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SUMMER 2015 | ISSUE 014


M A G A Z I N E

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Table of Contents

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Like Staff

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Letter from the Editor

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Contacts

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You are here

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Yours truly

Who did what, where

Tor Miller Music Interview

Music Interview

Submissions / Social Media / Advertising

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Contributors

22 Chief Scout

Words of wisdom

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30 Back to the Old House Fashion


TOR MILLER CHIEF SCOUT BACK TO THE OLD HOUSE PERESTROIKA GIRL HIGHLIGHTS RICKY WATTS JARED POWELL

CONTENTS

MAKER FAIRE 2015

52 Art

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Perestroika Girl

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Mayhem Manila

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Highlights

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Ricky Watts

Fashion

Fashion

Fashion

64 Event

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Jared Powell

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GATS - Drifting Forest

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Maker Faire 2015

Artist Interview

Artist Review

Event Review

Artist Interview

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Jesse Alford: Photographer / Editor Maryanne Alford: Writer / Editor Andrew Jurado: Graphic Design / Editorial Design Christina Hedlund: Graphic Design / Editorial Design

model: Lila Flowers @ No Ties Management makeup artist: Gabriela Lara hair stylist: Rene Cortez fashion stylist: Bailee Edgington photographer: Jesse Alford

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Letter from Editor s it just me or is summer not the same when you’re a grown up? Nostalgia is kinda my trade mark but damn...what I wouldn’t give for an old school water balloon fight right now! While summers may not be what they used to be, they do come with their own set of perks. For example, it is very unlikely your parents are still shaming your skimpy summer clothes or implementing a “summer hours curfew”. If you find yourself with some spare time this summer do yourself a favor and use it for good! Discover a new band, research a topic of interest, do some arts and crafts, get out in nature, oh man, the possibilities are nearly endless! You see, summer is a lot like seminew-years. New beginnings and shit...because we all need a little reminder every once in a while to get off netflix. The good news is this issue of LIKE is the perfect place to start your productive summer. Chalk full of fantastic music, exquisite art, and unprecedented fashion (just to name a few things.) All of us here at LIKE would like to wish you a beautiful summer, and whatever you choose to do, don’t forget...wear sunscreen. - Maryanne Alford LIKE Magazine

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Moldie Goldies www.moldiegoldies.bigcartel.com

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Contacts Submissions

Social Media

Jesse Alford Submit@TheLikeMagazine.com

Facebook www.facebook.com/TheLikeMagazine

General Inquiries

Instagram www.instagram.com/TheLikeMagazine

Veronica K General@TheLikeMagazine.com

Twitter www.twitter.com/TheLikeMagazine

Advertising Adertising Director Patrick Bateman BeLiked@TheLikeMagazine.com

www.TheLikeMagazine.com


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Contributors Perestroika Girl Photographer / Stylist / MUA: Liza Nechaeva Model - Maria Murashko Mayhem Manila Models: Fernanda Aquino, Julya Beretta, Ray Velez & Ben Donato Creative Consultant / Stylist: Jules Szoke Creative Director / Photographer: Jules Szoke Into the Wild Model - Talia Michaels @ Target Models Photographer - Kristina Hader

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Highlights Model - Rosie Siltani Hair - Jen Mathison Makeup - Savannah St Jean Styling - Christina Lazar-Schuler Photographer - Christina Lazar-Schuler GATS - Drifting Forest Photographer: Joal Gallegos Maker Faire 2015 Photographer: Joal Gallegos

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N E W A L B U M R E L E A S E : JU L 17, 2015

Ms Mr How Does It Feel www.msmrsounds.com

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Interview: Maryanne Alford

The new york born piano player heads out on tour with high hopes, big dreams, and city inspired ballads.


