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Monday October 29, 2012 year: 132 No. 123

the student voice of

The Ohio State University

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thelantern Sandy intrudes on East Coast, OSU families

sports

Kristen Mitchell Campus editor mitchell.935@osu.edu

Shazier’s gesture

5A

OSU linebacker Ryan Shazier wore No. 48 Saturday in honor of a friend who died over the summer.

When her family in New Jersey went to buy a generator, they found clean shelves instead. “They’re preparing for the worst right now,” said Jill Martinko, a second-year in exploration, of her family living in New Jersey about an hour-and-a-half from the Atlantic coastline, where Hurricane Sandy is expected to hit Monday. The hurricane, which passed through the Caribbean killing about 60 people in its path, is expected to disrupt life on the East Coast this week. In anticipation of the hurricane, several places on the East Coast have declared a state of emergency, including New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Maryland, New York and Washington, D.C. Bob Armstrong, the director of

OSU emergency management, and Dave Isaacs, a Student Life spokesman, said severe weather isn’t anticipated in Columbus. According to the Weather Channel, there have been high wind and flood alerts for the northeast part of Ohio, and rain is expected in areas throughout the state for the rest of the week. In Columbus, there is a 30 percent or more chance of rain until Thursday. Many students with family and friends in the areas expected to be directly affected by the hurricane have been checking in on their loved ones to make sure they are prepared for the storm ahead. Gabby Ubilla, a third-year in French and English, said her family living in Sterling, Va., near Washington D.C., had been preparing for the storm by finishing up housework, charging electronics and gassing up their three cars. “Our main concerns right now

Courtesy of MCT

Hurricane Sandy stays offshore, as viewed from a beach access point on the north end of Pawleys Island, S.C., Saturday, Oct. 27. are the power going out and our house flooding,” she said in an email. “During major storms our basement floods as well. The last time this happened was during tropical storm Irene just over a year ago. It was so bad we had to get rid of the entire basement carpet and put in new

continued as Storm on 3A

Miller, Bucks silence PSU, improve to 9-0

[ a+e ]

Michael Periatt Managing editor for content periatt.1@osu.edu

8A

Kumar goes to the White House

Kal Penn visited the Ohio Union Sunday to talk about his career in politics and comedy.

campus

Parking employee in new role

2A

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weather high 43 low 39 showers

T 42/40 W 44/39 TH 48/39 F 50/34

flooring, and we lost a lot of stored items in our crawl space due to water damage.” Hurricane Irene was a severe storm that hit the East Coast during the 2011 Atlantic hurricane season

rain showers showers mostly cloudy www.weather.com

Andrew Holleran / Photo editor

OSU sophomore quarterback Braxton Miller (5) dives into the end zone for a touchdown in the 3rd quarter of the 35-23 game against PSU.

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Despite Ohio State’s 35-23 victory Saturday, Penn State’s “White Out” crowd lived up to its reputation. They wore white jerseys, waved white pom-poms and shook the stadium with noise. In the beginning of the game, they appeared to shake Braxton Miller too. To change the play at the line of scrimmage, the sophomore quarterback had to shuttle from lineman to lineman and shout the instructions through their helmets’ earholes. And as the noise level rose, Miller’s passes seemed to soar even higher. On the first drive of the game, Miller was almost intercepted twice — one of which likely would have been returned for a touchdown — and overthrew a wideopen receiver who had nothing but green grass between him and the end zone. At least three times in the first quarter, the player who has been billed as a Heisman candidate airmailed open receivers. Senior receiver Jake Stoneburner described his demeanor as “jittery.”

OSU’s first six offensive drives ended in a punt — the last of which was blocked and recovered in the end zone to give the Nittany Lions a 7-0 lead and sent the white-cladded crowd into a frenzy. Miller’s coach wasn’t worried, though. “He had that look in his eye,” said coach Urban Meyer. “There’s twice this year I’ve seen that look — he’s such a competitive guy — it was Nebraska and this one. It’s a night game, it’s the rah rah, it’s the flash.” The turning point for the OSU offense appeared to come on a misstep from the PSU defense. On a 4th-and-8 play late in the second quarter, OSU punted the ball away, but a holding penalty against the Nittany Lions gave OSU a first down and new life. Stoneburner said the PSU defense looked tired and the Buckeye offense quickened its pace. A few plays later and for one of the first times all game, Miller sprung free for a 33-yard dash to PSU’s six yard-line. Junior running back Carlos Hyde finished the job and ran into the end zone to knot the game up at 7.

continued as Miller on 2A

No fire in 94% of OSU fire alarms liz young Lantern reporter young.1693@osu.edu The sound of a fire alarm is something many students living in residence halls dread. Fire alarms can be set off by something as simple as burnt food in the microwave or a smoking hair straightener, and with thousands of students living together across campus, evacuations are bound to happen during the course of an academic year. From move-in day Aug. 19 until Oct. 20, 61 of the 65 fire alarms that have been set off and responded to by Columbus Division of Fire have been caused by burnt food, maintenance work, hot showers and hair straighteners, according to fire-related incidents data from Ohio State fire prevention. That’s roughly 94 percent of signaled alarms. However, the university isn’t charged any money for Columbus Fire responding if there isn’t a real emergency. Eleven of those 65 alarms were signaled in residence halls between the hours of 11 p.m. and 8 a.m., which is about 17 percent of total signaled alarms. However residents did not have to evacuate for all of those. At Indiana University, about 95 percent of alarms were caused by similar “occupant activity,” said Mel Lane, assistant director in IU’s Office of Insurance, Loss Control and Claims. He said “very few” alarms go off anytime between midnight and the early hours of the morning. At Northwestern University, 25 of the 29 signaled alarms since its Sept. 20 move-in day were caused by construction and maintenance, as well as burnt food, according to data from the Office of Risk Management at NU. That’s 86 percent, a lower percentage compared to OSU, but still a vast majority. Only four of the alarms sounded between 11 p.m. and 8 a.m., about 14 percent. Of the 22 alarms signaled at the University of Cincinnati this year, data from UC’s Department of Public Safety Emergency Services suggests that all were false alarms. Ten of 22 went off between 11 p.m. and 8 a.m., about 45 percent of alarms. At OSU, the policy is that an alarm can’t be canceled until a public safety official, anyone from a police officer to a Columbus firefighter, has responded to the scene and declared that it can be cleared. However, Bob Armstrong, director of Emergency Management and Fire Prevention at OSU, said Columbus Division of Fire does not bill the university when it responds to false alarms.

Liz Young / Lantern reporter

Neil and 12th avenues flood after a water main break left Mack Hall residents without water Saturday evening.

Cause unknown in Mack Hall main break liz young Lantern reporter young.1693@osu.edu For the second time this semester, a water main break on campus has affected students in South Campus residence halls. A water main break caused Mack Hall to lose water Saturday at about 6:45 p.m., said Dave Isaacs, Student Life spokesman, in an email. The area around the break at the intersection of 12th and Neil avenues was flooded, with the water and mud extending down Neil Avenue to the Mirror Lake area. An 8-inch line broke, and a contractor was able to fix the line and get the water back on in Mack just before noon Sunday, Isaacs said. No cause had been determined for the break by 4:30 p.m. Sunday. Oxley and Pomerene halls were also affected by the break but saw minimal impact since it occurred over the weekend, Isaacs said. A water main break on Sept. 16 caused Park-Stradley Hall, Ohio Union and Baker halls East and West to be evacuated, displacing about 2,000 students from their

continued as Break on 3A

continued as Alarm on 3A 1A


campus Former OSU employee helps ease parking transition anna duee Lantern reporter duee.1@osu.edu For Sarah Blouch, a former Transportation and Parking official, helping with the transition to privatize parking felt a bit like going to the dark side. Blouch was named the new director of CampusParc, an arm of QIC Global Infrastructure and LAZ Parking, to control OSU’s parking operations after the $483 million 50-year parking lease agreement was passed by the Board of Trustess in June. The bid on OSU’s parking was placed by QIC, an Australian-based investment firm. Blouch is the former executive director of OSU Transportation and Parking Services, a department that no longer exists. “It’s sort of like taking an old business, building it up as a new business, and trying some new things on it,� said Blouch about her new position at CampusParc. This year when CampusParc took over the operation for parking on campus, and Blouch came with it. “I would never in a million years have imagined that I would willingly switch. I felt like I was kind of going over to the dark side,� Blouch said. But the dark side of the for-profit organization turned out to be better than she first thought. After sitting down with its board of directors, Blouch was convinced that together they could improve the parking service on campus. “They truly want to make the world a better

place. They have terrific ethics. They are not out there for this long ‘let’s get all the money we can and run.’ That is not their philosophy at all,� Blouch said. Bill Lhota, a member of CampusParc’s board of directors and retired president and CEO of Central Ohio Transit Authority, said Blouch is a great addition to the organization. If she continues what she has done before with the support of additional resources and technology, Lhota said she will be able to continue to improve the “excellent� service OSU offered. Although there will be a cap on possible parking fee increase of 5.5 percent annually for the first ten years of the contract, as written into the 50-year lease contract, Blouch said annual increases have always been in that spectrum. Blouch said with CampusParc, she doesn’t want campus visitors to have to even think about parking. “The last thing we want, and I know it’s not always the case and we’ve worked on that for years, is it shouldn’t be the first and last thing you think about when you come to campus,� Blouch said. Students come to campus for other reasons than parking, which makes it even more important for CampusParc to maintain a good relationship with OSU, Blouch said. Even though CampusParc is set to operate parking for the next 50 years, it will still be tied to a concession agreement OSU set, which acts as a handbook. “Nothing will change without the university saying, ‘Yeah, we think this is a good idea’ and they have to agree to that. So we just can’t go and slip these changes in,� Blouch said. She said the operation model is simple: “No

Anna duee / Lantern reporter

Sarah Blouch has been named the director of CampusParc at OSU. surprises.� This means that whatever action CampusParc will take throughout the next years, OSU students will be warned in advance. The only days the operation will step back are universal events, such as football Saturdays. On those days, CampusParc will act as a contract operator that will be dictated by OSU. “All our folks will be doing is showing up, doing what they’ve been asked to do, collecting the money,� Blouch said. “We turn it back in, we make

Miller from 1A

Andrew Holleran / Photo editor

OSU sophomore quarterback Braxton Miller (5) pushes junior running back Carlos Hyde (34) into the end zone for a touchdown against PSU.

