and also share one thing that could make the project better. The teacher models this as well, sharing input with the group. The point of this traditional art assessment process is to practice being critical about work and how to praise and consider strategies to improve the work without it being a reflection of the artist. This helps them ​creatively solve problems​ and discuss areas for improvement. Focusing on areas of weakness is important because it helps students recognize areas they overlooked and to not make similar mistakes in the future. The same above can be when praising areas of strength. Finding strength can lead others to think about their design or art-making process in a different way and therefore take more risks in their c​ reative process.​ This is important to the whole class because they will glean from other students’ processes. This meets the skill benchmark number 7, “​Students will be able to articulate in writing and in critiques the process of their project’s development.”


Skills Benchmarks Students will: 1. Draw a three-dimensional space and shape from any point of view by applying the science of perspective. 2. Demonstrate that they can create a three-part composition. 3. Learn and demonstrate their understanding of the principles and elements of design. 4. Demonstrate their understanding of light and shadow. 5. Apply their understanding of color and formal properties. 6. Demonstrate their understanding of color using paint or pastels in drawing. 7. Articulate in both reflection essays and formal critiques their creative process. Units 1. Observation - Students will learn how to sight angles and apply them to their drawings of a still life object or arrangement. Students will study the particular observable details in a still life object or arrangement to practice unit of measure, sighting angles, and continuous looking at a subject. 2. Portraiture - Students will learn about methods for translating their subject in proportion from source to drawing. Students will practice identifying value ranges, drawing textures, and noticing small details. 3. Drawing the Human Form - Students will learn about the appropriate proportions of the human form. They will learn how to create gesture drawings of the figure. They will continue this unit with a final portrait of a fellow student. 4. Final Research Project - Students will explore their ideas in a personally-driven project. Students will be given a series of prompts from which they will write a working thesis and create a piece of art to support the thesis. They are asked to explore an unfamiliar style of drawing or media that will challenge their drawing skills. They may use many types of media including graphite, charcoal, pastels, conte, and pen. Textbooks and Resources 1. Audette, Anna (2004) ​100 Creative Drawing Ideas.​ Shamhala: London. 2. Thek, Paul (2012) ​Draw It With Your Eyes Closed: The Art of the Art Assignment. ​ Paper Monument, New York. 3. DuBosque, Doug (1998) ​Drawing 3-D A Step by Step to Perspective Drawing​. Peel: Cincinnati. Updated May 2018


804 - Painting Course Description Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Fall/Spring Prerequisite: 800 - Foundations of Art This course is designed to teach the student how to manipulate and handle paint. Student projects include creating original designs, learning and applying color theory, value, blending, and a study of different painting styles. Note: This course may be repeated ​once​ for credit. Priority will be given to first-time students. Students taking Painting for the second time will continue to master skills in understanding and applying color theory, expand painting techniques and tools, and create a cohesive series of work based on a thesis designed by the student. Instructors then customize a curriculum that combines the interests of the student with additional advanced painting techniques. Essential Questions 1. How are value, color theory, shape, and three-dimensionality created in my artwork? 2. How do I mix colors using different shades of primaries? 3. How did the Masters paint? What can I learn from them? 4. How do I learn from visiting artists? What can I use from their work to apply to my creative process? 5. How did a particular artist create line, light, shadow, and composition? 6. How are oil colors used in the fat or lean method? 7. How do I identify a style and incorporate that style into my painting? 8. How do you use various brushes and other tools to create different effects? 9. How do I learn how make two-dimensional drawings into three-dimensional representations of color? Assessment 1. A rubric is designed for each project that includes the following items: understanding, craftsmanship/skills objectives, values/shading, proportions, overall performance documentation, and meeting or exceeding the project requirements. 2. Students create an essay of at least 30 sentences that explains the process, final product, and reflection of students’ artwork. 3. Students must meet deadlines; tardiness in completion will result in the deduction of percentage points in grade. 4. Students will use the style of class critiques to discuss their creative process at the completion of each project. They are asked to defend their work by answering a series of questions that reflect their strengths and weaknesses. Classmates also initiate a conversation about each artist’s strength and weaknesses, further challenging the


student. This process is essential to the young artist to grow in ability, craftsmanship, and connection with the viewer. We will use many different tools to assess student grades including all of the following: homework grades that have clear objectives for students to demonstrate, daily conferences about students pace with the project deadline, rubrics made custom made to the assignments, written reflections that respond to direct questions about a students process with the objectives of the lesson and progress with achieving concepts, and finally a formal group critique where students present their work and receive feedback from classmates and teacher. Here is an example of a project and a formal critique. Class Critique: At the end of the Reflection Project (Unit 3- see below) students will prepare a statement about the process of their work. For example, they would include the how they developed and applied the specific painting techniques, execution of design, discuss areas in their project that were strong examples of exemplary work and areas that need improvement. Students are expected to use vocabulary from the unit as well as use the art-making terms known as the Principles and Elements of design. They are scored on how they prepare this statement. Instructions can be found on the handout, Critique Worksheet. This part of the formal critic is an exercise in ​critical thinking, communication skills,​ and public speaking. After this introduction is given to the class, the other members of the class are asked to comment on the student’s work. Classmates share at least one thing that they enjoy about the project that is being presented and also share one thing that could make the project better. They are not allowed to repeat what someone else said about the work. The teacher models this as well, sharing input with the group. The point of this traditional type of art assessment process is to practice being critical about work and how to praise and consider strategies to better the work without it being a reflection of the artist. This helps them c​ reatively solve problems​ and discuss areas for improvement. Focusing on areas of weakness are important because it helps students recognize areas they overlooked and to not make similar mistakes in the future. The same above can be when praising areas of strength. Finding strength can lead others to think about their design or art-making process in a different way and therefore take more risks in their c​ reative process. ​ This is important to the whole class because they will glean from other students’ process. This meets the skill benchmark number 9, “S ​ tudents will be able to articulate in writing and in critiques the process of their project’s development.” Skills Benchmarks ​Students will: 1. Demonstrate their ability to mix and create any color. 2. Demonstrate their ability to stretch a canvas. 3. Create different kinds of brush strokes using both flat and round brushes. 4. Demonstrate painting skills by painting straight lines, creating and identifying values, creating textures, and reflections.


5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Learn from the masters by recreating their art. Create original artwork. Students will be able to blend acrylic paint with washes and dry brushing techniques. Students will be able to design using a three-part composition. Students will be able to articulate in writing and in critiques the process of their project’s development.

Units 1. Color Theory and Brushstroke - Students create a color wheel of three levels of hue intensity. Students hone their skills by mixing color, painting straight lines, and matching value levels. Students create a work using three of the eight following color families: analogous, monochromatic, warm, cool, complementary, split complementary, double-split complementary, and neutral colors. 2. Blending- Students will demonstrate how to blend with a wet-on-wet wash, a wet-on-dry wash, and color-in-color techniques. 3. Reflection- Students will design a project that is both abstract and realistic. Students will also need to effectively produce the illusion of reflection. Students will need to design the work using three-part composition. 4. Research Project - Students select from themes to research, write a thesis, and create a piece of art to support the thesis. They are asked to explore a new style of painting that they are unfamiliar with and emulate this style in their work. The topics students can explore include the following: a. Artwork contrasts traditional values and historical references with contemporary models. b. Artwork reflects student’s current world-view including: social, economic, political or spiritual. c. Artwork reflects extreme points of view that can be physical, philosophical, emotional, or spiritual. d. Artwork reflects two concepts: the natural state and synthetic state of a subject. e. Artwork reflects a perspective of a subject or topic that includes the following three points of view; past, present, and future 5. Dog and Cat Painting- As a part of our K-12 Visual Art curriculum, every art student will produce an 8” x 10” work about dogs or cats. This will be displayed in the Spring in the main Art Gallery.

Textbooks and Resources 1. Visiting Artist Examples 2. Research materials from the Vasser Woolley Library Updated May 2018


806 - Printmaking I Course Description Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Fall/Spring Prerequisite: 800 - Foundations of Art

This course explores many different approaches to the diverse discipline of printmaking. Printmaking is the traditional fine arts discipline where artists make a design on a “plate” and then create multiple original impressions from the plate onto paper. Projects will introduce four types of printmaking and include elements of drawing, painting, collage, and digital media. Students will learn relief printing, intaglio printing, monotype, and lithographic printing. The course allows the young artist to discover their artistic and engineering sides; blending creative and technical problem-solving to communicate their creative vision. Studio work will reflect the student’s use of all the elements and principles of design and will train the student to create balanced, original artwork. Planning, time management, critical thinking, and the use of many different tools will be required for the young artist to manifest their original ideas. ​This course applies the Vision for Learning on many levels. Students use their creative skills, art-making techniques, unique point of view, and self-expression to communicate and empathize with the viewer through their original artwork. Being able to synthesize intentional ideas into the students’ projects allows them to grow emotionally, aesthetically, and intellectually. Essential Questions 1. What is printmaking? 2. How is each process similar to or different from the other types of printmaking I am studying? 3. Where can I find inspiration for my art piece? 4. What printmaking tools and skills do I need to complete my personal goals as an artist? 5. How do I construct and combine the different layers of my artwork? (Considering both the elements of the composition and the components of the physical plates) 6. How can I transform my idea to take advantage of the particular strengths of each kind of printmaking? 7. What essential ideas must I communicate to my viewer to ensure my desired interpretation of the image? How can I communicate these ideas effectively? Assessment 1. A rubric is designed for each project that includes the following items: a. Original work, innovative ideas, or risk-taking (self-challenge), sketches, image research and preparation (Skills Benchmark 1, 4 below) b. Composition and design that shows intention and use of the elements and principles of design (SB2) c. Problem-solving during design/development process and refining proofs (SB6) d. Technical quality and craftsmanship of final edition (SB7-10) e. In-class activity: cooperation, being on-task, and cleaning up their workspace (SB11)


f.

2.

3. 4. 5. 6.

Presentation and reflection, including that students participate in the group critique reflecting on others’ work and reflecting on their own work. (SB5) Students will use the technique of class critiques to communicate their creative process at the completion of each project. They are asked to defend their formal and conceptual choices in their artwork by answering a series of questions that reflect on their strengths and weaknesses. They also discuss and assess how and if the artwork communicates the artist’s intent. Classmates also initiate a conversation about each artwork’s strength and weaknesses, further challenging the student’s design choices. This process is essential to the young artist to grow in ability, craftsmanship, and connection with the viewer. For each unit, students create an essay of at least 25-30 sentences that explains the process, content, final product, and reflection on the student’s artwork. During class, individual feedback and conversations with the teacher facilitate in-process design changes, project improvements, and technical development. Students must meet deadlines; tardiness in completion will result in the deduction of percentage points in grade. See Unit #1 below for a description of an assessment and how it assesses critical thinking, communication, creativity, and/or collaboration.

Skills Benchmarks Students will: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Learn how to find resources for inspiration for both content and composition. Create a balanced composition that communicates their personal message to the viewer. Apply emotional quality to their artwork. Create only original artwork. Learn to research and reflect on the work of other artists. Apply creativity skills, technical knowledge of media, and composition skills to complete each project. 7. Learn subtractive plate carving. 8. Understand and apply different intaglio methods, including effective ink application and the integration of drawing skills. 9. Learn additive, subtractive, and trace monotype printmaking. 10. Understand how to properly use a cylinder press and work collaboratively to use and maintain a community studio space Units 1. Intaglio Printmaking - Students will learn the intaglio printmaking technique. This “dry-point” technique involves creating grooves in a metal or plastic plate without using acids. Students will learn this extensive process that includes etching, inking, and using the printing press. Students will also learn how to create different tones and values using multiple types of line and cross-hatching. Students must think ​creatively​ and ​critically​ to respond to the project prompt (different each time). Students are assessed on how they can ​visually communicate​ their concept with intentional composition designs and these alterations to the composition can be made during sketches, proofs, and adjustments to the physical plates. Additionally, students are assessed on how they ​verbally communicate​ (oral and written) their concept, process, and strengths/weaknesses of the final edition of prints.


2. Monotype Printmaking - Students will learn this unique kind of planographic printmaking that creates soft, painterly prints. This technique creates images by subtracting from or adding to a thin layer of ink that floats on a smooth plate. Students will learn how to selectively combine layers of color to create a range of hues and values. 3. Relief Printmaking - Students will create a print using the subtractive printmaking process of linocut. Students will learn how to cut and shape the linocut block, as well as how to use the printing press. This relief project will give students a foundation for printmaking and printing editions. 4. Polyester Plate Lithography - Students will use copy-machine toner and markers to create a polyester lithographic plate. The plate can capture fine drawing details and photographic imagery. This lithographic process introduces students to a new type of printmaking ink. 5. Laser Cut Relief Printmaking - Students will create a printmaking plate using the laser cutter. Students will apply skills they learned about relief printing at the beginning of the semester to this digital media application. This relief project will let students make even more detailed designs in their relief plate. Resources 1. Students will be able to view the instructor’s personal collection of prints, art books, and image slides 2. The class will also have access to research materials and art books from the Vasser Woolley Library and the art room book collection. Updated August 2018


808 - Printmaking II Course Description Grades: 10-12 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Fall/Spring Prerequisite: 806 - Printmaking I This course offers a deeper exploration of the diverse discipline of printmaking that students began studying in Printmaking I. Students will work with new printmaking processes, at a larger scale, and with more plates and colors. Participants will be able to further their personal vision as they will already have a baseline technical knowledge of the print processes. Studio work will reflect the student’s use of all the elements and principles of design and will further train the student to create balanced, original artwork. The student artist will continue to hone their time management, critical thinking, and technical skills. Students use their creative skills, art-making techniques, unique point of view, and self- expression to communicate and empathize with the viewer through their original artwork. Being able to synthesize intentional ideas into the students’ projects allows them to grow emotionally, aesthetically, and intellectually. Essential Questions 1. What is possible in printmaking? 2. How is this printmaking process best suited to express my artistic vision? 3. Where can I get inspiration for my art piece? 4. What printmaking tools and skills do I need to complete my personal goals as an artist? 5. How do I construct and combine the different layers of my artwork? How can I consider layering both the elements in the composition and the components of the physical plates? 6. What is my personal theme for this semester and how can I express these essential ideas to my viewer to ensure my desired communication between the image and the viewer? 7. How have other artist-printmakers solved these creative challenges in the past? Assessment 1. A rubric is designed for each project that includes the following items: a. Original work, innovative ideas or risk-taking (self-challenge), sketches, image research and preparation (Skills Benchmark 1, 3, 4 below) b. Composition and design that shows intention and use of the elements and principles of design (SB2, 3) c. Problem-solving during design/development process and refining proofs (SB6) d. Technical quality and craftsmanship of final edition (SB7-10) e. In-class activity: cooperation, being on-task, and cleaning up their workspace (SB 6, 7) f. Presentation and reflection, including that students participate in the group critique reflecting on others’ work and reflecting on their own work. (SB2,5) 2. Students will use the technique of class critiques to discuss their creative process at the completion of each project. They are asked to defend their formal and conceptual choices in their artwork by answering a series of questions that reflect on their strengths and weaknesses. They also discuss and assess how and if the artwork communicates the artist’s intent. Classmates also initiate a conversation about each artwork’s strength


3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

and weaknesses, further challenging the student’s design choices. This process is essential to the young artist to grow in ability, craftsmanship, and connection with the viewer. For each unit, students create an essay of at least 30 sentences that explains the process, content, final product, and reflection on the student’s artwork. The second unit will also include a research essay and companion image/sketch portfolio that will respond to the prints of a practicing printmaker from art history (SB 5). Students are given daily blog assignments that document their process and growth as an artist. During class, individual feedback and conversations with the teacher facilitate in-process design changes, project improvements, and technical development. Students must meet deadlines; tardiness in completion will result in the deduction of percentage points in grade. See Unit #1 below for a description of an assessment and how it assesses critical thinking, communication, creativity, and/or collaboration.

Skills Benchmarks Students will: 1. Learn how to find resources for inspiration for both content and composition. 2. Create a balanced composition that communicates their personal message to the viewer. 3. Approach themes from different perspectives and apply the themes to narratives, series, and multiples. 4. Create only original artwork. 5. Learn to research other artists and respond to other artists’ work in a unique and personalized way. 6. Apply creativity skills, technical knowledge of media, and composition skills to complete each project. 7. Understand how to properly use a cylinder press. 8. Learn how to register and print multiple-plate, multiple-color editions. 9. Create Solar Plates, learning a new intaglio printmaking technique. 10. Understand and select bookmaking techniques to best express their project’s narrative goals. Units 1. Refresher from Introduction-to-Print Processes- Students will refresh their foundational skills for printmaking and printing editions. At the same time, they will begin developing their personal theme for the semester. Students will select one of the processes from Introduction-to-Print (Relief, Intaglio, Monoprint, Collagraph, Polyester Plate Lithography) and use it to express their theme and re-familiarize themselves with the printmaking studio. Students must think ​creatively​ and ​critically​ as they challenge themselves to create a two-color/two-plate print with their selected process. Students are assessed on how they can ​visually communicate​ their concept with intentional composition designs and these alterations to the composition can be made during sketches, proofs, and adjustments to the physical plates. Additionally, students are assessed on how they verbally communicate​ (oral and written) their concept, process, and strengths/weaknesses of the final edition of prints.