Which came first for you, pianist or singer? I started playing the piano when I was about 8 or 9 and it wasn’t until I moved to New Jersey several years later that I started to sing and eventually write music. There is a distinct romance within your lyrics, do you draw from personal experience or fiction? T:I try as much as I can to draw from my own experiences. I find when I am totally fictional, I don’t feel as much as an attachment to that particular song. I can always embellish my own stories, however they always begin from something I know as true. Are you a hopeless romantic? (Left Blank) How about an old soul? People have told me I am an old soul and I find that my heart lies in bygone eras. I am a massive fan of 70’s music. I enjoy old movies and books by dead authors. Maybe I was born in the wrong decade. What artists have inspired your music the most? David Bowie was a massive influence on myself and my songwriting. I learned to sing from Ray Charles and many of his contemporaries. When I was young my father played all of his favorite Frank Sinatra records during long drives back and forth from New Jersey. As I grew up I loved the dark imagery of Tom Waits’ lyrics. Your deput EP “Headlights” has already gained international recognition, is a full album already in the works? We just finished recording of the album and now we are in the mixing and mastering process. Hopefully we can put it out in September! Your tour is fast approaching, anything in particular you are looking forward to? I’m most excited to perform. I want to put a band together and interpret the songs in whatever format we consist of. I’m excited to meet new people and see places I’ve never been before. What will you miss the most while on tour? Friends and family but I always miss them and hardly ever see them, so you grow accustomed to that. - Maryanne Alford


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Interview: Maryanne Alford


What does “Making it” mean to you? Making it would be being able to play to people every night. Preferably people who knew and enjoyed our music. What do you think it takes to get there? Just working it, paying dues, continuing to put out music we’re proud of. Is music your full time job? Yes, but I need a raise The Music Industry is notorious for being ruthless, how do you stay positive through the inevitable ups and downs? I wouldn’t say ruthless, but the amount of patience it requires can wear on you. I just like to pull my head out of it, write, record, work with my friends, remind myself that this is more of a passion than a job. Even if it is both. As a band, how do you balance your friendship with the business aspect of the industry? Pretty simply. Friends first. What influences your music the most? (exterior or interior inspiration? i.e. life, love, struggle, money, etc.) I’d say most of the time I’m writing about the things closest to me, the people closest to me. I try to be very honest and literal in my music. It’s a therapeutic exercise to create and perform a song that stems from a specific feeling. I use it as a chance to voice my opinion without any hesitation or restriction. It’s an open letter in a way. What advice would you give to the “new to the scene” artist? As cliche as the term “be yourself ” is, be yourself. Create as it comes and be honest. In my experience people value identity over attitude. - Maryanne Alford

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ILONA CLOTHING CO. ilonausa 2015 Instagram - @ilonausa www.ilonausa.com


Back to the Old House Makeup artist: Gabriela Lara | Hair stylist: Rene Cortez Models: Lila Flowers and Kylee Poling @ No Ties Management Fashion stylist: Bailee Edgington | Photographer: Jesse Alford


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Pants - Charles Henry | Swim top - Insight | Top - BooHoo | Shoes - Just Fab Bracelet - CC Skye

Bra - RVCA | Shorts -BooHoo | Jacket - RVCA | Shoes - koolaburra | Necklace - 8 Other Reasons | Bracelets and rings - CAM jewelry

Rings & Earring - CAM Jewelry | Ring - J. Southern | Earcuff - Artelier Sunglasses - Crap Eyewear


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Earrings and bracelets - CAM jewelry | Double necklace - cc Skye | Necklace - Haati Chai Jumper - Capulet | Jacket - Chelsea flower efg | Shoes - koolaburra kenwerks


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Bra - RVCA | Shorts - line and dot (Ica) | Shoes - L.A.M.B | Necklace - Haati Chai Necklace - J. Southern | Bracelet - Jinammi


Top - RVCA | Pants - BooHoo | Shoes - L.A.M.B | Bracelets - CC Skye | Earring - CAM Jewelry | Tattoos - Pixie Ink Tattoos


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Top - 2020AVE | Skirt - RVCA | Bracelets - CC Skye | Shoes - Joe’s | Tattoos - Pixie Ink Tattoos


Photographer / stylist / make-up artist - Liza Nechaeva | Model - Maria Murashko


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Models: Fernanda Aquino, Julya Beretta, Ray Velez & Ben Donato Creative Consultant / Stylist: Jules Szoke Creative Director / Photographer: Jules Szoke https://www.facebook.com/JulesSzokePhotographer http://julesszokephoto.com/


can feel you staring at me. I don’t even have to look, know you want it but you don’t have what it takes. The sweat on my chest is the only thing that’s cool, so don’t piss me off cos I’m already hot. You’re in my space, the streets are MAYHEM. I need to get some air. If you can find me I’ll take it off, but you’ll be in my playground, my rooftop, MANILA.