It was a different offense after that. Miller appeared to calm down and — as has been the case for most of the year — the rest of the offense followed his lead. “I was so excited I missed a lot of throws,� Miller said of his early-game performance. “The crowd was just energetic. We came back in the second half and I slowed down.� As Miller slowed down, the offense sped up as it stuck with a no huddle offense. The PSU defense struggled to keep up. In the second half, the offensive line’s push was stronger and the running holes were bigger. “We kind of caught them off guard, tired them,� Stoneburner said. “Our offensive line, Braxton and Carlos, they were running the crap out of the ball.�

 

a deposit and send that back to the university, and then they pay the bill.� Jay Kasey, senior vice president of Administration and Planning, said in an email the university is very pleased to continue to work with Blouch as the new director. “We are fortunate to have someone with Sarah’s skill and very unique understanding of our parking operations and our university community overseeing the agreement for our parking management firm,� Kasey said. “We feel strongly this will be a great benefit to the University and will help ensure the continued excellence of the parking operations.� But the biggest struggle that Blouch and her team face is the management of expectation, she said. Students buy permits and expect to get a parking spot during the busiest times of the day. As a result, they’re often disappointed and upset when they can’t find one. To keep the transition from OSU to CampusParc as smooth as possible, Blouch said she hopes to hear from students if there are any problems regarding parking. “Ask a lot of questions,� Blouch said. “Then if your expectations aren’t being met, let us know what that was, ‘cause sometimes (students and parking operations) don’t communicate well.�

By game’s end, OSU had amassed 234 yards on the ground compared to PSU’s 32. Miller, who ran for 134 yards and two touchdowns during the game, became the first person Meyer has ever coached to rush for 1,000 or more yards in a season. Of Miller’s 134 yards, one especially stuck out. On a third down play near the goal line, Miller kept the ball on an option play, sidestepped a defender that appeared to have Miller in the backfield, accelerated forward and avoided two more defenders while leaping into the end zone. The joke after the game was that Miller can juke people in midair. “We work on that, we have a drill. Make seven people miss, dive across and hold the ball,� Meyer said of the play, smiling. “Only a few guys can do that.� PSU scored in the fourth quarter to make

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things interesting, but a 72-yard bomb from Miller to Stoneburner put the game out of reach. It wasn’t a perfect game for the Buckeyes, but it was one Meyer was proud of. After the game, OSU’s coach shot down a reporter’s notion that the team didn’t play a complete game. “We got to get better but I want to repeat; we ran for (234) and they ran for (32),� Meyer said. “If you want to have a conversation about how well these guys plan, I’m into that.� The win improved OSU’s record to 9-0 on the year and put the Buckeyes in sole possession of first place of the Leaders Division in the Big Ten. OSU returns home Saturday to face Illinois. Kickoff is scheduled for 3:30 p.m.

  

      

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Issue 122/Thursday In the article â&#x20AC;&#x153;Haunted, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;goryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tales buried in OSU loreâ&#x20AC;? Theora Hixâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name was incorrectly spelled Theodora Hix.

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Storm from 1A that resulted in 56 deaths, and several days without power for many. Myra Sabolesky, a 19-year-old from Uniontown, Ohio, currently living in Manhattan, N.Y., said people have been comparing Hurricane Sandy to Irene. The New York transit system was expected to close Sunday night due to the storm. It closed last year for Hurricane Irene. Sabolesky said Sunday that she has been preparing by stocking up on candles and non-perishable food. She said she is thankful that one of her roommates will be staying with her while the storm passes through. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like storms â&#x20AC;Ś but I think I should be OK,â&#x20AC;? said Sabolesky, who expects to lose power. Sabolesky wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the only one in the city who thought to stock up on food. She said when her roommate went to Trader Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, she had to wait a half-hour to check out of the store. Martinko said aside from the generators that

Break from 1A rooms. Ohio Union and Baker East and West were reopened the following morning, but 1,200 Park-Stradley residents werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t permitted back into their rooms until Sept. 19, three days after the break forced them out. Some Mack Hall residents were afraid that they too would need to evacuate Saturday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone was running around like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;I hope we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get evacuated,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? said Rachel Fladung, a first-year in animal sciences. Others werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even aware of the problem until later. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t (worried about getting evacuated). I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even know what was going on until I turned on the shower and it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t working, so I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really think anything of it,â&#x20AC;? said Jared Vanderpohl, a second-year in business. Some Mack residents were not significantly affected by the break. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were all pretty much in the dorm and I was walking back to Mack and I saw that a water line

were sold out when her family tried to buy them, they also found that non-perishable food supplies were low as well. She said her parents arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going back to work until the storm passes. Scott Swope, a 23-year-old from Reading, Pa., said he went to New Jersey over the weekend to help his grandmother prepare for the storm. Living â&#x20AC;&#x153;right off Long Beach Island,â&#x20AC;? her coastline home is right in the stormâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s path. Swope said he went to New Jersey â&#x20AC;&#x153;just to make sure nothing could be used as projectiles by the windâ&#x20AC;? in his grandmotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s yard. His grandmother is not planning to evacuate, but she has family in the area she could stay with if needed. Swope described people preparing for the storm like â&#x20AC;&#x153;something out of a movie.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Perfect Stormâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;Ś theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really expecting it to be devastating.â&#x20AC;? Emily Tara and Ally Marotti contributed to this article.

had bust,â&#x20AC;? Fladung said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was water everywhere. It was muddy. (Workers) were trying to put gravel down, and then I came in and everyone was like, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Oh, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no water.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Went to go turn the sink on, no water.â&#x20AC;? However, Fladung said she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need to use the water while it was out. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had taken a shower earlier at like 5, so I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have an issue with that, but I know a lot of other people did because they all wait till late at night,â&#x20AC;? Fladung added. Other residents said that they were informed that water wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t available via Facebook and signs on the bathroom doors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think we got an email, I think they said something on Facebook. Whoever was working the desk at the time posted it on Facebook, and then there were signs on all the bathroom doors saying donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t use them,â&#x20AC;? Vanderpohl said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(The signs) just said there was a water main leak and that the water was shut off so we couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t use it, so they just told us to go to Canfield (Hall) and use their bathrooms.â&#x20AC;?

OSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fire alarm activity average among universities The majority of fire alarms set off around campus are located in residence halls and signal as a result of burnt food, maintenance work, hot showers and hair straighteners. Some of the 65 fire alarms set off at OSU between Aug. 19 and Oct. 20 were signaled between 11 p.m. and 8 a.m.

Alarms set off by resident activity

Alarms set off from 11 p.m. and 8 a.m.

The Ohio State University

94 Percent

17 Percent

Indiana University

95 Percent

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Very fewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;*

Northwestern University

86 Percent

14 Percent

University of Cincinnati

100 Percent

45 Percent

School

*According to Mel Lane, assistant director in IUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office of Insurance, Loss Control and Claims

source: reporting

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Alarm from 1A Some students in residence halls this year have experienced the extensive procedure that happens when an alarm goes off, even just over burnt popcorn. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the residents in Halloran (Hall) burnt their popcorn and then they set off the fire alarm, which in turn set off the alarm in Barrett House, alerting the other RAs in the other buildings ... We had to call the fire department to come and from there we had to call our hall director and our resident manager,â&#x20AC;? said Sebastian Mejia, a first-year in biology. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No one evacuated, but we did call the RAs to check out the situation.â&#x20AC;? However, he said it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really much of a problem. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was indifferent just cause it was just procedure so it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t too bad, and I was glad to hear it was popcorn and not something more drastic,â&#x20AC;? Mejia added. Some older students remember fire alarms going off for non-safety related reasons in their time in the residence halls.