2. Response to a Printmaker- Students will select a printmaker from art history or an established printmaker in contemporary art. The student will research and respond to this artist’s work – studying the artist’s themes, processes, mark-making styles, experiments, evolution of ideas, and influences. The project will culminate in an edition of prints and an essay. 3. Series or Bookform- Students will use their printmaking skills to create a series of prints exploring a particular theme and process, or a small edition of artist’s books. The theme of the series or structure of the books will be selected and adapted to the students’ concepts. Students will learn about constructing narratives and telling a story in visual form. 4. Solar Plate (Alternative Project)- This project gives students the experience to learn a new kind of intaglio printmaking. Harnessing the UV power of the sun, students will use digital positives to create photographic-like images in this “greener” version of traditional photogravure. 5. Collagraph Printmaking (Alternative Project)- This project gives students the experience to learn a different kind of intaglio printmaking. This technique involves constructing a three-dimensional, textured surface through paper collage. Students will learn how to seal, ink, and print this paper construction on the printing press. Textbooks and Resources 1. The class will not have a specific textbook. 2. Students will be able to view the instructor’s personal collection of prints, art books, limited edition artists books, and image slides. 3. The class will also have access to research materials and art books from the Vasser Woolley Library and the art room book collection. Updated September 2018


810 - Photography I Course Description Grades: 10-12 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Fall/Spring Prerequisite: 800 - Foundations of Art Fee: Students are responsible for film and paper costs and there is an OPTIONAL $50 camera rental (limited quantities) In this beginning course in photography, students will use a 35mm camera and learn the techniques of developing film and printing in an analog darkroom. This course develops the student’s powers of observation, inquiry, and imagination, and demands that the student learn to follow procedures which require careful timing, close attention, patience, planning, cooperation with others, and the responsible handling of chemicals and photographic equipment. Note: A 35mm SLR cameras required, black and white film, and photographic paper. Because one main objective of this course is to understand and utilize the camera, cameras with fixed focus lenses and cameras without a manual mode are not suitable. Essential Questions 1. What is the artistic process of becoming skilled in the photographic arts? 2. What are the processes and techniques required to understand the basics of photography? 3. What is the difference between a snapshot and a photograph? 4. How does a camera function? 5. What makes a good composition in a photograph? 6. What are the essential parts of the SLR camera and how do they affect exposure and image? 7. How did photography become an accepted art form? 8. Who are the early photographers and how did they use and promote photography? 9. What are the compositional elements in photography and how do they combine to help convey meaning? 10. How do I work with subject matter and yet convey my ideas? 11. How do I control technical issues in photography (dust, cropping, chemical stains)? 12. How do you use photo manipulation software to alter photographs? 13. How to understand the chemical process with film and paper? Assessment 1. Observation of students’ black and white film based on their use of the camera, darkroom chemistry, and film development. 2. Investigate and research various themes, interests, material, and methods. 3. Develop work through open-ended inquiry and consideration of the elements and principles of design.


4. Two rolls of film, two contact sheets, and 6 final 8x10 prints for each of the three major assignments: landscape, portrait, and environment. 5. Two rolls of film, two contact sheets, and 3 final 11x14 fiber based prints for final photo series 6. Critique in-process works individually and collaboratively. 7. Each student is required to scan all final image content and create a website for the course. 8. Develop life skills through the study and production of art (e.g.collaboration,creativity, critical thinking, communication). Collaborate in large and small groups with peers and community to examine, discuss, and plan projects. Use creativity and imagination in planning and development of products.Use critical thinking and problem solving strategies to conceive of and develop ideas.Communicate meaning and ideas through a variety of means including visual representations, technology, and performance. Skills Benchmarks ​Students will: 1. Learn effective use of a 35mm camera to take and develop black and white photographs. 2. Learn the foundation of black and white printing by understanding the enlarger, printing chemistry, resin-coated papers vs. fiber-based papers, contrast, control, tone, and surface. 3. Select the content of their photo series, choose the appropriate film speed, and produce matted prints for a final critique. 4. Explore natural and studio lighting methods. 5. Create traditional wet darkroom photographic prints. 6. Demonstrate understanding of F/stop and shutter speed. 7. Demonstrate safe and proper use of photographic tools and processes. Units 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

The Camera The Darkroom Landscape Photography Portrait Photography Photographing in Altered Lighting Incorporate the elements and principles of design as they relate to the creation of a photograph. 7. Consider and incorporate self-expression and explore how it relates to the creation of a photograph. 8. Explore a variety of subjects and photographic styles including historical, contemporary, commercial, and fine art. 9. Document processes which support works of art through personal research, reflection, collaboration, and critique

Textbooks and Resources 1. Hornstein, Henry, ​Basic Photography


2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

PPT’s from the collection of instructor Access resources to research art (e.g. museums, internet, visiting artists, galleries, community arts organizations, visual culture). The History of Photography, Beaumont Newhall Identify various photography related careers and emerging technological fields Identify, compare, and contrast major styles of photography and their distinguishing characteristics

Supplies required for the course 1. 35 mm SLR film camera 2. 4 rolls of an ISO 100 speed black and white film 3. 2 rolls of an ISO 400 speed black and white film 4. 2 rolls of an ISO 3200 speed black and white film 5. Package of 10 sheets of 11x14 fiber based paper 6. White or yellow 3 ring binder Updated August 2018


812 - Photography II Course Description Grades: 10-12 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Fall/Spring Prerequisite: 810 - Photography I This course elaborates on the development of a basic knowledge of the elements of design. Working with analog and digital photography, aesthetic awareness is emphasized through the use of photographic expression. Students will work with a variety of alternative techniques in this course, creating projects with orthographic film, color film, Holga Cameras, historic techniques, and Adobe Photoshop. Because one main objective of this course is to understand and utilize the camera, cameras with fixed focus lenses and cameras without a manual mode are not suitable. ​Students use their creative skills, art-making techniques, unique point of view, and self- expression to communicate and empathize with the viewer through their original artwork. Being able to synthesize intentional ideas into the students’ projects allows them to grow emotionally, aesthetically, and intellectually. Essential Questions 1. What artists’ tools are essential to creating certain types of photography? 2. Is it effective to encourage students to think independently and to create based upon conceptual thinking? 3. What makes a good composition in a photograph? 4. What is the difference between a snapshot and a photograph? 5. How does a camera function? 6. What are the essential parts of the SLR camera and how do they affect exposure and image? 7. How did photography become an accepted art form? 8. Who are the early photographers. How did they use and promote photography? 9. What are the compositional elements in photography and how do they combine to help convey meaning? 10. How do I work with subject matter and yet convey my ideas? 11. How do I control technical issues in photography (dust, cropping, chemical stains)? 12. How do you use photo manipulation software to alter photographs? 13. How to understand the chemical process with film, paper, and historic techniques? Assessment 1. Investigate and research various themes, interests, material, and methods. 2. Critique in-process works individually and collaboratively. 3. Students will learn to scan all works of art and start developing an archive of works. 4. Develop work through open-ended inquiry and consideration of the elements and principles of design. 5. A personal website is required for the course.


6. Incorporate the elements and principles of design as they relate to the creation of a photograph. 7. Consider and incorporate self-expression and explore how it relates to the creation of a photograph 8. Explore a variety of subjects and photographic styles including historical, contemporary, commercial, and fine art. 9. Presentation through a website and artist statement. 10. Develop life skills through the study and production of art (e.g.collaboration,creativity, critical thinking, communication). Collaborate in large and small groups with peers and community to examine, discuss, and plan projects. Use creativity and imagination in planning and development of products.Use critical thinking and problem solving strategies to conceive of and develop ideas.Communicate meaning and ideas through a variety of means including visual representations, technology, and performance. Skills Benchmarks Students will: 1. Utilize both digital and analog processes. 2. Learn advanced darkroom skills: understanding exposure compensation, processing film with the option of pushing and pulling, editing final works with production of a contact sheet, and creating final prints on large fiber based paper. 3. Study the makeup of alternative films; the basics of instant film techniques, and the use of color negative film with camera exposure. 4. Use plastic toy cameras to create larger formatted works of art. 5. Understand the foundation of digital photography and the use of the computer in the advancement of the photographic arts. 6. Create traditional wet darkroom photographic prints. 7. Demonstrate understanding of F/stop and shutter speed. 8. Explore digital manipulation of photographs. 9. Experiment and create photographs utilizing alternative processes. 10. Demonstrate safe and proper use of photographic tools and processes. Units 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Toy cameras and color negative film Cyanotype printing and creating digital negatives. Explore a variety of subjects and photographic styles, both historical and contemporary. Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Lightroom Explore mixed media approaches (e.g. traditional, digital, alternative materials, installation, video). 6. Understand and practice safe handling of photographic media. 7. How to create a website and a portfolio.

Textbooks and Resources 1. Magazines such as ​Aperture,​ P ​ hoto District News,​ ​Camera Arts​, ​Shots​, ​Rolling Stone​, National Geographic,​ and ​Vanity Fair 2. Work of artists such as Richard Avedon, Cindy Sherman, Nan Goldin, Keith Carter, Sebastiao Salgado, and Ansel Adams.


3. Works of art by previous Lovett students 4. Construction of the Starn twins and Robert Rauschenberg for alternative ideas for presentation of artwork. 5. Access resources to research art (e.g. museums, internet, visiting artists, galleries, 6. community arts organizations, visual culture). 7. Identify various photography related careers and emerging technological fields. 8. Identify, compare, and contrast major styles of photography and their distinguishing 9. characteristics. Updated August 2018


814 - Photography III: Advanced Photography Course Description Grades: 12 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Fall only Prerequisite: 812 - Photography II AND departmental recommendation Advanced Photography will survey a variety of non-traditional techniques that expand artistic possibilities for darkroom photographers and digital photographers. ​Students use their creative skills, art-making techniques, unique point of view, and self-expression to communicate and empathize with the viewer through their original artwork. ​This class builds on and enhances Photography II skills, provides opportunities to apply more complex photographic designs, and c​ontinues to study photography and photographers for historical and critical appraisal.​ The course introduces advanced, experimental analog, and digital photographic techniques. Photography III explores alternative printing, working with historical processes and digital software. Students will learn how to mix analog chemicals, using paint brushes students apply solutions to various papers, expose and process with negatives in the darkroom, and tone prints. Students will work with Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Lightroom, troubleshooting with Photoshop, organization with Adobe Lightroom, and creating a portfolio website. ​This course stresses the personal expression of ideas and depth of exploration in selected photo techniques. Essential Questions 1. What is the difference between a snapshot and a photograph? 2. How does a camera function? 3. What are the essential parts of the SLR and DSLR camera? 4. What makes a good composition in a photograph? 5. How did photography become an accepted art form? 6. Who are the early photographers and how did they use and promote photography? 7. What are the compositional elements in photography and how do they combine to help convey meaning? 8. How to understand the chemical process with film and paper? 9. How to enhance or change your photograph is Adobe Lightroom CC and Adobe Photoshop CC? 10. Develop life skills through the study and production of art (e.g.collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, communication). Collaborate in large and small groups with peers and community to examine, discuss, and plan projects. Use creativity and imagination in the planning and development of products. Use critical thinking and strategies to conceive of and develop ideas. Communicate meaning and ideas through a variety of means including visual representations, technology, and performance. Assessment


1. Develop work through open-ended inquiry and consideration of the elements and principles of design. 2. Evaluate and respond to artists’ choices in technique, media, and style by relating and connecting personal photographic content to historical and contemporary photographers. 3. Critique in-process works individually and collaboratively. 4. Create traditional wet darkroom photographic prints. 5. Exhibit works of art with a written supporting artist statement that communicates the purpose and intent. 6. Create an exhibition level series of photographs: archival quality, matted, and installed. 7. Explore natural and studio lighting methods. 8. Demonstrate an understanding of F/stop and shutter speed. 9. Explore the digital manipulation of photographs. 10. Experiment and create photographs utilizing alternative processes. 11. Demonstrate the safe and proper use of photographic tools and processes. Skills Benchmarks Students will: 1. Download, process, and archive film. 2. Create contact sheets 3. Reflect and analyze work, generate ideas, and document skills progress through self-assessment 4. and critique 5. Collaborate in large and small groups with peers and community to examine, discuss, and plan projects. 6. Use creativity and imagination in the planning and development of products. 7. Use critical thinking and problem-solving strategies to conceive of and develop ideas. 8. Communicate meaning and ideas through a variety of means including visual representations, technology, and performance. 9. Learn the details of historic printing in photography. 10. Plan compositions and production elements (e.g. sets, lighting, location, wardrobe) 11. Evaluate the choice of media, technique, and process as a means to edit, revise, and modify photographic works. 12. Develop work through open-ended inquiry and consideration of the elements and principles of design. 13. Investigate and research various themes, interests, material, and methods. 14. Use a sketchbook/journal to research, explore, and invent artistic approaches to connect and express visual ideas. 15. Critique in-process works individually and collaboratively. 16. Exhibit works of art with a written supporting artist statement that communicates purpose and/or intent. 17. Identify, compare, and contrast major styles of photography and their distinguishing characteristics. Units 1. Form 2. Locks, Chains, Metals 3. Evidence


4. Repetition 5. Unique Portraits 6. Still Life 7. Lines 8. Clean up in Aisle 3 9. Color 10. Passageways 11. Texture 12. Photo Documentary 13. Negative Space 14. Self Portrait 15. Nature 16. Expressive Portraits 17. Choose Your Adventure 18. Frame Your Photo 19. Abstract Photography 20. Exceptional View 21. Lots of Layers Recourses 1. Magazines such as ​Aperture,​ P ​ hoto District News,​ ​ New York TImes Lens, Camera Arts, Shots, Rolling Stone, National Geographic, and Vanity Fair 2. Access resources to research art (e.g. museums, internet, visiting artists, galleries, community arts organizations, visual culture). 3. Identify various photography related careers and emerging technological fields. 4. Atlanta Celebrates Photography 5. The High Museum of Art 6. Jackson Fine Art 7. National Portfolio Day 8. LensCulture Updated September 2018


816 - Digital Photography Course Description Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Fall/Spring Prerequisite: 800 - Foundations of Art  This course will introduce students to digital photography and printing, exploring the visual image as a creative and expressive tool. We will use Adobe Photoshop as an introduction to the digital darkroom and printing technology. Students will practice editing with a mouse and with a Wacom Tablet. Projects will also use the scanner to import digital imagery and mobile editing apps such as Snapseed or VSCO. We will discuss different processes used in the digital darkroom, such as organizing files, sending images over the internet, making adjustments in Adobe Photoshop, and the basics of digital printing. Owning or accessing a digital camera or film camera is required for this course; however, if you do not have access to a digital camera, some cameras are available for loan from Lovett. If you are curious about digital photography and digital editing tools, we encourage you to enroll. Prior Photoshop experience is not necessary. Some assignments may require students to shoot on location; therefore, a driver’s license or access to transportation is required. Note: Students must have a digital camera with manual control over shutter speed and aperture. Prior experience with Photoshop is not necessary. Essential Questions 1. What is digital photography and how do digital cameras work? 2. What is the role of Photoshop today, compared to traditional photography techniques? 3. What can Photoshop edit in an image and what cannot be altered? 4. How is an understanding of Photoshop essential for moving forward in the job market? 5. What makes a compelling image composition? How can I use composition to communicate my ideas to my viewers? 6. How am I presenting my artwork and my portfolio of images? 7. How is fine art photography similar to and different from personal, commercial, or social media photography? Assessment 1. A rubric is designed for each project that includes the following items: a. Composition and design that shows intention and use of the elements and principles of design (SB7) b. Technical quality, use of photographic equipment and digital editing tools (SB1, 6) c. Originality and coherence of concept (SB4, 7) d. In-class activity: cooperation, being on-task, and coming to class prepared (SB1-7) e. Presentation and reflection, including maintaining their website, and participating


in the group critique reflecting on others’ work and reflecting on their own work. (SB4-5) 2. Students will be required to focus on the final presentation of their work, including matting and framing. Works will be critiqued in class and hung for exhibition around campus. 3. Students will upload files for a class presentation and critique. 4. For each unit, students create an essay of at least 30 sentences that explains the process, content, final product, and reflection on the student’s artwork. This document helps students prepare for critique and track their growth as an artist. Skills Benchmarks ​Students will be able to: 1. Use Photoshop to make basic photo corrections, work with selected areas of a picture, and use multiple layers to create a graphic. 2. Add special effects and advanced layering techniques to their work. 3. Create multiple types of digital documents using Photoshop. 4. Demonstrate their ability to think freely and creatively. 5. Create and maintain a digital portfolio on a website. 6. Use a digital camera, scanner, and digital printer. 7. Create a balanced composition that communicates their personal message to the viewer. Course Units 1. Introduction to Digital Photography & Photoshop 2. Light and Space 3. Perspective and Composition a. Students must think ​critically​ to identify the appropriate instances of linear perspective in the world around them. Students think ​creatively​ to capture their personal point of view when composing photographs. Students are assessed on how they can ​visually communicate​ each of the instances of perspective using composition, editing techniques, and proper exposure. Additionally, students are assessed on how they ​verbally communicate​ (oral and written) their subjects, composition process, and the strengths/weaknesses of their final series of photographs. 4. Scanography 5. Typologies 6. Image & Idea Textbooks and Resources Online tutorials for Photoshop techniques. Digital Resource of The Photographic Eye: Learning to See with a Camera Updated October 2018


818 - Ceramics I Course Description Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Fall/Spring Prerequisite: 800 - Foundations of Art This course is designed to teach the student how to manipulate clay, the ceramic process of construction, surface design, and its historical and contemporary relevance. Student project topics include basic techniques in both hand-building and wheel pottery to create a variety of functional and sculptural forms. Essential Questions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

What defines a good bowl and cup, and why is that important? What are the tools that are needed to shape a piece? Where can I find inspiration for my piece and why is that important? What tools and skills do I need to complete my personal goals as an artist? How do I connect, combine, and construct elements to make a more interesting piece? What is a glaze, and how can I use glazes to make interesting surfaces?

