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© 2014

February 7, 2014

NORTHERN EDITION

(800) 657-4665 www.TheLandOnline.com theland@TheLandOnline.com P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002

Scarce supplies mean long lines at pipeline terminals — Cold temps mean big bills for consumers Story on Page 12


A lifetime and seven years ago

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

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P.O. Box 3169 418 South Second St. Mankato, MN 56002 (800) 657-4665 Vol. XXXIII ❖ No. III 40 pages, plus supplement Ride-along enclosed

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Cover photos by John Cross

COLUMNS Opinion Farm and Food File Calendar Marketing Mielke Market Weekly The Bookworm Sez Cookbook Corner The Back Porch The Outdoors In the Garden Auctions/Classifieds Advertiser Listing Back Roads

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“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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STAFF

Publisher: Jim Santori: jsantori@cnhi.com General Manager: Kathleen Connelly: kconnelly@TheLandOnline.com Editor: Kevin Schulz: editor@TheLandOnline.com Assistant Editor: Tom Royer: troyer@TheLandOnline.com Staff Writer: Dick Hagen: dickhagen@mvtvwireless.com Advertising Representatives: Kim Henrickson: khenrickson@TheLandOnline.com Mike Schafer: mike.schafer2@gmail.com Danny Storlie: theland@TheLandOnline.com Office/Advertising Assistants: Vail Belgard: vbelgard@TheLandOnline.com Joan Compart: theland@TheLandOnline.com Ad Production: Brad Hardt: lndcomp@mankatofreepress.com For Customer Service Concerns: (507) 345-4523, (800) 657-4665, theland@TheLandOnline.com Fax: (507) 345-1027 For Editorial Concerns or Story Ideas: (507) 344-6342, (800) 657-4665, editor@TheLandOnline.com National Sales Representative: Bock & Associates Inc., 7650 Executive Drive, Minneapolis, MN 55344-3677. (952) 905-3251. Because of the nature of articles appearing in The Land, product or business names may be included to provide clarity. This does not constitute an endorsement of any product or business. Opinions and viewpoints expressed in editorials or by news sources are not necessarily those of the management. The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The Publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any monies paid for the advertisement. Classified Advertising: $17.70 for seven (7) lines for a private classified, each additional line is $1.33; $23.46 for business classifieds, each additional line is $1.33. Classified ads accepted by mail or by phone with VISA, MasterCard, Discover or American Express. Classified ads can also be sent by e-mail to theland@TheLandOnline.com. Mail classified ads to The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002. Please include credit card number, expiration date and your postal address with ads sent on either mail version. Classified ads may also be called into (800) 657-4665. Deadline for classified ads is noon on the Monday prior to publication date, with holiday exceptions. Distributed to farmers in all Minnesota counties and northern Iowa, as well as on The Land’s website. Each classified ad is separately copyrighted by The Land. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Subscription and Distribution: Free to farmers and agribusinesses in Minnesota and northern Iowa. $24 per year for non-farmers and people outside the service area. The Land (ISSN 0279-1633) is published Fridays and is a division of The Free Press Media (part of Community Newspaper Holdings Inc.), 418 S. Second St., Mankato MN 56001. Periodicals postage paid at Mankato, Minn. Postmaster and Change of Address: Address all letters and change of address notices to The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002; call (507) 345-4523 or e-mail to theland@TheLandOnline.com.

Seven years ago, with the arrival of our those lessons to become a better person. two incredible daughters, my wife’s father I have to remind myself to afford this became a grandpa for the first time. In same grace to my own children. about two months I’ll become one, too. In the perfect world in my mind, my elder Adoption has a way of compressing and daughter put a few more years between rearranging your life like that. herself and her childhood before creating a My wife and I sometimes feel like we’ve child of her own, establishing a full-time lived a lifetime with our children — seecareer for herself, building up some savings, ing one grow from a little chubby-cheeked and being with her partner for, say, 25 or 30 girl to a statuesque high school beauty; years just to make sure it was going to last. LAND MINDS the other from a defiant-at-any-cost teen In the perfect world in my mind, my By Tom Royer to a young woman finally growing comyounger daughter enjoys discussing curfortable in her own skin — and we’ve rent events, football and comic books as only been a family since 2007. much as I do, and would rather listen Ours was very literally a planned parentto Steely Dan than Ke$ha. hood. Over-planned, really. We attended numerous Selfishness is a big part of my problem, sure. I classes, signed endless paperwork, had our backgrounds wasn’t at the hospital when they were born, didn’t (and those of close friends and relatives) checked by law get to rock them to sleep in my enforcement, had our home arms, didn’t get to hug them outinspected and critiqued, read hunside of school on their first day of dreds of one- or two-paragraph foster kindergarten, didn’t get to protect Sometimes children care system profiles of “hard to them from the monsters under have the nerve to place” older children whose pasts their beds, didn’t get to “mold” were heart-breaking and whose not do what you tell them before they became adults futures were in doubt ... and still we them to, and their and started their own lives without dragged our feet for years. me — and that makes me jealous. lives don’t always Then we happened to receive an I want to have had those experiimmediately go in e-mail about two sisters and, withences, both the special and the borthe direction you’ve out even knowing they were doing ing everyday ones, that all of the got mapped out for it, the girls reached into our other “regular” parents had with them. This may be chests, grabbed tightly onto our their children. hearts, and instantly turned our shocking news to Yeah, I know that it’s not about lives upside down, inside out, and many of you. “me.” every which way. But maybe it’s not really about I don’t know if I’ve ever — my children, either. Maybe it’s about the generation officially, to their faces — thanked my mom and dad after them. Maybe it’s about the opportunities that for everything they’ve done for me. Raising my four my grandchildren will have because my wife and I older siblings and me out in Iowa’s corn and soybean adopted two girls out of foster care and into a forever boonies in the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s couldn’t have been family — a lifetime and seven years ago. easy. By the time I showed up they must have been Looking back, I guess all it really took was a little plum tired of parenting all of us yahoos. bit of love, faith and hope ... and I bet my family has Children are exhausting. Sometimes they have the more where that came from. nerve to not do what you tell them to, and their lives I’m looking forward to meeting that granddaughter don’t always immediately go in the direction you’ve of mine. got mapped out for them. This may be shocking news to many of you. Tom Royer is assistant editor of The Land. He may ❖ Poor choices and head-scratching decisions? I’ve made be reached at troyer@TheLandOnline.com. my share over the past 40-some years. But even though my parents — and my wife’s parents — have undoubtClarification edly been disappointed in me on any number of occaThe story “With acreage gain, enough soybean sions, I am at peace with where life’s roads have seed for 2014?” in the Jan. 10 issue of The Land brought me. I mean, a person shouldn’t go out of their contained an error. Precision Soya does indeed do way to do stupid things, but you need to be free to make seed treatments. mistakes so that you can learn from them, and use

OPINION

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: 6 — Export federation uses education to create meat demand 7 — MSP aims for big things with addition of unit-train facility

8 — Minnesota soybean growers adding legal talent 10 — PEDv challenge keeps expanding in U.S. swine herds 13 — ‘Green’ pig barns offer safer, more efficient housing


Letter: Conciliatory attitude will aid public’s view of ag

The winners of the 2013 National Dairy Quality Awards represent the best in quality milk production, and Merial is proud to again sponsor this industry recognition. Recipients of the 2013 NDQA Platinum Award are Randy and Kathy Bauer of Faribault, Minn.; Donald Beattie of Holton, Mich.; Gordon Dick of McBain, Mich.; Duane and Janet Molhoek of Falmouth, Mich.; Sean Quinn and Melissa Murray of Greenwich N.Y.; and Dennis and Doris Tubergen of Ionia, Mich. Dairy industry professionals nominate producers for the award, and are selected based on a comprehensive evaluation of their quality measures, systems for monitoring udder health, milking routines, protocols for detection and treatment of clinical and subclinical mastitis cases, and strategies for overall herd health and welfare. The NDQA is a partnership between the National Mastitis Council and Hoard’s Dairyman.

“Milk quality is top of mind for everyone in the dairy industry, and we’re pleased to support producers that produce a high standard of milk, including lowering somatic cell counts,” said Steve Vandeberg, director of endectocide marketing at Merial. “With real economic pressure and changes in the global dairy marketplace, an invigorated focus on milk quality can make a real difference for producers.” Through its Best in Class Dairies program, Merial provides dairies free access to valuable training tools in English and Spanish, as well as external resources including a daily dairy report with up-to-date market information for milk, cheese and butter prices and relevant dairy news. Producers can get more information about the Best in Class Dairies program or Merial’s line of dairy products by logging on to www.BestInClass Dairies.com or contacting their sales representative. ❖

National Dairy Quality Awards recognizes best milk producers

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industries telling them of the problems with their products. The food consumers have every right to be concerned. But, those concerns should be based on good science not emotional knee jerks. Remember, farm families also eat. A strong public relations program with a conciliatory and cooperative attitude is much needed. Malcolm G. Maxwell Menahga, Minn.

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growth promotant in the cattle industry. What about BHT? This list is almost endless. And further, the present controversy over GMOs will possibly produce pressure to do good science rather then “emotionalism” in that area. (Yes, I am reserving an opinion on that issue.) Just as farmers are consumers of the farm equipment industry and the farm chemical and fertilizer industries, we have every right to complain to these

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necessary, criticize the practices of those who produce any product for us all. If it were not for watchdogs such as Rachel Carson, for example, and her crusade against DDT, we would not have the majestic bald eagle. If it had not been for public pressure there would not be state and federal meat inspectors. If it were not for concern over certain antibiotics being fed to hogs, those drugs would not have been recently withdrawn from use. If it were not for public pressure and competition from foreign auto makers we would not have the vast improvements in crash safety and gas mileage today. If it were not for the horrible Dust Bowl we would not have the Soil and Water Conservation Districts which, in my opinion, have gone a long way in preserving the productive lands we have today. If it were not for good science, diethylstilbestrol would not have been banned from use as a

OPINION

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

To the Editor: The letter to the editor “Produce your own food, or don’t complain” was thought provoking, to say the least. (From the Jan. 10 issue of The Land, available at www.TheLandOnline.com.) I believe the attitude presented by Roger Zastrow and Roger Dukowitz is damaging to the public perception of our industry. Certainly, we all should be proud of the productive advance of our industry and much should be said about that major advance. Might I add that many of those wonderful achievements are based on good science. I also decry urban sprawl. Most of those advances were during my tenure as a corn-soybean-hog farmer in southern Minnesota. However, consumers have every right to be concerned with what goes into their bodies. Indeed, we are what we eat. In our highly specialized economy, we all should be concerned and, if

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

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‘Miraculous,’ ‘reforming’ and ‘amazing’ bill yet to come House ag committee Caught up in his expanChairman Frank Lucas, a sive rhetoric, Lucas finished fast talker by birth and describing the law’s bigger trade, spared few superlaelements with a flourish: tives when describing, in a “This is not just a good farm telephone press conference bill, it’s almost a miraculous Jan. 28, the finally finished, farm bill!” modestly named AgriculTruth be told, the 950tural Act of 2014. page bill is not a near-mira“Historic in many ways,” cle, not amazing, not very FARM & FOOD FILE reforming and, most defiLucas said of the pending law as he shared the call nitely, not historic. By Alan Guebert with his Senate counterIt is a very late, very part, Debbie Stabenow, a dense and very status quo Democrat from Michigan. law that further instituWhat’s more, he continued, the three- tionalizes scale over substance and years-in-the-making legislation was insurance over economics. “amazing” and, in fact, “a reform bill.” On the face of it, there’s nothing

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OPINION

wrong with either growth or insurance. Under this law, however, the two are tied tightly together; growth is all but guaranteed by heavily subsidized revenue insurance. The market is, well, in there somewhere. How that policy will work is certain to be tested in 2014. Right now corn is scraping along at $4 per bushel, ethanol is poised to lose some of its government-mandated demand, the export market is increasingly crowded and competitive and U.S. farmers will grow between 13.9 billion and 14.3 billion bushels of corn this year, or about 2 billion bushels more than forecasters predict will be needed. As such, Iowa State University economist Robert Wisner estimates cash corn prices will drop from an alreadythin average of $4.40 per bushel in 2013-14 to a well-underwater season average of $3.75 to $3.90 in 2014-15. The new farm law, with its higher insurable levels and fatter insurance subsidies, makes this corn-choking outcome quite likely. So likely, in fact, that the Jan. 29 Wall Street Journal editorialized that the cost of this new “shallow loss” insurance program could “balloon to $14 billion a year” if overproduction results. Link to the editorial and all supporting documents at http://farmandfoodfile.com/in-the-news. Implementation, however, hinges on whether the bill will clear Congress and be signed into law by the president (a near-slam dunk; the House passed it Jan. 29 on a solid, 251-166 vote) and if the rules to administer it can be done in — what — no more than 60 days? Good luck on that second thing, says a well-placed farm bill watcher. “The operating language of what will

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be allowed under this insurance program is very complicated,” the friend offers, “and writing the rules for it will be even more complicated.” Complicated, yes. Different, no. And that’s the biggest irony to this whole, bloody bill: there’s nothing in it that might have required the best part of three years to write or provided all the fuel to the fierce, bitter partisanship that dogged its every agonizing step. After all, this bill never got within a mile of very difficult discussions on whether ethanol still holds a place in America’s renewable fuels future or how a farm bill might address the nation’s increasing health problems. Moreover, Congress didn’t convene one public hearing or one ag committee meeting over what the United States and its farmers and ranchers can do to ensure sustainable food production in a world steeply challenged by expanding population, increasing climate change and tougher, narrower economics. No, this farm bill was the easy one — despite the delays and politics — so we took the easy way out. The hard farm bill — the one that tackles more than subsidized insurance and government-supported markets like ethanol and sugar, the one that views consumers and agbiz as equals, the one that make soil and water as important as corn and soybeans — lies ahead. That’s the one that will be historic, reforming, amazing and a near-miracle. Alan Guebert’s “Farm and Food File” is published weekly in more than 70 newspapers in North America. Contact him at agcomm@farmandfoodfile.com. Past columns, news and events are posted at www.farmandfoodfile.com. ❖

hat do you think about how the “Agricultural Act of 2014” turned out? hat do you think about farm and ranch profitability for 2014?

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

hat are your thoughts on COOL and GMO labeling? hat are you paying for propane these days?

The Land wants to hear from you. Send your Letters to the Editor to: Editor, The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002 or e-mail: editor@TheLandOnline.com

Letters must be signed and have writer’s name, address and phone number. Please keep your letters to less than 250 words.


Send us your events by e-mail to editor@TheLandOnline.com

5th Annual Crop Nutrient Management Conference Feb. 11 Verizon Wireless Center, Mankato, Minn. Info: Advanced registration requested via e-mail nutri.conf@state.mn.us or by calling Ryan Lemickson, (612) 209-9181, or logging on to www.mda.state.mn.us/nutrient conference — for more information, contact Lemickson or George Rehm, (507) 263-9127, or log on to www.mawrc.org/events.html

Conservation Tillage Conference Feb. 18-19 Holiday Inn and Suites, St. Cloud, Minn. Info: $155/person; log on to www.TillageConference.com or call (320) 235-0726, Ext. 2001 New Tools for New Rules Agricultural Symposium Feb. 19, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. South Central College John Votca Conference Center, North Mankato, Minn. Info: $119/person, all proceeds go toward agribusiness scholarships and program advancement, as well as support for the SCC Foundation; Michael Boehlje and David Kohl will speak; contact Tami Reuter, (507) 389-7342 or log on to www.southcentral.edu/ agsymposium Pork Quality Assurance Training Feb. 19 Minnesota Pork Board Office, Mankato, Minn. Info: PQA Plus, 9 a.m.-Noon; Transport Quality Assurance, 1-4 p.m.; contact colleen@mnpork.com or (800) 537-7675 to register; log on to www.mnpork.com for location details and updated training dates

Irrigators Association of Minnesota Annual Meeting Feb. 20 Community Center, Freeport, Private Pesticide Applicator Minn. Recertification Workshop Info: Contact Alan Peterson, Feb. 11, 6 p.m. (320) 293-3302 or alpeteSenior Center, Northfield, Minn. farm@frontiernet.net Info: First-time applicators cannot certify at this workCold Climate Conference shop, instead they must take Feb. 20-22 the online or mail-in exam; Crowne Plaza, St. Paul certification fee is $50; log on Info: E-mail to www.pat.umn.edu or conmissy@mngrapes.org or log tact your local Extension on to mngrapegrowers.com/ office for more information conference or 15th Annual Stoen Farm Supply Workshop Feb. 24 Minnewaska House, Glenwood, Minn. Info: 9 a.m. registration (must register by 10:30 for Managing Specialty Crops noon meal); 9:30 a.m. early for Profit bird drawings and noon meal Feb. 15, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and door prizes; George South Central College, North Rehm will lead several agMankato, Minn. related speakers and consultInfo: $75/person, $25/each ants; contact Ron or Jesse,

Gypsy Moth Quarantine Public Hearing Feb. 25, 10 a.m. Cook County Courthouse, Grand Marais, Minn. Info: Held as part of the Cook County Board of Commissioners Meeting; Minnesota Department of Agriculture is proposing a quarantine of gypsy moth for Lake and Cook counties in Minnesota; public comment will be accepted through Feb. 25 by sending to Minn. Department of Agriculture, Gypsy Moth Quarantine Comments, 625 Robert St. N., St., Paul, MN 55155 or gypsy.moth@state.mn.us — proposed quarantine language is available at www.mda.state.mn .us/gmquarantine

and 7 Billion Mouths to Feed” reach Center, Morris, Minn. Info: See details on Feb. 19 Pork Quality Assurance National Institute for Training March 26 Animal Agriculture West Central Research and Out- Annual Conference

March 31-April 3 Omaha, Neb. Info: “The Precautionary Principal: How Animal Agriculture Will Thrive” ; call (719) 5388843, Ext. 14

Commodity Classic Feb. 27-March 1 San Antonio, Texas Info: Log on to www.CommodityClassic.com; open to all friends of corn, soybeans, wheat and sorghum Pork Quality Assurance Training March 5 AmericInn, Marshall, Minn. Info: See details on Feb. 19 South Central Minnesota Crops Day March 6, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Knights of Columbus, Fairmont, Minn. Info: Registration begins at 8:30 a.m.; contact Liz Stahl, stah0012@umn.edu or (507) 372-3900 Solar Powering Minnesota: From Ideas to Action March 7, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. University of St. Thomas, St. Paul Info: Log on to www.grow solar.org/education-training/ solar-powering-mn — call (414) 431-2830 or e-mail solarpoweringmn@growsolar.org 20th Horticulture Day March 8, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Southern Research and Outreach Center, Waseca, Minn. Info: Advanced registration required by Feb. 26, space is limited; $25/person, sent with named and address to Deanne Nelson, UM Southern Research and Outreach Center, 35838 120th Street, Waseca, MN 56093; call (507) 835-3620 National Ag Day March 25 Info: www.agday.org; theme is “Agriculture: 365 Sunrises

Arnolds A & C Farm Smiths Mill Equipment Service Implement St. Cloud, MN

Paynesville, MN

Janesville, MN

Hyland Motors

Spring Valley, MN

Modern Farm Equipment

Schlauderaff Implement

Titan Machinery

Werner Implement

Lano Equipment

Melrose Implement

Sauk Centre, MN • Pierz, MN

Vermillion, MN

Litchfield, MN

Norwood-Young America, MN

Albert Lea, MN

Melrose, MN

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

World Ag Expo Feb. 11-13 International Agri-Center, Tulare, Calif. Info: Log on to www.worldagexpo.com

(320) 283-5283

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Gypsy Moth Quarantine Public Hearing Feb. 11, 2 p.m. Lake County Courthouse, Two Harbors, Minn. Info: Held as part of the Lake County Board of Commissioners Meeting; Minnesota Department of Agriculture is proposing a quarantine of gypsy moth for Lake and Cook counties in Minnesota; public comment will be accepted through Feb. 25 by sending to Minn. Department of Agriculture, Gypsy Moth Quarantine Comments, 625 Robert St. N., St., Paul, MN 55155 or gypsy.moth@state.mn.us — proposed quarantine language is available at www.mda.state.mn .us/gmquarantine

additional person from same farm; contact Minnesota Fruit & Vegetable Growers Association, (763) 434-0400 or mfvga@msn.com, to register or for more information

5 THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

Managing Specialty Crops for Profit Feb. 8, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Berry Hill Farm, Anoka, Minn. Info: $75/person, $25/each additional person from same farm; contact Minnesota Fruit & Vegetable Growers Association, (763) 434-0400 or mfvga@msn.com, to register or for more information

Log on to www.TheLandOnline.com for our full events calendar


THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

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Export federation uses education to create meat demand By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer Currently about 25 percent of U.S. pork production is marketed overseas and about 13 percent of U.S. beef production is exported. “And key to this huge market is that much of these carcass items sold overseas have little or zero value in our U.S. domestic market,” said Greg Hanes, U.S. Meat Export Federation assistant vice president in Denver, Colo.

Hanes said that these “low-value” variety meats are tongues, livers, the uteri, etc. “These items are sold in the international market at substantially higher prices which of course is a net plus for the U.S. beef industry.”

Pulling the American side together with the foreign side is how these purchase agreements happen. “Education is the key thing. Any time you’re in a market situation, that local buyer is going to think his prod-

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The strength of the USMEF is its

network of 18 offices around the globe. “These offices cover about 120 different countries. They are staffed by local people so they understand the culture, the customs of each Greg Hanes country. So if someone in a particular country has a question about buying U.S. meat products, a visit to their meat export office is often the starting point,” he said.

uct is the best. So we have to convince them on the safety, the quality, the consistency and the reasonable prices that the American livestock industry can provide,” Hanes said. A good example of the value of education is the Japanese market for U.S. beef. With the single break a few years back of a single “mad cow” situation in America, Japan suddenly quit buying U.S. beef. “Thanks to a heavy educational campaign, we’ve finally rebuilt that market and Japan is now again the biggest buyer of U.S. beef,” he said, adding that Japan is also now a huge market for U.S. pork. He credits the Minnesota Soybean Growers Association and the Minnesota Pork Producers Association for big help in introducing new pork cuts like back ribs into the Japanese market. Again thanks to an education process on how to cut their carcasses, pork back ribs are now a popular consumer item in Japan, Hanes said.

Norwood Young America 952-467-2181 A family business since 1946 with the Lanos: Jack, Paul, Bob and Andy

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Perhaps they deserve credit for developing new markets for beef, but we quibble with the quality of their ‘beef’. This allows us to come in and ‘up sell’ with U.S. beef as these markets evolve.