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Model - Talia Michaels @ Target Models Photographer - Kristina Hader


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HIGH

LIGHTS

Model - Rosie Siltani Hair - Jen Mathison Makeup - Savannah St Jean Styling - Christina Lazar-Schuler Photographer - Christina Lazar-Schuler


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Sleeveless hoodie/long black tunic - H&M | Faux leather leggings - Romeo & Juliet |Cardigan - H&M


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Thrifted denim shirt/overalls - Tommy Hilfiger | Vintage black cut-offs - Ikeda


Interview | Jesse Alford icky Watts’ love for art was prevalent at an early age. As a 3-year-old, his mother would draw bubble letters on paper for Ricky to color in. A relatively normal suburban childhood, Watts collected comic books, rode BMX bikes, explored creeks and construction sites. He often created his own comic strips involving epic battles between nuclear dinosaurs and the U.S. Army. In an 8th grade math class, Ricky fell in love for the first time. A classmate shared a copy of Can Control magazine, a graffiti publication from Seattle. He became obsessed, experimenting with spray paint under bridges around town. These early years were all trial & error experimentation, as the “how-to” internet boom hadn’t developed yet. Fascinated with aerosol art, by 1995 he was fully engaged, painting elaborate works often under the cover of night. A year later, Watts developed HelmetHeds, a black and white graffiti zine, made from photos and articles of the Northern California graffiti scene. Created as a way to inspire and share with others, HelmetHeds grew to a cult-like following over 13 issues in eight years.

HelmetHeds was Watts’ first experience in print design. In 2000, “seeking a career”, Watts enrolled at the Art Institute of California, San Diego campus with an emphasis in graphic design. Ricky left AI in 2002 and returned to the bay area the following year. It was then he realized his true calling as a fine artist and focused on exhibitions while working a day job as a graphic designer in the print industry. Ricky Watts has exhibited works in San Francisco, Oakland, New York City, London, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, Portland, San Diego and through out Northern California. Watts’ art has been featured in numerous international print and web publications; Juxtapoz.com, Herman Miller, X-Funs (Taiwan), Refused, Dig-In Magazine, Bay Area Graffiti (book), ZeroFriends (book), the Outside Lands Music Festival in San Francisco and the 2014 Counter.Point Music Festival near Atlanta. In 2013, Watts painted the largest mural in Sonoma County, a five-story monster on the side of the Phoenix Theater in Petaluma. A member of the ZeroFriends collective, Ricky currently works out of his Sebastopol, California studio.


Twitter: @rickywatts Instagram: @rickywatts Facebook: RickyWattsART


ARTIST INTERVIEW

“ There’s so much behind-the-scenes work that goes into being an artist”

