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29 MAR–26 APR 2012 / ISSUE 695 / £2.50

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FASTS 2012 list.co.uk

GLASGOW INTERNATIONAL WOLFGANG TILLMANS FOUND & AIDAN MOFFAT GET INTO PHOTOGRAPHY

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EASTER IDEAS A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE

ART T HE

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THE

www.proclaimers.co.uk

PROCLAIMERS PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS

NOVEMBER 2012

Wed 14 Thu 15 Sat 17 Mon 19 Tue 20 Thu 22 Fri 23

GLASGOW Academy 0844 477 2000 GLASGOW Academy 0844 477 2000 ABERDEEN Exhibition Centre 0844 477 9000 INVERNESS Eden Court Theatre SOLD OUT 01463 234 234 PERTH Concert Hall 01738 621 031 EDINBURGH Playhouse 0844 871 3014 EDINBURGH Playhouse SOLD OUT 0844 871 3014

Ticket Hotline: 0844 844 0444 www.ticketmaster.co.uk (All Shows) www.atgtickets.com/edinburgh (Edinburgh Only)

NEW ALBUM ‘LIKE COMEDY’ OUT 07/05/12


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29 MAR-29 APR YOU’VE GOT 29 DAYS TO LIVE! This month’s editorial reaches you from Beijing, where I’m currently on holiday. The Chinese capital is an intense mix of gloss and grime. There’s no Facebook or Twitter of course – the Great Firewall of China prevents that – but there is Chinese micro-blog site Weibo. The state are moving to gain more information about, and more control over, Weibo’s users, but tracking opinions is only one concern. Tracking profits is another. Skyscrapers go up at an astonishing rate. Tourguides point to office blocks and highways where important houses and monuments once stood. The speed of economic growth is visible daily and (cheap shot though it is) you can’t help think of Edinburgh’s stalled trams on their puny tracks. Progress comes at a cost, but the Party don’t half know how to get things done.

list.co.uk

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Around Town

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Edinburgh Intl Science Festival Little Birds Market It’s Funtime!

46 47 48

Books Iain Banks Peter Carey Mark Millar

EASTER DAYS OUT We present our top 10 suggestions for events happening around the country throughout the Easter break.

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Cover Story

Richard Wright

BEST BREAKFASTS Whether you prefer coffee and croissants or bacon butties and Bru, you’ll find your perfect brekkie venue here.

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Pin-up Nights Above & Beyond Qabalala

54 54 54

Comedy

The Art Issue The GI is in town (with a solo show from this issue’s cover photographer Wolfgang Tillmans, his first in Glasgow since 1995), and we’ve set our sights on all things arty. Check out our 12-page art feature from page 14, including FOUND’s Unravel; our art-buyer’s guide on page 40; plus our GI coverage in the Visual Art section, starting on page 118.

THIS MUST BE THE PLACE An interview with Paolo Sorrentino, director of the Sean Penn-starring washed-up rock star-slash-Nazi hunter drama.

+ Regulars 2 First & Last

Published by The List Ltd HEAD OFFICE: 14 High Street, Edinburgh EH1 1TE Tel: 0131 550 3050, Fax: 0131 557 8500, list.co.uk, email editor@list.co.uk GLASGOW OFFICE: at the CCA, 350 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow G2 3JD Tel: 0141 332 9929, glasgow@list.co.uk ISSN: 0959 - 1915 ©2012 The List Ltd. Reproduction in whole or in part is forbidden without the written permission of the publishers. The List does not accept responsibility for unsolicited material. The List provides this content in good faith but no guarantee or representation is given that the content is accurate, complete or up-to-date. Use of magazine content is at your own risk. Printed by Acorn Web Offset Ltd, W.Yorkshire. Subscriptions: 30 issues UK £30

Richard Wiseman is on the couch.

7 Noticeboard

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Lee Camp Daniel Sloss

63 64

Film

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Paolo Sorrentino interview Wild Bill Iron Sky This Must be the Place Salmon Fishing in the Yemen

66 68 68 69 70

Kids

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CBeebies Live

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LGBT

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Music Graham Coxon Florence and the Machine Sinead O Connor Records Jazz & Folk Classical

Theatre

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50 50 51

Clubs

Uh Huh Her

Editor

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A Streetcar Named Desire For Once Alegria Tightrope King Lear

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81 82 84 84 86 102 107

109 110 111 111 111 112

Visual Art

118

Emory Douglas Wolfgang Tillmans George Wyllie – Thursday Alison Turnbull

119 119 120 120

Classified Recruitment Property I Saw You

126 126 127 127

GREAT OFFERS Win tickets to Fascinating Mummies

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Win tickets to Wide Days 2 for 1 tickets for Edinburgh International

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Science Festival

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Festival announcments from the EIF, EIFF and Fringe.

Win tickets to Bank of Scotland's Imaginate festival

30 Food and Drink

Win tickets to A Streetcar Named Desire 113

Reviews of new Edinburgh eatery Steak and Glasgow’s Bruadar.

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Mailbox HA YOUVE SAY R

Ask Bob BOB SERVANT, window cleaning kingpin and beneficiary of Dundee’s Cheeseburger Wars, turns Agony Uncle for The List

CONTRIBUTORS Publisher & General Editor Robin Hodge Director Simon Dessain

EDITORIAL Bob, I see Obama has been laying out the red carpet for Cameron. Have you ever ventured Stateside? Barnes Darcus, Edinburgh

Barnes, I haven’t and it’s one of the greatest regrets of my life. I’d love to have stood on top of the Empire State and done the old King Kong routine, and I’ve always wanted to visit that national park where they’ve carved the penis of every American President into the stone. More than anything though I’d like to have met Jessica Fletcher from Murder She Wrote. I know the boo boys say she was a nosy so-andso but for me she was a game old bird with a hell of a twinkle in her eyes.

PINTER POINTER

Bob, Perth with city status! Whatever’s next?! Callum Godden, Dunfermline

Re: Betrayal review (694) This was a terrific production and the humour is as cleverly delivered as it was cleverly crafted by Pinter. The reviewer touches on the difficulty of empathising with this urban literati set, but the real problem is that none of the characters really seem to care enough – where is the anger that would normally come alongside such gross infidelity? I think this is a weakness not of the production, but the play itself. Comment posted by A.F-A at list.co.uk

Callum, I must say I was as surprised as you are and it’s caused a lot of confusion down at Stewpot’s Bar. I thought to qualify as a city somewhere had to have an airport, but Frank thinks they have to have a Zapzone. If they’re handing these things out then I’m going to apply for Broughty Ferry to become a city and Aberdeen to become a zoo.

SIR WASABI Re: Edinburgh venue closures (694) Kris Wasabi is the shiniest knight on the Edinburgh club scene! I have faith he will fix all of it! I believe. Comment posted by Chef De Party, Glasgow at list.co.uk

Your Servant, Bob Servant

Send your questions to bob@bobservant.com bobservant.com

All the best, Bob

THE

Question

We ask the question, you provide the answer. Follow us on Twitter @thelistmagazine to contribute.

WHAT’S YOUR IDEA OF A PERFECT SUNDAY BREAKFAST/BRUNCH? @DukesBarGlasgow A scotch pie and beans and a pint of Asahi Superdry. Sweet.

am I kidding, at least 3 good coffees . . . and perhaps some bacon too : )

@SAMackinnon Huevos rancheros, coffee, papers, no talking.

@judfrazer American-style pancakes with pieces of apricot in and lots of maple syrup – mmmm.

@Wee_COOK Fried egg butties with cheese and brown sauce delish Sunday brunch hangover fodder! Hx @minkprisoner Scrambled egg and smoked salmon, wheat toast, fresh Scottish berries and champagne (lots of it). @LittleBigSpoon Bacon, tomato, scallops grilled, wholemeal toast, cold butter 2 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

and good strong coffee. @heathercrumley Citation in Merchant City does a rather lovely line in French toast with maple syrup and bacon. @CafebargeArgyll Manzanilla sherry, Illy cofffee, @tapaorganic sourdough toast & laverbread. The

Observer. Segueing into Tarbert scallops . . . @RedDoor_Gallery Sunday brekkie has to be a gooood coffee, fresh american-style pancakes packed with blueberrries and . . . mmmmore fruit. @RedDoor_Gallery Who

@Llara_has_2_Ls I bloody love fruit pudding. Plus, get a breakfast pack, most folk don’t like it so you get it all! @HtotheP Surely a @PincerVodka bloody Mary with Stravaigin french toast? @carolinearmour Pancakes with bacon, pretty much all the time – but Sundays too.

Editor Jonny Ensall Deputy Editor Claire Sawers Assistant Editor Henry Northmore, Allan Radcliffe Editorial Assistant Niki Boyle Editorial Interns Varvara Bashkirova, Abbey Johnston Research Manager Laura Ennor Research Alex Johnston, David Pollock, Murray Robertson, Fiona Shepherd, Kirstyn Smith

SALES & MARKETING Media Sales Manager Juliet Tweedie Senior Media Sales Executive Jude Moir Media Sales Executive Nicky Carter, Lindsay Paul Digital Sales Executive Freya Cowan Digital Commercial Manager Brendan Miles Sponsorship & Promotions Manager Sheri Friers Promotions Executive Amy Russell Circulation Executive Murray Robertson

PRODUCTION Senior Designer Lucy Munro Production Manager Simon Armin

DIGITAL Web Editor Hamish Brown Senior Developer Andy Carmichael Senior Designer Bruce Combe Software Developer Iain McCusker

ADMINISTRATION Accounts Manager Georgette Renwick

SECTION EDITORS Around Town/LGBT Lauren Mayberry Books/Comedy Brian Donaldson Clubs/Play Henry Northmore Dance/Kids Kelly Apter Food & Drink Donald Reid Film Gail Tolley Music/Shopping Claire Sawers Noticeboard/Travel Anna Millar Theatre/Visual Art Allan Radcliffe


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Know when to unplug. Please drink Jack Daniel’s responsibly. Competition closes 19th April 2012, over 18’s only, see online for full details. Copyright © 2012 JACK DANIEL’S. All rights reserved. JACK DANIEL’s and OLD NO. 7 are registered trademarks


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TheRealist So much culture, so little time. We boil it down to ten of the best events

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Glasgow International VISUAL ART The 2012 GI features some of the best-known names in Scottish and international contemporary art, including fine art photographer Wolfgang Tillmans (see his photography on this issue’s front cover), Turner-prize winner Richard Wright (see above), Jeremy Deller, Emory Douglas and Rosalind Nashashibi, plus FOUND’s latest project, #Unravel with Aidan Moffat (read our interview, page 18). Look out for a round up of places to buy art on page 40, and exhibition previews within the Visual Art section, starting on page 118. Various venues, Glasgow, Fri 20 Apr–Mon 7 May.

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A Streetcar Named Desire DANCE Scottish Ballet have taken on quite a challenge in adapting Tennessee Williams’ famous play. It’s a notoriously dialoguedriven text, but the company has managed to surmount that problem with a spot of canny casting – Streetcar’s tragic central figure Blanche DuBois is played by Nancy Meckler, who also writes and codirects the production. See feature, page 114. Theatre Royal, Glasgow, Wed 11–Sat 14 Apr; Festival Theatre, Edinburgh, Wed 18–Sat 21 Apr.

4 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012


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Sub Club’s 25th birthday

Edinburgh International Science Festival

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CLUBS The venerable clubbing institution is 25 years old, and is celebrating with over a month of clubbing events including Seth Troxler at Sensu, Matthew Dear and Andrew Weatherall at Subculture and a return of the mighty Optimo with Twitch & Wilkes (pictured). See preview at list.co.uk. Sub Club, Glasgow, Sat 31 Mar–Sat 5 May.

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Wild Bill FILM While the London gangster genre may seem like an all-tooobvious choice for Dexter Fletcher, the Lock, Stock actor has managed to give the genre a refreshing overhaul in his directorial debut. See review, page 68, column, page 69, and an interview with Fletcher at the Glasgow Film Festival at list.co.uk Out now on general release.

AROUND TOWN As ever, the kid friendly EISF programme also features a bunch of activities for grownups as well, including ‘sensual dining’, the physics behind DJing and chocolate-tasting. See feature, page 28, and preview, page 44. Various venues, Edinburgh, Fri 30 Mar–Sun 15 Apr.

King Lear

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THEATRE After a 33 year absence, David Hayman returns to the scene of many of his early stage triumphs, the Citizens Theatre. He’s playing the highly-prized role of Lear for the first time in this new adaptation of Shakespeare’s tragedy, directed by Dominic Hill. See preview, page 112. Citizens Theatre, Glasgow, Fri 20 AprSat 12 May.

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Graham Coxon

Uh Huh Her

Le Havre

MUSIC The sometime Blur guitarist is on tour in support of his latest solo effort A+E. Read our interview, page 82, an album review on page 86, and win copies of A+E, page 91. Liquid Room, Edinburgh, Mon 16 Apr; The Garage, Glasgow, Tue 17 Apr.

MUSIC / LGBT A resurrection of indie electro-pop duo Camila Grey (formerly of lo-fi rock outfit Mellowdrone) and Leisha Hailey (who you may recognize from The L Word). See preview, page 80. Arches, Glasgow, Sun 22 Apr.

FILM Finnish director Aki Kaurasmaki has invested the illegal immigrant fish out of water story with charm and warmth, and picked up the Cannes International Critics Award as a reward. See review, page 70. Selected release, Fri 6 Apr.

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Hot Mess SELECTED BY SOPHIE HOLMES-ELLIOT OF LOCK UP YOUR DAUGHTERS If LUYD had a penis it would be Hot Mess. Founder and DJ extraordinaire, Simon ‘Simonotron’ Eilbeck, is a man after my own heart. While his straight-friendly queer party is open to everyone, make no mistake: that shit gay. And, as an earlier poster proclaimed, that’s ‘not gay as in “lame”, gay as in “f**king awesome”’. If you haven't yet been then you need to take a good long look in the mirror and ask yourself why. It’s hosted at the shabby-cumhipster Wee Red Bar, and the fact that the venue is ever so slightly off the beaten track in terms of the ’burgh’s scene only works in its favour, creating an upbeat and welcoming atmosphere. It only happens once every two months, so it’s always a special occasion. Hot Mess, Wee Red Bar, Edinburgh, Fri 6 Apr. LUYD club night, Flying Duck, Glasgow, Fri 20 Apr; LUYD presents Priscilla Queen of the Desert, GFT, Glasgow, Sun 22 Apr.

29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 5


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First Last The eminent psychologist is appearing at no less than nine events at the Edinburgh International Science Festival. He also quite likes Jet from Gladiators . . . Last time you exploited your position to get something How very dare you.

Last extravagant purchase you made A lovely leather suitcase from Lilies & Dreams in Stockbridge. I have a thing for luggage. First film you saw that really moved Bambi. Loved that it looked so wonderful, yet was dark and unpredictable. Last lie you told The previous answer. First movie you went on a date to Scorsese’s After Hours. Ironically, we went to an afternoon showing.

RD A H C RI EMAN

Last time someone criticised your work Probably a few seconds ago on the web somewhere.

WIS

Last time you cried With laughter, last month, listening to an old Derek and Clive recording First thing you do when you’ve got time off work Play Temple Run on my iPad. 3,256,785. I thank you. Last great meal you cooked I don’t cook, so it would have been fish fingers in pitta bread with just a hint of carbon. First crush Jet from Gladiators. Last book you read Steve Martin’s Born Standing Up. Great account of his rise to stardom and subsequent disillusionment with comedy industry. First great piece of advice you were given Never criticise a person. It is one of the rules in Dale Carnegie’s How To Win Friends And Influence People. I read that book when I was 8 and still think it is one of the best psychology books out there. Last time you were star struck I saw Jackie Mason live a few weeks ago. He is in his 70s and still very charismatic. First thing you’d do if you ran the country Cancel the Edinburgh tram project, put the roads back and hope everyone would forget it ever happened. Last meal on earth – what would it be Easy. Sushi. Lots of it. Love the stuff. First song you’ll sing at karaoke I am a terrible singer, but a big fan of accuracy, so would probably go with the Carpenter’s ‘We’ve Only Just Begun’. 6 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

First time you realised you were famous When someone came up to me and told me how much they loved my book I Can Change Your Life in 7 Days. Unfortunately, that was written by Paul McKenna.

First three words your friends would use to describe you Bright, funny, modest.

Last time you made an impulse buy and regretted it A Caramac bar. I am sure they were yummy when I was a kid. First concert you ever attended Hmmm . . . Not been to many but I saw Queen at the Milton Keynes Bowl in my teens. They arrived in a helicopter. Last time you bought someone flowers A few months ago for Mother’s day. Had I waited 24 hours I could have saved £3. First object you’d save from your burning home My house insurance policy. Failing that, my laptop. Last funny thing you saw online I just saw a video of a dog dreaming. At the end of the video the dog falls off a settee. That was quite funny.

First job Stacking the toilet roll aisle at Sainsbury’s in Luton. Last person you fantasised about Jet from Gladiators. First word you spoke Boo. Last crime you committed How very dare you. I had a train ticket to Waverley but went through to Haymarket. I know, mad. First song at your (potential) wedding ‘Another One Bites the Dust’. Last song at your funeral ‘Another One Bites the Dust’. First person you’d thank in an awards acceptance speech Mr Ben (long story). Last thing you recommended to someone Illegal Jacks on Lothian Road. Ace burritos. First thing you think of when you wake up in the morning I wonder who has emailed me during the night. Last thing you think of before you go to sleep I wonder who will email me during the night.

 Richard Wiseman’s Beginners Guide To . . . lecture series takes place at the National Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh, Wed 11–Fri 13 Apr. For full listings of his other events, see list.co.uk.

PHOTO © ANTJE M. POHSEGGER

First record you ever bought Meatloaf’s ‘Bat Out Of Hell’.


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Electric Cables Lightships is the new project from Teenage Fanclub’s Gerard Love LP | CD | DL | 02.04.12

<:D<G6E=>8

lightships.tumblr.com dominorecordco.com

29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 7


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ReaderOffers WIN TICKETS TO FASCINATING MUMMIES

2 FOR 1 TICKETS FOR EDINBURGH INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE FESTIVAL

Bringing the 2012 Edinburgh International Science Festival to a suitably cosmological conclusion, Brighton’s Spacedog and the crew from Edinburghbased retro-futuristic podcast Project Moonbase make a rare visit to planet Earth. With old film footage, live theremin and truly modern robotic instruments, Rocket Lolly is a cabaret evening like no other. Merging retroscience gems – think space-age fashions, smoking robots and other strange visions of the future – with sparkling tunes from the outer reaches of the known musical universe, it’s a guaranteed feast of retro-futurist fun. We are offering 2 for 1 tickets - to book, please call the Box Office on 0844 557 2686 and quote ‘List Offer’ Rocket Lolly Ghillie Dhu Sunday 15 April 8pm £10/£8

Mummies as you’ve never seen them before. Discover the ancient Egyptian world of the dead and uncover what lies deep within its tombs. Featuring treasures from the worldfamous Rijksmuseum van Oudheden in the Netherlands and National Museums Scotland, this is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see in the UK.

TERMS & CONDITIONS: OFFER IS SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY. THERE IS NO CASH ALTERNATIVE. USUAL LIST RULES APPLY.

WIN TICKETS TO WIDE DAYS

Be transported back in time and see objects dating back as far as 4000BC and discover the complex rituals surrounding death and the afterlife, including mummification and burial. See a spectacular array of painted coffins, amulets, jewellery, papyri, embalming equipment and mummy ornaments. With 5 star ratings from the Scotsman and Evening News this is one exhibition you won’t want to miss. ‘Absolutely amazing. Go visit’ ‘Highly recommended’ ‘I shall certainly come back, probably another three or four times’ To be in with a chance of winning a pair of tickets, just log on to list.co.uk/offers and tell us:

How far back do the objects in the exhibition date? Fascinating Mummies - until 27 May National Museum of Scotland Chambers Street Edinburgh 0300 123 6789 www.nms.ac.uk/mummies Adults £9 (members free) Supported by the Patrons of National Museums Scotland

In 2010 the organisers of Scotland’s only music business seminar night, Born To Be Wide, created Wide Days – an event which brings together industry veterans with grassroots promoters, musicians and labels. The conference will feature seminars about getting gigs abroad, A&R, new innovations in music technology and how to build an audience. There will be an additional focus on music tourism making Wide Days the first event in Europe to bring together the two sectors. Find out about Oslo’s rock hotel working with bands and promoters, the opportunities offered by sporting events incorporating a gig programme and how music is boosting tourist destinations. We have two pairs of tickets to give away. To enter, just log on to list.co.uk/offers and tell us:

What does A&R stand for? Wide Days 11 & 12 April Teviot House Edinburgh Full-price tickets for the event cost £45, with discounts for students, under 18s and members of the Musicians Union. Details of the conference and the free gig programme can be found at

widedays.com The Musicians’ Union supports Wide Days. TERMS & CONDITIONS: COMPETITION CLOSES 23 APRIL 2012. THERE IS NO CASH ALTERNATIVE. USUAL LIST RULES APPLY.

8 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

TERMS & CONDITIONS: COMPETITION CLOSES 3 APRIL 2012. THERE IS NO CASH ALTERNATIVE. USUAL LIST RULES APPLY.


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Noticeboard NEWS • GOSSIP • OPINION

LIST

Visit u.CO.UK fo s dai enterrtaarts & ly newins ment

5 Things ...

ALT-EASTER

How the non-Scottish world marks the occasion . . . Hunky Jesus Contest The devout gather at San Francisco’s Dolores Park to watch a pageant of men in loincloths carrying planks of wood.

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Chairlifting London’s merry band of Blackheath Morris Men celebrate Easter Monday the traditional way . . . by hoisting up a young maiden on a chair. blackheathmorris.com

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Eating an Easter Bilby Oz’s answer to the Easter bunny is cute and terrifying. They also munch on chocolate versions . Torture Garden Easter Ball The world’s largest fetish club, in London, presents its Easter edition. Because nothing says Easter like leopard print latex.

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Greek Orthodox Easter Taking place a week later than the Easter celebrated in the UK, these chaps go all out with the gold-plating, candle-carrying and beard-wearing.

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NewsExtra

Brave new world EIFF announce Pixar closing film

fter months of speculation about the future of Edinburgh’s International Film Festival and with a new director now firmly in place, Disney Pixar’s 3D fantasy film Brave has been announced as the film that will close this year’s festival. The screening will also double as the film’s UK premiere, occupying a similar slot at the festival as Toy Story 3 did in 2010. Featuring a stellar Scottish cast, including Kelly Macdonald, Billy

A

Connolly and Robbie Coltrane, Brave tells the story of a mythical Highland princess who must save her kingdom when her own actions unleash a deadly force. It will have its red carpet premiere at Edinburgh Festival Theatre on Sat 30 Jun. Music fans should listen out, too, for the soundtrack, which composer Patrick Doyle promises will ‘honour the Celtic traditions’. Tickets will be on sale from Thu 31 May at 10am. See edfilmfest.org.uk for info.

FRINGE FAVES  The good folks at Edinburgh’s Fringe HQ have offered up an advance look at this year’s lineup. The announcement comes as a teaser before the full line-up announcement on Thu 31 May. Comedy fans can expect shows from Alan Davies, Rhod Gilbert, Jason Byrne, Rhys Darby, Phil Jupitus and Stephen K Amos. In theatre, look out for Karen’s Way (about Holocaust escapee Karen Gershon), contemporary Aeschylus adaptation Seven Against Thebas and two Macbeth adaptations. See edfringe.com for more info. 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 9


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Noticeboard NewsGossipOpinion

NOBODY’S

Life

MODEL As part of our special issue celebrating the opening of Glasgow International, Folkert de Jong talks about what art – and art festivals – mean to him For me, art is about life and the human condition. It’s a very efficient medium to communicate about life and our individual position in it. I see the art exhibition space as a podium on which I can communicate with an audience. The audience becomes a witness rather than strictly a viewer. I want the audience and the artwork to be on the same level. I am very thankful to Jenny Brownrigg, the director of exhibitions at the Glasgow School of Art, for giving me the opportunity to go wild at Gi. It’s a great opportunity for me to communicate my ideas in a short but intense way. In general, festivals like this are helping to create awareness. The interaction between art and people in a festival situation accelerates this. In my work, I make use of the strong visual qualities of the specific materials that I work with. The art space thus becomes a metaphor for real life; like an illustration, it creates a perfect, safe distance and playground to study and reflect upon complex questions, such as the mystification and manipulation of reality through powerful business strategies. My first and best experience [of Glasgow] until now is with the people from the Glasgow School of Art and the Mackintosh Museum but I am sure to learn more during the festival; I’m looking forward to seeing Kaye Donachie’s work a lot, and meeting some more artists when I am there.  Folkert de Jong: The Immortals, Mackintosh Museum, Glasgow School of Art, Fri 20 Apr–Mon 7 May.

10 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

FOOL As the events licensing fee debate rumbles on throughout Scotland, many are rallying behind the cause, putting on special events in support. Here Jennifer McGregor,co-co ordinator of ‘A Little April Tomfoolery’ has her say

magine a country where every artistic event, from painters exhibiting a few pieces in cafés to readings in bookshops, had to be licensed. Even if it’s tiny. Even if it’s free. That could be Scotland after 1 April. New legislation on Public Entertainment Licensing, intended to regulate big unmanageable free events like raves and firework displays, comes into force on the 1st and, due to the removal of the word ‘free’, all free events will be illegal unless they’re licensed or specifically exempted by the local council. Glasgow City Council has put the introduction of licenses on hold pending a review, while the City of Edinburgh Council is bringing in the licenses temporarily whilst waiving the fees, pending a public consultation on the matter. It’s a good start, but fails to acknowledge that many grassroots artists and community event organisers will be put off by the extra admin, even if there’s no fee. Not all councils across Scotland have declared as yet how they intend to implement the PEL changes either, further muddying the situation. That’s where A Little April Foolery comes in. It’s an umbrella event calling on small-scale artists to

I

ReviewofReviews

stage little events all over Scotland. The plan is to raise awareness of the grassroots arts, protest against licensing laws which stand to do us harm, and to give our communities a day of fantastic free events! Anyone can take part, either by staging an event themselves or just by getting out and seeing what’s going on. Events we know about so far include a ukulele band in Glasgow, a sitar/tabla performance in Dundee and everything from film screenings and multi-disciplinary art events to egg rolling in Edinburgh. There will also be some artists working by stealth, leaving pretty things around the city centres or doing pop-up performances wherever they happen to be, and a co-operative documentary team using the day to take a snapshot of Scotland’s lesserknown cultural life. For more information about April Foolery, what’s on or how to take part, go to thisisnotentertainment.wordpress.com

WHAT WE SAID: ‘While Malcolm Middleton’s solo lyrics are typified by self-deprecation, Human Don’t Be Angry’s vocalisms are more forthright, driven and loved-up.’ THE LIST

‘This is a brave album from one of Scotland’s most understated yet prolific songwriters. Unlike Middleton’s recent solo releases, HDBA is a largely instrumental affair. But it’s a triumph alright.’ INSULARIS RECORDS

HUMAN DON’T BE ANGRY OUT NOW ON CHEMIKAL UNDERGROUND

WHAT THEY SAID: ‘Middleton is a master when it comes to this and previous work has always had a solid emotional power that taps right into your core.’

It seems that Mr Middleton is making music for himself at his own pace with his own ideas and his own destination in mind. Imagine that.

GLASGOW PODCART

SITTINGNOW.CO.UK

PHOTO © ADAM BUTTERFIELD

OPINION


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Visit list.co.uk for daily arts & entertainment news

g n i f e i r B The

ARTS AND CULTURE NEWS COVERED IN TWO MINUTES

AROUND TOWN New vintage fair, A Spoonful of

Vintage, will launch at Spoon café on Sun 22 Apr, 11am–5pm. Organisers promise 50s, 60s and 70s ceramics, collectables, fashions, furniture and much more.

reporter who investigates him; and 2 Days in New York, Julie Delpy’s comedic follow-up to 2 Days in Paris. Actor Robert Redford will appear with Nick Hornby and trip hop producer Tricky, and Placebo are scheduled to play a gig.

CLUBS Creamfields have announced their line-up

MUSIC Travis and The Wombats have been

for this year’s August dance festival. Avicii, deadmau5, Tiësto, David Guetta and Skrillex will headline at Daresbury in Cheshire from Fri 24–Sun 26 Aug, with sets and performances from Richie Hawtin, Calvin Harris and more. Closer to home, Glasgow’s Arches is launching LATE, Scotland’s first and only inclusive club, open to all and welcoming people with learning disabilities, on Tue 10 Apr.

announced as headliners for this year’s Belladrum Tartan Heart Festival, in August. The two-day festival at Belladrum Estate, near Beauly, Inverness will see over 90 acts perform over five stages. Other acts confirmed include Beverly Knight, Frightened Rabbit (below, left), We Are Scientists, Nina Nesbitt and Fink. See tartanheartfestival.co.uk. Elsewhere in festival news, The Drums, Friendly Fires and Mystery Jets are among the latest batch of bands to be added to the 2012 RockNess line up. They will join already-announced headliners Biffy Clyro, Mumford & Sons and deadmau5 (below). See rockness.co.uk for more info.

Glasgow’s Cineworld Renfrew Street has received its own IMAX screen, introducing special seats that add a ‘fourth dimension’ to the movie-going experience by rumbling and vibrating. Look out for future releases, including The Hunger Games, The Cabin in the Woods, Battleship and Snow White and the Huntsman, where you can experience it in all its glory. Down in Londontown, the programme has been revealed for the inaugural Sundance London Music and Film Festival, and will be held at The O2 from Thu 26–Sun 29 Apr. Among the highlights are Shut Up and Play the Hits, a film documenting the final gigs played by LCD Soundsystem in 2011; Safety Not Guaranteed, a Duplass Brothers-produced romantic comedy about a man who claims he can time travel and the

PHOTO © ADAM BUTTERFIELD

F ILM

Channel

HOPPER

THEATRE And finally, we at List

HQ are excited about the National Theatre of Scotland’s recentlyannounced upcoming show, Enquirer, which promises to stage an investigation into the crisis in newspaper journalism. The piece will be performed on the top floor of a BBC media block in Glasgow and use real testimony taken from 60 hours of interviews. Black Watch helmsman John Tiffany will direct. NTS artistic director Vicky Featherstone said of the production: ‘Theatre is an amazing place to be able to ask questions and debate.’ It will run between Thu 26 Apr–Sat 12 May. See nationaltheatrescotland.com for full ticket info.

DISPATCHES FROM THE SOFA, WITH BRIAN DONALDSON  Given that Stephen King pretty much owned the franchise on writing twisted tales set in Maine, it’s an act of errant folly that he’s not involved in Once Upon a Time (Five, Sun 1 Apr, 8pm). You can only imagine what fun the horror master would have had in getting his teeth into Jiminy Cricket, Geppetto, Prince Charming et al in this series which reinterprets classic fairy tales partly set in modern day America and back in whatever specific historical period fairy tales were located. Instead this is made by some hotshots who worked on Lost which will give you an idea of how lavish it looks and empty it feels. Ginnifer Goodwin and Bobby Carlyle are among those playing dual roles (the latter almost inevitably invests his manipulative Rumplestiltskin with a dark Begbie-esque menace) while there is an overbearing Disneyness to the whole enterprise which leaves you feeling as though your back teeth are slowly rotting. A holiday season weekend trilogy might have been just about enough to stomach, but they’re giving us 22 whole chances to decide which episode of this vapid drivel to make your last. If you get beyond three, consider yourself having achieved a feat of rare endurance. ‘Where are we going?’ whimpers Snow White. ‘Somewhere horrible,’ cackles the Evil Queen. You said it.

deadmau5

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Noticeboard

Visit list.co.uk for daily arts & entertainment news

NewsGossipOpinion

GAME ON The Edinburgh International Festival reveals its Olympic spirit

ere at The List, the August festival fever is officially upon is, thanks to the launch of the Edinburgh International Festival’s extensive 2012 programme. With nearly 200 different performances to choose from, 3000 artists and 47 nations being showcased from around the world, the first of many festival launches offered a flavour of the music, theatre, dance and opera that lies ahead – as well as whetting the appetite for the Royal Highland Centre’s Lowland Hall, which has been converted into a theatre space for three of this year’s shows. Below we cherry-pick just some of the highlights you won’t want to miss (see list.co.uk for dates and venues).

H

NVA’s Speed of Light Arthur’s Seat is the setting

for this innovative visual arts exhibition performance. The iconic mountain will be illuminated as hundreds of runners wearing specially designed light suits embark upon the intricate path networks below, resulting in a stunning visual display. Macbeth The Scottish Play is relocated to a contemporary Middle Eastern conflict by TR Warszawa, complete with pyrotechnics and immersive video effects. Watt Dublin’s Gate Theatre presents Samuel Beckett’s comedy about a servant struggling to make sense of the world around him, adapted and performed by Barry McGovern.

Gergiev, Ayrshire-born violinist Nicola Benedetti and tenor Toby Spence. Meine faire Dame – ein Sprachlabor Theatre

Basel’s loose adaptation of My Fair Lady is set in a language laboratory, with an eclectic soundtrack featuring Maurice Ravel and Bryan Adams. And Then One Thousand Years of Peace

French choreographer Angelin Preljocal brings his unusual apocalypse-themed ballet to the festival, following rave reviews for its runs in Moscow, Paris, Lyon, Amsterdam and Luxemburg. James MacMillan Composer MacMillan appears in two capacities at EIF 2012: his new commission with the Hebrides Ensemble will debut at Greyfriars Kirk, and his opera Clemency will have its Scottish premiere at the King’s Theatre. The Rape of Lucrece Provocative interpretation of Shakespeare’s classic narrative poem by Fringe veteran and acclaimed singer Camille O’Sullivan. Primer for a Failed Superpower Fresh from winning the 2011 EIF Fringe Prize for Mission Drift, TEAM returns with a work-in-progress about the generation that grew up in the 1980s. The Lady from the Sea Scottish Opera’s newest work focuses on a woman who must choose between her desire for freedom and her duty to her family, featuring music from composer Craig Armstrong.

Deborah Voigt and Brian Zeger Celebrated

soprano Voigt delivers a mix of romantic European songs and American vocal works, with accompaniment from regular collaborator, US pianist Zeger.

Wonderland Vanishing Point’s latest opus is a darkly adult exploration of fame, stardom and desire in an Alice in Wonderland-inspired setting. Mariinsky Ballet’s Cinderella The legendary

London

Philharmonic

O rc h e s t r a Four

performances that are sure to sell out instantly, with guests including powerhouse conductor Valery 12 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

Mariinsky Ballet tackles a large scale production of Cinderella, with choreograpy by Alexei Ratmansky and music from the Mariinsky Orchestra.

THE MOUNTAIN WILL BE ILLUMINATED WITH HUNDREDS OF RUNNERS


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BigPicture ALEXANDRA BACHZETSIS: A PIECE DANCED ALONE This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Glasgow International Festival of Visual Art has commissioned ZĂźrich-based artist, dancer and choreographer Bachzetsis to create a new performance work exploring the use of repetition in creating meaning in the live act. A Piece Danced Alone, which Bachzetsis herself performs in, is composed of an open-ended series of solos that are passed from one performer to another, each performer gradually modifying and adapting the movement, which is enhanced by pre-recorded and live video material.  CCA, Glasgow, Wed 25 & Thu 26 Apr. glasgowinternational.org

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T R A T HE

E U S IS

Glasgow International Festival of Visual Art returns this month with some of the best-known names in contemporary art showing their work in one of the most vibrant cities in the world. To mark the festival’s launch we’re celebrating the success of Scotland’s visual arts scene, and all its drawing, painting, photography, sculpture, film and installation work, kicking off with a showcase of eight hot young Scottish artists we think could just be the next Martin Boyce, Karla Black or Douglas Gordon

CHRISTINE JONES

Christine Jones is an artist and graphic designer based in Falkirk who graduated in 1997 from

Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art in fine art. Her work takes various forms: drawing, painting, illustration and photography, often personal in nature, depicting themes of loss, memory, romance and love. However, she is also interested in art that expresses a personal and social conscience. christinejonesmakes.blogspot.com 14 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

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David Galletly is a freelance illustrator and

DAVID GALLETLY

graphic designer living and working in Glasgow. He regularly contributes to various publications, including The List, and has exhibited his personal artwork locally and internationally. David is a member of the art collective Team Recoat and handles art direction for Fence Records. davidgalletly.com

Scott Myles was born in Dundee and currently

SCOTT MYLES

lives and works in Glasgow, having graduated from the painting department of Duncan of Jordanstone in 1997. His first solo show in the UK, This Production, opens at Dundee Contemporary Arts this month and features new sculptures and an expansive site-specific installation. The sculptures are created from everyday objects such as mirrors, manila folders and spirit levels, while the installation ‘Displaced Façade’ draws on Myles’ memories of skateboarding in the derelict building that became DCA.

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ROSS FRASER MCLEAN

Ross Fraser Mclean is a Dundee native whose photography has taken him from a rapidly-modernising China to the crumbling barrios of Cuba and

rural Northern India. His work – primarily comprised of analogue photography but including digital work and now cinematography – offers a personal reflection on wider issues, drawing direct links between the individual and society. Most recently he exhibited work from his travels in India in August 2011, during which time he was a virtual captive in an isolated village populated by snake-charmers. rossfrasermclean.com

Corin Sworn was born in London and raised in Vancouver,

BOBBY NIVEN

Canada and, having graduated with an MFA from Glasgow School of Art, now lives and works between Glasgow and Vancouver. Solo shows in the UK, Canada and the USA have exemplified her interest in the ways in which artefacts are borrowed, adapted and reconfigured to tell various stories, often exploring the alternative narratives that cultural products develop through use. kendallkoppe.com

Bobby Niven holds a BFA from Glasgow School of Art, an MFA from the University of

British Columbia in Vancouver and currently works at the Glasgow Sculpture Studios. His latest work is set on Inchgarvie Island under the Forth Rail Bridge. Working with a combination of found and fabricated objects, Niven explores the relationship between sculpture, artefact and prop as a way of stretching the time and landscape of the film. bobbyniven.co.uk

CORIN SWORN: UNTITLED, C-TYPE PRINT 2012. COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND KENDALL KOPPE, GLASGOW

CORIN SWORN

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85A

based multidisciplinary artists that in recent years have collaborated on various provocative shows. The group believes work ought to reveal itself by nonconformist means and, with this in mind, they often present projects in disused buildings and forgotten spaces. Highlights to date include 'Herbaceous Barbershop' (pictured), part of NVA's Glasgow Harvest Festival in which patrons wore edible cress herb caps on their heads and an evening devoted to Jan Svankmajer, which exhibited work inspired by the Czech filmmaker. 85a.org.uk

Rachel Maclean is a Glasgow-

RACHEL MACLEAN

based artist and graduate of the Edinburgh College of Art, working largely in digital composite video, and using the moving image in the context of installation and sculpture. Exploring the aesthetic of Poundland, Youtube, Manga and Hieronymus Bosch she creates hyper-glowing, artificially saturated visions that are both nauseatingly positive and cheerfully grotesque, and is the only actor or model in her work. rachelmaclean.com

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IT’ S T HE WAY I TE LL ‘ E M A sentient Aidan Moffat machine full of roguish tales. A band made up of instruments that play themselves. A prism for seeing how the past is affected by the present. FOUND and Moffat’s project together, #Unravel, is all of these things and more, as Claire Sawers discovers

A

s the old saying goes, there are three sides to every story: yours, theirs, and the truth. Or in the case of Aidan Moffat’s latest storytelling project, there is his version, her version, and somewhere, maybe lost forever in the mists of time, the facts about what actually happened. In a ‘new interactive sound installation’ at SWG3, Glasgow, Moffat can be heard telling different versions of the same stories. There are dewy-eyed memories of a teen holiday romance that ended with a moonlight grope in a rowboat on the lake (or, did the girl actually knock him back after the disco? Or was he a gent, and did he knock her back?) Then there’s the time his ex-girlfriend moved out of the flat they shared, and he was an embarrassing, ‘howling, hysterical’ emotional wreck (or, was it the ex who couldn’t keep it together, and him who comforted her?) Tales of strawberry wine and ecstasy; police being called to deal with a stalkerish, jilted schoolboy; a self-harmer; a frisky policeman’s daughter – the different tellings of Moffat’s tales explore the nature of memory and truth. Moffat was approached by the Edinburgh-based art-pop band, FOUND, last year to collaborate on a sound-meets-storytelling project they dreamt up – like several of their other projects – on the back of a beer-mat one night in the pub. What about an unreliable record player which played a slightly different version of a song each time the needle hit vinyl? Using their love of invention and product design, the record player would trigger a self-playing band – beautifully constructed of course, its minimal surfaces hiding state-of-theart software. But what if the mood of the lyrics could change depending on the weather, or the

number of people listening at the time? They liked the idea that the truth could vary depending on how well the story was remembered, or what mood the storyteller was in. ‘They called me exactly at the right time actually,’ nods Moffat, over a pot of tea, his recognisable Falkirk accent coming from somewhere underneath a beard and an electric blue cagoule. ‘I’d been reading a bit of experimental literature, and some stories by [1960s British novelist] BS Johnson. He did a book in 24 unbound chapters, they were like little pamphlets, and you were encouraged to shuffle them up. McSweeney’s have tried similar things too. Mark Saporta, a French guy who was reprinted not long ago, his writing got turned into a phone app that shuffles itself.’ Not only had he been thinking along similar lines, he was a fan of FOUND’s work. He’d seen FOUND’s robot-operated Chinese dulcimer in Edinburgh’s Botanic Gardens back in 2008, and collaborated with them during last year’s London Word Festival, when they took along Cybraphon, the ‘emotional, musical wardrobe’ that won them a Scottish BAFTA. Both Cybraphon and Unravel – machines designed with help from longtime colloborator, Professor Simon Kirby (pictured opposite, far left) from the University of Edinburgh’s Language Evolution and Computation Research Unit – have a very sensitive side, and don’t react well to criticism. Cybraphon was designed to be a robot diva – going in the huff and playing sad songs if it wasn’t being paid enough attention on Twitter and Facebook, but bursting into jaunty tunes if its popularity was on the rise. ‘I can imagine Cybraphon trying to wind up Unravel actually,’ says Moffat, about FOUND’s

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new toy, due to start stealing limelight away from Cybraphon any minute now. ‘I can just hear Cybraphon casually dropping in, “me and Aidan hung out in London actually – we spent a night together”.’ Where Cybraphon brought to mind 19th century mechanical bands, with instruments lining its antique wooden frame, Unravel is a sleek, contemporary beast, in dazzling white and bright blue plastic. Visitors to SWG3 pick a 7” single from a box of records – INXS, Julee Cruise, Tom Waits and Chris De Burgh are all in there – then play it on the turntable. Unravel’s Hammond organ, tubular bells and drum-kit spring into action, and Moffat’s voice is piped through speakers. But Unravel reacts to the room, measures weather conditions and the size of the crowd, and responds accordingly. Shyness or a showoff streak may skew the performance and make Moffat burst into song, with FOUND on backing vocals, or a gloomy day of rain may produce a more downbeat, whispered spoken word version of a story. Where Cybraphon’s mood is altered by the volume of Tweets and Facebook ‘Likes’ it receives, just one negative Tweet about #unravel can bum it out immediately, and bring on a melody in a minor key. ‘Cybraphon was pretty whimsical,’ says Ziggy Campbell (see far right),

who co-wrote music for Moffat’s lyrics with band member Tommy Perman (below, second from right). ‘Unravel is a lot meatier, and much darker.’ They left the storytelling up to Moffat, who picked ten songs, wrote stories inspired by them, then made different versions of them all. Sometimes only two or three words vary from one version to the next, but very dainty amounts of fine tuning let Moffat amplify details with hard-hitting effect. For example, in a knucklebitingly awkward-to-overhear drunken voicemail in ‘More Than Everything’, the narrator begs the girl, ‘Please pick up, I know he’s with you.’ But swapping ‘he’ for ‘that prick’ in another version adds a different tone, like a colour filter over a camera lens. The listener wants to cringe one minute, or maybe put a comforting arm round Moffat, then will suddenly feel the need to push him into a taxi home. A clock inside Unravel also lets it know when it’s past the watershed (4pm, for those who’d prefer to hear the uncensored version). When ‘The Minister’s Daughter’, which plays when ‘Freak Scene’ by Dinosaur Jr. is picked, comes on in the morning it might tell of a coy girl rebuffing Moffat with a slap in the face. But in some post-watershed versions Moffat ends up ‘punished and pummelled and pumped’ by her. And a carrot. So did Moffat have to dig deep into his imagination for

subject matter? ‘All ten stories are based on true events from my life,’ Moffat offers, unblinking. ‘I’m just not telling you what version is the truth.’ So the man who flips on Babestation after his girlfriend leaves in tears; the shy, clumsy teen; a sweating lad lurking outside HMV to catch a glimpse of ‘workskirt arse’–- they could all be him in disguise. ‘Put it this way, I don’t think any of these are exaggerated to the point where I’m not capable of it,’ he smiles. Already the FOUND team have been approached about doing a TED talk on Unravel, and are smoothing out details of an Edinburgh Fringe show this August. Plans for a phone app are being discussed, as well as a book and record further down the line. ‘Nowadays we’ve got so used to the idea of a record or an MP3 being this absolute, perfect product, a set rendition that stays the same over time,’ says Campbell. ‘It’s like the truth; that’s meant to be something fixed and definite, but it can vary a lot. Unravel is supposed to be a medium that shows how unreliable the narrator can be.’ ‘People want to hear and read things that they don’t talk about themselves,’ adds Moffat. ‘No one’s nice all the time, and rather than lying about something that’s happened, I think it’s healthier to just come out with it. I don’t get easily embarrassed, you could say I have no shame. So the truth – whichever version that is, is fine with me.’ UNRAVEL will be open to the public from Fri 20 Apr–Mon 7 May as part of Glasgow International Festival of Visual Art at SWG3, Glasgow. For more info, visit unravelproject.com. 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 19

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WOR K IN PROG R E S S Having tackled the miners’ strike, the war in Iraq and bat colonies in his work Jeremy Deller’s latest project is an interactive artwork destined for Glasgow Green. Hannah McGill finds the Turner Prize winner eager to keep his plans under wraps – a major challenge in this digital age

T

his is what Jeremy Deller will say, pre-embargo, about Sacrilege, the large public artwork that he’s unveiling on Glasgow Green as part of Glasgow International: ‘It’s a large public art work.’ This is what he will say if you try the Cunning Journalistic Trick of staying silent in the hope that your subject will babble revealingly to fill the gap: ‘There’ll be some level of interaction. It’s not something you just look at.’ Then he will conclude, with an air of genuine apology: ‘And that’s all I can tell you. I’m sorry.’ No problem, Jeremy: secrecy is actually a pretty seductive quantity in this age of constant information. But it must be hard, in the era of the hashtag and the status update, for a famous artist to keep a substantial project under wraps? ‘It is. The bigger this thing gets, and the fact that . . . it’s being made . . . means that more people are finding out about it just because they’re working on it. But so far it’s a top-secret thing, and we’re hoping we can keep it that way.’ Deller, a Turner Prize winner in 2004, is known for work that explores and celebrates social rituals, communities and collective memory. He’s worked on brass bands and acid house, the miners’ strike, the war in Iraq and the siege at Waco. He’s compiled a touring exhibition of folk art, and examined communities of bats and Depeche Mode fans. The art within his shows is often contributed by multiple hands and minds, so that he’s been called a curator as much as a maker. He can also be introspective – he reconstructed his teenage bedroom for his current solo show at London’s Hayward Gallery – but his work tends to be characterised by an unusual level of both collaboration and positivity (the touching title of the Hayward show is Joy in People.) Yet a lot of Deller’s work has glanced backwards, with or without a measure of nostalgia: what’s his take on those new, virtual communities established and developed online? He sounds wearied by the thought. ‘Well, this project has nothing to do with it, because it’s a real thing – it’s not virtual. But I’ve been doing this show in London, and audience figures have remained high partly, I

think, because people have been going online and talking about it. So, it’s interesting, because it’s grassroots. But it’s sort of ick at the same time.’ Does the ick factor also apply to the Occupy movement, with its spontaneous encampments and witty banners? ‘A lot of activists went to art college,’ Deller notes, ‘so they take on performance art strategies. There’s definitely a connection. But I haven’t been camping out.’ The Occupiers would doubtless approve of the fact that a Deller is unlikely to end up on a banker’s mantelpiece. Does he ever want to make more things that people can buy? ‘I do do that as well . . . just not as much, or maybe not as successfully as other people. I’m not against it. I’m just trying to find a balance. The work in Glasgow is definitely not a saleable or a commercial proposition.’ What about the role of art in education and community building? ‘It can add a lot of value, but it’s not part of a lot of people’s lives because they don’t have the opportunity to be exposed to it. We should spread it about. But governments are most interested in art for its heritage and its tourist potential.’ Sacrilege, a co-commission of Glasgow International and the Mayor of London, will head to London to be displayed – performed? Interacted with? – during the Olympics. In a time of swingeing cuts, does Deller think the coming Games have delivered the promised opportunities for artists? ‘To be honest . . . it’s not all great, from what I hear,’ he murmurs. ‘I suspect the interesting part will be the free events and festivals around the country – not so much the production of one-off art works.’ Sacrilege indeed. But where better to construct inclusive and interactive work than in a city that’s arguably outstripped London in its recent contribution to the art world? Has Deller an explanation for the Glasgow phenomenon? ‘It’s got a strong support system, a great art college – you can’t underestimate that. And people can hang around and make work there without having much money. Unlike London.’ Sacrilege, Glasgow Green, Fri 20 Apr–Mon 7 May. Joy in People runs at the Hayward Gallery, London, until Sun 13 May.

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7 April— 23 September 2012 Modern Two Belford Road Edinburgh £7/£5

Supported by

Edvard Munch, The Scream, 1895 (detail), Courtesy the Gundersen Collection, Oslo © The Munch Museum/ The Munch – Ellingsen Group, BONO, Oslo/DACS, London 2012. National Galleries of Scotland is a charity registered in Scotland (No. SC003728)

ad pages

THE MAKING OF US Co-created by Theatre Director Graham Eatough and Visual Artist Graham Fagen Director of Photography Michael McDonough

Tramway, Glasgow LIVE PERFORMANCES: Fri 20 – Sun 22 April 2012 8pm Sat 21 April 3pm EXHIBITION: Fri 20 April – Sun 6 May 2012 11am (12noon Sun) – 6pm TICKETED LIVE PERFORMANCES: £5 deposit (returnable) EXHIBITION: Free BOX OFFICE: 0845 330 3501

www.glasgowinternational.org/themakingofus Commissioned by Glasgow International Festival of Visual Art 2012. Supported by a Creative Scotland Vital Sparks award. The National Theatre of Scotland reserves the right to alter casts, performances, seating or ticket arrangements. The National Theatre of Scotland, a company limited by guarantee and registered in Scotland (SC234270) is a registered Scottish charity (SCO33377). Photography of Michael McDonough by Tommy Ga-ken Wan nationaltheatrescotland.com @GIfestival @NTSonline

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FOC US O N PHOT O G R A P HY

TAKESHI SUGA

Takeshi Suga (aka Sugar Crisp) is a Japanese-born photographer now living in Glasgow. He takes photographs for the Fence Collective, NME and himself and mixes digital photography with the use of analogue cameras such as the £45 Diana Mini First photograph you took? In the words of Henri Cartier-Bresson your first 10,000 photos are your worst! Who inspires you? Japanese photographer, Kotori Kawashima. First assignment? To shoot Fence’s Away Game Festival on the Isle of Eigg for The Sunday Times. What was your first camera? The Contax T3 which is an analogue point and shoot camera. I still use it occasionally. The other cameras I use are the Contax Aria, the Diana Mini and the Canon 5D Mark II. Any techniques that you use? Double exposures and anything that can render light atmosphere well. Favourite photography websites? Dazed Digital (dazeddigital.com) and British Journal of Photography (bjp-online.com). Favourite commission? I was commissioned by NME to shoot the Corona Capital Festival in Mexico. That was really exciting! Never had I dreamed about going there on assignment when I first came to Scotland. ■ sugarcrisp.viewbook.com 22 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

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KAT GOLLOCK

Kat Gollock is an Edinburgh-based photographer who graduated from Stevenson College and now covers music, fashion and weddings First photograph you took? I can remember the first photo I took that someone commented on. It was of my dad standing in front of some usual holiday vista in France. Both Mum and Dad commented on how good a photo it was, but it was the first time they really meant it. Who inspires you? Rock photographer Anton Corbijn. Also Pennie Smith – her image of Paul Simonon from The Clash on the sleeve of London Calling made me want to be a music photographer. How did you get into photography? I applied to Stevenson College, Edinburgh, and was accepted to do film and TV. The course included a black and white printing module and I was hooked after that. What camera do you use? A Nikon D700. Any techniques that you use? Intuition and trust! And I do like a vignette on my images. Any advice for taking wedding photos? Learn to shout politely and be firm when herding the guests for a group shot. Favourite photography websites? I like strobist. blogspot.com for flash and lighting advice. DPreview. com is a good camera comparison website. Favourite commission? Shooting Reg D Hunter. He was lovely and I very quickly fell in love with him and his voice. Why is it important to take photographs? To remember and record I think. Photos invoke such vivid memories, not just of when you took it but the time, the place, the day, what was going on in your life at the time. ■ katgollock.com

L O M O -A -G O -G

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Some helpful pointers to get you started in the art of lo-fi photography FOLLOW THE RULES Lomography is photography using the analogue equipment of Lomographische AG, Austria (including Holga and Diana cameras) but has come to refer to any kind of hip, lofi camerawork. The 10 Golden Rules set down at lomography.com provide a good starting point. They include: ‘take your camera everywhere you go’; ‘Lomography is not an interference with your life, but part of it’; ‘try the shot from the hip’; ‘don’t think’; ‘be fast’; and ‘don’t worry about any rules’. BUY THE GEAR Red Door Gallery (edinburghart.com) in Edinburgh and Fat Buddha (fatbuddhastore. com) in Glasgow both sell hipsteriffic Lomo gear including chunky Diana cameras, flashes and accessories. For photo development students at the ECA favour Trump (trumpslab.co.uk), while in Glasgow, Express Imaging (expressimaging.co.uk) is your best bet. JOIN THE CLUB In Glasgow, the Queen’s Park Camera Club (qpcc. org.uk) operates out of the Southside and meets on the second Monday of the month at their place next to Queen’s Park. The Edinburgh Photographic Society (edinburghphotographicsociety. co.uk) have their own premises in Stockbridge, while the Edinburgh LoFi Photography Group (edinburghlofi.com) meet at Spoon Café every first Monday of the month. BE INSPIRED In Glasgow, Street Level Photoworks (streetlevelphotoworks.org) host regular exhibitions of international photographers’ work (at the moment, it’s Chinese artists Chi Peng and Wang Fu Chun), as well as classes to encourage budding snappers. Stills (stills.org) does much the same on the east coast, home as it is to Scotland’s Centre for Photography. Its most recent exhibitions were based around US photographers Allan Sekula and Richard Williams. SHOW THE WORLD Sign up for an account at Blipfoto (blipfoto.com) and share your newfound artistic talents with the world. If you’re an official photography degree student or graduate, you’re also eligible to enter for the Jill Todd Photographic Award competition (jilltoddphotoaward.com), which launches this year with a theme of ‘kin’.

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A RT D IR E C T O R Y {GALLERIES} GLASGOW ALL THAT IS SOLID Brand new Merchant City gallery and shop in the newly opened South Block, with an exhibition, events and meeting space for the building’s 360+ artists and Glasgow’s wider creative community. 60 Osborne Street, 271 4700, allthatissolid.co.uk COLLINS GALLERY The University of Strathclyde’s gallery, which also sells limited edition cards and hangings. Scheduled for closure in May 2012. 22 Richmond Street, 548 2558, strath.ac.uk/collinsgallery COMMON GUILD One of Glasgow’s most important modern art galleries. Host to exhibitions and events, and the artistic directors of the Glasgow International Festival of Visual Art. 21 Woodlands Terrace, 428 3022, thecommonguild.org.uk DAVID DALE GALLERY & STUDIOS Voluntary artist-led gallery and studio space, set up by four GSA graduates and named after the 18th century philanthropist David Dale. 161 Broad Street, 258 9124, daviddalegallery.co.uk

Good Press Gallery

THE DUCHY A young and independent modern art gallery, whose focus is on emerging artists. 23/25 Duke Street, 237 8754, theduchygallery.com GLASGOW PRINT STUDIO Community workshop space and print gallery, offering prints for sale. Trongate 103, 552 0704, gpsart.co.uk GOOD PRESS GALLERY A small gallery based in hipster café Mono, also selling books, prints and art zines. At Mono, 12 King’s Court, goodpressgallery.co.uk KENDALL KOPPE Independent modern art gallery, representing emerging artists including Laura Aldridge and Grier Edmundson. Suite 1/2, 6 Dixon Street, 248 8177, kendallkoppe.com MARY MARY Independent modern art gallery, representing artists including Torsten Lauschmann, Lotte Gertz and Nick Evans. Suite 2/1, 6 Dixon Street, 226 2257, marymarygallery.co.uk MODERN INSTITUTE Independent modern art gallery, representing artists including Martin Boyce, Jim Lambie, Jeremy Deller and Luke Fowler. 14-20 Osborne Street, 248 3711, themoderninstitute.com

REPOSITIONED Exhibitions and educational projects in this new contemporary space, with an emphasis on emerging artists. 1203 Argyle Street, repositioned.co.uk RGI KELLY GALLERY The gallery wing of the Royal Glasgow Institute hosts exhibitions, lectures and artist events. 118 Douglas Street, 248 6386, royalglasgowinstitute.org ROGER BILLCLIFFE GALLERY Over five floors, Scotland’s largest private gallery, selling painting, ceramics, jewellery and metalwork. 134 Blythswood Street, 332 4027, billcliffegallery.com SCOTLANDART.COM (WEST) The Glasgow branch of one of Scotland’s most prominent private galleries. 193 Bath Street, 221 4502, scotlandart. com STREET LEVEL PHOTOWORKS Photographic gallery, workshop, booksellers and magazine stockists, with regular events. Trongate 103, 552 2151, streetlevelphotoworks.org

EDINBURGH ALPHA ART Original Scottish, UK and overseas art at this private gallery. 52 Hamilton Place, 226 3066, alpha-art. co.uk AXOLOTL A classy private gallery dealing in

contemporary art across different media. Due to relocate from Dundas street imminently. axolotl.co.uk, enquiries@axolotl.co.uk BOURNE FINE ART / DUNDAS STREET GALLERY Painting and sculpture specialist of more than 30 years’ standing and their for-hire basement gallery, respectively. 6 Dundas Street, 557 4050, bournefineart.com COLLECTIVE GALLERY A public gallery devoted to new talent, with artist-designed T-shirts available in person and online. 22-28 Cockburn Street, 220 1260, collectivegallery.net EDINBURGH PRINTMAKERS Opened in 1967, Britain’s first openaccess studio has a gallery and a print shop. 23 Union Street, 557 2479, edinburgh-printmakers.co.uk EMBASSY GALLERY Artist-run gallery with strong links to Edinburgh College of Art. Also directs citywide grassroots modern art festival the Edinburgh Annuale. 10b Broughton Street Lane, embassygallery.org, annuale.org INGLEBY GALLERY Edinburgh’s most renowned private gallery, with continuing high-profile exhibitions. 15 Calton Road, 556 4441, inglebygallery.com THE LEITH GALLERY Specialising in Scottish art, sculpture, glassware, jewellery and more. 65 The Shore, 553 5255, the-leithgallery.co.uk OPEN EYE GALLERY & I2 A long-established Edinburgh fixture for the sale of contemporary and fine art. 34 Abercromby Place, 557 1020, openeyegallery.co.uk SCOTLANDART.COM (EAST) The Edinburgh branch of one of Scotland’s most prominent private galleries. 2 St Stephen Place, 225 6257, scotlandart.com SCOTTISH GALLERY With a 170-year history, surely one of Edinburgh’s most esteemed fine art dealers. 16 Dundas Street, 558 1200, scottish-gallery.co.uk SUPERCLUB Artist-run gallery, project space and studio with a focus on emerging artists. 11a Gayfield Square, superclubstudios.com

24 THE LIST 2 Feb–1 Mar 2012

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THE ART ISSUE

UNION GALLERY Bright new private gallery in the east of the city. 45 Broughton Street, 556 7707, uniongallery.co.uk

exhibition studio in Leith. 25 Arthur Street, rhubaba.org

Dovecot Studios

WASPS STUDIOS Affordable artists’ studios run by Wasps (see above), with a public gallery at Patriothall. • Citizens Studios, 78 Albion Road • Patriothall Studios, 48a Hamilton Place, 226 7126, patriothallgallery.co.uk • West Park Place, 2/3 West Park Place

DUNDEE DUNDEE CONTEMPORARY ARTS Workshops, a first-rate exhibition space and a shop (physical and online) selling prints, books and original pieces. 152 Nethergate, 01382 909900, dca. org.uk

DUNDEE MEADOW MILL STUDIOS A nearly-redeveloped studio and exhibition space run by Wasps Studios (see above). West Henderson’s Wynd, 0141 553 5890, waspsstudios.org.uk

GALLERY Q Scottish contemporary art, sculpture, ceramics and more. 160 Nethergate, 01382 220600, galleryq.co.uk

{BOOKSHOPS}

{DEGREE SHOWS}

GLASGOW

GLASGOW

AYE-AYE BOOKS Books, magazines, zines, films and artist monographs. At CCA, 350 Sauchiehall Street, ayeayebooks.com

GLASGOW SCHOOL OF ART New works from students across a range of media at Scotland’s most famed art institution. Jun 2012, 353 4500, gsa.ac.uk/visitgsa/exhibitions

EDINBURGH

EDINBURGH EDINBURGH COLLEGE OF ART ECA’s students present painting, jewellery, glassware, sculpture, video art and much more. Jun 2012, 221 6000, eca.ac.uk

10,000 visitors. From Nov, Corn Exchange, 01875 819595, artedinburgh.com

{FESTIVALS}

DUNDEE

GLASGOW

DUNCAN OF JORDANSTONE COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN Most famed for visual courses including animation and digital film, DoJ also teaches fine art and various crafts. May 2012, 01382 388828, dundee. ac.uk/djcad/degreeshow

GLASGOW INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF VISUAL ART This bi-annual event showcases the best of Glasgow’s burgeoning art scene alongside impressive international guests. 20 Apr–7 May, 276 8384, glasgowinternational.org

{ART FAIRS} GLASGOW GLASGOW ART SHOW A new event which began in 2012, related to the Edinburgh Art Fair and taking up the baton from the defunct Glasgow Art Fair. From Mar, Thistle Hotel, Cambridge Street, 01875 819595, glasgowartshow.com

EDINBURGH EDINBURGH ART FAIR Sixty-five galleries were represented at 2011’s event, showing to more than

EDINBURGH EDINBURGH ART FESTIVAL New commissions and major international exhibitions at this large, Edinburgh Festival-timed event. 2 Aug–2 Sep, 226 6558, edinburghartfestival.com

{STUDIOS} GLASGOW SWG3 An extensive industrial warehouse space with a small modern art gallery attached. 100 Eastvale Place, 357 7246, swg3.tv

PROJECT ABILITY Providing workshops for people with disabilities and mental health issues. Trongate 103, 552 2822, project-ability. co.uk WASPS STUDIOS A Scotland-wide network of affordable artists’ studios in redeveloped industrial spaces, some of which hold exhibitions from time to time or may be available for pre-arranged private viewings. For any without contact details, direct enquiries to the main office at Glasgow’s Briggait. • Dovehill Studios, 15 East Campbell Street • The Wasps Factory, 77 Hanson Street • Pulp Papermaking, Unit F, 41 Hanson Street, 337 2842, paperartsworkshop. co.uk • South Block, 64 Osborne Street, southblock.co.uk • The Briggait, 141 Bridgegate, 553 5890, waspsstudios.org.uk

EDINBURGH DOVECOT STUDIOS Tapestry studio and gallery housed in a former swimming bath, celebrating its 100th anniversary this year. 10 Infirmary Street, 550 3660, dovecotstudios.com RHUBABA Warehouse studio and occasional

ANALOGUE BOOKS Excellent art and design book shop, with small but well-programmed exhibitions. 39 Candlemaker Row, 220 0601, analoguebooks.co.uk

{ONLINE} CENTRAL STATION Online portfolio showcase and commissioning pool for artists and creatives. thisiscentralstation.com CULTURE LABEL Intensely stylish art purchasing portal, with a regular selection of young Scottish artists. culturelabel.org OWN ART National scheme for spreading the cost of art, which many of the above galleries participate in. 0845 300 6200, ownart.org.uk SPIN Monthly members’ group in Edinburgh and Glasgow offering artist meetings and events. spinscotland.co.uk YUCK’N’YUM Dundee-formed collective who produce a quarterly art zine and host events that promote and distribute art out with galleries. yucknyum.com

26 THE LIST 2 Feb–1 Mar 2012

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Mummies as you’ve never seen them before

FIRST LOOK PREVIEWS! FREE FREE TICKET TICKET GIVEAWAY! GIVEAWAY! Friday 16th April at 7.45pm Friday 20th April at 7.45pm

The Lieutenant Cherry Orchard of Inishmore

By - A new version by John Byrne By Anton MartinChekhov McDonagh The Lyceum are offering 6 pairs of tickets to the The Lyceum are offering 6 pairs of tickets to the preview First Friday of The of Cherry Orchard. nightLook of The Lieutenant Inishmore

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Sunday 25th March - Monday 7th May Maclaurin Art Gallery, Rozelle Park, Ayr

Fascinating Mummies Until 27 May A major retrospective of work from one of Scotland’s leading painters. The exhibition shows the development of her work over the past forty years through painting, drawing and sketchbook studies. Opening Times : Monday, Wednesday – Saturday 10am – 5pm. CLOSED – Tuesday Sunday 12noon – 5pm www.themaclaurin.org.uk

£9, Members free Book your tickets now! nms.ac.uk/mummies

National Museums Scotland Scottish Charity, No. SC011130

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Image © Rijksmuseum van Oudheden

To enter, just log on to www.list.co.uk/offers and tell us: To enter, just log onhas to www.list.co.uk/offers us: Which Chekhov play John Byrne adapted forand thetell Lyceum stage that starred Brian Cox? Which Martin McDonagh penned film is due for release in 2012? Lyceum Lyceum Theatre, Theatre, Grindlay Grindlay St, St, Edinburgh Edinburgh Box Box Office: Office: 0131 0131 248 248 4848 4848 •• Online: Online: www.lyceum.org.uk

Supported by the Patrons of National Museums Scotland

29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 27

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EASTER DAYS OUT

R E ST

T U O S Y A D EA

ents, eggs-citing ev t s o m n te p h to one our to a. Not enoug v o ir k h s Take the kids a B ra Varva iki Boyle and ge 77 N y b d e il p m co tings, from pa s li s id K o ls a r you? See (or un oeuf) fo

1

Travel in time GALOSHINS

The Scottish Mask and Puppet Theatre resurrects the ancient Scots drama of Galoshins for Easter, complete with wise magicians, beautiful princesses and courageous knights. Performed with the aid of live folk musicians, singers and traditional glove puppetry. Scottish Mask and Puppet Centre, Glasgow, 0141 339 6185, Sat 21 Apr, scottishmaskandpuppetcentre.co.uk

REAL LIFE SCIENCE KITCHEN – FOOD OF THE GODS

Skip the mass-produced supermarket fare and let the kids make their own chocolate eggs and bunnies. After learning the secrets from professional chocolatier Nadia Ellingham, they can proudly carry their sweet creations home, if they can avoid eating them on the spot. There’s a tasting session as well, which seems a bit superfluous to us – we know chocolate tastes good, right? Ages 8+. Part of the Edinburgh International Science Festival – see Around Town for more info. Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh, 0844 557 2686, Sun 8 Apr, rbge.org.uk

3

Hunt for Easter eggs VARIOUS EVENTS AROUND THE COUNTRY

There are loads of different venues offering interesting spaces for kids to crawl about and hunt eggs in. The Almond Valley Heritage Centre offers a farm, complete with cute wee spring chickens; Traquair House in Innerleithen has a genuine oldschool hedge maze; and the Cadbury Easter Egg Trail takes place at historic locations across the country (including Gladstone’s Land in Edinburgh and Greenbank Garden in Glasgow), with chocolatey prizes available at the end. Almond Valley Heritage Centre, Livingston, 01506 414957, Sat 31 Mar– Mon 16 Apr, almondvalley.co.uk; Traquair House, Innerleithen, 01896 830323, Sun 8 Apr, traquair.co.uk; Cadbury Easter Egg Trail, various venues, Fri 6–Mon 9 Apr, eastereggtrail.com

5

Reach for the stars

MINI SCIENTISTS A break from school is no reason to take a break from learning, as long as it’s the fun kind provided by the Edinburgh International Science Festival. Let your junior biologists enter a real medical lab to build their own cell and examine its DNA; or create a virus to see how and what diseases it may cause. They’ll also be able to make a DNA bracelet to match their eye and hair colour. For more on the Science Festival, see Around Town. City Art Centre, Edinburgh, Mon 2–Sun 14 Apr, sciencefestival.co.uk

EGG DROP CHALLENGE

PHOTO © ALA STAIR MUIR

2

Make your own chocolate treat

4

Create a living cell

To demonstrate that Edinburgh doesn’t get all the safetygoggled fun in April, the Glasgow Science Centre is running its own Easter events with a scientific edge. The Egg Drop Challenge encourages budding physicists to construct a secure ‘pod’ for their eggs, before it’s launched from a great height. Even if the design isn’t wholly successful, there’ll still be a satisfying splat at the end. Science Centre, Glasgow, 0141 420 5000, Sun 1–Fri 6 Apr, gsc.org.uk

6

Take them Downton JUNIOR DOWNTON ABBEY EXPERIENCE

Kids get the chance to experience both sides of Edwardian life in an old country pile at this interactive drama workshop. They’ll start off by donning a servant’s apron to make biscuits and lemonade in the kitchen, before heading to the grand rooms upstairs to sample the highlife of the landed aristocracy. Lauriston Castle, Edinburgh, 0131 529 3963, Mon 2 Apr.

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EASTER DAYS OUT

Have a giggle JAMES CAMPBELL’S COMEDY 4 KIDS

If ‘stand up comedy for kids’ sounds a tad oxymoronic to you, check out James Campbell’s performance. Designed specifically for a younger audience, it involves dancing oatcakes, badger hurdling and discussions on essential topics such as how to make parsnips interesting and why owls don’t like Easter. Adults are invited to come along and learn a funny thing or two as well. Part of Glasgow Comedy Festival. Citizen’s Theatre, Glasgow, 0844 395 4005, Sat 31 Mar, citz.co.uk

8

Bring fiction to life FUNKY PUPPET-MAKING WORKSHOP

Under the careful tuition of Puppet Stew, attendees are given access to mountains of bright, colourful, furry, fuzzy and shiny bits and bobs to create their own puppet pal. They can recreate one of their favourite TV or story characters, or just whip up something from their own wild imaginations. Part of the Puppet Animation Festival. Various venues, Edinburgh. Mon 2–Fri 13 Apr, puppetanimationfestival.org

9

Get your hands dirty

NATIONAL MINING MUSEUM SCOTLAND A family-friendly attraction that’s absolutely free for kids, the National Mining Museum provides a compelling insight into the lives of miners in times past, with the aid of ex-miner tour guides. There’s a dedicated Kids Zone too, packed with games and activities. Lady Victoria Colliery, Newtongrange, 0131 663 7519, nationalminingmuseum.org.uk

10

Meet the monster THE GRUFFALO

Julia Donaldson’s most fearsome creation sets forth again this spring, challenging the bunny’s status as traditional Easter animal. The kids needn’t be worried though – that crafty mouse is sure to have a trick or two up his sleeve to keep the Gruffalo’s terrible teeth and poisonous nose wart at bay. Festival Theatre, Edinburgh, 0131 529 6000, Fri 6 & Sat 7 Apr, fctt.org.uk; King’s Theatre, Glasgow, 0844 871 7627, Thu 10– Sat 12 May, atgtickets.com/glasgow

From ballet, contemporary and jazz to musical madness, aerial and disco Courses, drop-in classes and workshops for everyone 16 April – 29 June I Bookings open Sat 31 Mar dancebase.co.uk I 0131 225 5525 14 –16 Grassmarket, Edinburgh EH1 2JU

Charity no: SC0022512

Discover Surgeons’ Hall Museum Pathology-Art-Scottish History-Medicine-Education-Tours & Events

al Speci e cienc S & r de e t inclu Eas vents e ord l L ‘ a F e s t i v n c e s f ro m c o t t i s h ara of S appe istory H nd an e h ’, T ries a aces, r e e s t s k i l F L ine ta entifying Medic Id f o n : noo e see .uk after pleas ed.ac s c r . m u e . mus etails w w w. o re d m r o f

Opening Hours: Monday to Friday, 12-4pm Special weekend opening from 31st March–28th October The Museum at Night: Special evening opening on 28th April Admission: £5/3conc. Nicolson Street, Edinburgh, EH8 9DW T: 0131 527 1649/1711 E:museum@rcsed.ac.uk 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 29

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Food&Drink News&Reviews SIDE DISHES NEWS TO NIBBLE ON EARTHY FOODS & GOODS are about to open their third venue in Edinburgh, with Earthy 3 at Canonmills, offering a shop, café and bistro with evening opening. There’s also to be an expansion at the original Causewayside site, with the café tables there expanding into a series of fruit and veg filled polytunnels and raised beds. earthy.co.uk THE OUTBREAK of posh chippies in Glasgow is getting serious. McCallums of Troon have just opened the Wee Fry in Bearsden, while in the city centre the Merchant Chippie opened last month on the corner of High Street and Ingram, not far from 2011 opening Gandolfi Fish to Go.

In the flesh Edinburgh’s latest steak restaurant comes roaring out the traps with images of raw meat, chic models and searing hot grills. Robin Wu went Steakside here beauty meats the the bone from three breeds, All dressed up and beast’ is the strap-line Scottish Aberdeen Angus, Black something to show for brash new arrival Isle and Limousin. A Black Isle Steak, archly attached to publicity rib-eye has rich flavour and The urge for a quiet, darkened room afterwards shots of ladies puckering their lips toothsome texture while in readiness under dangling raw taccompanying triple-cooked bones – although ‘where beauties eat the beast’ might dripping chips are a super-deluxe interpretation of be just as apt. McDonald’s fries. Steak is one of a new wave of steakhouses, Seasoning and char-grilling are at the aggressive influenced by the likes of London’s much-lauded end of the spectrum, perhaps at the cost of more Hawksmoor, to debut on the Edinburgh scene. From natural flavours, but then subtlety is not what this the team responsible for 12 Picardy Place, it’s aiming joint is about. Butter shrimp Caesar salad is punchy for hi-octane glamour that would be more at home in and delicious, as is a starter of maple-cured salmon the Meatpacking district in New York City than at the with drop scones. top of Leith Walk. Food as theatre is definitely a theme and certain If that sounds like a complaint, it’s not. Edinburgh dishes, like crêpe suzette, are prepared tableside. With could do with a dose of said glamour and ambition all its hullabaloo, one thing Steak does not do is make and Steak may be the one to deliver it. This grand for a calm and relaxing evening but if you are after former nightclub has been cleverly divided by rope late-night bovine thrills with serious sourcing, then it structures, which, along with butch banqueting tables, certainly brings something unique and exciting to low lighting and a ton of candles, create much Edinburgh’s table. aesthetic drama. Pumping beats are turned up to eleven as are the STEAK flavours of the food. In fact, with all this style, you could be forgiven for wondering if there would be any 12 Picardy Place, Edinburgh EH1 3JT substance. Fortunately there is and Jason Wright 0131 557 0952, steakedinburgh.com (previously of Ondine) has created a zeitgeisty menu where, alongside the beef, you can expect roast Wed–Thu 5pm–midnight, Fri 5pm–2am, Sat cockerel, truffled macaroni, langoustine cocktail and 11am–2am, Sun 11am–6pm. Closed Mon/Tue. more. Provenance and butchery of the beef are well Ave. price two course meal: £25 (lunch / dinner) considered: 35-day hung cuts are offered on and off

‘W

30 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

WITH OUR ANNUAL Eating & Drinking Guide due next issue (out 2 Apr) give your favourite local dining spot a boost by voting online in The List Readers’ Awards – go to list.co.uk, search for your choice then follow the link on each restaurant’s review.

+ –

DEUCHARS

RECOMMENDS THE PEAR TREE HOUSE 34 West Nicolson Street EH8 9DD, 0131 667 7533 To mark the start of the 30 Days of IPA festival, Caledonian Brewery will be unveiling their 'Mystery Beer' specially brewed for this event . If you love Deuchars, you will love this beer. No details released yet but you know its going to be something special. Look out for more great events throughout the 30 day festival across Edinburgh.


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SUPPORTED BY

For more food and drink visit list.co.uk/food-and-drink

EVENTS GLASGOW  Queen’s Park Farmers’ Market FREE Sat 7 & 21 Apr, 10am–2pm. Queen’s Park, 520 Langside Road, citymarkets glasgow.co.uk  Monday Curry Club at The Two Figs Mon 9 & 23 Apr, 7–10pm. £12. The Two Figs, 5 and 9 Byres Road, 334 7277. Fortnightly curry club with a different regional variety each time.  Mansfield Park Farmers’ Market FREE Sat 14 Apr, 10am–2pm. Mansfield Park, 5 Hyndland Street, citymarketsglasgow .co.uk

Stewart’s new range, accompanied by canapés.  Edinburgh Farmers’ Market FREE Saturdays, 9am–2pm. Castle Terrace, edinburghfarmersmarke t.com  The Pop-Up Restaurant Sat 31 Mar, 7pm. £35 (£32). The Hub, Castlehill Royal Mile, booking via the French Institute: 225 5366. Eleven visiting students from the Lycée Hotelier in Dinard with some top Edinburgh chefs present a one-night-only dining experience, with the five-course menu only revealed to diners on the night.

 Thirty Days of IPA Sun 1 Apr, from 12.30pm. Pear Tree House, 34 West Nicolson Street. Mingle with brewers and cellar managers at the launch of a month-long celebration of IPA. 30daysofipa.co.uk

 The Forager’s Breakfast Sat 7 Apr, 8.30–11am. £16. Royal Botanic Garden, Arboretum Place, 0844 557 2686. A morning walk around the Botanics to identify edible wild foods, with tips on

For ‘Poissons d’avril’, the French equivalent of the April’s Fool, the Institut Français in Edinburgh is going all fishy on Sunday 1 April. As part of the Budding chefs exchange with Breton chefs, the public can take part in workshops featuring cooking tips, demos and tastings with visiting students and hosting Edinburgh chefs.

EDINBURGH  Stewart Brewing Beer Launch Night FREE Fri 30 Mar, 7pm. Malmaison Hotel Edinburgh, 1 Tower Place Leith, 468 5000.

cooking then, followed by a wild breakfast in the Gateway restaurant. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival.  Portobello Market FREE Sat 7 Apr, 9.30am–1.30pm. Brighton Park, Brighton Place, pedalporty.org.uk  Whisky Wisdom Tue 10 Apr, 5.30–7pm. £15 (£12). The Jam House, 5 Queen Street, 0844 557 2686. Dr Bill Lumsden explores the science behind Scotland’s most famous export, illustrated with a few examples to try. Part of EISF.  Drill Hall Food Market FREE Sat 14 Apr, 11am–3pm. Out of the Blue Drill Hall, 30–36 Dalmeny Street, Leith, 555 7101.

 Poissons d’Avril Sun 1 Apr, 11am–4pm. £5 (£3). Institut Français d’Ecosse, 13 Randolph Crescent, 225 5366. See main pic.

 Whyte & Mackay Whisky Masterclass Thu 19 Apr, 6.15pm. £20 (£5 redeemable against any 70cl whisky). Whiski Rooms, 4, 6 & 7 North Bank Street, 225 1532. Master blender Richard Paterson introudces his recreation of the whisky recovered from Shackleton’s expedition to the South Pole. Booking essential.

OUTSIDE THE CITIES  25th Paisley Beer Festival Wed 25–Sat 28 Apr, Wed 5–11pm, Thu noon–11pm; Fri noon–midnight; Sat noon–9pm. £5. Paisley Town Hall, Abbey Close, Paisley, paisleybeer festival.org.uk. Four-day festival celebrating the best ales from around UK and Europe. Tickets available on the door only.

IN CO-PROMOTION WITH REAL FOODS, EDINBURGH Real Foods stock the whole range of Garvald Organic bread including: wholemeal, malted grain, Tibetan, malt, linseed, white, walnut bread and a variety of Garvald cakes and biscuits. Baked daily – except Saturday and Sunday. NEW! LOOK OUT FOR THE NEW SOURDOUGH LOAF BEING DEVELOPED.

REAL FOODS Natural Healthy Ethical Shopping  LOCAL PRODUCE  SEASONAL  WHEAT-FREE  DAIRY-FREE  GLUTEN-FREE  ORGANIC WINES  ORGANIC HEALTH & BEAUTY  NATURAL BABY PRODUCTS

ORGANIC & ETHICAL LOAVES Real Foods was the first shop to recognise Garvald Bakery’s unique ethos and products. Over 40 years ago Real Foods became the bakery’s first customer, and are today the bakery’s largest stockist with the whole range of Garvald handmade bread in their two central Edinburgh shops. But Garvald is no ordinary bakery. It is a

small Edinburgh charity based on Steiner principles, that provides adults with learning disabilities the opportunity to develop skills in meaningful work. They also produce a huge variety of delicious, local, handmade bread and cakes! All the products are 100% Organic as certified by the Soil Association and the flour and other ingredients are supplied by a local worker’s co-operative.

• Free recipes, health advice and online shop at realfoods.co.uk • Free UK delivery on orders over £15 • Daily special offers at two central Edinburgh shops. • Student, Senior citizen and Early Bird discounts.

REAL FOODS | 37 Broughton Street | EH1 3JU & 8 Brougham Street | Tollcross | EH3 9JH | www.realfoods.co.uk 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 31


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Food&Drink

SUPPORTED BY

Recent Openings

For more food and drink visit list.co.uk/food-and-drink to table. Highlights include txoripan, a warm, flaky bread studded with nuggets of chorizo, or silky fillets of hake with high-toned salsa verde. Best are the patatas: crisp and fluffy and with an earthy flavour that only comes from careful sourcing.

The best of the new restaurant, café and bar openings in Glasgow and Edinburgh

Glasgow

ARTCAFE MORITA THE LIBERTINE BARS & PUBS 45–47 Bell Street, Merchant City, G1 1NX, 0141 552 3539, £6.95 (set lunch) / £12 (dinner) Named after the decadent 17th-century poet, the 2nd Earl of Rochester, the Libertine neatly balances daytime bistro and night-time bar. Tall windows line both aspects, brightening the huge booths and intimate tables in the modern Victorian interior. Small plates, such as nachos and rice balls, are good sharers, while mains feature the likes of beer-battered haddock, but it’s the traditional pie range that really stands out – with the creamy filling of the chicken and bacon offering buried beneath a crispy, buttery crust, accompanied by mash and seasonal veg. It’s a pleasant reminder of how good classic home-cooked meals can be.

NACHOS MEXICAN 15 Skirving Street, Southside, G41 3AB, 0141 616 6666, £13 (dinner) Nachos’ spacious open-plan dining room, well suited to couples, groups and families, is colourfully decorated with Mexico’s cultural and architectural icons in spray-painted murals. Expect some genuine flavours from classics such as tacos, fajitas, burritos, and enchiladas, available in various meat, chicken, seafood and veggie combos, with sauces and salsas spiced to order – regular, hot or extreme. Crispy corn or super soft tortillas are accompanied by fresh salsa, guacamole, and sour cream and Monterey Jack cheese, keeping flavours well balanced. With an impressive array of tapas dishes available Tuesday and Wednesday, plus regular starters and large mains such as chilli con carne and mole chicken, there’s plenty here to feast upon.

VERONA ITALIAN 88 West Regent Street, City Centre, G2 2QZ, 0141 332 7414, verona32 THE LIST 17 Nov–15 Dec 2011

Dream debut Having delivered sophisticated beer’n’burger pubs such as Holyrood 9A to Edinburgh, Fuller Thomson have struck out west, as Steven Dick reports eer and a burger – Bruadar’s is a simple enough formula, but with so many quality variables it is one which delivers genuinely satisfying results. Twenty burgers include the expected beefy standards, a few chicken and five vegetarian choices – including ‘the chilli death’ with its accompanying health warning. All are thoughtfully presented, impressively generous, and accompanied by a cute bucket of skinny chips, coleslaw and dill pickle – with nice price tags that get even nicer before 6pm. There are also brunch choices until 5pm, sharing boards featuring mini burgers, and salads. The choice of beers is as overwhelming as the burgers. Scottish craft beer favourites from BrewDog, Tempest and Black Isle join kegs from other innovative UK, Belgian and US breweries. With 12 permanent pumps and eight rotating cask/keg ales it’s hard to know where to start – but the third-pint tasting measures certainly help. Spread over two floors, Bruadar (‘dream’ in Gaelic) is an attractive, minimalistic venue with bench seating downstairs and a more intimate mezzanine, all flooded with light from the large window looking out up Byres Road.

B

BRUADAR Bruadar, The Millhouse, 2 Partickbridge Street, West End, G11 6PL 0141 337 1200, fullerthomson.com Ave. price two-course meal: £13 (lunch / dinner)

glasgow.co.uk, £6 (set lunch) / £15 (dinner) With gaudy neon lighting outside and an interior that is about as authentically Italian as a fake Gucci handbag – grey walls and black leather booths oozing a lounge bar vibe – this newcomer is about as far removed from actual Verona as you can get. The saving grace is the fresh and tasty food – with real bargains offered such as a £7 three-course lunch deal. The à la carte calamari starter is fried to perfection, while the ‘man-sized’ main course of calzone veg packs both an aesthetic and taste punch, and tagliatelle casa mia is creamy and filling. The pistachio ice cream from a small dessert menu is worth a taste.

Edinburgh MALVAROSA SPANISH 262 Portobello High Street, Portobello, EH15 2AT, 0131 669 7711, malvarosa.co.uk, £7.90 (set lunch) / £17 (dinner) Madrid native Alvaro Bernabeu greets guests with a wry smile and many a cheeky comment, dishing out delicious tapas that could be as close as Edinburgh gets to this inherently Mediterranean way of eating. Dishes come as thick and fast as the kitchen can deliver, provided Alvaro can be distracted from chatting to the customers for long enough to bring them

JAPANESE 204 Canongate, Old Town, EH8 8DQ, 0131 667 1337, artcafe.morita.co.uk, £7.70 (set lunch) Positioned halfway down the Royal Mile, ArtCafe Morita combines traditional café, Japanese fast food outlet and ambitious gallery space. Proprietor Kozo Hoshino is the custodian of a large private art collection, from which he has plucked a dozen pieces to brighten up the café walls. The menu of home-cooked Japanese treats includes gyoza, a limited selection of made-to-order sushi and various fried noodle dishes. The lunch time set meal of panko-covered chicken with curry sauce is great value at £7.70 (with rice and a very capable miso soup). On the traditional side there are various filled rolls, cakes, fresh Java coffee and even a generous cooked breakfast.

THE HAVEN CAFES 9 Anchorfield, Newhaven, EH6 4JG, 0131 467 7513, havencafe.co.uk, £7 (lunch) Between Leith’s gentrified Shore area and Newhaven Harbour lies an unremarkable industrial stretch dominated by Chancelot Mill. This unlikely setting hasn’t put off café newcomer Natalie Kwek one bit, however, and it’s here that she’s created a lovely new space out of an old greasy spoon. Original cornicing, vintage objects and mismatched furniture restore character, while food is straightforward, fresh and attractive, focused on all-day breakfasts and home baking including cute cupcakes, stacked sandwich cakes, artily iced biscuits and supersweet raspberry cheesecake brownies.

Independent write-ups on all the restaurants worth knowing about in Glasgow and Edinburgh are available on our online Eating & Drinking Guide at list.co.uk/food-and-drink Prices shown are for an average two-course meal for one.


