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“Since 1976, Where Farm and Family Meet”

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418 South Second St., Mankato, MN 56001 • (800) 657-4665 www.TheLandOnline.com • theland@TheLandOnline.com

We salute

April 2, 2021 April 9, 2021

Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! In his great mercy he has given us new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. 1 Peter 1:3

FFA

Kristin Kveno catches up with Minnesota’s 1996 state officers


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THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021

FFA continues to open doors 418 South Second St. Mankato, MN 56001 (800) 657-4665 Vol. XLV ❖ No. 7 32 pages, 1 section plus supplements

www.TheLandOnline.com facebook.com/TheLandOnline twitter.com/TheLandOnline

Cover photo courtesy of Minnesota FFA alumni

COLUMNS Opinion Farm and Food File The Bookworm Sez Table Talk From My Farmhouse Kitchen Mielke Market Weekly Marketing Auctions/Classifieds Advertiser Listing Back Roads

2-5 4 6 7 8 17 19-20 22-31 31 32

STAFF

Publisher: Steve Jameson: sjameson@mankatofreepress.com General Manager: Deb Petterson: dpetterson@TheLandOnline.com Managing Editor: Paul Malchow: editor@TheLandOnline.com Staff Writer: Kristin Kveno: kkveno@thelandonline.com Staff Writer Emeritus: Dick Hagen: rdhagen35@gmail.com Advertising Representatives: Joan Streit: (507) 344-6379, jstreit@thelandonline.com Deb Petterson: dpetterson@TheLandOnline.com Office/Advertising Assistants: Joan Compart: theland@TheLandOnline.com Lyuda Shevtsov: auctions@thelandonline.com For Customer Service Concerns: (507) 345-4523, (800) 657-4665, theland@TheLandOnline.com Fax: (507) 345-1027 For Editorial Concerns or Story Ideas: (507) 344-6342, (800) 657-4665, editor@TheLandOnline.com Because of the nature of articles appearing in The Land, product or business names may be included to provide clarity. This does not constitute an endorsement of any product or business. Opinions and viewpoints expressed in editorials or by news sources are not necessarily those of the management. The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The Publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any monies paid for the advertisement. Classified Advertising: $19.99 for seven (7) lines for a private classified, each additional line is $1.40; $24.90 for business classifieds, each additional line is $1.40. Classified ads accepted by mail or by phone with VISA, MasterCard, Discover or American Express. Classified ads can also be sent by e-mail to theland@TheLandOnline.com. Mail classified ads to The Land, 418 South Second St., Mankato, MN 56001. Please include credit card number, expiration date and your postal address with ads sent on either mail version. Classified ads may also be called into (800) 657-4665. Deadline for classified ads is 5 pm on the Friday prior to publication date, with holiday exceptions. Distributed to farmers in all Minnesota counties and northern Iowa, as well as on The Land’s website. Each classified ad is separately copyrighted by The Land. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Subscription and Distribution: Free to farmers and agribusinesses in Minnesota and northern Iowa. $49 per year for non-farmers and people outside the service area. The Land (USPS 392470) Copyright © 2021 by The Free Press Media is published biweekly by The Free Press, 418 S 2nd Street, Mankato, MN 56001-3727. Business and Editorial Offices: 418 S. 2nd Street, Mankato, MN 56001-3727, Accounting and Circulation Offices: Steve Jameson, 418 S 2nd Street, Mankato, MN 56001-3727. Call (507) 345-4523 to subscribe. Periodicals postage paid at Mankato, MN. Postmaster and Change of Address: Send address changes to The Land, 418 South Second St., Mankato MN 56001-3727 or e-mail to theland@TheLandOnline.com.

Swift. While those names are recognizGrowing up in Apple Valley, Minn., FFA able to many, the organization is proud wasn’t available at my school. When I that it offers opportunities in so many went to college at North Dakota State different arenas, to so many students. University, I suddenly felt left out that I wasn’t in FFA in high school as it seemed From interviewing many past state like I was definitely in the minority. For officers, I’ve gotten to hear from them on four years I heard about all the wonderhow FFA open doors to so many experiful experiences my college friends had ences they never dreamed they’d have during their time in the organization. I the opportunity to be a part of. Having LAND MINDS learned all about the leadership opportuthose leadership responsibilities, while nities, travel adventures and the strong By Kristin Kveno daunting, seemed to have taught these friendships they forged from being a past officers they have the skills to part of FFA. handle those challenges with grit and determination. I married an FFA alum who still reflects fondly on his time in the I want to say a big thank you to the organization. While I never had a past state officers for allowing me the chance to be part of FFA, getting to opportunity to interview them and interview former state officers 25 share their stories with The Land years after they took office is such a readers. They fit me into their busy wonderful part of my job. Every sinlives. I even talked to one multi-taskgle year I’m in awe of what these ing former officer who was able to individuals accomplished in leaderregale stories from 25 years ago all ship roles all while juggling being in while doing some shopping at Costco. college. The after-FFA accomplishI’ve learned so much about the culments are pretty darn impressive as ture of FFA — that desire to not only well. It’s fun to hear where life has better themselves but better the comtaken them, what drives them, and munity in which they live. While I what qualities they gained during never got to experience FFA firsttheir time in FFA. hand, hearing all these wonderful Currently there are 76,000 stuexperiences from former state officers dents in FFA and 8,700 chapters makes me certainly glad such a wellacross all 50 states and Puerto Rico. These members respected and vital student organization still exists are in good company and the list of notable alumni today. is impressive. The 39th president of the United Kristin Kveno is the staff writer of The Land. She States and Noble Peace Prize recipient, Jimmy may be reached at kkveno@TheLandOnline.com. v Carter, was a member of FFA; as was professional athlete Bo Jackson and singing sensation Taylor

OPINION

wants to hear from you! Send your letters to: Editor, The Land 418 South Second St., Mankato, MN 56001 e-mail: editor@thelandonline.com All letters must be signed and accompanied by a phone number (not for publication) to verify authenticity.

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

9 — GreenSeam announces results of its annual State of Ag survey. 15 — Buffalo Lake farmer garners national attention for soil health efforts.

THERE’S EVEN MORE ONLINE... @ TheLandOnline.com • “Nuts and Bolts” — News and new products from the ag industry • “E-Edition” — Archives of past issues of The Land


THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021

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Life on the Farm: Readers’ Photos

Pam Krzmarzick took this photo of a colorful, billowy sunset outside of Sleepy Eye, Minn.

Al Batt of Hartland, Minn. sent these photos of our feathered friends recently. He said the tufts of lengthened feathers on the head of this great horned owl (right) are called plumicorns. Below, this robin’s feathers are all fluffed out to protect from winter’s chill.

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E-mail your Life on the Farm photos to editor@thelandonline.com.

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THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021

AltEn and Nebraska: The mess gets even messier On March 1, Nebraska’s attorney genyear lag to connect the environmental eral threw the book at AltEn, alleging the dots, the state still didn’t act until May 24 million gallon-per-year ethanol maker 2019 when the state’s Department of near Mead spent most of the last five Agriculture, reported the Journal Star, years making an environmental mess of ordered AltEn to “cease applying the its biofuels plant and the surrounding solid byproduct” of the treated seed as “a rural community. soil conditioner.” In a 97-page civil complaint, the state Simultaneously, the state “issued the detailed 18 “causes of action” against company a notice of violation that it was FARM & FOOD FILE AltEn ranging from “operating a solid operating a solid waste management By Alan Guebert waste management facility” (AltEn now facility” — by storing the now-unusable is “storing” an estimated “84,000 tons ethanol byproduct — “without a perof distiller’s grain onsite” which conmit.” tain “elevated concentrations of pestiAnd yet the plant continued to opercides”) to “discharge of a pollutant into waters of the ate even, according to the complaint, as AltEn offistate without a permit.” cials did little to comply to state demands that it As explained here last month, the allegations address growing problems with nearly every system stem from AltEn’s unique ethanol business. In a in the Mead facility: growing piles of tainted sales pitch to potential customers last summer, it byproducts, excessive wastewater drainage, leaking explained it was “processing 600,000 to 900,000 lagoons, and incomplete records. pounds of treated seed into ethanol daily,” according Equally remarkable, the complaint doesn’t explain to the Lincoln (Neb.) Journal Star. who AltEn is and, therefore, whom the state of That ethanol feedstock — treated agricultural Nebraska is charging with 18 different “causes of seed instead of the usual farm-raised corn — “creat- action.” It does note that “Defendant AltEn, LLC, is ed tens of thousands of tons of pesticide-contamia Kansas limited liability company” and “is regisnated byproduct” the plant tried to rid itself of in, tered as a foreign limited liability company in what the state now alleges, manners both legal and Nebraska.” illegal. The state’s lengthy, date-filled complaint also serves a second, if unintended, function: it documents just how neglectful Nebraska regulatory offi- To the Editor, cials were in their duty to protect citizens and natuThe Back Roads article of March 12, 2021 on ral resources from the type of calamity now hitting “Budejovice” left me feeling very sad. What a beautiAltEn’s rural neighbors. ful story of a gentleman’s willingness and ability to For example, according to the complaint, on restore the 1868 church! It was apparent that he “February 14, 2013, AltEn stated ‘Grain (mainly was energized physically and mentally — his cancer corn) will continue to be the primary raw material went into remission. and the facility will keep the ability to produce wet distiller’s grain and solubles… for animal feed’” Two paragraphs later, however, the state confesses it “discovered in 2015 that AltEn was using discarded seed corn that had been treated with pesticides as To the Editor, its feedstock… however, [it] did not know until 2018 Reading the opinion letter from Mr. Tommy Stiles that the byproducts from AltEn’s ethanol production (“Take Mr. Hagen’s Pen,” March 5/March 12) was could contain measurable residues of pesticides.” quite the eye-opening experience. I want to thank The Land for having the courage to print it. If the Even after what turned out to be a deadly, threeaverage American (democrat or republican) ever wondered what we are up against, his letter erases all doubt. I read Dick Hagen’s article from Jan. 29 again because I thought it was a respectable opinion, an accurate, historical look into how all prosperous civilizations have slowly but surely deteriorated and collapsed. I read slowly, looking for the anger Mr. Stiles accused him of. Nothing. I looked for division and hatred throughout Dick’s article. They should be obvious, Mr. Stiles referenced them not once, but twice. It had to be there, an old (again referenced twice) man like Mr. Hagen is surely incapable of changing his ways at his age. Just one problem: I couldn’t find those things in Dick’s words.

OPINION

Also, while the complaint lists the amount of civil fines (many are $10,000 per day) AltEn could be liable for, it doesn’t explain how the fines might be assessed or when they begin. Equally important to many in the surrounding community is who will pay cleanup costs if the owners of AltEn declare bankruptcy and walk away from the troubled plant and its dirty past. Al Davis, a rancher, former Nebraska state senator, and now a lobbyist for the Sierra Club hears that question whenever the name AltEn comes up in conversation. “It’s absolutely criminal what’s happened in Mead,” he relates in a March 22 telephone interview. “People have been complaining about the plant since 2017 and nothing was done.” The state confirms that fact, too: almost half of the 80 or so AltEn visits by state environmental inspectors since 2015 occurred in January and February 2021. All of which seem to point to a growing, implied understanding between most state governments and Big Agbiz: If we rarely check to see if the cows are still in the barn, don’t worry about fixing the barn door. v

Letter: Church showed lack of foresight The lack of foresight of the Holy Redeemer trustees to see the need for insuring the building left a serious imbalance of purpose in their thinking. All of the donation, besides the man’s health, seemed to have met with a petty lack of thought. Helen Schultz Canby, Minn.

Letter: Hagen is a concerned citizen

Instead I found a citizen concerned with the socialist direction this country is taking with little regard to the hard lessons of history. Then I read Mr. Stiles’ letter again with the same evaluation. To do so is a chilling look into what America is facing. His disagrees with Dick Hagen, which is fine, manages one respectable sentence, then launches a personal assault on Dick’s character, career and all who agree with him. When faced with an opinion he doesn’t like, Mr. Stiles doesn’t present a civilized dialog, instead he attacked and asked to have Dick Hagen silenced. Please wake up. This is the power of socialism staring all Americans in the face. Tom Haak Wood Lake, Minn.


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Dairy farmers: It may be time to change bloc voting law By BRAD RACH Director, National Farmers’ Dairy Division How many votes could represent the majority of America’s dairy farmers in a hearing concerning federal dairy regulations? The correct answer is 10. How can that be, you ask? To understand what’s going on, you need to know two things. The first is that more than half of America’s licensed dairy farmers belonged to one of the top 10 dairy cooperatives in 2019. The second is something called bloc voting, which allows cooperative managers to vote on behalf of all their members. It was authorized by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937. If you want to think about that law, it might help you to have some (early)

20th century dairy farm data in mind. Here are some highlights: Cows were being milked on over 5 million farms. An average farm had five cows. California, a state known for having larger-than-average dairy farms, averaged 10 cows per farm. Fast forward to today. The corresponding highlights are: Licensed dairy farms tallied up to 34,187 in 2019. Average-sized dairy farms in the United States today have close to 200 cows. Most dairy farms in the United States have fewer than 200 cows. On

the other extreme, the 2017 Census of Agriculture reported 714 dairies with at least 2,500 cows. Of those dairies, 189 had over 5,000 cows. The Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937 established the authority of the executive branch, acting through the Secretary of Agriculture, to mandate marketing orders and promotion programs on behalf of farmers. Rules were set in place for farmers to vote their acceptance or rejection of the executive actions. All farmers are covered in the act, but I am only referring to dairy farmers here. While I generally favor marketing orders for dairy farmers, the bloc voting provision has outlived any usefulness it may have once had. In 1937, there were millions of farmers, none having access to 21st century communications methods. new mastitis infections or mastitis Furthermore, dairy cooperatives cure, and decision criteria for selective were generally small and local, so the dry cow treatment. interests of one member farmer were To register for this webinar, go to not likely very different from those of https://bit.ly/3r3YNIC and follow the prompts. As the webinar approaches, registrants will receive an e-mail with information on how to log in to participate. If you are an NMC member and cannot attend the live program, you may access the webinar recording after April 30 at nmconline.org. For further information, contact JoDee Sattler at jdsattler@nmconline. org. This article was submitted by the National Mastitis Council. v

OPINION

Webinar on dry cow therapy “Selective Dry Cow Therapy: Which Herds, Which Cows?” headlines the National Mastitis Council’s next webinar, set for April 15, starting at 2 p.m. This free, one-hour educational offering features Volker Krömker, a professor in the University of Copenhagen’s department of veterinary and animal sciences, Frederiksberg C, Denmark. The April 15 webinar will focus on factors to consider when contemplating selective dry cow therapy for a dairy herd and factors to consider when choosing a dry cow therapy regimen for individual cows. Key topics include practical decision making regarding drying off dairy cows, herd-specific mastitis monitoring, risk factors for

Rob-See-Co announces NorthStar acquisition ELKHORN, Neb. — Rob-See-Co, an independent seed company located in Elkhorn, Neb. acquired NorthStar Genetics, a Minnesota-based seed company. The acquisition enables Rob-SeeCo to expand in the soybean market and provide its expertise in the corn market to NorthStar Genetics Dealers and growers. Rob-See-Co expects to work with all of NorthStar Genetics’ dealers and will continue to sell NorthStar Genetics

brands through the 2021 growing season. In 2022, the company plans to sell solely Innotech brand soybeans, but continue to sell NorthStar Genetics corn products along with Rob-See-Co corn products. The company will operate out of Rob-See-Co’s headquarters in Elkhorn. To learn more about Rob-See-Co, visit www.robseeco.com. This article was submitted by RobSee-Co. v

another. Efficiency, if nothing else, could be used to justify bloc voting. Contrast this with today when dairy farm numbers are measured by the thousands rather than the millions. The communications options available to today’s dairy farmers far exceed those of the 1930s. Add to that the sea change in cooperative size and influence — the largest cooperatives have thousands of members, representing a range of farm sizes and geographic locations that make fair representation with a single vote impossible. The time has arrived to amend the act so all executive branch decisions must be approved in a one farmer, one vote manner by all dairy farmers whose livelihood is affected by the decision. The Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937 passed during a time when over 16 million horses and mules still powered much of agriculture’s field work. We need to bring voting provisions of the act more in line with the agricultural system that feeds us in the 21st century. v


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THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021

This book helps readers plan ahead for the unexpected It’d be just your luck. “In Case You Get Hit by a Bus: How to Organize Your Life Now You’re outside, enjoying a for When You’re Not Around Later” nice sunny day and, like by Abby Schneiderman and Adam Seifer with Gene Newman Wile E. Coyote, a piano falls c.2021, Workman Publishing on your head. Or a car crashes through the wall $17.95 / $23.95 Canada onto your bed. Or tree244 pages climbing wasn’t such a good idea. Stuff happens. And “In THE BOOKWORM it’s probably not in a safe (POA) and mediCase You Get Hit by a Bus” SEZ deposit box). cal POA. Name by Abby Schneiderman and By Terri Schlichenmeyer Adam Seifer, with Gene Then think hard. Include an executor. If you’re a busiNewman, helps your family all your most important ness owner, to know what to do. passwords, safe combinations, and make a succesWhy is it that the document you need 4-digit codes in your documentation. sion plan. And You want to make it as easy as possiis never where it’s supposed to be? finally, remove the skeletons from your ble for a loved one to find any approThat’s bad for you, so imagine if a closet while you can. priate information in an emergency. loved one was looking for that docuOne way or another, you’ll be glad Remembering your time-limit, mindment in panic mode. That’s the kind of you did. walk yourself through your home and thing Schneiderman and Seifer are write down anything someone might Eventually. trying to stave off in this book. As the founders of Everplans, they know that need to know: alarm codes, mainteEventually, you’ll be glad you did nance schedules, garbage day, and the saving all your information in one everything that’s inside this book; but names and contacts for repair contracplace is “liberating” and comforting. doing so will take a year’s worth of tors. While you’re doing this, you’ll And it’s not that hard to do... 10-minute sessions. Indeed, “In Case inevitably think about the kids and First, in every step inside this book, your pets, so keep a running list of give yourself ten minutes and don’t don’t-forgets for them, too. stress. Start by looking for the 15 docDocument your doctors, insurance uments you’ll need most often, scan policies, and benefits you’re entitled to ST. CLOUD, Minn. — As the temperthem, and decide on the most convereceive. Note your Power of Attorney atures continue to warm and frost nient, best place to store them (hint: comes out of the ground, many of us are itching to spring into lawn and garden work. One of the first things on your to-do list might be getting a soil test ST. CLOUD, Minn. — Join the ment, and what we can do to be a part done. Benton County Extension Master of the solution to minimize the spread This time of year, I get numerous Gardeners for the annual Spring of invasive species. There will be time phone calls about fertilizers and other Seminar on April 15 at 7:00 pm. This to ask questions. soil additives. Sending a sample of your session will take place via Zoom. This seminar is free and open to the soil to a qualified lab can remove the The featured speakers will be Monika public. You must register in advance to guesswork out of fertilizer recommenChandler and Mari Hardel from the receive the link to join. To register you dations. This not only makes good ecovisit https://z.umn.edu/ nomic sense, but also helps ensure ferMinnesota Department of Agriculture’s can Noxious Weed Specialist team. The SpringSeminar or call (320) 255-6169. tile soils without excess fertilizer applievening will include information on This article was submitted by cation. Excess fertilizer can result in what invasive plants are, how they are University of Minnesota Extension. v undesired vegetative versus fruit prointroduced and thrive in the environduction growth and contribute to pollution in the environment. 30676 County Rd 24 Sleepy Eye, MN. 56085 Results of the soil test include data www.mathiowetzconst.com on soil fertility, pH, and organic matter. office@mathiowetzconst.com addition, fertilizer recommendations 507-794-6953 In are provided according to the soil test In All We Do, Farm Friendly Since 1924 data. A standard test from the We Do It Right! University of Minnesota Soil Testing – Aggregates – Grove Removal Laboratory will include soil texture, – Building Pads – Hauling organic matter, phosphorus (P), potas– Demolition – Site Grading sium (K), and pH. The most common – Ditch Cleaning – Terraces fertilizer used for a fertility program is nitrogen. Nitrogen (N) is not common– Farm Drainage – Equipment Sales & Service ly included with the test results because An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer

You Get Hit by a Bus” doesn’t overlook any part of American life, in an effort to ensure that your anxiety is eased some. Schneiderman, Seifer and Newman do a completely thorough job with that, and they admit up-front that not everything is mandatory. This lends a sense of “ahhhhhhh” right away. If you don’t have Document X, don’t sweat. Still, hints on how to find the top 15 most-needed docs and a few more worksheets might’ve been nice. Be scared by reading “The Big CloseOut.” Be comforted by skipping directly to tips on memory-making. Use what you need here. Flexibility is key to Everplans’ plans and to this book, and you know how many “what-ifs” you’ve thought about in the past year. Now, you’ll always think about them. And since you’ll need a book like “If You Get Hit by a Bus,” you’re in luck. Look for the reviewed book at a bookstore or a library near you. v