Assessment 1. A rubric is designed for each project that includes the following items: understanding, craftsmanship, and skills objectives. 2. Students will use the style of class critiques to discuss their creative process at the completion of each project. They are asked to defend their work by answering a series of questions that reflect their strengths and weaknesses. Classmates also initiate a conversation about each artist’s strength and weaknesses, further challenging the student. This process is essential to the young artist to grow in ability, craftsmanship, and connection with the viewer. Skills Benchmarks Students will: 1. Find resources for inspiration for both content and composition. 2. Create balanced compositions (i.e. shapes) that communicate their personal message to the viewer. 3. Use their own ideas and personal aesthetic to apply emotional quality to their work. 4. Create only original artwork. 5. Work to produce pieces that include ample volume, proper trimming, alteration and/or stamping, and interesting surface decoration. Units 1. Studio Procedures


2. Inspiration through Visits by Outside Artists 3. Inspiration through Demonstrations 4. Daily Art Challenges: a. Making clay b. Throwing c. Controlling the drying process d. Trimming e. Decorating the surface f. Loading kilns for bisque g. Glazing and glaze firing Textbooks and Resources ​Teacher’s personal library Updated August 2012


820 - Ceramics II Course Description Grades: 10-12 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Fall/Spring Prerequisite: 818 - Ceramics I AND teacher recommendation

 This course continues to explore the diverse discipline of ceramics. Students will work with new ceramic surface design processes at a larger scale and will explore more variety in creating specific vessel types through hand-building and wheel pottery. Students will begin to create more personal artistic expressions that exhibit their interests and creativity. Essential Questions 1. What defines a good bowl and cup, and why is that important? 2. What are the tools that are needed to shape a piece? 3. Where can I find inspiration for my piece and why is that important? 4. What tools and skills do I need to complete my personal goals as an artist? 5. How do I process and document my failed attempts and learn from those mistakes? 6. What is a glaze? What are the differences among the studio glazes? 7. How does my composition communicate to the viewer an emotional quality, idea, or concept? 8. What is the creative design process and how do you use it? Assessment 1. A rubric is designed for each project that includes the following items: understanding, craftsmanship, and skill objectives. 2. Students also work in a creative design making process which help them define and pinpoint the goals for their artwork. A rubric is used to evaluate if the student met their design goals. 3. Students will journal about their progress throughout the class. This reflection will be a record of the students experience, strengths and weaknesses, evolution as a potter, the moments when they discovered something about the material, and an account of meeting curriculum benchmarks. 4. Students will use the style of class critiques to discuss their creative process at the completion of each project. They are asked to defend their work by answering a series of questions that reflect their strengths and weaknesses. Classmates also initiate conversation about each artist’s strength and weaknesses, further challenging the student. This process is essential to the young artist to grow in ability, craftsmanship, and connection with the viewer. Skills Benchmarks Students will demonstrate their mastery of the following Level II techniques.


1. Throwing skills a. Throwing off the hump (for spouts and knobs) b. Multi-Section Forms c. Using calipers for multi-section forms, lids, and flange. 2. Trimming skills: a. Trimming a foot for a vessel. b. Cleaning up the surface at the leather hard stage. 3. Hand building skills: a. Pulling Handles and attaching them to form. b. Attaching spouts c. Attachments for multi-section forms. d. Creating own stamps for surface decoration. 4. Glazing skills: a. Brushed Glazing b. Dipped Glazing c. Poured Glazing d. Spray Glazing e. Overglazing and under glazing 5. Kiln Practice and Knowledge: a. Front loading b. Cleaning kiln shelves c. Bisque firing d. High fire glaze firing 6. Find resources for inspiration for both content and composition. 7. Create balanced compositions (i.e. shapes) that communicate their personal message to the viewer. 8. Wield and center 10 to 15 lbs of clay. 9. Use their own ideas and personal aesthetic to apply intentionality to their work 10. Execute original designs Units 1. Review of Studio Procedures while making vases. Students will explore Students will cover the cylinder, large cylinder, and multi-section forms. a. Throwing b. Controlling the drying process c. Trimming d. Decorating the surface e. Loading kilns for bisque f. Glazing and glaze firing 2. Teapot: Students will create and design a teapot. This includes using calipers, a consistent height, and depth, as well as a unique design. a. Pouring vessel platform for lip b. Spout c. Handle d. Lid


3. Plates: Students will create a set of plates that include using calipers, a consistent height, and depth, as well as a unique and consistent design. 4. Platters: Students will create a set of platters that include using calipers, a consistent height and depth, as well as a unique and consistent design. 5. Japanese Tea Set: Students will create a teapot and a set of yunomi teacups that include using calipers, a consistent height and depth, as well as a unique and consistent design. Textbooks and Resources 1. Nelson, Glenn (1971) ​Ceramics: A Potter’s Handbook​. Holt: New York. 2. Birks, Tony (1993) ​The Complete Potter’s Companion​. Bulfinch: New York. 3. Studio materials are provided for students. Updated May 2016


824 - Honors Visual Arts Course Description Grades: 11-12 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Fall/Spring Prerequisite: Three studio visual arts classes AND departmental recommendation This course is designed for the highly motivated and committed art studio student. In a single semester, the student will produce eight art pieces that show mastery in design, concept, composition, and materials. The artwork must also reflect problems solving, critical thinking, skillfulness and breadth in media. A series of work will be created around a topic of the student’s choosing that is submitted with their application. Work must be created with purpose and intention. Students will also develop their concepts with teachers and will need to execute their work with creative solutions. Students should expect to spend a minimum of two hours a week outside of class to complete assignments. Being inventive and learning how to take risks in the discovery of one’s aesthetic is an essential part of this course. Students may work in either 2-D or 3-D media, depending on the assignment. This course can serve individual students in an existing class under the guidance and supervision of instructors. Note: This course may be repeated once for credit. Priority will be given to first-time students. Students repeating the class will complete and edit their high school portfolio and develop a second series of work based on a concept designed by the student. Instructors then customize the curriculum that combines the interests of the student with additional advanced art media techniques. Essential Questions 1. While working under a rigorous deadline, how do artists develop a series of work? 2. Will students reach a point in their development as artists where they edit their work and think constructively? 3. How can students use the principles and elements of design to create unity in their artwork? 4. Will a balance of skill, an understanding of media, and participation in critiques allow students to create independently? 5. Will students be able to create conceptual work and understand the impact of their artwork? 6. Will students be able to create portfolios that have the three elements of concentration, breadth, and quality? Assessment 1. Diagnostic Assessment - Visual arts faculty will evaluate the areas in the student’s work and identify areas where students need to expand their portfolio and/or use of media. 2. Formative Assessment: a. Students will use the style of class critiques to discuss their creative process at the completion of each project. Students are asked to defend their work by answering a series of questions that examine their strengths and weaknesses. Classmates also initiate a conversation about each artist’s strengths and weaknesses, further challenging the student. This process is essential to the young artist’s growth in ability, craftsmanship, and connection with the viewer.


b. Students are given daily blog assignments that document their processes. There, they will publish their process on the web. c. A ​rubric ​is used that evaluates the quality of the work, the connection to the student’s topic, the investigation of 2-D and 3-D design principles, application of 2-D and 3-D design principles to broad range of design problems, purpose and intention in the compositional use of the elements and principles of design, and technical competence and skill with materials and media. 3. Summative Assessment a. Three portfolio reviews by the visual arts faculty will be conducted at the following times: end of the first quarter, mid-semester, and the end of the semester. Teachers will evaluate work using the ​AP Studio Art 2012 Scoring Guidelines​. b. Self-evaluations will be conducted at the following times: end of the first quarter term, mid-term, and end of the semester. Skills Benchmarks Students will: 1. Demonstrate that they can produce eight art pieces in a single concentration that are of high quality and are completed on an accelerated schedule. 2. Demonstrate that they can create work that includes all of the following: creativity and inventiveness, skills and mastery of materials 3. Articulate concepts, processes and personal reflections in critiques and written evaluations. 4. Learn and demonstrate their understanding of the principles and elements of design, including line, shape, color, value, texture, space, unity/variety, balance, emphasis, contrast, rhythm, repetition, proportion/scale, and figure/ground relationships. 5. Demonstrate their ability to be creative problem solvers, critical thinkers (Bloom’s “Higher Order” thinking skills), and collaborators. 6. Establish a comprehensive portfolio for college admission. Concentration Students will select a topic to explore through one or more of the media offered in visual arts. They will make certain that, when working in a medium, the pieces they produce will address specific criteria as indicated in the examples that follow. Painting, Mixed Media, and Advanced Drawing​ - Students create pieces to address specific conditions, examples of which include: ● Traditional values and historical references within the context of medium, society, or cultures ● Contrasts between traditional values and historical references with contemporary models ● Student’s current world-views, including social, economic, political or spiritual ● Extreme points of view that can be physical, philosophical, emotional or spiritual ● Inside and outside - how the two ideas connect or contrast in a single piece ● Natural and synesthetic - how two ideas connect or contrast in a single piece ● Perspective, either past, present, or future ● Conclusions they draw from this exploration in an independent final work Photography​ - Students create artwork using historic techniques: ● 1826 – Nicéphore Niépce takes the first fixed, permanent photograph from nature, a landscape that required an eight-hour exposure. ​Requirement​: three final prints that mimic the time exposure and look of an image from this time era


● ● ●

1854 – André-Adolphe-Eugène Disdéri is credited with introducing the ​Carte de visite (French "visiting card"). Disdéri introduced a camera with multiple lenses that could reproduce eight individually exposed images on a single negative. After printing on albumen paper, the images were cut apart and glued to calling card-sized mounts. Requirement​: three final prints that mimic the time exposure and look of an image from this time era 1860 – The tintype process became very popular in the United States, particularly during the​ ​Civil War​, and significant usage continued throughout the 19th century for inexpensive portraits, particularly by street photographers. ​Requirement​: three final prints that mimic the time exposure and look of an image from this time era 1878 – Eadweard Muybridge made a high-speed photographic demonstration of a moving horse, airborne during a trot, using a trip-wire system. ​Requirement​: make a sequential content that displays motion. 1900 – Kodak introduced its first Brownie. ​Requirement​: purchase a Kodak Brownie and create a series of six images from film. 1959 – Nikon F camera is introduced. Requirement: produce a series of six images created with the Nikon F series 35mm camera 2000 – J-SH04 is introduced by J-Phone and is the first commercially available camera integrated with a mobile phone that can make and share still pictures. ​Requirement​: create artistic images with a camera phone. 2008 – Polaroid announces it is discontinuing the production of all instant film products, citing the rise of digital imaging technology. Requirement: research Polaroid technology and where it stands today and produce a series of images that mimic the many styles of Polaroid

Ceramics​ - Students produce work artwork using the following guidelines: ● ● ● ● ●

Historic References: Explore historic and contemporary models and express how models have merged and how they are different. Shape and Form: Explore shape and form and express how shape and form address both utility and purpose. Surface and Texture: Explore surface and texture and address how surface merges with form. Firing: Explore high fire, wood firing, and/or Raku firing Contemporary Society and the Role of Pottery: Explore how pottery and the chosen topic of concentration relate to the following contemporary issues: social, economic, political, and spiritual

Textbooks and Resources Maggie Davis, "2-D Design Portfolio" AP Studio Art Guide pg. 15 (2003): College Entrance Examination Board. Updated September 2018


826 - History of Film Course Description Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Fall/Spring

This course provides an overview of the history of film as an avenue of artistic expression and will cover the development of film from silent movies to modern-day motion pictures. Students will study a century of classic films, both foreign and domestic, and the great directors, and will become acquainted with stylistic and technical innovations in film throughout the years. The course is designed to strengthen the Lovett students’ ​critical thinking​ skills, while engaging them emotionally​, ​aesthetically​ and s​ piritually​ through the art of visual storytelling. Essential Questions: 1. How is historical context critical to an art form? 2. How does film reveal meaning to an audience? 3. In what ways do the elements and principles of design become the language of self-expression? 4. How do film techniques influence our understanding of character, mood, plot or theme? 5. How do themes of films connect to our lives, our culture, and our world? Assessment: 1. Participation in class discussion and activities 2. Silent Film test 3. Citizen Kane midterm events a. Example: Each student will select a scene from Orson Wells’ classic film to present to the class. Students will analyze the clip in terms of camera movement, lighting, art direction, sound, music, acting, writing and directing. This project is designed to foster in each student a spirit of confident independence and the ability to think critically and communicate effectively. 4. Clip analysis 5. Quizzes Note: There is no final assessment. Skills Benchmarks: Students will be able to: 1. Evaluate film art by comparing and contrasting it to some of the great works of the medium. 2. Define specific criteria for making an informed critical evaluation of the quality and effectiveness of film art. 3. Analyze the various components of film art as a means of understanding and evaluating works of film as a whole. 4. Articulate the importance of film to our history and culture. 5. Grasp the historical development of film as an art form from its start to the present day. Units


1. Short Silent Film: From the Edison Studio to Lumiere and Melias in France 2. Editing Development: Eisenstein and Kuleshov in Russia and Montage v D. W. Griffith and the Development of the Hollywood Style 3. The Beginnings of the Star System: Charlie Chaplin and Dorothy Gish and the Glory of the Silent Era 4. The Beginning of Sound: Fritz Lang, Joseph Von Sternberg, Howard Hawks 5. Decade by Decade: Films from Selected Directors a. 1930’s – Charlie Chaplin, John Ford, Jean Renoir, James Whale, Fritz Lang, Joseph Von Sternberg, Jean Vigo, Howard Hawks, Frank Capra b. 1940’s –Orson Welles, Preston Sturges, Vittorio De Sica, John Ford, Alfred Hitchcock, Roberto Rossellini, Billy Wilder, Carol Reed, Marcel Carne, Maya Deran c. 1950’s - John Ford, Ingmar Bergman, Federico Fellini, Billy Wilder, Akira Kurosawa, Alfred Hitchcock, Francois Truffaut, Yasujiro Ozu, Satyajit Ray, Robert Aldrich, Sam Fuller, Stanley Donen d. 1960’s – Federico Fellini, Ingmar Bergman, Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick, Akira Kurosawa, Tony Richardson, Jean-Luc Goddard, Gillo Pontocorvo, Michelangelo Antonioni, Luis Bunuel, Francois Truffaut, Arthur Penn, Mike Nicholls e. 1970’s – Werner Herzog, Michelangelo Antonioni, Robert Altman, Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese, Stanley Kubrick, Fellini, George Lucas, Sidney Lumet, Woody Allen, Roman Polanski, Victor Erice f. 1980’s – Robert Altman, Tsui Hark, Emir Kusturica, Spike Lee, John Sayles g. 1990’s – Coen Brothers, Wong Kar-wai, Martin Scorsese, Peter Weir, Zhang Yimou, Chen Kaige, Tim Burton, Pedro Almodovar, John Duigan Ari Folman, Barry Levinson h. 2000’s – Michel Gondry, Ang Lee, Coen Brothers, Hayao Miyazaki, Richard Kelly, Jim Jarmusch, Christopher Nolan, Fernando Meiralles, Marc Webb Textbooks and Resources 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Close-Up Film​ - English site dedicated to recently released films and DVDs Metaphilm​ - 10 years of film interpretation Senses of Cinema​ - Australian film journal BFI​ - English film journal Bright Lights Film Journal​ - Film essay journal IMDB​ - General information The Lovett School library collection of films and film books

Revised July 2016


828 - Critical Approaches to Film Course Description Grades: 10-12 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Fall Prerequisite: 826 - History of Film This course is designed to deepen and sharpen students' critical thinking skills in the area of film analysis. Students will explore the work of some of cinema's greatest directors and learn to craft cogent, focused reviews. Essential Questions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

How is historical context critical to an art form? How does film reveal meaning to an audience? How do themes of films connect to our lives, our culture, and our world? How do we determine the quality of a film? How do we judge the film creator’s career as an artist? Are different critical approaches to film valuable to our understanding of the art of film?

Assessment 1. The greatest part of this class is the willingness and ability to discuss the themes, structures, and art of the film. The ability to analyze and criticize the films viewed and the ability to combine those skills with traditional critical approaches will make up the greatest part of the class grade. 2. There will be several analytical written assignments based on things discussed in the class in an attempt to ascertain the students’ understanding of the connections among the films. 3. Example: There will be a student-generated unit each semester. Each student will design an approach to the unit and suggest the films to be studied. This is a mandatory assignment and an important part of the overall assessment. This assessment is designed to foster a spirit of independence, intellectual curiosity, and creative engagement. Skills Benchmarks Students will be able to: 1. Evaluate film art by comparing and contrasting it to some of the great works of the medium. 2. Analyze the various components of film art as a means of understanding and evaluating works of film as a whole. 3. Compare and critique different works by the same artists. 4. Recognize themes that run through wildly divergent works. 5. Become familiar with at least one critical approach to film. 6. Evaluate the credibility of sources of information and opinion. Units​​ (choices from among each specific approach) 1. Genre Approach a. American High School Film


b. Science Fiction Film c. Film Noir d. The Western 2. Auteur Approach a. Alfred Hitchcock b. Joel and Ethan Cohen c. Stanley Kubrick d. Michelangelo Antonioni e. Christopher Nolan 3. Thematic Approach a. Updating Munch’s Scream for the 21​st​ Century: the Films of 1999 b. Surrealism c. Hollywood and Filmmaking d. The Intersection of Film and the News Media e. The Persistence of Frankenstein f. The Difficulty of Personal Identity g. Films That Live In Limbo h. Surveillance In Society i. America’s Second Golden Age: 1970-76 4. Structural Approach a. The Use of Narrative Experimentation b. Mind Games and Narration Textbooks and Resources 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Close-Up Film​ - English site dedicated to recently released films and DVDs Metaphilm​ - 10 years of film interpretation Senses of Cinema​ - Australian film journal BFI​ - English film journal Bright Lights Film Journal​ - Film essay journal IMDB​ - General information The Lovett School library collection of films and film books

Updated July 2016


830 - Motion Picture Production Course Description Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Fall/Spring

This course will introduce students to the craft of motion picture production. Students will quickly begin experimenting with their own productions, starting with basic shots and movie sequences and leading to the production of music videos, experimental and short narrative films. MPP I students will gain valuable experience and build solid skills in camera and editing. In the end, students will learn to communicate effectively through the art form, critically evaluate artistic choices, and collaborate creatively with their peers in the process. Students in this class may be required to attend the Atlanta Film Festival or other festival and learning opportunities outside of the classroom when scheduled. Note: This course may be repeated multiple times for credit. Essential Questions 1. Can you survive in a visual society without advanced media manipulation skills? 2. How do people express themselves through art today? 3. What artist’s tools are essential in creating certain types of art? 4. Is it necessary for a student to attempt mastery of an artistic medium? 5. Is it effective to encourage students to think independently and to create based on conceptual thinking? Assessment Progress in each unit will be assessed by either an exam or a project. Assessments for units 1-5 are worth 10% each and the final project will serve as 50% of the student’s total grade. Example: The Unit 4 assessment has each student demonstrate how to set up a basic video shoot with professional sound and three-point lighting. They will work in collaboration with their classmates, directing them appropriately to accomplish the goal. This assessment is designed to enhance each student’s ability to communicate effectively with their peers. Students are also challenged to grow emotionally as they take on leadership positions. Skills Benchmarks Students will: 1. Conceive and create film projects that demonstrate an understanding of how the communication of their ideas relates to the media, techniques, and processes they use. 2. Apply media, techniques, and processes with sufficient skill, confidence and sensitivity that their intentions are carried out in their artwork. 3. Demonstrate the ability to form and defend judgments about characteristics and structures used to accomplish commercial, personal, communal or other purposes of art.