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Food&Drink

2012

Breakfast. If it’s the most important meal of the day, that’s more to do with the significance we give to buttery croissants and salty bacon rather than the time we spend eating it. Our best breakfasts research for 2012 shows that people are fans of breakfast whether they eat it at 8am or the middle of the afternoon. The number of places serving all-day breakfasts has increased, and we have to give special commendation to Glasgow’s Hyndland Café for being the first café to offer a breakfast in bed delivery service – laziness taken to a brilliant extreme. Over the next five pages we cover all sorts of great breakfast experiences, from on-the-go bacon rolls to lazy Sunday brunches. We’ve also helped to narrow down the choices in item-specific hitlists. Have a hankering for eggs benedict? See the columns on pages 36 and 39 to find out exactly where to go. Head to list.co.uk to add your own suggestions to the list.

29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 33


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Food&Drink

For more food and drink visit list.co.uk/food-and-drink

GLASGOW Cookie

2012

covered, from a takeaway coffee and pastry for £3, via a virtuousbut-tasty granola, yoghurt and fruit bowl to generous helpings of squidgy French toast with bacon and maple syrup, all served up on chunky wooden boards. Delicious. (Laura Ennor)

THE HYNDLAND CAFÉ 96 Clarence Drive, 334 2719, thehyndlandcafe.co.uk BREAKFAST SERVED: Mon-Fri 8am-5pm; Sat 8.30am-5pm; Sun 9.30am-5pm. Deliveries from 10am.

CAFÉ GANDOLFI 64 Albion Street, 552 6813, cafegondolfi.com

A tiny neighbourhood café, deservedly popular with tender west-enders popping in for a hangover-banishing bacon or sausage roll to take away. It’s well-priced, no-nonsense greasy spoon fare, with any number of combinations available, up to a generous full breakfast at a very reasonable £5.45. And if you’re really suffering they’ll even home deliver (for an extra £1) within the west end at weekends. (Laura Ennor)

BREAKFAST SERVED: Mon-Sat 8am-noon; Sun 9am-noon.

The long-standing, Scottish cuisine-focused eatery has beefed up its breakfasts in recent years, resulting in a menu with eight different egg dishes including Hebridean (with Stornoway black pudding) and Alba (with peatsmoked salmon) options to back up the standard Benedicts and Florentines. French toast, pancakes and homemade scones exist for those with a carb-ier meal in mind. (Niki Boyle)

COOKIE 72 Nithsdale Road, 423 1411, cookiescotland.com BREAKFAST SERVED: Tue-Thu 9am-10pm; Fri & Sat 8.30am-11pm; Sun 10am-6pm; closed Mon.

A cosy Southside joint famed for its community focus and everchanging menu. The Stornoway Tower is always going to be difficult to say no to (poached eggs, bacon, French toast and black pudding. Ooft.), but the eggs Benedict is also top notch: crispy bacon, a nice and gloopy egg. Get it with a wonderfully rich 34 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

Heart Buchanan

coffee on the side. (Lauren Mayberry)

GUSTO AND RELISH 729-731 Pollokshaws Road, 424 1233. wix.com/gustoweb/gustoand-relish

sandwich of homemade, chunky Sunnyside pork sausage between doorstops of crusty white bread, or a sweet and buttery Belgian waffle with various toppings. (Laura Ennor)

HEART BUCHANAN BREAKFAST SERVED: Mon-Fri 911.45am; Sat 10-11.45am; Sun 10.30am-noon.

This friendly Southside deli offers the full range of breakfast options until noon only, but for late risers there’s still a good spread to choose from, including a hefty

380 Byres Road, 334 7626. heartbuchanan.co.uk BREAKFAST SERVED: Mon-Fri 8.30-11am; Sat 9am-9.30pm; Sun noon-7pm.

A light and airy deli on Byres Road with all brekkie bases

MARTHA’S 142a St Vincent Street, 248 9771, mymarthas.co.uk BREAKFAST SERVED: Mon-Fri 7.30-11am; closed at weekends.

From the plastic trays to the waitresses’ super-cheery greetings, this place has been designed to fit the fast food mould. But the certificates on the wall honouring ‘hero suppliers’ give a clue that, while the produce used here may be of Scottish origin, there will be no superfluous Mc- prefixes on the menu. Great for a good, simple bacon roll or a hearty smoothie on the go, Martha’s is filling a gap in the market. (Laura Ennor)


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Food&Drink STRAVAIGIN 2012

28 Gibson Street, 334 2665. stravaigin.co.uk

BRUNCH SERVED: Sun 11am-5pm. No breakfast menu during the week.

For those in search of an unpretentious yet undeniably swanky brunching experience, Stravaigin should be your destination. A perfectly cooked ‘Kick Ass Eggs Benedict’ (the kick is in the chilli Hollandaise) is a substantial option, while the full Scottish has all the essentials and outstanding black pudding, but isn’t too big for the average appetite, leaving room for one of a range of desserts if you’re feeling truly decadent. (Laura Ennor)

TAPA COFFEEHOUSE / BAKEHOUSE 721 Pollokshaws Road, 423 9494, tapacoffeehouse.com / 21 Whitehall Street, 554 9981, tapabakehouse.com

creamy scrambled eggs piled high on wholemeal organic toast, pleasingly non-greasy sausages, and a full breakfast available in vegetarian and even vegan versions. (Laura Ennor)

TRANS-EUROPE CAFÉ 25 Parnie Street, 552 7999. transeuropecafe.co.uk BREAKFAST SERVED: Mon-Sun 10am-5pm.

With any luck, the inheritance of a chef from the Ubiquitous Chip will only enhance the simple, unfussy atmosphere at this continentally-themed bistro. The breakfast and Sunday brunch menus are beloved by regulars, featuring toasted bagels and English muffins topped with perfectly poached eggs, as well as

For more food and drink visit list.co.uk/food-and-drink

a nice selection of omelettes. (Niki Boyle)

TRIBECA 102 Dumbarton Road, 576 0122. tribecacafe.com BREAKFAST SERVED: Mon-Fri 8am-7pm; Sat 9am-6pm; Sun 10am6pm.

Named after a hip New York neighbourhood, this cosy Partick café aims to inject some Big Apple largesse into the weekend brunch. Big being the operative word: pancakes are stacked and topped with crispy bacon and maple syrup, while the full Manhattan breakfast features hash browns, bacon, sausage, grilled tomatoes, three eggs and granary toast. If you’re counting calories, fu-get about it! (Niki Boyle) Tapa Coffeehouse

Good for . . . { CROISSANTS } Il Capuccino 491 Great Western Road Tapa 721 Pollokshaws Road

{ BACON ROLLS } Martha's 142a St Vincent Street An Clachan Kelvingrove Park

COFFEEHOUSE BREAKFAST SERVED: Mon-Thu 8am-6pm; Fri & Sat 8am-7pm; Sun 9am-6pm. BAKEHOUSE BREAKFAST SERVED: Mon-Sat 8am-6pm; Sun 9am-5pm .

{ PORRIDGE }

Famed for strong, characterful coffee but equally deserving of praise for their homemade bread and other edible delights, Tapa make and sell fresh and mostly organic goodies at sites in Pollokshields and Dennistoun. Among the highlights are lovely,

Where the Monkey Sleeps 182 West Regent Street Naked Soup 6 Kersland Street

{ JUICE & SMOOTHIES } The Flavour Co 517a Great Western Road

{ PANCAKES } TriBeCa 102 Dumbarton Road

{ FRENCH TOAST } The Left Bank 33-35 Gibson Street Heart Buchanan 380 Byres Road

{ EGGS BENEDICT } Cookie 72 Nithsdale Road Café Gandolfi 64 Albion Street

{ FULL SCOTTISH } Stravaigan 28–30 Gibson Street Hyndland Café 96 Clarence Drive Stravaigin 36 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012


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1st to 30th 0f April 13 Brewers 9 Scottish Pubs 1 Iconic Beer 30 Days of Celebration 30 Days of IPA 2012 is a celebration of India Pale Ale, an iconic British beer brewed for export to India and now one of the most popular styles of cask ale in the world. IPA was originally designed to survive & improve during the long sea journey to the Indian sub-continent. Throughout the entire month of April there are in excess of 80 events in 9 public houses geared towards celebrating India Pale Ale & raising funds for the Scottish Veterans Residencies. There are online competitions with fantastic prizes to be won, and we aim to have at least twenty different takes on IPA pouring in 9 different pubs in across the capital.

get online & get involved at

www.30daysof ipa.co.uk 29 Marâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 37


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Food&Drink

EDINBURGH Falko Konditormeister

2012

aubergines on a bagel. All with excellent coffee, naturally. (Emma Prior)

MIMI’S BAKEHOUSE 63 The Shore, 555 5908, mimisbakehouse.com BREAKFAST SERVED: Mon–Fri 9am–noon; Sat & Sun 9am–1pm.

BROUGHTON DELICATESSEN

HELLER’S KITCHEN

THE KING’S WARK

7 Barony Street, 558 7111, broughton-deli.co.uk

15 Salisbury Place, 667 4654, hellerskitchen.co.uk

36 The Shore, 554 9260, thekingswark.co.uk

BREAKFAST SERVED: Mon–Sat 8am–3pm; Sun 11am–3pm.

BREAKFAST SERVED: Mon–Fri 9.30am–11:30am; Sat 9am– 3pm; Sun 10am–3pm.

BREAKFAST SERVED: Sat noon–3pm; Sun 11am–12.30pm. Brunch served: Sun 12.30pm–3pm.

What does this place not do well? A great deli, healthy lunches and superb, made-from-scratch breakfasts from morning until 3pm every day. The Broughton Deli breakfast is a stand-out, with homemade potato scones and special recipe baked beans alongside bacon, black pudding and scrambled egg. Or, for an American twist, try maple syrupdoused pancakes with fruit or bacon. (David Pollock)

They only serve it on Sundays, but the Kings Wark’s brunch is an Edinburgh institution. The full breakfast, smoked salmon and scrambled egg bagels are positively pedestrian in comparison to a plate of smoked haddock, haggis and tattie scones or the fearsome rib eye steak with fried egg and potatoes. A spinach crêpe is also on offer for the veggies. (David Pollock)

FALKO KONDITORMEISTER

LEO’S BEANERY

185 Bruntsfield Place, 656 0763, falko.co.uk

23a Howe Street, 556 8403. leosbeanery.co.uk

BREAKFAST SERVED: Info to come, info to come, info to come, info to come.

BREAKFAST SERVED: Tue–Fri 8am–noon; Sat & Sun 9am–noon; closed Mon.

This German bakery/café, already renowned for its tasty selection of cakes, also offers two brunch menus on weekends: a two-course eggs Florentine and granola combo, or a hearty cold meat-andcheese platter with a pretzel and croissant. Both come with fruit juice and a tea or coffee, and cost only £9.80. Yum. (Niki Boyle) 38 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

At the opposite end of the spectrum to your standard greasy spoon is Heller’s, a spacious and sophisticated breakfast place offering an imaginative menu. If you can make it past the freshly baked sugar doughnuts in the window (always snapped up fast so get there early) we suggest ordering indulgent American style pancakes with either smoked bacon or fresh fruit. (Emma Prior)

A single sandwich board points the way down to Leo’s basement on Howe Street. It’s a blink-andyou’ll-miss-it place, making it the perfect hideaway from the city hubbub, and the buggy brigade in nearby Stockbridge. Enjoy freerange scrambled eggs on wholemeal artisan bread, or, for something different, oven-roasted

This Leith café’s monochrome candystripes and 1950s pin-up artwork draws cupcake-lovers at afternoon tea time, but for something more sturdy, their breakfast menu includes a full Scottish, porridge with cinnamon and brown sugar, or delicious slices of French toast with bacon and maple syrup. They recently expanded into the premises next door, but small weekend queues are still likely. (Claire Sawers)


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For more food and drink visit list.co.uk/food-and-drink

from porridge or fruit salad through to a full mixed grill – but it’s their breakfast rolls that we adore in particular. Served on a fulsome and herb-infused crusty roll, they’re a contender for the best in Edinburgh. (David Pollock)

Toast

TOAST 146 Marchmont Road, 446 9873, toastedinburgh.co.uk BREAKFAST SERVED: Mon–Fri 10am–noon; Sat & Sun 10am–3pm.

PETER’S YARD 7 Simpson Loan, 228 5876, petersyard.com

recommended latte and a traditional Swedish cinnamon bun at the Savour to Go shop round the back. (Emma Prior)

BREAKFAST SERVED: Mon–Fri 7am–noon; Sat & Sun 9am–noon.

Worth braving weekend brunch queues for: breakfast classics are finely executed – expect good quality, herby sausages, just-crisp bacon and homemade beans in the full works – but there’s a wealth of more unusual options, too: French toast comes either with bacon and maple syrup or with goats cheese and honey-baked tomatoes. And save room for gorgeous cakes! (Laura Ennor)

6a Nicolson Street, 557 4567, spooncafe.co.uk BREAKFAST SERVED: All day Mon–Sat 10am–10pm; closed Sun.

There’s a lot to love about this artsy central hangout – up the stairs from Nicolson Street’s buzz, and offering breakfasts ranging

{ CROISSANTS } Manna House 22–24 Easter Road Falko Konditorei 185 Bruntsfield Place

{ BACON ROLLS }

URBAN ANGEL

Spoon 6A Nicolson Street Rocket 41 Morningside Road

1 Forth Street, 556 6323; 121 Hanover Street, 225 6215

{ PORRIDGE }

SPOON Peter’s Yard is a paragon of Scandinavian minimalism – a café where both food and décor are simple, elegant and very pleasing indeed. Breakfast consists of freshly-baked breads with cheese and preserves. Watch the magic happen through the viewing windows of the bakery or, if you’re in a hurry, grab a highly

Good for . . .

FORTH STREET BREAKFAST SERVED: Mon–Sun 9am–5pm. HANOVER STREET BREAKFAST SERVED: Mon–Sat 9am–5pm; Sun 10am–5pm.

The Larder 15 Blackfriars Street Café Milk 232 Morrison Street

{ JUICE & SMOOTHIES } Hula 103-105 West Bow

Peter’s Yard

{ PANCAKES } Heller's Kitchen 15 Salisbury Place

{ FRENCH TOAST } Toast 146 Marchmont Road Mimi’s Bakehouse 63 Shore These smart, modern bistros do a good line in early morning pickme-ups, catering as much for the calorie conscious or those who don’t give a damn. You can pick from yoghurt, bircher muesli and pastries, or go the whole hog with some of the best eggs Benedict served anywhere in Edinburgh. Arbroath smokies and a mix’n’match fry-up are also on offer and vegetarians will find themselves not unwelcome here. (David Pollock)

{ EGGS BENEDICT } Circle 1 Brandon Terrace Urban Angel 1 Forth Street

{ FULL SCOTTISH } The King's Wark 36 Shore Broughton Deli 7 Barony Street 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 39


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Lifestyle

For more lifestyle visit list.co.uk/shopping

Shopping&Fashion

ART TO BUY If you’re looking to invest in some art to hang at home, here are a few ideas on where to shop, and who to buy. And with Own Art’s hire-purchase scheme, it’s not all Saatchi prices either . . . Scott Campbell £500, framed screenprint. Available from Glasgow Print Studio, Trongate 103, Glasgow, 0141 552 0704, gpsart.co.uk

Victoria Morton (right) £350, framed screenprint; Richard Wright (below) £1400, unframed screenprint Both available to buy from the Modern Institute, Osborne Street, Glasgow, 0141 248 3711, themoderninstitute.com

Jack Frame £950, oil painting. Available from Scotlandart.com Galleries, Bath Street, Glasgow, 0141 221 4502, scotlandart.com

Lorna Macintyre price on request, cyanotype print. Available from Mary Mary, Dixon Street, Glasgow, 0141 226 2257, marymarygallery.co.uk

Callum Innes (above left) limited edition etching, £1000, or £100 per month with Own Art; Alasdair Gray (above) screenprint, one of 50, signed & numbered by the artist, £480, or £48 per month with Own Art; Philip Braham (right) photopolymer etching, £300 or £30 per month with Own Art. All available from the Edinburgh Printmakers Studio, Union Street, Edinburgh, 0131 557 2479, edinburgh-printmakers.co.uk 40 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

Benjamin Rawson prices on request, paintings A zine featuring work from Rawson’s recent ‘Death Bed’ show (including these) is also available, £8.50, published by Museums Press. All available from the Good Press Gallery, in Mono, Kings Court, Glasgow, goodpressgallery.co.uk


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o t s t e k c i t n i W

IMAGE: TONY LEWIS

dinburgh returns to E l a v ti s e F aginate t with the f Scotland Im e fit to burs m m ra g ro The Bank o p with a g people May 2012, n and youn from 7 - 14 re d il h c r fo f theatre very best o

This year sees the Fe stival celebrate its 23 rd year with a stunning combinatio n of 14 of the finest national and international producti ons from Scotland, En gland, across Europe and Australia, to suit children and adults of every age. An d he re’s jus t a se lec tio n of wh at to ex pe ct : fro m Australia, the wonderful Grug (for everyone 3 – 6 years) who

Grug, Windm

ill Theatre began life as the top of a Burrawang tree an d goes on to invent his own dance; Traverse combines exhil arating dance, phenomenal choreograp hy and live music (for ev eryone aged ov er 7 ye ar s) an d Gr im m’s cla ss ic an d sc ar y ta le of Rumpelstiltskin, but wit h a happy ending and exquisite live music! (for everyone ag ed over 8 years)

To celebrate we’re giving away two sets of four tickets to see one of the following shows:

Traverse

Rumpelstiltskin

Grug

Monday 7 May 7pm Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh

Tuesday 8 May 7pm Brunton Theatre, Musselburgh

Saturday 12 May 1pm Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh

To be in with a chance of winning, just log on to list.co.uk/offers and tell us:

When does the Imaginate Festival take place? For the full Festival programme visit www.imaginate.org.uk Tickets are now on sale from the Traverse Theatre Box Office: 0131 228 1404 or online at

www.traverse.co.uk TERMS & CONDITIONS: COMPETITION CLOSES 25 APRIL 2012. THERE IS NO CASH ALTERNATIVE. USUAL LIST RULES APPLY.


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What’sOn ■ Books ■ Clubs ■ Comedy

■ Film ■ Kids ■ LGBT

49 53 61

■ Music ■ Theatre ■ Visual Art

65 77 80

AroundTown HITLIST

81 109 118

list.co.uk/aroundtown

FASHION, FESTIVALS AND FUNTIME!

Neighbourhood VOX

It’s Funtime The Generation Game meets your local pub quiz, in this mental and surprisingly slick evening of games, fancy dress and brain power tests. Bongo Club, Edinburgh, Sat 31 Mar.

WHO’S AROUND YOUR BIT OF TOWN? Name Michael Hunter Age 26 Ocucupation Graphic Designer

Edinburgh International Science Festival The annual festival is back for its 23rd year, with a plethora of events to please science lovers both old and young. Various venues, Edinburgh, Sat 31 Mar–Sun 15 Apr.

Ecomunky Pop-Up Sale This environmentally aware bunch aim to educate us all in the way of sustainability, with local organic, recycled and fairtrade fodder for sale. Oran Mor, Glasgow, Sun 1 Apr. Leabhar’s Craic One-day festival celebrating Gaelic literature, with readings and workshops on work by Margaret Callan and Aonghas MacNeacail, as well as theatre, music and film. CCA, Glasgow, Sat 31 Mar.

Wide Days Two days of seminars from the Born to be Wide team themed around tourism and music, and looking at everything from getting gigs abroad to audience building. Teviot Debating Hall, Edinburgh, Wed 11 & Thu 12 Apr.

Edinburgh Charity Fashion Show Three nights of fashion, with pieces borrowed from big name designers as well as work from upand-comers. Summerhall, Edinburgh, Thu 29–Sat 31 Mar.

Reversible Live! Brand spanking new monthly night of art, performance and music, where artists share work and talk about their practice. Curated by Fritz Welch, Julia Scott and Iain Findlay-Walsh. Mono, Glasgow, Tue 24 Apr.

Dee-CON If you love anime, take a road trip north for this one-day convention with game tournaments, films, exhibitions and competitions. Dundee University Students’ Association, Dundee, Sat 7 Apr.

Second City – Pattern Cutting Workshop Fourday workshop on how to make couture-inspired pieces. Experience with a sewing machine is an advantage. Make It Glasgow, Glasgow, Fri 6, Sat 7, Mon 9 & Sat 14 Apr.

Books in Focus: Lewis Carroll A look at John Tenniel’s illustrations in the Wonderland books in the light of Henry Holiday’s work in The Hunting of the Snark. Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art Two, Edinburgh, Thu 5 Apr.

Lives Glasgow Favourite places to eat and drink? I love deli food so Piece on Argyle St and Il Cappuccino on Great Western Road are my go to guys for a quick bite to eat. If I’m going for something more lavish I’d definitely say Stravaigin – the food’s incredible! For drinks, I’m a big fan of Bar 91 in the Merchant City and Gambrino in the West End. Best day out/night out? Daytime, I’d say a wander around the GOMA, Lighthouse or Trongate to take in some art/design is my ideal way to spend an afternoon. If it’s sunny, I’d maybe swap that for relaxing with mates at Kelvingrove Park. Night time would be some form of live music at a venue like the Arches or Stereo. Favourite quiet spot or hidden gem? Southblock on Osbourne Street. Even though I work there, it’s a great place to meet other creative people, grab a coffee and check out cool magazines, prints and interior design. (Lauren Mayberry) 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 43


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AroundTown Museums and attractions are listed by city, then alphabetically by venue. Submit listings at least 16 days before publication to aroundtown@list.co.uk. Listings compiled by Laura Ennor and Lauren Mayberry.

GLASGOW ■ BURRELL COLLECTION

2060 Pollokshaws Road, 287 2550, glasgowlife.org.uk/museums Mon–Thu & Sat 10am–5pm; Fri & Sun 11am–5pm. Free. Galllery including work by Degas, Rodin and Cézanne as well as ancient and medieval artefacts. ■ GLASGOW BOTANIC GARDENS

730 Great Western Road, 339 6964, glasgow.gov.uk Gardens open daily 7am–dusk; visitor centre 11am–4pm. Free. A great place to relax in summer or take a brisk walk in winter, with a programme of events including stargazing, gardening talks and even theatre. ■ GLASGOW NECROPOLIS

50 Cathedral Square, 552 3145, glasgownecropolis.org Daily 7am–6pm. Free. The Necropolis is the city’s own Père Lachaise with an obelisk to John Knox, Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s first solo work, and breathtaking views. Tours are offered by the Friends of Glasgow Necropolis, advance booking essential. ■ GLASGOW SCHOOL OF ART

167 Renfrew Street, 566 1472, gsa.ac.uk/visit-gsa Interpretation space & shop open daily 10.30am–6.30pm; building tours 11am, 1pm, 3pm & 5pm. Tours £8.75 (£7; under 18s £4; under 5s free). Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s astounding architectural masterpiece (and still a working art school) can be viewed throughout the year, with daily tours led by current students. ■ GLASGOW SCIENCE CENTRE

50 Pacific Quay, 420 5000, gsc.org.uk Daily 10am–5pm. £9.95 (£7.95; under 3s free); Planetarium, Glasgow Tower or IMAX Science films £2.50 extra. The home of Scotland’s first IMAX cinema, as well as state-of-the-art facilities for youngsters to learn about science and technology through fun exhibits, science shows, workshops and talks. ■ HUNTERIAN MUSEUM & ART GALLERY

82 Hillhead Street, 330 4221 (museum)/ 330 5434 (gallery), gla.ac.uk/hunterian Tue–Sat 10am–5pm; Sun 11am–4pm; closed Mon. Free; Mackintosh House £5 (£3; under 18s free). Scotland’s oldest public museum houses collections relating to science, medicine, archaeology, geology and more, as well

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as art by Charles Rennie Mackintosh and James McNeill Whistler. The art galleries – currently undergoing refurbishment – are due to re-open in Sep 2012. ■ KELVINGROVE ART GALLERY & MUSEUM

Argyle Street, 276 9599, glasgowlife.org.uk/museums Mon–Thu & Sat 10am–5pm; Fri & Sun 11am–5pm. Free. Twenty-two collections and more than 8000 artefacts from natural history, armour and weaponry to art from many different eras and touring exhibitions. ■ NATIONAL PIPING CENTRE

30–34McPhater Street, 353 0220, thepipingcentre.co.uk Mon–Fri 9am–5pm; Sat 9am–1pm; closed Sun. £4.50 (£3.50; under 16s £2.50; family £11). Home to the Museum of Piping, as well as teaching facilities, rehearsal rooms, a reference library, shop, a restaurant and accommodation. ■ PEOPLE’S PALACE & WINTER GARDENS

Glasgow Green, 276 0788, glasgowlife.org.uk/museums Palace: Tue–Thu & Sat 10am–5pm; Fri & Sun 11am–5pm; closed Mon; Winter Gardens: daily 10am–5pm. Free. The Palace gives an insight into how the people of Glasgow lived from the 1750s to the 1990s, while next door the Winter Gardens house exotic plants and a café. ■ POLLOK HOUSE

2060 Pollokshaws Road, 0844 493 2202, nts.org.uk/property/pollok-house Daily 10am–5pm. £6 (£5; family £11–£16). This 18th-century house holds one of the best collections of Spanish art in the UK, as well as traditional Edwardian furniture and decoration. ■ PROVAND’S LORDSHIP

3 Castle Street, 276 1625, glasgowlife.org.uk/museums Tue–Thu & Sat 10am–5pm; Fri & Sun 11am–5pm; closed Mon. Free. Restored to its 17thcentury finest, the oldest house in Glasgow also has a medicinal garden featuring the Tontine Faces stone masks. ■ RIVERSIDE MUSEUM

100 Pointhouse Place, 287 2720, glasgowlife.org.uk/museums Mon–Thu & Sat 10am–5pm; Fri & Sun 11am–5pm. Free. This transport museum is housed in a cutting-edge piece of architecture by Zaha Hadid. ■ SCOTLAND STREET SCHOOL MUSEUM

225 Scotland Street, 287 0500, glasgowlife.org.uk/museums Tue–Thu & Sat 10am–5pm; Fri & Sun 11am–5pm; closed Mon. Free. Another Mackintosh-designed building, this one detailing the history of the country’s education system from the time of Queen Victoria right through to the swinging 60s.

■ THE SCOTTISH FOOTBALL MUSEUM

Hampden Park, 616 6139, scottishfootballmuseum.org.uk Mon–Sat 10am–5pm; Sun 11am–5pm. Stadium tour or museum entry £6 (£3); combined ticket £9 (£4.50). Located inside Scotland’s national football stadium a couple of miles south of the city centre, this museum displays all kinds of memorabilia and offers tours of the stadium itself. ■ ST MUNGO MUSEUM OF RELIGIOUS ART & LIFE

2 Castle Street, 276 1625, glasgowlife.org.uk/museums Tue–Thu & Sat 10am–5pm; Fri & Sun 11am–5pm; closed Mon. Free. Situated across the road from the Provand’s Lordship, this museum holds artwork and historical artefacts exploring the role of religion in people’s lives, promoting understanding and respect between faiths. FREE Curious Until Wed 1 Aug. The Museum has collaborated with a wide range of community groups from across Glasgow to tell the stories of some of the many and varied objects in Glasgow Museums’ vast collection – from jewellery and paintings to games and musical instruments. ■ THE TALL SHIP AT RIVERSIDE

150 Pointhouse Place, 357 3699, thetallship.com Daily 10am–5pm. £5 (£4.50; one child free per paying adult, additional children £3). Step aboard the Glenlee, one of only five Clyde-built ships still afloat today. Learn about the maritime history of the area through talks, tours and costume days.

EDINBURGH ■ CAMERA OBSCURA & WORLD OF ILLUSIONS

Castlehill, 225 9846 (info)/ 668 8081 (bookings), edinburghcastle.gov.uk / nms.ac.uk Daily 9.30am–6pm. £14 (£11.20; under 16s £8.20). Edinburgh’s most visible landmark includes ceremonial rooms, fortifications, dungeons and Scotland’s Honours or crown jewels. Inside, the National War Museum (nms.ac.uk) delves into the country’s military history. Reconstructing Lives Until Feb 2013. A moving look at those who have lost limbs in war, and the advances in medical technology from the 16th century to the present that have helped them to cope. ■ THE EDINBURGH DUNGEON

31 Market Street, 240 1001 (info)/ 0871 423 2250 (bookings), thedungeons.com Mon–Fri 11am–4pm; Sat & Sun 10am–5pm. £9.20–£16.20 (under 16s £5–£12). A grizzly look into historical Edinburgh, with actor-led tours and rides, just above Waverley Station. ■ EDINBURGH ZOO

Corstorphine Road, 334 9171, edinburghzoo.org.uk. Daily 9am–5pm. £15.50 (£13; under 16s £11; under 3s free). Visitors can see the headlinegrabbing giant pandas, the famous Penguin Parade and over 1000 other rare and interesting animals and birds at this site three miles west of the city centre. ■ GEORGIAN HOUSE

7 Charlotte Square, 0844 493 2118, nts.org.uk/property/georgian-house Daily 10am–5pm. £6 (£5; family £11–£16). Reconstruction of a grand, Georgian-era home, located in the New Town.

GreatUT DAYS aOs ide

Castlehill, 226 3709, cameraobscura.co.uk Daily 9.30am–7pm (until 8pm on public and school holidays). £10.95 (£9.95; under 16s £7.95; under 5s free). In addition to the camera itself (a giant periscope inside a Victorian rooftop), the building also contains three galleries and lights up at night. ■ DEEP SEA WORLD

■ EDINBURGH CASTLE AND NATIONAL WAR MUSEUM OF SCOTLAND

Battery Quarry, North Queensferry, 01383 411880, deepseaworld.com Mon–Fri 10am–5pm; Sat & Sun 10am–6pm. £13 (£11; under 15s £8.75; under 3s free; family £38–£42). This marine life centre has a petting area and underwater tunnel so you can get to grips with the deep. Approximately a 20minute drive from Edinburgh.

■ HOLYROOD PARK

Holyrood Park Road, 652 8150, historicscotland.gov.uk. Open at all times; Holyrood Lodge Information Centre daily 9.30am–3pm. Free. The main feature of this wide green expanse in th cty centre is Arthur’s Seat, an 823foot hill that has a number of smaller peaks and ponds surrounding it.

■ MUSEUM OF CHILDHOOD

42 High Street, 529 4142, edinburghmuseums.org.uk/venues/museu m-of-childhood Mon–Sat 10am–5pm; Sun noon–5pm. Free. Kids and adults can learn about the toys, clothes and lifestyles of children of the past in this Royal Mile museum. ■ MUSEUM OF FIRE

76–78 Lauriston Place, 659 7285, lothian.fire-uk.org/museum Mon–Fri 10am–4pm; closed Sat & Sun. Free. See genuine artefacts from the oldest

e c n e i sc add some

to your

DJ Physics

The Dancing Br

ain

This year the Science Festival is presenting a vibrant programme that celebrates ideas and embraces discovery, innovation and creativity in all walks of life …

Online booking: www.sciencefestival.co.uk 44 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

(SOCIAL)

LIFE!


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list.co.uk/aroundtown fire brigade in the UK including horsedrawn fire engines and early motor models.

AroundTown

Spotlight: National Museum of Scotland

■ MUSEUM ON THE MOUND

The Mound, 243 5464, museumonthemound.com Tue–Fri 10am–5pm; Sat & Sun 1–5pm. Free. Learn how money has evolved over the past 4000 years or try cracking a safe in the Bank of Scotland’s head office. ■ NATIONAL MINING MUSEUM SCOTLAND

Lady Victoria Colliery, Newtongrange, 663 7519, scottishminingmuseum.com Daily 10am–5pm. £7.50 (£5.50; children free). Nine miles south of Edinburgh, this museum is one of the best-preserved Victorian collieries in Europe. Take a tour and learn about the life of a miner. ■ NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SCOTLAND

Chambers Street, 0300 123 6789, nms.ac.uk Daily 10am–5pm. Free. Recently renovated Victorian building with exhibitions on natural history, science and technology, Scottish history, art and design and world cultures. Fascinating Mummies Until Sun 27 May. £9 (£7.50; children £6; family £26). Exhibition looking at the complex and intriguing rituals surrounding death in Ancient Egypt. FREE See Scotland By Train Until Sun 24 Jun. A collection of beautiful Scottish railway posters depicting some of Scotland’s most spectacular scenery. ■ NATIONAL MUSEUMS COLLECTION CENTRE

242 West Granton Road, 247 4770, nms.ac.uk Visits by appointment only or with occasional tours. Two new collection buildings housing artefacts from the Museum’s collection. ■ OUR DYNAMIC EARTH

Holyrood Road, 550 7800, dynamicearth.co.uk Daily 10am–5.30pm (last entry 4pm). £10.80 (£9.50; under 16s £7.20; under 3s free). An interactive journey through the history of the earth, from the tundra to the bottom of the ocean. Best of Scottish Science Sun 1 Apr, noon–5pm; Mon 2–Wed 4 Apr, 10am–5pm. Interactive exhibits and a chance to meet Royal Society-approved scientists. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival. ■ PALACE OF HOLYROODHOUSE

Royal Mile, 556 5100, royalcollection.org.uk Daily 9.30am–6pm (last admission 5pm). £10.75 (£9.80; under 17s £6.50; under 5s free). This baroque palace houses the great artworks and tapestries of the Royal Family, and the Queen herself when she’s in town.

The recently revamped National Museum encompasses everything from the wonders of the natural world to art and design, science and technology and culture both at home and abroad. Current exhibitions include Evolution’s Missing Chapter (until Sun 29 Apr) and See Scotland by Train (until Sun 24 Jun), while the successful Fascinating Mummies exhibition runs until Sun 27 May. Keep an eye out for special late night events too, giving you the chance to explore the museum whilst swigging a cocktail and shimmying to some good live music – tickets for the next one are on sale now. (Lauren Mayberry) ■ nms.ac.uk. For information on one-off events at the museum, see Activities and Events listings. ■ ROYAL BOTANIC GARDEN EDINBURGH

Inverleith Row, 552 7171, rbge.org.uk Daily 10am–6pm. Free; glasshouse entry £4.50 (£3.50; children £1; family £9). 70 acres of tended gardens containing glasshouses, cafés and the Inverleith House gallery. FREE Science on a Plate Until Sun 15 Apr. Find out where the food on your plate comes from, as part of the Edible Gardening Project. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival. FREE Green Universe: a microscopic voyage into the plant cell Until Fri 1 Jun. Exhibition of

photographs showing in amazing detail the internal structure of plant cells. FREE Hard Rain: Whole Earth? Until Sun 1 Jul. Environmental exhibition.

Astronomy evenings (weekly, Fri 6.30pm & 8pm). Public Astronomy evenings £4 (£3). See the stars at weekly astronomy evenings, with additional one-off events throughout the year. ■ ROYAL YACHT BRITANNIA

Ocean Terminal, Leith, 555 5566, royalyachtbritannia.co.uk Daily 9.30am–4pm (last admission). £11.75 (£10; under 18s £7.50; under 5s free; family £34). Learn about life aboard the yacht that served the royal family for almost 50 years. ■ SCOTCH WHISKY EXPERIENCE

354 Castlehill, 220 0441, scotchwhiskyexperience.co.uk Daily 10am–6pm; entry is as part of a tour. Tours £12.50–£50 (£10–£25; under 18s £6.50). Learn more about Scotland’s tastiest export with a tour and tasting session.

RBGE’s Secret Garden: The Wild Woodland Garden of Larachmhor

Tue 3 Apr–Sun 6 May. Open Mon–Fri, 10am–4.30pm only. Exhibition telling the story of a 28-acre garden near Lochaber which has been transformed by a large team of volunteers. ■ ROYAL OBSERVATORY VISITOR CENTRE

Blackford Hill, 668 8404, roe.ac.uk/vc Entry by arrangement or at Public

■ SCOTTISH PARLIAMENT

Horse Wynd, 0800 092 7500, scottish.parliament.uk Opening hours vary according to whether Parliament is in session, see website for details. Free. Take a tour of the controversial Enric Miralles-designed building, sit in on a debate or look at the artwork on display.

■ SCOTT MONUMENT

Princes Street Gardens East, 529 4068, edinburghmuseums.org.uk Mon–Sat 9am–4pm; Sun 10am–6pm. £3. Commemorating Sir Walter Scott, this is the largest monument of any writer in the world. Take all 287 steps to the top for a great view of the city. ■ SCOTTISH STORYTELLING CENTRE AND JOHN KNOX HOUSE

43–45 High Street, 556 9579, scottishstorytellingcentre.co.uk. Mon–Sat 10am–6pm. Free entry to SSC; John Knox House £4.25 (£3.75; children £1; under 7s free). Houses materials relating to Scotland’s rich oral culture, with regular storytelling sessions. ■ SURGEONS’ HALL MUSEUM

Nicolson Street, 527 1649, museum.rcsed.ac.uk Daily noon–4pm. £5 (£3). Home to permanent collections on pathological anatomy, the history of surgery and dentistry, as well as temporary exhibitions, talks and occasionally gruesome hands-on events. Watching on the Heights: The Life and Work of Joseph Lister Until Fri

28 Sep. An exhibition of artefacts, documents, instruments and specimens relating to the work of pioneering surgeon Joseph Lister.

30 March - 15 April The Maths O

lympics

Derren Brow

n

Festival of the Spoken Nerd

… Join us as we coax science and scientists out of the lab and combine them with everyone from authors and artists to philosophers and politicians to create all sorts of new and unexpected experiences.

Booking hotline: 0844 557 2686 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 45


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AroundTown Events are listed by city, then type. Submit listings at least 14 days before publication to sport@list.co.uk for sport or aroundtown@list.co.uk for all other events. Listings compiled by Laura Ennor. ✽ Indicates Hitlist entry

GLASGOW Activities & Events FREE Mostly Movie Pub Quiz Weekly, Thursdays, 9–11pm. The Lane, Ashton Lane, 0845 166 6002. Moviethemed pub quiz hosted by Fraser Thomson, with a chance to win £50 to spend behind the bar. FREE Swishing Shop Fri 30 Mar, 11am–3pm. Simply Swap, 937 Tollcross Road, Tollcross, 551 0071. Clothesswapping event as part of a wider project aiming to make Glasgow’s East End more green and sustainable. Leabhar’s Craic Sat 31 Mar, 10am–midnight. £10 (daytime only

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£5; evening only £8). CCA, 350 Sauchiehall Street, 352 4900. One-day festival of Gaelic literary culture, with highlights including a special celebration of poet and songwriter Aonghas MacNeacail, the launch of Margaret Callan’s new book and a headline show from Gaelic folk band The Seedboat (Bàta an t-Sìl), alongside theatre, music, film, workshops and readings. FREE Drawing In Saturdays until 28 Apr, 3–5pm. CCA, 350 Sauchiehall Street, 352 4900. A space to draw, create and exchange ideas. El Abrazo Tango Club Fri 6 Apr, 7.30pm. £5 milonga only (class only £7; class and milonga £10). CCA, 350 Sauchiehall Street, 352 4900. Tango milonga from Glasgow Tango Studio with a range of music for social dancing. Preceded by an optional tango class. Ages 18+. FREE Bicycle Boom: Cycling Gymkhana Sat 7 & Sun 8 Apr, 2pm. Free (ticketed). Kelvin Hall International Sports Arena, 1445 Argyle Street, 276 1450. A parade of historical cyclists and bikes, synchronized cycling and ‘bizarre

races’ are all part of this family friendly re-imagining of the Cycling Gymkhana held as part of the Great Exhibition of 1901. Decorate your own bike for a chance to win the ‘Best Dressed Wheel’ prize. Part of Fish&Game’s Bicycle Boom, itself part of Behaviour. FREE Hunterian Late Night Wednesdays Wed 11 Apr, 5–8pm. Hunterian Museum & Art Gallery, University of Glasgow, 82 Hillhead Street, 330 4221. A new venture from the Hunterian, offering adults a chance to explore the museum after hours, with guided tours, short talks and refreshments. Glasgow Vet School Rodeo Sat 14 Apr, 11am–5pm. £7 (children £3; family £15). University of Glasgow Vet School, Garscube Estate, vet_rodeo@hotmail.com A day of animal-based fun including stalls from the vet school and charities, pony rides, small and exotic animal tents, ferret racing, falconry, duck herding, a husky demo and much more. The event is organised by Glasgow veterinary students with monies raised going to various animal charities. Girls’ Day Out Fri 20 Apr–Sun 22 Apr, 10am–5pm. £12–£15 (£10–£12). SECC, Finnieston Quay, 0844 395 4000. The women’s lifestyle, health, beauty and fashion event returns to the SECC. FREE Seeds of Thought Sat 21 Apr, 7.30–11pm. CCA, 350 Sauchiehall Street, 352 4900. Diverse live performance and spoken word night, including everything from traditional African ‘mbira’ music to comedy, dramatic sketches and visual presentations. Open mic available for extrovert types. Ages 18+. Hidden Gems of Garnethill Sun 22 Apr, 2pm. £7.50. Glasgow Women’s Library, Mitchell Library, 15 Berkeley Street, 248 9969. A walking tour telling the stories of women from Garnethill whose many achievements include pioneering European art movements, designing the banners for suffragette processions and creating the first (and only) women’s library in Scotland. Reversible Live! Tue 24 Apr, 8pm. £2. Mono, 12 Kings Court, King Street, 553 2400. Launch night for a new monthly experimental music, performance and art salon in which artists are invited to perform, present work, discuss and reflect on their practice. Curated by Fritz Welch, Julia Scott and Iain Findlay-Walsh.

Fairs & Markets FESTIVAL

EDINBURGH INTERNATIONAL SCIENCE FESTIVAL More fond of Brian Cox than the cartoonish nerds on the Big Bang Theory? Take a look at the programme of Edinburgh’s science fest to get physics out of your living room and into your real life The Scottish Storytelling Centre will be running one week of kiddy friendly events (Mon 2 Apr–Mon 9 Apr, times and prices vary), as well as lectures for over 18s including an examination of the science behind sex (Wed 4 Apr, 5.30pm, £6–£8) and a look at topical questions about infinity (Fri 6 Apr, 8pm, £6–£8). The Royal Botanic Gardens will teach the weans about the dairy industry (Tue 3 Apr, times vary, £1) and chocolate production (Sun 8 Apr, times vary, £5), whilst grown ups can find out about sustainable fishing (Thu 5 Apr, times vary, £3) and so-called superfoods (Mon 2 Apr, times vary, £3). The National Museum of Scotland takes on all things sporty in Britain’s Olympic year, as well as workshops about the physics behind good DJing (Mon 9 Apr, 8pm, £6–£8) and author Marcus Chown talking about the solar system (Sat 7 Apr, 5.30pm, £6–£8). Our Dynamic Earth highlight the best scientific developments from Scotland (Sun 1 Apr–Wed 4 Apr, 10am–5pm, free with admission). Special live editions of the BBC’s Bang Goes The Theory hit the Usher Hall (Fri 13–Sun 15 Apr, 11.30am & 4pm, free), whilst the Filmhouse will run a series of science-inspired films, including Frankenstein (Fri 13 Apr, 6.15pm, £5.50–£7.50), Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Fri 13 Apr, 3.15pm, £5.50–£7.50) and Gattaca (Sat 14 Apr, 3.15pm, £5.50–£7.50). St Andrew’s Square will host Invisible Worlds, an exhibition of cuttingedge scientific imagery, throughout the festival (8am–6pm, free), and there’s also one event falling outwith the official festival dates featuring ‘that guy off the telly’, Derren Brown (Pleasance, Sat 21 Apr, 2pm, £15). (Lauren Mayberry) ■ Various venues, Edinburgh, until Sun 15 Apr, sciencefestival.co.uk 46 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

FREE Craft Fair Sat 31 Mar & Sun 1 Apr, 10.30am–4pm. Glasgow Botanic Gardens, 730 Great Western Road, 334 2422. Monthly craft fair in the Botanics’ Hopkirk Building, featuring wooden items, handmade cards, designer jewellery, glass, candles and much more. Organisers’ profits go to Marie Curie and BLESMA. FREE Byres Road Makers Market Sat 31 Mar, 11am–4pm. Hillhead Library, 348 Byres Road, 339 7223. Handmade crafts and work by new Scottish designers. FREE Ashton Lane Sunday Market Sundays, 10am–5pm. The Lane, Ashton Lane, 0845 166 6002. Weekly market with stalls selling vintage clothing, original jewellery and art work and more. Ecomunky Pop Up Sale Sun 1 Apr, noon–5pm. £1 (under 16s free). Òran Mór, 731-735 Great Western Road, 357 6200. Eco-friendly market selling vintage clothes and jewellery, secondhand books, recycled items and locally made goodies. FREE Label Sundays, 2–7pm. Stairway Club, 95 Union Street, 221 1009. Bring, buy or just listen at this celebration of vinyl, with a vinyl DJ and mini record fair. FREE The Lighthouse Design Markets Sat 7 Apr, 10.30am–5pm. The Lighthouse, 11 Mitchell Lane, 276 5360. An array of wares to buy direct from the designers and makers who crafted them. FREE Little Birds Market Sun 8 Apr, noon–5pm. Sloans, 62 Argyll Arcade, City Centre, 07946 715204. Market with a tantalising selection of vintage, craft and design vendors – including clothes,

jewellery, handmade, up-cycled furniture, accessories, homewares, food, cakes, millinery, stationery, art and lots more. See panel, page 47. FREE Merchants Market Sun 15 Apr, 11am–5pm. Merchant Square, 71–73 Albion Street, 552 5908. Produce, arts and crafts market.

Sport Glasgow Rocks Home Games Sun 1, 8 & 22 Apr, 5pm. £9–£11 (children £6–£7). Kelvin Hall International Sports Arena, 1445 Argyle Street, 334 4600. Scotland’s only professional basketball team face their rivals in the British Basketball League. Insane Championship Wrestling: So’s Yer Maw Sun 1 Apr, 7.30pm. £10.

The Garage, 490 Sauchiehall Street, 332 1120. Live wrestling, including a ‘tagteam deathmatch’, plus live music from Senzafine and Drive by Audio. The Scottish Bike Show Fri 13–Sun 15 Apr, 9.30am–5pm. £7.50 (children £5.50; family ticket £20) in advance; £10 (£7.50; £27) on the door. SECC, Finnieston Quay, 0844 395 4000. A must for all cycling fanatics with exhibitors including bike manufacturers and retailers, accessory providers and cycling holiday organisers. Canal Race 10k & 5k Fun Run Sat 21 Apr, 1.15pm. £6–£10 registration fee. Bishopbriggs Leisuredrome, 147 Balmuildy Road Bishopbriggs. Charity race of either 5k or 10k along the banks of the Forth & Clyde Canal.

Talks FREE Sound Off for Women Tuesdays, 3–24 Apr, 12.30–2.30pm. Glasgow Women’s Library, Mitchell Library, 15 Berkeley Street, 248 9969. Join a group of like-minded women for a cup of tea and a blether about the issues that mean something to you at this weekly discussion group. Café Flicker Thu 5 Apr, 6.30–9pm. £3 or free with a film submission. Glasgow Media Access Centre, Fifth Floor Trongate 103, 553 2620. Informal networking and screening event for filmmakers. Trongate: Heart of a City Thu 12 Apr, 7pm. £3. Adelaides, 209 Bath Street, 248 4970. A talk on the hidden secrets of the Merchant City’s buzzing thoroughfare. FREE Melvin and his sister: A gay Kenyan’s struggle to survive Wed 18 Apr, 7pm. CCA, 350 Sauchiehall Street, 352 4900. Following a screening of The Guardian’s short documentary on the plight of gay people in Kenya, an expert panel will discuss the issue and take part in a Q&A. Ages 16+. FREE Star Formation Thu 19 Apr, 7.30–9pm. John Anderson Building, Strathclyde University, 107 Rottenrow East, 548 3444. Dr. Helen Fraser from the University of Strathclyde speaks on the formation of stars. FREE The Immortals: A Lecture by Folkert de Jong Fri 20 Apr, 11am–12.30pm. Glasgow Film Theatre, 12 Rose Street, 332 6535. The Dutch artist talks about his work on show at Glasgow International, much of which was inspired by Charles Rennie Mackintosh. Pollokshields Heritage AGM Wed 25 Apr, 7pm. £5 (includes wine). Fotheringay Centre, Fotheringay Road, Pollokshields, pollokshieldsheritage.org The Pollokshields Heritage AGM features a guest speaker, urban planner Kevin Murray presenting a talk on a masterplan project in Aberdeen.

Workshops The Comedy Unit Presents . . . Shortcuts to Comedy Writing Sat 31

Mar, 2pm. £6. The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. Simple, practical advice for writing comedy for radio and TV. Part of Glasgow Comedy Festival. Dr Sketchy’s Anti-Art School Sun 1 Apr, 3pm. £7 (£5). Tron Theatre, 63 Trongate, 552 4267. Burlesque art class with a relaxed atmosphere, music, drinks and interesting models.


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list.co.uk/aroundtown FREE Positive Thinking – In a Nutshell Mon 2 Apr, 11am–12.30pm. Inner Space Glasgow Meditation Centre, 277 High Street, 552 7446. Workshop on achieving empowering thought . . . yeeeeeah!

AroundTown srgc.org.uk Flower show and plant sale. Theatre Tour Sat 14 Apr, 10.30am. £12.50 (£9.50). The Edinburgh Playhouse, 18-22 Greenside Place, 0844 871 3014. Peek behind the scenes. FREE Bruncheon! Featuring The Sound of Muesli Sat 14 Apr, 11am–2.30pm. Out of the Blue Drill Hall, 30–36 Dalmeny Street, Leith, 555 7101. Live music plus your choice of breakfast, traditional or continental. FREE Plantaisons Collectives Sat 21 Apr, 2–4pm; Sun 22 Apr, 11am–1pm. Secret Location, 225 5366. An experience/performance in two parts by Belgian artist Anne-Dolores Marcelis. Organised by the French Institute, via whom bookings and enquiries should be made.

Little Birds Market

Listening through the Body with Art Tuesdays, 3 Apr–29 May, 6–7.30pm. £2. The Hidden Gardens, Tramway, 25 Albert Drive, 07940 224365. Therapeutic art making class. See lsp-scotland.com for more information. FREE Meditation Course Tuesdays, 3–24 Apr, 7–8.30pm. Inner Space Glasgow Meditation Centre, 277 High Street, 552 7446. Introductory meditation course, offering meditation practice, information and methods. Improv Comedy 1B Tuesdays, 3 Apr–15 May, 7–8.30pm. £80 for the full term. Vespbar, 14 Drury Street, 07909 822841. Classes in improvisational comedy for those with a little experience already, from improv troupe To Be Continued . . . There’s a performance at the end of the course to show off your newly-learned skills if you dare. Samba Course Thursdays, 5 Apr–24 May, 7–9pm. £60 for the eight-week course. Wellington Church, 77 Southpark Avenue, 07817 419723. Learn some groovy samba pieces and try out different samba percussion at this fun eight-week drumming course. Suitable for beginners. Ages 12+ to adult (under 16s must be accompanied by an adult).

Second City – Pattern Cutting Workshop Fri 6, Sat 7, Mon 9 &

Sat 14 Apr, 10am–5pm. £170 for the fourday course. Make It Glasgow, 3 Osborne Street, 07597 122809. Learn how to pattern cut and make a couture-led garment at these workshops. Sewing machine experience would be useful. Scottish Screenwriters Mon 9 Apr, 6pm. £3. CCA, 350 Sauchiehall Street, 352 4900. Open session for screenwriters, from the novice to the professional. Ages 16+. Write Camera Action Mon 16 Apr, 6pm. £5 (members £3). CCA, 350 Sauchiehall Street, 352 4900. Creative workshop for film writers, directors and actors on the third Monday of every month. Pre-submitted scripts are matched with a director and actors to workshop together, with observers welcome; the night closes with a performance from each group. Ages 18+. Etching & Screenprinting – Intermediate Wednesdays, 18 Apr–16

May, 6–9pm and Sun 20 May, 11am–5pm. £115 (£95) for the whole course. Glasgow Print Studio, Trongate 103, 552 0704. Two new courses offering a bit more depth on the techniques and processes of etching.

EDINBURGH Activities & Events

Edinburgh Charity Fashion Show Thu 29 Mar & Sat 31 Mar,

6.30pm & 8pm, £25–£40. Fri 30 Mar, 7pm, £70. Summerhall, 1 Summerhall, edinburghcharityfashionshow.com Accomplished student-run show with a black tie VIP night on Fri. Golden Street-Kart – Tournament Edition Thu 29 Mar, 7–11pm. £10.

Constitution Bar, 48 Constitution Street, Leith, 538 9374. A golden joystick awaits the winner of this tournament featuring Streetfighter 2 Turbo, Mario Kart and GoldenEye 007. Proceeds go to Habitat for Humanity who can also claim Gift Aid if you book in advance.

Edinburgh International Science Festival Fri 30 Mar–Sun

15 Apr, times vary. Prices vary. Various venues, Edinburgh, 553 0322. Brilliant scifest going for 23 years and now one of the largest of its kind in Europe list.co.uk/events/eisf. Public Astronomy Evening Fri 30 Mar, 6.30–7.30pm & 8–9pm. £4 (£3). Royal Observatory Visitor Centre, Blackford Hill, 668 8404. Hear about the history of the Observatory, journey through the solar system, observe the skies (weather permitting) and touch a

Traverse Arts & Entertainment Quiz Mon 23 Apr, 8pm. £1 per person.

Created as a networking platform for local businesses, entrepreneurs, crafters and designers, this cute monthly market is great for unusual vintage finds and bespoke new items. Mrs Sloan’s Cake Salon serves tea and brunch all day, meaning you can top up your caffeine levels before perusing the stalls of over 25 vendors. Check facebook.com/ littlebirdsmarket for more upcoming dates. (Lauren Mayberry) ■ Sloans, Glasgow, Sun 8 Apr. real piece of outer space. Booking essential. Neu! Reekie! Fri 30 Mar, 7pm. £5 (£4). Scottish Book Trust, Sandeman House Trunks Close 55 High Street, 524 0160. Avant-garde spoken word, film and music night describing itself as ‘playing host to the sinister and the sanguine’. FREE The Anatomical Museum Open Day Sat 31 Mar, 10am–4pm. Anatomical Museum, Doorway 3, Old Medical School, Teviot Place, anatomy.mvm.ed.ac.uk/museum A chance to explore the collections and meet notorious body snatcher Burke (or at least his skeleton). It’s Funtime Sat 31 Mar, 7.30pm. £7. The Bongo Club, Moray House, 37 Holyrood Road, its-funtime.com Razzmatazz game show/pub quiz hybrid. Register your team online. See panel, page 48. FREE A Little April Foolery Sun 1 Apr, at various venues and times around Edinburgh. Closing party, 8pm, The Third Door, 45–47 Lothian Street, 225 6313. A host of live music, spoken word, art installations, poetry readings, film screenings and more, sticking a collective two fingers up at laws coming into effect today that demand all events, however small, apply for a costly license. Due to the spontaneous nature of the event, details are scarce at time of going to press, but keep an eye thisisnotentertainment.wordpress.com for updates. See opinion, page 11. FREE Edinburgh 48 Hour Film Project Preview Party Sun 1 Apr, 4–7pm. The Banshee Labyrinth, 29–35 Niddry Street, 558 8209. The world’s largest timed film competition is back with a party and screening of some of the best entries from previous years. FREE Victoria’s Language Cafe Tuesdays, 7pm. Victoria, 265 Leith Walk, 555 1638. A meet-up for people interested in learning languages – just turn up and see if someone’s got the lingo you want to pick up, then have a chat. FREE Sofi’s Knitting Club Tue 3 Apr, 7.30pm. Sofi’s, 65 Henderson Street, 555 7019. Friendly monthly knitting session for all y’all purlers and garterers out there. The Indulgence Show Sat 7 Apr, 11am–6pm. £5 (£4; under 16s free). Corn Exchange, 11 New Market Road, 01592 647723. A little taste of luxury with live demos, workshops, tastings and an array of top quality exhibitors from the food, drink and leisure industries. FREE Write Shoot Cut Mon 9 Apr, 7–9pm. The Banshee Labyrinth, 29–35 Niddry Street, 558 8209. Monthly short film networking night taking open submissions for screening and discussion.

FREE Bake Club Tue 10 & 17 Apr, 7pm. Sofi’s, 65 Henderson Street, 555 7019. Share the love, and the cake, at this skill-swapping session. Check bodabar.com to find out this month’s theme. Café Voices Wed 11 Apr, 7–9pm. £5. Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High Street, 556 9579. A relaxed session of oral storytelling, poetry by memory, music and song. Spring Flower Show – SRGC Edinburgh & Lothian Group Sat 14

Apr, 10am–4pm. £1. Fairmilehead Parish Church, 1a Frogston Road West,

Traverse Theatre, Cambridge Street, 228 1404. Perfect for artsy types who always struggle with the sports round. Proceeds go to the Edinburgh Maggie’s Centre. FREE Write Here: End of Festival Party Tue 24 Apr, 9pm. Free with a ticket to any Write Here festival show. Traverse Theatre, Cambridge Street, 228 1404. A party to round off the Traverse’s new festival of new writing. Part of Write Here. Spring Fling Ceilidh Thu 26 Apr, 7pm. £6 in advance; £8 on the door. The Bongo Club, Moray House, 37 Holyrood Road, 558 7604. Big ol’ ceilidh as The Reel Stramash play live for Purple House Events to raise funds for the homeless.

Fairs & Markets Scottish Golf Show Fri 30 Mar–Sun 1 Apr, 9.30am–5pm. £15. Royal Highland Centre, Ingliston, 335 6200. Try and buy equipment from the big names in golf. St Mary’s Market Saturdays, 9am–2pm. St Mary’s Metropolitan Cathedral, Broughton Street, 667 4058. New weekly market offering food, clothes, crafts and household goods.

HOMELESS WORLD CUP SCREENING + Q&A

HORS-JEU, CARTON ROUGE CONTRE L’EXCLUSION

13 RANDOLPH CRESCENT, EDINBURGH BOOKING: 0131 225 53 66 WWW.IFECOSSE.ORG.UK

12 APRIL 6.30 PM ADMISSION FREE

ÉCOSSE

29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 47

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AroundTown FREE Out of the Blue Flea Market Sat 31 Mar, 10am–3pm. Out of the Blue Drill Hall, 30–36 Dalmeny Street, Leith, 555 7101. Bargain buys including furniture, clothes, music and more. FREE Gin in Teacups Sun 1 Apr, noon–6pm. The Voodoo Rooms, 19a West Register Street, 556 7060. An eclectic emporium of crafts, vintage jewellery and clothing and curiosities. FREE Ceilidh Culture Street Fair Fri 6–Mon 9 Apr, 10am–6pm. Castle Street, 07914 254334. Scottish food, drink, crafts, fashion, music and more throughout the Easter weekend. FREE Morningside Makers Market Sat 7 Apr, 11am–4pm. Columcille Centre, 2 Newbattle Terrace, 447 7404. Craft and design market.

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EVENTS

It’s Funtime

Greenbank Scouts Annual Jumble Sale Sat 14 Apr, 9.30am–noon. £2

(children free). Greenbank Parish Church, Braidburn Terrace, greenbankjumblesale@yahoo.co.uk Annual second-hand bonanza. FREE Portobello Makers Market Sat 21 Apr, 11am–4pm. Portobello Town Hall, Portobello. Handmade crafts and original designs by Scottish makers. The Vintage Kilo Sale Sat 21 Apr, 11am–4pm. £1. Out of the Blue Drill Hall, 30–36 Dalmeny Street, Leith, 555 7101. Vintage fashion sale where shoppers turn up and pay £15 per kilo of clobber.

Sport Booiaka Sundays, 10.45–11.45am.

£4–£5. Edinburgh Studios, 21 Arthur Street, info@fitnessaroundtheworld.co.uk Intense but fun cardio workout. Zumba Mondays, 8.15–9.15pm. £4. Pentland Community Centre, Oxgangs Brae, 445 2871. Get fit with the dance activity that burns calories to Latin music. Urban Funk – The Hip Hop Dance Class Tuesdays, 6–7pm. £5 per class.

Edinburgh Studios, 21 Arthur Street, fitnessaroundtheworld.co.uk Urban dance class that combines some sweet moves with a serious workout. Auld Reekie Roller Girls Home Season 2012 Sat 7 Apr, 2pm. £6.

Meadowbank Sports Centre, 139 London Road, 661 5351. The Cherry Bombers take on the Skatefast Club, ahead of the season final on Sat 28 Apr. Edinburgh Pole Competition Sat 14 Apr, 6.30pm–midnight. £10. The Granary, 32–34 The Shore, Leith, 554 9465. Pole dancing competition open to all levels of performer, with age categories from 16 up. Spectators are welcome too, but will have to pre-book. Rock ‘n’ Roll Half Marathon Sun 15 Apr, 9am. £43. Holyrood Park, 652 8150. Charity race with an added twist: bands including Kassidy, Homework and Stanley Odd entertain the runners at mile points along the way, turning a 13.1-mile loop of Edinburgh into a big ol’ block party. Register online by Sun 8 Apr. Outdoor Pursuits Scotland Sat 21 Apr, 10am–5pm; Sun 22 Apr, 10am–4pm. £10 (£6; children £1; family £21). Royal Highland Centre, Ingliston, 335 6200. A combination of trade fair and fun interactive family day out events.

Talks FREE From Amsterdam to Edinburgh via Hollywood Fri 30 Mar, 12.45–1.15pm. Scottish National Gallery, The Mound, 624 6200. A talk on Jan Weenix’s painting Landscape with Huntsman and Dead Game (Allegory of the Sense of Smell). FREE National Gallery of Modern Art Highlights Tour Sat 31 Mar, 2–2.45pm & 3–3.45pm. Scottish National Gallery, The Mound, 624 6200. A guided tour of the Gallery of Modern Art’s permanent collection, focusing on the major works. The tour meets at the gallery entrance. FREE Soapbox Sun 1 Apr, 3–4pm. Collective Gallery, 22–28 Cockburn Street, 220 1260. A presentation event by artists and academics, focusing on themes arising from the current exhibition. 48 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

This sparkly and wonderfully silly quiz night pays homage to the golden days of the game show. Activities include eating, drinking and observation rounds, fancy dress, balloon art, limbo, the ‘tower of strength’ task (one pint glass, oodles of pennies and incredible displays of human grit) and possibly a kazoo orchestra. For tickets, visit its-funtime.com. (Lauren Mayberry) ■ Bongo Club, Edinburgh, Sat 31 Mar. FREE Moments in European Sculpture: From Epstein to Now

Mon 2 Apr, 12.45–1.30pm. Scottish National Gallery, The Mound, 624 6200. Dr Jonathan Blackwood discusses six significant sculptures from the past 50 years. Why Infrared is the Future, Why the Past is Infrared Mon 2 Apr,

7.30–8.30pm. £3 (£1.50; children £1.50). Royal Observatory Visitor Centre, Blackford Hill, 668 8404. Sandy Rogers explains the technology required to investigate the history of the Universe. 20th Century British Sculpture in Context Tue 3–Thu 5 Apr, 6–7.30pm.

£20 (£10). Scottish National Gallery, The Mound, 624 6560. Three linked talks from Dr Jonathan Blackwood. FREE Books in Focus: Lewis Carroll Thu 5 Apr, 11.30am–12.30pm. Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art Two, 73 Belford Road, 624 6268. A talk on illustrator John Tenniel’s contribution to Carroll’s Alice books and Henry Holiday’s different but equally great illustrations for his The Hunting of the Snark. Booking essential. La tête et les jambes Thu 5 Apr, 6pm. £3 (members free). Institut Français d’Ecosse, 13 Randolph Crescent, 225 5366. Sports writer Jean-Louis Touzet discusses Lance Armstrong.

Edinburgh Local Food Network: Meet, Eat and Talk Thu 5 Apr, 7–9pm.

£5. Edinburgh Larder, 15 Blackfriars Street, 556 6922. A talk by Denise Walton from Peelham Farm. A Stroll Through the Axis of Evil

Thu 5 Apr, 7.30pm. £8 (students £2; under 18s, RSGS members free). Appleton Tower, University Of Edinburgh, Crichton Street, 01738 455050. With travel writer John Pilkington. FREE Portrait Gallery Thematic Tours Sat 7 Apr, 2–2.45pm & 3–3.45pm. Scottish National Portrait Gallery, 1 Queen Street, 624 6200. Thematic guided tour of Portrait Gallery exhibitions. The Art of Sleepwalking: Edvard Munch – Painter and Printmaker

Sat 7 Apr, 2–3pm. £5 (£4). Scottish National Gallery, The Mound, 624 6560. A talk about Edvard Munch’s printmaking. Booking essential. Edinburgh Forteans Tue 10 Apr, 7.30pm. £1. The Bongo Club, Moray House, 37 Holyrood Road, 558 7604. Ian

Robertson discusses ‘The Strange Case of Deacon Brodie and Mr Hyde’. Wide Days Wed 11 & Thu 12 Apr, times vary. £45. Teviot Debating Hall, Bristo Square, 650 4673. Born to be Wide presents two days of music seminars. See preview, page 90, and win tickets, page 8. FREE World Heritage Day: World

Heritage and Economic Regeneration Tue 17 Apr, 6pm. Royal

College Of Physicians, 9 Queen Street, worldheritagedayedinburgh2012.eventbrit e.co.uk. James Rebanks and Ian Baxter speak at this evening to celebrate World Heritage Day. Registration from 5.30pm. FREE Architecture and Dance Wed 18 Apr, 1–2pm. RCAHMS, John Sinclair House, 16 Bernard Terrace, 662 1456. Clive Albert talks about the buildings housing DanceBase, the new Scottish Ballet Headquarters and the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland. Booking essential. FREE First Breaks Wed 18 Apr, 7.30pm. Traverse Theatre, Cambridge Street, 228 1404. Playwrights including DC Jackson talk about the moments that got their careers off the ground. Part of Write Here. FREE Going the Distance Fri 20 Apr, 7.30pm. Traverse Theatre, Cambridge Street, 228 1404. Traverse Artistic Director Orla O’Loughlin discusses with three playwrights their experiences of writing a play for the Traverse, from initial idea to production. Part of Write Here. Scottish Ballet Insight: A Streetcar Named Desire Sat 21 Apr,

11am–12.30pm. £5.50 (£3.50). Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 13–29 Nicolson Street, 529 6000. Gain an insight into the workings of the company. See feature, page 110. Derren Brown: The Conversation

Sat 21 Apr, 2–3.30pm. £15. The Pleasance Theatre, 60 Pleasance, 0844 557 2686. Brown is quizzed by Richard Wiseman on the tricks of his trade. Curtain Raiser: The Lieutenant of Inishmore Tue 24 Apr, 6–7pm. £5

(under 18s free). Royal Lyceum Theatre, Grindlay Street, 248 4848. Ahead of the performance of The Lieutenant of Inishmore, playwright Nicola McCartney discusses its writer, Martin McDonagh. FREE Artist’s Talk: Alison Turnbull and Ross Birrell in Conversation

Thu 26 Apr, 6–8pm. Talbot Rice Gallery, University of Edinburgh, South Bridge,

650 2210. Turnbull discusses her work with artist and lecturer Ross Birrell. See review, page 120. The Edinburgh Lectures: Creativity and the Movies Thu 26 Apr, 6.30pm.

£5. Filmhouse, 88 Lothian Road, 228 2688. Mark Cousins discusses ideas and where they come from.

Workshops FREE BSL Workshop: Visual Connections with Mark MacQueen

Tue 3 Apr, 6–8pm. Talbot Rice Gallery, University of Edinburgh, South Bridge, 650 2210. Workshop suitable for both deaf and hearing participants exploring how BSL connects with art. Introduction to Improv Workshop

Wednesdays, 4 Apr–16 May, 7.30–9pm. £80 for the full course. The Canon’s Gait, 232 Canongate, 556 4481. Renowned comedy troupe To Be Continued . . . lead eight weeks improve classes. Explore Screenprinting Sat 7 Apr, 11am–4pm. £60 (£45). Edinburgh Printmakers, 23 Union Street, 557 2479. No experience required for this workshop where you’ll explore printing images in layers of colours. Booking essential. FREE Language with Flowers Sun 8 Apr, noon–4pm. Stills, 23 Cockburn Street, 622 6200. Open day with calligraphy and screen printing workshops. Dr Sketchy’s Anti-Art School Sun 8 Apr, 3pm. £7 (£6). The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers Street, 220 4298. Life drawing where the models are burlesque divas, strapping hunks of manhood and circus freaks. FREE Camera Club Thu 12 Apr, 7pm. Sofi’s, 65 Henderson Street, 555 7019. Bring an image relating to the month’s theme for friendly discussion and advice. Etching and Colour Printing Taster Class Sat 21 Apr, 11am–4pm. £60 (£45).

Edinburgh Printmakers, 23 Union Street, 557 2479. Beginner-level, artist-led workshop in etching and printmaking.

OUTSIDE THE CITIES

FREE Dee-CON Sat 7 Apr, noon–2.30am. Dundee University Students’ Association, Airlie Place, Dundee, 01382 386060. Anime, art and video game convention with tournaments, films, competitions, exhibitions and more throughout the day.


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Books HITLIST

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THE BEST BOOKS, COMICS & EVENTS

FirstWrites INTRODUCING DEBUT AUTHORS

Mark Millar & Leinil Francis Yu In Superior, Mark Millar offers a more poignant take on superheroes as a boy with multiple sclerosis has his ultimate wish fulfilled by becoming a Superman-like saviour of the people. See review, page 51. Titan.

Luath Off the Page Live As part of Ceilidh Culture, a night of performance poetry, prose and music featuring the likes of Catriona Child (see column, right) and Alistair Findlay. City Café, Edinburgh, Fri 30 Mar.

Words Per Minute Celebrating the ‘Special Relationship’ with Jarred McGinnis and Ryan van Winkle for the US, and Rodge Glass and Caroline Bird from over here. The Arches, Glasgow, Edinburgh, Sun 1 Apr.

Living Under the Gun A night of poetry and music in aid of Saor Phalastain’s Glasgow-Bethlehem cultural exchange, with Liz Lochhead, Billy Letford and more doing their bit. CCA, Glasgow, Wed 4 Apr.

MARIANNE MITCHELSON

The 2012 Annan Lecture The Scottish Society for the History of Photography annual lecture, The Word and the Image, is delivered by James Robertson and snapper Robin Gillanders. Mitchell Library, Glasgow, Thu 5 Apr. Julia Donaldson The Children’s Laureate and Gruffalo creator performs the tales from some of her inspiring picture books, including The Highway Rat and The Rhyming Rabbit. Mitchell Library, Glasgow, Sat 7 Apr.

Lin Anderson One of the capital’s many sterling crime writers visits the city’s newest library and chats about her work, of which Picture Her Dead is the most recent. Drumbrae Library Hub, Edinburgh, Wed 18 Apr.

Iain Banks A fine return to form for the man without M in his name for once, Stonemouth simultaneously hits the shelves and gets a public airing this month. See review, page 50. Waterstone’s, Edinburgh, Thu 5 Apr; Little, Brown. Peter Carey The twice Bookerwinning Australian author returns with a haunting novel, The Chemistry of Tears, memorably spanning the 19th and 21st centuries. See review, page 50. Faber.

Maggie O’Farrell The Northern Irish writer, who won the Costa Novel Award for latest work The Hand that First Held Mine, gets all wordy in a World Book Night event. See profile, page 52. Central Library, Edinburgh, Mon 23 Apr.

CATRIONA CHILD takes on this issue’s debut author Q&A. Her first book, Trackman, introduces us to Davie Watts, still haunted by the death of his brother when his life is changed by a homeless man’s MP3 player Give us five words to describe Trackman? Music, Edinburgh, memories, love, loss. Name one author who should be more famous than they are now? Brian McCabe. When I first started to take my writing seriously, I went to his writer’s workshop. He was really supportive, very encouraging and went out of his way to help me. What was the first book you read? The first book I remember reading was Five on a Treasure Island. My dad took me to the library when I first learnt to read and I remember being overwhelmed by all the books and not knowing what to choose. Which book makes you laugh? I’ll say I, Partridge as I’ve just finished it and spent a lot of time laughing while reading. It’s very funny and especially good if you know the TV shows well. Alan’s version of certain events in the book are not quite the same as they appeared on TV. Steve Coogan’s a smart guy. Which dead author do you wish was still alive today? I’ll go with Jane Austen. I recently went to visit my sister in Bath and we visited the Jane Austen Centre. While there we were told that nobody really knows what she looked like, and that the famous picture we always see of her was actually drawn by one of her sisters. What plans do you have for book number two? Hopefully to finish writing it! (Interview by Brian Donaldson) ■ Trackman is out now published by Luath. See list.co.uk for more of this Q&A. 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 49


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Books REVIEWS SOCIAL DRAMA

IAIN BANKS Stonemouth (Little, Brown) ●●●●● For those Iain Banks fans not overly keen on his sci-fi work, it will be a blessed relief to see no mention of a middle initial ‘M’ in his name here. For those who loved the prickly relationships and family machinations in the smalltown Scotland of The Crow Road, it’s time to crack open a fine malt. That previous book was set in Gallanach, here it’s ‘Stonemouth’, a fictional but highly recognisable locale pitched near Aberdeen. For the lovelorn Prentice McHoan, read Stewart Gilmour, banished from his home town after betraying Ellie who just so happened to be the daughter in the scary Murston clan, all laden with troubled beauties and psychotic males. He’s now back with Papa Murston’s permission to attend a funeral, but is this merely a chance for terrible vengeance to be wreaked? A page-turner for sure this, but there are a fair number of questions and objections raised which might distract you from the narrative’s natural flow. Would Gilmour really be willing to put himself back in the firing line simply on the reassuring word of a dangerous crimelord? In his descriptive sections, Banks can barely let a noun go by without chucking a colour before it and he throws so many subsidiary characters into the mix that you spend too much time trying to work out exactly who will be integral to the book’s central mystery. Still, if there’s one valuable life lesson to take away from this novel it’s this: don’t let young kids go wild with cameras at a wedding and then show an uncensored selection later on a big screen. It can only lead to disaster. (Brian Donaldson) SOCIAL DRAMA

PETER CAREY The Chemistry of Tears (Faber) ●●●●● Grief haunts the pages of Peter Carey’s new novel, the twice Booker-winning author painting a compelling picture of all-consuming love in the 19th and 21st centuries. Catherine Gehrig is a museum conservator who, after the sudden death of her lover, is tasked with reconstructing a mysterious automaton, commissioned by an aristocrat as a present for his consumptive son 157 years earlier. The project is initially intended to keep Gehrig focused while her personal life unravels, but pretty soon it becomes an obsession, with Carey’s main characters buffeted by sadness and their drive to complete at any cost. The Chemistry of Tears is yet another triumph for its creator, breathcatchingly beautiful and tender in places, with strange and shocking revelations slowly revealed. But perhaps most impressive is the Australian writer’s ability to evoke emotion through human recollection, engrossing us in the mania of two very different narrators. (Camilla Pia)

ILLUSTRATED GUIDE

GAVIN PRETOR-PINNEY Clouds that Look Like Things (Sceptre) ●●●●●

As founder of the Cloud Appreciation Society, Gavin Pretor-Pinney knows more than a thing or two about cirrus and cumulus. And all the other ones. The trouble with this collection is that some of the pictures are, frankly, not very convincing and having to read the caption to discover what we’re supposed to be looking at is a little bit like an impersonator telling you who they’re about to mimic. It’s a case of seeing what you want to see in a lot of instances (Sherlock Holmes in Turkey: where?), but that cloud in Arisaig really does look like a tennis player in action (but specifically Andy Murray?). ‘No other organisation could have come up with a set of images like these,’ Pretor-Pinney announces proudly. That’s undeniable. On flicking through the Scout Association’s Annual Report 2011, you will find absolutely no pictures of clouds that look like things. While he insists that finding curious shapes in the sky is an antidote to modern living, he is honest enough to acknowledge that such endeavours are ultimately ‘pointless’. Unless you want to put a book together. (Brian Donaldson)

VIDEOGAMES HISTORY

DYSTOPIAN THRILLER

DAVID KUSHNER

JULI ZEH

Jacked (Collins) ●●●●●

The Method (Harvill Secker) ●●●●●

This ‘unauthorised’ history of Grand Theft Auto traces the game’s development from its early beginnings in Dundee to become one of the highest selling videogames of all time. The most fascinating element of the GTA saga is not the groundbreaking gaming experience but its cultural impact. Vilified by the Christian right, GTA became the poster boy for violent videogames and their perceived threat to society. Much like comics, VHS and heavy metal before it GTA found itself demonised, stirring up a political storm in America. Kushner gives a human face to this ideological conflict by setting up Sam Houser as the dogmatic head of Rockstar against equally blinkered moral crusader Jack Thompson. Kushner has a tendency to favour sensationalist language but it helps propel the story forward, turning what could be a dry, technical history lesson into an entertaining, if hyperbolic, read. (Henry Northmore) 50 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

German author Juli Zeh’s translated 2009 novel is an Orwellian vision of the near future in which civilisation adheres to the stark principles of The Method. Priority is given to physical health over mental freedom with sexual partners being selected on the basis of compatible immunology, while exercise and cleanliness are state regulated and DNA evidence is irrefutable proof of a crime. Biologist Mia Holl has always carefully followed The Method, but when her brother commits suicide after being found guilty of murder and rape, she starts to question her rational outlook on life. Tightly plotted, philosophically enquiring and disturbingly plausible, The Method convincingly corresponds with current social and political trends. Holl’s nightmare escalates with compelling speed and the confrontations she has with her chief persecutor, journalist and witchfinder general Heinrich Kramer, are riveting intellectual and emotional duels. (Jay Richardson)


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EVENTS

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EVENTS

COMIC SUPERHERO COM IC

MARK MILLAR & LEINIL FRANCIS YU Superior (Titan) ●●●●● Glasgow writer Mark Millar has really picked up the pace on his creatorowned series over the last few years, but what’s more remarkable is how high the quality has remained. Wanted, Kick-Ass and Nemesis were action blockbusters but Superior offers a more poignant take on superhero tropes. As Millar points out, ‘superhero stories are essentially wish-fulfillment fantasies’ and Superior takes that concept one step further as a 12-yearold boy with multiple sclerosis gets his ultimate wish and is turned into his idol, the Superman-like Superior. But what would a young boy do with these newfound powers? Especially when even the ability to walk again, let alone fly, is a massive transformation. And what if you want to take things further and end the conflict in the Middle East or feed the starving in Africa? It’s a lot for a child to comprehend. Superior obviously takes inspiration from Shazam! (Captain Marvel’s alter ego is young lad Billy Batson) and packs an unexpectedly emotional punch, with Millar really capturing this wheelchair-bound boy’s desire to do good within his limited framework of how the world works. How and why he received these powers is almost irrelevant (and is perhaps the weakest element of the story) but it’s the way he reacts to this responsibility that gives Superior its heart. (Henry Northmore)

ALSO PUBLISHED MUSIC BOOKS

Events are listed by date, then city. Submit listings at least 16 days before publication to books@list.co.uk. Listings are compiled by Laura Ennor. ✽ Indicates Hitlist entry

Thursday 29

Glasgow FREE International Women’s Day Poetry Book Launches CCA, 350 Sauchiehall Street, 352 4900. 7pm. The Scottish Writers’ Centre launches poetry books by AC Clarke and Amy Anderson.

Edinburgh FREE It’s Life Jimmy, But Not As We Know It National Library of Scotland, George IV Bridge, 0844 557 2686. 10am–8pm. Explore the past, present and future of Scottish sci-fi writing at this exhibition running until Sun 15 Apr. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival. FREE A Room with Our View Central Library, George IV Bridge, 242 8100. 10am–8pm. A poetry installation in which the objects in a bedroom have been printed with poetry by young writers. Running until Fri 27 Apr.

Friday 30

Edinburgh Neu! Reekie! Scottish Book Trust,

Sandeman House Trunks Close 55 High Street, 524 0160. 7pm. £5 (£4). Avantgarde spoken word, film and music night. Guid Crack Waverley Bar, 1 St Mary’s Street, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £3 suggested donation. The monthly storytelling session hosts an open floor Ceilidh Culture special. Part of Ceilidh Culture. Luath Off the Page Live City Café, 19 Blair Street, 228 1155. 8pm. £3 (£2). An evening of performance poetry, prose and music featuring Catriona Child, Alistair Findlay and many more. Part of Ceilidh Culture.

Books

Edinburgh in 2005 and became Scottish Slam Poetry Champion in 2011.

Monday 2

Edinburgh Madwomen in the Attic Ghillie Dhu, 2 Rutland Place, 0844 557 2686. 5.30–7pm. £10 (£8). Journalist Viv Parry, lecturer Sarah Dillon and psychiatrist Dr Raj Persaud attempt to diagnose some of literature’s most famous hysterical females. Ages 18+. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival. FREE Blackwell Book Quiz Blackwells, 53–59 South Bridge, 622 8201. 5.45pm. Test your literary credentials in teams of up to five.

Wednesday 4

Glasgow

Living Under the Gun: A Night of Poetry and Music for Palestine CCA, 350 Sauchiehall Street,

352 4900. 7.30pm. £13 (£10). Poetry from Liz Lochhead, Tom Leonard and Billy Letford, and folk music from Roy Bailey, Alasdair Roberts and Gillebride Macmillan, all in aid of Saor Phalastain’s Glasgow-Bethlehem cultural exchange. FREE Bring Me the Head of Ryan Giggs by Rodge Glass Mono, 12 Kings Court, King Street, 553 2400. 8pm. Launch event for the new novel by Glasgow writer. Word Play Tron Theatre, 63 Trongate, 552 4267. 8.30pm. £2. Open mic night with acoustic music, poetry and prose, hosted by The Word Factory.

Edinburgh On Extinction Ghillie Dhu, 2 Rutland

Place, 0844 557 2686. 5.30–7pm. £10 (£8). In an event organised by Granta Books, science broadcaster Hermione Cockburn, poet Melanie Challenger and linguist Bernadette O’Rourke explore

Saturday 31

Glasgow Leabhar’s Craic CCA, 350 Sauchiehall

Street, 352 4900. 10–midnight. £10 (daytime only £5; evening only £8). Oneday festival of Gaelic literary culture, with highlights including a special celebration of poet and songwriter Aonghas MacNeacail, the launch of Margaret Callan’s new book and a headline show from Gaelic folk band The Seedboat (Bàta an t-Sìl), alongside much more theatre, music, film, workshops and readings.

Edinburgh The next best thing to hearing a great record is then going on to read all about it. Unless you feel that analysing music in any way is akin to destroying the purity of the aural experience. If you’re of that opinion then best avoid this clutch of books. Richard King’s How Soon is Now? (Faber) has the nifty subtitle, ‘The Madmen and Mavericks Who Made Independent Music: 1975–2005’, which looks at the likes of Tony Wilson and Alan McGee (pictured) as we get the inside scoop of how bands from Aphex Twin to Arctic Monkeys and Orange Juice to Franz Ferdinand were able to flourish. Rob Young has edited together No Regrets: Writing on Scott Walker (Orion), whose career also blossomed on the edges of sanity. From glorious 60s pop to 2006’s The Drift which featured the sound of meat being punched and musings on Elvis chatting to his still-born twin, Walker’s work is, thankfully, like no other. Martin C Strong’s The Great Folk Discography Volume 2: The Next Generation (Polygon) is a further example of his typically obsessively-detailed music bibles with entries on Billy Bragg, Midlake, Fleet Foxes, Nanci Griffith and the Proclaimers. Arguably the most eccentricsounding music book of the year is Bernie Krause’s The Great Animal Orchestra: Finding the Origins of Music in the World’s Wild Places (Profile) which explores natural soundscapes such as snapping shrimp, popping viruses and the songs of humpback whales as well as wind, rain and cracking glaciers. If you like this book, you will join an army of Krause fans that number David Bellamy, Terry Nutkins and Jacques Cousteau’s son. (Brian Donaldson)

Nothing But the Poem Scottish Poetry Library, 5 Crichton’s Close, Canongate, 557 2876. 11am–12.30pm. £5 (£3). See Thu 29. Traveller Traditions Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High Street, 228 1155. 2pm. £30 (£26). Discover the story tradition of Scotland’s travelling people and pick up some tales and tips for re-telling with storyteller and writer Jess Smith. Part of Ceilidh Culture

Sunday 1

Glasgow

Words Per Minute The Arches, 253 Argyle Street, 565 1000. 4–6pm. £5. Monthly spoken word, music, film and performance gig. This month they’re celebrating the ‘Special Relationship’ with writers from both sides of the pond: on Team USA, Jarred McGinnis, Ryan van Winkle and Sam Taradash; for the UK, it’s Elaine di Rollo, Billy Letford, Wayne Price, Rodge Glass and Caroline Bird.

Edinburgh Young Dawkins The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers Street, 220 4298. 8pm. £4 (£3). American beat poet who moved to

The inaugural colonsay Book Festival: Conversations @ The Edge will run from the 27th29th of April as part of the month long – Festival of Spring. Authors attending include: Alexander McCall Smith Kenneth Steven James Robertson Sophie Cooke Liz Lochead Margaret Elphinstone And whisky writer and musician Robin Laing. For tickets sales visit: http://www.spanglefish.com/ ColonsayBookFestival/ e-mail: colonsaybookfestival@ hotmail.co.uk Telephone: 01951 200067

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Books EVENTS things that have disappeared from our world, from species and cultures to languages and ideas. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival. Brave New Words Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High Street, 0844 557 2686. 8–10pm. £8 (£6). Writers’ Bloc present an informal night of spoken word inspired by science fact and science fiction. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival.

Thursday 5

Glasgow

FREE The 2012 Annan Lecture: The Word and the

Image Mitchell Library, North Street,

287 2999. 7–8.30pm. The annual lecture from the Scottish Society for the History of Photography explores the links between the written word and the captured image, and is delivered by James Robertson, author of And The Land Lay Still, and photographer Robin Gillanders.

Edinburgh

Iain Banks: Stonemouth

Waterstone’s West End, 128 Princes Street, 226 2666. 6pm. £2. Banks reads from his new novel, Stonemouth, a homecoming tale set in a small estuary town north of Aberdeen. See review, page 50.

Glasgow

Julia Donaldson Mitchell Library, North Street, 287 2999. 10.30–11.30am. £3. The Gruffalo author reads some of her well-loved kids’ stories. Please note re-scheduled date.

Monday 9

52 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

Tuesday 10

Edinburgh FREE Weird Things Customers Say in Bookshops The Edinburgh Bookshop, 219 Bruntsfield Place, 447 1917. 5.30–6.30pm. Jen Campbell introduces her forthcoming book, which does what it says on the tin, with many a funny and surreal tale of the odd requests made of her by customers in her life as a bookseller. The School of Poets Scottish Poetry Library, 5 Crichton’s Close, Canongate, 557 2876. 6–8.30pm. £2. Monthly poetry workshopping session. Beginners and new members welcome, if you like it you can join up for the year.

Wednesday 11

Glasgow FREE Be Inspired: Reading for Wellbeing Glasgow Women’s Library, Mitchell Library, 15 Berkeley Street, 248 9969. 2–3.30pm. A women-only launch event for GWL’s project to improve your wellbeing through books. Poetry@The Ivory Ivory Hotel, Langside Avenue Shawlands, 636 0223. 7.30–9.30pm. £3. Monthly poetry event with guest readers and open mic spots for those who want to share their poetic talents with the world.

Edinburgh Café Voices Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High Street, 556 9579. 7–9pm. £5. A relaxed session of oral storytelling, poetry by memory, music and song.

Thursday 12

Glasgow FREE Scottish Writers’ Centre presents Alan Bissett, In Process CCA, 350 Sauchiehall Street, 352 4900. 7pm. Noted Scottish author Alan Bissett (he of Pack Men, The Moira Monologues and Death of a Ladies Man fame) explains the workings of his creative process.

Dundee FREE A Pound of Flesh Central Library, The Wellgate, 01382 431500. 7pm. Three renowned Scottish novelists,

Skagboys The Caves, Niddry Street South, 557 8989. 8.30pm–midnight. £10. Irvine Welsh reads from longawaited new novel Skagboys, prequel to the seminal Trainspotting. Also appearing are World Slam Champion poet Elvis McGonagle as host, and DJ Craig Smith, who appears in some of Welsh's novels. Advance tickets from bookslam.com. See our interview with Irvine Welsh next issue.