Soil testing for lawn, garden

Spring seminar set for April 15

MATHIOWETZ CONSTRUCTION

of its mobile and ever-changing chemical forms in the soil. However, recommendations are given based on lawn care practices, plant or crops being grown as indicated on the form. More than one sample may need to be collected and analyzed in your yard and garden. For example, one sample from your vegetable garden and a second from your lawn should be collected. The soil test form provides instructions on how to collect a sample. The University of Minnesota Soil Testing Laboratory completes soil analysis for farm or for home and garden. A local private lab may also be an option for you. The standard soil test from the University of Minnesota will cost $17. Additional testing can be added for small fees but starting with the basic test is usually recommended. Most county Extension offices have the submission forms and soil testing bags. The information can also be found at http://soiltest.cfans.umn.edu/testing-services/lawn-garden. This article was submitted by Katie Drewitz, University of Minnesota Extension. v


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Covid and the Clay County Fair: Rising from the ashes Jeremy Parsons looked out the window fair staff members wiped away tears, and into the gray skies on the other side. His most everyone began a grieving process. expression told the story his staff and “Surreal” was the word of the day, and extended members of his board of direcemotions ran the gamut. tors were waiting to hear. The air was It was like the fair had died. thick with wonder … and trepidation. “This hasn’t happened since the days of The worst of it was over for Parsons, WWII,” said the board chairman. “Covidwho manages the Clay County Fair in 19 is our war.” Spencer. Dubbed the “World’s Greatest Board members had met for weeks before TABLE TALK County Fair,” the Clay County Fair drew this announcement, gathering input, sharan annual attendance of more than By Karen Schwaller ing thoughts, and imagining the world 300,000. Parsons and his executive board with no Clay County Fair. The facts were had made the decision to postpone the hard to ignore. There would be serious 2020 fair because of a global pandemic. financial fallout … for the fair itself, for the city and Now, with a heavy heart, he had to tell the world. county, local and area businesses, and for the busiBoard members and staff filed into the room quinesses who would have set up shop at the fair — etly; maybe a little nervously. All had shared input depending on it for some solid income. And for others in some form to help Parsons and his executive depending on fair income, too. board decide what to do. People — both paid and unpaid — were afraid to Finally, the chairman of the board stood up, come and do the work of the fair for fear of contractParsons seated next to him, and began to read a ing Covid-19. Who would make sure all of the public scripted announcement, so as to be very clear. But health and CDC guidelines were being followed in his emotions would swallow him before he could say every building and all throughout the fairgrounds? the words; and that told those in the room all they The cost of the extra sanitation procedures alone needed to know. was staggering to a county fair budget … and there were so many other uncertainties. The fair seemed An eerie silence filled the room before Parsons to be crumbling all around them. took over, himself among those grieving a decision they never imagined having to make. The announceBoard members wondered if, once public health ment seemed surreal even to Parsons, who has been procedures were put into place, people would recogin the fair industry literally all of his life. nize the fair as they knew it. Would it live up to its name as the “World’s Greatest County Fair?” Would A glance around the room mirrored the value of people return? Would first-time attendees ever come the fair in the eyes of those who sweat and toil all year to make it happen. The eyes of board members back? How much financial risk was the fair board were fixed on Parsons and what he had to say. Paid willing to take if attendance numbers were low? Its

Dairy webinar on digital technologies Join Dairy Cattle Reproduction Council for a webinar on May 13, starting at 2 p.m. Ricardo Chebel, University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine associate professor, will address “Using digital technology to optimize health and reproductive management.” The one-hour webinar is free.  The webinar will present a review of available health sensor technologies; explain how to use data to help enhance dairy cattle repro programs; and present recommendations on what to look for in a sensor technology system. To register for this webinar, go to  http://bit.ly/ DCRCmay13webinar and follow the prompts. For more information, e-mail Luciano Caixeta at  lcaixeta@umn.edu or e-mail DCRC at jodee@ dcrcouncil.org. This article was submitted by the Dairy Cattle Reproduction Council. v

very foundation seemed shaky at best. To have no fair in 2020 would be unprecedented — almost unthinkable. But they had to think about it. At the meeting of the 10-member executive committee, when the decision was made to postpone the fair, Parsons found and read the minutes from the fair board meeting of the 1940s WWII era, which was the last time the fair had been called off. It was a world war that stopped the fair then; this time it was a microscopic virus. But the result was the same. 2020 revealed the great value of the Clay County Fair as individuals and businesses rallied around the “Save the Fair” campaign. And they did so with good reason. The fair is a living, breathing entity, and the thought of that fair with no pulse was unimaginable. The people said farewell to the long-standing chuckwagon races at the 2019 Clay County Fair, then the 2020 edition was postponed altogether. The difference is, the chuckwagon races entered quietly into the annals of fair history forever. But the fair itself will rise from the ashes of 2020 and return stronger than before. We know now as a people that nothing is a ‘given.’ Not even the Clay County Fair. But taking it for granted is one more thing that 2020 took away from us. And we are grateful. Karen Schwaller brings “Table Talk” to The Land from her home near Milford, Iowa. She can be reached at kschwaller@evertek.net. v


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THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021

A messy apron might just be the sign of a good meal A month ago I cut an apron out from an for the glamour girl rather than the old dress that was looking a bit worn, but farmer’s wife who cooks up plenty of too good to throw away. It may have been mashed potatoes and gravy. a frugal moment on my part, but keep I recently saw the most beautiful handthat under your hat, please. made apron. It must have only been worn Because there are many things my when the neighbor ladies came over to farmer calls me, but frugal and economitea. On the sheer white material were cal minded are definitely not among two embroidered girls wearing sunbonthem. And I certainly don’t want him to nets. The girls were probably twelve FROM MY go into shock or worry that there is someinches tall. Another neat feature about FARMHOUSE thing desperately wrong with me. the apron was that the bonnets were KITCHEN made from material. The designer fashSo it goes, practically every single day I By Renae B. ioned them to serve as the pockets. So put a clean apron on over my dress. It is Vander Schaaf sweet! necessary to have a half dozen of those handy fashion items. At the beginning of the year, It might be impractical for use on an everyday one apron had to be tossed into the fire for real. It basis, but it sure was perfect for very special occahad two major faults: the fabric was wearing thin sions. and the holes were no longer protecting my clothing. This time I went with a vintage style. It is one I It was time for a new addition to my apron wardrobe. remember my Grandma Reemtsma wearing. My Aprons are fun to make. The difficult part is fabric is floral and the apron is made up of pieces choosing the pattern as there are so many ideas outlined with pink binding. some that are even practical. Others are not; more Although I didn’t have the problem this time, selecting the material can also be difficult. Have you been to a fabric store lately? They are just bursting at the seams with material in designs that would make cooking a delight. Cooking is messy and I do get covered grease and flour quite early in the day. So wearing an apron is a must here. Also it adds to the illusion that the food served here might taste good. Afterall appearances do make a difference on what we think. Therefore, my simple thinking tells me that if I dress for the part of the cook, perhaps it will appear that I know what I am doing just a wee bit especially if I have several cookbooks setting around that were carefully chosen from the hundred cookbooks on the kitchen shelf. Now wouldn’t that give everyone the idea that the meal was well planned, and

concocted to taste fabulous? Sorry, that doesn’t always happen, that’s why I keep a good supply of bread and cheese in this farmhouse. The reality is, it’s a pleasure to prepare three meals a day even if they don’t always turn out as any of us expected or desired. Because the actual sitting down to eat breakfast, dinner and supper together provides time to talk with each other whilst partaking of food that our physical bodies need. It is also a good time to thank God for the food and other blessings He has so graciously bestowed. After each meal, it’s only natural that we nourish our souls too, by reading a portion of scripture. Because we know ‘that man doth not live by bread only, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of the Lord doth man live.’ This is just a portion of the words found in Deuteronomy Chapter Eight. Renae B. Vander Schaaf is an independent writer, author and speaker. Contact her at (605) 530-0017 or agripen@live.com. v

New data shows what Iowans charge, pay for custom farming AMES, Iowa — Many Iowa farmers continue to hire at least some of their fieldwork and livestock work to be done by others, and new data provides ranges and averages of what is being paid. The “2021 Iowa Farm Custom Rate Survey,” conducted by Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, covers the amounts charged and paid for common crop and livestock services. Tillage, planting, harvesting, manure hauling and livestock transportation are all included, along with dozens of other tasks and data points. Compared to last year, most custom rates saw a decline except for the cost of farm labor, according to Alejandro Plastina, associate professor in economics and extension economist at Iowa State University. Plastina, sent 361 surveys via the U.S. Postal Service in February and 198 by email. The results were

based on 118 responses and 3,785 custom rates submitted. Fourteen percent of the respondents perform custom work, 16 percent hire work done, 45 percent indicated doing both and 25 percent did not indicate whether they perform or hire custom work. The cost of combining corn ranged from $22 to $45 per acre, with an average of $35.10 per acre. The cost of combining soybeans ranged from $22 to $46 per acre, with an average of $34.20. The cost to mow hay ranged from $8 to $15 per acre, with an average of $11.35 per acre. The average

cost for baling small square bales was $.59 per bale, $9.35 for large square bales, $10.80 for large round bales without wrapping, and $13.20 for large round bales wrapped. New information in this year’s survey includes rates for seeding cover crops, combining corn with a reel and scouting crops with fixed wing drones. For more information, Plastina can be reached at (515) 294-6160 or plastina@iastate.edu. This article was submitted by Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. v

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PAGE 9

GreenSeam survey reveals optimism, concerns for agriculture

By PAUL MALCHOW More than half of surveyed businesses are looking The Land Managing Editor to hire additional employees and nearly a quarter of respondents said they believe immigrant workNORTH MANKATO, Minn. — The world of ers are an important factor in allowing them to agriculture is unpredictable, and that was never grow their business. more so the case these past 12 months. Buoyed by Covid vaccine headlines and market prices not “Education, talent and employees are all tied seen in years, responders to GreenSeam’s annual together,” Ziegler said. “Businesses need to do a State of Ag survey were full of optimism. better job staying in contact with their educational institutions and educational institutions need to GreenSeam is a division of Greater Mankato do a better job looking beyond standardized testGrowth. Its mission is to promote the southern ing and reaching out to businesses. I have been Minnesota region as a world-class food and agritold by k-12 administrators that ag is not a driver; business epicenter. To that end, GreenSeam partand there is no need to put additional resources to ners with agriculture-related business to address ag education as the amount of farmers are getting issues ranging from developing new markets, Photo by Paul Malchow less. Yet they forget to understand we have just as products and technologies; to local, state and fedmany people in ag today as we did in the past — MSU-Mankato’s Shane Bowyer (left) and GreenSeam Director Sam eral issues and regulations. Ziegler (right) faced the media at Mankato Brewery on March 23 for they are just not farming.” For the past two years, GreenSeam has relied on the release of GreenSeam’s 2021 State of Ag survey. Survey respondents also voiced a number of coninput from business, financial and educational cerns for the health of agriculture. The biggest institutions to develop a survey of questions pertain- percent of respondents said the region is headed in threats to business growth were seen as increased ing to the current state of agriculture and issues fac- the right direction.” regulation, lack of potential employees, and taxes. ing the industry. On March 23 GreenSeam released Ziegler said data showed strong yields and good the 2021 State of Ag report during an event at “Reports from the Center for Rural Policy about crop prices are leading reasons for the optimism, Mankato Brewery. health care mention the lack of competition in rural along with advances in innovation and sustainability. The report carried an unusual and interesting ele- “Agriculture in the past year has had trade issues areas as the issue behind some of the concern,” comment in comparison to the 2020 survey. When the with China, Mexico and Canada,” he explained. “To mented Ziegler. “Other parts is policy-related as 2020 survey was being distributed and responses back large world supplies, to Covid causing meat pro- farmers end up in the single payer category which compiled, Covid-19 was relatively unknown; and few cessing shut-downs to a change in customer purchas- pays the highest amount for insurance. anticipated the economic impact the pandemic would es, to now where trade is open, world stocks are down “When it comes to policy and regulation, think have. When the 2021 survey was conducted, busi- and the supply chain has worked out a lot of chal- about the crazy Prop 12 from California. How can a nesses and families had experienced perhaps the lenges. We are seeing manufacturers with increased business prepare for this, and how can consumers most unusual year ever. But a vaccine was on the sales. The focus groups and survey respondents were pay for it? Or think about county ordinances. The horizon and ag commodity prices were robust. only business we regulate the size of is animal agrifrom all of these sectors with a positive outlook.” “The results were fascinating,” said GreenSeam Just over half of the respondents said Covid-19 had culture. We don’t limit the size of gas stations or Director Sam Ziegler. “While citing community pres- a negative impact on their business. At the same banks or restaurants; yet we determine as a society sures about affordable housein, available child care, time, some indicated positives — such as lower travel what size a dairy farm should be. Most of the time, health care and an unpredictable farm economy, a expenses and saving money with employees working businesses do not complain about the regulation itself. It is the process — which can stretch out and jamority of respondents said they were either “very from home. cost time. How can we be more efficient on this as optimistic” (16.4 percent) or “somewhat optimistic” Forecasting the change of their business in the next time is money.” (52.7 percent) about the economic prosects of the year, 60 percent reported they foresee growth, while local communities over the next five years. A full 62.3 only 12 percent thought their business will decline. See GREENSEAM, pg. 10

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PAGE 10

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THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021

Anhydrous safety should be top concern this spring Many farmers and applicators will soon be applying anhydrous ammonia (NH3) ahead of the planting season. Even with a rush against time and the weather, safety should never be compromised. Always wear appropriate goggles and gloves. Never wear contact lenses. Be sure to have a clean, adequate emergency water supply of at least five gallons. Exercise caution when making connections and disconnections as if lines contain anhydrous ammonia. Stand upwind when connecting, disconnecting, bleeding lines, or transferring NH3. Also, close, bleed, dis-

connect, and secure valves and transfer lines when taking breaks or disconnecting lines, and be sure to handle hose end valves by the valve body. Position equipment away and downwind from homes, people, and livestock. Never assume NH3 lines are empty, always wear proper protective equipment, and have access to safety water. When towing a nurse tank down the road, drive sensibly. Do not go any faster than 30 miles per hour, display a slow-moving vehicle emblem visible from the rear, and be sure the tank is secured to the trac-

tor or truck with two separate, independent chains that supplement the hitch pin/clip. If an accident or spill occurs, immediately call 911 and then the Minnesota Duty Officer at (800) 4220798 or (651) 649-5451. You can find more safety, storage, and transportation information on the MDA’s website at www.mda. state.mn.us/nh3. This article was submitted by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture. v

Beef producer improves forage on former CRP enrollment VILLARD, Minn. — Jennifer Olson is building up a herd of beef cattle as she works to develop a more productive pasture on the Pope County farm where she grew up. “Our end goal here is farm-raised beef. We’ll do some farm-to-fork eventually,” Olson said. With the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, Olson introduced British whites to the Charolais-Angus mix, selecting animals that exhibit a docile temperament and finish well on grass. She’ll add diversity to the brome grassdominated pasture, land previously enrolled in the federal Conservation Reserve Program. Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) assistance from NRCS will offset the cost of fencing the 155-acre pasture, installing a watering system, and seeding 4.2 acres with a native plant mix. As a beginning farmer, Olson, who recently took over the operation, qualifies for slightly higher payment rates. Olson and her husband, James, recently completed the second year of her five-year NRCS contract. Their three-year rotational grazing plan is designed to support 50 cow-calf pairs.

Rotational grazing results in more lush, green grass with well-developed root systems which help to stifle weeds. By keeping cattle out of streams, water systems address water quality and erosion concerns. Olson’s contract is one of about 20 active grazing contracts in Pope County. Throughout Pope County, 2,860 acres were enrolled in NRCS grazing contracts in 2020. “So much of the land is either in production or it’s in CRP. We had to better manage the pastures and grassland we had. I think that’s where some of this came from, is there’s a shortage of land for grazing producers,” Behrens said. Perham-based NRCS regional grazing specialist Jeff Duchene worked with Olson on her rotational grazing plan. “The idea is to get some cool-season native grasses for early in the season, and then some native warmseason grasses, and then add some forbs for diversity and hopefully make some habitat for native pollinators and other wildlife,” Duchene said. For the 4.2-acre native prairie seeding, Duchene suggested adding to those cool- and warm-season Between full-time day jobs (she’s a Farm Service grasses a legume-heavy mix of forbs — including Agency program technician, he works in automation manufacturing) they’ve erected all 5,000 feet of fourwire perimeter fence and about a third of the 12,000 feet of single-wire interior fencing. The finished pasture will contain 20 rotationally GREENSEAM, from pg. 9 grazed paddocks, more than one mile of buried water More than 60 percent of survey respondents have pipeline and nine shared water tanks. seen an increase in people taking side jobs to supplement income. The top occupations mentioned includd ed construction, trucking, factory work and food service. “We need to do a better job really understanding the economics of our communities,” urged Ziegler. “Often people look at who the largest employer is in a community. However, in many cases, the largest employer is only there because of agriculture. We need to better understand the ripple effects and be sure we give notice to what is the driver of our comSOUTHWEST MINNESOTA munities and regions; then commit purposeful Daniel & Terese Hall resources to improve this — rather than trying to be 40133 - 620th Ave. Butterfield, MN 56120 something we are not.” 507-956-2657

purple prairie clover, white prairie clover and Canada milk vetch; plus golden Alexander, Maximillian sunflower and long-headed coneflower. “In general, with a well-managed pasture you’ll have virtually no soil erosion if you maintain good ground coverage in the pasture, and very little runoff. A well-managed pasture will soak up virtually all the rainfall,” Duchene said. Olson will receive about $59,500 in NRCS reimbursements. “Without NRCS assistance we probably would have still completed this project,” Olson said, “but it would have taken us a lot longer to accomplish. We would have been looking more at a 10-year to a 15-year plan vs. a five-year plan. So it allowed us to move forward a lot faster, and thus benefiting water quality and environmental concerns through the rotational grazing.” The Olsons plan to install the watering system over the next two summers. Meanwhile, Olson continues to improve herd genetics. “I’ve got grass and I’ve got time,” Olson said. This article was submitted by the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources. v

Survey completion rate 47.5 percent

CUSTOM FENCE BUILDERS

Joining Ziegler at the Mankato Brewery event was Minnesota State University Mankato Professor Shane Bowyer. Bowyer is an assistant professor of management, as well as director of the school’s AgriBusiness and Food Innovation Program. Also taking part in the program were Minnesota Department of Agriculture Commissioner Thom Petersen; Andrew Herr, president of GAT Farms; Brad Schloesser, Dean of Agriculture at South Central College; and Val Johnson, who serves as Vice President of Human Resources for Christensen Farms. The survey in its entirety can be found online at https://greenseam.org/. Interested parties can view the Mankato Brewery event on GreenSeam’s Facebook page. v


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1996 FFA officers weathered a big storm as a team When memories and experiences remain with someone for 25 years, the stories are worth noting. Every year, The Land tracks down the Minnesota state FFA officers from 25 years ago to hear of the impact FFA had made in their lives. And every year the stories carry a common thread of hard work, nerves, comradery and rewards sometimes not realized until years later. This year’s batch of recollections had a more unusual, distinctive bond involving a camp and a big Minnesota thunderstorm. We’ll let the officers tell the story. The Land’s visit with past officers always prints in April to coincide the state FFA conven-

tion. Because of Covid-19, the 2020 convention took place in May and in a virtual format. Unfortunately, the 2021 Minnesota State FFA Convention will also be held virtually the week of April 19-23. We would like to thank the people who shared their time and stories for this issue. The Land would also like to thank the many ag instructors and FFA advisors who guide and influence our future leaders. Congratulations to the FFA organization, its members and their families for another successful year in dealing with the setbacks of the pandemic. It is our hope you all may gather in unison in 2022. v

ON THE COVER: Minnesota state FFA officers in 1996 were (front row, left to right) Reporter Stephanie Yonker, Sentinel Laura Heiden, and Secretery Arianne (Oudekerk) Steenblock. Back row, (left to right) Vice President Mark Jirik, Treasurer JoshTjosaas and President Lance Miller.