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RICKY WATTS

How many hours a week on average is dedicated to your art and art related goodness? That’s a tough one to gauge. My brain is always in art mode so I’m constantly working on something, either conceptual or physical. If I had to put a number on it, I’d say 60-70 hours of my week are dedicated towards art in one way or another. What else is involved in an artists world - that is required to be an artist? Like… in a fairytale land… you get to create art all day. What else is a factor? (Business, social media, research) Currently, I’m wearing all the hats. Everything from planning / coordinating gigs, prepping canvases & paint surfaces, creating the work, promoting it through media outlets, managing sales and the website, bookkeeping, documenting the process along the way and cataloging final works. There’s so much behind-the-scenes work that goes into being an artist. It’s tough when you’re doing it all but I enjoy the challenge and look forward to the day I can hire assistants to help and allow more time for painting. When you aren’t painting - what might you be doing? I like traveling and adventures of exploration. Many times these are art related projects or research missions. I’m an avid sports fan so if I’m not working on art, I’m most likely watching a game, whether it’s the SF Giants, 49ers or Golden State Warriors. Often I’m working on art in my studio and listening to the games on the radio. What’s the biggest mural you have ever done? In April 2013, I painted a five-story mural on the side of the Phoenix Theater in Petaluma, CA. It’s the largest work I’ve ever completed to this point. I’m looking forward to the opportunity to go even bigger. The high of completing something this size is like no other. If you could choose anywhere in the world to rock a mural, where would it be? There are so many places I’d love to paint. I think my top choices would be the Bowery Wall in New York City or murals in a European country. Over the course of one year; would you rather paint an incredibly huge mural or 31 mid-size canvases? I feel like the smart answer would be the 31 canvases, as the longevity of those paintings will outlast any public mural but in my gut, I’d rather paint the huge wall. There’s something magical about painting in public that you can’t get from canvas work in the studio. The connection with the people during the process, the recognition that comes from the finished mural. It’s hard to put into words. There’s an electric energy that I feel working on a huge wall and the exhilarating feeling that comes with it’s completion. What are your long term goals with your art? Or, have you reached your goal and are enjoying the ride? I feel like artists are always working towards bigger goals and it’s hard to be content and enjoy the ride. There’s always more to accomplish. After a large project or gallery show, it’s nice to take a week or two off and reflect on the accomplishment but soon after, it’s on the next goal. I’ve never had a solo exhibition outside of the United States. That’s always been a dream of mine. Honestly though, my #1 long term goal is to stay healthy enough to keep creating art until the day I die, regardless of where it takes me or what personal levels of accomplishment I reach along the way. www.rickywatts.com

- Jesse Alford

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Interview | Jesse Alford

What’s the setting like right now? Look around you... what’s the weather like... WHAT ARE YOU WEARING? Hemp Gwen Saucony Jazz sneakers, grey Levi’s with paint on ‘em, a white tall tee with the neck cut out, Marc Jacobs gun Wmetal grey and rose gold watch with paint all over it, black parachute rope survival bracelet with paint all over it, 1980s green John Deere cap. Sitting in the backyard of my business partner’s house. It’s sunny, light breeze. Taking a break from design and lawyers’ calls to type this out. Chilling with three cats and a little dog. Chain smoking and looking at some rap spray paintings and a mini ramp I wish I could skate but I don’t wanna break my old body. Kimya Dawson is playing out of a Bluetooth speaker, reminding me of the summer of 2003 in NYC, painting and partying with friends. HOT. Ok thanks. Now... We don’t like labels or nothin’… but, if you were to name your style of art what is it? Fuck man, I really do not know. It’s an abstract mix of cubist drips and texture. The line style actually comes from the way I learned to tattoo portraits. You make all these dots to connect — the shading, makes and contours of the face. One day I was just doodling and connecting the

dots. I also like the study of continuous line drawing without picking up my pen. It’s a good study; I found myself using it a lot to keep my hand busy while thinking of what to draw, or when I got stuck. This has all kinda turned into a more geometric line style. I try to keep it loose in the background and place some sketch

it go down some other way?

marks or color blocking before I get back into the fine lines and shading. My work has been likened to Doze Green, Picasso and the like, but I think that’s just simple classification. I feel like, more and more, people need some type of label for art without actually wanting to have any — unless it’s in their closets or in song lyrics. The long and short of it is I have been trying to make more art that I would want in my house, so I’ve also been doing more pure abstracts with loads of texture and color complements, things that make you feel like you’re in another world, or a small peek into the acid trip or DMT world.

what people like most on the internet or comment on, or what sells fastest, but what pieces have made connections in my life for the better (not in a monetary way, though money is a part of it all as I’ve taken a break from tattooing to focus on art and product development). As an example: I meet another man one night, and he was older; one wouldn’t think the two of us would speak, for whatever reason. He looked familiar to me though, so we tried to sort it out. We talked about the battles with cancer we both have / had close family deal with, we talked about being a realist about such things as if we had known one another for year. And as someone mentioned a painting I had made in the house, we flipped around an online portfolio I had.