4. Evaluate the effectiveness of artwork in terms of organizational structures and functions. 5. Create artwork that uses organizational principles and function to solve specific cinematic art problems. 6. Achieve a working knowledge of camera, lights, sound and editing techniques, equipment and software. Units 1. The Language of Film - Students analyze how to tell stories with moving pictures and sound, analyzing many examples from the great films of cinema history. 2. Last Things First: Editing - Students will work individually on editing projects as each learns the nuances of editing picture and sound. 3. First Things Next: Pre-production and Planning - Students will walk through the entire independent film pre-production process and study how the film and television industry operates. 4. Camera, Lights, and Sound - Students will embark on a unit covering the use of camera, lighting and sound equipment. Students will work independently and in teams to achieve these goals. 5. The Business of Film - Students will receive a cursory education in the business of motion picture and television production and discover the variety of roles and careers available to them in the business, from production assistant to producer. 6. Individual Film Projects - Each student will produce his or her own short film project.

Resources 1. Adobe Premiere Pro 2. Canon Cameras and accessories, Lighting and Sound 3. “How Not To Make A Short Film” by Roberta Marie Monroe 4. “Film Directing: Shot by Shot” by Steven Katz Revised July 2016


832 - Screenwriting I Course Description Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 1.0 Using Christopher Vogler’s book, The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers, beginning screenwriters will develop story outlines based on Joseph Campbell’s structure for hero myths. From Blake Snyder’s text, Save the Cat, students will gain in their understanding of classic feature film script structure. Writers also will receive comprehensive training in screenplay format and the use of professional screenwriting software. Students in this class may be required to attend the Atlanta Film Festival or other festival and learning opportunities outside of the classroom when scheduled. The course is designed to build in each student critical thinking skills, balancing independence and self-direction with the ability to collaborate effectively and take direction from the instructor. Essential Questions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

What is a screenplay? What is screenplay format? How do you craft an action paragraph? How do you craft dialogue? What is the point of staying organized, and how does the writer accomplish this? How does the three-act structure work for film? What is classic structure?

Assessment 1. Quizzes 2. Oral presentations Example: “Pitching” a project involves developing a 30-second “elevator” speech to draw a potential collaborator into the creative project. The assessment is designed to help students communicate their story ideas quickly and effectively. 3. 5-15 page short screenplay 4. Collaboration on feature film outline 5. Logline and beat sheet Skills Benchmarks Students will: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Understand and be able to replicate professional formatting standards. Be able to craft action paragraphs. Be able to construct dialogue. Have mastery and understanding of Final Draft software and the organizational tools embedded within.


5. Be able to complete a short screenplay. 6. Gain understanding of the mono-mythic three-act structure discovered by Joseph Campbell. 7. Construct a three-act feature film outline, following Christopher Vogler’s philosophy. 8. Create a compelling logline and a beat sheet, defining the moments of the story in outline form following Blake Snyder’s philosophy. 9. Refine their ability to reflect, analyze and offer constructive criticism. Units 1. Format First - The first unit in the course will guide students to a comprehensive understanding of the professional standard format and introduce them to the Final Draft software they will be using in class. 2. Writing Action - Writing evocative and descriptive action is essential to the making of a great screenplay. In this unit, students will craft an original scene, working with the elements of mood, setting, and character description, and will present their scenes to the class. 3. Writing Dialogue - In this unit, students will discover great dialogue in existing film clips and will gain a comprehensive understanding of the technical aspects of formatting dialogue. This overview will also serve as an introduction to personal style. Each writer will craft a scene of dialogue based on a conversation recently overheard or in which he or she participated. 4. Outline and Organize - At the center of every great screenplay is a great story. In this unit, students will outline a short story which will serve as the springboard for a short film script. Writers will then gain a practical understanding of the index card tool in the Final Draft software, which will allow them to arrange their scenes in order for easy reference. 5. Writing a Short Narrative Screenplay - In Unit Five, students will begin their first original screenplay. These film scripts will be based on the short stories each writer has developed. This unit will also introduce the concept of the re-write, and students will be guided through the first edit of their work. 6. Campbell, Vogler, and Mono-Mythic Structure - The hero myth is the focus of this unit of study. Students will explore the work of writer and mythologist Joseph Campbell, as interpreted by Christopher Vogler in our text, The Writer's Journey. 7. Collaborating on a Mono-Myth - Unit Seven marks the beginning of a collaboration that will culminate in the completion of a feature film outline. A feature is a full-length movie, and this will be the students' first opportunity to work with this form. Using Chris Vogler's structural elements, the class will collaboratively conjure a new hero myth. Ultimately, each writer will craft several scenes from the storyline and present these to the class. 8. Intro to Save the Cat and Blake Snyder - This unit gives a brief overview of the work and philosophy of Blake Snyder, the late great screenwriting guru. His terrific book, Save the Cat, will serve as a guide for this further exploration into structure and how it defines the writing process. Each writer will craft a logline and develop a beat sheet based on Mr. Snyder’s parameters. This is the beginning of Screenwriting II, for those who wish to continue. Textbooks and Resources


1. The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers; Christopher Vogler 2. Save the Cat; Blake Snyder Updated July 2016


834 - Screenwriting II Course Description Grades: 10-12 Group: II Units: 1.0 Prerequisite: 832 - Screenwriting I Writers will continue to work with the concepts learned in Screenwriting I and work independently on feature film scripts. These advanced screenwriters will further their understanding of the logline and how to develop a pitch. Each writer will complete a 90-120 page screenplay. Students in this class may be required to attend the Atlanta Film Festival or other festival and learning opportunities outside of the classroom when scheduled. The course is designed to build in each student critical thinking skills, balancing independence and self-direction with the ability to collaborate effectively and take direction from the instructor. Essential Questions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

How does a writer stave off resistance? What makes a great short screenplay? How does the writer navigate the process of rewriting? What makes a great pitch? What elements are absolutely necessary for a feature-length screenplay and on approximately what page numbers do they occur? 6. Irrespective of genre, what are the types of stories feature-length commercial movies like to tell? Assessment 1. Quizzes 2. Oral presentations 3. Two 5-15 page short screenplays 4. Series of loglines 5. Pitches a. Example: “Pitching” a project involves developing a 30-second “elevator” speech to draw a potential collaborator into the creative project. The assessment is designed to help students communicate their story ideas quickly and effectively. 6. Feature film outline/script Skills Benchmarks Students will: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Develop habits and strategies specifically geared to fight resistance. Outline and craft several original short screenplays. Develop proficiency with the lengthy process of rewriting. Learn to pitch their projects effectively. Understand and be able to articulate what the market wants in terms of the types of commercial stories typically produced. 6. Construct and refit a feature film outline.


7. Refine their ability to reflect, analyze, and offer constructive criticism. Units 1. Review - Screenwriting II students will look back at the lessons learned in Screenwriting I, refreshing their understanding of Final Draft software, screenplay formatting, and structure. A brief review of Vogler’s mono-mythic structure is also in order during the first few weeks of class. 2. Overcoming Resistance - We will use Steven Pressfield’s book, The War of Art, as our guide for this unit. The overarching goal is to develop an understanding of the universal force of resistance all writers and artists must learn to overcome. 3. Crafting Short Screenplays - Here, the class becomes much more independent, as each writer begins to hone his or her craft. This unit involves everything from making an outline to refining the screenplay. At the end of the unit, each writer will have produced at least two original works from 5-15 pages in length. 4. Back with Blake Snyder - In this unit, we reintroduce the logline, the beat sheet, and everything Blake Snyder has to offer within the covers of Save the Cat. Students will begin to flesh out their understanding of the commercial world of filmmaking and will learn how to craft a winning pitch. Each student will present a series of loglines and will pitch their projects. 5. Deeper Story with McKee - Students will receive a very brief overview of the important work of screenwriting teacher Robert McKee, using his outstanding book, Story, as a guide. Students will develop a balance between commercial complexities and considerations and the absolute need to tell a good, human story. 6. Writing a Feature - Writers will embark on crafting a feature film script, moving from an outline to the long, hard process of creating a 90-page script. Textbooks and Resources 1. 2. 3. 4.

The Writer’s Journey: Mythic Structure for Writers; Christopher Vogler Save the Cat; Blake Snyder The War of Art; Steven Pressfield Story; Robert McKee

Updated July 2016


840 - Orchestra Course Description Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 1.0 Orchestra is a year-long course emphasizing the development of orchestral and chamber ensemble performance skills for students playing bowed string instruments. Students receive instruction in basic music theory, and music sight-reading. With no beginning level offered in the Upper School, enrollment in the program assumes at least an intermediate level of proficiency. The group performs at various school and community functions, and all rehearsals and performances are mandatory. Students may be required to attend an out-of-state trip. A fee is applied to student billing for all trips. Students are expected to purchase or rent formal attire for performances and purchase or rent appropriate instruments. Note: Because performing arts courses are based on a continuous curriculum and ensemble balance, students must remain in the class for both fall and spring semesters, and students will not be allowed to drop the class once school starts. Students wishing to enter this class, who are not presently enrolled in an orchestral class at Lovett, must have teacher approval. Contact Ms. Sarah Dorian (sarah.dorian@lovett.org) for more information. Essential Questions 1. 2. 3. 4.

What is music, what is not….? What are the elements of music? What is the vocabulary used to discuss music and musical performance? How must the elements of music be managed by the musician in order to achieve a “musical” performance? 5. How do the concerns of a musician change as the ensemble configuration and genres change? 6. What role does my instrument play in the overall texture of the ensemble’s sound? 7. How do the performance practices of those styles compare/contrast? Assessment 1. Daily class participation:​ In-class participation is evaluated daily. Students are expected to remain on task for the duration of each class period. It is essential that each student come prepared, with instrument and materials required for full participation. 2. Playing evaluations​: Students are required to demonstrate mastery of the fundamental elements of musicianship as well as the degree to which they have prepared their concert music. Most playing tests are submitted to the instructor in recorded form over the web. The instructor provides written commentary and evaluation for most assessments. ​SmartMusic ​generated assignments/assessments are most common. 3. Written Assignments:​ Written assignments are given throughout the year and may include post-performance reflection and critique of a musical performance presented in class or on the recording, self-evaluation, surveys, etc 4. Practice records:​ Credit is given for personal practice time 5. SmartMusic® assignments​: Assignments are used to develop and reinforce regular practice habits and systems.


6. Rehearsals and Attendance at Concerts:​ Enrollment in orchestra assumes students expect and make time for rehearsals beyond the regular school day. Concerts are essential, providing the opportunity to set and reach goals and share music with a wider audience. They may be considered as our discipline’s truest measure of accomplishment. A schedule of the year’s performances and activities is issued at the beginning of each school year. Students sign a contract agreeing to be prompt and prepared with all that is required in the way of equipment, materials, and wardrobe for each gathering. 7. Extra Credit:​ Given at the discretion of the director for accomplishment or service beyond the stated requirements of the class. 8. Conduct:​ A conduct grade is given for each grading period, according to school policy. Conduct options include S-Satisfactory and N-Needs improvement and are a reflection of the general conduct of the student. Skills Benchmarks Playing Proficiency Orchestra students are expected to develop into proficient instrumentalists. The ongoing development of musicianship will be observed, addressed, and evaluated in each rehearsal. Playing evaluations (in class and online) and in-class demonstrations guide students toward specific performance objectives and reveal relative stages of development. Together, these perspectives provide the director with an opportunity to measure and document individual progress relative to age, experience, and talent. Performance Benchmarks​ (relative to age, experience, and musical talent) Students will: 1. Recognize and be able to play string orchestra music from the 17​th​, 18​th​, 19​th​, 20​th​, and 21​st​ centuries. 2. Develop individual technical skills to allow them to perform such repertoire. a. Produce a characteristic tone on their instrument. b. Demonstrate the ability to play in tune. c. Play in a steady rhythm, matching the pulse of a metronome, a conductor, or that of an ensemble. d. Demonstrate technique sufficient to play the concert music e. Play with musical expression. f. Demonstrate the ability to balance and blend within the context of the musical texture of an ensemble. 3. Develop the ability to play grade-level music at sight (sight-reading). 4. Develop an understanding of music theory and its function from both a performer’s and creator’s standpoint. 5. Develop the ability to analyze an unknown piece, place it in a historical context, and evaluate a performance by others. 6. Develop compositional skill. Performance Opportunities A series of performances is scheduled for members of the Upper School Orchestra that guides the year’s schedule of rehearsals and performance targets. Major performances for the group include the Fall Concert, the Holiday Concert, the Founders’ Chapel in January, the String Spectacular Concert in late February, the NHS/Cum Laude Induction, a Chamber Concert, and the Senior Communion in May. There are numerous additional options for those wishing to


expand their performance opportunities. Orchestra members may volunteer for participation in the GMEA All-State Orchestra, the Atlanta Junior Chamber Orchestra, MYSO, and the Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra, among others. Applied students perform at one of the applied lessons recitals each year, and a Chamber Music Recital is presented late second semester by and for those students who are highly motivated by small-group and solo performance. Units 1. Technique Review and Development; Simple Melodies a. Scales and arpeggios in varied rhythms and tempi b. Sight-reading at grade level c. Preparation of easy music for chapel, side-by-side, and occasional events d. Student-created melodies 2. Fall Concert - Learn music selected for a concert in late October 3. Holiday Concert - Learn music selected for a concert in early December 4. String Spectacular Concert - Learn music selected for a concert in late February 5. Small Ensemble Concert - Learn music selected for a concert in early-May 6. Senior Communion - Learn music selected for the Senior Communion Materials There is no textbook for this class. Students will use primary source materials, including music selected each year in response to enrollment and skill level. Music might include, but is not limited to: 1. String orchestra and chamber by: a. Bach, Corelli, Handel, Vivaldi, etc. b. Beethoven, Haydn, Mozart, etc. c. Brahms, Grieg, Mendelssohn, Nielson, Sibelius, Tchaikovski, etc. d. Britten, Corigliano, Holst, Meyer, Neubold, Shostakovitch, etc. e. Contemporary composers (specific “educational” pieces) 2. Essentials for Strings​ by Gerald Anderson (Neil A. Kjos Music, San Diego, 1985) 3. SmartMusic® subscription 4. Sheet music (published and out-of-print) 5. Recordings: on-line, CDs, and DVDs 6. Internet sites and subscriptions (YouTube, Naxos, etc.) 7. Magazines (STRAD, STRINGS, ASTA Journal, etc.) and books (New Groves Dictionary, Oxford Encyclopedia, etc.) Revised May 2014


842 - Wind Symphony Course Description Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 1.0

Wind Symphony is a performance class. As such, students spend the majority of their class time in group and sectional rehearsals. Classes are geared toward preparation of music for concerts and performances. Primary emphasis is placed on the study of concert band music with jazz ensemble and small ensembles as a secondary point of focus. With no beginning level offered in the Upper School, enrollment in the program requires the recommendation of the instructor and assumes proficiency for admission. Membership in the band is considered a long-term commitment - many will have spent nine years in band upon graduation. Each student brings a special set of talents; consequently, no two students will emerge from the program with exactly the same degree of accomplishment. It is expected, however, that each member of the group will make continuous progress throughout his or her study and achieve at least a reasonable degree of instrumental proficiency upon graduation. Note: Because performing arts courses are based on a continuous curriculum and ensemble balance, students must remain in the class for both fall and spring semesters, and students will not be allowed to drop the class once school starts. Essential Questions 1. What is music, what is not…? 2. What are the elements of music? 3. What is the vocabulary used to discuss music and musical performance? 4. How must the elements of music be managed by the musician in order to present a “musical” performance? 5. How do the concerns of a musician change as the ensemble configuration and genres change? 6. What role does my instrument play in the overall texture of the ensemble’s sound? 7. Which styles of music currently serve as a staple for literature for wind bands? 8. How do the performance practices of the various musical styles compare/contrast? 9. What clues must a musician recognize in order to evaluate the impact of his/her performance on an audience? Assessment 1. Rehearsals and Attendance at Concerts:​ Enrollment in band assumes students expect and make time for rehearsals beyond the regular school day. Concerts are essential, providing the opportunity to set and reach goals and share music with a wider audience. They may be considered as our discipline’s truest measure of accomplishment. A schedule of the year’s performances and activities is issued at the beginning of each school year. Students sign a contract agreeing to be prompt and prepared with all that is required in the way of equipment, materials, and wardrobe for each gathering.