CHRISTOPHER BRAUN / Design editor

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had someone on our floor my freshman year who cooked food for too long really late at night and it set off the alarm,â&#x20AC;? said Matt Crowley, a third-year in nursing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My roommate also, he set it off with the popcorn once.â&#x20AC;? Other students remember the inconveniences of a false alarm. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My freshman year, it was the middle of the night, and someone Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m guessing who was drunk ... pulled the fire alarm,â&#x20AC;? said Stephanie Boehm, a third-year in actuarial science. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No one knew thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why it went off, so everyone had to evacuate the building and wait outside in the cold for the squad or whatever to come.â&#x20AC;? Boehm said she was annoyed because most residents were â&#x20AC;&#x153;asleep and we were all frantic to try to get out of the building because we thought there was an actual fire.â&#x20AC;? Other students donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t remember ever having experienced a fire alarm besides a drill. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think (there were) just drills,â&#x20AC;? said Alison Webster, a second-year in biochemistry.

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sports

Monday October 29, 2012

thelantern www.thelantern.com Lantern Football rewind Top 25 College Football Poll

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Alabama (8-0) Oregon (8-0) Kansas State (8-0) notre dame (8-0) lSU (7-1) OHIO STATE (9-0) Georgia (7-1) Florida (7-1) Florida State (8-1) Clemson (7-1) South Carolina (7-2) louisville (8-0) Oregon State (6-1) Oklahoma (5-2) Stanford (6-2) Texas A&M (6-2) Mississippi State (7-0) USC (6-2) Boise State (7-1)

20 21 22 23 24 25

Texas Tech (6-2) nebraska (6-2) louisiana Tech (7-1) west Virginia (5-2) Arizona (5-3) UClA (6-2)

DROPPED FROM RANKINGS: Rutgers 18, Michigan 20, Ohio 23 OTHERS RECEIVING VOTES: Toledo 88, Rutgers 74, Oklahoma State 72, Texas 55, Kent State 33, Tulsa 17, Northern Illinois 12, Washington 8, Northwestern 7, Ohio 4, Wisconsin 4, Michigan 2, Louisiana Monroe 1.

BIG TEN STANDINGS LEADERS DIVISION Team

Big Ten record

Overall record

1. OHIO STATE

5-0

9-0

Penn State

3-1

5-3

3. Wisconsin

3-2

6-3

4. Indiana

1-3

3-5

Purdue

0-4

3-5

Illinois

0-4

2-6

LEGENDS DIVISION Team

Big Ten record

Overall record

1. Nebraska

3-1

6-2

Michigan

2-1

4-3

3. Northwestern

3-2

7-2

4. Iowa

2-2

4-4

5. Mich. State

2-3

5-4

6. Minnesota

1-3

5-3

source: BIGTen.OrG

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Featuring....

Ohio State — 35 Penn State — 23

- Shazier dons No. 48 to honor friend - OSU defense falters late, hangs on

Shazier honors fallen friend in OSU win Andrew HOllerAn Photo editor holleran.9@osu.edu UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — Wearing a number that made him a little hard to recognize, Ryan Shazier stood out at Beaver Stadium on Saturday against Penn State because of his play on the field. Sporting the number “48” in honor of a high school friend who died last summer, Shazier, who normally wears No. 10, had perhaps the best game of his career Saturday against the Nittany Lions. The sophomore linebacker had seven tackles, two sacks, a forced fumble and an interception returned for a touchdown in OSU’s 35-23 win against PSU in State College, Pa., Saturday night. He was at his best at the beginning of the third quarter, a time when the Buckeyes needed him most. With the game tied, 7-7, and neither team in control of momentum, Shazier took matters into his own hands during PSU’s opening drive on the second half. The sophomore sacked PSU senior quarterback Matt McGloin on a second-down play, putting the Nittany Lions in a third-and-long situation. On third down, Shazier intercepted McGloin’s pass across the middle, and returned it 17 yards for a touchdown, putting OSU up, 14-7. “The offense ran the play just how we practiced it and I got the sack,” Shazier said. “And on third down, I didn’t have any work on my side, so I worked back toward the middle and he threw it right to the curl and

continued as Shazier on 6A

Andrew HOllerAn / Photo editor

OSU sophomore linebacker ryan Shazier celebrates scoring a 3rd-quarter touchdown during an Oct. 27 game against Penn State at Beaver Stadium in State College, Pa. OSU won, 35-23.

OSU defense falters late in otherwise strong game against PSU PAT BrennAn Sports editor brennan.164@osu.edu UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. — The telling sign of Ohio State football’s defensive impact on the game against Penn State was evident in the Beaver Stadium grandstands. PSU’s white-clad supporters, regarded by some as the loudest, most intimidating fans in college football, were silent after 45 minutes of play and with the Buckeyes leading, 28-10. The last 15 minutes of the game saw a defensive lapse as well as the PSU fans briefly return to their pom-pom waving selves as the Nittany Lions attempted to claw back into the game. The Buckeyes would eventually close out a 35-23 win at PSU’s Beaver Stadium on Saturday despite 13 fourth-quarter points for the hosts, a blight on what still might be regarded as the OSU defense’s strongest outing of the season. OSU has allowed 61 fourth-quarter

points in 2012 — immediate evaluations of the final period of play from an otherwise outstanding night against PSU elicited a mixed bag of reactions from players and coaches. OSU (9-0, 5-0 Big Ten) stifled PSU (5-3, 3-1 Big Ten) through three quarters, limiting the hosts to 201 yards through the air, 21 on the ground and just three points (PSU’s first touchdown of the game came on an end-zone recovery after a punt block). As a result, PSU’s towering football fortress, which held 107,817 mostly fans on this night, was eerily quiet. OSU’s defense had stolen the show. During the final 9:49 of the game, that same defense creaked and buckled. The Nittany Lions added 13 points to tighten the gap, which nearly set the stage for the type of dramatic finish the Buckeyes have faced increasingly often in 2012. It was that performance that earned the defensive unit a half-compliment from firstyear coach Urban Meyer. Meyer split game-closing praise

continued as Defense on 6A

Andrew HOllerAn / Photo editor

OSU senior defensive end John Simon pursues Penn State senior quarterback Matt McGloin during an Oct. 27 game at Beaver Stadium in State College, Pa. OSU won, 35-23.

thelantern’s Heisman Hopefuls editors’ ranking of top Heisman Trophy candidates

1. COllIn KleIn, QB Kansas State senior quarterback Collin Klein remains at the top of The Lantern’s Heisman Trophy rankings after leading the Wildcats to a 55-24 win against No. 15 Texas Tech. He was 19-of-26 through the air for 233 yards and two touchdowns to go along with 83 rushing yards and two rushing scores. The win against Texas Tech brings his total passing yardage to 1,630 yards and 12 touchdown passes as well as 634 rushing yards and 16 rushing touchdowns. Kansas State is also ranked No. 3 in the Associated Press’ Top 25 poll, making his team a legitimate contender for a national title.

2. BrAXTOn MIller Ohio State sophomore quarterback Braxton Miller was far from his best form against Penn State on Saturday, but what he was able to do to the Nittany Lions was more than enough to take over the game and steer the Buckeyes to 9-0 on the year. Miller surpassed 1,000 rushing yards on the year with a 134-yard, two-touchdown rushing outing against PSU, in Happy Valley. With the Nittany Lions fighting to climb back into the game Miller also found redshirt senior tight end Jake Stoneburner on a 72yard touchdown play. Miller has 12 rushing scores on the year to go along with 1,527 passing yards.

3. A.J. McCArrOn Through steady, consistent play, Alabama junior quarterback A.J. McCarron has forced his way into the Heisman discussion. In our poll, he jumps up a spot after completing 16-of-23 pass attempts for 208 yards and two touchdowns in a 38-7 rout of Mississippi State. McCarron has completed 122-of177 of his attempts this season, throwing for 1,684 yards, 18 touchdowns and no interceptions — he’s a model for efficient passing.

4. GenO SMITH, QB Call it unfair, but so much of the Heisman discussion is about hype, and West Virginia’s bye week didn’t create any excitement for West Virginia senior quarterback Geno Smith. As a result, he drops two spots in this week’s poll. The Mountaineers suffered two losses in the games prior to the team’s break. Between Smith’s play and the bye week, his Heisman candidacy has cooled off considerably. However, he’s still a top contender. His touchdown pass to interception ratio is 26-2 and he’s thrown for 2,414 yards in seven games this season.