Agriculture, FFA has always been in President Miller’s life By KRISTIN KVENO The Land Staff Writer Lance Miller was raised on a diversified livestock farm near Pipestone, Minn., where he had the opportunity to show sheep, shorthorn cattle and market hogs in 4-H. “I’ve got an older sister, three years ahead of me, she was doing FFA things.” Miller was intrigued by hearing all about his sister’s experiences in FFA. “Most of the youth from 4-H participated in FFA. It was a natural progression for me.” The Pipestone chapter had around 80 members at the time. While in high school, Miller was the Region Four president. “I naturally gravitated toward leadership roles and activities.” Miller remembers the competition for the Region Four president position was fierce. “I was very fortunate to be elected to regional president.” Stephanie Yonker, who went onto serve as a state FFA secretary, was regional vice president at that same time. For Miller, once he was elected to that position, it really solidified his interest to run for a state office. The election process for state office wasn’t too bad for Miller. “For me, sitting down chatting with a couple of people is comfortable. Larger groups do kind of unnerve me a lot.” The interview process consisted of talking to a group of eight to 10 people, the perfect size for Miller. “I’m comfortable thinking on my feet.” When it was announced that Miller was state president, he was shocked. “I was the last officer to be named.”

After getting his undergraduate degree from the University of Minnesota, Miller went on to receive his master’s degree from the U of M as well in ruminant nutrition. He then moved to Wyoming where he taught at the University of Wyoming and had the opportunity to coach the livestock judging team as well for 12 years. He is now with Purina Animal Nutrition as a sales

Looking back at his time as state president, Miller remembers the triumphs of working alongside such a strong group of leaders. “I don’t recall much struggles, the team was a really good team to work with. I think our team was a neat combination of talent and personalities.” Miller was at the University of Minnesota, St. Paul campus while serving at state FFA president. Having that position in FFA while in his first year of college wasn’t always easy. “It was a balancing act. There is the balance of college life and being a state officer and those commitments you made.” FFA offered Miller the ability to become part of a solid ag organization and obtain leadership qualities that he has carried with him to this day. “It’s a great foundation. I’m truly blessed to be in the ag industry my whole life.”

specialist covering the state of Wisconsin. Today, Miller and his wife Lori, along with children Liam and Layla, reside in Edgar, Wis. His advice to FFA members today as they decide whether to run for a state office? “Just do it. If you’re debating about it, run.” Miller’s appreciative that he did. v


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Jirik raised his hand for the ultimate FFA experience By KRISTIN KVENO The Land Staff Writer Raised on a dairy farm outside of Mahnomen, Minn., Mark Jirik had a passion for all things agriculture. That zest for farming, coupled with the family tradition of participating in FFA, made joining the organization an easy choice. Jirik’s three older brothers were involved in FFA. Hearing all about their experiences made Jirik excited to jump right in. It wasn’t just his brothers who made Jirik enthusiastic about the numerous opportunities in FFA, it was his advisor who pushed him to his potential. “We had an ag teacher, Mr. Erickson, who was fabulous,” Jirik said. The Mahnomen FFA chapter had 70 members at the time. Jirik served as chapter president, secretary and then Region One treasurer and sentinel. While Jirik had leadership experience in the FFA organization, he still felt his chances of getting a state officer position were limited. “In a lot of ways, I was a very unlikely candidate.” Jirik had never attended an FFA convention or a camp. It was Erickson who encouraged him to run for a state office. Jirik recalls the state officer election interviews were an interesting experience. “I remember it being relatively stressful.” Jirik went into the election process ready for whatever the results were. “If it hap-

pens, it happens.” When Jirik’s name was announced for the vice president position, surprise came over him. “I was shocked. I wasn’t expecting to be vice president.” Jirik didn’t think he had much of a chance after all other officers were named. “It was very much overwhelming.” The state officer team that year was filled with people from all over Minnesota with the common goal of making a positive impact on the Minnesota FFA organization through their leadership. The state officer team put together a leadership camp were 100 FFA members attended. “It was a lot of responsibility,” Jirik recalled. “We were basically the adults on site. We just had a tremendous team.” A windstorm came through the camp causing a power outage and there was no running water. “Nobody complained, the students took it like champs,” Jirik said. Jirik was a student at North Dakota State University in Fargo while serving as a state officer. While many of the officers were in school at the University of Minnesota, others were in different parts of the state, with Jirik being in North Dakota and Laura Heiden (sentinel) in Wisconsin. “It was somewhat difficult to not all be together.” Though Jirik points out that it made the time the officers got

to spend together all the more special. Jirik looks back fondly on his time as a state officer. “It really changed my perspective on going for it. I never thought I could be a state officer.” Jirik had the opportunity to work with so many fellow FFA members from all over the state, making an impact on them through his leadership abilities. After his time as a state officer, Jirik went on to graduate from NDSU with a degree in ag economics. He then obtained a master’s degree in ag economics from the University of Illinois in Urbana. That led to a career with Cargill in commodity merchandising and commercial management, where he spent 17 years working in various locations from Wichita, Kan. to Melbourne, Australia. He’s now the director of the Northern Crops Institute in Fargo. “Our mission is to expand crops grown in this region.” Jirik resides in Detroit Lakes, Minn., not too far from where he grew up. “Roots and family are where I feel home is.” Having now been a world traveler and lived abroad, it was FFA that first introduced Jirik to a world outside his community. “The seed of travel was planted while I was in FFA,” he said. In his career, Jirik has utilized numerous skills he obtained during his time in FFA which includes the ability to work with people from different backgrounds. He’s grateful for the opportunity he had to become a state officer and the connections he made. He encourages those who are interested in running for a state office to take that chance. “You never know unless you put your hand up.” Jirik is grateful that he made the decision 25 years ago to simply put his hand up. v

State Secretary Steenblock is now in the cattle business By KRISTIN KVENO The Land Staff Writer For Arianne (Oudekerk) Steenblock growing up outside of Austin, Minn. on a small hobby farm, her enthusiasm for agriculture was ingrained in her at an early age. That interest continued to grow throughout the years. “I worked in middle school, high school and some of college on dairy farms. I have always loved agriculture and caring for animals.” 

for Steenblock. “It was my bigIt was an ag class in ninth grade gest goal up to that point in my in Austin which gave Steenblock life.” Some of Steenblock’s life the opportunity to learn more decisions were on hold until she about FFA. She jumped right into found out whether she was electthe organization by participating ed to a state officer position. in the FFA creed contest that year as well as attending Greenhand When it was announced that camp that summer. “It was so she was state FFA secretary, much fun,” Steenblock said. She Steenblock was thrilled. “I was went on to serve her local chapter shocked — but very excited. I in a variety of ways. Steenblock was probably kind of surprised transferred to Waseca high school to get the role of secretary.” in her junior year and was elected For Steenblock this ended up as Region Seven president. being the perfect position. “I think Steenblock knew she wanted to it was the ideal fit for each team become an FFA state officer as member and the selection process she looked up to so many past gave us an amazing team that state officers. She wholeheartedstrived to give back to our state, ly wanted to serve in a leadermembers, and communities.” ship capacity in FFA, giving back to the organization During her time as secretary, it was connecting not which had given her so many wonderful memories. only with her fellow state officers but with other FFA The state officer election process was nerve-racking See STEENBLOCK, pg. 13


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Not for the faint of heart, Tjosaas treasures his FFA experience By KRISTIN KVENO The Land Staff Writer Growing up on a 10-acre hobby farm near Long Prairie, Minn., Josh Tjosaas had a passion for agriculture — especially horses. That passion led Tjosaas to seek opportunities in the ag arena, leading him on a path which continues in his career today. While in eighth grade, Tjosaas was already interested in taking ag classes in high school and being a part of FFA thanks to the ag instructor/FFA advisor, Tim Wickstrom. “We had a young energetic ag instructor.” That enthusiasm for ag, coupled with already having been a part of 4-H, it was a natural progression for Tjosaas to join FFA. While in high school, Tjosaas jumped right into leadership opportunities in the chapter. He was chapter vice president and president. He then served as district vice president and region vice president. His interest in serving in a leadership compacity in FFA continued to grow. “I went to the state Greenhand camp.” While there he ran for camp officer, he was elected camp president. Tjosaas fondly remembers advisor Paul Day writing him an encouraging note at camp. That, along with meeting some state officers there, planted the seed for Tjosaas to eventually run for a state office.

“It was a very interesting process,” Tjosaas said. While at the convention, in addition to running for state office, he competed in the horse evaluation contest and the extemporaneous speaking contest. As he was busy competing in the contest as well as participating the state officer interview process, Tjosaas was exhausted and stressed. “I actually fainted on stage after I got elected.” All that excitement on stage was Tjosaas introduction to the world of the being an FFA state officer and what a thrilling ride it ended up being. “I really enjoyed the camps and conferences.” Getting the chance to meet fellow FFA members one-on-one was a privilege for Tjosaas. What did he treasure most about his time as a state officer? “The friendships.” He also fondly recalls the business industry tour that he was a part of traveling around part of the state. His role as treasurer offered Tjosaas the chance to get into the world of finance on a level he hadn’t had before. “It was unique in that Mr. Ertl trusted me with a lot of treasurer duties.” Tjosaas was attending the University of Minnesota majoring in and living on St. Paul campus while he was state treasurer.

Steenblock still very goal-oriented STEENBLOCK, from pg. 12 members as well that she treasured. “I really enjoyed the summer camps. They were filled with lots of stories — good ones and some kinda stinky — like the camp we lost power for several days after a bad storm.” Steenblock found that being a state officer offered her the chance to meet people and be involved in new experiences. “I thrive on learning new things and personal growth.” It was the ability to get outside her comfort zone and seek opportunities to better herself. “FFA pushed me to set big goals, to become a better version of myself, and never settle.” When Steenblock was elected FFA state secretary, she decided to enroll at Minnesota State University Mankato so she could stay in state and more easily attend officer activities. After that year, Steenblock went onto Iowa State University where she received a degree in ag business in 1998. After graduation, Steenblock worked in marketing for John Deere in both Moline, Ill. and in Des Moines, Iowa. She received a master’s degree in business administration from Drake University in 2003. Steenblock married her husband, Ryan, in July 1999 and are the proud parents of Arilyan, 14 and Brody,

10. They started their ag production dream with two bottle calves on their acreage outside of Panora, Iowa. They now own and operate over 200 head commercial cow-calf operation along with hay and row crops. Starting in 2010 she chose to be a full-time mom and live her dream of raising cattle and kids. It’s the skills learned during her time in FFA that Steenblock utilized both in her corporate career and today in her cattle business. “During my career, the leadership, speaking and writing experiences in FFA gave me a huge advantage in the corporate world.” On the farm, Steenblock continues to be ambitious in all her endeavors. “I’m still very goal orientated, striving to continually improve our practices as we feed our family, neighbors, America and the world. But my greatest accomplishment will always be my role as wife and mother as Ryan and I grow a legacy for our family.” Steenblock looks back fondly on her time in FFA and holds those memories dear. “FFA helped me to rise above adversity to achieve my dreams, sent me on great adventures to travel around the country and even overseas, and captured memories that will forever be treasured in my heart.” v

“The FFA program really developed me into the person I am.” Through his time in the organization, Tjosaas was able to gain interpersonal communication skills. Presenting to groups isn’t a problem now for him. “It doesn’t bother or rattle me.” The state officer interviews were a great opportunity to become a better interviewee. “It prepared me well for job interviews.” After graduation from the University of Minnesota with a degree in agricultural education, Tjosaas went onto to teach at Buffalo Lake-Hector where he was also the basketball and FFA advisor there for 13 years. In 2012, Tjosaas moved north where he is a farm management instructor at the Moorhead Northland site. Tjosaas and his wife, Alyssa live in Barnesville, Minn. He encourages those FFA members considering running for a state office to go for it and learn from the process. “Everybody that has the desire and interest to run should run for state office. The experience in running was invaluable.” v


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THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021

Yonkers took her Minnesota FFA skills to San Francisco By KRISTIN KVENO The Land Staff Writer For Stephanie Yonker, her foray into FFA life started at home near Jackson, Minn. “My dad back in the day was actually an ag teacher.” Growing up on a hog farm, her interest in agriculture was homegrown. It was natural that Yonker would join FFA when she was in ninth grade. She jumped right into the world of FFA and sought out as many opportunities as she could. “I was involved in the chapter and was Region Six vice president.” Yonker thoroughly enjoyed being a part of the speech competitions. “I won the creed, public and extemporaneous contests.” Yonker also competed in meat judging. Being so heavily involved in FFA, plus watching fellow chapter member Kimberly (Peterson) Kamolz become state FFA reporter in 1993 allowed Yonker to dream big and seize the chance to realize that dream of being a state officer. “The election process was pretty grueling. It was more grueling than most job interviews. I still think that a lot of people that were state officers that year

were some of the most talented people I’ve worked with.” One of Yonkers’s most memorable experiences as state reporter occurred when she and her fellow state officers were at the FFA camp in Hackensack, Minn. and the power went out due to a strong windstorm. “I ate moldy bread.” Dealing with the power outage and having to be responsible to staying calm and leading the campers through that is something that Yonker looks back at and is grateful for the experience. Though she her stomach still turns thinking of that moldy bread. During her time as state reporter she was on the Minneapolis campus of the University of Minnesota — the only one of the state officers to be at that location. “People were at so many campuses.” Yonkers graduated from the University of Minnesota with a degree in genetics and cell biology. She went on to the University of California Berkley where she received a PhD in molecular and cell biology and then on to law school at Harvard School of Law.

Yonker has worked in San Francisco as a business centered attorney. She and her husband, Carylai are the proud parents of two girls, Serena, Mila and live in the bay area. Throughout all her years in the business world, it is her time in FFA that was instrumental in giving her invaluable tools she uses every day — like honing her communication, teamwork and organizational skills. Yonkers recalls while working alongside her fellow state officers, they were extremely goal driven and that drive allowed them to work together focusing on that common mission. “It was a very cohesive time that year.” She is quick to point out that a mutual reverence for each other was part of their success as state officers. “We fundamentally respected each other.” Yonker is grateful for what FFA taught her and the memories that she made and still holds dear. She encourages those in FFA that are considering running for state office to give it a shot. “If you never try you never know if you can get it.” Yonker is thankful she went for it in 1996. No matter what the outcome was, the experience gave her insight on her own strength and determination for working towards a now-treasured goal. v

FFA Sentinel Heiden recalls different talents coming together By KRISTIN KVENO The Land Staff Writer Laura Heiden grew up on a crop and livestock farm near Rushford, Minn. Her background in agriculture made joining FFA a perfect fit for her. “I fell in love with the scope and variety,” Heiden said. The Rushford FFA chapter prided itself on being a community organization. “We had a good relationship with the ag businesses.” That involvement in turn supported the organization. It was a good match. Heiden enjoy the chance to make a different in her own community by helping out through FFA. While in high school, Heiden was FFA chapter president and treasurer, She also served as region president. It was attending Greenhand camp after her ninth grade year that solidified Heiden’s goal to run for a state office. “It was seeing the larger scope of what you could do.” She looked up to the previous state officers at the camp and thoroughly enjoyed the opportunity to meet new people from all over the state. The state officers’ election process for Heiden was intense. “It was a lot of people; it was a big group.” Heiden, though, kept her eyes on the prize. “I wanted it so bad. I had been pushing myself.” When it was announced that Heiden was named sentinel, joy ensued. “I was so happy; I couldn’t stop

smiling. It was an honor to be selected.” Looking back at her time as a state officer, Heiden is filled with gratitude for experiences she got to share with her fellow state officers. “We had a really amazing team. We were all very different in personality. We all brought something different. It was rooted in friendship and respect.” During her time as sentinel, Heiden was a student a University of Wisconsin River Falls. “Of course, it was a balancing act. I really enjoyed doing it.” Heiden remembers the nownotorious state leadership camp storm. “We were out of power for three days. It was hot, it was sticky, there was no running water.” Heiden laughs when explaining the ironic name of the final banquet at the camp, “Unplugged.” The theme for that night had been planned long before the storm took the electricity out, though it ended up being very fitting. The whole experience of dealing with a severe storm while hosting the FFA campers and trying to remain calm through it all was an experience Heiden vividly recalls. “It was memorable,”

she said. It’s memories like these, persevering in tough situations and having some fun along the way that made Heiden’s experience as a state officer such an exceptional one.

Heiden gained skills during her time in FFA that she employs today — like being resourceful. “This for me started at the chapter level. We were really involved in building a community park.” After Heiden graduated from UWRF with a degree in ag education she has worked in the ag industry in marketing and business development. Heiden lives in St. Paul. “I’m a farm girl who really loves the city.” Heiden’s advice to FFA members is to do something every day that scares them, to push themselves out of their comfort zone, in doing so they’ll broaden horizons. Taking that leap into pursuing a state officer position all those years ago pushed Heiden outside her limits and she’s thrilled she took that chance on herself. v


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Minnesotan nationally recognized for soil health efforts By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer Emeritus Editor’s note: Last December Dick Hagen visited with Buffalo Lake farmer Brian Ryberg for an update on Ryberg’s soil building efforts. This will be Ryberg’s seventh year of employing strip till farming techniques along with cover crops in an effort to reduce field time, save energy and build organic matter into his soil. On March 16 the American Soybean Association presented Ryberg with the 2021 National Conservation Legacy Award. The Conservation Legacy Awards program is a national program designed to recognize the outstanding environmental and conservation achievements of soybean farmers who help produce more sustainable U.S. soybeans. Shortly after the award was announced, Hagen caught up with Ryberg to offer congratulations. On March 19 it was my pleasure for another visit with this young (age 55) but now highly-honored conservation farmer. He had just received word he had been awarded the National Conservation Legacy Award — a most prestigious recognition. Recognizing top conservation farmers across America, the selection narrowed the process to four regional finalists. And from this ‘Best of the Best,’ Minnesota’s Brian Ryberg, emerged national champion. Ryberg, in his quiet way said, ”I’m humble to be recognized for our efforts. With Chris and Jason, I have a great team. We are together sharing this honor.” He related to the virtual awards banquet program which took place the evening of March 16. “We tuned in at our home,” said Ryberg. “The spokesperson shared some of the conservation background of the four regional winners. Yes, Sandy (his wife) and I were more than just a bit overwhelmed when they read our names as national winners. And I’m still in awe and humbly grateful.” The Rybergs are gracious people. Their homestead sits about 2 miles off busy U.S. Highway 212, directly south of Buffalo Lake. A huge farm shop dominates the complex, plus a few sizeable steel bins to accommodate their corn and soybean crops. However, for Ryberg Farms, forward pricing moves considerable quantities of both crops. And like many farmers these days, Ryberg said a significant portion of their 2021 production is already priced. But conservation farming and minimum tillage was their honor so let’s stay on track. In a story I did in May 2019 for The Land, Ryberg told me, “Five years ago we had the discussion of how to change our farming methods. Those talks with Chris and Jason, my two valued partners in this operation, were a bit uncomfortable since this was indeed a compete transition. Five years of continuous corn was our story book. We were doing some serious looking at what we were doing to soil structure on our cropland.”