What have been other ways one has described your work? “A blink in a wrinkle of another time.” How old were you when you realized, “Oh shit, art is the beez neez!” Or did

Well, for years I tried to separate the worlds of graffiti, tattoos, and fine art, and eventually they all crept in on each other, it was bound to happen. Now, I think, it’s working mainly ‘cause I’ve become more self-serving. I try to not think of

He stopped at this one painting and said “Have you ever been to Arizona?” .... ..


Twitter: @JP87cents Instagram: @JP87cents Facebook: jaredpowell1387


ARTIST INTERVIEW

I had, but only for a night of driving and playing a show. “This is what I see out in the sky when I take a little trip,” he said. “You’ve been to that world, you’ve seen what I’ve seen, and somehow painted it.” A bit of talking about life, loss, love, and drugs later ,we said our goodbye. Eventually he was back in the area, and I gifted him the painting. We became friends and made a weird connection in a brief time — all this from a painting that most would say “My four-year-old made a painting like that at school.” It’s all subject to the audience. Any major impacts in life that influenced your work? Life experience, like the story above. May sound silly, but… do you plan doing art forever?

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Yeah, man. “Can’t Stop Won’t Stop” — I have that tattooed on me. I’ve got no “Plan B,” realistically. If I can keep growing an audience; keep making things that make me smile, cry, and everything in-between; then yeah, as long as it’s coming from a deep drive, a feeling that I have to get this outta me, then yes. The second that it becomes “work,” like real work, or I’m just a human copy machine, then I’ll throw in the paint rag. But I fucking doubt that will happen. I’m too old and stubborn to stop now. Plus I really can’t. What has been the most exciting venture you’ve gotten yourself into through out the travels of your art? I’ve gotten to visit many new places to make art. I’ve gotten paid to paint huge murals with creative freedom. I’ve gotten chased by many people, from Hasidic Jews with bats to undercover Police. I’ve seen friends hit by taxi cabs running from cops in the streets. I’ve helped an albino

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opossum in Portland outside a tattoo shop. Most my life has been an adventure, all created by some type of art form. All that fun sex drugs and rock ‘n’ roll type shit. I think an old copy of the zine Helmet Heads that Ricky Watts made has some stupid chase story about strippers, cocaine, and spraypaint — I let my grandmother read it, actually. But I’ve chilled out more these days, not so much craziness. Well, a different type of crazy, I guess. What would be a dream venture? Like… to show in a gallery or mural in a specific part of the world, or maybe have like… Oprah or someone want a piece of your work in their home? Man, I want to see the world. I was just talking about this with a friend who I’ve recently reconnected with. I don’t even have my fucking passport like 80% of Americans, but not ‘cause I don’t want it — I was worried my past would fuck me


JARED POWELL

and I’d get into some kinda trouble, but I’ve looked into it and I was just freaking myself out. So I just got a copy of my birth certificate and gotta apply for my passport. I want to go to the UK and spend some time with the WHAT Collective guys, 45RPM & RICHT. They rule. They came out to SF a few years back, and it was a crazy — 36 hours of trains, walks, tattoos, whiskey, breakfast foods and laughter. We had been friends on the internet, and influencing each other for years. So I’d really love to spend some time out there. They do a rad Halloween show every year I’d love to see and be a part of. I just want to be around productive creative people and those dudes really do it. “Never Better,” always progressing, and making amazing stuff from paintings to toys. I’d like to visit Southeast Asia, and Australia really badly. I’m sure I’ll get out and see it. For a brief moment a few years ago I figured I was “getting too old for this shit” then I realized I also once thought I

wouldn’t be spraypainting at 30, or having art shows. But I still use spraypaint most days of my life. I paint something large at least once a week. I’m not running around the streets anymore, but I still have loads to learn. All the dreams of travel and seeing new things are just as important as getting together with old friends like Ricky Watts and making new art together — after 20-plus years of making things together, it never gets old. Just like meeting young artists and passing along stories and traditions will never be old. So if I never get across the world I can at least get across town and create a new world with old friends for everyone to see. I just want to stay on the path I’m on, meaning I’ll go wherever I’m welcome and can afford to see. It always helps to have a show somewhere new as a prompt to get outta town and meet new people or create in a different environment. Life ain’t bad. Just in the time I’ve been writing this I’ve made plans with a friend