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Mexico continues to be a major market both for U.S. pork and beef, though Hanes describes the Mexican market as more of a commodity market. “They’re more price sensitive whereas Japan is more value-driven so we get much higher premiums for good quality products. However, Mexico buys a lot of those cuts which are of little value in our domestic market.” He credits the growing overseas market for U.S. meats to a couple of things happening. “Logically No. 1 is a growing population worldwide, especially in the Asian markets. But equally vital is the growing ‘middle

class’ economies in some of these countries. As people have more disposable income the usual place for change is in their diets. They want to eat better; they want more protein in their foods and that’s why U.S. pork and beef is such a preferred food item. “High-quality and reasonably priced proteins for the world are the strength of the U.S. livestock industry. Yes, the last few years have been a challenge for our meats because of the higher feed costs. Plus the supply of beef cattle is now the lowest in recent history. And now the PED disease issue may be limiting the supply of U.S. pork. So how we balance pricing of U.S. meats on the global market is always a challenge, even more so right now,” Hanes said. He added that those same factors currently impacting U.S. production also are impacting U.S. competitors in this world meat market. But this bidding “war” for U.S. meat products versus meats from other countries varies from country to country. He said that Japan, for example, with higher incomes among its working people, is willing to buy up for U.S. products because of the quality and the dependability of U.S. meats. Right now Brazil has recaptured the title of being No. 1 in beef exports. However a big surprise to U.S. livestock producers is the fact that India is now No. 1 worldwide in “beef” exports. “We’re talking water buffalo,” Hanes said. “They categorize it as beef. They export almost all that they raise. Their major markets are China and other neighboring countries in Southeast Asia. Perhaps they deserve credit for developing new markets for beef, but we quibble with the quality of their ‘beef’. This allows us to come in and ‘up sell’ with U.S. beef as these markets evolve.” Hanes said the potential of the export business for U.S. meat products will continue to rise despite the ongoing competition from Brazil, Argentina and Australia. Hanes was interviewed at the recent MN Ag Expo in Mankato, Minn. ❖

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MSP aims for big things with addition of unit-train facility Because Mexico is so dry, they can’t grow all their own soybeans. They do have some crushing facilities but the real growth for them is bringing in meal ready-to-use. Their No. 1 source of protein is eggs so they have a huge poultry industry. And MSP soybean meal hopefully will soon be part of the diet of those millions of laying hens in Mexico. Considering some of the drought challenges of recent years we’ve been pleased that our growers have still been able to provide quality soybeans.” MSP doesn’t suggest specific varieties to its cooperative grower-mem-

See MSP, pg. 9

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loading facility will also open up the Mexico market. “We’ll run 110-car unit trains to the (Mississippi) river; then barge our meal down the Mississippi to New Orleans for ocean vessels delivering to foreign markets around the world,” Hofstra said. With the expanding fish, poultry and pork industry in Mexico, he sees this neighbor as potentially being a big market for U.S. soybean meal, including MSP meal. “Because Mexico is so dry, they can’t grow all their own soybeans. They do have some crushing facilities but the real growth for them is bringing in meal ready-to-use. Their No. 1 source of protein is eggs so they have a huge poultry industry. And MSP soybean meal hopefully will soon be part of the diet of those millions of laying hens in Mexico.” He said the added complexity of the Mexican market is that they don’t allow just a single train car but they do permit unit trains across their borders. “So this is a tremendous opportunity for us to grow our market share,” he said. Direct shipments on the Union Pacific is the shipping corridor for these unit trains from Brewster to Mexico. Area livestock producers are encouraged to buy direct at the plant, be that soy meal or the soy pellets. Hofstra said it’s always a good idea to call ahead so a particular load out ramp is ready when your truck arrives. The growing season climate makes a difference in the soybean processing business, too. “Last year we were blessed with what we call the magic bean. We had good yields, high protein and excellent oil content. That all adds up to a profitable business year for MSP because we get paid on the quality of that oil and the protein qualities, also,” Hofstra said. “As we go forward we hope to do as well with the 2014 crop. Seed companies have done a fantastic job in providing great varieties to our growers.

bers. “We’ve got sharp growers. They pay attention to data, whether that be from the University of Minnesota, plot data from individual seed companies, or results from their own farms. And we know this is a continually changing recipe so it just isn’t logical that we make recommendations,” Hofstra said. With markets in 30 states and a growing opportunity in foreign countries, how does MSP find new markets? Thanks to ever-expanding electronic and cyber technologies, markets today happen in multiple ways. “We get lots of action off our website; we go to trade shows to meet

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer Started in 2003 and a biodiesel refining facility added in 2005, the Minnesota Soybean Processors cooperative at Brewster, Minn., is about Rob Hofstra to join the big leagues. Despite construction slowed by winter challenges, a new $8 million unittrain facility capable of 110 hopper bottom rail cars should be operational in February, or early March at the latest. Each car can carry 100 tons of soybean meal. Rob Hofstra, commercial manager of MSP, said the completion of the unittrain facility this spring will dramatically improve both the quantity and the time frame for moving products from MSP to various destinations across America and other markets. It will take 500,000 bushels of processed soybeans to fill one unit train. He’s looking at a three-day timeframe to load such a train. A bigger bonus is simply logistics. Rail shipping is a fragmented and often unreliable business these days. It sometimes is weeks, even months, before MSP hopper cars get back to the Brewster facility. However with its own 110-car loading facility, MSP will be able to much better control the movement of its leased rail cars. Soybean meal is the main product. But there’s also crude soybean oil, soybean hull pellets, biodiesel and crude glycerin. Those soybean pellets, a highfiber feedstuff, have a good area market with both dairy and beef producers. The bulk of soybean meal processed at MSP goes to domestic feed markets, feed mills and feed manufacturers in Minnesota and northwest Iowa. There are “lots of hog producers and a few big poultry and broiler operations in northwest Iowa, so about 60 percent of our meal goes into that Iowa market,” Hofstra said. Thanks to rail shipments which now account for about 60 percent of MSP distribution, soybean meal gets shipped into 30 states. Currently only about 3 percent of MSP products go into the export market. “That ramped up slightly this past year and we see an expanding market because of the expanding pork and aquaculture industries developing in several of the Asian countries,” Hofstra said. Development of their unit-train

7


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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

8

Minnesota soybean growers adding legal talent By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer Perhaps a sign of the times, the Minnesota Soybean Growers Association has added an attorney to their staff. “We see a major concern developing in this ‘freedom-to-farm’ arena on legal issues dealing with the environment,” said Paul Simonsen, chairman of the Minnesota Soybean Research & Promotion Council, “and more specifically on water concerns dealing with tiling and movement of water from our agricultural fields. “As we’ve participated in some of these regional and state meetings with the Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection Agency and other agencies, we’ve at times felt inadequately prepared to present our point of view, especially with the legal talent these agencies bring to these meetings.” Joe Smentek, a specialist in environmental law, is the new hire for the Mankato-based MSGA. “In view of the tremendous complex-

ities of the environment, espe“Unit train shipments to the cially when it comes to water West Coast have come on rapidly quality issues,” said Simonsen, a the past couple of years,” SimonIn view of the tremendous Renville County producer, “we sen said, adding that due to complexities of the environment, council members decided we growing export markets in sevespecially when it comes to water needed to have more internal eral Asian countries, more and expertise for Minnesota soybean more Minnesota beans are movquality issues, we ... decided we producers. But the reality is that ing by unit trains. “Our local coneeded to have more internal Joe’s work will deal with all comop elevator is now doing almost expertise for Minnesota soybean modity groups protecting their weekly runs of unit trains to the producers. freedom to operate.” West Coast. Ports on the West Coast are then loading Panamax International trade — Paul Simonsen, MSR&PC chairman ships which can haul 56,000 tons Interviewed at the recent MN of soybeans.” Ag Expo in Mankato, Simonsen also gave an update on the growHe mentioned Vietnam took its ing market for Minnesota soyfirst delivery of a Panamax load beans and soybean products such of soybeans last year. Vietnam as soy meal and soy oil. Tradihas also built two new soybean tionally Minnesota-produced crushing facilities. “And thanks soybeans are a tad lower in proto their growing swine industry tein content which often is an and their huge aquaculture issue in international trade, industry,” Simonsen said, “Vietespecially into the constantly Paul Simonsen nam looks to be a good and growJoe Smentek growing Asian markets. ing customer of U.S. soybeans with a good amount of that being But thanks to some extensive Minnesota-grown beans.” research and amino acid profile nutrition work by University of Min- on key amino acids which are the Simonsen noted that Vietnam is now nesota scientists, Minnesota-grown building blocks of protein. No. 3 in aquaculture production and soybeans have a nutritional advantage “Thanks to this research,” he said, No. 5 in hog production. Currently 56 “we’re finding the protein quality of percent of Minnesota soybeans move our beans is at least as good as, and into export markets. China is still the often better than, soybeans grown in No. 1 buyer, but he noted that comother parts of the U.S. soybean belt. So bined sales of U.S. soybeans to Vietwhat used to be a trade disadvantage nam and Indonesia the first week of has now become a trading advantage January approximately equaled total sales to China. for our soybeans.” A freight advantage may also be emerging.

See MSGA, pg. 9


Asia trade missions educational, money-making trips This has been a process. We’ve been to Thailand every year for three or four years now, talking to major pork and aquaculture people.

— Paul Simonsen against Brazilian or Argentinean soybeans, but this fall when a Thailand group came over to visit us they, in

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Simonsen recalls a meeting in Davenport, Iowa, last year attended by various buyers from several Asian countries. “At the table the guy from Thailand asked the guy from the Philippines, ‘Why do you buy only U.S. soybeans?’ The Philippine guy said ‘In feeding trials we find the U.S. soybeans always outperform soybeans from South America.” Anecdotal evidence such as this apparently convinced Thailand to initiate some of its own feeding trials. Ever since, Simonsen said, sales of Minnesota soybeans to Thailand have been increasing. “This has been a process,” he said. “We’ve been to Thailand every year for three or four years now, talking to major pork and aquaculture people; also the major buyers of their soybeans and soy meal. “Cost is often an issue when selling

essence, said ‘We’re going to buy your soybeans even if they do cost more. We’re going to get some into our pork and fish system so we can determine the nutritional bonus of your Minnesota beans.’” To contact the Minnesota Soybean Growers Association and Minnesota Soybean Research & Promotion Council, e-mail info@mnsoybean.com or log on to www.MNSoybean.org or call (888) 896-9678. ❖

Expanding domestic and foreign markets good for MSP MSP, from pg. 7 prospective buyers, we’re here at the Minnesota Ag Expo to get more people informed about us. But new markets also springboard from our existing customers. Plus the ‘tried and true’ way of phone calls, leg work, connecting the dots and talking to new people. “We’re always looking to expand our markets into overall industry contacts. The more people you can reach out and connect with, the better you are,” Hofstra said.

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With a factory design processing capacity of 100,000 bushels per 24hour day, when the markets are good, the MSP people don’t mind “pushing

the envelope.” “We’re doing about 105,000 bushels currently with an ambition to increase to 110,000 and 120,000 bushels as soon as markets dictate,” Hofstra said, adding “with our expanded rail capabilities we hope to maximize the efficiencies within this plant and run it ‘full out.”’ Hofstra was interviewed at the MN Ag Expo held early January in Mankato, Minn. Minnesota Soybean Processors has about 2,350 members. As a farmerowned cooperative a 14-member board of directors governs the business. For more information, log on to www.mnsoy.com or call (888) 8426677. ❖

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

MSGA, from pg. 8 Better beans Of interest is the fact that tempeh, a traditional soy dish of the Indonesian people, is now using U.S. soybeans. U.S. soybeans are moving directly into that market for human consumption and GMO origin is not even an issue. Tempeh is made by a natural culturing fermentation process that binds soybeans into a cake form, similar to a firm vegetarian burger patty. The fermentation process also gives it a higher content of protein, dietary fiber and vitamins. “They prefer U.S. soybeans,” Simonsen said, “because the color of our soybeans is more uniform, more appealing to the Indonesian people. When we were visiting Indonesia last year we were shown soybeans shipped in from Argentina ... and noticed purple beans, red soybeans and other assorted colors. Supposedly those were No. 1 soybeans. We ship No. 2 soybeans and ours look better than the beans from Argentina.” He firmly believes that thanks to trade missions by Minnesota soybean farmers to these Asian countries, many of their buyers who used to buy on protein content are now understanding the superior nutritional value of Minnesota beans because of a better amino acid profile.

9


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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

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PEDv challenge keeps expanding in U.S. herds on the agenda right now is the By DICK HAGEN PEDv disease. Unfortunately The Land Staff Writer so far there isn’t vaccine that “PEDV Brings Its Worst. seems to effectively prevent Pork Checkoff Brings Its Best.” the disease, even though the That was the boldface title of best minds in universities and a new booklet printed by the private industry are working National Pork Board and on this suddenly huge issue.” widely distributed at the recent Losses from PEDv are beginMinnesota Pork Congress. Lori Stevermer ning to impact swine markets This booklet is loaded with information about porcine epidemic diar- simply because there are fewer pigs rhea virus, which reportedly has already being marketed. Because market weights are up, due in part to lowerkilled at least 3 million U.S. swine. priced corn, there so far appears to be First confirmed by the U.S. Depart- no reduction in total pork into the ment of Agriculture May 17, 2013, PEDv retail market, Stevermer said. has caused the swine industry to pull She also suggested there will likely together like never before. It prompted be bigger dips in butcher hog numbers the NPB to fund more than $1 million for PEDv research in 2013 to get results into this spring as PEDv death losses keep ramping up. producers’ hands as quickly as possible. Despite consolidations continuing Interviewed at the Minnesota Pork Congress, Lori Stevermer, new presi- across the entire swine belt, she said Mindent of the Minnesota Pork Producers nesota numbers are encouraging. “We’re Association, said, “first and foremost in a good grain production area. We haven’t experienced some of the incredi-

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ble weather challenges of some heavy hog-producing states. The Minnesota pork industry is healthy, even expanding in total hog numbers produced, despite a small dip in producer numbers.” Stevermer is certainly concerned about the challenges of younger people wanting to get into the industry, “but I’m also optimistic,” she said. “There are a lot of bright young individuals out there. Some of these larger hog operations offer multiple opportunities that wouldn’t have happened on smaller farms. And the service industry for swine producers keeps getting bigger also.” The Stevermer farm, near Easton, Minn., is a 150-sow farrow-to-finish operation. “Farrow-to-finish is almost atypical in swine operations these days but that’s what works well for my husband and me,” she said. Most of their market pigs go to Compart Family Farms for use in Compart’s branded pork products. She’s encouraged about the competitiveness of pork in retail counters across America. “Pork is showing some domestic growth, partly because of its favorable price compared to beef. Today pork products are also very competitive with chicken and turkey. As people learn more about how to prepare pork they are finding pork is a very flexible meat product. And this definitely is moving pork into more retail sales,” she said. She went on to say pork is a versatile meat, a good protein source and is commended for its flavor and leanness. Will so called “meatless” meats even-

tually get into the market or is this mostly a research fantasy at this stage? She chuckled, but said, “that ‘meatless Monday’ did create some interest. I think there will always be those challenges and we do have a consuming public that at times seems easily distracted with new foods and new health tastes. That is why our pork checkoff program is so vital. Those funds enable us to do our own promotions and to find new markets for our products, both domestically and overseas where about 25 percent of our pork products are now sold.” She doesn’t dodge the fact that as more of our population gets further removed from agriculture, the “anti-ag” agenda seemingly gets more appealing to more people. “That’s why telling our own story is important. We need more producers involved in telling their story about pork. It’s a fascinating industry and no one knows it better than us guys and gals out on the farm raising pigs.” For Stevermer that means almost weekly sessions with grade school student; high school students; even culinary groups at colleges and universities. She admits pork producers probably were taking some things for granted expecting advertising, trade shows and public relations campaigns to move the product from farms to consumer tables. “Now we realize we need to promote ourselves. It’s a tremendously competitive market out there when it comes to how consumers spend See PEDV, pg. 11


Pork virus spreading quickly; carried by manure, soil the Mankato-based Minnesota Pork Producers Association. Preisler said the cold weather has made biosecurity more difficult because the virus can survive wherever there is moisture, even if it’s solid ice. Cleaning trucks and equipment is doable, but getting them completely dry is much more difficult. Paul FitzSimmons, a partner at Mapleton-based Protein Sources, said it has been difficult for employees to watch helplessly as entire litters die. The pigs are born looking fine, but 10 hours later the infected piglets are facing euthanasia to spare them from further suffering. “In 40 years, I’ve never seen anything

‘Telling our story important’ public relations work. She and husband, Dale, have three children. Brett, the oldest is a freshman at the University of Minnesota. Adam is a high school junior and daughter, Beth, is an eighth grader. Lori isn’t the first female MPPA president, however her husband, Dale, was president of the Minnesota Pork Board back in 2005. Lori chuckled, “maybe that makes us the first husband-and-wife tandem team.” Stevermer can be contacted at lori.stevermer@hubbardfeeds.com or (507) 420-7213.For more information, log on to www.mnpork.com. ❖

inner lining of the intestines responsible for taking up nutrients, Brumm said. Dehydration sets in. With no proven vaccine on the market, farmers are concentrating on keeping the virus out of their barns, Brumm said. That means having visitors wear disposable plastic booties, washing hog trucks to knock off any of the virus, and inspecting new pigs carefully before they’re brought inside. Some operations even restrict what employees can do off the farm. The financial risk is significant. A farm hit with the virus might lose about 10 percent of its annual pig production. AgStar Financial Services senior vice president Mark Greenwood said his firm projects between 31⁄2 to 4 million pigs will be lost nationwide. That loss of supply could help push pork prices up even faster than currently estimated. Although the disease poses no health threat to humans, fewer hogs will be coming to market. The Mankato Free Press is a sister publication to The Land under The Free Press Media. ❖

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PEDV, from pg. 10 their food dollar. Like true Minnesotans, we’re kind of modest and don’t like talking about ourselves. But we do have a good story to tell and most people appreciate getting that story directly from we producers,” Stevermer said. She noted the National Pork Board’s Operation Main Street program works directly with producers on becoming better speakers, better “story tellers” about pork production. She has participated in Operation Main Street doing presentations to civic groups, Chamber of Commerce organizations, etc. She also does some presentations when working with Hubbard Feeds in their

like it,” he said, in terms of how quickly it spreads and how fatal the virus is for piglets. While the disease can’t sicken humans, it has taken an emotional toll. “It was devastating to the people on the farm,” FitzSimmons said. “Those people care about those animals.” He said three of the company’s 15 sow farms have been infected. One bright spot is that about 18 to 20 days after an infection, piglets can acquire antibodies in their milk, armoring them against the virus. The challenge posed by this virus has come at an already difficult time. “We were just getting corn prices where we were looking to get some profitability back in the system, and then this comes along so it’s been a tough run for pork producers in the past four or five years,” FitzSimmons said. The virus spreads rapidly, carried by manure or soil. “If a pig is under seven days of age, they die,” said Michael Brumm, a North Mankato-based consultant for hog farmers. The disease destroys the

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

Excerpts from a story by Minnesota Public Radio News and Mankato Free Press Staff Writer Dan Linehan Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus was first reported in Minnesota last May. It doesn’t make humans sick, but the disease is shrinking herds and could mean higher prices at the grocery story, Minnesota Public Radio News reported. The number of cases in Minnesota has jumped by almost two-thirds in the past month, and the disease has been found in about 300 hog barns around the state, MPR reported. Talk of the disease dominated the recent Minnesota Pork Congress at the Minneapolis Convention Center, said David Preisler, executive director of

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

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Cover story: Propane users get sticker shock By TIM KROHN Propane tankers park Mankato Free Press along Highway 169 Late last fall, a gallon of north of Vernon Center propane gas was about awaiting their turn for a $1.50 — a level it had long load at the Mid-America Pipeline Co. terminal. hovered around. Drivers have waited as When the propane delivlong as seven hours to ery truck rolled up to Tim be loaded. Gieseke’s rural New Ulm, Minn., residence a few days ago, the driver filled Gieseke’s tank with 224 gallons of fuel and handed him the bill. “It was $3.75 a gallon. Around $800,” Gieseke said. As it turns out, Gieseke got somewhat of a bargain. On Jan. 24, local propane dealers were selling it for around $5 a gallon. For those who heat their homes with propane, the price spiral — with no guarantee it won’t continue upward — is a financial burden. Most rural propane tanks are 500 gallons and are filled 80 percent full, or about 400 gallons. At $5 that’s a $2,000 bill. How long a tank lasts varies widely. Someone heating a home and maybe a larger shop could go through that tank in about a month. Gieseke is hoping he will be able to nurse his now full tank through much of the rest of the winter. “I mentioned to the family that we’re turning (the heat) down a notch,” he said. The price spike, being felt nationwide, is caused by a

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Distributed by the Associated Press The emergency management director said Jan. 31 that Minnesota is prepared to open warming shelters if propane supply problems continue in large portions of the country and cold weather persists in the state. “We have identified shelters in a number of communities,” said Kris Eide, Minnesota’s director of homeland security and emergency management. Many residents of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s reservation in North Dakota and South Dakota have already been forced into public shelters because of the propane shortage. Minnesota initiated a hotline Jan. 30 for residents who are worried about running out of propane or have other questions about the situation. The hotline took more than 80 calls in its first day.

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Much of the Northeast and Midwest has seen propane prices skyrocket in recent weeks, prompting state officials to look for ways to alleviate supply problems and investigate reports of price gouging. Minnesota’s Executive Council, chaired by Gov. Mark Dayton, met Jan. 31 and extended the governor’s emergency declaration related to the propane shortage, authorizing state agencies to take a number of steps in response. “We are starting to hear that people are out in certain places” in the state, state Commerce Commissioner Mike Rothman told the Executive Council. “Prices are skyrocketing ... it’s going to be touch and go for at least a few weeks, with forecasts for continued below-zero weather. The supply issues in Minnesota and nationally are not trending in a positive direction.” Rothman said propane was running about $6.77 a gallon by the end of this week, compared to $1.50 to $1.70 at this time last year. On Jan. 30, Minnesota received an additional $15.8 million in federal energy assistance funds; the state Commerce Department recently increased crisis benefits from $500 to $1,000 for households that heat with propane or heating oil. Minnesota officials are calling on the federal government to approve more funding for energy assistance. Dayton joined in a conference call Jan. 30 between several Midwestern governors and Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who told his fellow governors he would extend a waiver of state trucking rules that had been slowing movement of propane from Texas to points north. An estimated 250,000 Minnesota households use propane to heat their homes, mostly in rural areas. The number for the state’s propane hotline is (651) 297-1304 or (800) 657-3504. ❖


‘Green’ pig barns offer safer, more efficient housing gress, an eye-catching display was a 30-foot by 8-foot trailer labeled the “4State Swine Ventilation Training” unit. Somewhat looking like a fancy Minnesota ice fishing house, this portable facility was chock full of ventilation equipment components to demonstrate the technologies now available to keep swine and workers comfortable and free of obnoxious fumes and odors.

“We’re targeting barn managers, operators of facilities and individual hog producers. Our goal is to train and educate about how ventilation systems should be working in confinement hog facilities,” said University of Minnesota agricultural engineer Larry Jacobson. Collaborators with the U of M include Iowa State University, South Dakota State University and the Uni-

Natural gas consumers not hit as hard that carries 40 percent of the state’s propane. The 1,900-mile Cochin pipeline — which runs through the Mankato area — carries propane from western Canada all the way to the eastern United States. Canada is producing less propane, so the company that owns the pipeline, Kinder Morgan, will stop propane shipments, reverse the pipeline’s flow, and send light petroleum condensate from the United States for use by Canada’s booming oil industry. Last year, Gov. Mark Dayton, the state commerce commissioner and propane wholesalers met to discuss strategies to avoid supply problems when the pipeline stops sending propane this April. Wholesalers said they are building and converting terminals to take propane deliveries by train and expanding propane storage, among other things. Those who live in towns and cities and heat with natural gas may be seeing some price increases as well. The cold weather has caused a jump in natural gas prices sold on exchanges, particularly in the northeast. Consumers who use natural gas may not suffer as much, though. That’s because many big utilities are able to hedge natural gas prices by purchas-

ing futures contracts. Still, natural gas prices have been depressed in recent years because of a supply glut and relatively mild winters. But supplies have tightened a bit recently and some analysts expect prices to move higher throughout the winter. The Mankato Free Press is a sister publication to The Land under The Free Press Media. ❖

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PROPANE, from pg. 12 pipelines near Eagle Lake, Minn., and Vernon Center, Minn. But little is available at Eagle Lake, and the Vernon Center pipeline is being allocated, so each propane business can only take a certain amount. “We’ve been to Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas,” the co-op manager said of the business’ pursuit of propane. “Next week we’re going to Texas.” Truckers waiting at the Vernon Center terminal Jan. 24 said they have up to a seven-hour wait in line. Other big terminals around the country have waiting lines that stretch to 24 hours or more. The cost of a tanker truck driving to Nebraska and back for propane can add around 90 cents a gallon to the product’s cost. “If the cold continues and the supply continues to be tight, I don’t see prices coming down in the near future,” said the co-op manager. The reason he didn’t want his name used is because he hasn’t been a popular guy lately as customers take their frustrations out on him. “That’s pretty much what my day consists of.” His problems of getting enough propane to Minnesota could become considerably worse later this year. Minnesota will be losing a pipeline

versity of Nebraska. Their one-day workshops — Managing Your Unseen Employee: The Ventilation System — utilize both an agricultural engineer and a swine specialist. Major components of the program include: • Animal environmental needs • Static pressure/inlet velocity relationship • Cooling systems • Basic components (fans, inlets, controllers) • Troubleshooting systems • Hands-on time using the equipment Due to the detailed agenda, Jacobson said these workshops are generally limited to 30 to 35 people. The cost is $1,750 per workshop session, or about $50 per person, which See GREEN, pg. 14

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer Are pig barns going “green”? Swine specialists and engineers from four major Midwestern universities are working on the blueprints right now to help make this segment of American agriculture more energy efficient. At the recent Minnesota Pork Con-

13

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

14

Modern systems generate ‘drastically cleaner air’ GREEN, from pg. 13 includes lunch and materials for all participants, including a notebook containing specific details on information presented. “Morning presentation deals with the fundamentals of ventilation and how swine react to different environments,” Jacobson said. “The p.m. sessions are a hands-on event with participants shown exactly how the different ventilation components built into this traveling classroom work in an actual hog facility.” The afternoon session demonstrates the importance of a vacuum in your hog barn to make air movement work properly. It also explains how air

We’re targeting barn managers, operators of facilities and individual hog producers. Our goal is to train and educate about how ventilation systems should be working in confinement hog facilities.