2. Pass-Offs and Playing Tests​: Students are required to demonstrate mastery of the fundamental elements of musicianship as well as the degree to which they have prepared their concert music. Most playing tests are submitted to the instructor in recorded form over the web. The instructor provides written commentary and evaluation for most assessments. ​SmartMusic ​generated assignments/assessments are most common. 3. Daily Participation​: In-class participation is evaluated daily. Students are expected to remain on task for the duration of each class period. It is essential that each student come prepared, with instrument and materials required for full participation. 4. Written Assignments:​ Written assignments are given throughout the year and may include post-performance reflection and critique of a musical performance presented in class or on the recording, self-evaluation, surveys, etc. 5. Extra Credit:​ Given at the discretion of the director for accomplishment or service beyond the stated requirements of the class 6. Conduct:​ A conduct grade is given for each grading period, according to school policy. Conduct options include S-Satisfactory and N-Needs improvement and are a reflection of the general conduct of the student. Skills Benchmarks Playing Proficiency Band students are expected to develop into proficient instrumentalists. The ongoing development of musicianship will be observed, addressed, and evaluated in each rehearsal. Pass-offs (playing tests and quizzes) and in-class demonstrations guide students toward specific performance objectives and reveal relative stages of development. Together, these perspectives provide the director with an opportunity to measure and document individual progress relative to age, experience, and talent. Elements of Musicianship Used to Evaluate Proficiency: 1. Tone Production:​ This is the ability to produce a beautiful, characteristic tone relative to an “ideal” professional standard. For wind players, breath support, embouchure formation, and instrument condition (among many other factors) contribute significantly toward achieving a beautiful tone. For percussionists and other non-wind instrumentalists, touch, rhythmic sensitivity, and approach are determining factors. 2. Technique:​ The mechanical aspect of musicianship enables the student to successfully execute a wide variety of musical passages found within band literature. The mechanics include range, articulation, finger dexterity, motor memory, and control. 3. Intonation:​ The ability to match pitch and play in tune with others is essential. 4. Expression:​ The aesthetic aspects of musical performance include phrase shape and dynamic contrast. 5. Rhythm:​ Defined as the controlled movement of music as it relates to pulse and tempo, students constantly strive to play with a strong sense of pulse and musical timing in coordination with others. 6. Music Reading:​ Including the ability to read and perform written music at first sight, music reading involves almost exactly the same processes required to master a second language which does not also use the modern English alphabet. Reading proficiency


develops over an extended period through exposure, analysis, memorization, and repetition. Performance Benchmarks​ (relative to age, experience and musical talent) Students will: 1. Produce a characteristic tone on their instrument. 2. Demonstrate technique sufficient to play the concert music and technical exercises covered in class. 3. Demonstrate the ability to play in tune. 4. Play with musical expression. 5. Play in a steady rhythm, matching the pulse of a metronome, a conductor, or that of an ensemble. 6. Demonstrate the ability to balance and blend within the context of the musical texture of an ensemble. 7. Demonstrate the ability to read music at first sight, without help or prompt. Performance Opportunities A series of performances is scheduled for members of the Upper School Band that guides the year’s schedule of rehearsals and performances. Major performances for the group include opening and closing chapel services, the Band/Orchestra Holiday Concert, presented late in the first semester, and a spring concert (or festival trip), which occurs in mid to late second semester. There are numerous additional options for those wishing to expand their performance opportunities. Band members may volunteer for participation in the All-State Band, Orchestra, or Jazz Ensembles, the Atlanta Youth Wind Symphony, and the Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra, among others. Applied students perform at one of the applied lessons recitals each year, and a Chamber Music Recital is presented late second semester for those who wish to play a more extensive program of chamber music. (Some band members may also be involved in the Ellington Band’s Swing Concert.) Assessment 7. Rehearsals and Attendance at Concerts:​ Enrollment in band assumes students expect and make time for rehearsals beyond the regular school day. Concerts are essential, providing an opportunity to set and reach goals and share music with a wider audience. They may be considered as our discipline’s truest measure of accomplishment. A schedule of the year’s performances and activities is issued at the beginning of each school year. Students sign a contract agreeing to be prompt and prepared with all that is required in the way of equipment, materials, and wardrobe for each gathering. 8. Pass-Offs and Playing Tests​: Students are required to demonstrate mastery of the fundamental elements of musicianship as well as the degree to which they have prepared their concert music. Most playing tests are submitted to the instructor in recorded form over the web. The instructor provides written commentary and evaluation for most assessments. ​SmartMusic ​generated assignments/assessments are most common. 9. Daily Participation​: In-class participation is evaluated daily. Students are expected to remain on task for the duration of each class period. It is essential that each student come prepared, with instrument and materials required for full participation.


10. Written Assignments:​ Written assignments are given throughout the year and may include post-performance reflection and critique of a musical performance presented in class or on the recording, self-evaluation, surveys, etc. 11. Extra Credit:​ Given at the discretion of the director for accomplishment or service beyond the stated requirements of the class 12. Conduct:​ A conduct grade is given for each grading period, according to school policy. Conduct options include S-Satisfactory and N-Needs improvement and are a reflection of the general conduct of the student. Textbooks and Resources ​(among a wide variety of choices housed in the band library) 1. SmartMusic​ is a web-based practice and assessment tool for band students. For complete information, see ​www.smartmusic.com 2. Maxwell, Roger. ​14 Weeks to a Better Band​ (A Unison Approach for Reading Improvement). C. L. Barnhouse Co., 1974. 3. Ployhar, James. ​I Recommend​ (A Complete Warm-Up and Technique Book to Improve Fundamental Musicianship). Byron-Douglas Publications, 1972. 4. Williams, Richard and Jeff King. ​Foundations for Superior Performance​ (Warm-Ups and Technique for Band).​ ​Kjos Music Company, 1998. 5. Published band literature 6. Audio recordings 7. YouTube and other websites Updated May 2014


844 - Honors Ellington Band Course Description Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 1.0 Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor based on audition

Honors Ellington Band is specifically designed for those interested in a rigorous study of jazz music and performance. Daily rehearsals are required and will include combo and “big band” ensembles. With challenging literature at its core, the course is designed to nurture the development of advanced instrumental technique, ensemble playing, jazz improvisation and performance practice. Students are required to take applied lessons throughout the school year, and rehearsals, recording sessions and performances beyond the school day are mandatory. Public performances feature Ellington members in various ensemble types; members of this ensemble may also perform with the concert band and / or orchestra. The group routinely enters local and national jazz band competitions. Students may be required to attend an out-of-state trip. A fee is applied to student billing for all trips. Each semester concludes with a performance jury, wherein each student demonstrates continuous progress in instrumental technique, mastery of literature, historical perspective and music reading. Note: Because performing arts courses are based on a continuous curriculum and ensemble balance, students must remain in the class for both fall and spring semesters, and students will not be allowed to drop the class once school starts. Essential Questions 1. What is jazz music? 2. What are the elements of jazz music? 3. What is the vocabulary used to discuss jazz music and its performance? 4. What is “swing style” and how do I learn to swing? 5. What is jazz improvisation? 6. How do I become a jazz improviser? 7. How must the elements of music be managed by the musician in order to present a “musical” performance? 8. What role does my instrument play in the overall texture of an ensemble sound? 9. Which styles of music currently serve as a staple for music performed by the modern jazz ensemble? 10. How do the performances of the various jazz styles compare/contrast? 11. What is the history of American jazz, and who are its most important contributors? 12. What is the terminology used in the study of jazz? 13. What clues must a musician recognize in order to evaluate the impact of his/her performance on an audience? Assessment 1. Rehearsals and Attendance at Concerts: E ​ nrollment in the Ellington Band assumes students expect and make time for rehearsals beyond the regular school day. A weekly sectional rehearsal of 1 1/2 hours beyond the school day will be required of each member during competition and concert season. Concerts are essential culminating activities, providing an opportunity to set and reach goals and share music with a wider


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audience. They may be considered as our discipline’s truest measure of accomplishment. A schedule of the year’s performances and activities is issued to parents and students at the beginning of each school year. Students sign a contract agreeing to be prompt and prepared with all that is required in the way of equipment, materials, and wardrobe for each gathering. Ellington members are required to travel for finals competitions if selected to do so. Pass-Offs, Playing Tests and Performance Juries:​ Students are required to demonstrate mastery of the fundamental elements of musicianship as well as the degree to which they have prepared their concert music throughout each semester. Many playing assessments are submitted to the instructor in recorded form over the web. The instructor provides written commentary and evaluation for most assessments. SmartMusic g ​ enerated assignments/assessments are ongoing. Each semester students will perform two ​juries​, one at mid-term and a second at the end of the semester. Band faculty, outside professionals, and others may sit on the jury panel. Students will be asked to play segments/excerpts from literature, technical studies, scales, sight-read, etc. as a demonstration of their level of achievement. A written assessment from the jury panel will provide a baseline for measuring progress at subsequent jury sessions. Daily Participation​: In-class participation is evaluated daily. Students are expected to remain on task for the duration of each class period. It is essential that each student come prepared, with instrument and materials required for full participation. Applied Lessons:​ Ellington members are required to attend a minimum of 14 30-minute lessons with an approved applied lessons teacher. Daily Practice:​ Ellington members will be required to practice a minimum of 30 minutes per day, 5 days per week on his/her Ellington instrument. Students will keep a written record of each practice session. Written Assignments and Assessments​: Written assignments and assessments are given throughout the year and may include post-performance reflection and critique of a musical performance presented in class or on recording, self-evaluation, surveys, etc. Knowledge of the fundamentals of music theory and basic jazz history will also be assessed. Electives:​ Each member will select at least one long-range elective activity and pursue it throughout the school year. Extra:​ Given at the discretion of the director for accomplishment or service beyond the stated requirements of the class. Conduct:​ A conduct grade is given for each grading period, according to school policy. Conduct options include S-Satisfactory and N-Needs improvement and are a reflection of the general conduct of the student.

Skills Benchmarks Playing Proficiency Ellington Band members are expected to develop into highly proficient instrumentalists. The ongoing development of musicianship will be observed, addressed, and evaluated in each rehearsal. Pass-offs, performance juries and in-class demonstrations guide students toward specific performance objectives and reveal relative stages of development. Together, these perspectives provide the instructors with objective goals to present to the students and criteria with which to measure and document individual progress relative to age, experience, and talent. Elements of musicianship used to evaluate playing proficiency: 1. Tone Production:​ The ability to produce a beautiful, characteristic tone, relative to an “ideal” professional standard. For wind players, breath support, embouchure, and instrument condition (among other factors) contribute significantly toward achieving a


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beautiful tone. For rhythm section members, touch, concept, and approach are determining factors. Technique:​ The mechanical aspect of musicianship enables the student to successfully execute a wide range of musical passages found within band literature. Mechanics include range, articulation, finger dexterity, motor memory, and control. Intonation:​ The ability to match pitch and play in tune with others is essential. Expression:​ The aesthetic aspects of musical performance include phrase shape and dynamic contrast. Rhythm:​ Defined as the controlled movement of music as it relates to pulse and tempo; students constantly strive to play with a strong sense of pulse and musical timing (time-feel) in coordination with others. Music Reading:​ Including the ability to read and perform written music at first sight, music reading involves almost exactly the same processes required to master a second language which does not also use the modern English alphabet. Reading proficiency develops over an extended period through exposure, analysis, memorization, and repetition.

Performance Benchmarks​ (relative to age, experience, and musical talent) 1. Students will produce a professional quality tone on their instrument. 2. Students will demonstrate technique sufficient to play challenging arrangements and technical exercises covered in class. 3. Students will demonstrate the ability to play in tune. 4. Students will swing hard. 5. Students will play with intense musical expression and jazz inflection. 6. Students will play in a steady rhythm, matching the pulse of a metronome, rhythm section, director, or that of an ensemble. 7. Students will demonstrate the ability to balance and blend within the context of the musical texture of an ensemble. 8. Students will demonstrate the ability to read music at sight, without help or prompt. 9. Students will improvise in the jazz style. 10. Students will demonstrate a fundamental knowledge of music theory and history, with emphasis on that which relates to jazz performance and understanding. 11. Students will transcribe and perform one or more (director approved) jazz solos, as recorded by a recognized professional on his/her instrument. Performance Opportunities A series of informal performances and formal concerts is scheduled which guide the year’s schedule of rehearsals and presentations. Major performances for the group may include opening and closing chapel services; concerts at local jazz clubs; the Band/Orchestra Holiday Concert presented late in the first semester; recording of competition music; a spring concert (or festival trip), which occurs in mid to late second semester; national competitions; and the Swing Concert, featuring one or more professional guest artists. There are numerous extracurricular options for those wishing to expand their performance opportunities. Band members may participate in small group/commercial combo gigs, All-State Band, Orchestra, or Jazz Ensembles, the Atlanta Youth Wind Symphony, and the Atlanta Symphony Youth Orchestra, The Rialto Jazz Ensemble program, among others. All Ellington members perform at one of the applied lessons recitals each year, and a Chamber Music Recital is presented late second semester by and for those students who are highly motivated by small-group and solo performance. Textbooks and Resources


1. SmartMusic​ is a web-based practice and assessment tool for band students. For complete information, see ​www.smartmusic.com 2. Ployhar, James. ​I Recommend​ (A Complete Warm-Up and Technique Book to Improve Fundamental Musicianship). Byron-Douglas Publications, 1972. 3. Williams, Richard and Jeff King. ​Foundations for Superior Performance​ (Warm-Ups and Technique for Band).​ ​Kjos Music Company, 1998. 4. Jamey Aebersold Play-a-long series, Volumes 1, 3 and 24 5. Locally composed exercises and arrangements 6. Published literature 7. Audio recordings 8. YouTube and other websites 9. Honors Ellington Handbook​; sets forth in detail the expectations of the class and provides a wealth of essential information for the developing jazz musician. Updated May 2014


846/848 - Women’s and Men’s Choruses Course Description Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 1.0 Prerequisite: Previous Lovett choral experience or permission of the instructors Chorus provides students with the opportunity to learn and perform choral literature of all styles and periods. Students receive instruction in basic music theory, music sight-reading, and proper vocal production. The group performs for chapel services, assemblies, and concerts, and all rehearsals and performances are mandatory. Students may be required to attend an out-of-state trip. A fee is applied to student billing for all trips. Female students are provided with concert dresses but are expected to purchase formal shoes for performances as instructed by the teacher. Male students are expected to purchase formal attire for performances as instructed by the teacher. The Women’s and Men’s Choruses meet at the same time and will rehearse and perform both separately and jointly. Note: Because performing arts courses are based on a continuous curriculum and ensemble balance, students must remain in the class for both fall and spring semesters, and students will not be allowed to drop the class once school starts. Essential Questions 1. How is choral singing and choral music an integral interdisciplinary activity that applies life skills to music and choral music to life skills? 2. What are the basic principles of excellent vocal production? 3. How is choral music primordial organic expression? 4. What are the major stylistic choral eras and what major works and composers represent these eras? 5. What are the fundamental principles of musicianship in general and choral music in particular? 6. How is choral music representative of an era, its people, and its cultural values? Assessment 1. SmartMusic assessment instrument a. Private practice time b. Individual assessment 2. Periodic regular vocal audits 3. Final performance for each unit 4. Weekly rehearsals 5. Sectional rehearsals 6. Periodic vocal audits will assess each student’s ability to perform alone and with others. The audit will include an audio recording that will assess diction, musical line, phrasing, nuance, and intonation, as well as the individual singer’s aptitude in singing their voice part alone and with others. Skills Benchmarks 1. The student will develop a critical ear and capability to adjudicate one’s own singing in particular and the ensemble in general.


2. The student will be able to apply that critical ear through positive contributions to the ensemble as a whole. 3. The student will interact with the ensemble in a meaningful way that contributes to the Gestalt development collective unit. 4. The student will experience a variety of choral stylistic idioms, including major works, octavos and music of multiple stylistic eras and mediums. 5. Students will understand choral music in context with the other arts. 6. The student will understand the format of the Anglican Lessons and Carols service. 7. The student will experience a variety of choral music from various styles and eras, and understand appropriate vocal performance practice. 8. The student will recognize excellent choral tone, and be able to produce it as a part of their section. 9. The student will develop choral artistry, becoming aware of musical line, phrasing, dynamics, articulation, and diction. Units 1. Fall unit - Lessons and Carols service and All-State chorus auditions 2. Winter unit - Continued development of musical skills, including sight-singing, tonal development, ear training, and vocal pedagogy. 3. Spring Unit - US Choral Showcase Textbooks and Resources TTBB choral music selected each year from the standard repertoire, new works, and choral arrangements. Much of the music for this ensemble is arranged specifically for the group, as well as arrangements by the ensemble itself. Updated August 2018


850 - Honors Singers Course Description Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 1.0 Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor based on audition

 The Lovett Singers is a select, auditioned ensemble that studies, rehearses, and performs music of multiple stylistic idioms in the context of a graded choral program. Principal performance opportunities include the annual Lessons and Carols Service, Evensong, and Broadway Musical. Additionally, each member of Singers is required to study solo voice in support of the choral curriculum. Note: Because performing arts courses are based on a continuous curriculum and ensemble balance, students must remain in the class for both fall and spring semesters, and students will not be allowed to drop the class once school starts. Essential Questions 1. How is choral singing and choral music an integral interdisciplinary activity that applies life skills to music and choral music to life skills? 2. What are the basic principles of excellent vocal production? 3. How is choral music primordial organic expression? 4. What are the major stylistic choral eras and what major works and composers represent these eras? 5. What are the fundamental principles of musicianship in general and choral music in particular? 6. How is choral music representative of an era, its people, and its cultural values? Assessment 1. SmartMusic assessment instrument a. Private practice time b. Individual assessment 2. Periodic regular vocal audits 3. Solo/ensemble performance at October Singers’ Recital 4. Final performance for each unit 5. Weekly rehearsals 6. Sectional rehearsals 7. Each unit will include individual and small-group audits (singing solo or in a quartet) to assess the proficiency of each singer on their individual vocal part - singing alone and with others. The audit will be recorded and will assess diction, intonation, ensemble singing, and musical phrasing. Skills Benchmarks


1. The student will develop a critical ear and capability to adjudicate one’s own singing in particular and the ensemble in general. 2. The student will be able to apply that critical ear through positive contributions to the ensemble as a whole. 3. The student will interact with the ensemble in a meaningful way that contributes to the Gestalt development collective unit. 4. The student will experience a variety of choral stylistic idioms, including major works, octavos and music of multiple stylistic eras and mediums. 5. Students will understand choral music in context with the other arts. 6. The student will understand the format of the Anglican Lessons and Carols service and the Evensong service. 7. The student will experience a variety of choral music from various styles and eras, and understand appropriate vocal performance practice. 8. The student will recognize excellent choral tone, and be able to produce it as a part of their section. 9. The student will develop choral artistry, becoming aware of musical line, phrasing, dynamics, articulation, and diction. Units 1. Fall unit a. Lessons and Carols service b. All-State chorus auditions 2. Winter unit a. Musical production 3. Spring Unit a. Evensong b. Tour repertoire c. US Choral Showcase Textbooks and Resources Choral music selected each year from the standard repertoire, new works, and choral arrangements. Updated August 2018