Their program at that time involved a Wishek disc after a chopping corn head followed by a ripper. Then before planting, a field cultivator to prepare a smooth, level seed bed. Yes, lots of field trips and lots of equipment. They convinced themselves it was time for a change. Brian Ryberg Their data tells the story: Total field hours went from 430 hours (with two, 4-wheel drive tractors) down to 210 hours with one, 4-wheel drive power unit. With conventional farming and upwards of five passes on each acre, gasoline consumption was almost 5 gallons per acre. With the Soil Warrior incorporating both tillage and fertilization with a single field trip, diesel fuel consumption dropped to .6 gallons per acre. I asked Ryberg if his operation had made any changes in its program since we spoke two years ago. “Like most, we’re always tweaking a few things. But for the most part, pretty much the same. Corn, sugar beets and soybeans are the hub of our entire cropping program. We’re now into some vertical tillage for soybeans however.” “I’ve got two long-time employees, Chris and Jason, that I consider as equal partners. So when the ideas start flowing, we pretty much listen to what each has to say. As you might imagine, this gets to be some lively conversations. But inevitably, a new idea or two survives this incredible scrutiny. And that’s the genuine satisfaction to me of having such innovative partners.” “The key drivers don’t change: Reducing wear and tear on equipment; holding the reins on man power for each production year; keeping fuel costs to a bare minimum; and of course the ongoing evaluations of seed genetic changes, new herbicide considerations and the latest info of soil fertility techniques. Plus this year with the significant increase in fertilizer prices for this new season, we’re asking what changes can we make to keep the lid on our total production costs.” A key component in Ryberg’s field management is the Soil Warrior and a lot of research went into the decision to purchase such expensive equipment ($80,000 at the time). “We started checking manufacturers with equipment that would work in 22-inch rows. Soil Warrior, built at Faribault, Minn., only about 80 miles, did offer equipment that fit in 22-Inch row configurations. So obviously their location was a benefit. It seemed their machine was pretty much the ‘Cadillac’ of the reduced tillage equipment.” Ryberg said an added bonus is the implement’s durability. “It’s a well-engineered, solidly built piece of equipment. That was important in our decision six years ago. We’ve had to replace a few things as expected, but now it’s ready to roll again for our 2021 season.” In the last couple of years, soil health has gained a lot of traction with crop farmers who are partnering

with soil and water conservation districts to implement various techniques. Even though Ryberg could be considered a pioneer in soil health practices, he feels he is just scratching the surface. “Still a lot to learn,” he admitted. “You can see changes just by the texture of the soil and water infiltration. Plus a requirement of being in the SWCD Conservation program is the Haney test which gives you a ‘soil health’ reading. Key is to have these Haney test numbers increasing each year … it’s a score so to speak of the biological activities in your soils. They increase each year. We provide soil samples each year to the soil testing lab at New Ulm. I don’t know the exact procedures in their testing, but what we get is a measure of the biological activity of your soils. And this varies from soil type to soil type, plus drainage considerations, and we’re learning crop rotations and weed control also impact these scores. We’re moving in the right direction — that’s all that really matters. I don’t know if ‘ultimate scores’ are an eventuality. Ryberg is pleased with the organic matter content of his farm’s soils. “Improving somewhat … we’re mostly in the high 5’s and 6’s. Plus some peat soils in the 15-plus category. There’s a continual message for us farmers to be increasing the organic matter of our soils. We were at relatively high scores already See RYBERG, pg. 17

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Cheese production is up, demand may be lagging This column was written for the marfood prices are inflated in China helps to keting week ending March 26. project upcoming demand and points to “food shortages due to disease and China was the proverbial “bull in the weather, alongside rising needs and a china shop” when it came to the latest growing middle class. China does not import data. Reminiscent of its buying in have enough productive farmland, keep2014, data was released this week for ing food imports critical. If a pandemic both January and February, which was could not stop China from recording the case last year. But HighGround Dairy record dairy imports in 2020, consumpsays January marked the highest volMIELKE MARKET tion trends throughout this year will be umes on record for any month. WEEKLY strong as well. The country is turning to Whole milk powder imports in the two protein of any sort, including dairy, drivBy Lee Mielke months totaled 530.4 million pounds, up ing global values higher in recent weeks 7.4 percent from 2020. Skim milk where they will stay until Chinese powder totaled 192.5 million pounds, buyers are satisfied with inventory up 35.9 percent. Butter, at 46.2 millevels.” lion pounds, was down 18.8 percent, but cheese New Zealand exports are faring well, thanks to totaled 67.7 million pounds, up 33.7 percent year-toChina, and continue to break records. February data date. Whey product imports amounted to 277.1 milwas similar to January, says HighGround Dairy, lion pounds, up 49.2 percent from the same period a with growth primarily in whole milk powder and year ago. fluid milk and cream. Cheese exports started the The biggest leap was in whole milk powder from year at five year highs as exports to China accountNew Zealand, according to HighGround Dairy, and ed for 25.5 percent market share for the first two fluid milk and cream from the EU-27. China frontmonths of 2021. loaded both whole and skim milk powder in Back in the United States, February butter stocks January, as they typically do, “but it came at an climbed to 352.7 million pounds, up 20.8 million even stronger pace than usual given global shipping pounds or 6.3 percent from the January level, which uncertainty.” was revised 3.5 million pounds higher than what New Zealand, Germany and Poland recorded fresh was reported a month ago. Butter stocks are a highs to start a calendar year, according to whopping 50.9 million pounds or 16.8 percent above HighGround Dairy, and while imports from the Feb. 2020. United States were also strong, whey demand was February was the 20th consecutive month butter slightly below that of 2018. China brought in more stocks topped those a year ago. However, the build product from Belarus, EU and Turkey, says HighGround Dairy, blaming shipping issues for the was smaller than many expected. That is a positive; but butter output remains strong and we’ll get more decline. details in the February Dairy Products report HighGround Dairy says that remembering why issued April 1.

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American-type cheese stocks hit 816 million pounds, up 6.9 million pounds or 0.9 percent from January, which was revised up 8.3 million pounds, and is 37.7 million or 4.8 percent above a year ago. The ”other” cheese category jumped to 597.5 million pounds, up 19.6 million pounds or 3.4 percent from January and 37.8 million or 6.8 percent above a year ago. The total cheese inventory stood at 1.44 billion pounds, up 27.8 million pounds or 2 percent from January and 74.1 million pounds or 5.4 percent above a year ago. February was the fourth month in a row that See MIELKE, pg. 18

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Ryberg optimistic for 2021 season RYBERG, from pg. 15 so we’re very pleased with the Haney test scores we’re seeing each year.” Ryberg also employs variable nitrogen application rates for his crops. “Our fields are mapped and we collect yield data on a field-by-field basis. So we do some ‘spoon feeding’ our corn — especially those fields on continuous corn which get upwards of 220 pounds actual nitrogen. We’ve proven we can raise 225-230 bushel yields, so we try to feed according to appetite. On soybeans we’ve cut back to about 160 pounds. Commodity prices are strong. China continues a major buyer of U.S. farm production — be that corn, soybeans, soybean oil, now ethanol fuels and even pork and beef are getting lots of China buyers too. I asked Ryberg for his predictions for the upcoming crop year. “Right now we’re pretty optimistic,” he said. “Soil

moistures are looking good. We’re hoping to get an early start. If Mother Nature cooperates with us throughout the growing season, 2021 could be a good one.” With your increasing soil health, are you also considering boosting planting rates of corn, and even soybeans? “We’ve done a little with both crops,” explained Ryberg. “We don’t have much variability in our soils … pretty much flat and black on all our crop land. On seed genetics, we get at least a couple years data before making changes in our corn genetics, even our soybeans. In fact, with good genetics, it’s usually three to four years before a significant change to new pedigrees.” So the bottom line for Ryberg Farms: Over the past six years they’re averaging $70 to $80 per acre reductions in total production costs. In simple farm jargon, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it!” v

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THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021

USDA dedicating $6 billion to new pandemic assistance MIELKE, from pg. 17 total cheese stocks grew. Revisions for January amounted to 10 million pounds, which HighGround Dairy says is “a report-to-report build of 38 million pounds, a more bearish number than the initial February data would suggest.” And, with the spring flush upon us, cheese output will no doubt rise and that could push cheese stocks to new record highs. “Are we dealing with a lack of demand or really strong production?” asks StoneX. “We side with stronger cheese production. Demand was on solid footing back in February and it likely got better in March thanks to improving foodservice sales. But supply of milk is also very good and with programs like Food Box continuing through April (at least), we presume that manufacturers have begun to shift away from constrained production practices of last year. Additionally, we expect some export cheese was sitting in coolers stateside unable to find passage to its final destination.”  The stuck cargo ship in the Suez Canal was not helping matters. n Speaking of the Food Box program, the muchawaited 12-hour U.S. Department of Agriculture call to help determine the program’s fate took place March 22. Speakers were given three minutes to address the call and StoneX says “The key takeaway seems to be resounding support to establish a permanent food box program. Beyond that, participants want the USDA to consider more than the lowest price bids, verify what is in the boxes, lighten the weight of the boxes (probably by removing the halfgallon of milk), give longer lead time between awards and delivery, and build out long-term contracts to allow better planning. The takeaway for the markets is that a better organized and executed Food Box program is better handled by participants and less shocking to market prices.” National Milk called for federal officials to “effectively allocate dairy products as a source of highquality, cost-effective nutrition” in any successor program. Meanwhile, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack says USDA is establishing new programs and efforts to bring financial assistance to farmers,

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ranchers and producers who felt the impact of Covid-19 market disruptions. “The new initiative, USDA Pandemic Assistance for Producers, will reach a broader set of producers than in previous Covid-19 aid programs,” according to a USDA press release. “USDA is dedicating at least $6 billion toward the new programs. The Department will also develop rules for new programs that will put a greater emphasis on outreach to small and socially disadvantaged producers, specialty crop and organic producers, timber harvesters, as well as provide support for the food supply chain and producers of renewable fuel, among others. Existing programs like the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP) will fall within the new initiative and, where statutory authority allows, will be refined to better address the needs of producers.” n Dairy cow culling was down in February and slightly below February 2020. The latest Livestock Slaughter report shows an estimated 265,200 head were sent to slaughter under federal inspection, down 12,100 head from January and 900 or 0.3 percent below February 2020. Culling in the first two months of 2021 totaled 542,500 head, down 22,100 head or 3.9 percent from the same period a year ago. In the week ending March 13, 68,800 dairy cows were sent to slaughter, down 1,600 from the previous week but 3,100 or 4.7 percent more than that week a year ago. While slaughter is below that of a year ago,

StoneX points out, “We’re killing them at about the same pace we can replace them which matches up with the slowdown in herd growth the USDA reported for February.” n Cheese prices continued to weaken in the first part of the last full week of March but then rallied. The cheddar blocks fell to $1.67 per pound on March 24, the lowest since March 3. They closed March 26 at $1.72, down 7 cents on the week but 13 cents above a year ago when the Covid factor began hitting the markets. The blocks tumbled 24.75 cents that week and the barrels were down 9 cents. The barrels slumped to $1.4375 on March 21, but finished March 26 at $1.4625. This is up a penny on the week, 12.25 cents above a year ago, but 25.75 cents below the blocks. Sales for the week included four cars of block and three of barrel. Dairy Market News reports that some Midwestern cheese producers are and have been running full schedules while others are picking up. Food service cheese demand is not at pre-pandemic levels but has picked up quite a bit in the late winter/early spring season. Cheese availability reports were similar to those of production and vary plant to plant. Some producers are moving cheese out the door while others have available loads here and there. Market tones are mixed. Food service demand for western cheese continues See MIELKE, pg. 21

Walk-In Access enrollment underway Enrollment is now open for Minnesota’s Walk-In Access program, which pays private landowners to allow public hunting on their lands. This year, landowners can receive $18 per acre enrolled. And the program is expanding to include more counties. “We’re excited to see the program grow,” said Troy Dale, interim program supervisor. “Enrollment in the Walk-In Access program will be available for landowners in more than 50 Minnesota counties.” Landowners who are interested in enrolling their land must meet the following criteria: Parcels must be at least 40 acres in size or it must be contiguous with another WIA parcel that is 40 acres or more in size. Priority is given to lands enrolled in a conservation program such as the federal Conservation Reserve Program or the state Reinvest in Minnesota Reserve Program, or other state and federal conservation programs. Lands not enrolled in a conservation program may be eligible if high quality natural cover exists and is maintained by the landowner. Lands within 500 feet of a home or corral occupied by livestock cannot be enrolled, unless they are occupied by the cooperator or his/her livestock.

The enrolled parcel must be accessible from a public road. The habitat must be maintained through the enrollment period. Landowners, or the state, may terminate the contract at any time (effective 30 days after written notice of termination received). Hunters must purchase a $3 permit with a hunting license to access enrolled land. Walk-In Access parcels are marked with highly visible signs posted by DNR staff. Participating hunters can access Walk-In Access land Sept. 1 through May 31. Hunting laws are enforced by DNR conservation officers. Landowners are not required to purchase additional liability insurance. Landowners can sign up for the program at their local soil and water conservation district office or by contacting Troy Dale, program coordinator, at (507) 537-6616. More information is available at mndnr.gov/walkin.  This article was submitted by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. v


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PAGE 19

MARKETING

Grain Outlook Mexico’s corn crop could boost U.S. exports

Livestock Angles Covid decline should help livestock prices

up cattle are now disappearThe following marketing cast — and we’re just seven As we approach the end of ing and feedlots are closer to analysis is for the week endmonths into the marketing March and move into the normal numbers on feed ing March 26. year! month of April, the livestock before the Covid crisis. Cattle CORN — A drought of news Of total commitments, we markets have had a good on feed numbers have been this week. A weak start to the have shipped 1.3 billion month as prices have moved declining over the past sevweek wasn’t the end of the bushels or 50 percent of the higher to levels not seen in eral months which has helped uptrend in corn, but it was forecast compared to an quite a while. With the Covid turn the corner and improved challenged with some lower average of 42 percent infections declining and the prices for finished cattle. prices later in the week. shipped. These totals should lockdown loosening, restauJOE TEALE The replacement market Funds lightened up a portion PHYLLIS NYSTROM lead to the USDA raising rants are reopening — which Broker CHS H edging Inc. has also improved since those has increased the demand for of their long positions ahead corn exports 100-200 million Great Plains Commodity March 2020 lows to near the S t. Paul meat products. The outlook of the March 31 Prospective bushels on the April World Afton, Minn. levels they collapsed from. As Plantings and Grain Stocks Agriculture Supply and appears to be improving. The we look ahead, the outlook caveat to this is because of as of March 1 reports. Demand Estimates report. appears to be positive but guarded; the unemployment problem, demand Technically, the market was bent again, The only export sale announcement because a lot will depend on an improvfrom this point forward will likely but not broken with further consolida- this week was 4.4 million bushels to tion in the May contract from $5.30 to Japan in routine business. China has decline until the economy rebounds to ing economy which will have a direct $5.60 per bushel. This week’s May officially bought 23.3 mmt of U.S. corn. better levels. All livestock markets at influence on demand for product. The range was $5.41.5 - $5.58.75 per bush- Private estimates for China’s corn this writing were either overbought or weeks ahead will be important as to el. December corn also moved in a side- imports this year are increasing to approaching that condition. This would which direction cattle prices will take ways pattern as it edged toward sup- over 30 mmt with recent Ukrainian advise caution at this juncture; but into the summer months. port in the low $4.60’s per bushel. A purchases and assuming 2-3 mmt of does not mean higher levels can’t be The hog market has had an impresfirmer U.S. dollar, retreating energy the unknown sales in the United attained. sive rally over the past several months. prices, and weak wheat prices contrib- States will go to China. New crop sales Cattle prices have continued to Hog numbers have been reduced uted to limit the upside in corn. this week were 5.7 million bushels, improve since their lows established in because of the severe cold weather Argentina’s corn harvest was 7 per- bringing total new crop sales to 76.4 March of 2020. This has been mainly back in February which aided the cent complete in the central and south- million bushels and running just due to the fact that the market got strong market in the past two months. ern regions as of March 25, according ahead of last year’s 68.5 million on the overdone on the downside from the Couple this with a good export marscare of Covid virus. This caused the ket and prices moved to levels not to the Buenos Aires Grain Exchange. books by this date. They left their production forecast Weekly ethanol production unex- lockdown of people in their homes and seen since 2014. unchanged at 45 million metric tons. pectedly pulled back after three weeks the closure of businesses which obviCurrently, the market is extremely The recent rain was beneficial in help- of increases. This week’s production ously hurt demand for beef. As things overbought and could be subject to a ing to stabilize Argentina’s crop. was down 49,000 barrels per day to have relaxed, demand for beef has once correction. However, this maybe short again picked up. As a result, the backed- lived as the latest U.S. Department of Argentine farmer selling has been slow See NYSTROM, pg. 20 with 19.6 mmt sold vs. 21.1 mmt last Agriculture Hogs and Pigs report year when the crop was 51 mmt. released March 25 was friendly due to the reduced numbers. Brazil is finishing up their safrinha corn planting. With the later than norOne noticeable condition is as the corn/change* soybeans/change* mal safrinha corn planting this year pork cutout has risen, the movement Stewartville $4.94 -.15 $13.09 -.53 and pollination occurring in the heat of of products has slowly decreased. This Edgerton $5.27 .00 $13.65 -.23 summer, Brazil’s weather will continue could be signaling a slowly diminishto be a topic of conversation. ing demand for pork because of higher Jackson $5.21 -.09 $13.27 -.52 prices. The next few weeks should Janesville $5.29 -.04 $13.24 -.40 Weekly export sales were exceptiongive a signal as to which direction the Cannon Falls $5.11 -.01 $13.41 -.25 ally high, but within expectations, with hog market will take into the summer Sleepy Eye $5.11 -.15 $13.27 -.56 the huge Chinese purchases during the months. v reporting period.  Sales were 176.4 mil Average: $5.16 $13.32 lion bushels to bring total commitments to 2.558 billion bushels. This is Year Ago Average: $3.00 $8.35 closing in on the U.S. Department of Grain prices are effective cash close on March 30. Agriculture’s export forecast of 2.6 bil*Cash grain price change represents a two-week period. lion bushels or 98 percent of the fore-

Cash Grain Markets

Information in the above columns is the writer’s opinion. It is no way guaranteed and should not be interpreted as buy/sell advice. Futures trading always involves a certain degree of risk.


PAGE 20

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THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021

Soyoil futures soar while old crop soybeans take a dip NYSTROM, from pg. 19 922,000 bpd. Stocks rose 500,000 barrels to 21.8 million barrels. Net margins were 3 cents lower at 9 cents per gallon. Gasoline demand was 8.6 million bpd. The four-week average demand was down 8.7 percent from last year. One of Mexico’s largest farm groups this week stated they believe this year’s corn crop will produce 24 mmt. This is lower than their government’s 27 mmt estimate and below the USDA’s 27.8 mmt forecast. This may mean more opportunities for U.S. corn exports. The quarterly Hogs and Pigs report this week was friendly to hogs with all categories coming in lower than expected. All hogs were 98.2 percent vs. 100.1 percent estimated; kept for breeding 97.5 percent vs. 98.7 percent estimated; and kept for market 98.2 percent vs. 100.2 percent estimated. This may lend a modicum of pressure to corn and meal in later months. Crude oil was all over the page this week when one of the largest container ships in the world became lodged in the Suez Canal (through which 10 percent of all global trade travels). With tugs and dredging equipment trying to free it, it may take until at least March 31 to free the ship. The value of the cargo is estimated at $12 billion. Ship traffic is backed up with the only alternative route for ships around the tip of South Africa which can add a week’s transit time. Keep political tension between the United States and China on the radar. New sanctions (freezing assets and banning travel) against individual Chinese officials and a paramilitary organization are being taken by Canada, Britain and the European Union (and possibly the United States) in response to what is termed a genocidal campaign against Uyghur Muslims in China. China retaliated by blacklisting 10 EU lawmakers, along with some think tanks and academics, and blocking them from doing business with or travel to China. Average trade estimates for the March 31 reports: U.S. corn acreage 93.208 million acres vs. 92 million at the USDA Outlook Forum and 90.819 million acres last year. The range of estimates is from 92 to 94.5 million acres. U.S. corn stocks as of March 1 at 7.767 billion bushels vs. 7.952 billion bushels last year. The range of estimates is from 7.573 to 7.980 billion bushels. Outlook: This week was another one of consolidation. The next direction will be dictated by the March 31st numbers with attention then focusing on U.S. planting weather. The current spring weather forecast suggests an early to normal planting season. Export demand has been stellar and should push the USDA to raise estimates on subsequent reports. However, if energy markets lose steam and the U.S. dollar rallies, it may not make a difference. May corn remains in a $5.30 - $5.60 range until we see reports.

For the week: May corn down 5.25 cents at $5.52.5, July 3 cents lower at $5.35.75, and December down a nickel at $4.66.5 per bushel. A look at history: March 1 corn stocks were higher than the average trade guess in four of the last five years. Corn acreage on March 31 was higher than the average trade guess in three of the last five years. SOYBEANS — Old crop soybeans edged toward the upper end of their recent trading range in the first half of the week before succumbing to fund selling which resulted in a 15.75 cent loss for the week. November soybeans consolidated in the lower half of the previous week’s range, but were able to hold above longer-term support at their 50-day moving average. May soybean oil posted a limit up and two limit down sessions this week in volatile trading. A major influence on soybeans has been the surge in world vegetable oil prices, which includes soyoil. The push toward “green” energy is increasing the demand for soyoil. Nearby, soyoil futures soared to new contract highs before pulling back as global cases of Covid increased and energy prices retreated on concern that economic recovery may not be as quick as previously expected. The USDA numbers put combined global 2020-21 stocks to use ratio of palm, rapeseed, and soyoil at 9.8 percent — the tightest since 1993-94. The total stock of those oils is projected to be the lowest since 2010-11. China’s soyoil stocks are believed to be the lowest in three years. Palm oil stocks are anticipated to fall by nearly half to 2.67 mmt by the end of 2021 in Indonesia, which is the world’s largest grower of palm oil. Increasing world vegoil demand vs. lower production is behind the forecast. U.S. biodiesel use from October through February is up 15 percent vs. last year when the USDA is predicting use to be up just 5.6 percent for the marketing year.  USDA Secretary Vilsack said he received assurances from China they have African swine fever “under control.” To his credit, Vilsack said that may be overstated, but the outbreak likely isn’t as bad as last year. China’s Ministry of Agriculture Rural Affairs said 9 million sows were lost in January/ February due to ASF. It was estimated it could lead to 200 million fewer market animals. Harvest was picking up in central Argentina during the week with the BAGE keeping their production estimate at 44 mmt. They did comment that early yields were highly variable. Argentina received rain during the week, but dry weather is forecasted to return and may adversely affect late yields. Their soybean harvest will begin in earnest in a few weeks. Farmers have sold an estimated 12.5 mmt compared to 17.5 mmt last year when the crop was 48.8 mmt. 