— Larry Jacobson inlets are set and other management tactics to continuously provide good air exchange. “Maintaining this good environment is important both for animals and workers,” Jacobson said. Modern ventilation systems can be

fairly sophisticated — with computerized controls, even daunting, he said, if you don’t have a good understanding of the importance of proper air movement within a livestock facility. In view of the sophistication of modern swine housing, Jacobson stressed that built-in alarm systems have now become a priority. “Either high temperature alarms or, in case of power failure, an automatic alarm system is high priority,” he said, indicating a stand-by generator as an important piece of equipment. With power failure it can be a matter of only 30 minutes until animal deaths start occurring, Jacobson said, even in the winter season. Hazardous gases like ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, methane and other greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide) can be a quick concern if air movement within a hog facility suddenly cuts off. Does this suggest that negatively charged ionization of the air could be a benefit in reducing the impact of “bad air” within a hog confinement system? “Yes, I’ve become very much aware of the Clean Air system of Baumgartner Environics,” said Jacobson. “Their electrostatic system is one of the techniques to control dust and odorous gases attached to those particles. Their technology is one of the mitigation methods being looked at in this ongoing effort to improve air quality for our livestock.” He also noted biofilters which treat the exhaust air as it leaves the building, and additives added to either feed or manure pits as means to lessen dirty air issues. “It’s difficult to make general statements as to which ‘system’ works better because the feeds, the water, and animal numbers within a building can be different from one swine producer to the next,” Jacobson said. “But definitely we now have systems and techniques today which can drastically generate cleaner air. And generally that equates to better gains, reduced

mortalities, and better working conditions for employees also.” What’s next in further improving the overall environment for swine? “We’re now working on what we call a ‘green pig barn’ which offers some major suggestions in better pig comfort,” said Jacobson. “For example not using indoor lagoons but storing pig manure outside. Also the ability to provide cooling inside the structure; not air conditioning, but making structural changes so animals don’t get hot. This also would reduce some of the ventilation. Move less air and you reduce emissions. “These concepts need to be built into the total design of such a structure. South Dakota State is intending to employ some of these air quality items displayed here at Pork Expo into a totally new ‘green’ pig barn that will become part of their educational efforts with pork producers.” This will still be a partially slatted floor, sort of where we were when slats first started coming into practice 40 years ago, said Jacobson. Bad dunging habits when it got warm was an issue with partial slats but with this system, floors will be cooler and that should eliminate the dunging on the solid floor area. Also in a “green” pig barn some of the heat will be removed via conduction through the floor rather than just through the air. “We’re looking at other things to make buildings tighter and better control the total air movement within the structure,” he said. “It may not look that much different than convention hog barns today but it may have some impact on the perception that the industry projects to the non-agricultural audience.” Jacobson estimated that more than 5,000 swine practitioners have participated in these workshops over across Minnesota, Iowa, South Dakota and Nebraska since the traveling package was launched a few years back. A more intensive program called “The Real World of Ventilation” gets even deeper into the role of ventilation in modern swine production. Instructors for this program are an Extension agricultural engineer, and Mike Brumm, noted consultant on swine disease, health and the environment. In Minnesota, contact Jacobson at (612) 625-8288 or jacob007@umn.edu. In Iowa, contact Jay Harmon, Iowa State University ag and biosystems engineering professor, at (515) 2940554 or jharmon@iastate.edu. ❖


Local Corn and Soybean Price Index

15

Sauk Rapids Madison Redwood Falls Fergus Falls Morris Tracy Average: Year Ago Average:

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

Cash Grain Markets corn/change* soybeans/change* $4.17 $4.01 $4.16 $3.94 $3.89 $4.12

+.17 +.16 +.17 +.14 +.11 +.17

$12.38 $12.63 $12.73 $12.48 $12.52 $12.76

+.33 +.23 +.33 +.28 +.33 +.37

$4.05

$12.58

$7.06

$14.62

MAR ’13

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN ’14

FEB

Grain prices are effective cash close on Feb. 4. The price index chart compares an average of most recently reported local cash prices with the same average for a year ago. *Cash grain price change represents a two-week period.

Cattle launch fireworks show

2014 playing quiet market time, so far

The following market analysis is for the week ending Jan. 31. CORN — Corn traded a tiny 7 3/4-cent range this week as fresh news was sparse. The market has found decent demand from users at the lower end of the $4.20 to $4.40 range and producer selling at the upper end of the range. Weekly export sales were the highest for the marketing year and the biggest single week sales in almost three years at 72.4 million bushels for old crop. There were no new sales to China, with Japan the leading buyer. This brought total export PHYLLIS NYSTROM CHS Hedging Inc. commitments to 87 percent of the St. Paul U.S. Department of Agriculture’s yearly forecast. Only around 8 million bushels of exports per week are needed to reach the USDA’s 1.45 billion bushel projection. New crop sales were 4.2 million bushels. Ethanol production fell 5,000 barrels per day to 900,000 barrels per day. So far in the crop year, the annualized grind equates to 5.04 billion bushels, which is right at the USDA’s 5.0 billion bushel estimate. There have not been any ethanol imports into the United States in 16 weeks. The House this week passed a new farm bill which will now be considered by the Senate. The new farm bill is expected to be signed by President Obama in February. The new proposal would give producers two commodity income support programs, eliminating direct payments. The first is price-loss assistance and the second is revenue-loss assistance. Producers would have a one-time, irrevocable

Well it should be said that January in the livestock markets was nothing more than an incredible fireworks show, particularly in the cattle market. New all-time prices paid for cattle, feeder cattle and beef at the wholesale level. This all happening while hog prices spun around like a pinwheel going nowhere and remaining near steady as the month nears its end. Granted all the fireworks were in the cattle market over the past few months and these fireworks will likely continue. However, the direction of cattle prices may change during the following months. Like similar commodity markets in recent years, the cattle JOE TEALE market has reached a pinnacle in Broker prices that will undoubtedly affect Great Plains Commodity the demand for beef in the future. Afton, Minn. This will force the packers to be more frugal in the acquisition of live inventory to try to maintain their margins. Demand is now more than likely going to affect the price of cattle rather than supply despite the fact that cattle numbers will remain smaller than last year. The disparity of beef to all other protein sources is bound to hurt the demand and with that the beef cutouts will more than likely move back into line with these alternate sources, mainly chicken and pork. On Jan. 24, the U.S. Department of Agriculture released a monthly Cattle-on-Feed report as of Jan. 1. The results are: on-feed, 95 percent; placements, 101 percent; and marketed 99 percent. The report was seen as slightly negative as placements were higher than estimates and the marketed number was lower than anticipated. With prices at

See NYSTROM, pg. 16

See TEALE, pg. 16

As we head into February, the grain markets are entering a time period that has traditionally been pretty quiet. So far, 2014 seems to be starting the same way. The U.S. Department of Agriculture gave us a little bit of a surprise on Jan. 10 when they lowered the 2013 corn production by 1.6 bushels per acre to 158.8 bushels per acre for a national corn yield. Corn usage for the 2013-14 season was also raised by 150 million bushels, providing a brief lift to the markets before retreating. In the same report, the national soybean yield was raised 0.3 bushels per acre to 43.3 bushels per acre. Soybean exports were GLENN WACHTLER also increased, offsetting the AgStar Assistant VP increase in yield. This left the Financial Services ending stocks for soybeans Baldwin, Wis. unchanged. Our winter months can provide more volatility to the soybean market because of these exports. South American growing conditions can also have an impact on the world supply and demand and the soybean market this time of year. As expected, there has been a little more price movement in soybeans this year when comparing it to corn, but overall prices seem to be content staying within the latest range that has developed. The January USDA report is in the books. Typically there aren’t many high-impact events that move the markets until the USDA planted acreage report at the end of March. This quiet period gives you an opportunity to start planning your grain sales without being influenced by the short-term market “noise” that seems to always develop during more volatile times of the year. See WACHTLER, pg. 16

Japan steps in as leading buyer

Grain Angles

Information in the above columns is the writer’s opinion. It is no way guaranteed and should not be interpreted as buy/sell advice. Futures trading always involves a certain degree of risk.

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Brazilian soybean harvest, exports under way NYSTROM, from pg. 15 choice between the two for 2014-18 crop years. The price-loss program provides assistance when the commodity’s national average market price for the crop year is lower than the applicable target price. This is based on the farm’s historical planting and yields. The revenue-based program requires the producer to choose between individual and county coverage. Assistance is provided when the applicable, actual individual or country revenue is less than 86 percent of the benchmark revenue for the previous five years. Assistance ends when 76 percent of the benchmark revenue is reached. There is a payment rate difference between the individual and county coverage: individual coverage pays at a 65-percent rate, county coverage pays at an 85-percent rate. Crop insurance was relatively unchanged. On the Conservation Reserve Program, the CRP ceiling is lowered from 32 million acres to 24 million acres in increments over the bill’s five-year life. A penalty-free early out provision is also included, with stipulations. The House version also includes the elimination of federal subsidies for installing “blender pumps.” This is a negative sign for raising blend rates. The public comment period relating to the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposal to lower the cornbased ethanol mandate to from the original 14.4 billion gallons to 13 billion gallons ended this week. Now they must sift through them, which is expected to take some time. The Federal Reserve announced they will cut their asset purchasing program by another $10 billion per month

to $65 billion per month. Is anyone watching the oats market? Oats are being included in hog rations to battle the porcine epidemic diarrhea virus outbreak. March oats were up 9 1/2 cents at $4.05 3/4 per bushel after trading a weekly range from $3.95 to $4.27 1/2 per bushel. OUTLOOK: Bitter cold and snow blanketed the United States this week, complicating logistics even further. Moderate grower selling is occurring but getting it moved is a problem, be it by rail, barge, or truck. This has influenced firmer basis levels. Futures markets were generally quiet and range bound. The next USDA crop report is Feb. 10 when exports are expected to be raised. March corn was 4 1/2 cents higher this week, settling at $4.34 per bushel. March corn was 12 cents higher for January. December corn was up onehalf cent for the week at $4.50 per bushel. SOYBEANS — South American weather has become mostly a moot issue with Brazilian soybean harvest and export program getting under way. Brazilian bean exports have started earlier than last year with 200,000 to 250,000 metric tons of exports estimated for January, when last year there were none in January. Three soybean vessels were scheduled to be loaded out

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Hog market rather benign TEALE, from pg. 15 all-time highs in live cattle, feeder cattle and beef cutouts, this report would suggest that these prices are vulnerable to some sort of correction. Therefore producers should be aware of the current market conditions and protect inventories as necessary. In comparison to the cattle market, the hog market has been rather benign. Most of January has seen little overall price movement in the hog market. The cash trade has been rangebound for the most part until recently which shows signs of strengthening. The porcine epidemic diarrhea virus has caused concern in the hog indus-

of Paranagua for China this week. AgroConsult updated their bean production forecast for Brazil to 91.6 million mt. They are in the midst of a crop tour, so that number could be revised. The U.S. attaché in Brazil increased their estimate to 89.5 mmt. The USDA’s last number was 89.0 mmt. There is trade chatter that Argentine growers will be sellers of beans before harvest begins in March. They have held soybean supplies against currency moves and beans stored in bags will need to be sold before another crop is harvested. Demand for soybeans remains strong with weekly export sales of 18.2 million bushels for old crop and 13.6 million bushels for new crop. With 31 weeks left in the marketing year, total export commitments are 5 percent over the total USDA 1.495 billion bushel forecast. The more sales exceed the expectation the less impact future cancellations may have on the market. China will observe their Lunar New Year, the Year of the Horse, through the first week of February. This usually means subdued activity from that area. Weaker than expected economic reports this week from China has raised concern about demand growth this year. Also adding concern are additional

MARKETING

try and has increased the interest that hog numbers are likely to decline in the future as a result of the disease. This has supported prices, especially in the early spring and summer months. The fact that from a seasonal basis, the hog market usually begins to strengthen at this time of the year has also brought some interest into the market. The only caveat at this juncture is the fact that the deferred futures contract already has built in large premiums in anticipation of a firming market. Producers are expected to stay aware of these premiums and use them to their advantage when opportunity presents itself. ❖

bird flu cases in China. If poultry demand declines, the domino effect should ripple down to meal and soybean demand. A major bean crusher announced that they will idle a North Carolina crush plant, saying that demand for U.S. bean processing has become “variable and seasonally driven” in recent years. It is not unusual for South American soybeans to be imported into the East Coast to feed the processing market that provides meal to southeastern hog producers. OUTLOOK: March soybeans tested support at $12.60 this week, but found buyers at that level. The March contract traded a $12.60 to $12.93 range this week, closing at $12.82 3/4 per bushel for a weekly loss of 2 cents. For the month, March beans were down 9 3/4 cents. November soybeans were 4 3/4 cents lower for the week at $11.04 1/2 per bushel. Soybeans are in a sideways to lower trend. While demand is fine, South American supplies are now hitting the market. Not much action is expected until China returns from their New Year’s holiday. Nystrom’s notes: Contract changes for the week ending Jan. 31: Minneapolis March wheat was down 9 cents, Chicago fell 9 1/2 cents and Kansas City dropped 11 3/4 cents per bushel. March crude oil gained 85 cents to close at $97.49, ultralow-sulfur diesel was almost 2 cents lower, gasoline lost nearly 3 cents and natural gas declined 5 1/2 cents. This material has been prepared by a sales or trading employee or agent of CHS Hedging Inc. and should be considered a solicitation. ❖

Focus on mid-, upper range WACHTLER, from pg. 15 Farmers feel the impact of the USDA projections to their bottom line, and it is not always welcomed or agreed with. However, the USDA does provide a framework for the markets and the widely used data should be the foundation to start any plan. The range of corn price expected for the 2013-14 crop based on the last report is $4.10 to $4.70 per bushel. The range of expected soybean price for the same marketing year is $11.75 to $13.25. Objectively, it makes sense that you should focus your sales starting from the middle to the upper-end of this range. If you have a strong market bias that the market will move either direction, you may choose to start to

sell at the lower- or upper-end of the range, accordingly. Each market is local to some degree. Keep in mind the growing conditions the crops in your area experienced last year. Growing conditions will affect the local supply and demand, and should be a factor when evaluating your price to start your sales. Then use this quiet time in the markets, and the information at hand, to start a plan if you haven’t already. AgStar Financial Services is a cooperative owned by client stockholders. As part of the Farm Credit System, AgStar has served 69 counties in Minnesota and northwest Wisconsin with a wide range of financial products and services for more than 95 years. ❖


17

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

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Farm bill’s dairy title brings big changes to safety net This column was written for the marketing week ending Jan. 31. The House of Representatives passed the new farm bill Jan. 29, by a 251 to 166 vote. The Senate was expected to approve the measure Feb. 4, following a cloture vote on Feb. 3, and send it to the president for his signature.

The bill is bittersweet for the National Milk Producers Federation, which fought long and hard for a controversial supply management provision to control milk production, only to see it dropped when House Speaker John Boehner threatened to keep such a bill from even coming to the floor for a vote.

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The NMPF released an Incentive Program, the Fedanalysis of the resulting proeral Milk Marketing Order posal, which it supports and Review Commission estabpoints out that the main fealished in the previous farm ture is the Dairy Producer bill, and, once the Margin Margin Protection Program. Protection Program is up The NMPF says the Margin and running, the Milk Protection Program is a Income Loss Coverage pro“new and unique safety net gram will be ended. program that will provide Three existing dairy proMIELKE MARKET dairy producers with indemgrams are renewed through WEEKLY nity payments when actual 2018 — the Dairy Promotion dairy margins are below the By Lee Mielke and Research Program margin coverage levels (“checkoff ”), the Dairy the producer chooses on Indemnity Program, an annual basis. Its and the Dairy Forward focus is to protect farm Pricing Program. Log on to equity by guarding against destrucwww.goo.gl/3wrgxr for complete details. tively low margins, not to guarantee a The International Dairy Foods also profit to individual producers. gave thumbs-ups, commending farm The farm bill requires the Margin bill conferees for their hard work and Protection Program to be established congratulating them on “reaching a no later than Sept. 1, 2014.” compromise that represents historic The NMPF cautions that the program reform of our nation’s dairy policies.” supports producer margins, not prices, ■ and is designed to address both cataMeanwhile, cash dairy markets ended strophic conditions as well as prolonged periods of low margins. Under this pro- January at record highs for cheese and some Class III futures. The February gram, the “margin” will be calculated monthly by the U.S. Department of Agri- contract settled Thursday at $23.29 per culture and is simply defined as the all- hundredweight, up $3.08 in three weeks milk price minus the average feed cost. and highest milk price ever of any class. Average feed cost is determined using a The Cheddar blocks, up for the fourth week in a row, closed Friday at a record feed ration that has been developed to more realistically reflect those costs asso- high $2.36 per pound, up 5 cents on the ciated with feeding the entire dairy farm week, 71.5 cents above a year ago, and up 36 cents since Jan. 1. The barrels finenterprise consisting of milking cows, heifers, and other related cost elements. ished at a record $2.32, up 4.5 cents on the week and 77.75 cents above a year The new farm bill also creates a new ago. Four cars of block and three of barrel Dairy Product Donation Program that traded hands on the week. The National would be triggered in the event of Dairy Products Sales Report block price extremely low operating margins for averaged $2.1382, up 6.9 cents. Barrel dairy farmers and would also provide averaged $2.1496, up 10.7 cents. nutrition assistance to individuals in low Cheese production is mixed across the income groups by requiring the USDA to purchase dairy products for donation to country as record-high cheese prices food banks and other feeding programs. have buyers and sellers trying to develop new strategies, according to the USDA’s The program would only activate if Dairy Market News. Milk supplies are margins fall below $4 for two consecuincreasing seasonally however the tive months and would require the increases are not moving solely to cheese USDA to purchase dairy products for manufacturers. Class IV interest continthree consecutive months, or until mar- ues to pull milk away from cheese plants. gins rebound above $4. The program On the down side, the higher prices would trigger out if U.S. prices exceed international prices by more than 5 per- have reduced some domestic cheese demand, according to the DMN, but good cent. Under this provision the USDA would purchase a variety of dairy prod- export sales, often made last year and being delivered in the first quarter of ucts to distribute to food banks or 2014, are keeping supplies of cheese tight. related non-profit organizations. The USDA is required to distribute, not Butter finished at $1.88, down 1 cent store, these products and organizations but 32.5 cents above a year ago. Ten receiving them would be prohibited from cars were sold on the week. The NDPSR selling them into commercial markets. butter averaged $1.6689, up 4.5 cents. The bill eliminates the Dairy Price Support Program and the Dairy Export See MIELKE, pg. 19

MARKETING


China ‘most important factor’ driving global dairy same period a year earlier. Year-to-date sales of conventional products, at 45.09 billion pounds, were down 2.7 percent; organic products, at 2.07 million, were up 4.3 percent. Organic represented about 4.6 percent of total fluid sales, according to USDA data. Meanwhile, U.S. commercial disappearance of dairy products totaled 17.72 billion pounds in November, up 5.4 percent from November 2012. Year-to-date, total disappearance hit 187.86 billion pounds, up 1.23 percent from 2012. American cheese disappearance in November hit 366.1 million pounds, up 0.3 percent from a year ago. Other than American cheese, at 627.3 million pounds, was up 5 percent; butter, at 204.5 million, was up 23.9 percent; and nonfat dry milk, at 93 million pounds, was down 0.3 percent. ■ The U.S. Dairy Export Council’s Alan Levitt says the most significant part of the Jan. 21 Global Dairy Trade auction was what he referred to as the “forward curve.” Speaking in that Friday’s DairyLine Radio broadcast, Levitt said that is the “winning bid prices out into the future,” and “they’re all basically flat or rising.” The forward curve on U.S. delivered

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skim milk powder, for example, is close to $4,500 per ton or over $2/lb. through July, he said, and “significant because it tells us that the market seems to think that things are going to hold for quite awhile.” He believes pent-up demand is responsible. “Buyers were looking at the high prices toward the end of 2013, hoping things would pull back in early 2014,” Levitt said, “and they just haven’t and now they have to come back to the market and continue to buy and continue to pay these historically high prices for all the commodities.” Levitt said that bodes well for prices into mid-year. “China is the most important factor driving global dairy markets right now,” Levitt said, and December import numbers were up significantly. Second half imports of milk powder, whey, cheese and butterfat were up 52 percent from a year ago, he said, “so they’re absorbing any increase in world milk production or supply.” Lee Mielke is a syndicated columnist who resides in Everson, Wash. His weekly column is featured in newspapers across the country and he may be reached at lkmielke@juno.com. ❖

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Supplies of manufacturing milk are trending higher. A few cheese plant managers in the Central region indicate, though, that additional loads of milk are difficult to obtain. Some managers have looked for ultra filtered milk to enhance cheese production, but loads of UF have also been scarce. Livestock auctions in the West show strengthening prices for dairy heifers since the beginning of January, according to the DMN. In most regions, operating margins have improved through fourth quarter 2013 and into January as milk price trends remain strong and near-term feed input costs decline. Challenges remain in fluid milk consumption. The USDA reports that November 2013 packaged fluid milk sales totaled 4.39 billion pounds, down 2.1 percent from November 2012. (Sales were not adjusted for calendar considerations). November sales of conventional products, at 4.19 billion pounds, were down 2.2 percent; organic products, at 193 million pounds, were up 0.7 percent. Organic represented about 4.6 percent of total sales for the month. January-to-November 2013 total packaged fluid milk sales, at 47.15 billion pounds, were down 2.4 percent from the

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

MIELKE, from pg. 18 Churns across the United States continue to run at levels greater than seasonal trends, according to the DMN. “The market has a firm tone as exceptional demand is inhibiting many manufacturers from rebuilding low inventories,” the DMN said, and butter makers are busy filling good 82 percent orders for export. Domestic demand is above expectations in the Central and Northeast, but a litter slower in the West. Grade A nonfat dry milk closed Friday at $2.04, down a penny on the week. Twenty-three cars were sold on the week. The NDPSR powder averaged $2.0434, up 0.8 cent, and dry whey averaged 60.87 cents, up 1.3 cents. ■ Farm milk production is on the rise across the United States, according to the DMN. Milk increases in areas experiencing cold weather are less pronounced as cows use feed energy to maintain body warmth instead of adding to milk production. With school pipelines full, fluid milk demand is at seasonal levels in most areas. Winter storms are causing short-term spikes in bottled milk demand in the affected areas.

19

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H

As we go to press

Senate passes farm bill, reaction spills in FARM It also ties conservation compliance for wetNational Corn Growers Association BILL lands and highly erodible land to premium supThe National Corn Growers Association legislation provides the farmers the option to port for crop insurance. FEEDBACK thanked members of the Senate for their participate in either the revenue-based Agri• Maintains authorizations for important culture Risk Coverage program (with county or passage of the 2014 farm bill.

The Agricultural Act of 2014 was approved by the U.S. Senate Feb. 4 by a vote of 68-32, after previously passing the U.S. House 251-166. President Barack Obama is scheduled to sign the bill into law Feb. 7 during a visit to Michigan State University.

“We’re happy to see the farm bill pass the Senate and are looking forward to seeing it signed and implemented,” said NCGA President Martin Barbre. “It was a long time coming for a bill so important for promoting stability in farm policy while saving taxpayers money and feeding the hungry. While it’s not perfect, we’re pleased to see the bill contains many provisions we’ve been working hard for over the years.” Barbre in particular pointed out that the new

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farm-level options) or a Price Loss Coverage program with fixed reference prices. The ARC will provide a band of coverage for 76 to 86 percent of the benchmark revenue. Among other specific provisions, the bill ... • Eliminates controversial direct payments while maintaining decoupled farm support programs that will minimize the possibility of planting and production distortions that could trigger new World Trade Organization challenges. • Consolidates 23 previous conservation programs into 13, and focuses conservation efforts on working lands.