Monday 23

Glasgow

Jane Hirshfield Scottish Poetry

FREE World Book Night with Glasgow Women’s Library Glasgow Women’s Library, Mitchell Library, 15 Berkeley Street, 248 9969. 5.30–7.30pm. Enjoy tea, cake and chat amid the library’s shelves.

Edinburgh

Saturday 7

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

FREE Joseph Pearce’s Book Club Joseph Pearce’s, 23 Elm Row, 556 4140. 7–10pm. Monthly book club in a cosy bar setting.

FREE The Magic Carpet Cabaret Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. A night of poetry, songs and stories, with open mic spots.

Maggie O’Farrell often retells the moment when the notion of authorship became embedded in her psyche. At the age of five, little Maggie was struggling with a story she was penning. On asking if her mother would write it instead, she was met with this reply: ‘But if I wrote it, it would be my story, not yours.’ From that moment on, O’Farrell has fought to have her own voice heard on the page and has done so with much success. Her 2000 debut, After You’d Gone, was a taut drama about a troubled young woman, Alice Raikes, who sees something terrifying at Waverley Station and heads immediately back to London where she is later involved in a traffic accident and left in a coma. Through her damaged haze, the stories of her life slowly unravel. Arguably her breakthrough book is The Vanishing Act of Esme Lennox, whose setting shifts between India and Scotland as we learn of the complex relationship between two sisters and the impending psychological breakdown of one. Her most recent book is the Costa Novel Award-winning The Hand that First Held Mine, a haunting tale set both in the present day and 1950s Soho. In this World Book Night event, she discusses her work with literary agent Jenny Brown, no doubt looking at some key themes such as sibling relations, loss, love and the mysteries and connections held in the past. (Brian Donaldson)

FREE Reading Allowed Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. A monthly evening of storytelling and poetry reading in a relaxed, teasipping environment.

Edinburgh

Glasgow

Central Library, Edinburgh, Mon 23 Apr

Friday 13

Glasgow

Library, 5 Crichton’s Close, Canongate, 557 2876. 6–7.30pm. £10 (£7). American poet Hirshfield reads from her work and discusses it with Scottish Poetry Library director Robyn Marsack. FREE Hazel McHaffie Pulp Fiction, 43 Bread Street, 229 4444. 6.30–8.30pm. Hazel McHaffie, a specialist in novels dealing with medical ethics issues, reads from her new book Saving Sebastian before discussing her work. A Braw Nicht Oot Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High Street, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £6 (£4). Scots storytellers including Tim Porteous, Senga Munro, Sheila Kinninmonth, James Spence and Jackie Ross will be telling tales in different dialects, plus music and song, and a short comedic theatre piece, Costa del Port Seton. Part of Ceilidh Culture.

Friday 6

MAGGIE O’FARRELL

Alex Gray, Tony Black and Doug Johnstone (who’s also been known to scribe for The List from time to time), convene to discuss a life of crime . . . writing.

Monday 16 FREE Blackwell Book Group Blackwells, 53–59 South Bridge, 622 8222. 6pm. A discussion of the Pulitzer Prize-winning A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan.

Wednesday 18

Edinburgh

FREE Lin Anderson Drumbrae Library Hub, Drum Brae Drive, 529 5524. 6.30–7.45pm. Edinburgh crime writer Lin Anderson, creator of the Rhona MacLeod series, discusses her latest work. Booking essential. FREE Nothing but the Poem Central Library, George IV Bridge, 242 8100. 6.30–7.45pm. Ryan van Winkle leads this poetry reading session, which is mercifully free of high falutin’ language. Booking essential.

Thursday 19

Edinburgh FREE World Book Night Blackwells, 53–59 South Bridge, 622 8222. 6pm. Free (ticketed). Readings and chat from authors including James Robertson, Andrew Greig and Keith Gray. FREE World Book Night with Maggie O’Farrell Central Library, George IV Bridge, 242 8100. 6.30–9.15pm. O’Farrell, a Costa prize winner for her 2010 novel The Hand That First Held Mine, discusses her work with Jenny Brown. See panel.

Tuesday 24

Glasgow FREE Reading the Leaves TchaiOvna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. Join guest writers for an evening of poetry and creative writing.

Edinburgh Electric Tales The Stand, 5 York

Place, 558 7272. 8.30pm. £5 (£4). A blended mix of comedy and storytelling, making for a chilled night of funny yarns and verse told by a range of performers, with the sole aim of cheering you up.

Wednesday 25

Glasgow FREE Weegie Wednesdays CCA, 350 Sauchiehall Street, 352 4900. 7.30pm. Monthly forum offering writers, poets, publishers, booksellers, librarians, creative writing students or anyone else with a literary interest the chance to get together socially to talk about books and publishing.

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

FREE Reading: John KV Eunson Waterstone’s West End, 128 Princes Street, 226 2666. 6pm. Eunson talks about his new book Sporting Scotland, which tells the stories of remarkable Scottish sportspeople. Booking essential. FREE Alex Gray Central Library, George IV Bridge, 242 8100. 6.30–7.45pm. Crime writer Gray (author of the DCI Lorimer novels) discusses her latest novel A Pound of Flesh with Scotsman journalist Jackie McGlone. Booking essential.

Here Be Dragons: Edwin Morgan, Beowulf and the Dragon Scottish

Friday 20

Glasgow FREE Aye Aye Books Mobile Book Van Various venues, see glasgowinternational.org for details. You know how it is: you attend an art exhibition and the experience just isn’t complete unless you buy a book. Fortunately Aye Aye Books (normally based in the CCA) will be on hand (and in a van) to answer your coffee-tablefilling needs. The Mobile Book Van will be in operation until Mon 7 May. Part of Glasgow International Festival of Visual Art. FREE The Better Crack Club TchaiOvna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. Storytelling club for adults.

Poetry Library, 5 Crichton’s Close, Canongate, 557 2876. 6.30–8pm. £7 (£5). The inaugural Edwin Morgan lecture is given in the week of what would have been the poet and Makar’s 92nd birthday, by Chris Jones of the University of St Andrews.

Thursday 26

Glasgow FREE Unwind with a Book Glasgow Women’s Library, Mitchell Library, 15 Berkeley Street, 248 9969. Noon–2pm. A women-only reading group offering a friendly environment for sharing stories, books and poems with other readers. Contact the GWL for details and to sign up.

Edinburgh Nothing But the Poem Scottish Poetry Library, 5 Crichton’s Close, Canongate, 557 2876. 6–7.30pm. £5 (£3). Informal poetry discussion forum. This month, the group turns its attentions to the Dunfermline-born poet John Burnside, a former winner of both the TS Eliot and Forward Poetry prizes. Booking advisable; a second session runs on Sat 28 Apr.


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Clubs HITLIST

list.co.uk/clubs

THE BEST DANCEFLOOR ACTION

Crate DIGGING German DJ NICK CURLY specialises in deep intelligent house, hosts a residency at Kehakuma (Space, Ibiza) and heads out on tour showcasing his new album, Between the Lines. Here’s a taste of what to expect when he guests at Return to Mono 25 Years of Sub Club 25 years in and still going strong, the Subbie’s April line-up is one to get excited about. It features dependable Subculture guests Dixon (7 Apr) and Omar S (14 Apr), I AM with Blawan on 3 Apr, Seth Troxler at Sensu on 20 Apr and – perhaps most exciting of all – the return of Optimo on 6 Apr. Sub Club, Glasgow, through Apr.

Pinup Nights: Game Over Glasgow’s hardest-working indie club night is sadly coming to an end, in the company of live guests The Twilight Sad, Malcolm Middleton and more. Flying Duck, Glasgow, Fri 30 Mar.

Jackhammer Easter Weekender Ben Sim and Surgeon play the Fri, Radioactiveman guests on Sat. Two days of techno, it’s what Jesus would have wanted! The Caves, Fri 6 Apr; The Third Door, Edinburgh, Sat 7 Apr.

Volume! They helped break dubstep in Scotland and hosted the Edinburgh debuts of such Skream, Benga and Caspa, now they head off to the great DJ booth in the sky at the last Volume! Sneaky Pete’s, Edinburgh, Sat 7 Apr.

Axwell The pick of all this year’s Easter Sunday specials, as the third of the Swedish House Mafia who isn’t Sebastian Ingrosso or Steve Angello makes his debut solo Scottish appearance in a very big way. O2 Academy, Glasgow, Sun 8 Apr. 20 Years of Slam The boys behind Pressure celebrate two decades at the Arches controls with an apocalyptic Easter party featuring Laurent Garnier’s LBS and Ben Klock. Arches, Glasgow, Sat 7 Apr.

D!P It’s not so much the fact that M_nus’ Matador is playing this party at the Chambre, more that it’s a ridiculous 11-hour assault on your eardrums. Better get there early, though. Chambre69, Glasgow, Sat 14 Apr.

Coalition Rinse FM continue to prove why they’re at the forefront of modern dance music as Roska represents the pioneering radio station and lays down a set of UK funky and broken beat. Sneaky Pete’s, Edinburgh, Sun 15 Apr. The Go-Go Keep it old school as Tall Paul and Big Gus’s retro, garage, funk, mod and soul night celebrates their big 12th birthday with two party-starting sets from Them Beatles. Studio 24, Edinburgh, Sat 31 Mar.

Qabalala So what does Qabalala mean? Well in this case a multi-venue minifestival of live music and DJs all headlined by Rudi Zygadlo (Planet Mu) and Auntie Flo (Huntley & Palmer’s). The Third Door, Edinburgh, Sun 8 Apr.

I’ll start with Sante feat Daniel Wild ‘Easy’ (8Bit) for me it’s the best club record of the moment, people go crazy when I play it. I have two labels and sometimes you sign a track and you realise, ‘boom this is special, this could get really big’ and I think this could be one of the big tracks of 2012. My favourite track from my album is Nick Curly ‘Underground’ (Cecille). The album shows Nick Curly from Monday to Friday afternoon whereas other productions I’ve done before, the EPs, are more for the dancefloor but ‘Underground’ is a track you can play in the clubs. The third one is Mr V ‘Jus’ Dance (Cosmic Ritual Dub)’ (Vega Records) it’s an old track but still one of the sexiest tracks I’ve ever heard. It’s just a great record to warm up the night or the early morning after the party. Markus Fix ‘El Comienzo’ (Cecille) is very special to me and is always in my record box. It was the first release on my Cecille label and the first ever release from Markus Fix. It’s been out for five years but has such a great feeling and a special vibe. These two were never big big hits but they have something special which is why I still play them, they are always in my case, my secret weapons. The last one is Mr G ‘Got that Swing’ (Bass Culture). Bass Culture is one of my favourite labels at the moment. I really like Mr G’s productions and it’s 100% a club track. ■ Nick Curly guests at Return to Mono, the Sub Club, Glasgow, Fri 13 Apr. 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 53


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Clubs MINI-FESTIVAL

Rudi Zygadlo

QABALALA The Third Door & Assembly Bar, Edinburgh, Sun 8 Apr In the past month it’s seemed there’s been precious little to get excited about on Edinburgh’s clubbing and live scene, but let’s put the hand-wringing to one side for a few paragraphs and remember that people are still out there trying to get things done. Like the Third Door, for example, the former Bristo Square student pulling den known as Medina, which has become one of the city’s leading small music venues of late thanks to the creative direction of Ten Tracks online label founder Ed Stack. So this Easter Sunday special (named not in honour of Madonna’s spiritual leanings, but to tie the religious philosophy’s ‘celebrate everything’ mentality to what Ten Tracks do) is an opportunity to show off what’s happening at the Third Door and also to shine a light on the music programme Stack has begun at the rebranded Assembly Bar upstairs. ‘We’ve got a wide spectrum of tastes and interests, from the acoustic to the electronic,’ he says, ‘but we like to present them in a way that makes sense. Here we’ll be starting with noise bands and ending with the clean, Africaninfluenced electronic music of [Glasgow’s] Auntie Flo.’ In between there’ll also be dubstep from Planet Mu’s Rudi Zygadlo, ‘metal-dance’ act Tokamak and Leeds industrial gang Nope, as well as DJ representatives from No Globe, Departure Lounge and many more upstairs. ‘The situation isn’t great in Edinburgh at the moment,’ concedes Stack, ‘but we have a fantastic soundsystem, the right capacity and an eclectic policy. To nurture a local scene you need to be accepting and supportive, and sometimes the most important thing is to just let things happen.’ (David Pollock)

INDIE FINALE

TRANCE

PINUP NIGHTS: GAME OVER

ABOVE & BEYOND

Flying Duck, Glasgow, Fri 30 Mar

Barrowland, Glasgow, Fri 20 Apr

Has there ever been an indie night that’s worked as hard as Pinup Nights? Perhaps, but none have managed to alchemise the same mix of cannily chosen guest DJs, intelligently-curated young bands, painstaking theme nights and frankly dedicated gimmickry to the same effect. And now it’s over, and Glasgow will be a sadder place. ‘A lot of people have been asking why we’re stopping when things are going so well,’ says John D McGonagle, who founded Pinups almost nine years ago. ‘We want to go out – not at the top, that sounds really big-headed – but on our own terms.’ He doesn’t believe in revivals, and says if he ever throws a one-off party again it will be in a different venue under a different name. What a finale they have planned, though, with live sets from Miaoux Miaoux and Sonny Marvello, plus Twilight Sad, Malcolm Middleton and Emma Pollock playing acoustic sets in the kitchen bar. Plus there’s the online campaign to get Jarvis Cocker to come and DJ, which McGonagle has been desperate to make happen since the club began. In the spirit of praising-not-burying, then, what have been his favourite ever Pinups moments? ‘Getting a photo of Aidan Moffat, Frank McAvennie and Paolo Nutini chatting away last year was very amusing,’ he says. ‘Florence Welch DJing, Friendly Fires, Alex James – who didn’t sell out, strangely – and Tony Wilson’s screamo set. It was horrendous and it cleared the room, I don’t know what he was thinking on that night. I could write a book on it all – and it would be just like Peter Hook’s How Not to Run a Club.’(David Pollock)

Some dismiss trance as lowest common denominator dance music but for many it’s the epitome of club culture, the big build-ups, the huge breakdowns, glosticks, lasers and Gatecrasher kids. Whatever the critical reception, trance is wildly popular. Only names like Tiësto, Deadmau5 and Armin van Buuren can sell out stadiums, arenas and festivals. And Above & Beyond are joining their ranks. ‘Unlike some more disjointed, technical dance music, trance music has songs. Above & Beyond’s music is an attempt to deal with the emotional questions we all ask from time to time and if not provide answers at least show that someone else is feeling the same way as you,’ explains Tony McGuiness, one third of A&B alongside Jono Grant and Paavo Siljamäki. ‘That’s the reason why trance is getting more popular, rather than being in a dark club with your head down lost in a journey of your own.’ McGuiness and co pay far more attention to the live experience than most other DJs. ‘We’ve put a lot of time, effort and a considerable amount of money into producing something that looks good while you’re listening to the music.’ Above & Beyond want to create a shared experience with the crowd, writing messages on screen to further connect with the audience. ‘Paavo has been instrumental in getting the software from the decks to speak to the software that drives the visuals so that whatever clips we choose are exactly in time to the music. They’re all themed so it’s almost like a little film.’ (Henry Northmore)

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Clubs

list.co.uk/clubs

GLASGOW Events are listed by city, day, type then alphabetically by name. Submit listings at least 16 days before publication to david.pollock@list.co.uk. Glasgow listings are compiled by David Pollock. ✽ Indicates Hitlist entry

Glasgow Thursday

Monthly & One-Offs

■ Crimes of the Future at Berkeley

Suite. 29 Mar, 10pm–3am. £7. Andrew Weatherall associates Scott Fraser and Timothy J. Fairplay embark on a new project with Alan Gray from Transmission, playing Krautrock, electronica, dub and everything in between. ■ Korn Aftershow Party at Classic Grand. 29 Mar, 11pm–3am. £3; free with Korn ticket stub. Metal aftershow. ■ Likwit Fusion at Chambre 69. 29 Mar, 11pm–3am. £4. Hip hop, beats, glitch and R&B. With S-Type (LuckyMe, Phuturelabs), Sega Bodega (Naïve) and Freaky Freaky. FREE Boom Boom at Nice’n’Sleazy. 5 Apr, 11.30pm–3am. Club night. ■ Cryotec at Classic Grand. 5 Apr, 11pm–3am. £3. DJs Tailz and Effigy bring you a night of industrial and EBM. ■ Go Kill Disco at O'Couture. 5 Apr, 11pm–3am. £8 (early bird £6). Kick start the Easter weekend with the house and techno sounds of the Go Kill Disco team joined by Soma favourites Silicone Soul and Rebecca Vasmant (Ministry of Sound). ■ JLS Afterparty at Campus. 5 Apr, 9pm–3am. £10. The much perved-over foursome return to the scene of their first post X-Factor show to pose for photos and work the CD player. Steady girls! ■ Philanthrobeats at Chambre 69. 5 Apr, 11pm–3am. £4. An all new charity club night from the crew behind Kollektiv. With guest DJ and live sets from Mount Heart Attack, Mia Dora, Denney&FortyWinks and Tarantism. The decor theme will be based around surveillance and the CCTV-heavy state we live in, with all proceeds going to Amnesty International. FREE Harsh Tug at Nice’n’Sleazy. 12 Apr, 11.30pm–3am. ‘Get drunk and get crunk. Get hip-hopped oot yer nuts and dance like dickheads.’ Sold! ■ A Love From Outer Space at Berkeley Suite. 12 Apr, 10pm–3am. £7. Andrew Weatherall and Sean Johnstone bring their out-there club night to Glasgow for a bi-monthly residency. ■ The Rev Up at Nice’n’Sleazy. 19 Apr, 11.30pm–3am. £3. New rockabilly night, with Aaron (All Tore Up). Includes entry to Mixed Bizness. ■ Skrillex at O2 Academy. 19 Apr, 7pm. £16. Ridiculously hard dubstep assault from the infamous Skrillex. Please note new date. ■ Danse Macabre at Nice’n’Sleazy. 26 Apr, 11.30pm–3am. £3. DJs Pasta and Catnip spin old-school goth rock and classic disco (how does that even work?), along with Italo, sleazy synthpop and the best alternative rock tracks the 80s had to offer.

Glasgow Friday

Monthly & One-Offs

■ Banjax at La Cheetah. 30 Mar, 11pm–3am. £6 before midnight; £8 after. A bi-monthly night from Dave Shades (Mount Heart Attack), Tommy & McGarvatron (Bass Invaders) and Data Rape aka Full Phat (Obese, Concept Theory). With Mark Archer, ex of Altern-8, playing an old school rave set. ■ Deep Groan at Berkeley Suite. 30 Mar, 8.30pm–3am. £3. Slow jam, future pop, sexy synths and lo-fi beats, we’re promised, from residents including Steev Errors. ■ Dirtbox at Flat 0/1. 30 Mar,

10pm–3am. £tbc. A house and techno party, with regulars Dirty Basement, Crocky DaMan and Foley Foliage. ■ Friday Street at Blackfriars. 30 Mar, 10pm–3am. £5. Classic mod sounds, 60s psych and northern soul at Scotland’s premier mod club, with regular DJs Mikey Collins and Paul Molloy. With guest DJ Aitor Ziar (Get The Records On). ■ How’s Your Party? at the Sub Club. 30 Mar, 11pm–3am. £8 (£6). Funky, dubstep, bassline and more at this wellrespected party, with resident Boom Monk Ben. With special guest Eats Everything (Dirtybird) and support from MASH. ■ New Life at Nice’n’Sleazy. 30 Mar, 11pm–3am. Free before 11.30pm; £3 after. A club night spanning multiple open-minded styles from the New Life DJs Gerry and Ian. With London by way of Glasgow and Berlin duo Pop Campaign, GK Machine and Cry Parrot’s Fielding Hope. Pinup Nights at the Flying Duck. 30 Mar, 9pm–3am. £6 advance. Glasgow’s biggest indie night, with regular local, national and international guest DJs and live bands representing the best of Glasgow’s scene. March’s date is ‘Game Over’, the last ever Pinups party. Live guests include Sonny Marvello, new Chemikal Underground signing Miaoux Miaoux and big names The Twilight Sad, Malcolm Middleton and Emma Pollock. The online campaign to persuade Jarvis Cocker to DJ is ongoing. See preview, page 54. ■ Tristan Garner at O’Couture. 30 Mar, 9.30pm–3am. £10. The Tiestoremixing, Swedish House Mafiasupporting Frenchman comes to Glasgow. ■ Benny Benassi at the Arches. 6 Apr, 11pm–3am. £16. A huge Good Friday show with Benassi and friends, presented by Colours. Optimo (Espacio) at the Sub Club. 6 Apr, 11pm–3am. £tbc. The return of one of Glasgow’s most revered clubbing institutions to a new bi-monthly Friday night slot. After too long away, JD Twitch and JG Wilkes will team up once more to reprise the sound which defined Glasgow’s last decade. FREE Rumours at Flat 0/1. 6 Apr, 11pm–3am. A new residency from Skandy, Indra, Kris, Sultan and special guests. FREE Shaka at Bar Bloc+. 6 Apr, 11pm–3am. House, disco and electro based on the ‘shred/skate/surf and extreme sports lifestyles’, they tell us. With residents Jay Allan, Martin Bongo and Visual Experimentation, alongside live percussion. ■ Slabs of the Tabernacle at La Cheetah. 6 Apr, 11pm–3am. £7. Exploring the realms of disco, Italo, house, techno and beyond with Andrew Ingram, Brian d’Souza and the Slabs team. The fourth birthday party, with sets from Pamétex (Clone, Murder Capital) and John Heckle (Tabernacle, Mathematics Recordings). FREE Dirty Basement at Flat 0/1. 13 Apr, 11pm–3am. An eclectic mix of party tunes from the local duo. ■ Kino Fist at Nice’n’Sleazy. 13 Apr, 11.30pm–3am. £3. Night of cross-genre delights, new wave, Krautrock, spiky pop and freak beat from Charlotte and Rafla. ■ Processed Beats at Chambre 69. 13 Apr, 8pm–3am. New electronica night opening with live sets from Nevada Base, Crash Club, The Hype, Two Stripe and Fridge Magnets, and DJ sets from Hot Chip’s Felix and DARC. ■ Return to Mono at the Sub Club. 13 Apr, 11pm–3am. £12 (£10). Slam’s monthly house residency, with top-line house and techno guests and a set from the residents themselves. With guest Nick Curly. See preview, page 53. ■ Tribute at La Cheetah. 13 Apr, 11pm–3am. £8. Representatives of Glasgow nights Stay Plastic, Pest Control, All Caps, Scrabble and Jelly

Roll Soul team up for a club which will focus on the unique sound which Carl Craig once perfectly described as ‘electronic funk’. With M>O>S Recordings and MOS Deep label boss Aroy Dee and Glasgow producer Carlos Nilmmns aka Ross McMillan. ■ Above & Beyond at Barrowland. 20 Apr, 7pm. £20. UK leaders of the trance scene at this showcase from their own Anjunabeats label (also featuring Jaytech). See preview, page 54. ■ Argonaut Sounds at Blackfriars. 20 Apr, 11pm–3am. £3. The Argonaut Sounds team return playing roots, reggae and dancehall. ■ Balkanarama at Chambre 69. 20 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £8. A night of gypsy/Balkan/klezmer madness, film, visuals and live music featuring gypsy belly dancing, live visuals, free plum brandy and more. With contemporary Balkan fusion outfit The Destroyers. ■ Black Tent at Nice’n’Sleazy. 20 Apr, 11.30pm–3am. £3. Errors and Rock Action DJs playing indie, house and techno and all genres in between. ■ Lock Up Your Daughters at the Flying Duck. 20 Apr, 11pm–3am. £5 (£4). Ass-shaking session from the LUYD fanzine , with residents DJ Suezz, Lock Up Your DJs and Skeleton Boy. This month is Mess Up Your Daughters, with special guest Simonotron from Edinburgh’s Hot Mess. Sensu at the Sub Club. 20 Apr, 11pm–4am. £14. A typically great house, techno and electro night from the Sub Club. With Visionquest’s Seth Troxler, in celebration of the Subbie’s 25th. ■ Vibes at Stereo. 20 Apr, 11pm–3am. £10. A new night presenting up and coming house music names from around the world, with residents Ctrl+C, Late Nate, Eyeshake and Russ T Vibes. This month’s very special guest is Audiojack. ■ White Noise at La Cheetah. 20 Apr, 10pm–3am. £5 advance; £8 on the door. A brand new techno night from residents The Sublime, Lindsay Green and Kendal Baird. With Italian duo Wave Form.

Weekly FREE Badseed at Slouch. Weekly 11pm–3am. Heather McCartney plays indie, rock‘n’roll and electro. ■ Ballbreaker and Vice at the Cathouse. Weekly 10.30pm–3am. £5 (£4). DJs Billy and Martin Bate play a selection of rock, metal, emo and even hip hop over two floors. ■ Damnation at Classic Grand. Weekly 10.30pm–3am. £5 (students Free). Rock, metal, punk and emo. ■ Lip Service at FHQ. Weekly 6pm–3am. £tbc. Long-running lesbian club night with a focus on all things sensual. Includes facepainting, dressingup box, spin the bottle booths and a ‘sexual postbox’. Ooh-er. ■ Old Skool at the Buff Club. Weekly 11pm–3am. £6; £3 entry through the Butterfly & Pig. Funk, soul and disco from DJs Craig Thompson, Jack and Gordie. ■ Propaganda at O2 ABC. Weekly 10.30pm–3am. £5 (£4). UK-wide indie Friday nighter. ■ Sound at Club 520. Weekly 11pm–3am. £6 (£5). A collection of some of the finest DJs in Glasgow and beyond, with Derizen playing bass influenced party sets in T1 and the house sound of Biba Nights in T4. ■ Tardis at Stairway Club. Weekly 5pm–3am. Free before 10pm; £5 after. Northern soul, classic indie tracks and more from Gavin Dunbar (Camera Obscura), featuring live music. ■ TGIF at the Viper Bar & Club. Weekly 7pm–2am. £4–£6 (girls free before midnight). Alfredo Crolla and Stevie Foy play out the latest hits, club classics and dancefloor electro. ■ United Nations of Dance at the Tunnel. Weekly 11pm–3am. £8. Clubland anthems, hip hop and R&B from Scotty Boy, Marc Anderson, Steve Clarke, John Thomson and more.

CLUBBERS’

Decktionary HOBBES GUIDES US THROUGH CLUBBING’S MYRIAD GENRES

Balkan Beats proper noun: usually up-tempo (around 130 bpm), mixing gypsy/Balkan and other eastern European styles with traditionally more western dance music and electronica; most often little more than a two-bar loop of Balkan accordion, gypsy tuba or jazz trumpet with a fourfour beat rather crassly edited in. ORIGINS The Balkan peninsula is an ethnically charged area, with equally myriad folk music roots: Oriental, Middle Eastern, Islamic, Jewish (klezmer etc), urban, as well as some punk rock. As such, Balkanbeats is a very broad, pan-European mix of east and west. KEY FIGURES Bosnian ex-pat DJ/producer Robert Soko takes credit for first coining the term in Berlin, in 1993. He promotes his own nights in Berlin and London, with residencies in Paris and Budapest, to boot. Bukovinan German Romanian DJ/producer Shantel is another mid-90s pioneer, with a score of releases under his belt. Bavarian troupe La Brass Banda, active since 2007, and Italian DJ/producer Stefano Miele (aka Riva Starr and Madox) are also well worth a look, as is DJ/producer Ulf Lindemann’s Balkan Beats/Electro Swing crossover act, Dunkelbunt. (hobbesmusic.co.uk)

■ You’ll hear Balkan Beats at Balkanarama, Chambre 69, Glasgow, Fri 20 Apr; Studio 24, Edinburgh, Sat 21 Apr and Balkan Boom, Third Door, Edinburgh, Tue 10 Apr. Thanks to Marcus del Sol (Grandma Sta Flash & The Furious Grandads, Orkestra del Sol) for his help researching this piece.

29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 55


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Clubs Glasgow Saturday

Monthly & One-Offs

■ Back to the Future at O2 Academy.

31 Mar, 8pm–3am. £20. A customarily huge night of hardcore, rave and old skool at this established large-scale event. The Easter party features sets from Zatox, Dutch Master, Tommyknocker, Kodex, The R3bels and many more. ■ Bedlam at Queen Margaret Union. 31 Mar, 10pm–2am. £tbc. A monthly goth, EMB and hardcore night for the blackclad hordes. ■ La Cheetah Presents at La Cheetah. 31 Mar, 11pm–3am. £10. One of Glasgow’s most bangin’ basements selects a guest for your approval. With Berlin’s Fachwerk label boss Mike Dehnert. ■ Der Supermax Love Machine at Basura Blanca at the Brunswick Hotel. 31 Mar, 11pm–3am. £5. Sex, droogs and reich’n’roll with Glasgow’s disco grand master Billy Woods. ■ Divine at the Admiral. 31 Mar, 11pm–3am. £5 before midnight; £7 after. Glasgow’s longest-running club residency brings you a monthly dose of northern soul, heavyweight funk, Tamla Motown, 60s freakbeat, dynamite ska, easy listening and psychedelic soundtracks. ■ Inside Out at the Arches. 31 Mar,

GLASGOW CLUB VENUES ■ Admiral Bar Basement 72 Waterloo Street, 221 7705. A great venue that has managed to get a new 3am licence. ■ The Arches Argyle Street, 0870 240 7528. Probably the biggest venue in Glasgow and home to famous names like Colours, Death Disco and Pressure. ■ Arta 62 Albion St, 552 2101. An incredibly flash bar, restaurant and club space in the Merchant City. See listings for selected highlights. ■ Bamboo 51 West Regent Street, 332 1067/8. A musical programme that takes in modern soul and funky house makes this a favourite venue. See listings for selected highlights. ■ Basura Blanca at the Brunswick Hotel 106108 Brunswick Street, 552 0001. From electronica to soul and funk, a wide range of party nights abound at this basement venue. See listings for selected highlights. ■ Blackfriars 36 Bell Street, 552 5924. Rock, pop and indie DJs, with occasional bands earlier in the evening. See listings for selected highlights. ■ Black Sparrow 241 North Street, 221 5530. It’s an early-closing bar venue, but this new addition to Glasgow’s scene deserves mention for its fine selection of guest DJs. See listings for selected highlights. ■ Boho 59 Dumbarton Road, 357 6644. Glossy weekend clubbing at the foot of Byres Road. See listings for selected highlights.

10pm–3am. £15. Banging house, techno and trance from the long-serving club night, now no longer monthly. With Nicky Romero and support from Richard Durand and Andy Moor, in association with Bitch. ■ LuckyMe at Nice’n’Sleazy. 31 Mar, 10.30pm–3am. £3. The Glasgow-formed, internationally-based clubbing collective return to Glasgow for a date featuring guests Dorian Concept, Cid Rim and Eclair Fifi. ■ Menergy at the Forbidden Gentlemen’s Club. 31 Mar, 11pm–3am. £tbc. Monthly Italo disco and Hi-NRG gay dance party with guest DJs Gary Dance Commander and Blair Benzini. ■ South Side Soul at Pollok ExServicemens Club. 31 Mar, 8pm–1am. £5. Five hours of soul, Motown and R&B with a top quality sound system and a new wooden dance floor. Subculture at the Sub Club. Weekly 11pm–3am. £10. Glasgow’s well-established house institution. The 25 Years of Sub Club celebration kicks off here, with a Harri and Domenic birthday special on 31 Mar, Dixon on 7 Apr, Omar S on 14 Apr and a vinyl-only Record Store Day special on 21 Apr. ■ This Feeling at Chambre 69. 31 Mar, 8pm–2am. £8 in advance; £10 on the door. London’s rock’n’roll night

■ Box 431 Sauchiehall Street, 332 5431. Rock, punk, indie and alternative sounds. See listings for selected highlights.

soul, R&B and house on the site of the old Belo. See listings for selected highlights.

■ Braehead Arena Kings Inch Road, 886 8300. Occasional large one-off events in this shopping centre-based arena.

■ Corinthian Ingram Street, 552 1101. Uppercrust clubbing. Smart clothes are a prerequisite over the weekend. See listings for selected highlights.

■ The Buff Club 142 Bath Lane, 248 1777. A number of fine nights take place at this upstairs-downstairs venue. ■ The Bunker Bar 193–199 Bath Street, 229 1427. Pre-club indie and rock sounds, with late opening at the weekend and occasional big-name guest DJs. See listings for selected highlights. ■ Byblos Unit Q, Merchant Square, 71 Albion Street, 552 3895. Flash mainstream dance sounds for mainstream clubbers in the heart of the Merchant City. ■ Carnival Arts Centre 2nd Floor, 34 Albion Street, 946 6193. Occasional, mostly world music-themed club nights at this Merchant City haunt. See listings for selected highlights. ■ The Cathouse 15 Union Street, 248 6606. The most popular metal and goth club in the city. See listings for selected highlights. ■ Classic Grand 18 Jamaica Street, 847 0820. Regular clubs and live music including Souldiggin’ and more. ■ Club 30 22 Cambridge Street, 332 3437. Billed as a discotheque, expect the most commercial of pop sounds with the occasional bigger name guest. ■ Common 25 Royal Exchange Square, 204 0101. A flash club which offers

56 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

■ The Courtyard 84 West Nile Street, 354 0049. A pub with a small al fresco space to the rear for some legendary daytime house parties. ■ The Ferry Anderston Quay, the Broomielaw, 553 0606. This floating venue on the Clyde plays host to various one-off nights, and the genius monthly that is VEGAS! ■ Firewater 341 Sauchiehall Street, 354 0350. Student-friendly indie-rocking bands and party choons late into the night. See listings for selected highlights. ■ The Flying Duck 142 Renfield Street, 572 0100. An eclectic, indie-focused club which - rather impressively - features a room made out to look like a kitchen. ■ The Garage 490 Sauchiehall Street, 332 1120. Student venue playing party tunes. See listings for selected highlights. ■ Glasgow School of Art 167 Renfrew Street, 332 0691. Record Playerz/Mixed Bizness (on Thursday) and Divine (monthly Saturdays) every week make this student venue a consistent winner. ■ Ivory Blacks 56 Oswald Street, 248 4114. Featuring a mixture of rock gigs and hardcore techno clubs. See

comes to Scotland with a DJ set from The Coral and live performances from Draymin’, Janice Graham Band, Selective Service and Sulk. ■ Windrush 2012 at Blackfriars. 31 Mar, 9pm–3am. £6. Sounds and Pressure Sound System serve up reggae, ska, rocksteady and soul. FREE De Puta Madre at Boteco do Brasil. 7 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. Latin night playing Brazil and South American music, reggaeton, Brazilian house, R&B, Latin beats and African Dancehall with DJ Salazar from Columbia. ■ Deathkill4000 at Bar Bloc+. 7 Apr, 10pm–3am. Free before midnight; £3 after. An industrial rock noise party. With live guests We Are the Physics. ■ The Freak-Beats Club at the Flying Duck. 7 Apr, 11pm–3am. £5. A happening 60s dance party, playing mod, soul, psych, ska and more. Free guest passes available from pre-club party Get the Records On! at the CCA Bar. ■ Pandemic at Nice’n’Sleazy. 7 Apr, 11.30pm–3am. £3. Noj, Mark, Johnny Shrapnel and Gil Scott Heroin play indie, 60s garage, soul, rock’n’roll and ‘The Fall at least once’. 20 Years of Slam at the Arches. 7 Apr, 10.30pm–4am. £18. It’s been twenty years since seminal Glasgow producers Slam first started playing the

listings for selected highlights. ■ The Ivy 1102-1106 Argyle Street, 337 3006. It’s a bar, but it still manages an enviable selection of local house and techno DJ talent all week round. See listings for selected highlights. ■ Karbon 4 Buchanan Street, Springfield Court, 221 8099. Student night TIT is always full, with Electroball Fridays giving it a bit more of an edge. See listings for selected highlights. ■ Karibu 95 Hope Street, 221 7002. Glossy but commercial sounds in the heart of the city, with R&B a particular speciality. ■ Kushion 158-166 Bath Street, 331 4060. Studentfriendly house, pop and indie sounds. See listings for selected highlights. ■ La Cheetah 72 Queen Mary Street, 221 4851. Dance, electronica and cutting-edge rock’n’roll at the venue formerly known as Twisted Wheel. Studentfriendly house, pop and indie sounds. See listings for selected highlights. ■ MacSorley’s 42 Jamaica Street, 248 8581. It’s a pub, but one owned by (and just along the street from) the Sub Club, so the DJs are very good. ■ Maggie May’s 50 Trongate, Merchant City, 548 1350. A punk-themed music venue with a 3am license after the bands have finished. See listings for selected highlights. ■ Milan 50 42 Queen Street, 548 8002. Sleek and sexy urban and house music at Glasgow’s newest party joint, formerly Cube. See listings for selected highlights.

Arches, and tonight the guys behind Pressure will celebrate in style with Laurent Garnier’s LBS and Ben Klock. See 20 Reasons, page 58. D!P at Chambre 69. 14 Apr, 4pm–3am. £10. An eleven-hour marathon party featuring Matador (M_nus). Note that last entry is 8pm. ■ GBXperience at the Arches. 14 Apr, 9pm–3am. £20. A mighty night of hardcore and hardstyle from Back to the Future. With Mental Theo, Noize Suppressor, George Bowie, Mallorca Lee and many more. ■ Go Go Bad at the Flying Duck. 14 Apr, 11pm–3am. £5. A rock ‘n’ roll burlesque frenzy hosted by Babette Corvette. ■ Mixed Bizness x I Hate Fun at La Cheetah. 14 Apr, 11pm–3am. £5 before midnight; £7 after. Cutting edge underground beats and classic dancefloor gems from resident Boom Monk Ben, in association with I Hate Fun and La Cheetah. With Roska (Roska Kicks & Snares) and T Williams. ■ Osmium at Blackfriars. 14 Apr, 11pm–3am. £3. DJs Blair Benzini and Gary Dance Commander play Italo, disco, synthpop, funk and a whole bunch of other stuff . ■ Pretty Ugly at the Admiral. 14 Apr, 11pm–3am. £3 before midnight and all

■ Nice’n’Sleazy 421 Sauchiehall Street, 333 0900. One of Glasgow’s most down-to-earth and exciting bars, now with a late license at the weekend. See listings for selected highlights. ■ O2 ABC 300 Sauchiehall Street, 332 2232. This gig venue turns into a massive club night all through the weekend with a mix of indie and freeform mixing. ■ O2 Academy 121 Eglinton Street, 08700 771 2000. Host to big one-off parties ranging from Club Noir to Back to The Future. ■ O’Couture 373–377 Sauchiehall Street, 333 3940. Commercial and studentfriendly, in the heart of Glasgow’s busiest street. ■ The Old Fruitmarket Candleriggs, 353 8000. One of the city’s most atmospheric live venues, which hosts a selection of one-off clubs. ■ Oran Mor Byres Road, 0870 0132 652. Huge Gaelicstyle venue in the West End that plays host to Thursday, Friday and Saturday party nights. ■ Polo Lounge Wilson Street, 553 1221. The gay community of Glasgow votes with its feet every weekend, making this the most popular club of its kind in the city. See listings for selected highlights. ■ Queen Margaret Union University Gardens, 339 9784. Various club and cluborientated gigs occur at this student emporium. See listings for selected highlights. ■ The Shed 26 Langside Avenue, 649 5020. Commercial party nights in the heart of the Southside. See listings for selected highlights.

■ Soundhaus Hydepark Street, 221 4659. House, techno and live venue with Off The Record & DEFF and Monox every month. ■ Stereo 20–28 Renfield Lane, 222 2254. The venue which discovered Franz Ferdinand is revived in a new location, playing host to fine indie gigs and clubs in the basement. ■ Strathclyde Students’ Union University of Strathclyde, Students Association, 90 John Street, 567 5023. Housing a selection of cheesy and/or specialist student nights. See listings for selected highlights. ■ Sub Club Jamaica Street, 248 4600. One of the best club venues in Glasgow and host to Subculture and Optimo. ■ The Tunnel 84 Mitchell Street, 204 1000. A venue famous for its welldressed crowd and popularity. Dance tunes dominate the weekend. See listings for selected highlights. ■ Universal 157 Sauchiehall Lane, 332 8899. This smart venue hosts drum & bass and laid-back club nights, making it a varied space in which to relax. ■ The Viper Bar & Club 500 Great Western Road, Kelvinbridge, 334 0560. This west end institution has been recently refurbished, but it’s still an unashamedly mainstream affair. See listings for selected highlights. ■ The Winchester Club 49 Bell Street, 552 3586. A former jazz bar, this Merchant City basement venue attracts the kind of night and clientele which befits its elegant décor.


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Clubs

list.co.uk/clubs night for students; £5 after. The Pretty Ugly girls will be playing sexy, glamorous indie rock’n’roll, electro beats, 60s soul and experimenting with some new artists to get everyone in the mood for dirty dancing. ■ Wrong Island at Nice’n’Sleazy. 14 Apr, 11.30pm–3am. £3. A monthly party hosted by Dirty Larry and Teamy, playing a tracklist of everything danceable from 80s disco all the way to modern post-dubstep stompers. ■ zero10 at Stereo. 14 Apr, 11pm–3am. £8 (students £5). A new house and techno night. This first date gets off to a bang with a guest set from Levon Vincent. ■ Bottle Rocket at Nice’n’Sleazy. 21 Apr, 11.30pm–3am. £3. A night for dancing to indie-pop, post-punk, Motown, twee and anything else that gets feet tapping. ■ Symbiosis at Audio. 21 Apr, 10pm–3am. £tbc. Drum & bass and dubstep, with resident DJs including Calaco Jack, Alcane, Dom D’Sylva, Whoa!gan and Altronix. With guest DJ NoFace (Elektrikal Sound System/Mixed Bizness/Bad News). ■ System at La Cheetah. 21 Apr, 10pm–3am. £5 before 11pm; £7 after. A new night playing techno, house and minimal from DJ Unique and Richard Watson. With guest Hans Bouffmyhre.

Weekly

■ Absolution at Classic Grand. Weekly

11pm–3am. £5 (students free). Rock, metal, industrial and punk to liven up your Saturday night. ■ Back Tae Mine at the Flying Duck. Weekly 9pm–3am. £5; free before midnight. Going out is the new staying in with rotating resident DJs including Andy Divine and Chris ‘Beans’ Geddes from Singles Night and Jamo from Freakbeats. FREE Deep Groan at Berkeley Suite. Weekly 11pm–3am. A late night drinking bar with Jnr C and The Organist (of Love) playing weird pop, dark dance, soundtracks, lo-fi electro, new wave, international sounds and more. ■ Front to Back at Club 520. Weekly 11pm–3am. £7 (£5). Bouncy reggae business from Chungo Bungo, DJ L-IAM on beat patrol, the Marquee DJs, La Bamba and more. ■ Kinky Disco at Kushion. Weekly 7pm–3am. Free before 11pm; £7 (£5 students) after. The self-styled sexiest party in town is hosted by DJs Stevie Foy and Gav Somerville. playing house, electro and urban hits. ■ Life on Mars at Stairway Club. Weekly 5pm–3am. Free before 10pm; £5 after. Indie rock’n’roll, Motown, electro and soul with DJ Craig McGee. Featuring live music. ■ Love Music at O2 ABC. Weekly 11pm–3am. £7 (£5). Soul, rock’n’roll, indie and electro with Gerry Lyons, with a different club each week in the ABC2, featuring Now But Northern playing northern soul and Motown on the first Saturday, Beats, Rhymes and Life playing hip hop on the second, Flipsville playing 50s and 60s rock’n’roll on the third and FTW’s cross-genre dance party on the fourth. ■ Nu Skool at the Buff Club. Weekly 11pm–3am. £6; £3 entry through the Butterfly & Pig. Nick Peacock, John Ross and Alex O provide a fine line in disco, northern soul and all things funky. FREE Rip This Joint at Slouch. Weekly 11pm–3am. DJ Jopez plays indie, rock‘n’roll, blues, soul and funk. ■ The Rock Shop at Maggie May’s. Weekly 11.30pm–3am. Free before midnight; £5 (£3) after. Resident Lee Craig plays a selection of rock, indie and metal classics in Maggie’s basement. ■ Saturdays at the Cathouse. Weekly 10.30pm–3am. £6 (£5.50). DJs Eric and Muppet offer classic and current rock on level one, while DJ Billy and Framie belt out emo and metal on level two. FREE Thunder Disco Club at Flat 0/1. Weekly 11pm–3am. A weekly

Crimes of the Future

How’s Your Party? at the Sub

Club. 10 Apr, 11pm–3am. £10. Funky, dubstep, bassline and more at this well-respected party, with resident Boom Monk Ben. With guests Sinden, Mele, Krystal Klear and S-Type, in association with Grizzly. ■ Late at the Arches. 10 Apr, 7.30pm–midnight. £4. Scotland’s first club night for people with learning disabilities, in conjunction with Dates’n’Mates, a Glasgow based dating agency for people with learning difficulties, and C-Change, a supported living charity.

Weekly

Once you’ve heard the ethos behind CoF, it’s hard to resist. ‘We wanted to do a night in a great space where drinking and great music went together, rather than loud music and no drinking.’ The ‘great music’ should be easy as it’s a new project from Scott Fraser, Timothy J Fairplay (who have both worked with Andrew Weatherall) and Transmission’s Alan Gray digging deep into the dark corners of their record collection and dredging up a mix of Krautrock, electronica, dub and 80s soundtracks. ■ The Berkeley Suite, Glasgow, Thu 29 Mar. residency from TDC’s Jube.

■ Yoyo at the Shed. Weekly 10pm–3am.

Free before midnight; £6 after. DJs Euan and Derek play pop and hip hop hits.

Glasgow Sunday

Monthly & One-Offs

at O2 Academy 2. 8 Apr, 7.30pm–midnight. £23.50. A third ✽ of the Swedish House Mafia brings his Axwell

Axtone Presents tour to Glasgow for his first ever date in Scotland. ■ Bar Petite Easter All-Dayer at Bar Petite. 8 Apr, 3pm–midnight. £5. Why roll eggs when you can dance all day to the dirty house beats of Peter Farley (Colours, Supernova), Simon Forbes (Sonar FM), Billy Jones (Church On the Hill) and more? ■ Bleach at Classic Grand. 8 Apr, 11pm–3am. £5. Alternative 90s classics with DJ Barry. ■ Melting Pot at the Admiral. 8 Apr, 11pm–3am. £8. All things disco-house from residents Andrew Pirie and Simon Cordiner. An Easter Sunday special tribute to Larry Levan and the Paradise Garage, with the Dance! Dance! Dance! DJs getting involved and Divine’s Psychedelic Soul Lounge upstairs. FREE Nae Danger at Flat 0/1. 8 Apr, 11pm–3am. A monthly Grime and hip hop night from Jinty, I Hate Fun, MegaMegaMan and Kid Robotik, also showcasing live guest MCs. ■ A Riot in the Rock Shop at Maggie May’s. 8 Apr, 8pm–3am. £5. DJ Lopez plays rock, metal and indie. ■ Tayo’s Tracksuit Party at Chambre 69. 8 Apr, 11pm–3am. £8 (£5). Tayo comes to Glasgow, in association with Mixed Bizness’ Boom Monk Ben. With special guest Boddika (Swamp81). FREE Da Dungeon at Flat 0/1. 22 Apr, 11pm–3am. A secret line-up of local guests. ■ Mazor Lazer Aftershow at Nice’n’Sleazy. 22 Apr, 11pm–3am. £4 or free with Major Lazer ticket stub. With Major Lazer’s MC/DJ The Jillionaire, who plays a mash-up of dancehall, soca and big room tropical party music.

Weekly

■ Discobadger at Bamboo. Weekly 10pm–3am. Free before 11.30pm with a matric card; £5 (£4) after. DJ Kash, Domsko and Gerry Lyons play hip hop, house, funk and electro. ■ La Rocha at Berkeley Suite. Weekly 11pm–3am. Free on residents’ nights; £3 on guest nights. A place for the weird and wonderful, where regular live shows and events fill the gaps between resident vibemeisters Cutters Choice and Shax O’ Ring. Intrigue is the name of their game. ■ Sunday Service at Òran Mór. Weekly 11pm–3am. £5 (students £3). Chart, R&B, house and electro from Dave M. FREE Sundays at the Cathouse. Weekly 11pm–3am. DJ AM-Y playing killer rock, metal, punk and requests. ■ SuperSonic Electronic at Nice’n’Sleazy. Weekly 11.30pm–3am. £4 (£3). A night of classic synthesizer sounds and music made for dancing.

Glasgow Monday

Weekly FREE Boteco Intimo at Boteco do Brasil. Weekly 8pm–3am. Explore the intimate sounds of bossa nova, tropicalia, exotica and breezy lounge pop every Monday with your hostess DJ Mingo-go. ■ Burn at the Buff Club. Weekly 11pm–3am. £5 (£3). Burn provides all the disco songs you’ve forgotten about and the ones you can’t forget. Presented by Normski, Zeus and Mash. ■ Monday Night Heat at the Viper Bar & Club. Weekly 9pm–2am. £3–£5 (free entry to all trade staff). Trade night with DJ Ross McMillan playing chart, dance, student anthems.

Glasgow Tuesday

Monthly & One-Offs

at the Sub Club. Weekly (not 10 Apr) 11pm–3am. £4 or free at ✽ www.iamclub.co.uk/contact. Weekly I AM

electronica and bass supplied by Beta & Kappa. With special guest Blawan (R&S Records, Clone) on 3 Apr.

■ Killer Kitsch at the Buff Club. Weekly 11pm–3am. £4 (£3). Euan Neilson, Dave Sinclair and newly recruited resident Hushpuppy (RPZ, Death Disco) present the city’s best Tuesday-nighter. FREE Nectar & Nails at Hummingbird. Weekly 5pm–1am. Off the wall party sounds with DJ Ed Nygma. ■ Play-Doh Tuesdays at Re-Play. Weekly 7pm–3am. Free entry before 11pm; £5/3 after. Ross McFadyen, Ian McNab and friends play house, electro and student anthems. ■ Quids at Queen Margaret Union. Weekly 9pm–2am. £1 before 11pm; £3/2 after. Gerry Lyons provides the soundtrack for this new student indie night. ■ Reprisal at Classic Grand. Weekly 11pm–3am. £3. DJ Mythic presents a midweek extravaganza of rock, metal, punk and ska. ■ Switch Tuesdays at Bamboo. Weekly 11pm–3am. £4 (free for students). Dan South and Robin B mash up hip hop, R&B, pop and electro. ■ Wild Combination at Nice’n’Sleazy. Weekly 11pm–3am. £3. Drunk disco, fun house and acid rock at this new midweek party.

Glasgow Wednesday

Monthly & One-Offs FREE Take It Sleazy! at Nice’n’Sleazy. 4 Apr, 11.30pm–3am. A no-holds-barred mix of 80s pop, electro synths, techno beats and nu-disco. FREE Olympico at Flat 0/1. 11 Apr & 25 Apr, 11pm–3am. A quality midweeker from Theez Boyz R Athletes running laps around the decks. With guest DJs from Lets Go Back, Way Back. FREE Not Moving at Nice’n’Sleazy. 18 Apr, 11.30pm–3am. Club night.

Weekly

■ Bitter Glitter at Bennets Glasgow.

Weekly 11pm–3am. £3. A mix of homo-disco, electronic treats, jackin’ house and tech beats. ■ Gay as F**k at Play. Weekly 11pm–3am. Free before midnight; £3 after. Cheap drinks and gayness with DJs Darren and Michael. ■ Viper Wednesdays at the Viper Bar & Club. Weekly 9pm–2am. £3–£5 (students free). DJ Jimmy Eleven playing all the best chart, dance, R&B, cheese and student anthems. ■ Octopussy at the Arches. Weekly 11pm–3am. £7 (students £5). Jacuzzis, bouncy castles and a Chapel of Love at this weekly student night of indie, pop and electro. ■ Spiral at Stairway Club. Weekly 5pm–3am. Free before 10pm; £5 after. The darker side of indie from Gavin Dunbar (Camera Obscura), such as Queens of the Stone Age, Joy Division and The Kills. Featuring live music. ■ Sub Rosa at the Sub Club. Weekly 11pm–3am. £4 (£3) or free entry via sub-rosa@hotmail.co.uk. House-led student night. ■ Subversion at Classic Grand. Weekly 11pm–3am. £3; free with online guestlist. DJs Catnip and Pasta mix up 80s/90s alternative pop hits, dance, industrial and classic rock. 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 57


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Clubs EDINBURGH Events are listed by city, day, type then alphabetically by name. Submit listings at least 16 days before publication to clubs@list.co.uk. Edinburgh listings are compiled by Henry Northmore. ✽ Indicates Hitlist entry

20 REASONS TO CELEBRATE 20 YEARS OF SLAM AT THE ARCHES 1 Slam We must never forget that Stuart MacMillan and Orde Meikle are brilliant DJs mixing up a blend of deep house and techno. 2 International ambassadors Slam’s DJ skills are in demand across the world taking Glasgow club culture global. 3 Pressure Slam have made the Arches their own since 1992. 4 Laurent Garnier The French techno master brings his LBS project to the party. 5 Ben Klock The Berlin DJ also joins the birthday bill. 6 Easter Extra recovery time so enjoy that bank holiday Monday. 7 Soma Co-founded by Slam in 1991 Soma Records have released tracks by Daft Punk, Funk d’Void, Black Dog and many more. 8 ‘Positive Education’ One of the best techno tunes of all time. 9 ‘Eterna’ More top tunage from the Slam boys. 10 Alien Radio Slam’s second album and probably their best. 11 Paragraph Slam’s subsidiary label for the release of their own material. 12 ‘City Destroyer’ Their first release on Paragraph showcased the classic Slam techno sound. 13 Fenetik/Fifth Freedom/Pnuma Three (now dormant) sub labels from Soma that concentrated on non-house/techno releases. 14 Fabric Not only regulars at the London club they also released a mix CD (Fabric 09) on their label. 15 Remixes They’ve remixed the likes of Carl Craig, Josh Wink, PanPot and Samuel L Session. 16 Remixed Likewise they have been remixed by everyone from Carl Cox to Oxia. 17 Return to Mono Slam also run the more intimate Return to Mono at the Subbie (Nick Curly guests see Crate Digging page 53). 18 Monopods Slam release their Return to Mono sets as monthly podcasts on Sound Cloud. 19 T in the Park The biggest and best dance tent at any festival, this year’s line up already includes: Sven Vath, Benga and Major Lazer. 20 DJ Sneak Pressure returns with Chicago house’s finest, DJ Sneak on 27 Apr. ■ 20 Years of Slam, the Arches, Glasgow, Sat 7 Apr. 58 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

Cari Lekebusch

Edinburgh Thursday

Monthly & One-Offs FREE Ride at Sneaky Pete’s. 29 Mar & 26 Apr, 11pm–3am. Electro, indie and hip hop from Lauren and Chekkie. ■ Zzzap! at the Annexe at the Liquid Room. Weekly 10.30pm–3am. £5 or £3 with guestlist. Electro, nu-rave, UV and house party. Featuring a live set from Lapalux (signed to Flying Lotus’ Brainfeeder Records) on 5 Apr (please note £6 entry). ■ Shake Some Action at the Third Door. 29 Mar–25 Apr, 11pm–3am. £2. Indie night from the Evol crew. FREE Dapper Dan’s at Sneaky Pete’s. 5 Apr, 11pm–3am. Default and Picassio promise ‘a wonky cocktail of beats’ on decks and FX. ■ Hoodoo at the Third Door. 5 Apr, 11pm–3am. £3. Electro swing night. FREE Animal Hospital at Sneaky Pete’s. 12 Apr, 11pm–3am. Techno and minimal night with decor and live visuals. ■ Mad Caravan at Wee Red Bar. 19 Apr, 10pm–3am. Free before midnight; £3 after. World music night of ska, Latin, Balkan and gypsy beats. ■ No Globe at the Caves. 5 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £5 in advance; £6 before midnight; £8 after. ‘Party music without borders’ at this world music and global beats night. Featuring MIA collaborator Afrikan Boy. FREE Spare at Sneaky Pete’s. 19 Apr, 11pm–3am. Danco and Kamico play hench beats. ■ Switch Up at Wee Red Bar. Weekly (from 26 Apr) 10.30pm–3am. 99p. Hip hop, bass and techno from a selection of seasoned Edinburgh DJs, promoters and producers from the likes of Xplicit, JDub, JakN and more.

Edinburgh Friday

Monthly & One-Offs

■ LuckyMe at Sneaky Pete’s. 30 Mar,

11pm–3am. £5 (members free). The scene setting taste makers at Glasgow record label/art collective LuckyMe head over to Edinburgh for more hip hop, dubstep, nu wave, house, 80s soul and funky abstract beats. Joined by Cid Rim and S-type.

■ Outlook Edinburgh Launch Party at the Caves. 30 Mar, 11pm–3am.

£5 before midnight; £8 after. A warm up party for bass orientated festival Outlook 2012 as Riddim Tuffa invite Mungo’s Hi Fi and local lads Big Toe’s Hi Fi for a massive bass, dub, dancehall and reggae party all blasted out on a 20K soundsystem. ■ Riot Control at Studio 24. 30 Mar, 10.30pm–3am. £3. A crazed collision of genres as hip hop, gypsy, techno, disco, hardcore and rave crash together and somehow make a vibrant cohesive whole. Celebrating Terror’s second birthday. ■ Samedia at the Third Door. 30 Mar, 11pm–3am. £3 before midnight; £5 after. A mixed line-up from Edinburgh’s Departure Lounge as they host this laidback oasis of tropical beats, jazz, funk, world music and beyond. Celebrating the launch of the Croatian Soundwave festival with a line-up of Astroboy, Mr Zimbabwe and Wastepicker. ■ Soundburger at Henry’s Cellar Bar. 30 Mar, 11pm–3am. £3 before midnight; £5 after. Specialising in funk, rare groove, rock, psychedelia and jazz.

That deep rumbling sound you can hear reverberating through your cranial cortex is the sound of Cari Lekebusch, one of the pioneers of the Swedish techno movement. There are touches of industrial, mechanical techno and deep organic electro in his releases on Drumcode, Harthouse and his own H Productions (formerly known as Hybrid Sound Architectures) so he should fit in perfectly at Pulse as he tours his You Are a Hybrid Too album. ■ Pulse at Studio 24, Edinburgh, Fri 6 Apr. ■ Stacks at Wee Red Bar. 30 Mar, 11pm–3am. £5 (£3). A new monthly night of soul, funk, Motown, R&B, swing and old time rock’n’roll. ■ Four Corners at the Bongo Club. 6 Apr, 11pm–3am. £3 before midnight; £5 after. Your local one-stop hop for funk/soul/jazz/Latin/Afro/reggae dancefloor action. ■ Hot Mess at Wee Red Bar. 6 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £5 (£4). Gay club night describing itself as ‘an irregular party for irregular folks’, where the focus is on the music, which is a heady mix of disco, hiNRG, acid house, Italo and electro from the safe hands of DJ Simonotron (Club for Heroes/Devil Disco Club).

at the Caves. 6 Apr, ✽ 10.30pm–3am. £10 ; weekend tickets Jackhammer Easter Weekender

£16. Good Friday is battered into submission by the twin techno titans that are Ben Sims and Surgeon. ■ Pulse at Studio 24. 6 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £8 before midnight; more after. The techno night is joined by Swedish pioneer Cari Lekebusch as part of his You Are a Hybrid Too album tour, support comes from Dogma’s Neil Templar. ■ 49HZ at the Annexe at the Liquid Room. 6 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £5 before midnight; £7 after. New bass-orientated monthly party. Launching with UK producer Pasteman plus T-shirt, sticker and CD giveaways. ■ Bass Face #1: The Launch Party at the Venue, Potterrow. 13 Apr,

9pm–3am. £15 early bird; £18 in advance; more on the door. Massive opening night for this new dubstep and drum and bass party. Big launch line-up of Drumsound & Bassline Smith, Bar 9, Brookes Brothers, Funtcase, Sigma, Original Sin, Kromestar, Dub Phizix, Taz Buckfaster and Blackwax. ■ bETAMAX at Studio 24. 13 Apr, 11pm–3am. Free before 11.30pm; £5 (£4) after. New mutant disco, post punk, new wave and 2Tone night hosted by Chris FAST (FASTpunkclub) and Angus A-Go-Go (the Go-Go) with guests. ■ Confusion is Sex at the Bongo Club. 13 Apr, 11pm–3am. £tbc. Twisted

and freaky mix of burlesque, glam techno, electro, indie punk and rock’n’roll where ‘the weird is normal’. Third birthday special dedicated to the fight to save the Bongo, with circus performers and ‘spanking’. ■ Cosmic at Studio 24. 13 Apr, 9pm–3am. Free before 9.30pm; £4 before midnight; £6 after. A spaced-out night of psychedelic trance, with live percussion and visuals by VisualGnosis. ■ Dancehall at the Caves at the Caves. 13 Apr, 11pm–3am. £5–£8. Riddim Tuffa and Big Toe’s HiFi unite with some heavyweight dubplates and a massive selection of digital dub, reggae and dancehall. With special guests OBF. ■ Frame at Wee Red Bar. 13 Apr, 7pm. £7 before 10.30pm; £4 (club only) after. Indie/alternative/electronica night with three live bands. FREE Inner Rhythm at City Café. 13 Apr, 8pm–1am. James Clark, Deetek, and Scott Murray alongside some quality local DJ talent play out funky dubstep, house, tech-house and techno. ■ Rude at Henry’s Cellar Bar. 13 Apr, 11pm–3am. £3 before midnight; £5 after. Reggae, ska, dub and early ragga. ■ Souloco at the Annexe at the Liquid Room. 13 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £8 (£6). Deep techy house and underground electronica. ■ Karnival at the Caves. 20 Apr, 9pm–3am. 27 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £10. Forward thinking house night. Chunky funky German tech-house as Butch guests. ■ Robigan’s Reggae at Henry’s Cellar Bar. 20 Apr, 11pm–3am. Free before midnight; £5 after. A night of reggae, dancehall and rocksteady. ■ Substance at the Bongo Club. 20 Apr, 11pm–3am. £tbc. Edinburgh’s longrunning underground techno party. Hosting a Rephlex Records special with wonky techno and cryptic electro bass from with Detroit’s DJ Stingray (Planet E) and live double bill of Aleksi Perala and Monolith. ■ Too Much Fun Club at Studio 24. 20 Apr, 11pm–3am. £tbc. Celebrating three years of live art in Edinburgh clubs with an art battle, hip hop DJs and


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Clubs Sketch the Rhyme (live hip hop/art freestyling). ■ Turn It Up at Wee Red Bar. 20 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £3. Reggae, dancehall and R&B from the Dread Brothers.

Edinburgh Saturday

Monthly & One-Offs

■ Ad Hoc at Henry’s Cellar Bar. 31

Mar, 11pm–3am. £3 before midnight; £4 after. Indie, alt.rock and punk night. ■ Beat Control at the Third Door. 31 Mar, 11pm–3am. £5. The Evol DJs dish out the best in twisted pop, indie and alternative beats. The Go-Go at Studio 24. 31 Mar, 10pm–3am. £6.50 in advance; £8 (£7) on the door. Swinging 60s garage, soul, mod, new wave, surf and sleazy listening. Twelfth birthday special featuring two live sets from Them Beatles. ■ Heavy Gossip & Ultragroove at the Annexe at the Liquid Room. 31 Mar, 10.30pm–3am. £6 before midnight; £8 after. Two of Edinburgh’s best house nights merge into one almighty celebration of disco beats. Second birthday special. ■ Magic Nostalgic at Electric Circus. 31 Mar, 10.30pm–3am. £5 before midnight; £6 after. ‘The Wheel’ decides the playlist be it disco, 80s, rock gods, 90s rave, power ballads, one hit wonders or movie music. ■ Mumbo Jumbo at the Bongo Club. 31 Mar, 11pm–3am. £6 before midnight; £7 after (£5). Headspin’s Steve Austin and Colin Miller join forces with Tackno’s Trendy Wendy, mixing up funk, soul, electro, house and good time party tunes. ■ Playdate at Sneaky Pete’s. 31 Mar, 11pm–3am. £3 (members free). House night with a few leftfield cuts, joined by Andrew Weatherall associate Dan Avery (aka Stopmakingme). ■ Rewind at the Liquid Room. 31 Mar & 14 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £3 before midnight; £5 after. Mick and Shuggy return for this Edinburgh favourite of 70s, 80s and 90s hits. ■ Big’n’Bashy at the Bongo Club. 7 Apr, 11pm–3am. £tbc. Four deck mix of dubstep, reggae, grime, dancehall and jungle playing out over the Messenger Sound System. ■ VEGAS! at the Voodoo Rooms. 31 Mar, 8.30pm–1am. £5. Hipster swing, jump jive, rockin’ R&B, dancefloor jazz, sleazy listening and gangster grooves. ■ Bootleg at Studio 24. 7 Apr, 11pm–3am. £3 before midnight; £5 after. Dirty tech-house, techno and prog beats.

EDINBURGH CLUB VENUES ■ The Bongo Club Moray House, 37 Holyrood Road, 558 7604. One of the coolest and most eclectic clubs in town. See listings for details. ■ The Caves Niddry Street South, 557 8989. Great subterranean venue (as the name suggests) getting more and more popular due to its unique atmosphere. See listings for details. ■ CC Blooms 23-24 Greenside Place, 556 9331. One of the city’s most enduring gay clubs, with free entry and hi-NRG tracks every night of the week. ■ The Citrus Club Grindlay Street, 622 7086. Mainly studenty venue that goes for an indie vibe as well as a dash of punk,

■ Bordello at Studio 24. 7 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £2 before 11pm; £5 (£4) after. Sleazy classic rock. ■ Dr No’s at Henry’s Cellar Bar. 7 Apr, 11pm–3am. £3 before midnight; £5 after. Dr No’s is back with a steady stream of the best in ska, rocksteady, dancehall and 70s reggae.

at the Third Door. 7 ✽ Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £10; weekend ticket Jackhammer Easter Weekender

£16 (students £8 before midnight). The second night of Jackhammer’s Easter techno extravaganza sees a live set from Radioactiveman with Stephen Brown. ■ Musika at the Liquid Room. 7 Apr, 10pm–3am. £15.50 (advance). Edgy house and electro night VisionQuest special with a five hour set from Lee Curtiss, Ryan Crosson and Shaun Reeves. ■ Speaker Bite Me at Electric Circus. 7 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £4 before midnight; £5 after. The Evol DJs take charge at this alternative disco night of indie, hip hop and a dash of electro, which features everything from Dizzee Rascal to The Cribs. FREE Volume! at Sneaky Pete’s. 7 Apr, 11pm–3am. The Volume! crew brings the dubstep to Sneakys. They were one of the first night’s to bring the dubstep sound to Scotland now they bow out with their heads held high at their last even night. FREE Wired For Sound at the Street. 7 Apr, 9pm–1am. Funky mix with no musical boundaries as Allan Dunbar and Steven Wanless dig deep into the vaults. ■ Bass Syndicate at Sneaky Pete’s. 14 Apr, 11pm–3am. Free before midnight; £3 after. Bass Syndicate returns with a mix of bass heavy breaks, dubstep, electro and nu rave from GMac, Believe and guests. ■ ETC at Henry’s Cellar Bar. 14 Apr, 11pm–3am. £5. A mash of techno, acid house, bassline, jungle, dubstep, metal, breaks and gabber from the Edinburgh Tekno Cartel. ■ The Green Door at Studio 24. 14 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £2 before 11pm; £5 after. A night of rock’n’roll from classics to their mutant offspring. Third birthday special. ■ Gasoline Dance Machine at the Annexe at the Liquid Room. 14 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £6. A night of mutant disco from Cheap Picasso and Kris Wasabi. Special relaunch party as they relocate to the Annexe. ■ Jackhammer at the Caves. 14 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £10 (students £8 before midnight). Techno night joined by German jock Heiko Laux.

new wave and 80s classics. See listings for highlights. ■ City: Edinburgh 1a Market Street, 226 9560. From student nights and pop to big guest DJs. See listings for highlights. ■ Electric Circus 36-39 Market Street, 226 4224. Eclectic dance beats and indie plus private rooms and karaoke for a unique clubbling experience. See listings for details. ■ Espionage 4 India Buildings, Victoria Street, 477 7007. Five floors of varied chart and dancey action. ■ GHQ 4 Picardy Place, 550 1780. Swish gay club. See listings for highlights. ■ Henry’s Cellar Bar 8-16a Morrison Street, 228 9393. Eclectic and experimental nights from

60 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

■ Soulsville at the Bongo Club. 14 Apr, 11pm–3am. £5. The best in soul, doo-wop, R&B and rock’n’roll. ■ Balkanarama at Studio 24. 21 Apr, 9.30pm–3am. £8 before 10pm; £9 after. A blend of klezmer, Balkan, gypsy punk and electronic beats. Featuring live Destroyers (live). ■ Bixon at the Third Door. 21 Apr, 11pm–3am. £6. Slick house night with resident Philip Kearney and David Coleby. Joined by Youwandewan. ■ Corruption Live! at Henry’s Cellar Bar. 21 Apr, 11pm–3am. £4 before midnight; £5 after. Launch party for Corruption 106 Radio with DJ Archy, DJ/MC Shaun McLean and DJ Welshie playing dance, trance, electro, house, hard style and old skool, ■ Messenger Sound System at the Bongo Club. 21 Apr, 11pm–3am. £6 before midnight; £7 after. The best in righteous reggae, dub and roots. ■ Pop Rocks at Electric Circus. 21 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £3 before midnight; £4 after (students £3). Rock, 70s glam, 80s classics and 90s dance hits from the Beep Beep, Yeah! DJs. ■ Wasabi Disco at Sneaky Pete’s. 21 Apr, 11pm–3am. £3 (members free). Another dose of disco, new wave, punk and New York grooves. ■ Xplicit & Wax On at the Liquid Room. 21 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £12. New club collaboration bringing Radio 1’s doyenne of dance culture, Annie Mac, back to the capital.

Edinburgh Sunday

Monthly & One-Offs

■ Backlash Easter Sunday Party at

District. 8 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £5 before midnight; £7 after. Easter special with two rooms of house. ■ Elements at the Liquid Room. 8 Apr, 10pm–3am. £12. Trance and progressive house night. Easter Sunday special with a high energy trance from John O’Callaghan and David Forbes. Qabalala at the Third Door. 8 Apr, 11pm–3am. £5 in advance; £7 after. A melange of musical styles, DJs and live acts at Ten Tracks’ Easter Sunday special (also taking over the Assembly Bar). Planet Mu’s Rudi Zygadlo and Huntley & Palmer’s Auntie Flo headline playing everything from ‘metal-dance’ and techno to dubstep and acoustica. See preview, page 54. ■ Smiths Night at Citrus Club. 8 Apr, 11pm–3am. £6. All Smiths (and Morrissey) all night. Price includes entry into a draw to win a box set of the, newly, re-mastered, Smiths albums.

surf rock to electro. See listings for details.

cool house nights. See listings for highlights.

■ Hive 15–17 Niddry Street, 556 0444. Rock, indie, student nights and electronica. See listings for details.

■ Lava Ignite 3 West Toll Cross, 228 3252. Chart favourites, pop hits and R&B.

■ HMV Picture House 31 Lothian Road, 0844 847 1740. Home to indie clubbing and big name one-off special events. See listings for details.

■ The Liquid Room 9c Victoria Street, 225 2564. Big gig/club space and home to indie, electro, dubstep, house and visiting big name DJs. See listings for details.

■ The Jazz Bar 1 Chambers Street, 467 2539. Cool beats from global sounds to straight ahead jazz. See listings for details.

■ Lulu (under Tiger Lily) 125b George Street, 561 2245. Cool funk, house and other grooves from the people who brought you the Opal Lounge.

■ Karma Nights 23 Lothian Road, 229 9197. Club classics, chart nuggets, 80s and party tunes.

■ Mood Omni, Greenside Place, 550 1640. Chart, dance and party tunes.

■ The Lane 3 Queensferry Street Lane, 467 7215. Selection of

■ Opal Lounge 51 George Street, 226 2275. House and funky beats for a dressed up crowd.

■ State of Mind Charity Club Night at Electric Circus. 8 Apr,

10pm–3am. Donations upon arrival. Special club night to celebrate the third birthday of the State of Mind Boutique and the launch of their new clothing range. Gino (Motherfunk), FineART (LuckyMe), Profisee (Volume!) and more supply the music with all money raised being donated to the Sick Kids Hospital in Edinburgh. ■ In Your Chop at Studio 24. 15 Apr, 9pm–3am. £5. Fundraiser for local legend Bobby Collins Cassidy that had a big impact of Edinburgh’s club and gig scene. Games, competitions, banter, live music and a hip hop, breaks and jungle soundtrack.

Edinburgh Monday

Monthly & One-Offs

■ Moonshine at Electric Circus. 2 Apr,

10pm–3am. £5. Monday night student night playing everything from electroswing to reggae.

Edinburgh Tuesday

Monthly & One-Offs

■ Balkan Boom at the Third Door. 10

Apr, 11pm–3am. £3. Balkan beats from DJ Radulovich and friends.

■ Rack & Ruin at the Third Door. 24

Apr, 11pm–3am. £3. Detroit techno and Chicago house night.

Edinburgh Wednesday

Monthly & One-Offs

■ Full Moon: The Authentic Thai Beach Party at the HMV Picture

House. 4 Apr, 10pm–3am. £4 in advance; £5 on the door. Recreating the atmosphere of Koh Phangan’s Full Moon parties with thumping tunes, dancers and buckets of UV. ■ Project Mongolia Fundraiser at Wee Red Bar. 4 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £5 (£4). Phil Kearney, Ian Billet and Jack Stanley provide the music. ■ Spanglish at Henry’s Cellar Bar. 4 Apr & 18 Apr, 11pm–3am. £4. Flamenco fusion and techno/rumba/hip hop from Orkestra Simolika and Pellizco Flamenco. ■ Shake Yer Shoulders at Henry’s Cellar Bar. 11 Apr, 11pm–3am. £3 before midnight; £4 after. Minimal, electro, techno and drum & bass. FREE Witness at Sneaky Pete’s. Weekly 11pm–3am. Garage, UK funky, dubstep and bassline house. Moombahton pioneer Nadastrom guests on 11 Apr (please note £3 entry).

■ Opium 71 Cowgate, 225 8382. Rock, punk and metal, no messing. ■ Potterrow Teviot, Bristo Square, 650 9195. Student heaven and home to some big one off parties. ■ Shanghai Le Monde, 16 George Street, 270 3900. Slick and stylish venue in the heart of Edinburgh. ■ Silk King Stables Road, 229 7986. More big party tunes and drunken dancing. ■ Sin Wilkie House, Cowgate, 225 9764. Commercial dance sounds, pop hits and R&B. ■ Sneaky Pete’s 73 Cowgate, 225 1757. Underground clubbing at its best, from techno and dubstep to indie. See listings for details.

■ Studio 24 Calton Road, 558 3758. Down and dirty club nights, specialising in techno and rock. See listings for details. ■ Third Door 45-47 Lothian Street, 225 6313. Laid back vibes with cool hip hop and other sounds. See listings for highlights. ■ The Voodoo Rooms 19a West Register Street, 556 7060. Sophisticated clubbing, cabaret and entertainment. See listings for details. ■ The Wee Red Bar Edinburgh College of Art, Lauriston Place, 229 1442. Student nights for the arty set. See listings for details. ■ Why Not? 14 George Street, 624 8311. Hits from the 80s to last week.


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Comedy

list.co.uk/comedy

HITLIST

THE BEST COMEDY EVENTS

Events are listed by date, then city. Submit listings at least 16 days before publication to comedy@list.co.uk. Listings are compiled by Kirstyn Smith. ✽ Indicates Hitlist entry

Thursday 29

Glasgow Comedy Festival Ardal O’Hanlon King’s Theatre, 297

Bath Street, 0844 871 7648. 7.30pm. £21 (£19.50). Really rather good stand-up from ‘Dougal McGuire’. An Audience with Des Clarke Òran Mór, 731-735 Great Western Road, 357 6200. 8pm. £13.50 (£11.50). The morning DJ delivers some feel-good humour. Barry & Stuart Citizens Theatre, 119 Gorbals Street, 429 0022. 8pm. £14 (£12). BAFTA nominated comedy magicians. Cargo Hold Comedy The Tall Ship at Riverside, 150 Pointhouse Place, 357 3699. 8pm. £10 (£8). A band of top class comics. The Legendary Arnold Brown Comedy Interviews Tron Theatre, 63

Trongate, 552 4267. 8pm. £14.50. Comedy and chat with the legend himself. Susan Calman: Revenge of the Cat Lady The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road,

Edinburgh International Science Festival The Festival’s comedic strand features events from the likes of Robin Ince, Richard Wiseman, Helen Arney and the Bright Club. Various venues, Edinburgh, Fri 30 Mar–Sun 15 Apr.

0844 335 8879. 8pm. £10 (£9). Susan explains all about being a feline woman. Being John Malkyvich The Halt Bar, 160 Woodlands Road, 353 6450. 8.30pm. £5 (£3). Alan Scott Barry and Malky talk about the things that get them going.

Lee Camp Rousing the rabbles with some leftleaning stand-up, the lad who went on Fox News to say they were a ‘festival of ignorance’ is among us. See preview, page 63. Blackfriars, Glasgow, Fri 30 Mar; The Stand, Edinburgh, Sun 1, Wed 4–Sun 8 Apr. Daniel Sloss The lad with the Justin Bieber hairdo (though not for much longer) wants you to be on your best behaviour as he shoots his first live DVD. See My Comedy Hero, page 64. King’s Theatre, Glasgow, Sat 31 Mar.

Wicked Wenches This month’s laughinducing ladies are Fern Brady, Chloe Philip, Luisa Omelian and the two Scottish Susans, Calman and Morrison. The Stand, Edinburgh, Tue 3 Apr; The Stand, Glasgow, Wed 4 Apr.

Alun Cochrane It might sound a bit Partridge-esque, but Moments of Alun will have you laughing with and not at our hero, the Glasgow-born Yorkshireman. The Stand, Edinburgh, Tue 10 Apr.

Dara O’Briain: Craic Dealer

SECC, Finnieston Quay, 0844 395 4000. 8pm. £21. Straightforward observational humour.

Jenny Eclair: Old Dog New Tricks Citizens Theatre, 119

Gorbals Street, 429 0022. 8pm. £15. A wonderfully grumpy look at life. The Legendary Arnold Brown Comedy Interviews Tron Theatre, 63

Trongate, 552 4267. 8pm. £14.50. See Thu 29. £5 Festival Funnies Maggie May’s, 60 Trongate, 548 1350. 8pm. £5. Scott Agnew introduces some festival acts. David Morgan . . . Or Am I? Brel, 39–43 Ashton Lane, 342 4966. 8.30pm. £8 (£6). David Morgan is charming, camp and very funny.

Lee Camp is Yet Another American Mistake Blackfriars,

36 Bell Street, 552 5924. 8.30pm. £9 (£7). Angry American railing against life. See preview, page 63. Senior Moments: The Twilight Zone The Griffin, 226 Bath Street, 331

342 4966. 8.30pm. £7 (£5). Understated Irish lady Elaine Malcolmson.

Scott Agnew: Tales from the Sauna – Work in Progress The State

Lucky Bag! Life Bingo Called by Pauline Goldsmith Vespbar, 14 Drury

Bar, 148 Holland Street, 332 2159. 9pm. £4. Scott tries out some new material.

Street, 07909 822841. 8.30pm. £7 (£5). Pauline Goldsmith and co get stuck into some good old-fashioned life bingo.

Festival Club: Best of the Fest

Pete Johansson: What I Feel Like

Doug Stanhope Once a (very) outside bet to be President of the US, Stanhope has now opted to do what he’s best at: profane, thoughtprovoking, quasi stream-ofconsciousness comedy. King’s Theatre, Glasgow, Fri 30 Mar.

Elaine Malcolmson: Relevant Experience Brel, 39–43 Ashton Lane,

Plan B Books, 5 Osborne Street, 237 1137. 8.30pm. £5. Billy Kirkwood and Des O’Gorman revel in nerdiness. BYOB and all proceeds go to the Literacy Trust Scotland.

Dara O’Briain Quite simply one of the smartest cookies in the comedy biscuit barrel, the Irish fella returns with more lively observational craic and sharp audience banter. SECC, Glasgow, Fri 30 & Sat 31 Mar.

Òran Mór, 731-735 Great Western Road, 357 6200. 7.30pm. £12.50 (£10). Gloriously sharp and offensive comedy. Greg Proops The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 7.45pm. £15. The sharply-dressed wit brings his satirical voice to Glasgow.

5170. 8.30pm. £8 (£6). With John Gillick, Patrick Rolink and Phil Differ. Absolute Improv Vespbar, 14 Drury Street, 07909 822841. 9pm. £8 (£6). ToBeContinued transform random ideas into fast-paced improvised comedy. Comedy Out West WEST Brewery, Building 4 Templeton Building, Glasgow Green, 550 0135. 9pm. £10. A line-up of the best comics at this year’s festival.

Billy and Des’ Geek Comedy Night

Jenny Eclair A Perrier winner back in the day, the filthy-grumpy one takes a shot or two across the bows of middle-aged life, doubtless with the audience’s full support. Citizens Theatre, Glasgow, Fri 30 Mar.

Mark Nelson: Live & Unleashed

Blackfriars, 36 Bell Street, 552 5924. 8.30pm. £8. Brand new show from Canada’s Pete Johansson. Sarah Cassidy and Martin Croser

The Roxy 171, 171 Great Western Road, 331 1901. 8.30pm. £5. Cassidy and Croser deliver some monologues.

The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 10.30pm. £10 (£8). See Thu 29. Festival Picks Vespbar, 14 Drury Street, 07909 822841. 10.30pm. £12 (£10). Late night comedy showcasing acts from across the festival. Late Night Gimp Fight Tron Theatre, 63 Trongate, 552 4267. 10.30pm. £12.50. Off-the-wall sketches and songs.

Stuart Mitchell: It’s Just a Phrase I’m Going Through The Griffin, 226

Edinburgh

Bath Street, 331 5170. 8.30pm. £8 (£6). Exciting young up-and-comer. Comedy @ The Lee The Lee, 100 St James Road, 564 1218. 9pm. £5. Gary Little presents a line-up of local comedians. Festival Club: Best of the Fest The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 10pm. £10 (£8). The Stand lays on five of the festival’s top acts.

Rose Street, 226 4311. 8pm. £8. With host Jojo Sutherlan. The Beehive Comedy Club Beehive Inn, 18 Grassmarket, 225 7171. 8.30pm. £5–£7. Top local and visiting comedians. Jongleurs Comedy Club Jongleurs, Lava Ignite, 3 West Tollcross, 0870 011 1960. 8.30pm. £15. Brummie Andy White is joined by Matt Richardson and Andre King. The Friday Show The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 9pm. £10 (£9; members £5). See Thu 29 for line-up, but Siân Bevan is replaced by Stu Murphy. The Improverts Bedlam Theatre, 11b Bristo Place, 225 9893. 10.30pm. £5.50 (students £5). Edinburgh Uni’s longstanding improvised comedy troupe.

Greg Proops is the Smartest Man in the World Tron Theatre, 63 Trongate,

552 4267. 10pm. £12.50. The Proopdog presents his satirical podcast.

Edinburgh Gong Show The Shack, 119 Rose Street, 226 4311. 8pm. £3. Fresh comedy newbies compete against the clock. The Thursday Show The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 9pm. £8 (£7; members £4). Bruce Fummey, Owen O’Neill, John Ross and Siân Bevan.

Friday 30

Glasgow Comedy Festival Lunchtime Comedy Club

Corinthian, 191 Ingram Street, 552 1101. 1pm. £5; including lunch £10. Comedy snippets from throughout the festival. Andrew Learmonth in David Cameron Hates Mumford & Sons

The Old Hairdressers, 20-28 Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 7.30pm. £5. ‘Selfindulgent pish’, says Learmonth himself. Doug Stanhope King’s Theatre, 297 Bath Street, 0844 871 7648. 7.30pm. £21. The leading light in intelligent American comedy. Ages 18+.

Friday Night Live The Shack, 119

Saturday 31

Glasgow Comedy Festival Lunchtime Comedy Club Corinthian, 191 Ingram Street, 552 1101. 1pm. £5; including lunch £10. See Fri 30. Daniel Sloss: The Joker King’s Theatre, 297 Bath Street, 0844 871 7648. 4.30pm & 7.30pm. £15.50. Daniel continues his epic comedy rise. See My Comedy Hero, page 64.

United Airlines Presents America Stands Up The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 7.45pm. £12 (£11). The best newcomers American comedy has to offer. Coalition of Comedy: Awkward Second Year The Flying Duck, 142

Renfield Street, 564 1450. 8pm. £3. A selection of satire and stand-up. 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 61


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Comedy Comedy Picks DRAM!, 232–246

Woodlands Road, 332 1622. 8pm. £8 (£6). A pick’n’mix of acts from the festival.

Dara O’Briain: Craic Dealer

SECC, Finnieston Quay, 0844 395 4000. 8pm. £21. See Fri 30. David Kay: Sconetastic Òran Mór, 731-735 Great Western Road, 357 6200. 8pm. £13.50. Comedic ramblings. From Amateur Transplants: Adam Kay’s Smutty Songs Citizens Theatre,

119 Gorbals Street, 429 0022. 8pm. £14.50. Comical spoofs of popular songs. The Legendary Arnold Brown Comedy Interviews Tron Theatre, 63

Trongate, 552 4267. 8pm. £14.50. See Fri 30. Man vs Woman Vespbar, 14 Drury Street, 07909 822841. 8pm. £8 (£6). Raymond Friel’s fast-paced sketch show. £5 Festival Funnies Maggie May’s, 60 Trongate, 548 1350. 8pm. £5. See Fri 30. Chris Martin Blackfriars, 36 Bell Street, 552 5924. 8.30pm. £9 (£7). Jokes and observations from the ‘other Chris Martin’.

5THINGS YOU MIGHT NOT KNOW ABOUT . . . JEFF DUNHAM 1 Born in Dallas in 1962, Jeff Dunham got into the ventriloquist game at the age of eight having been given a dummy at Christmas, and later performed at birthday parties and Cub Scout banquets. 2 He first tasted serious fame when he appeared on Johnny Carson’s The Tonight Show in 1990 but the spread of the internet has been his saviour with his ‘skits’ involving Achmed the Dead Terrorist being watched by countless millions. In the face of accusations of Islamophobia, Dunham insists that Achmed is not Muslim: ‘he’s nondescript; he’s from over there somewhere’. Might be worth noting that back in 2002, the character was originally called Dead Osama. 3 Dunham appeared in 2010 screwball comedy Dinner for Schmucks alongside, let’s face it, much cooler comics Steve Carrell, Chris O’Dowd, Jemaine Clement, Kristen Schaal and Zach Galifianakis. Dunham plays, get this, a ventriloquist. He created a new character for the film in the busty shape of Diane, his only female doll. 4 When asked why he hasn’t got more females in his armoury, he once replied: ‘I can think like a terrorist, I can think like a white trash guy, I can even try and think like an African American. But I can’t figure out how a woman thinks.’ 5 As you can imagine, critics of his work (he’s a ventriloquist and a Christian conservative) are almost as long as the queues to his shows. Perhaps the most potent slaying was from JP Williams, producer behind the Blue Collar Comedy Tour, which appeals primarily to the Middle America that adores Dunham: ‘He’s got a great gift. And his gift is that he makes stuff talk and he keeps his mouth pretty much closed when he does it.’ Ouch. (Brian Donaldson) ■ SECC, Glasgow, Tue 24 Apr.

