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November 2, 2018 November 9, 2018

soybean series is comprised of the highest yielding soybeans in the industry, providing tolerance to both glyphosate and Liberty® herbicides. Freedom Plus™ is a trademark of Beck’s Superior Hybrids, Inc. LibertyLink® is a registered trademark of BASF. GT27™ is a trademark of MS Technologies and BASF.

Flocking to the fields

Mother Nature is finally cooperating as farmers finish harvest

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:

The Land’s final From The Fields reports A look at soil health and cover crops on two farms Milker’s Message, market news and more


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www.thelandonline.com — “Where Farm and Family Meet”

THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Ag’s best friend? P.O. Box 3169 418 South Second St. Mankato, MN 56002 (800) 657-4665 Vol. XLII ❖ No. 22 40 pages, 1 section plus supplements

www.TheLandOnline.com facebook.com/TheLandOnline twitter.com/TheLandOnline

Cover photo by Sarah Johnson Malchow

COLUMNS Opinion Farm and Food File From The Fields Cooking With Kristin Life on the Farm: Readers’ Photos The Back Porch Calendar of Events Marketing Mielke Market Weekly Auctions/Classifieds Advertiser Listing Back Roads

2-6 5 8 9 10-11 12 12 22-23 24 29-39 39 40

STAFF

Publisher: Steve Jameson: sjameson@mankatofreepress.com General Manager: Deb Petterson: dpetterson@TheLandOnline.com Managing Editor: Paul Malchow: editor@TheLandOnline.com Staff Writer: Dick Hagen: rdhagen35@gmail.com Advertising Representatives: Danny Storlie: theland@TheLandOnline.com James McRae: jmcrea@TheLandOnline.com Office/Advertising Assistants: Joan Compart: theland@TheLandOnline.com Deb Lawrence: auctions@TheLandOnline.com For Customer Service Concerns: (507) 345-4523, (800) 657-4665, theland@TheLandOnline.com Fax: (507) 345-1027 For Editorial Concerns or Story Ideas: (507) 344-6342, (800) 657-4665, editor@TheLandOnline.com National Sales Representative: Bock & Associates Inc., 7650 Executive Drive, Minneapolis, MN 55344-3677. (952) 905-3251. Because of the nature of articles appearing in The Land, product or business names may be included to provide clarity. This does not constitute an endorsement of any product or business. Opinions and viewpoints expressed in editorials or by news sources are not necessarily those of the management. The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The Publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any monies paid for the advertisement. Classified Advertising: $19.79 for seven (7) lines for a private classified, each additional line is $1.40; $24.90 for business classifieds, each additional line is $1.40. Classified ads accepted by mail or by phone with VISA, MasterCard, Discover or American Express. Classified ads can also be sent by e-mail to theland@TheLandOnline.com. Mail classified ads to The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002. Please include credit card number, expiration date and your postal address with ads sent on either mail version. Classified ads may also be called into (800) 657-4665. Deadline for classified ads is 5 pm on the Friday prior to publication date, with holiday exceptions. Distributed to farmers in all Minnesota counties and northern Iowa, as well as on The Land’s website. Each classified ad is separately copyrighted by The Land. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Subscription and Distribution: Free to farmers and agribusinesses in Minnesota and northern Iowa. $25 per year for non-farmers and people outside the service area. The Land (USPS 392470) Copyright © 2018 by The Free Press Media is published biweekly by The Free Press, 418 S 2nd Street, Mankato, MN 56001-3727. Business and Editorial Offices: 418 S. 2nd Street, Mankato, MN 56001-3727, Accounting and Circulation Offices: Steve Jameson, 418 S 2nd Street, Mankato, MN 56001-3727. Call (507) 345-4523 to subscribe. Periodicals postage paid at Mankato, MN. Postmaster and Change of Address: Send address changes to The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato MN 56002-3169 or e-mail to theland@ TheLandOnline.com.

In spite of the news coming out of have had unknown origins. One we found Washington, D.C., commodity markets roaming the countryside. The remnant of and local grain elevators, agriculture is his leash had been chewed through and not going to the dogs. Or is it? dangled from his collar. Another we obtained from a humane society. Another I recently received this news item from was found running wild by a third party the U.S. Department of Agriculture: who thought we might be interested in “Dogs detect prohibited agricultural taking him in. While we weren’t really products that can carry foreign pests and looking for another dog, this one was diseases that threaten U.S. agriculture merely weeks old and cute as a … puppy. LAND MINDS and forests.” How do you say “no” to that? By Paul Malchow The report began by telling of Hardy, Growing up on a farm, we seemed to a USDA-trained detector dog and always have a mutt on the place. No member of the “Beagle Brigade,” who Chihuahuas or Shih Tzus, they were sniffed out a roasted pig head in lugall strictly barn dogs. None of them gage at Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International would ever set foot inside the house. (Well, that’s airport. The USDA says this is just one of several not entirely true. One time our dog was sprayed by biosecurity efforts that are being undertaken to keep African swine fever from entering the country. a skunk. When we opened the front door of the house to investigate all of the yelping, the dog shot “USDA continues to train dogs at its National into the house like he was on fire — skunk smell Detector Dog Training Center in Newnan, Georgia,” and all. This did not endear him to my mother one the report stated. “The center is designed and bit.) Some of these dogs had natural herding equipped to train detector dog teams (canines and instincts and were great with the cattle. Some not handlers), like Hardy’s, to safeguard American agri- so much. culture. USDA’s Animal and Plant Health If you ever have the opportunity to watch dogs Inspection Service Plant Protection and Quarantine herd sheep, it is an impressive sight to behold. program and the Department of Homeland Tireless and alert, these four-legged shepherds not Security’s U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) use detector dog teams, known as the Beagle only control the entire herd, but seem to have a ball doing it. Brigade, to search for prohibited agricultural products at major U.S. ports of entry (airports and land So dogs have been ag partners in some form or border crossings), mail and cargo facilities. The another since there were farms to live on. They are teams detect prohibited agricultural products that generally good at varmint control, sounding the can carry foreign pests and diseases that threaten alarm when someone drives onto the place, and U.S. agriculture and forests.” keeping a watchful eye on young boys who may be heading for mischief. I am a dog owner and have been for many years. Our first dog was found sleeping on our stoop on a Now man’s best friend is working the front lines cold December morning. He was shivering and skin- of preventing African swine fever from crossing our ny and my wife immediately took pity on him. She borders. Aside from healthy appetites and the occagave him food and water, but we left him outside — sional vet bill, dogs work pretty cheap. If they can partly because we didn’t know his health, partly keep our swine, poultry and livestock safe from because we didn’t know who he belonged to and catastrophe, they are worth their weight in gold. thought he might move on. When we returned home If they can greet you at the end of a hard day with from a day at work, he was still there. Law enforce- a big smile and wagging tail, they are also worth ment had no reports of a missing dog. A check with their weight in gold … and then some. area veterinarians also came up empty. Just like Paul Malchow is the managing editor of The Land. that, we were dog owners. He may be reached at editor@TheLandOnline.com.v Aside from our Scottish terrier, all of our dogs

OPINION

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

13 — Father and son team up to build the health of their soil 16 — Field day provides growers with a variety of cover crop options 19 — Is sugar a key to sweetening crop yields?

THERE’S EVEN MORE ONLINE... @ TheLandOnline.com • “Calendar of Events” — Check out The Land’s complete events listing • “E-Edition” — Archives of past issues of The Land


THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/ NOVEMBER 9, 2018

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THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

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The road to perdition always leads south If war is hell, then trade wars must be The picture doesn’t get any rosier when a purgatorial stop along the way. For examining soybeans — the other critical proof, just look where Election Day 2018 U.S. export in tariff limbo. Recent U.S. finds American farmers. Department of Agriculture estimates show that 2018-19 ending soy stocks conFaced with ample production, stale tinue to grow. At mid-harvest, carryover commodity prices and the lowest forestocks were estimated to be 885 million casted national farm income since 2002, bushels, or a whopping 19 percent of proU.S. farmers are now waiting for a winter duction. of government “tariff mitigation” payFARM & FOOD FILE ments while competitors like Brazil and That means that nearly one out of five By Alan Guebert the European Union step into internabushels of American soybeans grown this tional markets (the Chinese pork year will still be in storage when next trade, for one) that just a year ago year’s harvest begins. favored U.S. firms and farmers. Worse, while we sit on our growing That’s not fake news. hill of tariff-dinged beans, South American farmers are greasing planters to leap into the gaping hole Illusionary, however, are the recent trade “victories” touted by the Trump White House. Those deals we opened for them. USDA reckons 2019 South American soy plantings will balloon more than 10 with Canada, Mexico, and South Korea — when percent to boost overall production to 7 billion bushexamined closely by ag trade experts instead of hopeful, Trump-supporting farm groups — hold few, els, or nearly 50 percent more than America’s 4.7 billion-bushel 2018 crop. if any, positive changes. The Trump Administration truly believes this Those extraordinary Canadian dairy concessions mess is a result of “unfair retaliatory tariffs” by touted by the Administration in NAFTA 2.0? “Canada’s scorned ‘Class 7’ price for nonfat milk sol- China when, in fact, China didn’t start this battle. The White House did. Economic claptrap about ids, used to lowball U.S. exports of dairy protein trade deficits and nonsense reviews about “the powders,” noted The Milkweed’s October issue, “has worst trade deals ever” might be fine for populist been barely neutered.” political campaigns, but they’re pure poison for onAnd, it adds, “Mexico’s 25 percent tariff on U.S. the-ground governing. cheese imports” remains. Two years in, however, the claptrap continues. The White House now wants farmers and ranchers to forget about the current trade debacle it created and instead focus on forthcoming trade talks with Japan, the European Union and China. OK, but no dates for even one initial meeting — let alone timeST. PAUL — The Agricultural Utilization Research tables for definitive, detailed negotiations — have Institute seeks two diverse and highly-skilled candi- been set with any of these now-wary “partners.” As dates to serve on its governing board of directors to such, any new deal with anyone is likely years away. But waiting isn’t an option for most farmers fill open seats for a term of three years each. One of the open seats must be occupied by a representative because signs of where today’s farm and trade polifrom the agribusiness, while the other is an at-large cy are taking American agriculture are beginning to seat, which is open to individuals with a variety of appear and most point south. Dead south, in fact. professional experiences. On Oct. 19, the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas Each elected board member will serve a three-year City reported that “non-real estate farm loans” term with a time commitment of up to seven meet- (that’s bank-speak for borrowed, day-to-day operatings per year and activities, which occur at various ing money) is now “30 percent higher than a year locations throughout Minnesota. Interested parties should submit a resume, brief FENC M E BUI biography and letter of interest to hr@auri.org by Dec. O LDER T S S 5. Organizations recommending an individual should High U Tensil send a letter of support by the same date. Election for C e F e n Speed cing rite E the open seats will occur on Jan. 17, 2019.  nergiz ers Water ing Sy stems Questions should be directed to Organizational FENC G r S azing E IN Y Suppli U Development Director Linda Thompson at  lthompOUR F es T U T E U son@auri.org, (218) 281-7600 ext. 108; or Nominating RE” L “ Committee Chair Jerry Hasnedl at jhasnedl@auri.

OPINION

AURI seeks new board members

org, (218) 684-5142. This article was submitted by the Agricultural Utilization Research Institute. v

507-956-2657

SOUTHWEST MINNESOTA

ago,” according to the National Survey of Terms of Lending to Farmers. “This sharp growth in farm lending followed steady increases earlier in 2018,” notes the Kansas City Fed, “and represents the largest annual percentage increase in the third quarter since 2002.” The report goes on to note two other prescient facts. First, the farmers taking out the loans are big operators: “(L)oans exceeding $1 million was a primary contributor to the increase…” and, despite the rise in lending, “… performance of agricultural banks across the country generally has remained solid.” The first point isn’t good. If big-acreage farmers are already borrowing money at historic levels to stay afloat at this year’s prices, lower prices next year could be historically calamitous. The second point is only marginally — and, most likely, just temporarily — better because of, well, the first point. Meanwhile, Congress is as busy as a farm dog chasing its tail. It’s running in circles to pass a farm bill that holds nothing to address the storm brewing on the horizon. The Farm and Food File is published weekly through the United States and Canada. Past columns, events and contact information are posted at www.farmandfoodfile.com. v

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THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Letter: A free press can be our ticket to safety To the Editor, Earlier this month, a swine factory farm operator in Dodge County, Minn. sent a letter to the editor of my hometown newspaper. The writer chastised the local newspaper for providing news coverage regarding my parents’ legal efforts to stop installation of the 11th and 12th swine factory farms within a three-mile radius of our farm. The writer asserts that my father, a lifelong farmer, does not represent “modern agriculture.” Thankfully, my family has no intention of drinking the “modern agriculture” Kool-Aid — code words used by the industry to promote large industrial factory farms. The “modern agriculture” chant has been repeated over and over again in Dodge County and dozens of other communities in rural America seeking to promote large corporate factory farms. “Modern agriculture” promotes super-sized confinement facilities that hold thousands of animals; the use of antibiotics or hormones to foster faster growth; the use of manure pits that hold massive amounts of raw manure; the vertical integration model that allows the industry to control the process from producer to consumer; and a business model that has little or no regard for environmental quality, human health, safe food, humane treatment of animals and the rural economy. Maybe contract

farmers will stop drinking the “modern agriculture” Kool-Aid when they realize they have been played by large corporate interests who seek to take control of the food supply while taking advantage of unsuspecting farmers who sign on the dotted line. My father represents all farmers who are trying to maintain their independence and get a fair price in a competitive market. The factory farm operator also threatened to cancel her subscription to the local newspaper, a common tactic used by industry folks to silence opposition and the media. We are thankful for a free press, as it has been our ticket to safety.  It’s important for rural residents to finally understand that my family went to the press — not to grab headlines — but for our own safety. My family has endured repeated harassment and intimidation since initiation of the first lawsuit against Dodge County and area swine operators in May 2014, including constant garbage dumped in our roadside ditches and driveway, recent dumping of blue farm booties every few feet along the township road, a large piece of metal that was hidden in the tall grass and damaged our mower, bullet holes that were shot in the stop sign just a few hours after my brother and I pulled weeds from the field just a few feet away, pure Roundup that was sprayed on the

OPINION

Minor Roof Leaks? CALL US!

neighbor’s corn field and caused thousands of dollars of damage (which we are quite confident was intended for our field given the proximity to other events), false telephone calls by industry folks to the sheriff’s department (not to report some illegal activity but to put the heat on my family and get us to shut up), harassing late night phone calls to my father, including such comments as “Have you changed yet?” and other harassing tactics.  The industry has been successful for years in silencing opposition by calling employers and threatening local businesses — including local newspapers. My family finally had the courage to speak out publicly. The harassment and intimidation experienced by my family is consistent with the pattern of harassment and intimidation targeted at other farm families across rural America who oppose factory farms. If you don’t believe me, go to the sheriff’s department and request copies of the multiple complaints and emails filed on behalf of my family. What do we tell our children if they’re picked on by a bully? To tell on the bully. So, we’re telling on the bully. We will continue to report all activity to the local sheriff’s department, request extra patrol near our family farm and go to the press, if necessary. It’s a shame what is happening in rural America and, yes, it’s happening right in Dodge County and other rural counties. We will not be silenced by industry bullies. There is a ray of hope in this gloomy story. Recently, a Good Samaritan, undoubtedly aware of the repeated harassment against my family, picked up garbage that was dumped in our roadside ditch hours earlier. Thank you for your showing of humanity. Sonja Trom Eayrs Maple Grove, Minn.

wants to hear from you! Letters to the editor are always welcome. Send your letters to: Editor, The Land P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002 e-mail: editor@thelandonline.com All letters must be signed and accompanied by a phone number (not for publication) to verify authenticity.


THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/ NOVEMBER 9, 2018

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www.thelandonline.com — “Where Farm and Family Meet”

THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Tillage is next on docket as farmers finish harvest

By KRISTIN KVENO, The Land Correspondent

Blair Hoseth, Mahnomen, Minn., Oct 19

The end of soybean harvest is near for Jamie Beyer. The Land spoke with Beyer on Oct. 19 as she expects to “finish beans tomorrow.” The beans are currently at 10 percent moisture.

“We finally got a nice day.” The Land spoke with Blair Hoseth on Oct. 19 as he was thrilled to report some good weather has made its way to the farm. Warm temperatures in the 70s, low humidity and sunshine the day before definitely helped dry out the fields that received four inches of snow the previous week. “It just kind of snowed on and off all week.” The snow is gone and “now the ground is finally started to dry out.” Hoseth has been “raking and trying to bale corn stalks.” The corn yields are around 160 bushels per acres “it’s a decent average.” Hoseth plans on finishing corn harvest next week as the forecast looks good with no rain or snow expected.

Blair Hoseth

Jamie Beyer

After corn harvest is complete, Hoseth will be hauling manures and working up some Conservation Reserve Program ground. Then it’s on to fall tillage and some ditching. He estimates that there’s about 10 days left of field work after harvest. The sunny, warm weather on Oct. 18 “was the first turning point day.” The snow of a week before soon became a distant memory and thoughts turned to getting back in the field and finishing up the 2018 harvest. It’s been a rollercoaster of weather this fall on the Hoseth farm, but with a nice forecast this week, the finish line is now in sight.

Matt Haubrich, Danube, Minn., Oct. 26

 FROM  THE  

FIELDS

“We’re down to the tail end of it.” The Land spoke with Matt Haubrich on Oct. 26 as he reported that he “picked corn until 2 a.m. yesterday morning” then the rain came. He estimates that there’s only about one and a half days left of corn harvest. He hopes to be back in the field tomorrow.

Next year, Haubrich may try to incorporate a fungicide on additional corn and soybean acres. “I’m going to study seed treatments on beans more.” Haubrich has been “constantly making notes in the combine” on what he is seeing. “I had corn that didn’t stand well late season. I need to figure out why.” Haubrich will be “shipping the last of our lambs out this Monday.” Harvest is beginning to wrap up on the Haubrich farm and while there were many challenges along the way, Haubrich is already planning on bettering his crop next year and looks forward to the opportunity to do so.

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Karson Duncanson, Mapleton, Minn., Oct. 26

After Duncanson wraps up bean harvest, he’ll switch back to corn. He’s already combined 400 acres of corn and it was “better than I thought.” The “planting date was huge, early-planted corn was very good.” The side dressing and fungicide application that Duncanson did this year really paid off. He predicts that “a week of good weather and we can get the corn knocked out.”

Karson Duncanson

The biggest challenge this year has been the weather. “There’s tools for us to control a lot of things. There are really no tools for us to change the weather.” The planting date was vital this year — most evident in the beans. After harvest, Duncanson will focus on finishing up tillage. Then “we apply quite a bit of hog manure.” The manure application will go non-stop until done.  “It’s going to be one of those years we talk about.” It started out with wet, tough planting conditions, a decent grow season and now a rough harvest. “It’s been a challenging year, but there’s always a challenge.” Forever the optimist, Duncanson is already “looking forward to next year.”

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Now that the combines are back in the field and harvest is rolling again everything “looks pretty good.” If the rain and snow can stay away, this year’s harvest should be wrapped up in no time.

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With sugar beet harvest complete, there’s plenty of help now for the rest of the crops. Tillage is all caught up and once beans are harvested, Beyer will finish up corn harvest. After that there’s about a week’s worth of ditching and tillage left to do. The forecast calls for temperatures in the 50s with a chance of rain for the end of next week so the time is now to get the crop out.  But come the beginning of November, the “guys will take a break during deer hunting.” 

“We are on the final leg of bean harvest.” The Land spoke with Karson Duncanson on Oct. 26 as he was pleased to report that he only had a day or two worth left of soybeans to harvest. Unfortunately, the bean yields are “not as good as I thought.” While the early beans were good, the later-planted beans just didn’t do as well — as they were planted three weeks later than usual.