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agricultural research programs, including AFRI, as well as including a new Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research that will provide a structure and mandatory funding for new public-private partnerships and investments that will further the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s research mission. • Maintains authorizations and funding levels for export promotion, including the Foreign Market Development Program and the Market Access Program. • Continues the combined authorization of both agricultural and nutrition programs, a linkage that has been essential in enacting every farm bill since 1974. ❖

Minnesota Farm Bureau The Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation applauds the U.S. Senate for approving the bipartisan farm bill, the Agriculture Act of 2014. The bill provides needed risk management tools and a viable economic safety net for America’s farmers and ranchers. “We appreciate the Senate’s decision to protect and strengthen the federal crop insurance program and not reduce its funding, as well as the approval of a commodity program that provides farmers varied safety net options,” said MFBF President Kevin Paap. “This proposed bill will encourage farmers to follow market signals. Most importantly, the bill is fiscally responsible.” “We thank Sens. Klobuchar and

Franken for voting in support of the final bill. A special thank you to Sen. Klobuchar for her leadership on the farm bill conference committee,” Paap said. “They had many tough decisions to make but were able to move forward with a solid bill that includes many Farm Bureau supported provisions. “It’s been a tough road for the legislation, but we are pleased with the clear bipartisan vote that prevailed,” Paap said. “We need the final bill signed into law by President Obama so farmers and ranchers can have the certainty they need to make business decisions over the next five years and to provide the U.S. Department of Agriculture time to begin implementation of the bill’s provisions.” ❖

Minnesota soybean farmers are celebrating the passage of a new five-year farm bill. The bill eliminates direct payments in favor of enhanced crop insurance, revises commodity supports, creates a new dairy program and makes several other changes to agricultural policy, including an approximate $8 billion cut to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. The Minnesota Soybean Growers Association and the American Soybean Association have been active in support of the bill, which provides for multiple soybean farmer priorities, most notably a flexible farm safety net that includes a choice between price-based and revenue-based risk management tools. The ASA supports the bill’s risk management framework; its strengthening of crop insurance; streamlining and optimization of conservation programs; investment in critical trade

development and renewables like biodiesel and bio-based products; support for beginning farmers and ranchers and acknowledgment of the role of agricultural research. The bill also consolidates 23 previous conservation programs into 13, while focusing conservation efforts on working lands. “We got a good farm bill,” said Bob Worth, Lincoln County farmer, MSGA director and ASA vice president. “It provides some safety nets and certainty for farmers going forward. There are a lot of good things in the bill and it was as good as we could get given the climate in Washington and the overall state of the economy.” “As a farmer, this gives us some certainty as to what we can expect,” said MSGA President George Goblish. “This will help us put together our business plans for the next five years.” ❖

Minnesota Soybean Growers Association


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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

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As we go to press

Senate passes farm bill, reaction spills in Land Stewardship Project The Land Stewardship Project believes this bill does not measure up as good farm policy. While some encouraging elements are included, in its totality this legislation continues to perpetuate inequities in our food and agriculture systems and falls brutally short in providing for stewardship of the land and stewardship of our nation’s fiscal resources. At a time when more is being demanded of our farming landscape, it’s unconscionable that $6.1 billion is cut from conservation funding by this legislation. This is the largest Congressional cut to conservation funding ever, and the first time we’ve witnessed a decrease in conservation funding since it became part of farm bills in 1985. On the crop subsidy front, the bill ignores the will of the majority of Congress by failing to enact either meaningful limits to excessive crop insurance subsidies or commodity program payments. This is particularly egregious considering that such limits have been generally supported in both bodies of Congress in the past. Crop insurance, already the largest farm-spending item in the bill, had its budget increased by an additional $5.7 billion to $89.8 billion over 10 years. While some worthwhile changes were made to federally subsidized crop insurance in terms of conservation compliance and a limited sodsaver provision, it is unacceptable that agricultural policymakers would fail to put limits on the amount of subsidies massive operators can extract from taxpayers through this program. We do not accept the proposition that because the

antiquated direct payment system has been discontinued, reform has been achieved. The 2014 farm bill’s new commodity programs and its expanded crop insurance system create a structure that does not adequately target payments or limit payment amounts producers can receive. This threatens to send the cost of these programs skyrocketing in the future. This is not reform — it is simply a new delivery system for making payments in a manner that is not accountable to or good for the public. Because of this, the new farm law will continue to be unfair in its distribution of resources and damaging to the long-term care of America’s farmland. There were notable bright spots of sound public policy contained in this bill, including investments in programs for new farmers and a number of key initiatives that support local and regional food systems, organic production methods and rural development. Approximately $1.2 billion is being dedicated to these innovative growth areas of agriculture. However, it should be noted that this represents just 6 tenths of 1 percent of overall farm-focused spending. In what could be characterized as a defensive victory, the final bill also rejected attempts to repeal the Country-of-Origin Labeling law as well as efforts to undermine fair competition rules in the livestock sector. These provisions are important and were hard fought wins over the corporate meatpacking lobby in the final days of negotiations. It is important we guard against weakening them. The LSP’s mission is to foster an ethic of stewardship for farmland, to promote sustainable agriculture and to develop sustainable communities. Farm policy is inextricably linked to how farmers approach their land and business, as well as how citizens spend their food dollars and what their tax money supports.

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FARM BILL FEEDBACK

While this tiresome bill has passed, it would be disingenuous to say we moved the ball forward toward greater sustainability and stewardship. Indeed, some gains were made and we’ll apply ourselves to make sure those gains are realized, but greater reform and a new alignment of priorities is desperately needed. ❖

Minnesota Farmers Union The Minnesota Farmers Union is pleased the farm bill is one step closer to becoming law with passage by the Senate. The MFU thanks Sens. Amy Klobuchar and Al Franken for supporting the bill. “Family farmers thank the Senate for acting swiftly and getting the farm bill passed. We urge President Obama to waste no time in getting this farm bill signed, so family farmers can have the security they need to plan for the future,” said Doug Peterson, Minnesota Farmers Union president. “I want to thank Sen. Klobuchar for her hard work on the farm bill conference committee, and also to Sen. Al Franken for supporting the bill, and helping pass this common sense piece of legislation that protects farmers as they provide food, fuel and fiber for this country.” The bill includes: • Approximately $4 billion in livestock disaster funds, retroactively available to those who suffered tremendous losses last October; • Repeals direct payments; • Protects current crop insurance program; • Does not repeal permanent law; • Provides $900 million of mandatory funding for energy programs; • Includes $30 million a year in mandatory funding for the Farmers Market and Local Food Promotion Program, with $10 million a year in discretionary funding; • Includes $20 million a year in mandatory funding for the Organic Agriculture Research and Extension Initiative; • Includes $20 million a year in mandatory funding for the Beginning Farmer and Rancher Program; • Addresses fraud within the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program; • Reduces SNAP funding by $8 billion over the next 10 years; • Increases access for livestock producers to Environmental Quality Incentives Program benefits, along with many other supportive policies for the livestock industry; • Does not make any legislative changes to the Country-of-Origin Labeling law; • Does not make any major adjustments to protections for producers under the Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration; and • The proposed farm bill reduces spending by about $23 billion over the next 10 years. ❖


Remembering the struggles, joys of winters on the farm

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014 << www.TheLandOnline.com >>

It snowed overnight. awe, gratitude, grace, more than a little knee-slapping — and lots of love for You saw it first thing this mornthe way things were, the rotation of ing, and you grumbled. You know the seasons, the bounty of the land, how much extra work that stuff is: and the perseverance of its people. “The Quiet Season: Remembering Country Winters” shoveling, brushing, scraping. Everything needs more time to By Jerry Apps This is the kind of book that elders warm up and get going — including will read and read again. It’s a book c.2013, Wisconsin Historical Society Press you. you’ll want to give to a whiner. It’s one $22.95 you’ll be glad to curl up with because, Sure, snow is pretty … for about 150 pages though it’s mostly about winter, “The 10 minutes. Or, as you’ll see in “The THE BOOKWORM Quiet Season” will leave you warm. Quiet Season” by Jerry Apps, it’s SEZ beautiful for a lifetime. Look for the reviewed book at a bookBy Terri Schlichenmeyer Born to a pair of farmers in store or a library near you. You may the “midst of the Great also find the book at online book retailDepression,” Jerry Apps says ers. that, save but for his time The season’s first often mentions his love of a good story The Bookworm is Terri Schlichenspent in the Army, he’s snow was espe- — is himself the teller of tales that cir- meyer. Terri has been reading since she never missed a Wisconsin cially cle around community in a TV-less, was 3 years old and never goes anywinter. For folks in snowy excitpacked-calendar-free, horse-drawn but where without a book. She lives in Wisclimes, winter reminds us ing; consin with three dogs and 10,000 hard-working world that fewer and that “we are not in says books. ❖ fewer folks remember. They’re told with charge,” he says. Apps, he and his The winters of 1939class47 were particularly mates were memorable for Apps. “running Electricity hadn’t around like yet come to his parwe were posents’ farm — it sessed by first didn’t arrive until snowfall the spring of ’47 demons.” As — which meant white stuff piled that milking up, his teacher in cows and the one-room fetching schoolhouse tapped water was all one of the bigger done by children to shovel a hand. Dinner path to the outhouses. was made on a wood-burning stove that Apps recalls playing served both to prepare food and in the snow, and wading to heat the kitchen. through waist-high Homework for the drifts. He rememthree Apps boys bers hunting in it, Apps remembers how was done by traveling by car kerosene lamp. his father prepared for and on foot through it, and winter by ‘making Apps remembers hoping that Santa how his father prewood’ from dead oak could handle it. He pared for winter by trees and hauling it recalls when “making wood” closer to the house. The neighbors took CALL NOW FOR UNBEATABLE SAVINGS! from dead oak trees family butchered a hog care of neighbors and hauling it and dances were every fall because they closer to the house. held in someone’s The family ‘needed the meat if we dining room. And butchered a hog were going to survive he remembers the every fall because the long winter.’ Profor New and/or Upgrading perfection of winthey “needed the duce from garden and ter some 70 years meat if we were ago, its loveliness field was laid in for the going to survive the and its magic. long winter.” Proseason. United Farmers Cooperative duce from garden I’m not sure Lafayette, MN and field was laid where it came 507-228-8224 in for the season. from, but reading “The Quiet Season” Gaylord, MN gave me a definite sense of pulse-slowEven when there was a snowstorm, 507-237-4203 ing calmness. the three Apps boys had to walk to United Farmers Cooperative Waconia, MN school and they tried not to miss a day. Maybe that’s because Apps — who 952-442-2126

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

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‘Kiwanians in the Kitchen’ a hearty, helpful cookbook

Cookbook Corner

By SARAH JOHNSON The Land Correspondent Whether they’re bagging meals for hungry children, cleaning up highways or donating to a scholarship fund, the Kiwanians in Albert Lea, Minn., always have something going on to improve the world, one needy person at a time. They continue their fund-raising efforts with their cookbook, “Kiwanians in the Kitchen,” full of unique recipes and helpful cooking tips. ■ Simple yet stick-to-your-bones delicious, Old-Fashioned Bean Soup requires minimal ingredients to deliver big, big flavor. Winter just isn’t complete for me without a steamy bowl of ham-and-bean soup and crusty bread for dunking. Old-Fashioned Bean Soup Submitted by Paula Nuessmeier 1 pound dry navy beans (soak overnight) 2 quarts water 1 pound meaty ham bone or meaty pieces 1/2 cup celery, chopped 1 medium onion, chopped

The Johnson clan gives five out of five ‘yums’ to Christmas Scent 1 bay leaf Salt and pepper, to taste Put all ingredients in crock pot; cover and cook on low 10-12 hours or on high 5-6 hours. Makes 2 1/2 quarts. ■ Make Blue Cheese Walnut Cheesecake the next time you want to wow a crowd. This is a savory dish, not a sweet one, meant to be spread on crackers as you would a cheese ball. It’s very classy. Blue Cheese Walnut Cheesecake Submitted by Rhonda Allison and Jody Horntvedt 2 (8-ounce each) packages cream cheese, softened 8 ounces blue cheese, crumbled 2 1/4 cups sour cream, divided 3 eggs 1/8 teaspoon pepper 1/2 cup chopped walnuts, toasted Optional garnishes: red grapes, sliced star fruit, fresh herbs Assorted crackers In a mixing bowl, beat cream cheese and blue cheese until fluffy. Add 1 cup sour cream until blended. Add eggs. Beat on low speed just until combined. Stir in pepper. Pour into a greased 9-inch springform pan. Place pan on baking sheet. Bake at 325 F for 30 minutes or until center is almost set (top may crack). Let stand on a wire rack for five minutes. Spread remaining sour cream (1 1/4 cup) to within one inch

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of sides. Bake five minutes longer. Cool on a wire rack for 10 minutes. Carefully run a knife around edge of pan to loosen; cool one hour longer. Refrigerate overnight. Remove sides of pan. Sprinkle with walnuts around the “sour cream line” at outside edge. Garnish with grapes, star fruit and herbs, if desired. Serve with crackers. ■ I’m always looking for new uses for those beautiful, tart, fresh cranberries found in the produce aisle, and this colorful bundt cake looks like a real winner. Cranberry Bundt Cake Submitted by Jean Eaton 3 tablespoons butter or margarine 1 cup sugar 2 eggs

1/2 cup water 1 cup evaporated milk 2 cups flour 1 teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons baking soda 2 cups fresh cranberries, cut in half Beat butter, sugar and eggs. Add water and milk. Stir in dry ingredients and mix well. Add berries and mix. Grease and flour bundt pan. Bake at 350 F for 45 minutes or until knife comes out clean. Cool slightly and remove from pan. Drizzle sauce over cake: 1 cup sugar 1/2 cup butter, melted 1/2 cup half-and-half 1 teaspoon vanilla ■ These make-ahead sliders need to “marinate” in the refrigerator overnight to allow the basting flavors to develop. Just pop them in the oven a half-hour before you’re ready to serve and stand back while they get devoured. Ham & Cheese Sliders Submitted by Roberta Czaplewski 24 small buns 1 pound sliced deli ham Sliced Swiss cheese 3/4 cup butter 1 tablespoon poppy seeds 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 4 tablespoons brown sugar Bring butter, poppy seeds, Worcestershire sauce and brown sugar to a boil and cool. Grease cake pan. Put ham and 3/4 slice of cheese on buns and put in cake pan. Baste the top of the buns with sauce until all is used up. Cover with foil and refrigerate overnight. Bake covered at 325 F for 25 minutes. Remove foil and bake 10 minutes more. Serve warm. ■ Although dubbed “Christmas Scent,” the next recipe for a whole-house aromatherapy session is certainly suitable for the entire winter season. Plop this baby on

k h e w i t t 7 6 2 9 @ g m a i l . c o m ~ w w w . h e w i t t d r a i n a g e e q u i p m e n t . c o m See COOKBOOK, pg. 25


Keep rural schools growing through Grow Rural Education

COOKBOOK, from pg. 24 the back burner, add water as needed, and take giant sniffs. You’ll feel wonderful. My whole family loves this — five out of five “yums”! Christmas Scent Submitted by Amanda Weiss 3 sticks cinnamon 3 bay leaves 1 teaspoon cloves Half a lemon Half an orange 1 quart water Simmer on back burner. Add more water as needed.

■ We are sorry to report that the “Kiwanians in the Kitchen” has sold out. If your community group or church organization has printed a cookbook and would like to have it reviewed in the “Cookbook Corner,” send us a copy to “Cookbook Corner,” The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002. Please specify if you wish to have the cookbook returned, and include information on how readers may obtain a copy of the cookbook. Submission does not guarantee a review. ❖

trict, Moulton, Iowa; Newell-Fonda Community School District, Newell, Iowa; Western Dubuque Community School District, Farley, Iowa; CAL Community School District, Latimer, Iowa; Riceville Community School District, Riceville, Iowa; Springville Community School District, Springville, Iowa; Alburnett Community School District, Alburnett, Iowa; West Lyon Community School District, Inwood, Iowa; Schaller-Crestland Community School District, Schaller, Iowa; Boyden-Hull Community School District, Hull, Iowa; Washington Community School District, Washington, Iowa; Forest City Community School District, Forest City, Iowa. School districts that apply for a $10,000 grant compete against other school districts in the same U.S. Department of Agriculture-appointed

Crop Reporting District. CRDs with five or fewer eligible school districts will compete against each other for a single $10,000 grant. School districts that apply for a $25,000 grant will compete against schools that are located in the same state or designated region. Winners will be announced in August. Monsanto Fund grants will be judged based on merit, need and community support. The America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education Advisory Council, a group of 30 farmer-leaders from across the country, will select the winning grant applications. For more information about the America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education program and to view the official rules, a list of eligible states, counties and CRDs, log on to www.GrowRuralEducation.com. ❖

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

gram officer. “This opportunity for success begins in the classroom.” The America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education program is part of a broad commitment by the Monsanto Fund to partner with farmers to support rural communities. America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education launched in 2012 after a successful pilot in Minnesota and Illinois. The program has since helped more than 400 school districts improve math and science education across 39 states. In 2013, the following Minnesota and Iowa school districts received funds to enhance math and science curriculums. Battle Lake Public School District, Battle Lake, Minn.; Farmington Area Public Schools, Farmington, Minn.; Lac qui Parle Valley School District, Madison, Minn.; Murray County Central School District, Slayton, Minn.; Norwood Central Public School District, Norwood, Minn.; N.R.H.E.G. School District, New Richland, Minn.; Ridgeway Community School, Houston Minn.; Southside Family Charter School, Minneapolis, Minn.; Waubun Public School District, Waubun, Minn.; Moulton-Udell Community School Dis-

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Across the United States, school districts are working to incorporate common core state standards and handson learning opportunities into their math and science curriculum. These new opportunities are designed to provide real world experiences that help grow the next generation by preparing them for success in college and in their careers. Now in its third year, the America’s Farmers Grow Rural Education program, sponsored by the Monsanto Fund, is once again gearing up to help rural school districts by investing over $2.3 million to strengthen math and science education in rural communities. Between now and April 6, farmers have the opportunity to nominate their local public school district to compete for a grant of either $10,000 or $25,000. Administrators from nominated school districts can then submit grant applications for either amount, through April 21 to enhance their math and/or science programs. “We believe that growing the next generation begins with a strong foundation in math and science,” said Michelle Insco, Monsanto Fund pro-

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

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‘We need community far more than we are willing to admit’ Editor’s note: This “Back Porch” But is this a connectcolumn was originally published edness that will have in March 2009. the same strength and Today we’ve become fiercely independent. All in all, backbone in its relaIn kindergarten my very front porches are more for decoration than for sitting tionships as the generfavorite board book was “The on to talk with the neighbors and sip lemonade. ation of the wagon Monster at the End of this Book” Lengthy, get-beneath-the-surface conversations have trains? For those of you starring lovable, furry old Grover who think the answer diminished from face-to-face conversations, to telefrom Sesame Street (Jon Stone, is ditching technology, phone calls and poorly punctuated text messages. author; Michael Smollin, illustrahold your horses. Comtor). puters and cell phones THE BACK PORCH From the get-go Grover is are here to stay, and stressed. His first words are, “On By Lenae Bulthuis or in Hillary’s words — a village. quite frankly, I’m thankful for it. I’d be unemployed the cover, what did that say? Did without mine and from health care to education to Wess Stafford, president and CEO of Compasthat say there will be a Monster communication and more its benefits certainly outsion International, and author of the must-read at the end of this book??? IT DID! Oh, I am so weigh the damage done. book, “Too Small to Ignore — Why Children Are the scared of Monsters!!” Next Big Thing,” points out the difference in At a conference that I attended in Nashville last Sickened at the thought of coming face to face lifestyles between America’s homesteaders and month, a pastor was describing where he lived in with a monster, he begs and pleads the readers to today’s citizens. Kentucky. “I live right in the middle of ‘no’ and stop turning pages. Of course, I always did, and by ‘where’,” he said. “Homesteaders once headed west in covered wagthe book’s end, was delighted to see Grover’s astonons, six or eight or 10 families in a cluster, each supIdentifying myself as a Minnesotan I replied, “I’m ishment when he discovered that he was the monporting one another, looking out for one another, familiar with that kind of rural living, but in the ster at the end of the book! Grover was so embardefending one another against outside threats. In northland we refer it to as living in the boonies.” rassed that he missed the obvious. time they settled into towns, and the spirit of comThe boonies: it’s a place where city dwellers go to I’ve been guilty of missing the obvious on more munity that had helped them survive the perils of slow down and catch their breath. It’s a place and than one occasion. When then-First Lady of the the wagon trail carried on as the backbone of society pace of life that holds utopia and connectedness for United States Hillary Rodham Clinton released her ... for a while.” some, and for others, not so much. For although the book, “It Takes a Village: And Other Lessons ChilToday we’ve become fiercely independent. All in all, county roads may host fewer rats than the freeway, dren Teach Us,” I missed the obvious. Immediately front porches are more for decoration than for sitting many living between “no” and “where” got caged in dismissing the title of the book with the policies of on to talk with the neighbors and sip lemonade. the rat race, too. her party that I didn’t respect, I missed the truth Lengthy, get-beneath-the-surface conversations have that raising kids takes families and communities — And the repercussion of that race, for there are diminished from face-to-face conversations, to telealways consequences to our choices, is disconnectedphone calls and poorly punctuated text messages. ness between the generations, our neighbors and According to a new study from the Pew Internet others within our “village” — a loss of multi-layered and American Life Project today’s families are love, wise instruction and role modeling. “building new kinds of connectedness built around The faster the pace of life, the more fierce the indecell phones and the internet.” Sounds cool ... a bit pendence and, Stafford believes, the more wealthy a edgy ... certainly 21st century. country’s citizens, “the more isolated and lonely its people become.” And it’s the very old and the very young who are the village’s biggest losers. He writes, “we need community far more than we are willing to admit.” Driving in a small town that I wasn’t familiar with I watched a man sprint across a snow-filled parking 230/95R32 320/80R42 lot, slip on an ice patch, and catch himself on the 230/95R36 320/90R42 “SPECIALS for on-hand Tanks” building’s front 230/95R44 320/90R46 door handle. By the urgency of his 230/95R48 320/90R50 run I wondered, “Where’s the fire?” LG Seed & Gold Country 270/95R36 320/90R54 270/95R48 320/105R54 As I passed what I originally thought was a storage Broad Range of SmartStax, VT Triple building, I discovered that the building he ran into 270/95R54 380/90R46 290/95R34 380/90R50 was actually the place where they stored the city’s & Double Pro, Roundup Ready and 290/90R38 380/90R54 ambulance. Within minutes an ambulance, fire truck 300/95R46 380/105R50 Conventional Varieties 320/85R34 420/80R46 and two police cars raced down the small town’s 320/85R38 main street. 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Cold snap or polar vortex, it’s still a brutal Minnesota winter

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Regardless of where you lived, just as recently as 20 years ago, a car that started without fail on sub-zero days was something to brag about. Today, we have efficient gasfired furnaces that distribute wonderful warmth evenly through our homes with the touch of a thermostat, cars that reliably roar to life with the turn of a key. When we do venture into the elements, we are protected by high-tech outdoor wear. So comparatively speaking, we’re living in the lap of luxury when yet another one of these pesky polar vortexes plunges us into arctic conditions. This latest round of bone-chilling cold might inspire even the hardiest Minnesotan to complain, Pat Christman/Mankato Free Press but in the end, we all know there’s not just a whole lot that dweller, there was firewood or perhaps a tub of corn- can be done except bundle up and deal with it. cobs to stockpile if you were going to stay warm and The good news is that spring is just 48 days away. then only by hovering in the immediate vicinity of The bad news is that in Minnesota, we all know the stove. that really doesn’t mean too much at all. A hot bath meant hand-pumping water and then John Cross is a Mankato (Minn.) Free Press staff heating it on a stove. A trip to the bathroom, likely writer. Contact him at (507) 344-6376 or as not, was a sprint through the snow to an jcross@mankatofreepress.com or follow him on unheated outhouse. That or a chamber pot. Twitter @jcross_photo. ❖ City folks may have had it a bit easier, what with indoor plumbing. But they still probably had dusty coal to shovel into a furnace and then tend to if they were going to stay warm.

