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The Lovett School Upper School English Curriculum


Upper School English Department Contents: 1. Upper School English Curriculum Guide 2. Upper School English Essential Questions 3. Upper School English Book List 4. Upper School English Core-texts, including summer reading and American Studies units *The Upper School English Department also prepared a Writing Guide for students; you may find it on the Lovett website on the English page. Upper School English Curriculum Guide (updated 08/2013) Department-Wide Practices Writing Requirements Students will write at least ten essays during the school year. (Grade 11 students will write eight essays and an interdisciplinary research paper.) Below are the minimum requirements for all grades: • Four analytical, thesis-based papers. • One in-class paper per semester (handwritten) • At least two papers per semester should follow the complete writing process: rough draft/peer review/final draft/revisions A journal notebook responding to literature and to issues discussed in class may be substituted for one essay per semester. The "rules" of organizing and writing a formal composition do not necessarily apply here. Journals, which give students extra practice in thinking and writing, are graded on content only. Hence, each entry must be a sincere, authentic, substantive response to the topic. All formal papers are to be word-processed, using MLA format. Reading We encourage students to be critical readers. (See attached document of core, required texts per course.) Writing Folders Each student will have a writing folder in which s/he keeps all significant writing. Students will have the opportunity for self-evaluation, reflecting on their growth as writers and setting goals for the future. They will use one folder for grades 9 and 10 and one for grades 11 and 12. Teachers are responsible for ensuring that major papers are kept in the appropriate folders. Ninth and eleventh grade teachers will start new folders for their students to pass on to tenth and twelfth grade teachers. At the end of the senior year, students will be given both the 9/10 folder and the 11/12 folder.


Vocabulary Whether through a vocabulary workbook or through lists compiled through literature, students should work to expand their vocabularies and thus improve their reading comprehension and written expression. Word Processing Skills As part of the school’s Certification of Computing Skills, the English department will be responsible for teaching and reinforcing the following computer skills: • Formatting word-processed documents such as line spacing, centering text, font, margins, etc. • Creating a header with page number code • Formatting an academic paper, including a bibliography using MLA format • Running a spell-check program • Converting files All teachers should hold students accountable to these expectations and reinforce these skills when necessary. PSAT/SAT Preparation 10th and 11th grade teachers are expected to help students prepare for the PSAT by providing approximately 15 minutes of PSAT practice / instruction per class, in the two weeks prior to testing in mid-October. 11th grade teachers are expected to spend a couple of days teaching students to write the SATtype essay and have them practice at least one in the appropriate timed situation. This should occur before spring break, at the very latest. (Consult SAT practice packet compiled by the dean of academic affairs.) Grade Level Expectations - Ninth Grade Writing Students in the ninth grade should develop their skills in writing the formal, five paragraph, thesis-based essay. Teachers will emphasize form and mechanics, guiding students to express their ideas clearly in writing. Of the ten required essays, the following types of writing must be included: • SING narrative essay (unless the 9th-grade teachers as a unified group decide to have students write letters instead) • Four thesis-based essays using basic literary analysis with textual support • Autobiographical essay • Creative writing assignment Composition Benchmarks: By the end of the year, students will: • Utilize effective openings in their writing. • Avoid plot summary.


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Present a debatable thesis. Create effective topic sentences. Provide details and examples within paragraphs. Include effective transitions, both internally and between paragraphs. Provide parenthetical documentation of a primary source. Utilize correct punctuation of incorporated quotations, including block quotations. Use present tense when discussing literature.

Grammar Benchmarks: By the end of the year, students will: • Recognize parts of speech, conjunctive adverbs, subordinating conjunctions, and coordinating conjunctions, and utilize them correctly in their writing. • Recognize and know how to correct fragments, run-ons, and comma splices in their writing. • Identify types of sentences (simple, compound, complex, compound/complex) as well as how to vary them in their writing. • Receive introduction to the various types of clauses and phrases. • Maintain agreement in subjects and verbs and pronouns and antecedents. • Demonstrate competency in the use of quotation marks and apostrophes. • Recognize and correct reference errors. • Demonstrate competency in the application of comma usage rules. Research Benchmarks: All ninth grade students should receive an orientation to the library during the fall semester. Students should conduct research in the library using a variety of sources at least one time each semester. Public Speaking: One assignment per semester will require an oral component. Grade Level Expectations - Tenth Grade The 10th-grade curriculum exposes students to literature from a variety of cultures. Writing The tenth-grade writing program reinforces the skills taught in the ninth grade and helps students to broaden their approach. Of the ten required essays, the following must be included: • Essay analyzing poetry • Formal essay that responds to literary criticism • Narrative, autobiographical, or reflective essay • Creative writing assignment • Thesis-based essays using literary analysis with textual support Composition Benchmarks:


Building on the composition benchmarks from 9th grade, students will (by the end of the year): • Demonstrate effective parenthetical documentation of a secondary source. • Employ sentence variety. • Utilize effective sentence beginnings. • Incorporate quotations in a fluid manner. • Include effective transitions, both internally and between paragraphs. Grammar Benchmarks: Building on the grammar benchmarks from 9th grade, students will (by the end of the year): • Demonstrate consistency of tense, mood, voice, tone, style, and perspective. • Demonstrate competency in use of the following punctuation marks: colon, dash, and ellipsis. • Incorporate the use of a variety of clauses (adjective, adverbial, noun) into their writing. • Incorporate the use of a variety of verbals (participles, gerunds, infinitives) into their writing. • Demonstrate the understanding of parallel structure in writing. • Recognize and correct misplaced parts and dangling modifiers. • Recognize and correct reference errors. • Demonstrate competency in comma usage with specific emphasis on punctuating restrictive and nonrestrictive clauses. Research Benchmarks: Tenth grade students will write a research paper in Western Civilization or AP European History. To complement the teaching of the research process, tenth grade teachers should introduce the following skills: • Locating an article based on its format. • Locating and using literary criticism. • Using a computer database to locate an article in a news magazine or newspaper. Tenth grade English classes should complete a research-based assignment one time during the year. Public Speaking: One assignment per semester will require an oral component. Grade Level Expectations - Eleventh Grade Interdisciplinary Work The approach to the presentation of material in the eleventh grade is interdisciplinary. Teaching pairs will plan each unit as a team and guide students to make relevant connections that lead to a comprehensive understanding of the American experience. American Studies teachers follow the guidelines set in the American Studies Faculty Guidelines, compiled by the American Studies Coordinator(s).


At a minimum, each American Studies team will meet the following expectations: Fall Semester 1) Students will write at least two in-class essays with an interdisciplinary topic, very likely as part of a two-period test. The grade for these essays will count as a major grade for both teachers. 2) The Fall Semester Exam will be a two-hour interdisciplinary exam. Spring Semester 1) Students will complete the interdisciplinary research paper. Both teachers will work with students as they research, develop a thesis, draft and revise these essays. This major paper will count 20% of the grade in each American Studies class. 2) Students will write at least two joint in-class essays on an interdisciplinary topic in the spring. The grade for these essays will count as a major grade for both teachers. Writing The eleventh-grade writing program will teach students to explore topics of an interdisciplinary nature, frequently incorporating historical context and information into the analysis. Because of the magnitude of the interdisciplinary research project, students will write a total of eight compositions, which must include the following: • Interdisciplinary research paper of 5-7 pages [Honors 6-8] (graded at each stage of the research process) • Narrative, autobiographical, or reflective essay • Analysis of art and music • Thesis-based essays using literary analysis with textual support Composition Benchmarks: Building on the composition benchmarks from 9th and 10th grades, students will (by the end of the year): • Move smoothly from text to quotation (the use of SEQUOIA) • Draft effective introductory and concluding paragraphs • Organize a significant amount of research and maintain the focus of an argument • Craft effective transitions, both internal and between paragraphs Grammar Benchmarks: By the end of the year, students will be more adept at: • Incorporating parallel sentence structure in their writing • Avoiding misplaced and dangling modifiers • Recognizing and avoiding vague, general, or unclear pronoun references.


Public Speaking Benchmarks: One assignment each semester will require students to create and deliver an original piece. Research Benchmarks: By the end of the year, eleventh-grade students will have experience • Finding primary resources using a subject or chronological approach • Identifying scholarly resources outside of the Vasser Woolley Library • Identifying and evaluating reliable and useful Internet sources. • Following the research process: invention/query, research, thesis, MLA documentation, outline, annotated bibliography, first draft, revision, and final draft Grade Level Expectations - Twelfth Grade The twelfth grade curriculum is divided into two parts. In the fall semester, seniors take British Literature. In the spring, seniors choose an elective course focusing on a particular area of interest. Electives for the 2013-14 school year include Paradoxes, Literature and Dystopia, Mystery Fiction, and Creative Writing. Students taking AP English follow a different year-long course of study. Writing Students will experiment with a variety of voices, styles, and genres as they develop a unique writer’s voice. Of the ten required essays, the following must be included: • College application essay (fall semester) • Thesis-based essays of varying lengths, with at least one 4-5 page paper per semester • Essay involving outside research and/or literary criticism (at least one per semester) • Poetry analysis (fall semester) Writing Benchmarks Students will develop proficiency in composition and grammar. While teachers are reinforcing technical competency, students will experiment with a variety of voices, styles, and genres as they develop their own style and a unique writer’s voice. Public Speaking Benchmarks One assignment per semester will require an oral component. Research Benchmarks Twelfth-grade students will incorporate research skills in independent research projects. Students will use library research at least once per semester in preparation for college. General Overview Essential Questions