Keara Patricia Murphy: Flypaper For Freaks The Griffin, 226 Bath

Street, 331 5170. 8.30pm. £8 (£6). Keara ponders the nature of freak-magnetism. The Unemployables Cottiers Theatre, 93–95 Hyndland Street, 357 4000. 8.30pm. £10. Joe Heenan brings together four dark, twisted comedians. Comedy @ The State The State Bar, 148 Holland Street, 332 2159. 9pm. £7 (£5). Line-up tba. BBC Scotland Presents Best of Red Raw The Stand, 333 Woodlands

Road, 0844 335 8879. 9.30pm. £3. The best recent newbies, plus some old hands. The Late Show Brel, 39–43 Ashton Lane, 342 4966. 10.15pm. £10. Late night laughs from the Fringe’s Festival Club. Festival Club: Best of the Fest The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 10.30pm. £10 (£8). See Thu 29. Festival Picks Vespbar, 14 Drury Street, 07909 822841. 10.30pm. £12 (£10). See Fri 30. Late Night Gimp Fight Tron Theatre, 63 Trongate, 552 4267. 10.30pm. £12.50. See Fri 30. Late Night Laughs DRAM!, 232–246 Woodlands Road, 332 1622. 10.45pm. £8. The Dram’s fave picks of the festival.

An Evening with Bob Mills and John Moloney The Stand, 333

Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 7.30pm. £10 (£9). Laughs, music and chat from the older generation. Scott Agnew: Project Couldn’t Give a F**k Blackfriars, 36 Bell Street,

552 5924. 8.30pm. £8 (£6). Scott examines situations where no expectations are made of you. Scott Capurro: Islamahomophobia

The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 9.30pm. £10 (£9). Scott proclaims he is the mightiest of the gays.

Glasgow A Night In Aid of the Greater Shawlands Republic The Bungo,

17–21 Nithsdale Road, 07403 176249. 8pm. £4.99. Bruce Morton, Phil Differ and Andrew Learmonth support the campaign for a free and independent Shawlands. FREE Fresh Meat The Butterfly and the Pig, 153 Bath Street, 221 7711. 8.30pm. Weekly new material night with six new comedians plus headliner.

Edinburgh FREE Whose Lunch Is It Anyway? The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 1.30pm. Improv with Paul Graham and Stuart Murphy. Sunday Night Laugh-In The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 8.30pm. £6 (£5; members £1). Lee Camp, Rob Collins and host Chris Forbes. See preview, page 63, for Camp.

Monday 2

Edinburgh Comedy Variety Show City Café, 19 Blair Street, 220 0125. 8pm. £3 (£2; £1 if booked through lastminute.com). Weekly new material night, hosted by Keara Patricia Murphy. The Beehive Comedy Club Newbees Beehive Inn, 18 Grassmarket,

225 7171. 8pm. £2. Ben Verth introduces the new talent and new material night. Red Raw The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 8.30pm. £2. Weekly showcase for new comics and new gags from the pros.

Tuesday 3

Glasgow Red Raw The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £2. Bright young things strut their comedy stuff.

Edinburgh The Beehive Comedy Club Newbees Beehive Inn, 18 Grassmarket,

225 7171. 8pm. £2. See Mon 2. Wicked Wenches The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 8.30pm. £6 (£5; members £3). Susan Calman introduces Susan Morrison, Fern Brady, Chloe Philip and Luisa Omelian.

Wednesday 4

Glasgow FREE Gong Show Vespbar, 14 Drury Street, 07909 822841. 8.30pm. Experienced acts in the first half, newbies against the clock in the second.

Glasgow Comedy Night The Lee, 100 St James

Road, 564 1218. 8.30pm. £5. Monthly night bringing up-and-comers to the fore. Jongleurs Comedy Club Jongleurs, The Glasshouse, 20 Glassford Street, 0870 011 1960. 8.30pm. £15. Des Clarke, Johnny Candon and R David. The Wee Man Presents: Nedator

The Arches, 253 Argyle Street, 565 1000. 8.30pm. £7 (£5). The Wee Man stars in an action-packed comedy thriller.

RADIO

Edinburgh

Radio 4, Mon 9 Apr, 11.30am ●●●●●

Saturday Night Live The Shack, 119

Rose Street, 226 4311. 8pm. £10. See Fri 30. The Beehive Comedy Club Beehive Inn, 18 Grassmarket, 225 7171. 8.30pm. £5–£7. See Fri 30. Jongleurs Comedy Club Jongleurs, Lava Ignite, 3 West Tollcross, 0870 011 1960. 8.30pm. £15. See Fri 30. The Saturday Show The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 9pm. £15. See Fri 30 for line-up.

Sunday 1

Glasgow Comedy Festival Lunchtime Comedy Club Corinthian, 191 Ingram Street, 552 1101. 1pm. £5; including lunch £10. See Fri 30. FREE Stand-Up for Britannia Britannia Panopticon Music Hall, 113–117 Trongate, 553 0840. 3pm. Standups compete for the Stan Laurel Cup. Janey Godley: Too Old for Telly

Òran Mór, 731-735 Great Western Road, 357 6200. 5pm & 8pm. £11.50–£13.50. Killer comedy from Lady Godley. Chris Conroy: Definitely Conroy

Vespbar, 14 Drury Street, 07909 822841. 62 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

7.30pm. £7. Chris draws parallels between his life and Oasis’ Definitely Maybe.

MR BLUE SKY When a recession hits, even optimists can feel the heat. In the opening episode of Mr Blue Sky’s second series lovable oaf Harvey Easter tries a few tricks to save the pennies. Such as walking to the newsagent rather than having his paper delivered, though taking to purchasing scratchcards seems like a potential pitfall to making ends meet. Especially when this becomes his gateway to a much bigger gamble. And you know when someone in a sitcom puts on a bet they probably shouldn’t that nothing can end well. The first radio sitcom penned by Andrew Collins (he of Collins, Quantick & Maconie and Collings and Herrin podcast fame), it would take a cad with a heart of marble to hate this. Cast-wise it’s flawless, with Claire Skinner (replacing season one’s Rebecca Front) as the stoical and fussing Jax Easter pioneering the family’s economy drive and cutting down on her frappuccino consumption; the drily funny Rosamund Hanson is permanently bamboozled daughter Charlie planning nuptials with grime DJ boyfriend Kill-R (real name Derek Rosewater) played by Javone Prince and Justin ‘Jeremy Lion’ Edwards as Harvey’s cynical oncologist best buddy Ray. You know you’re in the company of a warmly cosy comedy when talk of teenage drug-taking sounds quaint and potential marital infidelity feels homely. Then again, if sharp satirical fare to frighten the horses with is your bag, you probably shouldn’t be poking around Radio 4 of a late morning. (Brian Donaldson)


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Comedy

list.co.uk/comedy

Wicked Wenches The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £6 (£5; members £3). See Tue 3, but Susan Morrison is replaced by Wendy Wason.

Edinburgh Beatnik Comedy The Tron, 9 Hunter

Square, High Street, 226 0931. 8.30pm. £3 (students £2). New talent night hosted by Liam Withnail. Midweek Comedy Cabaret The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 8.30pm. £4 (£2). Lee Camp (see preview), Davey Connor, Hari Sriskantha and Richard Melvin, with host Joe Heenan.

Thursday 5

Glasgow The Thursday Show The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £8 (£7; members £4). Addy Van Der Borgh, Wendy Wason, Matthew Winning and host Raymond Mearns.

Edinburgh

Bright Club: Bodies Ghillie Dhu,

2 Rutland Place, 0844 557 2686. 8pm. £10 (£8). Some witty academics tell tales of a life in science. Ages 18+. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival. Gong Show The Shack, 119 Rose Street, 226 4311. 8–10pm. £3. See Thu 29. We Happy Few Presents . . . The Banshee Labyrinth, 29–35 Niddry Street, 558 8209. 8.30pm. £2 (members free). Sketches and stand-up. The Thursday Show The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 9pm. £8 (£7; members £4). Tony Burgess, Lee Camp (see preview), Davey Connor and Fern Brady, with compere Bruce Devlin.

Friday 6

Glasgow Jongleurs Comedy Club Jongleurs,

Lava Ignite, 3 West Tollcross, 0870 011 1960. 8.30pm. £15. Gar Murran, Ryan McDonnell, Dave Williams and Phil Walker. The Friday Show The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £10 (£9; members £5). See Thu 5 for line-up.

Edinburgh Friday Night Live The Shack, 119

Rose Street, 226 4311. 8pm. £8. See Fri 30. The Beehive Comedy Club Beehive Inn, 18 Grassmarket, 225 7171. 8.30pm. £5–£7. See Fri 30. Jongleurs Comedy Club Jongleurs, Lava Ignite, 3 West Tollcross, 0870 011 1960. 8.30pm. £15. With Anthony King, Paul Pirie, Ron Vaudry and Steve Harris. The Friday Show The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 9pm. £10 (£9; members £5). See Thu 5 for line-up.

Saturday 7

Glasgow Comedy @ The State The State Bar,

148 Holland Street, 332 2159. 9pm. £7 (£5). See Sat 31. Jongleurs Comedy Club Jongleurs, Lava Ignite, 3 West Tollcross, 0870 011 1960. 8.30pm. £15. See Fri 6. The Saturday Show The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 9pm. £15. See Thu 5 for line-up.

Edinburgh Saturday Night Live The Shack, 119 Rose Street, 226 4311. 8pm. £10. See Fri 30. The Beehive Comedy Club Beehive Inn, 18 Grassmarket, 225 7171. 8.30pm. £5–£7. See Fri 30. Jongleurs Comedy Club Jongleurs, Lava Ignite, 3 West Tollcross, 0870 011 1960. 8.30pm. £15. See Fri 6. The Saturday Show The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 9pm. £15. See Thu 5 for line-up. Jekyll and Hyde Comedy Club The Jekyll & Hyde, 112 Hanover Street, 225 2022. 9.30pm. £8 (£6). See Sat 31.

Sunday 8

Glasgow FREE Fresh Meat The Butterfly and the Pig, 153 Bath Street, 221 7711. 8.30pm. See Sun 1. Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service

The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £6 (£5; members £1). Relaxed comedy with the moustachioed Irish comedian and guests.

Edinburgh FREE Whose Lunch Is It Anyway? The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 1.30pm. See Sun 1. Sunday Night Laugh-In The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 8.30pm. £6 (£5; members £1). Tony Burgess, Lee Camp (see preview), Davey Connor and Bruce Devlin.

Monday 9

Glasgow Improv Wars The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £4 (£2). Garry Dobson, Stu Murphy and Billy Kirkwood do battle.

Edinburgh Comedy Variety Show City Café, 19 Blair Street, 220 0125. 8–10.30pm. £3 (£2; £1 if booked in advance through lastminute.com). See Mon 2. The Beehive Comedy Club Newbees

Beehive Inn, 18 Grassmarket, 225 7171. 8pm. £2. See Mon 2.

Tuesday 10

Glasgow FREE Pop-Up Comedy The Halt Bar, 160 Woodlands Road, 353 6450. 8.30pm. See Tue 3. Red Raw The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £2. See Tue 3.

Edinburgh The Beehive Comedy Club Newbees

Beehive Inn, 18 Grassmarket, 225 7171. 8pm. £2. See Mon 2.

Alun Cochrane: Moments of Alun The Stand, 5 York Place, 558

7272. 8.30pm. £12. Yorkshireman Cochrane presents his latest show of gentle observations, kitchen sink comedy and thinking out loud. Red Raw The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 8.30pm. £2. See Mon 2.

Wednesday 11

Glasgow The Fun Junkies The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £5 (£4; members £2.50). Magic, sketches and musical breaks. FREE Gong Show Vespbar, 14 Drury Street, 07909 822841. 8.30pm. See Wed 4.

Edinburgh

The Maths Olympics The Jam House, 5 Queen Street, 0844 557 2686. 5.30–7pm. £10 (£8). A show for the competitive sod in all of us. Ages 18+. Robin Ince: Happiness Through Science

The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 5.30pm. £7. The award-winning comedian presents a show that ponders happiness and rationality.

Humour Me: The Science of Laughter The Jam House, 5 Queen

Street, 0844 557 2686. 8–9.30pm. £10 (£8). Robins Ince and Dunbar explore the science of laughter, with Professor Richard Wiseman. Ages 18+. Beatnik Comedy The Tron, 9 Hunter Square, High Street, 226 0931. 8.30pm. £3 (students £2). See Wed 4. Melting Pot The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 8.30pm. £5 (£4; members £2.50). Vote for the best of the new sketches and skits from local comics.

Thursday 12

Glasgow The Thursday Show The Stand, 333

STAND-UP

LEE CAMP Blackfriars, Glasgow, Fri 30 Mar; The Stand, Edinburgh, Sun 1, Wed 4–Sun 8 Apr Were US satirist Lee Camp to retire from the comedy game tomorrow, he can always say he once made Jeremy Paxman giggle like a teenage girl. On Newsnight last autumn via satellite, Camp was involved in a debate over a gaffe made by Republican presidential nominee Rick Perry. Sharp as a pin and funny with it, Camp had his own Tea Party opponent reeling and Paxman chortling. ‘I didn’t know much about him [Paxo] before I went on but I was glad when I heard that he had laughed,’ recalls Camp. ‘I didn’t find out til afterwards when a bunch of people on Twitter were talking about him cracking up.’ It’s not just fearsome news hosts that Camp has been making laugh; the likes of Janeane Garofalo, Roseanne Barr and Rain Pryor have been digging his rabble-rousing left-leaning schtick with its roots in the establishment-baiting provocations of George Carlin and Bill Hicks and which shares contemporary ground with Doug Stanhope and Jamie Kilstein. A shy kid, Camp recalls his first gig at the age of 19 at an open mic night in front of some rednecks in Virginia who had been expecting a guitar band. ‘It went well enough that I didn’t jump off a bridge later and I was quickly addicted to being up on stage. My comedy started very observational but grew because I became more politically aware and I decided that if I was being given the gift of having a paying audience hearing what I say, I wanted what I had to say to matter. Laughter is the number one reason I’m up there but a close second is to say something important.’ (Brian Donaldson)

Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £8 (£7; members £4). Alistair Barrie, Janey Godley, Paul F Taylor and host Joe Heenan.

Edinburgh

Bright Club: Edinburgh The

Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 5pm. £5. Tales about the weird, wonderful, and often very funny, world of research. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival.

Festival of the Spoken Nerd

The Jam House, 5 Queen Street, 0844 557 2686. 8–11pm. £10 (£8). A night of nerdiness and laughs, with Helen Arney, Steve Mould, Matt Parker, Robin Ince and Professor Richard Wiseman. Ages 18+. Gong Show The Shack, 119 Rose Street, 226 4311. 8–10pm. £3. See Thu 29. The Thursday Show The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 9pm. £8 (£7; members £4). With acclaimed Belfast stand-up Jake O’Kane, Jeff Leach, Gus Lymburn and host Jojo Sutherland.

Friday 13

Glasgow Jongleurs Comedy Club Jongleurs,

Lava Ignite, 3 West Tollcross, 0870 011 1960. 8.30pm. £15. Scott Agnew, Ro Campbell and Raymond Mearns. The Friday Show The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £10 (£9; members £5). See Thu 12 for line-up.

Edinburgh

Bright Club: Edinburgh The

Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 5pm. £5. See Thu 12. Friday Night Live The Shack, 119 Rose Street, 226 4311. 8pm. £8. See Fri 30. The Beehive Comedy Club Beehive Inn, 18 Grassmarket, 225 7171. 8.30pm. £5–£7. See Fri 30. Jongleurs Comedy Club Jongleurs, Lava Ignite, 3 West Tollcross, 0870 011 1960. 8.30pm. £15. Dougie Dunlop, with Matt Reed, Joe Rooney and Wes Zahuruk. 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 63


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Comedy The Friday Show The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 9pm. £10 (£9; members £5). See Thu 12 for line-up.

Saturday 14

Glasgow Comedy @ The State The State Bar,

148 Holland Street, 332 2159. 9pm. £7 (£5). See Sat 31. Jongleurs Comedy Club Jongleurs, Lava Ignite, 3 West Tollcross, 0870 011 1960. 8.30pm. £15. See Fri 13. The Saturday Show The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 9pm. £15. See Thu 12 for line-up.

Edinburgh

Bright Club: Edinburgh The

Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 5pm. £5. See Thu 12. Saturday Night Live The Shack, 119 Rose Street, 226 4311. 8pm. £10. See Fri 30. The Beehive Comedy Club Beehive Inn, 18 Grassmarket, 225 7171. 8.30pm. £5–£7. See Fri 30. Jongleurs Comedy Club Jongleurs, Lava Ignite, 3 West Tollcross, 0870 011 1960. 8.30pm. £15. See Fri 13. The Saturday Show The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 9pm. £15. See Thu 12 for line-up. Jekyll and Hyde Comedy Club The Jekyll & Hyde, 112 Hanover Street, 225 2022. 9.30pm. £8 (£6). See Sat 31.

Edinburgh Beatnik Comedy The Tron, 9 Hunter

8.30pm. £10 (£9; members £5). See Thu 19 for line-up.

Square, High Street, 226 0931. 8.30pm. £3 (students £2). See Wed 4.

Edinburgh

Benefit for Commando Spirit Appeal The Stand, 5 York Place, 558

7272. 8.30pm. £7. An evening of charity-supporting comedy.

Thursday 19

Glasgow The Thursday Show The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £8 (£7; members £4). With Tony Burgess, Anthony J Brown, Sean Grant, Scott Gibson and Raymond Mearns.

Edinburgh The Thursday Show The Stand, 5

York Place, 558 7272. 9pm. £8 (£7; members £4). With David Kay, Pete Cain, Barry Dodds and Richard Gadd.

Friday 20

Glasgow Jongleurs Comedy Club Jongleurs,

Lava Ignite, 3 West Tollcross, 0870 011 1960. 8.30pm. £15. Nick Page, Bruce Fummey, Kevin Gildea and David Hadingham. The Friday Show The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879.

Friday Night Live The Shack, 119

Rose Street, 226 4311. 8pm. £8. See Fri 30. The Beehive Comedy Club Beehive

Inn, 18 Grassmarket, 225 7171. 8.30pm. £5–£7. See Fri 30. Jongleurs Comedy Club Jongleurs, Lava Ignite, 3 West Tollcross, 0870 011 1960. 8.30pm. £15. With Silky, Sully O’Sullivan, Brian Higgins and Tom Stade. The Friday Show The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 9pm. £10 (£9; members £5). See Thu 19 for line-up.

Saturday 21

Glasgow

Edinburgh Saturday Night Live The Shack, 119

Rose Street, 226 4311. 8pm. £10. See Fri 30. The Beehive Comedy Club Beehive Inn, 18 Grassmarket, 225 7171. 8.30pm. £5–£7. See Fri 30.

Jeff Dunham SECC, Finnieston Quay,

0844 395 4000. 7.30pm. £25–£28.50. US ventriloquist. See 5 Things. FREE Pop-Up Comedy The Halt Bar, 160 Woodlands Road, 353 6450. 8.30pm. See Tue 3. Red Raw The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £2. See Tue 3.

Edinburgh The Beehive Comedy Club Newbees Beehive Inn, 18 Grassmarket, 225 7171. 8pm. £2. See Mon 2. Electric Tales The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 8.30pm. £5 (£4). A mix of comedy and storytelling.

Glasgow Improv Wars The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £4 (£2). See Mon 9.

Edinburgh

Wednesday 25

Comedy Variety Show City Café, 19

Glasgow

Blair Street, 220 0125. 8–10.30pm. £3 (£2; £1 if booked in advance through lastminute.com). See Mon 2. The Beehive Comedy Club Newbees Beehive Inn, 18

Glasgow Benefit for Amnesty International

The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £7. Charity comedy night. FREE Gong Show Vespbar, 14 Drury Street, 07909 822841. 8.30pm. See Wed 4. 64 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

Comedy Variety Show City Café, 19 Blair Street, 220 0125. 8–10.30pm. £3 (£2; £1 if booked in advance through lastminute.com). See Mon 2.

Glasgow

Monday 16

Wednesday 18

Monday 23

Edinburgh

Tuesday 24

FREE Whose Lunch Is It Anyway? The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 1.30pm. See Sun 1. Raise the Titanic The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 8.30pm. £6 (£5). Susan Morrison details her early onset obsession with the Titanic.

The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 8.30pm. £5 (£4). Stand-up.

Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £6 (£5; members £1). See Sun 8.

225 7171. 8pm. £2. See Mon 2. Red Raw The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 8.30pm. £2. See Mon 2.

Edinburgh

Jo Caulfield’s Comedy Collective

Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service The Stand, 333 Woodlands

The Beehive Comedy Club Newbees Beehive Inn, 18 Grassmarket,

Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £6 (£5; members £1). See Sun 8.

Edinburgh

FREE Fresh Meat The Butterfly and the Pig, 153 Bath Street, 221 7711. 8.30pm. See Sun 1.

FREE Whose Lunch Is It Anyway? The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 1.30pm. See Sun 1. Sunday Night Laugh-In The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 8.30pm. £6 (£5; members £1). With Barry Dodds, Martin Bearne and Peter Wood.

Michael Redmond’s Sunday Service The Stand, 333 Woodlands

FREE Pop-Up Comedy The Halt Bar, 160 Woodlands Road, 353 6450. 8.30pm. See Tue 3. Red Raw The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £2. See Tue 3.

Glasgow

Edinburgh

Glasgow

Glasgow

Sunday 22

Lava Ignite, 3 West Tollcross, 0870 011 1960. 8.30pm. £15. See Fri 20. The Saturday Show The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 9pm. £15. See Thu 19 for line-up.

FREE Fresh Meat The Butterfly and the Pig, 153 Bath Street, 221 7711. 8.30pm. See Sun 1.

Tuesday 17

Lava Ignite, 3 West Tollcross, 0870 011 1960. 8.30pm. £15. See Fri 20. The Saturday Show The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 9pm. £15. See Thu 19 for line-up. Jekyll and Hyde Comedy Club The Jekyll & Hyde, 112 Hanover Street, 225 2022. 9.30pm. £8 (£6). See Sat 31.

Jongleurs Comedy Club Jongleurs,

Sunday 15

Grassmarket, 225 7171. 8pm. £2. See Mon 2. Red Raw The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 8.30pm. £2. See Mon 2.

Jongleurs Comedy Club Jongleurs,

MY COMEDY HERO

DANIEL SLOSS King’s Theatre, Glasgow, Sat 31 Mar I’d go for Ed Byrne. He did his own style of comedy which was a mixture of one-liners and stories and gags, a really beautiful mix which always had audiences in the palm of his hand. He could tell stories which might not have many gags in them but they were still really funny and had your attention the entire time. The first time I saw him live was at the Adam Smith Theatre in Kirkcaldy when I was 12, with my dad and my mate Craig. It was one of my first ever live stand-up gigs; I’d seen it on telly and knew I liked it, but seeing it in a live theatre environment with an actual audience built a passion in me. Ed Byrne was the one to inspire me to do stand-up and the person who inspired me to be better at it was Tom Stade. He lives quite close to me and he asked if I wanted to do some writing with him. I didn’t know what to expect because I’d only ever just sat down on my own to write my stuff. But the way he writes material is exceptional and he sees the potential in a lot of jokes that I would have doubts about or think wouldn’t really make sense. But his opinion is that if it makes you laugh, then just do it and he’s really helping me write material that is properly me. (Interview by Brian Donaldson)

Best of Irish Comedy The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £7 (£6; members £3). Hosted by Michael Redmond. FREE Gong Show Vespbar, 14 Drury Street, 07909 822841. 8.30pm. See Wed 4.

Edinburgh Beatnik Comedy The Tron, 9 Hunter

Square, High Street, 226 0931. 8.30pm. £3 (students £2). See Wed 4. Best of Scottish Comedy The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 8.30pm. £6 (£5; members £3). The finest Scotch comics.

Thursday 26

Glasgow Comedy Night The Lee, 100 St James

Road, 564 1218. 8.30pm. £5. See Sat 31. The Thursday Show The Stand, 333

Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. 8.30pm. £8 (£7; members £4). David Kay, Andrew Ryan, Eddie O’Dwyer and host Michael Legge.

Edinburgh The Thursday Show The Stand, 5 York Place, 558 7272. 9pm. £8 (£7; members £4). Rob Rouse, Noel James, Danny O’Brien and Bruce Devlin.


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Film HITLIST

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THE BEST FILM & DVD RELEASES

Profile AKSEL HENNIE

Wild Bill Actor Dexter Fletcher moves to the other side of the camera for this surprisingly fresh and funny East London drama starring Charlie Creed-Miles and Will Poulter. Typical grim gangster film this is not. See review, page 68. On general release now.

The Cabin in the Woods From Joss Whedon (Buffy) and Drew Goddard (Cloverfield) comes one of the most original horrors of the year. See review, page 67. General release from Fri 13 Apr.

Le Havre Heart-warming drama from Finnish director Aki Kaurismki in this story of a man who helps a young immigrant trying to make his way to England. See review, page 70. Selected release from Fri 6 Apr.

Into the Abyss Inimitable German documentarian Werner Herzog retruns, this time exploring the issue of death row. A probing look at crime and punishment. See review, page 67. Selected release from Fri 30 Mar.

This Must Be the Place Ambitious road movie from Paulo Sorrentino, starring Sean Penn as an ageing rock star who sets out to find the concentration camp guard who tormented his father. See feature, page 66. Selected release from Fri 6 Apr. Italian Film Festival Italiophiles rejoice, the Italian Film Festival returns to Scotland with a heady selection of awardwinning new cinema. See preview, page 72. Venues across Scotland, Fri 13–Thu 26 Apr.

Dundead The second year of Dundee’s horror film festival includes preview screenings of Norwegian thriller Babycall and Indonesian martial art feast The Raid. See preview page 75. DCA, Dundee, Thu 5–Sun 8 Apr.

Headhunters Adaptation of Jo Nesbo’s novel about a headhunter and art thief who steals a painting from the wrong man. Dark humour abounds in this outrageously entertaining romp. See review, page 68. General release from Fri 6 Apr. Sculpture on Film Co-curated by artist Karla Black and part of this year’s GI Festival is a programme of films by artists who have, in recent years, broadened the definition of sculpture. GFT, Glasgow, Sun 22–Tue 24 Apr.

The Story of Film Mark Cousins presents highlights from The Story of Film, his impressive, wide-reaching 15-hour history of cinema, released on DVD this month. Filmhouse, Edinburgh, Mon 23 Apr; GFT, Glasgow, Tue 24 Apr.

Born 29 October, 1975, Oslo Background Aksel is a popular Norwegian actor, writer and director who was once arrested and sentenced for tagging during his late teens. The experience helped to inform one of his films, Uno, which he wrote, directed and starred in, and which won him Norway’s Amanda Award for best direction. Although predominantly based in Norway, he has found international success with roles in Max Manus: Man of War and Age of Heroes (alongside Sean Bean). He can currently be seen as Roger Brown, the put-upon anti-hero in the film adaptation of Jo Nesbo’s Headhunters. On getting to grips with his character ‘After four or five pages [of the script] I hated him! I really hated his guts. He steals and cheats but after six pages, when he starts to have problems, he starts to get human and I began to like him and then I loved him and rooted for him. And then I wanted to be like him when the movie was done. And that’s how a good protagonist should be.’ On being submerged in ‘excrement’ for the film’s memorable toilet scene ‘Everybody was waiting for that scene. On one of the days we shot it – and we shot it numerous times from all kinds of angles – we had all the press you could imagine from Norway there. But it was fun. It’s just a mix of granola, olive oil, breadcrumbs, chocolate mousse, chocolate soufflé, chocolate, chocolate, chocolate and then a lot of coffee, which led to my girlfriend not drinking coffee for one year afterwards because I came to bed each night smelling of it!’ Interesting fact Aksel did all of his own stunts in the film and almost broke his collar bone during a fight scene with Julie Olgaard. (Rob Carnevale) ■ Headhunters is on general release from Fri 6 Apr. 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 65


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GIANNI FIORITO

Film

FINDING YOUR PLACE For This Must Be the Place, Italian filmmaker Paulo Sorrentino has turned to America. He speaks to Tom Dawson about finding inspiration in the expansive landscapes of the US and of course, the music of Talking Heads he protagonist at the heart of Paolo Sorrentino’s This Must Be the Place isn’t your typical Nazi-hunter. Endearingly played by Sean Penn, Cheyenne is a retired rock star, now living in Dublin, whose mental and physical faculties have been impaired by earlier excesses. Sporting red lipstick, mascara and a Robert Smith-style hairdo, and speaking in a high-pitched voice, our hero ends up crossing the Atlantic by ocean liner where he tries to track down the former concentration camp guard, Aloise Lange, who tormented his late father. There is a rich cinematic tradition of Italian filmmakers collaborating with A-list Hollywood actors: Bernardo Bertolucci working with Robert De Niro in 1900 and Marlon Brando in Last Tango in Paris, Luchino Visconti directing Burt Lancaster in the Risorgimento epic The Leopard, or Michelangelo Antonioni and Jack Nicholson heading out to the African desert in The Passenger. Italian writer and director, Paulo Sorrentino follows in these footsteps with This Must Be the Place, his first film in English having previously found success with films like The Consequences of Love. He first encountered Penn in the flesh at the Cannes Film Festival in 2008, when the actor was President of the Jury and the director was presenting Il Divo, his

T

66 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

coruscating satire of the veteran politician Giulio Andreotti. ‘I always had the dream of making a movie in the USA,’ reveals the 41-year-old writer and director on a recent trip to the UK. ‘I grew up watching American and Italian movies. All that I loved about America, including its big landscapes and the music of David Byrne’s Talking Heads I put in this movie. Although there are many capable actors in the States, I

‘ALL THAT I LOVED ABOUT AMERICA, INCLUDING ITS BIG LANDSCAPES AND TALKING HEADS, I PUT IN THIS MOVIE’ would have waited for Sean Penn to be free to make This Must Be the Place. Like Toni Servillo, whom I worked with on The Consequences of Love and Il Divo, Sean is a great observer of people and circumstances: they both integrate their observations into their performances.’ The Rome-resident Sorrentino is quick to point out several American films, which

influenced his own idiosyncratic reworking of the road movie, notably David Lynch’s The Straight Story and Wim Wenders’ Paris, Texas (look out for Harry Dean Stanton popping up in a diner cameo). Yet he also explains that, ‘Although I’ve seen a lot of American movies, I knew very little of the USA. I went there like a tourist, for whom everything is new. My approach was helped by the fact that the main character had been out of the country himself for 30 years.’ What connects all of Sorrentino’s films, which are attractively photographed by his regular cinematographer Luca Bigazzi, is the director’s virtuoso ability to shift between styles and tones, here embodied in the juxtaposition of the worlds of rock music and the Holocaust. ‘I did a lot of reading about Nazi hunters and the behaviour of Nazis during World War II in preparing this film,’ reveals Sorrentino. ‘For me the finished film is extremely real, and simpler than my Italian movies. What you see on the screen is the sense I had of the USA during the making of This Must Be the Place. I must say I found a lot of the people away from the big cities quite self-centred and eccentric – they were people who wanted to be noticed and remembered.’ This Must Be the Place is on selected release from Fri 6 April.


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Film

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REVIEWS DOCUMENTARY

INTO THE ABYSS: A TALE OF DEATH, A TALE OF LIFE (12A) 107min ●●●●● In an interview to promote Into the Abyss, the German filmmaker Werner Herzog declares that, ‘it is absolutely clear that the crimes of the persons in my film are monstrous, but the perpetrators are not monsters’. Although Herzog himself is staunchly opposed to capital punishment, his new documentary is much more than a righteous polemic against the state executing its citizens. Split into a prologue and six separate chapters, it focuses on a triple homicide case which took place in the Texan town of Conroe in 2001. A mother, Sandra Stotler, was shot dead in her home by two young men Michael Perry and Jason Burkett, who wanted to steal her red sports car. They then proceeded to kill her son Adam and his friend Jeremy to get the electronic key allowing access to their gated community. The facts of this shocking case are not disputed: instead Herzog probes away at the consequences to the lives of the victims’ relatives and the perpetrators. At a Texas prison he interviews through bullet-proof glass both Perry, eight days before his execution by lethal injection, and Burkett, who is serving a 40-year sentence. He speaks to Stotler’s daughter, who lost both her mother and her brother in the murders and he also talks to Burkett’s father (also serving a life sentence); a ‘Death Row groupie’ who married Burkett junior in jail and is now carrying his child via artificial insemination; and a former captain of the Death House team in Huntsville prison, who quit his job in protest at the death penalty after supervising 125 executions. Herzog himself remains off screen, but there’s no mistaking his idiosyncratic questioning, and Peter Zeitlinger’s digital camera picks out a host of revealing details, not least the impounded sports car – the trigger of the whole tragedy – in which a tree has now sprouted. (Tom Dawson) ■ Selected release from Fri 30 Mar.

THRILLER

HORROR

DRAMA

BABYCALL

THE CABIN IN THE WOODS

CORPO CELESTE

(15) 96min ●●●●●

(15) 94min ●●●●●

(U) 100min ●●●●●

Swedish actress Noomi Rapace, whose fearless performance as Lisbeth Salander was the best thing about the original Millenium trilogy, gets a chance to stretch her acting muscles again in this creepy thriller. Rapace plays Anna, a young mother who has been rehoused with her eight-year-old son Anders after escaping her abusive husband. On the advice of child services, Anna buys a ‘babycall’ – a oneway baby monitor – so that she can rest easy while Anders sleeps in his own room. But one night she hears other voices through the intercom, both frightened and threatening. Norwegian writer/director Pål Sletaune keeps us guessing as to what is really going on, while dripfeeding information that slowly undermines Anna’s perspective. But as the film progresses, more outlandish plot developments pile up, and what begins as a tightly controlled exercise starts to fall apart. Sletaune aims for a Sixth Sense-type final reveal, but goes too far, with a twist that glosses over so many inconsistencies that anyone who’s attempted to follow the plot will feel short-changed. (Paul Gallagher) ■ Selected release from Fri 30 Mar.

A film that’s almost impossible to talk about without ruining its multiple pleasures, The Cabin In The Woods is the most original horror movie of the year. Reverential to the genre, yet shaking it up simultaneously, it’s exactly what you’d expect from co-writers Joss Whedon (Buffy, and this month’s Avengers Assemble) and Drew Goddard (Cloverfield), who also directs. Showing how five sex and booze fuelled teenagers get more than they bargained for when they holiday in an isolated log cabin, this may sound overly familiar to anyone who has seen Evil Dead and its numerous imitators. Yet with a parallel plot, involving a group of white collar workers holed up in a hightech bunker, nothing is as it seems. The performances are credible, particularly Thor’s Chris Hemsworth and Fran Kranz as the obligatory jock and stoner, respectively. The effects too are first rate, but it’s the cavalcade of images (and horror references) in the final act that will blow your mind. Geeks, newbies, it won’t matter – Cabin has something in its box of tricks to scare everyone. (James Mottram) ■ General release from Fri 13 April.

Alice Rohrwacher makes her feature debut with this diligent, emotionally complex study of an adolescent girl attempting to square physical dislocation with incipient sexual awakening and the concurrent rituals of her family’s Catholic faith. Yle Vianello – one of those solemn child actors who remind us that it’s a short memory indeed that regards childhood as a lost realm of carefree irresponsibility – plays Marta, who’s moved with her mother and sister from Switzerland to their native Calabria just in time for her confirmation. The small local church is awaiting delivery of a fancy crucifix, in time for a visit from the Bishop; it also faces losing its ageing priest, and Marta finds herself pivotal to both eventualities. The film makes neat if familiar associations between Catholic ritual and sexual identity, and between religion and civic corruption. Hélène Louvart’s accomplished cinematography achieves a persuasive sense of place. However, the film as a whole is a rather gloomy watch, and its slight story arc leaves it feeling like a skilled but overextended short. (Hannah McGill) ■ Selected release from Fri 30 Mar. 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 67


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Film REVIEWS GANGSTER DRAMA

WILD BILL (15) 98min ●●●●● There are many aspects of Wild Bill that could cause a discerning cinemagoer to give it a wide berth – its lack of recognisable stars; its done-to-death London gangster milieu; its debuting writer/director Dexter Fletcher’s connections to the works of Guy Ritchie – but despite these seeming harbingers of dreck, to dismiss this film unseen would be to miss out on one of the highlights of the year so far. It’s not that Fletcher and his co-writer Danny King do anything particularly new with this story of an excon freshly released from prison and keen to reconnect with his kids; but they tell it with such unexpected maturity, drawing very funny comedy and resonant emotion from well-crafted characters, while lending the mundane locations an unexpected beauty through George Richmond’s striking cinematography. Having been part of the furniture of British film and TV since his acting debut, aged 10, in Alan Parker’s Bugsy Malone, Fletcher has clearly learned more than a thing or two from the sets he’s hung around, and here he puts it into practice with great results. The film begins with the introduction of 15-year-old Dean (Son of Rambow’s Will Poulter) and his younger brother Jimmy (Sammy Williams), fending for themselves in their crummy East London flat. Back into their lives comes Bill (Charlie Creed-Miles) – the aforementioned ex-con and the boys’ father – and tension immediately hits. This broken relationship, and its potential restoration, is the dramatic heart around which revolves myriad sub-plots and characters – from Bill’s old gang rivals to concerned social workers to various girlfriends and relatives. In truth, the film comes close to collapsing as all these layers build up, but Fletcher pulls the focus back to Bill, Dean and Jimmy for a powerful conclusion. (Paul Gallagher) ■ Out now on general release.

DRAMA

THRILLER

SCI-FI COMEDY

DELICACY

HEADHUNTERS

IRON SKY

(12A) 104min ●●●●●

(15) 101min ●●●●●

(TBC) 93min ●●●●●

Perhaps only in French cinema is the currency value of beauty so high that an entire film can be drawn out of the prospect of a not-that-good-looking man getting it on with Audrey Tautou. Even Hollywood would try to pretend that some other values had a look-in. Yes, Tautou’s character here, Nathalie, is supposedly ‘delicate’ because of being recently widowed; but the real question the film asks as she contemplates a union with clumsy workmate Markus (François Damiens) is whether her exquisiteness can reasonably be expected to share space with his lack thereof. Despite this rather yucky premise, the film musters not inconsiderable charm – Tautou is not mis-sold as an irresistible love object, and Nathalie’s workplace and family life are warmly and observantly drawn. But the film just lacks momentum: Nathalie’s mild resistance to nice, lumpen Markus doesn’t constitute a plot in itself, and we’re not offered much else to hold on to. Oddly, though her recovery from grief would have made for a rich subject, the film edges away from it, preferring to present itself as a low-impact opposites-attract romcom. (Hannah McGill) ■ Selected release from Fri 13 Apr.

The twisty, tangled, page-turning bestsellers of Norwegian author Jo Nesbø seem tailor-made for the screen. The narratives move with all the momentum of a runaway train and there are enough flawed individuals and crumbling moral certainties to provide substance as well as style. Roger Brown (Aksel Hennie) is a suave, successful headhunter living way beyond his means and lavishing gifts on his trophy wife. He is also something of a Raffles-like gentleman thief supplementing his income by stealing rare artworks from his clients. Clas Greve (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau) and his original Rubens seem like the perfect target, except Clas is prepared to fight back. The two men are soon engaged in a fight to the death that falls somewhere between a Road Runner cartoon and a Coen brothers thriller. Director Morten Tyldum leaves little time to doubt the spider’s web intricacy of the plotting and both of the lead actors are a perfect fit for their parts in this tit for tat feud. It may verge on the unhinged at times but Headhunters is breathlessly, outrageously entertaining. (Allan Hunter) ■ General release from Fri 6 April.

Six years in the making, Iron Sky arrives in a blaze of pre-release publicity. Finland’s first blockbuster, partly funded by fans, you certainly can’t quibble with its killer pitch: Nazis on the moon. It’s just a pity that director Timo Vuorensola’s so-so sci-fi comedy never quite lives up to such an inspirational premise. Set in 2018, the Germans have been hiding out on the dark side of the moon since the end of WWII. But when a lunar expedition ordered by America’s Sarah Palin-like President (Stephanie Paul) as a PR exercise uncovers their Swastika-shaped base, the Nazis (led by Udo Kier and Götz Otto’s powerhungry commandant) have no choice but to launch an attack on Earth. There are some nice sight gags – like the mad Nazi doctor dismissing a modern smart phone in favour of his ancient room-sized computer – and the Star Wars-influenced special effects impress, given the cut-price budget. But the satire on American imperialist policies falls flat, and the invasion plot is strictly B movie. Feeling like a missed opportunity, for once a Hollywood remake might be in order. (Vincent Renwick) ■ Selected release from 20 April.

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REVIEWS

APOCOLYPSE

Archives

Actor turned director DEXTER FLETCHER picks 5 films he’d save in an impending apocalypse DRAMA

THIS MUST BE THE PLACE (15) 119min ●●●●● There is a strong sense of the baroque running through the films of Paolo Sorrentino, not least his bravura portrait of former Italian Prime Minister Andreotti in Il Divo. His first English language venture This Must Be The Place neither dilutes nor abandons that impulse as he creates a weird but sometimes wonderful mixture of road movie and revenge drama. Sean Penn contributes one of his most fearless, idiosyncratic performances as Cheyenne, a reclusive, oddball rock star with the look of Robert Smith, the voice of Andy Warhol and a manner somewhere between Peter Sellers’ character in Being There (1979) and an alien visitor. It is an incredibly endearing, knife edge performance that also has the potential to irritate. How you respond to Penn might well determine how willing you are to embrace the film. There seems little promise in the initial Dublin

scenes where the reclusive Cheyenne shares a mansion with his wife Jane (Frances McDormand). The narrative only gains focus and momentum with the news that Cheyenne’s long estranged father is dying. It is then that Cheyenne discovers his father was obsessed with finding one Aloise Lange, the SS officer who humiliated him at Auschwitz. Cheyenne decides to continue the search through the American heartland and there are echoes of Paris, Texas (underlined by a cameo from Harry Dean Stanton) and even The Outlaw Josey Wales as the quest for revenge is transformed into something more complex and life-affirming. Sorrentino displays a wonderful eye for location, colour and composition and wraps the film in a great score from David Byrne. It might not all work and it might risk absurdity at times but there is a bracing aesthetic and gentle humanity to This Must Be The Place that encourages you to overlook the flaws and embrace the ambition of it. (Allan Hunter) ■ General release from Fri 6 April.

HORROR

THE DIVIDE (18) 108mins ●●●●● Rarely will you see a film as nasty and nihilistic as Xavier Gens’ The Divide. The Frenchman scored a cult hit with 2007’s Frontier(s) before making his first foray into the studio system with the by numbers video game adaptation Hitman. Like that film, The Divide is English-language, though infinitely more bleak as it depicts the rapid decline of civilisation in the aftermath of a nuclear attack. After Manhattan is subjected to a missile strike by unknown assailants, eight apartment block residents (including Rosanna Arquette and Heroes star Milo Ventimiglia) seek shelter in the basement-home belonging to the building’s janitor (Michael Biehn). Think Lord of the Flies, with lashings of torture, rape and battery, as humanity all but evaporates. Frankly, some of it is stomach-churning, but Gens and his actors stick to their task grimly, and the film boasts some stunning images – none more than the final shot, which is almost worth enduring what goes before it. (James Mottram) ■ Selected release from Fri 20 April.

1 The Elephant Man (David Lynch, 1980) ‘It’s a great film about London at a particular time, and there’s something so deeply emotionally impacting about it. I’d have to have it in there, irrespective of my own appearance in it! There’s some great people in it; Wendy Hiller and John Gielgud, John Hurt and Freddie Jones, and I’m lucky that I’ve got some memories that I can attach to it.’ 2 Semi-Pro (Kent Alterman, 2008) ‘It makes me laugh, and I think that would be important – you need to have a laugh. The scene where they’re sitting round the poker table and one guy calls Will Arnett a ‘jive turkey’ is particularly funny – he goes totally serious and says, “Did you just call me a jive turkey?” I love all of that stuff.’ 3 Once Upon a Time in the West (Sergio Leone, 1968) ‘It’s got one of the best openings of any film. Film is storytelling with pictures and not so much words, and [Leone] is brilliantly powerful in terms of telling a story with visuals. When you see Henry Fonda’s face change when someone calls him by his name – the power of that close-up; you can see what film can really do and what great film acting is. For me that’s something really special.’ 4 Black Cat, White Cat (Emir Kusturica, 1998) ‘It’s so full of life and vibrancy. These people are real and crazy and funny and alive: the girl is absolutely beautiful and you want to know her, and the old man with the band tied to a tree is brilliant, and a pig in a car, it’s inspired! It doesn’t matter to me that I don’t understand what they’re talking about, it’s a film I can sit and watch again and again.’ 5 Hard Eight (Paul Thomas Anderson, 1996) ‘I like all of his films, but for some reason I love this one. It’s the simplicity of it, and it’s Philip Baker Hall acting with heart and purpose. Samuel L [Jackson] is brilliant in it, and Gwyneth Paltrow is fantastic, massively underrated. It was his first film I watched after Boogie Nights that I was like, “This is really fucking good filmmaking”; so accomplished and steady.’ (Paul Gallagher) ■ Dexter Fletcher’s directorial debut Wild Bill is out in cinemas now.

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Film REVIEWS ALSO RELEASED Tiny Furniture

DRAMA

LE HAVRE (PG) 93min ●●●●● The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists (U) 88min Brand new 3D seafaring adventure from the claymation boffins at Aardman. General release from Wed 28 Mar. Bonsai (15) 95min Hispanic romantic drama with a literary flavour. Selected release from Fri 30 Mar. Tiny Furniture (15) 98min American independent comedy from hotly-tipped young writer Lena Dunham. See review at list.co.uk Selected release from Fri 30 Mar. The Emperor and the White Snake (12A) 100min Martial arts fantasy film based on an ancient Chinese legend, starring Jet Li. Selected release from Fri 30 Mar. The Island President (PG) 101min Political documentary with a climate change focus as the President of the Maldives strives to keep his nation above sea level. Selected release from Fri 30 Mar. Wrath of the Titans (12A) 100min Sequel to 2010 3D turkey Clash of the Titans, with Sam Worthington and Liam Neeson returning. General release from Fri 30 Mar. Mirror Mirror (PG) 106min Julia Roberts stars as the narcissistic evil queen in this comic-fantasy twist on the Snow White story. General release from Mon 2 Apr. A Cat in Paris (U) 70min Stylish French animation in the mysteryadventure vein. Selected release from Fri 6 Apr. The Cold Light of Day (12A) 93min Man of the moment Henry Superman Cavill joins Bruce Willis in this espionage/kidnap thriller. General release from Fri 6 Apr. La Grande Illusion (U) 114min Reissue of Jean Renoir’s 1937 prison-set war movie. Selected release from Fri 6 Apr. North Sea Texas (15) 98min Coming of age homosexual awakening drama set on the Belgian coast. Selected release from Fri 6 Apr. Return (15) 97min A returning US soldier struggles to re-adapt to her former life. See review at list.co.uk Selected release from Fri 6 Apr. 70 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

Battleship (12A) 131min Hasbro’s latest toy-to-film conversion adds sci-fi action to the familiar tactical sea battle scenario. General release from Wed 11 Apr. Blackthorn (15) 102min The Butch Cassidy story is continued, with Sam Shepard taking on the role of the old outlaw living in Bolivia. Selected release from Fri 13 Apr. Mozart’s Sister (12A) 120min French drama exploring the life of the famous composer’s unfairly overlooked older sister. Selected release from Fri 13 Apr. Beauty (Skoonheid) (18) 104min South African drama about a man’s detachment and self-disgust with his own sexuality. Selected release from Fri 20 Apr. Breathing (15) 93min Dramatic directorial debut from Austrian actor Karl Markovics (The Counterfeiters). Selected release from Fri 20 Apr. Elfie Hopkins (tbc) tbc min Junior detective thriller starring Ray Winstone and his daughter Jaime. Selected release from Fri 20 Apr. Elles (18) 99min Juliette Binoche stars in this drama about young female students who turn to prostitution to fund their studies. Selected release from Fri 20 Apr. Gone (tbc) 94min Abduction thriller starring Amanda Seyfried. General release from Fri 20 Apr. Grave Encounters (15) 90min A ghost-hunting reality show crew gets stuck in an abandoned asylum. You can guess what happens next. General release from Fri 20 Apr. Hari Kiri (tbc) 127min Takeshi Miike-directed period samurai drama about revenge, honour and disgrace. Selected release from Fri 20 Apr. Lockout (tbc) tbc min Guy Pearce and Maggie Grace star in sci-fi actioner set in a space prison. General release from Fri 20 Apr. Marley (15) 144min Kevin Macdonald documentary on the life of reggae legend Bob. Selected release from Fri 20 Apr. Oliver Sherman (tbc) 82min Returning soldier drama directed by newcomer Ryan ‘not related to Robert’ Redford. Selected release from Fri 20 Apr.

Migrating south to shoot his latest feature in France seems to have lightened the mood of the Finnish filmmaker Aki Kaurismaki, whose brand of deadpan humour has previously proved to be the key in crafting a series of delightfully miserable comedies set in and around Helsinki. Happily, exporting his trademark comic sensibility to (apparently) less melancholy climes has in no way diminished Kaurismaki’s talent for wringing laughs – and genuinely touching drama. All that said, it should come as no great surprise that Kaurismaki has chosen to set his new film in one of France’s most dismal locales: Le Havre, the Normandy seaport that was levelled during World War II. It’s here that elderly shoe-shiner Marcel Marx (the superbly stoic André Wilms) attempts tp help a young African immigrant boy to evade the French authorities and cross the Channel to London, family and a better life. In the hands of Ken Loach, this sorry tale would be an unremittingly grim, if trueto-life drama. In Kaurismaki’s hands, it’s not only grimly funny, but the proceedings are given a glorious stylistic makeover, courtesy of the filmmaker’s love of 1950s kitsch, which here expresses itself in a homage to the Technicolor romantic dramas of Douglas Sirk. It’s a beguiling cinematic conceit that bestows dignity upon Kaurismaki’s beloved underclass. And it looks really cool. (Miles Fielder) ■ Selected release from Fri 6 April.

ROMANTIC COMEDY

SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN (12A) 107min ●●●●● This adaptation of Paul Torday’s 2007 novel is another to add to the list of ‘books that didn’t work as films’. The story of a nerdish Scottish fisheries expert (Ewan McGregor) and a sophisticated legal aide (Emily Blunt) selected by a fishingobsessed Arab sheik (Amr Waked) to help realise the seemingly impossible vision of the title was undoubtedly more effective on the page; as a film it is played primarily as a quirky comedy romance, but a grating and clichéd one. Writer Simon Beaufoy (Slumdog Millionaire) fails to focus the story’s wild shifts of tone – there are elements of political satire, devastating drama and even a brief terrorism subplot – and the result is an insubstantial muddle. Director Lasse Hallström (Chocolat, The Cider House Rules) favours simple broad emotions over thematic complexity, but this story’s bigger themes of politics and faith require a subtle touch that is entirely absent. Kristin Scott Thomas also appears as a Malcolm Tucker-like spin doctor, but amongst this likeable cast it is only Waked’s considered performance that makes a lasting impression. (Paul Gallagher) ■ General release from Fri 20 April.


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INDEX

list.co.uk/film Films screening in the next four weeks are listed below with certificate, star rating, credits, brief review and venue details. See list.co.uk for the most up-todate list of films screening. Film index is compiled by Gail Tolley and Laura Ennor. ✽ Indicates Hitlist entry Act of Valour (12A) ●●●●● (Mike McCoy/Scott Waugh, US, 2012) Alex Veadov, Roselyn Sanchez, Nestor Serrano. 101min. Based on real events, a team of US Navy SEALs embark on a mission to rescue a CIA agent in this action-packed study of the front line. See review at list.co.uk. General release. The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (15) ●●●●● (Stephan Elliott, Australia, 1994) Terence Stamp, Hugo Weaving, Guy Pearce. 104min. Two transvestites and a transsexual team up for a trip across the Australian outback for a drag show in Alice Springs in this outrageous camp classic. Lock Up Your Daughters screening, introduced by Menergy’s Lady Guillotina Munter. Glasgow Film Theatre. The Adventures of Robin Hood (U) (Michael Curtiz, William Keighley, US, 1938) Errol Flynn, Olivia De Havilland, Basil Rathbone. 102min. Sparkling, Oscarwinning excitement as Flynn and his merry men fight the evil prince and the wicked Rathbone to help the poor and capture the hand of the fair De Havilland. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee. Agent Vinod (12A) (Sriram Raghavan, India, 2012) Kareena Kapoor, Saif Ali Khan, Malika Haydon. Bollywood Bond as Agent Vinod (Khan) travels the world on the trail of his colleague’s murderers. Odeon at the Quay, Glasgow; Cineworld Fountainpark, Edinburgh; Cineworld Renfrew Street, Glasgow. Aliens (18) ●●●●● (James Cameron, US, 1986) Sigourney Weaver, Michael Biehn. 137min. Revived from a 57-year snooze in deep space, Warrant Officer Weaver is cajoled into joining a marine rescue mission to the planet that is home for the original alien beastie. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. All About My Mother (15) ●●●●● (Pedro Almodóvar, Spain, 1999) Cecilia Roth, Penelope Cruz, Antonia San Juan. 101min. When Madrid hospital worker Manuela’s son is killed in a car accident the grief-stricken woman sets out to fulfil her son’s last wish to know his father, and goes to Barcelona to find the transvestite she ran away from 18 years earlier. Glasgow Film Theatre. All Divided Selves (15) (Luke Fowler, UK, 2011) 93min. Arthouse documentary about the life and work of Glasgow counterculture psychiatrist RD Laing. Part of Glasgow International. Glasgow Film Theatre. The Artist (PG) ●●●●● (Michel Hazanavicius, France, 2011) Jean Dujardin, Bérénice Bejo, John Goodman. 100min. A joyous, impeccably crafted crowdpleaser about the advent of the talkies. Vue Omni, Edinburgh. Babycall (15) ●●●●● (Pål Sletaune, Norway, 2011) Noomi Rapace, Kristoffer Joner, Henrik Rafaelsen. 96min. See review, page 67. DCA screening is part of Dundead. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee; Glasgow Film Theatre. The Bad and the Beautiful (PG) (Vincente Minnelli, US, 1952) Lana Turner, Kirk Douglas, Walter Pidgeon. 118min. Reissue of the Turner and Douglas-starring drama telling the story of an unpopular film producer. Selected release from Fri 20 Apr. Battleship (12A) (Peter Berg, US, 2012) Alexander Skarsgård, Brooklyn Decker, Liam Neeson. Hasbro’s latest toy-to-film conversion adds sci-fi action to the familiar tactical sea battle scenario. General release from Wed 11 Apr. Beauty (Skoonheid) (18) (Oliver Hermanus, South Africa, 2011) Deon Lotz, Charlie Keegan, Michelle Scott. 99min. South African drama about a man’s detachment and self-disgust with his own

sexuality. Selected release from Fri 20 Apr. The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (12) ●●●●● (John Madden, UK, 2011) Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, Bill Nighy, Tom Wilkinson. 118min. Despite an irresistible army of pension-age talent, this story about a group of unconnected British retirees who come to the titular hotel in Jaipur feels too calculated to offer anything more than disposable entertainment at best, and cheaply manipulative emotional kicks at worst. General release. Beyond Time: William Turnbull (E) (Pete Stern, Alex Turnbull, UK, 2010) William Turnbull, Voice of Jude Law, Anthony Gormley. 65min. Acclaimed documentary film on the celebrated Dundee modernist, written and co-directed by his son Alex who appears for a Q&A after the screening. Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh. Big Miracle (PG) (Ken Kwapis, US, 2012) Drew Barrymore, John Krasinski, Kristen Bell. 107min. Romantic drama ‘inspired by the incredible true story’ of a new reporter (John Krasinski) and his efforts to save a family of whales in Alaska. macrobert, Stirling; The Hippodrome, Bo’ness. Bill Cunningham New York (12A) ●●●●● (Richard Press, USA, 2010) 84min. Press’s feature debut is an exuberant and occasionally poignant portrait of a New York photographer specialising in street fashion and society events. Glasgow Film Theatre. Blackthorn (15) (Mateo Gil, Spain/US/Bolivia/France, 2011) Sam Shepard, Eduardo Noriega, Stephen Rea. 102min. The Butch Cassidy story is continued, with Shepard taking on the role of the old outlaw living in Bolivia. Filmhouse, Edinburgh; Glasgow Film Theatre. Blood Feast (18) (Herschell Gordon Lewis, US, 1963) William Kerwin, Mal Arnold, Connie Mason. 67min. A caterer hired for a young woman’s birthday party turns out to have rather unorthodox methods of sourcing his meat. Screening with David McGillivray’s vintage horror short The Errand. Part of Dundead. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee. Blow Up (15) ●●●●● (Michelangelo Antonioni, UK/Italy, 1966) David Hemmings, Vanessa Redgrave, Sarah Miles, Jane Birkin. 111min. Fashion photographer Thomas (Hemmings) takes clandestine photographs of the meeting between two strangers in a park – a woman (Redgrave) and an older man. Thomas initially thinks he has merely snapped evidence of an embarrassing affair. But, as he is tracked down for the photographs, he realises that he could possess proof of murder. Seminal Antonioni. Part of the Antonioni & Bergman season.. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Bombay Beach (E) ●●●●● (Alma Har’el, US, 2011) 80min. Documentary about Bombay Beach in southern California, once a vacation spot for the rich but now occupied by the poor. Director Har’el seeks to empathise with her subjects, happily fictionalising and fantasising in this dream-like film. The Hippodrome, Bo’ness. Bonsai (15) (Cristián Jiménez, Chile/Argentina/Portugal/France ) Gabriela Arancibia, Cristóbal Briceño, Julio Carrasco. 95min. Hispanic romantic drama with a literary flavour. Glasgow Film Theatre. Breathing (Atmen) (15) (Karl Markovics, Austria, 2011) Thomas Schubert, Karin Lischka, Gerhard Liebmann. 93min. Dramatic directorial debut from Austrian actor Markovics (The Counterfeiters). Selected release from Fri 20 Apr. The Bride of Glomdal (Glomdalsbruden) (12A) (Carl Theodor Dreyer, Norway/Sweden, 1926) Einar Sissener, Tove Tellback, Stub Wiberg. 115min. Dreyer’s romantic drama follows a young woman who goes against the wishes of her father when she falls in love with a poor farmer’s son. Part of the Carl Dreyer season. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. The Cabin in the Woods (15) ●●●●● (Drew Goddard, US, 2012)

Jesse Williams, Richard Jenkins, Bradley Whitford. 105min. See review, page 67. Part of Dundead. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee. Casablanca (PG) ●●●●● (Michael Curtiz, US, 1942) Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Dooley Wilson. 102min. Bogey and Bergman star in the WWII classic. A wonderful hill of beans. Glasgow Film Theatre. A Cat in Paris (PG) (Jean-Loup Felicioli/Alain Gagnol, France/Netherlands, 2010) Voices of Dominique Blanc, Bruno Salomone, Jean Benguigui. 70min. Intriguing animation about the wanderings of a cat who is, by day, a friend to a little girl, but by night accompanies a big-hearted burglar around Paris. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (PG) ●●●●● (Richard Brooks, US, 1958) Elizabeth Taylor, Paul Newman, Burl Ives. 108min. Inevitably bowdlerised but suitably sweaty version of Tennessee Williams’ loquacious play. Even in diluted form this still packs a punch and the Taylor-Newman teaming is irresistible. Scotsman Screening Room, Edinburgh. Cat People (PG) ●●●●● (Jacques Tourneur, US, 1943) Simone Simon, Kent Smith, Tom Conway. 71min. Writer/producer Val Lewton showed that horror was a matter of the mind. The 1943 film sees Simon haunted by legends of her homeland, leading her to believe that she is about to metamorphose into a panther. For all the melodrama and shaky dialogue, there is a dark intelligence and restraint which marks this (and its sequel) out as superior B-movie nonsense. Part of Dundead. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee. Chronicle (12A) ●●●●● (Josh Trank, US, 2012) Michael B Jordan, Michael Kelly, Alex Russell. 83min. Andrew (DeHaan) decides to make a video document of his difficult life at home and school, but then he, cousin Matt (Russell) and friend Steve (Jordan) are granted telekinetic powers by an otherworldly

Film

meteorite. The found-footage format helps to get the audience onside, and despite some contrivances Chronicle is dark, wellexecuted and sometimes exhilarating. macrobert, Stirling. The Cold Light of Day (12A) (Mabrouk El Mechri, 2012) Henry Cavill, Bruce Willis, Sigourney Weaver. 93min. Man of the moment Cavill (soon to be Superman) joins Willis in this espionage/kidnap thriller. General release from Fri 6 Apr. Contraband (15) ●●●●● (Baltasar Kormakur, US, 2012) Mark Wahlberg, Kate Beckinsale, Giovanni Ribisi. 109min. This terse US remake of 2008 Icelandic thriller Reykjavik-Rotterdam, about a smuggler roped into one last job, is bland, low-key, but ultimately solid and watchable entertainment. General release. Corpo Celeste (12) ●●●●● (Alice Rohrwacher, Italy/Switzerland/France, 2011) Yle Vianello. 100min. See review, page 67. Glasgow Film Theatre. Cross of Love (Rakkauden Risti) (15) (Teuvo Tulio, Finland, 1946) Regina Linnanheimo, Oscar Tengström, Ville Salminen. 99min. One of Tulio’s best known films follows a girl who is seduced and ultimately abandoned by her community. After escaping to the city she is forced to confront her past when it catches up with her. Part of the Teuvo Tulio season. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Danger Diabolik (12) (Mario Bava, Italy/France, 1968) John Philip Law, Marisa Mell, Michel Piccoli. 105min. Tongue-incheek action movie inspired an Italian comic book character, the daring Diabolik, who mounts ever more elaborate and dangerous heists. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Day of Wrath (PG) (Carl Theodor Dreyer, Denmark, 1948) Thorkild Roose, Lisbeth Movin, Seigrid Neiiendam. 110min. Rare outing for Dreyer’s stark masterpiece of love and witchcraft in the 17th century. Part of the Carl Dreyer season. Filmhouse, Edinburgh.

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29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 71


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Film INDEX Dead by Dawn A series of all-night showcases, screening the finest in independent genre cinema, short films and animations, alongside some higher profile new international releases and some classics from the vaults of horror cinema. This year’s selection includes The Puppet Monster Massacre, Nightmare Factory and new release Cabin in the Woods.See preview, page 75. Filmhouse, Edinburgh, Thu 29 Mar—Sun 1 Apr. Delicacy (La Délicatesse) (12A) ●●●●● (David Foenkinos/Stéphane Foenkinos, France, 2011) Audrey Tautou, François Damiens, Bruno Todeschini. 108min. See review, page 68. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. The Devil Inside (18) ●●●●● (William Brent Bell, USA, 2012) Fernanda Andrade, Simon Quarterman, Suzan Crowley. 85min. Skimpy, poorly shot and incoherent, this low-budget ‘found footage’ horror flick fails on nearly every point. General release. Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules (U) ●●●●● (David Bowers, US, 2011) Zachary Gordon, Devon Bostick, Rachael Harris. Anaemic sequel to last year’s adaptation of Jeff Kinney’s bestselling books. Glasgow Film Theatre. Dirty Dancing (15) ●●●●● (Emile Ardolino, US, 1987) Jennifer Grey, Patrick Swayze, Jerry Orbach. 100min. Sure it’s full of stereotyping and bad dialogue, but decades on Dirty Dancing still has the ability to send a generation of women all gooey. Sloans, Glasgow. The Divide (18) ●●●●● (Xavier Gens, USA/Germany/Canada, 2011) Lauren German, Milo Ventimiglia, Michael Biehn. 112min. See review, page 69. Part of Dundead. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee. Dooman River (tbc) (Lu Zhang, France/South Korea, 2010) Jian Cui, Lan Yin, Jin-Long Lin. 90min. A young Chinese boy befriends an illegal North Korean immigrant. Presented by GRAMNet and BEMIS. CCA, Glasgow. Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde (12) (Rouben Mamoulian, US, 1932) Fredric March, Miriam Hopkins, Rose Hobart, Holmes Herbert, Halliwell Hobbes, Edgar Norton, Tempe Pigott. 98min. Classic adaptation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s novella. Followed by a discussion. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Dracula (12A) ●●●●● (Terence Fisher, UK, 1958) Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee, Michael Gough. 82min. The film that set the Hammer standard and revitalised the vampire count. Lee’s Dracula is very much the seductive aristocrat, whose influence overshadows the entire film. Part of Dundead. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee. Dundead (Thu 5–Sun 8 Apr.) The second year of Dundee’s horror film festival includes genre classics plus preview screenings of Norwegian thriller Babycall and Indonesian martial art feast The Raid. See preview, page 75. DCA, Dundee, 18 Years Later (Diciotto Anni Dopo) (15) (Edoardo Leo, Italy, 2010) Marco Bonini, Edoardo Leo, Sabrina Impacciatore. 100min. Two brothers are reunited by tragedy in this decade-long labour of love from début director Leo. Part of the Italian Film Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh; Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee; Glasgow Film Theatre. Elfie Hopkins (tbc) (Ryan Andrews, UK, 2012) Ray Winstone, Steven Mackintosh, Jamie Winstone. Junior detective thriller starring father and daughter Winstones. Selected release from Fri 20 Apr. Elles (18) (Malgorzata Szumowska, France/Poland/Germany, 2011) Juliette Binoche, Joanna Kulig, Anaïs Demoustier. 99min. Drama about young female students who turn to prostitution to fund their studies. Glasgow Film Theatre. The Elvis Presley Film Society (PG) (Various, US, Various) A screening of a handful of The King’s 30-plus films, including 1969 revenge western Charro!, concert footage from a 1976 live show, and 2005 documentary The Memphis Flash. O’Neill’s, Glasgow.

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72 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

Italian Film Festival

brought to life with puppet and hand-cut animation inspired by the work of Josef Lada. Part of the Jiri Trnka season. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Gorbaciof (15) (Stefano Incerti, Italy, 2010) Toni Servillo, Mi Yang, Geppy Gleijeses. 85min. A prison cashier steals money to help out the father of his beau in this almost-wordless comedy. Part of the Italian Film Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh; Glasgow Film Theatre. The Gospel of Us (tbc) (Dave McKean, UK, 2012) Michael Sheen, John-Paul Macleod, Hywel Simons. Sheen stars as a Christ-like figure in this Passion story set in Port Talbot, Wales. Selected release from Fri 13 Apr. La Grande Illusion (PG) (Jean Renoir, France, 1937) Jean Gabin, Pierre Fresney, Erich von Stroheim, Marcel Dalio. 117min. Renoir’s classic prison camp escape story is secretly an ironic social analysis highlighting class differentiation. Followed by a discussion led by a representative of the Humanist Society of Scotland. Filmhouse, Edinburgh; Glasgow Film Theatre. Grave Encounters (15) (The Vicious Brothers, Canada, 2011) Sean Rogerson, Juan Riedinger, Ashleigh Gryzko. 92min. A ghost-hunting reality show crew gets stuck in an abandoned insane asylum. You can guess what happens next. General release from Fri 20 Apr. Hari Kiri (tbc) (Takashi Miike, 2011) Kôji Yakusho, Naoto Takenaka, Hikari Mitsushima. 126min. Takeshi Miikedirected period samurai drama about revenge, honour and disgrace. Selected release from Fri 20 Apr. Harvey (U) (Henry Koster, US, 1950) James Stewart, Josephine Hull, Peggy Dow, Charles Drake. 104min. Elwood P Dowd (Stewart) is a nice, pleasant man who just happens to have an invisible friend resembling a six foot rabbit. Scotsman Screening Room, Edinburgh. Le Havre (PG) ●●●●● (Aki Kaurismaki, Finland/France/Germany, 2011) Andre Wilms, Kati Outinen, JeanPierre Darroussin, Jean-Pierre Leaud. 93min. See review, page 70. Filmhouse, Edinburgh; Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee; Glasgow Film Theatre. Headhunters (Hodejegerne) (15) ●●●●● (Morten Tydlum, Norway, 2011) Askel Hennie, Synnøve Macody Lund. 101min. See review, page 68, and profile, page 65. DCA, Dundee; Glasgow Film Theatre. Hop (U) ●●●●● (Tim Hill, US, 2011) Voices of Russell Brand, James Marsden, Hugh Laurie. Animated riff on the Easter Bunny myth in which the deliverer of eggs is hit by a car not long before the big day. Glasgow Film Theatre. Hors-jeu (E) (Thomas Risch, Jerome Mignard, France, 2011) 90min. Documentary about the 2011 footballing Homeless World Cup, which took place in Paris. Followed by a Q&A with the film’s directors, the president of the Homeless World Cup Foundation and a former player and now team staff member. Institut Français d’Ecosse, Edinburgh. The Hunger Games (PG) ●●●●● (Gary Ross, US, 2012) Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Liam Hemsworth. 142min. An adaptation of Suzanne Collins’ dystopian thriller of a novel that successfully transcends its teen-fiction origins. General release. Hunky Dory (15) ●●●●● (Marc Evans, UK, 2011) Minnie Driver, Aneurin Barnard, Danielle Branch. 109min. Funny and gently moving tale set in 70s Wales, about a freespirited drama teacher (Driver) determined to put on a musical version of The Tempest. macrobert, Stirling. I Know Where I’m Going! (U) (Michael Powell, Emeric Pressburger, UK, 1945) Wendy Hiller, Roger Livesey, Finlay Currie, Pamela Brown, Nancy Price. 91min. An intriguing comedy romance with dark undertones, in which the young, confident Ms Hiller falls for Livesey’s sexy young naval officer. The choice of current exhibitor at the Ingleby Alex Finlay, who introduces the film. Ingleby Gallery, Edinburgh.

The Italian Film Festival returns in 2012 to four cinemas across Scotland: the Filmhouse, the GFT, the DCA and the Eden Court Theatre in Inverness. Highlights in the programme include smart and seductive road movie 18 Years Later; Antonioni’s artfully menacing drama The Red Desert; and Elio Petri’s Kafka-esque Oscar-winner, Investigation of a Citizen above Suspicion. For full listings visit list.co.uk ■ Various venues across Scotland, Fri 13–Thu 26 Apr, italianfilmfestival.org.uk The Emperor and the White Snake (12A) (Siu-Tung Ching, China, 2011) Jet Li, Shengyi Huang, Raymond Lam. 100min. Martial arts fantasy film based on an ancient Chinese legend. Selected release from Fri 30 Mar. The Emperor’s Nightingale (Cisaruv Slavík) (12A) (Jirí Trnka, Milos Makovec, Czechoslovakia, 1949) Helena Patockova, Jaromir Sobotoa, Detsky pevecky sbor Jana Kuhna. 72min. Hans Christian Andersen’s tale is brought to life by Trnka’s puppetry. A nightingale teaches an emperor to revolt against the status quo. Part of the Jiri Trnka season. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind (15) ●●●●● (Michel Gondry, US, 2004) Kate Winslet, Jim Carey, Tom Wilkinson, Kirstin Dunst. 108min. A wildly imaginative flight of fantasy based around the gloriously barmy conceit that Carrey’s lovelorn loser, Joel Barish, is having the painful memories of his ex-girlfriend (Winslet) surgically removed. Followed by a discussion on issues raised by the film. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. eXistenZ (15) (David Cronenberg, US, 1999) Jude Law, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Ian Holm. 97min. Futuristic thriller about the fight between two video games companies, and the ‘realists’ that seek to prevent them from ‘deforming’ reality. Followed by a discussion on human-machine interaction. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Filarmonica Della Scala 30th Anniversary (E) (Italy, 2012) Great symphonic music by Brahms and Mozart, conducted by Christopher Eschenbach and beamed live in HD from Italy’s La Scala. Selected screenings on Sun 1 Apr. Film Socialisme (PG) ●●●●● (JeanLuc Godard, Switzerland/France, 2010) Catherine Tanvier, Christian Sinniger, JeanMarc Stehlé. Still mad and provocative after all these years, legendary French filmmaker and polemicist Jean-Luc Godard’s new feature is set on a garish cruise ship that’s travelling around the Mediterranean (with Patti Smith among its guests). There’s no narrative to speak of: this is part treatise on the state of the European Union, part philosophical debate, part aesthetic experiment and part journal on the decline of European civilization. CCA, Glasgow. Five Children and It (U) (John Stephenson, UK, 2004) Kenneth Branagh, Zoe Wanamaker, Freddie Highmore, Jessica

Claridge, Eddie Izzard (voice). 89min. Charming adaptation of E Nesbit’s classic children’s book, set during WWI when a bunch of city kids are bundled off to stay with their Uncle Albert (Branagh), where they discover a mysterious creature living nearby. Glasgow Film Theatre. The Fog (15) (John Carpenter, US, 1980) Adrienne Barbeau, Jamie Lee Curtis, Janet Leigh. 89min. Horror classic set in a California seaside town on the centenary of the wrecking of a ship. Part of Dundead. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee. Frankenstein (PG) (James Whale, US, 1931) Boris Karloff. 71min. Whale’s wonderfully camp version of the horror myth takes liberties with its source material but is probably better known than Mary Shelley’s novel. Featuring a discussion on issues raised by the film. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Future Shorts (E) (Various) 90min. An international showcase of the finest short films from around the world. This month’s selection includes Amy Grappell’s polyamoury doc Quadrangle, Sam Taylor Wood’s young punk love story Love You More, and Spike Jonze & Simon Cahn’s stop motion animation Mourir auprès de toi (To Die By Your Side). CCA, Glasgow. Gattaca (15) ●●●●● (Andrew Niccol, US, 1997) Ethan Hawke, Uma Thurman, Jude Law. 106min. In the future, ‘naturally’ born Vincent (Hawke) forms a pact with the genetically-enhanced but crippled Jerome (Law) to use his genetic identity in an attempt to become an astronaut. Followed by a discussion on issues raised by the film. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance (12A) ●●●●● (Mark Neveldine, Brian Taylor, US/UAE, 2011) Nicolas Cage, Ciarán Hinds, Idris Elba. 95min. Bizarrely entertaining but otherwise unenjoyable comic-horror sequel. macrobert, Stirling. Gone (tbc) (Heitor Dhalia, US, 2012) Amanda Seyfried, Jennifer Carpenter, Wes Bentley. 94min. Abduction/serial killer thriller as Seyfried tries to convince the police her kidnapper has returned and nabbed her sister. General release from Fri 20 Apr. The Good Soldier Svejk – Eps I, II, III (Dobry Voják Svejk) (15) (Carl Lamac, Czechoslovakia, 1926) Karl Noll, Antonie Nedosinská, Carl Lamac. 88min. This adaptation of Jaroslav Hasek’s novel is

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Il Boom (PG) (Vittorio De Sica, Italy, 1963) Alberto Sordi, Gianna Maria Canale, Ettore Geri. 97min. A comedy about a man who lives far beyond his means and who winds up heavily in debt. Edinburgh screening introduced by Dr Pasquale Iannone. Part of the Italian Film Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh; Glasgow Film Theatre. The Immature (Immaturi) (15) (Paolo Genovese, Italy, 2011) Isabelle Adriani, Ambra Angiolini, Luca Bizzarri. 108min. A group of friends are reunited when the Ministry of Education makes them re-take their school exams in this award-winning comedy. Part of the Italian Film Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh; Glasgow Film Theatre. Inferno (18) (Dario Argento, Italy/US, 1980) Leigh McCloskey, Irene Miracle, Dario Nicolodi. 107min. An American student returns from studies in Rome to discover that a series of brutal murders on both sides of the Atlantic could have a bizarre supernatural connection. Part of Dundead. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee. Instrument (E) (Jem Cohen, US, 2003) 115min. Documentary following the band Fugazi from 1987 to 1998, with interviews and footage of tours, recording and rehearsals. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee.

✽ ✽

CINEMA INFORMATION

GLASGOW Britannia Panopticon Music Hall 113–117 Trongate. britanniapanopticon.org Free, unticketed screening as part of Glasgow Comedy Festival. CCA 350 Sauchiehall Street. 0141 352 4900. ccaglasgow.com Prices vary (free–£6). Cineworld Parkhead Forge Shopping Centre, 1221 Gallowgate. 0871 200 2000. cineworld.co.uk £6.40–£7 (£4.80–£5.20; family ticket £20.40); 3D supplement £2.10 (£1.50); glasses 80p per pair. Off peak prices Mon–Thu before 5pm. Cineworld Renfrew Street 7 Renfrew Street. 0871 200 2000. cineworld.co.uk £6.90–£8.30 (£5.70; family ticket £22–£23.40); 3D supplement £2.10 (£1.50); glasses 80p per pair. Off peak prices Mon–Thu before 5pm and Fri–Sun before noon.

Into the Abyss (12A) ●●●●● (Werner Herzog, USA, 2011) Richard Lopez, Michael Perry, Damon Hall. 106min. See review, page 67. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee; Glasgow Film Theatre. Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion (Indagine su un Cittadino al di Sopra di Ogni Sospetto) (18) (Elio Petri, Italy, 1970) Gian Maria Volonté, Florinda Bolkan, Gianni Santuccio. 112min. Kafkaesque drama about a police chief who murders his mistress. Part of the Italian Film Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh; Glasgow Film Theatre. Iron Sky (tbc) ●●●●● (Timo Vuorensola, Finland, Germany, Australia, 2012) Julia Dietze, Christopher Kirby, Götz Otto, Peta Sergeant, Stephanie Paul, Udo Kier. 93min. See review, page 68. General release from Fri 20 Apr. The Island President (PG) (Jon Shenk, US, 2011) 101min. Political documentary with a climate change focus as the President of the Maldives strives to keep his nation above sea level. Edinburgh screening on Fri 13 Apr followed by a discussion on what Scotland can do about climate change. Filmhouse, Edinburgh; Glasgow Film Theatre. Italian Film Festival (Fri 13–Thu 26 April) Italiophiles rejoice, the

glasgowfilm.org/theatre £7 (£5.50); Glasgow International screenings £4.

renfrewshire.gov.uk £5 (£4; Paisley Film Society members £3).

Grosvenor Ashton Lane, Hillhead. 0845 166 6002. grosvenorcafe.co.uk/ cinema.php £5–£7.75 (£4–£6; sofa seats £15–£30). Various peak and off peak prices throughout the week. For this month’s All Night Horror Madness, tickets are £15.50 (£14.50).

Showcase Cinema Barrbridge Leisure Centre, Coatbridge. 0871 220 1000. showcasecinemas.co.uk £6.40–£7.70 (£5.55); 3D supplement £2; glasses £1 per pair. Off peak prices before noon.

IMAX Theatre Glasgow Science Centre, 50 Pacific Quay. 0141 420 5000. gsc.org.uk/imax Feature films £9.95 (£7.95); IMAX science films: add £2.50 to Science Mall admission. O’Neills 71–73 Albion Street. 0141 552 0822. Elvis Presley Film Society screenings £5, contact elvispresley.filmsociety@ntlw orld.com for more information.

Eastwood Park Theatre Rouken Glen Road, Giffnock. 0141 577 4970. £4.50 (£3.50).

Odeon at the Quay Springfield Quay, Paisley Road. 0871 22 44 007. odeon.co.uk £7.30–£8.60 (£5.05–£6.45; family ticket £20.20–£23.80); 3D supplement £2 (£1.60); glasses £1 per pair. Off peak prices Mon–Thu before 5pm.

Empire Clyde Regional Centre, 23 Britannia Way. 0871 471 4714. empirecinemas.co.uk £5.45–£6.95 (£5–£5.25; family ticket £20–£21); 3D supplement £1.50. Off peak prices Mon–Thu before 5pm; SaverDay Tuesday £2.95.

Odeon Braehead X-scape, Kings Inch Road. 0871 2244 007. odeon.co.uk £7.30–£8.60 (£5.40–£7; family ticket £21.60–£25.60); 3D supplement £2 (£1.60); glasses £1 per pair. Off peak prices Mon–Thu before 5pm.

Glasgow Film Theatre 12 Rose Street. 0141 332 6535.

Paisley Arts Centre New Street, Paisley. 0141 887 1010.

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Showcase Cinema Griffin Avenue, Phoenix Business Park, Paisley. 0871 220 1000. showcasecinemas.co.uk £6.30–£7.70 (£5.65); 3D supplement £2; glasses £1 per pair. Off peak prices Mon–Fri before 6pm; Sat & Sun before noon. Sloans 62 Argyle Arcade, 108 Argyle Street. 0141 221 8886. sloansglasgow.com/ eatfilm Free. Vespbar 14 Drury Street. vespbar.com Screenings as part of Glasgow Comedy Festival £5 (£4) – call 0844 395 4005 to book.

EDINBURGH Brunton Theatre Ladywell Way, Musselburgh. 0131 665 2240. bruntontheatre.co.uk £5.10–£5.60 (£4.60–£5.10). Cameo 38 Home Street. 0871 902 5723. picturehouses.co.uk £5.30–£7.30 (£2–£5.80). Sunday double bills £7.30 (concessions £5.80; members free).Off peak price Tue–Fri before 5pm, all late shows and all day Mon; Wed first screening

Italian Film Festival returns to Scotland with a heady selection of award-winning new cinema as well as a celebration of the great filmmaker Michelangelo Antonioni. See preview, page 72. Various venues. Jaws (PG) ●●●●● (Steven Spielberg, US, 1975) Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw, Richard Dreyfuss. 125min. Cracking shark adventure from the days when Spielberg movies were scary. Sloans, Glasgow. The Jewel (Il Gioiellino) (tbc) (Andrea Molaioli, Italy, 2011) Toni Servillo, Remo Girone, Sarah Felberbaum. 110min. Financial thriller charting the rise and fall of an Italian food and drink company. Part of the Italian Film Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh; Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee; Glasgow Film Theatre. John Carter (12A) ●●●●● (Andrew Stanton, US, 2012) Taylor Kitsch, Lynn Collins, Willem Dafoe, Dominic West, Mark Strong. 133min. Muddled family scifi story saved by a personable lead (Kitsch) and Stanton’s creative panache. Selected release. Journey 2: The Mysterious Island (PG) (Brad Peyton, US, 2012) Josh Hutcherson, Dwayne Johnson, Michael Caine. 94min. Action-adventure semisequel to 2008’s Journey to the Center of the Earth. Cineworld Renfrew Street, Glasgow; The Hippodrome, Bo’ness.

£2 for concessions. For this month’s All Night Horror Madness, tickets are £17.50 (£15.50). Cineworld Fountainpark Fountain Park, 130/3 Dundee Street. 0871 200 2000. cineworld.co.uk £7.10–£8.30 (£5.40; family ticket £22.60); 3D supplement £2.10 (£1.50); glasses 80p per pair. Off peak prices Mon–Fri before 5pm. Dominion 18 Newbattle Terrace. 0131 447 4771. dominioncinemas.net £6–£10.90 (£4.60–£7.90; seniors discount Sun–Thu only). Off peak prices before 6pm. Edinburgh Printmakers 23 Union Street. 0131 557 2479. edinburghprintmakers.co.uk Negativnights events £5 (£4). Filmhouse 88 Lothian Road. 0131 228 2688. filmhousecinema.com £5.60–£7.50 (£2.60–£5.50). Off peak prices Mon–Fri before 5pm (extra discount on Fri). Ghillie Dhu 2 Rutland Place. 0131 222 9930. ghillie-dhu.co.uk Reel Cinema screenings £25 including dinner and dancing; kids film screenings £4 including craft activities. Ingleby Gallery 15 Calton Road. 0131 556 4441. inglebygallery.com Free screening, but booking essential at filmclubalecfinlay.eventbrite. com Institut Français d’Ecosse 13 Randolph Crescent. 0131 225 5366.

Khodorkovsky (12A) ●●●●● (Cyril Tuschi, Germany, 2011) 111min. Detailed and absorbing documentary about Russian oligarch Mikhail Khodorkovsky, controversially jailed for tax evasion in 2005. Glasgow Film Theatre. The Kid with a Bike (Le Gamin au Vélo) (12A) ●●●●● (Jean-Pierre Dardenne, Luc Dardenne, Italy, 2011) Thomas Doret, Cécile de France, Jérémie Renier. 87min. Young boy Cyril (Doret) has recently entered foster care. When his beloved red bike is sold by his absent father, local hairdresser Samantha (de France) buys it back for him and the two get to know each other. Selected release. Labyrinth (U) ●●●●● (Jim Henson, US, 1986) David Bowie, Jennifer Connelly, Shelley Thompson. 101min. A teenage girl has her baby brother kidnapped by the King Of The Goblins, and so has to enter the fiendish labyrinth to get him back. Sloans, Glasgow. Labyrinth of Passion (18) ●●●●● (Pedro Almodóvar, Spain, 1983) Cecilia Roth, Imanol Arias, Helga Liné. 100min. A nympho club chanteuse falls for a Middle Eastern heir, who, in turn, is having a fling with a terrorist who’s out to kidnap him. Sluggishly and tawdry early effort from Almodovar. Glasgow Film Theatre. Laura (U) ●●●●● (Otto Preminger, US, 1944) Gene Tierney, Dana Andrews, Clifton

ifecosse.org.uk Free. Odeon 118 Lothian Road. 0871 22 44 007. odeon.co.uk £7.50–£8.85 (£5.65–£6.90; family ticket £22–£26); 3D supplement £2 (£1.60); glasses £1 per pair. Off peak prices Mon–Thu before 5pm. Odeon Wester Hailes 120 Wester Hailes Road, Westside Plaza. 0871 22 44 007. odeon.co.uk £6.60–£7.85 (£4.75–£6; family ticket £19.80–£23.40); premier seat upgrade £1.10 (family £4.40); 3D supplement £2 (£1.60); glasses £1 per pair. Off peak prices Mon–Thu before 5pm. Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh Inverleith Row. 0131 248 2909. rbge.org.uk £6 (£4), screening organised by takeoneaction.org.uk, booking via yert-take-oneaction.eventbrite.com Scotsman Screening Room Scotsman Hotel, 20 North Bridge. 0131 556 5565. scotsmanscreenings.com Film only £10. Meal packages £39. Deluxe gourmet Christmas packages available for selected screenings. Scottish National Gallery Hawthornden Lecture Theatre, The Mound. 0131 624 6200. nationalgalleries.org Free. St Bride’s Centre 10 Orwell Terrace. 0131 346 1405. stbrides.wordpress.com Free. Summerhall 1 Summerhall. 0131 560

1590. summerhall.co.uk £5 (£4) or a batch of three tickets for £10 (£8). Screenings as part of Edinburgh International Science Festival, see sciencefestival.co.uk or call 0844 557 2686 for more details. Vue Ocean Ocean Terminal, Ocean Drive, Victoria Dock, Leith. 0871 224 0240. myvue.com £5.95–£8.40 (£4.50–£6.25; family ticket £18–£25); 3D supplement £2.60 (£1.95). Off peak prices all day Mon–Thu and Fri before 5pm (extra discounts Mon–Thu before 5pm). Vue Omni Omni, Greenside. 0871 224 0240. myvue.com £5.95–£8.40 (£4.50–£6.25; family ticket £18–£25); 3D supplement £2.60 (£1.95). Off peak prices all day Mon–Thu and Fri before 5pm (extra discounts Mon–Thu before 5pm).

OTHER INDEPENDENTS The Hippodrome 10 Hope Street, Bo’ness. 01324 506850. falkirk.gov.uk/hippodrome £5.55 (£4.25; family ticket £15.20). Certain Hippodrome Festival of Silent Cinema screenings £8 (£6). Macrobert University of Stirling, Stirling. 01786 466666. macrobert.org £4.75–£5.75 (£4.25–£5.25). Off peak prices before 4pm. Dundee Contemporary Arts Nethergate, Dundee. 01382 909900. dca.org.uk £5–£6.50 (£4). Off peak prices before 5pm (extra discounts Mon–Thu).