852 - AP Music Theory Course Description Grades: 11-12 Group: I Units: 1.0 Prerequisite: Experience in music reading, performance abilities, and permission of the instructor by review and evaluation of aural proficiency Fee: $94 AP Exam Fee This AP academic music analysis course provides melodic, harmonic, and historic study of music composition. It explores form and compositional style with special emphasis on aural and sight-singing skills and requires the student to be experienced in music reading and performance ability with voice or other instruments. Piano skills are recommended, though not required. Students are required to take the AP examination at the end of spring semester. Essential Questions 1. What is it that classifies sound “musical,” differentiating it from noise or other nonmusical sounds? 2. How do melody, harmony, rhythm, and form operate and interact in tonal music? 3. How does one convert the intangible elements of music into tangible elements and then apply them to an overall understanding of the inner workings of music? 4. Is it possible to develop aural perception of music to a level where one can recognize and notate much of what is heard without the aid of an instrument or other prompt? If so, how does one go about doing that? 5. What skills must one acquire in order to perform well on the Advanced Placement Examination at the end of the year? Assessment Students are graded on a 100% grading scale, with the following weights. 1. 25%-​Homework​: Because success in AP Theory depends so heavily on the amount and quality of work done outside the school day, students will nearly always have assignments to complete at home. 2. 15%-​Quizzes (Pop Quizzes)​: Students may expect one quiz per week on average. The content measured will generally be drawn from homework assignments or as a follow-up to concepts covered in class. 3. 25%-​Tests:​ Tests are longer, more comprehensive evaluative tools designed to follow larger units of study and broader concepts. 4. 25%-​Final Exams:​ Occurring at the end of each semester, these comprehensive tests are designed to measure concepts covered over an entire semester. 5. 10%-Daily:​ This is a subjective grade, based on a student’s overall approach to class measuring participation, teamwork/interaction, punctuality, and attendance. a. Presentations of special projects, performances, compositions, etc. may also fall under this category. A student who approaches the class with a sincere


commitment toward learning, and who serves as a team player, may expect to earn a daily average of 100%. 6. Spring Advanced Placement exam Skills Benchmarks At the end of the course, students will be able to: 1. Operate the equipment and software in the classroom 2. Play, name and identify notes on the piano keyboard in their respective octave (c’, CC, etc.) 3. Play simple melodies and block chords on the piano keyboard 4. Identify and notate pitch in four clefs (treble, bass, alto and tenor) 5. Notate and identify all major and minor key signatures 6. Notate, hear and identify the following scales: chromatic, major, whole-tone, pentatonic and three forms of minor 7. Name and recognize scale degrees (tonic, supertonic, etc.) 8. Notate, hear and identify the following modes: Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, Locrian 9. Draw and utilize the Circle of 5ths 10. Transpose a melodic line to or from concert pitch to any other key 11. Transpose a melodic line to or from concert pitch for any common band or orchestral instrument 12. Notate, hear and identify all major, minor, diminished and augmented intervals within an octave 13. Write simple manuscript by hand, quickly and legibly 14. Write simple manuscript by computer, using ​Finale​ based software 15. Hear and notate major and minor melodies, in treble and bass clef, diatonic or chromatic, simple or compound, 6-12 measures long, after only 3-4 hearings 16. Notate, hear and identify four-part harmonies (soprano and bass voices only), in major or minor, and provide harmonic analysis for them after only 3-4 hearings 17. Sing at sight melodies of 6-8 measures, in major or minor, treble or bass clef, diatonic or chromatic, simple or compound, with no prompt, given only a reference pitch and brief period of study 18. Notate, hear and identify triads and seventh chords in all positions 19. Construct and voice-lead harmonic progressions based on principles of the Common Practice period 20. Notate, hear and identify authentic, plagal, half and deceptive cadences in major and minor keys 21. Detect errors in pitch or rhythm in examples of written music, given aural excerpts 22. Identify and utilize the dominant seventh chord as a diatonic or modulatory harmonic device 23. Define melodic contour, phrase structure, and relationship by name or label 24. Notate, hear and identify any of the following nonharmonic tones: ​Anticipation, Appoggiatura, Embellishment, Escape Tone, Changing Tones, Free Tone, Neighboring and Passing Tones of various type, Ornament, Pedal Point, Suspension (including peripherals) or Retardation​. 25. Compose a melody of 4-8 measures, major or minor, to compliment a given figured bass


26. Given specific guidelines, compose a melody of 4-8 measures and harmonize it with a bass line and figured bass symbols 27. Realize a figured bass in four parts, according to the principles of eighteenth-century practice, in a major or minor key, using any or all of the following devices: diatonic triads, seventh chords, inversions, nonharmonic tones, dominant or secondary dominant seventh chords, modulation to a closely related key 28. Understand and recognize basic modern chord symbols used in jazz and popular music 29. Understand and recognize small compositional forms (strophic, binary, rounded binary, ternary, theme, and variation), and have had some exposure to important larger forms (rondo, sonata, etc.); understand and utilize form labels (e.g., a, a’; A- B-A, etc.) 30. Define common terms and expression markings relative to orchestration and texture, form, harmony, melody, rhythm and performance Course Units Based on recommendations from the most recent ​AP Music Theory Course Description Booklet, this​ year’s course will include a(n): 1. Introduction to the room and equipment 2. Review of music fundamentals; ​“Basic Training” 3. Introduction to the piano keyboard 4. Clefs and pitch 5. Scales, keys and the circle of 5ths 6. Intervals 7. Elements of rhythm (simple and compound) 8. Study of basic manuscript and notation, manual and computer generated 9. A thorough dose of ear-training (rhythmic, melodic and harmonic) 10. A thorough study of sight-singing 11. Study of the structure of tonality and harmonic gravity 12. Study of triads and their inversions 13. Study of voice leading of chords in four parts 14. Study of diatonic and nondiationic seventh chords 15. Study of the dominant seventh and secondary dominants 16. Study of melodic contour, form and phrase structure 17. Study of cadence and cadence formulas 18. Study of nonharmonic tones, diatonic/chromatic 19. Study of the fundamental nature and principles of harmonic progression 20. Study of how to set a bass line to a melody 21. Study of the basic processes for the harmonization of a melody 22. Study of modulation to closely related keys 23. Study of compositional forms and organizational devices, large and small 24. A brief introduction to 20th-century scales and compositional devices 25. Study of musical terminology Textbooks and other resources 1. Steinke, Greg A. ​Harmonic Materials in Tonal Music: A Programmed Course-Parts 1 and 2​, 9th ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 2006.


2. Horvit, Michael, Timothy Koozin, and Robert Nelson. ​Music for Ear Training: CD-​ ​ROM and Workbook,​ 2nd ed. Belmont, California: Wadsworth, 2006. 3. Burkhart, Charles. ​Anthology for Musical Analysis,​ 6th ed. New York: Schirmer Books, 2003. 4. Ottman, Robert. ​ Music for Sight Singing​, 4th ed. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1996. 5. The classroom is currently equipped with a high-quality stereo system, Mackie 12 channel mixer, overhead projector, and Apple MacBook laptop w/1.83 GHz Intel and 1 GB RAM). Each student has his/her own computer workstation equipped with a Macintosh ​e-mac​ computer (with wireless access to the web), stereo headphones, and a Korg X-5 synthesizer/keyboard. Software includes ​Smartmusic, Finale Notepad, Practica Musica, MiBAC Music Lessons, parts I and II. 6. The school’s library has a modest but adequate holding of CD, DVD, score and text reference material. Most may be checked out by the students. There are adequate listening stations in both the music lab and school library. The band and string libraries are also fine sources of music for score study, listening, and reference. 7. Students will frequently receive handouts generated by the teacher. Overheads and Powerpoints p ​ lay a major role in daily lesson and student presentations. Manuscript notebooks are a staple and available in the campus bookstore. 8. The Steinke text (​HMTM​) includes a CD containing a wealth of recorded music, supporting virtually every concept covered in the course. Together with other local resources, students have access to more than adequate examples of recorded and written music. Updated October 2014


860, 862 - Theater Arts I Course Descriptions 860 - Theater Arts I (Semester) Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Fall only Note: Students with a strong interest in theater are encouraged to register for 862 - Theater Arts I (Year-Long). 860 - Theater Arts I (Year-long) Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 1.0 Theater Arts I is designed to introduce students to the basics of theater through the medium of acting. The class will consist of ensemble exercises, theater games, beginning improvisation, reading from A Challenge to the Actor by Uta Hagen. Students who study for the full year will explore acting techniques and script analysis through scene work from contemporary plays. They will begin to explore the techniques of proper voice and speech through scene work and poetry. Students will be given the opportunity to work with and learn from recognized film and theater professionals who will be guest artists. Essential Questions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

What is an ensemble, and why are trust of self and others essential? What is the process of developing a theatrical work? What is demanded of an actor and what is the actor’s job? What is the difference between “living” a scene, and “presenting” a scene? What are the most important elements in a scene with which an actor must concern himself? 6. Why is a healthy, strong, flexible, and alert body important for an actor? 7. How does an actor create a safe, sustainable stage voice? 8. What are essential tools for strong, flexible and clear voice/speech production? 9. What are the rules of improvisation? 10. How does the improviser start a scene from nothing? 11. What are the benefits of the “Destination Exercise?” 12. How do you apply the principles from the Exercises and Improv to a scripted scene? 13. What are the fundamental principles needed for both improvizational AND scripted scenes? 14. What do you do from the moment you receive a script? 15. How do you analyze and read a script as an actor? What are the best questions to ask? 16. How do you identify valuable, healthy “ingredients” based on an understanding of the script? 17. How do you begin to build a performance/character/scene from the ground up?


18. What are the most effective elements to focus on? 19. Why is listening and learning to focus on OTHER people essential? 20. What is ACTIVE Listening? 21. Why is PLACE so important? 22. What is the importance of “self-awareness” vs “self-consciousness”? 23. What is the importance of time management for an actor? 24. Why is respect for self and for others essential for an actor? 25. Why is it important to give yourself permission to fail? 26. What is the importance of “active observance and assessment” to an actor while observing other actors’ work? Assessment 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Oral exams and discussions Participation Evaluations Performance Evaluations Actor’s Journals Journal’s require critical thinking throughout the year - asking students to focus on “What went right and why? What when wrong and why? In their work and presentations.” Students are always asked after each exercise or scene to self-evaluate. Those watching are thinking critically about what they are observing and how what they observe is applicable to their own work.

Skills Benchmarks A student will: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Gain an understanding of the nature of trust (of self and others); and ensemble. Understand the process of creating a theatrical work. Be able to discuss the job of an actor. Understand the six things every actor needs to know in a scene. Demonstrate an understanding of vocal mechanics and will experiment with his or her own safe, sustainable voice. 6. Improve their diction and verbal will. 7. Establish the foundation of the rules of improvising. 8. Create scenes from nothing. 9. Know how to create and execute the Basic Object Exercises. 10. Create and perform a role within a scripted scene. Units 1. Creating Ensemble I - Trust is one of the most critical factors in creating memorable performances in the theater. A great acting ensemble is created over time, as actors develop on-stage relationships with one another. In this unit, we employ various theater games and exercises designed to foster such trust in self and in others. 2. Discovering the Process I - The process of performing in a theatrical production is always the same, though the experience of it is never the same! In this unit, students


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will discover the process from beginning to end, culminating in the most exciting event on the timeline: the performance. Voice and Diction I - An actor who is unable to be heard and understood is a terrible frustration to an audience. Thus, the student actor must learn to breathe properly, to project the voice in a safe and efficient manner, and to articulate his or her words. This unit will focus on techniques and tips designed to help actors improve their voice and speech. Introduction to Uta Hagen - The class will embark on an initial understanding and application of Uta Hagen’s philosophy and technique, using ​A Challenge for the Actor​ as our text. Each actor will present three times, as the ensemble is guided through the first of Ms. Hagen’s exercises. Improvisation I - At the very core level of any performance is an improvisation. An actor must learn how to listen, react, and respond without preplanning. Improvisational training teaches the student how to allow spontaneity to flourish, while at the same time maintaining strict discipline. With the help of guest artists, we will explore the basics of improv. We will also learn what principles of improv are also essential for any scripted material, and begin learning how to apply these techniques to both improvised and scripted scenes. This unit culminates with a class presentation. Scene Study I - In this exciting unit, actors will work in pairs on scenes. The entire process is explored: from table work where the actors learn HOW TO READ A SCRIPT, to HOW TO IDENTIFY AND SUPPLY NEEDED INGREDIENTS for the script, and then how to bring the characters to life off of the page, drawing upon real-life experiences and knowledge as well as the power of imagination and make-believe. We will specifically apply many of the principles being explored and practiced in Improv to this scripted work. This unit culminates with a class presentation. Evaluation of Classic Plays I - It is critical for the young actor to have a broad knowledge of plays and playwrights. During this unit, the class will read and discuss several classic works, with an eye toward future production here at Lovett. In-class journaling & discussions - Journal writing and discussion will be centered on understanding the WHY of acting process and technique so that students can discuss, critique and improve their own work.

Textbooks and Resources A Challenge for the Actor,​ Uta Hagen Updated May 2016


864 - Theater Arts II Course Description Grades: 10-12 Group: II Units: 1.0 Prerequisite: 862 - Theater Arts I or teacher recommendation The goal of this class is to introduce the serious theater student to the different areas of skill and technique required in more advanced acting work, and to provide a hands-on experience in those areas. The class will include scene work from both contemporary and classical sources, movement for theater, voice and speech, basic stage combat, improvisation, and video and audition techniques. Students will be given the opportunity to work with and learn from recognized film and theater professionals who will be guest artists. Note: With the permission of the instructor, students may register for individual semesters of Theater Arts II, III, and IV, but they may not advance to the next level until a full year at the preceding level is completed. Essential Questions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

What is an ensemble, and why does trust matter? What is the process of developing a good audition technique? What is the actor’s job? How does the actor refine the scene study process? What are the rules of rehearsal? How do we recreate realistic human behavior? How does long-form differ from short-form improvisation? What are the differences between acting for stage and acting on camera? How does the actor collaborate successfully?

Assessment 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Oral exams Actor’s Journals Performance Evaluations – (3 class presentations) Participation Evaluations Journal’s require critical thinking throughout the year - asking students to focus on “What went right and why? What when wrong and why?” Students are always asked after each exercise or scene to self-evaluate. Those watching are thinking critically about what they are seeing and how what they observe is applicable to their own work.

Skills Benchmarks ​A student will: 1. Gain further understanding of the nature of trust and ensemble. 2. Develop and practice good audition techniques. 3. Be able to describe the job of an actor.


4. Begin to delve more deeply into the scene study process. 5. Demonstrate an understanding of recreating realistic behavior. 6. Have the tools to create complex improv. 7. Gain mastery of the rules of advanced improv games. 8. Articulate the differences in acting technique on camera as opposed to stage. 9. Rehearse and perform on camera. 10. Create an original video in collaboration with his or her classmates. Units 1. Creating Ensemble II - Trust is one of the most critical factors in creating memorable performances in theater. A great acting ensemble is created over time, as actors develop on-stage relationships with one another. In this unit, we employ various theater games and exercises designed to foster such trust. 2. Auditioning I - It is important for an actor to learn how to approach the audition, for it stands between every actor and the role he or she wants. Michael Shurtleff's classic book, ​Audition​,​ is used as a practical guide for this unit, and students will learn techniques designed to help them land their roles. 3. Advanced Scene Study II - The most important thing an actor can do to become more proficient is to act. Our unit in scene study gives each student the chance to do just that. Working in pairs, students will review the basics learned in Scene Study I. Then, the actors will learn how to score their scenes using the techniques outlined in Uta Hagen's masterpiece, ​A Challenge for the Actor​. This unit culminates with a class presentation. 4. Improvisation II - Students will begin with a review of the basics learned in Improvisation I. From there, the actor ensemble will explore a more advanced collection of improv games and scenes. This unit culminates with a class presentation. 5. Advancing with Uta Hagen II - The class will continue its study of Uta Hagen’s philosophy and technique, starting with a review of the material and exercises covered in Introduction to Uta Hagen I. All exercises will come directly from ​A Challenge for the Actor​, our class text. Each actor will present three times, as the ensemble is guided through Ms. Hagen’s exercises. 6. Advanced On-Camera Scene Study I - Students will spend several weeks working with a partner developing a scene for film or television. They will learn how to hit their mark, how to create continuity in their action, and how to approach duplicate takes, among other things. Each scene will be blocked, rehearsed “on set,” and filmed. 7. On-Camera Performance I - In this exciting unit, students will videotape theatrical scenes but using techniques specific to the camera. Actors will learn the fundamentals of acting for the camera by gaining real-world experience on a film set. This unit culminates with a film product and presentation 8. Evaluating Classic Plays II - It is critical for the young actor to have a broad knowledge of plays and playwrights. During this unit, the class will read and discuss several classic works, with an eye toward future production here at Lovett. 9. Journals (ongoing) - Each student will write in-class journals detailing the acting process successes and failures, why these issues might be present and setting goals for future work.


Textbooks and Resources A Challenge for the Actor​, Uta Hagen Updated May 2016


866 - Theater Arts III Course Description Grades: 11-12 Group: II Units: 1.0 Prerequisite: 864 - Theater Arts II or teacher recommendation Theater Arts III is a continuation of concepts and skills begun in Theater Arts II. Class work includes n overview of theater history, mime, scene study from all periods of theater, camera/video technique, further character study and movement for the theater, improvisation, and stage combat. All students in this class should expect to perform in workshop performances. Students will be given the opportunity to work with and learn from recognized film and theater professionals who will be guest artists. Note: With the permission of the instructor, students may register for individual semesters of Theater Arts II, III, and IV, but they may not advance to the next level until a full year at the preceding level is completed. Essential Questions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

What is an ensemble, and why does trust matter? What is the process of developing a good audition technique? What is the actor’s job? How does the actor refine the scene study process? What are the rules of rehearsal? How do we recreate realistic human behavior? How does long-form differ from short-form improvisation? What are the differences between acting for stage and acting on camera? How does the actor collaborate successfully?