Photos courtesy of MCT, Andrew HOllerAn / Photo editor

PAT BrennAn / Sports editor

5A


sports Shazier from 5A I took it to the house. It felt amazing, almost like a dream, because I dropped so many picks this year.â&#x20AC;? The Buckeyes would not relinquish the lead Shazier gave them, and the pick-six could not have come at a much bigger point in the game. Saturday was not all smiles for Shazier â&#x20AC;&#x201D; he had a missed assignment in the fourth quarter that resulted in a PSU touchdown and an earful from his coaches. The positives significantly outweighed the one negative, though. OSU defensive coordinator Luke Fickell, who took quite a bit of criticism over the past few weeks because of his unitâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s poor play, singled Shazier out after Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At that point in the game, it was unbelievable,â&#x20AC;? Fickell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We needed momentum and you can never account for those kind of things. Those are the things that just break the back of the other team.â&#x20AC;? OSU coach Urban Meyer had high praise for the sophomore linebacker as well. Shazier had a season-high 13 tackles last week against Purdue. On the season, he leads the Buckeyes with 85 tackles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love Ryan,â&#x20AC;? Meyer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s playing his best football right now.â&#x20AC;? Shazierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s big game helped propel OSU to a 9-0 record, but the sophomore linebacker said everything he did on Saturday was for Gary Curtis. A former high school football team manager and friend of Shazierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s at Plantation High School in Florida, Curtis suffered from muscular dystrophy and died earlier this year. Shazier said Curtis was â&#x20AC;&#x153;like a brother to (him)â&#x20AC;? and that the two would play video games â&#x20AC;&#x153;a lotâ&#x20AC;? when they attended high school together. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Curtis) always had number 48, no matter what year. No matter what, coaches always had a number for him,â&#x20AC;? Shazier said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He died this summer, and he was really close to me, so I felt like wearing his number is really going to be an honor.â&#x20AC;? He originally wanted to wear 48 for the Nebraska game on Oct. 6, but Shazier did not give the OSU staff proper notice for the change. He said he chose the PSU contest because of â&#x20AC;&#x153;how big a game it was.â&#x20AC;? Throughout the game Saturday, Shazier said he had his friend in the back of his mind. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was thinking about him the whole game. I knew I had his number on and I felt like he was playing through me and he had my back,â&#x20AC;? Shazier said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I felt that (it was) him playing out there today, not really me.â&#x20AC;? Shazier stood out so much in the 48 jersey Saturday that he is considering making the number switch permanent. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just going to keep it rolling and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find out next week,â&#x20AC;? Shazier said. OSU (9-0, 5-0 Big Ten) is set to face Illinois (2-6, 0-4 Big Ten) Saturday at 3:30 p.m. The game will be televised by ESPN.

Andrew Holleran / Photo editor

OSU sophomore linebacker Ryan Shazier tackles Penn State senior quarterback Matt McGloin during an Oct. 27 game at Beaver Stadium in University Park, Pa. OSU won, 35-23.

Andrew Holleran / Photo editor

OSU senior linebacker Zach Boren (44), redshirt senior defensive lineman Nathan Williams (43) and redshirt sophomore cornerback Bradley Roby (1) walk back to the huddle during an Oct. 27 game at Penn Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Beaver Stadium in State College, Pa. OSU won, 35-23.

Defense from 5A between the defense and offensive lines, saying the defenseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s effort toward finishing the game was only a little more comfortable than prior games this season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought our defense closed it out,â&#x20AC;? Meyer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once again, the whole world knows youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re running the ball, and to close it out running the ball â&#x20AC;Ś just shows you how far this offensive line has come.â&#x20AC;? At the outset of the third quarter, sophomore linebacker Ryan Shazier notched a sack and a 17-yard interception return for a touchdown on back-to-back plays. The touchdown put OSU up, 14-7. After PSU added three points on a 27-yard field goal by sophomore kicker Sam Ficken, OSU sophomore quarterback Braxton Miller added two third-quarter touchdowns â&#x20AC;&#x201D; his 11th and 12th of the season â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to extend the lead to 28-10. OSU allowed only 36 yards on the ground against PSU but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s passing defense wavered, allowing Nittany Lions senior quarterback Matt McGloin to throw for 126 yards and two touchdowns during the final 9:49 of the game. OSU redshirt sophomore cornerback Bradley Roby recovered the onside-kick attempt that followed PSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second fourth-quarter touchdown to squelch the Nittany Lions threat. The damage that had already been done was enough to turn OSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opinion of its own defensive effort.

Buckeyes redshirt senior defensive lineman Nathan Williams said he was sickened by the second PSU score of the final quarter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Honestly, I feel kind of sick to my stomach. We let them score on the last drive, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unacceptable,â&#x20AC;? Williams said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Other than that, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m proud of our guys. (Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m) proud of our offense. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a total team win. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a little sick to my stomach on the last drive. We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t close it out the way we should have.â&#x20AC;? Defensive coordinator Luke Fickell agreed, saying that the defensive line grew tired and it showed on the Nittany Lionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; late scoring drives. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to close things out better,â&#x20AC;? Fickell said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re up three touchdowns youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to keep bending and make the clock run.â&#x20AC;? Then thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the 10 total points â&#x20AC;&#x201D; only three of which can be pinned on Fickellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s defense â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and 236 yards of total offense through three quarters that had Beaver Stadium all but shut down for the weekend as the fourth quarter began. OSU also had four sacks to go along with Shazierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pick-six interception. The OSU defense did what it was asked to do, Fickell said, and things are starting to click. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know our guys played really, really hard,â&#x20AC;? Fickell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They did some things we asked them to do â&#x20AC;Ś Guys are starting to get a little more comfortable.â&#x20AC;? OSU will continue Big Ten Conference play Saturday at Ohio Stadium against Illinois. Kickoff is set for 3:30 p.m.

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6A

Monday October 29, 2012


studentvoice

andrew holleran / Photo editor

Buses line 17th Avenue on Oct. 9 while President Barack Obama visits OSU’s Oval. After Obama spoke to a crowd of about 15,000 attendees, the buses were available to take people to early voting locations in Franklin County to cast their ballots.

Quit whining about politics and go vote Lantern Columnist

Kayla Byler byler.18@osu.edu

With Election Day quickly approaching, campaign advertisements are becoming increasingly harder to ignore. It seems that every media outlet from cable television to YouTube and Facebook are plastered with the faces of President Barack Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney. This is starting to get annoying. However, something that is even more annoying is hearing friends and classmates lament things like, “I can’t wait for this election to be over,” and, “I hate politics.” I generally do not consider myself patriotic and I definitely don’t go around chanting “USA.,” but never for even a moment have I forgotten what an honor it is to live in a country like the United States.

I am incredibly grateful to live in a country where our government is literally a government of the people, where all citizens are given the opportunity, purely by being born on American soil, to be an integral part in this nation’s governing body. And I am incredibly grateful that for a couple months every four years, our media attempt (for the most part) to educate voters, without bias, on the decisions they will be faced with at the polls. This is not something that should be taken lightly. As a citizen, when you vote you are literally deciding the fate of our country, and in many ways making a choice that will affect the rest of the world. How many of your friends and classmates would recognize a photo of Honey Boo Boo? How many

people from that same group could distinguish Speaker of the House John Boehner from Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid? Let’s get our priorities straight here. You can handle the annoying campaign advertisements, you can handle the Oval being closed for one day when the president of the United States comes to campus. We cannot handle being passive citizens. This nation is ours, and our government is built from us. It is time we stop complaining and go out and vote.

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‘Happy Endings’ could redeem comedy TV lantern Columnist

Die-hard fans of television comedy are going through a rough time right now. “30 Rock” and “The Office” are coming to an end, and neither of those shows are as good as they once were. “Community” is on indefinite hiatus, most of the sitcoms on CBS stink, and while many love “Modern Family,” it really hasn’t lived up to its full potential. But things took a turn for the better last week, as the ABC comedy “Happy Endings” returned matt kraus for a third season. By all accounts, kraus.86@osu.edu this could be a truly great year for this show. “Happy Endings” doesn’t have much of a premise, and is often compared to “Friends.” Ultimately, it’s just about a bunch of friends in Chicago who hang out and get into all sorts of mischief. It got off to a perfectly fine start in its brief first season, but there was so little buzz around the show that it seemed destined to be cast aside. Luckily for television fans, ABC did “Happy Endings” a kindness and brought it back for a second season. Last year was a breakout year for the show. Its numbers were up, though nothing revelatory, and in its best episodes, it reached some incredible comedic highs. Really, it’s done exactly what all comedies should do: use the first handful of episodes to introduce the characters, and then start figuring out what to do with each of them to maximize their potential. Created by David Caspe, “Happy Endings” has even taken some not particularly funny actors and used them to hilarious ends. Elisha Cuthbert, previously known as Jack Bauer’s daughter on “24,” became one of the show’s secret weapons in the second season. There are some veteran comedic actors on the show as well, and it’s better for their presence. Adam Pally, Casey Wilson and Damon Wayans Jr. have all been funny in other things, and they help to make this ensemble one of the deepest in network comedy. When it

Courtesy of ABC

(From left to right) Damon Wayans Jr., Eliza Coupe, Elisha Cuthbert, Adam Pally and Zachary Knighton star in ABC’s ‘Happy Endings.’ The 1st episode of Season 3 ‘Cazsh Dummy Spillionaires - Watching Penny’s Fall’ premiered Oct. 23 at 9 p.m. premiered two seasons ago, the cast was full of weak links. By the time the second season ended, everyone was pulling their fair share of the weight. There are certainly more ambitious comedies on television, but when “Happy Endings” is at its best there might be no other show that comes

close to duplicating its laugh-a-minute style. Not a line of dialogue goes by without some kind of attempt at humor. Of course it doesn’t always click, but going into its third season “Happy Endings” has a ridiculously high batting average. “Happy Endings” airs Tuesday nights at 9 p.m. on ABC.