*Although some of the questions are grade-specific, in many cases the next grade-level builds upon some of the same questions. Most of the skills we are developing in the English department are recursive in nature. 9th grade How do we reflect on self and communicate ideas through coherent writing? How do we develop basic competencies in writing? How do I use the text to defend a thesis? How can we use the structures of language to express our ideas in varied, interesting, and intentional ways? How do we interpret literature on multiple levels and support those interpretations? What is the responsibility of the individual in the community? What are the qualities of a hero and what does that reveal about the community in which s/he lives? What are the qualities of a true leader? What are the qualities of a true friend? How does literature help us to “stand in someone else’s shoes”? What does literature reveal about the challenges of coming of age? How do we as a society deal with injustice, with unfairness, and with misfortune? Additionally, when are mercy and grace appropriate? 10th grade What are the particulars and the commonalities of literature of different cultures? What does the world look like from the eyes of someone from another culture? How do we use writing to communicate our own views on text and life? How can we use the structures of language to express our ideas in varied, interesting, and intentional ways? How do we respond personally and analytically during the process of reading? What makes English enjoyable? How does our need for survival inform our values and choices? How does one maintain one’s individuality in the face of pressures to conform? How does literature show us about truth, beauty, and other aesthetic questions? How do we look inwardly and externally to use writing to communicate understanding and meaning? 11th grade How and from what sources is identity formed? Is identity formation a finite process? Who are you as an individual? What does it mean to be an American? What does it mean to be an American citizen? Who are you as an American? How have notions of American identity changed throughout history? And, how are these changes manifested/reflected/questioned in American literature? Are the public American persona and the reality of American experiences equivalent?


How are gender and racial "otherness" treated within America? What are the various manifestations of the American Dream? Has each manifestation been accessible for everyone? Why are there multiple manifestations? What makes American art and literature distinctive? How are they AMERICAN? How are American art and literature both reflections of and influences on society and culture? Does America have a special destiny or role to play in the world? 12th grade How does narrative voice influence the story? How do we write effectively for various purposes and audiences? How does culture shape literature? How do we discover our human experience through literature? How do we learn to enjoy literature? How and why has/does language change(d) over time? How did the language spoken by small Germanic tribes develop into the world's pre-eminent language?


The Lovett School Upper School English Reading List (updated May 2013)

Students will read selected texts from the following lists: *-Required in all classes. h-Required in all honors classes. ENGLISH 9 Vocabulary from Latin and Greek Roots, book 4 * When the Emperor was Divine h Gulliver’s Travels h A Midsummer Night's Dream* Of Mice and Men * SING unit * The Odyssey * Catcher in the Rye * Pride and Prejudice h The Forever King The Bean Trees The Chosen Bless Me, Ultima The Book Thief Great Expectations Lord of the Flies The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian The Long Walk Independent selections ENGLISH 10 (WORLD LITERATURE) Vocabulary Energizers I and II * (not h) Vocabulary Workshop h Things Fall Apart A Tale of Two Cities h The Metamorphosis h Life of Pi * (not h) 1984 h Oedipus * A Doll's House House on Mango Street * (not h) Into the Wild * A River Sutra


Othello or Macbeth * Jane Eyre Death of Ivan Illych Accidental Death of an Anarchist Antigone The Good Earth A Passage to India Rashomon Pilgrim’s Progress In the Time of Butterflies The Merchant of Venice All Quiet on the Western Front Purple Hibiscus Frankenstein Independent Selections ENGLISH 11 – AMERICAN STUDIES A General History of Virginia, New England, and the Summer Isles * Of Plymouth Plantation * The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin * (excerpts) The Declaration of Independence * Nature *(excerpts) Narrative of The Life of Frederick Douglas, An American Slave Written by Himself * The Scarlet Letter Walden and Resistance to Civil Government * Song of Myself or other Whitman texts Up From Slavery * (excerpts) The Souls of Black Folk *(excerpts) The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn or other Twain The Open Boat * The Great Gatsby * Harlem Renaissance Poetry * The Things They Carried * The Sport of the Gods McTeague The Awakening h The Yellow Wallpaper Their Eyes were Watching God Salvation on Sand Mountain The Bluest Eye Death of a Salesman h The Glass Menagerie Maggie: A Girl of the Streets


ENGLISH 12 (Fall only—BRITISH LITERATURE) Beowulf * The Canterbury Tales * Hamlet * -Selections of British poetry * AP ENGLISH LITERATURE Beloved * Wuthering Heights * All The Pretty Horses * Beowulf * The Canterbury Tales* Hamlet * Reading Poetry: An Anthology of Poems * Catch-22 Heart of Darkness As I Lay Dying Madame Bovary Frankenstein Grendel No Exit Never Let Me Go ENGLISH 12 – Spring Semester Electives Detective and Mystery Fiction “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” The Murder of Roger Ackroyd People of Darkness The Big Sleep Selected Sherlock Holmes Stories Creative Writing This course is run like a college writing workshop so the bulk of the texts that students critique are written by the students themselves. Paradoxes Cry, The Beloved County A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich Excerpts from Dante's Inferno Other poetry, stories, and art Literature and Dystopia Brave New World