from the East Coast that’s in the area. I’m heading up north in a few days to see my dad and paint with some friends before this one spot gets torn down. I’m working on new products. I got a kitty at my feet and a dog in my lap. I’ll get to see another old friend tonight before I go home to the studio to work on some new art for Marz x Leon (an amazing singer and songwriter you should check out for sure), maybe work on these handbags I started or some shoes I’ve got going with the Shoe Surgeon. I’ve got a lot of work to do — and it doesn’t feel like work at all. #getweird #stayweird #stayposi Peace Love JP Jared ( JP87cents) Powell

- Jesse Alford

“- 36 hours of trains, walks, tattoos, whiskey, breakfast foods and laughter ” L I K E M AG A Z I N E

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ARTIST REVIEW

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GATS “DRIF TING FOREST”

G ATS

“Drifting Forest” (solo show) HASHIMOTO CONTEMPORARY SAN FRANCISCO CA.

Review By: Andrew Jurado Photography By: Joal Gallegos

Bio

Oakland, CA-based street artist GATS (an acronym for “graffiti against the system”) is an international graffiti legend, creating outdoor art in places that reach as far as Palestine, the Philippines and Rome. Known for the iconic mask seen predominately throughout the artist’s work, the face of GATS can often be spotted peering out from an alley way or stretched across a rooftop, greeting passerby’s with its all-seeing gaze. Representing a sense of duality, GATS’s iconic totem has filled with intricate insignia over the years, speaking to the artist’s personal reflections.

Very well could have been trash

Above: Individual pieces of wood, burned with diverse GATS characters, were spread across the wall in a collage - like manner. The varied pieces of scrap wood are twelve inches in size (give or take) and over 20 of these little guys were installed for display.

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ARTIST REVIEW

took the chance to check out the work of this street artist last month at his solo art show titled “Drifting Forest.” The show was held at the Hashimoto Gallery in San Francisco California from May 9th - 30th. You or I might catch a glimpse of the floating, big faced and bearded character on a wall downtown somewhere, making this a unique opportunity to see what this otherwise street based artist would create to display inside of a gallery. His new work was done on a range of materials - that very well could have been trash, using several different mediums. The pieces have strong qualities of urban life while staying true to his character’s iconic image and bold presence. Each piece has a way of commanding attention, reflecting still a surreptitious tone like that of illegally tagging a street wall in the stealth of the night. There is a striking range of emotions achieved through the reoccurrence of the varied eye illustration, yet the ambiguity of his work leaves much of the interpretation up to the viewer. - Andrew Jurado

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GATS “DRIF TING FOREST”

H A S H I M O T O CO N T EM P O R A RY S A N F R A N C I S CO CA .

In the artist’s own words, “‘Drifting Forest’ is my longing to have a relationship with nature, only to watch the forest drift farther and farther away. I attempt to grow food in containers on top of concrete I don’t own and the only native trees I see float in from the ocean disregarded as trash. These skeletons of the forest are sacred as I morn in the graveyard that is urban sprawl.”

Right: A large, ambiguous piece constructed with large wood planks layered upon each other. The art work stretched over ten feet in length and five feet in height.

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EVENT REVIEW

10 MAY 16 th + 17 th Brought to you by Make: magazine

The Maker Faire 2015 Science, engineering, art, performance, and craft.

