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© 2014

May 30, 2014

NORTHERN EDITION

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PAGE 5: How you can improve bee habitat PAGE 8: Colony losses down, still significant PAGE 23: ‘Bee whisperer’ combating die-off


Time to take charge, graduates

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P.O. Box 3169 418 South Second St. Mankato, MN 56002 (800) 657-4665 Vol. XXXIII ❖ No. XI 40 pages, plus supplement

COLUMNS Opinion Farm and Food File Calendar The Back Porch In the Garden Cookbook Corner Marketing Farm Programs Mielke Market Weekly Auctions/Classifieds Advertiser Listing Back Roads

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STAFF

Publisher: Jim Santori: jsantori@cnhi.com General Manager: Kathleen Connelly: kconnelly@TheLandOnline.com Editor: Kevin Schulz: editor@TheLandOnline.com Assistant Editor: Tom Royer: troyer@TheLandOnline.com Staff Writer: Dick Hagen: dickhagen@mvtvwireless.com Advertising Representatives: Kim Henrickson: khenrickson@TheLandOnline.com Mike Schafer: mike.schafer2@gmail.com Danny Storlie: theland@TheLandOnline.com Office/Advertising Assistants: Vail Belgard: vbelgard@TheLandOnline.com Joan Compart: theland@TheLandOnline.com Ad Production: Brad Hardt: lndcomp@mankatofreepress.com For Customer Service Concerns: (507) 345-4523, (800) 657-4665, theland@TheLandOnline.com Fax: (507) 345-1027 For Editorial Concerns or Story Ideas: (507) 344-6342, (800) 657-4665, editor@TheLandOnline.com National Sales Representative: Bock & Associates Inc., 7650 Executive Drive, Minneapolis, MN 55344-3677. (952) 905-3251. Because of the nature of articles appearing in The Land, product or business names may be included to provide clarity. This does not constitute an endorsement of any product or business. Opinions and viewpoints expressed in editorials or by news sources are not necessarily those of the management. The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The Publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any monies paid for the advertisement. Classified Advertising: $17.70 for seven (7) lines for a private classified, each additional line is $1.33; $23.46 for business classifieds, each additional line is $1.33. Classified ads accepted by mail or by phone with VISA, MasterCard, Discover or American Express. Classified ads can also be sent by e-mail to theland@TheLandOnline.com. Mail classified ads to The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002. Please include credit card number, expiration date and your postal address with ads sent on either mail version. Classified ads may also be called into (800) 657-4665. Deadline for classified ads is noon on the Monday prior to publication date, with holiday exceptions. Distributed to farmers in all Minnesota counties and northern Iowa, as well as on The Land’s website. Each classified ad is separately copyrighted by The Land. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Subscription and Distribution: Free to farmers and agribusinesses in Minnesota and northern Iowa. $24 per year for non-farmers and people outside the service area. The Land (ISSN 0279-1633) is published Fridays and is a division of The Free Press Media (part of Community Newspaper Holdings Inc.), 418 S. Second St., Mankato MN 56001. Periodicals postage paid at Mankato, Minn. Postmaster and Change of Address: Address all letters and change of address notices to The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002; call (507) 345-4523 or e-mail to theland@TheLandOnline.com.

High school graduations have stolen the headlines the past couple of weeks. I applaud you new “citizens of the real world.” We’re presenting you with an incredible challenge and a Little do you realize that in just a few years it will be your decisions shaping the ‘bankruptcy legacy’ that will destiny of your communities, your state, continue to haunt indefinitely. even your nation. We’re presenting you with an incredible challenge and a “bankthose boundaries. But soldiers continue ruptcy legacy” that will continue to haunt their duty because when they strap on indefinitely. that uniform they carry on regardless the LAND MINDS We continue to accept a growing entitlecalling. By Dick Hagen ment society that only feeds upon itself. Ponder for a moment these words by A. Yet in another 30 years this world will Lawrence Vaincourt: “Should you find have ballooned from 7 1/2 billion peryourself in danger, with your enemies sons to 9 billion. at your hand, would you really want a The biggest growth will be among the politician with his ever-shifting stand? Or would you under-privileged of China, India, Africa, even Brazil, prefer a soldier, who has sworn to defend his home, that rapidly are moving into better incomes, better his kin and country and would fight until the end? diets, a desire for a better education for their kids, and “He was just a common soldier, and his ranks are a free market economy for their farmers. What then? growing thin, but his presence should remind us we Graduates of 2014, it will be your ballgame. Take may need his like again. For when countries are in charge. You can’t mess up any more than we have. conflict, then we find the soldier’s part is to clean up all the troubles that the politicians start. ■ “If we cannot do him honor while he’s here to hear Memorial Day weekend signals the start of summer vacation time. More importantly it is our special the praise, then at least let’s give him homage at the ending of his days. Perhaps just a simple headline in privilege to honor America’s veterans. We still have a paper that would say: ‘Our country is in mourning, several thousand young men and women stationed a soldier died today’.” in various countries around the world doing their duty of protecting other people. Dick Hagen is staff writer of The Land. He may be reached at dickhagen@mvtvwireless.com. ❖ Sometimes it seems our government oversteps

OPINION

Touching the electric fence

American humorist Will Rogers once noted See links to documents at http://farmand that he “wasn’t a member of any organized foodfile.com/in-the-news. political party” because “I am a Democrat.” The report’s points hit most farmer and The crack is dead-on funny because it’s rancher hot buttons — free trade, property bulls-eye true. Just ask any Democrat. rights, over-regulation — and all of the tea Ag Republicans on Capitol Hill, however, party’s really hot buttons: free trade, propare working feverishly to take the title erty rights and over-regulation. from Rogers’ Dems. Earlier this month, Heritage’s hotter buttons, however, glow festering differences between the party’s white by what it sees as the hypocrisy at the right wing and never wrong (just ask ’em) FARM & FOOD FILE center of almost every federal farm policy. wing over ag policy broke into the open. For example, while most farmers and The heated fight featured mud, tea and By Alan Guebert ranchers believe they operate in a “free invective but no resolution. market,” Heritage explains, government The fight has been a long time coming. “loans, price and revenue guarantees … import barTough-minded GOP tea party members tied up the riers, payments to idle land, marketing orders and 2012 farm bill until it became the 2014 farm bill. The subsidized crop insurance” have nothing to do with Heritage Foundation, the influential conservative free markets and everything to do with “Depressionthink-tank that aided the tea partiers, however, era relics ground in central planning philosophies.” refused to surrender. Worse, it says, free markets have nothing in comOn May 5, Heritage issued a 10-point broadside it mon with things named “the sugar program and the described as “alternatives … beyond the status quo of central planning and subsidies” for U.S. ag policy. See GUEBERT, pg. 4

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: 12 — Cookbook Corner: Serving God and serving food just go together

14 — From the Fields: It’s getting time to get something done 17 — Farm Programs: Prevented planting options for 2014


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Heritage, farmers agree on big picture; specifics, not so much GUEBERT, from pg. 2 Renewable Fuels Standard.” Ouch. While Heritage and ranchers and farmers can agree on broad topics like the loss of free markets and the rise of government red tape, the niceties end when specifics — say, crop insurance subsidies and ethanol mandates — are mentioned. And all talking will stop when talk turns to the idea that “government should not intervene … to ensure that farmers are profitable, as through the ‘shallow loss’ program’ that protects farmers from even minor losses.” The very idea that the heavily Republican, deeply conservative Heritage Foundation would attack federal

farm programs devised, endorsed and used by the mostly Republican, largely conservative farm and ranch folk is unheard of. And it didn’t go unanswered. On May 16, an ag lobby named Farm Policy Facts fired back. The Heritage report, it noted on its website, “departs from the respected analysis Heritage was once known for in favor of what appears to be the talking point of donors.” It’s part of a clear pattern Heritage now practices, asserted the group that includes the American Sugar Alliance, National Crop Insurance Services, National Association of Wheat Grow-

ers, National Cotton Council and the USA Rice Federation among others. “Heritage increasingly starts with the answer to any policy question they want and then cherry pick (sic) information in order to arrive at their desired conclusion.” Most of those conclusions, it offered, are “unworthy of a think tank that years ago … was credible.” Unworthy or not, the central question Heritage raises isn’t about ethanol mandates or crop insurance subsidies. Instead it’s about the future of the modern welfare state, the dominant feature of today’s government, and how special interests — from banks to mili-

OPINION

tary contractors to academia and to even, yes, farmers and ranchers — personally benefit from “public” policy as much as the public. That’s a fight worth having and one we will have sooner or later. But don’t expect it soon because as Will Rogers also noted, “There are three kinds of men: the ones that learn by reading, the few who learn by observation and the rest who have to touch an electric fence.” Alan Guebert’s “Farm and Food File” is published weekly in more than 70 newspapers in North America. Contact him at agcomm@farmandfoodfile.com. Past columns, news and events are posted at www.farmandfoodfile.com. ❖

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Send us your events by e-mail to editor@TheLandOnline.com Log on to www.TheLandOnline.com for our full events calendar Producer Opportunity for Revenue and Knowledge Academy June 4-5 Iowa State Fairgrounds, Des Moines Info: Held during the World Pork Expo; log on to www.pork.org/wpx or call the Pork Checkoff Service Center, (800) 456-7675 World Pork Expo June 4-6 Iowa State Fairgrounds, Des Moines Info: Log on to www.world pork.org

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Jackrabbit Dairy Camp June 5-7 South Dakota State University, Brookings, S.D. Info: SDSU Dairy Club sponsors event for youth 8-18 who want to enhance their dairy cattle skills and learn about the dairy industry; $50/person; log on to www.sdstate.edu/ds or e-mail sdsudairyclub@gmail.com for registration information Robotic Dairy Open House June 6, 3-8 p.m. Middleroad Acres Farm, Chandler, Minn. Info: There will be a questionand-answer program at 4 p.m.; lunch served 4:30-7 p.m.; from Chandler, 2 miles west on County Road 4/Valley Road, then 1 mile north on 40th Avenue, farm is on corner of 40th Avenue and 61st Street Breakfast on the Farm June 7, 7:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Funk’s Midway Dairy, Melrose, Minn. Info: Parking is at Melrose Area Public School, a free coach shuttle will transport to farm, there will be no parking at the farm; log on to www.stearnsfarmbreakfast.com Sheep Facility Tour June 9, 7:15 a.m.-6:45 p.m. Minnesota West Community & Technical College, Pipestone, Minn. Info: Tour includes visits to four sheep farms; $175/person; 30 minimum enrollment, 54 maximum; North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin residents will be charged a higher tuition cost unless a reciprocity form is completed; log on to www.pipestonesheep.com for more information Pork Quality Assurance Training June 11 Minnesota Pork Board Office, Mankato, Minn. Info: PQA Plus, 9 a.m.-Noon; Transport Quality Assurance, 1-4 p.m.; contact colleen@mnpork.com or (800) 537-7675 to register; log on to www.mnpork.com for location details and updated training dates Four-State Dairy Nutrition and Management Conference June 11-12 Grand River Center, Dubuque, Iowa Info: Collaborative effort of Iowa State University Extension and Outreach, University of Illinois Extension, Univer-

sity of Minnesota Extension and University of Wisconsin Extension; log on to http://wiagribusiness.org/four state.php or contact Wisconsin Agri-Service Association, (608) 223-1111, or Jim Salfer, salf001@umn.edu or (320) 2036093, for more information or to register; $150/person until May 31, $175 after that 2nd Annual PlayCleanGo Day June 14, 11 a.m.-3 a.m. Various locations in Minnesota Info: PlayCleanGo volunteers will be available at 10 state parks and three park reserve location to provide information and education materials on terrestrial invasive species; log on to www.playcleango.org for more information and to find the locations Interlaken Heritage Days at Heritage Acres June 14, 1-4 p.m. Heritage Acres Interpretive Center, Fairmont, Minn. Info: Free ice cream cones; log on to www.heritageacresmn.org or call Jerry Simon, (507) 2384645 or Norma Brolsma, (507) 764-3531 South Dakota Cattlemen’s Foundation Prime Time Gala June 14 Sioux Falls Info: Beef banquet dinner and concert to benefit Feeding South Dakota, a hunger relief organization working to eliminate hunger in the state; log on to www.sdprimetimegala.com or www.feedingsouthdakota.org


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year to year. Bee keepers talk in terms By DICK HAGEN of 75 to 100 pounds of honey per hive, The Land Staff Writer Declining bee populations are a which takes a hive of 50,000 to 65,000 bees during peak summer. One queen growing concern everywhere. Why? Because honey bees are the bee is the boss and runs the show. Perhaps surprising is the fact that unpaid transporters of pollen, that miraculous stuff that generates new Minnesota is the home to more than 300 species of bees. “Right now bumble growth of innumerable plant species. Honey on your morning toast would- bees are a big concern,” Nelson said, indicating several n’t be a reality withspecies of bumble out the tenacious bees are now in that buzzing of literally “endangered species” When you plant millions of honey bees category. across our prairie flowers each spring, Bumble bees are landscape — espeplant flowers that excellent pollinators cially if the right mixthe bees will like. — “the vibration of ture of clovers and flowering gardens are — Carmelita Nelson their wings helps them pollinate tomapart of that landtoes and other vegscape. etables even better But what if there simply aren’t than honey bees,” Nelson said. enough of these food sources? Pollinators — wild insects and Improving the habitat for pollinator bees starts right outside your front domesticated honey bees — help 70 porch. “When you plant flowers each percent of the world’s wild and cultispring, plant flowers that the bees will vated flowering plants to reproduce. like,” suggested Carmelita Nelson, Every third bite of our food is a result, Minnesota Department of Natural directory or indirectly, of an insect Resources Prairie Grassland coordina- transporting pollen. Pollinators have been called a “keystone group that tor. other organisms rely on.” She said that native bees are espeThat keystone group is on the cially attracted to native flowers. Your decline. local greenhouse, even your favorite Aerial spraying of Minnesota crops is hardware store, can be a good source of one of the likely culprits, Nelson said, both seeds and suggestions. A good source for bee-attractive flow- but with honey bees a multitude of ers is the University of Minnesota’s things are happening. Road ditch mowBee Lab — online at ing of wild flowers and parasitic mites, www.beelab.umn.edu — or the Min- for example, are becoming an issue. Time will tell if 2013-14’s harsh winnesota DNR, at www.mndnr.gov. ter was detrimental to the bee popuAs you might expect honey producSee POLLINATORS, pg. 6 tion varies from hive to hive and from


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Improving nesting habitat POLLINATORS, from pg. 5 ing of native prairie is a start. Some lace. Nelson said bees can keep warm bees like to burrow into the ground for enough with their vibration, but some their nesting sites. additional supplemental feeding was “If we leave a few areas bare and a good idea this winter. open, these bees might burrow down She also said that organic farming is into the soil there,” said Jon Wogen, an Olivia, Minn.-area wildlife-outdoor a great enhancement writer. “Old stumps to the Minnesota bee and brush and wood population. “Organic piles are good nesting farming not only Old stumps and places, as native bees benefits bees but may use cracks or brush and wood also birds and other worm holes in the piles are good nestwildlife. I’ve talked wood for nesting burto many organic ing places, as native rows.” farmers who tell me bees may use cracks about all the birds Wogen said artifior worm holes in the cial nesting stations singing in their wood for nesting yards.” can be built for sevburrows. eral species, espeOther suggestions cially orchard bees, for rebuilding bee — Jon Wogen which sometimes are populations: Towns called mason bees or with unused leaf-cutting bees. Many of the native park/recreation space can plant native species of bees are friendly and nonprairie, with an emphasis on wild flowers in that space. Volunteer gar- aggressive; they won’t bother people deners and Master Gardeners can unless they are grabbed or squeezed. work up soil in certain park/recreEducation and research may be the ation areas and maintain butterfly, key to keeping pollinators in good numhummingbird and bee gardens. bers so they can do their job and proNesting habitat can be improved for vide us with fruit and vegetable crops all species of bees. Even a small plant- that feed and nourish us, Wogen said. ❖

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Building a bee box Wildlife-outdoor writer Jon Wogen offers tips on how to build a “bee box.” Most native bees like a six-inch deep hole drilled into a log or four-by-six post. One can screw two-by-fours together. The holes should go all the way through as it will be Jon Wogen photos mounted on a two-byfour post so it will close the back ends of the holes. This facilitates cleanout, which should occur every two years after the spring bees have hatched out. The box can be removed from the two-byfour back, and the holes can be cleaned out. In case you don’t want to miss any bees coming to lay eggs in the brooder house, you should have another house on hand to replace the one you are cleaning. A brush or drill can clean out the house. This prevents disease of the young bees growing in the house. It is best to use pine or fir, and not treated wood. An example house made of two-by-fours can be a foot tall and have about 24 holes drilled. Each hole is five-sixteenthsinch in diameter. A roof can be put on the house to provide shade and to prevent rain from coming into the holes. The bees like the nest box to face the morning sun. — Dick Hagen, The Land staff writer

Did you know?

• Honey bees visit 2 million flowers to make one pound of honey. • To make 1 pound of honey, bees may need to fly 50,000 miles. • Honey bees may forage up to 2 to 5 miles from the hive. • A worker honey bee will gather just 1/12 teaspoon of honey during her entire lifetime. • Honey is nature’s original sweetener; Humans have enjoyed honey since the dawn of recorded history. • Raw honey contains many beneficial minerals and vitamins. Honey also has antibacterial properties and anti-oxidant benefits. Many claim allergy relief by using local honey that contains pollen.

• Honey bees were brought to North America by the colonists. • Apiculture is the name for the keeping of bees. • Bees do not hibernate, but cluster for warmth. They remain active all winter. • Bees will maintain an internal cluster temperature of 92 F in the coldest part of winter while raising brood. • Bees will disconnect their wings allowing them to pump their wing muscles to create heat. • We only produce about 30 percent of the honey we consume in the United States. • Indirectly, honey bees pollinate 70 percent of the food crops, through seed production, etc. ❖


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Survey shows bees better; losses still significant A yearly survey of beekeepers, released May 15, shows fewer colony losses occurred in the United States over the winter of 2013-14 than in recent years, but beekeepers say losses remain higher than the level that they consider to be sustainable. According to survey results, total losses of managed honey bee colonies from all causes were 23.2 percent nationwide. That number is above the 18.9 percent level of loss that beekeepers say is acceptable for their economic sustainability, but is a marked improvement over the 30.5 percent loss reported for the winter of 2012-13, and over the eight-year average loss of 29.6 percent. More than three-fourths of the world’s flowering plants rely on pollinators, such as bees, to reproduce, meaning pollinators help produce one out of every three bites of food Americans eat. “Pollinators, such as bees, birds and other insects are essential partners for farmers and ranchers and help produce much of our food supply.

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Yearly fluctuations in the rate of losses like these only demonstrate how complicated the whole issue of honey bee health has become, with factors such as viruses ... parasites ... lack of diversity in pollen sources, and even sub-lethal effects of pesticides combining to weaken and kill bee colonies.

— Jeff Pettis Healthy pollinator populations are critical to the continued economic wellbeing of agricultural producers,” said U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “While we’re glad to see improvement this year, losses are still too high and there is still much more work to be done to stabilize bee populations.” There is no way to tell why the bees did better this year, according to both Jeff Pettis and Dennis vanEngelsdorp. Pettis is a research leader of the Agricultural Research Service Bee Research Laboratory in Beltsville, Md. ARS is the USDA’s chief intramural scientific research agency. VanEngelsdorp is a University of Maryland assis-

tant professor who is the leader of the survey and director of the Bee Informed Partnership. Although the survey, conducted by the USDA and the University of Maryland Bee Informed Partnership shows improvement, losses remain above the level that beekeepers consider to be economically sustainable. This year, almost two-thirds of the beekeepers responding reported losses greater than the 18.9 percent threshold. “Yearly fluctuations in the rate of losses like these only demonstrate how complicated the whole issue of honey bee heath has become, with factors such as viruses and other pathogens, parasites like varroa mites, problems of nutrition

from lack of diversity in pollen sources, and even sub-lethal effects of pesticides combining to weaken and kill bee colonies,” Pettis said. The winter losses survey covers the period from October 2013 through April. About 7,200 beekeepers responded to the voluntary survey. A complete analysis of the bee survey data will be published later this year. The summary of the analysis is at http://goo.gl/Ywzx4s. The USDA also announced that it will hold a summit this fall aimed at addressing the nutrition and forage needs of pollinators. The summit will take place in Washington, D.C., Oct. 20-21 and will be attended by a consortium of public, private and non-governmental organizations. Attendees will discuss the most recent research related to pollinator loss and work to identify solutions. Additionally, the USDA launched the People’s Garden Apiary bee cam at the USDA headquarters in Washington, D.C., as an additional effort to increase public awareness about the reduction of bee populations and to inform Americans about actions they can take to See SURVEY, pg. 10

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It’s been nearly 21 years Oppression into Opportuand I can still picture the nity for Women Worldwater fountain where she wide,” Nicholas D. Kristof Praise God, governments and people around the went missing. and Sheryl WuDunn write, “more girls were killed in world have taken notice this time. #Bringbackourgirls It was our family’s first the last 50 years — preis the rally cry. And as some nations join ours in the outing since Melanie was cisely because they were search, we pray. born. She was a couple girls — than men killed in weeks old; her sisters Elizaall the wars in the 20th beth and Stephanie were 6 century.” and 4, respectively. THE BACK PORCH When the first vehicle he them safely home. Ann Voskamp writes, “Does anyone The girls were giddy. What saw at the gate was a van, see the girls, care about the girls, do By Lenae Bulthuis As I write there are 276 missing child isn’t over a county fair? there was no polite proto- girls who were kidnapped from a whatever it takes to bring the girls Carnival rides, cotton candy, col. He whipped open its back to hope?” boarding school in Nigeria. The kidanimals and more. Thing is, side door like a federal agent and nappers plans are to sell these dear we didn’t see any of those things this There are some. But more are came face to face with the family he trip. We spent more time in the fair girls for about $12 each to potential needed. So many more! had just terrorized. With a quick, “husbands.” parking lot unbuckling children, reBut what do we do? There is no “Sorry!” he slammed the door shut and buckling sandals, setting up the Praise God, governments and people quick-fix to this worldwide epidemic stroller and arranging the diaper bag ran to the next gate. And we prayed. around the world have taken notice of injustice. than we had time within the gates and Within a timespan that was shorter this time. #Bringbackourgirls is the What I know is what we experithan it seemed, Stephanie was trans- rally cry. And as some nations join our first pit stop. enced firsthand. When you really Stephanie needed a drink. Not sure ported to the fair headquarters on the ours in the search, we pray. value and care for the one who is lost, shoulders of a gentle grandpa. He if she was actually parched or if it simBut what about all the children — you’ll do whatever it takes for as long heard the announcement and from the ply looked liked a cool fountain, but especially the girls — who go missing it takes to bring her home. And we she wanted a drink. While she sipped looks of the scared little girl within without anyone’s notice? What about pray. arm’s reach, he figured she had to be we scanned the grounds to determine the ones in other parts of Africa, Asia, the one. He hoisted her high so we’d Lenae Bulthuis is a wife, mom and where we should go first. One second South and Central America, and even friend who muses from her back porch see her sooner rather than later, and she was there, the next one she was on the soil we call home? There are the reunion was sweet. on a Minnesota grain and livestock missing. more in need. So many more! farm. ❖ I don’t know his name, but I’m forIt is a parent’s nightmare. Mike In their book “Half the Sky: Turning raced to the fair headquarters to have ever grateful. Together again, Mike it announced via the loud speaker that asked, “Do you want to stay?” there was a missing child. I made cir“I want to go home,” I said. The girls did, too. We were never so happy to cles around the water fountain with tuck them safely in bed, as we were the stroller gripped in one hand and Elizabeth’s small palm in the other. that night. And we prayed. Not all missing children’s reports end happily ever after. Not all missing After alerting the fair personnel, Mike sprinted to the entrance gate. At children have someone who cares the time there were stories of a enough to hoist them to his shoulders creeper in a van who trailed children. and do whatever it takes to bring

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Farmers encouraged to grow alfalfa, clover as habitat SURVEY, from pg. 8 support the recovery of pollinator populations. The USDA “Bee Watch” website — log on to www.usda.gov/beewatch — will broadcast honey bee hive activity live over the internet 24 hours per day, seven days per week. Created in 2010, the People’s Garden Apiary is home to two bee hives. The bees are Italian queens, the most common bee stock and the same used in many honey bee colonies throughout the United States. In March, Vilsack created a Pollinator Working Group, under the leadership of Deputy Secretary Krysta Harden, to better coordinate efforts, leverage resources and increase focus on pollinator issues across USDA agencies. USDA personnel from 10 department agencies (Agricultural Research Service, National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Farm Services Agency, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Economic Research Service, Forest Service, Agricultural Marketing Service, Risk Management Agency and Rural Development) meet regularly to coordinate and evaluate efforts as the USDA strives toward improving pollinator health and ensuring our pollinators continuing contributions to our nation’s environment and food security. Earlier this year, the USDA made $3 million available to help agriculture producers in five states (North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan) provide floral forage habitats to benefit pollinating species on working lands. The Honey Bee Pollinator Effort is intended to encourage farmers and ranchers to grow alfalfa, clover and other flowering habitat for bees and other pollinators. The president’s fiscal year 2015 budget proposal provides $71 million for pollinator health activities through multiple USDA agencies. This includes an increase of $40 million in combined mandatory and discretionary funds to advance efforts, in consultation with the Environmental Protection Agency and other federal partners, to respond to the decline in honey bee health and ensure their recovery. This coordinated effort is focused on targeted research that addresses multifactorial stressors, their interaction, and identification and implementation of measures to improve and increase habitat available to pollinators on federal and private lands. In addition, this initiative will help prevent introductions of invasive bees, bee diseases and parasites; document the status of honey bee health factors associated with bee losses and honey bee production; and work with stakeholders on best management practices. A coordinated communication strategy, including outreach and education, will engage the public to help solve this important challenge. ❖


Regardless of pronunciation, clematis queen of all vines That description suits this member of the Ranunculacea botanical family. I would love to have more of the several hundred varieties available but some restraint must be shown in this hobby of gardening. Larry and I grow eight cultivars of clematis and two are heirloom varieties that rank high on our list of favorites.

year. In our climate Mother Nature sometimes does all the pruning for us and we only need to remove the dead areas of plant material.