Matt Haubrich

Even though harvest isn’t over, Haubrich is “absolutely looking forward to next year.” He’ll “make changes where we can make changes.” This year, Haubrich was two and a half weeks late on planting corn. The “root development wasn’t the greatest. The yield penalties are stacking up on the corn.” There was “30 inches of rain this season. We average 19 inches.”  

Last two weeks were filled with rain and snow that kept the combine out of the field until Oct. 16. “It’s been going pretty good” since then. Though, on Oct. 17 “we had a small fire at our bin site.” The fire burned itself out and the dryer was repaired in one day.

Haubrich started combining beans on Oct. 14 and finished yesterday, “we had a really nice window for harvesting corn and soybeans.” After harvest, “we have a fair amount of tillage to do.” Then it will be time to finally head in from the field. This year’s harvest “early on it was muddy wet fields.” Later on, “we had nice drying winds, full-sun and the corn rapidly dropped in moisture.” In some cases, the corn didn’t even have to go through the dryer. The test weights were pretty good, though “overall yields are down in corn.” This year’s average was double-digits less than Haubrich’s three-year average. Disappointing, but “it’s what I suspected.”

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Jamie Beyer, Wheaton, Minn., Oct. 19

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THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/ NOVEMBER 9, 2018

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These recipes will add ‘pop’ to a traditional snack place in a large bowl. Melt 3 tableMy husband Seth and I spoons of butter in a medium are proud popcorn farmers. sauce pan.  Once the butter is OK, so Seth planted the 11 melted, add 3 cups of mini marshrows of popcorn; but I did mallows. Stir until the marshmalhelp weed and harvest the lows are melted.  Turn off the heat bounty. This year we plantas soon as the last marshmallow ed four different varieties: has melted. Add the 1/2 cup of yelrobust white, robust yellow, low cake mix to the marshmallow Japanese hull-less and my COOKING mixture. Slowly pour the marshpersonal favorite, puffy pop. WITH KRISTIN mallow mixture over the popcorn We’ve been growing popBy Kristin Kveno in the bowl and stir until most of corn for four years now and the kernels are covered in mixture. this harvest was our biggest yield ever. My husband plants the Mix the 1/4 cup of sprinkles into the popcorn popcorn because I LOVE the stuff and mixture. Pour the marshmallow popcorn onto a prepared cookie sheet. Allow the popcorn to so do my kids. My favorite way to cool. Break apart into pieces and serve. make popcorn is in a pot with a little oil on the stove; then sprinkled with n some salt and a few generous squirts I love snickers and I love popcorn. Putting the of Sriracha on top. two together is pure magic. Here are some other great ways to Snickers Popcorn enjoy popcorn. https://cookiesandcups.com/snickers-popcorn/ I bring this cake batter popcorn to many a 8 quarts air-popped corn (about 2 cups of kerpotluck and it’s a winner every time. This is an nels) easy but delicious recipe and really does taste 1 cup salted butter like cake batter! 2 cups light brown sugar, packed Cake Batter Popcorn 1 teaspoon salt www.twosisterscrafting.com/cake-batter1/2 cup light corn syrup popcorn/ 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 cup salted peanuts 10 cups of popped popcorn (salted) 30 “Fun Size” Snickers bars coarsely chopped 3 tablespoons butter (sweet cream, salted) 3 oz. melted semi-sweet chocolate (optional) 3 cups mini marshmallows 1/4 cup sprinkles Preheat oven to 200 degrees. Over medium 1/2 cup yellow cake mix heat boil butter, brown sugar, salt and corn Pop 10 cups of popcorn and salt liberally and syrup for five minutes. Remove from heat and

Hunters must test for CWD Hunters in central, north-central and southeast Minnesota need to bring their harvested deer to be tested for chronic wasting disease on opening weekend of firearms deer season which takes place Nov. 3 and 4. The Minnesota Department of Natural Resources also will require hunters to have their deer tested in much of southeastern Minnesota Nov. 3-4 as well as Nov. 17 and 18, because of its proximity to 18 known instances of CWD in wild deer centered around Preston. After field dressing their deer, all hunters in affected permit areas need to take them to a sampling station. DNR staff will remove lymph nodes, and the DNR will submit them for laboratory testing. Hunters should check mndnr. gov/cwd to find the permit areas where sampling is required.

Hunters must register their deer by phone, internet or in person. The DNR will not make harvest registration available at CWD sampling stations. The DNR website will have test results available at mndnr.gov/cwdcheck. The DNR reminds hunters who harvest deer in area 603 (the disease management zone) that carcass movement restrictions remain in place. Deer cannot be removed from the area until a “not detected” test result is received. Hunters not in a mandatory testing area can collect their own lymph node sample and submit it for testing to the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at the University of Minnesota for a fee. This article was submitted by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. v

stir in baking soda. Pour over popcorn and stir to coat evenly. Transfer to a waxed paper-lined counter and sprinkle peanuts on top. Stir until all is coated evenly. Transfer popcorn into a large roasting pan and bake for 1 hour 15 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes. Remove from oven and stir in coarsely chopped Snickers. Return to oven for three more minutes so the Snickers begin to melt slightly into the popcorn. Remove from pan and transfer popcorn back to wax paper to cool. Drizzle melted chocolate on top of popcorn if desired. Let set and store in an airtight container. n Dill pickle flavor is simply exquisite. Put that on popcorn and you have the perfect snack or in my case, a meal. It really is that good. Dill Pickle Popcorn https://noblepig.com/2013/01/dill-picklepopcorn/ 1/2 cup popcorn kernels dill pickle flavoring:  1 tablespoon coriander seed 1 tablespoon kosher salt 1-1/2 teaspoons dill weed 1/2 teaspoon mustard seed 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 1/2 teaspoon onion powder 1/2 teaspoon celery seed 1/2 teaspoon citric acid for popcorn: 1/2 cup butter, melted Place all ingredients for dill pickle flavoring in a spice grinder and process until smooth. Set aside. Pop popcorn using any method you choose. When popcorn is ready, drizzle with melted butter. Start sprinkling with dill pickle flavoring and tasting until desired flavor is reached. n Garlic and rosemary are beautiful flavors separately; but together on popcorn they combine

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to bring a taste sensation that cannot be beat. www.twopeasandtheirpod.com/garlic-rosemaryparmesan-popcorn/ 4 tablespoons butter 1 clove garlic, minced 1 teaspoon minced fresh rosemary 3 tablespoons canola oil 1/3 cup popcorn 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese salt, to taste In a small saucepan, melt butter over medium-low heat. Stir in the garlic and fresh rosemary. Cook for 1 to 2 minutes, until garlic is lightly browned. Remove from heat and set aside. To pop the popcorn, heat the canola oil in a 3-quart saucepan on medium high heat. Put a couple popcorn kernels into the oil to see if it is hot enough. If they pop, then it’s ready. Add the popcorn kernels in an even layer. Cover the pan with a lid. Remove from heat for about 30 seconds. Return the pan to the heat and gently shake the pan by moving it back and forth over the burner. You will hear the popcorn popping. Keep the lid slightly ajar so the steam can escape. If you remove the lid completely, you will have a popcorn mess. When the popcorn is done popping, remove the pan from the heat. Pour the popcorn into a large bowl. Pour the butter, garlic, and rosemary mixture over the popcorn and gently toss. Sprinkle Parmesan cheese over the warm popcorn. Season with salt to taste. Whatever way you like your popcorn, sweet, savory or both, these recipes will tempt your taste buds. Get poppin’ everyone! Kristin Kveno scours the internet, pours over old family recipes and searches everywhere in between to find interesting food ideas for feeding your crew. Do you have a recipe you want to share? You can reach Kristin at kristin_kveno@yahoo.com. v

farmtownstrong.org


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THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Apple crafts make festive decorations for the holidays A light dusting of snow this to three hours. Turn the morning sets the mood for slices after an hour of drysome simple dried apple ing. To add a lovely fracrafts. I spent an afternoon grance, sprinkle the slices making some fall and holiday with cinnamon if desired. ornaments from this season’s Use a toothpick or awl to abundant apple crop. poke a hole in the slice and To dry apples for crafts, cut tie with a small ribbon bow. the apples in about 1/8-inch These cute ornaments could IN THE GARDEN thick slices. (Notice the be hung in the window, perbeautiful five-pointed star sonalized with names writBy Sharon Quale — or pentagram — in the ten on them and used for center of the slices.) Brush with lemon Thanksgiving table cards or napkin juice for whiter color. Place the slices ring decorations. They also make a on a parchment paper lined cookie special tag for gift wrap decorating. sheet and bake in a 200 F oven for two My dried slices were made from Honeycrisp apples. I have one 10-year old Honeycrisp tree that hasn’t borne any fruit until this year. I was beginning to wonder why it wasn’t fruiting, but this year it produced a bumper crop. It yielded abundant apples to eat, bake, store and give to friends. If you have a Honeycrisp apple tree that isn’t bearing, be patient. Honeycrisp apples were developed by the University of Minnesota’s fruit breeding program over 30 years ago Photos by Sharon Quale

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and marketed to the public in 1997. The cells of Honeycrisp are larger than those of most apples giving it a fabulous flavor with an explosive crunch. It needs a cold climate to develop its sweet honey flavor and crisp texture. It commands a retail price twice that of Red Delicious apples. Since its introduction in 1991, millions of trees have been planted and the fruit is enjoyed by consumers all over the world. The University of Minnesota devel-

ops new varieties of apples the oldfashioned way — with research scientists painstakingly cross-pollinating apple flowers manually. Zestar is a newer variety developed which is available to home gardeners. I have an 8-year old Zestar that is being stubborn about bearing a good crop of fruit. It has just had a handful of apples so far. I am being patient! First Kiss is a new apple variety that has great parentage. It is a cross between the U of M’s Honeycrisp and AA44 — a variety from the University of Arkansas. First Kiss is an early-season apple that has excellent storage life. It inherited its crisp texture from Honeycrisp and early ripening from the AA44 variety and can be harvested beginning in mid-August. Commercial growers must obtain a license to grow this trademarked apple and trees will not be available for planting by home gardeners until the patent expires in 2034. Sharon Quale is a master gardener from central Minnesota. She may be reached at (218) 738-6060 or squale101@yahoo.com. v

Life on the Farm: Readers’ Photos

Proving that harvest doesn’t have to be all work, Paul Golden of Montevideo, Minn. sent this photo of a windrow ablaze in spectacular color along with a photo of harvest in progress. E-mail your Life on the Farm photos to editor@thelandonline.com. Your photo may be published in our next issue!


THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/ NOVEMBER 9, 2018

www.thelandonline.com — “Where Farm and Family Meet”

Life on the Farm: Readers’ Photos

Even though rain hampered harvest in many areas, Kathy Kern caught this farmer in action near Guttenberg, Iowa.

No thing holds more promise than a seed.

Pete Bauman of Ruthton, Minn. snapped this photo of his soybean field under four inches of snow on Oct. 14.

NOTICE

Early deadline for ads in The Land Due to the Thanksgiving holiday The Land office will be closed on Thursday, Nov. 22nd & Friday, Nov. 23rd.

And when it comes from Peterson Farms Seed, it’s backed with a promise from us: We will sell no seed we wouldn’t be happy to plant on our own farm.

Deadline for The Land’s Nov. 23rd issue is Tues., Nov. 13th at noon.

Grow your promise. Grow Peterson Farms Seed. PetersonFarmsSeed.com | 866.481.7333

Deadline for The Land’s Nov. 30th issue is Tues., Nov. 20th at noon.

PAGE 11


PAGE 12

www.thelandonline.com — “Where Farm and Family Meet”

THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

In a social world, are we less neighborly? and said, “They don’t neigh“We don’t neighbor.” Those bor either.” Which was old were the three words Terri’s news to the newest woman mom heard when she moved on the block. her family from Iowa to Nebraska. Terri’s dad was Though she may have an over-road trucker before been tempted to repack her cell phones and email were boxes, she didn’t. Instead of a thing. So the limited time becoming unhinged, she their family shared the became unhindered. Her same space each week was THE BACK PORCH moments on the porch were from Saturday afternoon to By Lenae Bulthuis pivotal. The slammed doors Sunday afternoon. While transformed her into a some napped after church watchdog. From that point and family dinner, he packed. It was forward, when someone new moved never enough time with the ones he into the neighborhood, she stepped on loved. their porch to deliver a warm hello. So Terri’s mom did brave. She moved Terri’s mom was a one-woman welcome wagon before welcome wagons her young family and all they owned were a thing. into a new community. They would lose nearness to extended family, treaForty-plus years hasn’t diminished sured neighbors, and all that was the memory nor Terri’s drive to follow familiar. But they would gain 24 extra in her mother’s footsteps. She has hours a week with their beloved husmore friends than almost anyone I band and dad. That mattered most. know. Not the Facebook kind (though she has hundreds of those too), but the After unloading boxes, Terri’s mom face-to-face kind. It’s my privilege to knocked on the nearest door and be one of them. heard these three words: ‘We don’t neighbor.’ Then the door was shut in Not that I can keep up with the way her face. she reaches out to so many. Watching her makes this introvert tired. But Surprised, but steadfast, she after hearing the story behind her knocked on another door and heard the same three words: ‘We don’t neigh- story, I get it. I understand her motivation to connect with people. It’s perbor.’ But this lady was an additional four words chattier than the last. She sonal and intentional. To meet Terri is to feel valued and seen. pointed to the house across the street

Outside Sales Representative The Land, a weekly farm and rural life magazine going strong for over 40 years, is looking for an Outside Sales Representative for the Southeastern Minnesota territory. Candidates should have professional sales skills to service existing clients and to prospect and develop new businesses in a designated territory. Also essential is self-confidence, strong organizational habits, keen attention to detail and superior written and verbal communication skills. This position requires reliable transportation and a good driving record. The successful candidate must have a motivation for sales and may be allowed to work primarily from their home office. A company laptop will be provided. This position is full time, salary plus commission, mileage allowance, and other benefits.

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Deb Petterson, General Manager at: dpetterson@thelandonline.com

Mr. Rogers agreed. He sang it, “I’ve always wanted to have a neighbor just like you. I’ve always wanted to live in a neighborhood with you.” He spoke it, “I like you just the way you are.” And he demonstrated it by faithfully showing up. He changed his sweater and shoes, but never his mind about making people feel welcomed and loved. It’s something an increasing number of people across our land know very little of. In a recent nationwide survey by the health insurer Cigna, 54 percent of respondents said they always or sometimes feel that no one knows them well. And loneliness is no respecter of age. “Our survey found that actually the younger generation was lonelier than the older generations,” says Dr. Douglas Nemecek, the chief medical officer for behavioral health at Cigna. We don’t neighbor. It seems those cold words spoken decades ago on a porch in Nebraska have blown across

the nation and become a reality for over half of our citizens. What would it take to reverse the stats? Some neighbor best by popping in unannounced. I’m more of the planning kind. When should we meet and where? Terri is on mission to connect people across the room and the miles, and Mr. Rogers’ walk matched his talk, “The only thing that really changes the world is when somebody gets the idea that love can abound and can be shared.” We may neighbor different, but it can all make a difference when people are seen and welcomed in your neighborhood and in mine. Lenae Bulthuis muses about faith, family, and farming from her back porch on her Minnesota grain and livestock farm. She can be reached at lenaesbulthuis@gmail.com or @ LenaeBulthuis. v

Calendar of Events Visit www.TheLandOnline.com to view our complete calendar and enter your own events, or send an e-mail with your event’s details to editor@thelandonline.com. Nov. 7 — Secure Pork Supply Workshop — Le Sueur, Minn. — Workshop will provide swine producers the opportunity to create their farm’s SPS plan. Participants will know how to monitor their herd for signs of FMD, CSF and ASF; and go home with their own SPS plan in hand. Bring a laptop, copies of farm’s SOPs and the site’s national premises ID number. Contact Diane DeWitte at stouf002@umn.edu or (507) 384-1745 Nov. 8 — Secure Pork Supply Workshop — Mankato, Minn. — Contact Diane DeWitte at stouf002@umn.edu or (507) 384-1745 Nov. 8 — Secure Pork Supply Workshop — Faribault, Minn. — Contact Diane DeWitte at stouf002@umn.edu or (507) 384-1745 Nov. 8 — Root and Tuber Production Field Day — Sioux Center, Iowa — Farm will show several root crops still in the ground and production methods; crop varieties from seeding and watering, harvesting to packing and storing. Implements will be demon-

strated. Contact Debra Boekholder at debra@practicalfarmers.org or (515) 232-5661 Nov. 9 — NREM Seminar — Ames, Iowa — Contact Sally Carullo at scarullo@iastate.edu or (515) 294-7991 Nov. 9 — Golden Silo Barn Party — Waterloo, Iowa — Celebrate Iowa agriculture and heritage with Silos and Smokestacks National Heritage Area. Feast on a meal of Iowa-style food and bid on auction items. Live music from bluegrass and gospel band, GrassRun. Contact events@silosandsmokestacks. org or (319) 234-4567 Nov. 13 — Women Marketing Grain — Nashua, Iowa — Women will learn how to manage price risk using tools like forward contracts, futures and options contracts, alternative marketing contracts and crop insurance. Participants will work in a computer lab to access online decision tools and to develop a marketing plan. Contact Lesley Milius at xfloyd@iastate.edu or (641) 228-1453


THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/ NOVEMBER 9, 2018

www.thelandonline.com — “Where Farm and Family Meet”

PAGE 13

Building soil health requires experimenting, patience By RICHARD SIEMERS The Land Correspondent MARSHALL, Minn. — If Randy Tholen is a conservationist, it’s because he is convinced good conservation makes economic sense. It’s not maximum yield that is profitable, but getting the best return on your investment. His convincing has Randy Tholen come from his own experience. Randy and his son Ryan have even put together a brochure and a PowerPoint presentation to share what they have found. They call it “Farming Clean and Green.” “The farming clean part means to eliminate soil and nutrient escape,” Tholen explained. He said that if farmers don’t take steps in that direction, eventually regulations will be forced on them to do so. “Farming green is to have living roots in the ground as long as possible,” he went on to say. “When you have living roots in the ground you are building soil structure, increasing organic matter, and feeding the

biology of the soil, microbes, bacteria — all that stuff.” When Tholen farmed 1,200 acres while raising 1,000 head of cattle near Tracy, he had no time to indulge his life-long interest in research. When he moved to a quarter-section farm between Balaton

and Marshall, he made it a research farm. “We’ve done a lot of research with a lot of different companies,” he said. “When we do research we do four replications of everything. We’ll have eight rows of the product and eight rows of check repeated four See SOIL HEALTH, pg. 15

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THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

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THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/ NOVEMBER 9, 2018

www.thelandonline.com — “Where Farm and Family Meet”