Assessment 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Oral exams Actor’s Journals Performance Evaluations (3 class presentations) Participation Evaluations Journal’s require critical thinking throughout the year - asking students to focus on “What went right and why? What when wrong and why?” Students are always asked after each exercise or scene to self-evaluate. Those watching are thinking critically about what they are seeing and how what they observe is applicable to their own work.

Skills Benchmarks A student will: 1. Develop leadership skills in directing the ensemble through theater games. 2. Develop and practice good audition techniques. 3. Be able to describe the job of an actor.


4. Begin to delve more deeply into the scene study process. 5. Demonstrate an understanding of recreating realistic behavior. 6. Have the tools to create complex improv. 7. Gain mastery of the rules of long-form improv. 8. Articulate the differences in acting technique on camera as opposed to the stage. 9. Rehearse and perform on camera. 10. Study presentation and techniques in period plays. Units 1. Creating Ensemble III - Trust is one of the most critical factors in creating memorable performances in theater. A great acting ensemble is created over time, as actors develop on-stage relationships with one another. In this unit, we employ various Theater games and exercises designed to foster such trust. Theater Arts III students are asked to lead. 2. Auditioning II - It is extremely important for an actor to learn how to approach the audition, for it stands between every actor and the role he or she wants. Students will start by reviewing the materials covered in Audition I. We then continue in Michael Shurtleff's classic book, ​Audition​,​ and continue with new techniques designed to broaden the student’s understanding of the process. 3. Advanced Scene Study III - This unit begins with a review of material covered in Scene Study II. Theater Arts III students will focus on the production of a one-act play, incorporating the scene study techniques they have learned. Actors will learn how to better work with a director and walk through the process step-by-step. This unit culminates with a class presentation. 4. Improvisation III - After a careful review of the concepts explored in Improvisation II, the actors will begin to explore even more advanced long-form improv structures, including the Harold. This unit culminates with a class presentation. 5. Advancing with Uta Hagen III - The class will begin with a review of the material and exercises covered in Introduction to Uta Hagen II. All exercises will come directly from ​A Challenge for the Actor​, our class text. Each actor will present three times, as the ensemble is guided through Ms. Hagen’s exercises. In addition to evaluating their own work, Theater Arts III students will be asked to evaluate (in writing) the work of their Theater Arts II & IV counterparts. 6. Advanced On-Camera Scene Study II - Students will continue the work begun in I and II. Applying techniques and understandings around how to perform both live in the theater and then moving to the camera. They will learn how to hit their mark, how to create continuity in their action, and how to approach duplicate takes, among other things. Each scene will be blocked, rehearsed “on set,” and filmed. 7. Evaluating Classic Plays III - It is critical for the young actor to have a broad knowledge of plays and playwrights. Study scenes from different periods, exploring the various requirements in each period covered. 8. Journals (ongoing) - Each student is required to keep a journal throughout the entire year-long course. In it, the actor will document thoughts and feelings about the process, along with other salient observations.


Textbooks and Resources A Challenge for the Actor​, Uta Hagen Updated May 2016


868 - Theater Arts IV Course Description Grade: 12 Group: II Units: 1.0 Prerequisite: 866 - Theater Arts III or teacher recommendation Theater Arts IV is a performance-based class. The student and instructor will create a "contract" that details particular areas of study which are most appropriate to that student. Classwork will include items listed in Theater II and III and may also include a one-person show, performance of a one-act play, or performance or assistance in one of Lovett's major theater productions. All students in this class will participate in workshop productions produced within the class and are required to audition for the fall and winter plays. Theater IV students are eligible to audition for the US musical and are strongly encouraged to participate in theater trips to New York City and North Carolina School of the Arts. Students will be given the opportunity to work with and learn from recognized film and theater professionals who will be guest artists. Note: With the permission of the instructor, students may register for individual semesters of Theater Arts II, III, and IV, but they may not advance to the next level until a full year at the preceding level is completed. Essential Questions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

How do you organize and develop class lessons? What is the process of developing a good audition technique? How do you manage a stage production? How does the actor refine the scene study process? What are the rules of rehearsal? How do we recreate realistic human behavior? How does long-form differ from short-form improvisation? What are the differences between acting for stage and acting on camera? How does the director collaborate successfully?

Assessment 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Oral exams Actor’s Journals Performance Evaluations (3 class presentations) Participation Evaluations Journal’s require critical thinking throughout the year - asking students to focus on “What went right and why? What when wrong and why?” Students are always asked after each exercise or scene to self-evaluate. Those watching are thinking critically about what they are seeing and how what they observe is applicable to their own work.

Skills Benchmarks


A student will: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Develop leadership and organizational skills by organizing an ensemble. Develop and practice good audition techniques. Be able to successfully organize and manage a stage production. Demonstrate an understanding of recreating realistic behavior. Have the tools to create complex improv. Gain mastery of the rules of long-form improv. Articulate the differences in acting technique on camera as opposed to the stage. Rehearse and perform on camera. Create an original video in collaboration with his or her classmates.

Units 1. Creating Ensemble IV - Trust is one of the most critical factors in creating memorable performances in theater. A great acting ensemble is created over time, as actors develop on-stage relationships with one another. In this unit, we employ various theater games and exercises designed to foster such trust. Theater Arts IV students will work together to develop a schedule of exercises, assign Theater Arts III leaders and to design new exercises. 2. Auditioning III - We will begin by reviewing the materials covered in Audition II. We then continue in Michael Shurtleff's classic book, ​Audition​,​ and continue with new techniques designed to broaden the student’s understanding of the process. Theater Arts IV students are asked to teach a lesson. 3. Advanced Scene Study IV - This unit begins with a review of material covered in Scene Study III. Theater Arts IV students will focus on the production of a one-act play, incorporating the scene study techniques they have learned. Actors will learn how to better work with a director and walk through the process step-by-step. Theater Arts IV students will collectively take on the role of stage manager, organizing and scheduling the production from start to finish. This unit culminates with a class presentation. 4. Improvisation IV - After a careful review of the concepts explored in Improvisation III, the actors will construct a 30-minute improvised play. This unit culminates with a class presentation. 5. Advancing with Uta Hagen IV - The class will begin with a review of the material and exercises covered in Introduction to Uta Hagen III. All exercises will come directly from ​A Challenge for the Actor​, our class text. Each actor will present three times, as the ensemble is guided through the fourth of Ms. Hagen’s exercises. In addition to evaluating their own work, Theater Arts IV students will be asked to evaluate (in writing) the work of their Theater Arts II and Theater Arts III counterparts. 6. Advanced On-Camera Scene Study III - Students will spend several weeks working with a partner developing a scene for film or television. They will learn how to hit their mark, how to create continuity in their action, and how to approach duplicate takes, among other things. Each scene will be blocked, rehearsed “on set,” and filmed. Theater Arts IV students will be asked to direct Theater Arts III students. 7. On-Camera Performance III - In this exciting unit, the class will collaborate to write and perform in a short film project. Actors will learn the fundamentals of acting for the


camera by gaining real-world experience on a film set. Theater Arts IV students are required to crew the production. Theater Arts IV students will also be responsible to maintain and organize props and costumes for the production, as well as supervise the script during production. This unit culminates with a class presentation. 8. Evaluating Classic Plays IV - It is critical for the young actor to have a broad knowledge of plays and playwrights. During this unit, the class will read and discuss several classic works, with an eye toward future production here at Lovett. 9. Journals (ongoing) - Each student is required to keep a journal throughout the entire year-long course. In it, the actor will document thoughts and feelings about the process, along with other salient observations. Textbooks and Resources A Challenge for the Actor​, Uta Hagen Audition​, Michael Shurtleff Updated May 2013


870 - Design & Production I Course Description Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Fall only This course provides an introduction to technical theater and engenders an appreciation and understanding of the different areas of theater production. The class includes the basics of scenic, lighting, and sound design, stage management, and costume and prop conceptualization through a combination of lectures, projects, and hands-on learning. There is a lab requirement of 20 hours outside of class. Students are encouraged to fulfill this time by joining the technical crew of an Upper School production. This lab time acquaints the student with the "behind the scenes" process of theatrical production, while directly applying techniques learned in the class. Note: Students will use power tools, such as saws and drills, after extensive training and under close supervision of the instructors. Questions from parents are encouraged; please contact Brian Patterson, Technical Director (brian.patterson@lovett.org). Essential Questions 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Why is technical theatre important? How are different types of theatre run and by whom? How are theatrical scripts and concepts realized on stage? How do designers for theatre develop a unified vision of a production? How do you use the different tools and supplies to create the scenery and props for a production? 6. How are lights and sound important to the world of the production? 7. Why is teamwork vital to a production? Assessment 1. Through the use of formal tests and quizzes, projects, and in-class discussion of ideas, the students’ progress and knowledge of each unit will be evaluated. 2. Each student will be asked to present his/her final projects in class, with particular attention paid to defense/explanation of his/her choices and what elements of the script or musical piece influenced his/her decisions. During these presentations, the students will also be asked to offer positive criticisms of each other’s work. 3. In-class participation places a big role in the assessment of a student’s progress. Technical theatre relies on teamwork and the sharing of ideas to affect a cohesive presentation of a production; one must be able to communicate effectively and utilize other’s creative thinking to produce the best show possible. 4. Deadlines and tardiness can and will affect the final grade during each assessment. 5. Students are required to serve on one production crew per year or complete 15 lab hours. Lab hours are done after school or on weekend work calls. Benchmarks


Students will be able to: 1. Identify the different physical areas and job duties that are essential to theatrical productions. 2. Safely use of a variety of construction tools including pneumatic nailer and stapler, power saws, and fastening and welding equipment. 3. Demonstrate the ability to read, analyze and develop his/her own “vision” of a theatrical script. 4. Demonstrate teamwork skills and problem solve. 5. Develop a working knowledge and appreciation for theatrical lighting, sound engineering, and costume construction. 6. Read and create workable drawings for their own projects. Units 1. Theatrical Spaces and Terminology - Students will tour our theatrical spaces and learn terminology specific to the theater as well as experience the different physical elements of a “traditional” proscenium and a Blackbox theatre. Exposure to our fly system, rigging, soft goods, and hard goods will all be included in this experience. 2. Scenery Shop Equipment and Materials - A variety of tools and materials will be taught and used during this unit. Students will learn proper safety techniques and procedures when using pneumatic and power equipment. In addition to this, the differences between natural and composite building materials will be discussed. 3. Construction Techniques - Materials and Construction methods will be explored as they pertain to theatrical elements. How scenic elements and properties for productions are constructed and the different materials that are used will also be explored during this section. Students will receive both lecture and hands-on instruction on the safe creation of flats, platforms and specialty items for shows. Among these materials and techniques will be steel and welding skills. 4. Introduction to Design - Through the study of well-known marketing ads, we will discuss the elements of design: color, shape, texture, common theme, and how those elements affect the way the audience identifies with a product. The students will be introduced to the concepts, tools, and terminology associated with basic hand drafting and an overview of CAD. 5. Theatre Lighting - Through projects and assignments the students will explore the different elements of Theatrical Lighting. They will learn about various lighting equipment and the effect lighting has on a theatrical performance. 6. Sound - Students will learn basic sound engineering through hands-on use of the sound mixing board, microphones, speakers and music. They will also be introduced to Qlab; the current sound design software that the industry uses. 7. Costumes - Through lecture and hands-on practice, students will learn the technical vocabulary and the practical skills of costume construction, including the use of hand sewing, sewing machines, and other measuring and cutting tools. 8. Theatrical Organization - During this unit students will learn how a theatre is run in an Educational, Community and Professional setting. They will learn how the responsibilities for mounting a production are assigned and the different duties of each position. 9. Script Analysis - By reading a theatrical script, the students will learn to verbalize, visualize, and then actualize what message the playwright is trying to get across to the audience. They will read and analyze the script for visual imagery and meaning. This will culminate in a concept paper and project presented to the class.


Textbook and Resources The students will be asked to use the Internet and library to research topics and ideas. They will be able to use tools and equipment located in the theatre program’s scenery shop as well as both the Hendrix-Chenault and Woodward Theatres. Updated May 2016


872 - Design & Production I Advanced Course Description Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Spring only Prerequisite: 870 - Design & Production I or teacher recommendation This semester course builds on the skills introduced in D&P I, giving a deeper look at each area of production: construction, lighting, sound, costuming, and stage management. Through guided projects, the student will work through the process of design to implementation. There is a lab requirement of 20 hours outside of class. Students are encouraged to fulfill this time by joining the technical crew of an Upper School production. This lab time acquaints the student with the "behind the scenes" process of theatrical production, while directly applying techniques learned in the class. Essential Questions 1. How are theatrical scripts realized on stage? 2. How do designers for theater develop a unified vision of a production? 3. What are more efficient ways to use the different tools and supplies for creating the scenery and props for a production? 4. How are lights important to the world of the production? 5. How can sound tell a story (emotionally, environmentally, physically)? 6. Why is communication critical in the theatrical setting? Assessment 1. Through the use of formal tests and quizzes, projects (both in class and take home) and in-class discussion of ideas, the students’ progress and knowledge of each unit will be evaluated. 2. Each student will be asked to present his/her final projects in class, with particular attention paid to defense/explanation of his/her choices and what elements of the script or musical piece influenced his/her decisions. During these presentations, the students will also be asked to offer positive criticisms of each other’s work. 3. In-class participation places a big role in the assessment of a student’s progress. Technical theatre relies on teamwork and the sharing of ideas to affect a cohesive presentation of a production; one must be able to communicate effectively and utilize other’s creative thinking to produce the best show possible. 4. Deadlines and tardiness can and will affect the final grade during each assessment. 5. Students are required to serve on one production crew per semester. These crews include Production/Build Crew and Running Crew. If a student chooses to work on a Production/Build Crew then he or she must complete at least 15 hours of after school or on weekend work calls. Benchmarks 1. Safely use a variety of construction tools including pneumatic nailer and stapler, power saws, and fastening and welding equipment.


2. Apply their knowledge of reading set plans through the construction of the Upper School Musical. 3. Understand the importance of research when it comes to creating the “world” in which a production is happening. 4. Demonstration of his/her skills and knowledge of hanging, focusing and maintenance of theatrical lighting instruments. 5. Demonstrate the ability to read, analyze, and develop his/her own “vision” of a script for theater. 6. Create a story based on his/her own creation using only sound effects. 7. Demonstrate problem-solving and teamwork skills. Units 1. Scenery Shop Equipment and Materials - Through a special building project, students will be re-familiarized with tools and materials. Students will be reminded of proper safety techniques and procedures when using pneumatic and power equipment, and the different building materials used in construction. 2. Construction Techniques - Materials and construction methods are reintroduced through the hands-on building of the Upper School Musical. Students will experience first hand how scenic elements and properties for productions are constructed and the different materials that are used. They will also learn to read and interpret plans from the set designer and begin to understand the process of planning the construction elements from day one. 3. Props and Set dressing - Students will learn to research specific time periods and discover what it takes to recreate a time and place on the stage, as realized through props and set dressing. They will have the opportunity to experience this application as they work on the Upper School Musical. 4. Theater Lighting - Students will continue to build upon their lighting knowledge by learning how to read a light plot and to hang and focus lighting instruments. As they work on these skills, they will begin to see the choices that a lighting designer makes and why. They will also learn how to manipulate and maintain lighting equipment and cabling. 5. Sound Design - Students will work with both pre-recorded and self-created sound effects to tell a story using sound only. Through the use of both digital and analog sound equipment, they will create a short story of their own design and present it to the class. 6. Script Analysis & Design - Through the reading of scripts, the students will learn to verbalize, visualize then actualize what message the playwright is trying to get across to the audience. They will read and analyze the script for visual imagery and meaning. This will culminate in a design project presented to the class. 7. Stage Management - The stage manager is the “communications hub” of a production. We will explore and experience what it takes to keep communication flowing and the detail it takes to keep a production on track from production meetings to performances. Resources Students will be encouraged to use the Internet and library to research topics and ideas. They will be able to use tools and equipment located in the theater program’s scenery shop as well as both the Hendrix-Chenault and Woodward Theaters. Updated May 2016


874 - Design & Production II Course Description Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 1.0 Prerequisite: 872 - Design & Production I Advanced or teacher recommendation This course focuses on the area of scenic design, rendering, and construction. Through guided projects, students will understand the process of design to implementation and realization of a design. This section will include the construction of the sets and props for the US productions. There is a lab requirement of 20 hours outside of class. Students are encouraged to fulfill this time by joining the technical crew of an US production. This lab time acquaints the student with the "behind the scenes" process of theatrical production, while directly applying techniques learned in the class. Note: With the permission of the instructor, students may register for individual semesters of Design & Production II, III, and IV, but they may not advance to the next level until a full year at the preceding level is completed. Essential Questions 1. How have the theaters of the past affected the modern theater? 2. How do we use the psychology of shapes and color to affect how an audience perceives the world of the playwright? 3. How are theatrical scripts and concepts realized on stage? 4. How do set designers create plans for the stage? 5. What are more efficient ways to use the different tools and supplies for creating the scenery and props for a production? 6. How are lights important to the world of the production? 7. How does sound affect the emotional feel of a production for an audience? 8. How does make-up portray a character’s personality and relate to the environment of the production? Assessment 1. Through the use of formal tests and quizzes, projects (both in class and take home), and in-class discussion of ideas, the students’ progress and knowledge of each unit will be evaluated. 2. Each student will be asked to present his/her final projects in class, with particular attention paid to defense/explanation of his/her choices and what elements of the script or musical piece influenced his/her decisions. During these presentations, the students will also be asked to offer positive criticisms of each other’s work. 3. In-class participation places a big role in the assessment of a student’s progress. Technical theatre relies on teamwork and the sharing of ideas to affect a cohesive presentation of a production; one must be able to communicate effectively and utilize other’s creative thinking to produce the best show possible. 4. Deadlines and tardiness can and will affect the final grade during each assessment. 5. Students are required to serve on one production crew per semester. These crews include Production/Build Crew and Running Crew. If a student chooses to work on a


Production/Build Crew then he or she must complete at least 15 hours after school or on weekend work calls. Benchmarks Students will be able to: 1. Understand the history of stage scenery and scenic elements. 2. Safely use a variety of construction tools including pneumatic nailer and stapler, power saws, and fastening and welding equipment. 3. Demonstrate the ability to read, analyze and develop, through drafting, his/her own “vision” of a set for theater. 4. Demonstrate the ability to program and run theatrical lighting. 5. Create a sound plot and use it to enhance storytelling. 6. Demonstrate problem-solving and teamwork skills. Units 1. History of stage sets and scenery - Students will learn the history of the architectural development of sets from the Ancient Greeks through to modern theater performances. 2. Scenery Shop Equipment and Materials - Through a special building project, students will be re-familiarized with tools and materials. Students will be reminded of proper safety techniques and procedures when using pneumatic and power equipment, and the different building materials used in construction. This will include welding and steel work. 3. Construction Techniques - Materials and Construction methods are reintroduced through the hands-on building of the Middle School and Upper School productions. Students will learn how to read set design plans and how to plan a production build. They will continue learning about the different construction methods of scenic elements and properties. 4. Set dressing and Fabrics - Students will learn to research specific time periods and discover what it takes to recreate a time and place on the stage, as realized through props and set dressing. They will discover the differences in fabrics and how they can be used to accentuate a set design or be used for various set dressing effects. 5. Scenic Painting and Finishing - Painting techniques can be used to create different theatrical illusions and effects. Each student will work on creating these effects and the skills to apply them to different theatrical scenery and properties pieces. 6. Script Analysis & Design - Through the reading of scripts the students will learn to verbalize, visualize, and then actualize what message the playwright is trying to get across to the audience. The students will learn how to create drawings for their designs with hand and computer-aided drafting. They will also learn how to turn their set designs into 3-dimensional models. 7. Theater Lighting - Through hands-on experience and projects, students will be introduced to programming theatrical lighting. 8. Sound Design - Students will create a sound plot for a story or production by analyzing a popular children’s’ story and producing a Qlab project to add to the effectiveness of the storytelling. 9. Make-Up - This fun unit exposes the students to character creation through the art of different makeup applications ranging from general highlights and shades to graphic horror make-up.