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

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After a brief temperature respite, we headed back into the deep freeze. A cold snap. That’s what we used to call it when the bottom dropped out of the thermometer. But when entire cable channels now are devoted to the THE OUTDOORS weather, when snow storms now are adorned with names, By John Cross well, that term apparently isn’t sexy enough anymore. The catch words this winter are polar and vortex. But a rose by any other name smells just as sweet. And by whatever name you choose, it is brutally cold out there once again. I’m Minnesotan, born and raised. So’s my wife. The reason we returned to Minnesota after a brief stint in comparatively balmy Kansas nearly 40 years ago was that we both missed Minnesota winters. How much did we miss them? We used the paltry amount of vacation we had accrued at our jobs in the Sunflower State to return to Minnesota to witness firsthand the meteorological carnage left in the wake of the Super Bowl Blizzard of 1975. For those too young to remember, it was one hell of a snowstorm. Snow began on Friday, Jan. 10, and continued unabated for the next two days, including Super Bowl Sunday. As much as 27 inches of snow fell in some parts of Minnesota and the Upper Midwest, accompanied by sustained winds of 30 to 50 mph, gusts up to 90 mph and sub-zero temperatures. In the blizzard’s wake, 58 people and tens of thousands of farm animals died. Wildlife populations suffered similar catastrophic losses. Snow drifts as high as 20 feet stranded motorists in their cars for days awaiting rescue in the wake of the storm that was characterized as an inland hurricane because of its record-low barometric pressure. We felt we had missed out on all of the excitement, so when the opportunity to return to live and work in Minnesota with its invigorating winter season presented itself, we didn’t hesitate. But now, I’m a little older, a lot wiser, and on mornings when the thermometer reads teens-below-zero through the frosty window, I wonder: What were we thinking? But when I start feeling a little sorry, I remind myself of just how easy we now have it compared to people who endured winters long past. Certainly, winter was an exceptionally tough time for homesteaders in the 1800s, frequently a matter of life and death as they huddled in their sod huts when blizzards swept across the untamed prairie. But as recently as the 1930s and even the ’40s, when an arctic blast descended on the Midwest, life still wasn’t all that easy. Prior to rural electrification, if you were a country

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

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Now is the time for planning your dream garden Only a mailbox stuffed with garden seed and plant catalogs can make me eager to venture out to get the mail in this recordsetting cold weather. Winter is a gardener’s dream time. A cozy fire, a cup of coffee and a bunch of new garden catalogs to IN THE GARDEN explore make for a perfect afternoon. Now is the time By Sharon Quale to think about and plan for this spring’s dream garden. Childhood memories surface when I reminisce about my mother’s love of gardening. She made extensive orders from the seed catalogs and always

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marked the pictures of what she had ordered so she would know what to anticipate getting in the mail. One year she grew — or rather tried to grow — both cotton and peanuts. The seeds were sown and although the plants didn’t mature because of our short growing season, we kids delighted in looking at the tips of the cotton plant where the bolls would be developing and hoeing up the peanut roots to get a peak at the developing legumes. Gurney’s and Jung’s were Sharon Quale two major sources to order from back then and those two companies are still going strong today. Gurney’s used to have a children’s package of vegetable seeds that would be included in any order for only a penny more. I also recall children going door to door in the spring selling seeds to earn a little money. The plethora of catalogs available now is astounding. The slick pictures and enticing descriptions makes one want to order one of everything. It is fine in a vegetable garden to have lots of different varieties but to achieve harmony in a flower garden it is best to have groups of the same plant — at least three to five or more of the same kind planted together. Resist getting one of five different flowering plants and get five or more identical plants. The reward will be a unified, harmonious garden that makes a statement. Just for fun every year, I order a vegetable and a flower that we haven’t had in the garden before. Last year the vegetable was edamame (edible soybeans). They were delicious with a nutty flavor and can be used like peas or lima beans. I will definitely plant them again. Pulmonaria was my choice for a flowering plant. It is a shade lover that blends well with hostas and ferns. Its common name is Lungwort. With a name like that a plant needs some redeeming attributes. It shows off pretty pink flowers that turn blue with time. The leaves, however, are what are most prized. The plant gets about 12 inches tall and 16 inches wide with dark green sword-like leaves speckled with silver spots. Pulmonaria brightens shade gardens and tolerates dry conditions. If you have access to the internet, just a few clicks can get you a free catalog sent your way, or even immediate seed shopping online. Gurney’s website is www.gurneys.com and Jung’s is at www.jungseed.com. You can also do a Google search for “seed catalogs” for hundreds of other sources. Get ready to spend many pleasant hours planning your dream garden. Sharon Quale is a master gardener from central Minnesota. She may be reached at (218) 738-6060 or squale101@yahoo.com. ❖


Announcements

010 Real Estate Wanted

021 Bins & Buildings

033

Farm Implements

035

Bins & Buildings

033

Grain Handling Equip

034

FOR SALE: '12 Grand View FOR SALE:Used grain bins, storage shed shop 16' x 40', floors unload systems, stiinsulated, finished off ceilrators, fans & heaters, aering & wall, floor has 2 layation fans, buying or sellers of plywood, all screwed, ing, try me first and also wired to code & inspected, call for very competitive heat & cool easy, contract rates! Office $15,500/OBO. 320-583-7433 hours 8am-5pm Monday – Real Estate 020 Friday Saturday 9am - 12 noon or call 507-697-6133 62 - 200 acres Organic Graz- FOR SALE: Lesters BuildAsk for Gary ing 30' long x 26' wide x 8' ing Farm/ no chemical 30+ tall, insulated, $8,500/OBO. years. Newer home and 320-220-3114 buildings/fenced. River frontage on class A trout stream, Bay Field Co. Call 715-372-5535 FOR SALE: 80 acres prime Dodge County farmland w/ 70 acres cropland, major tile, & 96 CPI for $8,050/acre. Send contact information to owner to request brochure to: dodgecoprime@gmail.com Selling or Buying Farms or 1031 Exchange! Private Sale or Sealed Bid Auction! Call “The Land Specialists!” Northland Real Estate 612-756-1899 or 320-894-7337 www.farms1031.com WANTED MOBILE HOMES I buy clean single and double wide mobile homes. I have transports to move them. For more information. 507-676-3088

Every Wednesday 11:30 AM - Farm Misc. 12 Noon - Hay & Straw 1:00 PM - Livestock Sheep & Goats 2nd Wed. at 8:00 PM

HOTOVEC AUCTION CENTER N. Hwy. 15 Hutchinson, MN

320-587-3347

www.hotovecauctions.com

★★★★★★★★★★★★

ADVERTISER LISTING Ag Power Enterprises........34 Ag Systems Inc ................10 Agri Systems/Systems West13 Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers ......................21 Anderson Seeds ................19 Bayer Truck & Equipment Inc ..................................25 Brent Tonne ......................10 Byron Seeds ........................7 Courtland Waste Handling 20 Dahl Farm Supply ............26 Dairyland Seed Co Inc ......17 Diers Ag & Trailer Sales Inc ..................................22 Double B Manufacturing ..12 Duncan Trailers ................39 Farm Drainage Plows........33 Fast Manufacturing Inc ....11 Haug Implement................31 Henslin Auctions ........29, 30 Hewitt Drainage Equip......24 Hotovec Auctions ..............29 Hughes Auction Service....30 Jackpot Junction ..................8 K & S Millwrights Inc ......18 Keith Bode ........................32 Keltgens Inc ......................26 Kibble Equipment ............37 Kiester Implement ............32

Kinze ................................25 Kubota ................................9 Lamplight Mfg Inc ............22 Lano Equipment - Norwood6 Larson Bros ................33, 36 Mankato Spray Center Inc 13 Massop Electric ..................8 Matejcek Implement..........38 New Holland ......................5 Northern Ag Service..........35 Nutra Flo Company 4, 14, 32 Orchard Rangers Saddle Club................................22 Pride Solutions ..................35 Pruess Elevator..................31 Rush River Steel & Trim ..24 Schweiss Inc......................33 Smiths Mill Implement ....36 Sorensen’s Sales ................32 State Bank of Gibbon........12 Steffes Auctioneers............30 Tjosvold Equipment ..........33 Triad Construction Inc 11, 19 United Farmers Coop ........23 Vermeer ..............................3 Wearda Implement ............35 Whitcomb Brothers ..........27 Willmar Farm Center ........35 Willmar Precast ................27 Woodford Ag LLC ............32

We have extensive lists of Land Investors & farm buyers throughout MN. We always have interested buyers. For top prices, go with our proven methods over thousands of acres. Serving Minnesota Mages Land Co & Auc Serv www.magesland.com 800-803-8761

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Sell your land or real estate in 30 days for 0% commission. Call Ray 507-339-1272

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Be An Auctioneer & Personal Property Appraiser Continental Auction Schools Mankato, MN & Ames, IA 507-625-5595 www.auctioneerschool.com

WEEKLY AUCTION

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

015

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

WANTED: Land & farms. I ADVERTISING NOTICE: '05 Hardi 1200 gal Commanhave clients looking for FOR SALE: '96 Super B Please check your ad the der sprayer 100'-110' boom, SA 625C Grain Dryer dairy, & cash grain operafirst week it runs. We make 320x46 tires, $13,900; JD Heat/Cool, shields & Cent tions, as well as bare land every effort to avoid errors 4040 tractor, PS, 2 hyds, fan 40HP, 3 ph, $22,000; parcels from 40-1000 acres. by checking all copy, but 90% tires, dual A/C, '94 Super B SA 500C Both for relocation & insometimes errors are $16,900; 20.8x38 combine Grain Dryer, Heat/Cool, vestments. If you have missed. Therefore, we ask duals, 9 1/2” hole, off 9650 shields & Cent fan 30HP, even thought about selling that you review your ad for combine, $3,500; IH 80 3 pt 3 ph, $18,000; '02 DMC contact: Paul Krueger, correctness. If you find a snowblower, hyd spout, 1200 Air System 5” maFarm & Land Specialist, mistake, please call (507) $1,350. 320-769-2756 chine & piping to 4 bins Edina Realty, SW Suburban 345-4523 immediately so w/ cyclones, $8,000; Office, 14198 Commerce that the error can be cor3500bph Clay grain leg Ave NE, Prior Lake, MN rected. We regret that we 80', 10HP, 3 ph $6,000 55372. cannot be responsible for (not taken down yet); paulkrueger@edinarealty.com more than one week's in2000 bu wet holding bin, (952)447-4700 sertion if the error is not $3,000; 7000 bu circle bin, called to our attention. We 24' dia, $4,000; 2000 bu cannot be liable for an wet holding bin on steel 031 amount greater than the Hay & Forage Equip structure, $5,000. Call cost of the ad. THE LAND 507-381-1871 has the right to edit, reject FOR SALE: JD 5400-5830 & or properly classify any ad. 6000 & 7000 series forage Each classified line ad is harvesters. Used kernel separately copyrighted to processors, also, used JD Stormor Bins & EZ-Drys. 100% financing w/no liens THE LAND. Reproduction 40 knife Dura-Drums, & or red tape, call Steve at ★★★★★★★★★★★★ without permission is drum conversions for 5400 Fairfax Ag for an appointstrictly prohibited. & 5460. Call (507)427-3520 ment. 888-830-7757 www.ok-enterprise.com Employment

February 7, 2014

29 THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

AUCTIONS & CLASSIFIEDS


THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

30

Steffes Auction Calendar 2013-14 For More info Call 1-800-726-8609 or visit our website: www.steffesauctioneers.com

Opening Saturday, February 1 & Closing Monday, February 10: IQBID February Auction, Upper Midwest Locations, Owners selling Ag, Construction, Trucks RV’s, Vehicles & More! Opening Saturday, February 1 & Closing Friday, February 14: IQBID Farm Toy Auction, Litchfield, MN 1/16 & 1/64 size Farm Toy Auction Opening Saturday, February 1 & Closing Wednesday, February 12: IQBID Morris Iverson Antique and Collectible Auction, Litchfield, MN, Guns, Knives, Beer Signs, Railroad Lights & More Unique Collectibles! Friday, February 7 @ 1 PM: Cass County Flood Property Acquisitions RESCHEDULED Auction Date, Steffes Arena, West Fargo, NH, 45+ lots “to be removed or salvage” in “as is condition”

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Opening Friday, February 14 & Closing Monday, February 24: IQBID Kibble Equipment Auction, Montevideo, MN, Late Model Online Auction featuring Track Tractors, MFWD & 2WD Tractors, Combines, Heads, Grain Cart, Planters, Rippers, Tillage, Navigation Equipment, Lawn Tractors & More! Opening Friday, February 21 & Closing Wednesday, March 5: IQBID American Grain LLC, Watkins, MN online auction Wednesday, February 26 @ 10 AM: Moellers Inc. RE & Business Liquidation, York, ND, Large Machine Shop, Lathes, Drills, Welders, Support Items & RE Opening Saturday, March 1 & Closing Monday, March 10: IQBID March Auction, Upper Midwest Locations, Owners selling Ag, Construction, Trucks, RV’s, Vehicles & More; Advertising Deadline: Saturday, February 15 Opening Saturday, March 1 & Closing Wednesday, March 10: IQBID Steffen Implement, Litchfield, MN, Shop/Owner Operator & Parts Manuals Wednesday, March 12 @ 10 AM: AgIron West Fargo Event, Red River Valley Fairgrounds, West Fargo, ND, Advertising Deadline: Wednesday, February 12 Thursday, March 20 @ 10 AM: AgIron Litchfield Event, Litchfield, MN, Advertising Deadline: Wednesday, February 19

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Wednesday, March 26 @ 10 AM: Chuck & Cheri Haus Auction, Hankinson, ND, Farm Retirement Opening Tuesday, April 1 & Closing Wednesday, April 9: IQBID April Auction, Upper Midwest Locations, Owners selling Ag, Construction, Trucks, RV’s, Vehicles & More! Advertising Deadline: Saturday, March 15 Wednesday, April 2 @ 10 AM: Thomas M. “Mickey” Snortland, Sharon, ND, Large Farm Equipment Auction Thursday, April 3 @ 11 AM: Kevin & Arlene Knudson, Larimore, ND, Farm Retirement Auction Tuesday, April 8 @ 11 AM: Seibold Auction, New Rockford, ND, Farm Retirement Auction

Farm Implements

035 Farm Implements

5 Used Mandako LAND ROLLERS

Rental Units

BUILT HEAVIER We Trade/Deliver Anywhere Dealer 319-347-6282

035

FOR SALE: '13 JCB 280 skidloader, loaded, deluxe cab. Call 507-230-0990 FOR SALE: 14' Kewanee cultipacker, hyd cylinder included, $2,850/OBO. 507920-7594

FOR SALE: 10R22” corn- FOR SALE: IH 28' 496 disk, $8,200; IH 2350 ldr w/ 8' head, IH 800 series made to bucket, $3,100; IH 800 8-18 fit JD combine; also 26 A/R plow, $2,500; Melroe weighted air inlets for live70' drag, $1,200. 218-739-4561 stock barn #2500 w/ all new baffle boards; also nursery FOR SALE: JD 435 round feeders. 507-532-2094 baler w/innoculant applic., $7,500; '07 JD 3710 plow, FOR SALE: Case Skids: $32,000; Chandler tandem 1840, 1825, both nice; Graviaxle dry fert/lime spreader ty Wagons: Brent 544, w/variable rate, $7,000. 320Demco 365, Parker 2600; 510-0468 Tractors: IH 560, sharp, SALE: Westfield Ford 800 P-St; IH 480 disk, FOR 13”x71' straight auger, plus more. $5,900; 60' Flex-coil tine Peterson Equipment drag, $4,900. 507-327-6430 New Ulm 507-276-6957 or 6958


Farm Implements

035 Tractors

036

www.haugimp.com TRACTORS

‘08 CS/IH Magnum 275, MFWD, 275 hp., 380-90R50 triples, 5 hyds., 2999 hrs. ................................$149,000

‘90 JD 4555, 2WD, 155 hp., 380-90R50 duals, 3 hyds., 5759 hrs. ..................$45,500

‘13 JD 7200R, MFWD, 200 hp., 380-90R50 duals, 4 hyds., 43 hrs...........$177,000

‘11 JD 8285R, MFWD, 285 hp., 380-90R54 duals, 4 hyds., 1307 hrs. ..$210,000

‘12 JD 8310R, MFWD, 310 hp., 380-90R54 duals, 4 hyds., 801 hrs. ....$250,000

‘07 JD 9330, 4WD, 375 hp., 18.4x46 triples, 5 hyds., 2463 hrs. ................$208,000

WANTED

DAMAGED GRAIN STATE-WIDE

We pay top dollar for your damaged grain. We are experienced handlers of your wet, dry, burnt and mixed grains. Trucks and Vacs available. Immediate response anywhere. CALL FOR A QUOTE TODAY

PRUESS ELEV., INC.

PLANTERS

‘03 CS/IH 1200-P Planter, 12R30, CCS ..........................$47,000 ‘11 JD 1990 Drill, 40’, no till, monitor ............................$95,000 ‘08 JD DB44 Planter, 24R22, CCS, Seedstar................$144,900 ‘09 JD DB60 Planter, 24R30, Seedstar 2, fert..............$154,500

SPRING TILLAGE

‘11 JD 9430, 4WD, 425 hp., 710-70R42 duals, 4 hyds., 2206 hrs. ................$238,000

‘12 JD 9460R, 4WD, 460 hp., 800-70R38 duals, 4 hyds., 811 hrs. ..................$270,000

‘12 JD 9510R, 4WD, 510 hp., 76x50, 210 hrs. ............CALL

‘10 JD 9530T, TRACK, 475 hp., 36” belts, 4 hyds., 1100 hrs. ................$289,000

‘10 JD 9630T, TRACK, 530 hp., 36” belts, 5 hyds., 2205 hrs. ................$280,000

‘12 JD 2210 Field Cult., 51’6”, 111 shank ......$79,000

1-800-828-6642

If you’re having a Farm Auction, let other Farmers know it! Upcoming Issues of THE LAND

Southern MNNorthern IA February 14 February 28 March 14 March 28 April 11 April 25

Northern MN February 21 March 7 March 21 April 4 April 18 May 2

PO Box 3169 Mankato, MN 56002 Phone: 507-345-4523 or 800-657-4665 Fax: 507-345-1027

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‘04 DMI Tigermate II Field Cult, 48.5’, 97-shank ..........$39,950 DMI Tigermate II Field Cult, 49’, 7” shovels, harrow ....$37,900 ‘09 JD 2210 Field Cult, 44.5’, 7” shovels, harrow..........$47,500 ‘09 JD 2210 Field Cult, 45’, harrow ................................$48,000 ‘08 JD 200 Seedbed Finisher, 35’......................................$9,500 Summers Coil Packer, 50’, hyd fold................................$18,900 ‘08 Salford RTS27 RTS, 27’, grease bank, harrow........$38,500 Salford RTS41 RTS, 41’, coulter, harrow........................$62,500 ‘09 Salford RTS50 RTS, 50’, 5-section, harrow ............$79,000 ‘12 Salford 570 RTS, 50’, harrow, grease bank ..........$110,500

CONSTRUCTION

‘08 JD 313 Skid, 512 hrs, 49 hp, power quick tach ......$18,500 ‘11 JD 315 Skid, 1290 hrs, 49 hp, cab ..........................$19,900 ‘05 JD 317 Skid, 1720 hrs, 61 hp, 72” bucket ..............$14,500 ‘05 JD 320 Skid, 984 hrs, 66 hp, power quick tach ......$23,900 ‘12 JD 320D Skid, 523 hrs, 63 hp, 2-spd, cab, 84” bkt $37,500 ‘11 JD 323D Skid, 695 hrs, 66 hp, Tracks, 2-spd, cab..$41,000 ‘12 JD 332D Skid, 753 hrs, 89 hp, 2-spd, cab ..............$44,000 ‘04 JD 35C Compact Excavator, 1700 hrs......................$24,900 ‘06 JD 544J Wheel Loader, 5400 hrs, 4WD, roll off bkt$85,000 ‘13 JD 1810E Ejector Scraper, 1810E fixed blade ..............CALL DyMax Roll Off Bucket ....................................................$25,000

HAY & FORAGE

‘03 JD 557 Round Baler, 540 PTO, single axle ..............$14,500 ‘11 JD 568 Round Baler, 540 PTO, surface wrap ..........$35,900 ‘11 JD 568 Round Baler, 7400 hrs, mega wide pickup $36,750 ‘12 JD 468 Round Baler, 2284 hrs, surface wrap..........$33,500 ‘02 NH BB940 Square Baler, 24,000 hrs, roller chute....$45,000

UTILITY VEHICLES

‘06 JD 1770, 24R30, CCS, fert. ........................$117,900

Paal

Neil

‘10 JD DB90, 36R30, CCS, vacuum ..................$215,000

Hiko

Felix

Dave

‘12 JD Gator Utility Vehicle, 23 hp, power lift ..................$8,950 ‘00 JD Gator Utility Vehicle, 1028 hrs, 4x2, bed liner......$3,250 ‘12 JD Gator Utility Vehicle, 130 hrs, 50 hp, 4WD, gas $11,900 ‘11 JD Gator Utility Vehicle, 288 hrs, 825I, 4WD ............$9,500 ‘06 Polaris Sportsman ATV, 151 hrs, 4WD, front winch $5,450

Jared

Ron

Matt

www.haugimp.com

Cal

Lance

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Deadlines are 1 week prior to publication with Holiday deadlines 1 day earlier ** Indicates Early Deadline

‘89 CS/IH 9150, 6702 hrs, 4WD, 280 hp, 20.8-42........$46,500 ‘72 IHC 966, 5960 hrs, 2WD, 91 hp, 18.4, 1 hyd............$8,500 ‘79 JD 2840, 1328 hrs, 2WD, 80 hp, 18.4x38, 2 hyds $10,000 JD 4030, 2WD, 80 hp, 14.9-38 ......................................$14,900 ‘84 JD 4450, 6755 hrs, 2WD, 135 hp, 18.4x38, duals..$33,900 ‘90 JD 4555, 6689 hrs, 2WD, 157 hp, 14.9x46, duals..$40,000 ‘75 JD 4630, 2770 hrs, 2WD, 150 hp, 14.9x46............$16,500 ‘74 JD 4630, 8500 hrs, 2WD, 18.4-38, duals, 2 hyds ..$15,500 ‘81 JD 4640, 12,158 hrs, 2WD, 156 hp, 14.9x46 ........$18,500 ‘12 JD 4720, 1014 hrs, MFWD, 66 hp, 17.5L-24..........$41,500 ‘92 JD 4760, 6950 hrs, MFWD, 175 hp, 14.9x46 ........$59,000 ‘13 JD 5085M, 80 hrs, MFWD, 85 hp, 18.4R30, 3 hyds ..CALL ‘13 JD 6150R, 301 hrs, MFWD, 150 hp, 380-90R50 $119,000 ‘13 JD 7200R, 732 hrs, MFWD, 200 hp, 380-90R50 $159,900 ‘11 JD 7200R, 815 hrs, MFWD, 200 hp, 4 hyds, ldr ..$165,000 ‘94 JD 7800, 6395 hrs, 2WD, 145 hp, 18.4-42, duals..$46,500 ‘05 JD 8120T, 2450 hrs, Track, 230 hp, 24” belts ......$120,000 ‘12 JD 8235R, 181 hrs, MFWD, 235 hp, 380-90R54 $173,000 ‘12 JD 8285R, 708 hrs, MFWD, 285 hp, 380-90R54 $241,000 ‘13 JD 8285R, MFWD, 285 hp, 380-90R54, duals ....$255,000 ‘13 JD 8285R, 206 hrs, MFWD, 285 hp, 380-90R54 $245,000 ‘13 JD 8285R, MFWD, 285 hp, 380-90R54, duals ............CALL ‘00 JD 8410, 6527 hrs, MFWD, 235 hp, 18.4-46..........$99,500 ‘13 JD 9560R, 574 hrs, 4WD, 538 hp, 800-70R38 ....$330,000 ‘12 JD 9560R, 403 hrs, 4WD, 560 hp, 800-70R38 ....$325,000 ‘13 JD 9560R, 950 hrs, 4WD, 560 hp, 800-70R38 ....$315,000 ‘04 JD 9620T, 3525 hrs, Track, 500 hp, 30”, 4 hyds ..$175,000 ‘10 JD 9630, 890 hrs, 4WD, 530 hp, 800-70R38 ......$277,000 ‘09 JD 9630, 2109 hrs, 4WD, 530 hp, 800-70R38 ....$238,000

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Hydrostatic & Hydraulic Re- FOR SALE: Case IH 9330 Steiger, 3 pt hitch, PTO, pair Repair-Troubleshootexc tires, exc condition. ing Sales-Design Custom 715-896-0828 hydraulic hose-making up to 2” Service calls made. FOR SALE: Hesston 140-90 STOEN'S Hydrostatic Sertractor w/ FWA & power vice 16084 State Hwy 29 N shift, 160 engine hp, 3540 hrs, nice! Priced at $23,900. Glenwood, MN 56334 320507-327-6430 634-4360 IHC 4130 skidloader, 25 hp FOR SALE: JD '13 6150R, premium cab, IVT, 18.4x42 Onan gas, 800” lift, new 54” tires, MFD, w/JD 360 ldr, bucket, shop work done, loaded, just like new, 160 $4,250. John 712-358-1008 hrs. 507-272-9358 JD 3020 D tractor, 3 pt, WF, 2 hyds, $6,750; JD 2510 gas FOR SALE: JD 9200 4WD, nice, $65,000; JD 6410 MFD tractor, 3 pt, 1 hyd, JDWF, w/ 640 ldr, no cab, $29,000; $4,500; JD 148 ldr, 6' buckJD 843 cornhead, rebuilt, et, $2,450; 18.4x38 10 bolt $7,000, JD 220 BH, $2,000. duals, $1,750; JD 10 bolt 3 Owner retired. 507-330-3945 5/8” or 4” hubs, $600/pr. 320769-2756 FOR SALE: MF 4880, 4WD, approx 7000 hrs, runs good, JD 8850, 370hp, 9185 hrs, $12,500; Cat Challenger 55 PTO, 30.5x32 duals, Trac, approx 7000 hrs, runs $21,000; JD 4630, PS, 9530 real good, PTO, 3 pt, hrs, 3pt, blade, 2 fuel $38,500. 320-859-4319 tanks, $14,000; FORD TW35 3880 hrs, 2WD, du- FOR SALE: Used Oliver tractor parts for 770 & 880 als, 3pt, 192hp, $15,000; that we are parting out this HAGIE 8250 sprayer 60' week, parts include 770 gas Insight/autoswath, motor, 880 dsl motor, both $11,000; '01 9500 HOULE run good; also WFs, hyd 7sh Dietrich, c. flowmeunits, 770 long rear axles, & ter, $45,000; UNVER1pr of steel pressed rims, FERTH 35' rolling bas11x38 tires, 9 bolt & trans & ket II, $3,700; AGRIrear end parts. 218-564-4273 PRODUCTS saddle tanks or 218-639-0315 JD 8000 or Cat, $2,500; YETTER 3415 rotary hoe NEW AND USED TRACTOR 15', $800; Allis 5 btm PARTS JD 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, plow w/ leveler, $500. 55, 50 Series & newer tracVORWERK FARMS tors, AC-all models, Large WYKOFF, MINNESOTA Inventory, We ship! Mark 507-352-6091 or Heitman Tractor Salvage 507-421-1481 715-673-4829 Oliver 1755, gas, $4,900, Kubota 1300D dsl hydra mac w/loader, $5,800; Glencoe skidloader, 35 hp, 1300” lift, diggers, 13', 15' or 17'; 60” bucket-shop, work done, White 20', $490. 507-665-3086. $9,450. Call John 712-3581008 Specializing in most AC MM Model GVI LP gas tracused tractor parts for tor, SN 16002215; also, Gsale. Rosenberg Tractor 705 LP, SN 23800568, Salvage, Welcome MN $2,500/ea. 712-288-6442 56181, 507-848-6379 or 507236-8726 We buy Salvage Equipment Parts Available Harvesting Equip 037 Hammell Equip., Inc. (507)867-4910 FOR SALE: JD 693 head, '98, 6x30", good poly, pixTractors 036 all knife rolls, Contour Case IH 9270, 20.8x42 duals Master drives, hydraulic 70%, 4 remotes, radar, 12 deck plates, header spd, 8900 hrs., auto guidheight, new rolls, deck ance, serviced, $45,500. 507plates, chains, chain 327-0858 slides 1200 acres ago $14,900 (507) 317-0178 CIH 5240 Maxxum, 2WD, cab, 6,000 hrs., 3 pt., PTO, pwr shift, new rubber, nice FOR SALE: Loftness 22' stalk chopper, pull type, 4 cond., $23,500. 507-327-0858 whl hyd lift, good condition, FOR SALE: '95 Case IH shedded, $6,850. 320-359-2692 9270, P/S, 710-38 Firestone tires, @ 95%, Tiger style Planting Equip 038 duals, easy steer, 4 remotes, exc cond, 5700 hrs, '97 JD 455, 25' bean drill, $67,000. 507-360-3396 markers, JD 250 monitor, disk openers like new, field FOR SALE: '98 MF ready. 507-364-5853 8120/FWA tractor, w/ duals w/ 1048 MF loader, FOR SALE: '02 White 16x22 130PTO/150hp, 4018 hrs, planter, dual lift assist, liq nice! Priced $43,900. 507fert w/ elec pump, 3 corn & 327-6430 1 soybean plates; spare planter parts, also. 320-583FOR SALE: 753 Bobcat, 2930 5324 hrs, 60” material bucket, runs & looks good, side en- FOR SALE: 16 JD Planter Covers Part # AA57258; closure, no door or heat; List $35.06 each, will sell also Massey Harris 55 utilifor half price $18/ea. Like ty; JD MC crawler. 320-249new. (507) 236-1387 0363 or 320-290-5003