Apology for ad demanded Look again at debate quips As students of this great university and daily readers of The Lantern, we were disappointed, appalled and honestly disgusted by the advertisement it chose to run on Oct. 24. The advertisement in question was written and paid for by FLAME — Facts and Logic About the Middle East — an organization that is notorious for publishing contentious blurbs vilifying Palestinians and all Muslims — two factions that are deeply engrained in The Ohio State University’s campus and culture. The Lantern, like many of its newspaper and media counterparts, desires to preserve the freedoms of speech and press that are enumerated in the First Amendment of our sublime Constitution; however, the advertisement in question was a blatant and inflammatory form of hate speech — a form of speech that is explicitly unprotected in our Bill of Rights. The advertisement asserts that all Muslims and Iranians are “crazies” and that Allah commands Muslims to “kill Jews and other infidels, whatever the cost.” This is not only completely false, but it is a malignant and clear attempt at generating hatred toward Muslims. As a point of reference, the Supreme Court has ruled that not all speech is protected, or even legal in our country — precedent was set in 1969 with the Brandenburg v. Ohio case, which states that the First Amendment does not defend inflammatory speech “that is directed to inciting and likely to incite imminent lawless action.” Adding to the magnitude of this situation

Monday October 29, 2012

is the fact that our outstanding institution has been tarnished with hate crimes and the profuse proliferation of hate speech among our student body over the course of the past two school years, exemplified by the OSU Haters Tumblr account. The Lantern is the official newspaper of Ohio State, and it is also sponsored and promoted by the university, thus everything it chooses to print inherently represents our university’s views and positions. The Lantern has an obligation to review everything that it publishes, including advertisements, for accuracy — a duty that is expected for all professional organizations and forms of print. It also has the onus of upholding the democratic values of our nation, which unequivocally exclude the use of hate speech, and it has absolutely failed in this instance. Unfortunately, this is not the first time The Lantern has printed advertisements that promote anti-Islamic sentiments, and The Ohio State University’s Muslim Student Association has decided to take a stand against The Lantern’s erroneous activity. From this point forward, we are refusing to patronize The Lantern until it takes an unambiguous stance against this type of speech, changes its flawed policy in regards to publishing advertisements and prints an apology to the thousands of Muslims and Iranians on our campus that were falsely accused of being crazy murderers. The Ohio State University’s Muslim Student Association

The presidential debates have come and gone, and they have left us with what the public’s attention span believes to be policy worthy of the president of the United States. “Binders full of women” patrick seaworth went quickly seaworth.1@osu.edu from a progressive utterance to a feminist quip during the second presidential debate. And laughing during a discussion on nuclear war became acceptable during the vice presidential debate. As they constitute the entirety of the open discussions between the president, vice president and those campaigning to replace them, those moments which became humorous deserve a bit of attention before being left behind. On the morning after the Oct. 11 vice presidential debate in which Vice President Joe Biden laughed throughout the event, Tom Brokaw appeared on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” and said, “I just don’t think you should be laughing during a discussion about thermonuclear war with Iran. It’s a very serious issue.” During the second presidential debate, Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney explained that during the first days of his administration, he went out of his way to ensure qualified women were part of his administration. He said “binders full of women” were considered for positions. When Romney came into office as governor

lantern Columnist

Letter to the editor

of Massachusetts in January 2003, with a female lieutenant governor, LinkedIn had yet to launch. According to LinkedIn’s website, it launched in May 2003, and 4,500 professionals had registered with the site by the end the month. There was no practical manner for Romney to search the Internet for qualified candidates, as we are able to in today’s world. Romney had to be proactive. Romney wished to hire women, and to do so, he needed to gather information that was not widely available. That compiled information, like most data of the age, was stored in binders for review. During the third presidential debate, Obama noted that an increased naval fleet was similar to increasing horses and bayonets. China purchased its first aircraft carrier, from our 1980s foe, Russia, as reported by The Guardian in 2011. In June, The Economist pointed out, “the demands of industrial-scale counterinsurgency campaigns have determined America’s spending priorities,” leaving the need, for what Defense Secretary Leon Panetta called a “rebalance” at the June Shangri-La Dialogue, an Asian defense summit. Henry Crumpton, lead CIA officer in our Afghanistan response to 9/11, stated within his autobiography, “The Art of Intelligence,” that CIA officers rode into battle against al-Qaida on horseback in Afghanistan. Crumpton also stated during a May “60 Minutes” interview with Lara Logan, that former President Bill Clinton refused to give the attack order in 1999 when the administration identified Osama bin Laden with the precursors to today’s Predator drones. Placed in context of the current Libya debacle, we have two Democrat administrations failing us in national security, leading to the suboptimal deaths of thousands of Americans since 1999.

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Monday October 29, 2012

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Kal Penn profiles acting, political career

Weekend Box 6MÄJL

Title 1. “Argo”

DANIELLE SEAMON Lantern reporter seamon.17@osu.edu

Weekend Gross Weeks $12.4M $60.8M

3

2. “Hotel Transylvania”

$9.5M $130.4M

5

3. “Cloud Atlas”

$9.4M

$9.4M

1

4. “Paranormal Activity 4” $8.7M

$42.6M

2

5. “Taken 2”

$117.4M

4

$8M

Source: Box Office Mojo CHRISTOPHER BRAUN / Design editor

the week ahead Monday

For an Ohio State crowd, Kal Penn illustrated his progression from only eating Ramen Noodles and beans from a can to having to lose “White House weight” following his stint as an associate director in the White House Office of Public Engagement under the President Barack Obama administration. Penn visited OSU Sunday as part of an event sponsored by the National Society of Leadership and Success and the Ohio Union Activities Board, held in the Ohio Union’s Archie M. Griffin Grand Ballroom. He lectured about racial profiling within the entertainment industry, his thoughts on the media and its role in today’s youth and the first White House binder he received (“which was not full of women”) to assemble a department while working for the Obama administration. Penn kicked the talk off acknowledging his opposite roles as a comedian and political figure, asking students which they wanted to hear about. The crowd seemed split between the two choices, so Penn discussed both. He first touch on his break into the acting business and the realization that every actor receives a typecast role from the get-go. Penn also cited his experience auditioning for the character Taj Mahal in the movie “Van Wilder” and his competition in the casting call.

Courtesy of MCT

Kal Penn speaks at the 2012 Democratic National Convention Sept. 4. Penn visited OSU Oct. 28 as part of an OUAB-sponsored event. “I go in and look into the waiting room, and there was a guy in brown face,” Penn said. “I was like, ‘Oh man, when did you acquire this makeup? Did you do it at home and drive here? Did you do it in the bathroom somewhere?’” Some members of the audience let out gasps of bewilderment when Penn noted other incidents of prejudice throughout his career, including an audition in which the director questioned why Penn was not wearing a turban and a studio director being puzzled as to why Penn and his co-star John Cho did not hold accents in “Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle.” He went on to cite a statistic he once read that by the time teenagers graduate high school, they will have spent more time watching TV than in class. Listing the five media outlets left in the U.S. (The Walt Disney Company, News Corporation, Time Warner Inc.,

Viacom and General Electric), Penn then divulged on how his friends Akiva Schaffer, Jorma Taccone and Andy Samberg, who make up The Lonely Island, somewhat got caught up in a lawsuit with one of the outlets. “After they got on ‘SNL,’ they produced digital shorts, and they would be on the ‘SNL’ website, but fans would also rip them and put them on YouTube, and there became this lawsuit between NBC and YouTube,” Penn said. “It was interesting to see Andy Samberg, one of my friends, representing this change in technology, these emerging technologies, and seeing his face on the second page of the ‘Wall Street Journal.’” Discussing his transition from acting to politics, he said that Olivia Wilde, one of his co-stars from the series “House,” introduced him to the Obama campaign. As an independent voter, he was inspired by Obama and

followed the campaign to 25 states to rally in support of the president. After Obama was elected, Penn applied for a job as a presidential aide, worked 16- to 18-hour days for two years and still catered to his acting audience, returning to Los Angeles to act in the series “How I Met Your Mother.” Although his job in the White House was a far cry from his role as Sunil Malhortra in “Dude, Where’s the Party?” Penn said he still wondered if other employees in the White House saw his movies. “I always wondered when was the best time to ask White House employees if they’ve seen your stoner movies. After the ‘Kill Osama bin Laden’ meeting?” Penn questioned. The audience was able to participate in a Q-and-A session following the lecture. Questions ranged from asking for advice on breaking into the business side of the entertainment industry to ways for the U.S. to return to its roots of immigration. Penn’s balance of discussing his dual careers was intriguing to some students. “I’m a fan of the ‘Harold & Kumar’ movies. I was really big into that. I also wanted to hear what his transition was into the White House,” said Musab Imam, a third-year in computer science. Jennifer Drue, a fourth-year in psychology, was also impressed by Penn’s lecture. “I assumed he was going to be smart, but he was very well-spoken,” Drue said. OUAB could not disclose how much it cost to bring Penn to campus for the event.