Drier weather in Brazil allowed for soybean harvest to move toward completion. Weekly soybean exports were on the light side of expectations at 3.7 million bushels. Total commitments at 2.23 billion bushels have essentially met the USDA projection of 2.25 billion bushels. We have shipped 1.997 billion bushels of the commitments which reduces the likelihood of bushels being canceled or rolled into the next marketing year. China has just 1.1 mmt of U.S. soybeans to ship having shipped 97 percent of their purchases. Total new crop sales were 2.4 million bushels bringing total new crop sales to 189 million bushels vs. 15.2 million bushels last year. The Canadian Pacific Railway will buy the KC Southern for $25 billion, linking Mexico, the United States and Canada. The deal needs approval from the U.S. Surface Transportation Board which is expected by the middle of 2022. Average trades estimates for the March 31 reports: U.S. soybean acreage 89.996 million bushels vs. 90 million at the USDA February Forum and 83.084 million acres last year. The range of estimates is from 86.1 to 91.61 million acres. U.S. soybean stocks as of March 1 at 1.543 billion bushels vs. 2.255 billion bushels last year. The range of estimates is from 1.44-1.825 billion bushels. Outlook: Soyoil has provided underlying support to soybeans while the meal has taken a backseat. That changed this week with May soyoil locking limit down for the last two trading days of the week. The upcoming USDA reports kept traders cautious about adding to soybean length. The reports should provide fuel for our next direction with attention then turning to U.S. planting weather.     The Energy Information Administration said they will publish expanded biofuels and feedstock data beginning on their March 31 weekly report. The USDA said they will break out soyoil use for renewable diesel beginning with the May balance sheet. For the week: May soybeans dropped 15.75 cents to $14.00.5, July down 11.75 cents at $13.91.25, and November soybeans lost 12.75 cents at $12.07.25 per bushel. History for the March 31 reports: bean acreage has been below the average trade estimate in all the last three years. Soybean stocks have been higher than the average trade estimate in all the last four years. Nystrom’s notes: Contract changes for the week as of the close on March 26: Chicago wheat retreated 13.75 cents to $6.13.25, Kansas City plunged 17.25 cents to $5.68.25, and Minneapolis was 13 cents lower at $6.14 per bushel. v

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PAGE 21

Cream supply tightening, food service butter demand grows MIELKE, from pg. 18

Spot Grade A nonfat dry milk also strengthened on the week, climbing to a $1.17 per pound March 26 close, 1.75 cents higher on the week and 25 cents above a year ago when the powder fell 6.75 cents. There were 16 sales on the week. Dry whey set another record high since trading began on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, hitting 62.75 cents per pound on March 24, a level not seen in previous National Agriculture Statistics Servicesurveyed prices since 2014. It was unchanged the rest of the week, up 1.5 cents on the week and 29.75 cents above a year ago. Only two sales were reported all week. n Cooperatives Working Together member cooperatives accepted 34 offers of export assistance this week that pushed the milk equivalent of CWT assisted export sales in 2021 over one half billion pounds. Sales included 1.368 million pounds of cheddar, Gouda, and Monterey Jack cheese, 699,417 pounds of butter, 1.64 million pounds of anhydrous milkfat, 335,103 pounds of cream cheese, and 4.41 million of whole milk powder. The product will go to customers in Asia, Central and South America, the Middle East, North Africa and Oceania through July and puts CWT 2021 exports at 11.2 million pounds of American-type cheeses, 8.35 million pounds of butter, 3.65 million pounds of anhydrous milkfat, 13.54 million of whole milk powder, and 3.87 million pounds of cream cheese. n Hoards Dairyman Managing Editor Corey Geiger gave listeners a lesson on cheese in the March 29 “Dairy Radio Now” broadcast. Based on a recent Dairy Livestream program, we talked about blocks and barrels because they are so much a part of milk pricing but Geiger said that the two are not created equal.

to rise with the loosening of Covid restrictions while retail demand has held steady. Dairy Market News says, “As market prices edged lower for block cheese, international buyer interest has ticked back up.” Plenty of milk is available and plants are running at or near capacity but cheese is moving well. Cheese inventories are around or slightly higher than a year ago. n Spot butter got a bounce from the Cold Storage data, closing March 26 at $1.775, up 11 cents on the week, highest since June 24, and 28.75 cents above a year ago when the butter had a 26.75 cent meltdown. Sales totaled seven loads. Butter contacts tell Dairy Market News that food service demand has grown; but some say it softened slightly from the previous week. General demand tones have “turned a corner from previous months,” says Dairy Market News, but “there is a lot of butter available.” Cream tightening continued this week but “The big question is, which direction cream availability will take following the spring holidays.” Some contacts expect steadiness then further tightness, while others expect some loosening considering the flush season, but market tones remain “somewhat sturdy.” Cream is ample in the west, but some contacts expect the supply may start tightening for butter makers as ice cream, sour cream, and cream cheese makers are increasing intakes. Some manufacturers report heavy butter inventories that are still growing however U.S. butter is competitively priced in international markets and export interest remains steady. Retail sales are down slightly compared to early Covid supply stockpiling from a year ago, but retail butter demand is reportedly strong heading Blocks can either weigh 40 pounds or 640 pounds, into the spring holiday season. With restrictions while barrels weigh in at 500 pounds. Most cheese softening and consumer comfort levels growing for plants specialize in one or the other and there’s dining out, food service demand continues to often not much switching between the two. Blocks strengthen, says Dairy Market News.

Rainfall network seeks volunteers The state climatology office in the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources needs volunteer rainfall monitors for the Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS). The network includes more than 20,000 volunteers nationwide who measure precipitation in their backyards using a standard four-inch diameter rain gauge. Volunteers perform rainfall monitoring activities at home and submit their reports online. The data are used to verify high rain totals after big events, monitor drought conditions and inform projections about floods, make precipitation maps more accurate, and provide needed guidance on Minnesota’s changing climate.

Volunteers are particularly needed outside of the immediate Twin Cities metro area. To participate, rainfall monitors must purchase or provide a standard four-inch diameter rain gauge (available at discount through CoCoRaHS) and have internet access to submit reports. CoCoRaHS provides online training on how to observe weather trends and how to submit precipitation and weather event reports. To sign up to become a CoCoRaHS rain observer or for more information, visit https://www.cocorahs.org/ application.aspx or contact Luigi Romolo at luigi. romolo@state.mn.us. The website includes lesson plans for STEM students and instructional videos for all participants. v

are usually “ready to eat,” he said, and have a certain flavor and melting consistency. They are also colored by a natural additive and most Americans outside of the Northeast eat a yellow cheddar. One of the participants in the livestream was Kurt Epprecht, who operates Ohio-based Great Lakes Cheese Company. Epprecht said barrels are generally an easier bet for cheesemakers to make because of their valuable white whey. Most customers who buy whey want it to be white, Geiger explained. Whey is typically made from barrel cheddar which is white and therefore has more value. Many countries stipulate they will not accept bleached whey, a necessary process if it comes from yellow cheddar. That’s very important in the infant formula market, Geiger said. Another topic of the livestream concerned the use of Mozzarella cheese in milk price discovery. Mozzarella is the most consumed cheese in the United States, according to Geiger — even ahead of cheddar. But one of the participants, dairy buyer and trader Ted Jacoby, CEO of T.C. Jacoby and Company, says including Mozzarella in milk pricing would be difficult. He points out that every plant which produces Mozzarella differs “so an even exchange for Mozzarella is a really difficult thing to establish.” And, “most Mozzarella is a part-skim product, so you’re automatically skimming fat,” he said, and “the components are different than a whole milk cheese, so that throws off that correlation between cheddar and Mozzarella. Mozzarella can also be sold frozen, while most cheddars cannot, so bottom line, Geiger believes block and barrel cheddar will remain a mainstay in price discovery. Last of all, we wanted to know, is barrel cheese really in a barrel? “It used to kind of resemble a chemical or fluid barrel,” answered Epprecht. “It was metal, but since then it has gone to a plastic bag and a corrugated box with multiple dimensions. It was very much a barrel at one point, but now it’s a cylindrical 500-pound block that is usually vacuum-packed,” he concluded. Lee Mielke is a syndicated columnist who resides in Everson, Wash. He may be reached at lkmielke@ juno.com. v

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THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021 T

AUCTIONS & CLASSIFIEDS

“YOUR #1 AUCTION PROFESSIONALS” 8-TRACTORS • FARM After 30 years ofMACHINERY the conGUNS • PICKUP • COINS struction business, Gordy has ANTIQUES • COLLECTIBLES OUTDOOR ITEMS HOUSEHOLD decided to• retire.

SATURDAY, APRIL 17, 2021, 9:00 A.M. LOCATION: Ellendale, MN, 2 miles north on Cty Rd. 14 (or SW 52nd Ave.) then 1 mile west on Cty Rd 21 or (SW 128th St.), then 2 miles north on 62nd Ave. SW. WATCH FOR AUCTION SIGNS!

Auctioneer’s Note: A very good Saturday auction to attend. Only a partial list of items to be sold 8-TRACTORS • FARM MACHINERY PICKUP • OUTDOOR ITEMS • MISC.

• J.D. 4020, gas, front weights, shows 6469 Hrs., S.N. T211R164762R • JD 620, power steering, NF, Fenders, SN 6201262 one owner • JD 60, power steering, NF, SN 6060737 • JD 50 NF, fenders, SN 5024342 • JD A, w/JD 237 mounted 2R picker • Farmall M, WF, w/Paulson loader, SN 24311 • Farmall M, NF, SN 247330, one owner • Farmall super H, NF, like new 12.4 - 38’’ tires, SN 10311-J • 1972 - GMC pickup, 3/4 ton, auto, 350 engine, shows 54,945 miles • 2-JD 3 bottom slat plows • J.D. 4 bottom x 16” plow w/buster bar • JD Field digger, 18’, w/3 bar harrow • JD 13’ RWA disc • JD flail chopper • NH hay baler, small squares • 10’ single disc • Flair box w/gear + hoist • 3 section culti-packer • 4 section coil tooth drag on cart • JD 2R mounted cultivator • Kewanee elevator • JD Hydraulic loader • 5 - older running gears • 2 - small Chief Grain Bins • Older 12’ x 14’ building to be moved • 500 gal fuel barrel on stand • Barn manure carry bucket • No 3 faning mill • Planter plates • Egg baskets • Anvil/Vice • 23” Anvil • New tarps • Tractor chains • Shovels - forks • Misc. tools

Real Estate Wanted

Real Estate SELL YOUR LAND OR REAL ESTATE IN 30 DAYS FOR 0% COMMISSION. Call Ray 507-339-1272

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Feed Seed Hay

WANTED: Land & farms. I 2000+ small square bales, have clients looking for oats straw for sale, $4.50 per dairy, & cash grain opera- bale. Phone 507-227-2251 tions, as well as bare land parcels from 40-1000 acres. ALFALFA, mixed hay, grass hay & wheat straw, mediBoth for relocation & investum square or round bales, ments. If you have even delivery available. thought about selling conThief River Falls, MN. Call tact: Paul Krueger, Farm & or text LeRoy Ose: Land Specialist, Edina Re218-689-6675 alty, 138 Main St. W., New Prague, MN 55372. paulkrueger@edinarealty.com FOR SALE: Nice grass ditch hay, made very early in (612)328-4506 3x3x8 bales $60 per bale. 507227-2602 www.thelandonline.com

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WE NEED YOUR SUBSCRIPTION CARD! If you haven’t already sent in your 2021 subscription card for The Land please take a minute and do it today. For your convenience we put a copy on page 16 of this issue. Fill it out, sign and date it, add your donation, and mail it back. It’s that simple. For everyone who has mailed it back we thank you very much! THE LAND

1999 New Holland Ford 6610S

2012 New Holland L220

1998 Wilson DWH401C

GUNS • COINS • ANTIQUES • COLLECTIBLES • HOUSEHOLD

• Winchester model 74, 22 cal. long rifle • Springfield J. Stevens arm co. 16 ga. • Ithaca model M-66 super single, 410 ga. 3” • Harrington + Richardson, 12 ga. • Coin collection • Car + truck toy collection • Misc. watches + knife collection • Large hat collection • Old clocks + radios • 2-5-15 gal Red Wing crocks • Collectible glass • Several oil lamps • 12 piece china set (cotillion) • Secretary w/beveled mirror • Buffet w/mirror • 2-Old trunks • Salt + pepper shakers • Depression glass • Cookie jars • Many figurines • Cedar chest • Old birdcage • Misc. furniture • 3-TV’s • Treadle sewing machine • 3-bedroom sets • Spinning wheel • Old pictures + frames • Collectible plates • Misc. silver pieces • Dining room table w/4 chairs • 2-refrigerator/freezers • Kitchen table w/4 chairs • Items too numerous to mention

GEORGE H. WODRICH - OWNER 10401 SW 62ND AVE., ELLENDALE, MN 56026 Terms: Cash or good check. Picture ID required. No property removed until fully settled for. Any verbal announcement made day of sale takes precedence over print. Sales staff and owners not responsible for accidents. . Clerk: Holland Auction Auctioneers:

HOLLAND AUCTION (507) 684-2955

FOR FULL COLOR PICTURES & LISTING Visit Our Website www.hollandauction.com

Tracy Holland and Associates Ellendale, MN #7405002 (507) 684-2955 or (507) 456-5128 (cell)

ATV’s, Snowmobiles, Boats, Recreation / Chemical/Fertilizer Accessories / Drills / Grain Carts & Gravity Boxes / Grain Handling Equipment / Hay Equipment / Heads / Livestock Equipment / Misc. Items / Mowers / Parts / Planters / Rotary Hoes / Skid Steer Loaders Sprayer / Swather / Tillage Equipment Trailers / Trucks and More!

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HOLLAND AUCTION  “America’s Best Brokerages”

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LOCATION: East of Beaver Lake, Ellendale MN

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Call early to take full advantage of advertising. Always a large auction, running two auction rings all day. Delivery of Consignments will be on April 18, 19, 20, 21, 2021 from 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. NO Consignments on April 22nd and 23rd!   Holland Auction at (507) 684-2955 or Tracy Holland, 507-456-5128 (cell) or

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PAGE 23

Steffes Auction Calendar 2021 For more info, call: 1-800-726-8609 or visit our website: SteffesGroup.com

Opening March 26 & Closing April 6 at 10AM Steve & Cheri Nicolai Farm Retirement Auction, Minor, ND Timed Online Auction Opening March 26 & Closing April 6 at 7PM Trim Bel Dairy Inventory Reduction Auction, Beldenville, WI, Timed Online Auction Opening March 29 & Closing April 7 Hausladen Inventory Reduction, New Germany, MN, Timed Online Auction Opening March 30 & Closing April 6 at 7PM Dale & Eric Sorenson Retirement Auction, Fisher, MN, Timed Online Auction Opening March 31 & Closing April 7 Green Ag Services Inventory Reduction Auction, Moholl, ND, Timed Online Auction Opening April 1 & Closing April 8 Matt Fischer Farm Retirement Auction, Mercer, ND, Timed Online Auction Opening April 1 & Closing April 9 Kelly & Colette Giffey Farm Retirement Auction, Roseglen, ND, Timed Online Auction Opening April 1 & Closing April 9 Witt Consulting Business Liquidation Auction, Monango, ND, Timed Online Auction Opening April 2 & Closing April 7 Online Steffes Auction - 4/7, Upper Midwest Locations, Timed Online Auction Opening April 2 & Closing April 12 Jim Oelfke Farm Retirement Auction, Hamburg, MN, Timed Online Auction Opening April 5 & Closing April 13 Peter Hanson Estate Auction, River Falls, WI, Timed Online Auction Opening April 5 & Closing April 14 EnRec Solutions Equipment Auction, Chippewa Falls, WI, Timed Online Auction Opening April 5 & Closing April 15 Meeker County, MN Land Auction - 80+ Acres, Meeker County, MN, Timed Online Auction

Opening April 5 & Closing April 16

Moberg Energy Retirement Auction, Watford City, ND, Timed Online Auction Opening April 6 & Closing April 13 Scott Muscha Estate Farm Auction, Harvey, ND, Timed Online Auction Wednesday, April 7 at 10AM Corey & Joan Refshaw Farm Retirement Auction, Mahnomen, MN Opening April 7 & Closing April 14 Gerald W Nepodal Estate Farm Equipment Auction, Platte, SD, Timed Online Auction Thursday, April 8 at 10AM Farden Construction Equipment Reduction Auction, Maxbass, ND Opening April 9 & Closing April 13 at 12PM Online Hay Auction – Quality Tested, Litchfield, MN, Timed Online Auction Opening April 9 & Closing April 15 Mark Christianson Farm Retirement Auction, Fertile, MN, Timed Online Auction Opening April 12 & Closing April 20 at 7PM Buhler Versatile Willmar Factory Liquidation Auction, Willmar, MN, Timed Online Auction Opening April 12 & Closing April 21 Mark Heck Estate Auction, Graceville, MN, Timed Online Auction


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Feed Seed Hay

Bins & Buildings

Farm Equipment

Farm Equipment

THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021 T Farm Equipment

FOR SALE: Alfalfa, mixed Barn and Quonset Roofing 2006 Great Plains (36 Ft 9”) FOR SALE: White 8100 8R30” FOR SALE: 30’ Multiweedhay, grass hay, straw and in- and Straightening. Kelling Discovator/Finisher Hi-Trash planter w/ liq fert; White 5100 er with new 200 gal. water Drag (Long Tines) Double 8R30” planter for beans; 70’ tank; 4 older John Deere dividually wrapped baleage. Silo. 1-800-355-2598 Fold (Original Blades) (18 hyd Herman culti harrow w/ running gears, 6” auger on Medium or large square bales. Delivery available. Stormor Bins & EZ-Drys. 3/4) 4 New Tires $18,500/ new tines; IH 14’ press drill transport; 1 1/2 horse motor Zumbrota, MN. Call or text 100% financing w/no liens or OBO. Real Good. Retiring w/ grass seeder; 50’ Wil- sweep auger. 320-833-5989 red tape, call Steve at Fair- 319-347-6282 or 319-269-4226 Ray Leffingwell 763-286-2504 Rich field cult w/ 3bar harfax Ag for an appointment. row; White 2-180 tractor w/ FOR SALE: Placo free stall 2870 Case tractor, duals, reOPEN Pollinated Seed Corn. 888-830-7757 4412 hrs, 2.8x38, duals avail- hog farrowing crates, Best cent eng OH, $8,500; 1830 Offer. Snowblower for John Produces more high qualiable. Retiring. 320-630-1777 Case IH 12R30” cult, $3,750; Deere front mounted comty silage on less acres than Farm Equipment Case IH 5300 grain drill, 24’ FOR SALE: Case IH 955 12- mercial mower, $2,800/OBO. hybrid. $67/bushel plus shiptandem unit, $7,000; 3pt fork 30 3pt with lift assist, 2-200 320-573-2614 or 320-360-2117 ping. High feed value grain. Located at Teutopolis, IL 1988 JD 4850 MFD with Duals lift, 3 stage, 20’ reach w/ 4x8 gal tanks, diaphragm pump, 217-857-3377 & 3 point; 9’ &10’ Ag bag- platform, $2,500. 507-240- Early Riser monitor, $8,500. FOR SALE: Top Aire pull 2005 Case IH MX285 2926 type sprayer, 60’ boom, 1000 ger model 6070; Parker 2 0294 hrs. 8 new tires, quick hitch, gallon tank, tandem axle, Compartment gravity box & Classified Line Ads J&M gravity box with brush Case IH 1230 row crop cul- big 1000 rpm PTO, red leath- hydraulic pump, $2,500. 507tivator, $6,750; Ag Leader Retiring 456-8139 augers; 1978 GMC Tandem 750 gal sprayer, 60’ boom, er seat, $75,000. green truck, Diesel, Auto- $2,350; (2) 18x34 tires, 35% (507) 236-7021 Call 507-345-4523 Please recycle this magazine. matic. 320-760-1634 tread, $175/each. 507-995-9676

WORK!