Anthem The Road Utopia The Tempest Gulliver's Travels Herland Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Upper School English Department: core, required texts per course: *Summer reading is listed beneath the core texts. English 9 A Midsummer Night's Dream The Odyssey Catcher in the Rye SING unit—2 shared readings (“Use of Force” and “A Visit of Charity”), 1 movie (Waging a Living), 2 journal assignments, and personal narrative. English 9 Honors A Midsummer Night's Dream The Odyssey Catcher in the Rye SING unit—2 shared readings (“Use of Force” and “A Visit of Charity”), 1 movie (Waging a Living), 2 journal assignments, and personal narrative. Pride and Prejudice Gulliver’s Travels English 10 Oedipus Macbeth or Othello Life of Pi House on Mango Street (A text set in Africa) English 10 Honors Oedipus Macbeth or Othello A Tale of Two Cities Kafka's Metamorphosis American Studies and American Studies Honors—See the end of this document. English 12


Beowulf Canterbury Tales Hamlet *British poetry

AP-12 Beowulf Grendel or other text with similar themes, such as No Exit Canterbury Tales Hamlet Beloved Poetry Anthology (*Optional—Heart of Darkness)

Summer Reading: 9th – Of Mice and Men 9th honors -- When the Emperor was Divine 10th -- Into the Wild 10th honors -- 1984 American Studies – As of summer 2009, students must select a text from two lists--a themed list and a 'free-choice' list. During the month of May students received the summer reading lists and the links to the online forms through which they make choices via their Lovett email account. 12th – Me Before You 12th AP -- Wuthering Heights and All the Pretty Horses (not Morality Play starting 09-10 school year) **Honors/AP students read the standard book plus the extras.

AMERICAN STUDIES COMMON TEXTUAL REQUIREMENTS In an effort to provide not only a consistent American Studies experience for all juniors, but also to ensure that there is a common textual vocabulary that students will take with them from the course, the texts marked with an “*” below are those that should be covered in the course. The remaining texts are suggested, but they may be omitted if time does now allow for them. Attempts have been made to include the diverse voices speaking at different moments in history, and, by whatever means, AS teachers should strive to include these voices in their curricula and


incorporate critical discussion of all texts in both classrooms. There is some fluidity in the units. Certain authors may be taught easily in either the latter portion of one unit or in the early portion of another as segues. Additionally, teaching of full texts is not necessarily required because excerpts that drive home thematic and/or didactic intent are often far more accessible for the students.

Unit One: Native American Folklore/Narrative/Image John Smith, The General History of Virginia, New England, and the Summer Isles William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation John Winthrop, “A Model of Christian Charity” Unit Two: Jonathan Edwards, “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” (may be taught in unit one) Benjamin Franklin, either The Autobiography or The Way to Wealth Thomas Jefferson et al, The Declaration of Independence Thomas Paine, Common Sense or “The American Crisis, No.1” Constitutional Congress, The Constitution of the United States *J. Hector St. John De Crevecouer *Phillis Wheatley *Native American Narrative Unit Three: *Note: During this unit, AS-English teachers are usually hard-pressed to cover a great deal of material. Dividing texts or assigning an art project in AS-History is usually quite helpful. Additionally, the unit may be divided into parts A and B. James Fenimore Cooper, The Pioneers or another of The Leatherstocking Tales Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nature, “The American Scholar,” “Self-Reliance” Henry David Thoreau, Walden and Resistance to Civil Government, * “Slavery in Massachusettes Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave Written by Himself * “The Meaning of the 4th of July to the Negro,” * “The Heroic Slave” Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter or a short story *Herman Melville *Native American Narrative *Women’s Narrative or Fiction *Walt Whitman


Unit Four: Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn W.E.B. DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk Stephen Crane, “The Open Boat” or other purely Naturalist text “The Cult of Domesticity” Immigrant Literature/Images Kate Chopin *Walt Whitman *Emily Dickinson *Charlotte Perkins Gilman, The Yellow Wallpaper *Paul Laurence Dunbar, “We Wear the Mask” The Sport of the Gods Unit Five: Ernest Hemingway F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby W.E.B. DuBois, “Criteria of Negro Art” Harlem Renaissance *Women’s Literature *Other ethnic literatures Unit Six: Tim O’Brien, The Things They Carried *Tennessee Williams *Toni Morrison


Upper School Curriculum: English