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list.co.uk/film Webb. 88min. A detective (Andrews) becomes fascinated with the eponymous femme (Tierney), who as the story begins is dead – or at least appears to be. A terrific murder mystery. The Hippodrome, Bo’ness. LIAF Animation for Kids (U) 65min. A selection of short animations from the London International Animation Festival, suitable for ages 2–6. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Live from the Met: La Traviata (E) (US, 2012) Natalie Dessay, Matthew Polenzani, Dmitri Hvorostovsky. 185min. Verdi’s opera about the passionate, consumptive Violetta, broadcast live from The Met Opera in New York. Selected screenings on Sat 14 Apr. Live from the Met: Manon (E) (US, 2012) Anna Netrebko, Piotr Beczala, Paulo Szot. 245min. Join the New York Metropolitan Opera for Massenet’s Manon, in which the eponymous heroine has little trouble attracting the attentions of men, but only has eyes for one young chevalier. Selected screenings on Sat 7 Apr. Lockout (tbc) (James Mather/Stephen St Leger, France) Guy Pearce, Maggie Grace, Peter Stormare. Sci-fi actioner set in a space prison. General release from Fri 20 Apr. Love One Another (Gezeichneten) (12A) (Carl Theodor Dreyer, Germany, 1922) Adele Reuter-Eichberg, Vladimir Gajdarov, Polina Piekowskaja. 105min. Second feature from Dreyer based on a novel on the Russion pogrom. Part of the Carl Dreyer season. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. A Man Escaped (Un Condamne A Mort S’est Echappe) (PG) ●●●●● (Robert Bresson, France, 1956) Francois Leterrier, Charles Le Clainche, Maurice Beerblock, Jacques Ertaud. 102min. Recently re-released true story of a French Resistance fighter’s escape from imprisonment by the Gestapo. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee. Margin Call (15) (JC Chandor, US, 2011) Zachary Quinto, Stanley Tucci, Kevin Spacey. 107min. A strong cast leads this thriller about an investment bank during the early stages of the financial crisis. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Marley (15) (Kevin Macdonald, US/UK, 2012) 144min. Documentary on the life of reggae legend Bob Marley. Selected release from Fri 20 Apr. Martha Marcy May Marlene (15) ●●●●● (Sean Durkin, US, 2011) Elizabeth Olsen, Sarah Paulson, John Hawkes. 102min. A young woman (Olsen) returns to the house of her sister (Paulson)

after two years as a cult member. Olsen is breathtaking, but the film lacks intensity. The Hippodrome, Bo’ness. Martin (18) (George A. Romero, US, 1976) John Amplas, Lincoln Maazel, Christine Forrest. 95min. Romero’s ultra low budget cult classic follows a young man trying to resist the vampiric urges he claims curse him. Geek film night screening, preceded by a Q&A with Ian Rankin, who chose the film, chaired by Mark Millar. Glasgow Film Theatre. A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Sen Noci Svatojánské) (12A) (Jirí Trnka, Czechoslovakia, 1959) Voices of Joss Ackland, Ann Bell, Richard Burton. 76min. Shakespeare’s verse is replaced by stylised dance moves in Trnka’s animated adaptation. Part of the Jiri Trnka season. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Mirror Mirror (PG) (Tarsem Singh, US, 2012) Lily Collins, Julia Roberts, Armie Hammer. 106min. Roberts stars as the narcissistic evil queen in this comic-fantasy twist on the Snow White story. General release from Mon 2 Apr. A Monster in Paris (U) (Bibo Bergeron, France, 2011) Mathieu Chedid, Vanessa Paradis, Gad Elmaleh. 90min. In 1910 Paris, a shy film projectionist and an inventor join forces with an eclectic band of misfits to embark on the hunt for a monster that is terrifying the locals. The Hippodrome, Bo’ness. Monty Python’s Life of Brian (15) ●●●●● (Terry Jones, UK, 1979) Graham Chapman, Terry Jones, John Cleese, Michael Palin, Eric Idle. 93min. A host of very funny setpieces and smart cameos from the Python team climaxes in a rather fetching musical crucifixion. Glasgow Film Theatre. Mr Popper’s Penguins (PG) ●●●●● (Mark Waters, US, 2011) Jim Carrey, Carla Gugino. 94min. Likeable family comedy starring Carrey as Mr Popper, a humourless businessman who inherits six penguins. Glasgow Film Theatre. The Muppets (U) ●●●●● (James Bobin, US, 2011) Amy Adams, Jason Segel, Chris Cooper. 103min. If the plot could be fresher (save the old theatre from the ruthless capitalist!), the self-referential humour and old-school bonhomie should raise a smile. Selected release. My Week with Marilyn (PG) ●●●●● (Simon Curtis, UK, 2011) Michelle Williams, Eddie Redmayne, Kenneth Branagh. 101min. This adaptation of Colin Clark’s memoirs from the set of The Prince

Weekends of the Dead

and the Showgirl focuses on the one week he spent with Marilyn Monroe (Williams). Brunton Theatre, Edinburgh. Mystery of Edwin Drood (PG) (Stuart Walker, US, 1935) Claude Rains, Douglass Montgomery, Heather Angel. 87min. Dickens’ final (and unfinished) novel was adapted by Universal at the peak of its horror cycle and focuses on a murder investigation. Part of Dickens on Screen. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Nannerl, la soeur de Mozart (Mozart’s Sister) (12A) (René Féret, France, 2010) Marie Féret, David Moreau, Marc Barbé. Historical drama Mozart’s perhaps equally talented but overlooked female sibling. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Negativnights (tbc) Experimental film works made and presented by various artists, distorting the usual tropes of narrative and meaning, followed by discussion and Q&As with the artists. With David Sherry (Thu 29 Mar), Cru Servers (Thu 12 Apr) and Beagles & Ramsay (Thu 26 Apr). Edinburgh Printmakers, Edinburgh. A Night To Remember (PG) ●●●●● (Roy Ward Baker, UK, 1958) Kenneth More, Ronald Allen, Robert Ayres. 123min. The British version of the Titanic story with plenty of excitement in a stiff-upper-lip sort of way. Introduced by Tom Stevenson, talking about the role of communications technology in the tragedy. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. North Sea Texas (tbc) (Bavo Defurne, Belgium, 2011) Eva van der Gucht, Thomas Coumans, Jelle Florizoone. Coming of age/homosexual awakening drama set on the Belgian coast. Selected release from Fri 6 Apr. NT Live: She Stoops to Conquer (E) (Jamie Lloyd, UK, 2012) David Fynn, Harry Hadden-Paton, John Heffernan. A man attempts to set his daughter up with the son of an old pal, only to find mistaken identity and misdemeanour all around as the young man mistakes the girl for a barmaid,

Film

but falls in love with her anyway. Broadcast live from the National Theatre in London. Selected screenings on Thu 29 Mar. Oliver Sherman (tbc) (Ryan Redford, Canada, 2010) Garret Dillahunt, Donal Logue, Molly Parker. 82min. A lonely veteran travels to a rural town to reconnect with the soldier who saved his life during the war. Glasgow Film Theatre. Oliver Twist (PG) (Roman Polanski, UK/Czech Republic/France/Italy, 2005) Barney Clark, Ben Kingsley, Jeremy Swift. 130min. Polanski’s adaptation of Dickens’ beloved classic features Ben Kinglsey as Fagin. Part of Dickens on Screen. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Oliver! (U) (Carol Reed, UK, 1968) Mark Lester, Ron Moody, Shani Wallis. 153min. Lionel Bart’s musical gets the big screen treatment courtesy of Carol Reed’s exuberant, Oscar winning production. Singalong screening on Sun 8 Apr. Part of Dickens on Screen. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Once Upon a Time (Der var Engang) (12A) (Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1922) Clara Pontoppidan, Svend Methling, Peter Jerndorff. 75min. A princess, searching for her prince charming, becomes grounded by her dealings with a ‘beggar’. Part of the Carl Dreyer season. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Once Upon a Time in Anatolia (Bir Zamanlar Anadolu’da) (15) ●●●●● (Nuri Bilge Ceylan, 2011) Muhammet Uzuner, Yilmaz Erdogan,Taner Birsel. 157min. A humane, beguiling and idiosyncratic shaggy dog story about a policeman, a doctor and a murder suspect searching for a body buried in the Turkish countryside. macrobert, Stirling; Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Ordet (The Word) (12A) (Carl Theodor Dreyer, Denmark, 1955) Henrik Malberg, Emil Hass Christensen, Preben Lerdorff Rye. 126min. One of Dreyer’s greatest films, this adaptation of the Kaj Munk play examines tensions in a farming family. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee.

art loving, comedy laughing, attraction visiting, theatre going, hill walking, scotland touring, club dancing, beer swilling, sport crazy, film watching, music listening, hotel staying money spenders?

We’ll target them There’s a double-whammy of horror movie madness over the coming weekends. First off, the Dead by Dawn festival will sink its teeth into the Filmhouse from Thu 29 Mar-Sun 1 Apr, with overnight screening programmes, guest filmmakers and a Shit Film Amnesty (unload the dreck from your DVD collection, but be warned – the worst film takes home the lot). The weekend after (Thu 5-Sun 8 Apr), Dundead scares the bejesus out of the DCA patrons with screenings of horrors old and new, including The Cabin in the Woods, Babycall (reviews for both on page 67), Dracula (the Christopher Lee/Hammer version) and Cronenberg’s Videodrome. ■ Dead by Dawn, Filmhouse, Edinburgh, Thu 29 Mar-Sun 1 Apr, deadbydawn.co.uk; Dundead, DCA, Dundee, Thu 5-Sun 8 Apr, bit.ly/dundead

DIRECT DISTRIBUTION Arts, Entertainment,Tourism and Leisure Publicity Nationwide

0 1 4 1 429 4 4 5 3838 8838 0141 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 75


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Our Life (La nostra vita) (15) (Daniele Luchetti, Italy/France, 2010) Elio Germano, Raoul Bova. 98min. Emotive Italian drama about a young builder whose world is pulled apart by the death of his wife. Part of the Italian Film Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh; Glasgow Film Theatre. Pina (U) ●●●●● (Wim Wenders, Germany/UK/France, 2011) Wim Wenders’ documentary is rooted in newly filmed excerpts from four of Pina Bausch’s productions and interspersed with theatrical performance footage and interviews. The Hippodrome, Bo’ness. The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists (U) (Peter Lord/Jeff Newitt, UK/US, 2012) Hugh Grant, Salma Hayek, Jeremy Piven. 88min. Brand new seafaring adventure from the claymation boffins at Aardman. General release. Prince Bayaya (Bajaja) (U) (Jirí Trnka, Czechoslovakia, 1950) 87min. Animation in which a young peasant must defeat evil spirits and wicked lords to win the hand of a princess. Glasgow Film Theatre. Profondo Rosso (18) (Dario Argento, Italy, 1975) David Hemmings, Daria Nicolodi. 126min. A music teacher witnesses the gruesome murder of a famous psychic. Glasgow Film Theatre. The Raid (18) (Gareth Evans, Indonesia/USA, 2011) Iko Uwais, Doni Alamsyah, Yayan Ruhain. 100min. Highoctane Indonesian crime thriller. Part of Dundead. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee. The Raven (15) ●●●●● (James McTeigue, US, 2012) John Cusack, Alice Eve, Luke Evans. 111min. Slow pacing lets down this Poe-themed crime-thriller. macrobert, Stirling; The Hippodrome, Bo’ness. Re-Animator (18) (Stuart Gordon, US, 1985) Jeffrey Combs, Bruce Abbott, Barbara Crampton. 86min. A new medical student arrives on campus with some radical ideas about reanimating dead tissue. Glasgow Film Theatre. Rear Window (PG) (Alfred Hitchcock, US, 1954) James Stewart, Grace Kelly, Wendell Corey, Raymond Burr. 112min. Laid up with a broken leg, Stewart witnesses a possible murder. But is it really? Sloans, Glasgow. The Red Desert (Il Deserto Rosso) (15) ●●●●● (Michaelangelo Antonioni, Italy, 1964) Monica Vitti, Richard Harris, Carlo Chionetti. 116min. A woman who has recently suffered a nervous breakdown begins a tentative affair with a friend of her husband. Part of the Italian Film Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh; Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee; Glasgow Film Theatre. Red Dog (PG) ●●●●● (Kriv Stenders, Australia, 2011) Rachael Taylor, Josh Lucas, Noah Taylor. 92min. Josh Lucas excels as a drifter who is chosen by a rebellious but loveable mutt to be his master. The Hippodrome, Bo’ness. Return (tbc) (Liza Johnson, US, 2011) Linda Cardellini, Michael Shannon, John Slattery. 97min. A returning US soldier struggles to re-adapt to her former life. Selected release from Fri 6 Apr. Road to Zanzibar (PG) (Victor Schertzinger, US, 1941) Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, Dorothy Lamour. 87min. Burlesque jungle adventures with Bing and Bob. St Bride’s Centre, Edinburgh. Robocop (18) ●●●●● (Paul Verhoeven, US, 1987) Peter Weller, Nancy Allen, Ronny Cox. 103min. Slick and stomachchurningly violent futuristic thriller about the resurrected half-cop, half-robot. Followed by a discussion on issues raised by the film. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Safe House (15) ●●●●● (Daniel Espinosa, US/South Africa, 2012) Denzel Washington, Ryan Reynolds, Robert Patrick,. 115min. Rookie CIA agent Weston (Reynolds) is caretaking a safe house in South Africa when spook-turned-fugitive Frost (Washington) turns up carrying dangerous secrets. Assassins and mayhem follow. macrobert, Stirling.

76 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

Salmon Fishing in the Yemen (12A)

●●●●● (Lasse Halström, UK, 2011)

Ewan Mcgregor, Emily Blunt, Kristin Scott Thomas. 111min. See review, page 70. General release from Fri 20 Apr. A Scanner Darkly (15) ●●●●● (Richard Linklater, US, 2006) Keanu Reeves, Robert Downey Jr, Mitch Baker. 100min. The interpolated rotoscoping technique by which animation is superimposed over live action, is put to innovative use in this adaptation of dark anti-authority fantasy from sci-fi author Philip K Dick. Followed by a discussion on issues raised by the film. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Sculpture on Film: Body & Environment (15) (Various) 70min. Films by artists including Gordon MattaClark, Robert Smithson and Lawrence Weiner. Part of Glasgow International. Glasgow Film Theatre. Sculpture on Film: Object, Body, Action (15) (Various) 70min. Rare footage of artist Eva Hesse, and films by artists including Carolee Schneemann, Bruce Nauman and Fischli & Weiss. Introduced by Karla Black. Part of Glasgow International. Glasgow Film Theatre. Secrets of Women (Kvinnors Väntan) (Waiting Women) (12) (Ingmar Bergman, Sweden, 1952) Anita Björk, Eva Dahlbec, Maj-Britt Nilsson. 107min. Bergman’s tale of three women friends discussing significant moments in their marriages even sees the director touch on a little comedy. Part of the Antonioni & Bergman season. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. A Separation (PG) ●●●●● (Asghar Farhadi, Iran, 2011) Peyman Moaadi, Leila Hatami, Sareh Bayat. 123min. A couple debate the ramifications of their impending divorce before a series of events unravel that will lead to a single tragic incident. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. The Silence (Tystnaden) (15) (Ingmar Bergman, Sweden, 1963) Ingrid Thulin, Gunnel Lindblom, Birger Malmsten. 96min. Part three of Bergman’s trilogy on humankind features two sisters, holed up and distracted in a Kafkaesque hotel. Part of the Antonioni & Bergman season. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Silent Comedy Classics (U) (Various) Silent film comedy classics from the like of Laurel & Hardy and Harold Lloyd with live musical accompaniment and sound effects by Gladstone’s Bag. Part of Glasgow Comedy Festival. Britannia Panopticon Music Hall, Glasgow. Singin’ in the Rain (U) ●●●●● (Gene Kelly, Stanley Donen, US, 1950) Gene Kelly, Donald O’Connor, Debbie Reynolds, Cyd Charisse. 102min. Absolutely wonderful musical set during the transition from silent films to talkies. macrobert, Stirling. The Space Between (15) ●●●●● (Tim Barrow, UK, 2010) Vivien Reid, Tim Barrow, David Whitney. Film made by (and starring) Tim Barrow (The Inheritance) on a mini-budget in Edinburgh and London, about two lonely people who find hope in one another. Featuring an introduction and Q&A with Barrow. Cameo, Edinburgh; Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Spalicek (The Czech Year) (U) (Ji_í Trnka, Czechoslovakia, 1947) 75min. Early stop-motion animation depicting the rural traditions of the Czech village at six significant points throughout the year. Glasgow Film Theatre. Splice (15) ●●●●● (Vincenzo Natali, Canada/France/USA, 2009) Adrien Brody, Sarah Polley, Delphine Chanéac. 104min. Themes including the God complex, empty womb syndrome and the sins of the parents play out in this genetic Frankenstein-y thriller. Followed by a discussion on issues raised by the film. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Stalker (PG) ●●●●● (Andrei Tarkovsky, USSR, 1979) Alexander Kaidanovsky, Anatoly Solonitsyn, Nikolai Grinko. 161min. Tarkovsky’s striking and profound adaptation of the Strugatsky novel set in the aftermath of an alien visitation. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee.

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The Story of Film (E) (Mark Cousins, UK, 2011) Mark Cousins, Norman Lloyd, Aleksandr Sokurov. 90min. Mark Cousins tours the world to discover the greatest films ever made in a previously un-aired episode of the Channel 4 series The Story of Film: An Odyssey. Featuring a Q&A with Mark Cousins. Filmhouse, Edinburgh; Glasgow Film Theatre. StreetDance 2 (PG) (Max Giwa, Dania Pasquini, UK, 2012) Tom Conti, George Sampson, Falk Hentschel, Sofia Boutella. 85min. 3D sequel starring various bootyshakers you might recognise from Britain’s Got Talent. General release from Fri 30 Mar. Summer Games (Giochi d’Estate) (15) (Rolando Colla, Switzerland, 2011) Fiorella Campanella, Armando Condolucci, Alessia Barela. A group of youngsters find a common purpose while holidaying on the Tuscan coast. Part of the Italian Film Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh; Glasgow Film Theatre. Terraferma (12A) (Emanuele Crialese, Italy/France, 2011) Filippo Pucillo, Donatella Finocchiaro, Beppe Fiorello. 88min. A fishing community is torn between traditional values and the changing world. Part of the Italian Film Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh; Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee; Glasgow Film Theatre. This Is Not a Film (In Film Nist) (12A) (Mojtaba Mirtahmasb, Jafar Panahi, Iran, 2010) 75min. Panahi appeals against his conviction for ‘propaganda against the system’ in this documentary about the defence of the artist. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee; Glasgow Film Theatre. This Means War (12A) ●●●●● (McG, US, 2012) Reese Witherspoon, Chris Pine, Tom Hardy. Action comedy as two CIA agents (Pine and Hardy) realise they are dating the same woman (Witherspoon). Selected release. This Must be the Place (15) ●●●●● (Paolo Sorrentino, USA, 2011) Sean Penn, Frances McDormand, Judd Hirsch. 118min. See review, page 69. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee; Glasgow Film Theatre. Titanic 3D (12) ●●●●● (James Cameron, US, 1997) Leonardo DiCaprio, Kate Winslet, Billy Zane. 194min. The story of the doomed ocean liner, rich girl Rose and frosty floater Jack, now in 3D. General release from Fri 6 Apr. Transfer (tbc) (Damir Lukacevic, Germany, 2010) BJ Britt, Regine Nehy, Ingrid Andree. 93min. Intriguing and unsettling German sci-fi about a world where wealthy customers can evade mortality by having their consciousness and memories implanted into the bodies of young, healthy volunteers. Followed by a discussion exploring the film’s take on the nature of consciousness and the feasibility of something like this actually happening. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Trnka Shorts for Adults (15) (Jiri Trnka) 93min. A selection of five shorts from the Czech puppet animation pioneer. Part of the Jiri Trnka season. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. 20 Cigarettes (tbc) (Alexander Gornovsky, Russia, 2008) Galina Tiunina, Ilya Lubimov, Anna Slynko. 90min. Gornovsky’s first successful feature follows powerful creative Audrey (Lubimov) through his day. Part of the Italian Film Festival. Glasgow Film Theatre. 21 Jump Street (15) ●●●●● (Phil Lord/Chris Miller, US, 2012) Jonah Hill, Channing Tatum, Ice Cube. 109min. Revamp of 80s TV series: youthful cops (Tatum & Hill) go undercover at a high school in order to break up a drugs ring. Directors Lord and Miller tease genre conventions and Hill and Tatum form a strong comic partnership. General release. Uneasy Worlds (tbc) (Various) A programme of films exploring the tension between society and technology. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival. Summerhall, Edinburgh. Vampyr (PG) (Carl Theodor Dreyer, Germany, 1932) Julian West, Henriette Gerard, Jan Hieronimko. 82min. Dreyer’s

version of Carmilla is one of the most poetic pieces of vampire cinema in film history. Beautifully photographed with a dream-like mood and logic, it uses the camera often from a subjective viewpoint, thereby becoming one of the first psychological horror films. Part of the Carl Dreyer season. Filmhouse, Edinburgh. Videodrome (18) (David Cronenberg, Canada, 1983) James Woods, Debbie Harry. 87min. Woods is a programmer for a pirate cable station who becomes intrigued and then obsessed with an untraceable porn channel that triggers hallucinogenic fantasies. A nasty but intriguing and ultimately confusing masterpiece with eye-popping special effects. Part of Dundead. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Dundee. The Vow (12A) (Michael Sucsy, US/Brazil/France/Australia/UK/Germany , 2012) Rachel McAdams, Channing Tatum, Sam Neill. 104min. Tatum tries to win back his wife’s (McAdams) heart after she wakes up after a car crash with severe amnesia. macrobert, Stirling. Wang’s Arrival (L’arrivo di Wang) (18) (Antonio Manetti, Marco Manetti, Italy, 2011) Ennio Fantastichini, Francesca Cuttica, Li Yong. 82min. Award-winning sci-fi in which begins when an interpreter is called up by the Italian authorities with an urgent and confidential Chinese translation assignment. Part of the Italian Film Festival. Glasgow Film Theatre. We Believed (Noi Credevamo) (15) (Mario Martone, Italy, 2010) Luigi Lo Cascio, Valerio Binasco, Toni Servillo. 205min. This epic mix of history lesson and costume drama details the 19th-century reunification of Italy, and won seven David Di Donatello awards (Italian Oscars). Part of the Italian Film Festival. Filmhouse, Edinburgh; Glasgow Film Theatre. We Bought a Zoo (PG) ●●●●● (Cameron Crowe, USA, 2011) Matt Damon, Scarlet Johansson. 124min. The clue is in the title: recently widowed fatherof-two Benjamin (Damon) quits his job and sets about saving a dilapidated zoo. Great actors are wasted in empty roles and the result is broad, sentimental and dishearteningly average. General release. Wild Bill (15) ●●●●● (Dexter Fletcher, UK, 2011) Charlie CreedMiles, Will Poulter, Liz White. 97min. See review, page 68. Selected release. Wise Blood (15) (John Huston, US/West Germany, 1979) Brad Dourif, John Huston, Dan Shor. 106min. Brilliant offbeat film in which a young man (Dourif) returns home to the Bible-belt South and starts a private war against evangelism. Monorail Film Club screening. Glasgow Film Theatre. The Witches (PG) ●●●●● (Nicolas Roeg, US, 1990) Anjelica Huston, Mai Zetterling, Rowan Atkinson. 92min. A pleasing adaption of Roald Dahl’s children’s story has director Roeg (in unusually straightforward manner) creating a superior kids’ movie that has you rooting for the mice all the way. Paisley Arts Centre, Paisley. The Woman in Black (12A) ●●●●● (James Watkins, UK/Canada/Sweden, 2012) Daniel Radcliffe, Ciaran Hinds, Janet McTeer. 95min. A young lawyer (Radcliffe) arrives at a remote English village to conclude the estate of a dead woman; cue lots of shoogly windows, creaky floorboards and slamming doors. Dull, oldfashioned and decidedly short on terror. Selected release. Wrath of the Titans (12A) (Jonathan Liebesman, US, 2012) Sam Worthington, Liam Neeson, Rosamund Pike. The world of Greek mythology is plundered once again in the sequel to 2010 3D dud Clash of the Titans. General release from Fri 30 Mar. YERT: Your Environmental Road Trip (E) (Mark Dixon, Ben Evans, US, 2009) Ben Evans, Julie Dingman Evans, Mark Dixon. 88min. Documentary celebrating human resolve and American go-getting spirit. This special bike-powered cinema screening is organised by Take One Action festival, and is preceded by a chance to view the Hard Rain: What Scotland is Doing photographic exhibition. Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh.


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Kids

list.co.uk/kids

HITLIST

THE BEST KIDS EVENTS

Events are listed by city, then type. Submit listings at least 14 days before publication to kids@list.co.uk. Listings are compiled by Kirstyn Smith.

GLASGOW Activities & Fun The Great Comical Characters Workshop Sat 31 Mar, 10am. £6.95.

You Can’t Catch Me Scottish Youth Theatre gives its lively take on the everpopular Gingerbread Man tale. Full of fun, this interactive production has been specially created for 3-7-year-olds and their families. Scottish Youth Theatre, The Old Sheriff Court, Glasgow, Thu 29 Mar–Fri 13 Apr.

Dr Bunhead’s Bigger Bang Theory Bunhead returns to the fold looking for participants to help him launch rockets, blow up Barbie and more. George Square Theatre, Edinburgh, Sat 7 Apr.

James Campbell’s Comedy 4 Kids Glasgow Comedy Festival welcomes the man who was creating comedy for kids long before it became the popular pastime it is now. Citizens Theatre, Glasgow, Sat 31 Mar. Edinburgh International Science Festival Buy a day pass at the City Art Centre and explore the ‘science playground’ it’s been turned into, or check out a host of venues throughout the city , during this year’s festival. sciencefestival.co.uk White Catherine Wheel’s (or more specifically, Andy Manley’s) playful and highly visual show for 2–4-yearolds has been doing the rounds for almost two years now, charming everyone who sees it. Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh, Wed 11–Sat 14 Apr.

Glasgow Vet School Rodeo Animal tents, laser quest, a dog show, the dramatically named ‘Riding of the Storm’ and much more, at this fun fundraising day for animal charities. Glasgow Vet School, University of Glasgow, Sat 14 Apr.

Puppet and Animation Festival What do a cloud man, an iron giant, a dirty potato, a spirited violin and a girl the size of a thumb have in common? They all feature in the P&A’s line-up across Scotland. See pupp etanimationfestival.org

Northern Streams’ Children’s Workshop Edinburgh’s annual festival of music, dance and song from Denmark, Iceland, Britain and more. Scottish Storytelling Centre, Edinburgh, Sat 14 Apr.

Scottish Mask and Puppet Centre, 8–10 Balcarres Avenue, Kelvindale, 339 6185. Make a silly character from an assortment of bits and bobs rich in comic potential. Part of Glasgow Comedy Festival. FREE Time for a Spring Clean Sat 31 Mar, 1–4pm. St Mungo Museum, 2 Castle Street, 276 1625. Make a broom and learn how other faiths and traditions deal with starting afresh in springtime. FREE Pirates of the Seas Sat 31 Mar–Sun 15 Apr, 1.30–4pm. Riverside Museum, 100 Pointhouse Place, 287 2660. Walk the plank to some pirate fun for the Easter holidays. Ages 6–11. FREE Beasts at the Burrell Tue 3, Thu 5, Mon 9 & Tue 10 & Thu 12 Apr, 2–4pm. Burrell Collection, 2060 Pollokshaws Road, 287 2550. Create a mini carpet, mask and group collage all featuring appearances from beasts of the world. Ages 5–12. FREE Behind the Mask Thu 5, Wed 11–Fri 13 & Sun 15 Apr, 11am–4pm. Free (workshop £1.50). Scottish Mask and Puppet Centre, 8–10 Balcarres Avenue, Kelvindale, 339 6185. Explore the exhibition of masks from across the globe then join in a workshop to create one. Cadbury Easter Egg Trail Fri 6–Mon 9 Apr, 10am–4.30pm. Standard ticket price included in house admission (children £1). Pollok House, 2060 Pollokshaws Road, 0844 493 2202. Easter trail with chocolate eggs and prizes to be won at the end. See feature, page 28. FREE Discover! Italian Art Sat 7 & Sun 8 Apr, 1.30–4pm. Kelvingrove Art Gallery & Museum, Argyle Street, 276 9599. Learn how artists made paint from eggs and how 3D pictures existed centuries before Avatar graced our screens. Ages 5–11. Easter Musical Theatre Course: Disney Jukebox Musical Mon 9–Sat

14 Apr, 9.30am–5pm. £125 for six days tuition and two tickets to the final performance. Scottish Youth Theatre, 105 Brunswick Street, 552 3988. Work with professionals and devise a new musical based on the songs of Disney. No experience necessary. Ages 8–16. Glasgow Vet School Rodeo Sat 14 Apr, 11am–5pm. £7 (children £3; family £15). University of Glasgow Vet School, Garscube Estate, Off Switchback Road. vet_rodeo@hotmail.com. Animal fun including pony rides, ferret racing and duck herding. Money raised goes to animal charities. Time Travellers: School Days Sat 14 Apr, 1.30–4pm. £2 (under 16s £1.50). Scotland Street School Museum, 225 Scotland Street, 287 0500. Relive schooldays from the 60s, WWII and Victorian times. Ages 5+. Places limited; arrive early. FREE Now Your Turn Sat 21 Apr, 11am–1.30pm. Platform, The Bridge, 1000 Westerhouse Road, Easterhouse, 276 9696. Drama workshop with an emphasis on creativity. Ages 13–21. FREE RSPB Weekend: Eagle Eyes Sat 21 & Sun 22 Apr, 11am–1pm & 2–4pm. Kelvingrove Art Gallery & Museum, Argyle Street, 276 9599. Learn more about the white-tailed eagle. Junior Art Club Sat 21 Apr, 12–1.30pm. £3 per session. Platform, The Bridge, 1000 Westerhouse Road, Easterhouse, 276 9696. Fun, but sometimes messy, arts session. Ages 5–11. FREE Farmyard Frolics Sat 21 Apr, 12.30–1.30pm & 3.30–4.30pm. Mitchell Library, North Street, 287 2999. Farmyard fun with activities, stories and

crafts. Ages 3–9. Little Explorers: Bug Ball Sun 22

Apr, 10am–5pm. £7.95 per child + adult. Glasgow Science Centre, 50 Pacific Quay, 420 5000. Meet the centre’s creepy crawlies before learning about a butterfly’s life cycle and creating a spring flower. Ages 3–5. Kids Can Knit Sun 22 Apr, 11am–12.30pm. £2. Scotland Street School Museum, 225 Scotland Street, 287 0500. Knitting session for ages 5–12. FREE Lost in the Museum! Sun 22 Apr, 1–3pm. Glasgow Museums Resource Centre, 200 Woodhead Road, South Nitshill Industrial Estate, 276 9300. Solve the clues on the trail to escape before the mummy finds you. Ages 7+.

Books & Storytelling FREE Animal Stories from Around the World Sun 1 & 22 Apr, 2pm. Burrell Collection, 2060 Pollokshaws Road, 287 2550. Enjoy some of Rudyard Kipling’s Just So stories and learn about the fascinating creatures of earth. FREE Carnival of Colour Mon 2–Wed 4 & Mon 9–Thu 12 Apr, 11am–4pm. Braehead Shopping Centre, Kings Inch Road, 885 1441. Celebrate all the colours of the rainbow with arts, crafts and storytelling. Ages 3–10. Julia Donaldson Sat 7 Apr, 10.30–11.30am. £3. Mitchell Library, North Street, 287 2999. The popular author reads from some of her books. Part of Aye Write! Tiny Tales Wed 18 Apr, 10am. £6 per adult + child. Tron Theatre, 63 Trongate, 552 4267. Hear the story of how ‘Giraffes Can’t Dance’. Ages 6 months–2 years. Tall Tales Thu 19 Apr, 10am. £6 per adult + child. Tron Theatre, 63 Trongate, 552 4267. Interactive storytelling session with movement and mime, on a seashore theme. Ages 3–5.

Film FREE Alice In Wonderland Sat 7 Apr, 1pm. St Mungo Museum of Religious Life and Art, 2 Castle Street, 276 1625. Classic Disney version of Lewis Carroll’s fantastical story.

Theatre, Dance & Comedy

You Can’t Catch Me Thu 29

Mar–Fri 13 Apr (not Mon), 10.30am & 1.30pm; Sat 14–Thu 19 Apr, 10.30am,1.30pm & 4pm. £7.50 (under 2s free; family £30). Scottish Youth Theatre, The Old Sheriff Court, 105 Brunswick Street, 552 3988. The Gingerbread Man escapes the bakery and encounters the endless possibilities of the world outside. Ages 3–7. Booking via the Tron Theatre box office: 552 4267

James Campbell’s Comedy 4

Kids Sat 31 Mar, 3pm. £7.50. Citizens Theatre, 119 Gorbals Street, 429 0022. Laughs without the rude bits. Ages 8+. See feature, page 29. Part of GCF. Magical Mayhem Sat 31 Mar, 2pm. £5.95 (children £4.95). Scottish Mask and Puppet Centre, 8–10 Balcarres Avenue, Kelvindale, 339 6185. Alex the Magician perform some tricks, then there’s a workshop to learn how he does it. Ages 3+. Part of GCF. Glasgow Kids Comedy Club Sun 1 Apr, 3pm. £4. The Stand, 333 Woodlands Road, 0844 335 8879. Comedians tweaks their material for children. All kids must be accompanied by an adult; ages 5+. Part of GCF. CBeebies Live!: Reach to the Stars

Wed 4 Apr, 2pm & 5pm; Thu 5 Apr, 11am, 2pm & 5pm. £15–£27.50. SECC, Finnieston Quay, 0844 395 4000. A chance to see favourite TV characters live on stage. See preview, page 78. The Pallywags Thu 5 Apr, 11am & 2.30pm. £10. Pavilion Theatre, 121 Renfield Street, 332 1846. Meet the magical Pallywags, who live on a rainbow. Science Museum Live on Tour Tue 17 & Wed 18 Apr, 11am & 7pm. £15.50–£18. Theatre Royal, 282 Hope Street, 0844 871 7647. An exploratory show with experiments and presentations. 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 77


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Kids Galoshins Sat 21 Apr, 2pm. £5.95 (children £4.95). Scottish Mask and Puppet Centre, 8–10 Balcarres Avenue, Kelvindale, 339 6185. A traditional Scots mumming play, with sword fighting and miracles aplenty. Ages 3+. See feature, page 28.

EDINBURGH Activities & Fun

Edinburgh International Science Festival at the National Museum of Scotland Fri 30

Mar–Sun 15 Apr, 10am–5pm. Prices vary (free–£3.50). National Museum of Scotland, Chambers Street, 0300 123 6789. The museum hosts a series of events, themed around human movement – in sport, technology and dance – and other events from chemistry trails to video game design workshops.

Edinburgh International Science Festival at the Royal Botanic Garden Sat 31 Mar–Mon 9

Apr, 10am-5pm. Prices vary (free–£5). Royal Botanic Garden, Arboretum Place, 248 2909. ‘Science on a Plate’ is the theme here, with activities exploring food and where it comes from. Meet a chocolatier, find out how milk gets from the cow to your fridge, and take part in a Junior Chef Challenge.

Dynamic Earth, Holyrood Road, 0844 557 2686. Walk Salisbury Crags and discover how they inspired the scientific discoveries of James Hutton. Ages 8+. Part of EISF. FREE Easter Family Fun Day Sun 1 Apr, 2–5pm. The Granary, 32–34 The Shore, Leith, 554 9465. With face painting, egg decorating, a magician and cartoons. Ages 3–10. Hip Hop School: Easter Mon 2–Fri 6 Apr, 9.30am–3.30pm. £97.50 for the week. Dance Base, 14–16 Grassmarket, 225 5525. A week of hip-hop culture for kids aged 7–9 and 10–12, with a chance to try street dance, video production, music and photography. Booking essential. Farmers Helpers Workshops Mon 2–Fri 6 & Mon 9–Fri 13 Apr, 10am–12.30pm. £7 per session. Gorgie City Farm, 51 Gorgie Road, 337 4202. Get up close to the animals. Ages 8–12. Booking essential. Junior Downton Abbey Experience

Mon 2 Apr, 10.30am–12.30pm. £4. Lauriston Castle, 2a Cramond Road South, 529 3963. Prepare lemonade and biscuits with cook in the kitchen before transforming into a Lord or Lady of the manor and touring the upstairs rooms. Booking essential. See feature, page 28. Easter Eggs Mon 2 Apr,

10.30am–12.30pm. £10. Imagination Workshop, 136 Marchmont Road, 466 0148. Use glitter, paint and fabrics to create a box of six Easter eggs. Ages 5+.

Funky Puppet Making Workshop Mon 2 Apr, 1pm. £1.50.

Valley Park Community Centre, 37 Southhouse Road, 664 2210. Make rod puppets from colourful bits and bobs. Ages 3+. See feature, page 29. Part of the Puppet Animation Festival. LYT Musical Mayhem Tue 3–Thu 5 Apr, 10am–4pm. £100 (£50) for the full course. Royal Lyceum Theatre, Grindlay Street, 248 4848. Three days of singing, dancing and acting based on Glee. Ages 12–18. FREE The Little Red Hen and

Friends Puppet Making Workshop Tue 3 Apr, 10–11.30am.

Booking required. North Edinburgh Arts Centre, Pennywell Court, 315 2151. Listen to the story of the Little Red Hen, then join puppeteers to put on a show. Ages 4+. Puppet Animation Festival. Spring Chickens Tue 3 & Wed 4 Apr, 10.30am–12.30pm. £20 for two days. Imagination Workshop, 136 Marchmont Road, 466 0148. Create mother hens and a brood of pom pom chicks. Ages 7+. Telescopes in Space Tue 3 & 10 Apr, 2.30–4pm. £4 (children £5). Royal Observatory Visitor Centre,

Edinburgh International Science Festival at the City Art Centre Sat 31 Mar-Sat 14 Apr (not

Sun), 9.30am–4.30pm. Day Pass: Adults £6.90 (concession £5.50; children aged 7+ £8.90; under 7s £6.50; under 3s free). City Art Centre, 2 Market Street, 529 3993. A day pass grants access to a host of fun scientific activities for children. Unwrap an ancient mummy, hunt some monsters via CCTV, concoct fake blood and dig up a dinosaur. FREE Street Science Sat 31 Mar & Sun 1 Apr, Sat 7 & Sun 8 Apr, 10am-4pm. Various venues, Edinburgh, 0844 557 2686. Bike-borne street science with explosions, liquid nitrogen and more. Part of EISF. Easter Eggs Sat 31 Mar, Sat 7 & 14 Apr, 10am, 1pm & 3pm. £1 if booked in advance; normal admission also applies. Our Dynamic Earth, Holyrood Road, 550 7800. Learn about the seasons then create an Easter basket. Online booking essential. Ages 6–14. FREE All in a Spin! Sat 31 Mar, 10.30am–12.30pm & 1.30–3.30pm. Museum of Childhood, 42 High Street, 529 3963. Make a brightly-coloured spinning top. Ages 5+. Going Native Sat 31 Mar–Thu 5 Apr, 11am–3pm. Included in admission. Edinburgh Zoo, Corstorphine Road, 0844 557 2686. Meet Scotland’s native animal species. Part of EISF. 11–11.30am, 1.30–2pm & 3–3.30pm. Included in admission or £2 for event only. Our Dynamic Earth, Holyrood Road, 0844 557 2686. Find out about the big freeze that Earth underwent 640 million years ago. Ages 8+. Part of EISF. FREE The Future’s Bright Sat 31 Mar–Sun 15 Apr, 11am–5pm. Ocean Terminal, Leith, 0844 557 2686. Energyconscious and fun activities for families. Living Lauriston 1910: Mangles, Mops and Feather Dusters Sat 31

Mar, 2pm & 3pm. £5 (children £3; family £12.50). Lauriston Castle, 2a Cramond Road South, 336 2060. Travel back to Edwardian times. FREE Watch Out Toads About Sun 1, Sat 7 & Sun 8 Apr, 8–10am. Holyrood Park, 652 8150. Help the park rangers aid the toads’ migration across Holyrood’s roads. Booking essential. Best of Scottish Science Sun 1 Apr, noon–5pm; Mon 2–Wed 4 Apr, 10am–5pm. Included in admission. Our Dynamic Earth, Holyrood Road, 0844 557 2686. Interactive science exhibits. Part of EISF. In the Footsteps of Giants Sun 1, Tue 3 & Thu 5–Sat 7 Apr, 2–4.30pm. £10 (£8; children £4). Our

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78 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

Friends Puppet Making Workshop

Wed 4 Apr, 4–5.30pm. Booking required. Craigmillar Community Arts Centre, 58 Newcraighall Road, 669 8432. See above. Flower Power Thu 5 Apr, 10.30am–12.30pm. £10. Imagination Workshop, 136 Marchmont Road, 466 0148. Make a flowery mobile to hang in your window. Ages 7+. Easter Themed Arts and Crafts Fri 6 & Mon 9 Apr, 11am–3pm. Included in admission. Edinburgh Zoo, Corstorphine Road, 334 9171. Design and make an Easter bonnet or create a 3D card. 10–11.30am. £4 (£2; local residents £1.50). WHALE Arts, 30 Westburn Grove, 458 3267. See above. Easter Treasure Hunt and Crafts in the Spring Gardens Sat 7 & Sun 8

Apr, 10am–12.30pm. £6. Lauriston Castle, 2a Cramond Road South, 529 3963. Tasty treat-hunting, then there’s an egg and spoon race. Booking essential. Fit for a Queen Sat 7–Mon 9 & Sat 14–Mon 16 Apr, 11am–3pm. Included in admission. Palace of Holyroodhouse, Royal Mile, 556 5100. Dress up like kings and queens of yore. Arts and Crafts Activities Sat 7 & Sun 8 Apr, 11am–3pm. Included in admission. Edinburgh Zoo, Corstorphine Road, 334 9171. Create something eggciting for Easter. Easter Egg Hunt Sun 8 Apr, 11am–3pm. Included in admission. Edinburgh Zoo, Corstorphine Road, 334 9171. Look for eggs with panda mascots Tian Tian and Yang Guang. FREE Portrait Detectives Science Special Sun 8 Apr, 2pm. Scottish National Portrait Gallery, 1 Queen Street, 0844 557 2686. Solve some mysteries in the Pioneers of Science gallery. Ages 3+. Part of EISF.

Snowball Earth: The Big Freeze Sat 31 Mar–Wed 11 Apr,

The Little Red Hen and Friends Puppet Making Workshop Sat 7 Apr,

Blackford Hill, 0844 557 2686. Help make a rocket and a telescope with scientists from the Royal Observatory. Ages 8+. Part of EISF. FREE Funky Puppet Making Workshop Wed 4 Apr, 10am. Booking required. North Edinburgh Arts Centre, Pennywell Court, 315 2151. See above. Easter Egg Decorating Wed 4 Apr, 11am–3pm. Included in admission. Edinburgh Zoo, Corstorphine Road, 334 9171. Decorate an egg with the Imagination Workshop. FREE Identifying Human Faces Wed 4 Apr, 1–4pm. Royal College of Surgeons, Nicolson Street, 0844 557 2686. Learn about the facial reconstruction techniques used to identify the living and the dead. Ages 12+. Part of EISF. FREE The Little Red Hen and

CHILDREN’S SHOW

CBEEBIES LIVE: REACH TO THE STARS Clyde Auditorium, Glasgow, Wed 4 & Thu 5 Apr If enthusiasm could be bottled and sold, then Phil Gallagher would be a very wealthy man. Better known as Cbeebies’ Mister Maker, Gallagher has been creating works of art from bits and bobs in his ‘Doodle Drawer’ for the past four years. Endlessly excited about all his creations as Mister Maker, it comes as no surprise to find that Gallagher is equally buoyed up about the his first CBeebies Live tour. ‘It’s very exciting for all of us,’ says Gallagher. ‘Because we’re putting all our TV shows on a big stage. But what’s really important, is to still have that connection with the viewer. We want to reach the thousands of CBeebies fans who come to a big arena, but also make sure that each member of the audience feels like they’re being spoken to and sung to directly, just like they do at home.’ Gallagher will be joined on stage by CBeebies regulars such as Mr Tumble, Postman Pat, the ZingZillas and Mike the Knight. This time around, Robbie Rotten from LazyTown is causing mischief, and the cast needs its young audience to help put things to rights. ‘We want the show to be as interactive as possible, so we’re getting the audience involved right the way through,’ says Gallagher. ‘Robbie Rotten is upset because he thinks he’s the biggest star on CBeebies and has various plans to prove it. But we’re depending on our CBeebies friends to warn us when he’s up to his old tricks.’ (Kelly Apter)

Funky Puppet Making Workshop Mon 9 Apr, 10am. £4

(£2; local residents £1.50). WHALE Arts, 30 Westburn Grove, 458 3267. See above. FREE Funky Puppet Making Workshop Tue 10 Apr, 2pm. Booking required. Craigmillar Community Arts Centre, 58 Newcraighall Road, 669 8432. See above. Wakey, Wakey Sleepy Heads! Wed 11 Apr, 10.30am–12.30pm. £4. Lauriston Castle, 2a Cramond Road South, 529 3963. A walk in the grounds of Lauriston followed by a craft session. FREE Bang Goes the Theory Interactive Arena Fri 13–Sun 15 Apr, 10.30am–5.30pm. The Mound, 0844 557 2686. Have a go at some experiments and nifty science tricks. Part of EISF.

Northern Streams: Children’s Workshops Sat 14 Apr, 10.15am &

2pm. £5. Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High Street. 228 1155. From 10.15–11.30am discover mouth music, then from 2–3.15pm explore Iceland’s traditional music, song and dance. Part of Ceilidh Culture Early Years – Play Time Wednesdays, 18 Apr–9 May 10.30–11.30am. £6 per adult + child; additional children £3; four week block £20. Royal Lyceum Theatre, Grindlay Street, 248 4848. Drama-based play for kids


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Kids

list.co.uk/kids aged 2–4 and their parents/carers. Life in Space Sat 21 Apr, 10am, 1pm & 3pm. £1 in addition to normal admission price. Our Dynamic Earth, Holyrood Road, 550 7800. Learn what it’s like to be an astronaut, and build your own rocket. Book via website. Ages 6–14.

Willie the Wicked Wolf Wed 11 Apr

1.30pm. £4 (£2; ‘good neighbours’ £1.50). Inch Community Centre, Inch House, 225 Gilmerton Road, 664 4710. See above. Potato Needs a Bath Wed 11 Apr, 3pm. £8 (£6). Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High Street, 556 9579. A gentle show about a potato who has mud on his face. Ages 3–6. Part of the Puppet Animation Festival. The Selfish Giant Thu 12 Apr, 33.40pm. £8 (£6). Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High Street, 556 9579. An imaginative version of Oscar Wilde’s moral tale. Ages 3–7. Part of the Puppet Animation Festival. FREE Bang Goes the Theory Live Science Shows Fri 13–Sun 15 Apr, 11.30am & 4pm. Usher Hall, Lothian Road, 0844 557 2686. An actionpacked live stage show from the BBC TV team. Part of EISF. Cloud Man Sat 14 Apr, 11am. £4 (£2; ‘good neighbours’ £1.50). North Edinburgh Arts Centre, Pennywell Court, 315 2151. Join cloud expert Cloudia on a journey to find a Cloud Man. Ages 4–7. Part of the Puppet Animation Festival. FREE Landscapes Mon 16 Apr, 1–1.50pm & 2.30–3.20pm & 4–4.50pm. Craigmillar Community Arts Centre, 58 Newcraighall Road, 669 8432. Puppet show taking children on a journey across the globe. Ages 4+. Part of the Puppet Animation Festival.

Books & Storytelling Find the Lost Cave of Harps – Story Walk/Come and Try Harp Session Sat 31 Mar, 10am (ages 5–8) &

2.15pm (ages 9–14). £9. Merchiston Castle School, 294 Colinton Road, 228 1155. Join a storyteller and harpist on a walk with stories, riddles and rhymes. Followed by a ‘Come and Try’ harp session. Part of Ceilidh Culture

EISF at the Scottish Storytelling Centre Mon 2–Mon Apr 9 (not Sat/Sun),

times vary. £4 per event. Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High Street, 556 9579. Storytelling with scientific themes. FREE Boris Goes Camping Tue 3 Apr, 2–2.30pm. Waterstone’s, 98/9 Ocean Terminal, Ocean Drive, Leith, 554 7732. Hear the tale of Boris the bear’s school camping trip. FREE Rumble in the Jungle Tue 10 Apr, 2–2.30pm. Waterstone’s, 98/9 Ocean Terminal, Ocean Drive, Leith, 554 7732. Animal-themed rhymes. FREE Super Science City Thu 12 Apr, 11–11.45am & 2–2.45pm. Scottish National Portrait Gallery, 1 Queen Street, 0844 557 2686. Storytelling about heroes of the Enlightenment. Part of EISF. FREE Lollipop and Grandfather Go on an Adventure Sat 14 Apr, 11am. Blackwells, 53–59 South Bridge, 622 8222. The story of a back garden safari. Ages 4–8. Tiny Tales Tue 17 Apr, 10–10.40am & 11.30am–12.10pm. £6 per child (accompanying adult free). Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High Street, 556 9579. Stories and rhymes for ages 6 months–2 years. FREE Zoe and Beans: The Magic Hoop Tue 17 Apr, 2–2.30pm. Waterstone’s, 98/9 Ocean Terminal, Ocean Drive, Leith, 554 7732. Storytelling session. FREE Picture Kelpies Storytelling Day Sat 21 Apr, 10.30–11am, 11.30am– noon , 1.30–2pm & 2.30–3pm. Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High Street, 337 2372. Hear some of the latest additions to the Picture Kelpies series. Ages 3–6.

Music Happy Ears Sat 31 Mar & 14 Apr, 10am. £5 per session. Calton Centre, 121 Montgomery Street, 661 0880. Music group for dads and male carers and their 0–18-month-olds. Baby Loves Disco Sun 8 Apr, 2–5pm. £8 (non walking babies free). Electric Circus, 36–39 Market Street, 07986 527957. A chance to dance for kids aged 6 months–7 years (and their parents).

OUTSIDE THE CITIES Activities & Fun macrobert Family Fundays Sun 1 FRENCH PUPPETRY

LAPIN WANTS AN EASTER CARROT Scottish Storytelling Centre, Edinburgh, Tue 10 Apr As any adult who has undertaken a language class will tell you, it goes in quicker when you’re younger. Learning French as a child, when that little sponge-like brain is firing on all cylinders, isn’t just easier, it’s a lot more fun since Tania Czajka set up her puppet company, Le Petit Monde. Aimed at ages 3-5, Lapin Wants an Easter Carrot is the latest show Czajka has created featuring Lapin, a friendly rabbit who only ever talks in his native tongue, French. His friends, however, speak both French and English, and that’s where the learning comes in. ‘I aim for my shows to be understood by everyone, including children who have never heard French words before,’ explains Czajka. ‘So having the right balance of French and English is very important. I build my scripts around simple words like ‘pomme’, fun or pleasant sounding ones or those similar to English, such as ‘carotte’. I then make sure the main word is repeated throughout the story.’ Czajka was inspired to set up her company after the children she worked with in nursery schools responded positively to her French puppet games. ‘I realised they could learn so much and so easily through puppetry,’ she says. ‘We don’t set out to teach French, but of course we speak it during the show. I think the children are naturally drawn to this very visual little world and don’t realise they are learning new words – to them, they are just other words. That’s the magic of the pre-school age.’ For more information go to lepetitmonde.co.uk (Kelly Apter)

Theatre & Dance

Oscar and the Quest for the Underground Princess Mon 2

Apr, 1.30pm. £4 (£2; ‘good neighbours’ £1.50). Goodtrees Neighbourhood Centre, 5 Moredunvale Place, 672 2629. Oscar goes adventuring in the Mole Kingdom. Ages 3+. Part of the Puppet Animation Festival. Oscar and the Quest for the Underground Princess Tue 3 Apr. 11am. £4 (£2). Out of the Blue Drill Hall, 30–36 Dalmeny Street, Leith, 555 7101. See above. Thumbelina Wed 4 Apr, 11am. £4 (£2). Out of the Blue Drill Hall, 30–36 Dalmeny Street, Leith, 555 7101. Tale of Thumbelina’s adventures in the garden. Ages 2–6. Part of the Puppet Animation Festival. The Elf of Glen Fern Wed 4 Apr, 2–2.40pm. £4 (£2). Out of the Blue Drill Hall, 30–36 Dalmeny Street, Leith, 555 7101. Colourful fabric puppets tell the tale of a brownie. Ages 3+. Part of the Puppet Animation Festival.

✽ ✽

Apr, 11am–4pm. £2–£5. macrobert, University of Stirling, 01786 466666. This month’s funday includes performances of Catherine Wheels’ acclaimed White, a new digital dance performance inspired by computer games, screenings of Up and Big Miracle and family workshops. Enchanted Easter Sat 7 & Sun 8 Apr, noon–4pm. Included in castle admission. Stirling Castle, 01786 450000. Jugglers, jesters and historic storytelling.

Theatre & Dance

Professor Egghead’s Aqua Adventure Sat 31 Mar–Sun 15 Apr,

2–2.45pm. Included in admission. Scottish Seabird Centre, The Harbour, North Berwick, 0844 557 2686. Explore life beneath the waves. Ages 4+. Part of EISF. Charlie & Lola’s Best Bestest Play

Sat 7 Apr 11am, 1.30pm & 3.45pm. £2. Dundee Rep, Tay Square, Dundee, 01382 223530. Stage production for tots. Ages 3+. Fireman Sam: Pontypandy Rocks

Sun 8 Apr, 1pm & 3pm. £12 (£10; family £40). Albert Halls, Dumbarton Road, Stirling, 01786 473544. Pontypandy holds its first ever music festival. Fireman Sam: Pontypandy Rocks

Mon 9 Apr, 1pm & 3.30pm. £12 (£10; family £42). Motherwell Concert Hall and Theatre, Windmillhill Street, 01698 403120. See above. Charlie & Lola’s Best Bestest Play

The Elf of Glen Fern Thu 5 Apr, 11-

11.40am. £4 (£2; ‘good neighbours’ £1.50). North Edinburgh Arts Centre, 15a Pennywell Court, 315 2151. See above. FREE Pop-Up Circus Thu 5 Apr, 2pm. Craigmillar Community Arts Centre, 58 Newcraighall Road, 669 8432. A gentle first trip to the circus. Ages 0–3. Part of the Puppet Animation Festival. The Gruffalo Fri 6 Apr, 1.30pm; Sat 7 Apr, 10.30am & 1.30pm. £13. Edinburgh Festival Theatre, 13–29 Nicolson Street, 529 6000. Julia Donaldson’s fun tale hits the stage. See feature, page 29.

The Pea, The Bean & The Enormous Turnip Sat 7 Apr, 2pm.

£4 (£2; local residents £1.50). WHALE Arts, 30 Westburn Grove, 458 3267. A magical new adaptation of The Princess and the Pea. Ages 5+. Part of the Puppet Animation Festival.

Little Red . . . You Know Who

Mon 9 Apr, 2pm. £4 (£2; local residents £1.50). WHALE Arts, 30 Westburn Grove, 458 3267. Puppetry and

music for ages 3–7. Part of the Puppet Animation Festival. Lapin Wants an Easter Carrot Tue 10 Apr, 11–11.40am & 3–3.40pm. £8 (£6). Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High Street, 556 9579. A show for ages 38, gently introducing them to the French language. See preview. Pop-Up Circus Tue 10 Apr, 11am. £3 (£2; ‘good neighbours’ £1.50). Gilmerton Community Centre, 4 Drum Street, 664 2335. See above. White Wed 11–Sat 14 Apr, 10.30am & 1.30pm. £10 (family tickets £8 per person). Traverse Theatre, Cambridge Street, 228 1404. Charming show about a dazzling world where everything is white. Ages 0–4. Willie the Wicked Wolf Wed 11 Apr, 11am. £4 (£2; ‘good neighbours’ £1.50). North Edinburgh Arts Centre, 15a Pennywell Court, 315 2151. A non-traditional version of Little Red Riding Hood. Ages 4+. Part of the Puppet Animation Festival.

✽ ✽

Wed 11 & Thu 12 Apr, 11am & 1.30pm. £10 (family £36). Motherwell Theatre, Civic Centre, Windmillhill Street, 01698 403120. See above. Scottish Dance Theatre: What on Earth!? Wed 11 Apr, 2pm; Thu 12 Apr,

11am. £7 (£4–£6; family £20). Dundee Rep, Tay Square, Dundee, 01382 223530. SDT’s first piece of contemporary dance aimed specifically at kids. Scottish Dance Theatre: What on Earth!? Wed 18 Apr, 11am & 1.30pm.

£7 (£5.50). macrobert, University of Stirling, 01786 466666. See above. We Dance Wee Groove Fri 20 Apr, 10.30–11.30am & 1.30–2.30pm. £7 (£5.50). macrobert, University of Stirling, 01786 466666. A groove extravaganza for clubbers aged 6 months to 4 years. Underneath the Floorboards Sat 21 Apr, 11am & 2.30pm. £7 (family £25). macrobert, University of Stirling, 01786 466666. balletLorent presents a show about a little boy who discovers a portal to a magical world. 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 79


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LGBT Events are listed by city, then type, then date. Submit listings at least 16 days before publication to gay@list.co.uk. Listings are compiled by Laura Ennor.

GLASGOW Activities & Events Glasgow FrontRunners Thursdays, 7–8pm; Sundays, 11am–noon. £1. The Arc, Glasgow Caledonian University, Cowcaddens Road, 331 8633. A running group suited to all abilities for LGBT folk and their friends. Go for a run led by a qualified jog leader, then afterwards join the city’s friendliest sports club for food and chat in the city centre. FREE LGBT Bipolar Self Help Group Tue 3 Apr, 7–9pm. Terrence Higgins Trust Scotland, 134 Douglas Street, 560 2050. LGBT self help group for people with bipolar disorder and their families, friends and carers.

Arts FREE Ivor Sexton: Fallen to Earth Until Sat 21 Apr, Tue–Sat 11am–6pm. The Virginia Gallery, 45 Virginia Street, 552 5699. Sexton presents the latest series of original paintings in his distinctive style, alongside his more rarely seen drawings. Uh Huh Her Sun 22 Apr, 7pm. £12. The Arches, 253 Argyle Street, 565 1000. Electro indie duo from Los Angeles whose music (and one member, Leisha Hailey) has been featured on The L Word. FREE Melvin and his sister: A gay Kenyan’s struggle to survive Wed 18 Apr, 7pm. CCA, 350 Sauchiehall Street, 352 4900. Following a screening of The Guardian’s short documentary on the plight of gay people in Kenya, an expert panel will discuss the issue and take part in a Q&A. Ages 16+.

Edinburgh’s Hot Mess (See Edinburgh, Clubs, below).

EDINBURGH Activities & Events FREE LGBT Centre for Health and Well-being Open Day Thu 29 Mar, 3.30–7.30pm. LGBT Centre for Health & Wellbeing, 9 Howe Street, 523 1100. Find out more about the wide range of activities and support offered at the centre, and how to get more involved with the LGBT community. Expect short talks and the opportunity to chat and ask questions. FREE Gay Dads Scotland Monthly Meeting Thu 29 Mar, 8–10pm. Café Nom de Plume, 60 Broughton Street, 478 1372. A discussion, support and social group for gay and bi men with children. The group meets from 8pm in the café, before heading to a private meeting room around 8.30pm. There’s no need to register in advance, but for information email info@gaydadsscotland.org.uk. Hot Scots FC Training Thursdays, 8.45pm. £tbc. Saughton Sports Complex, Stevenson Drive, 444 0422. Weekly

training session for players hoping to play for the Hot Scots in the Gay Football Supporters’ Network’s 11-a-side league. See hotscotsfc.com for more information. Hot Scots FC Kickabout Fridays, 8pm. £tbc. Saughton Sports Complex, Stevenson Drive, 444 0422. A friendly six/seven-a-side kickabout for players of all abilities with the first LGBT football team in Scotland. See hotscotsfc.com for more information. Hot Scots FC Pub Quiz Mon 2 Apr, 9pm. £1 per person. Priscillas, 17 Albert Place, 554 8962. Monthly fundraising quiz for Scotland’s first LGBT football team, who compete in the GFSN (Gay Football Supporters Network) league.

Arts FREE The Culture Club Thu 5 Apr, 7–8.30pm. LGBT Centre for Health & Wellbeing, 9 Howe Street, 523 1100. New monthly group offering a safe space to discuss the arts in all their forms, from music to exhibitions, ideas for new events and creative practices. Pussy Whipped Fri 6 Apr, 8–10.30pm. £2. Wee Red Bar, Edinburgh College of Art, Lauriston Place, 229 1442. A new

Clubs

Clubs Lip Service Fridays, 6pm–3am. £tbc.

FHQ, 10 John Street, 0845 166 6037. Long-running lesbian club night with a focus on all things sensual. Includes facepainting, dressing-up box, spin the bottle booths and a ‘sexual postbox’. Ooh-er. Menergy Sat 31 Mar, 11pm–3am. £8 (students £7). The Forbidden Gentlemen’s Club, 96 Maxwell Street, 221 6511. Monthly Italo disco and Hi-NRG gay dance party, hosted by Lady Munter and DJ Kid Zipper. With guest DJs from Osmium Gary Dance Commander and Blair Benzini. FREE Passionality Mon 2 Apr, 9 Apr, 16 Apr & 23 Apr, 11pm–3am. FHQ, 10 John Street, 0845 166 6037. Passion’s the fashion on a Monday with this night from TLC and DJ Shawn Roberts. FREE Poptart Tuesdays, 11pm–3am. The Polo Lounge, 84 Wilson Street, 0845 659 5905. Start the weekend very early with DJ Belle de Hell. Gay as F**k Wednesday, 11pm–3am. Free before midnight; £3 after. Play, 7 Renfield Street, 0845 166 6029. Cheap drinks and DJs Darren and Michael. Bitter Glitter Wednesdays, 11pm–3am. £3. Bennets Glasgow, 80–90 Glassford Street, 552 5761. Madame S (Utter Gutter) and Fraser Bone (Lock Up Your Daughters) with a weekly party, playing a mix of homo-disco, electronic treats, jackin’ house and tech beats. FREE Bears in the West Fri 6 Apr, 9pm–1am. Underground Glasgow, 6a John Street, 553 2456. The BearScots night for Glasgow gents in search of a little furry company. Lock Up Your Daughters Fri 20 Apr, 11pm–3am. £5 (£4). The Flying Duck, 142 Renfield Street, 564 1450. Assshaking session from the LUYD fanzine pitched as ‘a response to the boredom and brain dead stagnation that plagues modern gay culture’, with residents DJ Suezz, Lock Up Your DJs and Skeleton Boy. This month is Mess Up Your Daughters, with special guest Simonotron from 80 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

night for queer and female bands in Edinburgh, happening right before gay dance party Hot Mess. This month features Berlin’s electro-pop riot grrl Räuberhöhle, plus Scotland’s own Ste McCabe and Scragfight. FREE The Big LGBT Music Jam Sat 7 Apr, 1–4pm. LGBT Centre for Health & Wellbeing, 9 Howe Street, 523 1100. Music-making in a creative and supportive environment. Bring an instrument (which could be your voice) and join in with singing, playing or just listening. FREE Word: Women’s Book Group Wed 11 Apr, 7.30–9pm. LGBT Centre for Health & Wellbeing, 9 Howe Street, 523 1100. A chance to meet members of the LGBT community who share a passion for books. Gaydonia Thu 12–Sat 14 Apr, 7.30pm. £9 (£7). St Bride’s Centre, 10 Orwell Terrace, 346 1405. Edinburgh’s only LGBT theatre group, the Luvvies, presents the world premiere of a comedy drama by Gary Pedler about a financial crisis-stricken fictional European country called Gaydonia. FREE Edinburgh Gay Men’s Book Group Wed 25 Apr, 7–9pm. LGBT Centre for Health & Wellbeing, 9 Howe Street, 523 1100. A book club for gents with a lust for reading. All types of books considered.

PREVIEW ELECTRO POP

UH HUH HER Arches, Glasgow, Sun 22 Apr Let’s get it out the way: Leisha Hailey was in The L Word. For anyone unfamiliar with the Showtime series (presumably you have been living under a rock on the outskirts of the lez community? Welcome. And get a boxset.), Hailey played quirky journalist Alice Pieszecki – never short of a quip or dating quandary, but certainly never in charge of a musical instrument. Since the show ended in 2009, Hailey – previously part of 90s duo The Murmurs – has returned to her musical roots in indie/electro pop outfit Uh Huh Her alongside vocalist, guitarist, producer (and girlfriend) Camila Grey, a former member of lo-fi rock outfit Mellowdrone and experienced session musician for the likes of Busta Rhymes and Dr Dre. ‘When we started the band I thought a few people might have heard about it through The L Word, but the reaction was pretty overwhelming,’ Hailey says. ‘I knew the show was popular but I didn’t know that people followed all the actors individually to see what they were doing on the side. It took a while for the band to catch up to that, and prove itself as something other than this schticky side-hobby.’ The band released their debut album Common Reaction on Nettwerk in 2008 but split with the label shortly after, leaving them to personally finance 2011’s Nocturnes, their second full-length release. ‘It was frustrating because we were used to having a label behind us and things being very expeditious and always on time with people making sure that happens,’ Grey says. ‘This was kind of a crash course in how a record label works, so it just took a while to get all our ducks in a row.’ ‘We’ve actually been making a new EP, mostly acoustic, of one song from each record that we have,’ Hailey says, promising that their output will be much more prolific now the requisite distribution channels are in place. To book tickets for their gig at The Arches, visit thearches.co.uk. (Lauren Mayberry) ■ uhhuhher.com

FREE Frisky Disco Thursdays, 10pm–3am. GHQ, 4 Picardy Place, 0845 166 6024. Start the weekend early with DJ Dale. FREE Camp Thursdays, 11pm–3am. CC Blooms, 23–24 Greenside Place, 556 9331. Deejay Bird spins camp classics from Hi-NRG and disco to pop. Nocturnal Disco Fridays, 10pm–3am. £4–£5. GHQ, 4 Picardy Place, 0845 166 6024. Pop, chart, filthy house and electro sounds. FREE Friday Funk Fri 30 Mar, 11pm–3am. CC Blooms, 23–24 Greenside Place, 556 9331. DJ Shelle la Belle does her best to get your booty shaking with a mix of funky tunes from past and present. Bar is open from 6pm. FREE Motown Hodown Sundays, 10pm–3am. GHQ, 4 Picardy Place, 0845 166 6024. Motown and funk from DJ Lynne. FREE Sunday Skool Sundays, 11pm–3am. CC Blooms, 23–24 Greenside Place, 556 9331. Strictly 90s dancefloor fillers music policy from DJ Shelle La Belle. FREE Twisted Tuesday Tuesdays, 10pm–3am. GHQ, 4 Picardy Place, 0845 166 6024. DJ JT plays commercial house, electro and chart tracks, plus giant jenga, twister, etc. FREE Pop du Jour Tuesdays, 11pm–3am. CC Blooms, 23–24 Greenside Place, 556 9331. Chart, dance and pop from DJ Paton. Hot Mess Fri 6 Apr, 10.30pm–3am. £5 (£4). Wee Red Bar, Edinburgh College of Art, Lauriston Place, 229 1442. Gay club night describing itself as ‘an irregular party for irregular folks’, where the focus is on the music, which is a heady mix of disco, hi-NRG, acid house, italo and electro from the safe hands of DJ Simonotron (Club for Heroes/Devil Disco Club). FREE ELECTROsexual Fri 6 Apr, 11pm–3am. CC Blooms, 23–24 Greenside Place, 556 9331. Lucky Luciano and Kenwai are spinning the usual dirty bootlegs and ‘cheeky’ electro at this remix-lovers’ haven. Virgen Sat 7 Apr, 8pm–1am. £5. The Voodoo Rooms, 19a West Register Street, 556 7060. Female-run, females-only (men welcome as invited guests) night with Rebecca Vasmant playing house, techno, funk and jazz. FREE Bears in the East Sat 14 Apr, 10pm–2am. New Town Bar, 26b Dublin Street, 538 7775. A men-only night for bears and their admirers to meet up with old friends or make new ones, organised by the BearScots.


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Music HITLIST

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THE BEST ROCK, POP, JAZZ & FOLK

JULIAN-BERMAN

EAT, SLEEP and BREATHE

TOM BEARD

Odd Future Jokers? Over-hyped LA upstarts? The most exciting thing ever? We weren’t wild about the new album, but we’re still intrigued about what these Californian provocateurs do live . . . O2 ABC, Glasgow, Sun 1 Apr. (Rock & Pop)

Orbital They left, they retired, they returned. They’re playing RockNess (and did we hear an online T rumour too?), but there’s a chance to get a bit nostalgic/ravey before. 02 Academy, Glasgow, Sat 7 Apr. (Rock & Pop)

Optimo They love your ears. And they also couldn’t stay away, Twitch & Wilkes return to the Sub Club, for a bimonthly event, with the two of them DJing. Sub Club, Glasgow, Fri 6 Apr. (See Clubs, page 53.)

Graham Coxon The Blur guitarist talks to The List about his latest solo album, see page 82. The Liquid Room, Edinburgh, Mon 16 Apr; the Garage, Glasgow, Tue 17 Apr. (Rock & Pop)

TOMMY GA-KEN WAN

Pass the Spoon Absurd, cute, darkly funny, lavatorial . . . just what you’d expect from the brain of artist David Shrigley, really. His ‘sort of’ opera is in Edinburgh after a well-liked run last year. Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh, Thu 26-Sat 28 Apr. Wide Days Music industry experts advise on ‘making it’, with tips on getting your band a gig abroad. Music seminars and live showcase, Teviot House, Edinburgh, Wed 11 & Thu 12 Apr; closing party, Electric Circus. (R&P)

Sir Richard Bishop A return of the guitarist extraordinaire, of Sun City Girls and Sublime Frequencies fame. Captains Rest, Glasgow, Sun 22 Apr; Banshee Labyrinth, Edinburgh, Mon 23 Apr. (Rock & Pop)

Eye O’ the Dug A Fence-curated weekend, including a Hot Chip DJ set, Django Django, Errors, Pictish Trail (pictured), Conquering Animal Sound and others. Various venues, St Andrews, Sat 14 AprSun 15 Apr. (Rock & Pop) Tinariwen These Tuareg Saharan desert guitarists just won a Grammy for best World Music album. Oran Mor, Glasgow, Thu 5 Apr; Queens Hall, Edinburgh, Fri 6 Apr. (Folk & World)

Spaced in the City A new series taking over Glasgow spaces, starting with the Lighthouse. The Japanese War Effort, Open Swimmer and more perform. The Lighthouse, Glasgow, Sat 31 Mar. (Rock & Pop)

ALABAMA SHAKES are a bluesy foursome from Athens, Alabama, whose swampy Southern rock has been getting comparisons to The White Stripes – if they were fronted by an emotionally overwrought Amy Winehouse/Beth Ditto hybrid. Jack White’s a big fan too, and just announced a US tour with them in May. Guitarist Heath Fogg (second from left) talks us through the band’s on-the-road eating habits What time is breakfast? 1pm. Tea or coffee? Coffee, though [lead singer, pictured] Brittany likes chai. Smoking or non-smoking? Mostly non-smoking. Sweet or savoury snacks? Savoury. What food do you miss when you tour? Just some local spots from Athens. It has been fun getting to try so much new food in different spots throughout the world. Who’s the best cook you know? Jamie Oliver, we don’t really know him personally yet but would love to meet him. What’s on your rider? Mostly Red Bull and 5-Hour Energy drinks. Which country/city has the best food? New York. Do you eat out a lot? Mostly eat at home. Do you drink onstage? Usually beer. Sometimes whisky. ■ Alabama Shakes’ debut album, Boys & Girls is out on Mon 9 Apr (Rough Trade) and they play King Tut’s, Glasgow, on Wed 9 May. See alabamashakes.com for more info. 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 81


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BLURRED VISION Blur guitarist Graham Coxon is releasing his eighth solo record as the band prepares to play the Olympics. He talks to Ryan Drever about having his cake and eating it o, you’ve reunited with your hugely successful former band, are playing some of your biggest shows to date and have been chosen to lead the closing ceremony of the London Olympic games; you probably don’t need to be sitting in a studio playing with crappy drum machines and unreliable vintage synths. Right? In Blur guitarist Graham Coxon’s case, his motivation for making his eighth solo record, A+E, was far more about self-entertainment than necessity. (‘We drank lots of tea, ate loads of Double Deckers and just sort of had fun.’) Recorded with producer Ben Hillier – coincidentally the man responsible for producing Blur’s last album, Think Tank – A+E is a departure from the largely acoustic song cycle of 2009’s The Spinning Top and instead is built on largely improvised demos, sociallyanxious lyrics, and bass. A lot of bass. ‘I think my last album was just megaexpressive in every way,’ says Coxon. ‘As soon as I picked up a guitar I was like, “Argh, bloody hell, I’m doing the same kind of thing, how am I gonna get out of these habits?!” So that’s why I just put my guitar away. ‘I have this old Rickenbacker bass and it’s got

S

82 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

flat-wound strings on it so it’s got a kind of honky, clonky sound. I really enjoyed it, so I was just having fun on the bass really. Then sort of shouting and singing, or whatever it is, over the top until these melodies came along.’ The album also benefitted from being free from virtually all restraints; Coxon having been label-less at the time of making it, and picked up later by long-term affiliates, Parlophone.

‘NOW BLUR’S OUR SORT OF SUNDAY BAND’ ‘I suppose we didn’t care,’ says Coxon. ‘There was no one from record companies coming in and going, “Whoa, I don’t know about this”, because I wasn’t signed.’ He chuckles, summing the process up as ‘two sonic perverts doing whatever they want, surrounded by noise-making gear and recording gear.’ After February’s Blur-gasm at this year’s Brit Awards, followed by the announcement that the band would essentially be headlining the Olympics, it would be safe to say that Blur’s stature since reforming in 2009 has

risen well above the nostalgic novelty of too many reunions. But where does this fit in with Coxon’s solo endeavours? ‘I think it might be just a matter of putting the different glasses on,’ he jokes. ‘Me Blur glasses for this year are these ones, and me solo glasses are these. I’m lucky because I can have my own grubbier, sweatier experience, but also have that big audience experience with amplifiers flat out and sit back a bit. Let someone else do all the singing and just concentrate on my guitar playing. It’s really good to have both those things, like having your cake and eating it really. ‘I’m just going to see what happens and if we feel like doing stuff, we do, and if we don’t, we don’t. It really is as natural as that. All our side projects became our main things and now Blur is our sort of Sunday band. We get to hang out with each other and muck about so it’s sort of nice.’

Graham Coxon plays the Liquid Room, Edinburgh, Mon 16 Apr; the Garage, Glasgow, Tue 17 Apr. ‘A+E’ (Parlophone) is out on Mon 2 Apr, see p86 for a review.


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Music

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PREVIEWS PROG-FOLK

TWO WINGS Nice N Sleazy, Glasgow, Sun 8 Apr Hanna Tuulikki is musing on deficiencies in the human form. ‘I’d much rather have a syrinx [bird’s vocal organ] and wings than a larynx and arms,’ reflects the singer-songwriter, visual artist and multi-instrumentalist. ‘Birds are masters of the two things that I admire – and long for – most: to sing and to fly. I’ve managed something akin to the first of those . . .’ If you have encountered Tuulikki – perhaps in free-folk voyagers Nalle, or on RM Hubbert’s glorious single, ‘Sunbeam Melts the Hour’ – you will know that’s an understatement. Her voice is remarkable. Two Wings sees Tuulikki take flight in joyous, glittering folk-rock style, alongside co-songwriter, guitarist and singer Ben Reynolds (who’s worked in the past with Trembling Bells, Baby Dee, improv explorers Ashtray Navigations), backed by Lucy Duncombe, Kenneth Wilson and Owen Curtis Williams. Their lavish, vintage debut, Love’s Spring, is out in April. ‘It grows out of Anglo-American traditions of folk, soul, gospel, country, rockabilly, pop and a shared passion for the craft of composing and arranging songs,’ offers Tuulikki. Reynolds further identifies ‘Ray Davies, Tom Verlaine, Smokey Robinson, Bruce Springsteen, old soul, Fleetwood Mac, Richard Thompson and Peter Green’ as touchstones. When Reynolds released a solo album called Two Wings in 2008, did he have any sense its title would assume such a lively, communal life of its own? ‘I had no idea at all,’ he says. ‘At that time I was most concerned with developing my steel string finger-style skills – something I have since entirely abandoned for the far more satisfying craft of playing electric guitar solos . . .’ (Nicola Meighan) ■ Love’s Spring is out on Mon 30 Apr via Tin Angel. See a review in the next issue, out 26 Apr.

EXPERIMENTAL/FOLK

INDIE-ROCK

COUNTERFLOWS FESTIVAL

2:54

Various venues, Glasgow, Fri 6–Sun 8 Apr

Captains Rest, Glasgow, Thu 5 Apr

Held over nine days across Glasgow, London and Berlin, Counterflows is a glorious stramash of experimental songwriting, clamorous avant-rock, and absurdist improv. In bringing Japan’s great Kazuki Tomokawa to Europe, the organisers have pulled off a real coup. A unique artist, Tomokawa’s music is a devastating combination of graceful folk melodies and harrowing guttural rasps. Also appearing in the UK for the first time is the remarkable Kim Doo Soo, Korean acid-folk troubadour and star of Damon & Naomi’s International Sad Hits compilation. Austere and Old Testament-heavy, a Michael Gira (pictured) solo set is, in its own way, as powerful an experience as his band Swans in all their elemental fury. An inspiration to a new generation of freak-folk artists, picker and lupine howler Michael Hurley shares a bill with the uncanny Josephine Foster, the latter performing a rare piano set. Grouper’s Liz Harris offers her spectral songcraft up to noise-techno mutants Diamond Catalog, while Bill Wells appears with his National Jazz Trio of Scotland (they’re neither jazz nor a trio). In a co-production with The Arches’ Behaviour Festival, artist Torsten Lauschmann and Red Note Ensemble present performance-installation Inconsistent Whisper. Other highlights include drone-prog duo Volcano the Bear and relentless guitar army Opaque. Clear your diaries and open your minds. (Stewart Smith) ■ See list.co.uk for an interview with the organisers.