USED TRACTORS NEW NH T4.75, T4.90, T4.120 w/loader........... On Hand NEW NH Workmaster 60, 50, 35’s/loaders........ On Hand ’14 NH T7.210 ..................................................... Coming ’14 NH T8.350 ................................................... $152,000 ’13 NH T9.610 .....................................................$159,000 ’13 NH T8.390 .................................................... $169,500 ’11 NH T8.300 ..................................................... $94,500 ’84 JD 4850 FWA ................................................. $32,000 ’83 JD 4450PS W/148 LOADER ......................... $34,500 Farmall 340 wf w/mower .........................................$3,000 New Massey Tractors ......................................... On Hand ’07 Massey GC2300 w/loader................................ $13,900 White 6195 FWA....................................................$45,000

TILLAGE

PLANTERS ’11 White 8831 31-15 ..................................... $78,000 ’09 White 8816 cfs .......................................... $58,000 ’05 White 8186 DF......................... avail. after season COMBINES NEW Geringhoff chopping cornhead ....................Call ’12 Gleaner S77 ..............................................$179,000 ’03 Gleaner R65 .............................................. $72,000 ’95 Gleaner R52 w/cummins ........................... $32,500 ’90 Gleaner R40 w/heads ................................ $17,500 ’89 Gleaner R60 w/both heads ........................ $15,500 Geringhoff parts & heads available

‘11 Sunflower 4412-07............................................$28,000 MISCELLANEOUS ’13 CIH 870 9-24 ................................................. $38,500 ’13 Wilrich 513 5-30 ............................................ $31,500 NEW Salford RTS Units ........................................ Call ’10 Wilrich QX2 37’ w/basket ................................... Sold NEW Unverferth Seed Tenders .............................. Call ’09 Wilrich QX2 55’5 w/bskt ............................... $34,500 NEW Westfield Augers .......................................... Call

NEW REM VRX Vacs. .......................................... Call NEW Hardi Sprayers ............................................. Call NEW NH E26C mini excavator ......................... On Hand NEW Riteway Rollers ........................................... Call NEW NH L318/L320/L328 wheeled units ........ On Hand NEW Lorenz Snowblowers ................................... Call NEW NH C327/C337/C345 track units ............. On Hand NEW Batco Conveyors ......................................... Call ‘13 L225 EH 937hrs.............................................. $33,500 NEW Brent Wagons & Grain Carts ....................... Call NEW E-Z Trail Seed Wagons ................................ Call HAY TOOLS NEW Rock Buckets & Pallet Forks ...................... Call New Disc Mowers - 107,108,109 REM 2700, Rental ................................................. Call New Disc Mower Cond. - 10’, 13’ Pre-Owned Grain Cart .................................. On Hand New Wheel Rakes - 10,12,14 New Horsch Jokers ...................................... ......... Call New NH Hay Tools - ON HAND CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT

Thank You For Your Business! (507) 234-5191 (507) 625-8649 Hwy. 14, 3 miles West of Janesville, MN

Mon.-Fri. 7:30-5:00 • Sat. 7:30-Noon

Did you know... you can place your classified ad online at www.TheLandOnline.com or email theland@TheLandOnline.com

Farm Equipment FOR SALE: Massey Ferguson 3pt rotary disc mower, 6’, 4 rotors, model DM1305, like new, $4,500. 507-665-6300 Harms Mfg. Land Rollers, Brand New, 12’-$7,600; 14’$8,075; 16’-$8,550;24’-$17,000; 32’-$20,300; 42’-$23,550; Others from 8’-62’. 715-234-1993 JD 7200 8x36” corn planter $9,500; JD 6620 combine, 915 bean head, 444 cornhead $12,000. Both pieces of machinery in exc condition & always shedded. Owner is retiring. Call 507-276-6916 JD 7000 Corn Planter, 2Row, 3PT, $1,800; Fert. Avail. $350/Row. 715-234-1993


THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021 Farm Equipment

-JD 4255 2WD tractor, QR, 3 , hyd, 14.9x46 tires, $29,750; , CIH RMX370 36’ tandem 0 disc, 3 bar CIH harrow, $19,750; Wil-Rich 12x30 cult , w/ rolling shields, $2,450; - J&M 350 gravity box w/ ; 11Rx22.5 tires w/ tarp & Un- verferth brush auger, $2,250; 18.4x42 10 bolt duals, Goodr year tires 70%, $1,900/pr; 10 , bolt hubs off a CIH Magnum d tractor, $550/pr. 320-769-2756 &JD planter, mounted, model s 1700 MaxEmerge Plus, 8R w/ fert tanks on lift assist. Fast 6400 sprayer, 60’, tall wheels. , JD 4520. JD rotary hoe, 20’. . 8R cultivators. Grain vac. 507-227-0222 We buy Salvage Equipment Parts Available Hammell Equip., Inc. (507)867-4910

Tractors 1993 JD 8770 24 spd. 20.8 x 38 @ 65-70%, 7980 hrs., through J.D. Inspection Program, new head and injectors, $35,500. Call 320-395-2635 FOR SALE: Four Allis Chalmers tractor wheel weights. Donut shaped, came from AC8050. Will fit other AC models. Approximately 400lbs each. $400/ OBO (or best offer) (320) 226-8180 FOR SALE: ‘66 JD 4020 dsl, 3pt, JDWF, $7,200; ‘70 MF 20 industrial, gas, loader, 3pt, LPTO, pwr steering, box blade, $4,250/BO. 320-5433523 FOR SALE: 18.4x46 tires, Firestone radial all traction 23 degree, 40% tread. Good for duals. Asking $600/pair. 507-227-2602 FOR SALE: John Deere 3020; also gravity boxes; hay racks; 8x54 augers. 701-4128910 FOR SALE: Minneapolis Moline R tractor, NF. J 3pt track scratcher, $20/OBO. 320-760-5382 NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS JD 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 55, 50 Series & newer tractors, AC-all models, Large Inventory, We ship! Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage 715-673-4829

Tillage Equip 4800 Case IH Field Cultivator, 32 ft., $5,700. (320) 368-0485 FOR SALE: 45 ft. Rolling Basket, $3,500. 507-920-7458

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PAGE 25

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Ending Monday, April 12 at 5:00 p.m. Located at Kerkhoff Auction Center

FOR SALE: 30 1/2’ John Deere model 726 soil finisher, has knock on shovels, disc blades good. 218-6399304 or 320-815-1040

Your ad could be here! 507-345-4523 FOR SALE: BMI 32 1/2’ field cultivator, 3 bar mulcher with rolling baskets. Sunflower 4412 ripper, 5 shank. FarmFan CFAB 190 dryer. 507-381-0193 FOR SALE: 2009 JD 2210 field cult, 28 1/2’, permalock quick change shovels, 4 bar harrow; JD 400 20’ rotary hoe; Alloway 8R30” Danish spring tooth cult. All items low acres, very good cond, shedded. Retiring 507-8285810

www.kerkhoffauction.com


PAGE 26 Tillage Equip

www.thelandonline.com —”Where Farm and Family Meet”

Planting Equip

Wanted

THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021 T Wanted

Livestock

Cattle

GREAT PLAINS (2013) 33 7000 JD planter, 30”, 8RN, dry All kinds of New & Used farm Wanted to Buy: JD725 6, 8 & FOR SALE: Black Angus bulls POLLED HEREFORD Ft 5” #8533 Discovator/Fin- fertilizer, JD monitor, $3,900; equipment - disc chisels, field 12 row - front mount cultiva- also Hamp, York, & Hamp/ BULLS, yearlings and 2 year isher (blades 19 1/2”) (20” 300 bushel Unverferth gravi- cults, planters, soil finishers, tors; Stanhoist and Bushhog Duroc boars & gilts. Alfred olds, low birth weight, high new.) Like new, $23,500/ ty box, $400; JD 2800 4 bot- cornheads, feed mills, discs, steel barge boxes; Gehl and Kemen 320-598-3790 performance, semen tested and delivery available. OBO. Retiring. 1990 Glencoe tom plow, $900; IH 843 corn- balers, haybines, etc. 507- Lorentz grinder/mixers; plus all types of farm machinery. Jones Farms, Le Sueur, MN. 28 Ft #3500 New Style (Five head, $400. 320-587-4544 438-9782 Cattle Wanted: also JD 4430 1975 or 507-317-5996 Bar Frame) w/ 4 Bar Har- FOR SALE: Eight Stainless row (16” New Tines) $5,900. Fertilizer tubes off a 1770 Buying and selling any gold newer. 507-251-2685 Good One. Retiring. 319-347- John Deere planter for the and silver items, collector coins, diamonds, gold jewel- Wanted: International 540 & Swine 6282 Or 319-269-4226 back of the planter, 2” off ry, paying $25-$30 for silver 550 spreaders for salvage the side, asking $18 each. dollars, rare currency. No or use. Also JD 4430 and 507-227-2602 FOR SALE: Yorkshire, collection too big. Kuehl’s 4230 tractors. Call 507-251Hampshire, Duroc, cross FOR SALE: John Deere 7200 Coins, Fairmont, Minnesota, 2685 bred boars, gilts & 4-H pigs. 6RN dry fertilizer, insecti- 507-235-3886, 507-399-9982, Top quality. Excellent herd cide, 250 monitor. 320-296- open 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. WANTED: JD 336 or 327 balhealth. No PRSS. Delivery 9929 er; NH 315 baler; also NH available. 320-760-0365 479 or 488 haybine; JD 1209 Polled Hereford registered Spot, Duroc, Chester White, or 1219 haybine. All items yearling bulls for sale. Boars & Gilts available. any condition. 320-630-8131 Have had all shots. Will be Monthly PRRS and PEDV. semen tested, poured and Delivery available. Steve WANTED: JD 450 or 780 fly tags before delivery. Resler. 507-456-7746 manure spreader, good or Halter broke and broke parts; NH 718 chopper; also to lead. Several heifer JD 7000 4 row planter. 320bulls available. FantasSELL YOUR 630-8131 tic growth E.P.D.’s. DeLIVESTOCK livery available. Klages Looking for something with a line ad in Herefords, Ortonville, MN special? Get what you 320-273-2163(H) 605-880THE LAND! want quick and easy when 0521(C) you place a want ad in 507-345-4523

Thank you for reading The Land. We appreciate it!

THE LAND! 507-345-4523

JD 2032R Utility Tractor, Hydrostatic w/ H130 Loader & 62D Drive On Motor Deck, 512 hrs, 3 pt, PTO

2000 Ford F250, 4 x 4, Approx 80k on replaced engine, powder coat undercarrage, 2016 box 2016 Polaris Ranger, 730 Mi.

1995 Ford Aeromax 900 Semi Tractor, Single Axle, M11, Fuller 7 sp Transmission 6’ x 8’ Tagalong Utility/Car Hauler Trailer

2002 Polaris Sportsman 400 4 x 4 ATV

1979 Cornhusker 42’ Semi Trailer

C Allis w/ Belly Mower & New Paint 2003 Hillsboro 24’ Tandem Axel gooseneck trailer with beaver tail, 10,000 lb axels with heavy duty ramps

For more pictures and additions go to kerkhoffauction.com

JD Gator 2011, 625i with 523 hrs

Hyster Heavy Duty Imlement Trailer, 95 x 24’ Dual, 6’ Beaver Tail, HD Ramps, Tandem Axle, Air Brakes, Pintl Hitch

Many items from Redwood Co HWY Department

Honda 400 4 x 4 Ranger, 70 Original Miles


THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021

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PAGE 27

• 5/8” drum roller wall thickness • 42” drum diameter wall thickness • 4”x8” frame tubing 3/8” thick • Auto fold

~ LARGE INVENTORY IN STOCK ~ W/W Werk Weld:

Port-A-Hut Shelters: • All Steel Shelters for Livestock & Other Uses

JBM Equipment:

• Feeder Wagons - Several Models • Self-locking Head Gates • HD Feeder Panels • Self-locking Bunk Feeders • Tombstone Horse & Horned Cattle Feeders • Skid Feeders • Bunk Feeders • Bale Wagons • Bale Thrower Racks • Flat Racks for big sq. bales • Self-locking Feeder Wagons • Fenceline Feeders • Several Types of Bale Feeders

Mar-Weld Sheep & Goat Equipment:

• Lambing Pens • Crowd Tub • Grain Feeders • Scale • Round & Square Bale Feeders • Sheep Head Locks • Spin Trim Chute • Creep Feeders

For-Most Livestock Equipment:

• Squeeze Chutes - Head Gates • Large & Small Animal Tip Chute • Open Bar Corral Tub • Round & Square Calving Pens • Tub & Alley Chutes • Crowding Tubs

Notch Equipment:

• Rock Buckets • Grapple Forks • Manure Forks • Bale Spears • Hi-Volume Buckets & Pallet Forks • Bale Transports & Feeder Wagons, 16’-34’ • Adult & Young Stock Feeders & Bale Feeders • Land Levelers

S-I Feeders:

• Mid-Size and Full-Size Bunks • One-Sided Juniors and Adult Bunks • Arrow Front 4-Wheel Feeders, 12’-36‘

• Bale Feeders • Calf Shelters • Wind Breaks • Creep Feeders • Feed Bunks • Fence Line Bunks • Bottomless Bunks • Towable Handy Hoppers

3 Brands of Cattle & Calf Feeders:

• Smidley Steer Stuffers, Waterers, Hog Feeders & Huts • Bergman Tongue & Groove wood and One Piece Roof • W/W All Steel Cattle & Calf Feeders

Sioux Equipment:

• Gates • Calving Pens • Haymax Bale Feeders • Cattle & Feeder Panels • Head Gates • Loading Chute • Hog Feeders • Squeeze Chutes & Tubs • Calf Warmer

• • • •

“Farm Built” Hay Feeders w/roof Poly “Hay Huts” (Saves Hay) Ritchie Live Stock Waterers Easy Way Cattle Care Oilers & Scratchers

• DR® Power Equipment: • GT (Tox-O-Wik) Grain Dryers, 350-800 bu. • Sunfire Radiant Heaters • Bohlman Concrete Waterers • Calftel Hutches & Animal Barns • R&C Poly Bale Feeders • Ameriag Poly Mineral Feeders • Miniature Donkey & Fainting Goats • Conestoga Compact Manure Spreaders • 3pt PTO or Skid Steer Snowblowers Crowding Tubs, Steer Stuffers, Feed bunks, Squeeze Chutes, Sheep & Goat Equipment, Good Bale Thrower Rack with Good Wagon

Ask for Larry

12’-60’ LONG ROLLERS

FOR THE BEST DEAL ORDER NOW!

GREENWALD FARM CENTER Greenwald, MN • 320-987-3177

HUGE MID-AMERICAN AUCTION CO SPRING SAUK CENTRE, MN CONSIGNMENT AUCTION SATURDAY APRIL 10TH, 2021 9:00 AM

Wanted To Buy: Good Used Manure Spreader,

320-587-2162

MANDAKO

14 miles So. of Sauk Centre

Lot - Hwy. 7 E Office Location - 305 Adams Street NE Hutchinson, MN 55350

sorensenssalesandrentals.com

LAND AUCTION CEDAR MILLS TOWNSHIP, MEEKER COUNTY, MN OPENS: MONDAY, APRIL 5

CLOSES: THURSDAY, APRIL 15 | 1PM

2021

D r h . .

www.thelandonline.com — “Where Farm and Family Meet”

LAND LOCATED: From Cosmos, 4.5 miles east on MN-7 E, 2 miles south on County Rd 1, .7 miles east on 110th St. Land is on the north side of the road.

AUCTIONEER’S NOTE: This parcel of land has been in the Stucke Family for multiple generations and is now going on public auction. Do not miss the chance to own 80± acres of farmland & recreational land.

NOTE: HUGE MULTI RING AUCTION W/ SEVERAL COMPLETE & PARTIAL FARM RETIREMENTS AS WELL AS INDIVIDUAL CONSIGNMENTS. LARGEST AUCTION AT THIS SITE THUS FAR, EXPECT MANY MORE ITEMS THAN LISTED IN ANY ADVERTISING. EASY ACCESS NEAR I94 & US 71 INTERSECTION. ONLINE BIDDING THROUGH PROXIBID POWERED BY MID-AMERICAN AUCTION CO. FOR COMPLETE LISTING SEE: www.midamericanauctioninc.com OR PHONE 320-760-2979

TRACTORS & COMBINES NH TD 5050 MFWD W/ LOADER; FORD 7710 MFWD; JD 6320 CAB W/ JD 652 HI-LIFT LOADER; FORD TW-25 MFWD; FORD TW 25 2WD; CIH 7250 MFWD; CIH 5140 MFWD W/ IH LOADER; JD 4400 P SHIFT; MF 2745 W/ CAB; JD 4020 P. SHIFT; IH 1066; CASE 1270; JD 3010 DSL; IH 460 DSL.; JD 50; JD 8430 4WD; PLUS MANY MORE; JD 7720 TURBO HYDRO COMBINE; JD 6620 TURBO HYDRO COMBINE; SEVERAL CORN, BEAN & GRAIN HEADS.

PLANTING AND TILLAGE OVER 200 PIECES INCLUDES: BRILLION 30.5' FIELD CULT.; DMI 30.5' CRUMBLER; CIH 496 25' HYD. CU. DISC; JD 3710 6 BOTTOM PLOW; SCHOULE 20' HD ROCK RAKE; JD 8300 13' DRILL; KENT 24' FIELD CULT.; JD 1010 28' FIELD CULT.; NICE WHITE 6100 12X30 PLANTER; JD 1000 34' FIELD CULT.; JD 680 15 SHANK CHISEL; BRILLION 10' SEEDER, KINZE 16R22 RIGID CORN PLANTER; JD 215 15' DURA CUSHION DISC; JD 7000 8R30 PLANTER; SUNFLOWER JD 30' CU. GANG DISC; SEVERAL GOOD CROP SPRAYERS FROM 300 TO 1000 GAL. 45' TO 90' BOOMS; (2) WILRICH 42' FIELD CULTIVATORS; JD 7000 6RN PLANTER; IH 720 5 BOTTOM VAR. WIDTH PLOW; SUNFLOWER 30' CRUMBLER; JD 2800 4 BOTTOM PLOW; PLUS DOZENS OF HARROWS; DISCS; RIPPERS; FIELD CULTIVATORS; PLANTERS AND DRILLS.

HAY AND FORAGE NH 1499 12' SP. WINDROWER; FORAGE HARVESTERS & HEADS, INCLUDE: JD 3955 ONE OWNER; JD 3970 ONE OWNER EXC.; JD 3950; GEHL 1275; GEHL 1065; JD 2R30; JD 3R30; JD 7' HH; FORAGE BOXES INCLUDE: (2) H&S 7+4 18' ON 14T TANDEM WAGONS-ONE OWNER LIKE NEW; (2) JD 716-A 16' ON JD 1275 TANDEM GEARS-ONE OWNER EXC. COND.; ( 2 ) BADGER 950 16' ON TANDEMS WAGONS; ( 2) VERY CLEAN H&S STEEL 16' ON TANDEM WAGONS; (2) GEHL 970 ON TANDEM WAGONS; BALERS INCLUDE: VERMEER 550 REBEL ROUND; NH 650 ROUND; JD 457 MEGA WIDE PU; JD 327 W/ #40 EJECT.; H&S 420 ROTARY RAKE LIKE NEW; PLUS ROTARY & CONVENTIONAL RAKES, DISC STYLE & CONVENTIONAL; HAYBINES & MOWER CONDITIONERS; THROW RACKS; BALE HAULERS AND MUCH MORE.

TRUCKS, TRAILERS '13 FREIGHTLINER COLUMBIA DAY CAB, 500,000 MILES; '11 FREIGHTLINER COLUMBIA W/ 48” BUNK, 385,000 MILES; OUTSTANDING 2020 MID-SOTA 40' FULL TILT 5TH WHEEL TRAILER W/ SLIDE RAILS, LIKE NEW; 2019 8X22 H&H PT TRAILER, FULL TILT, SLIDE RAILS; '05 CARDINAL LE 31' 5TH WHEEL TRAVEL TRAILER; UNUSED GR. 2020 6.6' X 24' 5TH WHEEL STOCK TRAILER; '88 CORNHUSKER 40' GRAIN TRAILER, AIR RIDE; SEVERAL NICE TANDEM AXLE TILTING SKID LOADER TRAILERS.

80 Selling in 1 Tract

SteffesGroup.com

DOZER, SKID LOADERS, ATTACHMENTS & GENERAL EQUIPMENT MASSEY 2244 DSL DOZER, 6 WAY BLADE, 15” TRACKS; '16 GEHL R-220 SKID LOADER, 2600 HRS.; MELROE 773 W/ BUCKET; UNUSED 72” BRUSH MOWER; SEVERAL UNUSED AND USED SKID LOADER ATTACHMENTS OF ALL TYPES; 30 GRAVITY BOXES FROM 175 TO 600 BU ON HD GEARS; 7500 PACIFIC DSL GENERATOR; MANURE SPREADERS, WAGONS, UNUSED BUILDINGS & GREEN HOUSES, LOTS OF LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT INCLUDING FEEDERS, BUNKS, OVER 50 24' FREE STANDING CORRAL PANELS, LAWN & GARDEN EQUIPMENT, 3 POINT MOWERS, MISC. PARTS AND MUCH MORE.