Future 2012 film releases vying to be Oscar bait, award worthy

OUABoo! A Haunted House of Horrors 7 p.m. @ Archie M. Griffin Grand Ballroom Percussion Ensemble 8 p.m. @ Weigel Hall Auditorium

Tuesday

ARTS Columnist

Falling in Reverse 6:30 p.m. @ Newport Music Hall

October is drawing to a close. We’re staring down a few days off for Thanksgiving, and not long after, winter break. With a bit of free time coming our way, it’s worth taking a look at some of the films still left to be released this year. ZACH LOW The Novemlow.65@osu.edu ber-December run is the homestretch for studios hoping to snag some awards for their films. Most companies save their so-called “prestige pictures” for the last few months, so they’ll be fresh in the minds of both audiences and Academy Awards voters. Warner Brothers probably had Oscar gold in mind when it rolled out “Cloud Atlas” this weekend, but mostly average reviews and a weak opening weekend at the box office might hurt the film’s chances. The flashy-looking adaptation of David Mitchell’s complex novel stars Tom Hanks and Halle Berry, who play different characters across multiple timelines. While some critics have praised the film for its handling of Mitchell’s complicated narrative, ambition doesn’t always equal success on the big screen. A similarly ambitious-looking adaptation is “Life of Pi.” Director Ang Lee tackles Yann Martel’s story of a young man who, surviving

a shipwreck, is marooned in a lifeboat with a Bengal tiger. Early reviews liken its visual inventiveness to “Avatar,” but the trailers seem more akin to Peter Jackson’s dreadful handling of “The Lovely Bones.” The film is scheduled to drop Nov. 21. Coming Nov. 2 is “Cast Away” director Robert Zemeckis’ “Flight.” Starring Denzel Washington as a pilot who heroically lands a crashing plane, “Flight” will be the first liveaction film in nearly 12 years from Zemeckis, who also directed “Forrest Gump.” Reviews have been positive so far, certainly better than the Zemeckis’ previous three films, and looks to feature Washington’s best work since “American Gangster” in 2007. Another high profile actor-director pairing is Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln.” Scheduled to hit select screens Nov. 9 and everywhere Nov. 16, the film stars Daniel Day-Lewis as the 16th president, and seems to have “Oscar” written all over it. Joe Wright’s “Anna Karenina” (Nov. 16) with Keira Knightley and Jude Law, and Sacha Gervasi’s “Hitchcock” (Nov. 23) starring Anthony Hopkins as the titular “Psycho” director also look like awards bait, while Andrew Dominik’s “Killing Them Softly” (Nov. 30) starring Brad Pitt should be smarter than the average crime thriller, if strong reviews from its Cannes International Film Festival premiere in May are to be believed.

continued as Movies on 10A

Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

‘The Hobbit’ is slated to be released Dec. 14.

Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

‘Flight’ is slated to be released Nov. 2.

Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

‘Cloud Atlas’ released Oct. 26.

White Denim 7 p.m. @ A&R Music Bar Improv Wars 7:30 p.m. @ Funny Bone The Skitzo Show 8 p.m.@ Kobo

Wednesday

TIM KUBICK / For The Lantern

OSU’s School of Music held its 19th annual Halloween Concert ‘HalleBOOia!’ Oct. 26 in Weigel Hall Auditorium.

School of Music hails Halloween spirit with ‘HalleBOOia!’ concert BEN KEITH Lantern reporter keith.146@osu.edu

Flicks for Free ft. “The Cabin in the Woods” 6 p.m. @ US Bank Conference Theater Old Hundred 8 p.m. @ Kobo The Vampires’ Masquerade 9 p.m. @ Shadowbox Live 8A

Ohio State’s School of Music incorporated more than instruments into its performance Friday. It collaborated with the Hulk, “South Park” and a two-headed director to give its audience a slight scare. The School of Music held its 19th annual Halloween concert “HalleBOOia!” Friday in Weigel Hall Auditorium. “We never have Weigel this packed,” said Daniel Kozlowski, a graduate student in music education. Weigel, which has an 800-person capacity, appeared full Friday night, with some of the audience in costumes.

Chatter filled the auditorium as the audience settled in. The house lights dimmed, but no one was onstage. A rotating wall panel opened, and out wobbled a sturdy, tipsy German woman to welcome the audience to Oktoberfest. Then came the OSU Tuba/Euphonium Ensemble, wearing Halloween costumes, directed by the Hulk. Halfway through the piece, the Hulk sat down and was replaced by a character with a second head growing on his shoulder, who conducted the horns through a rendition of “The Sorcerer’s Apprentice.” For some attendees, the directors were most entertaining. “It was cool to see the directors dressed up. They were really into it,” said Lee Lowry, mother of performer David Lowry. “I saw gray hair under some of those masks.” The horn performance was accompanied by the

snares, but it appeared no one was playing the drums. The snares’ vibration waxed and waned with the volume of the horns, and as the horns left the stage, a devil came out and silenced the snares. Next came a collection of marionettes, directed by a puppet-master to play Charles Gounod’s “Funeral March of a Marionette,” followed by a “South Park” saxophone quartet that played George Kirck’s “Resultants.” Four saxophones droned aimlessly, provoking some laughs from the audience, but not as many as when the fraulein from the start sneaked onstage and stabbed Kenny. The other three continued playing, only noticing the dead Kenny when they took their bows. Stan shouted, “Oh my God! They killed Kenny!” Visit thelantern.com for the rest of this story.


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1 Golf pros regularly break it 4 Gemologistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weight 9 Force back 14 â&#x20AC;&#x153;__ had it up to here!â&#x20AC;? 15 Single-celled critter 16 Boâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hold it!â&#x20AC;? 17 Blink of an eye 18 Rocky, for one 19 Midterms and finals 20 Do-or-die moment 23 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Para __, oprima numero dosâ&#x20AC;?: customer service option 24 Woos 27 Crystal ball consulter 28 Bringing up the rear 31 Cut back 32 Offbeat 35 Cowboyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s footwear 37 Pieces on a board 38 When the BrontĂŤs wrote 43 Cannes crony 44 Arrow-shooting god 45 Prez before Jack 46 Prefix with second 48 Computer operator Monday October 29, 2012

sudoku

Los Angeles Times, Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis

50 Bottom-line concern 54 Hole for a shoelace 56 Heart, soul, or heart and soul 59 Precisely 62 Cheer for a diva 64 Fragrant compound 65 Game based on crazy eights 66 Seethed 67 Underground Railroad traveler 68 Fort Worth sch. 69 Stockpile 70 Repaired, as a shoe 71 â&#x20AC;&#x153;But then again ...â&#x20AC;?

11 Deli meat 12 Body shop quote: Abbr. 13 Many USMA grads 21 Card worth a fortune? 22 Squid relatives 25 Palm smartphone 26 Mail out 29 Belittle 30 Trinity member 33 Deer mom 34 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sex for Dummiesâ&#x20AC;? author, familiarly 36 â&#x20AC;&#x153;__Warâ&#x20AC;?: Shatner novel 38 Rooftop rotator 39 Uncertain response 40 Wide-screen technique introduced in the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;50s 41 Island in the Aegean 42 CSA general 47 Antipasto tidbits 49 Beach house, maybe 51 At oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s post 52 Wall-mounted candleholder 53 Embark 55 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Holy moly!â&#x20AC;? 57 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Date Nightâ&#x20AC;? actor Carell 58 Destroy, as documents 60 Miss Trueheart of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dick Tracyâ&#x20AC;? 61 Nobel Peace Prize city 62 Painterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deg. 63 Caribbean liquor

by The Mepham Group Š2012

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Ralph and Chuck by Tommy Grooms

DOWN

1 The Fishes of the zodiac 2 Opposed (to) 3 Bon AppĂŠtit offering 4 Mountain retreat 5 BP merger partner 6 Drugstore name derived from the prescription symbol 7 Genesis sibling 8 Infield protection 9 Betting odds, e.g. 10 Bring into balance

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9A


[ aâ&#x20AC;&#x201A;+e ] HighBall intoxicates High Street with Halloween entertainment

Arts Columnist

HighBall Halloween had its moments. At any point in the night, or at the turn of any corner, the event could have been rated PG to R, depending on attendeesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; costumes, interlindsey poole actions and at poole.130@osu.edu times, reactions to their alcohol. From politicians to superheroes and classic childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s movie characters, almost every character imaginable invaded the Short North and the Arena District for Columbusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; largest Halloween party Saturday night. The streets were packed and often hard to navigate in the high-heeled boots I wore that night. I stopped in amazement at some of the costumes, shook my head at others and still others made me cringe. Some of the gruesome face-painting of zombies and man-eaters made me feel like I was a part of a horror movie. Last-minute costumes made me cringe the most. While I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a costume this year and wore street clothes to the event, at least I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hastily try to make a costume by taking a permanent marker and writing â&#x20AC;&#x153;BOOâ&#x20AC;? across the front of a T-shirt. Wearing a tiny black dress and pinning a tail on the back also does not automatically turn you into a cat, so please, next year try a little harder to create a costume, or just wear your normal clothes. The Cookie Monster attended Highball and also tried to make a political statement as he walked through the festival with his cardboard sign reading â&#x20AC;&#x153;Free Big Bird,â&#x20AC;? calling attention to a comment Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney made about cutting funding to PBS. A Michelle Obama impersonator was at the event, fully equipped with Secret Service in tow. Some of my favorite costumes for the night were Nemo from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Finding Nemo,â&#x20AC;? Woody and Buzz from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Toy Storyâ&#x20AC;? and the Village People who sang â&#x20AC;&#x153;Y.M.C.A.â&#x20AC;? down the streets as they walked past the bars. The streets were kept safe as the classic super heroes were all over the area. Batman and Robin, Captain America and even the Hulk seemed to be enjoying a night out. Of course all the female versions of these costumes were also