Tholen is researching nitrogen rates SOIL HEALTH, from pg. 13 times, (each row extending) all the way across the field. These testings have a lot of integrity and the companies appreciate that.” For four years he tested biological soil additives from companies around the United States. The result: he found none of the products worked. Only one time did the product even pay for itself. At the same time, he was also attending national no-till conferences and hearing that if we take care of the soil, it will take care of us. Cover crop roots feed the microbes already present. Rather than add products to the soil, feed and take care of what you have. That made economic sense to Tholen, but he had to see for himself. Instead of testing products, he now tests methods — working with a crop consultant In the spring of this year, the corn sprouts between last year’s and occasionally the University of Minnesota. bean rows were planted right after bean harvest with cereal rye grass. The photo was taken right before Tholen terminated the In his fifth season of working on building rye grass. soil health, he has found excellent results using strip till to disturb less of the soil, bed. But that kind of soil does not absorb moisture. banding fertilizer in the spring to concentrate it With this kind of soil (that looks like cottage cheese) where it’s needed and make leaching and runoff less there is opportunity for moisture to go down.” likely, and interseeding corn and soybeans with cover All those roots feeding the microbes are the result crops. of cover crops. While cover crops can provide off-season grazing In 2015, Tholen hosted a field day for the University and prevent erosion, it’s what is going on below the of Minnesota. He handed out a sheet about cover crops. soil that especially interests Tholen. “One farmer looked at it for a while, handed it back Earthworms are one sign of soil health. to me and said, ‘Why would I want to plant weeds in “The value of earthworms is something farmers my corn? It’s going to take my fertility and moisture have not paid attention to,” Tholen said. “A healthy and cut my yield by a third.’ That prompted me to do soil will be home to 25 worms per square foot, down a yield test.” to a depth of nine feet. That amount of earthworms Tholen did his usual four replications: eight rows can produce up to 100 tons of excrement of manure including the worm carcass decay at the end of their each of corn across the field, with and without cover life cycle. It has only four pounds of nitrogen per acre, crops. There was virtually no difference in yield. but there is 30 pounds of phosphorus, 72 pounds of “The thing is, we didn’t take a 10-20 percent hit in potassium, 90 pounds of magnesium and 500 pounds yield from having the cover crops. Both areas yielded of calcium per acre.” 216-217 bushel.” When he moved to his current farm, he allowed an Even Tholen was surprised he could get 60 bushel environmental class studying earthworms to do a beans and 200 bushel corn on soil that tested project on his land. The students from Southwest extremely low in fertility — a P of 6 and a K of 135. Minnesota State University dug 20 pits — 18-inches “My crop consultant told me that with your cover long, 12-inches wide and 12-inches deep. They found crops (that feed the soil life), the microbes will actiearthworms in only three of the pits. vate the natural ability of the soil to create and cycle “That has changed tremendously,” Tholen said. plant available nutrients. We have a tremendous Wherever he turns over soil, it is full of worm holes amount of natural fertility in the soil, but it’s not that provide pathways for water and roots. available to plants.” Earthworms are at the top of the subsoil food chain In the spring, Tholen sprays to knock down cover and indicate the presence of microbial life. And it is crops which survive the winter. By then, their roots roots that provide food for the soil life. have done their job of feeding the soil life and “What microbes do,” Tholen explained, “when you increasing organic matter. He strip-tills his corn and have all these different roots in the ground, they put beans, and later interseeds cover crops once the corn out something called exudates. They are a kind of and beans have a head start. sticky substance and that helps hold soil particles Tholen is currently researching nitrogen rates. His together (giving good soil structure). I used to think spring banding already reduces cost since it requires that when we were planting, if we had a field that less nitrogen by concentrating it at the roots and looked like powder, that would be the perfect seed See SOIL HEALTH, pg. 19

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HX1 – Contains the Herculex® I Insect Protection gene which provides protection against European corn borer, southwestern corn borer, black cutworm, fall armyworm, western bean cutworm, lesser corn stalk borer, southern corn stalk borer, and sugarcane borer; and suppresses corn earworm. HXRW – The Herculex® RW insect protection trait contains proteins that provide enhanced resistance against western corn rootworm, northern corn rootworm and Mexican corn rootworm. HXX – Herculex® XTRA contains the Herculex I and Herculex RW genes. YGCB – The YieldGard® Corn Borer gene offers a high level of resistance to European corn borer, southwestern corn borer and southern cornstalk borer; moderate resistance to corn earworm and common stalk borer; and above average resistance to fall armyworm. LL – Contains the LibertyLink® gene for resistance to Liberty® herbicide. RR2 – Contains the Roundup Ready® Corn 2 trait that provides crop safety for over-the-top applications of labeled glyphosate herbicides when applied according to label directions. Herculex® insect protection technology by Dow AgroSciences and Pioneer Hi-Bred. Herculex® and the HX logo are registered trademarks of Dow AgroSciences LLC. YieldGard®, the YieldGard Corn Borer Design and Roundup Ready® are registered trademarks used under license from Monsanto Company. Liberty®, LibertyLink® and the Water Droplet Design are trademarks of Bayer. Agrisure® and Agrisure Viptera® are registered trademarks of, and used under license from, a Syngenta Group Company. Agrisure® technology incorporated into these seeds is commercialized under a license from Syngenta Crop Protection AG.

PIONEER® brand products are provided subject to the terms and conditions of purchase which are part of the labeling and purchase documents. ®, TM, SM Trademarks and service marks of DuPont, Dow AgroSciences or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. © 2018 PHII. DUPA1418008_legal_VB_SYN


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Rebuilding soil with cover crops is constant experiment By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer RENVILLE, Minn. — Saving your soil. Those three words appear to be the driving force behind the adoption of minimum tillage and cover crops. For most farmers, saving your soil is a no-brainer. Everyone talks a good game; however, putting it in action is another matter. But not so for Dean Schroeder, a Renville County, Minnesota farmer. He’s been practicing strip till/no till for 15 years and now plants cover crops for the past five years. Why? “I just didn’t like our soil loss when we were in conventional tillage,” commented Schroeder. “Strong winds we’d see soil whipping; after rains soil washing into the creeks … that bothered me and we said there’s got to be a better way.” Schroeder admits his conscious got to him. There were also some potential cost savings because of fewer trips across the field. “So less fuel and lots less hours on the tractor.” He started with a chisel plow in corn stalks. “We haven’t moldboard plowed for about 40 years. In our corn/soybean rotation, we plant soybeans between last year’s corn rows without any tillage before planting. Been doing that for about 15 years.” Now Schroeder is into strip tillage with a NiftyReaper strip till shank machine. Hitched behind, a Montag Air Cart with double tanks permits both phosphorus and potassium applications. This system also lets him variable rate each fertilizer separately. His fields are soil sampled in two-and-a-half-acre grids. Schroeder prefers a shank machine which requires a bit more horsepower, but it will work 6 inches into the soil profile versus a ‘coulter’ machine that works only 3 to 4 inches deep. He also indicated there are now several brands of strip till equipment in the market. The Nifty Reaper is made by Niffty Ag Inc. of Galesburg, Illinois. A Minnesota-made machine is the Soil Warrior, manufactured in Faribault. So why is soil health now common conservation with farmers into minimum tillage? For Schroeder, soil health really wasn’t an issue those first years of strip till. “But the last 6 to 7 years we’ve seeing the advantage of building soil health too. Our crops can handle stress conditions better — be that fungus diseases or weeds or even moisture, too much or too little. We’re now five years with cover

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shared this soil health teaser: ”The idea is to mimic Mother Nature,” she said. And another teaser: “a teaspoon of soil contains more living organisms than the world’s population.” The Sept. 14 field day included stops at six farms which incorporate a variety of cover crops and cropping systems. Schroeder’s farm was the last stop. A handout received by tour participants read, “Fall 2017 no-till drilled winter wheat, followed by a broadcast frost seeding of Mammoth red clover. Harvested wheat on July 26, 2018, sprayed Gramoxone, then no-till drilled cover crop on July 28, 2018. Prior to 2017, the field has been continuous strip-till/no-till for 15 years. Field will be no-till corn in 2019. His cover crop mix: 3 lbs. each of sunflowers, buckwheat, cow peas and pea TS750; 4 lbs. Pieper Sudan grass; 7 lbs. kayle; 7 lbs. purple top prune; 1 lb. berseem” plus a few more listed on the handout. Photos by Dick Hagen Dean Schroeder uses 12 different species of cover I asked Hatlewick if Schroeder was a good student? crops with a variety of root systems. Each contributes She smiled, “Dean is awesome to work with because different attributes to build healthy soil. he wants to try new things. Also, he’s willing to share crops. The more we do cover crops, the more I see with me what he’s got going on; plus he seems to thrive on doing innovative things. that’s an important piece of the puzzle.” “When I got to Renville County in November, 2014, The decision to utilize cover crops raises a number of question such as: What kind of cover crop? I quickly learned he was already knowledgeable, so Multiple species or just a couple? When to seed your it’s been both a good teaching and a good learning cover crops? Do they work in corn too? Can you experience for me. Sharing what we each know is harvest soybeans and then seed cover crop? Does special when your mission is to upgrade conservation and soil health.” aerial seeding into corn work? But why 12 different species of cover crop? “The first year we just used a single species, like a Hatlewick responded, “I think he’s right on the radish,” said Schroeder. “But we’ve since learned you want multiple species — both for what they do above money! With the diverse mix, you have even more ground to minimize wind and water erosion and also things working for you. You’ve got species that are how much scavenging of nutrients deeper into the scavenging nitrogen. You’ve got a couple legumes soil profile. It’s been a learning curve which keeps it building nitrogen. You’ve got broad leaves harvesting interesting; but also shows more benefits to be energy from the sun. You’ve got grasses that will be gained. This mixture in this field has 12 different tall and narrow to protect your soils from wind erospecies. This provides even more varieties of root sion. So mixes are really important. We always try to structure … some will gather up nitrogen; some will get growers to do at least a three to four-species mix of cover crops. But I think 12 are awesome because gather phosphorous for next year’s crop. you’ve got your soil working that much harder.” “Yes, it’s a never-ending learning process which is A big help to Schroeder’s operation is the guy who part of the fun and rewards. Every year I go to the sells cover crop seed. “He gives me recommendations national no-till conference which involves about a thousand or more no-tillers from across America. on what he thinks would work,” Schroeder said. “He Networking with different farmers is always a good also suggests the pounds per acre of total seed and source of information. I’m not inventing the wheel. I the pounds for each of the 12 species. Then we tweak like to copy from other farmers who are already it from there.” making it work.” As Schroeder inspects the abundant cover crop in Instrumental in Schroeder’s learning curve has his field, he likes what he sees. “This is about what I been Holly Hatlewick, who is the district administra- expected it could be,” he stated. “You never know the tor for the Renville County Soil and Water first time you plant such a mixture. Hopefully the Conservation District. “Her knowledge and how she turkey manure gets spread next week.” teaches the farming community is tremendous.” Schroeder seeds 32,000 plants per acre on corn in 30-inch rows. He thinks today’s hybrids have enough A good example of Hatlewick’s work is the Reduced flex so you can do with a lesser population and still Tillage and Cover Crop Field Day which took place on Sept. 14. Attended by 64 farmers, farm lenders, achieve strong yields. conservation technicians and media reps, the event Schroeder admitted it is difficult to determine how included an update by David Mettler on cover crop much better his yields are with his techniques, but is test plots by the Southern Minnesota Sugar Beet See SCHROEDER, pg. 18 Co-op. Before loading buses for a tour, Hatlewick


THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/ NOVEMBER 9, 2018

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Data is based on an average of 2016-2017 comparisons made in the U.S. through Nov. 29, 2017. Comparisons are against all competitors, unless otherwise stated, and within +/- 3 RM of the competitive brand. Product responses are variable and subject to any number of environmental, disease and pest pressures. Individual results may vary. Multi-year and multi-location data are a better predictor of future performance. DO NOT USE THIS OR ANY OTHER DATA FROM A LIMITED NUMBER OF TRIALS AS A SIGNIFICANT FACTOR IN PRODUCT SELECTION. Refer to www.pioneer.com/products or contact a Pioneer sales representative or authorized dealer for the latest and complete listing of traits and scores for each Pioneer® brand product. Pioneer® brand products are provided subject to the terms and conditions of purchase which are part of the labeling and purchase documents. TM ® SM , , Trademarks and service marks of Dow AgroSciences, DuPont or Pioneer, and their affiliated companies or their respective owners. © 2018 PHII. DUPPSY18035_VAR3_110218_TL_S

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THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Schroeder has grown over an inch of topsoil in 15 years SCHROEDER, from pg. 16 confident of an additional 10-15 bushels per acre of corn. Added Hatlewick, “With the good cover crop mix and this reduced tillage, you’ve rebuilt the soil structure considerably. You’ve got the sponge activity in your soils, so moisture absorption is that much better.” However, Schroeder noted, a 5-inch downpour did produce some drowned-out spots. Hatlewick explained when you have good aggregate stability in your soil with irregularity and lots of open spore spaces, it actually acts like a sponge and can handle these bigger rainfalls. “It basically expands like your kitchen sponge and the plants draw up the moisture as needed. Where you don’t have that structure is where you end up with compacted, almost concrete conditions, because all those soil particles pack together.” Hatlewick also reminded that when a raindrop hits the earth at 20 miles per hour, it can move soil particles up to 5 feet horizontally and 5 feet vertically. “All this movement is taking soil nutri-

ents along too.” Hatlewick added incorporating cover crops into a farming operation is a trial-and-error process. “You’ve got to make a plan,” she said, “then be willing to throw that plan out the window and come up with Plan B. Sometimes adapting on the fly and making decisions on the go is a good bail-out procedure. And it’s important to think also if this decision today goes backward next year, am I prepared to adjust. In a nut shell, it’s long-term planning rather than shortterm planning.” Schroeder used 28 percent nitrogen applied when corn is anywhere from 6 inches to maybe 2 feet in height. A ValMar air seeder is part of this N bar so he can “air blow” his cover crop at the same time — thus saving another trip. Cover crops in standing corn means fewer species that will tolerate the shading of the corn. If seeding cover crops into standing corn, think in terms of hybrids that aren’t so tall. Also, upright leaves that droop will shade much of the soil beneath them. Summed up Hatlewick, “We just love

Renville County Soil and Water Conservation District Administrator Holly Hatlewick studies soil cultures on several area farms.

to talk about how much ‘life’ is now in Dean’s soils. With this mixture he has really helped manage the livestock beneath the surface of his fields. Root activity of these cover crops is often 27 inches and deeper. When you crumble his soil, you almost sense it’s alive. it’s moving with living organisms, microbes and fungi and bacteria. I call that your ‘beneficial livestock’ beneath the soil surface. In Dean’s soils, you can see the streaks and lines where the earthworms are carrying his top soil down further into the profile. He’s actually building top soil at a very rapid rate. USDA says it takes 500 to 1,000 years to grow an inch of top soil. I’m certain Dean has grown more than an inch of top soil in the last 15 years since he got into reduced tillage and cover crops too.” Said Schroeder, “Our goal is to leave the soil better than we found it.” Hatlewick can be reached via email at Holly.Hatlewick@MN.NACDNE.NET and by phone at (320) 523-1559. Schroeder’s email address is dean27mj@gmail.com. v

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Sugar could make for sweet corn and soybean yields By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer “Sugar in the mornin’, Sugar in the evenin’, Sugar at suppertime. Be my little sugar and love me all the time!” GIBBON, Minn. — Made famous by the McGuire Sisters in 1958, this sweet song may be part of your corn fertilization next year! No, not the song, but the strange idea of using sugar to sweeten up your corn yields is not just poppycock. At Becks’ Seed’s Practical Farm Research Tour on Sept. 11, Research Agronomist Travis Burnett shared some intriguing information about an Ohio State University horticulturist adding sugar when transplanting apple trees. The result was more apples and healthier apple trees. ”That intrigued us,” Burnett admitted. “We thought if that works for trees, why wouldn’t it work for corn and soybeans? So we started testing sugar as a fertilize additive at our Ohio location in 2015. The intent is to feed the microbiology within the soil. The Ohio State study was simply adding four pounds of sugar in the transplant hole. “That first year we tested regular granulated table sugar such as you find in the baking aisle at Walmart. So using our plot planter, we put four pounds of sugar in the furrow with water as the carrier. We saw double digit yield increases that first year at this single location.

“That excited us because the cost of sugar is minimal — less than $2 per acre. So we started identifying some of the challenges with using table sugar. The biggest being it is hard to keep in solution. That led us to looking at different types of sugar. The one we landed on and like a lot is feed grade dextrose — a livestock additive and available at most any feed mill. It’s a much finer material, easier to get into solution and it stays in solution. “We did some jar tests using water and ortho-phosphorus starter fertilizers. The dextrose stayed in solution in both jars … after two weeks we finally just dumped the jars. Now we are using 6-24-6, an ortho-phosphorus starter fertilizer in furrow applications. We are using a 5-gallon rate to which we add the different types of sugars. The feed grade dextrose seems to find its way to the top of the performance charts most frequently. Perhaps a reason is the ortho-phosphorus has a higher sugar load at the rates we are testing.” Burnett related they picked up interesting results last year which was a really wet spring. “Across our six PFR locations, our planting dates were spread out over a pretty long period. We had some early planting; we had some late planting. We noted the sugar working better with the late planting dates. We’re thinking maybe that is a soil temperature issue. “The sugar is an energy source for the soil microbes. So we think with the early planting, the microbes weren’t yet awake and thus this little amount of sugar was not having much impact. With the later

Organic matter helps hold rain water SOIL HEALTH, from pg. 15 reducing loss through leaching. But could that be reduced further? “We want to see if by using strip till and cover crops we can cut nitrogen and not affect yield.” In 2017, using his usual replications, he applied at two rates — the normal rate of 140 pounds per acre, and a reduced rate of 110 pounds per acre. “We did not take a yield hit for lesser nitrogen,” Tholen said. This year he is experimenting with rates of 135, 100, and 65 pounds per acre. “What we want to do is find the nitrogen rate where we start seeing a lower yield.” Tholen is constantly seeking to find out what works best. He tries seeding and drilling for cover crops — including seeding cereal rye while combining corn. When he started, he interseeded three species into the corn. This year he’s using eight. He can recount numerous benefits that have been shown from studies of cover crops. “Organic carbon and organic nitrogen increase dramatically in fields where diverse cover crops are planted as compared to monoculture — just corn or beans alone. Adding cover crops can increase organic

matter 15 times faster than rotations without cover crops. Organic matter is slow to build back up. By adding cover crops we can do that faster.” Studies show that one percent organic matter will hold 27,000 gallons of water per acre. Typically, Tholen does not find water standing in his fields after a big rain. This wet year has been a real test. While the heavy rains in early July did not drown out any crop, even his already-saturated soil couldn’t swallow all of the water. No gullies were created, but yellow lower leaves showed the beans suffered from water shock. For Randy Tholen, successful farming is all about building soil health. It’s a long-term vision, “but not as long-term as you might think,” he said. “We’ve seen dramatic improvements in a matter of a few years. That’s why we do what we do. Stop erosion and build healthy soil. Those two go hand-in-hand. I can get more excited about seeing what the cover crops are going to do than seeing what the corn and beans are going to do.” He’s not only excited about what he’s doing and learning, he is always ready to share it with others through his PowerPoint presentation or a phone call. You can reach him at (507) 993-1803 or by email at rethole7@gmail.com. v

planting dates, microbe activity in the soil was much greater. And that little bit of sugar was kind of like an energy drink for those microbes. Like drinking a Mountain Dew right after you get up. Burnett said it apparently relates to the mineralization process going on in your soils. “The more biological activity, the more organic matter breaking down and turning over those nutrients … we think mineralization is being activated by the addition of sugar. Basically, this sugar increases the rate of biological activity in your soils. Now we’re looking at different planting dates to see if that effects sugar impact.” His team is also checking the impact of sugar with soybeans. Furrow apps aren’t consistent, but foliar applications are measurable. And with commodity prices continuing in the tank, Burnett suggests just a bit of sugar applied in the furrow can be costeffective. Their 2017 data shows about a 2.5 bushel increase on soybean yields in six tests in five states. “With double-digit increases on corn, do the math with $4 corn and you have a good ROI,” he summed up. “This is one I encourage people to try because it is such a low cost. Just because it works on our testing plots doesn’t mean it will do the same in your soils. But a trial run is a starting point.” Mention was made of a South Dakota grower using ‘sugar enriched’ starter fertilizer furrow applied on 8,000 acres of corn! Becks has not yet used sugar enriched fertilizers on different types such as offensive vs. less-aggressive; but Burnett suggested that likely could show some differences. However, for the past two years, this innovative seed firm has been doing ‘time of day’ research applications on foliar nutrition products at 9 a.m., 3 p.m. and 9 p.m. Intent here is to determine if the stomato (leaf openings) are more receptive to foliar-applied products in the morning than midafternoon. “A heavy morning dew contributes 162 gallons of water per acre,” Burnett said. “Yet during the heat of the day, you see corn leaves rolled up trying to conserve moisture. The theory being that with stomato pores being open in the morning, fungicides should be applied in the mornings. “The take-home on these studies is if you are going to spray a foliar nutrition product such as VersaMax, perhaps it is wise to prioritize your spray times. Do morning sprays if you are working with offensive type hybrids,” summed up Burnett noting this applies only to fungicides. Beck’s Practical Farm Research program is to test situations that farmers need to make decisions about — like how to manage nitrogen, whether or not to foliar feed a crop, and testing products currently available for different cultural practices. For more information, contact Jim Schwartz, Director of PFR and Agronomy at jim.schwartz@ beckshybrids.com. You can reach Burnett at travis. burnett@beckshybrids.com. v


CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, EAT, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CO RN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, DRINK, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CO RN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, C ORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, SLEEP, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CO RN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, CORN, PAGE 20

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MARKETING

Grain Outlook Little movement in corn market Editor’s Note: Joe Lardy, CHS Hedging research analyst, is sitting in this week for Phyllis Nystrom, the regular “Grain Outlook” columnist. The following marketing analysis is for the week ending Oct. 26. CORN — The corn market just keeps plugging along in a sideways trading range between $3.60 and $3.75.25. Since Oct. 1, the open or the close of December corn futures has been in that range every day. The weekly change for the December futures was a slim gain of just three-quarters of a cent. Corn inspections came in on the low end of expectations and was JOE LARDY the first time since February that CHS Hedging Inc. inspections were under 1 million St. Paul tons. The inspection pace is just a wee bit behind the U.S. Department of Agriculture level by only 3 million bushels. Corn export sales were just terrible. Sales of just 13.7 million bushels is the lowest total of the marketing year and the lowest total since December 2017! There were cancellations of 12.4 million bushels which really cut into this week’s sales. Weekly ethanol production rose 13,000 barrels per day to 1.02 million bpd. This is below the 1.068 million pace needed to meet USDA estimates. Ethanol stocks fell 233,000 barrels to 23.9 million barrels. Brazil reports that the main corn production state of Parana has corn planting at 90 percent complete vs. 89 percent a year ago. The state of Mato Grosso is 50 percent planted. AgRural says Brazil’s overall first season corn planting is 48 percent complete vs. a 45 percent average. Argentine corn planting is 34 percent complete vs. 33 percent last year. Conditions there are 30 percent good-to-excellent, and 24 percent poor-to-very poor, with dryness in the state of Cordoba. Outlook: The next World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report is still two weeks away, so harvest results should be the biggest driver for prices in the short run. Results we have seen are overall pretty good, but there is much more variability than we are seeing in soybeans. This variability has some believing that the national yield could decline in the November report. SOYBEANS — With the exception of a few days See LARDY, pg. 23

Cash Grain Markets corn/change* soybeans/change*

Stewartville Edgerton Jackson Janesville Cannon Falls Sleepy Eye Average:

$3.00 -.05 $3.20 -.05 $3.15 -.05 $3.13 -.05 $3.06 -.01 $3.12 -.08

$3.11

$7.31 -.37 $7.52 -.42 $7.40 -.52 $7.43 -.51 $7.34 -.34 $7.38 -.47

$7.40

Year Ago Average: $2.89 $8.97 Grain prices are effective cash close on Oct. 30. *Cash grain price change represents a two-week period.

Livestock Angles Will high cattle numbers stall rally? As we end the month of October, the livestock markets appear to show some promise of prices moving higher — at least in the short term. After either trading in a sideways pattern in the cattle market or a large sell-off as in the hog market, both are seeing some potential recovery as we head into the month of November. The cattle market experienced a strong cash trade on the last Friday of October as packers quickly moved their bids higher to acquire inventory. The high price paid was $115 — substantially higher than the previous day and the highest paid in JOE TEALE weeks. The beef cutout has been Broker improving daily for several weeks Great Plains Commodity which inevitably has improved Afton, Minn. the packer margins to allow the aggressiveness in the acquisition of live inventory. Export business has been fairly good — also helping in giving a positive outlook for the short term. The only question is, how far can this rally take the market at a time with numbers still fairly abundant. Weights are also a bit of a concern as beef tonnage remains more than a year ago. So the demand must stay positive to offset or overtake the supply of cattle into the remainder of the year. Producers should remain in contact with market conditions and protect inventories as needed. The hog market has shown signs of stabilizing after the past several weeks of seeing price depreciation. Cash and pork cutouts have fallen off recent See TEALE, pg. 24

Grain Angles A producer’s post-harvest list As producers across the Midwest finish up harvest, they’ll shift their mindset towards getting bookwork up to date and preparing for tax planning. As a lender, I’m continually thinking of ways to help my clients succeed and be better prepared. I want to share some thoughts for producers to pay attention to with year-end just around the corner. It’s no secret that 2018 brought a lot of challenges. The weather wasn’t very cooperative — at least not in southern Minnesota where I’m located. In addition, the markets were volatile with projected record crops and the potential impacts on demand due to trade issues. It is easy to blame these things that we have JOSH SWANSON no control over as producers. Compeer Financial Officer However, I’d challenge you to Worthington, Minn. reflect on what else went wrong in your own operation this year that was within your control. Those items are the ones we should be focusing on for next year. Along the same lines, what went right in 2018? Were there changes or executed plans which resulted positively in your operation? It can be easier to focus on the negatives — especially the ones that we can’t control. I encourage you to recognize your successes and use them as motivation for next year. If you don’t already know your yields, you will shortly. It’s the final piece in determining your breakeven price per bushel. I’ve spoken to many producers throughout this harvest season who have already analyzed their profitability per field to assist in next years’ rent negotiations and decisions. Analyzing profitability and break-evens on a per field basis gives you the perspective to know where to invest time and resources. These numbers will also play a large part in budget planning for the year ahead. Analyzing yield and profitability data helps to determine where longer term investments in tile, soil testing and fertility will provide the greatest return. Performing this analysis also helps producers quantify and measure where past investments are paying off. Perhaps your yields are better than expected — causing your breakeven price per bushel to be lower. In contrast, your yields may be less than expected, requiring increased pricing targets in your marketing plan. Having your breakeven figures up to date at the end of harvest is critical for making adjustments to your marketing plan. I recommend producSee SWANSON, pg. 23

Information in the above columns is the writer’s opinion. It is no way guaranteed and should not be interpreted as buy/sell advice. Futures trading always involves a certain degree of risk.


THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/ NOVEMBER 9, 2018

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PAGE 23

Last week’s soybean export sales were ‘a disaster’ LARDY, from pg. 22 last week, soybeans have been stuck in an $8.40 to $8.70 trading range since late September. Soybean inspections were pretty good this week at nearly 41 million bushels. Argentina and Egypt were the two largest destinations this week. Normally, China dominates the top spot this time of the year. Inspection continue to lag the USDA pace by 44 million bushels. Export sales, however, were a disaster. Sales were only 7.8 million bushels which is the lowest total of the marketing year. This is also the lowest total since May 31. China also cancelled another cargo of 2.2 million bushels this week. There was also a flash sale announcement of 200,000 tons to unknown. This is the first positive flash sale we’ve seen since the huge bean sale to Mexico on Sept. 26. U.S. soybean condition ratings were unchanged at 66 percent good/excellent. Soybean harvest made good progress this week and is 53 percent complete vs. the five-year average of 69 percent. This year remains the second-slowest bean harvest in 30 years. The weather remains favorable for harvest and we

should see a big jump again next Monday — bringing the harvest progress closer to average. The next big USDA report is still two weeks away. Until then, the market will get price direction from harvest results. So far, we have been seeing really strong soybean yields which is in line with the USDA’s estimate of a record yield. The USDA is predicting that 12 U.S. states will set a new soybean yield record this year. Soybean planting in Brazil is moving along at record pace with roughly 45 percent of the crop in the ground. Weather remains good (maybe a touch too wet) and will keep the fast pace going. The fast pace will mean Brazil will be harvesting in January and will be able to keep the pipeline to China relatively well supplied. Traders believe China has soybean coverage for 85 percent of November needs, 40 percent of December and 10 percent of January needs. The African swine flu continues to spread across China with several new cases reported this week. There are some that believe the problem is way bigger than China is publicly acknowledging. The United States is stepping up surveillance to keep the disease out of the country. Scientists have said that a vaccine is at least 10 years away due to the complexity of this

virus. Changes to genetics might be a quicker way to combat the disease. If this virus continues to spread and the killing of pigs expands, this will factor into Chinese feed demand. Outlook: It doesn’t look like China will be returning to our markets anytime soon. That leaves the market to deal with the supply side of the market and bean yields look to be as good as advertised and worthy of the USDA record outlook.   WHEAT ­— We need to touch on wheat this week as that was the market which seemed to have the most activity and talking points. Egypt’s General Authority for Supply Commodities is tendering for wheat, for Dec 11-20 shipment. The lowest offer was two cargoes of U.S. soft red winter wheat at $219/metric ton free on board, offered by Cargill. When you add in freight costs, U.S. wheat was the first and third most expensive. However, Egypt pretty much bought all that was offered except the two most expensive offers, which meant one cargo of U.S. wheat was purchased. The futures market was quick to rally prices which immediately cut into the competitive we had in the world market. v

Calculate working capital needs during year-end tax planning SWANSON, from pg. 22 ers put their marketing plan in writing with target prices and dates. It will help you make decisions. The document can and should be modified with changes in circumstances. Be aware of the larger market picture and focus less on the day-to-day price movements. Also, remember the fundamentals of seasonal price and basis trends, and take advantage of on farm storage by making forward sales. If you haven’t already, it’s time to start a 2019 sales and marketing plan along with a 2019 cash flow projection. There will be crop insurance claims in some areas due to lower yields and prices. While it’s still fresh in your mind, review your crop insurance plan and make some notes for next year of any changes you would like to discuss with your crop insurance provider. I’ve heard it said that the perfect crop insurance plan could be written in the fall after the growing season.

We learn each year and should try to incorporate those lessons into making a better plan for next year. As you think about year-end cash flow needs and tax planning, you should also be calculating your working capital position and whether it’s adequate for 2019. I recommend at least $200 per acre or 25 percent of your gross revenues. If you are short of your working capital target, there are things you can do to improve it. Working capital not only prepares your operation for adversity, but also puts you in a position to take advantage of opportunities. I encourage you to be proactive in discussing your financial position with your lender. In the last year or two, many have put off machinery trades or purchases for a variety of reasons. If you’re considering a replacement, make analyzing your cash flow and working capital position a priority

to tax considerations. Take inventory of your machinery line and determine if there are any underutilized or unused pieces and sell them. I find that the fewer things we have around can help make the decisionmaking process more efficient. There are many different machinery ownership strategies and agronomic practices to produce a crop. Challenge yourself to step back once in awhile and consider different ways of looking at machinery investment. Although I’ve heard it many times before, it bears repeating: at the end of each growing season, take the time to count your blessings and be grateful for the important things in your life. It’s because of those reasons that we get up every day and work in this industry. For additional insights from Swanson and others from the Compeer team, visit Compeer.com v

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THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

October cold storage report is ‘unabashedly bearish’ This column was written for the marketing week ending Oct. 26. Strong gains in milk per cow kept U.S. milk output above that of a year ago for the 58th consecutive month. Preliminary September data in the top 23 producing states shows output at 16.4 billion pounds, up 1.5 percent from September 2017. The 50-state total, at a slightly bullish 17.38 billion pounds, was up 1.3 percent. Revisions lowered the initial 50-state August estimate by 43 million pounds to 18.252 billion pounds, 1.1 percent above a year ago. September cow numbers in the 50 states totaled 9.37 million head. This is down 12,000 from August and 32,000 less than a year ago — the third time cow numbers were below a

News and information for Minnesota and Northern Iowa dairy producers year ago since May 2016. August numbers By Lee Mielke were revised lower by 21,000. Output per cow averaged 1,855 pounds, up 30 pounds from a year ago. California output jumped a hefty 4.8 percent, spurred by a 95-pound gain per cow outweighing the loss of 11,000 cows from a year ago. Wisconsin MIELKE MARKET WEEKLY

Pork cutouts drifting lower TEALE, from pg. 22 highs made in the month of July and are showing signs of recovering at this time. The futures market, which has seen a deep discount to the cash index, has closed that gap in the past few days suggesting the futures market is overdone. Pork cutouts are still drifting lower. However, movement of product has picked as the cutout has dropped — indicating interest in demand. Exports continue to remain good, also helping the demand picture. The prob-

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showed a 2.0 percent increase on a 45-pound gain per cow, though numbers were down 4,000. Idaho was up 1.6 percent, thanks to 4,000 more cows and a 20-pound increase per cow. New York inched up 0.8 percent, on a 25-pound gain per cow outweighing 3,000 fewer cows. Pennsylvania dropped 4.3 percent on 8,000 fewer cows and a drop of 45 pounds per cow. Minnesota was up 1.5 percent, on a 50-pound gain per cow offsetting a loss of 6,000 cows. Elsewhere, Michigan was down 2.1 percent on 6,000 fewer cows and output per cow being down 15 pounds. New Mexico inched up 0.9 percent on a 40-pound gain per cow. Cow numbers were down 4,000. Texas upped its output 8.9 percent, thanks to a 75-pound gain per cow and 24,000 more cows. Vermont was down 0.9 percent on 2,000 fewer cows; though output per cow was up 10 pounds. Florida was down 8.7 percent on 5,000 fewer cows and a drop of 70 pounds per cow. Washington State was up 2.2 percent on a 20-pound gain per cow and 3,000 additional cows milked.

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Dairy cow culling dropped in September and trailed that of a year ago, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s latest Livestock Slaughter report. An estimated 247,400 head were slaughtered under federal inspection, down 32,300 from August and 2,200 below a year ago or 0.9 percent. A total 2.3 million head have been culled in the nine-month period, up 99,200 head or 4.4 percent from 2017. n September butter stocks were down from August, but well above 2017 and the seventh consecutive month they topped year ago levels, according to the USDA’s latest Cold Storage report. The Sept. 30 inventory slipped to 283.1 million pounds. This is down only 7.8 million pounds or 2.7 percent from August and the slowest September decline since 2012, according to HighGround Dairy, but was a bearish 27.2 million pounds or 10.7 percent above September 2017. American-type cheese, which includes cheddar, climbed to 792.4 million pounds. This is up 6 million See MIELKE, pg. 25

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Mitigation program purchases 4.1 million pounds of cheese HighGround Dairy’s Lucas Fuess pointed out in MIELKE, from pg. 24 the Oct. 29 Dairy Radio Now broadcast that even pounds, or 0.8 percent from August, and 11.9 milthough dairy commercial disappearance and exports lion or 1.6 percent above a year ago. are strong, that hasn’t been enough to help the barOther cheese crept to 543.1 million pounds, which rel cheese price. Most exports are blocks, he said, is up 2 million pounds from August or 0.4 percent and that has contributed to the big price spread from August, and 40.9 million or 8.1 percent above a between them. year ago. Dairy Market News warns that some Midwestern That put the total cheese inventory at 1.37 billion cheesemakers are beginning to build inventories as pounds, up 7.8 million pounds or 0.6 percent from buyers hesitate to take on extra cheese while marAugust and a bearish 58.3 million pounds or 4.5 kets falter. Cheese producers have generally had a percent above a year ago and the 47th consecutive healthy demand season and new customers are month stocks topped a year ago. showing interest. Retail demand and prices have HighGround Dairy called the report “unabashedly also shown relative stability. But, record price splits bearish, showing much less product than normal between process cheese and blocks, followed by conmoving out of storage in September — a month that tinuing price slides “have taken their toll.” Cheese usually sees end users begin to pull product to meet production remains steady to slower with spot milk fourth quarter holiday demand. Strong stocks will prices at 50 cents to $1.50 over Class. weigh on the market and limit any price upside in Western cheese makers say there is a lot of milk both butter and cheese, an especially concerning and a lot of cheese. Inventories are heavy, especially development in cheese prices which have seen confor barrels and mozzarella. End users suggest they siderable weakness in recent weeks.” are getting many offers, and some at discounted n prices. Milk production is near low tide for the year but there is plenty to keep facilities running at or Cheese prices fell the week of Oct. 22, taking near full output. Manufacturers report demand is futures with them, but then rallied a bit. Block good, but not great and it has taken some time for cheddar fell to $1.47 per pound on Oct. 24, the lowholiday retail demand to get started. “Export sales est price since June 26, but closed Oct. 26 at seem to ebb and flow according to price, with pro$1.5150. This is up 1.75 cents on the week, ending cessors’ phones ringing more as cheese prices fall.” AD COPY INSTRUCTIONS Please read attached email three weeks of decline, but is 23 cents below a year ago. The barrels plunged to $1.2075 Oct. 24, which n is the lowest price since June 27 and an earREP shotNAMESSpot CODE AND ALREADY ONtoAD THE butter fell $2.1950 perLAND pound 3.7461 on Oct.x23,” from a nine-year low. However, barrels finished on the lowest price since Sept. 5, but closed Oct. 26 at Oct. 26 at $1.25 which is down 1.75 cents on the $2.2325. This is down 2.75 cents on the week and 7 week, 45.5 cents below a year ago, and 26.5 cents cents below a year ago. Twenty-eight cars found below the blocks. Sixteen sales of block were report- new homes on the week. ed for the week and 54 of barrel. FC Stone dairy broker Dave Kurzawski wrote in his Oct. 23 Early Morning Update, “This is the first time in 12 years that the price of barrel cheese fell below $1.30 during the month of October.” He also points out that the 10-year October block price average is $1.7761, far above where it is today. The USDA announced their awarded solicitation for the Trade Mitigation Food Purchase and Distribution Program. The awarded volume is just over 4.1 million pounds of processed cheese and just over 600,000 pounds of natural American. Kurzawski says, “While that didn’t scratch the USDA maximum volumes, the announcement comes a bit earlier than expected. 4.1 million pounds of barrel cheese is about 0.64 percent of total U.S. November and December cheddar production. However, given that barrel cheese is sub $1.30, Darin Zanke New Ulm/Mankato Area there may not be a finer time to source at least David Baldner some of that product sooner rather than later.” Austin, MN Michael Terry But, with plenty of milk being produced, along Fairbault, MN with plenty of cheese, plenty in inventory, and cheese prices falling, buyers will likely hold off some of their purchases — not being concerned over shortages and big price rises ahead.