31 THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

E Hwy 12 - Willmar 800-428-4467 Hwy 24 - Litchfield 877-693-4333

Hydra Mac skidloader, 9DL FOR SALE: '91 CIH 7130 MFWD, 7100 hrs., duals, Isuzu dsl, 30 hp, 1100# lift, wgts, quick hitch, $42,000 56” bucket, fresh overhaul, OBO. 320-360-0744 $7,950. John 712-358-1008


Planting Equip

32 THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

~ NEW EQUIPMENT/BIG INVENTORY ~

Notch Equipment: • Rock Buckets • Grapple Forks • Manure Forks • Bale Spears • Hi-Volume Buckets & Pallet Forks • Bale Transports & Feeder Wagons, 16’-34’ • Adult & Young Stock Feeders & Bale Feeders • Land Levelers Smidley Equipment: • Steer Stuffers • Hog Feeders • Hog Huts • Calf Creep Feeders • Lamb & Sheep Feeders • Cattle & Hog Waterers • Mini Scale Sioux Equipment: • Gates • Calving Pens • Haymax Bale Feeders • Cattle Panels • Feeders Panels • Head Gates • Hog Feeders • Squeeze Chutes & Tubs

• Port-A-Hut Shelters (Many Sizes) • Bergman Cattle Feeders – Special Prices • Lorenz Snowblowers - All Models in Stock! • GT (Tox-O-Wic) Grain Dryers, 350-800 bu. EARLY ORDER DISCOUNTS NOW IN EFFECT! • Sheep & Calf Feeders • Livestock Equipment by Vern’s Mfg. • Mister Squeeze Cattle Chutes & Hd. Gates • Peck Grain Augers – Big Discounts • MDS Buckets for Loaders & Skidloaders • Powder River Livestock & Horse Equipment • Tire Scrapers for Skidsteers, 6’-9’ • Hay feeders for horned animals

~ USED EQUIPMENT ~

• 225 bu Meyers poly spreader w/hyd endgate, VG • Gehl 310 Scavenger II spreader • 2 Wheel Bunk Feeder Wagon (rebuilt) • 72” PTO Woods snowblower • Skidsteer snowblower • IHC #80 Snowblower, VG • Smidley Cattle & Hog Feeders

• Jari Sickle Mowers • MDS Roto King Round Bale Processor • Parts for GT Tox-O-Wic Grain Dryers • Sitrex Wheel Rakes • Bale Baskets • SI Feeders & Bunks • (Hayhopper) Bale Feeders • JBM Bunks w/headlocks • Calftel Hutches & Animal Barns • R&C Poly Bale Feeders • JBM hay & grain feeders & bunks • Amish Built Oak Bunk Feeders & Bale Racks • JBM & Notch Bale Trailers • Goat & Sheep Feeders • Mist Sprayers, gas or PTO • NEW ITEM! * 3 Pt. Fence Mowers* • Fainting goats & min. donkeys

DR® POWER EQUIPMENT

038 Tillage Equip

FOR SALE: JD 1770 planter, '98, 12x30, flex fold, mech. drive, Yetter screw adjust row cleaners, liquid fertilizer,single disk openers, piston pump, openers at 14.75", either size boxes, rear hitch, Seedstar monitor w/o display, $34,750/OBO (or best offer) (507)3170178 JD 1750, 6R conservation planter, finger corn & radial bean meter, w/fert. cross auger w/box extensions, many options. 763-389-1957

039

Tillage Equip

039

2008 LANDOLL 23 Ft Model FOR SALE: Case IH 36' 4900 #6230 Heavy Tandem Disk field cultivator w/ newer Heavy Duty mulcher, Front Blades 23”, Rear 23 $7,500. 320-264-3791 1/2”, Shedded Like New. 500 Bu E-Z Flow Wagon w/ Tarp Lights & Brakes Real FOR SALE: IHC #700 pull type moldboard plow, 6 or 7 Good. 319-347-6138 Can Del 16” bottom, all new tires & wear parts, can deliver, FOR SALE: '12 72' HD Sum$4,900. Call 320-220-3114 mers super harrow w/ hyd tine angles, less than 500 acres, like new. 320-269-8719 Machinery Wanted 040 or 320-226-0296 FOR SALE: 3pt JD 610 chis- All kinds of New & Used farm equipment – disc chisel plow, 20', 4 gauge els, field cults, planters, wheels, $4,500/OBO; 3pt JD soil finishers, cornheads, 1610 chisel plow, 14', 2 feed mills, discs, balers, gauge wheels, $3,000/OBO. haybines, etc. 507-438-9782 320-583-7433

• Field & Brush Mowers • Roto-Hog Power Tillers • Stump Grinders • Log Splitters • Chippers • Power Graders • Power Wagons • Leaf & Lawn Vacuums • Versa-trailers

20% Off New In-Stock Equipment Listed Below:

• Mr. Squeeze Squeeze Chute • S-I Arrow Front Hay & Silage 4-Wheel Feeder • E-Z Flo 300 bu. Box w/10-ton E-Z Trail Wagon • E-Z Trail Bale Basket • Bergman Cattle Feeder • Lorenz #9101 9’ Snowblower, 1000 rpm

Wanted to Buy:

• Good Smaller Manure Spreaders • Cattle & Calf Feeders, Hog Feeders • Cattle Handling Equipment

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

/FARM, HOME & CONSTRUCTION

Office Location - 305 Adams Street Hutchinson, MN 55350

320-587-2162, Ask for Larry

INVENTORY REDUCTION SALE!! AZLAND SEED TENDERS

2 Box - on hand ....................$10,550 4 Box Scale & Talc - on hand 4 Box Skid - on hand

STROBEL SEED TENDERS

2 Box - on hand ......................$8,900 BT-200 - on hand BT-300 ..........................................Call

SEED SHUTTLE SEED TENDERS

SS-290 - on hand SS-400 - on hand SS-500 - coming in ......................Call

ENDURAPLAS NURSE TANKS

1100 Gal., 6.5 Honda & hoses $5,750

AZLAND FUEL TRAILERS

500 Extended Platform............$7,800

WOODFORD WELDING BALE RACKS

18’ - 23’ - 28’

HARVEST INTERNATIONAL AUGERS

H 13-62, 72, 82, 92, 102, 112 H 10-62, 72, 82 T 10-32, 42, 52, 62 Auger Joggers - on hand........$1,950

WHEATHEART AUGERS All Sizes

16-82 and 16-112..........................Call

COMBINE HEAD MOVERS

Renegade 25’ & 30’ - 4 Wheel Harvest International 35’, 40’ & 45’

KOYKER LOADERS & PRODUCTS

585 - on hand ..........................$6,995 1050 Grain Bagger 210 GraIn Vac

E-Z TRAIL GRAIN CARTS

510 - 710 - on hand

E-Z TRAIL GRAIN WAGONS

400 bu & 500 bu - on hand

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

*************** USED EQUIPMENT ***************

Feterl 12” drive over, Like New ............................$4,500 1981 Versatile 555..............$12,750 2012 SS-400, Scale............$24,500 2012 SS-400 ......................$21,500 EZ Trail 860 Grain Cart, red, Like New............................$19,000 Brent 470 Grain Cart............$6,500

Land Pride 1872 Mower ......$1,250 Hitch Doc 4 box seed cart, green ..................................$13,500 Westfield 1371 Auger w/swing hopper walker, PTO ............$8,500 Feterl 10x34 truck auger, PTO ....................................$2,100

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

‘11 JD 8320R, MFWD, IVT, ILS, 5 remotes, 60 GPM hyd. pump, 380/90R54 duals, 380/80R38 front duals, wgts., 3180 hrs., Warranty ............................$165,000 ‘10 JD 8295R, MFWD, Powershift, 1300 front axle, 480/80R50 duals, 4 remotes, 60 GPM hyd. pump, wgts., 2325 hrs. ............................................$149,000 ‘08 JD 8230, MFWD, Powershift, 1300 front axle, 380/90R50 duals, 380/85R34 single fronts, 4 remotes, 60 GPM hyd. pump, wgts., 3290 hrs. ............$112,500 ‘07 JD 7730, 2WD, 16-spd. power quad trans., 18.4R42 singles, 3 remotes, 540/1000 PTO, 6575 hrs...........................................................$58,500 ‘11 NH T8.390, MFWD, suspended front axle, 19-spd. trans., 710/70R42 duals, 600/70R30 single front tires, Luxury cab, 310 hrs. ....................$159,500 ‘08 JD 8430, MFWD, Powershift, 380/90R50 duals, 4600 hrs.........................................................$125,000 ‘10 JD 9530T, 36” tracks, 3 pt. hitch, 4268 hrs. ......................................................................$147,500 ‘05 JD 8320, MFWD, ILS, 380/90R50 duals, wgts., 9600 hrs...........................................................$67,500 ‘06 NH TV145 bi-directional tractor, 3 pt. hitch & PTO on cab end only, 18.4R34 tires, Mega Flow hyd. pump, 84LB loader w/grapple, 1100 hrs. ........$69,000 ‘11 CIH Magnum 290, MFWD, 380/90R54 duals, 380/80R38 front duals, high cap. hyd. pump, 23-spd. creeper trans., 5 remotes, 1425 hrs. ............$139,500 ‘05 MF 5455, MFWD, cab, 3600 hrs. ................$29,500

Keith Bode Fairfax, MN 55332 507-381-1291

EQUIPMENT CIH 8950, MFD ........................................$59,900 CIH 7130, 2WD ........................................$32,900 CIH 7120, 2 whl, 4900 hrs. ......................$39,900 JD 4430, OS, PS ............................Coming Soon ‘77 JD 4430, quad....................................$19,900 JD 4240 Quad ................................Coming Soon JD 4240, PS..............................................$21,900 JD 4230, Quad, OS, w/JD 720 ldr ..........$18,900 JD 4040, Quad ........................................$21,900 JD 4030, Syncro, open station................$14,900 JD 4030, Quad, open station ..................$14,900 (2) ‘69 JD 4020, diesel ....................................Call JD 2940 w/146 loader..............................$11,900 (2) IH 1026, hydro ..........................From $15,900 IH 856, 1256, 1456..........................From $10,900 IH 806, diesel..............................................$8,900 (2) IH 560, gas & diesel ....................From $4,000 Gehl 4635 skid steer, 6’ bkt ....................$12,900 Allied Buhler 695 ........................................$4,900 JD Sound Guard Cabs ..................................Call

LOADERS

“New” Koyker 510, JD 148, JD 158, JD 522, JD 58, JD 48, IH 2250 JD Soundguard Cabs, Call for info

KIESTER IMPLEMENT, INC. 110 S. Main, P.O. Box 249 • Kiester, MN

507-294-3387

www.midwestfarmsales.com


Machinery Wanted

040

Machinery Wanted

040

Feed Seed Hay

050

WANTED: Help locating 1962 JD 4010 diesel SN SPRAY TRAILER Semi wa2T31612. 952-873-6180 ter trailers, rust-free in different sizes; Tanks, WANTED: Hiniker 5000 or pumps, hose reels, etc. 6000 row crop cultivator, 12www.rydelltrailers.com 30 or 16-30 row, 563-920-0011 (701) 474-5780

33

USED PARTS LARSON SALVAGE

CAMBRIDGE, MN 763-689-1179 We Ship Daily

Visa and MasterCard Accepted

The Affordable Way to Tile Your Fields 3 Point Hitch & Pull Type Models Available • Walking Tandem Axles • Formed V Bottom on

Buy Factory Direct & $AVE!

Shoe & Boot forms to Tile. No more Crushed Tile • Paralled Pull Arms, Zero Pitch for the Most Accurate Tile Placement

© 2011 CNH America LLC. New Holland is a registered trademark of CNH America LLC

TJOSVOLD EQUIPMENT Sales & Service • West Hwy. 212 — Granite Falls, MN 56241 800-337-1581 • 320-564-2331 • After Hours (320) 212-4849 www.tjosvoldequip.com

USED TRACTORS

‘08 Buhler 435, 4WD, 710/70R42 duals, 2250 hrs. ..........................................................$161,900 ‘05 Buhler 2180, MFD, Super steer, 14.9R46 duals, EZ Pilot, 2000 hrs. ................................................$95,900 ‘11 NH T3045, MFD, cab, CVT, 350 hrs. ................$35,500 ‘95 Ford 8870, MFD, Super steer, Mega Flow, 750 hrs. ................................................................$74,900 ‘88 Ford TW35, MFD, w/18.4R42 duals, 4900 hrs.$33,900 ‘97 NH 7740, SLE pkg., MFD, w/cab, A/C, loader & bucket ..................................................................$29,900 ‘97 NH 7740, SLE pkg., MFD, 18.4-34, 4600 hrs...$29,700 ‘83 Ford 7710, MFD, w/4500 hrs. ..........................$21,900 ‘04 Buhler 2425, 4WD, 710/70R38 duals, full wgts., 3350 hrs. ..........................................................Coming In ‘95 Ford 9680, 20.8R42 duals (90%), 4 remotes ..........................................................................Coming In

COMBINES/HEADS

MISCELLANEOUS EQUIP.

‘01 NH TR99, RWA combine, straddle duals, bin ext., chaff spreader, 40K in parts, Field Ready! ..........$109,900 (2) ‘01 NH TR99, 2100 hrs., 18.4R42 (4), Y/M, GPS, Field Ready............................................................$89,900 ‘06 NH CR960, 20.8R42 duals, 1391 hrs., Loaded, Nice! ..................................................................Coming In ‘04 NH CR940, 20.5-32 tires, Y/M, 1350 hrs. ......$119,900 (4) ‘10 NH 99C, 8R30” chopping cornheads From $60,900 ‘00 NH 996, 8R30” cornhead w/K&M chopper ......$39,950 (2) ‘10 NH 74C, 35’ flex heads......................From $33,900 ‘04 NH 98C, 6R30” cornhead, Like New! ..............$33,000 ‘02 NH 96C, 8R30” cornhead, Loaded ..................$25,900 ‘00 NH 73C, 30’ flex head w/AWS, cut, New! ........$25,900 ‘98 NH 996, 12R22” cornhead, Loaded ................$23,900 ‘02 JD F930 flexhead ..............................................$15,900 NH 974, 10R22” cornhead, poly ............................$11,900 (2) ‘97 NH 973, 30’ flex head ................................$10,500 ‘98 CIH 1020, 25’ flex head......................................$9,900 (2) ‘98 NH 973, 25’ flex head ..................................$9,500 ‘94 NH 974, 8R30 cornhead ....................................$8,900 ‘92 NH 974, 6R30” cornhead ..................................$8,900 ‘11 Geringhoff 8R30 chopping corn head - Green ........Call ‘02 JD 9650STS, 20.8R38 duals, Greenstar, 1780 hrs. ............................................................................$104,900 ‘91 NH L785, 2-spd., cab ........................................$7,500 ‘10 NH 74C, 35’ flex head ..................................Coming In ‘08 NH L175, 2-spd., cab, A/C, pilot controls, 990 hrs. ‘94 NH TR87 Q5-32, terrain tracer, 3200 hrs. ....Coming In ..............................................................................$29,900

SKID STEERS

Visit Us At: www.tjosvoldequip.com

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

‘05 JD 1780, 16/31 planter, 3 bu. boxes ............Coming In ‘00 JD 750, 20’ drill, Nice! ....................................$19,900 ‘13 Degelman LR7651 & LR7645, Demo’s, New! ........Call ‘12 EZ Trail 510 grain cart, tarps & lights ..............$14,900 ‘01 EZ Trail 475 grain cart w/Shurlock tarp..............$9,900 ‘11 Loftness 240, semi-mtd. shredder w/tow bar ..$22,900 ‘11 NH BR7090 Silage Special rnd baler, loaded, 3000 bales ............................................................$32,900 ‘11 Wilrich 657DCR, 23’ w/discs & rolling baskets & harrow ..................................................................$51,900 ‘11 NH H6740, 6 disc mower ..................................$8,500 ‘98 NH 616 disc mower, Nice ..................................$5,900 ‘11 Parker 524 grain cart, holdover ..............................Call ‘10 Parker 1048 grain cart w/tarp ......................Coming In ‘12 Case 100, 50’ crumbler, Like New! ..................$18,900 ‘05 JD 200, 45’ crumbler ......................................$15,000 ‘07 NH 1475 w/HS 14 head, Clean! ........................$19,900 ‘07 Parker 838 grain cart w/tarp ............................$24,000 ‘07 NH 617, 7 disc mower, Rebuilt ..........................$6,900 ‘04 Wilrich 957DDR ripper, 5 shank w/harrow, 30” spacing ..........................................................$22,900 ‘03 Loftness 20’ semi-mtd. shredder ....................$13,900 ‘92 DMI 530 ripper w/leads ................................Coming In DMI 527 ripper........................................................$12,900 ‘11 Wilrich 513SP 9-shank ripper w/spike harrow ..........................................................................Coming In ‘06 Wilrich 957DDR ripper, 7x30”..........................$19,900 ’00 DMI 40’ crumbler..............................................$14,900 ‘13 NH H7450 discbine, Loaded, Demo Unit ..........$28,900 ‘00 JD 980, 45’ field cult. w/harrow, Nice! ............$19,900 ‘88 CIH 4900, 45’ field cult. w/harrow ..................$10,900 New Unverferth rolling reels, 18’ & 22’ ........................Call ‘10 Krause 5850-21 Dominator, Nice! ................Coming In IH 20’ chisel plow ....................................................$2,150 Wilrich 30’ field cult w/Nobel harrow ......................$1,950 ‘00 Fast 6420 sprayer, 90’ boom, Raven................$15,900 (2) Parker 2500 wagons ....................................Ea. $5,000 Demco 450 wagon....................................................$4,900 ‘04 Allied 108” snowblower w/truck spout, NIce!....$6,500

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Good selection of tractor parts - New & Used All kinds of hay equipment, haybines, balers, choppers parted out. New combine belts for all makes. Swather canvases, round baler belting, used & new tires. 6 miles East of

w/425/65R22.5 Tires for Superior Grade Control • Tile Installation Depth Gauge

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

Disc chisels: JD 714 & 712, WANTED: Meyers 3600 ma- Corn silage for sale, 60% nure spreader. (563)682moisture. $45/ton, pick up Glencoe 7400; Field Cults 7739 in Menomonie, WI. (715) under 30': JD 980, small 308-7608 grain carts & gravity boxes 300-400 bu. Finishers under Spraying Equip 041 20', clean 4 & 6R stalk chopDairy Quality Alfalfa pers; Nice JD 215 & 216 FOR SALE: '07 Hardi NaviTested big squares & round flex heads; JD 643 cornbales, delivered from South gator 1100, 80' 1100 gal, heads Must be clean; JD Dakota John Haensel (605) flush & rinse, triple nozzle, corn planters, 4-6-8 row. 351-5760 hyd driven pump, chemical 715-299-4338 inductor, HC 5500 controller, very nice, $19,750. Dairy quality western alfalWANTED TO BUY: Alufa, big squares or small 320-634-4307 minum single chain elevasquares, delivered in semi tor 12' – 16' long, good con- FOR SALE: 1600 gal plastic loads. Clint Haensel dition. 507-213-9760 or 507tank on tandem running (605) 310-6653 373-6670 gear, 5.5HP Honda engine w/ 15 gal mix cone; 1600 gal WANTED TO BUY: Case IH plastic tank on hay rack Magnum or Maximum 5.5HP Briggs engine. 320tractor, low hrs, 320-352748-7726 or 320-760-5492 3878 FOR SALE: Demco HT 1000 WANTED TO BUY: JD 8300 gal sprayer, 60' cross fold or 450 grain drill or IH boom, 13.9x38 tires, grain drill, w/ grass. 320foamer, Raven 440, 70 gal 352-3878 rinse tank, good condition, $8,000. 507-360-3396 WANTED: 10' Kewanee wheel disk. Leave message at 507-932-3278


YOUR SPRAYER HEADQUARTERS (B) Belle Plaine, MN • 1051 Old Hwy. 169 Blvd.

34 THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

(952) 873-2224

(H) Hollandale, MN • W. Hwy. 251

(507) 889-4221

(O) Owatonna, MN • 3555 SW 18th St.