MID-AMERICAN AUCTION CO. ANNUAL SAUK CENTRE, MN SPRING CONSIGNMENT AUCTION 40274 408TH ST. SAUK CENTRE, MN

24400 MN Hwy 22 South, Litchfield, MN 55355 | 320.693.9371 For a detailed Buyer’s Prospectus with complete terms and conditions, contact Eric Gabrielson at Steffes Group, 701.238.2570 or 320.693.9371

TERMS: Ten percent down upon signing purchase agreement, payable by cash or check. Balance due at closing within 30 days. This is a 5% buyer’s premium auction. Eric Gabrielson MN47-006, Scott Steffes MN14-51

ALLEN HENSLIN 320-979-1808


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www.thelandonline.com —”Where Farm and Family Meet”

THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021 T

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ LATE MODEL CASE IH, JOHN DEERE 4WD & MFWD TRACTORS, JD SELF 2014 CASE WHEEL LOADER & ATTACHMENT, MACK FEED TRUCKS ★ ★ PROPELLED CHOPPER & HEADS, CASE WHEEL LOADER, FEED TRUCKS, 2014 Case 621F wheel loader, 5,800 hrs. ★ PLANTING & TILLAGE, HAYING & CHOPPING & LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT cab, AC, heat, aux hyd, JRB coupler; 4 ★ Yd Hyd tipping bucket; Easy Rake face ★ shaver JRB coupler; 2003 Mack LE613 ★ tandem truck w/2017Kuhn Knight RC GRAND MEADOW ★ $600,000 Beautiful turn-key acreage with 4 BR 3BA 295 Helix Reel commercial TMR, scale in Houghton’s Auction Service Red Wing, MN rambler, 5 sheds, ★ abundant fencing and pasture on approx. 18.7 ac. cab feed supervisor, holds 10 ton of feed, MLS#5718863 248,000 miles, Cummins engine, Allison auto; 2000 Mack LE613 ★NEW LISTING! tandem truck w/Kuhn Knight 3070 SDL commercial TMR, scale , ★ $575,000. HOUGHTON'S AUCTION SERVICE RED WING, MINNESOTA STEWARTVILLE: Great location$600,000 4 BR 2 BABeautiful picturesque rambler GRAND MEADOW turn-key acreage with 4 BR 3BA cab controls. new liner in 2018, Cummins engine, Allisononauto; Skid ★ Oversized approx. 24 acres. garage with 2fencing storageand sheds just on approx. 18.7 ac. rambler, 25 stall sheds, abundant pasture Location: 57264 270TH AVE, PINE ISLAND, MN loader attachments; pallet fork, bale spears, buckets; Skid Loader ★ minutes to Rochester! MLS# 5716953 NEW LISTING! LISTING! MLS#5718863 From Pine Island south end of Main St. take Olmsted Co #3 3/4 mile, take mnt. poly unroller, for covering bunk ★ 3BR, STEWARTVILLE: $575,000. location 4 BR 2 BA picturesque rambler RACINE: $299,000. 1BA, on 10-acres. MLS#Great 5701169 PENDING Olmsted Co #5 SW 5 1/2 miles, turn right (west) on 575th St. go 1 mile, ★ on approx. 24 acres. Oversized garage with 2 storage sheds just PLANTING & TILLAGE EQUIPMENT MOWER COUNTY: 193-acres. MLS# 56953972 stall PENDING turn right (north) on 270th Ave 1/4 mile. Equipment located behind dairy. ★ Approx. minutes to Rochester! MLS# 5716953 NEW LISTING! John Deere 455, 30 ft. tri fold drill, 7” spacings, grass MOWER seed boxes, COUNTY: ★ Approx. 120-acres. MLS# 5705409 SOLD 7” drill, 3 ★ RACINE: $299,000. 3BR, 1BA, onSOLD 10-acres. MLS# 5701169 PENDING 10:00 a.m. rubber press wheels; Hay Buster 107, No Till 10 ft.MOWER 108-acres. MLS# 5705429 compartment boxes, grass, fert., seed, nice; DMI NH ST250, 48COUNTY: ft. ★ Approx. MOWER COUNTY: Approx. 193-acres. MLS# 5695397 PENDING Live auction w/live online bidding www.proxibid.com/houghton field cult. walking tandems, gauge wheels, rolling basket, RACINE: 10,000 sq. ft. building on 2.12-acres. Multiple uses! MLS# 5247299 harrow, ★ MOWER COUNTY: Approx. 120-acres. MLS# 5705409 SOLD LATE MODEL CASE IH & JOHN DEERE TRACTORS & SILAGE BLADES nice; John Deere 637, 37 ft. disc, rock cushion, hyd wings; 2007 ★ MOWER COUNTY: Approx. Services 108-acres. MLS# 5705429 SOLD Full★Farm Management 2019 Case IH 280 Magnum, MFWD, Suflower 4411, 9 shank ripper, new frt. disc gangs; DMI 527, 5 shank JohnRental Rates, RACINE: 10,000Programs sq. ft. building on 2.12-acres. Multiple uses! MLS# 5247299 CVT, 710 hrs. one owners hrs. front & ripper, frt. & rear disc; John Deere 1710, 9 shank disc chisel; including Government & Environmental Issues ★ rear 3pt. & PTO, 4 Hyd, 710/70R 42, Deere 1610, 12 shank chisel plow; ★ Randy Queensland • 507-273-3890 • randy@lrmrealestate.com 600/70R 30, Factory warrany till 4/22 Full Farm Management Services ★ LINCOLN COLLECTOR CAR Very nice tractor; 2012 Case IH 500HD, Ryan Queensland •including 507-273-3000 • ryan@lrmrealestate.com ★ Rental Rates, Government Programs & Environmental Issues 1962 Lincoln Continental 35,685 ACT. second owner miles, 428 eng. 4WD, 4,353 hrs. GPS, PTO, 4 Hyd. LSW ★ Grand Meadow, MN • 800-658-2340 1100/45R 46 tires (nice); Weights for suicide doors, Very very nice Randy Queensland • 507-273-3890 • randy@lrmrealestate.com ★ 500HD; Int 5288, 2,195 Act Hrs. 3pt. 3 LIKE NEW ARTEX MANURE SPREADER & Ryan Queensland • 507-273-3000 • ryan@lrmrealestate.com ★ hyd, PTO, 20.8-38 duals, diff lock Very LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT & DRIVE OVER SCALE Grand Meadow, MN • 800-658-2340 nice; John Deere 4850 MFWD, PS, 10,000 2017 Artex SB600 manure spreader, Vert beaters, tandem, 600 ★ plus hrs. weights, 3pt. 3 hyd, PTO, 18.4 bushel, nice; NI 3639 manure spreader, tandem hyd end gate; 2014 ★ -42; John Deere 4320 Dsl. side console, Roto Grind 760 bale chopper; Big John Eq. LJ20 fogger, Kohler ★ 3pt. dual hyd, PTO; John Deere 4020 Dsl. engine; Reel Tuff cattle sqeeze chute on transport; Drive over scale ★ If you’re having a Farm Auction, PS, cab, 3pt. dual hyd, PTO; Int M WF; 2018 Pit Bull 3060 Ag Series w/monitor, has transport wheels; Henke roller mill, hyd auger, 1000 ★ ★ 14 ft. 8 way hyd silage blade; Degelman 46/57 3pt. Hyd silage blade PTO; Notch 20’ feeder wagon let other Farmers know it! ★ JOHN DEERE SELF PROPELLED CHOPPER, Upcoming Issues of THE LAND MAHINDRO UTV, FARM EQUIPMENT, CALF HUTCHS & PEN SYSTEM ★ CHOPPING & HAYING EQUIPMENT 2014 Mahindra XTV 750S, UTV, 4x4, Hyd dump box, windsheild, ★ 2012 John Deere 7750 Pro Drive chopper, ★ Northern MN Southern MN/ 4WD, Cab, AC, heat, Harvest lab, roof; Loyal 18’ conveyer w/elect motor on trans.; 500 gal nurse tank, ★ 5 hp transfer pump; Snapledge adaptor for NH chopper; Kory gravity Greenstar, GPS, moister monitor ready, April 9, 2021 Northern IA ★ auto steer ready, 1,637 cutter head hrs. wagon w/Sudenga hyd fert. auger; (2) 200 Bushel gravity wagons; ★ Badger tandem running gear; 4 Sect drag w/cart; 65 Calf Tel calf April 23, 2021 April 16, 2021 2,515 engine hrs. auto header height, ★ Hyd spout, auto greaser, backup camera, hutches; Calf Tel pen system (approx 30 pens); 500 gal. fuel barrel w/ ★ May 7, 2021 April 30, 2021 weights, shear roll processor (2 yrs. old) elect pump; 110 gal pickup fuel tank, 12 volt pump; Rd bale feeders; ★ 12.5-16 skid loader tires & rims; Cut tires for bunker cover; Seed; May 21, 2021 May 14, 2021 KP is 32% speed diffrential, Has all 80 series updates, Through SEMA shop 500 point inspection every year; John Deere 678G 8R 2000 LB of Ryman Rye; 2 totes of Spring Trit; 2 Totes of Spring Trit ★ *June 4, 2021 May 28, 2021 ★ Kemper rotary corn head; John Deere 640C, 13 ft. hay head (both & Meadow fistque heads through SEMA shop every year); 2007 Auto Car tandem truck Auctioneer Note: Make your plans to attend this very nice no reserve ★ Deadline is 8 days prior to publication. ★ w/Aulick 2157, 21 ft. silage box, hyd power gate, Cummins engine, retirement auction. Indicates early deadline, 9 days prior to publication. ★ Allison auto; Krone Tri cutter Easy cut B1000CV frt. F360CVrear, 32 ft. total cutting width, Krone monitor (4 yrs. old) nice cutter; H&S OF PINE ★ ★ HSM12, 12 ft merger; John Deere 3970 chopper, 3R corn head, 7’ ISLAND ★ hay head; (3) Badger BN1050, 16 ft. chopper boxes, Badger tandem ★ gears; Case IH 8530 in line baler; Bale King 8 Rd bale heavy duty www.houghtonauctions.com ★ bale wagon, MN 13 ton tandem gear; (4) Pro Quality bale baskets; (2) NH 40 blowers; NH 27 blower ★ 418 South Second Street • Mankato, MN 56001 ★ Phone: 507-345-4523 or 800-657-4665 2016 DODGE RAM & FEATHERLITE STOCK TRAILER & PJ TRAILER ★ Fax: 507-345-1027 2016 Dodge ram 5500 Heavy Duty, 4x4, 31,414 One owner miles, RED WING, MN 651-764-4285 ★ Cummin Dsl. dually, auto, 9 ft. steel flat bed, gooseneck hitch (nice); Todd Houghton, MN Lic. #25-47, WI Lic. #181 Website: www.TheLandOnline.com ★ 2006 Featherlite 24 Ft. gooseneck livestock trailer, tandem axle, 2 Red Wing, MN - 651-764-4285 ★ e-mail: theland@TheLandOnline.com dividers, 14,000 GVW; 2015 PJ 20 ft. tandem flat bed trailer, ramps Brian Sander, MN Lic. #25-89, Red Wing, MN - 651-301-2344 ★ Ask Your Auctioneer to Place Your Auction in The Land! ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

Thursday, April 8, 2021

Daley Farms

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HAVE AN UPCOMING AUCTION? For the best results place your auction ad in The Land! Talk to your auctioneer or our friendly staff. 507-345-4523 or email: theland@thelandonline.com


THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021

www.thelandonline.com — “Where Farm and Family Meet”

TIMED ONLINE FARM RETIREMENT

OPENS: FRIDAY, APRIL 2

CLOSES: MONDAY, APRIL 12 | 10AM

2021

AUCTION LOCATION: 35603 170th Street Hamburg, MN 55339 / PREVIEW: Fri., April 9 from 10AM-3PM / LOADOUT: Wed., April 14 from 9AM - 4PM GPS & NAVIGATION EQUIPMENT 4WD TRACTORS 464,252 miles FLEX HEADER 2009 John Deere 9530 2000 John Deere 930F GRAIN CARTS & GRAVITY BOXES SHREDDERS, FLAIL CHOPPERS ATVS, SNOWMOBILES, BOATS, 4WD, 3,581 hrs. CORN HEADER - STANDARD FLAT TRAILERS / HOPPER RECREATION / ROUGH TERRAIN MFWD TRACTORS 2003 John Deere 893 BOTTOM TRAILER / LIVESTOCK FORKLIFT / SKID STEER LOADER 1997 John Deere 8400 DRILLS TRAILER / HEADER TRAILERS ATTACHMENTS / TRACTOR MFWD, 7,974hrs. John Deere 8300 - grain drill SPRAY TRAILERS / PULL-TYPE IMPLEMENT TIRES / BINS & 2WD TRACTORS PLANTER SPRAYER CHEMICAL HOPPER BIN / AERATION 1970 John Deere 3020 John Deere 1770NT FERTILIZER ACCESSORIES EQUIPMENT / MISCELLANEOUS 1969 John Deere 4020, 7,200 hrs. TILLAGE HAY RAKE / ROUND BALER PARTS / MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS 1990 John Deere 4055 John Deere 2700 - disc ripper LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT FARM SUPPORT ITEMS 2014 John Deere 6615 - open Wil-Rich QX2 - field cultivator PNEUMATIC GRAIN EQUIPMENT station, 4,000 hrs. John Deere 400 - rotary hoe AUGERS & DRILL FILLS COMBINE ROLLING PACKERS BLADE / SNOWBLOWER OTHER 2000 John Deere 9550, 3,192 eng. Brillion XL144 - packer EQUIPMENT / MISCELLANEOUS CONVENTIONAL TRUCK W/ SLEEPER hrs., 2,376 sep. hrs. SHOP EQUIPMENT / MANURE 2000 IH 9200i - semi, pro-sleeper, HANDLING EQUIPMENT

SteffesGroup.com

Steffes Group, Inc., 24400 MN Hwy 22 South, Litchfield, MN 55355 | 320.693.9371

JIM OELKE FARM RETIREMENT AUCTION | JACOB 952.913.1433 OR BEN 612.387.0611 or Randy Kath at Steffes Group, 320.693.9371 or 701.429.8894

COMPLETE TERMS, LOT LISTINGS AND PHOTOS AT STEFFESGROUP.COM / RANDY KATH MN47-007

AUCTION OPENS: FRIDAY, MARCH 26

CLOSES: TUESDAY, APRIL 6 | 7PM

2021

TIMED ONLINE TRIM BEL DAIRY INVENTORY REDUCTION

LOCATION: N6669 State Road 65 Beldenville, WI 54003 / PREVIEW: By Appointment / LOADOUT: Friday, April 9AM - 4PM MFWD TRACTOR Case-IH 140 Magnum Pro - CAH, 8,990 hrs. PICKUP HEADER Krone Easy-Flow 3801 - pickup head, 123’ DRAPER HEADER Stainless steel receiver jar CORN HEADER - STANDARD Krone - corn head, 8 row TILLAGE Case-IH 530 C - Ecolo-Tiger disc ripper Glencoe Soil Saver 7400 - disc chisel

Case-IH 4300 - field cultivator Case-IH 183 - row crop cultivator CONVENTIONAL TRUCK W/O SLEEPER Kenworth T-800 - silage truck, shows 20,654 miles PICKUP 2004 Ford F350 XLT Super Duty - pickup, 218,617 miles GRAIN CARTS & GRAVITY BOXES (2) Demco 365 - gravity box PULL-TYPE SPRAYERS & SPREADERS Calhoun - dry fertilzer spreader

Krone Big X 650 - self-propelled BALERS forage harvester, 4,026 eng. Vermeer 604M - silage round hrs., 2,813 cutter hrs. baler Miller Pro 5100 - forage box, 18’ John Deere 327 - small square LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT baler GRAIN SCREENER BALE HANDLING ACCESSORIES AUGERS & DRILL FILLS Columbus - small square MOWERS thrower rack MANURE HANDLING Hay Buster 2655 - shortcut bale EQUIPMENT / AUTOMOBILES processor FUEL TANKS Meyers - 18’x9’ TRACTOR/IMPLEMENT TIRES Meyers - small square thrower AND MUCH MORE! rack FORAGE PROCESSING Case-IH 600 - forage blower

SteffesGroup.com

Steffes Group, Inc., 24400 MN Hwy 22 South, Litchfield, MN 55355 | 320.693.9371 TRIM BEL DAIRY INVENTORY REDUCTION AUCTION | JIM 715.222.7200 or Randy Kath at Steffes Group, 320.693.9371 or 701.429.8894 Complete terms, lot listings and photos at SteffesGroup.com / Randy Kath MN47-007

PAGE 29

ADVERTISING NOTICE: Please check your ad the first week it runs. We make every effort to avoid errors by checking all copy, but sometimes errors are missed. Therefore, we ask that you review your ad for correctness. If you find a mistake, please call (507) 345-4523 immediately so that the error can be corrected. We regret that we cannot be responsible for more than one week’s insertion if the error is not called to our attention. We cannot be liable for an amount greater than the cost of the ad. THE LAND has the right to edit, reject or properly classify any ad. Each classified line ad is separately copyrighted to THE LAND. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited.

INVESTIGATE BEFORE YOU INVEST! Midwest Free Community Paper Association does not knowingly accept fraudulent or deceptive advertising. Readers are cautioned to thoroughly investigate all classifieds and other ads which require an investment. (MCN) DONATE YOUR CAR TO CHARITY. Receive maximum value of write off for your taxes. Running or not! All conditions accepted. Free pickup. Call for details. 855-752-6680 (MCN) DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. Free 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care Of. CALL 1-855-977-7030 (MCN) BEST SATELLITE TV with 2 Year Price Guarantee! $59.99/mo with 190 channels and 3 months free premium movie channels! Free next day installation! Call 855-824-1258. (MCN) High-Speed Internet. We instantly compare speed, pricing, availability to find the best service for your needs. Starting at $39.99/ month! Quickly compare offers from top providers. Call 1-855399-9295 (MCN) AT&T TV - The Best of Live & On-Demand On All Your Favorite Screens. CHOICE Package, $64.99/mo plus taxes for 12months. Premium Channels at No Charge for One Year! Anytime, anywhere. Some restrictions apply. W/ 24-mo. agmt (TV price higher in 2nd year.) Regional Sports Fee up to $8.49/mo. is extra & applies. Call IVS 1-866-387-0621. (MCN) 4G LTE Home Internet Now Available! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 844-8978159. (MCN)

DISH TV $64.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 7/21/21. 1-844-316-8876. (MCN) Earthlink High Speed Internet. As Low As $49.95/month (for the first 3 months.) Reliable High Speed Fiber Optic Technology. Stream Videos, Music and More! Call Earthlink Today 1-855-679-7096. (MCN) TRUCK DRIVERS – REGIONAL Average over .62 CPM. All miles paid. Home when needed. Nice equipment. Paid weekly. Benefits. Driver friendly, won’t get jacked around. Class-A license required. WWW.MCFGTL.COM, Call 507437-9905 . (MCN) Portable Oxygen Concentrator May Be Covered by Medicare! Reclaim independence and mobility with the compact design and longlasting battery of Inogen One. Free information kit! Call 844-716-2411. (MCN) Life Alert. One press of a button sends help FAST, 24/7! At home and on the go. Mobile Pendant with GPS. FREE First Aid Kit (with subscription.) CALL 844-646-2333 FREE Brochure. (MCN) NEW AUTHORS WANTED! Page Publishing will help you selfpublish your own book. FREE author submission kit! Limited offer! Why wait? Call now: 855-623-8796 (MCN) Become a published author! Publications sold at all major secular & specialty Christian bookstores. CALL Christian Faith Publishing for your FREE author submission kit. 1-888-981-5761. (MCN) BATHROOM RENOVATIONS. EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Grab bars, no slip flooring & seated showers. Call for a free in-home consultation: 855-836-2250. (MCN)

Eliminate gutter cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris-blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off Entire Purchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1-855577-1268. Promo Code 285. (MCN) Wesley Financial Group, LLC Timeshare Cancellation Experts. Over $50,000,000 in timeshare debt and fees cancelled in 2019. Get free informational package and learn how to get rid of your timeshare! Free consultations. Over 450 positive reviews. Call 877-3261608. (MCN) Put on your TV Ears and hear TV with unmatched clarity. TV Ears Original were originally $129.95 - NOW WITH THIS SPECIAL OFFER are only $59.95 with code MCB59! Call 1-855-958-5196. (MCN) The Generac PWRcell, a solar plus battery storage system. SAVE money, reduce your reliance on the grid, prepare for power outages and power your home. Full installation services available. $0 Down Financing Option. Request a FREE, no obligation, quote today. Call 1-877-381-3059. (MCN) Never Pay For Covered Home Repairs Again! Complete Care Home Warranty COVERS ALL MAJOR SYSTEMS AND APPLIANCES. 30 DAY RISK FREE. $200.00 OFF + 2 FREE Months! 1-844-596-1237. Hours Mon-Thu, Sun : 9:30 am to 8:00 pm Fri : 9:30 am to 2:00 pm (all times Eastern). (MCN) Buying and selling any gold and silver items, collector coins, diamonds, gold jewelry, paying $25-$30 for silver dollars, rare currency. No collection too big. Kuehl’s Coins, Fairmont, Minnesota, 507-235-3886, 507399-9982, open 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. (MCN)


PAGE 30

www.thelandonline.com —”Where Farm and Family Meet”

LARGE LONG PRAIRIE, MN FARM RETIREMENT AUCTION LARGE LONG PRAIRIE, MN FARM RETIREMENT AUCTION SAT. APRIL 17TH, 2021 – 11:00 AM SAT. APRIL 17TH, 2021 – 11:00 AM

LOCATED: 6.5 MILES SE OF LONG PRAIRIE, MN ON MN. 287, 3 EAST LOCATED: 6.5 MILES SE OF LONG PRAIRIE, MN ON MN. 287, 3 EAST ON COUNTY 13, ½ WEST ON 184TH ST. ON COUNTY 13, ½ WEST ON 184TH ST. NOTE: CLEAN LINE OF EQUIPMENT WITH MANY ONE OWNER NOTE: CLEAN LINE OF EQUIPMENT WITH MANY ONE OWNER PIECES. FOR COMPLETE LIST SEE www.midamericanauctioninc.com PIECES. FOR COMPLETE LIST SEE www.midamericanauctioninc.com o r PH. 320-760-2979. ONLINE BIDDING PROVIDED THROUGH o r PH. 320-760-2979. ONLINE BIDDING PROVIDED THROUGH PROXIBID. PROXIBID.