Review By: Andrew Jurado Photography By: Joal Gallegos

s we approach the entrance and walk through the gate, it is instant sensory overload! The out door booths, activities and food vendors went on as far as the eye could see. Giant mechanical animals towered over the public! Among them an eagal, dragon, praying mantis, snail, rhino, giraffe and many others. This event was for all ages and had the younger crowd covered, equipped with Lego pits, craft stations of all kinds and out door play areas with live science demonstrations. There were several different areas devoted to categories like

the Home Grown Village, Maker Ed, the Dark Room, Start-Up Pavilion, Make Labs, Make Activities and more. It was good to see the larger companies there like Google, NASA and Intel, set up along side the others. The Maker Faire started about 20 miles south of San Francisco, held at the San Mateo County Event Center. A huge venue with over 600 vendors from around the Bay Area, California and the Nation! This event gets bigger and better every year, featuring a spectrum of creatives. I respect this event as it encourages learning

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MAKER FAIRE 2015 - SAN MATEO CA

Mechanical Animals Above to the left is the face of a gigantic rhyno bus. Above to the right is the snail mobile; seats four in-shell and a party balcony on top for all of those shell shindigs.

“Encourages learning and the do-it-yourself attitude, as opposed to consuming, buying and wasting.”

Big Ass Robot Huge sized robot; fully functional tank treads for mobility, two guns for show and a hydrolic cockpit for convenience. Constructed out of various materials, metals, fiberglass, tubing /piping and a few gadgets n’ gizmos.

Venue San Mateo County Event Center. Bay Area, California. U.S.

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The Greatest Show & Tell on Earth

and the “do it yourself” attitude, as opposed to consuming, buying and wasting. MAKE Magazine was launched in 2005, which provided a platform to showcase the tech-influenced, grassroots, DIY community that has come to be classified as the “Maker Movement.” As the movement has gathered momentum, Makers have created their own market ecosystem developing new products and services. The combination of DIY Makers and open source technologies such as the Arduino microcontroller, Raspberry Pi, and personal 3D printing are driving innovation in manufacturing, engineering, industrial design, hardware technology, and education. With the rapid popularity of MAKE Magazine came the demand for a larger event to showcase this community in all of its glory. 66

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ISSUE 14

The launch of Maker Faire in the Bay Area in 2006 demonstrated the popularity of making and interest among legions of aspiring Makers to participate in hands-on activities and learn new skills at the event. Maker Faire is primarily designed to be forwardlooking, showcasing Makers who are exploring new forms and new technologies. But it’s not just for the novel in technical fields—Maker Faire features innovation and experimentation across the spectrum of science, engineering, art, performance, and craft. The launch of the Faire took place less than a year after the publication of the first Make: magazine in 2005, created by Dale Dougherty. Maker Faire launched in the San Francisco Bay Area and was quickly followed by faires in Austin, Detroit, and New York City, as well as other Maker Faires outside the United States.


MAKER FAIRE 2015 - SAN MATEO CA

Giant Giraffe Robot This sucker came fully equipped with LED lights that aligned it’s entire frame. The damned creature had LED lights for eyes that respond to touch sensors making the giraffe light up. I propose a zoo, and I demand penguins.

The Maker Faire to me, is one of rare events that allow general insight into where our society and this innovative community is technologically, creatively, economically and politically. Take 3D Printing, also known as Additive Manufacturing, for example. In the past decade there has been an incredible expansion with in the 3D Printing industry. What use to be a few small companies pioneering a new technology, preaching open source and revolutionary applications, has since gave way to a closed-source, highly competitive and lucrative industry, out of which spawned many new companies with big ideas. As the interest and demand for the technology grew so did the machines capabilities. There are printers that print with various materials (including those that are edible), printer units can be found in very large to very small sizes and we see web sites offering

both free and subscription based service for downloading 3D printing schematics. In the most recent adaptation, the ability to scan objects into your own 3D blueprint that can be printed out, all on one single machine not much larger than an inkjet desktop printer. Finally, technology reminiscent of something off Startrek; today a 3d printer, tomorrow the replicator! - Andrew Jurado


LIKE MAGAZINE DOES THE MAKER FAIRE

2015


Maker Faire San Mateo, California

2015 “The Greatest Show and Tell on Earth”

SCIENCE ENGINEERING ART PERFORMANCE CRAFT


L I K E M AG A Z I N E

SUMMER 2015

ISSUE 14

Photo: Jesse Alford | Typography: Andrew Jurado

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Like Magazine - issue 014  

The long awaited, issue 014

Like Magazine - issue 014  

The long awaited, issue 014