(507) 451-4054

‘12 JD 4730, 618 hrs., ‘07 JD 4930, 3100 hrs., ‘12 JD 4940, 767 hrs., 90’ boom......................$209,900 Dry Box ........................$160,000 120’ SS boom ..............$281,500

Contact Paul Gohlke about JD Crop Insurance & Total Weather Insurance - 612-756-0001 4WD TRACTORS

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

050

FOR SALE - Western Hay & Straw In large squares or round bales by the semi load. Protein 18-26%, RFV up to-200. Smikrud, Galesville, WI 608-582-2143 or 608-484-0916 cell (Over 23 years in the Hay Business) Grass hay, straw, corn stalks in round bales, net or plastic twine, delivered in semi loads. Call Tim at 320221-2085 Hay For Sale Round or large square bales, alfalfa, straw or grass hay. Delivery Available by semi. Ose Hay Farm, Thief River Falls, MN Call or text LeRoy at (218)689-6675

‘12 JD 4830, 775 hrs., 90’ boom......................$234,500

(O)’12 JD 9560R, 360 hrs., IF tires ..........................$319,900 (O)’13 JD 9560R, 605 hrs., Lease Return ..............$314,900 (O)’13 JD 9560R, 573 hrs., Lease Return ..............$314,900 (O)’12 JD 9650R, 573 hrs., Lease Return ..............$312,500 (O)’13 JD 9510R, 694 hrs., Lease Return ..............$284,500 (O)’13 JD 9410R, 435 hrs., PTO, Lease Return ......$269,900 (B)’97 JD 9200, 4695 hrs., 710/38’s ........................$105,000 (H)’97 JD 9200, 3567 hrs. ..........................................$97,000 (H)’90 CIH 9170, 4418 hrs., PS ................................$54,500 (B)’92 JD 8760, 6878 hrs. ..........................................$52,900 (B)’93 JD 8970, 9000 hrs, 20.8x42’s..........................$46,900 (H)’76 JD 8430, 9164 hrs., 3 pt., PTO ......................$14,900

TRACK TRACTORS

(O)’13 JD 9560RT, 318 hrs., Lease Return..............$334,900 (O)’12 JD 9460RT, 1013 hrs., Ext. Warranty............$299,900 (O)’11 JD 9630T, 1472 hrs. ......................................$288,900 (O)’10 JD 9630T, 1650 hrs. ......................................$287,500 (B)’10 JD 9630T, 1586 hrs. ......................................$269,900 (O)’13 JD 8335RT, 391 hrs., 18” tracks....................$269,900 (B)’09 JD 9630T, 1482 hrs. ......................................$264,900 (O)’09 JD 9530T, 1877 hrs., 30” tracks ....................$229,900 (O)’07 JD 8430T, 3184 hrs., 25” tracks ....................$159,900 (O)’02 JD 9420T, 4430 hrs. ......................................$139,900 (B)’03 JD 9320T, 4641 hrs. ......................................$139,900 (H)’00 JD 9300T, 4375 hrs., 30” tracks ....................$105,000 (O)Camoplast 5500, 18” tracks, Like New ................$12,500 (B)Camoplast 18” tracks, Like New..............................$9,500

ROW CROP TRACTORS

(O)’11 JD 8260R, 484 hrs., Ext. Warr. ....................$194,900 (B)’13 JD 7230R, 259 hrs., IVT................................$179,900 (H)’06 JD 8430, 3570 hrs., ILS ................................$164,900 (B)’13 JD 6150R, 694 hrs., IVT................................$131,900 (B)’13 JD 6150R, 667 hrs., IVT................................$131,900 (O)’13 JD 6150R, 577 hrs., Auto Quad ....................$125,900 (O)’97 JD 8400, 7722 hrs., MFWD ............................$78,900 (B)’95 JD 8200, 7335 hrs., MFWD ............................$74,900 (B)’93 JD 4560, 7170 hrs., MFWD ............................$56,900 (B)’78 JD 4240, 9114 hrs., PS....................................$24,900 (O)’74 JD 4030, open station ....................................$12,900 (B)’65 JD 4020, diesel, syncro ....................................$8,300 (H)’78 White 2-105, 5057 hrs., one owner ..................$8,195

UTILITY TRACTORS

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Feed Seed Hay

(O)’09 JD 5105M, 1600 hrs., loader ..........................$67,900 (O)’96 White 6105, 5480 hrs., MFWD, cab................$24,900 (B)JD 401C, diesel, 3 pt., PTO ....................................$5,900 (B)Oliver 1650D, 6507 hrs. ..........................................$4,900 (B)’41 JD “B” ................................................................$2,995 (H)’49 IH “C”, belly mower............................................$1,850

COMBINES

(O)’13 JD S680, 239 sep. hrs. ................................$352,900 (O)’12 JD S680, 511 hrs., Ext. Warr.........................$345,000 (O)’13 JD S670, 200 sep. hrs. ................................$332,000 (O)’13 JD S670, 190 sep. hrs., duals ......................$329,900 (O)’12 JD S670, 225 sep. hrs., PRWD ....................$319,900 (B)’11 JD 9870, 511 sep. hrs., PRWD......................$309,900 (O)’12 JD S670, 502 eng. hrs. ................................$299,000

(O)’12 JD S660, 160 sep. hrs., duals ......................$299,000 (O)’11 CIH 9120, 727 sep. hrs., PRWD, tracks........$295,000 (O)’11 JD 9870, 700 sep. hrs., PRWD ....................$294,900 (O)’12 JD S670, 263 sep. hrs., duals ......................$289,900 (O)’12 JD S660, 325 sep. hrs., duals ......................$279,900 (B)’11 JD 9770, 511 sep. hrs., duals ........................$256,500 (B)’10 JD 9870, 1067 sep. hrs., PRWD ..................$244,900 (B)’09 JD 9770, 1320 eng. hrs., PRWD ..................$214,900 (H)’07 JD 9570, 900 sep. hrs., duals ......................$208,900 (O)’09 JD 9770, 1041 sep. hrs., duals ....................$204,900 (O)’09 JD 9570, 700 sep. hrs., duals ......................$197,000 (H)’05 JD 9660, 1792 sep. hrs., duals ....................$168,500 (O)’05 JD 9660STS, 1442 sep. hrs., duals ..............$159,900 (O)’04 JD 9760, 1192 sep. hrs. PRWD ....................$159,900 (B)’06 JD 9760, 1726 sep. hrs., duals, PRWD ........$154,900 (O)’05 JD 9660, 1442 sep. hrs., duals ....................$151,900 (H)’03 JD 9650STS, 1740 sep. hrs., duals ..............$114,900 (H)’92 JD 9500, 2812 hrs. ..........................................$49,900 (O)’91 JD 9500, 1720 hrs., duals ..............................$46,900 (O)’96 JD 9600, 2790 sep. hrs., duals ......................$39,900 (O)NEW Mudhog PRWD for 70 Series Combines ....$16,900

(O)’11 JD 4830, 1011 hrs., 90’ boom ......................$225,000 (O)’12 JD 4730, 694 hrs., 90’ boom ........................$215,500 (O)’12 JD 4730, 800 hrs., 90’ boom ........................$209,900 (O)’12 JD 4730, 900 hrs., 90’ boom ........................$209,700 (O)’12 JD 4730, 490 hrs., 90’ boom ........................$209,600 (O)’12 JD 4730, 800 hrs., 90’ boom ........................$208,500 (O)’09 JD 4830, 2400 hrs, 90’ boom ........................$200,000 (O)’07 JD 4930, 3093 hrs, dry box ..........................$160,000 (O)’09 Ag-Chem 1084SS, 2094 hrs., 80’ boom........$159,500 (O)’09 Ag-Chem 1286C, 1994 hrs., 90’ boom..........$158,900 O)’09 Ag-Chem 1084SS, 2951 hrs., 90’ boom ........$145,500 (O)’09 Miller Nav1000M, 2787 hrs., 90’boom ..........$133,100 (B)’05 JD 4720, 3794 hrs., 80’ boom ......................$124,900 (O)’10 Apache AS715, 1200 hrs., 90’ boom ............$109,900 (O)’03 Case IH SPX4260, 2563 hrs., 90’ boom ......$108,900 (O)’06 JD 4720, 3902 hrs., 90’ boom ......................$107,900 (O)’95 Tyler WT, 4617 hrs., 75’ boom ........................$36,900 (O)’94 Tyler Patriot, 3831 hrs., 80’ boom ..................$29,900

TILLAGE

(O)’08 JD 2210, 55.5’ ................................................$57,500 (B)’09 JD 2210, 45’5 ..................................................$55,900 CORNHEADS (O)Case IH TM14’, 48’ ..............................................$46,000 (B)’12 Drago 1820, 18R20”, 150 acres ....................$144,900 (H)JD 2210, 58.5’ ......................................................$42,500 (O)’13 JD 612, 12R20”, chopping ............................$108,900 (O)’05 JD 2210, 45.5’ ................................................$41,500 (O)’11 JD 612C, 12R30”, chopping ............................$90,000 (B)’02 JD 2200, 60.5’........................................................$39,900 (B)’10 Geringhoff RD1820, 18R20” ............................$84,900 (H)’03 JD 2200, 38.5’ ......................................................$33,900 (B)’09 JD 612, 12R20”, chopping ..............................$79,500 (O)’04 JD 726, 30’ mulch finisher ....................................$29,900 (O)’11 JD 608C, 8R30”, chopping ..............................$69,000 (O)’09 Rite Way LR4353, 53’ land roller ..........................$27,900 (O)’10 Geringhoff 830B, 8R30” ..................................$62,900 (H)’97 JD 985, 48.5’ ........................................................$24,000 (H)’10 JD 608, 8R30”, chopping ................................$59,900 (O)’00 JD 980, 44.5’ ........................................................$23,900 (B)’07 JD 612, 12R30”, chopping ..............................$59,900 (B)’97 JD 980, 43.5’..........................................................$20,900 (H)’09 JD 608C, 8R30”, chopping ..............................$58,900 (B)’98 JD 980, 36.5’..........................................................$20,900 (O)’10 CIH N12TR, 12R30”, chopping ......................$57,900 (O)DMI Tigermate II, 50’ ..................................................$20,625 (O)’09 JD 608, 8R30”, non-chopping ........................$43,000 (B)JD 235, 22’ disk ............................................................$9,200 (O)’04 JD 1291, 12R22”, hyd. plates ........................$29,900 (O)Summers 30 packer ......................................................$5,995 (O)’08 Drago N8TR, 8R30” ........................................$29,000 (H)JD 960, 30.5 ..................................................................$3,995 (O)’07 JD 893, hyd. deck, header height ..................$28,000 PLANTERS-SEEDERS (O)’03 JD 893, Contour Master ..................................$25,900 (O)’08 JD DB44, 24R22” CCS, liq. fert. ..................$141,000 (H)’03 JD 893, 8R30”, hyd. deck................................$24,900 (B)’09 JD 1790, 32R15”, CCS..................................$105,900 (O)’97 JD 893, knife, single point ..............................$19,900 (H)’04 JD 1770NT, 16R30”, 3 bushel ........................$79,900 (H)’95 JD 693, knife, hyd. deck plates ......................$17,900 (O)’03 JD 1770NT, 16R30”, liq fert ............................$76,900 SPRAYERS (H)Kinze 3700, 36R20”, finger pickup ........................$62,500 (B)’01 JD 1780, 24R20”, 3 bushel..............................$49,900 0% for 36 or 1.9% for 60 months (B)’00 JD 1760, 12R30”, finger pickup, LF ................$48,500 (O)’97 JD 1760, 12R30”, liq. fert. ..............................$46,500 w/Approved Credit on All Used JD 4730, 4830, 4930 & 4940 sprayers (H)’98 JD 1850, 30’ 10” spacing ................................$36,500 (H)JD 1760, 12R30”, liq. fert. ....................................$32,500 (O)’12 JD 4940, 750 hrs., 120’ boom ......................$281,500 (B)’97 JD 1710, 12R30”, vertical fold ........................$29,500 (O)’13 JD 4830, 404 hrs., 1000 gal. SS, 120’ boom $269,700 (B)’05 White 8128, 8R30”, liq. fert. ............................$26,900 (O)’13 JD 4830, 410 hrs., 90’ boom ........................$259,900 (O)’07 JD 1750, 6R30” ..............................................$25,900 (O)’13 JD 4830, 442 hrs., 90’ boom ........................$259,900 (B)’01 JD 455, 35’, 10” spacing..................................$25,900 (O)’11 JD 4930, 1216 hrs., 120’ boom ....................$245,900 (O)JD 7200, 8R36” ....................................................$11,500 (O)’12 JD 4830, 668 hrs., 90’ boom........................$236,500 (O)’12 JD 4830, 1155 hrs., 90’ boom ......................$235,750 Large Selection Of Used 3 pt. (O)’12 JD 4830, 775 hrs., 90’ boom ........................$234,500 Snow Blowers On Hand (O)’12 JD 4830, 800 hrs., 90’ boom ........................$233,500 (O)’12 JD 4830, 792 hrs., 90’ boom ........................$233,000 Starting at $1,750 (O)’11 JD 4930, 1725 hrs., 120’ boom ....................$229,500

Your Southern Minnesota & Western Wisconsin John Deere Commercial Sprayer Center

SEED CORN SALE! Top yields & lower seed cost. Best value pricing on conventional & technology hybrids. Volume savings & delivery. Call 320-237-7667 or visit WWW.KLEENACRES.COM “It's the place to be!” WANTED AND FOR SALE ALL TYPES of hay & straw. Also buying corn, wheat & oats. Western Hay available. Fox Valley Alfalfa Mill. 920-853-3554 Livestock

054

FOR SALE: Purebred Black Angus bulls, calf ease & good disposition; also York, Hamp & Hamp-Duroc boars & gilts. 320-598-3790 Dairy

055

Expanding Dairy in need of close up Springing Heifers. 715-579-7200 WANTED TO BUY! USED BULK MILK COOLER ALL SIZES 920-867-3048 WANTED TO BUY: Dairy heifers and cows. 320-2352664 Cattle

056

FOR SALE - Registered Dexters, cows and heifers. Hayward area. 715-634-8303 FOR SALE OR LEASE REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS Bulls, 2 year old & yearlings; bred heifers, calving ease, club calves & balance performance. Al sired. In herd improvement program. J.W. Riverview Angus Farm Glencoe, MN 55336 Conklin Dealer 320864-4625 FOR SALE: Polled Black Purebred Salers bulls, low birth wgts, exc P.B.D. & also some 2 yr olds. Oak hill Farms 507-642-8028 FOR SALE: Registered & Purebred British White beef bulls, Sired by Hy Noon, 13 yrs of progressive breeding. 320-815-5192 Red Angus & Black Angus registered bulls for sale. Most w/700-800# weaning wgt. Care included in price until May 1st. Also bred cows & heifer calves for sale. Meado-West Farms. (715)664-8854 Registered Texas Longhorn breeding stock, cows, heifers or roping stock, top blood lines. 507-235-3467


Cattle

056 Swine

065 Swine

065 Swine

065

35 THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

WANT TO BUY: Butcher Compart's total program ORR FEEDER PIGS - Tim features superior boars & cows, bulls, fats & walkable Orr. Call for availability. open gilts documented by cripples; also horses, (563) 920-2680 BLUP technology. Duroc, sheep & goats. 320-235-2664 York, Landrace & F1 lines. Terminal boars offer lean- STROEBEL 075 FARMS Livestock Equip Horse 057 ness, muscle, growth. MaStroebel Farms is interestternal gilts & boars are ed in contracting pig SHEEP & GOAT productive, lean, durable. 6 & 7 yr old Belgians, Red spaces, both finishing and EQUIPMENT All are stress free & PRRS Sorrel, full brothers, broke nursery, in MN or Northern free. Semen also available to all farm machinery, Iowa. Stroebel Farms is a Our TURNING CRADLE has 2 Guillotine Gates Special through Elite Genes A.I. $6,000 for the team. Also 4 progressive swine company Make 'em Grow! Comparts Price $945 While They Last. & 5 yr old Belgians, Red based out of Pemberton, Boar Store, INC. Toll Free: Run & Corral Panels, Slide Sorrel, half brothers, broke MN. If you have spaces to 877-441-2627 Gates, 2 & 3 Way Sorting to all farm machinery, contract, or are interested $5,000/team. (715)308-7608 Gates, Creep Panels, Minin building new, please conFOR SALE: Yorkshire, eral Feeders Etc. NOTICEtact Chalsey at 507-869-3335. Hampshire, Duroc & Also All the Jigs. Can DeHamp/Duroc boars. Also, Sheep 060 liver 319-347-6282 Hamp/York/Duroc cross gilts. Tough & durable pigs 30 Sheep $6,600 due in April. raised in outside lots. Exc R.J. Borntreger 14872 Hwy herd health. No PRSS. De33 Cashton, WI 54619 livery avail. 320-568-2225

NEED A NEW TRACTOR?

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Plow Right In and-

LOOK IN THE CLASSIFIEDS!!

THE LAND 1-800-657-4665

USED EQUIPMENT NEW EQUIPMENT • DMI crumbler, 50’

TRACTORS

• ‘13 MF 8690, MFD, 350 hp • MF GC1705 w/loader • MF 4610, MFD, platform • ‘13 MF GC 1705, compact tractor • ‘05 MF 451, 45 PTO hp, 400 hrs • JD 4440 Cab, Loader

CORN HEADS

DAMAGED GRAIN WANTED ANYWHERE We buy damaged corn and grain any condition - wet or dry TOP DOLLAR We have vacs and trucks CALL HEIDI OR LARRY

Clara City, MN 56222 320-847-3218 www.wearda.com

NORTHERN AG SERVICE INC 800-205-5751

• Geringhoff 1822RD, ‘09 • Geringhoff 1820RD, ‘09 • Geringhoff 1630RD, ‘09 • Geringhoff 1622RD, ‘07 • Geringhoff 1622RD, ‘07 • Geringhoff 1622RD, ‘04 • Geringhoff 1230RD, ‘09 • Geringhoff 1230RD, ‘08 • Geringhoff 1222RD, ‘11 • Geringhoff 1222RD, ‘08 • Geringhoff 1222RD, ‘07 • Geringhoff 1222RD, ‘05 • Geringhoff 1222RD, ‘03 • Geringhoff 1220RD, ‘11 • Geringhoff 1220RD, ‘05 • Geringhoff 1220RD, ‘04 • Geringhoff 1220RD, ‘02 • Geringhoff 1220RD, ‘12 • Geringhoff 830NS, ‘08 • Geringhoff 830RD, ‘08 • Geringhoff 830RD, ‘06 • Geringhoff 830RD, ‘05 • Geringhoff 830RD, ‘04 • Geringhoff 830RD, ‘04 • Geringhoff 830RD, ‘01 • Geringhoff 830RD, ‘07 • Geringhoff 630RD, ‘07 • Geringhoff 630RD, ‘05 • Geringhoff 630RD, ‘97 • JD 622, GVL poly • JD 822 KR, HT, steel • ‘04 Gleaner 1222 Hugger, GVL Poly • MF 844 4 Row Wide • MF 1163

COMBINES

• MF 9790, duals, RWA, 1001 hrs • MF 9540, RWA • MF 8780 combine RWA duals • MF 8570, RWA • ‘86 MF 8560

• ‘97 Gleaner R62, duals, 2052 sep hrs • ‘92 Gleaner R62, 2063 hrs

GRAIN HANDLING

• (2) Parker 2620 seed tenders • Parker G. Box, 250 bu. • A&L Grain Cart 850S w/tarp, 850 bu • Park 605 gravity box, 625 bu, brakes • ‘08 Brandt 1535 LP, gas, track mover • ‘06 Brandt 1535 LP, electric • Brandt 20110 swing hopper • Brandt 7500HP, grain vac. • ‘08 Brandt 1535 LP, gas eng, mower • ‘08 Brandt 1545 LP, grain belt, gas eng • ‘00 Brandt 4500 EX, grain vac. • ‘03 Brandt 1070, auger, PTO Drive, w/swing hopper • Brandt, 1515, 1535, 1545, 1575, 1585 belt conveyor • Brandt 8x62 auger, PTO drive, SC • Brandt 8x45 auger, 18hp, Briggs • Brandt 8x35, 8x37, 8x40, 8x47, 8x52, 8x57, 8x62, 8x67, 10x35, straight augers • Brandt 1060XL, 1070XL, 1080XL, 1380XL, 1390XL, swing hopper augers • ‘12 Buhler 1282, sling hopper • Parker 1039, grain cart, w/tarp • Parker 839, grain cart, tarp, 850 bu. • Parker 165-R, gravity box • Hutchinson, 10x61 auger • ‘08 Unverferth grain cart, 500 bu. • Killbro 1175, grain cart, 750 bu. w/tarp • J&M 500-14, grain cart, 500 bu. • ‘07 5000 EX, Grain Vac

HAY & LIVESTOCK

• JD 38, sickel mower 7’ • IH 14, 5 bar rake • MF 1329 & 1330, 3 pt disc mwr • ‘11 NH H6750, 3 pt, disk mower, 110” • Sitrex 16 wheel rake • Sitrex 10 rakes on cart

• MF 2856 baler, w/kicker w/net-twine wrap • MF 1745 baler, w/ramp & elec tie • MF 1372 mwr cnd, 12 steel rollers • Used MF 200 SP windrower, cab w/14’ auger head • ‘13 760 Roto-Grind tub grinders • 13’ 2881 Bale King Bale Processor, RH Discharge • Degelman 1510, Rotary Cutter, 15ft

MISCELLANEOUS

• WRS 30’ header trailers • E-Z Trail, 39’ header trailer • Mauer 28’-42’ header trailers • Degelman, 5 ft skidsteer buckets • Degelman RP 570, prong pickers • Degelman RD 320, rock digger • Degelman 7200 rock picker • Melroe 600, rock picker • Degelman 6000HD, rock picker • Sunflower 4311-14 disk ripper, 7 shank • Sunflower 1435-21 21ft disc, 3 bar harrow • Wil-Rich 36’, field cultivater • (2) Degelman LR7645 land rollers, Rental Return • Everest 84” finish mower • ‘08 JD 520 stalk chopper • Loftness 20’ stalk chopper • Wil-Rich 25’ stalk chopper • Loftness 240, stlk chopper, semi-mount • ‘06 Kodiak 60”, 72” & 84” rotary cutters • Loftness 84” snowblower, hyd spout • Loftness 8’ snowblower • 2011 SB Select snwblwr, 97” & 108”, 3 pt • Lucke, 8’, 3 pt, snowblower • Farm King 8ft, snow blower • Sunflower 4610-9 Disc Ripper • Sunflower 4511-15 Disc Chisel • Sunflower 4412-07 Disk Ripper • Sunflower 4412-05 Disk Ripper • Sunflower 5056-63 Field Cult • Sunflower 5055-36 Field Cult • Sunflower 1435-21 Disc

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

• DMI crumbler, 45’ • Wilrich QX2, 60’, rolling baskets • Wilrich Quad X, 55’, rolling basket • Wilrich Quad X, 55’ F.C. • Wilrich Quad 5, 45’ F.C. • CIH TII, 55’, rolling basket • Kongskilde 3500, 28’ • Hardi 6600, 132’ USED EQUIPMENT • Hardi Com. 1500, 132’ • ‘12 Hardi 4000, 90’ • White 8524-22 planter • Hardi Nav. 1100, 90’ • Pickett thinner, 24-22 • Hardi Nav. 1000, 88’ • Alloway 22’ shredder • Hardi Nav. 950, 88’, (2) • Alloway 20’ shredder • ‘12 Amity 12-22 • Killbros 1810 cart, tracks • ‘10 Amity 12-22 • Killbros 890 cart • Sheyenne 1410, 10x66 hopper • ‘07 Amity 8-22 • Amity 8-22, (3) • Westfield MK 13x71 • ‘11 Artsway 6812, 12-22 • Westfield 13x61 • ‘10 Artsway 6812, 12-22 • Hutch 13x71, swing • ‘11 Artsway 6812, 8-22 • Coverall 13” drive over • ‘06 Artsway 6812, 8-22 • REM 2100 grain vac. • Artsway 898, 8-22 • ‘09 JD 2700, 7-30 • Artsway 692, 8-22 • MW 2200, 9-24 • (2) Alloway 12-22 folding • Wilrich 957, 9-24 w/harrow topper • Wilshek 862, 26’ disk • Alloway 12-22 topper, St. Ft, • EZ-On 4600, 30’ disk (2) • JD 2410, 41’ chisel • Artsway 12-22 topper • DMI 730B, 7-30 • Flex-Coil packer, 50’ • Agco • Hardi Sprayers • REM Grain Vac • Woods Mowers • J&M Grain Carts • Westfield Augers • Sunflower Tillage • White Planters • Wilrich Tillage


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

36

Livestock Equip

4WD & TRACK TRACTORS

‘07 CIH Magnum 245, MFWD, 4090 hrs., 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, ‘08 JD 9630, 1588 hrs., power 4 hyd., 420x46 rear tires shift, Deluxe cab w/leather, HID w/18.4x42” duals ..............$92,000 lights, 4 hyd. valves, diff. lock, ‘94 NH 8770, 5250 hrs., super steer, 800x38 tires & duals........$180,000 MFWD, 3 pt., 3 hyd., 1000 PTO, ‘12 JD 9560R, cab, power shift, 14.9x46 tires &duals ..........$55,000 808 hrs., 4 hyd., Michelin 800x38 tires & duals ....................$257,500 COMBINES ‘12 JD 9410R, 750 hrs., cab, ‘11 CIH 9120, 143 eng./1005 power shift, 3 pt. hitch, 1000 PTO, sep. hrs., Luxury cab, tracker, 18.4x50 duals, 5 hyd. ......$239,000 rock trap, chopper, auto guidance, ‘10 JD 8295RT, 922 hrs., 25” 520x42 tires & duals........$182,500 tracks, 3 pt., PTO, front wgts., ‘11 CIH 8120, 934 eng./729 4 hyd. valves ....................$189,000 sep. hrs., rock trap, chopper, ‘12 CIH Steiger 400HD, 298 hrs., tracker, 520x42” duals ....$189,000 power shift, 3 pt. hitch, 1000 PTO, ‘11 CIH 7120, 871 eng./732 480x50” duals, diff. lock ..$225,000 sep. hrs., Luxury cab, rock trap, ‘12 CIH Steiger 400, 318 hrs., tracker, chopper, 520x42 tires & power shift, 4 hyd., big pump, duals ................................$188,500 520x46 tires & duals........$195,000 ‘10 CIH 6088, 996 eng./786 ‘10 JD 8295RT, 992 hrs., 3 pt., sep. hrs., tracker, chopper, 1000 PTO, 25” tracks, HID lights Pro 600 Y&M, 18.4x42 duals ........................................$189,000 ........................................$152,000 ‘91 Ford 946, 7232 hrs., 30.5x32 ‘87 CIH 1640, 3468 hrs., rock duals, 12-spd. manual trans., trap, auto header controls, motor has 200 hrs. on OH $32,500 24.5x32 tires ......................$18,500 ‘87 CIH 1660, 4200 eng. hrs., ROW CROP TRACTORS 4x4, auto header controls, ‘11 JD 8335R, ILS, MFWD, 1777 hrs., 268 PTO hp., IVT trans., 30.5x32 tires ......................$24,000 ‘09 JD 9870STS, 1895 eng./1233 3 pt., 1000 PTO, front duals, sep. hrs., Premier Cab, Pro-drive, 380x54” rear tires & duals, 4 hyd., big pump..............$192,000 5 spd. Feederhouse, CM, 520x42” duals, 28L-26 rears ..........$145,000 ‘12 JD 8360R, 866 hrs., IVT, ILS, ‘11 JD 9770, 880 eng./613 MFWD, big pump, 5 hyd., 380x54 sep. hrs., CM, 5 spd. feederhouse, tires & duals, front duals..$229,000 Pro-drive, chopper, 520x42 tires ‘12 JD 8310R, MFWD, IVT trans., & duals ............................$189,000 1465 hrs., 3 pt., 255 PTO hp., ‘08 JD 9770, 1380 eng./938 1000 PTO, 5 hyd., big pump, 18.4x50 tires & duals ......$189,000 sep. hrs., 4x4, CM, chopper, 1250/45/32 tires ..............$155,000 ‘12 JD 7130 standard, MFWD, ‘98 JD 9610, 3578 eng./2379 cab, 3 pt., 2 hyd., 600 hrs. $72,500 sep. hrs., chopper, bin ext., ‘13 JD 6190R, 585 hrs., Premium 20.8x42 duals ....................$49,000 cab, 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, IVT trans., 18.4x46 tires & duals COMBINE HEADERS ........................................$129,000 ‘95 JD 893, 8R30” cornhead, hyd. ‘12 CIH 290, MFWD, 385 hrs., deck plates, Pixall knife rolls Luxury cab, 540/1000 PTO, ..........................................$14,500 4 hyd., 480x50 tires & duals, ‘00 Geringhoff 1820, 12R30” front duals........................$169,000 chopping head....................$47,500 ‘12 CIH Magnum 260, MFWD, ‘05 Geringhoff 830B, 8R30” 525 hrs., 540/1000 PTO, chopping cornhead ............$29,000 4 hyd., big pump, complete ‘90 JD 643, 6R30” cornhead..$7,500 auto guidance setup, 420x46 Check Out Our Large tires & duals ....................$150,000 On-line Inventory of ‘07 CIH Magnum 245, MFWD, Trucks, Semis & 3050 hrs., 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, Industrial Equipment 4 hyd., 420x46 tires & duals ........................................$100,000 @ www.larsonimplements.com

LARSON IMPLEMENTS 5 miles east of Cambridge, MN on Hwy. 95

763-689-1179

Free delivery on combines in MN, Eastern ND & SD

Look at our Web site for pictures & more listings www.larsonimplements.com

DID Y OU? Please make sure you have a completed & signed subscription card on file with us. It is a postal regulation that EVERY subscriber MUST have a completed card on file. If you aren’t sure if you returned a card, give us a call and we will be happy to check for you. THANK YOU for your cooperation!