IN THE GARDEN

By Sharon Quale

Henryi is one of the finest pure whites with blooms 6 to 8 inches across and coffee colored anthers. Its heaviest flush of flowering is early in the season with smaller displays of bloom throughout the summer. If you have an all white garden or want a plant for evening interest, Henryi is unequaled. The pure white flowers sparkle and glow at dusk and in moon light.

Henryi the soil level and water well.

Nelly Moser

Photos by Larry Hansen

Some say Klem-uh-tiss and some say Clem-at-tis. Klem-uh-tiss is considered the correct pronunciation. I think it is never wise or necessary to correct anyone when talking about names of plants — we gardeners all know what plants we are describing and sometimes the names are not pronounced like they would sound phonetically.

If you are not sure of the pronunciation, say your version with conviction. All but the most serious minded plant people will likely think you are saying the name correctly.

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All clematis like their heads in the sun and their feet in the shade. A good 3-inch layer of mulch or a ground cover will keep their feet shaded. It will take Our gardening season is off to a late start this about two years for the plants to become established spring and once again there are too many tasks to and produce large flower displays. accomplish in too short of a time. I did manage to Pruning clematis sounds complicated; however, Nelly Moser is a trusted heirloom variety that displays check and trim all the clematis vines. there are only three bloom times that affect pruning. pink petals set off by darker bars. The blooms are huge Nothing pleases the eye as much as one of these beautiand the flowers prolific. The seed pods are exotic looking • Early flowering varieties don’t need any pruning ful climbers in full bloom, reaching 10 feet or more on a whorls, and provide added interest after the plant has except removal of dead material. trellis, meandering over a fence or climbing an old stump. finished blooming. Nelly Moser and other pastel colored • Mid-summer bloomers can be pruned to a desired Sharon Quale is a master gardener from central varieties keep their color best when planted where they shape when dormant. Minnesota. She may be reached at (218) 738-6060 or get some afternoon shade. • Late-flowering species can be pruned to 4 to 6 inches squale101@yahoo.com. ❖ Plant these vines in early spring. Soak the root from the ground in early spring. A garden diary indicatballs for 20 minutes. Dig a hole at least 18 inches ing when the plant was purchased and its care works deep and 18 inches wide and work some compost into well to keep pruning information available from year to it. Set the plant so at least two leaf nodes are below

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THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

Clematis are often called the queen of all vines.

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THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

12

Making great memories one wonderful recipe at a time Cookbook Corner

By SARAH JOHNSON The Land Correspondent “Most memories are made when people are gathered together enjoying great food.” It’s a simple sentence that sums up the essence of “Serve the Lord With Gladness,” a collection of 600 recipes from Holy Cross Lutheran Church of Prior Lake, Minn., in honor of their 25th anniversary this June. Serving God and serving food just seem to go together, strengthening faith and creating lifelong memories at the same time. This cookbook contains too many recipes I wanted to share, so I had to pare them down to these few — a difficult choice indeed. It’s one of the best church cookbooks I’ve seen, with recipes that are decidedly not run-of-the-mill. Apples in your cole slaw? Sure, why not! This part-fruit/part-veggie slaw is sweet and tangy, and it’ll be great this summer for all your grilling, camping and partying needs. You can make it in advance; just add the crushed peanuts at the last minute. Apple Sour Cream Slaw Submitted by Joanne Naas and Pamela Hunter Dressing 1 cup sour cream 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons cider vinegar 2 tablespoons sugar 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 1 teaspoon dry mustard Combine all ingredients and beat until smooth. Set aside. Slaw 1 cup celery, sliced

The Johnson clan gives four ‘yums’ to Fresh Pear Bread

2 cups cabbage, shredded 1 cup carrot, shredded 2 large apples, cored and cut into bite-size pieces 1/3 cup raisins 1/3 cup salted peanuts, chopped Add everything except peanuts to dressing mixture. Toss to mix. Refrigerate. Mix in peanuts just before serving. If you’re tired of the same old beef and chicken on the grill, do your stomach a favor and grill up some fish. This recipe calls for halibut not only because it’s delicious but because it’s a firm, meaty fish that won’t fall off the skewer. Grilled Halibut Kabobs Submitted by Lori Siedelman 1/2 cup olive oil 1/4 cup orange juice 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 1 garlic clove, minced 1 tablespoon each fresh rosemary and fresh thyme, chopped 1/2 teaspoon salt 12 ounces halibut, skinned, cut into 2-inch cubes

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2 small red potatoes 1 small yellow squash, cut into 1/2inch slices 2 Roma tomatoes, cut into thick chunks 6 white button mushrooms 1 green pepper, cut into chunks 2 lemons, cut into thick wedges Combine olive oil, orange juice, balsamic vinegar, garlic, rosemary, thyme and salt in glass measuring cup. Toss halibut with threefourths of marinade. Refrigerate and marinate for at least half hour and up to 1 hour. Set the reserved marinade aside. Parboil the potatoes in lightly salted water until almost tender. Drain and cut into 1/2-inch slices. Toss with a little of the extra marinade and set aside. Toss squash, tomatoes, mushrooms and green pepper in a large bowl with the remaining marinade. Heat grill. Thread skewers, alternating the halibut, vegetables and lemon wedges. Reserve some lemon wedges for garnish. Grill over medium-hot heat for 4-5 minutes per side. Serve garnished with remaining lemon wedges. Serves 2-3. Moist and delicately sweet, Fresh Pear Bread will be your next favorite quick bread. I made these luscious loaves one morning and they were both gone by sundown. Four out of four “yums” from the Johnson kin, and this one goes in my recipe box! Fresh Pear Bread Submitted by Tracy and Josh Eickhoff 3 eggs 1 1/2 cups sugar 3/4 cup vegetable oil 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 3 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 4 cups ripe pears, peeled and finely chopped 1 teaspoon lemon juice 1 cup miniature chocolate chips Preheat oven to 350 F. Grease two 9x5inch loaf pans. In a mixing bowl, combine the eggs, sugar, oil and vanilla; mix well. Combine flour, baking powder, cinnamon, baking soda and salt; stir into the egg mixture just until moistened. Toss pears with lemon juice. Stir pears and chocolate chips into batter (batter will be thick). Spoon into two greased pans. Bake for 55-60 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool for 10 minutes

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before removing from pans to wire racks. Here is a recipe for sweet-and-salty Bacon Bark for the bacon freaks in your life. Bacon + brown sugar + spices make a very good equation. You can also try this with chili powder, black pepper, cayenne pepper, cinnamon, dry mustard or any other spice you feel like. Bacon Bark Submitted by Pamela Hunter 6 slices bacon, cut into 1-inch pieces 1/4 cup brown sugar 1 teaspoon Hungarian paprika Lemon zest Salt and pepper Preheat oven to 350 F. Mix all ingredients, tossing well to coat the bacon. Spread out on cookie sheet. Bake for 810 minutes. Soda Cracker Pie uses an old-fashioned method for making a pie crust with — you guessed it — soda crackers! It’s as tasty as it is unique. You can top it with anything you like; this recipe calls for strawberries and whipped cream. Soda Cracker Pie Submitted by Evelyn Jabs Crust 3 egg whites, beaten stiff 1 cup sugar 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla 14 soda crackers, crushed 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 cup chopped nuts Preheat oven to 350 F. Grease pie tin. Beat egg whites until stiff. Fold in sugar and vanilla. Fold in crushed crackers, baking powder and nuts. Bake for 30 minutes. Topping 1 cup whipping cream 1 box frozen strawberries, well drained Beat whipping cream until stiff. Fold in strawberries. Spoon over pie crust and refrigerate for 4 hours. Cut and serve. “Serve the Lord with Gladness” is available for $25 (shipping included) by sending a check payable to Holy Cross Lutheran Church LWML, Attn: Tracy Eickhoff, 14085 Pike Lake Trail, Prior Lake, MN 55372. If your community group or church organization has printed a cookbook and would like to have it reviewed in the “Cookbook Corner,” send us a copy to “Cookbook Corner,” The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002. Please specify if you wish to have the cookbook returned, and include information on how readers may obtain a copy of the cookbook. Submission does not guarantee a review. ❖


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From the Fields: It’s getting time to get something done By KRISTIN KVENO The Land Correspondent

The Thronsons Gary, Minn.

For Jared Thronson planting is finally underway. The number of acres planted so far may not be impressive but at least it’s Jared Thronson a start to getting the crops in the ground. The Land spoke with Thronson May 13 as he was waiting out the rain and anxious to get back in the field. “Only got 35 acres planted,” he said. He was happy to report, however, that he had no planter issues and planting went well. The forecast was for “sunny and warmer” temperatures, just what the fields need to be ready. “Hopefully by Friday or Saturday we can do some more planting,” Thronson said. The delay in getting corn in the ground has made him change to some early corn varieties. He will be planting mostly 75- to 80-day corn. This is the first time Thronson has had to change to earlier varieties due to late planting. “The 25th of May is the crop insurance deadline (for corn),” Thronson said. If the corn isn’t in the ground by then, Thronson will switch to either soybeans or wheat. With 280 acres of corn to plant, he believes that with “two good days” the corn should all be in. His plan is for this dad, Lloyd, to run the planter during the day and Thronson will take the nighttime shift — keeping the planter going 24 hours a day until the crops are all in. “Hopefully all the crops will be seeded in two weeks,” Thronson said. He believes that “shouldn’t be a problem if we can get going by this weekend.” Some people have big plans for Friday and Saturday nights; Thronson's big weekend plans include a planter, a field and, most importantly, no rain.

The Wiltses Herman, Minn.

In the past two weeks “we got another two-and-a-half days in the field,” Dennis Wilts reported to The

The Thronsons ❖ Gary, Minn ❖ Norman-Mahnomen Counties corn, soybeans and wheat

the haybine out this weekend for the first crop of hay.” He is also working on trimming trees along the field and getting some repair jobs finished on the farm. “We need this moisture, the timing is terrible,” he said. Hoffman does point out that this moisture could become valuable to the crop this July and August.

The Wiltses ❖ Herman, Minn ❖ Stevens County corn, soybeans, wheat and sugar beets

The Hoffmans ❖ New Ulm, Minn ❖ Brown County dairy cattle, corn, soybeans and alfalfa

The Hagens ❖ Lake Mills, Iowa ❖ Winnebago County corn and soybeans

Land on May 12. Though the field conditions were “plenty wet when we started, we got some corn and sugar beets in,” Wilts said. With almost three-quarDennis Wilts ters of an inch of rain since May 7, he hasn’t been able to get back in the field. The planting conditions so far this season “haven’t been ideal but still a little better than we thought it would be,” Wilts said. With more rain and cool temperatures expected for the next couple of days, “it just isn’t going to warm up.” When the weather does turn around, he estimates that “in 10 days we’d have it all done.” Wilts said that they’ve had enough moisture; now they need sunshine and warm weather. “In another week if we don’t get the wheat in we’ll have to change to another crop,” he said. “It’s getting time to get something done.” The weather must not have heard that spring should be here as Wilts reported that there was “frost on the roof on Saturday.” This lack of heat isn’t welcome as the ground needs to dry out and dry out fast. Wilts hopes that things turn around and the crops will be in, the sun will be shining, and the frost will be a longforgotten word around his farm.

The Hoffmans New Ulm, Minn.

Rain is back and planting is on hold. That about sums up the planting progress for Don Hoffman. When The Land spoke Don Hoffman with Hoffman on May 12, he reported that since May 7 the farm had received three-and-a-half inches of rain. With more moisture on the way — “I think today and tomorrow it’s rain” — planting will have to wait. Hoffman was last in the field on May 7 when they planted 50 acres of corn and 30 acres of beans. On that day the “ground conditions were excellent.” With 250 acres of corn left, he hopes that he needs just “two good days” to get planting done. Hoffman can’t be picky at this point in the season and will begin to plant around wet spots in the fields. “I would’ve liked to have had all the corn in,” he said. With the amount of moisture that fell, planting delays were imminent. If Hoffman isn’t able to get the crop in another week to 10 days, “I’d be concerned.” On the dairy side everything is going “very steady, very stable. The way we like it,” he said. But that doesn’t mean there isn’t work to be done while waiting to plant. Hoffman will be “getting

The Hagens Lake Mills, Iowa

“It’s just cold and wet.” Not exactly perfect planting conditions for Jim Hagen, but he hopes that’s about to Jim Hagen change. When The Land spoke with Hagen on May 14 he found the fields to still be wet from “another two inches of rain last weekend.” The corn planting finished last week for Hagen. He was pleased that he had “good conditions” for getting the corn in the ground. While he’s waiting for the fields to dry up before starting to plant soybeans, Hagen has been busy hauling corn to the ethanol plant. He’s also working on getting the sprayer ready to go as he’ll be putting down preemergent herbicide for the soybeans. Hagen estimates that he just “needs four good days” to get the beans in the ground. He’s not panicking yet about not having the beans in, but if they’re not in by the end of the month it will be a different story. The ground “just has to dry up,” he said. “There’s no drought here,” said Hagen. “The tiles are all running.” He credits the drain tiles for the reason that he’s done with planting corn and feels the “tiling is proving its worth.” According to Hagen, only half the corn is planted around the area. Hagen doesn’t expect to be in the field for at least two more days. He is looking forward to getting back in the planter and utilizing his new “row shut-off system; that means no overlapping, hopefully,” Hagen said. No planting overlaps, sunny skies and warm weather all sound like ingredients for some great soybean planting conditions. ❖

Look for the next update in your June 13 issue of The Land


Local Corn and Soybean Price Index

15

Sauk Rapids Madison Redwood Falls Fergus Falls Morris Tracy Average: Year Ago Average:

THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

Cash Grain Markets

corn/change* soybeans/change* $3.95 $4.07 $4.27 $3.92 $3.98 $4.25

-.33 -.27 -.28 -.20 -.25 -.30

$13.74 $14.35 $14.59 $14.13 $14.23 $14.49

+.05 +.07 +.15 +.15 +.14 +.05

$4.07

$14.26

$6.75

$14.80

JUN’13

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN ’14

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

Grain prices are effective cash close on May 27. The price index chart compares an average of most recently reported local cash prices with the same average for a year ago. *Cash grain price change represents a two-week period.

Grain Outlook Planting progress slows slightly

Livestock Angles Grain Angles Cattle, hogs Don’t neglect your fickle as of late bookkeeping For some areas of Minnesota and Wisconsin, producers are once again finding it challenging to get seed in the ground. Spring is the favorite time of year for most producers because it starts the cycle of growth and it brings hope of a bountiful crop. Usually, the production side of agriculture is where the producer gets his pleasure, but equally important is the business side of your farming operation, including your financial reporting, bookkeeping, records and all of the other dayto-day tasks involved in running a business. Most producers perform record ANDY HUNEKE keeping for two reasons: to have the AgStar Director, Agbiz & proper information to file income Trade Credit/Leasing Northfield, Minn. taxes, and to have the records for their lender so they can continue to get loans. Those are definitely good reasons, but I challenge you to utilize those records to make your business better. As producers grow their operations, they get bigger equipment, upgrade facilities and add necessary labor. As lenders, we see the biggest hurdle for a producer’s growth is upgrading their record keeping to fit the size of their operation. As the size of your credit package grows your lender will require more complete and accurate records. To ensure your records are where they need to be, you can hire a firm to perform the record keeping duties or invest in software that allows you to create a robust financial reporting system. It’s also important that you use the accrual method of accounting, which provides an accurate reflection of the current period of income and expenses. The accrual method of accounting allows producers to understand their business’ level of prof-

See EMSLIE, pg. 16

See TEALE, pg. 16

See HUNEKE, pg. 16

Information in the above columns is the writer’s opinion. It is no way guaranteed and should not be interpreted as buy/sell advice. Futures trading always involves a certain degree of risk.

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

It seems as if the livestock markets are fickle as of late. Both the cattle and hog cash prices have slumped recently, while the futures markets of both have either remained steady or have slightly improved. This indicates a lot of indecision on the future price of both cattle and hogs. The cattle market has seen cash prices drift lower in recent days as packers seem to be more discrete in the accumulation of live inventory. The futures market, on the other hand, seems to be driven by the smaller supply of animals and the anticipation that prices must rise because of that situation. The interesting dilemma is that JOE TEALE demand has been slowed due to Broker the higher prices at the retail Great Plains Commodity Afton, Minn. level and in the export market. This has caused the movement of beef to slow, which is offsetting the smaller supplies of cattle. It appears that each time the beef cutout reaches $235 per hundredweight or greater, demand for beef contracts — and as the cutout drops, the movement increases, but not to the levels seen a year ago. This appears to be the culprit causing the standoff in the cattle market which is holding prices in a distinct trading range. On May 16, the U.S. Department of Agriculture released the Monthly Cattle on Feed report the results are as follows: On-feed, 99 percent; placements, 95 percent and marketed, 98 percent. The report was seen as neutral to slightly friendly since the placement number was less than expected. The key will still remain in the demand for beef since the demand side of the equation is more elastic than the supply side. Therefore, producers should stay aware of current market conditions and protect inventories when the opportunity arises.

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Editor’s note: Tim Emslie, CHS Hedging market analyst, is sitting in this week for Phyllis Nystrom, the regular “Grain Outlook” columnist. ❖ The following market analysis is for the week ending May 23. CORN — Corn prices edged lower this week, holding relatively stable compared to the rally in soybeans and the sell-off in wheat. For the week, the July contract was down 5.5 cents, and the December contract was down 5.75 cents. After catching up to the fiveTIM EMSLIE year average the previous week, CHS Hedging Inc. St. Paul planting progress slowed slightly to come in 3 points below the fiveyear average at 73 percent complete as of May 18. Northern tier states such as North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin and Michigan remain behind their respective fiveyear averages. The U.S. Department of Agriculture indicated that it does not expect to report conditions in the coming week, which means the first conditions report of the season is likely to be out on June 2. Weekly export sales increased this week to 508,000 metric tons. The ethanol production rate reported on a weekly basis rose 3,000 barrels per day to 925,000. Summertime gasoline demand should easily maintain enough ethanol demand to keep corn use for ethanol on track to meet the USDA projection for the marketing year. The opposite directions of the corn and soybean markets this week sent the new-crop bean-corn ratio soaring to new heights. The ratio rallied from 2.54 to 2.66 this week, eclipsing the previous high made in


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THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

16

Soybean exports on pace to top 1.6 billion bushels EMSLIE, from pg. 15 December. It’s late in the planting season, but it could make the decision to switch away from corn in the northern tier states mentioned earlier easier. OUTLOOK: Markets will hinge on crop development issues as always this time of year, but more specifically in 2014 the two main questions are acreage across the northern tier, and the initial condition report expected in early June. In the four northern states mentioned above, there were nearly 11 million acres unplanted as of May 18. The five-year average for the initial good/excellent rating is 67 percent. Last year, the initial rating was 63 percent. On the chart, the December contract moved down to support at $4.70 this week, with the downside momentum that followed the May USDA report still intact. SOYBEANS — Soybean prices climbed to new contract highs in both the July and November contracts this week. For the week, the July contract was up 50.5 cents, and the November contract was up 41.5 cents. Export sales reported on Thursday were the impetus for part of the rally, coming

in at 164,000 metric tons for the current marketing year. That was the largest total since midMarch, and pushed the total commitments number to 1.649 billion bushels, now 49 million bushels more than the current USDA estimate of 1.6 billion bushels for the year. That’s not quite as bad as it sounds since the commitments total at the end of the marketing year always includes some outstanding sales that end up being rolled over to the next marketing year. However, the final export total is clearly on a pace to exceed 1.6 billion bushels. The meal and oil export totals were impressive as well at 186,000 metric tons for meal and 41,000 metric tons for oil, respectively. There was talk this week of planned imports of Argentine meal being canceled because of poor protein content. Domestic processor cash markets were firm over the first part of the week, but backed off after the futures rally. Some of the additional crush needed will have to come from imported soybeans because of the tight balance sheet. The United States imported

HUNEKE, from pg. 15 itability during the year and eliminates any impact of actions made to manage taxes. This will also show the impact of capital draws, income taxes and capital sales. If your expense statement is done properly using the accrual method, your income and expense statement should match the gain or loss that would show on your annual balance sheet. This is what we call reconciling. If you can produce a reconciled profitand-loss statement to the balance sheet, your lender will feel comfortable in your ability to understand your complete financial picture. This also gives you confidence to know that your finances are in order and you can rely on them to make sound decisions for the operation. If your operation continues to grow, you may be asked for reviewed or audited financial reports. So, you might be wondering, what does that really mean? Many people think that their tax returns are reviewed by their accountant and that should be considered reviewed, but that is not the case. A reviewed financial report is done by a tax firm and is considered independ-

ent. They must understand the entity they are reviewing, review the accounting practices you are using to prepare your financials and they also perform analytics on the operation. If you grow to the size where an audit is required, all of the items done while reviewing your financials is done as well as observing your inventories (check your bins to verify bushels), gaining an understanding of your internal controls and an assessment of your fraud risks. An audit gives everyone the confidence in the information as it is verified. So, are your records keeping pace with your production? If your future plans include growth and you want to be prepared so investing in your financial records is important. Make the investment now and utilize the information to make good business decisions and allow your lender to have confidence in the information provided, so they can grow with you. AgStar Financial Services is a cooperative owned by client stockholders. As part of the Farm Credit System, AgStar has served 69 counties in Minnesota and northwest Wisconsin with a wide range of financial products and services for more than 95 years. ❖

23.3 million bushels through March. Official April data is released in early June. To achieve the USDA’s projection of 90 million bushels for the marketing year, monthly import totals will need to average 13.3 million bushels from April to August. Last July, the United States imported about 12 million bushels during the month, the most in any one month. Harvest activity in Argentina is being slowed by wet weather. According to the Buenos Aires Grain Exchange, harvest advanced 3 percentage points on the week to 70 percent complete. Soybeans harvested wet are more likely to move directly into marketing channels rather than be stored. OUTLOOK: June 4 is an important date for the old-crop soybean balance sheet. That’s the date the official imports for April are reported. The new highs registered this week indicate the market is still looking to see how the tight stocks situation will be resolved. On the chart, the next objective for the November contract is the June 2013 high of $13. Tim’s tidbits: Russia and China signed a 30-year natural gas supply agreement this week that was many years in the works. The recent tension between Russian and Europe probably gave the Russians just enough additional incentive to find an alternative customer to conclude the deal. The deal provides the capital needed to develop gas fields in eastern Siberia, along with the pipeline needed to carry the gas to China. The amount of gas provided each day beginning in 2018 is the equivalent of a quarter of Russia’s current exports to Europe. The long-term implications of this agreement are likely to be significant, not only in the current RussiaUkraine-Europe tensions, but also on

MARKETING

Records build confidence

the longer-term geo-political structure of the globe. For example, the Russians and Chinese intentionally withheld any details of what currency payments would be made in, although the total size of the deal was broadly reported in U.S. dollar terms. It seems likely that both sides would like to move away from the U.S. dollar. This would be a blow to the U.S. dollar’s reserve currency status, a status that among other things allows the United States to borrow inexpensively. Pricing in Chinese yuan is not feasible today, but this is likely a significant step toward the yuan’s move toward greater convertibility in world markets. The flash manufacturing Purchasing Managers’ Index for China rebounded from 48.1 in April to 49.7 this month, indicating that the slowdown in China is easing. In the United States, new home sales gave the equity markets a late-week boost at a 433,000 annualized rate in April, up from a revised 407,000 in March. That provided further evidence that we’ll see a nice weather-related bounce in Q2 Gross Domestic Product. The S&P was up more than 1 percent for the week, finishing near the record high. Wheat prices fell for a second week in all three contracts. The week began with winter wheat conditions falling another point to 29 percent good-excellent, but ended with the nicest rains of the season for much of the southern plains. The rain came too late to help in most of Texas and Oklahoma, but will give a boost further north. For the week, Kansas City wheat was down 22.75 cents, Minneapolis wheat was down 14 cents and Chicago wheat was down 21.75 cents. This material has been prepared by a sales or trading employee or agent of CHS Hedging Inc. and should be considered a solicitation. ❖

PEDv still a major factor TEALE, from pg. 15 Hog prices have again slipped during the past few weeks, reflecting the lack of demand for pork at the higher prices. The porcine epidemic diarrhea virus is still a main factor in the trade’s mind and has dominated the futures market while the cash market is more in tune with the immediate market conditions. Hog numbers have be more than adequate to meet the packers’ kill needs and with weights high the total pork production has remained enough to

meet current demand. Considering that the PEDv is still a major factor and that numbers are likely smaller because of the death loss due to the virus, a firming tone to prices into the summer months may not be out of the question. The only caveat to that scenario would be if demand once again decreases because of higher prices. Because of the large premiums in the futures market, producers should take advantage of the wide basis and protect inventories when necessary. ❖


Farmers may be facing prevented-planting options again

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base prices in 2014. The decision that your neighbor makes regarding prevented planting may not necessarily be the best A large majority of prodecision on your farm, depending on the ducers in the Upper situation and the factors involved. Midwest carry Revenue Producers should contact their crop Protection crop insurinsurance agent for more details on final ance with preventedplanting dates and prevented planting options with various crop insurance poliplanting coverage on cies, before making a final decision on pretheir corn and soyvented planting. The prevented-planted beans. If they choose acres need to be reported to their crop the prevented planting insurance agent. The U.S. Department of coverage, they will Agriculture Risk Management Agency has receive 60 percent of some good crop insurance fact sheets available on their website, www.rma.usda.gov/ their original crop aboutrma/fields/mn_rso. insurance guarantee for Late, prevented planting crop that crop on a specific insurance options farm unit. Assuming that producers have an eligible RP or Yield Protection crop insurance revenue guarantees on various farms. All of policy, they would have the following these factors become important when evaloptions with regards to delayed or preuating prevented-planting crop insurance vented planting later than the established decisions. It is also important to note that final planting dates (May 31 for corn and the guaranteed payments for prevented June 10 for soybeans in Minnesota). planting with corn and soybeans are con• Plant the insured crop during the siderably less in 2014, as compared to 2013, due to lower levels of crop insurance See PROGRAMS, pg. 18

THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

For the second year in a row extending for 25 days until some farmers in portions of July 5 in Minnesota and northMinnesota and Iowa are dealern Wisconsin, and until July ing with wet field conditions 10 in Iowa and southern Wisand delayed crop planting. consin. Unless conditions improve Once the final planting soon, some producers could date for corn or soybeans be forced to consider not has been reached for corn or planting a portion of their soybeans, farmers can opt to FARM PROGRAMS take the prevented planting crops in 2014. As we approach June 1, producers insurance coverage, if they By Kent Thiesse in the affected areas will have that coverage be evaluating their crop option, rather than insurance options for planting the crop. late-planting or preA large majority of producers in the vented-planting coverage. Upper Midwest carry Revenue Protection The final planting date for corn in the crop insurance with prevented-planting southern two-thirds of Minnesota, as coverage on their corn and soybeans. If well as in all of Iowa and Wisconsin, is they choose the prevented planting coverMay 31, in order to receive full crop age, they will receive 60 percent of their insurance coverage for 2014. The lateoriginal crop insurance guarantee for that planting period for corn is June 1-25, crop on a specific farm unit. with a reduction in the insurance coverEvery farm situation is different when it age level of 1 percent for each day that comes to making a decision on whether to corn planting is delayed past May 31. utilize the prevented planting option, so it In northern Minnesota, the final date for is important for producers to make individcorn planting with full insurance coverage ualized decisions for each farm unit. is May 25. For soybeans, the final planting Crop producers will have different yield date is June 10 in Minnesota and the potential, crop expenses, land costs, etc., on northern two-thirds of Wisconsin, and June various farm units, as well as differences in 15 in Iowa and the southern one-third of their level of crop insurance coverage and Wisconsin, with the final planting date

17


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THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

18

Be in contact with crop insurance agent for details PROGRAMS, from pg. 17 late-planting period, which is typically 25 days following the established final planting date for a given crop. (Example: A final planting date of May 31 for corn would result in a late-planting period from June 1-25.) The crop insurance coverage is reduced by 1 percent for each day after the final planting date for the next 25 days. For crops planted after the final dates for the late planting period (June 25 for corn), crop insurance coverage is set at a maximum of 60 percent of the original insurance guarantee, which is the same as the preventedplanting insurance coverage. • Plant another crop (second crop) after the final planting date. For example, soybeans could be planted on intended corn acres after May 31. In that case, there would be no prevented-planting coverage for the corn acres, and the soybeans would be treated as insurable

soybean acres. If the soybeans are planted after the final planting date (June 10), they would be considered “Late Planted,” with a 1 percent per day reduction in the revenue guarantee for 25 days. • File a prevented-planting crop insurance claim on the qualifying original unplanted acres, after May 31 for corn and June 10 for soybeans. The producer will receive a prevented-planting payment per eligible acre equal to the original revenue guarantee times 60 percent.The original revenue guarantee was the APH yield times the crop insurance base price ($4.62/bu. for corn and $11.36/bu. for soybeans) times the level of RP coverage level. (Corn example: 190 bushels per acre x $4.62/bu. x 0.80 = $702.24 x 0.60 = $421.34 prevent-plant amount) (Soybean example: 52 bu./acre x $11.36/bu. x 0.80 = $472.58 x 0.60 = $283.55 prevent-plant amount)

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There is no Harvest Price option with prevented planting insurSmall areas of ance coverage, so even if land do not the harvest price is higher than the crop qualify for prebase price, the amount vented-planting of the prevented-plantcoverage, ing payment will not be which could be increased. Preventeda factor on planting payments are made on the base price. some smaller land tracts with A producer who files a prevented-planting optional unit insurance claim after insurance covthe final planting date erage. cannot plant another crop on those acres during the 25-day late-planting period, or they will lose their prevented-planting insurance payment. After the lateplanting period (June 25 for corn and July 5 or 10 for soybeans), a producer has the following options on those acres. • Leave the unplanted acres idle and control the weeds. • Plant an approved cover crop on the prevented-planted acres, with no reduction in the prevented-planting insurance payment. The cover crop cannot be harvested in 2014. Haying and grazing of those acres is permitted after Nov. 1. • Plant another crop (second crop) after the late planting period (June 25 for corn) has ended, with the intent of harvesting that crop. In this case the prevented-planting payment is reduced to 35 percent of the original prevented planted payment. (Example: $702.24/acre original guarantee x 0.60 = $421.34/acre x 0.35 = $147.47/acre adjusted prevent-plant payment) This may be an option for dairy and beef producers who are short of feed and hay supplies. Minimum acreage for prevented planting To qualify for prevented-planting insurance coverage and payments, affected areas must be the lower of 20 acres or 20 percent of the total eligible insured acreage in a farm unit. Small areas of land do not qualify for prevented-planting coverage, which could be a factor on some smaller land tracts with optional unit insurance coverage. Meeting the 20-percent threshold will likely be easier with enterprise units than with optional units. However, there is lot of variation from farm-to-farm, so producers need to check with their crop insurance agent. (Example: 500 acres of corn; 400 acres planted with full crop insurance coverage; 100 acres (20 percent) prevented-planting paid at 60 percent of the original insurance guarantee per acre.) Economics of the prevented-planting decision Every producer and every farm unit has a different situation as it relates to the economics of the preventedplanting crop insurance decision. Refer to the tables on Page 19 showing a comparison of normal corn and soybean production and returns, a late-planting scenario See PROGRAMS, pg. 19


Prevented-plant acres will not impact future APH yields

THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

PROGRAMS, from pg. 18 Table A: Crop insurance prevented planting example for corn Table B: Crop insurance prevented planting example for soybeans Background data Background data with reduced yields and crop APH yield: 190 bushels per acre Prevented planting: $421.34/acre ($702.24 x APH yield: 52 bushels per acre Prevented planting: $283.55/acre ($472.58 x Insurance policy: 80 percent RP policy 0.60) Insurance policy: 80 percent RP policy 0.60) insurance coverage, and a sceunits: Enterprise units Direct costs: $425/acre (Fertilizer cost: Insurance units: Enterprise units Direct costs: $175/acre nario using prevented-planting Insurance Yield guarantee: 152 bu./acre Yield guarantee: 41.6 bu./acre $175/acre) Machinery cost: $75/acre RP base price: $4.62/bu. Machinery cost: $100/acre RP base price: $11.36/bu. Land cost: $275/acre coverage. Total cost: $525/acre Revenue guarantee: $702.24/acre Land cost: $275/acre Revenue guarantee: $472.58/acre Again, the situation for pro- Late planting: 1 percent/day revenue reduc- Total cost: $800/acre Late planting: 1 percent/day revenue reduction after May 31 until June 25 tion after June 10 until July 5 ducers on individual farm Situation A Situation B Situation C Situation A Situation B Situation C units may be different than (Normal planting) (Late planting) (Prevented planting) (Normal planting) (Late planting) (Prevented planting) Intended 2014 corn acres 500 500 500 Intended 2014 bean acres 500 500 500 this example. Corn acres planted 500 500 250 Soybean acres planted 500 500 250 Additional prevented Corn planting date 500 acres by May 15 250 acres by May 31 250 acres by May 31 Soybean planting date 500 acres by May 25 100 acres by June 10 100 acres by June 10 250 acres by June 25 250 acres prevent-plant 400 acres by June 25 400 acres prevent-plant planting crop insurance Revised revenue guarantee $702.24/acre (500 acres) $702.24/acre (250 acres) $858.80/acre (250 acres) Revised revenue guarantee $472.58/acre (500 acres) $472.58/acre (100 acres) $472.58/acre (100 acres) considerations $526.68/acre (250 acres) $421.34/acre (250 acres) $401.69/acre (400 acres) $283.55/acre (400 acres) $614.46/acre (Average) $437.14/acre (Average) • Prevented-planting notifiProduction yield (est.) 190 bu./acre (500 acres) 180 bu./acre (250 acres) 180 bu./acre (250 acres) Production yield (est.) 52 bu./acre (500 acres) 45 bu./acre (100 acres) 45 bu./acre (100 acres) cation. Crop insurance policy 140 bu./acre (250 acre) Prevent-planted (250 acres) 35 bu./acre (400 acre) Prevent-planted (400 acres) holders are required to notify Crop price (est.) $4.50/bu. $4.50/bu. $4.50/bu. Crop price (est.) $11.50/bu. $11.50/bu. $11.50/bu. Revised revenue/acre $855 $810 (250 acres) $810 (250 acres) Revised revenue/acre $598 $517.50 (100 acres) $517.50 (100 acres) their insurance agent within $630.50 (250 acres) $421.34 (250 acres prev.-plant) $402.50 (400 acres) $283.55 (400 acres prev.-plant) 72 hours after the final plant$720 (average) $615.67 (average) $425.55 (Average) $330.34 (Average) Total cost per acre $800 $800 (500 acres) $800 (250 acres) Crop insurance ing date, if they plan to file a $375 (250 acres no fert.) indemnity payment 0 $11.64/acre (Average) 0 prevented-planting insurance $550 (250 acres fertilizer) claim. The same 72-hour $587.50 (average no fert.) Revised total revenue/acre $598 $437.14 (Average) $330.34 (Average) Total cost per acre $675 (average fertilizer) $525 $525 (500 acres) $525 (100 acres) deadline is in place during Net return per acre $55 ($80) $28.17 (prev.-plant no fert.) $325 (400 acres prev.plant) the 25-day late-planting ($59.33) (prev.-plant fert.) $365 (Average) Tables prepared by Kent Thiesse Net return per acre $73 ($87.86) $34.66 (400 acres prev.-plant) period, if a producer decides to discontinue the farm unit. If no insured crop acres are planted on extremely critical for producers to consult with their planting, and proceed with a farm unit, that crop year will not be considered in the a prevented-planting claim. crop insurance agent before finalizing late- and prefuture APH calculation, unless a second crop was vented-planting crop decisions. • Minimum planting with enterprise units. A proplanted. ducer filing a prevented-planting claim, who originally Kent Thiesse is a government farm programs analyst signed up with enterprise units, must have planted the Bottom line and a vice president at MinnStar Bank in Lake CrysEvery producer’s situation is different when it comes to lower of 20 acres or 20 percent of the insured crop acres tal, Minn. He may be reached at (507) 726-2137 or late- and prevented-planting situations; as a result, the in at least two sections to be eligible for the lower kent.thiesse@minnstarbank.com. ❖ best option will vary considerably from farm to farm. In insurance premiums with enterprise units. addition to differences in production practices and yield Otherwise, the farm potential, there are differences in level of insurance coverunit will still receive age, optional or enterprise units, and other crop insurthe appropriate preance provisions. The choice that a producer makes could vented-planting payresult in a difference of thousands of dollars in the potenEvery proment on that farm tial insurance coverage that is available. That is why it is ducer’s situaunit, but will be

19

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charged the insurtion is different ance premiums for when it comes the higher of basic or to late- and optional units. This preventedwould be the situaplanting situation if no acres were tions; as a planted. result, the best • Impact of preoption will vary vented-planting on future APH yields. Genconsiderably erally, preventedfrom farm to planted acres will not farm. impact the future APH yields, unless a second crop is planted, as only the planted acres are used to determine the crop year yield on a farm unit. If a second crop is planted, the prevented-planted acres will be assigned a yield equal to 60 percent times the APH on


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THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014 20


$2 cheese is back; Class I milk price falls $1.61

THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

This column was written for the marketof total sales for the month. ing week ending May 23. First quarter, January to March, total The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s packaged fluid milk sales, at 12.89 billion preliminary data issued Monday in its pounds, were down 1.5 percent from the latest Milk Production report, shows April same period a year earlier. Year-to-date output in the top 23 dairy producing sales of conventional products, at 12.27 states at 16.3 billion pounds, up 1.2 perbillion, were down 2.2 percent; organic cent from April 2013. The 50-state total, products, at 623 million pounds, were up at 17.43 billion pounds, was up 1.0 per15.6 percent. Organic represented about cent. Revisions added 6 million pounds to 5.1 percent of total sales. MIELKE MARKET the original March 23-state estimate, now WEEKLY Speaking of fluid milk, the USDA reported at 16.7 billion pounds, up 1.1 announced the June federal order Class I By Lee Mielke percent from a year ago. base milk price at $22.86 per hundredApril cow numbers in the 23 dairy weight, down $1.61 from the record high states, at 8.53 million head, were up May price, but still $3.93 above June 10,000 from March. Year-ago data was 2013, and the highest June Class I price not available due to the sequester. April output per since June 2011. It equates to about $1.97 per gallon. cow in the 23 dairy states averaged 1,911 pounds, That puts the six-month Class I average at $23.02, up down from 1,958 pounds in March, but the highest from $18.22 at this time a year ago, $16.48 in 2012, and production per cow for April since the 23-state series $18.14 in 2011. began in 2003. Again, year-ago data was not availThe two-week, National Dairy Products Sales able due to the sequester. Report-surveyed butter price used in calculating California was up 1.5 percent from a year ago, Wis- today’s price was $2.0176 per pound, up 4.7 cents consin was down 0.3 percent. New York was up 0.3 from May. Nonfat dry milk averaged $1.8768, down percent; Idaho, up 1.1 percent; Pennsylvania, up 0.1 12.7 cents. Cheese averaged $2.2029, down 16.7 percent; and Minnesota was down 2.7 percent. cents, and dry whey averaged 67.24 cents, down fractionally from May. Other key players included Michigan, up 2.6 percent; New Mexico, down 1.4 percent; Texas, up 8.7 Preliminary data in the USDA’s Cold Storage percent; and Washington, up 3.4 percent. Output per report issued Thursday shows April butter stocks at cow and cow number data is not available, due to the 174.15 million pounds, down 5.9 million pounds or 3 sequester. percent from March but a whopping 135.6 million pounds or 44 percent below April 2013. The USDA’s latest Livestock Slaughter report shows an estimated 229,800 dairy cows took early American-type cheese, at 648.1 million pounds, was retirement from the dairy business in April, down up 9 million pounds or 1 percent from March but 16,000 head from March and 38,000 head below 50.6 million or 7 percent below a year ago. The total April 2013. The report said 982,000 culled dairy cat- cheese inventory stood at 1.037 billion pounds, up tle were slaughtered under federal inspection in the 18.3 million pounds or 2 percent from March but January-to-April period, down 117,000 head from the 84.7 million or 8 percent below a year ago. same period a year ago. ■ HighGround Dairy’s Eric Meyer said there are some encouraging signs in April’s Milk Production report that strong on-farm margins are promoting herd expansion. After making revisions to last “SPECIALS for on-hand Tanks” month’s data, the USDA is estimating U.S. milk cows have grown by 29,000 head since the start of the LG Seeds & Gold Country year. But when looking at overall milk production growth, the upward trajectory has been muted with Broad Range of SmartStax, VT Triple just 1 percent year-over-year growth in 2014, cer& Double Pro, Roundup Ready and tainly not the kind of increase expected with record high prices. Conventional Varieties While nearby milk and dairy commodity prices may still endure short-term weakness, Meyer viewed Seed Tenders - DEF TANKS Monday’s report as slightly bullish versus expectations and may provide underlying support once the Farm Chemicals-Major and Generic Northern Hemisphere’s seasonal peak has passed. Enduraplas Poly Tanks-Liquid Fertilizer The dairy industry’s challenges continue regarding falling fluid milk consumption. March packaged fluid Traeger Smoker Grills - Nurse Trailers milk sales totaled 4.30 billion pounds, down 2 percent from March 2013, according to the USDA’s latest data. March sales of conventional products, at 4.09 billion pounds, were down 2.7 percent from a year 27296 730th Avenue - Albert Lea, MN 56007 ago; organic products, at 212 million pounds, were up www.dahlfarmsupply.com 14.3 percent. Organic represented about 5.2 percent

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See MIELKE, pg. 22

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■ The USDA’s latest Crop Progress report issued Tuesday afternoon showed 73 percent of the nation’s corn has been planted, up from 59 percent the previous week, up from 65 percent on this week a year ago, but 3 percent behind of the five-year average. Seventeen states show corn emerged, or 34 percent, up from 18 percent the previous week, up from 17 percent a year ago, but lags the five-year average by 8 percent. The report shows 33 percent of the soybean crop was in the ground, as of the week ending May 18, up from 20 percent the previous week, up from 21

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THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

22

Export demand slows as U.S. butter prices climb MIELKE, from pg. 21 percent a year ago, but 5 percent behind the fiveyear average. Seed is in the ground in all of the top 18 states that made up 95 percent of the 2013 soybean acreage. The data shows 9 percent of the soybeans are emerged, up from just 3 percent a year ago, and 2 percent behind the five-year average. There is 46 percent of the cotton crop planted, up from 30 percent the week before, up from 37 percent a year ago, and 2 percent behind the five-year average. Of the 15 states listed, which comprised 98 percent of the 2013 cotton crop, all show cotton planted. ■ Cash cheese reversed four weeks of decline Thursday and topped $2/lb. again for the first time since May 12. The blocks closed Friday at $2.02/lb., up 2.25 cents on the week and 26.75 cents above a year ago. Barrel closed at $2.02 as well, up 6 cents on the week and 29.75 cents above a year ago. Ten cars of block and two of barrel traded hands on the week. The lagging NDPSR-surveyed U.S. average block price dropped 5.2 cents, to $2.1602. The barrels averaged $2.1651, down 6.5 cents. Cheese production across the United States is mixed, according to the USDA’s Dairy Market News. Some of the southern regions are past peak milk production. Milk availability is varied sometimes within regions. The northern edge of the central region is slow to show a spring flush this year, while much of the Midwest is experiencing increasing volumes. This is allowing plants that want to increase production, the ability to find additional milk at increasingly favorable prices on the spot market. The lower prices have some buyers looking to increase orders and build their own stocks. Export demand has slowed as

international prices are more competitive to our market. Cash butter saw a small rally Tuesday, slipped a half-cent Wednesday, then inched up three-quarters Thursday, and gained a penny Friday to close at $2.18/lb., up 2 cents on the week, 63 cents above a year ago, and the highest spot butter price since May 26, 2011. Thirty-eight carloads traded hands on the week. NDPSR butter averaged $2.0544, up 6.5 cents. U.S. butter prices have surpassed most international markets, slowing export demand. The DMN reports the market tone is mixed. Domestic print buyers are purchasing in a “hand-to-mouth” fashion while bulk purchasers are actively seeking supplies with rebuilding stocks in mind. Production rates are mixed with variances in milk supplies and cream availability. Inventories are tight. Cash nonfat dry milk saw some strength this week, closing Friday at $1.7925, up three-quarter cents on the week. One car was sold. NDPSR powder averaged $1.8556, down 4.3 cents, and dry whey averaged 67.27 cents, up 0.1 cent. The tone of dry dairy products varies by commodity in the market, the DMN said. Prices in the nonfat dry milk market are trending lower throughout the regions. Most spot market buyers are still hesitant to develop transactions beyond immediate needs, although interests are improving. Milk production is active in the East, Central and West regions with higher milk intakes for most drying operations. Farm-level production volumes are seeing different developments across the country, according to the DMN. Eastern milk production has leveled in some areas of the region while seeing declines in others; however, manufacturing supplies remain heavy. Output rates in the Midwest are steady to slightly higher, but lower than expected. As a result, some

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cheese makers are looking for extra loads to meet current orders and rebuild inventories. Milk volumes are decreasing in California and New Mexico. Some loads in New Mexico required clearing to distant processors due post-peak maintenance projects. Utah, Idaho and the Pacific Northwest milk production continues to increase, as favorable temperatures prevail. Expectations are that the approaching alfalfa harvest will extend production. Bottling demand throughout the country is steady to lower as semesters end at most educational institutions. Cream markets are mixed. Some churning operations have chosen to scale back on butter production, as manufacturers shift cream supplies to other dairy classes. ■ This week’s Global Dairy Trade auction saw the weighted average for all products drop 1.8 percent, following the 1.1-percent drop in the May 6 event and a 2.6-percent decline in the April 15 event. The price index has seen seven consecutive declines since reaching its recent high Feb. 4. The downfall Tuesday was led by a 3.8-percent drop in butter (down 1.5 percent in the last event), a 3.5percent decline in skim milk powder (down 2.3 percent in the last event), a 2.1-percent drop in Cheddar cheese (down 1.8 percent last time), and a 1.9-percent drop in buttermilk powder (down 1.2 percent in the last auction). Whole milk powder was down 1.1 percent, (down 1.7 percent in the May 6 event). Increases were seen in rennet casein, up 4.6 percent (up 6.8 percent in the last event), and a 1.9-percent increase in anhydrous milkfat (up 2.4 percent in the last event). FC Stone reports the average butter price equated to about $1.6631/lb. U.S., down from $1.7652 in the May 6 event ($1.6225/lb. on 80-percent butterfat, down from $1.7222/lb.). Chicago Mercantile Exchange butter closed Friday at $2.18. The GDT Cheddar cheese average was $1.8635/lb. U.S., down from $1.9029. The U.S. block price Friday was at $2.02. Skim milk powder, at $1.6933/lb. U.S., is down from $1.7568, and the whole milk powder average at $1.7586/lb. U.S., is down from $1.7819 in the last event. The CME Grade A nonfat dry milk price Friday stood at $1.7925/lb. ■ Cooperatives Working Together accepted 21 requests for export assistance this week to sell 1.551 million pounds of Cheddar and Gouda cheeses, 3.306 million pounds of 82-percent butter and 1.482 million pounds of whole milk powder to customers in Asia, Europe, the Middle East, North Africa, South America and the South Pacific. The product will be delivered through October. Year-todate, the CWT has assisted member cooperatives in selling 53.085 million pounds of cheese, 45.953 million pounds of butter and 10.337 million pounds of whole milk powder to 37 countries on six continents. These sales are the equivalent of 1.591 billion pounds of milk on a milkfat basis, according to the CWT. Lee Mielke is a syndicated columnist who resides in Everson, Wash. His weekly column is featured in newspapers across the country and he may be reached at lkmielke@juno.com. ❖

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Beekeeper Jerry Linser takes apart a beehive to take a look at the bees inside in Grant, Minn. In an effort to reverse declines in bee populations, Linser is among the hundreds of Minnesotans who have jumped on to the beekeeping bandwagon.

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One sign of the buzz around beekeeping is the success of the Stillwater Honey Bee Club, which has jumped from four members to 160 in 14 months. The University of Minnesota Extension Service has seen an increase in beekeeping interest, and Bob Sitko, who teaches at Century College, said his beekeeping classes are “overflowing.” Their mission: saving mankind’s best friend in the insect world. In the past, Linser said, about 10 to

THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

GRANT, Minn. (AP) — In Jerry Linser’s apiary rehab clinic, he holds one of his clients between his fingers. “I know where you’ve been,” murmurs Linser to a honeybee, as he gently lifts it to the bee screen around his face. “You have a honeytummy full of stuff, I can see it.” Linser was tending to one of the 150,000 residents of his Bee Ranch in Grant, checking to see how they survived the harsh winter. In an effort to reverse declines in bee populations, Linser is among the hundreds of Minnesotans who have jumped onto the beekeeping bandwagon.

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Arnold’s of Alden Alden, MN

Arnold’s of Mankato

North Mankato, MN

Arnold’s of St. Martin St. Martin, MN

Arnold’s of Willmar Willmar, MN

Arnold’s of Glencoe << www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Glencoe, MN

Arnold’s of Kimball Kimball, MN

Arnold’s of St. Cloud Sauk Rapids, MN

Trueman-Welters Inc. Buffalo, MN

Domeyer Implement Ellsworth, MN

Rabe International Fairmont, MN

Hammell Equipment Chatfield, MN

Pederson’s Agri Service Herman, MN

Caledonia Implement Caledonia, MN

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Bancroft Implement Bancroft, IA

Miller Sellner Slayton Slayton, MN

Miller Sellner Equip.

Bingham Lake, MN

Miller Sellner Impl. Sleepy Eye, MN


Sitko: Without bees, ‘no melons, no berries, no nuts’ Left: A queen bee, center, which is darker and longer than the other bees, is one of 150,000 residents of Jerry Linser's Bee Ranch in Grant, Minn.

THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

Lower left: A bee covered in yellow pollen, left, returns to one of the hives of beekeeper Jerry Linser in Grant, Minn.

Hewitt Drainage Equipment

Golddigger Tile Plows ~ Intellislope Guidance

Kevin Hewitt 507-327-7629

khewitt7629@gmail.com ~ www.hewittdrainageequipment.com

Pull Type Road Grader 22’9” long w/tandem axle, 14’ blade w/industrial cutting edge, 9’ wide in the narrow position, many options

Hose Reels 65’ or 100’ - 2 Models 2” full port swivel & transport lock. Can be mounted right side up or upside down, & crank can be on either side.