TRACTORS, HAY, PLANTING & TILLAGE EQUIPMENT TRACTORS, HAY, PLANTING & TILLAGE EQUIPMENT

2010 NEW HOLLAND TD 5050 MFWD, SYNC. SHUTTLE, CAB, 2010 NEW HOLLAND TD 5050 MFWD, SYNC. SHUTTLE, CAB, LOADED, JUST 646 ONE HOUR HOURS; 1997 CIH 4210 2 WHEEL LOADED, JUST 646 ONE HOUR HOURS; 1997 CIH 4210 2 WHEEL DRIVE, OPEN STATION, 3888 ONE OWNER HOURS; '74 IH 100 HYDRO DRIVE, OPEN STATION, 3888 ONE OWNER HOURS; '74 IH 100 HYDRO DIESEL, OPEN STATION, 6441 ONE OWNER HOURS; IH 2350 ALL DIESEL, OPEN STATION, 6441 ONE OWNER HOURS; IH 2350 ALL HYD. LOADER WITH BUCKET AND SPEAR; 2014 NEW HOLLAND HYD. LOADER WITH BUCKET AND SPEAR; 2014 NEW HOLLAND MOW MAX 313 DISCBINE, ONE OWNER; NH 166 INVERTER; JD 450 13 MOW MAX 313 DISCBINE, ONE OWNER; NH 166 INVERTER; JD 450 13 FT. END WHEEL DRILL , GRASS, ONE OWNER; NICE TONUTTI 10 FT. END WHEEL DRILL , GRASS, ONE OWNER; NICE TONUTTI 10 WHEEL V RAKE; CIH 770 HD 18 FT. OFF-SET DISC, 10 INCH SPACING, WHEEL V RAKE; CIH 770 HD 18 FT. OFF-SET DISC, 10 INCH SPACING, ONE OWNER; BRILLION 14 FT. HYD LIFT PACKER; JD 235 HYD. FOLD ONE OWNER; BRILLION 14 FT. HYD LIFT PACKER; JD 235 HYD. FOLD CUSHION GANG DISC; IH 45 24 FT. VIBRA SHANK DIGGER; (2) GOOD CUSHION GANG DISC; IH 45 24 FT. VIBRA SHANK DIGGER; (2) GOOD BALE RACKS AND WAGONS; 6 X 12 FLAT RACK ROCK TRAILER ON BALE RACKS AND WAGONS; 6 X 12 FLAT RACK ROCK TRAILER ON JD 1075 WAGON; IH 55 15 SHANK CHISEL PLOW; NICE ALLOWAY 16 JD 1075 WAGON; IH 55 15 SHANK CHISEL PLOW; NICE ALLOWAY 16 FT STALK CHOPPER, ONE OWNER; (5) GRAVITY BOXES ON GOOD FT STALK CHOPPER, ONE OWNER; (5) GRAVITY BOXES ON GOOD FACTORY WAGONS; JD MX7 3 POINT ROTARY BRUSH MOWER; PLUS FACTORY WAGONS; JD MX7 3 POINT ROTARY BRUSH MOWER; PLUS MORE FARM MACHINERY, SKID LOADER ATTACHMENTS, TOOLS, MORE FARM MACHINERY, SKID LOADER ATTACHMENTS, TOOLS, MISC AND GENERAL FARM EQUIPMENT . MISC AND GENERAL FARM EQUIPMENT .

HUGE SAUK CENTRE, MN AREA FARM ESTATE AUCTION TUESDAY APRIL 13TH, 2021 – 10:30 AM LOCATED: 4 MILES EAST OF SAUK CENTRE, MN ON I-94, 5.2 MILES SOUTH ON MN STATE 4, TO MEIRE GROVE, THEN 2 MILES WEST ON 345TH ST. AND PORTAGE RD. NOTE: FAMILY FARM FOR 72 YEARS. FOR COMPLETE LISTING SEE: www.midamericanauctioninc.com OR PHONE 320-760-2979. LIVE AUCTION WITH ONLINE BIDDING PROVIDED BY PROXIBID.

TRACTORS, COMBINE, HEADS, SKID LOADER '86 CIH 3594 MFWD, 4838 HRS.; '87 CIH 3394 MFWD, 8044 HRS.; '81 IH 1086, REMAN ENGINE AND OTHER UPDATES, SHOWS 9620 HRS. ONE OWNER; 1970 IH 826 DSL. CAB, 9835 HRS.; '69 IH 656 HYDRO GAS, NF, 3 PT. 6115 HRS.; '70 IH 656 HYDRO DIESEL, 7271 HRS.; FARMALL 460 GAS, NF; '48 FARMALL H; CIH 1660 AXIAL FLOW COMBINE, 5451 HRS.; CIH 1660 AXIAL FLOW FOR PARTS OR REPAIR; CIH 815 CORN/MAIZE DSL. COMBINE, 4265 HRS. NOT RUNNING; CIH 820 FLEX HEAD; IH 1064 CH, IH 810 5 BELT PU HEAD; IH 4000 14 FT. DRAPER HEAD WINDROWER, CONDITIONER; MELROE 843 DSL. BOBCAT, MELROE 610 BOBCAT FOR PARTS, MRF 6 FT. ROCK GRAPPLE, 66 IN. BUCKET.

PLANTING, TILLAGE GENERAL FARM EQUIPMENT IH 510 12FT. END WHEEL DRILL, GRASS; CIH 900 6RX30 PLANTER, DF, BEAN AND CORN DRUMS; CIH 900 4RW PLANTER, DF; JD 714 9 SHANK DISC CHISEL; JD 724 19 FT. SOIL FINISHER; WILRICH 16 FT. & 13 FT. CHISEL PLOWS; IH 720 5 X 18 AND 5 X 16 PLOWS; 6 GRAVITY BOXES UP TO 550 BUSHEL AND HD WAGONS; NEW IDEA 363 TANDEM AXLE MAUNRE SPREADER; PLUS FULL LINE OF FARM MACHINERY, SUPER B GRAIN DRYER, 3000 BUSHEL CONE BOTTOM BIN, 100 # ANVIL, IH 1320 LAWN TRACTOR, LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT, 50 ROUND BALES OF GRASS HAY AND FARM RELATED MISC.

ANN MARIE NIETFELD ESTATE OWNERS 38276 350TH ST. SAUK CENTRE, MN FOR MORE INFO PH. BOB NIETFELD 320-292-4284

LLOYD AND DIANNE SCHWANKE OWNERS LLOYD AND DIANNE SCHWANKE OWNERS PH. 320-808-9411 PH. 320-808-9411 30386 194TH ST. BURTRUM, MN 30386 194TH ST. BURTRUM, MN

Place Your Line Ad Today!

THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021 T

DEADLINE: Friday at 5:00 p.m. for the following Friday edition.

To submit your classified ad use one of the following options: Phone: 507-345-4523 or 1-800-657-4665 Mail to: The Land Classifieds 418 South Second St., Mankato, MN 56001 Fax to: 507-345-1027 Email: theland@TheLandOnline.com Online at: www.thelandonline.com

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Plus! Look for your classified ad in the e-edition. THE LAND

1 run @ $19.99 2 runs @ $34.99 3 runs @ $44.99 Each additional line (over 7) + $1.40 per issue EXTENDED COVERAGE - must run the same number of times as The Land FARM NEWS (FN) - Serving farmers in Northwest Iowa, 14,219 circ. THE COUNTRY TODAY (CT) - Serving farmers in Wisconsin, 25,000 circ. THE FREE PRESS (FP) - Serving south central Minnesota, 22,500 circ. PAPER(S) ADDED (circle all options you want): FN CT FP ($7.70 for each paper, and each time) issues x $7.70 STANDOUT OPTIONS (THE LAND only) $2.00 per run:  Bold  Italic  Underline  Web/E-mail links

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Name ____________________________________________________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________________________________________________ City _________________________________________________State_________ Zip ___________________________

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Phone ___________________________________________# of times _______

The ad prices listed are based on a basic classified line ad of 25 words or less. Ads running longer than 25 words will incur an added charge.

Write in catagory that you would like the line ad placed in ________________________________________________________ NOTE: Ad will be placed in the appropriate category if none is indicated.

Card # ___________________________________________Exp. Date________ Signature ____________________________________________________________

SORRY!

CHECK We do not issue refunds.

ADVERTISING NOTICE: Please check your ad the first week it runs. We make every effort to avoid errors by checking all copy, but sometimes errors are missed. Therefore, we ask that you review your ad for correctness. If you find a mistake, please call (507) 345-4523 immediately so that the error can be corrected. We regret that we cannot be responsible for more than one week’s insertion if the error is not called to our attention. We cannot be liable for an amount greater than the cost of the ad. THE LAND has the right to edit, reject or properly classify any ad. Each classified line ad is separately copyrighted to THE LAND. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited.


THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021 Sheep

Miscellaneous

www.thelandonline.com — “Where Farm and Family Meet”

Every moment has the potential to be amazing.

FOR SALE: 2 Reg. yearling PARMA DRAINAGE PUMPS Suffolk Rams. Elite genetics. New pumps & parts on hand. Morning Meadows Farm Call Minnesota’s largest dis507-789-6564 tributor HJ Olson & Company 320-974-8990 Cell - 320-212-5336

WANTED

DAMAGED GRAIN STATEWIDE

Pets & Supplies

FOR SALE: 9 week old purebred collie pups, $600/each. 507-521-2560

Trucks & Trailers FOR SALE: 1984 GMC 7000 single axle semi tractor, 3208 CAT diesel, 5x2 transmission, very good rubber, excellent shape, always shedded, very clean, $2,400/OBO. 507-213-0600

Please recycle this magazine.

REINKE IRRIGATION Sales & Service New & Used For your irrigation needs 888-830-7757 or 507-276-2073 Winpower Sales & Service Reliable Power Solutions Since 1925 PTO & automatic Emergency Electric Generators. New & Used Rich Opsata-Distributor 800-343-9376

PAGE 31

We pay top dollar for your damaged grain. We are experienced handlers of your wet, dry, burnt and mixed grains. Trucks and vacs available. Immediate response anywhere.

Looking for something special? Put a line ad in The Land and find it! Call 507-345-4523

CALL FOR A QUOTE TODAY

PRUESS ELEV., INC. 1-800-828-6642

Spring Consignment Sale!!!

INCLUDING: SEMA EQUIPMENT EXCESS VEHICLE LIQUIDATION Please visit our website for complete listing and details www.hamiltonauctioncompany.com

ONLINE ONLY

Date: Tuesday, April 6th, 2021 Bidding will open on 3/23/21 @ 9:00 a.m. and begin closing at 6:00 p.m. on 04/06/21.

SEMA VEH’S: PICKUPS - (10) Ford’s 2003-2018, (23) Chevy’s 19972018, (1) 2011 GMC Sierra, SUV’s - (1) 2012 GMC Yukon, (1) Chevy Equinox, SEMI’s- (1) 2006 Freightliner Tractors: 2010 John Deere 6330 Premium, 2009 John Deere 9230, John Deere 8640, John Deere 8630, Planters: Kinze PT6 6 row 30”, Kinze 3500 split planter 15 row/8 row, 30”/15”, John Deere 1770 NT 16 row 30”, 2013 DB90 36 row 30”, 2005 John Deere DB60 24 row 30” CCS, Wagons: (2) Triggs 550 bu gravity & gear, Sprayers: Best Way 60’, Top Air TA 600, 1994 Willmar 765 sprayer, 500-gal Walsh sprayer, Farm Equip: DMI 527 disc ripper, Hiniker 1700 stalk chopper, 1990 MC Grain dryer, 2012 Yetter all-wheel steer 1600-gal liq. cart, Unverferth 130 Inline ripper, Blue Jet Liquid Applicator, Bulk Seed Wagon, Brillion SST 1201, Veh’s & Trl’s: 2018 Midsota 24’ low profile gooseneck, 167 Hyster lowboy, Kiefer gooseneck Trailer, 2002 Transport 48’ step deck, 2011 PJ gooseneck, 2008 Dodge Cummins, 2018 Big Tex gooseneck, 1992 Featherlite 8x24 GN van trailer, Monon semi storage trailer, 2007 Chevy 3500HD, 2006 Chevy 2500HD, 2001 Haulmark enclosed, Skid Loaders, Mowers & UTV’s: 2001 T200 Skid loader, Kubota SVL 90 track skid loader, New Holland L220 skid loader, JD 310 backhoe, Bobcat T650 Skid loader, Bobcat skid loader M371, JD 1445 front deck mower, 2016 Gravely Proturn 460, 2018 Gravely Proturn 472, 2018 Bad Boy ZT Elite 5400, 2018 Bad Boy ZT Elite 6000, John Deere 495 diesel, John Deere 855 Gator, Misc: (8) Dome storage shelters, (10) Bi-parting wrought iron gates, (2) 40’ high cube multi door containers, Safety cones, (2) portable toilets, (12) Steelman work benches, (2) 9’ containers, (2) 8’ containers, Aluminum flatbeds for pickups, Aluminum auxilary fuel tanks

Sale conducted by: Hamilton Auction Company 130 State Hwy. 16, Dexter, MN 55926 Phone: 507-584-0133

ADVERTISER LISTING

ADM Animal Nutrition ...............................................................................3 Auctioneer Alley ......................................................................................24 Beck's Hybrids ...........................................................................................1 Dan Pike Clerking ....................................................................................26 Factory Home Center ............................................................................... 11 Freedom Home Care ...................................................................................5 Generac ...................................................................................................18 Greenwald Farm Center ............................................................................ 27 Ground Zero Services ...............................................................................13 Hamilton Auction Service .........................................................................31 Henslin Auctions, Inc. ..............................................................................25 Holland Auction Co............................................................................ 22, 23 Houghton's Auction Service ......................................................................28 Jason Helicopter Services, LLC ................................................................21 Kannegiesser Truck ....................................................................................9 Kerkhoff Auction ............................................................................... 25, 26 Land Resource Management .....................................................................28 Mages Auction Service ............................................................................. 23 Mathiowetz Construction Co. .....................................................................6 Mid American Auction ....................................................................... 27, 30 Mike's Collision & Repair Center ...............................................................7 Northland Buildings .................................................................................12 Pruess Elevator, Inc. ................................................................................31 Pumps Motor & Bearings LLC .................................................................15 Rush River Steel & Trim ..........................................................................17 Schweiss Doors ........................................................................................31 Scott Buboltz .............................................................................................4 Smiths Mill Implement, Inc. .....................................................................24 Sorensen's Sale & Rentals ........................................................................ 27 Southwest MN K-Fence ............................................................................10 Steffes Group ....................................................................22, 23, 25, 27, 29 Wingert Realty & Land Services ...............................................................23 507-345-4523 • 800-657-4665 418 S. Second Street, Mankato, MN 56001 www.thelandonline.com


PAGE 32

www.thelandonline.com — “Where Farm and Family Meet”

THE LAND — APRIL 2/APRIL 9, 2021

This week’s Back Roads is the work of The Land Correspondent Richard Siemers.

Schwanke’s Quonset collection

S

chwanke Tractor and Combine has had a parts business in Willmar, Minn. for over 60 years. It began as a tractor salvage business. One day Virgil Schwanke came across a tractor he didn’t want to scrap, so he fixed it up and put it in the back of a Quonset building. That tractor seemed to have a magnetic attraction. It was joined by more tractors — as well as trucks and cars — until the Quonset was full. After two more Quonsets had been built and filled, Virgil thought it best to share his collection. A building was constructed to connect the three Quonsets, vehicles were arranged to allow walking aisles, and the public was welcomed in. As the collection of an individual, it is astounding: 175 tractors, 85 cars and 24 trucks (of which eight are fire trucks). Sprinkled among the vehicles are vintage gas pumps. There are steam engines (the oldest item is an 1899 stationary engine) and a wall of press drills that looks like an installation in a museum of modern art. Among the agricultural implements is a huge 1922 Minneapolis tractor — 10 feet tall, 9 feet wide, and 17 feet long. There are Farmall tractors with off-set steering wheels, Co-op branded tractors, and skeleton-like Thieman tractors. (Thiemans were sold as kits to be assembled by the farmer, who had to add the engine and trans-

Willmar, Minn.

mission.) If your interest is in a particular company, you will probably find it here. The automobiles are equally diverse. The oldest is a 1910 Hupmobile. The 1928 Franklin has a tilt steering wheel and powered convertible top. A beautifully restored yellow and brown 1923 Anderson is one of only about a dozen in existence out of about 6,000 that were built. There is a blue Ford Model A Tudor Sedan, and two small, no-frills vehicles built by Crosley. Minnesota car manufacturers are also represented. The 1981 HMV Freeway on display is a one-person commuter car built in Burnsville. After building 700 cars, the unsuccessful company was purchased by a St. Cloud group and redesigned as the Minikan, but that folded after 17 vehicles. Following Virgil’s death a few years ago, the family determined to keep the museum open to the public. It is closed during the winter because the Quonsets are not heated. The museum is accessed through the main store entrance. There is a small admission charge and a gift shop. Explore their website, www. schwanketractor.com, for museum information and its 2021 opening date; a complete list of the vehicles on display; and a short video featuring Virgil Schwanke. You can also find them on Facebook, and at their blog, http://schwankemuseum.blogspot.com. v


Page 4 - April 2/April 9, 2021

THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

Insulate your HOG barn:

© 2021

April 2/April 9, 2021 (800) 657-4665 www.TheLandOnline.com theland@TheLandOnline.com 418 South Second St., Mankato, MN 56001

Proper insulation prevents condensation and rust.

greener world solutions CALL E HEDUL TO SC E A FRE ATE ESTIM

855-612-8038 www.greenerworldsolutions.com A Minnesota Family-Owned Business

MN LIC BC639351

S P O SH S N R BA S D E SH S E M HO

SPRAY FOAM INSULATION

greener world solutions CALL E HEDUL TO SC E A FRE ATE ESTIM

855-612-8038 www.greenerworldsolutions.com A Minnesota Family-Owned Business

www.greenerworldsolutions.com

MN LIC BC639351


Page 2 - April 2/April 9, 2021

THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

April 2/April 9, 2021 - Page 3

Insulate your BEEF barn:

Insulate your DAIRY barn:

Spray foam prevents condensation and rust.

Spray foam prevents condensation and rust.

Call for more info:

Call for more info:

855-612-8038 33908 128th Street Waseca, MN 56093 www.greenerworldsolutions.com

MN LIC BC639351

855-612-8038 33908 128th Street Waseca, MN 56093 www.greenerworldsolutions.com

MN LIC BC639351


Page 2 - April 2/April 9, 2021

THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

April 2/April 9, 2021 - Page 3

Insulate your BEEF barn:

Insulate your DAIRY barn:

Spray foam prevents condensation and rust.

Spray foam prevents condensation and rust.

Call for more info:

Call for more info:

855-612-8038 33908 128th Street Waseca, MN 56093 www.greenerworldsolutions.com

MN LIC BC639351

855-612-8038 33908 128th Street Waseca, MN 56093 www.greenerworldsolutions.com

MN LIC BC639351


Page 4 - April 2/April 9, 2021

THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

Insulate your HOG barn:

© 2021

April 2/April 9, 2021 (800) 657-4665 www.TheLandOnline.com theland@TheLandOnline.com 418 South Second St., Mankato, MN 56001

Proper insulation prevents condensation and rust.

greener world solutions CALL E HEDUL TO SC E A FRE ATE ESTIM

855-612-8038 www.greenerworldsolutions.com A Minnesota Family-Owned Business

MN LIC BC639351

S P O SH S N R BA S D E SH S E M HO

SPRAY FOAM INSULATION

greener world solutions CALL E HEDUL TO SC E A FRE ATE ESTIM

855-612-8038 www.greenerworldsolutions.com A Minnesota Family-Owned Business

www.greenerworldsolutions.com

MN LIC BC639351

Profile for The Land

THE LAND ~ April 2, 2021 ~ Southern Edition