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FC Stone blames continued weakness in the world fat market “finally spilling over in the United States.” But Dairy Market News reports that cream remains tight in the Midwest, thus some churns are running solely to meet contract needs. “There are mixed reports on salted vs. unsalted bulk butter demand. Some contacts relay that unsalted butter demand is trending up this fall, while others report salted demand remains stronger than that of the unsalted variety. Supply demand imbalances regarding unsalted butter may become a concern with the limited cream supplies.” The western butter market undertone seems to be strong. Several reports suggest that buyers are looking to purchase butter for the upcoming holidays See MIELKE, pg. 27

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THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Teat health presents extra challenges in winter weather It’s time to prepare your milk quality program for winter. “Healthy teat skin is crucial to help cows fend off intramammary infections,” says Keith Engel, GEA dairy farm hygiene and supplies specialist. “By addressing winter weather and teat skin condition before the temperatures drop, you can minimize damage and loss of profitability from elevations in somatic cell count levels.” Here are five ways to help keep teats healthy in winter: Precondition the skin. Teat skin thickness changes rapidly during extreme temperature changes. “Increasing the level and number of emollients in your post dip well before winter can help precondition teat skin by making it more pliable and ready for weather changes,” says Engel. A chlorine dioxide teat dip containing lactic acid can help exfoliate the teat skin to slough off excess

keratin. This type of teat dip helps reduce hyperkera- Check your detacher settings so they are not too low tosis and prepare teats for colder temperatures. with your milk flow rate. If settings are too low, they WE BUILD OUR STALLS RIGHT! “Smoother teat ends also harbor fewer bacteria can cause excessive compression on teat ends. a look atproceand are easier to clean,” says Engel. Review milking procedures.Take Milking our tubing withhighdures help maintain healthy teats and harvest Develop a winter teat dip plan. Using the unequaled corrosion quality milk. The ideal milking procedure includes appropriate post dip to help control mastitis is just as time of 90 to protection! essential in the winter as it is during summer. appropriate stimulation, milk letdown 120 seconds, clean teats and proper unit attachment Emollients are a critical ingredient in winter teat Freudenthal Tubing has been and alignment. dip. engineered for your specific Have the housing environment ready cold requirements wherefor strength “Emollients help protect, heal and soften skin in weather. Having the cows’ housing environment and corrosion resistance are Release Head Locks Panel CORROSION harsh winter elements,” says Engel. “A Auto successful critical design factors. ready for winter can help minimize the weather’s PROTECTION winter teat dip should also include an effective gerimpact on teats. Environmental adjustments could micide proven to kill mastitis-causing bacteria.” include bedding moreCS-60 frequently using less Comfortand Tie Stall When weather hits below freezing: Use a winter recycled bedding. teat dip with a high level of emollients (74 to 76 perThe Toughest Consider adding wind blocks to help reduce wind cent) with a low enough freezing point to protect your Stallsalleys speeds and avoid chapping or frostbite. Keep cows.  and holding pens clean with frequent scraping. on the Maintain equipment automa• Providesand superior optimize lunge area This article was submitted by GEA North America.v market, tion. Vacuum and pulsation level settings too low or • Much stronger than our guaranteed too high increase teat stress teat ends. competitors’and beamaggravate systems

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Exports to Mexico chipping away at dry milk stockpiles MIELKE, from pg. 25 and baking season. Retail and food service orders are more solid as buyers replenish inventories. Manufacturing plants are also busy producing butter and keeping up with demand. But supplies of cream have tightened a bit, contributing to a rise in cream prices. Another challenge is the ability to find adequate trucks and drivers at a cost-effective price for butter deliveries. Grade A nonfat dry milk inched a half-cent lower on the week to 86.75 cents per pound — 11.75 cents above a year ago. Seven trades were reported on the week. Cash dry whey saw the biggest drops ever in its seven-month existence, losing a nickel on Oct. 22 and again on Oct. 23, falling to 47.5 cents per pound — the lowest price since Aug. 23. It closed on Oct. 26 at 47 cents per pound, down 10.5 cents on the week, with 24 loads exchanging hands on the week. FC Stone points out that up until this week, it took three months for the whey to accumulate over 20 trades. n

Dairy margins weakened the first half of October on a combination of higher feed and lower milk prices, according to the latest Margin Watch from Chicagobased Commodity and Ingredient Hedging LLC. “Margins remain positive and generally above average over the past ten years, although not as attractive as they have been recently,” the Margin Watch states. “Milk prices have been slipping since early September despite some encouraging domestic and global indications. August dairy product exports were robust, mostly topping year-ago levels with strong demand from Mexico for nonfat dry milk helping to chip away at large stockpiles. In addition, a blistering drought this summer in the EU has lowered milk production on the continent with concerns over tightening supply working to boost demand. The European Commission sold 2,499 metric tons of SMP from its intervention storage program in the latest tender which is now occurring twice a month, and the price while steady with the previous two tenders was higher than tenders in the first seven months of the year. The Commission now holds 485 million pounds of SMP in storage compared to over 800 million at this time last year.

Lower heifer costs, boost fertility It’s a great time to own cows, but only if you have a competitive cost structure with the right genetics and management to compete in today’s marketplace, Rick Funston said. Funston is a reproductive physiologist with the University of Nebraska-North Platte. He addressed 200 cattlemen at the Feeding Quality Forum this summer in Sioux City, Iowa. While input costs should be minimized in times like these, “breakeven at best” for many, he said, it won’t pay to compromise fertility in the process. “Fertility is the most important trait in beef production, especially in the cow-calf sector, but all the way to the plate,” Funston said. “If we don’t have a live calf, we don’t have anything for the consumer.” That’s why he focuses much of his work on replacement female development. “It’s a huge financial cost before she produces a weaned calf,” Funston said. “We have to look at lowinput development so we don’t have exorbitant costs for a female that’s difficult to get rebred.” Relatively cheaper feed such as corn residue may bring slower gains, but he noted that’s often no problem for five-weight weaned heifers that only need to gain 250 pounds. When the optimum percentage get bred and move on to better nutrition on summer grass, they respond more favorably than their peers developed to a higher weight on better feed. The slower-start heifers rebreed at a higher rate and stay in the herd longer because their diets fluctuate less than heifers given

every early feed advantage. “You feed them up on whatever your byproduct is, get them all pregnant and say, ‘Oh, by the way, you are never going to see that again.’ A lot of our work,” Funston said, “is focused on let’s treat that heifer like she is going to be treated as a cow.” Aiming for 95% or more bred is folly, he added. “If I can get that, am I really selecting for the more fertile ones?” Better to get cattle to rebreed a few points lower than that, but on low-cost feed such as corn stalks. Data on early-born steers has shown their advantage from feedyard to packinghouse and beef quality grade, but recent data also shows heifers born in the first 21 days of a calving season are heavier at weaning, gain at the average rate after that and begin cycling before the breeding season. They have a higher pregnancy rate, more in the first 21 days, breed back sooner and wean a heavier calf than average. Unfortunately, many producers cull the early-born heifers for being too big, not realizing they are simply older. “This is a mistake,” Funston said, urging adoption of some quick visual tool such as notching ears of those early heifers. “Get rid of those that are born late.” Heifers most likely to settle the first time and then rebreed on time are more likely to stay in the herd long enough to make a profit. This article was written by Katrina Huffstutler for Certified Angus Beef LLC. v

“USDA’s October World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report showed a surprise reduction in the forecasts for both the corn and soybean crops. Corn production was projected at 14.778 billion bushels, down 49 million from September with the yield lowered to 180.7 bushels per acre vs. 181.3 last month. Soybean production was projected down 3 million bushels to 4.69 billion, with a 600,000 drop in harvested acres offsetting a slight increase in yield to 53.1 bushels per acre,” the Margin Watch concluded. n USDA’s latest Crop Progress report shows 49 percent of the U.S. corn crop was harvested as of the week of Oct. 21, up from 39 percent the previous week and 37 percent that week a year ago. This compares to 47 percent for the latest five-year average. Condition wise, 68 percent is rated good to excellent. The soybeans are at 53 percent harvested, up from 38 percent the previous week and compares to 67 percent a year ago and 69 percent in the five-year average. Sixty-six percent is rated good to excellent. The cotton harvest is at 39 percent, up from 32 percent the previous week and 36 percent a year ago, and compares to 33 percent for the average, with just 34 percent rated good to excellent compared to 56 See MIELKE, pg. 28

255 16th Street South St. James, MN 56081


PAGE 28

MILKER’S MESSAGE www.thelandonline.com — “Where Farm and Family Meet”

THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Perdue: Second trade mitigation payment may be made MIELKE, from pg. 27 percent a year ago. n In politics, the National Milk Producers Federation called on the USDA this week to “better reflect the dairy-farm incomes lost to tariff retaliation when it calculates its next round of trade mitigation payments.” In a letter sent to Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, NMPF Chairman and Missouri dairy farmer Randy Mooney cited four studies illustrating that milk producers have experienced more than $1 billion in lost income since May, when the retaliatory tariffs were first placed on dairy goods in response to U.S. levies on for-

eign products. In contrast, the first round of USDA trade mitigation payments, announced in August, allocated only $127 million to dairy farmers. “We are ever-grateful for your advocacy on agricultural trade, which is crucial to the economic health of our industry,” wrote Mooney, “However, our members are greatly concerned about the level of aid that was provided in the initial effort.” The letter details four analyses, including two independent studies using sophisticated economic modeling. Each show losses to dairy producers far above USDA’s initial payment level. Perdue has said a second trade mitigation payment to producers may be

made this year after additional calculations of farmer losses. Mooney wrote Perdue, “We are eager to work with you on a plan that better reflects the struggles dairy producers across the country have faced due to the tariffs.” Meanwhile, the U.S. Trade Representative this week announced progress in talks with the Philippines under the bilateral Trade and Investment Framework Agreement. A joint NMPF/U.S. Dairy Export Council press release stated, “U.S. dairy producers and processors appreciate the Administration’s work to preserve and deepen market access ties with a country that purchased $243 million in U.S. dairy products last year. “In a joint statement released about the recent achievements in resolving

trade issues under the TIFA, both governments agreed that they should work together to benefit agriculture. This is viewed as a promising development given Southeast Asia’s growing market for dairy products.” Cooperatives Working Together extended 12 offers of export assistance to members to help sell 1.407 million pounds of cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese and 264,555 pounds of whole milk powder. The product is contracted for delivery in Asia, the Middle East, North Africa and Oceania through April 2019. Lee Mielke is a syndicated columnist who resides in Everson, Wash. His weekly column is featured in newspapers across the country and he may be reached at lkmielke@juno.com. v

Reduced crop insurance premiums available to Iowa DES MOINES — Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig  recently announced farmers who are using cover crops and not receiving state or federal cost share can sign up for a $5 per acre premium reduction on their crop insurance. A new online application process is available to make it easier for farmers to sign up for the program. Applications will be taken until Jan. 15, 2019. Cover crop acres currently enrolled in state and/or federal programs are not eligible for this program. The premium reduction will be avail-

ERAGE COMES STANDARD

able for fall-planted cover crops with a spring-planted cash crop. Farmers can sign up for the program now at www.cleanwateriowa.org/covercropdemo. Farmers who participate will receive the reduction on their crop insurance in 2019. Farmers are encouraged to sign up after their cover crop seeding has been completed. This article was submitted by the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship. v

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Steffes Auction Calendar 2018

For more info, call: 1-800-726-8609 or visit our website: SteffesGroup.com Opens November 1 & Closes November 8 Stearns County, MN Farm/Recreational Land Auction, Waite Park, MN, 137+/- Acres Friday, November 2 at 11AM Schoon Farms Retirement Auction, Beardsley, MN Opens November 2 & Closes November 9 Robert & Tessie Ronsberg Farm Auction, Downer, MN, Timed Online Auction Opening November 5 & Closing November 13 Art Dubuque Farms Retirement & Dan Dubuque Estate Auction, Grand Forks, ND, Timed Online Auction Tuesday, November 6 at 11AM Bottineau County, ND Land Auction, 988+/- Acres, multiple tracts in Newborg & Lewis TWPS Wednesday, November 7 at 12:00PM Cass County, ND Land Auction, 80+/-Acres in DOWS TWP Wednesday, November 7 at 11AM RV Walsh Farms Inc. Farm Retirement, Niagra, ND Thursday, November 8 at 10AM Leon & Louis Klocke Farm Retirement, Fessenden, ND Friday, November 9 at 10AM Meeker County, MN Farmland Auction, 627+/- Acres in Greenleaf TWP Opens November 9 & Closes November 14 Ag Iron Online Auction - 11/14 Monday, November 12 at 10AM Tom McInnes Jr. Farm Retirement Auction, Hillsboro, ND Tuesday, November 13 at 11AM Major McHenry & McLean County, ND Land Auction, 3,239+/-Acres in north central ND Wednesday, November 14 at 10AM John & Connie Dimmer and Neal & Colleen Dimmer Farm Retirement, Oriska, ND Thursday, November 15 at 10AM Robert Peterson Trust & Ronald Peterson Trust Land Auction, Atwater, MN, 74+/-Acres Thursday, November 15 at 10AM Kelly & Jo Boyd Farm Retirement, Buffalo, ND Friday, November 16 at 10AM Keith Fluth Farm Retirement, Dalbo, MN Friday, November 16 at 10AM Steel Wood Supply Business Liquidation, Detroit Lakes, MN Tuesday, November 20 at 10AM Curt & Marilyn Swanson Farm Retirement, Thief River Falls, MN Wednesday, November 28 at 10AM Ag Iron West Fargo Event, Red River Valley Fairgrounds Deadline to Consign is October 31st!

Successful auctions start in The Land! VERY CLEAN, LOW HOURED FARM MACHINERY RETIREMENT AUCTION MATT MARING

CO.

The Malechas have sold their farm, and after a lifetime of farming they will sell all their clean farm machinery. Auction location: 1736 Millersburg Blvd. W, Dundas MN 55019. (South of Northfield) 5 miles west of Dundas on Co. Rd. 1 and East of 35 W, just 7 miles from Faribault.

Sat., Nov. 10, 2018 9:30 A.M. Sharp

Live & online bidding - For more photos, go to www.maringauction.com

Go to www.maringauction.com Case IH 2096 2WD – IHC 966 – Farmall Super M Tractors Case IH 2096 2WD, 3,485 act. hours, 18.4xR38 w/axle duals, rock box, 3-hyd., 540/1000 PTO, 3-pt., SN:1626578; IHC 966, cab, 5,729 act. hours, 1,791 hours on overhaul, Hiniker 1300 cab, square fenders, good TA, rock box, 2-hyd., SN:U014279; Farmall Super M, narrow front, 13.6x38, 1-hyd., clamshell fender, SN:F6116 John Deere 6620 Titan II Combine – John Deere Combine Heads John Deere 6620 Titan II combine, 2,889 hours, chopper/spreader, rear weights, 28L26 tires 99%, through shop every year, many new parts, SN:X610543; John Deere 216 bean head, SS pan, poly skids, 3” cut, stone guard, light kit, super clean; John Deere 444 corn head, 4R38” John Deere 515 Drill – IHC 5100 Drill – John Deere 1240 Planter, Looks Like New John Deere 515 grain drill, 15’x10” spacing hyd. markers, tire track scraper, Trew-press wheels, SN:X001676; IHC 5100 grain drill, 12’x7” spacings, small seed attachment, press wheels, SN:C009213; John Deere 1240 planter, 4R38” dry fert., corn & soybean, super clean, collector caliber Gravity Flow Grain Wagons & Grain Auger (2) Smaller Grain Bins (2) E-Z Trail 3400 gravity flow wagons w/extensions, 400 bushel on E-Z Trail 1384 gear, 14L16.1 tires; E-Z Trail 500 gravity flow wagon w/E-Z Trail 1585 running gear, 22.5 rubber; Parker 2600 gravity flow wagon, 400 bushel w/12-ton gear, 10:00x20 rubber; (3) MN 250 bushel gravity flow w/extension w/MN 10-ton gears; Kilbros 350 bushel gravity flow w/JD 1065 gear; (2) Bradford 165 gravity flows w/extensions; one with E-Z Trail 872 gear, one with JD 1065 gear; Westfield WR100-31 grain auger, 10”x31’, 540 PTO; MN 175 gravity flow on 7-ton gear, new 9.5x15 rubber; (2) Columbian 1,000 bushel grain bins New Holland 1431 Discbine – New Holland 489 Haybine – New Holland Baler – Excellent Hay Flat Racks - Other Related Items New Holland 489 haybine 9’ cult., excellent cond.; New Holland 1431 windrower discbine, swivel hitch, like new; New Holland 268 smaller square baler, straight chute, excellent cond.; (2) New Holland side rakes, 56 and 256; Case IH 600 blower; (4) Excellent hay flat racks, 8’x15’, 8’x16’ and 7.5’x17’, all with 7-10 ton gears

Clean Like New John Deere 710 Disc Chisel – John Deere 110 Disc – John Deere 980 Field Cult. - Other Tillage Machinery John Deere 980 field cult., 18.5’, 42 sweeps w/6” spacings, 3-bar coil tine harrow, walking tandems, depth control, SN:X004500; John Deere 710 disc chisel, 7-shank, weights, SN:X000199, looks new; John Deere 110 disc, 16’ cone blades, SN:014861; IHC 720 plow, 4x18s, auto reset IHC 153 row crop cult., rolling shields; Kovar 5-section drag on cart, tine harrows; John Deere 400 rotary hoe, 15’, 3-pt., stone guard; Demco 500 gal. crop sprayer, 45’ booms, PTO; J. L. Owens Co. 10’ Cultipacker Katolight Generator Snowblower – Fuel Tanks Farm Related Items Katolight Model 250-S PTO generator, 25 KW single phase, on trailer; Farm King 960 snowblower, 96”, 540 PTO, 3-pt., double auger, hyd. spout; 3-Pt. or trailer log splitter, hyd. drive; (10) Implement tires; CIH 3-pt. QH; Log chains; (2) 500 Gal. fuel tanks w/Gasboy pumps; 200 Gal. crop sprayer w/PTO pump; 3-Pt. bale mover; Bolt on to big square bale mover; Rear axle for 4400 JD combine; ½ -1 -2 hp. elec. motors; Barn fan100 lbs. LP tank John Deere LX279 Lawn Tractor – Polaris 325 ATV – Other Lawn & Garden – Power & Hand Tools John Deere LX279 lawn tractor, 48” deck, 17 hp., 710 hours, liquid cooled, hydro.; 2000 Polaris Magnum 325 ATV, 2x4; TroyBilt Big Red rear tine tiller, 11 hp., elec. start; Craftsman 24” snowblower, 5.5 hp., elec. start; Honda 20” push mower; MoJack Pro lawn mower lift; Stihl 011 chainsaw; North Star 25 gal. lawn sprayer, 12 volt pump w/wand; Agri Fab 100 broadcaster spreader; Rubbermaid poly lawn cart, 1,200 lbs. cap.; Fimco 15 gal. lawn sprayer w/booms, 12 volt; North Star 2.5 G.P.M. 3,000 PSI pressure washer; Werner 24’ extension ladder; Pulsar 3500 watt generator, 7 hp.; Reddy Heater Pro 155; Excellent power & hand tools; Farm Primitives, potato plow, milk cans; Lincoln 225 stick welder (120) Ertl 1/16 Scale Farm Toys – Pedal Tractors – Household Items Toy Farmer, Precision, John Deere, Case IH IH, AC, JD 4WD in boxes, 30, 40, 50, 60 and 70 Series, IH 6388-3588 in box, JD 5020 pedal, Case IH MX270 pedal, IH 1466 pedal, JD A pedal; Kenmore 8.5 CF chest freezer; Whirlpool 21 CF refrigerator/freezer; Dining table & (6) chairs; Dressers; End table All machinery is shedded and is in exceptionally clean condition. Terms: Cash, check, credit card. All sales final. All sales selling as-is. All items to be paid in full on auction day.

2 auction rings starting at 9:30. www.maringauction.com

Delbert & Darlene Malecha

Owner/Sellers - Ph: 507-645-4028 We Sell the Earth & Everything On It.

MATT MARING AUCTION CO. INC. PO Box 37, Kenyon, MN 55946 507-789-5421 • 800-801-4502

Matt Maring, Lic. #25-28 • 507-951-8354 Kevin Maring, Lic. #25-70 • 507-271-6280 Adam Engen, Lic. #25-93 • 507-213-0647 Reg. WI auctioneer #2992-52


Farm Retirement Auction

Monday, November 19, 2018

10:00am

PROXIBID ITEMS AT 11:15. 1584 Cty Rd 13. Russell, MN 56169

From Hwy 23 South of Russell, 1 Mile west on Cty Rd 16, then 1/4 mile south on Cty Rd 13. (Snow Date: Monday, November 26, 2018) AUCTIONEERS NOTE: Bill is retiring from farming and will be selling his exceptionally clean machinery to the highest bidder. Approximately 1 hour of miscellaneous followed by major equipment. Louba’s Lunchwagon will be serving on grounds. Deutz Auctions, LLC, or Bill and Barb will not be held responsible for accidents on property.