AP Photos/The St. Paul Pioneer Press, Scott Takushi

Trench Groomer for leveling tile lines

Double B Manufacturing

6666 58th Avenue SE • Willmar, MN 56201 Fax: (320) 382-6253 • Email: brad060154@frontiernet.net

Phone: (320) 382-6623

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

fall survived the winter with few casualties. Speaking from inside the bee helmet, he explained that he is doing genetic engineering of his own. He picks out which bees to breed, looking for bees that are disease-free, docile, tough enough to survive winter and good honey producers. At one hive, Linser suddenly stood up straight. “Oooh,” he said. He held up an index finger with a bee hanging on, stinging him. The finger swelled up like a bratwurst. Other people might have reacted by, say, putting on gloves. But not Linser. His relationship with bees is not just about business. Even with a swollen finger, he continued to pick them up and feel them wiggling — almost affectionately. He wanted to encourage them, feed them, comfort them and talk to them. He tenderly held up a small worker bee. “Why, just look at you,” he said proudly, “all covered with pollen.” ❖

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

WHISPERER, from pg. 23 15 percent of bee hives in the United States died over the winter. In the past several years, the die-off has soared to 40 to 80 percent. Why all the buzz kill? Bee mites, pesticides and lack of food are three big reasons. The mites, tiny parasites that attack bees, are widespread. “It’s the wood tick of honeybees,” Linser told the St. Paul Pioneer Press. (See http://bit.ly/1nH2U8a) Common pesticides are suspect, including neonicotinoids. These are among the most popular insecticides in the world, spread widely on commodity crops and available in garden centers. Linser said the neonicotinoids appear in pollen, where bees can pick it up and take it back to their hives. Bees’ food sources are disappearing. Bees depend on nectar from flowers, but as suburbia sprawls into natural areas, another source of pollen vanishes. A neatly mowed lawn? “That is like the Sahara Desert to a honeybee,” Linser said. The so-called bee-pocalypse is alarming because bees are natural gardeners. As they fly from flower to flower, they transfer pollen — which fertilizes plants and allows them to reproduce. “Without bees, there would be no melons, no berries, no nuts,” said Sitko, one of the founders of the Stillwater club. Bees are responsible, he said, for about a third of the world’s food production. Bees are so valuable that they have become immigrant farm workers. Roughly half of the nation’s domesticated bees are annually trucked into California, where they are essential to fertilize the state’s almond crop. Recently, Linser suited up for his chores, donning a white bee smock, complete with a built-in zip-up helmet. He loaded some green grass into his smoker, which is like a coffee can with a bellows to fan the flames inside. Carrying a bucket of tools, he entered the bee pen, about the size of a double garage. He passed through the electric fence, which keeps bears and other critters away. With the steady monotone buzz of thousands of bees in his ears, he began to check each of the 19 hives. He already had ordered 18,000 replacement bees, about six pounds of insects, to make up for the bees lost over the winter. The box, sent from California, included tinier boxes, like thrones, for the queens. By each hive, Linser squirted a few puffs of smoke to calm the bees. He noted with satisfaction that one experiment had worked — a hive he insulated last

25


AUCTIONS & CLASSIFIEDS Employment

Ag Power Enterprises Inc 34 Agro-Culture Liquid .............. Fertilizers ......................20 Anderson Seeds ..............6, 9 Bayer Truck & Equipment Inc ....................................9 Case IH..............................24 Country Cat ........................8 Courtland Waste Handling 23 Cyrilla Beach Homes Inc ..10 Dahl Farm Supply ............21 Diers Ag & Trailer Sales, Inc. ................................22 Double B Manufacturing ..25 Duncan Trailers LLC ........39 Dupont ................................3 Excelsior Homes West Inc 11 Factory Home Center ........12 Grasshopper ......................13 Greenwald Farm Center ....32 Henslin Auctions ........26, 27 Hewitt Drainage Equipment25 Holt Truck Center..............17 Hotovec Auction Center Inc26 Jackpot Junction ................23 Jark Worlie Auctions ........27 Kannegiesser Truck Sales 17 Keith Bode ........................29 Keltgens Inc ......................19

Kibble Equipment Inc ......33 Larson Brothers Impl ..29, 36 Luther Honda of St. Cloud18 Mankato Spray Center ......19 Massop Electric ................29 Matejcek Implement..........37 Midwest Machinery Co ....31 Miller Sellner ....................38 New Holland ......................5 NK Clerking ......................26 Northern Ag Service..........36 Nutra Flo ......................4, 29 Pioneer ................................7 Pruess Elevator..................30 Pumps Motor & Bearing LLC ................................22 Rabe International Inc ......32 Rush River Steel & Trim ..11 Schweiss Inc......................30 Smiths Mill Implement Inc36 Sorensen Sales & Rentals 35 Steffes Group ....................27 Tjosvold Equipment ..........30 United Farmers Coop ........32 Wieman Land & auction ..28 Willmar Farm Center ........35 Willmar Precast ................21 Woodford Ag LLC ......29. 35

• PO Box 3169 • 418 S 2nd Street • Mankato, MN 56001 • theland@thelandonline.com

015

Real Estate

020

Be An Auctioneer & Personal Property Appraiser Continental Auction Schools Mankato, MN & Ames, IA 507-625-5595 www.auctioneerschool.com

Check Us Out Online www.TheLandOnline.com

Selling or Buying Farms or 1031 Exchange! Private Sale or Sealed Bid Auction! Call “The Land Specialists!” Northland Real Estate 612-756-1899 or 320-894-7337 www.farms1031.com HELP WANTED: Herdsman on 100 cow Dairy, looking We have extensive lists of for long term commitment. Land Investors & farm buyOsceola, WI. (715)294-3104 ers throughout MN. We always have interested buyReal Estate 020 ers. For top prices, go with our proven methods over thousands of acres. Cabin with walkout, beautiServing Minnesota ful large lot, 200+ feet of Mages Land Co & Auc Serv sand beach. 715-986-4457 www.magesland.com 800-803-8761 Sell your land or real estate in 30 days for 0% commission. Call Ray 507-339-1272 Real Estate Wanted 021

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ADVERTISER LISTING

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

May 30, 2014

WEEKLY AUCTION

Every Wednesday 5:00 PM - Farm Misc. 6:00 PM - Hay & Straw 7:00 PM - Livestock Sheep & Goats 2nd Wed. at 8:00 PM

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

26

HOTOVEC AUCTION CENTER N. Hwy. 15 Hutchinson, MN

320-587-3347 ★★★★★★★★★★★★ www.hotovecauctions.com

WANTED: Land & farms. I have clients looking for dairy, & cash grain operations, as well as bare land parcels from 40-1000 acres. Both for relocation & investments. If you have even thought about selling contact: Paul Krueger, Farm & Land Specialist, Edina Realty, SW Suburban Office, 14198 Commerce Ave NE, Prior Lake, MN 55372. paulkrueger@edinarealty.com

(952)447-4700

Antiques & Collectibles

026

JD Collectors: Pickup attachments for combine #12A & 45; straw spreader for 45; 2 JD corn elevator drags; MC 10' grain drill on steel. 320-396-0436

Early Notice Farmland & Recreational Land Auction

Tuesday, June 10th • 6:30 p.m. Children of Lorraine Smith

180 Acres located in Sec. 35, Westford Twp., Martin County, 4 miles South of Truman, MN on Hwy. 15 & 11⁄4 miles East on 190th St. 143 Acres Tillable, approx. 35 acres recreational & pasture. Contact Auctioneer Alley– Land Services Unlimited Inc. 507.764.3591 or 507.841-1564

For Early Inspection, Open House: Tues. Evening, May 27th, or June 3rd, Pre-Auction info booklet available, or see www.auctioneeralley.com Kahler’s Wedel, Pike & Hartung Auctioneers


Hay & Forage Equip

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Hay & Forage Equip

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Grain Handling Equip

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Farm Implements

035 Farm Implements

or visit our new website: SteffesGroup.com

Opening May 26 & Closing June 4: IQBID Donny & Juanita Arens Farm Retirement, Watkins, MN, Tractors, Loaders, Planter, Drills, Tillage Equipment & more!

035 Tractors

036

'07 7730 JD tractor, 177hp, MFD, IVT trans., low hrs & sharp, $99,500. (715)572-1234 '95 JD 6400 open station, 1000 PTO, hours, very (715)667-5353

2WD tractor, PQ trans, 5401825 original nice, $26,500.

1949 Farmall C, runs well, $1,700/OBO. (608)754-2065 4850 JD MFD, needs trans. rebuilt, $13,900. (715)2233664 FOR SALE: '05 AGCO 240, 8 tires, nice. (715)796-5521 FOR SALE: '74 IH 1466, rebuilt motor, 18.4x42 tires, radials, duals, factory cab, $13,950. 612-501-4177 FOR SALE: '99 JD 8400T, 24” tracks, auto steer ready. 507-340-2937 FOR SALE: JD 4055, pwr shift, 3 hyds., rear tires 90%, 5900 hrs., exc. cond., 726 loader w/high volume bucket, like new, $42,500. 507-639-6325 or 507-236-4835 JD 740 Self leveling loader w/7000 series mount & joy stick controls, good condition, $5,800. (715)667-5353

+ANOTHER JARK/WORLIE AUCTION+

RETIREMENT FARM MACHINERY SALE Location: From Brentford, SD – go 7 mi. South on Hwy. 11 (395 Ave). From Turton, SD – go 11 mi. West on Hwy. 12 (161 St.). Watch for signs...

UTuesday, June 10, 2014U Sale Time: 11:00 A.M.

Lunch Available

Friday, May 30 @ 10:00 AM MDT: Ken Kudrna Farm Retirement, South Heart, ND, Tractors, Loaders, Harvest Equipment, Tillage, Hay & Livestock Equipment & much more! Opening June 1 & Closing June 10: IQBID June Auction, Upper Midwest Locations, Owners selling Ag, Construction, Trucks, RV’s, Vehicles & More! Advertising Deadline: Thursday, May 15 Friday, June 6 @ 11:00 AM: Greg Schultz Estate, Davenport, ND, Late Model Farm Equipment Auction Opening June 4 & Closing June 11: IQBID June Auction, Upper Midwest Locations, Owners selling Ag, Construction, Trucks, RV’s, Vehicles & More! Thursday, June 19 @ 10:00 AM: Lakeview Excavating Inc. & Lakeview Trucking, Sanborn, ND Wednesday, June 25 @ 10:00 AM: Benedict Farms Inc, Sabin, MN, Farm Retirement including Sugarbeet, Row Crop & Harvest Equipment

Wednesday, July 30 @ 9:00 AM: AgIron West Fargo Event, Red River Valley Fairgrounds, West Fargo, Large multi-ring event selling: Tractors & Loaders, Combines, Heads, Tillage Equipment, Semi Tractors, Skid Steer Loader & Much More! Advertising Deadline: Wednesday, July 2 Thursday, August 14 @ 10:00 AM: AgIron Litchfield Event, Steffes Group facility, Litchfield, MN, Multi-ring event selling Tractors & Loaders, Combines, Heads, Tillage Equipment, Semi Tractors, Skid Steer Loader & Much More! Advertising Deadline: Wednesday, July 16

Clutches, Corn/Bean Discs, #600 Display (2010)– Good • JD 635 32’ Tandem Disk w/Cushion Gangs, Gauge Wheels, Tandem wheels on Wings, 3 bar Mulchers – Nice • Eagle 4A Ditcher (2011) – Absolutely Like New • Phoenix 48’ Harrow • Wheatheart 10”x71’ Auger w/Swing Hopper, PTO Drive, Hydr. Lift – Good • Case 8x18 Plow w/On land hitch, Packer • Gravity Box (200 bu.) w/4 Wheel Gear FERTILIZER TANKS – SPREADER • (3) Lode King 51 ton Hopper bottom Dry Fertilizer Tanks (to be moved) • Willmar ‘Super 800’ Dry Fertilizer Spreader (8 ton) w/Stainless Box, Roll Tarp, Rawsen Hydr. Drive - Good SEMI – SPRAY TRAILER – GENERATORS • ‘87 Freightliner Semi Tractor w/Day Cab, Fuller 9 spd., L10 Motor, Twin Screw • Birmingham 36’ Low Boy Machinery Trailer w/Tandem Axles, (2) 1500 gal. Poly Tanks, (1) 1000 gal. Poly Tank, Chem. Cone, Liq. Transfer Pump • TP 9000 kw LXU Generator w/Gas Motor, Remote Start (Brand New) • TP 7000 kw LXU Generator w/Diesel Motor, Remote Start (Brand New)

Terms: Cash/Check on Day of Sale – Not Responsible for Accidents – SD Sales Tax Applies NOTE: Kenny has rented his land and has decided to retire. He will offer his nice line-up of late model equipment at public auction. There will only be 15-20 minutes of small items and then the big equipment. Every item is listed and will not take long to sell – BE ON TIME!

Owner: KENNY OLSON, Jr. Phone: (605) 262-3556

Auctioneers: Merlin T. Worlie • Aberdeen, SD • (605) 715-9200 Val W. Jark • Warner, SD • (605) 380-2244 Clerk: Jark/Worlie Auction, LLC • Aberdeen, SD • (605) 225-1828 Photos on www.jarkworlie.com

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Opening July 2 & Closing July 9: IQBID July Auction, Upper Midwest Locations, Owners selling Ag, Construction, Trucks, RV’s, Vehicles & More! Call now to consign your equipment. Advertising Deadline: June 15

COMBINE – HEADS – GRAIN CART • JD 9770 STS Combine w/Bullet Rotor, Pro Drive, Long Unloading Auger, Mauer Grain Tank Ext., Green Star Ready (no display), 520/85R42 Tires/Duals, 28L-26 Rear Tires, Chopper, Spreader, Small Grain & Row Crop Concaves, 1112 Eng. hrs., 948 Sep. hrs. (2011) – Nice • JD 635F 35’ Flex Head (2012) – Nice • Shelbourne Reynolds CVS32 Stripper Head (36’) w/new style Variable Speed Drive (2010) – Good • Drago Tech N8TR Corn Head (8R30) w/Knife Rollers, Height Sensor (2012) – Good • J&M 1326 ‘Grain Storm’ Grain Cart w/36” Tracks, Scale, Roll Tarp, 22” Unloading Auger, Hydr. Spout, Big PTO (‘09 - new flighting ‘13) – Good TRACTOR – AIR SEEDER – CORN PLANTER – DITCHER • Case IH 275 Magnum FWA Tractor w/18 spd. Power Shift, Auto Steer, Cummins Motor, 4 Hydr., 3 pt., PTO, Quick Tach, Power Beyond & Motor Return, Front Wgts., Buddy Seat, 480/80R50 Tires/Duals, 380/80R38 front Tires/Duals, 2102 hrs., (2010) – Good • JD 1890 42’ No-Till Air Seeder w/JD 1910 Cart, Split Tanks (150 & 200 bu.), 71⁄2” Spacing, 710/70R38 Tires, Ground Driven, Row Sensors, (2011) – Good • Case IH 1250 ‘Early Riser’ 16R30 Front Fold Planter w/2 Tanks, Shark Tooth Trash Whippers, Double Row

27

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Steffes Auction Calendar 2014

035 Farm Implements

FOR SALE: Blu Jet side JD 12' blade, w/ brackets to dress machine, AT4000, 16R fit JD 8 wheel, $2,000. (715) w/ 17 coulters, gullwing, 684-9549 John Blu double piston pump, very good cond, MACHINERY FOR SALE: 1086 Int'l, $10,750; 966 Int'l, $18,500. 507-525-0660 $8,750; (2) JD 3950 Forage Harvester, both have new Hydrostatic & Hydraulic Reknives, $4,000 & $3,750; pair Repair-TroubleshootBadger Forage boxes, ing Sales-Design Custom $2,500 & $500, one box is hydraulic hose-making up slightly damaged; NH Forto 2” Service calls made. age Box, $2,300; Dion BlowSTOEN'S Hydrostatic Serer, $300. (715)235-9272 vice 16084 State Hwy 29 N Glenwood, MN 56334 320- NH 273 small baler, $2,000; 634-4360 NH BR 750, 4x6 bales, $16,500; New Idea 40' hay IH 153 cult, 6R30”, rolling grain elevator, $700; 2 sets shields; Koehn 6R30”, of round bale spears, 1w/JD rolling shields; Jaeger 3” quicktach $300, other w/pin water pump, direct drive, 3 hookup, $200; Pequea hay pel; IH Super A w/ Woods tedder, $1,000; (2) NH L59 mower, HID; New Idea rakes, model 256 $2,000, 218 spreader, T-bar chain, model 56 $1,800; Farm Rite poly floor. 507-426-7429 200 gal sprayer, $400; (2) IH 800 eleven bottom plow, 10T wagons w/H&S metal $8,250; JD 346 baler, $4,750. flat racks, 9x18, $2,000; NH (715)684-9549 discbine #1411, $15,500; JD #100 blower, $2,000; 3800 JD JD 328 baler w/40 bale throwchopper w/ 2R corn & hay er, elec. controls, $6,950; head, $3,000. All equipment '04 JD 946, 13' Mo-Co, very good-exc cond, all $10,750; NH 258 rake, prices are OBO. (715)592$2,450; JD 3020D tractor, 4104 or (715)498-7771 JD WF, 3 pt., fenders, 2 hyds., $6,750; JD 148 ldr We buy w/6' bucket, $2,450; (2)J&M Salvage Equipment 375 bu. gravity boxes, J&M Parts Available 13T gears, 16.5Lx16.1 tires, Hammell Equip., Inc. $2,750 each. 320-769-2756 (507)867-4910

THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

FOR SALE: '08 Kuhns MFG FOR SALE: 499 New Hol- FOR SALE: 300 bu Bradford 5 Used Mandako gravity wagon, 300 bu land hay bine. (715)796-5521 1834 small square bale acLAND ROLLERS 40-45 Ft Dakon gravity wagon, both cumulator & a 6/8 grabber have 10T gears, good rubRental Units w/ JD mounts, excellent FOR SALE: Used Rossi 9wheel inline finger rake, ber, no fert, always shedshape, $12,500. Call 507-317BUILT HEAVIER hyd. lift, exc. cond., $1,200. ded. $1,900/ea or $3,600/pr. We Trade/Deliver Anywhere 8103 Glencoe, MN 612-281-2773 507-451-9614 or 507-213-0600 Dealer 319-347-6282 FOR SALE: '97 Case 8575 NEW RHINO Disc Mowers baler w/ '05 accumulator, on hand 7-8-9½ Ft models (3 Farm Implements 035 CIH 183 RC cult, 8x30, FF, R 45,610 bales, last bale eject, shields, shedded, very good Pt) built heavier. NEW a silage special, innoculator cond., $2,500; Feterl 7'x41' RHINO 15 & 20 Ft Flex- '05 Hardi 1200 Commander system, re-conditioned, auger, PTO, good shape, Wing Cutters 250 & 325 HP sprayer, 320x46 tires, 100' $39,500. 320-760-2227 or 320$700 OBO. 3pt round bale Gear Boxes (6 Yr Warranboom, $13,900; set of 4 – 808-9891 fork, good cond, $300. All 320x50 tires & rims for JD ty) Also New & Used 3 Pt shedded. 320-328-5794 tractor, $3,450; IH 770, 15' Cutters. NEED Your FOR SALE: Gehl round offset disc, 24” blades, Trade-Ins. Dealer 319-347baler, #1475, exc cond. $4,650; CIH 1820, 12x30 6282 We Deliver Anywhere Tonutti SPC v-rake, 8cult., $3,650; CIH 1830, wheeler, exc cond. NH #479 NH 116 14' haybine, $3,900; 12x30 flat fold vibrashank haybine, good condition. Vermeer 5 x 5 rd baler, cult. w/shields, $4,750; CIH (715)235-3747 $1,700. Both field ready. 183, 6x30 cult., $875; White Used wood & 6' T post. 715378, 8x30 cult., $650. 320-769FOR SALE: JD 338 baler, For Sale: Fuel Storage 273-5756 2756 quarter turn chute, preserTank, 1,000 gallon with vative applicator, very Bins & Buildings heater. wt.10,000#, $2500 033 16' JD 995 Rotary MOCO good condition. 763-295-2724 OBO. 320-217-9605 head, V-10 conditioner off Stormor Bins & EZ-Drys. R450, self propelled, brand 100% financing w/no liens FOR SALE: JD 5400-5830 & new. Warranty, $32,000 or FOR SALE: NH 900 chopper or red tape, call Steve at 6000 & 7000 series forage would trade for 13' 994 w/ both heads; JD 3960 Fairfax Ag for an appointharvesters. Used kernel head, new or close. 715-296chopper; Krause 26' disc; ment. 888-830-7757 processors, also, used JD 2162 Bale kicker wagons; NH 40 knife Dura-Drums, & 1431 discbine; Knight 2450 drum conversions for 5400 Grain Handling Equip 034 310 H & S manure spreader, TMR; Cunningham & 5460. Call (507)427-3520 w/ top beater, tandem axle, crimper; Bale elevator on www.ok-enterprise.com FOR SALE:Used grain bins, w/ 40 bushel ext, very nice, transport. Leave message. floors unload systems, sti$7,900. 270 H & S manure (715)352-2138 FOR SALE: NH 790 silage rators, fans & heaters, aerspreader, good cond, $3,450. chopper, 824 cornhead, 890 ation fans, buying or sell(715)223-3664 hay head, very clean, ing, try me first and also $11,500. 507-530-2357 call for very competitive contract rates! Office hours 8am-5pm Monday – Friday Saturday 9am - 12 noon or call 507-697-6133 For More info Call 1-800-726-8609 Ask for Gary


THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

28

– LARGE AUCTION –

TRACTORS – SKID LOADERS – PAY LOADER – CONSTRUCTION – FORKLIFTS – COLLECTOR TRACTORS & EQUIP – COMBINES – HEADS – HAY & FEEDING EQUIP. – TILLAGE – PLANTERS – ASST. MACHINERY – TRUCKS – TRAILERS – FARM MISC. Our Spring Auction Event will be held at the Wieman Auction Facility located 1 mile south and 1⁄2 mile west on Highway 44 from Marion SD on:

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 4TH 8:15 CDT Lunch by Presbyterian Church Ladies

TRACTORS – SKID LOADERS – PAY LOADER – CONSTRUCTION – FORKLIFTS ‘13 JD 9460R, CAH, 776 hrs, PTO, Triple, 520x42’s, like new; ‘13 Kubota M135GX, MFD, CAH, 300 hrs w/Kubota LA2254 Loader, sharp; ‘08 JD 9630, CAH, PS, 2000 hrs, 710 metrics, sharp; ‘01 JD 9400, CAH, 24 speed, duals, 710 metrics, 6728 hrs, sharp; ‘97 JD 9300, CAH, 24 speed, 6300 hrs, 650x42’s, sharp; ‘10 JD 7330, MFD, PQ, LHR, 2325 hrs w/JD 741 Ldr; ‘05 JD 7920, MFD, IVT, 3026 hrs w/duals, sharp; ‘99 JD 7610, MFD, PS, 5300 hrs, CAH; ‘80 JD 4640, CAH, QR, 11,000 hrs; JD 4440, CAH, 7200 hrs; JD 4430, CAH, QR; JD 955 Compact w/Loader; ‘91 JD 2955, CAH, needs trans work; ‘80 JD 4440 QR 42” rubber, 1800 hrs, Eng. OH; ‘97 JD 8400, MFD, CAH, 10,000 hrs; CIH MX120, MFD, CAH, 9000 hrs w/Koyker 565 Ldr w/grapple; ‘08 CIH 275, MFD, 1625 hrs w/duals; ‘12 CIH 235, MFD, 1637 hrs w/duals; ‘05 CIH MXM175, MFD, 4200 hrs w/GB 860 Ldr; CIH JX95, MFD w/LX132 Loader, 1000 hrs w/pallet fork & bale spear; ‘05 CIH MXU 125, MFD, CAH, 5800 hrs w/Koyker Loader w/grapple; ‘90 CIH 885, D., WF, 2029 hrs; ‘86 CIH 3394, MFD, CAH, 7800 hrs; Case 2294, MFD, CAH, 8000 hrs; Case 2394, CAH, 7300 hrs; Agco Allis 8610, MFD, CAH, 5400 hrs, trans OH; IHC 686, D., WF w/Miller PL3 Ldr; IHC 1486, CAH, 3 pt; ‘87 CIH 9130, PS, CAH, duals, 3 pt; ‘89 CIH 7120, MFD, CAH; ‘90 CIH 5130, MFD, CAH w/Westendorf TA46 Ldr; ‘04 CIH JX95, MFD, CAH, 2560 hrs w/CIH LX232 Ldr; IHC 966, WF, cab; White 4-210, CAH, 4x4, 3 pt, PTO, 5600 hrs, eng. OH; ‘81 White 155, MFD, CAH; ‘76 White 2-105, CAH, WF w/Westendorf Ldr; ‘72 Ford 4000, Gas; ‘07 NH T6070, MFD, CAH, 1610 hrs w/NH 840TL Ldr; ‘95 NH 8670, MFD, PS, 6700 hrs w/trans problems; PAY LOADERS – SKID LOADERS – ATTACHMENTS – CONSTRUCTION – FORKLIFTS: ‘04 Hyundai HP 757-7 payloader, CAH, 3600 hrs, 3.5 yd. bucket; Fiat Allis 645B payloader, bucket & forks; Fiat Allis 545 payloader; ‘11 NH L225 skid ldr, 2 spd, 1943 hrs; ‘05 Gehl 5640 skid ldr, 1651 hrs; Mustang 960 D. skid ldr; Bobcat 610 skid ldr; Bobcat 371 skid ldr; Asst. of skid loader attachments (buckets, pallet forks, rock buckets, hyd. post augers & etc.); (2) Hydraulic Packer attachments for excavators; asphalt cutting wheel; excavator bucket; excavator thumb; skid ldr QT hyd. sweepster boom; JD 310 D. Tractor-Loader-Backhoe; Vermeer 4150 trencher w/5’ bar & dozer blade, 2100 hrs; ‘91 Kobelco SK200 excavator w/cab; Bomag 2 drum SP steel roller packer; Raygo SP rubber tire & steel roller packer; Kolberg 40’ gravel conveyor w/screen att.; NH LM430 Telehandler, CAH, engine has knock; Cat TH63 Telehandler, open station; ‘00 Lull F600 Telehandler forklift 42’- 6000#, 4x4, 3300 hrs, cab; Clark Warehouse forklift, salvage; (2) forklift masts; rock bucket w/JRB for Cat 980C loader; (2) Cat/Komatsu 1.5 yd. excavator buckets; 150 ton overhead asphalt silo w/60’ drag feed in;

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COLLECTOR TRACTORS & EQUIPMENT AC D21 D., WF, nice; AC D19, WF; ‘66 AC D17 Series IV; (2) AC WD’s; ‘52 JD R Pony, repaint; ‘48 JD D., repaint; JD 60 Gas Wheatland, repaint, nice; (2) JD MT, repaint; JD 420 Tractor; ‘48 JD A, NF, repaint; ‘43 JD B, NF, repaint; ‘26 JD D., On Steel, stuck; ‘52 JD 60; JD 60; JD 4020 LP Gas, WF, fenders; ‘65 JD 3020 Gas, WF, PS, 5684 hrs; ‘70 JD 4020, D., WF, side console; IHC 1206 D., NF, nice; (2) IHC 806 D. Wheatland’s, runs; IHC 706 D. Wheatland, runs; IHC 706 D., WF, 3 pt, 5200 hrs; IHC 656 D. utility, runs; IHC Super M, WF, w/GB ldr, repaint; IHC Cub, WF; ‘54 IHC Super MTA; ‘51 IHC H; ‘52 IHC Super C w/belly mower; IHC 706 Gas; IHC 450 Diesel; IHC H; (2) IHC 350 Gas, restored; IHC 300 Gas; IHC 350 Gas utility, restored; (3) IHC Super MTA’s, (1 restored); IHC M, restored; (2) IHC 400’s, Gas; ‘29 McCormick Deering 2236, stuck, cutoff steel; ‘50’s IHC TD6 Crawler w/dozer; IHC W4 Gas, runs; ‘71 IHC 615 combine w/PU head; IHC 1066, WF, new clutch; IHC 706, new rubber; IHC 826 D., WF, w/Dual ldr; IHC 210 LP Gas swather; IHC WD9 D. Wheatland; Case 1030 D., WF, 3 pt; Case 800 w/eagle hitch; Twin City 17-28 tractor on steel, stuck; ‘52 MM R w/cult; MM UB, NF; ‘43 Ford 2N, repaint; Oliver 88 D. Wheatland, runs; (2) MH 101 Junior’s; Coop E4 Gas, WF; MH Pony w/belly mower-older restoration; (2) Cockshutt 1650 D. Wheatland’s, runs; Oliver 1800 D. Wheatland, runs; NH Super 77 sq. baler w/engine; ‘18 Hart wood elevator, shedded; VanBrunt 8’ drill, shedded; Case 3x14 and 4x14 plows, 3 pt; Ferguson 2 bottom 2-way plow; JD 3 pt subsoiler; IHC #36 silage cutter, 1 row; JD 3 pt, 2RW planter; IHC 3x14 plow, 3 pt; Ford 3 pt 2x14 plow; JD Killefer 8’ offset disk; IH 30 gear; MM 4 bottom plow, 3 pt; AC 2RW cult.; JD 494 planter; ‘27 Ford T running gear; IHC 100 manure spreader; JD barge boxes w/gears;