Like a louchely worn black leather jacket, moody guitar music will never go out of fashion – see 2:54 for proof on both counts. Having toured with Warpaint and The Big Pink since emerging a year ago, the London four-piece based around sisters Colette and Hannah Thurlow will release their self-titled debut album next month. Singer/guitarist Colette took time out from a frantic first trip to SXSW to describe the band’s genesis. ‘Hannah taught herself guitar and then she taught me,’ Thurlow explains, ‘and we just started playing together for fun.’ The band wear their influences on their sleeves – Colette’s vocals speak of PJ Harvey and Liz Fraser, while Hannah’s playing echoes alternative guitar heroes from Thurston Moore to Billy Corgan. Which makes some of 2:54’s recreational listening tastes slightly surprising. ‘The first album I bought, I think it was Now 27,’ reveals Collette. ‘I was really into R&B – I still am a massive R&B fan, TLC and stuff.’ As crowds have grown, confidence has followed suit: ‘We’ve been trying to build it up and not feel not terrified when we play.’ The Thurlows take reassurance from a powerful rhythm section in Alex Robins and Joel Porter – equal partners in the band, even if they don’t always share equal billing in photos and interviews with 2:54’s leading ladies. ‘It’s like a family atmosphere,’ says Colette. ‘The boys have a sibling quality like Hannah and I, so it really works.’ (Malcolm Jack) 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 83


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Music

WWW.LEEGOLDUP.COM

LIVE REVIEWS

ELECTRONICA

BLANCK MASS

POP

School of Art, Glasgow, Sun 18 Mar ●●●●●

XIU XIU Captain’s Rest, Wed 14 Mar ●●●●●

FLORENCE & THE MACHINE

84 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

DUNCAN BRYCELAND

SECC, Glasgow, Mon 12 Mar ●●●●●

FREAKY MONKEY SEQUENCE

WWW.PETERKAMINSKI.CO.UK

21ST CENTURY DIVA

Has Florence Welch ever told you about the time she flew up to Glasgow on a whim to visit a friend who lives in a castle in the Highlands? The fourhour bus journey that followed – still in her pyjamas – took her through Lochgilphead, where her Scottish granny (cue applause) used to holiday as a girl. This journey was the last act of a very heavy weekend, of course. God, those heavy weekends. She’s just off the back of one now, as it happens . . . All of which helps to illustrate the 24-carat crackpottery required to fully live up to that ‘new Kate Bush’ mantle, as if wafting in through what looks like an enormous Art Deco hotel lobby, wearing a brown sequinned cape, hasn’t already announced Welch as an arena act worthy of the name. Many artists graduate to a venue of this size through a combination of perseverance and marketing, but with Welch the feeling persists that she’s here because she was destined to be; that she has the songs, the style, the sheer talent and the winning level of affirmative eccentricity to be bound for superstardom and no less. The impersonation of stony-eyed otherworldliness she opens with lasts almost half the set, in the end, with ‘Only if for a Night’ and ‘What the Water Gave Me’ performed with a voice as crystalline as a heavenly choir and an expression as beatifically detached as Alison Goldfrapp in her pomp. Murmured hellos from the darkness seemed at odds with the woman confidently proclaiming, ‘We are all too young to die’ during ‘Between Two Lungs’, a declaration that she intends to hang around if ever there was one. But she couldn’t resist telling us about her big nights out for long, and the frost thawed as she conducted mountainous anthem ‘Shake It Out’s ‘ooh’-ing coda. A good set got better and better as it went on, with Welch and the audience loosening their dancing feet to ‘Dog Days Are Over’, and her nowstandard Candi Staton cover ‘You Got the Love’ and the dense, rich pound of ‘Spectrum’ taking her into the territory of Ibiza’s last anthemic buildup of the morning. Both Florences, the arena ice queen and the after-party princess, have surely arrived as an essential pop star for the 21st century. (Paul Little)

In comparison to Fuck Buttons, his and Andrew Hung’s punishing drone-techno crucible, Benjamin John Power’s solo project Blanck Mass makes music that manages to recreate the elegia and emotional power of club-ready electronic music with none of the basslines. Twenty years ago this would have been called ambient, and in this room there was womb-like calm. For a time, at least. As the set progressed the occasional bass note thudded as if dropped to the floor. Power’s live keys seemed strangely disembodied, but they chimed with the sweet uplift of good house music. In presumable tribute to his friend and attendee at this show Stuart Braithwaite, the churning guitar riff of Mogwai’s ‘Rano Pano’ was mixed in and reversed at one point. And then, even as the set threatened to dissipate into a fuzz of chimes and noise from the Pink Floyd playbook of designer psychedelia, a dark, minimal tribal beat kicked in. Much like Fuck Buttons, Power’s Blanck Mass does nothing new and everything with an emotional intensity that goes beyond instinct. (David Pollock)

Those who have seen Xiu Xiu’s past Glasgow appearances may be expecting songwriter Jamie Stewart to be accompanied by just one other musician, but the tour for latest record Always sees him flanked by a full band. Opening on the gentle ‘Fabulous Muscles’, the band flit between more intense, almost Pavement-y guitar pop sounds, and the delicately weird and pained vocals for which Stewart is best known. The appeal of Xiu Xiu surely lies in the lyrical content, with lines from songs like ‘Sad Pony Guerrilla Girl’ and even new track ‘Smear The Queen’ picked up on by dedicated fans in attendance. It is in his most personal, intimate moments where Stewart’s talent shines through, his pained, idiosyncratic delivery intense throughout the set. Silent between songs, stopping methodically to gargle water, he speaks only to say goodbye before ‘I Luv The Valley OH!’ delivers one final emotional blow to Xiu Xiu’s disarmingly loyal fanbase. (Lauren Mayberry)

CONFESSIONAL SINGER/SONGWRITER

HIP HOP

SINEAD O’CONNOR

SOULS OF MISCHIEF

Oran Mor, Glasgow, Wed 14 Mar ●●●●●

Electric Circus, Edinburgh, Tue 13 Mar ●●●●●

One of the funniest tales in music concerns an Irish hack sent to doorstep Sinead O’Connor. The scribbler promptly vanishes then days later is tracked down to O’Connor’s Paris hotel suite: ‘Sinead and I,’ he informs his former colleagues loftily, ‘aren’t talking to the press.’ The implication is a stubborn one, that O’Connor is a man-eating flake elevated by one well-chosen Prince cover to an unearned and flouncy megastardom. A recent marriage (her fourth) and years in the wilderness appear to have galvanised her. One result has been her most recent album, How About I Be Me (And You Be You)?, a piece of work that is solid and accommodating. As is her live show, wherein O’Connor foregoes flakiness and attempts to reconnect with her audience, humbly at times. The new material, while tuneful, remains militantly autobiographical, however, the lyrical equivalent of an email written at 4am. There’s no shortage of banshee Gaelic wailing either. How long new love will sustain this rebirth remains to be seen, of course, but for the meantime it’s nice to have the old suede-headed nutter back. (Allan Brown)

As creators of a classic 90s hip hop hit (‘93 til Infinity’), it would be easy for Souls of Mischief to tour on the back of that alone. However, the California-natives did not disappoint the sold-out crowd with a dull and lazy performance, like some of their golden age hip hop peers find acceptable to do. Instead, they treated fans to an engaging and ardent show. Souls of Mischief’s Opio, Phesto and Tajai took to the stage (A-Plus hasn’t appeared on any of the tour) and put up their Hieroglyphics collective hand sign to their followers, who signalled back. The threesome performed material from their five albums, plus Hieroglyphics’ numbers and tracks from Phesto’s new album Background Check. The group spoke out, saying they ‘came a long way to be on this stage’ because they ‘love hip hop’. They also got a few laughs when they announced they had ‘Buckfast up in the back’. Next year will be the 20th anniversary of the track that made them famous. Souls of Mischief’s zeal and commitment proves why they are still around. When they said ‘93 til Infinity’, they meant it. (Lauren Gelling)


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DF CONCERTS & EVENTS PRESENTS… DF CONCERTS & EVENTS PRESENTS… DF Concerts & Events by arrangement with X-ray

orbitalofficial.com

Bernard Sumner Stephen Morris Gillian Gilbert Phil Cunningham Tom Chapman

Saturday 5thUMay T O

LD Academy Glasgow SO Second Date Added Due to Phenomenal Demand

PLEASE NOTE: CHANGE OF VENUE – ORIGINAL TICKETS STILL VALID

Sunday 6th May

Edinburgh Usher Hall 08444 999 990 www.gigsinscotland.com | www.ticketmaster.co.uk newordernow.net

+ The Japanese Popstars

O2 Academy Glasgow Saturday 7th April

Edinburgh Electric Circus Saturday 28th April

O2 ABC GLASGOW WEDNESDAY 25TH APRIL

Glasgow King Tut’s

THE NEW STUDIO ALBUM WHATEVER’S ON YOUR MIND AVAILABLE NOW VOTE FOR YOUR DREAM SETLIST AT WWW.GOMEZTHEBAND.COM

Thursday 17th May

S GU ES TS PL US

CHES GLASGOW AHRA PRIL MONDAY 9T

GLASGOW THE ARCHES

Monday 30th April www.boxes.mu

PLEASE NOTE: CHANGE OF DATE – ORIGINAL TICKETS STILL VALID

GLASGOW ORAN MOR

MONDAY 16TH APRIL

EDINBURGH PLEASANCE THEATRE TUESDAY 17TH APRIL

PLUS SUPPORT

THE TODDLA T SOUND & UNICORN KID

O2 ABC GLASGOW SUNDAY 22ND APRIL

WWW.TWITTER.COM/MAJORLAZER WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/MAJORLAZER

EDINBURGH PLEASANCE THEATRE

WEDNESDAY 11TH APRIL

ABERDEEN LEMON TREE THURSDAY 12TH APRIL

GLASGOW ORAN MOR FRIDAY 13TH APRIL

www.butcher-boy.co.uk

L I A N N E L A H AVA S GLASGOW ORAN MOR SUNDAY 6TH MAY

w w w. l i a n n e l a h a v a s . c o m

BUTCHER BOY

GLASGOW THE COTTIER THEATRE GLASGOW nice‘n’SLEAZY sat 7th april FRIDAY 6TH APRIL EDINBURGH THE PLEASANCE THEATRE SATURDAY 14TH APRIL + Michael Cassidy

For tickets call: 08444 999 990 or online: www.gigsinscotland.com www.ticketmaster.co.uk

Follow gigsinscotland on twitter @gigscot


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Music RECORDS

BAROQUE POP

AMERICANA

RUFUS WAINWRIGHT

M WARD

Out of the Game (Polydor) ●●●●●

A Wasteland Companion (Bella Union) ●●●●●

In the bowels of a radioactive pop bunker somewhere between Glasgow and Falkirk, Malcolm Middleton has spent 18 months incubating a (super) heroic alter-ego. We all thought we knew the mild-mannered Middleton – sublime melodist with Arab Strap but behind the smile and modest beard, there throbbed the fluorescent brain of an ambient 80s overlord. He was hatching a plan for interplanetary domination, as soundtracked by the Art of Noise, Tangerine Dream, Whitesnake and Top Gun, and his plotting has borne brilliant fruit in the guise of Human Don’t Be Angry. From the gorgeous alt-MOR swell of ‘Monologue: River’ to the lambent riffs and glimmering krautrock of ‘First Person Singular, Present Tense’ – not to mention the discombobulating art-pop thrill of ‘1985’ – Human Don’t Be Angry is a captivating, drum-embracing beast. It is fortified by guitar-fuelled instrumental adventures (‘The Missing Plutonium’), Frankie Goes to Hollywood homages (‘After the Pleasuredome’) and a fitting widescreen leitmotif (‘HDBA Theme’). While Middleton’s solo lyrics are typified by self-deprecation, Human Don’t Be Angry’s vocalisms are more forthright, driven and loved-up. Human, gird thy loins. (Nicola Meighan)

Releasing career retrospective House of Rufus last year and now drafting in ubiquitous producer Mark Ronson, all signs point to reinvention for Wainwright. Never one to shy away from the idiosyncratic in his operatic and multi-genre-infused pop, he embraces an expanded framework of instrumentation over which to drape his trademark sonorous tones. The country and soul-inflected anthemic first single ‘Out of the Game’, the swaggering debauchery of ‘Rashida’, and the melancholy country shuffle of ‘Respectable’ all play to his known and loved strengths: soaring, sensuous vocals, opulent lyrical worldbuilding, vertiginous emotional range and a delicious sense of occasion. (Suzanne Black)

M Ward is probably best known these days for being one half of She & Him, his collaboration with Zooey Deschanel, but long before that partnership he was dishing up dreamy slices of Americana like this. As the title hints at, this eighth album is evocative of the dusty back roads of rural America and all the booze-soaked heartbreak that implies. Guitars shuffle and strum and Ward croons away, but you do crave for something to cut through the reverb and tumbleweed. When it does, like the piano-led ‘Crawl After You’ or the upbeat Phil Spector whoops and handclaps of ‘Sweetheart’ (also notable for Deschanel’s presence), it hints at what can be achieved. Full of charm, but too understated. (Doug Johnstone)

INDIE POP

VOCAL HARMONY

INDIE

INDUSTRIAL

LIGHTSHIPS

THE CORNSHED SISTERS

GRAHAM COXON

CARTER TUTTI VOID

A+E (Parlophone) ●●●●●

Transverse (Mute) ●●●●●

While Blur’s will-they-won’t-they recorded reunion is a brand of comeback cock-teasery perfectly suited to the age of stone-bleeding revivalism, what will their eventual decision to just get on with it offer that Coxon and Albarn’s respective solo careers don’t? This latest lo-fi gem from the guitarist sticks closest to the formula Blur devised during their fruitful mid-period – that is, shameless wholesale genre adoption (the krautrockin’ ‘City Hall’), arch and distortedly ugly meditations on copulation (‘Meet + Drink + Pollinate’) and Essex boy punk rockers (‘Running For Your Life’) – but at least their purchase won’t allow cheese-making bumpkin Alex James any more proceeds to fund his desperate Greggs habit. (David Pollock)

Fans of doom-laden industrial machine music might find their clockwork hearts oiled slightly by the release of this most definitive of collaborations, as Carter Tutti (Throbbing Gristle’s Chris Carter and Cosey Fanni Tutti, nee Chris & Cosey) and Factory Floor’s Nik Void combine their powers for a new live composition from last year’s Short Circuit festival. In four ten-minute movements impersonally labelled ‘V1’ to ‘V4’ they explore a sound whose repetitive simplicity masks a wealth of emotional resonance and a series of grinding, metronomic artificial beats hurtling like a train in the night. It’s beautiful, although listeners’ opinions of what constitutes such may vary. (David Pollock)

SCOTTISCHE POP

HUMAN DON’T BE ANGRY Human Don’t Be Angry (Chemikal Underground) ●●●●●

Electric Cables (Geographic) ●●●●● Gerry Love might have insisted on a band name for this new project, but the sound is all Gerry. Love’s contributions to Teenage Fanclub are invariably the understated gems, and so it is here with this sumptuous, trembling collection of sun-soaked, blissed-out guitar pop. With members of Fanclub, The Pastels and Belle and Sebastian in tow, it’s a gentle ride, but often a mesmerising one, as tremolo guitars and soft flute lines interlink with Love’s coy vocals brilliantly. This is not a revolutionary record, more like a warm musical bath to soak yourself in, right up to the fading echoey, looping guitar riffs of gorgeous closer ‘Sunlight to the Dawn’. Excuse the obvious pun, but this is just Lovely. (Doug Johnstone) 86 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

Tell Tales (Memphis Industries) ●●●●● A gentle debut with just enough edge and earthy Northern lilt to balance the sweetness of the belllike vocal harmonies, Tell Tales is the work of four non-sisters from Tyne and Wear. The tales told stretch from the overtly modern, grown-up pop of ‘Dance at My Wedding’ to yarn-spinning ballads with an almost timeless quality, like ‘Tommy’ and ‘Pies for the Fair’ – a folksy rhyme with pat-a-cake accompaniment. The first four tracks, announced by the stop-inyour tracks imagery of ‘Dresden’ are also the best, with not enough of their sparkiness to perk up the second half. Reminiscent of the Unthanks with extra dollops of pop sensibility, and very pretty sounding with it. (Laura Ennor)


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RECORDS

list.co.uk/music

Music

GLAM-POP

ELECTRONICA

HIP-HOP

PSYCH FOLK

BOBBY CONN

DEAN BLUNT & INGA COPELAND

OFWGKTA

ALEXANDER TUCKER

The Odd Future Tape Vol. 2 (Columbia) ●●●●●

Third Mouth (Thrill Jockey) ●●●●●

Can Tupac and Kanye West-lensing promo director Hype Williams finally have gotten wise to the ridiculously inventive London duo using his name? Is that why the pair are using their own names for this debut album on Kode9’s Hyperdub? The oblique press release and lack of a tracklist suggests we’d best not go looking for an answer: instead, enjoy some of the most striking and boundarycrashing music you’re likely to hear this year, from the Krupa-drumming intro to acres of off-balance, late night ambient dick-aboutery, crisply produced but lent an eerie edge by Copeland’s lo-fi, atonal vocal. Lowslung hip hop beats arrive later, but the overall sense is of the dubstep Throbbing Gristle having risen from the shadows. (David Pollock)

Declared ‘the future of the music business’, controversial young California alternative hip hop crew OFWGKTA – aka Odd Future – make their major label debut off the back of a reputation forged through mix-tapes and bad behaviour. With major label solo efforts from members Tyler, The Creator, Frank Ocean and MellowHype set to follow, it’s as if the lunatics are taking over the asylum. A typically quality-control-free spurt of hyper-creativity, The Odd Future Tape Vol. 2 is impressive but fatally flawed. No matter how strange, sinister, inventive and box fresh the production, Odd Future’s collective obsession – ironic or otherwise – with violence, bitches and fellatio makes them sound depressingly commonplace. (Malcolm Jack)

Avant-pop druid Alexander Tucker has long ruled with his explorations of memory, mythology and landscape – from the experimental psalms and pastoral drones of Old Fog (2005), through the otherworldly psych folk of Furrowed Brow (2006), to the high-watermark of last year’s uncanny Thrill Jockey debut, Dorwytch. Third Mouth sees the English artist cultivate lusher melodic pastures in a record that’s stirring, compelling and glorious. While the choral guitar psalm of ‘Sitting in a Bardo Pond’ goes some way to locating Tucker’s muse it’s the string-drawn psychedelia of ‘A Dried Seahorse’ and the title track’s encircling beauty that best illustrate, and illuminate, Tucker’s command of (un)earthly wonder. (Nicola Meighan)

LO-FI POP

DIY SYNTH-POP

FOLK

FOLK-ROCK

TORO Y MOI

MOTHER GANGA

SEAMUS FOGARTY

June 2009 (Carpark) ●●●●●

Pineal Soup (Instructional Media) ●●●●●

God Damn You Mountain (Fence Records) ●●●●●

TREMBLING BELLS FEAT. BONNIE PRINCE BILLY

Chillwave pioneer and Carolina native Chazwick Bundick follows up last year’s second release Underneath the Pine with further lo-fi pop trinkets dating back to June 2009, which should be stacked alongside the likes of his pals Washed Out, Aerial Pink and Real Estate. Originally released as a tour-only CD-R, there’s enough infectious melody on this repackaged artefact to keep the art school kids entertained, but there’s also an unnecessary amount of throwback chic piled on quickly. Once you step out of the forcefully retro nature of a lot of the guitardriven tracks, there’s much more life to this release when Toro delves into a funkier realm. (Nick Herd)

Lewis Cook’s first release as Mother Ganga was made mostly at his girlfriend’s flat, in her bedroom. The 21-year-old calls it ‘electronic haze-pop’, and the wonky results (a limited run of 100 cassettes) show up in time to make a good soundtrack to the sudden burst of early summer. Buried beats, warped, gothy vocals, melted and bendy analog synthesisers – it’s a lot less doomy than the stuff he’s made with Glasgow’s Cosmic Dead – aka, ‘Scotland’s foremost Hawkwind tribute band’, but retains some of their psych, kraut sounds. Only 20 minutes long, it’s Oneohtrixy, Com Truisey, space-straddling spectralpop, with a Scottish-accented frill round the edges. (Claire Sawers) ■ soundcloud.com/motherganga

We’re beginning to suspect Fence Records have some secret laboratory in Fife where they genetically splice brilliant musicians to create new wonders. In the case of Irish singer-songwriter Seamus Fogarty, that would involve DNA samples from a James Yorkston nail clipping, a strand of Mark Linkous’ hair and some spit from Jason Lytle, maybe. This is folk music that nods towards Irish tradition but with a dreamy, mesmerising feel all of its own; echoes of Scotland and rural Americana haunting everything. While the stripped-down tracks in the middle display Fogarty’s songwriting chops, it’s the more experimental beginning and ending that really demonstrate an exciting talent. (Doug Johnstone)

Macaroni (Fire Records) ●●●●● Imagine if something really emotionally scarring happened to, say, Prince, something in his formative years that sent him down an altogether darker path. Now say hello to Bobby Conn, flamboyant glam-pop weirdo from Chicago with a pocketful of showbiz tricks, a DIY ethic and a confrontational hipster vibe. This is album number six, and while it fails to reach the heights of his peak (2001’s The Golden Age), it’s still a fun ride, as Conn mashes up funk, soul and rock with a rather muddled protest-song lyricism about the woes of Western civilization. Sadly, there’s not enough memorable melody to match the chutzpah this time round, but the world’s still a better place for having Bobby Conn in it. (Doug Johnstone)

Black is Beautiful (Hyperdub) ●●●●●

The Marble Downs (Honest Jons) ●●●●● Over three albums in as many years, Trembling Bells have refined their heady mix of courtly psychfolk, Yorkshire country and colliery band jazz, losing some of their rickety charm, while gaining in dynamism and panache. For their latest, lead singer Lavinia Blackwell is given a new sparring partner in Will Oldham, a wolfy colonial aristocrat to her steely English rose. Oldham’s vocals are highly mannered, situated somewhere between backwoods Kentucky and Vivian Stanshall’s Rawlinson End. It works, lending a fustian air to the band’s eccentric Renaissance rock. An intriguing start to what is hopefully an ongoing collaboration. (Stewart Smith) 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 87


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Music RECORDS JAZZ & WORLD JAZZ

KENNY GARRETT Seeds From The Underground (Mack Avenue Records) ●●●●● Here we find Kenny Garrett – a Detroit-born alto saxophonist who began his career performing with the Duke Ellington Orchestra before pursuing a solo career — in his most melodic vein, accompanied by a fine pianist, Benito Gonzalez, and a strong rhythm section that includes percussionist Rudy Bird. Nedelka Prescod adds wordless vocals on a couple of tracks, and is part of a minichorus on ‘Welcome Earth Sound’. Their vibrant treatment of a series of new compositions by Garrett (several are dedicated to his jazz mentors, while a couple have distinct ‘world music’ roots) is very enjoyable. (Kenny Mathieson) JAZZ

GARY HUSBAND Dirty & Beautiful, Volume 2 (Abstract Logix) ●●●●● Jazz-rock isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, and tends to be sniffed at in critical circles, but when it’s done well, it remains an exciting facet of the contemporary jazz spectrum. Like its predecessor, this album features keyboard player and drummer Gary Husband in duo, trio and quartet settings with a range of the genre’s luminaries, including guitarists John McLaughlin, Allan Holdsworth, Robin Trower and Wayne Krantz, keyboard player Jan Hammer and Level 42 bassist Mark King. Husband revisits Hammer’s ‘Rain’ and Miles Davis’ ‘Yesternow’ (briefly featured on Volume 1, but expanded here) alongside new material. (Kenny Mathieson) WORLD

ROBERTO FONSECA Yo (Montuno/ Jazz Village) ●●●●● Hitherto dressed by number one French fan Agnès B, Cuban pianist Roberto Fonseca literally strips naked to underscore journeying into the diaspora of his Afro-Cuban roots. As eclectic as ever, Fonseca walks a fine line between cutting edge trio jazz, lyrical poems and flirtations with a more high energy, clubby scene. Beautiful collaborations with Malian singer Fatoumata Diawara and Assane Mboup among others are welcome. A consummate classical and popular pianist, Fonseca’s bold percussive style fused with wit, discipline and knowledge of the masters mark him as innovating the future of jazz, at home and abroad. (Jan Fairley) WORLD COMPILATION

VARIOUS ARTISTS Songlines Music Awards 2012 (Songlines/Proper Music) ●●●●● Despite difficult times for music business sales, with popular small independents reporting they are barely covering their costs, let’s hear it for this innovative magazine. Songlines offers a bimonthly vision of the diverse with superb articles and covermount CDs. This compilation album rounds up the nominees for the 4th annual Songlines Music Awards, where artists including Staff Benda Bilili and Amadou & Mariam have previously scooped awards. Newcomer Fatoumata Diawara definitely gets this reviewer’s vote. (Jan Fairley)

SINGLES & DOWNLOADS TS Eliot got it wrong. April is not the cruellest month. Not where our ear canals are concerned, anyway. April is killing us with its pop kindness. Take ‘Storm’ (●●●●●, Because), a sojourn into sun-dappled collage-rock, courtesy of vintage exoticists Django Django; or the tropical indie of François and the Atlas Mountains’ ‘City Kiss’ (●●●●●, Domino); not to mention the shimmering optimism of ‘Among Angels’ (●●●●●, Fish People) from the ever-exquisite Kate Bush. (The latter is released on 10” picture-disc for Record Store Day on April 21). Alas, April’s aural altruism email did not reach farce-metal braggarts Steel Panther in time for ‘17 Girls in a Row’ (●●●●●, Island) and nor could it salvage Christina Perri’s mawkish, Mumfords-esque ‘Arms’ (●●●●●, Atlantic, see left), but Teenage Fanclub’s Gerry Love, aka Lightships, is on blissful, restorative form with the indie balm of 'Sweetness In Her Spark' (●●●●●, Geographic). (See also page 86 for a review of the Lightships album.) Love’s TFC shipmate, Norman Blake, appears on Bill Wells and Aidan Moffat’s ‘The Powers and The Glory of Love’ (●●●●●, Chemikal Underground, see right) – a cut so divine that The List is bestowing upon it an unprecedented 1980s Single of the Decade garland. It’s a gorgeous homage to all the greatest ‘Power’ ballads (Frankie; Huey; Rush), and it might just save your life. Back in the future, April’s Single of the Month goes to Scottish alt-rock enigma(s) The Son(s) with the untrammelled DIY glam-strop of ‘If I Hear You Talk Apostrophes Again’ (●●●●● , Olive Grove). Grammatical funk, cross-dressing blues and skewed-folk despotism never sounded so full of the joys of spring. (Nicola Meighan)

ALSO RELEASED Battles Dross Glop (Warp) ●●●●● First in a 4-part series of Gloss Drop remix albums. Gang Gang Dance, HudMo and Hyperdub owner, Steve ‘Kode9’ Goodman redo ‘Ice Cream’ and ‘Africastle’, but the results taste more watery icepole than zingy sorbet.

Jon Porras Black Mesa (Thrill Jockey) ●●●●●

One half of San Francisco’s Barn Owl, Jon Porras’ solo work is a foreboding, desolate, droney haze of psychy desert guitar. Meditative, darkly beautiful soundscape stuff.

88 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

King Creosote & Jon Hopkins Diamond Mine Special Edition (Domino) ●●●●●

A reissue of last year’s much-loved, Mercurynominated album, with two brand new songs, plus the Honest Words EP and a B-side ‘Missionary.’

The Time and Space Machine Taste the Lazer (Tirk) ●●●●● Motorik workouts from Richard Norris, better known as half of Beyond the Wizard’s Sleeve with Erol Alkan. Driving and hypnotic, with Neu!-esque moments among more Balearic bursts.

Bear in Heaven I Love You It’s Cool (Dead Oceans) ●●●●● Less stoner rock and proggy stuff than Beast Rest Forth Mouth, and more pulsing, danceable beats on album three from the Brooklyn trio, channelling a bit of Pet Shop Boys if we’re not mistaken?

Plum The Seed (Plum Tunes) ●●●●● Plum aka Shona Maguire, was the first female release on leftfield gem, Benbecula Records. Her light vocals have a soft, poppy sound, and bring on dubby Portishead flashbacks. (Claire Sawers)


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list.co.uk/music

ROCK&POP Events are listed by date, then city. Submit listings at least 16 days before publication for Glasgow to glasgow@list.co.uk and for Edinburgh to henry@list.co.uk. Listings are compiled by Fiona Shepherd and Henry Northmore. For ticket outlet information, see Book Now. ✽ Indicates Hitlist entry.

Thursday 29

Glasgow

■ One Direction SECC, Finnieston Quay, 0844 395 4000. 6.30pm. £25– £32.50. X-Factor boy band. ■ Korn, Downlink and J Devil O2 Academy, 121 Eglinton St, 0844 477 2000. 7pm. £29.50. Over-14s show. Godfathers of nu-metal. Plus bagpipes. ■ Chris Rea SECC, Finnieston Quay, 0844 395 4000. 7.30pm. £27.50–£33.50. Rea performs selections from his extensive back catalogue. ■ The River 68s, David McKay, Stephen Pettigrew and Lyndsey Hurren Nice’n’Sleazy, 421 Sauchiehall

St, 333 0900. 7.30pm. £5. Strutting vintage style from The River 68s.

■ Absolutist The 13th Note Café/Bar,

50–60 King Street, 553 1638. 8pm. Irish band. FREE Alice & the Rampant Trio, Kat Healy and Rona Topaz Black Sparrow, 241 North St, 221 5530. 8pm. Fleetwood Mac-style sounds from St Andrews band, plus singer/songwriters. ■ Benny Banks Stairway Club, 95 Union St, 221 1009. 8pm. £6–£8. North London rapper supported by Madhat McGore, Skolzy, Wee D and Black Bros. ■ Dead Medicine, Deadly Inscription, Roxstedy, Death Trap and Kolumbia Maggie May’s, 60

Trongate, 548 1350. 8pm. £4. Metal and heavy rock showcase. FREE Diana Schad Linen 1906, 1110 Pollokshaws Rd, 649 0007. 8pm. Singer/ pianist performing originals and covers. ■ John Hinshelwood Band St Andrews in the Square, 1 St Andrews Square, 559 5902. 8pm. £8 (£6). Americana and country sounds. FREE Rank Berry, Still Whisky, La Rocha and Evil Edison Box, 431 Sauchiehall Street, 332 5431. 8pm. Local rock and indie bands. ■ The Red Sands Captain’s Rest, 185 Great Western Rd, 332 7304. 8pm. Live music. ■ Tut Vu Vu, Smack Wizards and Einstein Cross Mono, 12 Kings Court, King Street, 553 2400. 8pm. £4. Dark, swampy cabaret from Tut Vu Vu. FREE Jam Session Samuel Dow’s, 67–71 Nithsdale Rd, 423 0107. 8.30pm. Weekly jam night. ■ The Milk King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent Street, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £5. A danceable blend of soul, rock ‘n’ roll and pop. With support from The Dirty Demographic and Johnny Jack. FREE The Rudiments Maggie May’s, 60 Trongate, 548 1350. 9pm. Melodic 60s-inspired harmony sounds.

Edinburgh FREE Henry Ibbs The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. Electroacoustic sounds from singer-songwriter Ibbs and friends. FREE Henry Ibbs Captains Bar, 4 South College St. 9pm. See above. ■ Eras Sneaky Pete’s, 73 Cowgate, 225 1757. 7pm. £5. Edinburgh rockers. ■ Make Sparks and Vukovi Electric Circus, 36–39 Market St, 226 4224. 7pm. £5. Alt.rock in a Biffy/Twin Atlantic mould from Make Sparks. ■ Asolutist Henry’s Cellar Bar, 8-16 Morrison St, 228 9393. 7.30pm. £5. Crust/hardcore punk. ■ Conflagration, T-34, Wheelchair x4 and Cerata Henry’s

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Cellar Bar, 8-16 Morrison St, 228 9393. 7.30pm. £5. Punk night from the House of Crust. FREE Open Acoustic Session The Ale House, 18–22 Clerk St, 629 0275. 8pm. Ian Robertson hosts. ■ Sharpshooter, Titus Pullo and Who’s Edna The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £5. Rock and indie triple bill at this charity fundraiser for Parkinsons UK and Rosie Bond, who will be cycling 500km (from Vietnam to Cambodia) in aid of the charity.

H E R E ’ S W H AT Y O U C O U L D H A V E W O N . . .

0 2 A B C S U N D AY

KEVIN McDERMOTT ORCHESTRA

GLASGOW 8TH APRIL

A REGULAR MUSIC/TRIPLE G PRESENTATION IN ASSOCIATION WITH WME

Friday 30

Glasgow

■ The Strategy, Our Time Now, Papa Ganash, Palladium and SilverLinedCity Classic Grand, 18

Jamaica St, 847 0820. 6.30pm. £6. Over-14s show. Four-piece rock band from Hamilton headline with pop-punk support from Our Time Now, prog trio Papa Ganash, thrash metallers Palladium and hard rockers SilverLinedCity. ■ Cast O2 Academy, 121 Eglinton St, 0844 477 2000. 7pm. £20. Mancunian Britrockers back after a decade’s rest. FREE Diana Schad The Living Room, 150 St Vincent St, 229 0607. 7pm. See Thu 29. ■ Hue & Cry Hot Wire Weekend

O2 ABC, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £19.50. Over-14s show. Soulful pop and jazz grooves from Scotrock veterans Pat and Greg Kane. Piano and vocal show.

Tues 3rd April 0141 353 8000 GLASGOW CONCERT HALL Sun 8th April 0131 529 6000 EDINBURGH FESTIVAL THEATRE

BOO HEWERDINE BROOKS WILLIAMS

■ Soul Circus, Crimson Saints, Bliss and Interzone Barrowland 2,

244 Gallowgate, 552 4601. 7pm. £6. Over-14s show. Dirty rock’n’roll from Soul Circus. FREE Jamie & the Daisycutters, The Widows, Unkle Vanya and Skinny Rhino Box, 431 Sauchiehall St, 332 5431. 8pm. Local band line-up. ■ The Just Joans Heavenly, 185 Hope St, 353 0884. 8pm. £5. Bittersweet harmonies from Motherwell outfit.

ABERDEEN EDINBURGH

TUE 24TH APRIL WED 25TH APRIL

Dick

Valentine Thu 2nd Aug Nice & Sleazy Glasgow

ROACHFORD

O2 ABC2 GLASGOW FRIDAY 4 MAY

SAT 02 JUNE O ABC2 2 O2 ABC GLASGOW GLASGOW

Union St, 221 1009. 8pm. Folky indie and alt.rock.

Rest, 185 Great Western Rd, 332 7304. 8pm. £8. Texan psych punk trio. FREE Wing & A Prayer Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. Folk/blues duo. FREE The Latecomers Lauries Bar, 34 King St, 552 7123. 8.15pm. Acoustic set of originals and classic covers.

does acoustic...

Friday 25th May

ANDREW

■ The Last September, Visions of and Havana Rising Stairway Club, 95 ■ The Strange Boys, Top Dollar and The Rosy Crucifixion Captain’s

Wednesday 11th April FRENCH WIVES O2 ABC2 Glasgow

THE LEMON TREE VOODOO ROOMS

■ Loch Awe, Finn le Marinel, Ceylan Hay and Coat Hooks Stereo,

20-28 Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 7pm. £5. Folky indie goodness from Loch Awe.

HEY ROSETTA! Special Guests

PHILIP SAYCE PLUS SPECIAL GUESTS

SAT 21 APR

GLASGOW GARAGE

IAL GUESTS

PLUS SPEC

SATURDAY 21ST APRIL

O2 ABC2 GLASGOW

■ The Bucky Rage, The Seafield Foxes, Dirty Red Turncoats and The Wildhouse The 13th Note

ThE

RoBERT

CRAY

Café/Bar, 50–60 King St, 553 1638. 8.30pm. £5. A night of furious rock.

■ The Chakras, Bacchanal Party,

Roxbury and Soho Dandy King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £5. Indie psychedelia. FREE Trunk Monkey Samuel Dow’s, 67–71 Nithsdale Rd, 423 0107. 8.30pm. Rock. FREE Hidden Agenda Maggie May’s, 60 Trongate, 548 1350. 9pm. Motown and soul covers in the bar. ■ Pinup Nights The Flying Duck, 142 Renfield St, 564 1450. 9pm–3am. £6 advance. March’s edition of Glasgow’s biggest indie night is ‘Game Over’, the last ever Pinups party. Live guests include Sonny Marvello, new Chemikal Underground signing Miaoux Miaoux, The Twilight Sad, Malcolm Middleton and Emma Pollock. See Clubs preview, page 54.

BanD

SAT 19TH MAY 02 ACADEMY GLASGOW DOORS 7PM

AFTERSHOW REGGAE DJS UNTIL 2AM

Thur 28th June

o2 ABC GLASGOW

The Civil Wars plus special guests

Friday 2nd Nov

O2 ABC Glasgow

Edinburgh

www.ticketmaster.co.uk www.regularmusic.com

FREE Rossco Galloway The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. singer-songwriter-guitarist and friends.

0844 844 0444 or in person from Ticket Scotland: Argyle Street Glasgow, Rose St Edinburgh & Ripping Records and all usual outlets 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 89


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Music ROCK&POP ■ Jakil, Bwani Junction, Six Storeys High, People, Places, Maps and Hold the Suspect The

■ Gemma Hayes and Boat to Row

Wide Days

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £10. Return of one time Mercury Award nominee singer-songwriter Gemma Hayes. FREE Fried Medicine MacSorley’s, 42 Jamaica St, 248 8581. 9.30pm. Rock’n’roll covers.

HMV Picture House, 31 Lothian Rd, 0844 847 1740. 6.30pm. £5 in advance; £7 on the door. MessFest 2.0 all proceeds go to Myeloma UK.

■ Bainbridge Music Showcase

Sneaky Pete’s, 73 Cowgate, 225 1757. 7pm. £5. Band showcase, line-up tbc. ■ The Black Cabaret The Third Door, 45–47 Lothian St, 225 6313. 7pm. £tbc. ‘Dark carnival of gothic theatrics and live music’ organised by Church of When the Shit Hits the Fan frontman Harlequinade. ■ Chantel McGregor The Caves, Niddry St South, 557 8989. 7pm. £10. New blues guitar whizz. ■ Charlie Simpson The Liquid Room, 9c Victoria St, 225 2564. 7pm. £13.50. The former Busted and Fightstar singer in more reflective, acoustic solo guise.

Edinburgh

■ Ged Hanley Trio and Fatlips

Whistlebinkies, 4-6 South Bridge, 557 5114. 5pm. Free before midnight; £4 after. Blues and rock covers. FREE Camii Sinclair The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. Songs and humour from comedian and singersongwriter Sinclair and guests. ■ Red Dog Battle of the Bands

Studio 24, 24–26 Calton Rd, 558 3758. 6pm. £5 in advance; £7 on the door. Metal bands (including local bands Wrath of Orias, Disposable, Beneath the Oceans, The Titans of War, Riding Shotgun and Greywood Manor) go headto-head. ■ The Barry van Dykes, Diego and Gigantic Leaves Henry’s Cellar Bar, 8-16 Morrison St, 228 9393. 7pm. £5. Bainbridge Music showcase.

■ Dead Boy Robotics, Indian Red

Lopez and Song of Return Wee Red Bar, Edinburgh College of Art, Lauriston Place, 229 1442. 7pm. £4. New Wave electro punk sounds. See Song of Return preview, page 99.

■ Fitzroy Soul, Rag’n’Bone Man, Royal Edinburgh Music and Jason Kyrone Sneaky Pete’s, 73 Cowgate, 225

■ The Falling Rain, Solace, Anna’s

1757. 7pm. £5. Psych-out blues rock from this Edinburgh trio.

■ Mickey 9s and The Tea St Band

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 8-16 Morrison St, 228 9393. 7pm. £tbc. Funky hip hop, with a comedic twist, from Scotland.

■ The Nature Boys, Fridgemaster and Maydays Electric Circus, 36–39

Market St, 226 4224. 7pm. £5. Launch party for Edinburgh label, Feast Records.

■ Amplifier Demo & Drum Clinic

The Voodoo Rooms, 19a West Register St, 556 7060. 7.30pm. £5. Demos of Marshall amps and Nadal drums with Doug Aldrich, Brian Tichy and Michael Devin (of the mighty White Snake) followed by a Q&A session. All profits to Nordoff Robbins Music Therapy.

If you’re not already familiar with unsigned music seminar Wide Days, where have you been? Arranged by the folks at Born to be Wide, it’s an indispensable two-day conference where industry professionals (this year including Fat Cat label boss Alex Knight and FOUNDling Tommy Perman) gather to impart their wisdom to those looking to make a living from music. It also segues neatly into a series of great gigs showcasing hot young talent: this year, Norwegian teen punks Honningbarna will be making their debut Scottish appearance alongside Homework, Michael Cassidy, Quickbeam, Donna Maciocia, Lady North and Honeyblood (pictured). To listen to Honeyblood’s garage-rock bathroom recordings, click on bit.ly/honblood. ■ Various venues, Edinburgh, Wed 11 & Thu 12 Apr, widedays.com ■ To win tickets see Reader Offers, page 8.

■ The Declaration Band

Whistlebinkies, 4-6 South Bridge, 557 5114. 9.45pm. Free before midnight; £4 after. Soul, blues and rock’n’roll. FREE The Dead Beat Club Nobles Bar, 44a Constitution St, Leith, 629 7215. 10pm. Acoustic rock-pop delights.

■ Outlook Edinburgh Launch Party

The Caves, Niddry St South, 557 8989. 11pm–3am. £5 before midnight; £8 after. Bass orientated festival Outlook 2012 gets a warm-up from Riddim Tuffa, Mungo’s Hi Fi and Big Toe’s Hi Fi.

Saturday 31

Glasgow FREE Music of the Commonwealth Castlemilk Park, Rutherglen, 634 2673. 1–3pm. Live music from the Commonwealth, with sounds by Ayawara Percussion Group, Oi Musica, Clan Macondo and the Abolicao Capoeira Group, and storytelling by Alasdair Taylor. ■ Any Color Black LOVEmusic, 34

Dundas St, 332 2099. 4pm. Electro sleaze rock duo from Glasgow. FREE David Duffy MacSorley’s, 42 Jamaica St, 248 8581. 5.30pm. Weekly residency. FREE The Ray-Bandos Maggie May’s, 60 Trongate, 548 1350. 6pm. Rhythm’n’blues and rock’n’roll covers. Spaced in the City The Lighthouse, 11 Mitchell Lane, 276 5360. 6pm–1am. £8. New multi-arts event, planned as the first in a series of collaborative happenings around the city. Those appearing include musicians The Seventeenth Century, Open Swimmer, Adam Stearns, The Japanese War Effort and Dead Boy Robotics; visual artists Rachael Berman, Rossie Lesso, Katie Johnston, Mitch Miller, Stewart Swan and Anna Gibb; performance artists Rebecca Wade Morris and Adam Scarborough; and installations from Playdead Ltd, Automatic Exposure and Altronix.

■ Deadly Inscription, Sintonic, Dirty Hearts, Papa Zita and Teledauphin Classic Grand, 18 Jamaica

St, 847 0820. 6.30pm. £6. Over-14s show. Thrash metal headliners.

■ Hue & Cry Hot Wire Weekend O2 ABC, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £24.50. Over-14s show. Soulful pop and jazz grooves from Pat and Greg Kane. Full band performance. ■ Inkubus Sukkubus and Demimonde Queen Margaret Union, 22 University Gardens, 339 9784. 7pm. £8. Pagan goth rockers supported by electronic pop act. ■ The Naughty Strawberries, The Dirties, Radiowaves, The Dossian and IKR Barrowland 2, 244 Gallowgate,

552 4601. 7pm. £6. Over-14s show. Local band showcase.

■ The Plimptons, We Are the Physics, The Girobabies and Cracktown Stereo, 20-28 Renfield

Lane, 222 2254. 7pm. £6. Selfproclaimed ‘DIY-genius’ outfit. ■ Song of Return and Indian Red Lopez O2 ABC2, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £5. See Fri 30. See preview, page 99.

■ Angel of Everyone Murder, Noma & Buy Veale and Lamplighter

Old Hairdressers, Opposite Stereo, Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 8pm. £3. Music and noise from local experimenters. ■ Happy Particles, North American War and Olympic Swimmers The 13th Note Café/Bar,

50–60 King St, 553 1638. 8pm. Indie pop bill. FREE Hooks’n’Crooks, Dirty Boots, Bismarck, Rdway and The Daddy Naggins Box, 431 Sauchiehall St, 332 5431. 8pm. H’n’C are an indie rock trio from Denny, citing classic influences. ■ This Feeling Chambre 69, Stock Exchange House, 69 Nelson Mandela Place, 248 6447. 8pm–2am. £8 in advance; £10 on the door. See Fri 30. 90 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

Left Hook and Backlash Sneaky Pete’s, 73 Cowgate, 225 1757. 7pm. £5. Local rock line-up. ■ Led Astray Electric Circus, 36–39 Market St, 226 4224. 7pm. £7. Led Zeppelin tribute band with support from local blues duo Ghosts of Progress. FREE Stewart MacLennan Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 7pm. Guitarist and singer-songwriter. ■ The New Age Jam Citrus Club, 40–42 Grindlay St, 622 7086. 7.30pm. £7 in advance; £10 on the door. Jam tribute act. ■ Panda Su, Finn Anderson and Gabriel Lucena The Third Door, 45–47 Lothian St, 225 6313. 7.30pm. £4 in advance; £6 on the door. Whimsical electro-acoustic and folk pop from Panda Su with piano-based lounge music and Brazilian folk in support. ■ Van Morrison The Edinburgh Playhouse, 18-22 Greenside Place, 0844 871 3014. 8pm. £46–£76. Live show from the legendary Irish curmudgeon. FREE Chil Rock The Southsider, 3–7 West Richmond St, 667 2003. 9pm. Live music. FREE The Plastic Babies Victoria, 265 Leith Walk, 555 1638. 9pm–midnight. Anders and Matt’s band The Plastic Babies put on a show. FREE Portnawak & The Woo Nobles Bar, 44a Constitution St, Leith, 629 7215. 10pm. Musical ensemble, playing gypsy folk hop, psychedelic tribal bounce music and organic punk.

Sunday 1

Glasgow

■ Big Blues Day The Ferry, 25 Anderston Quay, 01698 360085. 12.30pm. £8. Featuring Domino Gumbo, Graeme Scott Blues Band, Craig Hughes, Marie McCormick Band with Big Black Taxi, Miss Quincy and George Lindsay Blues Band. Live music begins at 4pm. FREE Rebel 69, The Aspect and Neil Stewart Slouch, 203–205 Bath St, 221 5518. 6pm. Trio of blues bands. ■ Il Divo SECC, Finnieston Quay, 0844 395 4000. 6.30pm. £29.50–£65. Phenomenally successful pop opera act. OFWGKTA O2 ABC, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £15. Controversial rap collective headed by Tyler, the Creator. See 5 Reasons, page 92. ■ Shearwater and Julie Doiron Stereo, 20-28 Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 7pm. £10. Nico-inspired Texan art rock quartet. ■ Steve Aoki The Arches, 253 Argyle St, 565 1000. 7pm. £14. Californian electro producer, also known as Kid Millionaire.


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list.co.uk/music ■ Insane Championship Wrestling: So’s Yer Maw The Garage, 490

Sauchiehall St, 332 1120. 7.30pm. £10. Live wrestling, including a ‘tagteam deathmatch’, plus live music from Senzafine and Drive by Audio. ■ Kunt & the Gang The 13th Note Café/Bar, 50–60 King St, 553 1638. 8pm. £5. Electro filth pop. ■ Nicola Atkinson Does Fly and Diana Meehan Mono, 12 Kings Court, King St, 553 2400. 8pm. £3. Visual artist who recently collaborated with Stevie Jackson on his solo album. Plus special guests. FREE Acoustic Session Samuel Dow’s, 67–71 Nithsdale Rd, 423 0107. 8.30pm. Folk to rock, hosted by Smillie and Bryce. ■ Those Darlins and The Meat Men King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £8. Femme rockers hailing from Tennessee.

Edinburgh FREE A Little April Foolery Edinburgh, times & venues vary. A host of multi-arts performances, sticking a collective two fingers up at the proposed laws that would demand all events, however small, apply for a costly licence. Due to the spontaneous nature of the event, details are scarce so far (although there is a confirmed party at The Third Door in the evening), but read our interview with one of the organisers on page 11, and see thisisnotentertainment.wordpress.com for updates. FREE Hair of the Dog The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 3pm. Chilled acoustic session programmed by Roberta Pia of Red Dog Music. FREE Most Entertaining Student Concert LifeCare, 2 Cheyne St, 343 0940. 3pm. (donations to Scottish Love in Action welcome). Easter concert as students perform music from films, jazz standards, classical and pop. ■ Carnivores Sneaky Pete’s, 73 Cowgate, 225 1757. 7pm. £5. Biffy/McLusky riffola. ■ Mystery Jets Electric Circus, 36–39 Market St, 226 4224. 7pm. £12.50. London quintet with an added 80s electro edge. FREE Feldy-Keg Nobles Bar, 44a Constitution St, Leith, 629 7215. 10pm. Collaboration between Aberfeldy and Peterman Powderkeg Project members.

Monday 2

Glasgow

■ Drake SECC, Finnieston Quay, 0844 395 4000. 6.30pm. £35–£45. Wellconnected Canadian rapper. ■ Cher Lloyd O2 Academy, 121 Eglinton St, 0844 477 2000. 7pm. £15.50. Shiny pop and electro from the X Factor pipsqueak. ■ Empty Avenue, District 55 and Dirty Rotten Scoundrels Pivo Pivo, 15 Waterloo St, 564 8100. 7.30pm. £5. Alt.rock. ■ Eric Ayotte, Onsind and Uniforms The 13th Note Café/Bar, 50–60 King St, 553 1638. 8pm. Punk bill headlined by Indiana’s Eric Ayotte. ■ Ren Harvieu, Fossil Collective, Leah and Erin Todd King Tut’s Wah

Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £6. Mancunian indie vocalist with a retro slant, much admired by Glasvegas. FREE Acoustic Session Live Slouch, 203–205 Bath St, 221 5518. 9pm. Weekly unplugged session.

Edinburgh

■ The Soul Foundation, Sharfla and Elyssa Vulpes. The Voodoo

Rooms, 19a West Register St, 556 7060. 7.30pm. £5. Motown and soul sounds, synth pop and a singer-songwriter at this fundraiser for Radio Lollipop. FREE Boda Bar’s Chan Bang Boda Bar, 229 Leith Walk, 553 5900. 8pm–1am. Jam session hosted by Roberta Pia (Banana Sessions).

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WIUNFF

WIN BRETON ALBUMS

Field recordings of keys turning, subway cars rolling and footsteps in a hospital corridor, on an album made using automatic writing – there’s very little about the filmmaking, South London artist collective Breton (named after surrealist André Breton) that doesn’t scream ‘experimental’. Their music is surprisingly listenerfriendly though, with classical arrangements by Hauschka funneled into well-structured electronica frameworks. Intrigued? Have a listen for yourself – we’ve got five copies to give away.

ST

COMING SOON AT THE QUEEN’S HALL

WIN GRAHAM COXON ALBUMS Blur guitarist turned solo indie axewielder Coxon is due to hit us with his second album A+E on Mon 2 Apr. He’ll be touring the UK in support of the new record, stopping at Liquid Room, Edinburgh, on Mon 16 Apr and the Garage, Glasgow, on Tue 17 Apr. Read an interview with him on page 82 and our A+E review on page 86, or enter our competition to win one of three copies of the album at list.co.uk

WIN BEAR IN HEAVEN ALBUMS Brooklyn trio Bear in Heaven have already unleashed latest effort I Love You, It’s Cool upon the world. It’s streaming from their website (bearinheaven.com) right now – the only catch is that it’s been slowed down 400,000%, with each second of music now lasting one hour as a result. Alternatively, if you don’t have the rest of eternity to spare, you can win one of five copies of the normal-length album from us. You can also see them at the Stag and Dagger Festival, Glasgow, on Sat 19 May – we’ll be intrigued to see which version of the album (LP or XXLP) they go for live.

HOW TO ENTER Log onto list.co.uk/offers. Closing date for competitions is Wed 25 Apr, unless otherwise stated. There is no cash alternative. Usual List rules apply.

ALL THESE SHOWS COME WITH A MONEY BACK GUARANTEE

Trembling Bells with Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy Wed 25 April

Phil Bancroft’s Small as the World Sat 28 April

Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain Sun 29 April

Camille O’Sullivan Tue 8 May

Martin Simpson Thu 10 May

James Grant Fri 11 May

JUST ANNOUNCED The Hairy Bikers - Sat 10 November

TICKETS & INFORMATION WWW.THEQUEENSHALL.NET 0131 668 2019 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 91


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Music ROCK&POP Tuesday 3

Glasgow

Eye o’ the Dug

■ Action Bronson, Gasp & Depths, United Front and Bunty Beats O2

5REASONS ODD FUTURE 1 We might find out what they are Are they an ironic comedy hip hop troupe? Or are they a wilfully nasty, relentlessly violent, misogynistic and homophobic throwback whose goofy nonsense just happens to distil the finest styles of rap created in the past 20 years as its soundtrack? The clues might be here. 2 We might find out what to call them Do we really have to use their ludicrous but eye-catching full title Odd Future Wolf Gang Kill Them All, or OFWGKTA, as it’s reduced to in print? Or will just Odd Future do? Get a chant going and find out. 3 We might find out if Tyler, the Creator, is a screen superstar in waiting The upcoming Odd Future-affiliated sketch show Loiter Squad, produced for grown-up Cartoon Network alter-ego Adult Swim, has been pitched as a blend of Jackass’ blokey goofiness and the relentless iconoclasm of Dave Chappelle’s Chappelle’s Show, and you can find Tyler mugging it up in preview clips online. It might bomb, it might blow up, but there’s no doubting the guy has presence. 4 We’ll discover what everyone thinks of the new material Sony-released The Odd Future Tape Vol.2 has just dropped, and Tyler told The Guardian before its launch that everyone ‘might hate’ it and that he doesn’t care how many copies it shifts. Do we believe him? 5 We might get to Tyler’s heart of darkness ‘I’ve got love for my mother / none of you other fuckers,’ he murmurs on his album Bastard’s title track, a dark Wu-Tang style beat which hints at barelyburied family disharmony as a reason for the bitter-tasting attitudes of, for example, 2 Live Crew-aping horror ‘Bitch Suck Dick’ or West Coast slow jam ‘She’. Impossible to pigeonhole, these songs speak with the disturbing, untempered voice of youth gone wrong, and they reflect their audience more accurately than any number of arena guitar-janglers. (David Pollock) ■ OFWGKTA play the ABC, Glasgow, Sun 1 Apr. 92 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

Academy 2, 121 Eglinton St, 0844 477 2000. 7pm. £10. Hip hop bill headed by a rapper from Queens. ■ Ben Montague O2 ABC2, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £8. Upcoming singer-songwriter who has supported Stereophonics. ■ Failsafe Stereo, 20-28 Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 7pm. £7. Punk rock from Preston. ■ This Will Destroy You Ivory Blacks, 56 Oswald St, 248 4114. 7pm. £10. Instrumental post-rock quartet from Texas. See preview, page 94. ■ Scott Logan, The Last of Us and McGabe Pivo Pivo, 15 Waterloo St, 564 8100. 7.30pm. £5. Art/dance/music mash-up at Oh Yeah. ■ Allen Stone, ZZ Ward and Leon Jackson King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £15. Smalltown boy with a powerhouse soul vocal.

Edinburgh FREE Acoustic Edinburgh The Third Door, 45–47 Lothian St, 225 6313. 7pm. All unplugged, all original music. FREE Edinburgh Napier University BA (Hons) Popular Music 4th Year Recitals Electric Circus, 36–39 Market

St, 226 4224. 7pm. Final Year Performance Exam from Napier University Music Students Brian Macleod, Johnny Steele and Giancarlo Tammaro. Featuring arrangements of compositions from John Scofield, Bella & The Flecktones, Dream Theater, Jeff ‘Tain’ Watts, Israel Houghton and more. FREE Aaron Wright The Ale House, 18–22 Clerk St, 629 0275. 9.30pm. Rootsy local singer-songwriter hosting a songwriters session.

Wednesday 4

Glasgow

■ JLS SECC, Finnieston Quay, 0844

395 4000. 6.30pm. £32.50. Incredibuly popular urban-lite X-Factor posers. ■ Helmet The Cathouse, 15 Union St, 248 6606. 7pm. £15. Over-14s show. Alt.rock heroes from LA. ■ JapanFour, Cairo, 24Broken Amps and Law Of The Chord Pivo

Pivo, 15 Waterloo St, 564 8100. 7pm. £6. Indie, grunge, rock and pop at the latest Hellfire Club Glasgow. ■ Stacey Earle & Mark Stuart The Rio Café, 27 Hyndland St, 334 9909. 7.30pm. £20 including supper. Steve’s li’l sis is a great country-orientated talent in her own right, with a less fiery, more poetic approach than her brother. ■ Mad Dog Mcrea Captain’s Rest, 185 Great Western Rd, 332 7304. 8pm. £6. Devon band blending folk rock, gypsy jazz and bluegrass. ■ Slow Club King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £10. Folky alt.pop duo.

Edinburgh FREE Edinburgh Napier University BA Popular Music (Hons) Degree Show Electric Circus, 36–39 Market St, 226 4224. 7pm. Final Year Performance Exam from Napier University Music Students Paul Bannon (Lady North/Dead Boy Robotics), Liam Flaherty and Marek Chrzanowski. ■ Sectioned and The Bowery Henry’s Cellar Bar, 8-16 Morrison St, 228 9393. 7pm. £4. Metal. ■ Bannerman’s IPA Battle of the Bands Bannerman’s, 55 Niddry St, 556

3254. 8pm. £tbc. Local bands compete for ‘amazing secret prizes’. Apply via the website if you want to get involved. Indie round. ■ Read Charity Fundraiser The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £5 (£4). Live bands, prizes and more to raise funds for the EdUni Charity Society. FREE Scarlet Wednesdays The Blue

The folks at Fence have dispensed with their usual Homegame festival this year, but not to worry – they’ve simply shifted their focus up the road to St Andrews, where’ they’ll be hosting the Eye o’ the Dug two-dayer. King Creosote and The Pictish Trail (aka Fence label bosses Kenny Anderson and Johnny Lynch) are obvious attendees – joining them will be KT Tunstall, Errors, Django Django, Francois and the Atlas Mountains, RM Hubbert, Conquering Animal Sound, James Yorkston and Kid Canaveral, with a DJ set from Joe Goddard and Alexis Taylor of Hot Chip (above). For more info, see eotdfestival.com ■ Various venues, St Andrews, Sat 14 & Sun 15 Apr. Goose Country Pub, 27 Lanark Rd, 629 4143. 8pm. Easy listening classics from the Scarlet Acoustic girls. FREE The Jack O’Diamonds Scrimshaw Shanties Nobles Bar, 44a Constitution St, Leith, 629 7215. 9.30pm. Toby Black Diamond and friends.

Thursday 5

Glasgow FREE Fatherson Apple Store, 147 Buchanan St, 300 4950. 5pm. Instore single launch from the Kilmarnock indie power poppers. ■ JLS SECC, Finnieston Quay, 0844 395 4000. 6.30pm. £32.50. See Wed 4. ■ Urbanmyth Classic Grand, 18 Jamaica St, 847 0820. 6.30pm. £5. EP launch. ■ Glasvegas and Two Wounded Birds Classic Grand, 18 Jamaica St, 847 0820. 7pm. £16.50. The anthemic Glasgow rockers play material from their second album. ■ Take a Worm for a Walk Week

Stereo, 20-28 Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 7pm. £5 in advance; £6 on door. Last ever show from the fast, chaotic and intense techcore group. ■ Cemtex, Portion Fed and Crowned by Kings Pivo Pivo, 15 Waterloo St, 564 8100. 7.30pm. £6 including free entry to The Cathouse. Trio of metal bands at this week’s Mayhem Underground. ■ 2:54 and Chelsea Wolfe Captain’s Rest, 185 Great Western Rd, 332 7304. 8pm. £7. Queens of the Stone Age and PJ Harvey-influenced sisters. Plus special guest Chelsea Wolfe – see preview, page 83. ■ Billy Lockett, Chloe Latimer and Naledi Herman King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8pm. £6. Over-14s show. Young Northampton singer/songwriter who cites Radiohead and Bright Eyes as influences. FREE Classic Album Night Maggie May’s, 60 Trongate, 548 1350. 8pm. Local acts cover material from The

Beatles’ Revolver album. FREE Dave Dominey Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. Funkiness on laptop and bass. FREE Fat Goth Bar Bloc+, 117 Bath St, 574 6066. 8pm. Alt.rock from exAlamos members. FREE Shauna Joy, Andy Lucas and Norquay Black Sparrow, 241 North St, 221 5530. 8pm. Singer/pianist. ■ Thula Borah Stairway Club, 95 Union St, 221 1009. 8pm. £6. Glaswegian alt.rock band. FREE Jam Session Samuel Dow’s, 67–71 Nithsdale Rd, 423 0107. 8.30pm. See Thu 29.

Edinburgh FREE Henry Ibbs The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. See Thu 29. ■ Thomas J Speight Sneaky Pete’s, 73 Cowgate, 225 1757. 7pm. £5. London-based artist with Keane connections. ■ Vantage Point, Metaltech, Coholic and Engines of Vengeance

Studio 24, 24–26 Calton Rd, 558 3758. 7pm. £5–£6. Metal night headlined by Edinburgh’s hardworking Vantage Point. ■ Vladimir Henry’s Cellar Bar, 8-16 Morrison St, 228 9393. 7.30pm. £5. Dundonian noisy rock four-piece. ■ Amy Duncan Presents The Third Door, 45–47 Lothian St, 225 6313. 8pm. £3. Acoustic night hosted by singersongwriter Duncan. FREE Rossco Galloway & Alisdair McErlain Nobles Bar, 44a Constitution St, Leith, 629 7215. 9.30pm. Singersongwriter showcase.

Friday 6

Glasgow

■ Counterflows Various venues, 565 1000. Times vary. £15 day pass. Collaborative, experimental song-writing festival. See preview, page 83. FREE Thomas J Speight King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 5.30pm. See Thu 5.


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■ Mexico Fallz, Yeah Detroit and Try This At Home Classic Grand, 18

Jamaica St, 847 0820. 6.30pm. £6. See Thu 5. ■ Steps SECC, Finnieston Quay, 0844 395 4000. 6.30pm. £35. Pete Waterman’s 90s cheesy pop sensations are back. ■ Michael Gira, Grouper & Diamond Catalog and Early Songs

St Andrews in the Square, 1 St Andrews Square, 559 5902. 6.45pm. £15 (£12). Gothic folk rumblings from Swans frontman Michael Gira. Part of Counterflows. See preview, page 83. FREE Diana Schad The Living Room, 150 St Vincent St, 229 0607. 7pm. See Thu 29. ■ Lee Fields & The Expressions

O2 ABC2, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £15. Over-14s show. Old school Stax and Muscle Shoals sounds from a singer who has been recording on and off since the late 60s. ■ The Sensational David Bowie Tribute Band Òran Mór, 731-735

HANNAH COHEN Two years ago New York-based model and photographer Hannah Cohen met Antony and the Johnsons and The National pianist Thomas Bartlett, aka Doveman, at a party. She shyly played him some songs she’d been secretly penning, and he immediately offered to produce them; now Cohen’s set to reveal her disarmingly pretty debut album Child Bride – essential listening for fans of Feist, Beth Orton or Joanna Newsom – to an unsuspecting world Modelling, photography and now music – you’re a bit greedy when it comes to talents. [Laughs] ‘I’ve always done a bunch of things, but that’s because I think I was scared of committing to just one. Music is my calling, and I want to do this every day. It makes me really happy.’ You took up guitar only four years ago. Do you remember the first song you learned? ‘I had a Neil Young songbook. I learned ‘Helpless’ just sitting feeling sorry for myself. [Sings] ‘There is a town in North Ontarioo-oh . . .’ You were raised among ‘hippie intellectuals’ in San Francisco, which must explain your natural creativity? ‘Yeah, my mom’s in the book art world, her father was a poet, so I kind of grew up having a big imagination. I’m drawn towards doing things with my hands – I love cooking and I make jewellery.’ Is music just the next thing you do before writing a novel or taking up sculpture or something, or are you in it for the long-run? ‘I feel content in this position. Maybe I’ll turn into a disco-funk pop princess or something like that. But I’m sticking with the music.’ (Malcolm Jack) ■ Child Bride is released by Bella Union on Mon 16 Apr. 94 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

Great Western Rd, 357 6200. 7pm. £10. Glam rock tribute (formerly known as Tigers on Vaseline). ■ Butcher Boy Cottiers Theatre, 93–95 Hyndland St, 357 4000. 7.30pm. £8. Kitchen sink observations rendered on piano, cello, viola and guitar from this Glasgow indie group.

■ Electric Gardens, Knots & Crosses and Dosa Nice’n’Sleazy, 421

Sauchiehall St, 333 0900. 7.30pm. Live music. ■ Joe Longthorne Pavilion Theatre, 121 Renfield St, 332 1846. 7.30pm. £18–£20. ‘Live at the Palladium’ veteran Longthorne performs from his vast back catalogue. ■ The Monochrome Set and Wake the President Stereo, 20-28 Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 7.30pm. £10. Post-punk pop outfit fronted by the enigmatic Bid who has reunited with original guitarist Lester Square and bassist Andy Warren. Extra support comes from Casual Sex. ■ Brogan, The Homegrown Blues, Soho Dandy and LK Audio Maggie

May’s, 60 Trongate, 548 1350. 8pm. £5. Bluesy indie. ■ Fetus Christ, Plane Crasher, Clocked Out and Coffin Splitter

The 13th Note Café/Bar, 50–60 King St, 553 1638. 8pm. £5. Filthy grindcore headliners from punk rock Hereford. Plus hardcore supports. ■ U2-2 The Ferry, 25 Anderston Quay, 01698 360085. 8pm. £10.50 in advance; £12 on door; £24.45 with early dinner at 6pm. Tribute to the all-conquering Irish behemoths, with support from Rosewood. ■ Martin Stephenson, Helen McCookerybook and The Starlets

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £19.50. Solo show from the Daintees frontman Stephenson, plus support from the former frontwoman of The Chefs. FREE Toozup Samuel Dow’s, 67–71 Nithsdale Rd, 423 0107. 8.30pm. Live music. FREE Volcano the Bear Mono, 12 Kings Court, King St, 553 2400. 10pm. Experimental Kraut- and noiserockinfluenced duo of Daniel Padden and Aaron Moore. Part of Counterflows. See preview page 83.

Edinburgh

■ Chris Finn, Bluesoul, The Skababs and Alma Fiera

Whistlebinkies, 4–6 South Bridge, 557 5114. 5pm. Free before midnight; £4 after. Rock and ska. FREE Rossco Galloway The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. See Fri 30. ■ 8 Track Stereo The Bongo Club, Moray House, 37 Holyrood Rd, 558 7604. 7pm. £6. Glaswegian indie rock. ■ The Doors Alive The HMV Picture House, 31 Lothian Rd, 0844 847 1740. 7pm. £13. Tribute to Jim Morrison’s seminal LA rock crew. ■ Indie Funday Friday Henry’s Cellar Bar, 8-16 Morrison St, 228 9393. 7pm. £3. An indie pop fundraiser for Capability Scotland featuring local bands and songwriters such as Cancel The Astronauts, The Cosmonauts, Fishing For Seagulls and Astronaut Head. ■ Nettles, Herculean and Seams Electric Circus, 36–39 Market St, 226 4224. 7pm. £4 (£3). Indie and alt.rock presented by Hit The Rd, a project run by the Scottish Music Centre and supported by the Youth Music Initiative

This Will Destroy You

that gives young performers between aged 14–19 the opportunity to learn more about performing and touring across Scotland.

■ Rat Scabies and Brian James play The Damned Citrus Club, 40–42

Grindlay St, 622 7086. 7pm. £5 in advance; £7 on the door. Two former members of the Damned play from the punk rockers’ back catalogue. ■ The Rising Souls, Majestic Dandelion and Naledi The Caves,

Niddry St South, 557 8989. 7pm. £5 in advance; £8 on the door. Sound Cafe Records present the sexy soul rock sounds of The Rising Souls, fronted by vocalist Dave Archibald.

■ Edinburgh School for the Deaf, Chris Devotion & The Expectations and Blank Canvas

The Voodoo Rooms, 19a West Register St, 556 7060. 7.30pm. £5 in advance. Fuzzed up psyche shoegaze and distorted guitars from ESD at this Limbo night. ■ Pussy Whipped Wee Red Bar, Edinburgh College of Art, Lauriston Place, 229 1442. 8–10.30pm. £2. A new night for queer and female bands in Edinburgh, happening right before gay club Hot Mess. This month features Berlin’s electro-pop riot grrl Räuberhöhle, plus Scotland’s own Ste McCabe and Scragfight. FREE Rail Fan Nobles Bar, 44a Constitution St, Leith, 629 7215. 10pm. American-style blues and country. ■ Bodies, Panic Attack and Chinese Jocks Henry’s Cellar Bar, 816 Morrison St, 228 9393. 10.30pm. £5. Punk tributes to The Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Heartbreakers.

Saturday 7

Glasgow

■ Counterflows Various venues, 565 1000. Times vary. £15 day pass. See Fri 6. ■ Michael Hurley, Kim Doo Soo, Sven-Ake Johansson, Josephine Foster and Torsten Lauschmann with Red Note Ensemble The

Arches, 253 Argyle St, 565 1000. 2.15–10pm. £18 day pass. Blues, acid folk, free jazz and haunting piano pieces feature in this eclectic day-long bill. Some events are individually ticketed. Part of Counterflows. See preview, page 83. FREE David Duffy MacSorley’s, 42 Jamaica St, 248 8581. 5.30pm. See Sat 31. FREE The MeatMen Maggie May’s, 60 Trongate, 548 1350. 6pm. Rockabilly, bluegrass and skiffle. ■ 4 Past Midnight, Hateful and The Red Eyes Classic Grand, 18 Jamaica St, 847 0820. 7pm. £5. Over-14s show. Reunion of Glasgow punk band. ■ The Doors Alive O2 ABC, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £12. See Fri 6. ■ Freshman 15 and The Bottom Line Classic Grand, 18 Jamaica St, 847 0820. 7pm. £6. Over-14s show. US punk-pop quartet headline. ■ Katie Sutherland Òran Mór, 731735 Great Western Rd, 357 6200. 7pm. £8. Commercial pop from Pearl & the Puppets frontwoman Sutherland. Orbital and The Japanese Popstars O2 Academy, 121 Eglinton St, 0844 477 2000. 7pm. £26. The Hartnoll brothers rock the house with their techno anthems. Please note new venue. Original tickets still valid. ■ Turbyne, Ocean House and Rare Breed O2 ABC2, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £8. Over-14s show. Heavy progressive metal. ■ Boy & Bear and Michael Cassidy Nice’n’Sleazy, 421 Sauchiehall St, 333 0900. 7.30pm. £7. Fleet Foxes-style indie folk group from Sydney. ■ Joe Longthorne Pavilion Theatre, 121 Renfield St, 332 1846. 7.30pm. £18–£20. See Fri 6. ■ Any Color Black Captain’s Rest, 185 Great Western Rd, 332 7304. 8pm. See Sat 31. ■ Are You Experienced? The Ferry, 25 Anderston Quay, 01698 360085. 8pm.

With a name like that, they were never gonna be deliverers of niceynicey pop tunes, were they? Instead, Texas born post-rockers This Will Destroy You follow in the Mogwai/Explosions in the Sky mould of epic, effects-laden guitar pieces with a masterful control of build and dynamics. Check out their latest track, ‘Black Dunes’, at bit.ly/blckdns, should you need any aural evidence, then check them out live as part of the expertly named ‘Don’t be a Ha-Tour’ alongside like-minded punk, rock and metals acts Show It Off, Black Echo, Without Our Crowns, City Surrender and A Season Of Secrets. ■ Ivory Blacks, Glasgow, Tue 3 Apr.


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list.co.uk/music £10.50 in advance; £12 on door; £24.45 with early dinner at 6pm. A tribute to the mighty Jimi Hendrix formed in 1996 by John Campbell. ■ The Dawn Cartel and The Fear The Art School, 468 Sauchiehall St, 0845 166 6009. 8pm. £5. Swaggering rock’n’roll five-piece.

■ Some Velvet Morning, Paradigm Shift, Una Fiori and The Speak Easy Maggie May’s, 60 Trongate, 548

1350. 8pm. £5. Rousing pop/rock trio. ■ The Mouse That Ate the Cat

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £6. Lo-fi electro pop and indie disco from TMTATC, featuring Dykeenies lead singer Brian Henderson and Colin Keenan, formerly of Drive By Argument. With support from Seed and Digital Jones. FREE NDA Samuel Dow’s, 67–71 Nithsdale Rd, 423 0107. 8.30pm. Live music. ■ Caspar Brotzmann’s Massaker, Opaque and Ultimate Thrush

Stereo, 20-28 Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 9pm. £5. Hendrix-influenced guitarism from Brotzmann and his power trio. Part of Counterflows. See preview, page 83. FREE James Russell Band Bon Accord, 153 North St, 248 4427. 9pm. Rock and pop. ■ We Are The Physics Bar Bloc+, 117 Bath St, 574 6066. 9pm. Self-styled mutant science punk rockers.

Edinburgh

■ The Ged Hanley Trio, The Midnight Blues Band and Size Queen Whistlebinkies, 4-6 South

Bridge, 557 5114. 5pm. Free before midnight; £4 after. Blues and rock. FREE Camii Sinclair The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. See Sat 31. ■ The Cathode Ray Citrus Club, 40–42 Grindlay St, 622 7086. 7–10.30pm. £5–£7. Local group started by singer/songwriter Jeremy Thoms and ex-Josef K frontman, Paul Haig, who has now been replaced by Steve Fraser, but they still play art punk. With support from Sam Barber & The Outcasts plus Begbie Boyle (of The Rules). ■ Davey Horne The Liquid Room, 9c Victoria St, 225 2564. 7pm. £6. Davey Horne of the Ray Summers performs solo. ■ The Mighty Cream, Tisoki, Hangman and IamDino Studio 24,

24–26 Calton Rd, 558 3758. 7pm. £4. Unplugged Scotland host the launch party for The Mighty Cream’s Triple Whipped EP. FREE The OK Social Club, Hattie Murdoch and L’il Zee The Bongo Club, Moray House, 37 Holyrood Rd, 558 7604. 7pm. Danceable indie rock from The OK Social Club. ■ Palms and North American War Henry’s Cellar Bar, 8-16 Morrison St, 228 9393. 7pm. £tbc. Raucous psychobilly, lo-fi garage and shoegaze. ■ Plum Electric Circus, 36–39 Market St, 226 4224. 7pm. £tbc. Benbecula signing playing ethereal acoustic indie infused with trip hop beats and electronica. FREE Stewart MacLennan Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 7pm. See Sat 31. ■ The Monochrome Set and Wake the President The Voodoo Rooms, 19a West Register St, 556 7060. 7.30pm. £12. See Fri 6. ■ The Japanese War Effort, Ten, Convex Mancave The Banshee

Labyrinth, 29–35 Niddry St, 558 8209. 8pm. £5 (includes two-track download EP). Jamie Scott (Conquering Animal Sound) returns in electronic solo guise, with support from Leeds/London soundsmiths Ten and a first ever live performance from Mancave. FREE Caramello Nights Nobles Bar, 44a Constitution St, Leith, 629 7215. 10pm. Live music night hosted by Brendan Lamont.

Sunday 8

Glasgow

■ Counterflows Various venues, 565

1000. Times vary. £15 day pass. See Fri 6. See preview, page 83. FREE Jack & the Bird and SarahJane Van Der Berg Slouch, 203–205 Bath St, 221 5518. 6pm. Live music at the weekly Blues Kitchen. ■ Kazuki Tomokawa, National Jazz Trio of Scotland and Margareth Kammerer CCA, 350

Sauchiehall St, 352 4900. 6.45pm. £12 (£10). Japanese singer/songwriter supported by the Bill Wells-led NJToS. Part of Counterflows. See preview, page 83. ■ Flipper and PAWS Stereo, 20-28 Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 7pm. £12.50. Veteran Bay Area punk rock band. See preview, page 102. ■ The Johnny Cash Roadshow

The Ferry, 25 Anderston Quay, 01698 360085. 7pm. £14.50 £28.45 with early dinner at 5pm. Cash tribute from singer/songwriter Clive John. ■ Bekon Pivo Pivo, 15 Waterloo St, 564 8100. 7.30pm. Hard rock and metal. ■ Astrid & Quinn, Dandawrs and Lewis Hughes Maggie May’s, 60 Trongate, 548 1350. 8pm. £5. Dunfermline indie pop band headline. ■ Herculean, Nettles and Seams King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8pm. £4. Over14s show. Epic indie rock trio. ■ Two Wings, Doug Tielli and Rob St John Nice’n’Sleazy, 421 Sauchiehall St, 333 0900. 8pm. £5. Collaboration between Hanna Tuulikki (Nalle) and Ben Reynolds (Trembling Bells). See preview, page 83. FREE The Union Maggie May’s, 60 Trongate, 548 1350. 9pm. Classic rock.

Edinburgh FREE The Sunday Sessions Nobles Bar, 44a Constitution St, Leith, 629 7215. 10pm. Live music showcase. ■ Qabalala The Third Door, 45–47 Lothian St, 225 6313. 11pm–3am. £5 in advance; £7 after. A melange of musical styles, DJs and live acts (also taking over the Assembly Bar). Planet Mu’s Rudi Zygadlo and Huntley & Palmer’s Auntie Flo headline. See Clubs preview, page 54.

Monday 9

Glasgow

■ Parkway Drive, The Ghost Inside, Defeater and Miss May I

O2 ABC, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 6pm. £14. Over-14s show. Heavy hardcore from Byron Bay, Australia. ■ Flux Pavilion The Arches, 253 Argyle St, 565 1000. 7pm. £8.50. English dubstep DJ and producer whose work has been sampled by Jay-Z and Kanye West. ■ The Futureheads and The Cornshed Sisters Òran Mór, 731735 Great Western Rd, 357 6200. 7pm. Well-loved post-punk Sunderland quartet. ■ Juan Zelada Captain’s Rest, 185 Great Western Rd, 332 7304. 7pm. £5. London-based Spanish singer/songwriter who has worked with Amy Winehouse and Duran Duran. With support from Saint Max and Craig White. Please note change of venue. FREE Zion, Ded Rabbit and Broken Boy Soldiers Pivo Pivo, 15 Waterloo St, 564 8100. 7.30pm. Alternative and indie sounds. FREE Michael Simons Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. See Mon 2. ■ Weatherbird The 13th Note Café/Bar, 50–60 King St, 553 1638. 8pm. £5. Indie sounds from End of the Trail Records. ■ Toy, Sick Kids and Strawberry Ocean Sea King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £6. Goth indie crowd from London, featuring ex-members of Joe Lean & The Jing Jang Jong. FREE Acoustic Session Live Slouch, 203–205 Bath St, 221 5518. 9pm. See Mon 2.

Edinburgh

■ Black International and Bear Makes Ninja Wee Red Bar, Edinburgh

College of Art, Lauriston Place, 229 1442. 7pm. £4 (£3). Indie punk line-up. FREE Boda Bar’s Chan Bang Boda Bar, 229 Leith Walk, 553 5900. 8pm–1am. See Mon 2.

Tuesday 10

Glasgow

■ Angels & Airwaves O2 ABC, 330

Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £19.50. Over-14s show. Side project from Blink 182 guitarist/vocalist Tom Delonge. ■ Orange Goblin, Solace and Firebird Classic Grand, 18 Jamaica St, 847 0820. 7pm. £13. Stoner rock, psychedelic noodlings and greasy biker grooves – how can you resist?

■ Your Demise, Trapped Under Ice, Man Overboard and Basement The

Cathouse, 15 Union St, 248 6606. 7pm. £10. Over-14s show. Hardcore metallers from St Albans.

■ Rabb Crosbie, Static Rock, Diabhul, Ashes of the Priest and Bareknuckle Execution Pivo Pivo, 15

Waterloo St, 564 8100. 7.30pm. £3. Rabb Crosbie launches his new album. ■ Emeli Sandé The Old Fruitmarket, Candleriggs, 353 8000. 7.45pm. £15. The chart-topping Aberdonian soul singer, with support from Seye. ■ Fat Bicth, Battery Face and Shudder Pulps Nice’n’Sleazy, 421 Sauchiehall St, 333 0900. 8pm. £4. Brighton math rock trio and London/Brighton support blending pop and post-punk influences. ■ Pelican and The Little Mill of Happiness Stereo, 20-28 Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 8pm. £12. Gargantuan instrumental rock soundscapes from this Chicago band. ■ Viking Galaxy, Graham Kerr and John Hendry The 13th Note Café/Bar,

at

Music

50–60 King St, 553 1638. 8pm. Space rock and classic rock. ■ Marion and Exit Calm King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £13. 90s Britpop fringe players.

Edinburgh

■ Rosemary Squires: Those Were the Days Brunton Theatre, Ladywell

Way, Musselburgh, 665 2240. 2.30pm. £15.25 (£13.25). See Sat 7.

■ Turn it Up I Can’t Hear the Words

The Third Door, 45–47 Lothian St, 225 6313. 7pm. £3. Live showcase where bands play their own work and cover a famous lyricist. Launching with a tribute to Bob Dylan. ■ Bwani Junction and Crow Rd Sneaky Pete’s, 73 Cowgate, 225 1757. 7.30pm. £6. Afrobeat soundsmiths Bwani Junction help raise funds for SVA Malawi Bangwe’s 2012 project. FREE End of Neil, Landslide, The Cundeez and The Diversions Whistlebinkies, 4-6 South Bridge, 557 5114. 8pm. Indie and classic rock. FREE Aaron Wright The Ale House, 18–22 Clerk St, 629 0275. 9.30pm. See Tue 3.

Wednesday 11

Glasgow

■ Hey Rosetta! and French Wives O2 ABC2, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £10. Over-14s show. Newfoundland indie rockers known for their energetic live shows. ■ Skindred, Therapy?, Yashin and Black Spiders O2 Academy, 121 Eglinton St, 558 3758. 7pm. £5. Over-18s show. Reggaefied punk metallers Skindred, supported by Northern Irish tourmates on this Jägermeister-sponsored jaunt. ■ The Dill Dolls and Stonehouse Violets Pivo Pivo, 15 Waterloo St, 564 8100. 7.30pm. £5. Live music.

ORAN MOR

Mon 2nd April

GLASGOW Oran Mor By arrangement with Neil O’Brien Entertainment presents

THE A L B E R T HA M M OND

S O N G B O O K

P L U S

S P E C I A L

L O T T E

G U E S T

M U L L A N

ORAN MOR S A T 1 2 T H M AY

SIMON FOWLER

PERFORMS SONGS FROM HIS NEW SOLO ALBUM

TUES 24 APR

GLASGOW ORAN MOR

THURSDAY 5TH APRIL

GLASGOW Oran Mor

DUANE EDDY

PLUS SPECIAL GUEST

NELL BRYDEN Wed 16th May

ROOTS & WINGS UNPLUGGED Sat 23rd June

GLASGOW ORAN MOR

GLASGOW ORAN MOR

Saint Etienne Wed 23 May

Glasgow Oran Mor www.ticketmaster.co.uk www.regularmusic.com

0844 844 0444 tickets also available in person from Ticket Scotland: Argyle St Glasgow, Rose St Edinburgh & Ripping Records. 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 95


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Music ROCK&POP Book Now ■ Denotes just announced

Tickets are available from:

Tickets Scotland 239 Argyle Street, 0141 204 5151; 127 Rose Street, 0131 220 3234, www.tickets-scotland.co.uk See Tickets 0870 895 5505, www.seetickets.com Ripping Records 91 South Bridge, 0131 226 7010, www.rippingrecords.com Ticketmaster 08444 999990, www.ticketmaster.co.uk Ticketweb 08444 771000, www.ticketweb.co.uk

Azealia Banks O2 ABC, Glasgow, 29 Sep.

■ Get Cape, Wear Cape, Fly King Tut’s,

■ A$ap Rocky

House, Edinburgh, 20 Sep; O2 Academy, Glasgow, 21 Sep.

■ The Crookes King Tut’s, Glasgow, 22 May.

■ The Charlatans

Barrowland, Glasgow, 9 Jun.

■ WASP HMV Picture House, Edinburgh, 22 Sep.

■ Dirty Goods The

■ Elton John Falkirk FC Stadium, Falkirk, 10 Jun.

■ Marc Almond O2 ABC, Glasgow, 23 Sep.

■ Keane O2 Academy, Glasgow, 24 May.

■ Lucy Rose Oran Mor, Glasgow, 10 Jun.

Glasgow, 20 May.

Arches, Glasgow, 24 May.

■ Newton Faulkner

Oran Mor, Glasgow, 24 May.

■ Brendan Henson

Oran Mor, Glasgow, 25 May.

APRIL ■ Ian Prowse King

Tut’s, Glasgow, 27 Apr. ■ Hip Parade King Tut’s, Glasgow, 28 Apr. ■ Helmet Cathouse,

Glasgow, 29 Apr.

■ Kobi Onyame King Tut’s, Glasgow, 29 Apr. ■ Boxes Arches,

Glasgow, 30 Apr. ■ Lady Hawke Liquid Room, Edinburgh, 30 Apr. ■ Tribes Oran Mor,

Glasgow, 30 Apr.

MAY ■ The Vaccines Caird

Hall, Dundee, 2 May.

■ Spector Oran Mor, Glasgow, 2 May; Electric Circus, Edinburgh, 3 May. ■ Quantic & Alice Russell HMV Picture House, Edinburgh, 3 May. ■ Simple Plan O2

■ The Subways

Liquid Rooms, Edinburgh, 6 May. ■ Alkaline Trio HMV

Picture House, Edinburgh, 7 May.

■ Friends King Tut’s,

Glasgow, 7 May.

■ Marina & The Diamonds Queen’s

Hall, Edinburgh, 7 May; O2 ABC, Glasgow, 8 May. ■ Train O2 Academy,

Glasgow, 7 May.

■ Twenty Twenty

King Tut’s, Glasgow, 8 May. ■ Dodgy Electric

Circus, Edinburgh, 9 May. ■ Vukovi Arches, Glasgow, 9 May. ■ Blood Red Shoes

King Tut’s, Glasgow, 10 May.

■ Dan Reed Arches,

Glasgow, 10 May. ■ The Cribs

Barrowland, Glasgow, 11 May.

ABC, Glasgow, 3 May. ■ Happy Mondays O2

■ Albert Hammond Oran Mor, Glasgow, 12 May. ■ The Temper Trap O2 ABC, Glasgow, 14 May.

■ Guns n’ Roses

SECC, Glasgow, 25 May. ■ Peter Hook & The Light Oran Mor,

Glasgow, 26 May.

Academy, Glasgow, 5 May; Usher Hall, Edinburgh, 6 May. ■ Errors Arches,

Glasgow, 11 May. ■ A Place to Bury Strangers King Tut’s,

Glasgow, 11 May. ■ Ozric Tentacles Arches, Glasgow, 11 May.

96 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

■ Tenacious D SECC, Glasgow, 12 Jun. ■ Citizens! King Tut’s, Glasgow, 14 Jun. ■ Chris Cornell O2 Academy, Glasgow, 15 Jun. ■ The Imagineers

King Tut’s, Glasgow, 15 Jun. ■ Best Coast O2 ABC, Glasgow, 16 Jun. ■ Suzanne Vega Oran

Mor, Glasgow, 18 Jun.

■ Into It Over It Captain’s Rest, Glasgow, 28 May.

■ Westlife SECC,

Tut’s, Glasgow, 14 May.

■ Papa M King Tut’s,

Glasgow, 20 Jun.

■ The Horrors O2

ABC, Glasgow, 15 May.

■ Slam Dunk Scotland feat Taking Back Sunday and

■ Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons SECC:

■ I Dream In Colour

Motion City Soundtrack O2 ABC,

Clyde Auditorium, Glasgow, 3 Jul.

■ Zulu Winter King

The Berkeley Suite, Glasgow, 16 May.

■ Electric Guest King Tut’s, Glasgow, 16 May. ■ The Xcerts

Garage, Glasgow, 16 May. ■ Michael Kiwanuka O2 ABC,

Glasgow, 17 May. ■ Nina Nesbitt King

Tut’s, Glasgow, 17 May.

■ Spoek Mathambo Bongo Club, Edinburgh, 18 May.

■ New Order O2

Tut’s, Glasgow, 6 May.

Oran Mor, Glasgow, 11 May.

Barrowland, Glasgow, 25 May.

■ The Dykeenies QMU, Glasgow, 19 May. ■ Jimmy Cliff O2 Academy, Glasgow, 19 May. ■ Katzenjammer King Tut’s, Glasgow, 19 May.

Glasgow, 19 Jun.

■ Blink 182 SECC,

Glasgow, 28 May.

Glasgow, 29 May.

JUNE ■ The Grand Gestures King Tut’s,

Glasgow, 1 Jun. ■ Lynyrd Skynyrd

SECC: Clyde Auditorium, Glasgow, 1 Jun. ■ Hawkwind Queen’s Hall, Edinburgh, 2 Jun. ■ Kathryn Williams King Tut’s, Glasgow, 2 Jun.

JULY

■ Roxette SECC,

Glasgow, 3 Jul.

■ T in the Park feat Snow Patrol, Stone Roses and Kasabian

Balado, Fife, 6—8 Jul. ■ Tune Yards Oran

Mor, Glasgow, 11 Jul. ■ Noel Gallagher’s Nigh Flying Birds

Edinburgh Castle, Edinburgh, 17 Jul. ■ Madonna

Murrayfield, Edinburgh, 21 Jul.

AUGUST

■ Duke Special Pleasance, Edinburgh, 18 May.

Glasgow, 4 May.

■ Red Sky July King

■ Rachel Sermanni

■ The Enemy

Arches, Glasgow, 17 May.

■ Reverend & The Makers Oran Mor,

■ Lianne le Havas Oran Mor, Glasgow, 6 May.

Glasgow, 11 May.

■ Fresh/Live

Academy, Glasgow, 4 May.

■ Dexys Cottiers Theatre, Glasgow, 6 May.

■ Prong Cathouse,

Arches, Glasgow, 9 Jun.

■ Beverly Knight O2 ABC, Glasgow, 3 Aug. ■ Belladrum feat Travis and The Wombats Beauly,

■ Roddy Woomble Oran Mor, Glasgow, 4 Jun. ■ Cursive King Tut’s, Glasgow, 7 Jun. ■ RockNess feat Biffy Clyro, Mumford & Sons and Deadmau5

Loch Ness, Dores, 8— 10 Jun.

Inverness, 3 & 4 Aug. ■ Set Your Goals

King Tut’s, Glasgow, 8 Aug.

SEPTEMBER ■ The Buzzcocks

Liquid Room, Edinburgh, 14 Sep. ■ Dappy HMV Picture

■ George Michael SECC, Glasgow, 23 & 24 Sep. ■ Dr Feelgood King

Tut’s, Glasgow, 28 Sep. ■ Lionel Richie

SECC, Glasgow, 27 Sep. ■ Azealia Banks O2 ABC, Glasgow, 29 Sep.

OCTOBER ■ Chris Isaak Royal Concert Hall, Glasgow, 5 Oct. ■ Neil Sedaka SECC:

Clyde Auditorium, Glasgow, 8 Oct.

■ Benjamin Francis Leftwich Pleasance, Edinburgh, 10 Oct; Oran Mor, Glasgow, 13 Oct. ■ Reverend & The Makers Liquid Room, Edinburgh, 12 Oct.

NOVEMBER ■ Ben Howard O2 Academy, Glasgow, 10 Nov.

■ Europe O2 ABC, Glasgow, 22 Nov. ■ The Saw Doctors HMV Picture House, Edinburgh, 30 Nov.

2013 ■ One Direction SECC, Glasgow, 26 & 27 Feb & 29 Mar. ■ Alfie Boe Playhouse, Edinburgh, 25 Mar; SECC: Clyde Auditorium, Glasgow, 27 Mar.


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ROCK&POP

list.co.uk/music FREE Bear Makes Ninja and The Future Capital Bar Bloc+, 117 Bath St, 574 6066. 8pm. Clever guitars and big choruses from this English band. ■ We Should Be Spies and Anchor Lane Nice’n’Sleazy, 421 Sauchiehall St, 333 0900. 8pm. £5. Fundraiser for an Everest climb to raise money for Childreach International. ■ Wounded Knee presents: Downsize Sounds Mono, 12 Kings

Court, King St, 553 2400. 8pm. £2. Monthly unplugged night hosted by Wounded Knee.

■ Xerxes, Midnight Souls, Make

the Effort and Leagues The 13th Note Café/Bar, 50–60 King St, 553 1638. 8pm. Hardcore punk bill. ■ Nneka King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £14. CANCELLED. FREE James Russell Band The Rio Café, 27 Hyndland St, 334 9909. 9pm. See Sat 7.

Edinburgh

Teviot Debating Hall, Bristo Square, 650 4673. Times ✽ vary. £29 until 12 Mar; £45 after. Born Wide Days

to be Wide present two days of music seminars, on topics including A&R, getting gigs abroad, audience development and technical innovations. Live performances on Thu 12 come from Homework and Honey Blood at Sneaky Pete’s; Michael Cassidy and Quickbeam at The Third Door; Donna Maciocia, Lady North and Honningbarna at Electric Circus, which also hosts the closing party. See preview, page 90. ■ Lewis Floyd Henry Sneaky Pete’s, 73 Cowgate, 225 1757. 7pm. £5. Oneman blues maelstrom. ■ Richard Knox & Frederic D Oberland, Jasper TX and Matthew Collings Wee Red Bar, Edinburgh

College of Art, Lauriston Place, 229 1442. 7pm. £6 in advance, including free EP download; £7 on the door. Experimental and ambient noise. ■ Simone Felice Group and Simi Stone Electric Circus, 36–39 Market St, 226 4224. 7pm. £12.50. Former drummer in The Felice Brothers, current frontman of The Duke & the King, author, poet and renaissance dude brings the soulful rootsiness. ■ United Fruit, Shudderpulps and Fat Bicth Henry’s Cellar Bar, 8-16 Morrison St, 228 9393. 7pm. £5. Old school slacker indie. ■ Charlene Soraia The Pleasance Theatre, 60 Pleasance, 650 4673. 7.30pm. £10. Acoustic songstress who came to prominence on the soundtrack to a Twinings tea ad. Phew, rock and roll! ■ Bannerman’s IPA Battle of the

Bands Bannerman’s, 55 Niddry St, 556 3254. 8pm. £tbc. Local bands compete for ‘amazing secret prizes’. Apply via the website if you want to get involved. Punk round. ■ Edinburgh Unlimited The Third Door, 45–47 Lothian St, 225 6313. 8pm. £3. Bands and music showcase. FREE Scarlet Wednesdays The Blue Goose Country Pub, 27 Lanark Rd, 629 4143. 8pm. See Wed 4. FREE Jammin’ The Voodoo Rooms, 19a West Register St, 556 7060. 9pm. Live jam session. FREE The Jack O’Diamonds Scrimshaw Shanties Nobles Bar, 44a Constitution St, Leith, 629 7215. 9.30pm. See Wed 4.

Thursday 12

Glasgow

■ Delilah O2 ABC2, 330 Sauchiehall

St, 332 2232. 7pm. £10. Over-14s show. Upcoming London-based singer who combines urban, soul and folk elements in her pop sound. ■ Nights At The Circus Stereo, 2028 Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 7pm–midnight. £5. A mixed night of live music (from Natalie Pryce, Louise McVey & the Cracks in the Concrete and Miss the Occupier) plus circus skills,

vaudeville, poetry and more including strange tales from Allan Johnstone, burlesque from Roxy Stardust, Fergus The Great Magician and free cakes. ■ Simone Felice Group and Simi Stone Òran Mór, 731-735 Great Western Rd, 357 6200. 7pm. £12.50. See Wed 11. ■ Dave Alvin & the Guilty Ones

The Arches, 253 Argyle St, 565 1000. 7.30pm. £16. Veteran roots rock guitarist whose songs have been covered by the likes of Dwight Yoakam and Los Lobos. ■ Iain James & the Sound Classic Grand, 18 Jamaica St, 847 0820. 7.30pm. £5. Over-14s show. Fingerstyle guitarist fronts a classic rock sound. ■ Witness the Fall, Falling Rain and Bloodthreat Pivo Pivo, 15

Waterloo St, 564 8100. 7.30pm. £6 including entry to The Cathouse. Trio of metal acts. FREE The Midden, Lizzie Nightingale and Evera Black Sparrow, 241 North St, 221 5530. 8pm. Laidback live music. ■ Simian Ghost Captain’s Rest, 185 Great Western Rd, 332 7304. 8pm. £6. Chillwave from Sweden’s Sebastian Arnstrom. ■ Dirty Rose, Rank Berry and Manta The 13th Note Café/Bar, 50–60 King St, 553 1638. 8.30pm. £5. Metal, punk and classic rock bands raising funds for the Erskine hospital for exservicemen. FREE Jam Session Samuel Dow’s, 67–71 Nithsdale Rd, 423 0107. 8.30pm. See Thu 29. ■ Sea of Bees and Stealing Sheep King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £8.50. Melancholy folk rock from Californian musician Julie Ann Bee and her band. FREE Steady State Regime and 4 Day Weekend Bar Bloc+, 117 Bath St, 574 6066. 9pm. Progressive indie rock sounds from SSR.

Edinburgh

Teviot Debating Hall, Bristo Square, 650 4673. Times ✽ vary. £29 until 12 Mar; £45 after. See Wide Days

Wed 11. FREE Henry Ibbs The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. See Thu 29. ■ Napier Live Wee Red Bar, Edinburgh College of Art, Lauriston Place, 229 1442. 7pm. £5 (£4). Three Napier Uni-affiliated bands play live. ■ Pump Action Henry’s Cellar Bar, 816 Morrison St, 228 9393. 7.30pm. £4. A fusion of grinding alt.rock, hip hop, noise punk and ‘furious libidos’. FREE Lewis Gibson & The Midas Touch Nobles Bar, 44a Constitution St, Leith, 629 7215. 9.30pm. Eclectic session.