TECHNOLOGY

TRACTORS • 2015 JD 9570R 4WD- 305 hours • 2015 JD 8270R MWFD- 740 hours • 1995 JD 7800- 3,450 hours

• JD Starfire 3000 RTK Reciever w/ Antenna Ext. • Starfire RTK Radio/Repeater

TRAILERS & WAGONS

COMBINE • 2015 JD S670 STS - 527 eng/428 sep. hours • 2016 JD 612C 12R20” Stalkmaster Corn Head • 2016 JD 640FD Draper Bean Head

EQUIPMENT • 2012 JD 1790 24R20” Planter w/ E-set • 2015 JD 2720 11-shank 27.5’ Ripper w/ basket • 2015 JD 2210 55.5’ Digger w/ basket • Top Air TA1600 120’ Sprayer w/ Swath Control • JD 24R20” Cultivator • Vac-U-Vator DK1051 Grain Vac • Pro-Tile Tile Plow • JD 2800 Variable Width 6-Bottom Plow • Fertilizer Spreader - Pull type, 20” rows • Kewanee 24’ bi-fold Packer • JD 15’ Rotary Hoe • NH 258 9’ Hay Rake 10”x30’ Auger - Hyd Drive • 9’ Farm King snowblower

TRUCKS & TRAILERS • 1995 Peterbilt 378 - 661k miles • 1995 Peterbilt 378 - 727k miles • 1995 Timpte 40’ Hopper Bottom • 1991 Timpte 40’ Hopper Bottom

PICKUP • 1998 Chevy Silverado 2500 - 98k, Manual, 5.7 v8, Ext. Cab

CONSIGNED BY PAUL NYGARD 320-212-8078 2010 JD 9230 4WD. 650 Hours, PTO, Quad Range, 4 Hyd.

Call Bill at 507-829-4626 with

Tim, Auctioneer 507-530-4146

MISCELLANEOUS • Wack-a-Track • Melroe Rock Picker • 2- 500 Gal. Fuel Tanks w/ pumps • 4- 1500 Gal. Poly Liquid Tanks • Saddle Tanks w/ brackets, 2 sets • 3- 120 Gal. Chemical Tanks w/ pumps • Honda 2” Liquid Transfer Pump • Sprayer Parts • Aluminum Straight Pipe w/ Couplers - 7 20’x 5”. • Steel 5” Pipe- 45&90-degree, 1 ea. • 30 Gal. DEF Tank w/ hand pump • 300 Gal. DEF Tank w/ 110v pump • Grain Aeriation- flat and bin, various sizes. • Hot Water Pressure Washer- fresh rebuild • Wisconsin ATK Motor w/ hand clutch • 14 hp Kohler Cast Motor • 5” JD hub ext 10 bolt w/hardware • 2 10’ transfer augers 1 hyd & 1 electric

ITEMS IN BOLD WILL BE THE PROXIBID ITEMS

Owners: Bill and Barb Driscoll questions on equipment.

• 2012 Brent 782 Grain Cart • Friesen Seed Express 240 Tender • Frontier 42’ Header Trailer • Corn Head Trailer • 330 gallon Fuel Trailer - Tandem Axle, 15 GPM 12v pump • Parker Seed Wagon w/ Brush Auger & Tarp • Rock Picking Trailer- 2wl, Hyd. Hoist • Steel Hay Rack- 14’, Hyd. Lift • 3 Tile Trailers • Tile Parts Rack- fits 8’ pickup box • 330 Gal. Portable Fuel Tank w/ pump

To register for online bidding visit proxibid.com/deutzfamilyauctions Questions regarding proxibid contact Jordan Deutz 507-530-1141

Chuck, Auctioneer 507-530-4183

Bob, Clerk 507-530-6721

Auctioneers: Troy Deutz, Jordan Deutz, Cory Deutz

SEE OUR AUCTIONS @ www.marshallindependent.com or deutzfamilyauctions.com

Employment

Real Estate

Real Estate

Real Estate

Corn and Soybean Harvest- 75 acres Richland Township, Blue Earth Co. Farm For Sell your land or real estate in ing Wanted. New Gleaner Rice County, high CPI, Sale: Judson Township NE 30 days for 0% commission. combine w/ 35’ flex draper & some tile. Wayne Gadient, 1/4 Sec. 14, SE SW 1/4 Sec. Call Ray 507-339-1272 chopping cornhead. 320-221- Keller Williams Premier 11. 187.9 tillable. Contact Ag1872 Realty. (651) 380-7025 or ricultural Resource ManageReal Estate ment Co. John Murphy Browgadient@gmail.com Wanted Please support the advertisers you see here. ker PO Box 4097 Mankato, Tell them you saw their ad in The Land! www.thelandonline.com MN 56002 507-625-1363 WANTED: Land & farms. I have clients looking for dairy, & cash grain operations, as well as bare land parcels from 40-1000 acres. Both for relocation & investLOCATION: 4/10 MILE SOUTH OF SWANVILLE, MN ON COUNTY #15 THEN 4/10 MILE SOUTH ON MORRISON ments. If you have even LINE ROAD. TO FARM #18651 thought about selling conNOTE: HUGE AUCTION W/ REAL ESTATE & WIDE VARIETY OF ITEMS SELLING. REAL ESTATE SELLS AT 10:00 tact: Paul Krueger, Farm & AM FOLLOWED BY FARM EQUIPMENT. ONLINE BIDDING AVAILABLE ON MAJOR EQUIPMENT THROUGH Land Specialist, Edina Realty, 138 Main St. W., New PROXIBID. FOR ONLINE INFO PHONE 877-505-7770. MAJOR ITEMS IN NICE COND. & HAVE BEEN WELL Prague, MN 55372. MAINTAINED. FOR COMPLETE BROCHURE SEE: www.midamericanauctioninc.com. paulkrueger@edinarealty.com REAL ESTATE SELLS AT 10:00 AM PARCEL #1: 62.21 AC/ MOSTLY TILLABLE, GOOD SOILS, BUILDING (612)328-4506

HUGE REAL ESTATE, FARM EQUIPMENT & TRUCK AUCTION FRIDAY NOVEMBER 9TH, 2018- 10:00 AM

ELIGIBILITY. PARCEL #2: 50,000 PLUS BUSHEL BIN SITE, SEVERAL BINS UP TO 45,000 BU., DRYER, NAT. GAS, 3 PHASE, GREAT LOCATION

TRACTORS: ‘01 CIH MX270 MFWD, 18SPD. PS, 4 REMOTES, DUALS, 8676 HRS; ‘06 JD 7520 MFWD W/ JD 741 LDR W/ SKID LDR BACKPLATE, DUALS, 8093 HRS; ‘91 CIH 5140 2WD, CAB, 8051 HRS; ‘89 CIH 9180 4WD, DUALS, 4 REMOTES, NEW PAINT, NICE UNIT, 8563 HRS.; FARMALL 450 GAS, TA, 3 HYO.; IH 300 GAS, NEEDS WORK; IH 424 GAS, NEEDS ENGINE WORK. COMBINE & HEADS: ‘90 CIH 1660 AXIAL FLOW COMBINE, ROCK TRAP, GRAIN LOSS, 5017 ENG HRS.; CIH 1063 6R30 CH, POLY SNOUTS; CIH 1-20 22.5’ BEAN HEAD; IH 6 BELT PU HEAD. HAY & FORAGE & GENERAL FARM EQUIPMENT: ‘10 JD 568 NET & TWINE BALER, 10,000 BALES, NICE; JD 946 13’ HYDRA SWING MO-CO, HYD TILT CUTTER BAR, ONE OWNER; BUSH HOT 12 WHEEL V RAKE, NEW IN ‘15; 10X24 STEEL BALE RACK ON H&S TANDEM GEAR; ARTEX SB 600 VERTICAL BEATER MANURE SPREADER, ONE OWNER; KUHN 12’ 4 POD PTO HAY TEDDER; JD 637 26.5’ ROCK DISC, 3 BAR HARROW; HARMS 3 SECT. 30’ LAND ROLLER; TOP AIR TA 800 60’ CROP SPRAYER, LIKE NEW; CIH 5000 20’ NO TILL DRILL W/IH CULTI CART; GLENCOE 15 SHANK 18.5’ SOIL SAVER DISC CHISEL; IH 700 8X18 ON LAND PLOW; WESTFIELD 10X71 SWING HOPPER AUGER; CIH 900 12R30 MOUNTED CORN PLANTER, EARLY RISER MONITOR; 6 GRAVITY BOXES ON HD GEARS UP TO 250 BU. PLUS SEVERAL OTHER PIECES TOO NUMEROUS TO LIST SEVERAL SKID LOADER ATTACHMENTS INCLUDING: HYD LANDSCAPING POWER RAKE, 102” BUCKET, 10’ ANGLE BLADE, ROCK BUCKETS, BALE SPEARS, PLUS BULK BINS, FOUR WHEELER, MISC. AND MUCH MORE. LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT INCLUDING: SQUEEZE CHUTE; (2) PORTABLE CREEP FEEDERS, GATES, GPS EQUIPMENT INC. CIH TRIMBLE EZ GUIDE 250 SYSTEM WITH GLOBE. TRUCKS & TRAILERS: ‘98 PETERBILT 379 SEMI, C-12 CAT, 48 INC. FLAT TOP SLEEPER, 13SPD, PTO, WET KIT, AIR RIDE SEATS, 1,208,000 MILES; ‘02 TRANSCRAFT 48’ ALUMINUM COMBO SPREAD AXLE STRAIGHT DECK, AIR RIDE, 22.5 TIRES; ‘93 FRUEHAUF 32’ END DUMP, TANDEMS W/ LIFT TAG; ‘85 TRANSCRAFT 53’ STEP DECK TRAILER, HUB PILOT WHEELS.

MARK & PAM THROENER OWNERS PH. 320-360-5351 18651 MORRISON LINE ROAD, SWANVILLE, MN MID-AMERICAN AUCTION CO. INC.

AL WESSEL LIC # 77-60 PH. 320-760-2979 & KEVIN WINTER 320-760-1593, AUCTIONEERS

Feed Seed Hay Alfalfa, mixed hay, grass hay, and feed grade wheat straw. Medium squares or round bales. Delivery available. Call or text LeRoy Ose. 218689-6675

USED PARTS LARSON SALVAGE Good selection of tractor parts - New & Used All kinds of hay equipment, haybines, balers, choppers parted out. New combine belts for all makes. Swather canvases, round baler belting, used & new tires. 6 miles East of

CAMBRIDGE, MN 763-689-1179

We Ship Daily Visa and MasterCard Accepted

HAVE AN UPCOMING AUCTION? For the best results place your auction ad in The Land! Talk to your auctioneer or our friendly staff. 507-345-4523 or email: theland@thelandonline.com


THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018 Bins & Buildings

Farm Equipment

www.thelandonline.com — “Where Farm and Family Meet”

Tractors

e in SILO DOORS IH 720 6x18 3pt onland spring ‘68 JD 3020, 148 ldr, gas, synion. Wood or steel doors shipped reset plow, $2,250; IH 720 cro/range, good tires; 7’ JD 5x18 3pt plow w/coulters, 275 snowblower, twin aupromptly to your farm $1,450; Brent 440 gravity ger, hyds, exc cond; retired stainless fasteners box, $3,900; JD 635 35’ rock farmer. (952)466-9818 hardware available. cushion disc w/JD harrow, (800)222-5726 $10,900; Balzer 2000 20’ft NEW AND USED TRACTOR Landwood Sales LLC . I stalk chopper, exc cond, PARTS JD 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, for $3,450; new Farm King 55, 50 Series & newer traceraFarm Equipment 8’ 3pt snowblower, $2,900. tors, AC-all models, Large and (320)769-2756 Inventory, We ship! Mark res. Heitman Tractor Salvage FOR SALE: Fantini chopping estJD4020 dsl, 3pt, JDW, $7,995; 715-673-4829 8R & 12R CH; 70’ Elmer ven JD2940 dsl, new tires w/ drag, Merritt alum hopper onloader, $11,500; JD2955, grain trailers; 24R30” JD pl Sell your farm equipment m& CAH, OH’d, $11,900. All good on Kinze bar; Big A floater; in The Land with a line ad. Rerunners. 320-543-3523 175 Michigan ldr; IH 964 507-345-4523 New CH; White 706 & 708 CH & parts; White plows & parts; Your ad om Tillage Equip 54’ 4300 IH field cultivator; could be here! JD 44’ field cult; 3300 Hini507-345-4523 ker field cult; header trailer. RETIRING-- For Sale 507-380-5324 2004 Great Plains 30’ TurFOR SALE: JD 2510, gas, WF, Massey 44, nice condition, bo-Till Has NEW Rolling hay, $4,750; 8’ snowblower, $650; $4,000; Balzer 20’ stalk chop- Harrow & Basket, A-One aw. (2) gravity wagons; (2) hay per, works great, $3,000; Cond. M&W #1710 und racks; Massey hay rake, Agco 8R22” cornhead, great 2014--NEW GVL snouts, EarthMaster 5 or 7 Shank ble. $650; ‘93 F150 for parts. 507- condition, w/ Crumbler List $64,252 $12,000. Phone 507-317-5367 218- 665-3086 SPECIAL $39,700 or Less We buy Crumbler $36,700. 400 Bu Classified Line Ads Salvage Equipment J&M Gravity Wagon ReParts Available painted, Trk Tires, $1,900. Hammell Equip., Inc. Can Del Dealer 319-347-6282 Call 507-345-4523 (507)867-4910 9AM - 4PM Let It Ring

AUCTION Farm Equipment & Estate

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16 | 11AM

2018

S E

WORK!

LOCATION: 17650 81st St SE, Wahpeton, ND 58075.

From Wahpeton, ND, 2.5 miles west on ND-13, 1.5 miles south on 178th Ave SE, 1.4 miles west on 81st St SE. AUCTIONEER’S NOTE: Major equipment begins selling at 11:00 AM. Live online bidding available on major equipment. Registration, terms, & details at SteffesGroup.com.

d

Track Tractors / Tractors & Loader / GPS Equipment Heads & Header Trailers / Planters & Air Drills / Tillage Equipment / Semi Tractor / Service Truck / Pickup / Trailers Sprayer & Applicators / Excavator / Backhoe & Scraper Grain Handling & Other Equipment / Tracks, Tires, & Rims Snowblower & Attachment / Parts & Shop Equipment

SteffesGroup.com

Scott Steffes ND81

Steffes Group, Inc., 2000 Main Ave E, West Fargo ND 58078 | 701.237.9173

TRIPLE “O” FARMS & WILLARD ONCHUCK ESTATE DAN 701.640.1816 or KEVIN 701.640.2451

or Dave Benedict at Steffes Group, 701.237.9173 or 701.238.5062 TERMS: All items sold as is where is. Payment of cash or check must be made sale day before removal of items. Statements made auction day take precedence over all advertising. $35 documentation fee applies to all titled vehicles. Titles will be mailed. Canadian buyers need a bank letter of credit to facilitate border transfer.

PAGE 31

BUY ONE GET ONE

FREE

Classified Line Ads in The Land Purchase one line ad at regular price and get the second one free. Offer good for one full circulation combo. Free ad must be of equal or lesser value and run in the same editions. Hurry! Offer ends soon.

507-345-4523 or 800-657-4665


PAGE 32

www.thelandonline.com —”Where Farm and Family Meet”

Harvesting Equip

Land Specialists

Sealed Bid And Land Auctions

Nov. 9 • 79 ± Ac. & Bldg. site Willow Lake Twp., Redwood Co. Nov. 13 • 158.66 ± Ac. Deerfield Twp., Steele Co. Nov. 29 • 152.06 ± Ac. Brush Creek Twp., Faribault Co. For information brochures CALL 1-800-730-LAND (5263) or visit www.Wingert Realty.com. Only registered bidders may attend. View our other available properties for sale on our website. 1160 Victory Drive South, Suite 6 • Mankato, MN 56001 • 507-345-LAND (5263)

Charles Wingert, Broker # 07-53

Wanted

Cattle

Miscellaneous

FOR SALE: ‘06 Massey Agco All kinds of New & Used farm Holstein steers: Vaccinat- PARMA DRAINAGE PUMPS 30’ flex head, on Gleaner equipment - disc chisels, field ed, dehorned, nice cut, & New pumps & parts on hand. combine, will fit Massey/ cults, planters, soil finishers, wormed. 125 head approx. Call Minnesota’s largest disGleaner & Challenger com- cornheads, feed mills, discs, 375 lb & $1.10/lb; 200 head tributor balers, haybines, etc. 507- approx. 250 lb & $330 each. bines. 507-995-2513 HJ Olson & Company Delivery available. 715-613- 320-974-8990 Cell - 320-212-5336 438-9782 FOR SALE: Rear wheel as2072 sist for combine, off JD 7720. REINKE IRRIGATION (320) 697-5550 Sales & Service Livestock New & Used Swine NOTICE--Lots of Used Parts For your irrigation needs For Brady/Hiniker 1440- FOR SALE: Black Angus 888-830-7757 or 507-276-2073 1680 Shredders, Used Drive bulls also Hamp, York, & FOR SALE: Yorkshire, HampShafts Gear Boxes, Sheaves Hamp/Duroc boars & gilts. shire, Duroc & Hamp/Duroc Pulleys PTO Parts Axles 320-598-3790 Winpower Sales & Service boars, also gilts. Excellent Reliable Power Solutions Legs Etc. 20% Discount selection. Raised outside. Since 1925 PTO & automatic For Shredder Knives, Belts, Exc herd health. No PRSS. Bearings For Artsway, JD Emergency Electric GenerDelivery avail. 320-760-0365 Dairy 270 & 115, Brady/Hiniker or ators. New & Used Balzer, C-IH MC Schultz Rich Opsata-Distributor ADC, Etc. Can Ship Speedy. REGISTERED Jerseys - 7 Spot, Duroc, Chester White, 800-343-9376 cows 5 dry, due in Nov, 1 Boars & Gilts available. Dealer Retiring. 319-347-6282 Sell your farm equipment bred heifer, due in Dec. $900 Monthly PRRS and PEDV. Sell your livestock in The Land per head. 319-438-1460 or Delivery available. Steve in The Land with a line ad. Resler. 507-456-7746 319-310-5691 507-345-4523 with a line ad. 507-345-4523

OAKLAND TWP / FREEBORN COUNTY, MN

95 ACRES+/- • 1 TRACTS

SALE TO BE HELD AT THE GLENVILLE LEGION, 331 WEST MAIN ST. GLENVILLE, MN

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17 @ 10 A.M.

This is a great parcel of land on a black top road in a wonderful farming community. Located just North of Myrtle Online Bidding Available

#1647 TROY AND TAMMY OUDEKERK FARM

THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Broker/ Auctioneer GREG JENSEN

507-383-1067 gregjensen@landproz.com

SECTION 30 OAKLAND TOWNSHIP / 95 DEEDED ACRES ± / 90.13 CROPLAND ACRES / CPI OF 90.7 / NORTH OF MYRTLE, CTY RD 30 TO CTY RD 19 THEN EAST, FARM ON THE SOUTH SIDE / PRODUCTIVE CROPLAND• TERMS: $50,000 DOWN DUE DAY OF THE SALE, BALANCE DUE ON OR ABOUT DEC. 20, 2018. A 2% BUYERS FEE WILL APPLY.

Agricultural & Recreational Real Estate / Auctions / Farm Management

Broker/Auctioneer GREG JENSEN • Agent/Auctioneer BEAU JENSEN Broker Greg Jensen - MN, IA / Broker Brian Haugen - MN, SD, IA, WI / Broker Amy Willett - MO LandProz Real Estate, LLC. 111 East Clark Street, Albert Lea, MN 56007


THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

MPS nd. dis-

www.thelandonline.com — “Where Farm and Family Meet”

Farm Retirement

**WE SPREAD AG LIME**

R&E Enterprises of Mankato, Inc.