COMBINES – CORN HEADS – FLEX HEADS – GRAIN CARTS & GRAIN HANDLING ‘12 JD S670 combine CM, 1400/1000 hrs, loaded, sharp; ‘09 JD 9670 STS, 1200 sep hrs, loaded, sharp; ‘08 CIH 7010 RT, chop, tracker, 2339/1735 hrs; ‘11 CIH 7120, loaded, duals, 715/577 hrs, sharp; ‘04 CIH 2388 RT, chop, tracker, 2988/2212 hrs; ‘97 CIH 2188 RT, chopper; ‘98 JD 9610, bin ext., 5045/3422 hrs; ‘98 JD 9510 combine; ‘07 CIH 2388 RT, chop, tracker, duals; ‘88 CIH 1660; JD 7720 Titan II, chopper; JD 7720 hydro; ‘88 JD 8820 Titan II; JD 4400; ‘94 CIH 1688 combine; (5) JD 9500 combines; ‘84 JD 6620; (2) ‘00 JD 9650 STS CM, 3000/2000 hrs; JD Corn Heads: (444, 643’s, 644, 843’s, 893’s, 1243, 1293’s, 608C’s, 612C’s) CIH Corn Heads: (944, 1044, 1063’s, 1083’s, 983’s, 2208, (2010-3406); JD 224 rigid header; JD 220 rigid; JD 215 rigid; JD Flex Heads: (215, 220’s, 920, 920F, 924, 925’s, 930’s, 930F’s, 630F, 635F’s) heads as new as 2012; CIH Flex Heads: (1020’s - 20’, 22.5’, 25’, 30’) (2020’s - 30’, 30’ w/air reel, 35’, 35’ w/air reel); Gleaner Flex Heads: (LM 320, LM 220); MF 1859 flex; MF dummyhead w/PU; (2) JD 653 RC heads; New MD 32’ & 38’ header trailers; Assortment of New & Used Header Trailers (25’, 30’, 35’ & 38’); GRAIN CARTS: Sunflower 8600 CA 600 bu. cart w/scale; Brent 572 CA cart; Brent 776 CA cart; Brent 674 CA cart; J&M 750-16 CA cart; Unverferth 672 CA cart; UFT 565 CA cart; J&M 620 CA cart; A&L 400 & 500 bu. grain carts; J&M 550 gravity box w/gear & tarp; (8) gravity boxes (160 - 300 bu.); Westfield 8x61 auger w/swing hopper; Sudenga 12”x51’ auger; Koyker 8”x55’ auger; Buehler 1035 belt conveyor; Walinga 614 grain vac; The Delayne Graber Estate/Jim Graber 605-925-4654 will sell: ‘70 IHC 826 German Diesel, WF, cab w/FH 235 Ldr; Haybuster 1100 tub grinder, PTO; Knight 2300 mixer feeder wagon, auger discharge; Gehl 1275 TA silage cutter, 2 row cornhead & hay head; Automatic 20” portable roller mill w/auger in; Automatic 16” portable roller mill w/auger in; Gehl 99 short hopper silage blower; Richardton 700 dump wagon, 12’; Parker 300 bu. gravity box w/gear; Wheatheart 10” hyd. hopper auger; Morris 12’ chisel, 3 pt or PT; IHC 45 FC, 12’ w/3 pt; IHC 12’ DD drill w/GSA; Gehl 425 TA manure spreader w/slop gate; Brady 16’ stalk chopper; barge box w/gear; ‘62 IHC 1600 truck w/14’ box & hoist; 3 sets of saddle tanks; Benson & Benson Farms will sell (Daniel 605-310-8176 (Greg) 605-321-3414: CIH 9370 Quad Trac, CAH, 6300 hrs, 3 pt, PTO; CIH 4450 PT, 28’ soil finisher w/crumbler; JD 510 disk ripper, 7 shank; Krause Dominator 14’ disk ripper; Brent 1082 CA 1000 bu. grain cart w/scale; ‘09 Geringhoff 12RN chopping corn head w/hyd. fold for CIH; ‘00 Cornhusker 46’ hopper grain trailer, spread axle & new roll tarp; Dan Merkwan 605-680-2383 will sell the following: ‘07 JD 9760 STS combine, 4x4, 20.8x42 duals, CM, chopper, bin ext., yield & moisture, 1777/1295 hrs, sharp; ‘78 JD 843 cornhead w/new poly snouts, rebuilt in 2012; ‘95 JD 930 rigid head;

40 ROUND BALERS – SWATHERS – MOCO’S – RAKES – MOWERS – SILAGE EQUIP. – GRINDER-MIXERS – MANURE EQUIP. – PLANTERS – DRILLS – SPRAYERS – LOADERS – TILLAGE EQUIP. – MACHINERY – TRUCKS – TRAILERS – VEHICLES – RIDING MOWERS – TIRES & MISC.

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Auctioneers Note: A portion of the Auction will be available on wiemanauction.com for online bidding with a 2.5% buyers premium with a max of $ 750.00 per item. Another large interesting sale! Bring a friend, come prepared. Misc. items start @ 8:15 w/ 3-4 rings. Machinery starts at 9:15 AM sharp with 2 auction rings all day, 3rd ring @ 11:00 will sell payloaders-construction items-forklifts-augersvehicles-trailers-trucks. South Dakota sales tax will be charged. This ad is subject to additions and deletions. All consignments must have been approved by the Wieman’s. We have excellent loading and unloading equipment. We appreciate your business. We are in our 66th year of selling. Honest and fair treatment to all. Financing and trucking available. Sorry we are full! Come prepared to buy! If you are driving a good distance - call to make sure your item is here. (Welcome to the “Machinery Mall of South Dakota”). Our Next Auction is August 6, 2014!

WIEMAN LAND & AUCTION CO., INC. (SINCE 1949) MARION SD 605-648-3111 or 1-800-251-3111 AUCTION SITE: 605-648-3536 or 1-888-296-3536 EVENINGS: Richard Wieman 605-648-3264 Mike Wieman 605-297-4240 Kevin Wieman 605-648-3439 Derek Wieman 605-660-2135 Gary Wieman 605-648-3164

For a detailed ad and some pictures call our office or visit our website at: www.wiemanauction.com • e-mail address: wiemanauction@yahoo.com


Tractors

036 Planting Equip

THE LAND

theland@TheLandOnline.com • www.TheLandOnline.com

Harvesting Equip

037 FOR SALE: NYB 80' pickup sprayer & Chevy Heavy Duty pickup, foam markers, auto rate controller, Honda engine, new engine in pickup, $5,500. 701-6404697 FOR SALE: '04 MF 9690 combine, 8R Geringhoff JD 1750 6 X 30 no till consercornhead, 30' MF 8000 bean vation planter, dry fertilizhead, through the dealer's er finger unit, cross auger, winter program & field $16,900. 608-387-2679 ready. 320-220-1481 or 320212-0327 JD 7100 Soybean Special, 3 bu. boxes, 12R20” spacing FOR SALE: '07 JD 635F tire track rows offset 2”, bean head, SN 721342, lift assist, JD 250 mon., $14,000. 507-526-7491 or 507field ready, $4,900. 612-756525-4792 0271 FOR SALE: '08 NH flex draper, 88C, 36', JD 7200 conservation corn planter, finger meters, $29,500/OBO. Also, 630 JD 4R30", dry fertilizer & monflex head, $10,000. Both itor, field ready, $5,800. heads are very low acres. (715)667-5353 701-640-4697

USED PARTS

'03 JD 9650STS, 2WD, Duals, eng hrs 2494, sep hrs 1679, Bin Extensions, $76,000. (715) 296-2162

LARSON SALVAGE Good selection of tractor parts - New & Used All kinds of hay equipment, haybines, balers, choppers parted out. New combine belts for all makes. Swather canvases, round baler belting, used & new tires. 6 miles East of

CAMBRIDGE, MN 763-689-1179 We Ship Daily

Visa and MasterCard Accepted

NEW DRYERS

DELUX 10’ MODEL DP3015, LP/NG, 1 PH, W/MOISTURE LINK

theland@TheLandOnline.com • www.TheLandOnline.com

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

Keith Bode Fairfax, MN 55332 507-381-1291

Green, 7 function remotes, self-loading 1 with scale- $24,600 1 without scale- $21,500

(2) SEED SHUTTLE 290 Green - $15,250 Each

DELUX 20’ MODEL 6030, LP/NG, 3 PH, 600 BPH DELUX 20’ MODEL 5030, LP/NG, 3 PH, 500 BPH DELUX 15’ MODEL DPX7040, LP/NG, 3 PH, 700 BPH

USED DRYERS

KANSUN 1025 215, LP, 1 PH BEHLEN 380, 1 PH, LP, HEAT RECLAIM BEHLEN 700, 3 PH, LP, HEAT RECLAIM BEHLEN 700, 3 PH, LP, DOUBLE BURNER

USED LEGS

100’, 4000 BPH, 40 HP, 3 PH, DRIVE & MOTOR, GALVANIZED - NEW BELT & CUPS 60’, 3000 BPH, 10 HP, 3 PH, DRIVE & MOTOR, PAINTED

STROBEL BT-200

‘08 DEMCO 1600 CONQUEST

AZLAND TRAUG

AZLAND TRAUG

2 On Hand - Starting at: $18,600

2 Box Defender w/Scale - $13,050

120’ Boom, 7 Section, Norac boom height, 320x46 duals, Runs with Raven Controller - $22,000

4 Box Defender w/Scale, Talc and Pivoting Auger - $21,500

WOODFORD AG, LLC 37666 300th St. • Redwood Falls, MN • (507) 430-5144 www.woodfordag.com

We carry a full line of Behlen & Delux dryer parts; Mayrath and Hutch auger parts. Large inventory of Welda sprockets, hubs, bearings, chains & pulleys

1409 Silver Street E. Mapleton, MN 56065 507-524-3726 massopelectric.com

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

‘12 Case 580SN tractor/loader/backhoe, cab w/heat & air, extend-a-hoe, 4WD, pilot controls, ride control, 235 hrs.......................................$77,500 ‘11Case 580SN, WT tractor/loader/backhoe, PS, cab w/heat & air, 4WD, extend-a-hoe, pilot controls, 1625 hrs. ........................................................$69,500 ‘12 NH Boomer 50, compact tractor, MFWD, hydro, 250TL loader, 340 hrs., Warranty ........$21,000 ‘10 JD 7230 Premium, MFWD, IVT, 650/65R38 single rear tires, 540/65R28 front tires, rear wgts., air seat, 741 self-leveling loader w/joystick control, 885 hrs. ..........................................................$98,000 ‘11 JD 7830, MFWD, 16 spd. power quad trans., 4 remotes, HD front axle, 380/90R50 duals, front wgts., 2950 hrs., Powertrain Warranty till March 2015 or 4000 hrs. ..........................$99,500 ‘09 JD 8430, PS, 1300 front axle, 380/90R50 duals, 380/85/R34 single fronts, 4 remotes, wgts., 5200 hrs.......................................................$109,500

USED DELUX DRYERS

(2) ‘13 SEED SHUTTLE 400

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– SEED TENDER SPECIALS –

(800) 657-4665 (507) 345-4523

29 THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

Have an upcoming auction? Talk to your auctioneer or call The Land Office at (800) 657-4665 to place your auction in

038

FOR SALE: Oliver 880 trac- FOR SALE: '82 JD 7100 12R30” planter, radial bean tor. 320-398-3153 units, precision corn units, NEW AND USED TRACTOR liq fert, insect, 1.6 boxes, PARTS JD 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, $7,500. Call 507-317-8103 55, 50 Series & newer tractors, AC-all models, Large FOR SALE: (2) 6R30” Inventory, We ship! Mark planters w/ dry fert, moniHeitman Tractor Salvage tors, (Landoll & Duetz), 715-673-4829 both very good condition. 763-295-2724 River Dale Farms Engine building, cylinder headFOR SALE: JD 700 6R30” w/ work, port polishing, monitor, no fert, restorations. (920)295-3278 $3,500/OBO. 320-292-2947


Planting Equip

30 THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

WANTED

DAMAGED GRAIN

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STATE-WIDE

We pay top dollar for your damaged grain. We are experienced handlers of your wet, dry, burnt and mixed grains. Trucks and Vacs available. Immediate response anywhere. CALL FOR A QUOTE TODAY

TJOSVOLD EQUIPMENT Sales & Service • West Hwy. 212 — Granite Falls, MN 56241 800-337-1581 • 320-564-2331 • After Hours (320) 212-4849 www.tjosvoldequip.com

USED TRACTORS

‘07 NH L175 SSL, w/2-spd., cab/AC, hyd. Q/A, New Engine....................................................$24,900 ‘06 NH L170 SSL, cab/heat, 2060 hrs. ..........$21,900 ‘08 NH LS170 SSL, cab/heat, 490 hrs.........Coming In ‘06 NH TC55, MFD, ROPS, w/loader, 1300 hrs. ..................................................................Coming In ‘93 Ford 8830, MFWD, 18.4R42 duals, 2637 hrs., New Engine! ..................................................$41,900 ‘04 Buhler 2425, 4WD, 710/70R38 duals, full wgts., 3350 hrs. ....................................................$119,900 ‘95 Ford 9680, 20.8R42 duals (90%), 4 remotes, 3050 hrs. ......................................................$96,900 ‘89 Deutz 5215, MFD w/325 loader ..................$8,500

COMBINES/HEADS

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

038 Machinery Wanted

040

New Yetter Pin Adjust Row WANTED TO BUY: 800 or 900 rear folding InternaCleaners, 22 Available, tional corn planter, pull $225/ea. Fit JD and others. type. 605-268-1872 715-234-1993

‘01 NH TR99, RWA combine, straddle duals, bin ext., chaff spreader, 40K in parts, Field Ready! ....................................................................$109,900 ‘94 NH TR87, 30.5-32 singles ........................$43,900 ‘04 NH CR940, 20.5-32 tires, Y/M, 1350 hrs. ....................................................................$119,900 (4) ‘10 NH 99C, 8R30” chopping cornheads ............................................................From $60,900 ‘00 NH 996, 8R30” cornhead w/K&M chopper ......................................................................$39,950 (2) ‘10 NH 74C, 35’ flex heads ..............From $29,900 ‘04 NH 98C, 6R30” cornhead, Like New!........$33,000 ‘02 NH 96C, 8R30” cornhead, Loaded! ..........$25,900 ‘00 NH 73C, 30’ flex head w/AWS, 3” cut, New! ..............................................................$25,900 NH 974, 10R22” cornhead, poly ....................$11,900 (2) ‘97 NH 973, 30’ flex head ........................$10,500 (2) ‘98 NH 973, 25’ flex head............................$9,500

‘94 NH 974, 8R30 cornhead ............................$8,900 ‘92 NH 974, 6R30” cornhead............................$8,900

MISCELLANEOUS EQUIP.

‘05 JD 1780, 16/31 planter, 3 bu. boxes ........$45,900 ‘93 JD 7300, 12R30” planter, Nice! ................$13,900 ‘13 Degelman LR7651 & LR7645, Demo’s, New! ....................................................................Call ‘12 EZ Trail 510 grain cart, tarps & lights ......$14,900 ‘01 EZ Trail 475 grain cart w/Shurlock tarp ......$9,900 ‘11 Loftness 240, semi-mtd. shredder w/tow bar ......................................................................$22,900 ‘89 NH 855 round baler, Nice! ..........................$5,500 ‘11 NH H6740, 6 disc mower............................$8,500 ‘06 NH 616 disc mower ....................................$5,950 ‘98 NH 616 disc mower, Nice! ..........................$5,900 ‘11 Parker 524 grain cart, Holdover................$19,900 ‘10 Parker 1048 grain cart w/tarp ..................$36,900 NEW NH SG110 60’ coil packers, (4 Left) Ea. $37,900 ‘05 Great Plains 50’ crumbler ........................$15,900 ‘07 Parker 838 grain cart w/tarp ....................$24,000 ‘07 NH 617, 7 disc mower, Rebuilt!..................$6,900 ‘04 Wilrich 957DDR ripper, 5 shank w/harrow, 30” spacing ..................................................$22,900 ‘92 DMI 530 ripper..........................................$14,900 ‘11 Wilrich 513SP 9-shank ripper w/spike harrow ......................................................................$44,900 ‘05 JD 2210, 50’ field cult. w/4 bar harrow ....$45,900 ‘00 JD 980, 45’ field cult. w/harrow, Nice!......$19,900 New Unverferth rolling reels, 18’ & 22’ ................Call ‘10 Krause 4850-21 Dominator, Nice! ............$45,900 ‘04 Allied 108” snowblower w/truck spout, NIce! ................................................................$6,500

Visit Us At: www.tjosvoldequip.com

PRUESS ELEV., INC. 1-800-828-6642

White 6100 6 x 30 no till WANTED TO BUY: Rotary planter, trash whippers, no hoe; also, CIH 600 blower till fert coulters w/ fertilizor NH or H&S. 320-352-3878 er auger, shedded & sharp, WANTED: JD 994 13' MOCO $16,900/OBO. 608-387-2679 head for JD R450, must be new or close to it. 715-296Tillage Equip 039 2162 WANTED: Want to find my 4 Used Mandako Dad's (1968) 1750 Oliver LAND ROLLERS 40-45 Ft gas tractor SN 203401. Call Rental Units 507-317-8103 BUILT HEAVIER 041 We Trade/Deliver Anywhere Spraying Equip Dealer 319-347-6282 FOR SALE: '04 1000 gal HD Century pull type sprayer, FOR SALE: '07 Case IH 60' booms, 320/85R tires, 530C disk ripper, cushion 8605 controller, foamer, gang, always shedded, nice, rinse tank, hyd pump, 20” $26,500. 515-320-2398 spacings, used very little. IHC 183 8R36” flat fold culti612-554-0052 vator, always shedded, like new. 507-764-3943 Feed Seed Hay 050 JD 75, 12R30” cultivator, like Alfalfa grass, grass, straw, new shovels, $2,000. 320-522corn stalks in round bales, 1260 net wrapped. Delivered in semi loads. Call Tim at 320Kent 28 ½ Ft Series 6 Disco221-2085 vator/Finisher (NO Repair Welding) Real Good. 42 Ft Dairy Quality Alfalfa Mandako Land Roller(2012) Tested big squares & round (5/8 Wall x 42 In Dia)Low bales, delivered from South Acres Like New. 319-347Dakota John Haensel (605) 2349 Can Deliver 351-5760 Dairy quality western alfalMachinery Wanted 040 fa, big squares or small squares, delivered in semi All kinds of New & Used loads. Clint Haensel farm equipment – disc chis(605) 310-6653 els, field cults, planters, soil finishers, cornheads, FOR SALE: Western Hay & Straw In large squares or feed mills, discs, balers, round bales by the semi haybines, etc. 507-438-9782 load. Protein 18-26%, RFV Disc chisels: JD 714 & 712, up to-200. Smikrud Glencoe 7400; Field Cults Galesville, WI 608-582-2143 under 30': JD 980, small 608-484-0916 cell (Over 23 grain carts & gravity boxes years in the Hay Business) 300-400 bu. Finishers under 20', clean 4 & 6R stalk chop- WANTED AND FOR SALE ALL TYPES of hay & pers; Nice JD 215 & 216 straw. Also buying corn, flex heads; JD 643 cornwheat & oats. Western Hay heads Must be clean; JD available. Fox Valley Alcorn planters, 4-6-8 row. falfa Mill. 920-853-3554 715-299-4338

If you’re having a Farm Auction, let other Farmers know it! Upcoming Issues of THE LAND

Southern MNNorthern IA June 6 June 20 July 4 July 18 August 1 August 15

Northern MN June 13 June 27 July 11 July 25 August 8 August 22

Deadlines are 1 week prior to publication with Holiday deadlines 1 day earlier ** Indicates Early Deadline

PO Box 3169 Mankato, MN 56002 Phone: 507-345-4523 or 800-657-4665 Fax: 507-345-1027

Ask Your Auctioneer to Place Your Auction in The Land!

Website: www.TheLandOnline.com e-mail: theland@TheLandOnline.com


31

THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”


Livestock

THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

32

Dairy

United Farmers Cooperative www.ufcmn.com

Reg. Holstein bulls, good maternal lines & good sires. We also have red & white. Merritt's Elm-Chris Farm (715)235-9272

Main Office: Ag Service Center, 840 Pioneer Avenue • PO Box 4 • Lafayette, MN 56054-0004

USED DRYERS & AUGERS .......... Good Selection of Used Dryers-CALL!

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

(L) Feterl, 12”x72”, Swing Hopper Auger ........................................................$8,995 (L) Batco 15-90, Conveyor w/swing hopper ......................................................$14,995 (L) Kansun 10-25-215, FF 190, GSI 260, GSI 1218 Dryers..................................CALL (L) Westfield WR, 100”-51’ PTO................CALL (L) Westfield WR, 80”-46’, electric ............CALL (L) Westfield WR, 60”-61’ EMD ..............$1,800 (L) GSI Dryer 1122 ....................................CALL (L) Hutch 10”x72’, Swing Hopper ..........$5,900 (L) Hutch 6”x61’, electric........................$2,400 (L) Sudenga 10”x31’, electric ................$3,495 (L) Sudenga 10”x56’, electric ................$4,995

SKID LOADERS ......................

(L) Bobcat S650, heat, 2-spd. ..............$38,900 (L) ‘09 Bobcat S160, heat, 2-spd. ........$25,900 (L) Bobcat S130, heat, w/bucket ..........$17,900 (L) Bobcat 863, heat, 2-spd. ................$13,500 (L) Bobcat 843, w/bucket........................$8,350 (W) ‘92 Bobcat 7753, 3438 hrs. ............$9,199 (L) Gehl V330, heat, 2-spd. ..................$40,900 (L) Gehl 5640E, heat ............................$22,900 (W) ‘05 Gehl 5640 ................................$18,100 (L) Gehl 5240E, heat, 2-spd. ................$24,900 (W) ‘04 Gehl 4840, 1995 hrs. ..............$17,999 (L) Gehl 4640, Hi-Flow, heat, 840 hrs...$21,900 (W) Gehl 4625SX, cab, heat, 10.5x16 tires, 4014 hrs. ..........................................$8,299 (L) Gehl 4240E, heat ............................$18,900 (W) ‘09 Gehl 4240, 4000 hrs. ..............$14,900 (W) ‘12 Gehl 4240E, 1150 hrs. ............$16,799 (L) ‘99 CIH 1845C, open cab ................$14,900 (L) JD 240, heat....................................$13,900

SPREADERS ..........................

(W) New Idea 3709 ................................$3,499 (W) New Idea 352, (23035) ....................$1,899 (W) H&S 560 ........................................$10,900 (L) H&S 270 ..........................................$6,450 (W) Knight 8124 Slinger Spreader........$15,500 (W) Knight 8114, (A088) ........................$8,400 (W) Knight 8132, (B0077) ....................$19,200 (W) Knight 8132 ..................................$17,500 (W) Knight 8018 Spreader ....................$10,900 (L) JD 370 Spreader ..............................$5,950 (W) Meyer 3954, (1250) ........................$4,500 (W) NH 185 ............................................$5,650 (W) Gehl 329 Scavenger ........................$4,200

TILLAGE .............................. (G) Wilrich 957, 9-shank ......................$39,600 (L) Wilrich 957, 5-shank ......................$16,500 (L/G) Wilrich 957 (3), 7-shank ....From $21,600 (L) JD 2700, 9-24, w/harrow ................$39,900 (L) Glencoe Soil Saver, 11-shank............$7,950 (L) Glencoe DR 8600, 7-shank ..............$8,500 (L) Krause Dominator, 18’ ....................$34,900 (L/G) (2) Krause 18’ Rippers ................$44,800 (L) DMI Tigermate II (2), 38.5’, 4-bar ..$31,500 (L) Krause Dominator, 18’ ....................$33,900 (G) DMI 730 (2) Rippers ......................$11,900

WANTED TO BUY! USED BULK MILK COOLER ALL SIZES 920-867-3048

STOP IN TO SEE THE KUHN/ KUHN KNIGHT/ KUHN KRAUSE EQUIPMENT! (L) JD 2700, 9-24 Ripper......................$26,900 (G) JD 2700, 7-shank ..........................$23,900 (L) JD 2210, 38.5’, 4-bar ......................$31,900 (L) JD 985, 49.5’, 4-bar ........................$21,600 (L) JD 985, 49.5’, 3-bar ........................$20,700 (L) JD 980, 44.5’, 3-bar ........................$17,500 (L) JD 980, 44.5’, 3-bar ........................$19,600 (L) JD 960, 3-bar, 36.5’ ..........................$5,600 (G) JD 3 pt. Plow, 5-bottom ..................$2,850 (W) Great Plains Turbo Till,24’..............$37,800 (L) CIH 730B ........................................$19,800 (L) CIH 4900, 36.5’, 3-bar ......................$6,975 (L) CIH 4800, 36.5’, 3-bar ......................$6,975 (L) CIH 4300, 26.5’, 3-bar ....................$11,950 (L) CIH 4300, 34.5’, 3-bar ....................$13,400 (L) CIH, 32’5’ w/basket ........................$38,900

TMR’S ................................ (W) Knight 5073, tow ..........................$17,199 (W) Knight 3250, stationary....................$3,899 (W) Knight 3050 ..................................$11,499 (W) Knight 3150, tow ..........................$22,499

SPRAYERS ............................ (L) Hardi 1000 gal., 60’ boom ..............$14,400 (G) Century 750 gal., 60’ boom ..............$9,500 (L) Century 750 gal., 60’ boom ..............$7,950 (L) Redball 670, 1200 gal., 66’ boom ..$13,800 (G) Fast 1000 gal., 90’ boom ..................$9,900 (L) Top Air 800 gal., 60’ boom................$9,350

MISCELLANEOUS ....................