Jennifer Jung / Lantern photographer

Brad Stickley attends HighBall Halloween, held Oct. 27 on High Street between Goodale Street and Nationwide Boulevard. out Saturday night and I often laughed at the girls in skimpy costumes complaining about how cold it was outside. DJ Pons and Illicit Kitty performed and the crowd formed a giant dance party in the middle of High Street between Goodale Street and Nationwide Boulevard. There was a costume contest for the general public and also one for designers. Categories for the general public contest included Most Brilliant, Best Transformation, Best Extreme Face Painting, Best Old School and Most Artistic. The public could enter the contest as an individual, a duo or as a group and top prize was $1,000 with every category-winner receiving a prize bag. Second place received $500 and third $250. As part of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dogtober Howl-O-Ween,â&#x20AC;? attendees dressed up in costumes with their furry companions. One dog was disguised as a tiger with stripes painted onto his fur. Another pair paid tribute to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Peanutsâ&#x20AC;? comic strip, incorporating Snoopyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doghouse. The doghouse was a bicycle cart, with pictures of Woodstock on the sides of it. The owner and her dog matched as they were both dressed in Snoopyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pilot gear and the dog rode in the back of the cart. After Highball officially ended at 1 a.m., many of the event-goers migrated to the nearby bars to continue the party. Gaswerks Bar, located at 487 Park St., had a line out the door and around half the building with people waiting to enter. This was an opportune time to people-watch and get

a good look at many of the people in costumes that night. Though Highball was a good time overall, part of it made me nervous. I drove myself and some friends to the event. The streets were packed with pedestrians, which was to be expected, but it was difficult to navigate through the streets and arrive at the event without the constant fear of striking a pedestrian. Several times throughout the night I saw folks who enjoyed the festival a little too much and should have realized they were far too intoxicated to continue drinking as they struggled to keep their balance when walking. One young woman sat alone on a bench outside one of the bars and vomited onto the sidewalk as people walked passed her. It was just past 1 a.m. and she had already drank herself into a incoherent stupor. It seemed she was too intoxicated to hold up her head and I wondered if she was alone downtown or if her friends left her behind. Halloween is best enjoyed when you can remember it, not when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re blacked-out at a bar, so drunk you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stand up on your own or that your friends have to take turns babysitting you to make sure you live to see the next morning. I hope the people I saw who had too much to drink also had a friend or a kind stranger looking out for them to help them get home safely Saturday night, because every Halloween is worth remembering on a good note.

Movies from 8A While the announcement that it will be broken into three parts struck some as a needless cash-grab, New Line Cinema is hoping that the good memories that surround Peter Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lord of the Ringsâ&#x20AC;? trilogy will extend to â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey.â&#x20AC;? The fantasy adventure, which will be offered in 3-D, 2-D and IMAX, is slated to unspool Dec. 14. The director and writer combination behind the Best Picture-winning â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hurt Lockerâ&#x20AC;? reteam for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zero Dark Thirty.â&#x20AC;? Concerning the events leading up to the death of Osama bin Laden, the film looks to be every bit as gritty and suspenseful as Kathryn Bigelow and Mark Boalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s previous film together. Coming Christmas Day are two films that couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be more different than one another. The star-studded big screen version of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Les MisĂŠrables,â&#x20AC;? from Tom Hooper (â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Speechâ&#x20AC;?) will almost certainly be a hit with musical fans of all ages. Then, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Django Unchained.â&#x20AC;? Quentin Tarantinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s follow-up to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inglourious Basterdsâ&#x20AC;? is another Spaghetti-Western-inspired revenge thriller, this time set in the Antebellum Deep South. Starring Jamie Foxx as a freed slave bent on rescuing his wife from a vicious slave owner, played by Leonardo DiCaprio, Columbia and The Weinstein Company are taking a bit of a gamble releasing the violent, racially charged film on Christmas (â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Girl with the Dragon Tattooâ&#x20AC;? attempted a similar feat last year, and was largely unsuccessful). However, Tarantino has a devoted fan base, and the chance to see DiCaprio in a villainous role should attract a solid audience. The next two months look to be a mixed bag of releases, with the typical Oscar bait mixing with some more interesting-looking genre efforts. Time will tell which films will flop, and which will be a hit with critics and audiences alike.

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Ď­Ď°Ď­Ďł Ͳ Ď­Ď°ĎŽĎŻ ,ƾŜĆ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152; ϭϲϲͲϭϲϴ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď­Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ ϭϭϲ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď­Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϰϾϹ EÍ&#x2DC; ,Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺ&#x161; ^Ć&#x161;Í&#x2DC; ΡÍ&#x2022;  ϭϳϏ Ͳ Ď­Ď´Ď´ tÍ&#x2DC; ĎľĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϾϾϴ ^ƾžžĹ?Ć&#x161; ^Ć&#x161;Í&#x2DC; ϭϹϯϾ ^ƾžžĹ?Ć&#x161; ^Ć&#x161;Í&#x2DC; ϭϹϏ Ͳ ϭϲϭ tÍ&#x2DC; DÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;ĹśÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x161; ϭϹϲ tÍ&#x2DC; WÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć?ŽŜ ĎŽĎŹĎŹĎŹ /ĹśÄ&#x161;Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ŜŽůÄ&#x201A; Ρ ϭϳώϹ ^ƾžžĹ?Ć&#x161; ^Ć&#x161;Í&#x2DC; ϭϹώ Ͳ ϭϲϏ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď­Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ĎŽĎŹĎŹĎŹ Ͳ ĎŽĎŹĎŹĎŽ ^ƾžžĹ?Ć&#x161; ϭϳϹ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŻĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϳώ Í&#x2DC; >Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x17E; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϹώώ tĹ˝Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?ĹśĹ?Ć&#x161;ŽŜ ϭϳϳ Í&#x2DC; EĹ˝Ć&#x152;Ç Ĺ?Ä?Ĺ&#x161; ĎŽĎŹĎ° Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď°Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϳϾ Í&#x2DC; ϭϲĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϹϰϹ /ĹśÄ&#x161;Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ŜŽůÄ&#x201A; ϭϾϏͲϭϾϴ tÍ&#x2DC; EĹ˝Ć&#x152;Ç Ĺ?Ä?Ĺ&#x161; ĎŽĎŽĎŻĎľ EÄ&#x17E;Ĺ?ĹŻ Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď´ĎŻ Í&#x2DC; ϭϲĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϹϹϲ Ͳ ϭϹϲώ ,ƾŜĆ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152; ϭϾώ Í&#x2DC; >Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x17E; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϾϴ Î&#x2DC; ĎŽĎŹĎ­ Í&#x2DC; >Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x17E; ώϹϏ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎľĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϹϾϲ ,Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺ&#x161;ĹŻÄ&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161; ϭϾϲϴ /ĹśÄ&#x161;Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ŜŽůÄ&#x201A; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ĎŽĎŹĎŹĎŹ /ĹśÄ&#x161;Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ŜŽůÄ&#x201A; Ρ ĎŻĎŹ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď´Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϳϏͲϭϴϴ tÍ&#x2DC; ĎľĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ĎŻĎ­ Í&#x2DC; >Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x17E; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ ϭϾϾϲ ^ƾžžĹ?Ć&#x161; ^Ć&#x161; Í&#x2DC; ĎŽĎ­Ď­ Í&#x2DC; >Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x17E; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϳϭ tÍ&#x2DC; DÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;ĹśÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ĎŽĎŹĎŹĎŹ /ĹśÄ&#x161;Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ŜŽůÄ&#x201A; Ρ ĎŽĎ´ Ͳ ĎŻĎŹ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŽĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ĎŻĎ°ĎŻ tÍ&#x2DC; Ď´Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď´Ď´ Í&#x2DC; >Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x17E; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ώϏϭͲώϹϯ tÍ&#x2DC; ĎľĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ĎŻĎŹ Í&#x2DC; EĹ˝Ć&#x152;Ç Ĺ?Ä?Ĺ&#x161; ĎŻĎ°Ďą tÍ&#x2DC; Ď´Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϾϏ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŻĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ ĎŻĎł Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď°Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ ĎŽĎŹĎ° Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď°Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ĎŻĎ°Ďľ tÍ&#x2DC; Ď´Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ĎŽĎ­Ď´ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎłĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ' ώϏϲϳ /ĹśÄ&#x161;Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ŜŽůÄ&#x201A; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ĎŻĎ´ tÍ&#x2DC; EĹ˝Ć&#x152;Ç Ĺ?Ä?Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϰϰͲϰϲ Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ĺś ĎŽĎŻĎ­ Í&#x2DC; WÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć?ŽŜ Ϲϯ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŽĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ĎŽĎ­Ď´ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎłĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ď°ĎŽ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď°Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ώϰϳϭͲώϰϳϯ tÄ&#x201A;ĹŻĹŻ ^Ć&#x161;Í&#x2DC; ϹϲͲϹϴ Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ĺś ĎŽĎ°Ď° Ͳ ώϰϲ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎľĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϹϏ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŽĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ώϲώϳ EÄ&#x17E;Ĺ?ĹŻ Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ώϳώͲώϳϰ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŻĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϲϰ ĆľÄ?ĹŹĆ? ĹŻĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ç&#x2021; ϹϏ Í&#x2DC; >Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x17E; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ď´ Ͳ Ď­ĎŹ Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;Ć&#x152;ŽŽžĆ?