Resources Students will be encouraged to use the Internet and library to research topics and ideas. They will be able to use tools and equipment located in the theater program’s scenery shop as well as both the Hendrix-Chenault and Woodward Theaters. Updated May 2016


876 - Design & Production III Course Description Grades: 10-12 Group: II Units: 1.0 Prerequisite: 874 - Design & Production II or teacher recommendation This course is designed for students who are interested in learning more about a specific area of concentration, such as lighting design, sound design, costumes, and make-up design, and stage management. Depending on the student's areas of interest, s/he will be given projects to enhance his or her understanding of design and implementation in those areas. There is a lab requirement of 20 hours outside of class. Students are encouraged to fulfill this time by joining the technical crew of an Upper School production. Note: With the permission of the instructor, students may register for individual semesters of Design & Production II, III, and IV, but they may not advance to the next level until a full year at the preceding level is completed. Essential Questions 1. How have lights and sounds of the past affected the modern theater? 2. How do we use the psychology of shapes and color to affect how an audience perceives the world of the playwright? 3. How are theatrical scripts and concepts realized on stage? 4. How do designers for theater develop a unified vision of a production? 5. What are more efficient ways to use the different tools and supplies for creating the scenery and props for a production? 6. What aspects of lighting are most important in the theatre and how can lighting be used to manipulate the audience’s impression of the show? 7. How does sound affect the emotional feel of a production for an audience? 8. How do costumes portray a character’s personality and relate to the environment of the production? Assessment 1. Through the use of formal tests and quizzes, projects (both in class and take home), and in-class discussion of ideas, the students’ progress and knowledge of each unit will be evaluated. 2. Each student will be asked to present his/her final projects in class, with particular attention paid to defense/explanation of his/her choices and what elements of the script or musical piece influenced his/her decisions. During these presentations, the students will also be asked to offer positive criticisms of each other’s work. 3. In-class participation places a big role in the assessment of a student’s progress. Technical theatre relies on teamwork and the sharing of ideas to affect a cohesive presentation of a production; one must be able to communicate effectively and utilize other’s creative thinking to produce the best show possible. 4. Deadlines and tardiness can and will affect the final grade during each assessment. 5. Students are required to serve on one production crew per semester. These crews include Production/Build Crew and Running Crew. If a student chooses to work on a


Production/Build Crew then he or she must complete at least 15 hours after school or on weekend work calls. Benchmarks Students will be able to: 1. Demonstration of their skills and knowledge of hanging, focusing and programming of theatrical light instruments. 2. Safely use a variety of construction tools including pneumatic nailer and stapler, power saws, and fastening and welding equipment. 3. Demonstrate the ability to read, analyze and develop, through drafting, his/her own “vision” of a set for theater (lights, sound, costume, and set). 4. Create an environment and mood through the use of sound and lighting effects. 5. Portray a character’s personality through costume and make-up design. 6. Demonstrate problem-solving and teamwork skills. Units 1. Scenery Shop Equipment and Materials - Through a special building project, students will be re-familiarized with tools and materials. Students will be reminded of proper safety techniques and procedures when using pneumatic and power equipment, and the different building materials used in construction. 2. Construction Techniques - Materials and construction methods are reintroduced through the hands-on building of Middle School and Upper School Productions. Students will experience first hand how scenic elements and properties for productions are used in conjunction with lights, sound, and costumes to create a unified vision for a production. 3. Script Analysis & Design - Through the reading of scripts the students will learn to verbalize, visualize then actualize what message the playwright is trying to get across to the audience. They will read and analyze a script looking at it through a “designer’s eyes”. The student will explore the importance of colors, shapes, textures, and themes as important to the emotion and flow of a theatrical production. 4. Light Design - Beginning with a brief history of theatrical lighting, this unit will take students through a full light design process. They will study the emotional response to light choices, design a light plot, then hang, focus, and add color to their design. Finally, they will program their lighting to create a colorful story using only lights to tell it. 5. Sound Design - Students will briefly explore the history of sound and sound creation. Through projects and experimentation, they will understand the effect sound has on emotions and creating environments. They will also learn the art of creating their own sounds and engineering sounds in an environment particular to a setting. 6. Costuming and Character Creation - Students will analyze a character from a script and use costumes and make-up to create their vision of the character. This will culminate in a concept paper and project presented to the class. Resources Students will be encouraged to use the Internet and library to research topics and ideas. They will be able to use tools and equipment located in the theater program’s scenery shop as well as both the Hendrix-Chenault and Woodward Theaters. Updated May 2016


878 - Design & Production IV Course Description Grade: 11-12 Group: II Units: 1.0 Prerequisite: 876 - Design & Production III or teacher recommendation Each D&P IV student will focus on the design and implementation of specific aspects of a production agreed upon by the student and the teacher. Independent design work and extensive technical work will be required. The work will be realized on stage in US productions. Students are expected to leave this class with portfolio pieces to be used in college applications. D&P IV students will be encouraged to participate in programs with professional theater affiliations of Lovett, such as Theatrical Outfit and Atlanta Lyric Theater. Note: With the permission of the instructor, students may register for individual semesters of Design & Production II, III, and IV, but they may not advance to the next level until a full year at the preceding level is completed. Essential Questions 1. What is the difference between a “good” and “bad” design? 2. How do you, as a designer, develop your own style? 3. How do we use the psychology of shapes and color to affect how an audience perceives the world of the playwright? 4. What are the different approaches used by stage managers? 5. How do theatre directors and designers develop a unified vision of a production? 6. What are the methods for solving complicated theatrical effects? 7. How do lights affect the world of the production? 8. How does sound affect the emotional feel of a production for an audience? Assessment 1. Student progress and knowledge of each unit will be evaluated through in-class discussions of ideas, formal tests and quizzes, and projects. 2. Students will be asked to present their final projects in class, with particular attention paid to defense/explanation of their choices and the elements of the scripts or musical piece that influenced their decisions. 3. Students are required to serve on one production/build or running crew per year. If a student chooses a production/build crew, he or she must complete at least 12 hours of after-school or Saturday work. Skills Benchmarks Students will:


1. Identify the different emotional responses to various colors and shapes as they pertain to theatre design. 2. Demonstrate their skills and knowledge of the process of designing lights for a theatrical production. 3. Use safely a variety of construction tools, including a pneumatic nail gun and stapler, power saws, and fastening and welding equipment. 4. Demonstrate the ability to read, analyze and develop their “vision” of a script for theatre. 5. Create a sound design for a given production which will include music and sound effects. 6. Demonstrate problem-solving and teamwork skills. Units 1. Emotions of Colors and Shapes - Students will explore the effects of color, placement, shapes, and presentation on viewers. They will utilize scripts to develop design elements that will exemplify their own emotional responses to playwrights’ works. 2. Production Organization - During this unit, students will study several different methods used to stage-manage various types of productions. 3. Construction Techniques - Advanced materials and construction methods will be explored as they pertain to theatrical elements. Students will work with/on various special and theatrical rigging effects. 4. Scenery Shop Equipment and Materials - The fourth unit is a continued discussion of the various tools and materials used for more involved theatrical applications. 5. Scenic Painting and Finishing - Advanced painting techniques can be used to create different theatrical illusions and effects. Each student will work on creating these effects and on the skills to apply them to a variety of scenery pieces. 6. Theatre Lighting - This unit covers the creation of lighting plots, instrument schedules, and the use of computer software for the creation of original lighting designs for various types of productions. 7. Script Analysis - Through the reading and advanced analysis of scripts, students will learn to verbalize, visualize, and then actualize the message the playwright is trying to convey to the audience. 8. Sound Design - Students will work with both pre-recorded and self-created sound effects to tell a story using only sound. Through the use of both digital and analog sound equipment, they will create short stories of their own design and present them to the class. 9. Stage Make-up and Character Creation - Students will analyze characters from a script and use stage makeup to transfer themselves into their visions of the characters. Resources Holloway, John. ​Illustrated Theatre Production Guide​. Elsevier Inc., 2010. Tools and equipment located in the theatre program’s scenery shop and the Hendrix-Chenault and Woodward theatres Revised August 2012


879 - Design and Production V Course Description Grade: 12 Group: II Units: 1.0 Prerequisite: 878 - Design & Production IV or teacher recommendation This demanding course is for the more advanced student, who will focus on the design of a specific aspect of a production. Independent work will be expected and extensive technical work will be required. A course of study will be selected from the following: scenic design and rendering, sound design, lighting design, costume design, or stage management. Students will assist with assemblies, concerts, and other events in the Hendrix-Chenault Theater and are expected to attend all technical rehearsals and crew calls. Essential Questions 1. What are the roles in theatrical design and production? What job and responsibility do each role in a theatrical production organization consist of in their respective fields (​e.g. lighting, sound, stage management, props, scenery, direction, costuming, video, producing)? 2. How are decisions made regarding the design and execution of a production? Who is involved in the complete design process from beginning to end and what are their responsibilities? 3. How do theatre directors and designers develop a unified vision of a production? What is the process of decision making and how to they work together as a team? 4. How do you, as a designer, develop your own style? What influences your choices, how do you learn more about your personal style? 5. How do we use the psychology of shapes and color to affect how an audience perceives the world of the playwright? What affects how the audience feels when experiencing a production? Assessment 1. Students will be evaluated through in-class discussions. Class time will be spent observing and discussing what constitutes ‘good design’ of a production. A portion of the assessment will be based on participation and input into these discussions 2. Students will be tested on their comprehension of the field of production being studied. These may be in the form of physical exercises such as creating and following a light plot to be able to confidently hang lights for a production. May also be in the form of written exams over terms and ideas discussed in class. 3. Based on their chosen area of production (lighting, sound, scenery, etc…) students will be given a production and be tasked with creating a full design for that production. For example: for scenery, they will research, design and draft scenes for the given production. Using rubrics they will be graded on all aspects of their final design 4. Students will be asked to present their final projects in class, with particular attention paid to defense/explanation of their choices and the elements of the scripts or musical


piece that influenced their decisions. Why did they choose particular colors or textures? What influenced the style of their particular production? 5. Students are required to serve on one production/build or running crew per year. If a student chooses a production/build crew, he or she must complete at least 15 hours of after-school or Saturday work. Benchmarks 1. Script Analysis Research the cultural, political, economic contexts of the theatrical work. Understand the story components, themes, and ideas expressed in the work. Using this researched information, determine what is needed for the design whether it’s specific scenery pieces, particular lighting effects, certain props, a specific style of costume. 2. Communication Communicate an understanding of the work. Communicate ideas and concepts to other designers, technicians, and directors working with them to develop a cohesive design that presents a united vision of the show through all technical aspects of scenery, costumes, audio, lighting, color, textures, design. 3. Research Show an understanding of how to find and use cultural, political, economic contexts of the theatrical work and how that research is used to develop a cohesive design for a theatrical work. Include elements such as style, textures, emotion/Mood, 4. Design Develop a design concept for a theatrical production in a chosen discipline using the previous benchmarks to show a thorough understanding of what is needed to bring a show all the way from a concept to a realized production.

Projects 1. Complete a design concept package. ​Present a completed design concept to peers and teachers that faithfully communicates the desired direction for the show to go. This can be ideas on particular elements of the design, color, texture, style that have resulted from research. This is not a fully realized design but a presentation on a possible direction to begin heading 2. Preliminary Design. ​Students take the design to the next step by coming up with concrete decisions, drawings, and ideas of where the production is going to go. Firm decisions on the elements of the design should be presented and discussed and still possibly be changed. Most of the major elements are set at this point. 3. Final Design. ​Students will present final designs taking into account all aspects discussed between directors, technicians, and other designers. This will present how the show will look. 4. Final Drawings. ​All drawings will be presented of the design and will include all aspects of the design ready to be handed over to technicians to create.


5. Execution. ​If the Fine Arts calendar allows, the show will be executed to faithfully recreate the student’s design on one of the Fine Arts stages. The student will be responsible for overseeing other student technicians in executing their work in a realized production Resources Sources will primarily be through a variety of sources such as instructor experience, professional tradespersons visits, trade publications, internet research, site visits. Updated November 2017


880 - Dance Course Description Grades: 9-12 Group: II Units: 0.5 Offered: Fall/Spring Prerequisite: Previous Lovett dance experience or teacher recommendation

Dance students study many styles of dance including ballet, modern, hip-hop, jazz, and contemporary. Students have the opportunity to participate in the creative process (music selection, choreographic process, and staging), while also learning dance vocabulary and dance history. Additionally, students will perform in a dance recital and may perform for other events. Students are responsible for the purchase of appropriate dance attire and shoes for class. Note: This course may be repeated multiple times for credit. Essential Questions 1. What makes dance an art and not a sport? 2. How do we turn “movement” into dance? 3. What are the components of a good dance performance? 4. What is the difference between ballet, jazz, contemporary, and hip hop? 5. Why is ballet technique the base for all other dance styles? 6. What are the key core skills/strengths necessary to all types of dance? 7. What are the keys to dance injury prevention? 8. What is the relationship of dance to my life? 9. How does dance become an outlet for personal expression? 10. What is the choreographic process? Assessments 1. Technical skills: students are evaluated for the technique ​at their particular level. 2. Knowledge of Choreography 3. Energy (how much energy and effort the student puts forth) 4. Rhythm 5. Classroom Etiquette (behavior in class, attendance and dress code). 6. Participation in class-choreographed dance. Skills Benchmarks 1. Through practice, watching fellow students, and exposure to professional dancers (either live or videotaped), students will be able to evaluate dance performance and make informed choices about their own expressions through dance. At the end of the course students should be able to: a. Demonstrate knowledge of what technical features make a dancer good or bad. What performance qualities make a dancer excel or not. b. Evaluate their own performances and self-correct technical mistakes.


2. Students will be able to choreograph their own dance. This involves using steps and choreography from the various genres taught in class, as well as taking into consideration patterning, music and costumes. Students will further have an understanding of how to turn the “steps” they’ve been taught into dance. At the end of the course, students should be able to: a. Demonstrate knowledge of proper execution of steps as well as knowing the correct terminology/vocabulary for these steps. b. Execute a dance combination and imbue it with an expression of emotion and/or an interpretation of the music. c. Use the basic steps and techniques to perform and/or create a short dance. d. Create a short dance or dance combination to a given piece of music that is both rhythmical and evocative of the chosen music. 3. Students will be able to identify and demonstrate the difference between at least two styles of dance. By the end of the course students should be able to: a. Recognize the style of dance based on the movement and not on the music. b. Recognize and verbally or physically demonstrate differences in the dance genres introduced in class. c. Have a basic understanding of the vocabulary used in the dance styles taught and which terms apply to which dances. 4. Students will demonstrate their ability to learn and perform a complete dance. By the end of the course students should be able to: a. Show a commitment to learning and retaining choreography. b. Demonstrate the ability to work with others adjusting as needed in terms of space and abilities. c. Understand the value of the repetitive rehearsal process and attention to detail. d. Experience the joy and exhilaration of live performance. Dance Class Curriculum based on the above Objectives 1. Technical skill (basic alignment, proper control from the core, basic steps: plié, tendu, battement, etc.) 2. Performance and Rehearsal Skills (interpretation, retention of choreography, stage presence) 3. Evaluation of performances 4. Dance history 5. Dancing in a wide range of styles and music 6. Choreography of a dance by the students in the class Units 1. 2. 3. 4.

Basic ballet technique Preparation for Fall Performance Exploration of jazz, hip-hop and contemporary Choreography of a class dance by the students

Textbooks and Resources Students will see video DVDs and YouTube videos of dance. Some choreography study guides will be made available online. I can also recommend books and magazines for those interested.

Upper School Fine Arts Curriculum  

Upper School Fine Arts Curriculum

Upper School Fine Arts Curriculum  

Upper School Fine Arts Curriculum