(L) Loftness 20’ Chopper ........................$9,600 (G) Minnesota 250, 10-ton gear ............$1,900 (L) Empire 45’ Roller ............................$24,800 (G) Gehl 1410 Spreader ..........................$8,250 (G) Used Grain Legs ..................................CALL (L) Woods 3 pt. 20’ Chopper ..................$5,950 (L) EZ Flow, 475 Kart ..............................$6,375 (L) EZ-Flow 300 bu. Box ........................$1,950 (G) Demco 650 bu. Grain Cart ..............$16,900 (L) Unverferth 400 bu. Cart ....................$7,950 (L) JD 15’ Chopper Pull ..........................$3,750 (L) Used Snowblowers ..............................CALL (L) Tonutti 5’ Disc Mower ......................$4,500 (W) 74” Grapple, skid steer, universal attachment ........................................$1,850 (W) 72” Box Blade, skid steer, universal attachment ........................................$2,899 (W) 72” Dump Bucket, skid steer, universal attachment ........................................$3,299 (W) Thundercreek 3” Portable Welder ....$4,950 (W) Westin 84” Snow Bucket, skid steer, universal attachment ............................$975 (W) ‘80 Allied 8’ 3 pt. Single Auger Snowblower w/hyd. chute ................$1,999

055

FOR SALE: 55 Freudenthal free stalls, $57/ea. 91 rubber stall mats, $15/ea. Oxbo windrow merger, $22,500. (715)229-4574 or (715)2294669

(L) Lafayette 507-228-8224 or 800-642-4104 (G) Gaylord 507-237-4203 • (W) Waconia 952-442-7326

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

054

FOR SALE: Purebred Black Angus bulls, calf ease & good disposition; also York, Hamp & Hamp-Duroc boars & gilts. 320-598-3790

• 5/8” drum roller wall thickness • 42” drum diameter • 4”x8” frame tubing 3/8” thick • Auto fold

MANDAKO

FOR THE BEST DEAL ORDER NOW!

12’-60’ LONG ROLLERS

GREENWALD FARM CENTER Greenwald, MN • 320-987-3177 14 miles So. of Sauk Centre

LOCAL TRADES TRACTORS

New Farmall 31, MFD w/60” & 74” blower - $22,500 ‘08 CIH 95, 2WD, w/cab - $29,500 ‘09 CH 245, 1335 hrs. - $145,000 ‘10 CIH 305, 1575 hrs. - $179,500 ‘11 CIH 315 w/Soucy tracks, 550 hrs. - $253,500 ‘05 CIH 500 Quad w/PTO, 2350 hrs. - $215,000 ‘12 CIH Puma 130 CVT, 350 hrs. - $96,500

CIH 183, 12-30, V.S. CIH 900, 8-30, liq. fert. ‘07 CIH 1200, 16 row, bulk fill - $69,500

COMBINES

‘93 1666 - $26,500 ‘91 1680 - $24,500 ‘95 2166 - $44,500 ‘99 2388 - $79,500 ‘98 1020, 25’ - $6,500 ‘02 1020, 25’ - $9,500 ‘03 1020, 30’ - $11,500 ‘01 2208 - $21,500 Brent 644 - $14,500 EZ-Trail 510 cart - $8,950 620 cart PLANTERS & TILLAGE J&M Brent 420 cart ‘08 JD 1760, 12-30 - $39,500 Like New 25’ reel - $2,000 CIH Tigermate II, 44’, 4 bar - $34,500

RABE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

1205 Bixby Road (across from fairgrounds), Fairmont, MN 507-235-3358 or 800-813-8300 • Get the Rabe Advantage

Case IH and CNH Capital are registered trademarks of CNH America LLC

Visit our Web Site at http://www.caseih.com

WANTED TO BUY: Dairy heifers and cows. 320-2352664 WANTED: Holsteins Springing heifers and Jersey Holstein cross springers. Bred 8-9 months. 715-928-3526 Cattle

056

25 Limousin bulls, 2 yr olds & yrlings, low birth wgt., super growth, black or red. John Goelz, Franklin, MN 507-557-8394 Angus Bulls for sale. Yearling & 2 yr olds. Breeding soundness exam. Tschanz Farms, Hwy 53, Blair, WI. (608)989-2223 Bulls: 15 long yearlings, Black Polled, quiet disposition, excellent quality, light birth weights, your choice for $2,200. 40 plus years of breeding. Gerald Polzin, River Side Simmentals, Cokato, MN 320-286-5805 FOR SALE OR LEASE REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS Bulls, 2 year old & yearlings; bred heifers, calving ease, club calves & balance performance. Al sired. In herd improvement program. J.W. Riverview Angus Farm Glencoe, MN 55336 Conklin Dealer 320864-4625 FOR SALE OR LEASE: Purebred Registered Charolais bulls, heifers, & cows. Great bloodlines, excellent performance, balanced EPD's, low birth weights. Delivery available. Laumann Charolais Mayer, MN 612-490-2254 FOR SALE: Angus Bull yearling & 2 yr. olds, stout heavy muscled bulls with excellence performance genetics. Sullivan Angus, Kellogg MN. (507)767-3361 or (612)799-7736 FOR SALE: Purebred Black Angus bulls, long yearlings & 2 year olds, great EPD's. John 507-327-0932 or Brian 507-340-9255 JRC Angus Reg. Angus Bulls For Sale: AAR Windy & Sitz Dash Sons, balanced EPDs w/ extra thickness and muscle. Lausted's Green Meadows, Menomonie, (715)308-9954 Registered Hereford Bull, 4 yrs. old, calm, crossover genetics, $1,950. (715) 9432422


33

THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”


THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

34

(OW)

‘12 JD 9460R, 185 Hrs., 800/70R38’s, Ext. Warr. ..$265,000

‘10 JD 9630T, 1589 Hrs., Auto Trak ready ..............$269,900

‘11 JD 4930, 1725 Hrs., 1200 Gal. SS, 120’ SS Boom ..........$229,500

‘09 JD 4830, 2400 Hrs., 1000 Gal., 90’ Boom..........................$200,000

‘12 JD 4730, 1065 Hrs., 800 Gal. SS, 90’ Boom ..................$208,500

(OW) Ford TW-10, 4950 hrs, 18.4x38........................$12,500 (OW) ‘76 IH 1586, 5178 hrs, 18.4R38 ........................$11,900 (N) ‘67 JD 4520, 6330 hrs, Syncro ..............................$9,995 4WD Tractors (N) ‘13 JD 9560R, 172 hrs........................................$346,500 (OW) ‘75 Case 1070, 4924 hrs, 20.8x38......................$9,000 Utility Tractors (N) ‘13 JD 9560R, 218 hrs........................................$346,500 (OW) ‘13 JD 9560R, 606 hrs, ext. warranty ............$304,900 (OW) ‘09 JD 5105M, 1600 hrs, loader ......................$67,900 (OW) ‘12 JD 9560R, 579 hrs, ext. warranty ............$285,900 (OS) ‘11 JD 6330, 625 hrs, OS, loader ......................$65,000 (B) ‘12 JD 9560R, 840 hrs........................................$288,900 (OW) ‘13 JD 6105D, 202 hrs, Lease Return ..............$54,900 (OW) ‘13 JD 9510R, 450 hrs, lease return ..............$284,500 (B) ‘12 JD 5085M, 427 hrs, MFWD ............................$51,900 (N) ‘12 JD 9460R, 325 hrs........................................$278,500 (OS) ‘12 JD 5075E, 2012 hrs, MFWD, OS ................$29,500 (OW) ‘13 JD 9410R, 435 hrs, lease return ..............$269,900 (N) ‘12 JD 5075E, 63 hrs, MFWD, OS........................$29,250 ‘12 JD 8260R, 357 Hrs., (N) ‘12 JD 9460R, 185 hrs, 800/38’s ........................$265,000 (OS) ‘13 JD 5065E, 300 hrs, MFWD ..........................$28,500 ILS, PS ............................$216,500 (OS) ‘11 JD 9430, 195 hrs, 800/38’s ........................$245,000 (OS) ‘13 JD 5065E, MFWD ........................................$26,500 (OW) ‘09 JD 9530, 2450 hrs, 800/38’s ....................$214,900 (OS) ‘13 JD 5064E, MFWD ........................................$26,500 (B) ‘97 JD 9200, 4695 hrs, 710/38’s ........................$105,000 (OW) ‘96 White 6105, 5480 hrs, MFWD, cab ............$24,900 (OW) ‘02 Case IH STX325, 6525 hrs, 3 pt ..............$102,900 (N) ‘12 JD 5065E, 138 hrs, MFWD, OS......................$24,500 (OW) ‘98 JD 9200, 3963 hrs, 20.8x42’s ....................$96,900 (N) Ford 5610 II Special, 2077 hrs, loader ................$14,900 (N) ‘97 JD 9400, 4888 hrs, 710/70R38’s ....................$95,000 (N) ‘11 JD 5045D, 110 hrs, 2WD, OS ........................$14,800 (H) ‘97 JD 8770, 5640 hrs, 20.8x42’s ........................$59,500 Combines (OS) ‘90 JD 8760, 4906 hrs........................................$56,500 (H) ‘90 Case IH 9170, 4418 hrs, PS ..........................$54,500 (B) ‘13 JD S680, 282 sep hrs, PRWD ......................$377,500 (B) ‘92 JD 8760, 6878 hrs ..........................................$52,900 (H) ‘12 JD S680, 108 sep hrs, 650/38’s ..................$358,000 (OS) ‘89 JD 8760, 6915 hrs........................................$52,000 (OW) ‘13 JD S680, 239 sep hrs ..............................$352,900 (B) ‘93 JD 8970, 9000 hrs, 20.8x42’s ........................$46,900 (OW) ‘12 JD S680, ext warranty ..............................$345,000

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Tractors

‘11 JD 5045D, 110 Hrs., 2WD, Mid SCV ............................$14,900

Track Tractors

(N) ‘13 JD 9560RT, 260 hrs ......................................$369,900 (OS) ‘10 JD 9650T, 930 hrs ......................................$315,000 (OW) ‘12 JD 9460RT, 1013 hrs, ext warranty ..........$299,900 (OW) ‘11 JD 9630T, 1472 hrs ..................................$288,900 (H) ‘10 JD 9630T, 1650 hrs ......................................$287,500 (OW) ‘13 JD 8335RT, 391 hrs, 18” Tracks ..............$269,900 (B) ‘10 JD 9630T, 1586 hrs ......................................$269,900 (B) ‘09 JD 9630T, 1482 hrs ......................................$264,900 (H) ‘11 JD 9530T, 1452 hrs ......................................$254,900 (N) ‘08 JD 9530T, 2035 hrs, 36” tracks ....................$238,000 (N) ‘07 JD 8430T, 3170 hrs, 18” tracks ....................$170,000 (OS) ‘06 JD 8430T, 3062 hrs, 18” tracks ................$165,000 ‘11 JD 568, Surface Wrap (OW) ‘07 JD 8430T, 3184 hrs, 25” tracks ................$159,900 ............................................$32,500 (H) ‘06 JD 9520T, 3808 hrs ......................................$149,900 (B) ‘03 JD 9320T, 4641 hrs ......................................$139,900 (H) ‘00 JD 9300T, 4375 hrs, 36” tracks ....................$105,000 (OW) ‘00 JD 8410T, 5100 hrs, 18” tracks ..................$79,900 (H) ‘97 JD 8200T, 5233 hrs, 16” tracks ......................$62,900

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Row Crop Tractors

(OS) ‘13 JD 8310R, power shift ..............................$255,000 (OS) ‘10 JD 8320R, 1877 hrs, ILS, PS ....................$225,000 (N) ‘12 JD 8260R, 357 hrs, ILS, PS..........................$216,500 (N) ‘12 JD 7260R, 300 hrs, IVT ................................$185,000 (OS) ‘12 JD 7215R, 295 hrs, IVT ..............................$172,500 (OS) ‘13 JD 7200R, 200 hrs, IVT ..............................$169,900 JD 328, Ejector ..............................................$8,900 (N) ‘13 JD 7200R, 200 hrs, IVT ................................$169,900 (OS) ‘11 JD 7215R, 760 hrs, IVT ..............................$167,000 (OS) ‘12 JD 7200R, 135 hrs, IVT ..............................$162,500 (OW) ‘13 JD 6150R, 669 hrs, IVT ............................$131,900 (B) ‘07 JD 7830, 1379 hrs, Auto Quad ....................$129,900 (OW) ‘09 JD 7830, 1274 hrs, 2WD, Auto Quad ......$114,900 (OS) ‘97 JD 8200, 7800 hrs, MFWD, PS ....................$75,000 (H) ‘90 JD 4755, 5500 hrs, 2WD, PS..........................$57,500 (OW) ‘13 JD 6105D, 202 hrs., Lease Return..............$54,900 (OS) ‘00 JD 7410, 6342 hrs, Power Quad..................$49,500 (OW) ‘85 JD 4450, 11,000 hrs, 2WD, loader ............$39,500 (OW) ‘82 JD 4440, 5974 hrs, Quad ............................$28,500 (OW) ‘79 JD 4440, 8052 hrs, Quad............................$25,900 ‘97 Hardi Navigator, 1000 Gal., (OW) ‘74 JD 4030, open station ................................$12,900 60’ Boom............................$13,000

(OW) ‘13 JD S670, 260 eng hrs ..............................$332,000 (OW) ‘13 JD S670, 190 sep hrs, duals ....................$329,900 (H) ‘13 JD S670, 270 sep hrs, PRWD ......................$329,900 (N) ‘13 JD S670, 223 sep hrs ..................................$326,000 (B) ‘12 JD S660, 163 hrs, PRWD ............................$299,900 (OW) ‘12 JD S660, 215 hrs, duals............................$299,000 (OW) ‘11 CIH 9120, 727 sep hrs, tracks, PRWD ....$295,000 (OW) ‘11 JD 9870, 700 sep hrs, PRWD ..................$294,900 (OW) ‘12 JD S670, 350 sep hrs, ext warranty..........$289,900 (OW) ‘12 JD S660, 420 sep hrs, duals ....................$279,900 (B) ‘11 JD 9870, 511 sep hrs, PRWD, 800/70R38 ..$279,900 (B) ‘11 JD 9770, 511 sep hrs ..................................$256,500 (N) ‘11 JD 9670, 405 sep hrs, duals ........................$255,000 (B) ‘10 JD 9870, 1067 sep hrs, PRWD ....................$244,900 (OS) ‘10 JD 9670, 431 sep hrs, duals ......................$240,000 (B) ‘09 JD 9770, 1323 eng hrs, PRWD ....................$214,900 (N) ‘09 JD 9770, 772 sep hrs ..................................$210,000 (H) ‘07 JD 9570, 888 hrs, duals................................$208,000 (OW) ‘09 JD 9770, 1041 sep hrs..............................$204,900 (H) ‘09 JD 9570, 700 sep hrs, duals ........................$197,000 (OS) ‘07 JD 9760, 1206 sep hrs, auto trac ready ....$174,500 (H) ‘07 JD 9660, 1203 sep hrs ................................$169,900 (H) ‘05 JD 9660, 1792 sep hrs, duals ......................$168,500 (OW) ‘06 JD 9760, 1500 sep hrs..............................$167,500 (B) ‘07 JD 9560, 876 sep hrs, PRWD ......................$163,900 (B) ‘06 JD 9760, 1750 sep hrs, PRWD ....................$154,900 (OW) ‘05 JD 9660, 1442 sep hrs, duals ..................$151,900 (OW) ‘06 JD 9760, 1760 sep hrs, PRWD ................$149,000 (H) ‘04 JD 9760, 2350 hrs, duals..............................$132,500 (OS) ‘01 JD 9550, 1872 sep hrs, walker, duals ..........$89,000 (H) ‘92 JD 9500, 2840 sep hrs, 10 Series updates ....$49,900 (H) ‘99 JD 9610, 2064 sep hrs, duals ........................$45,000 (OW) ‘96 JD 9600, 2790 sep hrs, duals ....................$39,900

Planters - Seeding (N) ‘13 JD 1770, CCS, 24 row 30” ..........................$164,500 (OW) ‘08 JD DB44, 24 row 22”, CCS, liq fert ..........$141,000 (OS) ‘11 JD 1790, CCS, 32 row 15” ........................$135,000 (N) ‘08 JD 1770NT, CCS, 24 row 30” ......................$129,000 (OS) ‘05 JD 1770NT, CCS, 24 row 30” ....................$120,000 (OS) ‘07 JD 1770NT, 24 row 30”..............................$110,000

‘09 Miller Nitro N2XP, 2800 Hrs., 1000 Gal., 90’ Boom........$133,900

(N) White 8524, CCS, 24 row 30”, liq fert................$109,900 (N) ‘10 JD 1770NT, CCS, 16 row 30” ........................$99,000 (H) ‘05 JD 1790, 32 row 15”, liq fert ..........................$90,000 (H) ‘04 JD 1770NT, 16 row 30”, 3 bushel ..................$79,900 (OW) ‘03 JD 1770NT, 16 row 30”, liq fert ..................$76,900 (OS) ‘97 JD 1770, 24 row 30” ....................................$68,000 (OS) ‘04 Kinze 3650, 23 row 15” ..............................$65,000 (H) Kinze 3700, 36 row 20”, liq fert............................$62,500 (OS) ‘97 JD 1770, 24 row 30” ....................................$62,000 (N) ‘06 JD 1770NT, 16 row 30” ..................................$58,500 (OW) ‘96 JD 1760, 12 row 30”, 3 bushel ..................$46,500 (OS) ‘96 JD 1770, 16 row 30” ....................................$37,500 (B) ‘95 JD 455, 30’, 15” spacing ................................$27,900

Sprayers (OW) ‘12 JD 4940, 756 hrs, 120’ boom ..................$281,500 (OW) ‘12 JD 4830, 386 hrs, 120’ Pommier boom....$279,900 (OW) ‘13 JD 4830, 405 hrs, 120’ boom ..................$269,700 (OW) ‘13 JD 4830, 410 hrs, 90’ boom ....................$259,900 (OW) ‘13 JD 4830, 442 hrs, 90’ boom ....................$259,500 (OW) ‘12 JD 4830, 668 hrs, 90’ boom ....................$236,500 (OW) ‘12 JD 4830, 1155 hrs, 90’ boom ..................$235,750 (OW) ‘12 JD 4830, 775 hrs, 90’ boom ....................$234,500 (OW) ‘12 JD 4830, 792 hrs, 90’ boom ....................$233,000 (OW) ‘12 JD 4830, 722 hrs, 90’ boom ....................$232,900 (OW) ‘11 JD 4930, 1725 hrs, 120’ boom ................$229,500 (OW) ‘11 JD 4830, 1011 hrs, 90’ boom ..................$225,000 (OW) ‘12 JD 4730, 694 hrs, 90’ boom ....................$215,500 (OW) ‘12 JD 4730, 800 gal, 90, boom ....................$209,900 (OW) ‘12 JD 4730, 490 Hrs, 90’ boom ....................$209,600 (OW) ‘12 JD 4730, 800 hrs, 90’ boom ....................$208,500 (OW) ‘09 JD 4830, 2400 hrs, 90’ boom ..................$200,000 (OW) ‘09 JD 4930, 2403 hrs, 120’ boom ................$169,900 (OW) ‘07 JD 4930, 3093 hrs, dry box ......................$160,000 (OW) ‘09 Ag-Chem 1084SS, 2094 hrs, 80’ boom ..$159,500 (OW) ‘09 Ag-Chem 1286C, 1994 hrs, 90’ boom ....$158,900 (OW) ‘09 Ag-Chem 1084SS, 2951 hrs, 90’ boom ..$145,500 (OW) ‘09 Miller Nitro N2, 2787 hrs, 90’ boom ........$133,100 (OW) ‘07 JD 4720, 2450 hrs, 90’ boom ..................$126,900 (B) ‘05 JD 4720, 3794 hrs, 80’ boom ......................$124,900 (OW) ‘10 Apache AS715, 1200 hrs, 90’ boom ........$109,900 (OW) ‘03 Ag-Chem 1264, 3785 hrs, 90’ boom..........$82,000 (OW) ‘97 Ag-Chem 854, 90’ boom............................$49,900 (OW) ‘95 Ag-Chem 844, 750 gal, 60’ boom..............$36,900 (OW) ‘94 Ag-Chem 1083, 51,000 miles, 80’ boom ..$17,500

Hay Equipment (OS) ‘11 JD 568, surface wrap ..................................$32,500 (B) ‘10 JD 568, surface wrap......................................$31,900 (N) ‘09 JD 568, surface wrap......................................$30,900 (N) ‘12 JD 468, silage special ....................................$29,900 (B) ‘11 JD 946, 13’ rotary moco ................................$25,900 (N) Vermeer top gun bale processor ........................$22,500 (OS) ‘01 JD 567, surface wrap ..................................$17,500 (B) Cat RB46 round baler ..........................................$14,900 (B) ‘03 NH BR740, silage special ..............................$13,500 (OS) ‘90 JD 535, surface wrap ..................................$11,500 (B) JD 328 square baler, ejector ..................................$8,900 (B) ‘94 JD 3950, chopper ............................................$7,900 (B) NH 315 square baler, thrower ................................$5,900 (B) ‘96 Hesston 565A round baler ..............................$5,500 (B) JD 530 round baler ................................................$5,000 (H) Hesston 1120 haybine ..........................................$4,995 (B) NH 144, hay inverter ..............................................$3,500 (OS) Sitrex 10 wheel rake ............................................$2,000


Cattle

056

35 THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

Registered Texas Longhorn breeding stock, cows, heifers or roping stock, top blood lines. 507-235-3467 Top Qual. Holstein Steers, 200-800 lbs. in semi load lots. 319-448-4667 Top Quality Holstein Steers 200-800 lbs. in semi load lots. 319-448-4667 WAKEFIELD FARMS Performance tested Charolais & Red Angus bulls, 50+ yrs in the seed stock business. Delivery available. Put more profit in your pocket with a Wakefield bred bull. 507-402-4640 WANT TO BUY: Butcher cows, bulls, fats & walkable cripples; also horses, sheep & goats. 320-235-2664 Horse

– TRACTOR SPECIAL –

2011 CIH 260 Magnum

057

A pr of 5 yr old 3/4 brother Belgians, dark red sorrel, light mane & tail, strip in the face, stand 17.2, weigh 1900 lbs., broke to all farm equip. & traffic safe. Kids have been skidding firewood, & hauling manure all winter, kid safe & ready to work, $6,500. (715)308-7208 FOR ADOPTION: 2 Arabian Geldings. Call for details. WANTED: Western Saddles. (715)828-2779 or (715) 556-0678 Swine

065

Compart's total program features superior boars & open gilts documented by BLUP technology. Duroc, York, Landrace & F1 lines. Terminal boars offer leanness, muscle, growth. Maternal gilts & boars are productive, lean, durable. All are stress free & PRRS free. Semen also available through Elite Genes A.I. Make 'em Grow! Comparts Boar Store, INC. Toll Free: 877-441-2627 FOR SALE: Sow shares & a 2400 head filtered sow farm, PEDS and PRRS negative. Northwest IA. 712-441-4410 ORR FEEDER PIGS Tim Orr. Call for availability. (563) 920-2680 Livestock Equip

075

Wieser cement hog feeders, w/ stainless steel feed flow control, $175/ea. Eau Galle. (715)495-1984 Trucks & Trailers

084

175,000

WOODFORD AG, LLC 37666 300th St. • Redwood Falls, MN • (507) 430-5144 www.woodfordag.com

~ NEW EQUIPMENT/BIG INVENTORY ~

Notch Equipment: • Rock Buckets • Grapple Forks • Manure Forks • Bale Spears • Hi-Volume Buckets & Pallet Forks • Bale Transports & Feeder Wagons, 16’-34’ • Adult & Young Stock Feeders & Bale Feeders • Land Levelers Smidley Equipment: • Steer Stuffers • Hog Feeders • Hog Huts • Calf Creep Feeders • Lamb & Sheep Feeders • Cattle & Hog Waterers • Mini Scale Sioux Equipment: • Gates • Calving Pens • Haymax Bale Feeders • Cattle & Feeder Panels • Head Gates • Hog Feeders • Sqz. Chutes & Tubs • Calf Warmer JBM Equipment: • Feeder Wagons - Several Models • Self-locking Head Gates • Self-locking Bunk Feeders • Tombstone Horse & Horned Cattle Feeders • Skid Feeders • BunkFeeders • Bale Wagons • Bale Thrower Racks • Flat Racks for big sq. bales • Self-locking Feeder Wagons • Fenceline Feeders • Several Types of Bale Feeders • Port-A-Hut Shelters (Many Sizes) • Bergman Cattle Feeders – Special Prices

~ USED EQUIPMENT ~

• Grasshopper 227, 61” deck, 15 hrs., Demo • Bergman Cattle Special Grasshopper 620Feeders ZT, 48” –fold deck,Prices 140 hrs.! • 9x16 Bale Rack • Smidley Hog & Cattle Feeders • 3-4 yd. Soil Scraper • 15’ JD BWA Disc w/duals, Very Good • 12x21 Porta Hut w/door • Bale Baskets • New Idea 213 Spreader, Very Good

• GT (Tox-O-Wic) Grain Dryers, 350-800 bu. EARLY ORDER DISCOUNTS NOW IN EFFECT! • Sheep & Calf Feeders • Livestock Equipment by Vern’s Mfg. • Mister Squeeze Cattle Chutes & Hd. Gates • Peck Grain Augers – Big Discounts • MDS Buckets for Loaders & Skidloaders • Powder River Livestock & Horse Equipment • Tire Scrapers for Skidsteers, 6’-9’ • EZ Trail Wagons & Boxes • EZ Trail Bale Baskets, • MDS Roto King Round Bale Processor • Parts for GT Tox-O-Wic Grain Dryers • Sitrex Wheel Rakes • Bale Baskets • SI Feeders, Wagons & Bunks • (Hayhopper) Bale Feeders • Calftel Hutches & Animal Barns • R&C Poly Bale Feeders • Amish Built Oak Bunk Feeders & Bale Racks • Goat & Sheep Feeders • Mist Sprayers, gas or PTO • NEW ITEM! * 3 Pt. Fence Mowers* • Fainting goats & min. donkeys