Friday 13

Glasgow

■ Quickbeam, Endor and Washington Irving The Tall Ship at

Riverside, 150 Pointhouse Place, 204 5151. 6.45pm. £7. Indie folk and acoustic sounds at this record label launch party from Comets & Cartwheels. ■ Charlene Soraia Òran Mór, 731735 Great Western Rd, 357 6200. 7pm. £10. See Wed 11. FREE Diana Schad The Living Room, 150 St Vincent St, 229 0607. 7pm. See Thu 29. ■ Jon Windle, Goosedubbs, Ruby Culture, Papa Zita and Shauna Joy

Maggie May’s, 60 Trongate, 548 1350. 7pm. £6. Little Man Tate frontman Windle headlines this bill. ■ McFly, Ivy Rise and The Alleys SECC, Finnieston Quay, 0844 395 4000. 7pm. £27.50. Pop with a punky edge from this UK quartet. ■ Mick Taylor The Arches, 253 Argyle St, 565 1000. 7pm. £17.50. Solo show from the former Rolling Stone.

■ The Modern Kind, Ded Rabbit and Fargo O2 Academy 2, 121 Eglinton

St, 0844 477 2000. 7pm. £6. Over-14s show. Local rock and pop bands. ■ The Dirty Cuts Nice’n’Sleazy, 421

Music

Sauchiehall St, 333 0900. 7.30pm. Local quartet playing ‘radio friendly filth’. ■ Specialized Pivo Pivo, 15 Waterloo St, 564 8100. 7.30pm. £5. Specials tribute night in aid of the Teenage Cancer Trust, featuring Esperanza, This Modern Youth and Big Fat Panda. ■ Absolute Bowie The Ferry, 25 Anderston Quay, 01698 360085. 8pm. £12.50 in advance; £14 on door; £26.45 with early dinner at 6pm. ‘Europe’s premier Bowie tribute band’. With support from 32 Miles to Breakfast. ■ Esperanza Pivo Pivo, 15 Waterloo St, 564 8100. 8pm. Scottish ska outfit. ■ Processed Beats Chambre 69, Stock Exchange House, 69 Nelson Mandela Place, 204 5151. 8pm–3am. New electronica night opening with live sets from Nevada Base, Crash Club, The Hype, Two Stripe and Fridge Magnets, and DJ sets from Hot Chip’s Felix and DARC. ■ Roy & The Devil’s Motorcycle

The 13th Note Café/Bar, 50–60 King St, 553 1638. 8pm. Fuzzed-up wildman blues meets lysergic psych. ■ A Weekend at the Old Hairdressers Old Hairdressers,

Opposite Stereo, Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 8pm. £3 (£5 for both nights). Two nights of gigs from the folks at Green Door Studio. Glamshackle indie pop from 1990s, Post, Casual Sex and Asian Babes on Friday, followed by bonerattling testifying from Jacob Yates & the Pearly Gate Lock Pickers, supported by The Rosy Crucifixion, Black Jash and Future Glue on Saturday. Plus films by Gregor Johnstone and Green Door DJs.

■ Proud Mary, Town, Alan Jeffrey

and Fiction Faction King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £10. Dadrock plodders beloved by Noel Gallacher. FREE String Driven Thing Samuel Dow’s, 67–71 Nithsdale Rd, 423 0107. 8.30pm. Scottish folk prog rockers touting a more Americana driven sound. FREE Dilated Bar Bloc+, 117 Bath St, 574 6066. 9pm. Retro hip-hop showcase. ■ Fridge Magnets Chambre 69, Stock Exchange House, 69 Nelson Mandela Place, 248 6447. 10pm. £tbc. Blend of electro pop and post-punk guitars, with a Hot Chip DJ set.

Edinburgh FREE Pete McConville, Hugo Undershin, Rodney Relax and The Razorbills Elvis Shakespeare, 347 Leith Walk, 561 1363. 2.30pm. An afternoon of leftfield poetry and music. FREE Rossco Galloway The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. See Fri 30. ■ The Architects and Rolo Tomassi The Liquid Room, 9c Victoria St, 225 2564. 7pm. £12. Hardcore metal quintet from Brighton. ■ Frame Wee Red Bar, Edinburgh College of Art, Lauriston Place, 229 1442. 7pm. £7 before 10.30pm; £4 (club only) after. Indie/alternative/electronica night with three live bands. ■ The Gillyflowers The Third Door, 45–47 Lothian St, 225 6313. 7pm. £4. Lush alt.country. ■ The Houserockers, Big Tuna and Jojocoke Whistlebinkies, 4-6 South Bridge, 557 5114. 7pm. Free before midnight; £4 after. Rock night. ■ The Reverb Syndicate, Preston Pfanz & The Seaton Sands and The Fnords Henry’s Cellar Bar, 8-16

Morrison St, 228 9393. 7pm. £5. Surf and garage rock. ■ Nearly Dan The Voodoo Rooms, 19a West Register St, 556 7060. 7.30pm. £14. Steely Dan tribute. ■ Haight-Ashbury The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £4 (£3). Countrified psych-rock from Miyagi and friends. Joined by Glaswegian psychgarage trio Hidden Masters and DJ Fowler. FREE The Razor Bills Nobles Bar, 44a Constitution St, Leith, 629 7215. 10pm. Indie folk pop. ■ bETAMAX Studio 24, 24–26 Calton Rd, 558 3758. 11pm–3am. Free before 11.30pm; £5 (£4) after. New mutant 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 97


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Music ROCK&POP disco, post punk, new wave and 2Tone night hosted by Angus A-Go-Go (the GoGo) and Chris FAST (FASTpunkclub).

Saturday 14

Glasgow

■ Flyin’ Jalapenos Crew SWG3, Studio Warehouse, 100 Eastvale Place, 357 7246. 2pm. £5 (under 18s £3). The FJC throw a tenth birthday party featuring DJs, dancers, MCs and showcases from the likes of Hektor Bizerk, Steg G & Freestyle Master, Krash Slaughta and Pro Vinylist Karim. FREE David Duffy MacSorley’s, 42 Jamaica St, 248 8581. 5.30pm. See Sat 31. FREE The MeatMen Maggie May’s, 60 Trongate, 548 1350. 6pm. See Sat 7. ■ Andrew WK The Garage, 490 Sauchiehall St, 332 1120. 7pm. £15. The demented party punk metaller returns. ■ Belabushka, Emerald Sunday, Tom Foolery and The Foxholes O2

Academy 2, 121 Eglinton St, 0844 477 2000. 7pm. £6. Over-14s show. Local pop and rock bands.

■ Dance Shiny Dancer, The Rusty Nails Band, Holly Ogilvie and Burning Flags Stereo, 20-28 Renfield

Lane, 222 2254. 7pm. £tbc. Alt.rock bill.

■ Going Down With The Ship

STUC, 333 Woodlands Rd, 221 8806. 7pm. £5. Music (from proto-punk party rockers Tuaregs and the more ambient Animal Sanctuary) and spoken word (from poet Tom Leonard) at this fundraiser for Great Little Libraries which provides books for schools in deprived areas. ■ Nearly Dan Òran Mór, 731-735 Great Western Rd, 357 6200. 7pm. £14. See Fri 13. ■ Oli Brown Band O2 ABC2, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £12.50. Over-14s show. Young guitarist playing the resurrection blues.

■ The Lysergic Suite, Tijuana Bibles, Holy Pistol Club, Catfish &

the Bottlemen and Cherri Fosphate Flat 0/1, 162 Bath St, 331

6227. 7.30pm. £6.50. Catchy riffs and vocal harmonies from C&TB. ■ Marionettes, Dalzel, Dougsy and Hitchcock Blonde Pivo Pivo, 15 Waterloo St, 564 8100. 7.30pm. £4. EP launch for the indie electro headliners. ■ White Heat, Zener Diode, Alan McKim and Gary Ovens

Nice’n’Sleazy, 421 Sauchiehall St, 333 0900. 7.30pm. £5. Experimental alt.rock from WH. ■ Absolute Bowie The Ferry, 25 Anderston Quay, 01698 360085. 8pm. £12.50 in advance; £14 on door; £26.45 with early dinner at 6pm. See Fri 13, with support 32 Miles to Breakfast replaced by The Black Triangles. ■ The Reverb Syndicate, Los Tentakills and The Fnords The 13th

Note Café/Bar, 50–60 King St, 553 1638. 8pm. £5. Surf instrumentals from Canadian headliners. ■ Secret Affair and The Laynes Ivory Blacks, 56 Oswald St, 248 4114. 8pm. £18 in advance: £20 on door. Mod revivalists on the comeback trail. ■ Ted Milton & Sam Britton, Fur Hood and Galoshins Nice’n’Sleazy,

421 Sauchiehall St, 333 0900. 8pm. £5. Ted Milton of veteran jazz punkers Blurt plays old band and solo material in collaboration with laptop musician Sam Britton.

■ A Weekend at the Old Hairdressers Old Hairdressers,

Opposite Stereo, Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 8pm. £3 (£5 for both nights). See Fri 13. ■ Clock Opera and The Hollows King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £6. Cut and paste soundscaping from London’s Guy Connelly. FREE Groovefellas Samuel Dow’s, 67–71 Nithsdale Rd, 423 0107. 8.30pm. Live music.

Edinburgh FREE Bruncheon! Featuring The Sound of Muesli Out of the Blue Drill Hall, 30–36 Dalmeny St, Leith, 555 7101. 11am–2.30pm. Live music plus your choice of breakfast, traditional or continental. FREE Roy & The Devil’s Motorcycle and Acid Fascists Elvis Shakespeare, 347 Leith Walk, 561 1363. 2.30pm. See Fri 13. FREE Camii Sinclair The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. See Sat 31.

■ Rock’n’Roll Half Marathon

45–47 Lothian St, 225 6313. 7pm. £5. Psychobilly headliners. FREE Stewart MacLennan Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 7pm. See Sat 31.

Holyrood Park, 652 8150. 9am. £43. Charity race with an added twist: bands including Kassidy, Homework and Stanley Odd entertain the runners at mile points along the way. Register online by Sun 8 Apr. ■ Marionettes Sneaky Pete’s, 73 Cowgate, 225 1757. 7pm. £5. See Thu 12. ■ Rocket Lolly Ghillie Dhu, 2 Rutland Place, 0844 557 2686. 8–11pm. £10 (£8). A cabaret evening of retro-futurist delights, with music from Spacedog and DJ Bongoboy including live theremin and robotic instruments, old film footage and space-age fashions. Ages 18+. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival. ■ In Your Chop Studio 24, 24–26 Calton Rd, 558 3758. 9pm–3am. £5. Fundraiser for a memorial bench dedicated to local legend Bobby Collins Cassidy, who had a big impact on Edinburgh’s club and gig scene. Games, competitions, banter, live music and a mixed up, mashed up hip hop, breaks, folk and jungle soundtrack from the likes of Adam Holmes (Young Folk Musician Of The Year Finalist), Jamie Kenny, DJ Sonny, Gareth Cook, ChopManD and Jamin Nimjah. FREE Blues For Pocketmoney Whistlebinkies, 4-6 South Bridge, 557 5114. 9.30pm. Blues. FREE The Sunday Sessions Nobles Bar, 44a Constitution St, Leith, 629 7215. 10pm. See Sun 8.

St Andrews

St Andrews

Eye O’ the Dug Various Venues. eotdfestival.com. £40 for the weekend. Fence Records festival maestros Johnny ‘Pictish Trail’ Lynch and Kenny ‘King Creosote’ Anderson conjure up a brand new festival, with a typically diverse line-up of King Creosote and Jon Hopkins, Django Django, Hot Chip (DJ set), Errors, Pictish Trail, James Yorkston, Withered Hand, RM Hubbert, Conquering Animal Sound, KT Tunstall, Seamus Fogarty, Francois and the Atlas Mountains, Kid Canaveral, Rozi Plain and more TBA. See preview, page 92.

Eye O’ the Dug Various Venues, eotdfestival.com Times vary. £40 for the weekend. See Sat 14.

■ Ged Hanley Trio, Main St Blues, U-Know-Hoo and Mad Ferret

Whistlebinkies, 4-6 South Bridge, 557 5114. 6pm. Free before midnight; £4 after. Covers, blues, funk pop and roots.

■ Closure in Moscow, The Elijan, Altered Sky and This Murder of Angels Studio 24, 24–26 Calton Rd,

558 3758. 6.30pm. £6. Alt.rock fivepiece from Down Under. ■ Oceansfall and Edward & The Itch Wee Red Bar, Edinburgh College of Art, Lauriston Place, 229 1442. 7pm. £4. Experimental progressive shoegaze. ■ Rolled Up 20s, Jack Rowerberry, TOWN and Vinyl Jacket Electric Circus, 36–39 Market

St, 226 4224. 7pm. £5. Rock bill with a punky edge.

■ The Stagger Rats The Third Door,

Sunday 15

Glasgow FREE Bad Bad Men Slouch, 203–205 Bath St, 221 5518. 6pm. Murky Cave/Waits-influenced rock’n’roll. ■ Rock for CF Classic Grand, 18 Jamaica St, 847 0820. 6.30pm. £6. Over14s show. Local rock and metal bands, including Closed Off Comedown, Bekon, Dana O’Hara, Scarcinogen, Silvertrace, Definitions and Draw Me A Promise, play to raise funds for the Cystic Fibrosis Trust. ■ Alyssa Reid O2 ABC2, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £8. Canadian singer/songwriter. ■ Ancient VVisdom Stereo, 20-28 Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 7pm. £6. Satanic metal band who incorporate acoustic, folky touches to their sound. ■ Ben E King The Arches, 253 Argyle St, 565 1000. 7pm. £22.50. Stellar soul from the former Drifters frontman. ■ Meshuggah The Garage, 490 Sauchiehall St, 332 1120. 7pm. £15. Over-14s show. Death, thrash and prog metal fusion.

■ Esperi, Conn Harp, Calum Gilligan and Kieran Robinson Band

Pivo Pivo, 15 Waterloo St, 564 8100. 7.30pm. Acre Records showcase with special guest Esperi. ■ Gilbert O’Sullivan Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, 2 Sauchiehall St, 353 8000. 7.30pm. £25–£27.50. The piano man performs from his back catalogue. ■ Jethro Tull’s Ian Anderson

Theatre Royal, 282 Hope St, 0844 871 7647. 7.30pm. £25.50–£28.50. See Sat 14. ■ Sway and Kof King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £10. UK hip hop and grime artist with a MOBO award to his name. 98 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

Edinburgh

Monday 16

Glasgow

■ The Staves Òran Mór, 731-735

Great Western Rd, 357 6200. 7pm. £8. English sister act blending beautiful harmonies with a Laura Marling-like folkiness. ■ The Kleptocrats and People Places Maps Pivo Pivo, 15 Waterloo St, 564 8100. 7.30pm. Fundraising event with Glasgow indie rockers. FREE Michael Simons Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. See Mon 2. ■ The Sunshine Underground and Dead Sea Souls King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £10. Bouncy indie-pop from Leeds. FREE Acoustic Session Live Slouch, 203–205 Bath St, 221 5518. 9pm. See Mon 2.

Edinburgh

The Liquid Room, 9c Victoria St, 225 2564. ✽ 7pm. £16.50. Over-14s show. Blur Graham Coxon

guitarist continues his parallel noisenik solo career with a new album A+E. See preview, page 82, review, page 86, and win copies of A+E, page 91.

■ Fuzzy & The Peaches, The Loungers and November Orchid

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 8-16 Morrison St, 228 9393. 7.30pm. £4. Classic rock. FREE Boda Bar’s Chan Bang Boda Bar, 229 Leith Walk, 553 5900. 8pm–1am. See Mon 2.

Tuesday 17

Glasgow

■ Graham Coxon The Garage, 490

Sauchiehall St, 332 1120. 7pm. £16.50. See Mon 16. ■ Verses and LYU Stereo, 20-28 Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 7pm. £7. Anthemic rockers from Brighton. ■ Odonis Odonis Captain’s Rest, 185 Great Western Rd, 332 7304. 8pm. £6. Self-styled ‘surf-gaze’ trio. ■ The Juveniles King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £6. Indie four-piece. With support from Sorcha.


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ROCK&POP

list.co.uk/music

Edinburgh

■ Library Tapes, Thverfellshorn, Poppy Ackroyd and Hiva Oa The

Third Door, 45–47 Lothian St, 225 6313. 7pm. £7. Ambient sounds with film score and classical echoes from Library Tapes. FREE Satellites, Inkfields and The Diversions Whistlebinkies, 4-6 South Bridge, 557 5114. 8pm. Classic rock. FREE Aaron Wright The Ale House, 18–22 Clerk St, 629 0275. 9.30pm. See Tue 3.

Wednesday 18

Glasgow

■ Howard Jones O2 ABC, 330

Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £20. Over-14s show. Human’s Lib and Dream Into Action performed in their entirety. ■ Twilight Hotel O2 ABC2, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £8. Over-14s show. Talented Canadian alt roots duo. ■ We Are The In Crowd, The Summer Set, Every Avenue and Sugar Prime Queen Margaret Union,

22 University Gardens, 339 9784. 7pm. £10. Over-14s show. Pop punk from Poughkeepsie. Please note change of venue (again). ■ Amanda Shires Woodend Tennis & Bowling Club, 10 Chamberlain Rd, 959 1428. 8pm. Texas singer/fiddler Shires plays rock’n’roll with regular collaborator, alt.country songwriter Rod Picott. ■ Greg Holden Captain’s Rest, 185 Great Western Rd, 332 7304. 8pm. £5. Nomadic singer/songwriter.

new venue and date. FREE Callum Beattie and Splendid Gentlemen Whistlebinkies, 4-6 South Bridge, 557 5114. 7.30pm. Covers. ■ Bannerman’s IPA Battle of the Bands Bannerman’s, 55 Niddry St, 556

3254. 8pm. £tbc. Local bands compete for ‘amazing secret prizes’. Apply via the website if you want to get involved. Alternative round. ■ Faculty The Third Door, 45–47 Lothian St, 225 6313. 8pm. £5. Will Pickvance continues his series of musical lectures. FREE Scarlet Wednesdays The Blue Goose Country Pub, 27 Lanark Rd, 629 4143. 8pm. See Wed 4. FREE The Jack O’Diamonds Scrimshaw Shanties Nobles Bar, 44a Constitution St, Leith, 629 7215. 9.30pm. See Wed 4.

Thursday 19

Glasgow

■ The Dandy Warhols The Garage,

490 Sauchiehall St, 332 1120. 7pm. £20. Over 14s show. Indie garage schtick. ■ Skrillex O2 Academy, 121 Eglinton St, 0844 477 2000. 7pm. £16. See Wed 18. Please note new date. ■ Vulcano, Necroriser and Haar Classic Grand, 18 Jamaica St, 847 0820. 7pm. £10. Veteran Brazilian metal band. ■ What’s The Damage?, Final Silence and Dog Tired Pivo Pivo, 15

Waterloo St, 564 8100. 7.30pm. £6 including entry to The Cathouse. A trio of metal acts.

■ Make Sparks, The DeTours, Skippy Dyes and Fluorescent Hearts King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a

■ Beartrap, Witch Cult, Horrors That You’ve Seen, HaroldxShitman and Wheelchairx4

St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £6. Alternative rock in a Biffy/Twin Atlantic mould from Make Sparks. FREE Teletextile Bar Bloc+, 117 Bath St, 574 6066. 9pm. Lush alternative pop.

The 13th Note Café/Bar, 50–60 King St, 553 1638. 8pm. Massachusetts hardcore titans headline, with various UK support. FREE Diana Schad Linen 1906, 1110 Pollokshaws Rd, 649 0007. 8pm. See Thu 29. FREE Doolally Music Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. US band fronted by Rebecca Connelly. ■ Imperial Leisure, Mike Only and The Willie G Trio King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8pm. £7. Ove-14s show. Ska headliners supported by ex-King Blues man. Please

Edinburgh

■ The Lemonheads The HMV Picture House, 31 Lothian Rd, 0844 847 1740. 7pm. £15. Evan Dando’s melodic grunge outfit revisit their breakthrough album It’s A Shame About Ray. ■ Skrillex Corn Exchange, 11 New Market Rd, 477 3500. 7pm. £16–£18. Ridiculously hard dubstep. Please note

note rescheduled date. FREE John Morgan, Saint Max and Michael Timmons Black Sparrow, 241 North St, 221 5530. 8pm. Laidback live music. ■ Kariss Andrew and Vickie Paxton Captain’s Rest, 185 Great Western Rd, 332 7304. 8pm. Singer/songwriter bill.

■ Maps & Atlases, Tall Ships, Trapped in Kansas and Alarm Bells Nice’n’Sleazy, 421 Sauchiehall St,

333 0900. 8pm. £9. Off-kilter indie and lo-fi folkiness from this Chicago band. FREE Jam Session Samuel Dow’s, 67–71 Nithsdale Rd, 423 0107. 8.30pm. See Thu 29. FREE Belmondo Bar Bloc+, 117 Bath St, 574 6066. 9pm. EP launch for this lofi pop outfit.

Edinburgh FREE Henry Ibbs The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. See Thu 29. ■ Profisee, Madhat McGore and Silvertongue Electric Circus, 36–39 Market St, 226 4224. 7pm. £7. Scottish hip hop night hosted by Vic Galloway. FREE Killing Time, Echofella and Acoustidours Whistlebinkies, 4–6 South Bridge, 557 5114. 7.30pm. Indie and covers. ■ Click Clack Club The Third Door, 45–47 Lothian St, 225 6313. 8pm. £3. Funky experimental music club.

Friday 20

Glasgow

■ Anderson, McGinty, Webster,

Ward & Fisher Stereo, 20-28 Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 7pm. Dundonian supergroup featuring members from various bands including The Law, Luva Anna and Magdalen Green. ■ Christiaan Webb Òran Mór, 731735 Great Western Rd, 357 6200. 7pm. £8. The eldest of The Webb Brothers,

at

Music

son of the great Jimmy Webb, strikes out solo. With Kat Healy and Joshua Caole. ■ Deaf Havana The Garage, 490 Sauchiehall St, 332 1120. 7pm. £10. Over-14s show. Post-hardcore band. FREE Diana Schad The Living Room, 150 St Vincent St, 229 0607. 7pm. See Thu 29. ■ Futures, Don Broco, Natives and Arches O2 ABC2, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. Over-14s show. Alt.rock four-piece with Hammond organ touches. ■ Toyah – The Changeling Resurrection Classic Grand, 18

Jamaica St, 847 0820. 7pm. £15. The actress/songstress celebrates the 30th anniversary of her album The Changeling and the live album of the accompanying tour, Warrior Rock.

■ Devilish Presley, The Coffins, Homesick Aldo and Melissa Kelly & the Homesick Thieves Pivo Pivo,

15 Waterloo St, 564 8100. 7.30pm. £5. Goth rockers and garage punks.

■ Ellen & The Escapades, Paper Aeroplanes, Matt Norris & the Moon and Gary Stewart

Nice’n’Sleazy, 421 Sauchiehall St, 333 0900. 7.30pm. £6. Delicate, bitter sweet alt.folk/rock quintet from Leeds. ■ Hector Bizerk Captain’s Rest, 185 Great Western Rd, 332 7304. 8pm. Alt hip-hop duo. ■ Re-Take That The Ferry, 25 Anderston Quay, 01698 360085. 8pm. £12.50 in advance; £14 on door; £26.45 with early dinner at 6pm. Tribute act to the all-conquering boy band. ■ Jay Brannan, Ryan Keen and Sean Kennedy King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £10. New York-based singersongwriter.

■ The Rosy Crucifixion, Future Glue and The Electric Gardens The

13th Note Café/Bar, 50–60 King St, 553 1638. 8.30pm. £3. Lynchian twang from the headliners.

The Queen’s Hall

FRIDAY 6TH APRIL

EDINBURGH The Queen’s Hall

Song of Return

JOHN HIATT WED 18TH JULY EDINBURGH

QUEEN’S HALL

IN ERL IN B NGO T TA LAS

EN QUE

ALL ’S H H

G BUTRH MAY N I 4 ED AY

FRID

PAUL KELLY Sun 26th Aug

FRI 3RD AUG & SUN 26TH AUG

EDINBURGH

Queen’s Hall

EDINBURGH Queen’s Hall

Doors 6pm (show 7pm)

a REGULAR MUSIC & MZA presentation

Anyone familiar with Glasgow’s indie-folk darlings Admiral Fallow might be surprised to hear the substantial difference between them and frontman Louis Abbot’s other project, Song of Return. A much more dark, dramatic and distorted affair, SoR have more in common with Muse than Mumford, with cut-up drum loops and synthlines buzzing throughout last year’s debut album Limits. They’re about to jet off to New York to play a couple of unique gigs, as part of their prize for winning the 2011 Big Apple Award, but first they’re waving goodbye with a couple of end-of-March performances. ■ Wee Red Bar, Edinburgh, Fri 30 Mar; O2 ABC, Glasgow, Sat 31 Mar.

Show 7pm (8:30) Doors 6:30pm

WED 8TH • THU 9TH • FRI 10TH AUGUST

EDINBURGH QUEEN’S HALL

www.queenshall.net www.ticketmaster.co.uk

Box Office: 0131 668 2019 Hotline: 0844 844 0444 Ticket Scotland: Glasgow, Edinburgh & Ripping Records: Edinburgh 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 99


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Music ROCK&POP FREE Swagger Samuel Dow’s, 67–71 Nithsdale Rd, 423 0107. 8.30pm. Quality rock covers. FREE Capone & the Bullets MacSorley’s, 42 Jamaica St, 248 8581. 9pm. Ska sounds.

Edinburgh FREE Rossco Galloway The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. See Fri 30. ■ Billy Ocean The Jam House, 5 Queen St, 226 4380. 7pm. £19. Eighties soul balladeer. ■ The Black Seeds and James Brown is Annie The Liquid Room, 9c Victoria St, 225 2564. 7pm. £12.50 in advance; £15 on the door. Eight-piece New Zealand band blending funk, reggae, soul and dub. ■ Bombay Bicycle Club and Lianne La Havas Corn Exchange, 11 New Market Rd, 477 3500. 7pm. £17.50. Quirky youthful indie trio from London. ■ Bwani Junction, The Little Kicks and The Mirror Trap Electric

Circus, 36–39 Market St, 226 4224. 7pm. £7. Three bands who were picked by The Sun as their tips for 2012. ■ The Cosmic Dead The Third Door, 45–47 Lothian St, 225 6313. 7pm. £4. Hawkwind tribute. ■ The Demons Eye Whistlebinkies, 4-6 South Bridge, 557 5114. 7pm. Free before midnight; £4 after. Classic rock. ■ Kyla La Grange Sneaky Pete’s, 73 Cowgate, 225 1757. 7pm. £7. Cat Power and Elliott Smith-influenced singersongwriter. ■ RM Hubbert, Yusuf Azak and Rory Sutherland Henry’s Cellar Bar, 8-16 Morrison St, 228 9393. 7pm. £5. Guitar instrumentals from Hubbard. ■ The Bon Jovi Experience Brunton Theatre, Ladywell Way, Musselburgh, 665 2240. 7.30pm. £15.25 (£13.25). See Thu 19. ■ Prairie Rose & The Wildwoods, Lord Rochester and The Phar’isees The Voodoo Rooms, 19a West

Register St, 556 7060. 7.30pm–1am. £6. Creeque Alley club night of retro rock, Americana, country and folky rock. ■ Velvet Scooter Blind Poet, 32c West Nicolson St, 667 4268. 9pm–1am. £tbc. Classic rock covers. FREE Bainbridge Music Showcase Nobles Bar, 44a Constitution St, Leith, 629 7215. 10pm. See Fri 30.

Saturday 21

Glasgow FREE David Duffy MacSorley’s, 42 Jamaica St, 248 8581. 5.30pm. See Sat 31. FREE The MeatMen Maggie May’s, 60 Trongate, 548 1350. 6pm. See Sat 7. ■ Bowie Tribute Maryhill Community Central Hall, 304 Maryhill Rd, 332 9115. 7pm. £5. Many singers, many songs in tribute to the Thin White Duke. ■ Little Comets, The 1975 and Bwani Junction Òran Mór, 731-735 Great Western Rd, 357 6200. 7pm. £8.50. Alt.pop with an Afrobeat edge. ■ Miles Kane and Eugene McGuiness Barrowland, 244 Gallowgate, 552 4601. 7pm. £15. Indie rock swagger from the charismatic Rascals/The Last Shadow Puppets frontman, with support set from singer/songwriter Eugene McGuiness. ■ The New Piccadillys O2 ABC2, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £8.50. Rock’n’roll and 60s beat pop in the new old fashioned way. ■ Philip Sayce The Garage, 490 Sauchiehall St, 332 1120. 7pm. £12.50. Welsh-born blues guitarist with links to Melissa Etheridge and Uncle Kracker. ■ Young Jeezy O2 ABC, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £25. Atlanta-based, much-collabo’d rapper. ■ Badmouth Battles 3 Pivo Pivo, 15 Waterloo St, 564 8100. 7.30pm. £5. Hip hop slam battle and live performances. ■ Edward Reid Cottiers Theatre, 93–95 Hyndland St, 357 4000. 7.30pm. 100 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

£12 (£10). Quirky comedy covers from the Britain’s Got Talent star. ■ Holy Mountain and Adam Stafford Nice’n’Sleazy, 421 Sauchiehall St, 333 0900. 7.30pm. £6. Album launch for the delightful stoner rockers as part of Record Store Day. See preview, page 100. ■ The Muzak, The 4/5s, Emerald Black, Jennifer Lindsay and Juno & the Mook Maggie May’s, 60

Trongate, 548 1350. 7.30pm. £6 (£4). Indie Rocks night. ■ Hells Bells The Ferry, 25 Anderston Quay, 01698 360085. 8pm. £10 in advance; £12 on the door; £23.95 with early dinner at 6pm. AC/DC tribute band. ■ The Murderburgers, Clocked Out and The Bucky Rage The 13th

Note Café/Bar, 50–60 King St, 553 1638. 8pm. Local punks’ album launch. FREE Silk Cut Vs Femme Bitch Nation, Ultimate Thrush Vs Blue Sabbath Black Fiji, Palms and Smack Wizards Stereo, 20-28

Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 8pm. Art noise shenanigans to mark the opening of Glasgow International Festival. ■ THEEsatisfaction The Art School, 468 Sauchiehall St, 0845 166 6009. 8pm. £6. Seattle-based hip hop duo. ■ RM Hubbert The Arches, 253 Argyle St, 565 1000. 8.30pm. £7. See Fri 20, with support from Martin John Henry. Part of the Behaviour 2012. FREE 2 Bob Rocket Samuel Dow’s, 67–71 Nithsdale Rd, 423 0107. 8.30pm. Rock covers.

Edinburgh

■ The Ged Hanley Trio, Safehouse, Soulussion and Fatlips

Jackson Concert Pavilion Theatre, 121 Renfield St, 332 1846. 7.30pm. £15–£18. Tribute show to the King of Pop. ■ Dry the River King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8pm. £8. Over-14s show. Post-Mumfords indie/folk from this London band. ■ Necro Deathmort, Guanoman, Tangles and Droy The 13th Note

Café/Bar, 50–60 King St, 553 1638. 8pm. Gossamer guitar sounds in the vein of Robert Fripp from Tangles. Sir Richard Bishop Captain’s Rest, 185 Great Western Rd, 332 7304. 8pm. £8. Guitarist inspired by Latino, gypsy and cowboy sounds.

■ Thrashist Regime, Circle of Tyrants, Monheim and Citizen Death Nice’n’Sleazy, 421 Sauchiehall St,

333 0900. 8pm. £5. The headliners launch their debut album Fearful Symmetry. ■ Hey! Jimi! Café Cossachok, Trongate 103, 10 King St, 553 0733. 9pm. £8. A night of music inspired by Jimi Hendrix.

Edinburgh

■ Anderson, McGinty, Webster, Ward & Fisher Sneaky Pete’s, 73

Cowgate, 225 1757. 7pm. £5. See Fri 20. FREE Jamie Scott Café Grande, 184 Bruntsfield Place, 228 1188. 7pm. Soulful troubadour. ■ The Osmonds Up Close and Personal – The Final Tour Usher

Hall, Lothian Rd, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £27.50–£29.50 Plus £2.50 booking fee. The four siblings enter their 60th year of pop performance.

FREE Dolalay, The Ringos and Bannockburn Whistlebinkies, 4-6 South Bridge, 557 5114. 9.30pm. Classic rock and folk. FREE The Sunday Sessions Nobles Bar, 44a Constitution St, Leith, 629 7215. 10pm. See Sun 8.

Monday 23

Glasgow

■ Wolves Like Us, Junius and Falloch Ivory Blacks, 56 Oswald St,

248 4114. 6.30pm. £8. Nordic/US metal double bill. ■ Professor Green and Chiddy Bang O2 Academy, 121 Eglinton St, 0844 477 2000. 7pm. £18.50. Under-14s to be accompanied by an adult. London hip-popper. ■ Steps Braehead Arena, Kings Inch Rd, 0844 499 1700. 7pm. See Fri 6. ■ Various Cruelties O2 ABC2, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £8. band led by songwriter Liam O’Donnell, who digs The Specials, Shuggie Otis and Devendra Banhart. ■ Camille O’Sullivan Òran Mór, 731735 Great Western Rd, 357 6200. 7.30pm. £15–£17.50. Stunning voice and passionate performance of work from the likes of Nick Caves, David Bowie and Jacques Brel.

■ Fostercare, Machines In Heaven and Asthmatic Astronaut The Art

School, 168 Renfrew St, 353 4690. 8pm. £5. Dark brooding electronica and witch house from Fostercare

Record Store Day

Whistlebinkies, 4-6 South Bridge, 557 5114. 5pm. Free before midnight; £4 after. Rock, blues and funk. FREE Camii Sinclair The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. See Sat 31. ■ Bainbridge Music Showcase

Henry’s Cellar Bar, 8-16 Morrison St, 228 9393. 7pm. £5. See Fri 30. ■ Record Store Day Party Electric Circus, 36–39 Market St, 226 4224. 7pm. £3. A celebration of independent record shops, line-up tbc. See preview, page 100. FREE Stewart MacLennan Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 7pm. See Sat 31. ■ We Luv Musik The Voodoo Rooms, 19a West Register St, 556 7060. 7pm. £5. Line up tbc. ■ Big Fat Panda, Urang Matang and The Sea Bass Kids The Voodoo

Rooms, 19a West Register St, 556 7060. 7.30pm. £7. Ska night in aid of the Sick Kids Foundation. ■ The Hollies 50 Years On Usher Hall, Lothian Rd, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £21.50–£25 + £2 booking fee per ticket. See Thu 19. FREE Lewis Gibson & The Midas Touch Nobles Bar, 44a Constitution St, Leith, 629 7215. 10pm. See Thu 12.

Sunday 22

Glasgow

■ The Deportees and the 1930s

Pivo Pivo, 15 Waterloo St, 564 8100. Times tbc. £tbc. See Wed 18. ■ The Dead Lay Waiting Ivory Blacks, 56 Oswald St, 248 4114. 6.30pm. £6. Post melodic metalcore. ■ Example, Wretch 32, Young

Man and Alvin Risk SECC, Finnieston Quay, 0844 395 4000. 6.30pm. £23.50. ‘Dysfunctional electro pop’ from Example. ■ Major Lazer and Unicorn Kid O2 ABC, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £12. Dancehall incarnation of DJs Diplo and Switch. Supported by the 8-bit rampage of Edinburgh’s Unicorn Kid. ■ Uh Huh Her The Arches, 253 Argyle St, 565 1000. 7pm. £12. Electro indie duo from Los Angeles. See LGBT preview, page 80. ■ The Hollies 50 Years On Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, 2 Sauchiehall St, 353 8000. 7.30pm. £22.50–£26. See Thu 19. ■ The World’s Greatest Michael

In these days of digital piracy, the life of the indie record store seems constantly overshadowed with doubt; thankfully, the annual Record Store Day reminds what a pleasure can be hand from flicking through dusty vinyl LPs and just enjoying music in the company of others. Monorail in Glasgow have the most exciting line-up so far - Edwyn Collins (pictured), Human Don’t Be Angry, Organs Of Love, Snowgoose and Dead Flamingos are all set to play throughout the day, in addition to an AED Records showcase. The Rubadub residents will be joined by house/garage/post-dubstep supremo Joy Orbison, while through in Edinburgh, Coda on the Mound features performances from Kris Drever, Bella Hardy and Rura. In addition to the bricks-and-mortar vinyl outlets, a few music venues will be taking part in the fun. InsularisRecords.com are hosting a pop-up record shop at Nice’n’Sleazy, with live performances from Adam Stafford, Holy Mountain and few acts still to be announced, while Avalanche in Edinburgh are hosting a Record Store Day after party at Electric Circus. For full listings, keep your eyes on list.co.uk and recordstoreday.com ■ Various venues worldwide, Sat 21 Apr.


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list.co.uk/music FREE Michael Simons Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. See Mon 2. ■ Paradise Lost, Insomnium and Vreid King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £14.50. Darkwave metal overlords from Halifax. FREE Acoustic Session Live Slouch, 203–205 Bath St, 221 5518. 9pm. See Mon 2.

Edinburgh

■ Discopolis and Academy Strangers Sneaky Pete’s, 73 Cowgate,

225 1757. 7pm. £tbc. Tipped electro rock trio. Sir Richard Bishop and Black Twig Pickers The Banshee Labyrinth, 29--35 Niddry St, 558 8209. 7.30pm. £6. See Sun 22. FREE Boda Bar’s Chan Bang Boda Bar, 229 Leith Walk, 553 5900. 8pm–1am. See Mon 2.

Tuesday 24

Glasgow

■ JLS Braehead Arena, Kings Inch Rd,

0844 499 1700. 7pm. £25–£32.50. See Wed 4. ■ Simon Fowler Òran Mór, 731-735 Great Western Rd, 357 6200. 7pm. £15. Ocean Colour Scene frontman’s solo show. FREE Jamfest Pivo Pivo, 15 Waterloo St, 564 8100. 7.30pm. See Tue 17. ■ Ally Macperson, Martin Smith and Samuel Loughrey The 13th Note

Café/Bar, 50–60 King St, 553 1638. 8pm. Music and comedy fundraiser night featuring indie, folk and Americana. ■ The Used King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8pm. £16.50. Over-14s show. Hirsute rockers from Utah.

Edinburgh FREE Papa Zita and The Diversions Whistlebinkies, 4-6 South Bridge, 557 5114. 8pm. Classic rock. FREE Aaron Wright The Ale House, 18–22 Clerk St, 629 0275. 9.30pm. See Tue 3.

Wednesday 25

Glasgow

■ Gomez and Diagrams O2 ABC,

330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £17. Seven albums on and still going strong. ■ JLS Braehead Arena, Kings Inch Rd, 0844 499 1700. 7pm. £25–£32.50. See Wed 4. ■ JT & the Clouds O2 ABC2, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £10. Over-14s show. Soul-infused indie from this Chicago band. ■ Lostprophets and Modestep O2 Academy, 121 Eglinton St, 0844 477 2000. 7pm. £22.50. Over-14s show. Welsh nu-metal tykes. ■ Of Mice & Men The Cathouse, 15 Union St, 248 6606. 7pm. £10. Over-14s show. California post-hardcore troupe formed by vocalist Austin Carlile. ■ The Osmonds Up Close and Personal – The Final Tour Glasgow

Royal Concert Hall, 2 Sauchiehall St, 353 8000. 7.30pm. £27.50–£29.50 (vip ticket £95). See Sun 22. ■ Russian Circles and Deafheaven Stereo, 20-28 Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 7.30pm. £11. Instrumental power trio. ■ The Tea Offensive and Tio Malo The 13th Note Café/Bar, 50–60 King St, 553 1638. 8pm. £3. Glasgow indie. FREE Galleries and Capitals Bar Bloc+, 117 Bath St, 574 6066. 9pm. Melodic, epic indie rock with an electronica twist.

Edinburgh

■ Placebo The HMV Picture House, 31

Lothian Rd, 0844 847 1740. 7pm. £28.50. The angsty Gothic alt.rockers return.

■ Trembling Bells with Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy and Muldoon’s Picnic

The Queen’s Hall, 87–89 Clerk St, 668 2019. 7pm. £18. The Glasgow-based four-piece and the American singersongwriter perform folk and country

18:33

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Page 101

Music SYNERGY CONCERTS PRESENT

from the album The Marble Downs. See preview, page 104. FREE Chris Finn, Jojocoke and Spendid Gentlemen Whistlebinkies, 46 South Bridge, 557 5114. 7.30pm. Blues and classic rock covers. ■ Bannerman’s IPA Battle of the

Bands Bannerman’s, 55 Niddry St, 556 3254. 8pm. £tbc. Local bands compete for ‘amazing secret prizes’. Apply via the website if you want to get involved. The final! FREE Scarlet Wednesdays The Blue Goose Country Pub, 27 Lanark Rd, 629 4143. 8pm. See Wed 4. FREE The Jack O’Diamonds Scrimshaw Shanties Nobles Bar, 44a Constitution St, Leith, 629 7215. 9.30pm. See Wed 4.

M AY

11 TH

22

15 TH

ND

SLEEP

ERRORS The Big Sleep THE ARCHES

THE ARCHES (IN ASSOCIATION WITH ATP)

NICE N SLEAZYS

J U N E

Thursday 26

Glasgow

■ Bow Wow Wow O2 ABC2, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £14. Over14s show. Tribal pop crew fronted by Annabella Lwin. ■ Here Stands Ilithyia Stereo, 20-28 Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 7pm. Posthardcore quintet from Johnstone. ■ Bright Young Nights Nice’n’Sleazy, 421 Sauchiehall St, 333 0900. 7.30pm. Local rock. ■ Ryan Adams Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, 2 Sauchiehall St, 353 8000. 7.30pm. £25. The impish New York troubadour delivers material from Ashes and Fire, his most accomplished and poignant singer/songwriter set since his early solo albums. ■ The Self Titled, Deadly Inscription and Grader Pivo Pivo, 15

Waterloo St, 564 8100. 7.30pm. £6. Trio of metal acts. ■ Dbass Collective The Universal, 57–59 Sauchiehall Lane, 332 8899. 8pm. £5 (£4). Hip hop and jazz fusion, with a series of special collaborations and special guests including a string quartet. FREE Engine 7, Voltergeist and Integra TV Black Sparrow, 241 North St, 221 5530. 8pm. Ambient electronica from Engine 7.

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Twilight Sad THE BARROWLAND TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM WWW.SYNERGYCONCERTS.COM / TICKETS SCOTLAND / RIPPING / MONORAIL

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■ Man Made Origin, Clarke, The Falling Rain, Kevin McCormack and No Fear Maggie May’s, 60 Trongate, 548

1350. 8pm. £4. Progressive black metal from MMO.

■ Mines, Usurper and Maya Dunietz with Lumps Mono, 12 Kings Court,

King St, 553 2400. 8pm. £4. Experimental sounds. FREE Organs of Love, Tut Vu Vu and

0LGVXPPHUPXVLFSLFQLFZLWKÀUHZRUNÀQDOH

If You Lived Here You’d Be Home By Now Old Hairdressers, Opposite Stereo,

Renfield Lane, 222 2254. 8pm. Glasgow’s IYLHYBHBN cite Dirty Three and Tom Waits as influences on their haunting, lyrical sound. ■ The Rudiments Stairway Club, 95 Union St, 221 1009. 8pm. £5. See Thu 29. ■ The Wrong Boyfriends, Dirty Red Turncoats and The Part Time Martyrs The 13th Note Café/Bar, 50–60

King St, 553 1638. 8pm. £3. Gothic gutter punk from TWB plus garage and indie rock supports. FREE Jam Session Samuel Dow’s, 67–71 Nithsdale Rd, 423 0107. 8.30pm. See Thu 29.

■ Th’ Legendary Shack*shakers, Dirty Old Red and The Jackhammers King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut,

272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £13.50. Demented hillbilly punks from Nashville give Tut’s an unholy shake-up. FREE A Thousand Suns Bar Bloc+, 117 Bath St, 574 6066. 9pm. Libertines/ Coral-influenced band from Stevenage.

Edinburgh FREE Henry Ibbs The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. See Thu 29. ■ Talon Brunton Theatre, Ladywell Way, Musselburgh, 665 2240. 7.30pm. £17.50 (£15.50). Eagles tribute band. FREE The Thursday Session Nobles Bar, 44a Constitution St, Leith, 629 7215. 9.30pm. Featuring Donna Maciocia and Austen George. 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 101


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Music JAZZ JAZZ Events are listed by date, then city. Submit listings at least 16 days before publication to henry@list.co.uk. Listings are compiled by Henry Northmore. ✽ Indicates Hitlist entry

Thursday 29

Glasgow

■ Kim Edgar Woodend Tennis &

Bowling Club, 10 Chamberlain Rd, 959 1428. 8pm. £10. Acoustic pop, jazz and original compositions.

Monday 2

Edinburgh FREE Ron Carruthers Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 7pm. Popular pianist. FREE The Jazz Bar Big Band The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. Big band jazz classics from this 17-piece ensemble of pros from all over Scotland. ■ The Babes The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 10.30pm. £3 (£2). Mix of rock, jazz, blues and funk classics, re-arranged and improv’d.

Tuesday 3

Edinburgh

Glasgow

FREE Ged Brockie & Doug Urquhart Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 7pm. Jazz guitar duo. ■ Future Heroes The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm. £2–£3. Groovy funk four-piece with ace guitarist Aki Remally.

FREE The Hot Club of Glasgow Ivory Hotel, Langside Avenue Shawlands, 636 0223. 7.30pm. Informal jam session of Django-Reinhardt-style gypsy jazz and swing. FREE Jamie Bell Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. Fingerstyle jazz guitarist. FREE Live Jazz Slouch, 203–205 Bath St, 221 5518. 9pm. Popular soul, blues and classic jazz.

Friday 30

Glasgow FREE Strathclyde University Big Band Cafe Source Too, Hillhead Sports Club, 32 Hughenden Rd, 357 6437. 9–11pm. The student Big Band, with singer Rachel Gilmour and guest vocalists from across Glasgow, plays numbers by Mingus, Nestico, Tormaro, Hancock, Paick and others.

Edinburgh FREE Lachlan’s Sounds of Jazz Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 7pm. Accomplished jazz. ■ Picante The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £5 (£4). Latin infused modern jazz and blues led by drummer Ken Mathieson.

Saturday 31

Edinburgh FREE The Mellotones The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 3pm. Jimmy Taylor and band play songs by Mel Torme and other great jazz vocalists. ■ World Premiere Quintet The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £4 (£3). A different selection of five leading jazz players come together for each session with no rehearsal. ■ Late’n’Live The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm–3am. £5 (£3). Late night jazz and funk acts and DJs. Featuring funk five-piece 101st Airborne.

Sunday 1

Glasgow

■ Gitane Ecosse Café Cossachok,

Trongate 103, 10 King St, 553 0733. 9pm. £6. Quartet headed by Polish gypsy jazz guitarists Ricardo Wiszniewski and Darius Szoma.

Edinburgh FREE Hot Tin Roof The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. Jazz/blues duo. ■ Salon du Jazz, Blueswater Collective, The Foo Birds and Tequila Mockingbird The Voodoo

Rooms, 19a West Register St, 556 7060. 7.15pm. £5 (£4). Cheeky-Tiki showcase of Edinburgh jazz, funk and indie talent. FREE The Whighams Jazz Club Whighams Wine Cellars, 13 Hope St, Charlotte Square, 225 8674. 8pm. All singers and instrumentalists are welcome at this jazz jam with a different host every week and a trio featuring Edith Budge. ■ The Sunday Sinners The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm. £3 (£2). Motown style funk/soul from this six-piece with Fiona Lynch and Joe Early. 102 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

Flipper, with PAWS

Edinburgh FREE The Six O’Clock After Work Blues The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. Live acoustic blues from John Hunt and friends. FREE Steve Tyler Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 7pm. Classical jazz guitar. ■ Great Jazz Jam Session The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £2 (£1). Faces old and new drop in to perform with the House Trio each week. ■ 101st Airbourne The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm. £3 (£2). Jazz and funk with a Hendrix twist from guitarist Aki Remally and his band.

Wednesday 4

Glasgow

■ Joe Bonamassa Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, 2 Sauchiehall St, 353 8000. 7.30pm. £35–£75. Virtuoso of blues rock guitar. FREE Candiru Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. Adventurous jazz act led by drummer Nick Weston.

Edinburgh FREE Edinburgh University Jazz Orchestra The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 5pm. Open rehearsal. FREE Fraser Urquhart Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 6.45pm. Relaxing piano. ■ Mike Kearney Ka-Tet The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm. £3 (£2). Talented piano player/vocalist Mike Kearney leads this funk/blues fivepiece.

Thursday 5

Glasgow FREE Johnny Jazz Baby Grand, 3–7 Elmbank Gardens, 248 4942. 9pm. Fourpiece jazz band.

Edinburgh FREE Ged Brockie & Doug Urquhart Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 6.45pm. See Thu 29.

■ David Macgregor The Voodoo

Rooms, 19a West Register St, 556 7060. 8pm. £6. Acoustic, electro and jazz guitar from David Macgregor. ■ William Young The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £4 (£3). US soul/jazz/blues vocalist. ■ Future Heroes The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm. £2–£3. See Thu 29.

Friday 6

Edinburgh FREE Graham High Henderson’s

San Franciscan grunge-punks Flipper have been a going concern (off and on) since 1979 – early enough to have been an influence on the late 80s/early 90s Seattle grunge movement (especially The Melvins, Black Flag and Nirvana), and late enough to have reconnected with those acts on the other end of the curve (Nirvana bassist Krist Novoselic had a stint on bass from 2006-2009). They’re back up and running again for a new UK tour, and they’ll be joined on their Glasgow date by kindred spirits PAWS, who do a nice line in Dinosaur JR-ish, Sonic Youth-y vibes. ■ Stereo, Glasgow, Sun 8 Apr. Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 6.45pm. The guitarist is joined by guests playing Hot Club-style jazz. ■ The Jazz Bar Quintet The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £4 (£3). Hard bop and lesser-known standards from the five-piece. ■ Late’n’Live The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm–3am. £5 (£3). See Sat 31. Featuring funk/soul act The Union.

Saturday 7

Edinburgh FREE The Mellotones The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 3pm. See Sat 31. ■ Kyle-Keddie Sextet The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £4 (£3). Modern jazz from drummer Bill Kyle and trombonist Brian Keddie. ■ Late’n’Live The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm–3am. £5 (£3). See Sat 31. Featuring Latino funk from Das Contras.

Sunday 8

Edinburgh FREE Hot Tin Roof The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. See Sun 1. FREE Lorna Reid & Graeme Stephen Café Grande, 184 Bruntsfield Place, 228 1188. 7pm. Cool and classy vocalist Reid, with guitarist Stephen. ■ Roots Showcase The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £4 (£3). Roots, R&B and blues from Toby of Black Diamond Express and friends. This month features Sleepy Eyes Nelson, Lynne Roberts, Olivia Salazar, Jack Nissan, Cameron Henderson and Jack’s Rabbit’s Foot Minstrels. FREE The Whighams Jazz Club Whighams Wine Cellars, 13 Hope St, Charlotte Square, 225 8674. 8pm. See Sun 1. Featuring swing jazz from Rose Room. ■ The Sunday Sinners The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm. £3 (£2). See Sun 1.

Monday 9

Edinburgh FREE Ron Carruthers Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St,

225 2131. 7pm. See Mon 2. FREE The Jazz Bar Big Band The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. See Mon 2. ■ The Babes The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 10.30pm. £3 (£2). See Mon 2.

Tuesday 10

Glasgow FREE The Hot Club of Glasgow Ivory Hotel, Langside Avenue Shawlands, 636 0223. 7.30pm. See Tue 3. ■ Snarky Puppy, Little Fix and The Horndog Brass Band Stereo, 20-28 Renfield Lane, 07866 298070. 7.30–11pm. £10 in advance; £12 on the door. Brooklyn-based raw funk collective led by bassist and composer Michael League. Each gig is preceded by a masterclass (£8 or £15 combined with gig ticket) at 4.30pm covering composition, arranging, ensemble playing and improv. FREE Live Jazz Slouch, 203–205 Bath St, 221 5518. 9pm. See Tue 3.

Edinburgh FREE The Six O’Clock After Work Blues The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. See Tue 3. FREE Steve Tyler Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 7pm. See Tue 3. ■ Great Jazz Jam Session The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £2 (£1). See Tue 3. ■ 101st Airbourne The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm. £3 (£2). See Tue 3.

Wednesday 11

Glasgow FREE D-Bass Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. Modern jazz.

Edinburgh FREE Edinburgh University Jazz Orchestra The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 5pm. See Wed 4. FREE Interplay Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 6.45pm. Featuring guitarist Lachlan MacColl and guests.


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JAZZ

list.co.uk/music ■ Snarky Puppy, Little Fix and The Horndog Brass Band The Bongo

Club, Moray House, 37 Holyrood Rd, 07866 298070. 7pm. £10 in advance; £12 on the door. See Tue 10. Interactive workshop will be held at the Jazz Bar. ■ John Lowrie Quartet The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £4 (£3). Modern jazz and reworked standards from this talented young drummer. ■ Mike Kearney Ka-Tet The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm. £3 (£2). See Wed 4.

Thursday 12

Edinburgh FREE Desafinado Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 6.45pm. Brazilian jazz duo. ■ Victoria Bennett The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £4 (£3). Showcase of classic 30s jazz standards from this classy Edinburgh vocalist. ■ Future Heroes The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm. £2–£3. See Thu 29.

Friday 13

Edinburgh

■ Oli Brown The Caves, Niddry St South, 557 8989. 7pm. £12.50. Powerful, award-winning blues. ■ Late’n’Live The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm–3am. £5 (£3). See Sat 31. Featuring rock/ jazz/funk fusion from Washington St.

Saturday 14

Glasgow

■ Oli Brown O2 ABC, 330 Sauchiehall

St, 332 2232. 7pm. £12.50. See Fri 13.

Edinburgh FREE The Mellotones The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 3pm. See Sat 31. ■ World Premiere Quintet The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £4 (£3). See Sat 31. ■ Late’n’Live The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm–3am. £5 (£3). See Sat 31. Featuring a Saturday outing from funk/soul five-piece The Sunday Sinners.

Sunday 15

Glasgow FREE The Blokes Slouch, 203–205 Bath St, 221 5518. 9pm. See Sun 1. ■ Nigel Clarke & Madaline Pritchard Café Cossachok, Trongate

103, 10 King St, 553 0733. 9pm. £6. Jazz guitarist Clarke is joined by vocalist Pritchard.

Edinburgh

■ NYJOS The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St,

220 4298. 2pm. £3 (£2). Intimate show from the National Youth Jazz Orchestra of Scotland. FREE Hot Tin Roof The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. See Sun 1. ■ Royal Conservatoire of Scotland Big Band The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St,

220 4298. 8pm. £4 (£3). The renamed RSAMD Big Band made up of 17 talented players directed by Chris Greive. FREE The Whighams Jazz Club Whighams Wine Cellars, 13 Hope St, Charlotte Square, 225 8674. 8pm. See Sun 1. Featuring Kate Gieben. ■ The Sunday Sinners The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm. £3 (£2). See Sun 1.

Monday 16

Edinburgh FREE Ron Carruthers Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 7pm. See Mon 2. FREE The Jazz Bar Big Band The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. See Mon 2. ■ The Babes The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 10.30pm. £3 (£2). See Mon 2.

Tuesday 17

Glasgow

■ Rush Hour Jazz City Halls, Candleriggs, 353 8000. 5.30–6.15pm. £4 on the door. Early evening jazz with Strathclyde Youth Jazz Orchestra. ■ Strathclyde BA Applied Music Jazz Orchestra City Halls,

Candleriggs, 353 8000. 5.30–6.30pm. £4. Concert by student jazz players. FREE The Hot Club of Glasgow Ivory Hotel, Langside Avenue Shawlands, 636 0223. 7.30pm. See Tue 3. ■ September Songs: the Music of

Kurt Weill Tron Theatre, 63 Trongate, 552 4267. 8.30pm. £10 (£7). Linden Tree presents an evening of classics by Kurt Weill, starring Joyce Falconer. FREE Live Jazz Slouch, 203–205 Bath St, 221 5518. 9pm. See Tue 3.

Edinburgh FREE The Six O’Clock After Work Blues The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. See Tue 3. FREE Steve Tyler Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 7pm. See Tue 3. ■ Great Jazz Jam Session The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £2 (£1). See Tue 3. ■ 101st Airbourne The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm. £3 (£2). See Tue 3.

Wednesday 18

Glasgow

■ The Blueswater Collective The

13th Note Café/Bar, 50–60 King St, 553 1638. 8pm. Blues, funk and rock’n’roll. FREE Gus Stirrat Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. Bassist Stirrat and guests with a mixture of modern jazz and standards.

■ September Songs: the Music of Kurt Weill Tron Theatre, 63 Trongate,

552 4267. 8.30pm. £10 (£7). See Tue 17.

Edinburgh FREE Edinburgh University Jazz Orchestra The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 5pm. See Wed 4. FREE Fraser Urquhart Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 6.45pm. See Wed 4.

■ Sean Noonan/Matthew Bourne

Duo The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £8 (£6). Modern jazz with a punk energy from New York drummer Noonan and Leeds-based pianist Bourne. ■ Mike Kearney Ka-Tet The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm. £3 (£2). See Wed 4.

Thursday 19

Glasgow

■ September Songs: the Music of Kurt Weill Tron Theatre, 63 Trongate,

552 4267. 8.30pm. £10 (£7). See Tue 17.

Edinburgh FREE Ged Brockie & Doug Urquhart Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 6.45pm. See Thu 29. ■ Click Clack Club The Third Door, 45–47 Lothian St, 225 6313. 8pm. £3. Funky experimental music club. ■ Jazz Bar Quartet The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £4 (£3). Jazz four-piece. ■ Future Heroes The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm. £2–£3. See Thu 29.

Friday 20

Glasgow

■ Rat Pack Live Glasgow Royal

Concert Hall, 2 Sauchiehall St, 353 8000. 7.30pm. £23.50. A swinging tribute to Frank, Sammy and Dean.

■ September Songs: the Music of Kurt Weill Tron Theatre, 63 Trongate,

552 4267. 8.30pm. £10 (£7). See Tue 17.

Edinburgh FREE Graham High Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 6.45pm. See Fri 6. ■ Head2Head The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £4 (£3). Graham Robb and Bill Kyle’s jazz sextet, formed from the ashes of Head.

Saturday 21

Glasgow

■ September Songs: the Music of Kurt Weill Tron Theatre, 63 Trongate,

552 4267. 8.30pm. £10 (£7). See Tue 17.

Edinburgh FREE The Mellotones The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 3pm. See Sat 31. ■ Head2Head The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £4 (£3). See Fri 20. ■ Late’n’Live The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm–3am. £5 (£3). See Sat 31. Featuring Acid jazz from Gecko 3.

Sunday 22

Edinburgh FREE Hot Tin Roof The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. See Sun 1. ■ The Sunday Sinners The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm. £3 (£2). See Sun 1. ■ The Sunday Sinners The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £5 (£4). See Sun 1. FREE The Whighams Jazz Club Whighams Wine Cellars, 13 Hope St, Charlotte Square, 225 8674. 8pm. See Sun 1. Featuring Dave Batchelor.

Monday 23

Edinburgh

Music

Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm. £3 (£2). See Wed 4.

Thursday 26

Edinburgh FREE Desafinado Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 6.45pm. See Thu 12. ■ Andi Neate The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £8 (£6). A mix of folk and jazz. ■ Future Heroes The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm. £2–£3. See Thu 29.

FOLK & WORLD Events are listed by date, then city. Submit listings at least 16 days before publication to henry@list.co.uk. Listings are compiled by Henry Northmore. ✽ Indicates Hitlist entry

Thursday 29

Glasgow FREE Tango Libre La Bodega Tapas Bar, Dance with Attitude Studios, 1120 South St, 581 3401. 7.30pm. A weekly ‘Tango Salon’ with live music to dance to and of course tapas to fuel those moves. ■ John Hinshelwood Band St Andrews in the Square, 1 St Andrews Square, 559 5902. 8pm. £8 (£6). Americana and country sounds.

Edinburgh

■ Ceilidh Beginners Dance Base, 14–16 Grassmarket, 228 1155. 7pm. £6.50 (£5.50). Learn traditional Scottish partner dances and join in the ceilidh. Part of Ceilidh Culture

FREE Ron Carruthers Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 7pm. See Mon 2. FREE The Jazz Bar Big Band The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. See Mon 2. ■ The Babes The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 10.30pm. £3 (£2). See Mon 2.

Tuesday 24

Glasgow FREE The Hot Club of Glasgow Ivory Hotel, Langside Avenue Shawlands, 636 0223. 7.30pm. See Tue 3. FREE Live Jazz Slouch, 203–205 Bath St, 221 5518. 9pm. See Tue 3.

Edinburgh FREE The Six O’Clock After Work Blues The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 6pm. See Tue 3. FREE Steve Tyler Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 7pm. See Tue 3. ■ Great Jazz Jam Session The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £2 (£1). See Tue 3. ■ 101st Airbourne The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 11.30pm. £3 (£2). See Tue 3.

Wednesday 25

Glasgow FREE Live Jazz Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. A mixture of standards and originals played on guitar, drums and saxophone.

Edinburgh FREE Edinburgh University Jazz Orchestra The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 5pm. See Wed 4. FREE Interplay Henderson’s Vegetarian Restaurant, 94 Hanover St, 225 2131. 6.45pm. See Wed 11. ■ Jazz Bar Quartet The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £4 (£3). See Thu 19. ■ Mike Kearney Ka-Tet The Jazz 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 103


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Dance Base, 14–16 Grassmarket, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £6.50 (£5.50). Prepare for a reel mix, all in an authentic ceilidh style. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Gallagher & Lyle The Queen’s Hall, 87–89 Clerk St, 668 2019. 7.30pm. £27.50. Homecoming tour for the Scottish duo whose career together has spanned five decades. ■ Rory Butler, Mairi Campbell and davesnewbike Maggie’s Chamber, Three Sisters, 139 Cowgate, 622 6801. 7.30pm. £6 (£5). Solo show from guitarist Butler, Scots singer Campbell and rootsy pop from davesnewbike.

Friday 30

Glasgow

■ Deoch’n’Dorus Glasgow University

Union, 32 University Avenue, 339 8697. 8pm. £8. Ceilidh from the young band comprising members from Portree, Jura and Fort William who met on the RSAMD’s traditional music course. FREE Wing & A Prayer Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. Folk/blues duo.

Edinburgh FREE Adam Holmes Captains Bar, 4 South College St. 4pm. Folk. ■ The Burly Ceilidh Club Ghillie Dhu, 2 Rutland Place, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £25. Join in the weekly Burly Ceilidh Club to be energetically entertained with one of the finest live ceilidh acts. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Guid Crack Waverley Bar, 1 St Mary’s St, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £3 suggested donation. Monthly storytelling session hosts an open floor Ceilidh Culture special. Part of Ceilidh Culture. ■ Patrick Ball and Rachel Hair Trio Merchiston Castle School, 294 Colinton Rd, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £14.50 (£12.50). Patrick Ball presents O’Carolan’s ‘Farewell to Music’, a one person theatre piece on the life, turbulent times and captivating music of this celebrated Irish artist. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Scots Music Group: Tutors’ Concert Teviot Row Union, Bristo

Square, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £10 (£7). A fundraising concert. Tutors appearing include songstress Wendy Carle Taylor and top young fiddlers Paul Murray and Lucy MacRae. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Luath Off the Page Live City Café, 19 Blair St, 228 1155. 8pm. £3 (£2). An evening of performance poetry, prose and music organised by Luath press. Writers appearing include Catriona Child and Alistair Findlay. Part of Ceilidh Culture. ■ Movings of the Spirit Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High St, 228 1155. 8pm. £10 (£7). Mairi Campbell and David Francis explore the story of Mairi’s grandfather, Duncan Campbell, Highlander, seanachaidh and itinerant preacher, through storytelling and music. Part of Ceilidh Culture.

■ Gallagher & Lyle Pavilion Theatre, 121 Renfield St, 332 1846. 7.30pm. £25–£27.50. See Thu 29.

Edinburgh

■ Find the Lost Cave of Harps: Story Walk/Come and Try Harp Session Merchiston Castle School, 294

Colinton Rd, 228 1155. 10am & 2.15pm. £9. Join Heather Yule, storyteller and harpist in exploring stories, riddles and rhymes. Children will have a chance to try the harps. Ages 5–8 (10am) and 9–14 (2.15pm). Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Telling Scottish Folktale Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High St, 228 1155. 10am. £30 (£26). Get back to the roots of Scotland’s oral storytelling heritage by exploring folktales and their contexts. With storyteller and writer Janis Mackay (Intermediate skills). Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Traveller Traditions Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High St, 228 1155. 2pm. £30 (£26). Discover the story tradition of Scotland’s Travelling people, and pick up some tales and tips for retelling, with storyteller and writer Jess Smith. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ An Audience with Catriona McKay Merchiston Castle School, 294

Colinton Rd, 228 1155. 3pm. £9. McKay will present, celebrate and talk about three influential harp recordings from her collection. Part of Ceilidh Culture FREE Allan Johnston & Mike Slessor Captains Bar, 4 South College St. 4pm. Folk music. ■ Portobello Fun Fiddle and Linten Adie: Singin and Fiddlin at the Wash House Portobello Community

Centre, 3 Adelphi Grove Portobello, 228 1155. 4.30pm. £6 (£4). A meeting of voices and fiddles. Original compositions and arrangements with musicians and singers from age seven to 86. Part of Ceilidh Culture

■ Anne-Marie O’Farrell & Cormac De Barra and Rhodri Davies

Merchiston Castle School, 294 Colinton Rd, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £14.50 (£12.50). O’Farrell and De Barra perform music for two Irish harps, reflecting Ireland’s oral musical heritage and the classical tradition. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ The Edinburgh Highland Reel and Strathspey Society’s 130th

Anniversary Concert The Queen’s

Hall, 87–89 Clerk St, 668 2019. 7.30pm. £12 (£8). Compere Jim McColl (The Beechgrove Garden) plus guests Colette Ruddy (mezzo soprano) and Martin Duncan (piper). Part of Ceilidh Culture.

■ Sangstream & Friends

Stockbridge Parish Church, 7b Saxe Coburg St, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £6 (£4). Choir singing Scots traditional song and are joined by Voices in Common, a folk choir from Devon; Scott Gardiner, the bothy ballad singer; Tanteerie and The Cast. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Khyam Allami The Pleasance Theatre, 60 Pleasance, 650 4673. 8.30pm. £7 (£6). A modern take on Middle Eastern music on the oud (Middle Eastern lute). FREE Cauldstane Slap Captains Bar, 4 South College St. 9pm. Accordion led folk

Sunday 1

Glasgow FREE The Blokes Slouch, 203–205 Bath St, 221 5518. 9pm. Blues and folk residency.

Edinburgh

■ Music of Two Nations Merchiston Castle School, 294 Colinton Rd, 228 1155. 3pm. £11 (£9). Yi Dong and Eddie McGuire mix classical and traditional Chinese sounds, and are joined by established performer and harpist Hannah Phillips. Part of Ceilidh Culture FREE Kenny Herbert & Rab Howatt Café Grande, 184 Bruntsfield Place, 228 1188. 7pm. Much loved local musicians playing traditional Scottish to soul and R&B. ■ The Merry Muses of Robert Burns with The Five Freens

Edinburgh Folk Club, Cabaret Bar, 60 The Pleasance, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £8 (£6). Bawdy funny and upbeat Burns. Adults only. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Ancience Merchiston Castle School, 294 Colinton Rd, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £12.50 (£14.50). Harpers Mary Macmaster, Gwenan Gibbard, Northumbrian piper Andy May and Uillean piper Tiarnán Ó Duinchinn play music from their own traditions, plus Joe Acheson’s computer to create something

new. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Chris Rogers Wee Folk Club, Royal Oak, Infirmary St, 228 1155. 8.30pm. £5. Chris Rogers has been on the Scottish folk club scene for ten years now. Part of Ceilidh Culture

Monday 2

Glasgow

■ Alkinoos Ioannidis Òran Mór, 731735 Great Western Rd, 357 6200. 7pm. £17.50. Greek-Cypriot singer/composer. FREE Michael Simons Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. Glasgow-based guitarist playing folk, blues and beyond.

Edinburgh

■ Dimitri Boekhoorn and Susan Enochsson Merchiston Castle School,

294 Colinton Rd, 228 1155. 3pm. £9. Boekhoorn plays up to seven different modern and early harps such as hybrid Celtic baroque harp, modernised Romanesque harp, bray harp, Galician medieval harp with horse hair and medieval wire-strung clairseach. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ A Gaelic Partnership: The Clàrsach at National Mod

Merchiston Castle School, 294 Colinton Rd, 228 1155. 7pm. £11 (£9). Featuring two accomplished Gaelic singers, National Mòd Gold Medallists Wilma Kennedy and James Graham, along with multi-talented harpists Màiri and Calum Macleod, this concert celebrates 120 years of unbroken links between the National Mòd and the clàrsach. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Family Ceilidh with Bella McNab’s Dance Band Merchiston

Castle School, 294 Colinton Rd, 228 1155. 8pm. £8 Under 12s free. Don’t worry if you don’t know the steps – dances will be expertly called. Dance away the evening with fun friendship – meet old pals and make new ones. Part of Ceilidh Culture.

Tuesday 3

Glasgow

■ An Appointment with The Waterboys Glasgow Royal Concert

Hall, 2 Sauchiehall St, 353 8000. 8pm.

Trembling Bells with Bonnie Prince Billy

■ Nuala Kennedy: A Suite of Scottish Industry The Queen’s Hall,

87–89 Clerk St, 228 1155. 8pm. £15 (£12). The Irish folk singer performs a new collaboration with several Scottish musicians/composers and a filmmaker. Part of Ceilidh Culture. FREE Tom Oakes & Kathryn Nicoll Captains Bar, 4 South College St. 9pm. Traditional folk on flute, guitar and violin.

Saturday 31

Glasgow

■ Leabhar ‘s Craic CCA, 350 Sauchiehall St, 352 4900. 10–midnight. £10 (daytime only £5; evening only £8). One-day festival of Gaelic literary culture, with highlights including a celebration of poet and songwriter Aonghas MacNeacail, the launch of Margaret Callan’s new book and a headline show from Gaelic folk band The Seedboat (Bàta an t-Sìl), alongside much more theatre, music, film, workshops and readings. 104 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

Folk rock quartet Trembling Bells have only been in existence for three years, but in that time they’ve managed to impress people from both sides of the divide. Belle and Sebastian’s Stevie Jackson produced their second album; coincidentally, they also popped up at the B&S-curated ATP Bowlie Weekender in 2010. From the folkier end of the spectrum, songwriter Alex Neilson has previously worked with Texan outsider Jendak and the regal Will Oldham – so it’s no surprise that the latter’s joining them for a jaunt round the UK. Support comes from eclectic Glaswegian five-piece a capella group Muldoon’s Picnic. ■ Queen’s Hall, Edinburgh, Wed 25 Apr.


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list.co.uk/music £24.50–£26.50. A concert of two halves – one of Waterboys hits and the other comprising material from their acclaimed album, An Appointment with Mr Yeats, setting the Irish bard’s poetry to music.

Edinburgh

■ Columcille Ceilidh Band: Music Workshop McDonald Rd Library, 2–4

McDonald Rd, 228 1155. 10.15am. £3.50. Columcille Ceilidh Band includes musicians with and without learning disabilities. The band plays for a wide range of events, including workshops focused to welcome everyone, and especially encouraging people with disabilities to enjoy playing music. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Mairi Chaimbeul and Twelfth Day Merchiston Castle School, 294 Colinton Rd, 228 1155. 3pm. £11.50. Young Harper Màiri Chaimbeul draws deeply on the Gaelic roots in performances of traditional and original music and song. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Catriona McKay and Chris Stout/ Scottish Ensemble

Merchiston Castle School, 294 Colinton Rd, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £14.50 (£12.50). Catriona McKay, Scottish harp and Chris Stout, Shetland fiddle blend elemental intensity with graceful eloquence to create a virtuosic and physically engaging duo. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Easter Gaitherin Tutor Concert

Old St Paul’s Church, 39 Jeffrey St, 556 3332. 7.30pm. £9 (£7). Folk concert featuring an impressive line-up of Bella Hardy, Gary Innes, Amy Geddes, Ruth Kirkpatrick, Amy Lord, Anna Massie, Sarah McFadyen, Mark Neal, Patsy Reid, James Ross, Mike Vass, Innes Watson and Fraser Stone. ■ Rachel Harrington Leith Folk Club, Victoria Park Hotel, 221 Ferry Rd, 454 2060. 7.30pm. £8 (£6). See Fri 30. ■ Edinburgh Ceilidh Club The Bongo Club, Moray House, 37 Holyrood Rd, 228 1155. 8.30pm. £6. The ceilidh club meets every Tuesday bringing you one of Scotland’s top ceilidh bands. This week features The Pentland Ceilidh Band. Part of Ceilidh Culture

Wednesday 4

Glasgow

■ Living Under the Gun: A Night of Poetry and Music for Palestine

CCA, 350 Sauchiehall St, 352 4900. 7.30pm. £13 (£10). Poetry from Liz Lochhead, Tom Leonard and Billy Letford, and folk music from Roy Bailey, Alasdair Roberts and Gillebride Macmillan, all in aid of Saor Phalastain’s Glasgow-Bethlehem cultural exchange.

Edinburgh

■ Columcille Ceilidh Band together with All Singing All Dancing St Bride’s Centre, 10 Orwell

Terrace, 228 1155. 10.15am. £3.50. See Tue 3. Part of Ceilidh Culture

■ An Audience with Wendy Stewart Merchiston Castle School, 294

Colinton Rd, 228 1155. 11.15am. £9. Wendy has woven her own path through the revival of both harp and traditional music scene. Part of Ceilidh Culture

■ Festival Orchestra, Kristianstad Harp Ensemble and Kylemore Harp Ensemble Merchiston Castle

School, 294 Colinton Rd, 228 1155. 3pm. £9. A short suite by Isobel Mieras, incorporating new and traditional Scottish music inspired by Alexander Gray’s poem Scotland, read by Gillean McDougall. Part of Ceilidh Culture FREE Easy Chair The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 7pm. Laid-back folky sounds from Graham Laird and Mike Bennet. ■ Edmar Castaneda, Namo and Winning Entry 2011 Young Composer Award Merchiston Castle

School, 294 Colinton Rd, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £14.50 (£12.50). A flamenco guitarists rooted in the traditions of his native Colombia. Part of Ceilidh Culture

■ Katriona Gilmore & Jamie Roberts Edinburgh Folk Club, Cabaret

Code, Wailing Miserere and Sharon McBrearty Counting House,

Bar, 60 The Pleasance, 228 1155. 8pm. £9 (£7). Lap-tapping guitar, fiery fiddle and harmonies. Part of Ceilidh Culture FREE Matt Norris The Ale House, 18–22 Clerk St, 629 0275. 8pm. Contemporary and traditional folk. ■ Spanglish Henry’s Cellar Bar, 8-16 Morrison St, 228 9393. 11pm–3am. £4. Flamenco fusion and techno/rumba/hip hop from Orkestra Simolika and Pellizco Flamenco.

West Nicolson St, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £5. Showcase featuring variety of Scottish folk bands. Part of Ceilidh Culture

Thursday 5

Glasgow

Òran Mór, 731-735 Great Western Rd, 357 6200. 7pm. ✽ £16. Hard rocking blues from a band Tinariwen

formed in a refugee camp in Libya in the early 1980s, made up of nomadic Touaregs from the Malian Sahara desert. FREE Tango Libre La Bodega Tapas Bar, Dance with Attitude Studios, 1120 South St, 581 3401. 7.30pm. See Thu 29. ■ Katriona Gilmore & Jamie Roberts St Andrews in the Square, 1 St

Andrews Square, 559 5902. 8pm. £9 (£7). Contemporary folk duo on guitar and fiddle.

Friday 6

Glasgow

■ Charlie & the Bhoys and The Ryan Band Barrowland, 244

Gallowgate, 552 4601. 7pm. £19. Folk rockers with Celtic (in both senses of the word) influences. ■ Vagabond Social Club The State Bar, 148 Holland St, 332 2159. 8pm. £4. Alt-acoustic night featuring York-based troubadour, Mark Wynn, Little Rumba from Wales and Glasgow songwriter/guitarist Martin McLaughlin. ■ Friday Ceilidh Sloans, 62 Argyll Arcade, City Centre, 229 5270. 8.30pm. £9 (£6). End of the week ceilidh action. ■ Martin Stephenson, Helen McCookerybook and The Starlets

King Tut’s Wah Wah Hut, 272a St Vincent St, 221 5279. 8.30pm. £19.50. Solo show from the Daintees frontman Stephenson, plus support from the former frontwoman of Brighton indie poppers The Chefs.

Edinburgh FREE Ceilidh Culture St Fair Castle St, 07914 254334. 10am–6pm. Browse the stalls for Scottish food, drink, crafts, fashion, music and more throughout the Easter weekend. Part of Ceilidh Culture. Tinariwen The Queen’s Hall, 87–89 Clerk St, 668 2019. 7pm. £16. See Thu 5. ■ The Burly Ceilidh Club Ghillie Dhu, 2 Rutland Place, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £25. See Fri 31. Part of Ceilidh Culture

■ Folk Weekender: Manran, Rura, Ross Couper and Tom Oakes Usher

Hall, Lothian Rd, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £15. Mànran play a high energy combination of Gaelic/English songs. Rura channels the passions of some of Scotland’s most exciting young musicians. Part of Ceilidh Culture

Saturday 7

Edinburgh FREE Ceilidh Culture St Fair Castle St, 07914 254334. 10am–6pm. See Fri 6.

■ The Lowland and Border Pipers’ Society: Annual Piping Competition Edinburgh Folk Club,

Cabaret Bar, 60 The Pleasance, 228 1155. 10am. £2.50. Competitive piping. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Folk Weekender: Rock, Salt & Nails, Skerryvore and Ewan Robertson Trio Usher Hall, Lothian

Rd, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £15. A fresh take on ‘Shetland music’, trad-rock fusion plus The Ewan Robertson Trio. Part of Ceilidh Culture

■ Jacob’s Pillow, Andy Mill, James Mackenzie, Blue Rose

Sunday 8

Glasgow

■ Kevin McDermott Orchestra O2

ABC, 330 Sauchiehall St, 332 2232. 7pm. £18.50. Over-14s show. Local singer/songwriter of 1980s vintage resurrects his Orchestra moniker. FREE The Blokes Slouch, 203–205 Bath St, 221 5518. 9pm. See Sun 1. ■ Lev Atlas Café Cossachok, Trongate 103, 10 King St, 553 0733. 9pm. £6. Russian folk tunes from the violinist.

Edinburgh FREE Ceilidh Culture St Fair Castle St, 07914 254334. 10am–6pm. See Fri 6. ■ Scots Music Group’s Big Seat by the Fire St George’s West Church,

58 Shandwick Place, 228 1155. 7.15pm. £1. Aimed at those new to performing, people can try out pieces in a friendly environment. Part of Ceilidh Culture

■ An Appointment with The Waterboys Edinburgh Festival Theatre,

13–29 Nicolson St, 529 6000. 8pm. £24.50–£26.50. See Tue 3. ■ Roots Showcase The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £4 (£3). Roots, R&B and blues from Toby of Black Diamond Express and friends. This month features Sleepy Eyes Nelson, Lynne Roberts, Olivia Salazar, Jack Nissan, Cameron Henderson and Jack’s Rabbit’s Foot Minstrels. ■ Jennifer Byrne Wee Folk Club, Royal Oak, Infirmary St, 228 1155. 8.30pm. £5. Irish singer who’s first album, Suitcase of Piper, was released in early 2011 and features collaborations with John McCusker, Kevin McGuire and Alan Kelly. Part of Ceilidh Culture

Monday 9

Glasgow FREE Michael Simons Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. See Mon 2.

Edinburgh FREE Ceilidh Culture St Fair Castle St, 07914 254334. 10am–6pm. See Fri 6. FREE Bluegrass Folk Session by Pat and Friends Victoria, 265 Leith Walk, 555 1638. 8–11pm. The audience are encouraged to join in this bluegrass session. ■ Simon Kempston, Tom Fairnie and Mark Barnett Wee Folk Club,

Royal Oak, Infirmary St, 228 1155. 8.30pm. £8. Enjoy three of Scotland’s finest songwriters in a diverse, dynamic and intriguing bill. Part of Ceilidh Culture

Tuesday 10

Glasgow FREE Pauline Vallance Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. Folk on vocals and clàrsach.

Edinburgh

■ Columcille Ceilidh Band: Music Workshop McDonald Rd Library, 2–4

McDonald Rd, 228 1155. 10.15am. £3.50. See Tue 3. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Cafe Ceilidh Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High St, 556 9579. 2pm. Donation. Relaxed day time music session hosted by Linten Adie. FREE TMSA Edinburgh & Lothians: Open Singers’ Session

Wee Folk Club, Royal Oak, Infirmary St, 228 1155. 8pm. A chance to get together and sing in a fun, social setting. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Edinburgh Ceilidh Club The Bongo Club, Moray House, 37 Holyrood Rd, 228 1155. 8.30pm. £6. Deoch n’ Dorus play the informal ceilidh club. Part of Ceilidh Culture

Music

■ Iain King Tribute Evening The Edinburgh Masonic Club, 1 Shrub Place Lane, Leith Walk, 228 1155. 8.30pm. £3. An evening celebrating the life and work of Iain King, the much-loved folk and jazz fiddle and guitar player from Leith (including a ceilidh). Part of Ceilidh Culture

Wednesday 11

Edinburgh

■ Café Voices Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High St, 556 9579. 7–9pm. £5. A relaxed session of oral storytelling, poetry by memory, music and song. FREE Easy Chair The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 7pm. See Wed 4.

■ Damien O’Kane, John Joe Kelly & Gerard Thompson Edinburgh Folk

Club, Cabaret Bar, 60 The Pleasance, 650 2458. 8pm. £9 (£7; members £6). Contemporary and traditional Irish folk from the banjo-player and friends. Part of Ceilidh Culture FREE Matt Norris The Ale House, 18–22 Clerk St, 629 0275. 8pm. See Wed 4.

Thursday 12

Glasgow

■ Dave Alvin & the Guilty Ones

The Arches, 253 Argyle St, 565 1000. 7.30pm. £16. Veteran roots rock guitarist who started out in The Blasters and whose songs have been covered by the likes of Dwight Yoakam and Los Lobos. FREE Tango Libre La Bodega Tapas Bar, Dance with Attitude Studios, 1120 South St, 581 3401. 7.30pm. See Thu 29. FREE Julia Gillard Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. Duo playing klezmer folk.

Edinburgh

■ Arrk The Royal Scots Club, 29–31

Abercromby Place, 228 1155. 8pm. £10. A set of no-nonsense, foot-tapping traditional Scottish/Irish music from this multi-instrumental duo. Part of Ceilidh Culture

Friday 13

Glasgow

■ Friday Ceilidh Sloans, 62 Argyll Arcade, City Centre, 229 5270. 8.30pm. £9 (£6). See Fri 6.

Edinburgh

■ Columcille Ceilidh Band: Music Workshop New Trinity Centre, 7A

Loaning Rd, 228 1155. 10.15am. £3.50. See Tue 3. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ A Braw Nicht Oot Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High St, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £6 (£4). The second Braw Nicht Oot will feature Scots speaking storytellers telling tales in different dialects, plus a wonderful mixture of music and song, and a short comedy Costa del Port Seton. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ The Burly Ceilidh Club Ghillie Dhu, 2 Rutland Place, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £25. See Fri 30. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Edinburgh Ceilidh Club Pollock Halls, Holyrood Park Rd, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £10 (£8). The best in Scottish music and dancing, featuring Edinburgh’s premier rock/funk ceilidh band, Teannaich. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Northern Streams Concert: Songs of Ice & Fire Edinburgh Folk

Club, Cabaret Bar, 60 The Pleasance, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £10 (£8). Featuring FUNI (old Icelandic word meaning ‘fire’) – Bára Grímsdóttir and Chris Foster, performing traditional songs from Iceland and Britain; Karin Ericsson Back and Maria Misgeld covering Swedish and British folk songs; and Kim André Rysstad – one of Norway’s top traditional singers – with fellow singer and hardanger fiddler, Lajla Buer Storli. Part of Ceilidh Culture 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 105


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Music FOLK ■ Northern Streams: Finale Concert and Singaround Edinburgh

Saturday 14

Glasgow

Folk Club, Cabaret Bar, 60 The Pleasance, 228 1155. 3pm. £10 (£8). Your final chance to hear performers from the Northern Streams Festival including: FUNI – Bára Grímsdóttir and Chris Foster, covering traditional songs from Iceland and Britain, followed by the opportunity for you to join in as a singaround. Tea, coffee and biscuits too! Part of Ceilidh Culture

■ Jonathan Morton Takes Over: Taraf Da Haidouks, Hilliard Ensemble & Pekka Kuusisto The

Old Fruitmarket, Candleriggs, 353 8000. 8pm. £15. The celebrated Romani ensemble performs with the Hilliard Ensemble and top Finnish violin star Kuusisto in an evening of genre-bending musical fireworks.

■ Canongate Cadjers Ceilidh Band The Merlin, 168-172 Morningside

Edinburgh

■ The Edinburgh Assembly: A Weekend Dance Workshop

Rd, Southside, 228 1155. 8pm. £10 (£7). Come along and experience an intoxicating night of music, song and dance with Edinburgh’s own Canongate Cadjers Ceilidh Band. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Judy Cook Wee Folk Club, Royal Oak, Infirmary St, 228 1155. 8.30pm. £5. Originally from Virginia, Cook has been on the rd since the early 1990s, making her own the songs and ballads of traditional Americana and the British Isles. Part of Ceilidh Culture

Columcille Centre, 2 Newbattle Terrace, 228 1155. 10am. £20. A varied programme of country dances in English Playford or ‘Jane Austen’ style, and American Contra. Part of Ceilidh Culture

■ Northern Streams : Children’s Workshop Scottish Storytelling Centre,

43–45 High St, 228 1155. 10.15am & 2pm. £5. 10.15-11.30am: Discover mouth music or ‘diddling’ with Karin Ericsson Back and Maria Misgeld, two of Sweden’s foremost folk singers. Part of Ceilidh Culture

Monday 16

Glasgow

■ Northern Streams Workshops

FREE Michael Simons Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. See Mon 2.

Scottish Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High St, 228 1155. 11.30am, 1.30pm & 3.30pm. £7 (£5). 11.30am-1.00pm: Medieval ballads, lullabies and ‘stevs’– 4-lined verses unique to tutor Kim André Rysstad’s Norwegian home area, with fellow singer and hardanger fiddler, Lajla Buer Storli 1.30-3.00pm: Choose either: 1. Harmony in North Sea area songs with Karin Ericsson Back and Maria Misgeld – two of Sweden’s foremost folk singers or 2. Harmony in music with Daniel Reid (saxophone) and fiddler Emma Reid, resident in Sweden. 3.30pm-5.00pm: Song & accompaniment: Danish singer Julie Hjetland and Swedish bouzouki player Jens Ulversand join Norwegian singer Annlaug Borsheim and accordionist Rannveig Djønne. Part of Ceilidh Culture

Tuesday 17

Glasgow FREE Stephan Zatkulak Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. Traditional and original material from this Czech songwriter.

Edinburgh

■ Ceilidh Club The Bongo Club, Moray House, 37 Holyrood Rd, 558 7604. 8.30pm. £6. Ceilidh dancing, furious fiddlers and callers to lead you through the steps. Featuring the Hotscotch Ceilidh Band.

Wednesday 18

Glasgow

■ Amanda Shires Woodend Tennis &

Bowling Club, 10 Chamberlain Rd, 959 1428. 8pm. Good old down and dirty rock’n’roll with Texas singer/fiddler Shires, playing with her regular collaborator, alt.country songwriter Rod Picott.

Edinburgh FREE Easy Chair The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 7pm. See Wed 4. ■ Brian Peters Edinburgh Folk Club, Cabaret Bar, 60 The Pleasance, 650 2458. 8pm. £9 (£7; members £6). Singer, guitarist and melodeon player.

Storytelling Centre, 43–45 High St, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £10 (£8). Featuring Danish singer, Jullie Hjetland, accompanied by Swedish musician, Jens Ulversand on bouzouki; leading Swedish folk musician on soprano/baritone saxophone – Daniel Reid and Emma Reid, equally rooted in the fiddle traditions of Britain and Sweden; and to round off the evening singer, Annlaug Borsheim and accordionist, Rannveig Djønne from Norway, who will be joined by Anne Sofie Linge Valdal and Ewan Macpherson (who also form part of wellknown Nu-Nordic band, Fribo). Part of Ceilidh Culture

Sunday 15

Glasgow FREE The Blokes Slouch, 203–205 Bath St, 221 5518. 9pm. See Sun 1.