PAGE 33

336

2018

AUCTIONEER’S NOTE: Major equipment begins selling at 10:00 AM. Live online bidding available on major equipment. Registration, terms, & details at SteffesGroup.com.

NO STOCKPILING ON THE GROUND • Our trucks deliver ag lime directly to the TerraGator • TerraGators minimize ground compaction •No wasted lime or mess to clean up • No foliage to plug the spreader GPS APPLICATION AND GUIDANCE SYSTEMS • We apply variable and conventional rates • We can spread 1 to 6 ton/acre in a single pass • We have seven units to minimize wait time • We have twenty five trucks to haul lime

Tractors / Collectible Tractors / GPS Equipment / Combines Heads & Header Trailers / Grain Carts / Pull-Type Planters & Air Seeders / Seed Tender / Tillage & Row Crop Equipment / Semi Tractors & Trucks / Pickup / Trailers / Hopper Bottom Trailers NH3 Equipment / Hay Equipment / Grain Handling Equipment Other Equipment / Skid Steer Attachments / Hopper Bins & Bin Parts / Fuel & Water Tanks / Tires / Shop Equip. & Parts

For more information on Agricultural Lime delivery, spreading and rates, please email us at: evang@randeofmn.com or call 800-388-3320 today!

R & E Enterprises of Mankato, Inc. 1-800-388-3320

SteffesGroup.com

Steffes Group, Inc., 2000 Main Ave E, West Fargo ND

LEON KLOCKE, 701.653.5588

aglime@randeofmn.com www.randeofmn.com

or

LOUIS KLOCKE, 701.652.5088

or Justin Ruth at Steffes Group, 701.237.9173 or 701.630.5583

TERMS: All items sold as is where is. Payment of cash or check must be made sale day before removal of items. Statements made auction take precedence over all advertising. $35 documentation fee applies to all titled vehicles. Titles will be mailed. Canadian buyers need a bank letter of credit to facilitate border transfer. Scott Steffes ND81.

Farm Retirement MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12 | 10AM

LOCATION: 990 Hwy 52, Fessenden, ND 58438. From Fessenden, ND, 6.7 miles south on US-52. From intersection ND-200 & US-52, 7.1 miles north on US-52.

Farm Retirement

AUCTIONEER’S NOTE: Most equipment has been purchased new, has had excellent maintenance and has been stored inside. Please note these are preharvest hours and miles. Major equipment begins selling at 10:30 AM. Live online bidding available on major equipment. Registration, terms & details at SteffesGroup.com.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15 | 10AM

2018

vice ons atic ner-

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8 | 10AM

Why use R&E Enterprises of Mankato, Inc?

2018

s 73

LOCATION: 3270 139th Ave SE, Buffalo, ND. From Buffalo, ND, 1-1/4 miles north on ND Hwy. 38. AUCTIONEER’S NOTE: Major equipment begins selling at 10:30 AM. Live online bidding available on major equipment. Registration, terms, & details at SteffesGroup.com.

LOCATION: 565 164th Ave SE, Hillsboro, ND. From I-29 Exit 100, West side of interstate, 1-1/4 miles South.

Track Tractors / Tractors / Combine / Heads & Header Trailers / Grain Cart & Gravity Wagons / Sprayer & Terragator / Planter & Drill / Tillage Equipment / Semi Tractors & Service Truck / Hopper Bottom Trailers / Trailers / Chemical & Fertilizer Equipment / Grain Handling & Hay Equipment / Loaders & Attachments / Forklift & Manlifts / Mini Excavator / Skid Steer / Rockpickers & Scrapers / Mower / Pickups Recreation / Lawn & Garden / Hopper Bins / Shop Equipment / Parts & Much More!

SteffesGroup.com Steffes Group, Inc. | 2000 Main Ave E, West Fargo, ND

Tom McInnes Jr., / 701.430.0162

4WD Tractors / 2WD Tractors & Loader / Collectible Tractors / GPS Equipment / Grain Cart Head & Header Trailer / Planter / Tillage Equipment / Row Crop Equipment / Semi Tractor & Trucks / Pickups & Service Vehicle / Trailers / Sprayers / Chemical/Fertilizer Equipment Skid Steer Loader & Attachments / Livestock Equipment & Hay Wagons / Hopper Bins & Grain Handling Equipment / Other Equipment / Forklift & Lift Lawn & Garden Equipment / Shop Equipment / Fuel & Propane Tanks / Parts / Recreation / Farm Support & Misc. Items

SteffesGroup.com

Steffes Group, Inc., 2000 Main Ave E, West Fargo ND 58078 | 701.237.9173

KELLY & JO BOYD / 701.730.1253

or at Steffes Group, 701.237.9173, Brad Olstad, 701.238.0240 or Tadd Skaurud, 701.729.3644. Scott Steffes ND81

or Brad Olstad (ND319) at Steffes Group, 701.237.9173 or 701.238.0240

TERMS: All items sold as is where is. Payment of cash or check must be made sale day before removal of items. Statements made auction take precedence over all advertising. $35 documentation fee applies to all titled vehicles. Titles will be mailed. Canadian buyers need a bank letter of credit to facilitate border transfer.

TERMS: All items sold as is where is. Payment of cash or check must be made sale day before removal of items. Statements made auction take precedence over all advertising. $35 documentation fee applies to all titled vehicles. Titles will be mailed. Canadian buyers need a bank letter of credit to facilitate border transfer.


PAGE 34

www.thelandonline.com —”Where Farm and Family Meet”

MULTI-PARCEL REDWOOD CO. LAND AUCTION Wednesday, Nov 14th, 2018 at 10 a.m.

THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

Farm Retirement

Oriska, ND

• PARCEL 1: 40 Acres M/L Section 14 Brookville Twp, Redwood Co. Parcel# 50-014-2020 - CPI 96.1 Closing date: Dec 21, 2018 • PARCEL 2: 40 Acres M/L Section 23 Brookville Twp, Redwood Co. Parcel# 50-023-2040 - CPI 88.2 Closing date: Dec 21, 2018 • PARCEL 3: 97.1 Acres M/L Section 13 Sundown Twp, Redwood Co. Parcel# 67-013-2020 - CPI 88 Closing date: Jan 4, 2019

Watch for Kerkhoff Auction Signs!

For More Information:

DOUG KERKHOFF

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14 | 10AM

LOCATION: 12731 39th St SE, Oriska, ND. From I-94 Exit 302 (Oriska, ND), 5 miles S to mile marker 71, 1/2 mile E on 39th St. AUCTIONEER’S NOTE: The equipment has had excellent maintenance and most has been stored inside. Major equipment selling at 10:30 AM. Live online bidding available on major equipment. Registration, terms, & details at SteffesGroup.com.

4WD & MFWD Tractors / Loader & Attachments / GPS / Combines / Heads & Trailers / Grain Cart & Gravity Wagon / Air Seeder / Planter / Tillage & Row Crop Equipment / Semis Pickups / Hopper Bottoms / Flatbed Spray Trailer / Sprayer & Spreader / Fertilizer Equipment Seed Tender / Grain Handling & Aeration Equipment / Rockpickers & Lift Travel Trailer / Tanks / Farm Support Items / Tires & Parts

507-829-6859 or 507-644-8433

SteffesGroup.com

www.kerkhoffauction.com

JOHN & CONNIE DIMMER, AND NEAL & COLLEEN DIMMER John, 701.840.2092 or Neal, 701.490.0023

Go to Website to See photos

220.49 ac of Brown County Farm Land

Land Auction

Tuesday, November 13th - 10:30 am

Steffes Group, Inc., 2000 Main Ave E, West Fargo ND

or Brad Olstad (ND319) at Steffes Group, 701.237.9173 or 701.238.0240 TERMS: All items sold as is where is. Payment of cash or check must be made sale day before removal of items. Statements made auction day take precedence over all advertising. $35 documentation fee applies to all titled vehicles. Titles will be mailed. Canadian buyers need a bank letter of credit to facilitate border transfer.

Ag Equipment, Construction, Recreation, & More! UPCOMING TIMED ONLINE CONSIGNMENT CLOSINGS

Church of the Japanese Martyrs School Hall 30881 County Road 24, Sleepy Eye, MN Directions to land: From Sleepy Eye, head South on State Hwy 4 for 5 miles, turn West onto Co Rd 24, after 3 miles the land will be on the South Side of the road. Watch for signs!

Nov. 14 Nov. 29 Dec. 12

This property will sell as four parcels:

Location of property within Brown County: Leavenworth Township, Sections 26 & 27, Range 33 Total of farm: 220.49 acres approx. 200.49 acres tillable. Productivity Index: 71 Parcel 1: 70.67 total acres, Parcel 3: 34.22 total acres, approx. 65.77 acres tillable approx. 27.9 acres tillable Productivity Index: 88.6 Productivity Index: 65.7 Parcel 2: 70.38 total acres, approx. 68.44 acres tillable Productivity Index: 61.4

2018

Auction Location - Springfield Community Center

Dec. 26 Jan. 9 Jan. 23

Parcel 4: 45.22 total acres, approx. 38.4 acres tillable Productivity Index: 61.9

Note: All acres are published based on Brown County Online Records and FSA records.

Leon & Elizabeth Nachreiner Family Trust Listing Auctioneer: Matt Mages, 507-276-7002 Lic 08-18-002

Auctioneers: Lar r y Mages, Lafayette; J oe Maidl, Lafayette; J ohn Goelz, Fr anklin Joe Wersal, Winthrop; Ryan Froehlich, Winthrop; Broker: Mages Land Co. & Auction Ser vice, LLC. Terms: No Buyer ’s Premium. Everything sold in “AS IS” condition.

magesland.com

Photos shown may not depict actual equipment.

SteffesGroup.com Scott Steffes ND81, MN14-51

North Dakota | South Dakota | Minnesota | Iowa | Missouri | Wisconsin | Nebraska FOR CONSIGNOR INFORMATION & LOCATION, TERMS, FULL LOT LISTING & PHOTOS VISIT STEFFESGROUP.COM


Looking for New or Used FARM EQUIPMENT? Check out The Land classifieds first!

www.thelandonline.com — “Where Farm and Family Meet”

Please visit our website WWW.THELANDONLINE.COM

MEEKER COUNTY, MN

LAND FOR SALE BY BIDS

MULTI TRACT

Friday, November 9 @ 10AM

35.6± Acres • Martin County, Minnesota

If you’re having a Farm Auction, let other Farmers know it! Upcoming Issues of THE LAND Southern MNNorthern MN Northern IA Nov. 9, 2018 Nov. 23, 2018 Nov. 16, 2018 * Nov. 30, 2018 Dec. 7, 2018 * Dec. 14, 2018 Dec. 21, 2018 *Dec. 28, 2018 *Jan. 4, 2019

Deadline is 8 days prior to publication. Indicates early deadline, 9 days prior to publication.

*

Auction Location: Auction to be held at the Steffes Group Litchfield Facility, 24400 MN Hwy 22 S, Litchfield, MN Property Location: Greenleaf Township, approx. 9.2 miles SW of Litchfield, MN or approx. 7.5 miles NE of Cosmos, MN.

Available for 2019 crop year!

offered in 5 tracts

Farmers National Company PO Box 882 • Lake Crystal, Minnesota

• Productive soils: mostly silty clay loam • Near to grain elevators and ethanol plants • Located in the #1 hog producing county in Minnesota For bidding and property details, please contact:

Lee Williams, AFM/Agent

LWilliams@FarmersNational.com www.FarmersNational.com/LeeWilliams

SteffesGroup.com

Jeanne Williams, Agent

Business: (507) 340-6613

JWilliams@FarmersNational.com www.FarmersNational.com/JeanneWilliams

Office: (507) 726-2280 • Lake Crystal, Minnesota

www.FarmersNational.com

Real Estate Sales • Auctions • Farm and Ranch Management Appraisal• Insurance • Consultation • Oil and Gas Management Forest Resource Management • National Hunting Leases •FNC Ag Stock

L-1900019

Ask Your Auctioneer to Place Your Auction in The Land!

629 acres

Thursday, November 15 • Bids due at 12:00 PM

Business: (507) 341-0097

PO Box 3169 • Mankato, MN 56002 Phone: 507-345-4523 or 800-657-4665 Fax: 507-345-1027 Website: www.TheLandOnline.com e-mail: theland@TheLandOnline.com

PAGE 35

2018

THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

ALBANY, MN AREA REGISTERED HOLSTEIN HERD DISPERSAL AUCTION SATURDAY NOV. 17TH, 2018 - 11:30 AM LOCATION: 6 MILES NORTH OF ALBANY, MN ON MN STATE 238 TO ST. ANTHONY, MN THEN FOLLOW SIGNS

84 HEAD OF OFFICIAL DHIA REGISTERED HOLSTEINS SELL UNDER COVER NOTE: ONE OF STEARNS COUNTY’S EARLIEST ESTABLISHED REGISTERED HERDS. THE GOEBELS HAVE SOLD OVER 3000 HERD SIRES THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES. OFFICIAL DHIA, 22,563 M, 871 F, 702 P, NO TMR. AL SIRES INCLUDE: GOLDEN DREAM, ADMIRAL, MCCUTCHEN, MOGUL, DOORMAN, TOO HOT. FOR YOUR CATALOG PLEASE PHONE 320-760-2979 OR VIEW ONLINE AT www.midamericanauctioninc.com INCLUDES: A EXC. 90 PT ADMIRAL THAT IS DUE TO DOC EARLY 2019, SHE HAS TWO DAUGHTERS SELLING. 40 MATURE FEMALES INCLUDING: 10 VG 2 AND 3 YEAR OLDS AT 85 TO 87 PTS. 16 FANCY BRED HEIFERS DUE SALE TIME ON; 27 HIGH QUALITY OPEN HEIFERS 1 TO 15 MONTHS; 2 VERY GOOD GOLDEN DREAM HERD SIRE PROSPECTS 12 MOS OLD OUT OF HIGH PRODUCING DAMS.

GOEBEL’S DAIRY OWNERS 25369 385TH ST. ALBANY, MN FOR MORE INFO PLEASE PHONE ELMER & KATHLEEN GOEBEL AT 320-836-2536 MID-AMERICAN AUCTION CO. INC.

AL WESSEL #77-60 PH. 320-760-2979 KEVIN WINTER 320-760-1593, ALAN GRAVES - HOLSTEIN USA, 712-574-6120

Steffes Group, Inc. | 24400 MN Hwy 22 S, Litchfield, MN 55355 For a detailed Buyer’s Prospectus with complete terms and conditions contact Steffes Group at 320.693.9371, Ashely Huhn 701.238.1975, Eric Gabrielson 701.238.2570, or Shelly Weinzetl 763.300.5055 TERMS: 10% down upon signing purchase agreement, payable by cash or check. Balance due at closing within 30 days. This is a 5% buyer’s fee auction. Ashley Huhn MN47-002 / Scott Steffes MN14-51

72.00 ACRES Cropland – In Part of Section 11 – Wells TWP. – Rice Co. MN. Just west of Faribault MN

MATT MARING

CO.

Auction Location: 530 Wilson Ave. NW, Faribault MN, 55021 (Chamber of Commerce Building) Directions to Farm: West of Faribault MN, on MN Hwy. 21 (Shieldsville Blvd.) on north side of road, close to Canby Ave.

Mon., November 19, 2018 6:00 P.M.

www.maringauction.com 72.00 Acres – 57 tillable acres – 85.3 Crop Productivity Index Good Crop Farm – Good Soils 72.00 Acres of Good Cropland – Part of the N ½ of SW ¼ of Section 11, Wells Twp. – Rice Co. MN – Just Northwest of Faribault MN PID#: 10.11.3.00.001; Taxes for 2018 $2,368; Area: 72.00 +/- acres; Rice Co. FSA: 57 tillable cropland; Crop Productivity Index: 85.3; To be sold 72 x $ bid Terms: $20,000 down the day of auction; (which is nonrefundable if Buyer fails to close). The balance is due and payable in full on or before Dec. 27, 2018, at which time the Buyer shall receive a clear and marketable title. All real estate is selling in AS-IS condition, with no representation whatsoever. No warranty or guarantee expressed or implied. All real estate taxes due in the year of 2018 shall be paid by Sellers. All bidders/buyers must have finances in order prior to auction time.

www.maringauction.com

Jean E. Hachfeld Trust We Sell the Earth & Everything On It.

MATT MARING AUCTION CO. INC. PO Box 37, Kenyon, MN 55946 507-789-5421 • 800-801-4502

Matt Maring, Lic. #25-28 • 507-951-8354 Kevin Maring, Lic. #25-70 • 507-271-6280 Adam Engen, Lic. #25-93 • 507-213-0647 Broker: Maring Auction & Realty Co. Inc., Lic. #40241191


PAGE 36

www.thelandonline.com —”Where Farm and Family Meet”

THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

irst Your F or f Choice ds! ie Classif

Place d Your A Today!

Livestock, Machinery, Farmland... you name it! People will buy it when they see it in The Land! To submit your classified ad use one of the following options: Phone: 507-345-4523 or 1-800-657-4665 Mail to: The Land Classifieds, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002 Fax to: 507-345-1027 • Email: theland@TheLandOnline.com Online at: www.thelandonline.com DEADLINE: Friday at 5:00 p.m. for the following Friday edition. Plus! Look for your classified ad in the e-edition.

South Central Minnesota’s Daily News Source

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THE FREE PRESS

1

25

• Reach over 150,000 readers • Start your ad in The Land • Add more insertions • Get more coverage

The ad prices listed are based on a basic classified line ad of 25 words or less. Ads running longer than 25 words will incur an added charge.

CHECK ONE:  Announcements  Employment  Real Estate  Real Estate Wanted  Farm Rentals  Auctions  Agri Business  Farm Services  Sales & Services  Merchandise  Antiques & Collectibles  Lawn & Garden  Feed Seed Hay  Fertilizer & Chemicals  Bins & Buildings  Farm Equipment  Tractors  Tillage Equipment  Planting Equipment  Spraying Equipment

 Hay & Forage Equipment  Harvesting Equipment  Grain Handling Equipment  Livestock Equipment  Wanted  Free & Give Away  Livestock  Poultry  Dairy  Cattle  Swine  Sheep  Goats  Horses & Tack  Exotic Animals  Pets & Supplies  Cars & Pickups  Industrial & Construction  Trucks & Trailers  Recreational Vehicles  Miscellaneous

NOTE: Ad will be placed in the appropriate category if not marked.

Now... add a photo to your classified line ad for only $10.00!!

THE LAND (Includes 1 Southern & 1 Northern issue)

1 run @ $19.99 = _____________________________ 2 runs @ $34.99 = _____________________________ 3 runs @ $44.99 = _____________________________

Each additional line (over 7) + $1.40 per line per issue = _____________________________ EXTENDED COVERAGE - must run the same number of times as The Land FARM NEWS (FN) - Serving farmers in Northwest Iowa, 21,545 circ. THE COUNTRY TODAY (CT) - Serving farmers in Wisconsin, 21,000 circ. THE FREE PRESS (FP) - Serving south central Minnesota, 19,025 circ.

PAPER(S) ADDED (circle all options you want): FN CT FP $7.70 for each paper and $7.70 run each issues x $7.70 = _____________________________ STANDOUT OPTIONS (THE LAND only) $2.00 per run: = _____________________________  Bold  Italic  Underline  Web/E-mail links

 Border $10.00 each per run  Photo (THE LAND only)

= _____________________________ TOTAL

This is NOT for businesses. Please call The Land to place line ads.

= _____________________________

Name ____________________________________________________________ Address __________________________________________________________ City ___________________________________State_________ Zip__________ Phone __________________________________________ # of times _______ Card # ____________________________________________________________ Exp. Date__________________

CHECK

Signature _________________________________________________________

SORRY! We do not issue refunds.