DR® POWER EQUIPMENT • Field & Brush Mowers • Roto-Hog Power Tillers • Stump Grinders • Log Splitters • Chippers • Power Graders • Power Wagons • Leaf & Lawn Vacuums • Versa-trailers

Wanted to Buy:

• Green Choppers • Hog & Cattle Scales • Good Smaller Manure Spreaders • Cattle & Calf Feeders, Hog Feeders • Cattle Handling Equipment

FARM, HOME & CONSTRUCTION

Office Location - 305 Adams Street Hutchinson, MN 55350

320-587-2162, Ask for Larry

SOLD

TRACTORS

• ‘11 NH H6750, 3 pt., disk mower, 110” • Sitrex RP2 wheel rakes • Sitrex RP5 wheel rakes • Sitrex 10- & 12-wheel rakes on cart • Sitrex MK12 & MK16 hy. cap. wheel rakes • MF 2856 baler, w/kicker w/net-twine wrap • MF 1372 mwr cnd, 12 steel rollers CORN HEADS • Used MF 200 SP windrower, cab • Geringhoff 1822RD, ‘09 GRAIN HANDLING w/14’ auger head • Geringhoff 1820RD, ‘09 • Parker gravity box, 250 bu. • ‘13 760 Roto-Grind tub grinders • Geringhoff 1630RD, ‘09 • ‘05 Parker 625 gravity box, 4-wheel • ‘13 2881 Bale King bale processor, • Geringhoff 1622RD, ‘07 brakes RH discharge • Geringhoff 1622RD, ‘07 • A&L 850S grain cart w/tarp, • Geringhoff 1622RD, ‘04 MISCELLANEOUS 850 bu. • Geringhoff 1230RD, ‘09 • Brandt 20110 swing hopper • WRS 30’ header trailers • Geringhoff 1222RD, ‘11 • Brandt 7500HP grain vac. • E-Z Trail 39’ header trailer • Geringhoff 1222RD, ‘08 • ‘00 Brandt 4500 EX, grain vac. • Mauer 28’-42’ header trailers • Geringhoff 1222RD, ‘07 • ‘03 Brandt 1070 auger, PTO Drive, • Degelman 5 ft. skidsteer buckets • Geringhoff 1222RD, ‘05 w/swing hopper • Degelman RP 570 prong pickers • Geringhoff 1222RD, ‘03 • Brandt, 1515, 1535, 1545, 1575, • Degelman RD 320 rock digger • Geringhoff 1220RD, ‘11 1585 belt conveyors • Degelman 7200 rock picker • Geringhoff 1220RD, ‘05 • Brandt 8x62 auger, PTO drive, SC • Degelman 6000HD rock picker • Geringhoff 1220RD, ‘04 • Brandt 8x45 auger, 18 hp. Briggs • Degelman RR1500 rock rake, PTO • Geringhoff 1220RD, ‘02 • Brandt 8x35, 8x37, 8x40, 8x47, drive • Geringhoff 1220RD, ‘12 8x52, 8x57, 8x62, 8x67, 10x35 • Sunflower 1435-21 21ft. disc, 3 bar • Geringhoff 830NS, ‘08 straight augers harrow • Geringhoff 830RD, ‘08 • Brandt 1060XL, 1070XL, 1080XL, • Degelman 7651, 51’ land roller • Geringhoff 830RD, ‘06 1380XL, 1390XL swing hopper • (2) Degelman LR7645 land rollers • Geringhoff 830RD, ‘05 augers • Everest 84” finish mower • Geringhoff 830RD, ‘04 • ‘12 Buhler 1282 sling hopper • ‘08 JD 520 stalk chopper • Geringhoff 830RD, ‘04 • Parker 1048 grain cart, tarp, • Loftness 20’ stalk chopper • Geringhoff 830RD, ‘01 1000 bu. • Wil-Rich 25’ stalk chopper • Geringhoff 830RD, ‘07 • Parker 1020 seed tender, bulk • Loftness 240 stalk chopper, • Geringhoff 630RD, ‘07 boxes semi-mount • Geringhoff 630RD, ‘05 • Parker 839 grain cart, tarp, 850 bu. • ‘06 Kodiak 60”, 72” & 84” rotary • Geringhoff 630RD, ‘97 • Parker 165-R gravity box cutters • JD 622, GVL poly • Hutchinson 10x61 auger • Loftness 84” snowblower, hyd. • JD 822 KR, HT, steel • ‘08 Unverferth grain cart, 500 bu. spout • ‘04 Gleaner 1222 hugger, GVL poly • Killbros 1175 grain cart, 750 bu. • Loftness 8’ snowblower • MF 844 4RW w/tarp • 2011 SB Select snowblower, 97” • MF 1163 • ‘05 Demco 650 gravity box, & 108”, 3 pt. • ‘12 CIH 2608, HHC, end row 4-wheel brakes • Lucke 8’ 3 pt., snowblower augers, chopping • Sunflower 4610-9 disc ripper HAY & LIVESTOCK • Sunflower 4511-15 disc chisel COMBINES • JD 38, sickel mower. 7’ • Sunflower 4412-07 disk ripper • ‘07 MF 9790, duals, RWA, • IH 14, 5 bar rake • Sunflower 4412-05 disk ripper 1001 hrs. • ‘12 NH H7450 disc mower • Sunflower 4311-14 disk ripper, • ‘92 MF 9750, 25’, HHC reel conditioner, 13’ 7 shank • ‘14 MF 9540, RWA • MF 1361 disc mower, 6 disc, 10’ • Sunflower 5056-63 field cult. • (2) ‘86 MF 9320, 20’ • MF 1361 disc mower, 6 disc, 10’, • ‘14 Sunflower SF 5056-49 field • ‘98 MF 8780 combine. RWA. duals w/conditioner cult. • ‘91 MF 8570, RWA • MF 1361 disc mowers • Sunflower 5035-36 field cult. • ‘86 MF 8560 • (4) MF 1358 disc mowers, 5 disc, • ‘10 Sunflower SF 4213-13 disk • ‘12 MF 8200-30 beantable, UII reel 8.4’ chisel • ‘03 MF 8000-30 beantable • MF 1329 & 1330, 3 pt. disc mower • Sunflower 1435-21 disc • ‘14 MF 6616 tractor & loader • ‘13 MF 8690, MFD • ‘13 MF GC1705 Compact • ‘05 MF 451, 45 PTO hp., 400 hrs. • JD 4440, cab, loader • Ford 7600 w/Schwartz loader • ‘14 MF 1754 Compact w/loader

• ‘05 MF 8000-30 beantable • ‘06 MF 8000-30 beantable • ‘97 Gleaner R62, duals, 2052 sep. hrs. • ‘92 Gleaner R62, 2063 hrs. • ‘05 Gleaner 8000-32 beantable, UII reel • ‘98 Gleaner 800-25 beantable, HHC reel • MF 1859 beantable

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

'06 Kiefer Genesis 22' 3 horse all alum gooseneck trailer w/ living quarters finished in a knotty pine, electric hook ups, but no appliances. Living quarters are well insulated, HD axles, well maintained, cleaned after each use, stored indoors year round, lots of storage. One owner—only reason for selling is that we have upgraded to a larger trailer. Must see to appreciate. Asking $19,800/OBO. Call 507-381-9315

$

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

1158 hrs., 1-owner, 3 PTO’s, cab suspension, 360 HID lights, front & rear duals, Michelin 90%, Pro 700 AFS Auto Steer, leather


<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

36

4WD & TRACK TRACTORS ‘12 JD 9560RT, 799 hrs., 36” tracks, 1000 PTO, 5 hyd. hi-flow $269,000 ‘13 JD 9560R, 416 hrs., 4 remotes, 800x38” tires & duals ......$259,000 ‘12 Cat 865C, 992 hrs., 36” tracks, 5 hyd., hyd. swing draw bar, HID lights ........................$250,000 ‘12 JD 9560R, cab, powershift, 808 hrs., 4 hyd., Michelin 800x38 tires & duals ....................$250,500 ‘11 JD 8360RT, 1101 hrs., 16” tracks, 1000 PTO, 3 pt., 5 hyd., big pump, front wgts. ........................................$220,000 ‘11 JD 8360RT, 1167 hrs., ultra wide stance up to 160”, 16” tracks, 5 hyd., big pump, 3 pt., 1000 PTO, front wgts. ........................................$220,000 ‘12 CIH Steiger 400HD, 298 hrs., power shift, 3 pt. hitch, 1000 PTO, 480x50 duals, diff. lock....$225,000 ‘12 CIH Steiger 400, 318 hrs., power shift, 4 hyd., big pump, 520x46 tires & duals........$195,000 ‘11 Case Steiger 400HD, 702 hrs., Luxury cab, 1000 PTO, 710x42 duals, complete auto guidance setup ................................$198,000 ‘09 Versatile 485, 1704 hrs., 4 hyd., 12-spd., manual front & rear wgts., 800x38 tires & duals 80%..................................$155,000 ‘93 JD 8570, 6682 hrs., 12-spd., 3 hyds., 18.4x38 tires & duals ..........................................$39,000

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

ROW CROP TRACTORS ‘11 JD 8335R, MFWD, 1777 hrs., ILS, IVT trans., 4 hyd., big pump, front wgts., 18.4x50 tires & duals ............................$187,500 ‘11 JD 8285R, MFWD, 1214 hrs., powershift, 4 hyd., big pump, 18.4x46 tires & duals ......$165,000 ‘13 JD 6190R, 585 hrs., Premium cab, 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, IVT trans., 18.4x46 tires & duals ........................................$125,000 ‘13 JD 7200R, MFWD, IVT trans., 540/1000 PTO, 3 pt., 3 hyd., 710x38 rear tires..............$132,000 ‘12 CIH Magnum 260, MFWD, 525 hrs., 540/1000 PTO, 4 hyd., big pump, complete auto guidance setup, 420x46 tires & duals ........................................$149,000

‘08 JD 8430, MFWD, 4468 hrs., 3 pt., 1000 PTO, 4 hyd., big pump, front wgts., 480x50 tires & duals ............................$120,000 ‘07 CIH Magnum 245, MFWD, 3050 hrs., 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, 4 hyd., 420x46 tires & duals ........................................$100,000 ‘07 CIH Magnum 245, MFWD, 4090 hrs., 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, 4 hyd., 420x46 rear tires w/18.4x42” duals ..............$92,000 ‘06 CIH MX245, MFWD, 4975 hrs., 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, 14.9x46” tires & duals ..............................$82,000 ‘80 Ford TW20, 2WD, 8075 hrs., cab, air, 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, 2 hyd., 18.4x38 tires, 10 front wgts. ..................................$16,500

COMBINES ‘12 JD 5690, 902 eng./571 sep. hrs., 4x4, 650x38” Michelin tires & duals, Clean, Well Equipped ........................................$260,000 ‘11 JD 9670, 1160 eng./736 sep. hrs., Contour Master, chopper, SLS shoe, 20.8x38 duals ................................$160,000 ‘11 CIH 8120, 934 eng./729 sep. hrs., rock trap, chopper, tracker, 520x42” duals ....$189,000 ‘11 CIH 7120, 871 eng./732 sep. hrs., Luxury cab, rock trap, tracker, chopper, 520x42 tires & duals ............................$188,500 ‘87 CIH 1640, 3468 hrs., rock trap, auto header controls, 24.5x32 tires ......................$18,500 ‘09 JD 9870STS, 1895 eng./1233 sep. hrs., Premier Cab, Pro-drive, 5 spd. Feederhouse, CM, 520x42” duals, 28L-26 rears ..........$145,000 ‘09 CIH 7088, 1193 eng./895 sep. hrs., tracker, chopper, rock trap, 30.5x32 tires ....$142,000 ‘11 JD 9770, 880 eng./613 sep. hrs., CM, 5 spd. feederhouse, Pro-drive, chopper, 520x42 tires & duals ............................$189,000 ‘08 JD 9770, 1380 eng./938 sep. hrs., 4x4, CM, chopper, 1250/45/32 tires ..............$155,000 ‘98 JD 9610, 3578 eng./2379 sep. hrs., chopper, bin ext., 20.8x42 duals ....................$49,000

LARSON IMPLEMENTS 5 miles east of Cambridge, MN on Hwy. 95 763-689-1179

Look at our Web site for pictures & more listings www.larsonimplements.com

Trucks & Trailers

084

Miscellaneous

'04 Freightliner Columbia, mid-roof sleeper, 435 MB, auto shift, w/'95 Merritt 42' hopper trailer. 320-398-3153 or 320-398-8396

DAMAGED GRAIN WANTED

FOR SALE: '73 Chev C60, no rust, 81K miles, 2spd, 15' grain box, 40” sides, HD hitch, white w/ blue trim, $3,950. 952-442-4259 Miscellaneous

090

090

RANGER PUMP CO. Custom Manufacturer of Water Lift Pumps for field drainage Sales & Service 507-984-2025 or 406-314-0334 www.rangerpumpco.com REINKE IRRIGATION Sales & Service New & Used For your irrigation needs 888-830-7757 or 320-212-2520

ANYWHERE We buy damaged corn and grain any condition - wet or dry TOP DOLLAR We have vacs and trucks

FOR SALE: '07 Bil Jax WANT MORE READERS 5533A towable land lift, TO SEE YOUR AD?? electric, low hrs, good oper- Expand your coverage area! ating, stored outside, The Land has teamed up $21,500. 507-525-0660 with Farm News, and The Country Today so you can One call does it all! do just that! Place a classiWith one phone call, you can fied ad in The Land and place your classified ad in have the option of placing it The Land, Farm News, in these papers as well. AND The Country Today. More readers = better reCall The Land for more sults! Call The Land for info @ 507-345-4523 • 800-657more information. 507-3454665. 4523 • 800-657-4665

CALL HEIDI OR LARRY

PARMA DRAINAGE WANTED: 750 or 1000 gallon PUMPS New pumps & propane tank. (715)654-5585 parts on hand. Call Minnesota's largest distributor Winpower Sales & Service HJ Olson & Company 320Reliable Power Solutions 974-8990 Cell – 320-212-5336 Since 1925 PTO & automatic Emergency Electric Generators. New & Used Rich Opsata-Distributor 800-343-9376

NORTHERN AG SERVICE INC 800-205-5751 USED TRACTORS

NEW NH T9.565, 4WD ....................................CALL NEW NH T9.505, 4WD ....................................CALL NEW NH T8.300, FWA ....................................CALL NEW NH T8.275, FWA ....................................CALL NEW NH T7.200, FWA ....................................CALL NEW Massey 8670, FWA ................................CALL NEW Massey 7620, FWA ................................CALL NEW Massey 6615, FWA ................................CALL NEW Versatile 450, 4WD ................................CALL NEW Versatile 310, FWA ................................CALL NEW Versatile 305, FWA ................................CALL NH TV6070 bi-directional ............................$95,000 ‘00 NH 8870, FWA........................................$64,900 ‘08 NH 6070 w/cab, 2WD ............................$69,000 Versatile 895, 4WD ......................................$21,500

TILLAGE

Sunflower 4630, 11-shank, Demo ..................CALL Sunflower 4412-07, 7-shank ......................$29,500 Wilrich 957, 7-shank ....................................$18,500 Wilrich 513, 5-shank, Demo............................CALL ‘09 Wilrich QX2, 55.5’ w/bskt. ....................$54,500 ‘12 JD 3710, 10 bottom ..............................$52,500 ‘08 JD 3710, 10 bottom ..............................$34,500 JD 980, 32’ ......................................................CALL CIH 4900, 46.5’ ............................................$12,500 ‘08 JD 2210, 44.5’ w/3-bar ..........................$38,900

SKIDSTEERS

NEW NH skidsteers on hand ..........................CALL NH LS170 ....................................................$13,750 NH L170 cab, new rubber ..............................CALL

PLANTERS

NEW White planters ........................................CALL ‘11 White 8516 CFS, loaded ......................$97,500

White White White White

6222, 6186, 6122, 6100,

12-30, front fold ......................$29,500 16-30 w/ins..............................$21,500 12-30........................................$16,500 12-30 w/twin row ....................$18,500

COMBINES

NEW Fantini chopping cornhead ..................CALL (2) Fantini pre-owned 8-30 chopping CH ......CALL ‘11 Gleaner S77 ..............................................CALL ‘10 Gleaner R76, loaded............................$235,000 ‘03 Gleaner R75, loaded............................$129,500 ‘01 Gleaner R72, just thru shop ................$110,000 ‘00 Gleaner R72 ..........................................$78,000 ‘90 Gleaner R60 w/duals ............................$24,500 ‘90 Gleaner R50 w/20’ ..............................COMING

HAY TOOLS

New Hesston & NH Hay Tools On Hand

MISCELLANEOUS

NEW Salford RTS units ..................................CALL NEW Salford Plows ........................................CALL NEW Unverferth seed tenders ................ON HAND NEW Westfield augers ....................................CALL NEW Rem 2700 vac ........................................CALL NEW Hardi sprayers ........................................CALL NEW Riteway rollers........................................CALL NEW Lorenz snowblowers ..............................CALL NEW Batco conveyors ....................................CALL NEW Brent wagons & grain carts ..................CALL NEW E-Z Trail seed wagons ..........................CALL NEW rock buckets & pallet forks .................. CALL REM 2700, Rental............................................CALL Unverferth 8000 grain cart ..............................CALL Kinze 1050 w/duals ........................................CALL Pre-owned Snowblowers, 7’-9’ ......................CALL Pre-owned Sprayers........................................CALL

(DMI Parts Available)

SMITHS MILL IMPLEMENT Hwy. 14, 3 miles West of Janesville, MN

Phone (507) 234-5191 or (507) 625-8649 Mon. - Fri. 7:30-5:00, Sat. 7:30-Noon www.smithsmillimp.com


“JUNE DAIRY SPECIALS”

‘87 Steiger Cougar 1000, 280 hp., PS, 8455 hrs. ........................$39,500

‘13 CIH Steiger 600Q, 564 hrs., 36” tracks............................$369,900

‘11 CIH Magnum 235, 1074 hrs., Lux. cab ..............................$144,500

‘01 JD 9400, 3542 hrs., 425 hp. ............................................$115,000

‘13 CIH Magnum 235, 337 hrs., full Pro 700 auto steer ........$169,900

‘09 CIH Magnum 305, 3119 hrs., full Pro 600 auto steer, loaded ..$135,500

‘11 Bobcat S-750, joystick control ..............................................$41,900

USED 4WD TRACTORS STX and STEIGER PTO, TOW CABLE & 3 PT. KITS ON HAND!!!

USED 2WD TRACTORS

LOW RATE FINANCING AVAILABLE thru

Call For Details

‘13 CIH Puma 160 CVT, 110 hrs. ............................................$122,900

‘12 CIH Puma 160 CVT, with loader, 320R50 tires........................$113,900

‘71 JD 1520 with 47 loader ................................................$8,900

‘97 Bobcat 863, 3500 hrs. ..............................................$11,500

5 Years Interest Waiver Available Thru Case Credit* • Call For Details ‘13 CIH 9230, 323 sep. hrs., track drive, RWA, HID lites ............................................................................................$369,900 ‘11 CIH 7120, 579 sep. hrs., duals, HID lites, Lux. cab..............................................................................................$239,900 ‘10 CIH 6088, 694 sep hrs.,......................................................................................................................................COMING IN ‘06 CIH 8010, 1223 sep. hrs., duals............................................................................................................................$129,900 ‘02 CIH 2388, 2074 sep. hrs., duals, RWA ....................................................................................................................$79,000 ‘95 CIH 2188 ............................................................................................................................................................COMING IN ‘13 CIH 2612, New 12-row chopping cornhead............................................................................................................$99,000 ‘13 CIH 2608, 8R30” chopping cornhead......................................................................................................................$64,500 ‘13 CIH 2608, 8R30” chopping cornhead......................................................................................................................$64,500 ‘13 CIH 3408, New 8R30” cornhead ..................................................................................................................................CALL ‘12 CIH 3408, 8R30” cornhead ....................................................................................................................................$44,900 ‘89 CIH 1083, 8R30” ......................................................................................................................................................$7,900 ‘10 CIH 2020, 25’ platform w/Crary air reel..................................................................................................................$26,800 ‘05 CIH 1020, 30’, 3” knife, rock guard ........................................................................................................................$13,900 ‘04 CIH 1020, 30’, 3” knife, rock guard ........................................................................................................................$12,900

USED SPRAYERS

‘12 CIH 4330, 880 hrs., 120’ boom, aim, auto boom, Pro 700 steering, active suspension ......................................$287,500 ‘09 CIH 3330, 1750 hrs., 100’ boom, aim, auto boom, Pro 700 steering, active suspension ....................................$183,000

‘11 CIH 7120, 579 sep. hrs. ............................................$239,900

‘06 CIH 8010, 1223 sep. hrs. ............................................$129,900

‘13 CIH 9230, 323 sep. hrs., tracks, RWA ....................................$369,900

‘14 CIH Tigermate 200, 50’ w/rolling basket

‘04 DMI Tigermate II, 54’, w/mulcher ............................$34,900

‘12 CIH Tigermate II, 54’ W/crumbler............................$59,900

‘09 CIH 3330, 1750 hrs., 100’ boom ............................................$183,000

‘12 CIH 4430, 880 hrs., 120’ boom ............................................$287,500

‘13 CIH 3330, 546 hrs., 90’ boom ............................................$210,000

Frontier DH1615, 15’ tandem disc ................................................$9,950

‘06 Kinze 1050 Cart, tracks, scale, trap ........................................$77,500

‘14 Leon 10 yard scraper ..............................................$24,000

‘13 Ashland I-130 scraper ..............................................$39,000

‘12 Ashland I-950 scraper ..............................................$29,500

CNH Capital’s Commercial Revolving Account provides financial assistance for parts and service when you need it, keeping your equipment running as its best with the quality parts and service you’ve come to expect from Case IH. Contact your local dealer or visit www.cnhcapital.com today for details. ©2014 CNH Capital America LLC. All rights reserved. CNH Capital and Case IH are registered trademarks of CNH America LLC. Printed in the USA.

Herb

www.matejcek.com

Paul

Blake

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

I-35 & Highway 60 West • Faribault, MN • 507-334-2233

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

18 Months Interest Free • Call For Details • ‘13 CIH Magnum 235, 337 hrs., susp. Lux. cab, Full Pro 700 auto guide, hi capacity hyd. pump, 360 HID lites ......$169,900 ‘11 CIH Magnum 235, 1000 hrs., Lux. susp. cab, front & rear duals ......................................................................COMING IN ‘09 CIH Magnum 305, 3120 hrs., Lux. cab, susp. front axle, HID lites ......................................................................$135,500 ‘13 CIH Puma 160, 250 hrs., powershift trans., L765 loader, w/grapple ..................................................................$117,900 ‘12 CIH Puma 160, 356 hrs., CVT trans., L765 loader, susp. axle, w/grapple ............................................................$114,900 ‘12 CIH Puma 160, 569 hrs., DVT trans., susp. axle, 320x50 tires, w/loader, w/grapple ..........................................$113,900 ‘13 CIH Puma 145, 258 hrs., powershift trans., susp. axle, w/loader........................................................................$105,900 ‘00 CIH MX220, 3600 hrs. ........................................................................................................................................COMING IN ‘14 CIH Farmall 105C, MFD, cab, power shuttle, w/loader, Rental Return Unit ..........................................................$55,500 ‘71 JD 1520, w/JD loader ..............................................................................................................................................$8,900

‘12 CIH Puma 160 CVT, 356 hrs., with loader ..........................$114,900

USED COMBINES

18 Month Interest Waiver or Low Rates Available • Call Details • ‘13 CIH Steiger 600Q, 564 hrs., 36” tracks, HID lites, Full Pro 700 auto guide, hi capacity hyd. pump ..................................$369,900 ‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 761 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites..................................................................................................................$319,900 ‘08 CIH Steiger 485, 3150 hrs, Lux. cab ..................................................................................................................................$149,900 ‘01 JD 9400, 3542 hrs., 710/70R42 tires..................................................................................................................................$115,000

‘13 CIH Puma 145, 258 hrs., 125 PTO hp., with loader ....$105,900

THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 761 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lights, loaded ........$319,900

37


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

38

SE = Sleepy Eye BL = Bingham Lake SL = Slayton

(507) 794-2131 • (507) 831-1106 • (507) 836-8571

www.millersellner.com

TRACTOR 4WD

BL BL BL SE SE SE SE SL SL

'07 CIH QUADTRAC 530, Eng Hrs: 2750..................$225,900 '08 JD 9530T, Eng Hrs: 1800 ..................................$249,950 '04 JD 9520, Eng Hrs: 3033....................................$164,900 '09 CIH STEIGER 435, Eng Hrs: 1150......................$189,900 '79 ST ST310, Eng Hrs: 5808....................................$14,900 '10 CIH STEIGER 485, Eng Hrs: 1200......................$235,000 '04 CIH STX450Q, Eng Hrs: 3720 ............................$164,500 '13 JD 9560R, Eng Hrs: 230 ..................................$335,000 '12 CIH STEIGER 500 4WD:-HD, Eng Hrs: 371 ........$279,000

BL BL BL BL BL BL SE SE SE SE SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL

'95 CHLGR 75C, Eng Hrs: 5522 ................................$62,750 '58 IHC 560 ................................................................$4,465 '08 CIH JX1075C, Eng Hrs: 1015 ..............................$31,875 '07 CIH MAGNUM 275, Eng Hrs: 3005 ....................$149,900 '80 IHC 1086, Eng Hrs: 8163 ....................................$12,750 '12 CIH FARMALL 95, Eng Hrs: 274 ..........................$42,900 '48 AG C......................................................................$2,450 '77 IHC 1086, Eng Hrs: 8774 ......................................$9,950 '92 JD 4760, Eng Hrs: 4700......................................$69,850 '78 IHC 1086, Eng Hrs: 7700 ....................................$10,250 '09 CIH MAGNUM 275, Eng Hrs: 2200 ....................$169,500 '11 CIH MAGNUM 315, Eng Hrs: 612 ......................$215,000 '11 CIH MAGNUM 315, Eng Hrs: 991 ......................$213,000 '65 IH 656 ..................................................................$5,500 '80 IHC 1086 ............................................................$12,500 '13 CIH MAGNUM 235, Eng Hrs: 175 ......................$159,500 '13 CIH MAGNUM 235, Eng Hrs: 641 ......................$170,000 '13 CIH MAGNUM 235, Eng Hrs: 232 ......................$175,000 '12 CIH MAGNUM 235, Eng Hrs: 460 ......................$167,500 '13 CIH MAXXUM 140 T4, Eng Hrs: 443....................$80,200 '13 CIH MAGNUM 180, Eng Hrs: 423 ......................$135,000 '08 CIH FARMALL 95, Eng Hrs: 2100 ........................$37,500 '10 CIH STEIGER 485, Eng Hrs: 1600......................$225,000