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 Monday October 29, 2012

ĎŻ Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;Ć&#x152;ŽŽžĆ? ŽŜĆ&#x161;Í&#x2DC; ώϳϹ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŻĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ĎŻĎ­ Î&#x2DC; ĎŻĎą Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŽĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ĎŻĎŹ Í&#x2DC; EĹ˝Ć&#x152;Ç Ĺ?Ä?Ĺ&#x161; ĎŻĎł Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď°Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ ϯϴͲϰϏ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď´Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϹϏ ĆľÄ?ĹŹĆ? ĹŻĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ç&#x2021; ϹϹ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŻĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ ϲϏ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď´Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC;  ϲϭ Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ĺś Ρ ϲϯ Ͳ ϲϾ tÍ&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŹĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϲϳ Í&#x2DC; ĎľĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϳϳͲϳϾ Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ĺś Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ď´ĎŽ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď­Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϾϏ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŻĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ Ͼϯ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎąĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ Ͼϳ Î&#x2DC; ϾϾ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď­Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ĎŽ Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;Ć&#x152;ŽŽžĆ? Ď­ĎŹĎŹ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď­Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ΡÍ&#x2022;  Ď­ĎŹĎŹ tÍ&#x2DC; ĎľĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϏϲ Ͳ Ď­Ď­Ď° Í&#x2DC; >Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x17E; Ď­ĎŹĎł Í&#x2DC; ϭϲĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď­ĎŻ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď­Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ Ď­ĎŽĎŹ tÍ&#x2DC; EĹ˝Ć&#x152;Ç Ĺ?Ä?Ĺ&#x161; Ď­ĎŽĎł Ͳ Ď­Ď°Ď­ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď­Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŽĎ´ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď­Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ΡÍ&#x2022;  Ď­ĎŻĎŹ tÍ&#x2DC; DÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;ĹśÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x161; Ď­ĎŻĎŻ Í&#x2DC; >Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x17E; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŻĎ´ĎŽ ,Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺ&#x161;ĹŻÄ&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161; Ď­Ď°ĎŹ tÍ&#x2DC; DÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;ĹśÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x161; Ď­Ď°ĎŻĎŽ ,ƾŜĆ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152; Ď­Ď°Ďą <Ĺ?ĹśĹ? Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϹϏ Ͳ ϭϳϭ tÍ&#x2DC; DÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;ĹśÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x161; ϭϹώϲ Ͳ ϭϹϯώ tĹ˝Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?ĹśĹ?Ͳ Ć&#x161;ŽŜ ϭϲώͲϭϲϰ tÍ&#x2DC; EĹ˝Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ç Ĺ˝Ĺ˝Ä&#x161; ϭϲϹ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď­Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϲϹϴ EÄ&#x17E;Ĺ?ĹŻ Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϲϲ Í&#x2DC; >Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x17E; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϲϾϰ EÍ&#x2DC; ,Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺ&#x161; ^Ć&#x161;Í&#x2DC; ϭϳϏ Î&#x2DC; ϭϳϰ tÍ&#x2DC; ĎľĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϳϏώ EÍ&#x2DC; ,Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺ&#x161; ^Ć&#x161;Í&#x2DC; Ρ

ĎŽ Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;Ć&#x152;ŽŽžĆ? ŽŜĆ&#x161;Í&#x2DC; ϭϳϹ Í&#x2DC; EĹ˝Ć&#x152;Ç Ĺ?Ä?Ĺ&#x161; ϭϾϏ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŻĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϾϭϾ /ĹśÄ&#x161;Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ŜŽůÄ&#x201A; ĎŽĎ­Ď´ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎłĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ώϰϲϭͲϴϯ tÄ&#x201A;ĹŻĹŻ ^Ć&#x161;Í&#x2DC; ώϾώ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎąĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ĎŻĎŹ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŻĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ ĎŻĎ­ Ͳ ĎŻĎą Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŽĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ĎŻĎ­ Í&#x2DC; >Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x17E; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ ϯϲϰ tÍ&#x2DC; >Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x17E; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ΡϰώϾ ϯϲϳ tÍ&#x2DC; ϲĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ΡϾ ϯϾͲϰϹ Í&#x2DC; Ď´Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϯϾϯ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď´Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ď°Ď° Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŽĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ Ď°Ď´ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎąĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ď°Ďľ ĐŞ tÍ&#x2DC; dŽžĆ&#x2030;ĹŹĹ?ĹśĆ? ϹϏ Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ĺś Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϹϏ tÍ&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŹĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ϲϳ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď°Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ ϲϏ Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ĺś ϲϏϲ ZĹ?Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x20AC;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ç Ć&#x152;Í&#x2DC; ϲϭ tÍ&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŹĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ ϲώϏ Ͳ ϲώώ ZĹ?Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x20AC;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ç Ď˛ĎŻĎľ ZĹ?Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x20AC;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ç Ć&#x152;Í&#x2DC; ϲϹ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŻĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ ϲϹϲ ZĹ?Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x20AC;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ç Ć&#x152;Í&#x2DC; ϳϹ Ͳ Ď´Ď­ tÍ&#x2DC; EĹ˝Ć&#x152;Ç Ĺ?Ä?Ĺ&#x161; ϳϳϯ ZĹ?Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x20AC;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ç Ć&#x152;Í&#x2DC; Ď´Ďą Í&#x2DC; ĎľĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϾϏ tÍ&#x2DC; ĎľĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ͼϯ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎąĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ ϾϳͲϭϏϹ Í&#x2DC; ĎľĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ĨĨĹ?Ä?Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ?Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ć? ϭϲϏͲϭϲϲ tÍ&#x2DC; EĹ˝Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ͳ Ç Ĺ˝Ĺ˝Ä&#x161; ϭϲϲ Í&#x2DC; >Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x17E; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϲϭ Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ĺś Ρ Ͼϯ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎąĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ&

Ď­ Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;Ć&#x152;ŽŽž Ď­ĎŹĎŹ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď­Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ Ď­ĎŹĎŹ Í&#x2DC; EĹ˝Ć&#x152;Ç Ĺ?Ä?Ĺ&#x161; Ď­ĎŹĎŹ tÍ&#x2DC; ĎľĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŹĎł Í&#x2DC; ϭϲĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď­ĎŻ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď­Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď­Ď° DÄ?DĹ?ĹŻĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ĺś Ď­ĎŽĎ­ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎąĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď° Ͳ ĎŽĎŽ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŽĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϰϯώͲϭϰϯϰ ,ƾŜĆ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152; Ď­Ď°Ďľ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď­Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϹϰϹ /ĹśÄ&#x161;Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ŜŽůÄ&#x201A; ϭϲϹϴ EÄ&#x17E;Ĺ?ĹŻ Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϲϾϰͲϭϳϏώ EÍ&#x2DC; ,Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺ&#x161; ϭϳϏ tÍ&#x2DC; DÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;ĹśÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x161; ϭϳϹͲϭϾϭ tÍ&#x2DC; ĎľĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϭϾϭϾ /ĹśÄ&#x161;Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ŜŽůÄ&#x201A; Ρ ϭϾϲϴ /ĹśÄ&#x161;Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ŜŽůÄ&#x201A; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ ώώϏϲ ^ƾžžĹ?Ć&#x161; ^Ć&#x161;Í&#x2DC; ώϹͲώϳ Í&#x2DC; Ď´Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ĎŽĎľ Ͳ ĎŻĎ­ Í&#x2DC; WÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć?ŽŜ ώϾώ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎąĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ĎŻĎŹ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŻĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ ĎŻĎ­Ď­  ϭϲĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϯϲϹ Ͳ ϯϲϳ tÍ&#x2DC; ϲĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; ĎŻĎ´ Ď­ÍŹĎŽ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď´Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϰϭͲϰϯ tÍ&#x2DC; dŽžĆ&#x2030;ĹŹĹ?ĹśĆ? Ď°Ď° Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎŽĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ ϰϲ Í&#x2DC; Ď´Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ď°Ď´ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎąĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ΡώϏϭ Ď°Ďľ dŽžĆ&#x2030;ĹŹĹ?ĹśĆ? Ϲϳ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď°Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ ϲϏ Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ĺś Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; ϲϏϲ ZĹ?Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x20AC;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ç Ć&#x152;Í&#x2DC; Ρ: ϲϭ Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ĺś Ρ ϲϯϾ ZĹ?Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x20AC;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ç Ć&#x152;Í&#x2DC; ϲϹϭ ZĹ?Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x20AC;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ç Ć&#x152;Í&#x2DC; ϳϳϯ ZĹ?Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x20AC;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ç Ć&#x152;Í&#x2DC; Ͼϯ Í&#x2DC; Ď­ĎąĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; Ρ ϾϹ Í&#x2DC; Ď­Ď­Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; 10A


October 29, 2012  

The Lantern

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