ADVERTISING NOTICE: Please check your ad the first week it runs. We make every effort to avoid errors by checking all copy, but sometimes errors are missed. Therefore, we ask that you review your ad for correctness. If you find a mistake, please call (507) 345-4523 immediately so that the error can be corrected. We regret that we cannot be responsible for more than one week’s insertion if the error is not called to our attention. We cannot be liable for an amount greater than the cost of the ad. THE LAND has the right to edit, reject or properly classify any ad. Each classified line ad is separately copyrighted to THE LAND. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited.


u e .

THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

After the morning chores... it’s a cup of coffee, The Land Magazine and you!

WANTED

DAMAGED GRAIN STATEWIDE

We pay top dollar for your damaged grain. We are experienced handlers of your wet, dry, burnt and mixed grains. Trucks and vacs available. Immediate response anywhere.

www.thelandonline.com — “Where Farm and Family Meet”

RENVILLE COUNTY FARMLAND

SEALED BID SALE

Do you have an upcoming

10:00 a.m., Thursday November 8, 2018 SALE HELD AT THE

Franklin Depot

343 2nd Ave E • Franklin, MN 55333

+/-74.99 Acres LAND LOCATION:

Section 21 Beaver Falls Twp, Renville County Greg Thomas Broker

CALL FOR A QUOTE TODAY

Rachelle Kraus

PRUESS ELEV., INC.

REAL ESTATE AGENT • 507-359-2004

1-800-828-6642

PAGE 37

ummc.co

AND MUCH, MUCH MORE.

Place your auction ad where it will get noticed...

507-345-4523 800-657-4665 TheLandOnline.com


PAGE 38

wants your feedback. Email: editor@thelandonline.com or visit: www.thelandonline.com or call: our friendly staff at 507-345-4523 800-657-4665

www.thelandonline.com —”Where Farm and Family Meet”

Fall Harvest

BOGO

‘17 JD S680 W/PRWD, 584-472 Hrs, Powerfold Ext, 580/85R42’s,

FREE

26’ Auger, Command Touch W/5-Spd Rev, Warranty..........$315,000

Classified Line Ads in The Land

‘13 JD 9410R, 1480 Hrs, PTO, Hi-Flow 78 Gal Hyd Pump W/5-Remotes, 620/70R42’s, Grain Cart & Planter Tractor..............$189,500 ‘12 JD 9360R, 1678 Hrs, PTO, Hi-Flow 78 Gal Hyd Pump W/5-Re-

Purchase one line ad at regular price and get the second one free in the same editions. Offer good for one full circulation combo. Free ad must be of equal or lesser value. Hurry! Offer ends soon.

motes, 480/80R50’s, Grain Cart & Planter Tractor..............$169,500 ‘12 JD 7200R, 970 Hrs, 20 Spd PowerQuad, 480/80R46’s, 380/85R34 Frts, 540-1000 PTO, 4-Remote....................... $109,000 ‘17 JD 608C, StalkMaster Chopping Corn Head, Intermeshing Knife Rolls, 0-Acres, Warranty............................................. $79,500

M.S. Diversified Fairfax, MN

Call The Land 507-345-4523

800-432-3565 • 320-894-6560

www.ms-diversified.com • monte@ms-diversified.com

USED TRACTORS

HAY TOOLS

‘03 Versatile 2310, PS ..................................... $85,000 ‘12 Buhler 280...............................................$109,000 NEW Massey GC1715 w/loader ............................. Call NEW Massey 7722 FWA CVT ................................. Call ‘05 CIH MX210 ................................................ $79,000 NEW NH T4.75, T4.90, T4.120 w/loader.. ...... On Hand NEW NH T9.645, w/Smart Trac .............................. Call NEW NH Workmaster 60, 50, 35’s/loaders ... On Hand NEW NH T8.410 ...................................................... Call NH T8.275, 495 hrs ....................................... $145,000 ‘08 NH 8010 .................................................. $110,000 ‘99 NH 9682 .................................................... $67,000 ‘96 White 6175 FWA....................................... $49,500 Allis 185..............................................................$8,750 Kubota L245 2wd ...............................................$6,500

New NH Hay Tools - ON HAND

TILLAGE Sunflower 4610, 9-shank ................................ $45,000 14’ Sunflower 4412-05.....................................$32,500 10’ Sunflower 4412-07 .................................... $31,000 DMI 530B ................................................................ Call ‘95 JD 726, 30’ ................................................ $21,500 10’ Wilrich QX2 37’ w/basket.......................... $38,500 Wilrich QX 55’5 w/bskt..................................... Coming

PLANTERS NEW White Planters ............................................... Call White 8182 12-30 w/liq ...................................Coming\ ‘12 White 8186, 16-30 w/liq. fert. .................... $59,000 ‘11 White 8516 CFS, Loaded .......................... $85,000 White 8186 16-30 w/liq .................................... Coming

THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT

New NH W80C wheelloader .......................... On Hand New NH E37C mini excavator ....................... On Hand New NH E26C mini excavator ....................... On Hand New NH track & wheeled skidsteers............. On Hand NH 230 w/cab & heat ...................................... $37,900 ‘99 Bobcat 863F .............................................. $16,800

COMBINES

Gleaner R65 ................................................... $105,000 ‘12 Gleaner S77............................................ $205,000 ‘03 Gleaner R65 ............................................... Coming ‘98 Gleaner R62 .............................................. $79,500 ‘98 Gleaner R62 ...................................................... Call Gleaner 3308 chopping corn heads ...................... Call NEW Fantini chopping cornhead ........................... Call Geringhoff parts & heads available

MISCELLANEOUS

NEW Salford RTS Units .......................................... Call NEW Salford Plows................................................. Call NEW Unverferth Seed Tenders .............................. Call NEW Westfield Augers ........................................... Call NEW REM VRX vacs. .............................................. Call NEW Hardi Sprayers............................................... Call NEW Riteway Rollers .............................................. Call NEW Lorenz Snowblowers ..................................... Call NEW Batco Conveyors ........................................... Call NEW Brent Wagons & Grain Carts ......................... Call NEW E-Z Trail Seed Wagons .................................. Call NEW Rock Buckets & Pallet Forks ......................... Call REM 2700, Rental ................................................... Call Pre-Owned Grain Cart ................................... On Hand

All Equipment available with Low Rate Financing

SMITHS MILL IMPLEMENT Hwy. 14, 3 miles West of Janesville, MN

Phone (507) 234-5191 or (507) 625-8649 Mon. - Fri. 7:30-5:00 • Sat. 7:30-Noon www.smithsmillimp.com

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

‘13 JD 7230R, 20 speed Command Quad Plus transmission, 380/90R50 rear duals, 540/1000 PTO, 4 remotes, HID lights, 840 hrs ............................................................................. $95,500 ‘13 JD 8295R, powershift, 1300 front axle, 6 remotes, LED lights, 380/90R54 rear duals, 380/80R38 single fronts, 4890 hrs .......................................................................... $92,500 ‘14 CIH Magnum 280, 19 speed powershift, 620/70R42 rear duals, 600/65R28 single fronts, front and rear weights, 5350 hrs ........................................................................... $69,500 ‘11 CIH Magnum 290, 480/80R50 singles, 19 speed economy powershift transmission, 14000 hrs ................. $25,000 ‘15 New Holland BC5060 small square baler, has not been used ............................................................ $15,250 ‘12 New Holland L218 skid steer loader, no cab, 72” bucket, 365 hrs.............................................. $19,750 ‘16 Case 721F XR wheel loader, 4.5 cubic yard bucket, 20.5R25 tires, extended reach, 4010 hrs, warranty till March 2019 or 6000 hrs ................................................... $83,500 ‘10 JD 9770 combine, 800/70R38 single tires, tank ext. 2WD, contourmaster, chopper, tank ext., 1650 sep. hrs, just though service program ............................................ $87,500 ‘13 JD 2720 17’6”, disc ripper, rolling baskets .............. $19,750

– AgDirect Financing Available – Please call before coming to look.

Keith Bode

Fairfax, MN 55332 507-381-1291 • www.keithbodeeq.com

THANK YOU FOR READING THE LAND!


THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

4WD TRACTORS ‘14 JD 9560R, 1045 hrs, 800x38 duals, 5 hyd valves, wheel wgts ..............................................................................$210,000 ‘14 JD 9360R, 2550 hrs, 5 hyd valves, 480x50 tires & duals, ext warranty to 3/27/2020 or 4,000 hrs .............................$140,000 ‘13 JD 9360R, 1799 hrs, 1000 PTO, 4 hyd valves, 620x42” tires & duals .........................................................................$159,000 ‘02 JD 9320, 5341 hrs, power shift, 1000 PTO, 4 hyd valves, 8 new 18.4x46” tires, auto steer .......................................$89,000 ‘13 NH T9.390, 2557 hrs, 1000 PTO, power shift, diff lock, 480x50 duals ................................................................$120,000 ‘11 NH T9.390, 905 hrs, power shift, HID lights, big pump, 480x50 tires & duals ....................................................$123,000 ‘94 C-IH 9270, 8533 hrs, power shift, 4 hyd valves, 650x42” tires & duals ...................................................................$34,000 ‘92 C-IH 9270, 9969 hrs, 12spd gear drive, 4 hyd valves, 520x42” tires & duals .....................................................$25,000

TRACK TRACTORS

www.thelandonline.com — “Where Farm and Family Meet”

COMBINES ‘13 JD 660 4X4, 1598/1066 sep hrs, 2630 display, ContourMaster, chopper, 520x42” duals ....................$139,000 ‘13 JD 660, 1180/892 sep hrs, 2WD, ContourMaster, chopper, HID lights, 520x38 duals .............................................$139,000 ‘04 JD 9760, 2WD, 3460/2268 sep hrs, ContourMaster, chopper, bin ext, 480x42” tires & duals .......................................$54,000 ‘01 JD 9750, 4156 eng/3013 sep hrs, ContourMaster, setup w/single point for 600 series heads, chopper, 20.8x42duals ................................................................$42,000 ‘01 JD 9650STS, 4325/3014 sep hrs, ContourMaster, chopper, 520x38” tires & duals .....................................................$42,000 ‘14 5130, 928/660 sep hrs, rock track, Tracker, chopper, 900, 5x32 single tires ...........................................................$132,000

‘11 C-IH 5088, 1743/1541 sep hrs, rock trap, chopper, 30.5x32 ‘15 C-IH 500 Quad trac, 2750 hrs, 36” tracks, cab susp, HID lights, 4 hyd valves ......................................................$180,000 tires .................................................................................$89,000 ‘14 C-IH 350 Row trac, 1865 hrs, 1000 PTO, 18” tracks, 4 hyd, hi-flow ...........................................................................$155,000 ‘09 C-IH 7088, 1807 eng/1275 sep hrs, rock trap, field tracker, ‘14 C-IH 340 Mag Row trac, 287 hrs, luxury cab, suspended chopper, Pro 600 monitor, HID lights, 520x42” duals ...$92,000 front, 18” tracks, 6 hyds, 1000 PTO, 76” track spacing .........................................................................$185,000 ‘11 Claas Lexion 740, 1466 eng/1899 sep hrs, 4x4, chopper, ‘13 C-IH 600 Quad trac, 2155 hrs, 36” belts, 4 hyd, hi-flow, complete auto steer equipped ....................................$200,000 520x42” duals ................................................................$98,000 ‘15 Challenger MT 845E, 3909 hrs, 30” belts, 4 hyd valves, HID lights, 58 gpm hyd pump ............................................$142,500 ‘04 Cat Challenger MT 755, 4844 hrs, 16” tracks, 4 hyd, 3 pt, ‘13 JD 645C 13’ pickup head ..............................................$10,000 1000 PTO, JD ATU steering wheel ................................$65,000 ‘83 JD 643 6R30 cornhead, low tin, oil drive ....................... $6,500

HARVEST HEADERS

ROW CROP TRACTORS ‘12 JD 8235, 2WD, 1235 hrs, cab, air, power shift, 3pt, 1000 PTO, 4 hyd valves, 18.4x46 duals ...............................$110,000 ‘06 JD 7420, MFWD, 5164 hrs, cab, IVT, 3 pt, 540/1000 PTO, w/ JD H360 ldr ....................................................................$65,000 ‘11 Versatile 305, MFWD, 690 hrs, 4 hyds, 3pt, 1000 PTO, HID lights, front wgts, 480x46 tires & duals .........................$98,000 ‘13 NH T8360, 1200 hrs, luxury cab, 4 hyd, 1000 PTO, 3pt, 480x50 duals, auto steer complete .............................$110,000 ‘06 NH TG210, MFWD, 4240 hrs. 540/1000 PTO, 3pt, 4hyd, 380x46 rear tires & duals ...............................................$56,000 ‘03 NH TG230, MFWD, 3346 hrs. Megaflow hyd 4 valves, 3pt, 540/1000 PTO, 380x46 duals ........................................$59,000 ‘13 C-IH 290, 1250 hrs, 1000 PTO, 3pt, 4 hyd valves, big pump, front duals, rear 480x50 tires & duals .........................$113,000 ‘13 C-IH 260, 577 hrs , 540/1000 PTO, 3pt, 4 hyd hi -flow, front wgts, 420x46” tires & duals .........................................$110,000 ‘12 C-IH 260, 1784 hrs, 1000 PTO, 3pt hitch, suspended front axle, 4 hyd valves, hi-flow, front duals, front wgts, 480x50” rear tires & duals..........................................................$105,000 ‘04 C-IH MX 285, 8540 hrs, 3 pt, 18.4x46 tires & duals, 1000 PTO, 4 hyd valves, front wts, eng overhauled- 0 hrs ....$59,000

PAGE 39

‘13 C-IH 3408 8R30 cornhead ............................................$21,000 ‘08 C-IH 2408 8R30 cornhead ............................................$12,500 ‘02 C-IH 2208 8R30 cornhead, new knives ........................$11,500 ‘13 Drago 6R30 chopping cornhead, fits JD ........................$26,000 ‘09 Drago 6R30 chopping cornhead, fits JD ........................$20,000 ‘06 Drago 8R30 chopping cornhead, fits C-IH 7000 ............$15,000 Drago 6R30 cornhead, non-chopping, came off newer C-IH combine .......................................................................... $6,500 ‘05 Geringhoff 8R30 chopping cornhead, off JD 9770.........$18,000

GRAVITY BOXES Brent, 740 gravity box .......................................................$10,500 Parker, 450 bushel gravity box ........................................... $3,300

STEEL TRACK SET-UP FOR 9610 JD COMBINE ............................................................................... $4,800

LARSON IMPLEMENTS 5 miles east of Cambridge, MN on Hwy. 95

ADVERTISER LISTING

40 Square Cooperative Solutions ..............................................................18 Beck's Hybrids .......................................................................................1, 7 Blethen Berens .........................................................................................23 C & C Roof ing ........................................................................................16 C & D Corporation...................................................................................10 Courtland Waste Handling ........................................................................24 Curt's Truck & Diesel ...............................................................................13 Deutz Auctioneers ....................................................................................30 Doda USA ...............................................................................................27 Farmers National Company .......................................................................35 Freudenthal Dairy & Mfg .........................................................................26 Henslin Auctions ................................................................................ 31, 32 Kannegiesser Truck Sales .......................................................................... 8 Keith Bode ...............................................................................................38 Kerkhoff Auction ............................................................................... 34, 35 LandProz.com ..........................................................................................32 Larson Implement .............................................................................. 30, 39 Mages Auction .........................................................................................34 Matt Maring Auction .......................................................................... 29, 35 Mid-American Auction ....................................................................... 30, 35 Mike's Collision ........................................................................................ 6 Minnesota Farm Bureau ............................................................................. 9 MS Diversif ied ........................................................................................38 Northland Buildings .................................................................................25 Peterson Farms Seeds ...............................................................................11 Pioneer Corn ...................................................................................... 14, 15 Pioneer Soybeans .................................................................................3, 17 Pruess Elevator ........................................................................................37 R & E Enterprises ....................................................................................33 Roy E Abbott Futures ...............................................................................28 Rush River Steel & Trim ..........................................................................18 Schweiss Doors ........................................................................................38 Smiths Mill Implement .............................................................................38 Sonic Herbicide ........................................................................................ 4 Southwest MN Farm Business .................................................................... 5 Southwest MN K-Fence ............................................................................. 5 Steffes Group ....................................................................29, 31, 33, 34, 35 Ultimate Outdoor Furnace ........................................................................13 Upper Midwest Management ....................................................................37 Wingert Realty .........................................................................................32 Wyffels Hybrids ................................................................................. 20, 21

507-345-4523 • 800-657-4665 PO Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56001 www.thelandonline.com

763-689-1179

Look at our Web site for pictures & more listings www.larsonimplements.com

Do you have extra stuff sitting in a shed? sell it fast with an ad in

!

Classifieds work! 507-345-4523 • 800-657-4665


PAGE 40

www.thelandonline.com — “Where Farm and Family Meet”

THE LAND — NOVEMBER 2/NOVEMBER 9, 2018

This week’s Back Roads is the work of The Land Correspondent Richard Siemers.

Rural Victorian

I

t wasn’t a typical 1893 farmhouse when Albert and Jennie Sperry built it overlooking Foot Lake in Kandiyohi County. There was brick work on the exterior, stained glass in the windows, a two-toned wood floor in the entry, and a machine-carved staircase bannister. When their son, Bryan, died in 1970 and willed the house to the Kandiyohi County Historical Society, the farm was gone and the house was a part of the city of Willmar. “Bryan lived his whole life in the house,” said Jill Wohnoutka, Executive Director of KCHS. “He was also sitting on the board of the historical society when he died.” His father, Albert, was one of the first settlers in the area, according to Wohnoutka. He moved to the area from Atwater after his first wife died and their general store had burned. He married Jennie and they built the house. Albert was a businessman, with an implement dealership and a meat market, and was involved in land development. He was also a farmer, of course, but according to Wohnoutka, Sperry’s younger daughter didn’t think farming was his forte. Five of Albert’s children (including one from his previous marriage) lived into adulthood. Albert died in 1917 and a few years later the house was divided into upstairs and downstairs apartments. Bryan stayed on

Willmar, Minn.

and lived in the upstairs apartment. After KCHS came into possession of the house, that apartment was home for the caretaker who took care of the complex of buildings and grounds. Now empty, the Society is looking into restoring the upstairs. After six years of renovations, the bottom floor opened to the public in 1976. “This is a Victorian farmhouse,” Wohnoutka said. “The Board returned it to the turn-of-the-century period. The wallpaper is era-specific, but not trying to match the original. All the woodwork and stained glass is original.” Most of the furnishings are from the museum’s collection, with a dining room table and fireplace mantle from the Carnegie Library of that era. A few items are from the Sperrys: Jennie’s set of dishes, a bedroom set, and a framed picture of William Jennings Bryan — Albert’s favorite politician after whom Bryan was named. The Society holds an annual tea and has a fundraising raffle for a turn-of-the-century walleye and bison dinner served in the house. Otherwise, the Sperry House can be seen by appointment if the historical society is contacted ahead of time so someone is available to show it. Check the KCHS website at www. kandiyohicountyhistory. com, or find them on Facebook. v


Page 4 - November 2/November 9, 2018

THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

© 2018

Nov. 2/Nov. 9, 2018

(800) 657-4665 www.TheLandOnline.com theland@TheLandOnline.com P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002


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THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

November 2/November 9, 2018 - Page 3


Page 2 - November 2/November 9, 2018

THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

November 2/November 9, 2018 - Page 3


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THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

© 2018

Nov. 2/Nov. 9, 2018

(800) 657-4665 www.TheLandOnline.com theland@TheLandOnline.com P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002

THE LAND ~ November 2, 2018 ~ Southern Edition  

"Since 1976, Where Farm and Family Meet"

THE LAND ~ November 2, 2018 ~ Southern Edition  

"Since 1976, Where Farm and Family Meet"