BL BL BL BL BL BL BL SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SL SL

WR QUAD-X--44.5 ....................................................$29,950 '02 JD 2200--60.5 ....................................................$34,900 '09 CIH TIGER MATE 200 54.5FT. with basket ..........$57,450 '09 JD 2210 ..............................................................$32,850 '98 DMI TIGERMATE II--30.5 FT. ..............................$21,875 '04 CIH TIGERMATE II-48.5 ......................................$39,950 '03 JD 980 ................................................................$24,850 '08 CIH TM200--60 ..................................................$63,500 '98 DMI TIGERMATE II--50.5 ....................................$25,750 '10 CIH TIGER-MATE 200-50.5 FT. ............................$58,500 '98 CIH 4800--28.5 FT. ..............................................$8,850 '04 CIH TIGER MATE II--32.5 ....................................$32,500 '07 WR QUAD X-52 ..................................................$44,500 '05 CIH TIGER-MATE II FIELD CULT--32.5 FT. ............$29,850 JD 960-41 ..................................................................$8,250 JD 980 ......................................................................$16,900 '05 CIH TGM2--29.5 FT. ............................................$33,750 '01 CIH TIGERMATE II 54.5........................................$36,500 '98 CIH 4300 ............................................................$19,500

BL BL BL BL BL SE SE SE SE SE SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL

'13 CIH 1250--24R30--FF ......................................$159,500 '10 CIH 1250--24R30--FF ......................................$135,000 '90 CIH 900 ................................................................$7,989 '05 JD 1790 ..............................................................$89,500 '10 CIH 1250--24R30--FF ......................................$135,000 '98 CIH 955--12R30..................................................$18,500 '12 AW 8816--16R30--FF, Acre Meter: 1200Acres ..$91,500 '98 CIH 955--12R30..................................................$18,750 '03 CIH 1240--16R30--PT ........................................$59,500 '05 CIH 1240--16R30--PT ........................................$59,900 '12 CIH 1250--24R30--FF ......................................$140,000 '06 CIH 1240--12R30--PT ........................................$52,500 '10 CIH 1250--24R30--FF ......................................$133,000 '08 CIH 1240--16R30--PT ........................................$72,500 '08 CIH 1250--24R30--FF, Acre Meter: 6500Acres $118,500 '91 JD 7200--16R30 ................................................$28,500 '09 CIH 1250--16R30--FF ........................................$72,500 '92 JD 7200-16R30 ..................................................$16,500 '11 CIH 1250--12X30................................................$74,500

TRACTORS

FIELD CULTIVATORS

PLANTERS & DRILLS

SPRAYERS

SE BL BL SE BL SE SE

'04 CIH MRX690--7S30 ............................................$21,500 '07 WR 7650 ............................................................$23,500 '07 WISHK 862NT ....................................................$49,875 '07 GR 2200TT-22 FT. ..............................................$22,500 '09 JD 3710 ..............................................................$42,350 '11 JD 3710 ..............................................................$44,500 '87 IHC 735 ................................................................$2,950

BL BL SE SE SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL

'86 CA 1845C, Hour Meter: 4800Hrs ........................$14,750 '12 CA SR220, Hour Meter: 222Hrs ..........................$39,900 '99 CA 1840, Hour Meter: 6149Hrs ............................$9,500 '06 CA 410, Hour Meter: 2508Hrs ............................$19,900 '11 NH L230, Hour Meter: 1150Hrs ..........................$35,500 '11 BCAT S185, Hour Meter: 3000Hrs ......................$26,000 '12 BCAT S750, Hour Meter: 3000Hrs ......................$41,000 '08 NH L185, Hour Meter: 3989Hrs ..........................$22,500 '11 BCAT S850, Hour Meter: 1957Hrs ......................$42,600 '02 BCAT 553, Hour Meter: 1552Hrs ........................$11,500 OW 345 MUSTANG, Hour Meter: 6916Hrs ..................$6,250 '04 BCAT S185, Hour Meter: 7840Hrs ......................$12,900 '11 BCAT S650, Hour Meter: 900Hrs ........................$33,500 '11 CA SR200, Hour Meter: 2200Hrs ........................$27,900 '04 BCAT S300, Hour Meter: 5800Hrs ......................$23,000 '12 BCAT S650, Hour Meter: 700Hrs ........................$35,700 '90 CA 1835C, Hour Meter: 1537Hrs ..........................$7,500 '05 JD 320, Hour Meter: 3060Hrs ............................$16,000

BL BL BL BL BL BL BL BL BL BL BL BL BL BL BL BL SE SE SE SE SE SE SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL

'97 CIH 2166, Eng Hrs: 2540/Sep Hrs: 2076 ............$69,950 '98 CIH 2366, Eng Hrs: 2932/Sep Hrs: 2240 ............$84,950 '99 CIH 2388, Eng Hrs: 3143/Sep Hrs: 2383 ............$94,950 '78 IHC 1460, Eng Hrs: 5058 ......................................$6,950 '86 CIH 1660, Eng Hrs: 3583 ....................................$25,000 '11 CIH 9120, Eng Hrs: 773/Sep Hrs: 588 ..............$329,950 '95 CIH 2166, Eng Hrs: 3530/Sep Hrs: 2250 ............$59,950 '01 CIH 2388, Eng Hrs: 3300/Sep Hrs: 2500 ............$94,500 '82 CIH 1460, Eng Hrs: 5185 ......................................$8,950 '09 CIH 7088, Eng Hrs: 827/Sep Hrs: 619 ..............$239,875 '10 CIH 7088, Eng Hrs: 736/Sep Hrs: 568 ..............$249,900 '01 CIH 2388, Eng Hrs: 3232/Sep Hrs: 2046 ..........$112,500 '13 CIH 7230, Eng Hrs: 233/Sep Hrs: 188 ..............$325,000 '98 CIH 2388, Eng Hrs: 4230/Sep Hrs: 3094 ............$87,900 '05 CIH 8010, Eng Hrs: 2383/Sep Hrs: 1909 ..........$169,850 '10 CIH 7120, Eng Hrs: 1122 ..................................$223,900 '04 CIH 8010, Eng Hrs: 2451/Sep Hrs: 1835 ..........$147,950 '04 CIH 8010, Eng Hrs: 2060/Sep Hrs: 1564 ..........$149,950 '01 CIH 2388, Eng Hrs: 2733/Sep Hrs: 2117 ..........$114,950 '00 CIH 2366, Eng Hrs: 3404/Sep Hrs: 2534 ............$91,500 '96 CIH 2188, Eng Hrs: 4575 ....................................$58,950 '12 CIH 9230, Eng Hrs: 784/Sep Hrs: 650 ..............$318,000 '03 CIH 2388, Eng Hrs: 2375/Sep Hrs: 1861 ..........$117,500 '05 CIH 2388, Eng Hrs: 2030/Sep Hrs: 1583 ..........$139,950 '88 CIH 1660, Eng Hrs: 3758 ....................................$15,500 '11 CIH 7120, Eng Hrs: 650/Sep Hrs: 550 ..............$265,000 '13 CIH 7230, Eng Hrs: 400/Sep Hrs: 300 ..............$315,000 '10 CIH 7120, Eng Hrs: 993/Sep Hrs: 723 ..............$235,000 '05 CIH 2366, Eng Hrs: 1997/Sep Hrs: 1549 ..........$120,000 '09 CIH 6088, Eng Hrs: 1071 ..................................$235,000

BL BL SE SE SL

LOFTN 240..................................................................$9,250 '11 WO 20CD ............................................................$15,500 WO 20'........................................................................$9,350 '98 WO 15' MOUNTED ................................................$7,950 '07 WR CD20LK ........................................................$12,500

BL BL BL BL BL BL BL SE SE SE SE

'06 WF MK 13X71 GLP..............................................$10,500 FK 1070 ......................................................................$6,950 '99 WF MK 13X91 GLP................................................$8,950 '02 WF MK 13X71 FT GLP ..........................................$7,950 '94 FETER 10X66 ........................................................$2,950 '90 SUDEN 450 ..........................................................$3,950 '09 PECK 1002............................................................$5,775 WF TR100-71 ................................................................$795 SUDEN 8X60 ..............................................................$1,650 '87 ALLOW FIELD MASTER 8X61 ................................$2,150 '95 FETER 10X60 ........................................................$3,350

SE '03 REDBL 665, 1000 GALLON..................................$13,500 SE '95 FC 650 ..................................................................$5,850 BL SE DEEP TILLAGE BL '08 CIH ECOLO-TIGER 9300 ......................................$44,950 SL BL '00 CIH 730B ............................................................$17,950 SE BL '97 DMI 730B............................................................$11,850 SE BL '96 DMI 730 ..............................................................$10,900 SE BL '95 DMI 530B............................................................$14,950 SE BL '98 DMI 730B............................................................$15,900 SE BL '10 CIH ECOLO-TIGER 870-9S ..................................$54,500 SE BL '05 WR 357 ................................................................$5,950 BL '99 CIH 730B ............................................................$17,900 BL BL '97 DMI 730B............................................................$14,750 BL BL '08 JD 2700--9 SHANK--24" SPACING ....................$26,900 BL BL '02 CIH 730B ............................................................$17,850 SE SE '00 DMI 530B............................................................$19,900 SE SE '09 CIH ECOLO-TIGER 870-11S ................................$66,850 SE SE '00 CIH 9300 ............................................................$33,750 SE SE '06 CIH 730C ............................................................$35,500 SE SE '97 DMI 730B............................................................$15,500 SE SE '05 JD 2700--9 SHANK--24" SPACING ....................$20,500 SE SE '09 JD 2700--9 SHANK--24" SPACING ....................$34,500 SE SE '03 JD 2700--7 SHANK--30" SPACING ....................$16,900 SE SE '08 CIH 730C ............................................................$35,500 SE SL '02 JD 2700--5 SHANK--30" SPACING ....................$15,000 SE SL '89 CIH 14 ..................................................................$5,500 SE SL '02 CIH 730B ............................................................$17,500 SE SL '05 CIH 730B ............................................................$26,900 SE SL '07 CIH 730C ............................................................$35,500 SE SL '07 CIH 730C ............................................................$32,900 SE SE DISK RIPPERS/DISK TANDEM/PLOWS BL '10 JD 512-9S30 ......................................................$43,000 SE BL SF 4510 ....................................................................$19,950 SE SE '09 JD 512-5S30 ......................................................$23,000 SL SE '04 CIH MRX690--7S30 ............................................$22,500 SL

SKID STEER LOADERS

COMBINES

STALK CHOPPERS

GRAIN AUGERS

GRAIN CARTS/GRAVITY BOXES

'90 KINZE 640 ..........................................................$12,900 KILLB 490 ..................................................................$8,950 '04 DEMCO 650-RED ................................................$13,750 '12 DEMCO 750 ........................................................$17,000 KILLB 550 ..................................................................$6,500 KILLB 550 ..................................................................$6,500 '98 KILLB 655 ..........................................................$11,900 '98 KILLB 655 ..........................................................$11,900 '98 KILLB 655 ..........................................................$11,900

MOWER/ZERO TURN

'05 GP 720K, Eng Hrs: 566Hrs....................................$5,465 '12 GP 723T, Eng Hrs: 200Hrs ....................................$9,500 '10 GP 620T, Eng Hrs: 248Hrs ....................................$9,350 GP 723T, Eng Hrs: 157Hrs ..........................................$8,450 '04 GP 618, Eng Hrs: 590Hrs ......................................$3,650 '08 GP 616T ................................................................$4,500 '07 JD Z445, Eng Hrs: 214Hrs ....................................$2,950 '05 GP 618, Eng Hrs: 532Hrs ......................................$3,950 '09 JD Z445, Eng Hrs: 274Hrs ....................................$3,850 '98 GP 720K, Eng Hrs: 850Hrs....................................$2,900 '10 CK Z FORCE S 60, Eng Hrs: 252Hrs ......................$3,450 '06 CK Z FORCE 60, Eng Hrs: 750Hrs ........................$2,500 '97 SN ZF2200K, Eng Hrs: 649Hrs..............................$1,200 '08 GP 723T2, Eng Hrs: 252Hrs ..................................$8,300 '03 GP 720K, Eng Hrs: 525Hrs....................................$4,300 '93 GP 718, Eng Hrs: 1412Hrs ....................................$1,950 '01 GP 720K, Eng Hrs: 893Hrs....................................$3,900 '08 GP 722D, Eng Hrs: 1337Hrs..................................$7,900 '04 GP 718, Eng Hrs: 620Hrs ......................................$5,300 '01 WO M2560, Eng Hrs: 700Hrs ................................$4,350 '89 GP 718, Eng Hrs: 1800Hrs ....................................$1,150 '01 GP 720K, Eng Hrs: 500Hrs....................................$4,500 '08 CK Z FORCE 50, Eng Hrs: 298Hrs ........................$1,800 '89 GP 718..................................................................$2,500


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‘98 Wilson, 41x96, 66” Sides, Extra Lights, Roll Tarp, BELTED 24.5 LP Tires ................$18,000 ‘02 Red River, 48’, 78/102, 63” ‘95 Merritt, 42’ AL Hopper, Belt, 3 Single AR Axles, 1 Lift 68” Sides, 2-Spd. Doors, Rebuilt ..........................$12,500 Axle, 385x225 Super Singles, ‘94 Wilson Commander AL Grain Electric Tarp, Wind Kit, Weight Gauges, Clean ..............$35,500 Hopper, 41’, SPR, 80% Brakes END DUMPS ......................................$16,000 Summit End Dump, 30’, SEMI TRUCKS 72” Sides, 3 Axle, AR ....$16,750 (2) ‘04 Volvo Day Cab, Single VAN/WATER TRAILERS Axle, 365 Hp., 10c Trans., 390 Ratio, 450K Mi. ..Ea. $8,000 (2) Reefers, 48/102, Clean ‘95 Kenworth T800 Conventional, ..........................$5,000-$6,000 Series 60 Detroit Eng., 860K Kentucky Furniture Step Van, Mi., Jake Brake & Cruise, Side Doors AR, 70% T&B $5,500 10-Spd., 40,000 lb., 3.90 Ratio, (2) Kentucky Furniture Vans, AR, 2 Line Wet Kit, Air Slide 5th, Flat Floor, Roll Up Door ..$6,000 235” WB, Full Screw, 80% 22.5 (10) Van Trailers, 48/102-53/102; LP Radial Tires..............$16,000 Great for water storage or TRUSS TRAILERS over the road......$3,000-$7,000 48/102 Van Bodies, Less Axles & ‘98 Lakeside RollerMaster, Dollies, for setting on ground 32’-45’/102, Elec. over Hyd. ..................$2,000 Plus Delivery Lift, Top Locking Deck Rollers, New Paint, Winches, 80% 48’ & 53’ Van Trailers. Rent For T&B ................................$6,500 Storage Only ....$145.00/ Month ‘97 JDH TrussMaster, AUTOS 42’-60’/102, 8 Winches, Elec. ‘07 Hyundai Sonata SE, 85K Mi., over Hyd. Tilt, Elec. over Air Light Hail Damage ..........$6,250 Extend, Tandem Axle ......$5,500 ‘06 Hyundai Sonata, 114K Mi. FLATBEDS ........................................$5,000 ‘99 Transcraft, 48/102, All Steel, ‘06 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT, 80% T&B, Closed Tandem 3.8L, 108K Mi. ................$5,750 ........................................$8,750 ‘04 Dodge Caravan SXT, 3.8L, ‘98 Fontaine, 48/102, All Steel, 130K Mi., Clean ..............$4,250 New Airbags & Brakes, SPX/AR, ‘02 Chevy Impala, 160K Mi., No Rust, 80% T&B, California Tan ..................................$5,500 Trailer..............................$9,000 ‘04 Malibu Max LS, V6, 32 mpg., ‘99 Transcraft, 48/102 AL Combo, Good Tires, Sunroof, 76K Mi., Winches, Tie Down Chains, SPX, Silver ..............................$6,500 AR, 80% Tires ................$9,500 ‘00 Chevrolet Impala, 147K Mi., ‘95 Utility, 48/96 AL Combo, Loaded, Heated Leather Seats, AL Floor, Winches, Tie Downs, Sunroof, Black ................$4,800 Storage Box, SPX, AR......$8,500 ‘88 Ford F150 XLT Lariat, 4.9L (2) Utility, 45-102, Closed 6-Cyl., 2WD, 5-Spd. Overdrive Tandem, SPR, All Steel Rebuilt Trans., New Clutch, ................................Ea. $6,000 AC, PS/PB, Dual Tanks, Topper, 4 New Tires ....................$1,550 DROPDECKS MISCELLANEOUS ‘05 Fontaine, 48/102, Tandem SPX, 22.5 Tires..............$23,900 ‘70 John Deere Tractor, Gas, ‘94 Utility, 48/102, Sandblasted/ Wide Front, Runs Good ..$4,000 Painted, New Floor, New T&B, ‘64 IH 806 Gas Tractor, Wide New Lights, New Airbags Front, 2P, Runs Good ......$4,000 ......................................$17,000 Hyster Forklift, 6000 lb., Side Engineered 5’ Beavertail, Shift, 131⁄2’ Lift, 15” Pneumatic Kit includes Paint & LED Lights Tires................................$5,000 & All Electrical Custom Haysides ............$3,750/$5,750 Installed Stationary ........................$1,250 ‘80 Transcraft DoubleDrop, 53’, Tip In Tip Out ....................$1,750 33’ Well Non-Detachable, AR, Front & Rear Extensions Polished AL Wheels, New ....................................$350/Ea. Hardwood Decking, 80% Tires Complete Suspensions, & Brakes, Clean ............$14,000 Air Ride or Spring Ride CATTLE/HOG TRAILERS ..........................$1,000 AR/Axle ‘07 Barrett, 53’ Drop Center, (50) Steel & (25) Aluminum Rims Closed Tandem, AL Wheels, - In Stock: 24.5 & 22.5 New Tires, 50% Floor, Clean ..................................$50 Steel ......................................$25,500 ........................$150 Aluminum

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Merrit, 46’, 3 Floors 1 Removable, 50% 24.5 Tires, 70% Brakes ..........$5,000 AS IS

THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

HANCOCK, MN

HOPPERS

39


Umpah & the news

This week’s Back Roads is the work of The Land Correspondents Tim King (story) and Jan King (photo)

M

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THE LAND, MAY 30, 2014

40

KEYL 1400 AM Long Prairie, Minn.

y father-in-law said that if you don’t listen to the local radio station you won’t know when your neighbor’s barn burns. He also said that his Holsteins were calmed by old-time music. If you listen to KEYL 1400 AM in Long Prairie you will hear local news and old-time music. “We took the music off the air for a while but we were swamped with letters asking us to put it back,” said Clif Cline, who has been the morning show host since 1998. “Older people tell me that they wake up, turn the radio on, and lay in bed and listen to the accordions.” Cline comes on the air at 5:30 a.m. with a weather report and the umpah of tubas. “I learned in radio school that you talk to the microphone like you’re talking to just one person,” he said. “You want to give them some news and put a smile on their face.” From 6 to 7, Cline links his show up with KEYL’s sister FM station, KXDL. For an hour he broadcasts the farm news to the community as it starts another day. “I love what I do,” this self-proclaimed Master of the Bad Joke said. “I wouldn’t want to do it otherwise. The bad jokes really start coming when Allen Bailey joins Cline at 7:30. Bailey tells Cline that the news wires are carrying a story about a KFC restaurant refusing to serve a teenager because he wasn’t 18 years old. “They said they were afraid he would start a food fight,” Bailey reports in absolute mock awe. The KFC story turns into a 15-second discussion about the carbon footprint of Amish horse-drawn buggies on local roads, and then Clif reads the “Be Nice To” List. The “Be Nice To” List consists of called-in birthdays and wedding anniversaries. The idea is that if your name is on it your friends will remember and call you. It definitely put a smile on my father-in-law’s face. Next come garage sales, funeral announcements, local news and sports, national news and Open Mike. On Open Mike an elderly couple can pitch their new health supplements or the superintendent of schools can recap last night’s school board meeting. This is truly local radio and Cline is proud to be a part of it. “I want to keep doing this until I’m at least 70,” he said. ❖

Do you have a Back Roads story suggestion? E-mail editor@TheLandOnline.com or write to Editor, The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002.


© 2014

May 30, 2014

(800) 657-4665 www.TheLandOnline.com theland@TheLandOnline.com P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002

NORTHERN EDITION

K&S Millwrights is your Full Service Grain Handling Leader! FROM PLANNING TO EXCAVATION TO ERECTION TO SERVICE WE DO IT ALL!! We Are Your Dealer For: • • • • • • • • • – Your Minnesota NECO Distributor – ~ The NECO Advantage ~

• No screens to clean • Whisper-quiet operation • Energy efficient design • Preserves grain quality • Up to 1/3 more efficient than screen dryers

• Works with all grains • Totally automated 250-2,500 farm capacities • 2,500-8,000 bph commercial capacities

Howell • Bromie Meridian • Lemar Sioux • Warrior Conrad • Bazooka DMC • Deluxe Hutchinson Mayrath • InterSystems Schlagel • Caldwell Sudenga • Norwood Bin Master • Essmuller

• • • • • • • •

Spreadall York Chief Honeyville Lampton Westeel Martin Dodge


Page 2 - Friday, May 30, 2014

THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

K&S – Your MN SPRINGLAND Distributor Bin unloaders are available in 11 U-Trough or 8 Round Auger Models Unloaders fitting under most standard aeration floors.

Gearbox for sweep drive. Double length centre gate provides 24” of exposed flight for maximum unloading capacity.

Unloader Extensions from 12” to 10’ for Custom Installations are available.

DEALERS Wanted Call for INFO

25 Degree Incline Elbow option available and can be Quoted

SPRINGLAND U-TROUGH UNLOADS WITH POWER SWEEP

TRUCKLOAD SPECIAL (FOB Buffalo Lake) Price good only until June 12th SIZE

PACKAGE PART #

INT SUMPS

24’ 27’ 30’ 33’ 36’ 39’ 42’ 48’ 54’ 60’

UT24-7-EHE UT27-7-EHE UT30-7-EHE UT33-7-EHE UT36-7-EHE UT39-7-EHE UT42-7-EHE UT48-7-EHE UT54-7-EHE UT60-7-EHE

1 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 4

PULLEY 12.4” 2V 12.4” 2V 12.4” 2V 12.4” 2V 12.4” 2V 12.4” 2V 12.4” 2V 12.4” 2V 18.0” 3V 18.0” 3V

WEIGHT 883 907 972 1014 1056 1098 1161 1245 1464 1688

Motor & Pulley Not Included but can be Quoted once the phase is known

PRICE $4,199.00 $4,606.00 $4,861.00 $4,994.00 $5,099.00 $5,211.00 $5,506.00 $5,779.00 $7,123.00 $8,185.00


THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

Friday, May 30, 2014 - Page 3

1 - 85’ 5,700 Bu/hr. Grain Leg

1 - 90’ 8,000 Bu/hr. Grain Leg

• Head Platform • Distributor Platform • 2 Rest Platforms, 10” Sq. to Rnd. • Ladder & Cage • Gear Reducer Drive • Galvanized Construction • Requires 20 hp. motor (not included) • Dual motor mount available for single phase power

• Head Platform • Distributor Platform • 2 Rest Platforms, 12” Sq. to Rnd. • Ladder & Cage • Gear Reducer Drive • Galvanized Construction • Requires 30 hp. motor (not included)

$

$

24,32600

33,79800

1 - 100’ 10,000 Bu/hr. Grain Leg

1 - 90’ 15,000 Bu/hr. Grain Leg

• Head Platform • Distributor Platform • 3 Rest Platforms, 14” Sq. to Rnd. • Ladder & Cage • Gear Reducer Drive • 12 ga. Trum King Galvanized Construction • Requires 40 hp. motor (not included)

• Head Platform • Distributor Platform • 2 Rest Platforms, 16” Sq. to Rnd. • Ladder & Cage • Gear Reducer Drive • 12 ga. Trum King Galvanized Construction • Requires 60 hp. motor (not included)

$

37,64000

$

53,62100

* Freight & Sales Tax not included


Page 4 - Friday, May 30, 2014

THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

Best Products - Best Price!

Call K&S First!! Sioux Steel Flooring Specials!

18’ Floor 21’ Floor 24’ Floor 27’ Floor 30’ Floor 33’ Floor 36’ Floor

BEST BIN PRICES

18 Ga. Perforated Full Aeration Floor......$1,262 18 Ga. Perforated Full Aeration Floor......$1,553 18 Ga. Perforated Full Aeration Floor......$1,932 18 Ga. Perforated Full Aeration Floor......$2,847 18 Ga. Perforated Full Aeration Floor......$2,365 18 Ga. Perforated Full Aeration Floor......$3,385 18 Ga. Perforated Full Aeration Floor......$3,797

• Flashing not included, but can be quoted when we know corrugation of bin. • Supports not included, but can be quoted for height of bin. • Freight not included.

FINANCING TERMS As Low As

0% for 9 months*

* 9 month waiver of finance option OR take advantage of cash option

In Stock!

CALL TODAY! YOUR NUMBER ONE SOURCE FOR:

• Aeration Fans • Fan Transitions • Angle Rings • Full Aeration Floors • Grain Bin Unloading Equipment

Office: 320-833-2228

• Grain Spreaders • Gooseneck Roof Vents • Bin Ladders • Hoppers • Bearings • V-Belts

• Roof Augers • Platforms • Cages • Grain Dryers • Air Systems • Electric Motors

www.ksmillwrights.com

• Motor Pulleys & Shieves • Crane Service • Grain Dryer Repairs All Makes • Grain Bins • Site Design & Layout

• Bin Level Indicators • Portable Augers • Grain Legs • Spouting • Spouting Accessories

Cellular: 320-979-9221

THE LAND ~ May 30, 2014 ~ Northern Edition  

"Since 1976, Where Farm and Family Meet in Minnesota & Northern Iowa"

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