Edinburgh

■ The Edinburgh Assembly: A Weekend Dance Workshop

Columcille Centre, 2 Newbattle Terrace, 228 1155. 10am. £20. See Sat 14. Part of Ceilidh Culture ■ Northern Streams: Presentation & Workshop: Songs and Music of Iceland Edinburgh Folk Club, Cabaret

Bar, 60 The Pleasance, 228 1155. 1pm. £7 (£5). FUNI (old Icelandic word meaning fire), who are Bára Grímsdóttir and Chris Foster, have taught across the world and run the first degree level course on Icelandic traditional music at the Icelandic Academy of the Arts. Part of Ceilidh Culture 106 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

Glasgow FREE Tango Libre La Bodega Tapas Bar, Dance with Attitude Studios, 1120 South St, 581 3401. 7.30pm. See Thu 29. ■ Dick Gaughan and Chloe Matharu St Andrews in the Square, 1 St Andrews Square, 559 5902. 8pm. £10 (£8). Gaughan plays an eclectic mix of styles and stringed instruments, combining his classic orchestration skills with a love of the Scots ballad.

Friday 20

Glasgow

■ Friday Ceilidh Sloans, 62 Argyll Arcade, City Centre, 229 5270. 8.30pm. £9 (£6). See Fri 6. ■ Balkanarama Chambre 69, Stock Exchange House, 69 Nelson Mandela Place, 248 6447. 10.30pm–3am. £8. A night of gypsy/Balkan/klezmer madness, film, visuals and live music featuring gypsy belly dancing, live visuals, free plum brandy and more. With contemporary Balkan fusion outfit The Destroyers. ■ Allan MacDonald The Canon’s Gait, 232 Canongate, 556 4481. 8pm. £5. Twice winner of the Inverness Clasp, renowned for his exploration of the relationship between piobaireachd and Gaelic song. Support comes from Kevin & Ellen Mitchell singing traditional Irish and Scottish song. ■ Heather Heywood The Canon’s Gait, 232 Canongate, 556 4481. 8pm. £5. Scottish ballads from the folk singer. Support from Naomi Harvey.

Saturday 21

Edinburgh

■ Mantra Concert with Satyaa and Pari The Augustine Church, 41–43

TOMMY GA-KEN WAN

■ Northern Streams Concert: NuNordic Music & Song Scottish

Thursday 19

Edinburgh

■ The Edinburgh Assembly: Evening Dance Columcille Centre, 2

Newbattle Terrace, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £6. Informal dance, part of the Assembly Weekend Dance Workshop. Part of Ceilidh Culture

FREE Matt Norris The Ale House, 18–22 Clerk St, 629 0275. 8pm. See Wed 4. ■ Spanglish Henry’s Cellar Bar, 8-16 Morrison St, 228 9393. 11pm–3am. £4. See Wed 4.

BACKWARDS-LOOKING PROGRAMME

SE INVERSION – TRAVELLING AGAINST TIME Queen’s Hall, Edinburgh, Fri 20 Apr; St Andrew’s in the Square, Glasgow, Sat 21 Apr Moving back in time is something more usually found in the world of science fiction than classical music performances. Putting its audience into a time machine where the concert hall takes on the role of TARDIS for the night, the Scottish Ensemble present Travelling against time, a back-to-front programme that starts in the late 1960s and goes back almost 300 years to the time of Bach. The Scottish Ensemble, with its artistic director Jonathan Morton (pictured), is becoming increasingly well known for the new perspectives it offers on music, and Morton’s latest programme looks like one of the best yet. ‘We’re again playing around with when a piece was written and how relevant that is,’ says Morton. ‘This programme is more directional than previously in that it’s going backwards. Indirectly, it’s tackling a big question in the classical music industry. Are we performing museum music if we play repertoire which was written hundreds of years ago?’ While Morton sees where this question is coming from, the answer for him is a resounding no. ‘Although we are going back in time, we may not actually be aware of things getting older and older. Bach sounds completely relevant and not some old thing written centuries ago.’ For SE Inversion, the Ensemble starts with Ligeti. ‘Even almost 50 years after this was written, Ramifications is still an extreme, radical soundscape,’ says Morton. ‘It is, though, the most museum piece we’re playing, as it’s of its own time.’ The programme then winds back in time via Webern, Debussy – ‘the turning point of modernity’, says Morton – then Bruckner and Mendelssohn before settling on Bach’s popular E major violin concerto. ‘Really,’ he says, ‘the idea is that the further we go back in time, the less we’ll actually feel that we’re going back in time.’ (Carol Main)

George IV Bridge, 220 1677. 7–9.30pm. £12 (£10). Swiss Satyaa and Greek Pari express their love for the Divine using devotional songs and self-composed mantras. Part of The Edinburgh International Middle Eastern Spirituality and Peace Festival 2012. Booking essential.

■ The Kilkennys: ‘Fine Girl, Ye Are!’ Brunton Theatre, Ladywell Way,

Musselburgh, 665 2240. 7.30pm. £15.25 (£13.25). See Sun 15.

■ Ceilidh in aid of Marie Curie Hospice Corn Exchange, 11 New

Market Rd, 477 3500. 8pm. £10. Fundraising ceilidh with live music provided by Ceilidhdonia. ■ Balkanarama Studio 24, 24–26 Calton Rd, 558 3758. 9.30pm–3am. £8 before 10pm; £9 after. See Fri 20..

Sunday 22

Glasgow FREE The Blokes Slouch, 203–205 Bath St, 221 5518. 9pm. See Sun 1.

Monday 23

Glasgow

■ Kevin Welch CCA, 350 Sauchiehall St, 352 4900. 8pm. £12. Kevin Welch returns to Glasgow from his Texan log cabin for this folk gig. FREE Michael Simons Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago Lane, 357 4524. 8pm. See Mon 2.

Tuesday 24

Edinburgh

■ Cafe Ceilidh St Colm’s Parish

Church, 158 Dalry Rd, scotsmusic.org 1.15pm. Donation. See Tue 10.


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Wednesday 25

Edinburgh

■ Boo Hewerdine and Brooks Williams The Voodoo Rooms, 19a West

Register St, 556 7060. 7pm. £12.50. Admired pop/blues songsmith – founder of cult band The Bible and frequent collaborator with Eddi Reader. With State of the Union’s Brooks Williams. FREE Easy Chair The Jazz Bar, 1 Chambers St, 220 4298. 7pm. See Wed 4.

■ Trembling Bells with Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy and Muldoon’s Picnic

The Queen’s Hall, 87–89 Clerk St, 668 2019. 7pm. £18. The Glasgow-based four-piece and the American singersongwriter perform folk and country from the album The Marble Downs. ■ Andy Irvine Edinburgh Folk Club, Cabaret Bar, 60 The Pleasance, 650 2458. 8pm. £9 (£7; members £6). A solo performance from this Irish singer and mandolin player who co-founded a succession of acclaimed Irish bands, from Sweeney’s Men to Patrick St. FREE Matt Norris The Ale House, 18–22 Clerk St, 629 0275. 8pm. See Wed 4.

Thursday 26

Glasgow FREE Tango Libre La Bodega Tapas Bar, Dance with Attitude Studios, 1120 South St, 581 3401. 7.30pm. See Thu 29. ■ Andy Irvine Star Folk Club, St Andrew’s in the Square off Saltmarket St Andrew’s St, 563 0454. 8pm. £10 (£8). See Wed 25. FREE JEM Tchai-Ovna House of Tea, 42 Otago La, 357 4524. 8pm. Indian and Scottish music on guitar, cello and sax.

Edinburgh

■ Andi Neate The Jazz Bar, 1

Chambers St, 220 4298. 8pm. £8 (£6). A mix of folk and jazz from this Highland lass. Launching her new album.

CLASSICAL Events are listed by date, then city. Submit listings at least 16 days before publication to classical@list.co.uk. Listings are compiled by Carol Main & Alex Johnston. ✽ Indicates Hitlist entry

Thursday 29

Glasgow BBC SSO Afternoon Performance 5: Tchaikovsky’s Rococo Variations

City Halls, Candleriggs, 353 8000. 2pm. £7 in advance; £9 on the day. Stefan Blunier conducts William Wallace’s The Passing of Beatrice, Lyadov’s Eight Russian Folk-Songs, Shostakovich’s Symphony No 1 and Tchaikovsky’s Variations on a rococo theme for cello and orchestra featuring soloist Gemma Rosefield.

Messiaen’s mighty Quartet is one of the few musical masterpieces to have been composed and premiered in a German POW camp. Here it’s played with new works for the same instruments by Suzanne Parry and Mark Boden. St Petersburg Philharmonic Orchestra Usher Hall, Lothian Rd, 228

1155. 7.30pm. £10–£27.50. Prokofiev’s Classical Symphony, Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No 1 with soloist Dmitri Alexeev and Shostakovich’s Symphony No 5, the huge critical and popular success of which probably saved its composer from the gulag. Yuri Temirkanov conducts.

Friday 30

Glasgow Gusztáv Fenyo: Vienna Series St Bride’s Episcopal Church, 69 Hyndland Rd, 339 2708. 8pm. £12 (seniors £10; students, under 18s, disabled, unemployed £5). Piano works by Schubert, Haydn, Mozart and finally, Beethoven.

Edinburgh FREE Katharine Platt St Giles’ Cathedral, Royal Mile, 226 0673. 12.15pm. Young harpist in solo recital. FREE Ben Johnson & James Baillieu: Die schöne Müllerin St Cecilia’s Hall, Niddry St, 668 2019. 1pm. Boy meets girl, girl goes off with huntsman, boy throws himself in the river. Schubert’s great song cycle will be brdcast live on BBC Radio 3, so the audience must be seated by 12.45pm. Edinburgh University Wind Band

Reid Concert Hall, University of Edinburgh, Bristo Square, 651 3212. 7.30pm. £6 (£4). Morven Bell conducts. RSNO: Beethoven Eight Usher Hall, Lothian Rd, 228 1155. 7.30pm. £11–£34. Glaswegian conductor Douglas Boyd conducts Bizet, Chopin and Fauré, and finally Beethoven’s Symphony No 8.

Saturday 31

Glasgow FREE Avis McIntyre Renfield St Stephen’s Church, 260 Bath St, 332 2826. 1pm. Organ recital. Glasgow Chamber Choir: Handel’s Messiah St Bride’s Episcopal Church,

69 Hyndland Rd. 7pm. £10 (£5). Handel’s lovable old warhorse. Contact secretary@glasgowchamberchoir.org.uk for tickets. RSNO: Beethoven Eight Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, 2 Sauchiehall St, 353 8000. 7.30pm. £11–£34. See Fri 30.

Edinburgh FREE Jesmond Choral Group and The Priory Singers St Giles’ Cathedral, Royal Mile, 226 0673. 12.15pm. Vocal ensembles from Newcastle and Wales join forces for Fauré’s Requiem. Scottish Opera: The Rake’s Progress Edinburgh Festival Theatre,

13–29 Nicolson St, 529 6000. 7.15pm. £10–£67.50. See Thu 29. Edinburgh Concert Band: Charity Concert for Richmond’s Hope

13–29 Nicolson St, 529 6000. 7.15pm. £10–£67.50. Stravinsky, Auden & Kallman’s astringent morality tale is directed by David McVicar with Edgaras Montvidas, Steven Page and Carolyn Sampson in the leading roles.

Performing Arts Centre, Stewart’s Melville College, Queensferry Rd, edinburghconcertband.org.uk 7.30–9.30pm. £8 (£5). Charity concert from the woodwind, brass and percussion ensemble. Jubilo: Handel’s Messiah St Cuthbert’s Church, 5 Lothian Rd, 229 1142. 7.30pm. £12 (£10). Jubilo celebrates 30 years with a reunion performance of Handel’s mighty Christganza. Featured soloists are Susan McNaught, Katrine Townhill, Andy Fraser and Ivor Klayman, with accompaniment from Edinburgh Players. The Open Orchestra Canongate Kirk, 153 Canongate, 556 3515. 7.30pm. Free with retiring collection. Amateur orchestra plays Prokofiev, Lehar, Falla and Chabrier.

Hebrides Ensemble: Quartet for the End of Time The Jam House, 5

Rutter Requiem: A Concert for Passiontide St Andrew’s and St

Queen St, 226 4380. 7.30pm. £14 (£7).

George’s Church, 13 George St, 225

Edinburgh FREE Live Music Now: Jennifer Port Scottish National Gallery, The Mound, 624 6200. 6pm. Clàrsach recital. Scottish Opera: The Rake’s Progress Edinburgh Festival Theatre,

3847. 7.30pm. £5. John Rutter’s Requiem and choral works by McDowall and Mendelssohn. Sospiro: Membra Jesu Nostri St Michael and All Saints Church, Brougham St, Tollcross, sospirobaroque@hotmail.co.uk. 7.30pm. £10 (£7). The baroque ensemble plays Buxtehude’s celebrated cantata cycle.

HITLIST THE BEST CLASSICAL & OPERA MARK HAMILTON

■ Ceilidh Club The Bongo Club, Moray House, 37 Holyrood Rd, 558 7604. 8.30pm. £6. Ceilidh dancing, furious fiddlers and callers to lead you through the steps. Featuring Norman Mackay’s Ceilidh Experience.

Music

Sunday 1

Glasgow FREE Kelvingrove Sunday Organ Recitals Kelvingrove Art Gallery & Museum, Argyle St, 276 9599. 3–3.45pm. Sunday promenade concerts with different organists. Il Divo SECC, Finnieston Quay, 0844 395 4000. 6.30pm. £29.50–£65. Simon Cowell’s boys sing pop songs in Italian.

Monday 2

Edinburgh FREE Dunwoody High School Chamber Orchestra St Giles’ Cathedral, Royal Mile, 226 0673. 12.15pm. Recital by student ensemble from Georgia (USA).

Tuesday 3

Edinburgh Recorder and Piano Recital St

George’s School for Girls, Garscube Terrace, 226 3392. 1.15–2pm. £5 (schoolchildren £1). Chris Orton (recorders) and Audrey Innes (piano) play music from the 14th to the 21st centuries. Edinburgh Film Music Orchestra

Reid Concert Hall, University of Edinburgh, Bristo Square, 651 3212. 7.30pm. Suggested donation £5. Yati Durant conducts film music by Morricone, Durant and Saint-Saëns. Scottish Ensemble: Seavaigers

Merchiston Castle School, 294 Colinton Rd, 478 8446. 7.30pm. £12.50–£14.50. The Edinburgh premiere of Sally Beamish’s Seavaigers, performed with ace Scottish/classical/improvisation fusion-meisters Catriona McKay (clarsàch) and Chris Stout (fiddle).

Wednesday 4

Glasgow sound lab: Stelkur City Halls,

Candleriggs, 353 8000. 8pm. £6 plus £1/£1.50 booking fee. Icelandic contemporary music ensemble.

Edinburgh FREE Very Wednesday St Giles’ Cathedral, Royal Mile, 226 0673. 12.15pm. Will Pickvance (piano) and guests play classical favourites and new material. Edinburgh Chamber Orchestra

Morningside United Church, 15 Chamberlain Rd, 447 8724. 7.30pm. £8 (£6). Beethoven’s Christ on the Mount of Olives Op 85 with a chorus of singers from across the city.

Thursday 5

Glasgow Xuefei Yang Westbourne Music, 7 West George St, 649 5347. 12.45pm. £8 (£7; children £4). Recital by guitar virtuoso.

Scottish Opera: The Rake’s Progress World renowned opera director David McVicar returns to his native Scotland for his first staging of Stravinsky’s The Rake’s Progress, putting human frailty at its heart. Festival Theatre, Edinburgh, Thu 29 & Sat 31 Mar. Pass the Spoon It’s a sort of opera about cookery, which was a huge hit with audiences and critics during its sell-out run at Glasgow’s Tramway last year. There are actors, singers, giant puppets, music and at least your five a day of fruit and veg in composer David Fennessy’s collaboration with visual artist/librettist David Shrigley. Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh, Thu 26-Sat 28 Apr. RSNO: Järvi Conducts Sibelius One It’s always a special occasion when Neeme Järvi returns to the RSNO. This time, he brings a forgotten Scottish treasure written in France by Borders-born composer Sir John Blackwood McEwen. And Järvi’s version of Sibelius’ First Symphony should be mind-blowing stuff. Usher Hall, Edinburgh, Fri 28 Apr; Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, Sat 29 Apr.

Saturday 7

Glasgow Inconsistent Whisper The Arches, 253 Argyle St, 565 1000. 4pm. £3. Performance installation by Glasgowbased artist Torsten Lauschmann and Red Note Ensemble. Part of Behaviour. Edinburgh Youth Orchestra Spring Concert Royal Conservatoire of

Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. 7.30pm. £15 (£12; students £5; children £2). Dvorák’s Cello Concerto with soloist Philip Higham, and Williams’ Olympic Fanfare and Elgar’s Enigma Variations, 113 years old but still enigmatic. Garry Walker conducts.

BBC SSO: Shostakovich’s Fifth and

Edinburgh

Prokofiev Piano Concerto 5 City Halls, Candleriggs, 353 8000. 7.30pm. £10–£23. Martinu’s Memorial to Lidice, Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No 5, featuring Denis Kozhuhkin, and Shostakovich’s provocative and disturbing Symphony No 5. Ludovic Morlot conducts.

FREE David Goodenough St Cuthbert’s Church, 5 Lothian Rd, 229 1142. 1.30pm. Organ recital.

Friday 6

Edinburgh FREE Edinburgh Chamber Orchestra Morningside United Church, 15 Chamberlain Rd, 447 8724. 7.30pm. Good Friday performance of Pergolesi’s Stabat Mater.

Sunday 8

Glasgow FREE Kelvingrove Sunday Organ Recitals Kelvingrove Art Gallery & Museum, Argyle St, 276 9599. 3–3.45pm. See Sun 1.

Edinburgh Edinburgh Youth Orchestra Spring Concert Usher Hall, Lothian Rd, 228

1155. 7.30pm. £15 (£12; students £5; children £2). See Sat 7. 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 107


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Edinburgh FREE Shotime Productions Chamber Choir St Giles’ Cathedral, Royal Mile, 226 0673. 12.15pm. Recital by choir from Dearborn, Michigan. Get Organised: John Kitchen Usher Hall, Lothian Rd, 228 1155. 1.10pm. £3. Organ works by Mendelssohn.

Wednesday 11

Glasgow NYCoS National Girls Choir City

fireworks from the celebrated Romani ensemble and special guests.

Edinburgh FREE University of St Andrews Chapel Choir St Giles’ Cathedral, Royal Mile, 226 0673. 12.15pm. Choral recital.

Sunday 15

Glasgow Jonathan Morton Takes Over: Towards Silence Kelvingrove Art

Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. 7.30pm. £9 (£7). The International Fellow in Marimba (great job title) leads a student percussion recital.

Gallery & Museum, Argyle St, 276 9599. 9pm–midnight. £15. John Tavener’s Towards Silence for 4 String Quartets performed by the Medici, Cavaleri and Finzi Quartets plus Fifth Quadrant; Hilliard Ensemble performs Pärt; and Pekka Kuusisto plays Bach’s epic Partita No 2 BWV 1005 for solo violin. FREE Kelvingrove Sunday Organ Recitals Kelvingrove Art Gallery & Museum, Argyle St, 276 9599. 3–3.45pm. See Sun 1.

sound lab: The Red Ensemble plus Lives as omens City Halls,

Edinburgh

Halls, Candleriggs, 353 8000. 3pm. £12 (£8; children £4; family £27). Christopher Bell conducts music by Richard Rodney Bennett, with pianists Philip Moore and Andrew West. Percussion Ensemble with Eric Sammut Royal Conservatoire of

Candleriggs, 353 8000. 8pm. £6 plus £1/£1.50 booking fee. Improvised electronica plus debut live performance by Lives as omens.

Edinburgh FREE Very Wednesday St Giles’ Cathedral, Royal Mile, 226 0673. 12.15pm. See Wed 4.

Thursday 12

Edinburgh FREE Live Music Now: Sax Ecosse Scottish National Gallery, The Mound, 624 6200. 6pm. Transcriptions for sax ensemble of music by Josquin, Byrd, Gesualdo and JS Bach, as well as contemporary music by David Maslanka. Scottish Chamber Orchestra: Baroque Greats The Queen’s Hall,

87–89 Clerk St, 668 2019. 7.30pm. £9.50–£28. Richard Egarr conducts (from the harpsichord) works by Telemann, Heinichen, Vivaldi and JS Bach. Alec Frank-Gemmill and Harry Johnstone play horn.

Friday 13

Glasgow RCS Stevenson Winds Royal

Conservatoire of Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. 1pm. £10.50 (£7.50). Top student wind players in recital. Scottish Chamber Orchestra: Baroque Greats City Halls,

Candleriggs, 353 8000. 7.30pm. £12–£26 (seniors £10–£24; children, students & unemployed £5; plus booking fee £1–£1.50 for phone/online bookings). See Thu 12. Jonathan Morton Takes Over: Icebreaker, Scottish Ensemble & Pekka Kuusisto The Old Fruitmarket,

Candleriggs, 353 8000. 9.30pm. £15. Rampant minimalism: Reich’s Variations for Vibes, Piano and Strings, Andriessen’s De Snelheid and Glass’ Glassworks.

Edinburgh FREE Domchor Würzburg St Giles’ Cathedral, Royal Mile, 226 0673. 12.15pm. Recital by the choir of Bavaria’s Würzburg Cathedral.

Saturday 14

Glasgow Scottish Ensemble: Open Rehearsal CCA, 350 Sauchiehall St,

352 4900. 3.30pm. £3 (under 16s free). An open rehearsal of the Ensemble’s upcoming Inversion – Travelling against Time programme, with works by Ligeti, Bruckner, Debussy, Mendelssohn and JS Bach. Jonathan Morton Takes Over: Taraf de Haidouks, Hilliard Ensemble & Pekka Kuusisto The

Old Fruitmarket, Candleriggs, 353 8000. 8pm. £15. Genre-bending musical 108 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

The Hans Gál Society Canongate

Kirk, 153 Canongate, 556 3515. 4pm. £10 (£8; members £7). Trios by Gál, Beethoven, Krása and Strauss.

Monday 16

Glasgow RCS String Department Showcase Concert Royal Conservatoire of

Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. 1pm. £7 (£5). Student recital.

Tuesday 17

Glasgow Norma Greig French Song Prize

Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. 4.30pm. £3 (£2). Competition for young singers specialising in the French mélodie. Jung Soo Yun in Recital Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. 7.30pm. £9.50. Korean tenor accompanied by Timothy Dean.

Edinburgh Get Organised: John Kitchen Usher Hall, Lothian Rd, 228 1155. 1.10pm. £3. Organ recital featuring Calum Robertson (clarinet) in extracts from Mozart, Finzi and MacMillan.

Wednesday 18

Friday 20

Glasgow Joan Alexander Memorial Concert with Malcolm Martineau Royal

Conservatoire of Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. 1pm. £10.50 (£7.50). Concert in memory of the great soprano and teacher, led by her great sometime accompanist. RCS: Kaspar Hauser – Child of Europe Alexander Gibson Opera

Studio, Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. 7.15pm. £12.50 (£10). Rory Boyle’s opera is conducted by the acclaimed young Australian, Jessica Cottis. Scottish Chamber Orchestra: A Cold Spring City Halls, Candleriggs,

353 8000. 7.30pm. £12–£26 (seniors £10–£24; children, students & unemployed £5). Oliver Knussen conducts his own Two Organa and the world premiere of his latest composition, along with Helen Grime’s A Cold Spring, Stravinsky’s Movements for Piano and Orchestra and Beethoven’s Symphony No 8. Peter Serkin is the soloist.

Edinburgh FREE Peter Backhouse St Giles’ Cathedral, Royal Mile, 226 0673. 12.15pm. Organ recital. RSNO: Järvi Conducts Sibelius One Usher Hall, Lothian Rd, 228 1155.

7.30pm. £11–£34. Conductor Laureate Neeme Järvi returns for Sibelius’ Symphony No 1, Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No 2 with soloist Christian Blackshaw, and music from Sir John Blackwood McEwen. Scottish Ensemble: Inversion – Travelling against time The Queen’s

Hall, 87–89 Clerk St, 668 2019. 7.30pm. £10. Ligeti’s Ramifications, works by Webern, Debussy, Bruckner and Mendelssohn and JS Bach’s ebullient Violin Concerto in E Major.

Saturday 21

Glasgow The Opera Experience Glasgow Cathedral, Castle St, 946 0966. 7–10.30pm. £10 (under 12s free). Martin Aelred, accompanied by Stuart Mitchell, sings popular arias with dance accompaniment from Edinburgh 21st Century Ballet School. Fundraiser for Alzheimer Scotland. RSNO: Järvi Conducts Sibelius One Glasgow Royal Concert Hall, 2

Plug 2: Blue Monday Royal

Conservatoire of Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. 6.30pm. £7 (£5). Original student tunes led by bassist and guest leader Mario Caribé.

Edinburgh Get Organised: John Kitchen

Usher Hall, Lothian Rd, 228 1155. 1.10pm. £3. The music of Arthur Sullivan for organ, featuring overtures and songs from the Savoy Operas. Meadows Chamber Orchestra

Rudolf Steiner Hall, 60 Spylaw Rd. 7.30pm. Free with retiring collection. SCO Principal Horn Alec FrankGemmill conducts and, where appropriate, plays in Fauré’s Pavane, selections from the Requiem and the Cantique de Jean Racine, amongst others.

Tuesday 24

Glasgow Plug 3: Plug Postludes Alexander

Gibson Opera Studio, Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. 1pm. £7 (£5). More recitals of new music. Plug 4: The New Auld Alliance

Alexander Gibson Opera Studio, Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. 7.30pm. £10.50 (£7.50). The beginning of a new collaboration between the RCS and the Paris Conservatoire.

Wednesday 25

Glasgow Plug 5: Style in Performance

Alexander Gibson Opera Studio, Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. 1pm. £7 (£5). Student musicians play music by student composers. Plug 6: Alistair MacDonald at 50 – Electroacoustic Plug Royal

Conservatoire of Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. 7.30pm. £7 (£5). New electroacoustic works by composer and RCS staff member MacDonald, as well as student compositions.

Edinburgh FREE Very Wednesday St Giles’ Cathedral, Royal Mile, 226 0673. 12.15pm. See Wed 4.

Thursday 26

Glasgow

Sauchiehall St, 353 8000. 7.30pm. £11–£34. See Fri 20.

Glasgow

Young Artist in Residence Recital Tailleferre Anniversary Concert

Scottish Ensemble: Inversion – Travelling against time St Andrew’s

Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. 7.30pm. £9 (£7). Maciej Granat leads students in works for piano by Germaine Tailleferre, the only female member of Les Six.

in the Square, 1 St Andrews Square, 559 5902. 7.30pm. £10. See Fri 20.

Gibson Opera Studio, Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. 1pm. £7 (£5). Further adventures in new music.

Edinburgh

Plug 8: Music Lab – The Return of Volkov Royal Conservatoire of

Edinburgh FREE Very Wednesday St Giles’ Cathedral, Royal Mile, 226 0673. 12.15pm. See Wed 4.

Thursday 19

Glasgow Pure Brass Westbourne Music, 7 West

George St, 649 5347. 12.45pm. £8 (£7; children £4). The young brass ensemble in concert. BBC SSO: The Lark Ascending & Vaughan Williams Symphonies City

Halls, Candleriggs, 353 8000. 7.30pm. £10–£23 (seniors £8–£21; students, under 16s and unemployed £5). Andrew Manze conducts the dissonant and troubled Symphony No 4 and the serene and tranquil Symphony No 5, with soloist Jennifer Pike joining for The Lark Ascending. RCS Song Studio: A French Connection – Two Anniversaries

Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. 7.30pm. £8 (£6). Student singers perform works by Massenet, Debussy, Caplet and Messiaen.

Scottish Chamber Orchestra: A Cold Spring The Queen’s Hall, 87–89

Clerk St, 668 2019. 7.30pm. £9.50–£28. See Fri 20.

Sunday 22

Glasgow Scottish Cinema Organ Trust

Pollokshaws Burgh Halls, 2025 Pollokshaws Rd, 632 5811. 2.45pm. £7 (members £6). Cinema organ recital by Trust members. FREE Kelvingrove Sunday Organ Recitals Kelvingrove Art Gallery & Museum, Argyle St, 276 9599. 3–3.45pm. See Sun 1.

Monday 23

Glasgow Plug Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. Times and prices vary. The Royal Conservatoire’s annual festival of new music is back with a week of new compositions and exploratory music-making. See listings. Plug 1 Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. 1pm. £7 (£5). Recitals of new music.

Plug 7: Plug Postludes Alexander

Scotland, 100 Renfrew St, 332 5057. 7.30pm. £7 (£5). SCO Principal Guest Conductor Ilan Volkov conducts MusicLab in a concert of new music.

Edinburgh FREE Live Music Now: Flercussion Scottish National Gallery, The Mound, 624 6200. 6pm. Jo Ashcroft (flute) and Calum Huggan (yes, percussion) play music inspired by the Red Chalk exhibition, featuring Soviet music as well as a Piazzolla tango. Pass the Spoon Traverse Theatre, Cambridge St, 228 1404. 7.30pm. £15–£17 (£6–£13). Foodie opera featuring vegetables, a dung beetle, from theatre company Magnetic North, artist/librettist David Shrigley, composer David Fennessy and contemporary musicians the Red Note Ensemble.

Scottish Chamber Orchestra: Benedetti – Vivaldi’s Four Seasons Usher Hall, Lothian Rd, 228

1155. 7.30pm. £9.50–£28. Scotland’s favourite violinist plays everyone’s favourite work by Vivaldi, as well as pieces by Gluck and Rameau. Christian Curnyn directs from the harpsichord.


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Theatre HITLIST

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THE BEST THEATRE & DANCE

Stage WHISPERS KIERAN HURLEY

For Once/Write Here New Writing Festival The Scottish premiere of Tim Price’s dark comedy For Once is followed by a reading of the playwright’s 50-character opus Demos as part of the theatre’s new writing showcase. See previews, pages 111 and 116. Both Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh; For Once, Wed 4–Sat 14 Apr; Write Here, Mon 16–Tue 24 Apr.

Behaviour The Arches’ envelopepushing theatre festival continues, with new work from Kieran Hurley and Stef Smith, writer of Roadkill. See Stage Whispers, right. Various venues, Glasgow, until Sat 28 Apr.

Cirque du Soleil: Alegría Prepare to be amazed by Cirque du Soleil’s mix of acrobatics, dance and music when they bring their long-running show north. See preview, page 111. SECC, Glasgow, Wed 11–Sat 15 Apr.

A Streetcar Named Desire Scottish Ballet adapts Tennessee Williams’ classic. See feature, page 110. Theatre Royal, Glasgow, Wed 11–Sat 14 April; Festival Theatre, Edinburgh, Wed 18–Sat 21 April.

Kith/Kin Double bill of contemporary dance exploring male identity, from Company Chameleon and featuring onetime members of Scottish Dance Theatre. See preview, page 111. Brunton Theatre, Musselburgh, Thu 19 Apr. Tightrope An inclusive dance piece by Glasgow’s Indepen-dance, featuring disabled and able-bodied performers in the role of an ageing circus troupe. See preview, page 111. Tramway, Glasgow, Fri 30 & Sat 31 Mar.

The Lieutenant of Inishmore Absurdist comedy from Irish playwright Martin McDonagh, writer of last year’s Lyceum hit The Beauty Queen of Leenane. Reviewed next issue. Royal Lyceum, Edinburgh, Fri 20 Apr–Sat 12 May.

King Lear Veteran Scottish thespian David Hayman returns to the Citz after a 33-year absence to take on the role of Shakespeare’s hubristic king. See preview, page 112. Citizens Theatre, Glasgow, Fri 20 Apr–Sat 12 May. Dear Glasgow The political situation in the Arab world is explored through letters by some of the Middle East and North Africa’s best-known writers. See preview, page 114. Òran Mór, Glasgow, Mon 23–Sat 28 Apr.

Enquirer Site specific theatre piece based on interviews with newspaper industry insiders about the crisis in journalism. See Noticeboard, page 11. The Hub, Pacific Quay, Glasgow, Thu 26 Apr–Sat 12 May.

What was the inspiration for Beats? Unlike my previous monologue piece, Hitch, which was autobiographical, Beats is all made up. It’s a story set against the backdrop of the free party movement in the early 90s, shortly after the Criminal Justice Act of 1994 was passed, which clamped down on the rave subculture. All that was a little before my time, but I returned to it because I wanted to make a piece about the feelings of possibility that can occur in crowds, essentially about the power of gathered youth. There are issues here that feel really relevant now in terms of restrictions on civil liberties, and sometimes looking back can be useful in trying to make sense of the present. I think for that reason it’ll make a very fitting double-bill with Gary Gardiner’s Thatcher’s Children. How did you come to collaborate with DJ Johnny Whoop? When I was making Hitch I worked with the wonderful twopiece pop band Over The Wall, who performed their music live, and this dynamic was something I wanted to continue to pursue. When I thought of Johnny I knew straight away he was the right guy. He’s a resident DJ at the Arches but he also knows his way round a studio theatre setting. He’s sound designer, lighting designer, and co-performer and he’s got knowledge of the whole scene that’s beyond mine really, so he has been crucial in ensuring the piece is authentic. How crucial was the Arches to your development of the piece? The show is transferring to the Traverse, and is made with that in mind, so it doesn’t respond directly to the architecture of the Arches, however, the Arches’ dual identity as theatre and nightclub make it a great place to make this show. My hope is that this might draw in an audience from some of the crowd who consistently show up for Pressure, not just from the regular theatre audience. That’s quite an exciting prospect for me. ■ Beats, Arches, Glasgow, Wed 18–Sun 22 Apr; Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh (double bill with Gary Gardiner’s Thatcher’s Children), Wed 25–Sat 28 Apr. 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 109


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FOUND IN TRANSLATION How on earth do you make a ballet out of a Tennessee Williams play? Kirstin Innes goes backstage at Scottish Ballet’s new production of A Streetcar Named Desire to find out tanley Kowalski eases his muscles in around the thin body of the woman who will become his wife. Flirting with her, he pulls her handbag from her lap, wears it on one casually extended foot, a powerful, teasing predator. Behind her eyes, a light switches on, and she rises to his lure, shakes off her prim posture and picks up his movements with the rhythm of her hips, a conscious and willing sexual submission. Around them, New Orleans bustles with gossips drinking gin, gamblers, sailors on leave, and the jazz on the score goes somewhere charged and carnal. It’s not, directly, a scene from Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire, but the characters of Stanley and Stella and their primal physical chemistry are instantly recognisable to anyone even vaguely familiar with the play (or the 1951 movie, starring Marlon Brando). And it’s all done without a syllable of conversation. Adapting one of Williams’ notoriously talky texts into a wordless medium, as Scottish Ballet are doing with their soon-to-premiere version of Streetcar, might seem counter-intuitive, if not an impossible task. However, one of Williams’ greatest talents was always giving life to fully 3D characters. In the corner of the rehearsal room, a token string of pearls around Eve Mutso’s neck are not the only thing marking her out immediately as the dancer creating the role of the definitive ‘fading Southern belle’, Blanche DuBois. She’s en pointe, practising delicate, fluttering movements with her

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110 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

shoulders, the turn of her head. These characters have always existed in the physical; this is a logical step. ‘Tennessee Williams almost called the play The Moth,’ says Nancy Meckler, Streetcar’s director and co-creator. ‘That idea of Blanche, how vulnerable she is, drawn to bright things that will harm her. It’s a very visual image we’ve gone back to in the ballet.’ It was actually Meckler herself, who comes to Scottish Ballet from recent stints at the RSC, Broadway and the National Theatre of England, with whom the production started.

‘THIS IS A BALLET OF STREETCAR BUT IT’S NOT A BALLET OF THE PLAY’ ‘Ashley [Page, Scottish Ballet’s artistic director] had seen a very physical, movementbased adaptation of [George Eliot’s novel] The Mill on the Floss, which I did with my company Shared Experience, and thought it would be interesting to have a theatre director work on a ballet.’ Although her work is well known for its physical elements, Meckler has never directed a ballet before, so she was paired up with choreographer Annabelle Lopez Ochoa. ‘When we met, I came with a few

suggestions for ideas we could work on,’ says Meckler. ‘One of them was Streetcar, and Annabelle went and watched the film, got crazy about the characters, and came back saying that we had to make a ballet from them.’ The scene I’ve watched Scottish Ballet principals Tama Barry (as Stanley) and Sophie Martin (Stella) rehearse today is one of a number created especially for the production. ‘Early in the text, Stella and Blanche have a long conversation about Stanley where Stella says how much she loves him, how their poverty doesn’t matter – complex ideas that you can’t necessarily get across in ballet. It’s also mentioned that Stanley is at the bowling alley, and we realised that if we went to the bowling alley, we could see this Stanley Kowalski, close up. We could see that he’s king-of-the-walk, can be violent when things don’t go his way; also, Blanche can watch how close her sister is with her husband, and feel excluded. It’s all a much more physical way of meeting Stanley than having two women sitting around a kitchen table talking about him.’ What Meckler has done is an act of translation; the conversion of the characters’ rich, often sordid backstories into action is only a small part of that. ‘Finally, this is a ballet of Streetcar, but it’s not a ballet of the play. The play has inspired us to make a ballet.’ A Streetcar Named Desire, Theatre Royal, Glasgow, Wed 11–Sat 14 April; Festival Theatre, Edinburgh, Wed 18–Sat 21 April.


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list.co.uk/theatre PREVIEW NEW PLAY

FOR ONCE Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh, Wed 4–Sat 14 Apr Shropshire’s Pentabus Theatre has earned a shelfload of awards for its imaginative and challenging productions of stories set in rural areas. Television writer Tim Price’s debut play, For Once, is a case in point. Set in Wales, it’s about the impact of a car crash in a country lane on the family of the only survivor. The director is Orla O’Loughlin, former artistic director of Pentabus, and her six years with the Shropshire-based company enabled her to introduce Price to Pentabus’ local community, the very rural and very foodie town of Ludlow. In the course of research, Price visited an abattoir and worked a shift in a local Michelin-starred kitchen. ‘The two biggest stories in Ludlow,’ he says, ‘are probably its food, and its teen death toll on countryside roads. I explore how these two might be related.’ O’Loughlin is pleased with the result, praising Price’s humour, enthusiasm and commitment and saying that the development process felt like a culmination of much of her work with the company. The play takes the form of integrated monologues, a new writing trope that contemporary playwrights can’t seem to tear themselves away from. Price engagingly admits that he ‘usually hates’ monologues, but he commends O’Loughlin for recognising that, in a piece about family members isolated from each other, they seemed – for once – appropriate. O’Loughlin is now artistic director of the Traverse, Scotland’s cauldron for new writing, where she’s determined to keep renewing the tradition of producing new work. ‘The new will one day be the classic and we have a duty as artists to keep the canon ongoing and relevant.’ Price, meanwhile, seems bracingly unafraid of big subjects. His next play is about the Welsh upbringing of interned US soldier Bradley Manning. (Alex Johnston)

PREVIEW CONTEMPORARY DANCE

PREVIEW CIRCUS ARTS

PREVIEW INCLUSIVE DANCE

ALEGRIA

TIGHTROPE

KITH/KIN

SECC, Glasgow, Wed 11–Sat 15 Apr

Tramway, Glasgow, Fri 30 & Sat 31 Mar

Brunton Theatre, Musselburgh, Thu 19 Apr

Expect a heady mix of high-energy acrobatics, dance and music when Cirque du Soleil returns to Scotland this month. Alegria, Spanish for ‘joy’, has been delighting audiences across the globe for 17 years, as artistic director Bruno Darmagnac points out. ‘It’s a very theatrical production. There are moments of poignancy and intense acting: you laugh, you’re surprised and then you are moved.’ Combining an effervescent blend of angels, clowns and nostalgic old birds, the production explores the division of a carnivalesque society, as a younger generation fights against established members of the community to decide who should take over the ruling of their kingdom. Darmagnac describes his role as being in charge of maintaining the concept of Alegria: ‘As new artists arrive they change the characters and give ideas, but it’s up to me to be careful to stay within the initial concept.’ Watching every performance and taking notes, Darmagnac’s own sense of Alegria comes from the reactions of audiences. ‘We use a language that doesn’t exist, but people understand what happens on stage. It works – kids, parents and grandparents come out happy and amazed.’(Kirstyn Smith)

Down on its luck, an ageing circus troupe sticks together in an attempt to survive. On paper, Tightrope’s storyline doesn’t sound like much fun, but in reality the work has been lauded for its wit and poignancy. The show was created for Londonbased integrated dance company AMICI in 2010, by company founder, Wolfgang Stange. Featuring disabled and nondisabled dancers, who perform a range of circus skills, Tightrope has now been reworked to include Glasgow’s Indepen-dance. ‘The beauty of working with another company is that they bring in their own personalities,’ says Stange, ‘so the production will become theirs within the structure of the existing piece. Working together has been a positive challenge that has enriched both Indepen-dance and AMICI.’ AMICI first visited Tramway in 1990, helping to foster a re-evaluation of who can and cannot dance. ‘In the years since AMICI first appeared in Glasgow, there has been a steadily positive shift in people’s attitude towards performances with disabled artists,’ says Strange. ‘This sharing of artistic expertise is another development in bringing inclusive dance theatre to mainstream audiences.’ (Kelly Apter)

The recent departure of Janet Smith from Scottish Dance Theatre (SDT) highlighted not just her achievements over the past 15 years, but the alumni she helped foster. Two such dancers are Kevin Turner and Anthony Missen, both of whom had a compelling stage presence at SDT, and have since branched out to form Company Chameleon Dance Theatre. ‘My time with SDT was tremendously formative,’ says Missen. ‘The broadness of the repertory helped me become a versatile performer. I developed my voice in a variety of ways and took away a whole raft of ideas and approaches to creating movement.’ Company Chameleon is heading back to Scotland this April, to perform a double-bill of contemporary dance exploring male identity. Before Night Fell, created with choreographer Beth Cassani, looks at friendship, camaraderie and bravery. Rites takes a more personal look at the journey from childhood, through adolescence into adulthood. ‘We researched various notions of masculinity but realised we would have to bring it back to our own experiences to find something intimate that we could share. We’ve been dancing together for almost 20 years, so there’s a lot of history – the good, bad and ugly.’ (Kelly Apter) 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 111


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Theatre PREVIEW CLASSIC

KING LEAR Citizens Theatre, Glasgow, Fri 20 Apr–Sat 12 May

ALAN MCCREDIE

DOUGLAS ROBERTSON

EAMONN MCGOLDRICK

It’s been 33 years since David Hayman last performed at the Citizens Theatre. ‘Backstage is very different so I now need a chaperone to get me from A to B,’ he laughs. Widely recognised for his role as DCS Walker in ITV’s Trial and Retribution, Hayman was lauded for his turns as Hamlet and Lady Macbeth at the Citz in the 1970s, and April will mark his first appearance as King Lear. ‘It’s a great play,’ Hayman says. ‘It’s about a king who learns to be a man. His wealth, power and position are stripped away from him and he’s left abandoned. Suddenly he sees life through the eyes of a pauper and he finds his own humanity. That’s a wonderful message and it’s particularly relevant today when you think of the haves and the have nots in this world, and the gap is getting greater. It’s got a real contemporary resonance.’ This social conscience is echoed throughout Hayman’s life. His charity, Spirit Aid, has set up a range of humanitarian projects, from mobile clinics in Afghanistan to Christmas presents for destitute families in the UK. ‘It’s a wonderful antidote to this industry,’ he explains, ‘I think it’s incumbent in all of us to do what we can to help those less fortunate than ourselves.’ And as he prepares to tread the boards at the Citz once more, Hayman is clearly excited about working with director Dominic Hill and a cast that includes ‘old pals’. He explains: ‘I think it’s been generations since we’ve had a home-produced, Scottish production of King Lear. I think it’s really bold of Dominic to do it but it is his favourite play. He’s a man who adores the classics and he’s been longing to do it. It’s fab that he’s seeing his dream come true at the Citz and in Scotland.’ (Yasmin Sulaiman)

REVIEW COMEDY DOUBLE BILL

REVIEW NEW PLAY

REVIEW ADAPTATION

WATERPROOF/ FROM PAISLEY TO PAOLO

THE MAN WHO LIVED TWICE

THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO

Touring until Thu 5 Apr. Seen at Brunton Theatre, Musselburgh, Fri 23 Mar ●●●●●

Royal Lyceum, Edinburgh, until Sat 14 Apr

For a few years in the early 20th century playwright Edward Sheldon was the toast of Broadway, with melodramas such as Romance notching up lengthy runs and inspiring hit movies. Crippled by rheumatoid arthritis, he withdrew Hughes-like to a penthouse apartment and began a new career as confidante to such luminaries as John Barrymore. Garry Robson’s fascinating play speculates on the meeting in 1936 between Sheldon and a youthful John Gielgud, the latter breaking box office records with his Hamlet but rather adrift in the Big Apple. Paul Cunningham gives a striking performance as the dramatist, immobile for much of the play but evoking through richly nuanced inflection the charisma and vulnerability that inspired such trust. Laurie Brown, too, is very moving as Gielgud, whose struggle with his sexuality is coaxed to the surface. Alison Peebles’ production achieves a romantic atmosphere through stylised design, songs and the device of having Sheldon’s macaw pass comment on the action, and while Robson’s text is wordy, its main theme, of hiding from oneself and the world, is quietly brought into focus at the end. (Allan Radcliffe)

With this energetic adaptation of Beaumarchais’ 18th-century original, DC Jackson has breathed fresh life into a classic. It’s a good-humoured, goodtime show, with just enough emotional power up its sleeve to make you feel more than just belly laughs. The action is relocated from the bloated French aristocracy to the equally affluent (and possibly equally ill-fated) top floor of an Edinburgh banking firm. Figaro and fiancée Suzanne are about to merge their too-good-to-be-true fair trade finance start-up with former bosses the Chief – a despicable oldschool banker with a ‘BUPA-certified sex addiction’ – and the Chair – his long-suffering wife. It feels fresh and up to date, but there’s no time to let the rapacious actions of the boardroom get you down, as this was always more sex comedy than satire at heart. The humour is fast and fun, the cast wrapping their tongues around wordy one-liners and making some complicated physical farce look easy. With jokes at the expense of Dundee and accountants, not to mention cross-dressing and an unexpected penguin, it’s even a little pantoesque, but done with enough intelligent wit to stay classy. (Laura Ennor)

Touring Scotland until Sat 21 Apr. Seen at Paisley Arts Centre, Mon 12 Mar ●●●●● These short comic plays, being toured by Mull Theatre, began their lives at A Play, a Pie and a Pint (Òran Mór, Glasgow’s famous lunchtime theatre). Both contemplate the life disappointments of young, Scottish, working-class men (most often with a fairly low grade, sexual comedy). In Andy Duffy’s Waterproof (in which lovelorn shop worker Gordon and his friend, cocky university student Alex, go on a fishing trip), Alex emerges from the tent to inform his pal that he is sweating like ‘a rapist’ and ‘a paedo in a nursery’. This is typical of the recycled nature of much of Duffy’s script. Martin McCardie’s From Paisley to Paolo, in which Paolo Nutini wannabe Jack wins tickets for himself and two friends to a festival at which Nutini is headlining, is an altogether more substantial, and funnier, play; even if its gear changes from comic set piece to pathos-laden monologue are executed with all the subtlety of a foghorn. An extended debate about how Nutini would get into hot water for his supposed in-tent jacuzzi is a comic highlight. (Mark Brown) 112 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

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list.co.uk/theatre Events are listed by city, then alphabetically by venue. Submit listings at least 16 days before publication to theatre@list.co.uk. Listings are compiled by Laura Ennor. ✽ Indicates Hitlist entry

GLASGOW ■ ADELAIDES 209 Bath Street, 248 4970. The Phantom of the Opera Thu

29–Sat 31 Mar, 7.30pm. £17.50 (£15; family £55). A new production of the popular musical from Transylvania Productions, featuring Josh Kemp’s contemporary score and Joseph Taylor’s book and lyrics. ■ THE ARCHES 253 Argyle Street, 565 1000. Behaviour Until Sat 28 Apr, times vary. £5–£12. An intelligently cool festival of theatre, built around The Arches’ sturdy reputation for pushing genre and art form boundaries. See show listings, below.

We Are Gob Squad and So Are You: Adventures in Remote Lecturing Sat 31 Mar, 7pm. £12 (£9).

A performance lecture from British/German arts collective Gob Squad, dissecting the modern-day mantras about being yourself, following your dreams and reaching for the stars, and asking just what that self or those stars actually are. Part of Behaviour. The Mermaid Show Sat 31 Mar, 8.30pm. Sun 1 Apr, 7.30pm. £12 (£9). A

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Theatre new, viscerally physical piece from opinion-dividing New York performance artist Ann Liv Young. Part of Behaviour. Inconsistent Whisper Sat 7 Apr, 4pm. £3. Torsten Lauschmann and Red Note Ensemble present a performance installation looking at the problems of miscommunication. Part of Behaviour. Maybe If You Choreograph Me, You Will Feel Better Thu 12–Sat 14

Apr, times vary. £7. Tania El Khoury offers herself up for direction in this piece of performance art. Via a dictaphone, a male audience member directs El Khoury with commands either scripted or not, in a bid to explore the relationship between female performance and the male gaze. Part of Behaviour. Thatcher’s Children Wed 18, Fri 20 & Sat 21 Apr, 7.15pm; Thu 19 Apr, 7pm; Sun 22 Apr 2pm. £11 (£8; all tickets £5 on Wed 18 Apr). Physical theatre piece exploring the legacy of Margaret Thatcher. Part of Behaviour. Kieran Hurley: Beats Wed 18, Fri 20 & Sat 21 Apr, 7.15pm; Thu 19 Apr, 7pm; Sun 22 Apr 2pm. £11 (£8; all tickets £5 on Wed 18 Apr). Part of Behaviour. See Stage Whispers, page 109. White Rabbit Red Rabbit Wed 18, Fri 20 & Sat 21 Apr, 7.15pm. New play from young Iranian writer Nassim Soleimanpour, dealing with the experience of a generation and the nature of live art. An Arches Brick Award winner. Part of Behaviour. Collecting Fireworks Thu 19–Sat 21 Apr, times vary. £6 (£4). A recorded archive of people’s whispered recollections of theatre events. Part of Behaviour.

LOVE DANCE? LOVE FESTIVAL THEATRE Scottish Ballet: A Streetcar Named Desire

Trying to leave a troubled past behind her, fading southern belle Blanche DuBois moves into her sister Stella’s New Orleans apartment. Stella’s brutish husband Stanley sees that Blanche is not what she appears to be, and sets out to destroy her.

PREVIEW REVIVAL

FURTHER THAN THE FURTHEST THING Dundee Rep, Tue 24 Apr–Sat 5 May James Brining, artistic director of Dundee Rep, has a rule of thumb about choosing plays. ‘When you have a strong sense of how to do it and how it should look,’ he says, then it’s time. And if this coincides with the members of the repertory company fitting the cast list, then ‘the stars are all in alignment’. And so it turns out that a daring production of Zinnie Harris’s Further Than the Furthest Thing will be Brining’s last show in Dundee before he heads off to his new job at West Yorkshire Playhouse. He’s known Further Than . . . since it was first performed by the Tron Theatre Company at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 2000. Then, in 2006, Liz Ogilvie’s DCA show Bodies of Water gave him the visual framework. ‘Her work is all about the reflections of light on water. Somehow, the two fused in my head.’ Organising a rehearsed reading in Dublin, showed him how a piece written in patois, set in Tristan da Cuhna and then Southampton, could work without a team of accent coaches. This production will have, he says, ‘a very particular approach.’ The Rep’s wide stage will be extended to include a pool of water in the auditorium, with the actors on islands. Staging aside, Brining will play Harris’s text straight. ‘When you have a non-naturalistic, poetic environment you need some naturalistic elements. There has to be a bit of reality, otherwise it would be too much abstract symbolism. The story couldn’t get through.’ (Anna Burnside)

Set to a specially commissioned jazz-inspired score by awardwinning composer Peter Salem, Scottish Ballet presents A Streetcar Named Desire in the 65th anniversary year of Tennessee Williams’ Pulitzer Prize-winning play. The Company continues to push the boundaries of modern ballet in a collaboration with American theatre and film director Nancy Meckler and international choreographer Annabelle Lopez Ochoa, creating a powerful infusion of drama and dance. To be in with the chance of winning a pair of tickets to the opening night of A Streetcar Named Desire, just log on to list.co.uk/offers and tell us:

Who wrote A Streetcar Named Desire? Festival Theatre, Edinburgh 18 - 21 April Box Office: 0131 529 6000 www.festivaltheatre.org.uk Competition closes on 13 April 2012. There is no cash alternative. Usual List rules apply.

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Theatre Fatherland, Motherland Wed 25–Fri

27 Apr, 7pm. £11 (£8). Work-in-progress from Nic Green, exploring her dual heritage – from Yorkshire on her mother’s side and Scotland on her father’s – and ideas of place, identity and authenticity. Part of Behaviour. 7 Day Drunk Thu 26 & Fri 27 Apr, 9.30pm. £11 (£8). Bryony Kimmings explores her rocky relationship with alcohol. Part of Behaviour. ■ CITIZENS THEATRE 119 Gorbals Street, 429 0022. King Lear Fri 20 Apr–Sat 12 May (not Sun/Mon), 7.30pm (Sat 5 May mat 1.30pm). £12–£19 (£8–£16). See preview, page 112.

■ COTTIERS THEATRE 93–95 Hyndland Street, 357 4000. Comann na Comadaidh Fri 30 Mar, 8pm. £9 (£7). Community drama in Gaelic, organised by An Lochran. ■ EASTWOOD PARK THEATRE Eastwood Park, Rouken Glen Road, Giffnock, 577 4970. Ah, Wilderness! Wed 18–Sat 21 Apr, 7.30pm (Sat mat 2.30pm). £8–£10. Giffnock Theatre Players perform Eugene O’Neill’s coming of age comedy. ■ THE HUB Pacific Quay, thehub-pacificquay.com Booking via the Citizens Theatre, see above for contact details.

Enquirer Thu 26 Apr–Sat 12 May

(not Mon), 8pm. £15 (£5–£10; previews on Thu 26 & Fri 27 Apr, all tickets £10). Journalists Paul Flynn, Deborah Orr and Ruth Wishart have interviewed around 50 people involved in the newspaper industry, from editors to readers and retailers, gathering responses to the ongoing events and revelations in the industry in the wake of the hacking scandal. Their words have been structured by the National Theatre of Scotland’s Vicky Featherstone and John Tiffany into a piece of site-specific theatre, which is being performed in an empty floor of the BBC’s Glasgow offices. ■ KING’S THEATRE 297 Bath Street, 0844 871 7648. Seven Brides for Seven Brothers

Tue 3–Sat 7 Apr, 7.30pm (Wed & Sat mat 2.30pm). £12.50–£22.50. Classic 19th-century-set musical, performed here by the Lyric Club. Girls’ Night Tue 10–Thu 12 Apr, 7.30pm; Fri 13 Apr, 5.30pm & 8.30pm; Sat 14 Apr, 5pm & 8pm. £13.50–£26.50. Five friends embark on a night of karaoke, cocktails and hilarious antics. Monkee Business The Musical Tue 17–Sat 21 Apr, 7.30pm. £19.50–£39.50. Jukebox musical combining an ‘Austin Powers-style’ plot and classic tunes from the first manufactured pop band. Rainy Days and Mondays – The Carpenters Story Sun 22 Apr,

7.30pm. £23–£28. Celebrate the lives and music of Karen and Richard with a full live band and video presentation. Dancing Queen Tue 24–Sat 28 Apr, 7.30pm (Sat mat 2.30pm). £9.50–£32. Four lead singers and 16 dancers take you back to the 70s.

NORMAN MCBEATH

■ LUSH 111 Buchanan Street, 243 2522. Booking via the Arches, see above for contact details. The Silence of Bees Thu 12–Sat 14 Apr, 7pm & 8.30pm. £11 (£8). This sitespecific tale unpacks the stories of three women from different times but linked by business, blood and beekeeping. Part of Behaviour. PREVIEW LUNCHTIME SERIES

DEAR GLASGOW Òran Mór, Glasgow, Mon 23–Sat 28 Apr With the Syrian crisis showing no sign of abating, the human story behind the various conflicts and uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa has seldom been so urgent. It’s an issue that David MacLennan, artistic director of Oran Mor’s A Play, a Pie and a Pint strand, is keen to explore with his latest special project, Dear Glasgow. Inspired by the reach and response of last year’s Reveal, in which the National Theatre of Scotland and Òran Mór presented five Latin American plays adapted by young Scottish playwrights, MacLennan has turned his attentions to the Middle East and North Africa, commissioning a series of letters from some of the Arab world’s writers. Keen to deal with the here and now, the director explains he was eager to find writers not plays, so new work was to the fore. ‘We wanted to give writers the opportunity to write a letter to Glasgow about the Arab world, responding to the current situation is their countries,’ explains MacLennan. ‘It’s an extraordinarily difficult time in that part of the world: the bloody ghastliness in Syria, the relatively successful transition in Tunisia, the curious situation in Egypt where resolution seems to have taken place but at the same time hasn’t really – the letters really reflect that.’ Syrian novelists Laila Hourani and Samar Yazbek, Palestinian playwright Raja Shehadeh and Egyptian librarian Ismail Serageldin are just some of the writers taking part, in a stage project that will see different Scottish writers read the letters daily, including Liz Lochead, David Grieg, William McIlvanney and Alan Bisset. ‘I wasn’t expecting to get such a great variety,’ says the director. ‘Some are very directly political, accounting events; others go in a different direction, one, for example, is the very symbolic story of a garden’s tenacious caper bush, so each is very unique.’ MacLennan has also commissioned a filmmaker and composer to create a 50minute video and soundscape to accompany the piece. ‘We may change the order and content every day, we’re still deciding but I think everyone will take something away from it.’ (Anna Millar)

■ ÒRAN MÓR 731-735 Great Western Road, 357 6200. A Play, a Pie & a Pint: The Last Great Dictator Until Sat 31 Mar, 1pm.

£8–£12.50. A new play by Kieran Lynn about the final chapter in the life story of a great dictator. Ticket price for this and all the below Play, Pie & Pint productions includes a pie and a drink. A Play, a Pie & a Pint: Cold Turkey at Nana’s Mon 2–Sat 7 Apr,

1pm. £8–£12.50. Nana’s on a mission to rehabilitate Tony even when everyone else has given up in this play by Ben Tagoe. A Play, a Pie & a Pint: Forfeit Mon 9–Sat 14 Apr, 1pm. £8–£12.50. Lunchtime theatre from the pen of Alan Wilkins, in which three ex-con women meet in a pub halfway between Glasgow and Dundee. A Play, a Pie & a Pint: Would You Please Look at the Camera Mon

16–Sat 21 Apr, 1pm. £8–£12.50. Play by an anonymous Syrian playwright, cutting straight to the heart of the current maelstrom in the country.

A Play, a Pie & a Pint: Dear Glasgow Mon 23–Sat 28 Apr,

1pm. £8–£12.50. See preview, left. ■ PAVILION THEATRE 121 Renfield Street, 332 1846. Gordon Smith: Beyond Belief Sat 14 Apr, 7.30pm. £20. Medium Gordon travels the world looking to connect people with their departed loved ones. Good Mourning Mrs Brown Mon 16–Sat 21 Apr, 7.30pm. £29.50 (£19.50). Brendan O’Carroll stars in the continuing hilarious tales of this typical Dublin Mammy. Singin’ I’m No a Billy He’s a Tim

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7.30pm (Sat mat 2pm). £17.50. Goldfish Theatre presents its take on Des Dillon’s classic anti-sectarian play. ■ PLATFORM The Bridge, 1000 Westerhouse Road, Easterhouse, 276 9696. Kith/Kin Tue 17 Apr, 1.30pm. £3.50. See preview, page 111.

■ SECC Finnieston Quay, 0844 395 4000. Diversity Thu 29 Mar, 6.30pm. £21.50–£29.50. Street dance skills from the winners of the third series of Britain’s Got Talent who actually, believe it or not, have some of the aforementioned talent. Cirque du Soleil: Alegría Wed 11–Sat 14 Apr, 8pm (Sat mat 4pm); Sun 15 Apr, 1pm & 5pm. £50. See preview, page 111. Derren Brown – Svengali Wed 18–Sat 21 Apr, 8pm. £30–£35. Derren Brown plays mind games with his audience and himself using psychology, illusion and showmanship – and then hopefully explains how he did it.

■ THEATRE AT QUEEN’S 170 Queen’s Drive, 423 6037. To Serve is to Resist Fri 30 & Sat 31 Mar, 2pm & 7pm. £6–£7. A play about the life of Jane Haining, one of the very few Scots to die in Auschwitz. ■ THEATRE ROYAL 282 Hope Street, 0844 871 7647. Long Day’s Journey Into Night

Until Sat 31 Mar, 7pm. £15–£30. David Suchet stars in Eugene O’Neill’s tale about the Tyrone family, torn asunder over 24 hours as they battle their demons and each other.

Scottish Ballet: A Streetcar Named Desire Wed 11–Sat 14

Apr, 7.30pm (Sat mat 2pm). £14.50–£37.50. See preview, page 110. ■ TRADES HALL 85 Glassford Street, 228 8000. William O’Connor: Psychic Psychic Fri 30 Mar, 7.30pm. £14.50.

Open stage psychic event with guests Geraldine Russell and Steven Thomson. ■ TRAMWAY 25 Albert Drive, 0845 330 3501. Tightrope Fri 30 & Sat 31 Mar, 7.30pm. £8 (£5). See preview, page 111. The Making of Us Fri 20–Sun 22 Apr, 8pm. £5 refundable deposit. A chance to watch a series of films and become part of this performance art installation as an extra. Part of Glasgow International Festival of Visual Art.

■ TRON THEATRE 63 Trongate, 552 4267. A Slow Air Thu 29 Mar, 2.30pm. £8. Family drama written and directed by David Harrower and brought to the stage by the Tron Theatre Company. I Was Always Behind You Thu 29–Sat 31 Mar, 8pm. £7. A play about love and foolishness from the Tron Young Company. Gifted Thu 5–Sat 7 Apr, 7.30pm. £7. New play developed in the Tron’s Skillshops classes, dealing with unwanted gifts. Weddings Can be Murder: Murder Mystery Dinner Fri 13 & Sat 14 Apr, 7.15pm. £25. Upstage Productions presents a fiendish mystery, served up over a three-course meal. Doris Day Can F**k Off Fri 13 & Sat 14 Apr, 7.45pm. £12 (£7). Find out what happened when Greg McLaren attempted to live his life as if in a Doris Day musical, breaking into song at every available opportunity. Kin Thu 19–Sat 21 Apr, 8pm. £10 (£7). An insightful exploration of middle-aged children and their feelings towards their ageing parents as they all face the future. Performed by Donna Rutherford with a cast including Alison Peebles, Tim Ingram, Richard Gregory and more.


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From the boardroom to the bedroom. It’s a ruthless journey.

World Première

23 March –14 April 2012 BOX OFFICE: 0131 248 4848 GROUPS 8+: 0131 248 4949 TEXT RELAY: 18001 0131 248 4848 MOBILE: m.lyceum.org.uk ONLINE: www.lyceum.org.uk/figaro TWITTER: #figaro Royal Lyceum Theatre is a Registered Company No. SC062065. Scottish Charity Registered SC010509.

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Theatre A Song and a Sip Sun 22 Apr, 4pm.

£12. Cabaret afternoon with songs from the musicals, courtesy of Insideout Productions in the Tron’s Victorian Bar. Lady M: His Fiend-Like Queen?

Wed 25–Sat 28 Apr, 7.30pm (Sat mat 2.30pm). £7–£15. A work directed and adapted from Macbeth by Mary McLuskey and produced by McLuskey and Kenny Miller’s Theatre Jezebel company, exploring the relationship between the Scottish play’s notorious power couple. ■ WOODSIDE HALL 36 Glenfarg Street, apolloplayers@hotmail.com Little Shop of Horrors Thu 19–Sat 21 Apr, 7.30pm (Sat mat 2.30pm). £14 (£12). The Apollo Players perform the cult musical.

EDINBURGH

Scottish Opera: The Rake’s Progress Thu 29 Mar & Sat 31 Mar,

7.15pm. £10–£67.50. Stravinsky’s most famous opera is a taut morality tale about the decline and fall of an 18th century gentleman. The Steamie Tue 10–Sat 14 Apr, 7.30pm (Wed & Sat mat 2.30pm). £15–£28 (£12–£25). Tony Roper’s washhouse comedy about the relationships between a group of working women as they rush to finish their work before the New Year bells, now celebrating its 25th anniversary.

Scottish Ballet: A Streetcar

Named Desire Wed 18–Sat 21 Apr, 7.30pm (Sat mat 2pm). £16.50–£37.50). See Theatre Royal, Glasgow. Calendar Girls Mon 23–Sat 28 Apr, 7.30pm (Wed & Sat mat 2.30pm). £11.50–£29.50). The show about the Women’s Institute fundraisers who

stripped for a (tasteful) nude calendar. ■ GHILLIE DHU 2 Rutland Place, 222 9930. The Strange Undoing of Prudencia Hart ●●●●● Tue 17 &

Wed 18 Apr, 7.30pm. £15. Another chance to see this lively, pub-set show taking audiences on a journey through tales of the supernatural, music and theatre, all inspired by Border Ballads. ■ NATIONAL MUSEUM OF SCOTLAND Chambers Street, 0300 123 6789. Emotion and Motion Mon 2 Apr, 5.30–7pm. £8 (£6). A combination of talk (from Dr Peter Lovatt) and contemporary dance performance (from Ruth Mills) on the science of human emotion. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival.

■ ROYAL LYCEUM THEATRE Grindlay Street, 248 4848. The Marriage of Figaro Until Sat 14 Apr (not Sun/Mon), 7.45pm (Sat & Wed mat 2.30pm). £14.50–£29. See review, page 112.

The Lieutentant of Inishmore

Fri 20 Apr–Sat 12 May (not Sun/Mon), 7.45pm (Wed 25 & Sat 28 Apr, Wed 2, Sat 5 & Sat 12 May mat 2.30pm). £14.50–£29. The Lyceum presents another gruesomely absurd comedy from Martin McDonagh (who also wrote In Bruges). ■ SCOTTISH STORYTELLING CENTRE 43–45 High Street, 556 9579. Dayglo Thu 5 Apr, 8–9.30pm. £8 (£6). Abi Brown’s Dayglo is possibly the only play ever to combine pharmacogenetics and punk. Part of Edinburgh International Science Festival.

■ ADAM HOUSE 3 Chambers Street, 650 8058.

■ ST BRIDE’S CENTRE 10 Orwell Terrace, 346 1405.

Six Degrees Of Separation Wed

Dance for All Spring Fling Fri 30 & Sat 31 Mar, 7.30pm. £10 (£8). A showcase of dance plus musical theatre from Dance for All’s professional students and senior dance school pupils. Gaydonia Thu 12–Sat 14 Apr, 7.30pm. £9 (£7). World premiere of a comedy drama about a financial crisis-stricken fictional European country called Gaydonia.

4–Sat 7 Apr, 7.30pm. £10 (£5). Edinburgh Graduate Theatre Group puts on John Guare’s play probing the theory that everyone in the world is connected by a string of just six people. ■ BRUNTON THEATRE Ladywell Way, Musselburgh, 665 2240. Half a Sixpence Mon 2–Sat 7 Apr, 7.30pm. £11–£12 (£9 on Mon & Tue). Show-stopping musical from Musselburgh Amateur Musical Association. Equus Fri 13 & Sat 14 Apr, 7.30pm. £11.25 (£9.25; under 18s £6). A psychiatrist is enlisted to cure a 17-yearold boy whose obsession with horses has led him to behave in a devastating way in this production from London Classic Theatre. Kith/Kin Thu 19 Apr, 12.30am. £10.75 (£8.75; under 18s £6). See Platform, Glasgow.

■ TRAVERSE THEATRE Cambridge Street, 228 1404. Talent Night in the Fly Room Thu 29 Mar, 7.30pm. £6. Songs, poems and sketches in a revue written and directed by Peter Arnott. 2401 Objects Fri 30 & Sat 31 Mar, 7.30pm. £17 (£13). Theatre based on the true story of Henry Molaison, who awoke after brain surgery without the ability to form new memories. For Once Wed 4–Sat 14 Apr (not Sun/Mon), 7.30pm (Sat mat 2.30pm). £15–£17 (£6–£13). See preview, page 111. Traverse Introducing Mon 16–Sat 21 Apr, 2–3pm. £5. A series of rehearsed readings of work developed by the Traverse with next generation of playwrights. Part of Write Here New Writing Festival. The Fly Room Mon 16 & Tue 17 Apr, 4–5pm (open view rehearsals); Tue 17 Apr 7.30pm (rehearsed reading). £5. A new play by Peter Arnott, in which, genetically engineered survivors of an extinct human race gather in a library at the end of time – all earthly life is here, stored in DNA sequencing, but they have forgotten how to read it. Part of Write Here New Writing Festival.

The Kilkennys: ‘Fine Girl, Ye Are!’

Sat 21 Apr, 7.30pm. £15.25 (£13.25). Irish band The Kilkennys tell the story of the Clancy Brothers, in a theatrical show narrated by Cathal McCabe. Italia ‘n’ Caledonia Wed 25 Apr, 7.30pm. £11.25 (£9.25; under 18s £6). A warm-hearted look at the culture of Scots Italians. ■ CHURCH HILL THEATRE 33a Morningside Road, 447 7597. Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street Thu 29-Sat 31

Mar, 7.30pm (Sat mat 2.30pm). £10–£14. Edinburgh Musical Theatre present Stephen Sondheim’s murderous masterpiece with fully integrated BSL signing, telling the gruesome tale through voice and signs simultaneously. Daisy Pulls It Off Wed 4 Apr, 8pm. £12.50 (£10.50). Musical from full-time performing arts students at the MGA Academy. Tickets available from MGA Box Office by emailing tickets@themgacompany.com Step in Time Fri 6 Apr, 8pm; Sat 7 Apr, 3pm & 8pm. £12.50 (£10.50). Dance from stage and screen by the students of MGA Academy of performing arts. Tickets available via the MGA Box Office, as above. ■ THE EDINBURGH PLAYHOUSE 18-22 Greenside Place, 0844 871 3014. South Pacific ●●●●● Tue 3–Sat 14 Apr (not Sun), 7.30pm (Wed & Sat mat 2.30pm). Sweeping romantic story of two couples threatened by the realities of war and by their own prejudices. Chicago Mon 23–Thu 26 Apr, 7.30pm; Fri 27 & Sat 28 Apr, 5pm & 8.30pm. £20.50–£39. Cell block musical telling the tale of adulterous nightclub dancer Roxie Hart and double-talking lawyer Billy Flynn. ■ EDINBURGH FESTIVAL THEATRE 13–29 Nicolson Street, 529 6000. 116 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

PREVIEW NEW WRITING

WRITE HERE FESTIVAL Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh, Mon 16–Tue 24 Apr Two months into her role as the Traverse’s artistic director, Orla O’Loughlin has launched one of the most exciting new writing festivals Edinburgh has seen in years. Write Here will showcase work from the theatre’s Young Writers Group graduates alongside talks by Traverse luminaries Zinnie Harris and Gregory Burke and rehearsals of new plays by Peter Arnott, Rob Drummond and Morna Pearson. O’Loughlin says: ‘It’s an offer to the audience to come and see a wide range of work at very different stages of development by writers at different stages of their career. The gesture is come and get involved, come and participate. It’s a two way process: it’s not just about us saying “here’s some work, come and see it”. It’s actually come and tell us what you think of it, meet the writers, ask me a question.’ Demos, a new audience-driven verbatim play by 2012 Olivier Award nominee Tim Price, will end the festival and promises to be a thrilling climax. ‘Tim spent a lot of time around the Occupy movement, recording and speaking to people,’ O’Loughlin explains. ‘He wrote a play with over 50 parts, which asks what democracy is and what democracy looks like. In order to stage it, it requires people to get involved. Part of the joy is how is this going to work? Is it going to work? It’s an offer to the audience to come and make it happen. I can’t think of anything quite like it – and that’s the whole purpose of doing it.’ (Yasmin Sulaiman)

The Artist Man and the Mother Woman Wed 18 & Thu 19 Apr, 4–5pm

(open view rehearsals); Thu 19 Apr 7.30pm (rehearsed reading). £5. A new play by Morna Pearson about a middleaged art teacher, still living with his mother, who sets out to get a girlfriend. Part of Write Here New Writing Festival. Too Far Gone, 4–5pm (open view rehearsals); Fri 20 & Sat 21 Apr; Sat 21 Apr 7.30pm (rehearsed reading). £5. A new play by Rob Drummond, about a mysterious spate of deaths in a remote island community. Part of Write Here New Writing Festival. A Play, a Pie & a Pint: Would You Please Look at the Camera Tue 24–Fri 27 Apr, 1pm; Sat 28 Apr, 12.30pm. £12. See Òran Mór, Glasgow. Demos Tue 24 Apr, 7.30pm. £5. World premiere of a new play by Tim Price, composed from interviews conducted in response to the Occupy Movement of winter 2011/12. Part of Write Here New Writing Festival. Platform 18 New Work Award Double Bill Wed 25–Sat 28 Apr, 7pm.

£15 (£6–£11). A double bill of Kieran Hurley’s Beats and Gary Gardiner’s Thatcher’s Children. See Arches, Glasgow, for more details. Pass the Spoon ●●●●● Thu 26–Sat


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list.co.uk/theatre 28 Apr, 7.30pm (Sat mat 2.30pm). ÂŁ15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;ÂŁ17 (ÂŁ6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;ÂŁ13). Foodie opera from theatre company Magnetic North, artist David Shrigley, composer David Fennessy and contemporary musicians the Red Note Ensemble.

OUTSIDE THE CITIES â&#x2013;  BYRE THEATRE Abbey Street, St Andrews, 01334 475000. Are You Being Served? Thu 29â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 31 Mar, 7.30pm (Sat mat 2.30pm). ÂŁ12 (ÂŁ10). A stage adaptation of the muchloved television show. The Man Who Lived Twice Thu 5 Apr, 7.30pm. ÂŁ12 (ÂŁ8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;ÂŁ10). See review, page 112. â&#x2013;  CITY NIGHTCLUB 8â&#x20AC;&#x201C;12 Princes Street, Falkirk. Box office: 01324 506850. FREE Reasons to Dance Thu 29â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 31 Mar, 7pm (Sat mat 2.30pm). Interactive show, which gathers Falkirk residentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; dancing memories. Tickets are free but must be reserved with a ÂŁ3 deposit, refundable on the night. â&#x2013;  DUNDEE REP Tay Square, Dundee, 01382 223530. Call Mr Robeson Thu 29 Mar, 7.30pm. ÂŁ10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;ÂŁ14 (ÂŁ4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;ÂŁ12). Tayo Alukoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s play on the life of actor, singer and civil rights activist Paul Robeson. Dust Sat 31 Mar, 2.30pm & 7.30pm. ÂŁ10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;ÂŁ15 (ÂŁ4â&#x20AC;&#x201C;ÂŁ13). Imagined response to the death of Margaret Thatcher. A Play, a Pie & a Pint: Forfeit Tue 3â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 7 Apr, 9pm. ÂŁ10 (ÂŁ8). See Ă&#x2019;ran MĂłr, Glasgow. Further Than the Furthest Thing

Tue 24 Aprâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 5 May (not Sun), 7.30pm (Thu & Sat mat 2.30pm). ÂŁ8. See preview, page 113.

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Theatre â&#x2013;  MACROBERT University of Stirling, Stirling, 01786 466666. Errol White Company: iam Sat 31 Mar, 7.30pm. ÂŁ12.50 (ÂŁ7â&#x20AC;&#x201C;ÂŁ10). New show in which a group of dancers weave in and out of the fabric of their own personal histories. glitching Sun 1 Apr, 3â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4pm. ÂŁ3 (ÂŁ1.50). Digital dance performance inspired by the glitches of characters in sports and action computer games. Part of the events programme to accompany sports science exhibition Human Race. Scottish Dance Theatre: What on Earth!? Wed 18 Apr. See Kids listings. Triple Bill: Jackinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; the Box and Balbir Singh Dance Company Thu

19 Apr, 10.30am. ÂŁ7 (schools and friends ÂŁ5.50). Jackinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; the Box perform Mislead, a light-hearted look at gender stereotypes, followed by iDance which explores memories behind dance. Balbir Singh Dance Company perform Decreasing Infinity, a male duet in Kathak and contemporary styles. Scottish Community Drama One Act Play Festival Thu 26â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 28 Apr,

7pm. ÂŁ12.50 per night; ÂŁ32 for all three nights. Final of the festival featuring the winners from regional competitions. â&#x2013;  PERTH THEATRE 185 High Street, Perth, 01738 621031. Moonlight and Magnolias Thu 29â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 31 Mar, 7.45pm (Sat mat 2.30pm). ÂŁ5â&#x20AC;&#x201C;ÂŁ19. The bizarre true story behind the making of a Hollywood blockbuster, Gone with the Wind. Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street Fri 6â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 14 Apr, 7.30pm (Sat 2.30pm). ÂŁ15 (ÂŁ12). Stephen Sondheimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gruesome tale. A Play, a Pie & a Pint: Cold Turkey at Nanaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tue 17â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 21 Apr,

6pm. ÂŁ12.50. See Ă&#x2019;ran MĂłr, Glasgow.

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29 Marâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;26 Apr 2012 THE LIST 117


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VisualArt HITLIST

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THE BEST EXHIBITIONS

ARTBeat

ALAN DIMMICK

George Wyllie: A Life Less Ordinary The final exhibition at the Collins Gallery celebrates the work of sculptor Wyllie, famous for his giant nappy pin, ‘Monument to Maternity’. See review, page 120. Collins Gallery, Glasgow, until Sat 21 Apr.

Alan Dimmick Photography retrospective documenting the past 15 years of gallery openings, parties and exhibitions by Scottish artist Dimmick. See Artbeat, right. Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow, until Sun 13 May.

© LUIS ALVARADO AND TERESA MARGOLLES

COURTESY SCOTT MYLES AND SONIA ROSSO, TURIN

Glasgow International Festival of Visual Art The city-wide showcase of contemporary art returns with work by Richard Wright, Wolfgang Tillmans, Lorna McIntyre (pictured), Emory Douglas, Jeremy Deller and many more. Various venues, Glasgow, Fri 20 Apr–Mon 7 May.

Scott Myles: This Production The first UK solo show from the Dundee artist features work inspired by Myles’ experience of skateboarding as a teenager. Dundee Contemporary Arts, Sat 7 Apr–Sun 10 Jun. Alison Turnbull Thought-provoking exhibition of work by an artist who creates paintings based on preexisting patterns in music scores, maps and graphs. See review, page 120. Talbot Rice Gallery, Edinburgh, until Sat 5 May.

Teresa Margolles Mexican artist Margolles exhibits the fruits of her threemonth residency at Glasgow Sculpture Studios. See preview, page 121. Glasgow Sculpture Studios, Fri 20 Apr–Sat 30 Jun.

Emory Douglas Historical works from the artist and activist, including poster art from his spell as the Black Panthers’ Minister of Culture in the 60s and 70s. See feature, page 119. Kendall Koppe Gallery, Glasgow, Fri 20 Apr–Mon 7 May.

118 THE LIST 29 Mar–26 Apr 2012

#Unravel Interactive sound installation in which musician Aidan Moffatt can be heard telling different versions of the same story. But which one is the truth? See feature, page 18. SWG3, Glasgow, Fri 20 Apr–Mon 7 May.

Jeremy Deller: Sacrilege The provocative experiential artist and former Turner winner creates a new site-specific, interactive work for Glasgow International. See feature, page 20. Glasgow Green, Fri 20 Apr–Mon 7 May.

Wolfgang Tillmans The highly regarded Germanborn photographer unveils new work in his first exhibition in Scotland since 1995. See preview, page 119. The Common Guild, Glasgow, Fri 20 Apr–Sat 23 Jun.

What was the first exhibition you went to see? I recall as a very young lad going to the ‘Art Galleries’ at Kelvingrove a lot with my Mum in the late 60s – just remember being amazed. The Robert Mapplethorpe show at the old Stills in the High Street around the early-mid 80s made a big impression. I bought the catalogue, which was given to me in a brown paper bag! What was your first paid job as an artist? It was selling b/w prints of specific girls to friends at school for 50p in 1978 [three years before Gregory’s Girl!] What kind of music do you listen to while you’re working? I own a large collection of CDs, but it’s only in the last six months I have got into ipods. At the moment we have Al Green [Belle period] followed by Gene Clark and Alasdair Roberts. What are the best things about opening nights? It’s really nice to meet friends and catch up – but also to keep on taking pictures while chatting – bit rude but no one seems to mind. Which living artist should be better known than they currently are? Steve McQueen [not the filmmaker!] An amazing natural talent – check out his drawings and watercolours. What has been your career highlight to date? Certainly the current show at GoMA. I really hope I will be able to get more of these prints out of the boxes and onto the walls in the future. What is your favourite work of art? I am quite taken by Sandro Botticelli’s ‘Primavera’, Cave paintings at Altamira in Spain and Emmet Gowin’s photographs at Danville from the mid 60s. What advice would you give to your younger self? Good question – always have your camera with you [obviously] but also realise that images of quite ordinary things can be important in years to come, and keep your negatives neatly filed. ■ Alan Dimmick: Photographs from the last 15 years of Contemporary Art in Scotland, Gallery of Modern Art, Glasgow, until Sun 13 May.


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PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST

BENOIT PAILLEY

Talitha Kotzé looks at the practice of photographer Wolfgang Tillmans

REVOLUTIONARY ROAD As Minister of Culture for the Black Panther Party Emory Douglas created some of the movement’s most iconic imagery, harnessing the power of art to communicate ideas. He talks to Neil Cooper about his political and artistic journey n Revolution one wins, or one dies.’ When this slogan appeared aloft Emory Douglas’ image of a couple of beret-clad African-American guerrillas on a big-screen back-drop at major concert halls around the world, it was a far cry from the roots of Douglas’ work 30 years before. Then, such visual provocations were on the front-line of the American Black Power movement via the pages of The Black Panther Party’s weekly newspaper, which regularly sold more than 250,000 copies. In the current climate of born-again activism, the archive of Douglas’ newspaper images, collages, posters and lithographs that visits GI is especially pertinent. Fusing the iconic immediacy of poster art with a loaded polemical intent, the images by the Black Panthers’ Minister of Culture up until the party’s demise in 1980 are a living record of one of the most turbulent times of American history that neither preaches nor patronises. ‘To me it’s about sharing the ideals,’ says Douglas today. ‘It’s about getting information out there. Art is something people observe and learn through, whether it’s subliminal or very provocative. It’s communication. Once you understand that, you can learn to get your message across in a broader way. I see some young artists trying to do that, but it looks coded. If you learn that it’s about communication, art can become a profound tool for change.’ The man dubbed by critic Colette Gaiter as the Norman Rockwell of the ghetto fell in with the Panthers while making props for plays by radical black writer LeRoi Jones, (who would later change his name to Amiri Baraka), who was presenting his work in San Francisco campuses, community centres and shop-front spaces. After attending a meeting he’d

‘I

designed the poster for, Douglas visited the Pantherpatronised political/cultural centre The Black House, where the likes of Jones and the Art Ensemble of Chicago were regulars. Here he found Panther Minister of Information Eldridge Cleaver poring over the first issue of the party’s rather dry-looking tabloid weekly, and told him he could make it look better. It was the beginning of a great, if stormy, adventure. ‘We were in coalition politics,’ says Douglas. ‘We weren’t in isolation. We had solidarity with groups in Vietnam and Korea. In America the Latinos formed the Brown Berets inspired by us, and there were other groups. That whole period changed how the dialogue in this country worked, with young people beginning to define things for themselves.’ After four decades working on socially and politically aware community-based projects, it was only in 2007 that the world rediscovered Douglas via the publication of Black Panther: The Revolutionary Art of Emory Douglas. The concerts, featuring the likes of proto-Rap street-gurus The Last Poets, latter-day hip hop troupe The Roots and freejazz saxophonist David Murray, were a form of pop-cultural entryism rather than what Tom Wolfe dubbed in a famous 1970 essay ‘radical chic’. Similarly, Douglas quite correctly points out that mainstream exposure of his work in museums is down to ‘open-minded people who open the work up to a new audience, where in the past it would’ve been black-listed, and that’s a plus. The pictures are fine in themselves, but once you get the history behind them, you see it’s not just art, but art with a meaning.’

People have been making pictures for thousands of years, and 150 years ago the photographic process was added to that vocabulary. Germanborn, London-based artist Wolfgang Tillmans makes no distinction between a photograph and a painting, but he chooses photography to create his pictures and sees this medium as having a closer connection to the reality of the world. In his exhibition at the Common Guild viewers will be presented with works from the Arts Council’s collection alongside a series of new works selected by the artist himself. As the youngest artist and first photographer to win the Turner prize in 2000, Tillmans started his career as a documentarian of his generation – especially that of the London club and gay scenes. Today he is known for his intimate portraits within manifold social landscapes as well as the way he references other image making and printing methods. He also pioneered a type of exhibition style that acknowledges the physical quality of the photograph by displaying these in a non-linear pattern, often unframed and instead pinned or taped to the gallery wall. Although this display method injects a temporariness that suits his scenes of everyday social situations, his classic, observing, and self implicating eye converts images of ubiquitous debris, and traces of human fragility, into iconic historical reference points. Tillmans’ own selection of new works from his series ‘Onion’ and ‘Headlights’ ranges widely in both size and subject, and his exhibition guarantees to showcase the breadth of his artistic output. ■ Wolfgang Tillmans, Common Guild, Glasgow, Fri 20 Apr–Sat 23 Jun.

‘IF YOU LEARN THAT IT’S ABOUT COMMUNICATION, ART CAN BECOME A PROFOUND TOOL FOR CHANGE’

Emory Douglas: Seize the Time, Kendall Koppe, Glasgow, Fri 20 Apr–Mon 7 May.

Check out the

GreatOffers on page 8

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VisualArt REVIEWS RETROSPECTIVE

GEORGE WYLLIE: A LIFE LESS ORDINARY Collins Gallery, Glasgow, until Sat 21 Apr ●●●●● Environmental art may be all the rage these days, but, as with the soon to be mothballed Collins Gallery, George Wyllie was way ahead of the curve. While best known for huge public spectacles The Straw Locomotive and The Paper Boat, as well as a fully-fledged stage show with actor Bill Paterson, A Day Down a Goldmine, this huge archive of small works and papers, posters and other ephemera taps into the ever enquiring mind of the now 90-year-old polymath, who was reimagining Glasgow long before the cultural tsars moved in to take the credit. Having first exhibited his self-semanticised Scul?tors at the Collins in 1976, with other shows following in 1981 and 2005, it’s fitting that the venue’s last ever show should be the launchpad for the inaugural event of the Glasgow-wide Whysman Festival to celebrate Wyllie’s nutty professor-like take on the world. Perennially captured in smiling photographs sporting overalls and bunnet, Wyllie may appear somewhere between Oor Wullie, Tom Weir and Ivor Cutler, but file him as a ukuleleplaying novelty act at your peril. In his use of outdoor spaces, a (post) industrial tool-kit and playfully serious critique of capitalism in A Day Down a Goldmine, captured on film by Murray Grigor, Wyllie is an equal to, and as deeply serious as, Joseph Beuys, with whom he worked, Ian Hamilton Finlay, and indeed Angus Farquhar’s NVA organisation, who picked up his mantle. The great bum steers that have allowed Strathclyde University pen pushers to close down the Collins and the Scottish Government to introduce Public Entertainment Licence legislation that would effectively outlaw Wyllie’s work should be noted. This lovingly gathered and utterly humane collection is a serious word to the Whys. (Neil Cooper)

DRAWING & PAINTING

PAINTING & PHOTOGRAPHY

SCULPTURE

ALISON TURNBULL