Sincerely,

THE LAND Staff

1-800-657-4665 USED TRACTORS

NEW NH T9.505, 4WD ................................CALL NEW NH T8.300, FWA ................................CALL NEW NH Boomer 50 w/loader ..................CALL NH TV6070 bi-directional ..........................CALL NH 8770, SS......................................COMING IN NH TN55S, FWA, w/cab ..................COMING IN NH 8870, SS ............................................$67,500 ‘08 NH 6070 w/cab, 2WD ......................$69,000 NEW Massey 8670, FWA............................CALL NEW Massey 5450, FWA, cab....................CALL NEW Versatile 305, FWA ............................CALL Versatile 895, 4WD ..................................$23,500 ‘60 IH 560, WF ..........................................$5,200

TILLAGE

M&W 9-shank, 24” w/leveler ..................$12,500 Sunflower 4630, 11-shank, Demo..............CALL Sunflower 4412-07, 7-shank ..................$29,500 Wilrich 957, 7-shank ..............................$18,500 Wilrich 513, 5-shank, Demo ......................CALL ‘12 JD 3710, 10 bottom ..........................$52,500 ‘08 JD 3710, 10 bottom ..........................$34,500 CIH 4900, 46.5’........................................$12,500 DMI 39.5 Tigermate, 3 bar........................$8,500 DMI Econo Champ 11-shank ..................$7,500 M&W 1875, 9-shank................................$12,500

SKIDSTEERS

NH L175, 2 spd, cab ..................................CALL NEW NH skidsteers on hand......................CALL NH LS170 ................................................$13,750 NH L170 cab, new rubber ..........................CALL

PLANTERS

NEW White planters....................................CALL ‘11 White 8516 CFS, loaded ..................$97,500

075

Miscellaneous

090

DRAINAGE Haybuster round bale shred- PARMA ders, stretch hay & bedding PUMPS New pumps & supply, take out mold & parts on hand. Call Mindust, used 256 self-loading, nesota's largest distributor $5,995; used 2100, $8,250; HJ Olson & Company 320new 2650, $19,975. 320-543974-8990 Cell – 320-212-5336 3523 TIRES-4- 480/80R50 Goodyear White Pine Vertical siding 80 DT 800 Super Traction Racents/sq.ft.; oak, livestock, dial tractor tires. Like new horse pen, planks, takeoffs. $9,750 for the set. 6"x8',10',12', $1/linear ft. Call 507-789-6049 River Falls. 715-425-5552 WANT MORE READERS Industrial & Const. 083 TO SEE YOUR AD?? Expand your coverage area! FOR SALE: '94 JD 490E exThe Land has teamed up cavator, 28,000# machine, with Farm News, and The good cond, $25,000; '93 Country Today so you can Koehring 6612 excavator, do just that! Place a classi28,000# machine, good cond, fied ad in The Land and $22,500. Call Steve 952-292have the option of placing it 0653 or Chris 612-221-9829 in these papers as well. More readers = better reMiscellaneous 090 sults! Call The Land for more information. 507-345One call does it all! 4523 • 800-657-4665 With one phone call, you can place your classified ad in WEIGHTS- JD rear tractor weights - 165#, 450#, & 1450# The Land, Farm News, available. Also JD front AND The Country Today. suitcase weights (7000/8000 Call The Land for more series style) available. $95 info @ 507-345-4523 • 800-657each. Call 507-789-6049 4665. RANGER PUMP CO. Winpower Sales & Service Custom Manufacturer of Reliable Power Solutions Water Lift Pumps Since 1925 PTO & automatfor field drainage ic Emergency Electric Sales & Service Generators. New & Used 507-984-2025 or 406-314-0334 Rich Opsata-Distributor www.rangerpumpco.com 800-343-9376

White 6700, 12-30, w/res. managers ......$6,500 White 6222, 12-30, front fold..................$29,500 White 6122, 12-30 ..................................$16,500 JD 7200, 16-30, w/res. managers ..........$14,500

COMBINES

‘10 Gleaner R76, loaded ......................$235,000 ‘03 Gleaner R75, loaded ......................$129,500 ‘01 Gleaner R72, just thru shop ..........$110,000 ‘00 Gleaner R72 ......................................$78,000 ‘90 Gleaner R60 w/duals ........................$24,500 ‘90 Gleaner R50 w/20’ ..........................COMING NEW Fantini chopping cornhead ..............CALL

HAY TOOLS

New Hesston & NH Hay Tools On Hand

MISCELLANEOUS

NEW Salford RTS units ..............................CALL NEW Salford Plows ....................................CALL NEW Unverferth seed tenders............ON HAND NEW Westfield augers................................CALL NEW Rem 2700 vac ....................................CALL NEW Hardi sprayers ..................................CALL NEW Riteway rollers ..................................CALL NEW Lorenz snowblowers ........................CALL NEW Batco conveyors ..............................CALL NEW Brent wagons & grain carts ..............CALL NEW E-Z Trail seed wagons ......................CALL NEW rock buckets & pallet forks .............. CALL REM 2700, Rental ......................................CALL Unverferth 8000 grain cart ........................CALL Kinze 1050 w/duals ....................................CALL Pre-owned Snowblowers, 7’-9’..................CALL Pre-owned Sprayers ..................................CALL

(DMI Parts Available)

SMITHS MILL IMPLEMENT Hwy. 14, 3 miles West of Janesville, MN

Phone (507) 234-5191 or (507) 625-8649 Mon. - Fri. 7:30-5:00, Sat. 7:30-Noon www.smithsmillimp.com


37

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”


THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

38

‘12 CIH 9230 Track, AWD, 590 sep. hrs. ................................................$315,500

‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 682 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lights, loaded......$319,900

‘13 CIH Steiger 500Q, 145 hrs. ................................................$319,500

‘12 CIH 3330 Sprayer, 90’ booms, 546 hrs. ....................................$175,000

‘09 CIH 3330, 100’ boom, aim, auto boom, Pro 700 steering, active suspension, 1750 hrs. ..............$183,000

‘12 CIH 4430, 120’ boom, aim, auto boom, Pro 700 steering, active suspension, 880 hrs ................$287,500

‘98 CIH 2388, 1764 sep. hrs. ....$66,000

‘13 CIH Steiger 500Q, 262 hrs., Lux. cab, 36” tracks ................$329,500

‘14 CIH Steiger 600Q, 293 hrs., 36” tracks, PTO ........................$397,900

‘13 CIH Steiger 400, 366 hrs., PTO, Luxury susp. cab ......................$249,900

‘09 CIH Magnum 245, 770 hrs., Lux. cab, big pump ..................$139,900

‘08 JD 9530, 2665 hrs. ..........$194,500

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‘02 Case 2388, 2074 sep hrs. ..................................$79,000

‘02 CIH MX240, 3900 hrs., duals ............................$79,500

‘99 CIH MX200, 4501 hrs. ..................................$62,000

‘13 CIH Magnum 235, 170 hrs. ..................$169,900

‘13 CIH Magnum 340, 415 hrs, susp axle, Lux cab ....$229,900

‘13 Puma 145, 258 hrs., w/loader ..................$119,900

CIH 885, 3300 hrs, cab, loader ........................$18,900

USED 2WD TRACTORS 18 Months Interest Free • Call For Details •

‘13 CIH 9230 Track, AWD, 323 sep hrs. ............$369,900

‘11 Case 580N, 4x4, cab, Ext.-Hoe, 277 hrs. ......$65,500

‘11 Bobcat S750, 760 hrs. ..................................$41,900

‘06 Kinze 1050 Cart, tracks, scale, tarp ..................$77,500

USED 4WD TRACTORS 24 Month Interest Waiver or Low Rates Available • Call Details • ‘14 CIH Steiger 600Q, 293 hrs., Pro 700 auto guide, Lux. susp. cab, 6 remotes, PTO, 36” tracks ..........................................................$397,900 ‘13 CIH Steiger 600Q, 564 hrs., 36” tracks, HID lites, Full Pro 700 auto guide, hi capacity hyd. pump..................................................$369,900 ‘14 CIH Steiger 600Q, 409 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, Full Pro 700 auto guide ..........................................................................................$385,000 ‘11 CIH Steiger 600Q, 1598 hrs., 36” tracks, Lux. cab, HID lites, big pump............................................................................................$299,900 ‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 682 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites ................................................................................................................................$319,900 ‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 901 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites ................................................................................................................................$309,900 ‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 1038 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites ..............................................................................................................................$299,900 ‘13 CIH Steiger 500Q, 145 hrs., Full Pro 700 auto guide, HID lites ........................................................................................................$319,500 ‘13 CIH Steiger 500Q, 262 hrs., 36” tracks, HID lites, Lux. cab, hi capacity hyd. pump, Full Pro 700 auto guide ..................................$329,500 ‘13 CIH Steiger 450, 198 hrs., Lux cab, PTO, 800 tires, hi capacity hyd. pump, HD drawbar, Full Pro 700 auto guide ..........................$259,900 ‘13 CIH Steiger 400, 250 hrs., Lux. cab, Full Pro 700 auto guide, hi capacity hyd. pump, cab suspension............................................$239,900 ‘13 CIH Steiger 400, 400 hrs., Lux. cab, PTO, hi capacity hyd. pump, Full Pro 700 auto guide ..............................................................$249,900 ‘08 CIH Steiger 535, 1900 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, 800 tires..................................................................................................................$205,500 ‘08 JD 9530, 2665 hrs., 800x38 duals, Full JD steering ..........................................................................................................................$194,500 ‘09 CIH Steiger 335, 1119 hrs., 480R50 tires, Lux. cab, HID lites, PTO ..................................................................................................$169,900 ‘05 CIH STX375Q, 2700 hrs., big pump, diff. locks ..................................................................................................................................$149,900 Steiger Cougar 1000, powershift, 20.8x38 tires........................................................................................................................................$39,500

STX and STEIGER PTO, TOW CABLE & 3 PT. KITS ON HAND!!!

USED SPRAYERS

‘12 CIH 4330, 880 hrs.,120’ boom, aim, auto boom, Pro 700 steering, active suspension......................................................................$287,500 ‘12 CIH 3330, 546 hrs., 90’ boom, std. spray ..........................................................................................................................................$175,000 ‘09 CIH 3330, 1750 hrs., 100’ boom, aim, auto boom, Pro 700 steering, active suspension ..................................................................$183,000 “Where Farm and Family Meet”

‘13 CIH Magnum 315, 408 hrs. ..................$209,900

‘13 CIH Magnum 340, 415 hrs., Lux. cab, front susp. axle, susp. cab, 360 HID lites, Full Pro 700 auto guide......................................$229,900 ‘13 CIH Magnum 315, 434 hrs., Full Pro 700 auto guide, 360 HID lites, hi cap. hyd. pump, susp. cab, susp. front axle, 380/R54 tires ........................................................................................................................................................................................$209,900 ‘13 CIH Magnum 290, 400 hrs., Creeper trans., Full Pro 700 auto guide, hi cap. hyd. pump, susp. axle, 360 HID lites ......................$194,500 ‘13 CIH Magnum 290, 400 hrs., Creeper trans., Full Pro 700 auto guide, hi cap. hyd. pump, susp. axle, 360 HID lites........................$194,500 ‘04 CIH MX285, 3199 hrs., 480/80R46 tires., Lux. cab, HID lites ............................................................................................................$106,000 ‘13 CIH Magnum 260, 300 hrs., susp. Lux. cab, susp. front axle, Full Pro 700 auto guide, hi cap. hyd. pump, 360 HID lites ..............$179,900 ‘00 CIH MX240, 3900 hrs. ....................................................................................................................................................................COMING IN ‘13 CIH Magnum 235, 337 hrs., susp. Lux. cab, Full Pro 700 auto guide, hi cap. hyd. pump, 360 HID lites ........................................$169,900 ‘09 CIH Magnum 245, 770 hrs. ..............................................................................................................................................................$139,900 ‘13 CIH Puma 145, 258 hrs., powershift, CIH loader ..............................................................................................................................$119,900 ‘99 CIH MX200, 4500 hrs. ....................................................................................................................................................................COMING IN ‘12 CIH Puma 160, 300 hrs., CVT trans., L765 loader, susp. axle..........................................................................................................$135,800 CIH 685, cab & loader ................................................................................................................................................................................$13,900 CIH 885, 3300 hrs., cab, 2255 loader ........................................................................................................................................................$18,900 ‘78 IH 986, 7631 hrs., 18.4x38 w/duals ....................................................................................................................................................$13,500

USED COMBINES 5 Years Interest Waiver Available Thru Case Credit* • Call For Details ‘14 CIH 7230, duals, HID lites, Lux. cab, cross auger shut off ........................................................................................................................CALL ‘13 CIH 9230, 323 sep. hrs., track drive, RWA, HID lites ..........................................................................................................................$369,900 ‘12 CIH 9230, 734 eng./590 sep. hrs., track drive, RWA, HID lites ..........................................................................................................$315,500 ‘11 CIH 7120, 579 sep. hrs., duals, HID lites, Lux. cab............................................................................................................................$239,900 ‘06 CIH 8010, 1223 sep. hrs., duals ........................................................................................................................................................$129,900 ‘08 CIH 8010, 1150 sep. hrs., duals ........................................................................................................................................................$149,900 ‘02 CIH 2388, 2074 sep. hrs., duals, RWA ..................................................................................................................................................$79,000 ‘98 CIH 2388, 2569 eng./1764 sep. hrs., duals ..........................................................................................................................................$66,000 ‘13 CIH 2608, 8R30” chopping cornhead ..................................................................................................................................................$69,500 ‘13 CIH 2608, 8R30” chopping cornhead ..................................................................................................................................................$69,500 ‘13 CIH 3408, New 8R30” cornhead............................................................................................................................................................JUST IN ‘12 CIH 3408, 8R30” cornhead ..................................................................................................................................................................$44,900 ‘89 CIH 1083, 8R30” ....................................................................................................................................................................................$7,900 ‘10 CIH 2020, 25’ platform w/Crary air reel ..............................................................................................................................................$26,800 ‘05 CIH 1020, 30’, 3” knife, rock guard ......................................................................................................................................................$13,900 ‘04 CIH 1020, 30’, 3” knife, rock guard ......................................................................................................................................................$12,900

LOW RATE FINANCING AVAILABLE thru

I-35 & Highway 60 West • Faribault, MN • 507-334-2233

Call For Details

Herb

Paul

CNH Capital’s Commercial Revolving Account provides financial assistance for parts and service when you need it, keeping your equipment running as its best with the quality parts and service you’ve come to expect from Case IH. Contact your local dealer or visit www.cnhcapital.com today for details. ©2014 CNH Capital America LLC. All rights reserved. CNH Capital and Case IH are registered trademarks of CNH America LLC. Printed in the USA.

www.matejcek.com

Blake


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HOPPERS

TRUSS TRAILER

DROPDECKS

‘99 Wilson, 48/102, New Recaps, New Airbags, AL Crossmembers, Painted & Sandblasted ............$18,500 ‘96 Fontaine, 53/102, All Steel, 90% Tires & Brakes ....$19,250 ‘95 Doonan, 48/102, All Steel, Sandblasted & Painted, 70% Tires & Brakes ....$16,750 ‘94 Fontaine, 48/102, Steel, New Recaps, Sandblasted & Painted ....................$16,750 (5) 39’ Drop Decks, Never Pulled During Winter, 80% T&B, Good For Seed Tenders, Fertilizer or Water Trailers ................$9,750 Engineered 5’ Beavertail, Kit includes paint & LED lights ............$3,750/$5,750 Installed

DOUBLE DROPS

Land classifieds with extended coverage. We offer you the reach and the prospects to get your phone ringing.

To submit your classified ad use one of the following options: Phone: 1-800-657-4665 or 507-345-4523 Mail to: The Land Classifieds, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002 Fax to: 507-345-1027 • Email: theland@TheLandOnline.com Online at: www.thelandonline.com

Reach Over 259,000 Readers!

‘07 Hyundai Sonata Limited, 4 -Door, 86K Mi., V6, Reg. Maint. ............................$7,000 ‘06 Dodge Caravan SXT, 108K Mi. ........................$6,000

A Quote

Will Consider Trades!

Call: 320-212-5220 or 320-392-5361

CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE!!! www.DuncanTrailersInc.com Delivery Available!

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Announcements Employment Real Estate Real Estate Wanted Housing Rentals Farm Rentals Merchandise Antiques & Collectibles Auctions Hay & Forage Equipment Material Handling Bins & Buildings Grain Handling Equipment Farm Implements

             

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Cattle Horses Exotic Animals Sheep Goats Swine Pets & Supplies Livestock Equipment Cars & Pickups Industrial & Construction Trucks & Trailers Recreational Vehicles Miscellaneous

THE LAND (1 Southern & 1 Northern issue) 1 run @ $17.70 =____________ 2 runs @ $30.96 =____________ 3 runs @ $46.44 =____________ Each additional line (over 7) + $1.33 per issue =____________ EXTENDED COVERAGE - must run the same number of times as The Land FARM NEWS (FN) - Serving farmers in Northwest Iowa, 14,219 circ. THE COUNTRY TODAY (CT) - Serving farmers in Wisconsin, 25,000 circ. THE FREE PRESS (FP) - Serving south central Minnesota, 22,500 circ. Paper(s) added (circle all options you want): FN CT FP ($7.24 for each paper, and each time) ______ issues x $7.24 = ___________ COMMERCIAL RATE: ______ issues x $23.46 = ___________

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The ad prices listed above are based on a basic classified line ad of 25 words or less. Ads running longer than 25 words will incur an added charge.

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NOTE: If category is not marked, it will be placed in the appropriate category

ADVERTISING NOTICE: Please check your ad the first week it runs. We make every effort to avoid errors by checking all copy, but sometimes errors are missed. Therefore, we ask that you review your ad for correctness. If you find a mistake, please call (507) 345-4523 immediately so that the error can be corrected. We regret that we cannot be responsible for more than one week’s insertion if the error is not called to our attention. We cannot be liable for an amount greater than the cost of the ad. THE LAND has the right to edit, reject or properly classify any ad. Each classified line ad is separately copyrighted to THE LAND. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited.

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

‘80 Transcraft, 53’, 33’ Well, Non-Detachable, AR, Polished AL Wheels, New Hardwood Decking, 80% Tires & Brakes Call For ....................................$12,750 • All Trailers DOTable •

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MISCELLANEOUS

We Can Convert Flatbeds To Bridges To Suit Your Needs.

THE FREE PRESS South Central Minnesota’s Daily News Source

Start your ad, in THE LAND, then add more insertions DEADLINE: Monday at Noon for the following Friday edition and more coverage. The choice is yours. You can count Plus - look for your classified ad in the e-edition on THE LAND, a Minnesota tradition where farm and family meet!

AUTOS

Complete Suspensions, Air Ride or Spring Ride ........................$1,000 AR/Axle ............................$500 SR/Axle (8) 385 Super Single Tires w/Polished AL Rims ........................$1,200/set of 4 (50) Steel & (25) Aluminum Rims - In Stock ..................$50 Steel ........................$150 Aluminum

Livestock, Machinery, Farmland - you name it People will buy it when they see it in The Land!

1-800-657-4665

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‘98 Lakeside RollerMaster, ‘98 Wilson, 41x96, 66” Sides, 32’-45’/102” Extendable, Extra Lights, Roll Tarp, 24.5 LP Tires ..............$18,000 Elec. over Hyd. Lift, Top Locking Deck Rollers, ‘95 Merritt, 42’ AL Hopper, New Paint, Winches, 68” Sides, 2-Spd. Doors, Roll Tarp, Disc Wheels $12,500 80% T&B......................$10,000 ‘97 JDH Trussmaster, ‘94 Wilson Commander, 42’-60’/102” Extendable, 41’ AL Grain Hopper, SPR, 80% Brakes ................$16,000 8 Winches, Elec. over Hyd. to Tilt, Elec. over Air to Extend, ‘94 Timpte, 40’, Split Hoppers, Tandem Axle ................$10,000 SPR, 80% Tires & Brakes, Clean............................$15,500 END DUMPS Summit End Dump, 30’, SEMI TRUCKS 72” Sides, 3 Axle, AR ..$16,750 ‘04 Volvo Day Cab, Single Axle, 365 Hp., 10c Trans., 390 Ratio, VAN/WATER TRAILERS 450,000 Miles................$8,500 (8) Reefers, 5 @ 48/102’, FLATBEDS Swing & Side Doors, 2 w/Flat Floors ..$5,000-$6,000 ‘98 Fontaine, 48/102, New Airbags & Brakes, SPX/AR, (2) ‘86 Kentucky Furniture Vans, Side Doors AR, 50% T&B No Rust, 80% T&B, California Trailer ............................$9,850 ......................................$6,250 ‘93 Wilson, 48x96, SPR, (20) Van Trailers, 48/102-53/102; Sliding Tandem ..............$7,000 Great for water storage or over the road ....$3,000-$7,000 HAYSIDES 48’ & 53’ Van Trailers To Rent. Haysides are painted and made ....$145.00 Per Month, Plus Tax out of 11 gauge steel, Stationary Haysides ......$1,250 48/102 Van Bodies, Less Tires & Tip-In-Tip-Out Haysides $1,750 Dollies, or setting on ground Front & Rear Extensions ..$350 ................$2,000 Plus Delivery

THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

THE LAND CAN SELL IT! - Your First Choice for Classifieds - Place Your Ad Today -

HANCOCK, MN


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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THE LAND, FEBRUARY 7, 2014

40

Top off your coffee?

This week’s Back Roads is the work of The Land Correspondents Tim King (story) and Jan King (photo)

T

he first things you see when you walk into Hats Off Coffee, on the east end of Central Avenue in Long Prairie, Minn., are hats. Lots of them. There are homburgs for men and cloches for women. There are respectable fedoras and adventuresome boonie hats, derbies, summer straw hats for men and women, pork pies, safari and trail hats, women’s sun hats, Greek fisherman hats, French berets, and floppy hats with big flowers. “We even have top hats,” proprietor Daiv Freeman said, pointing to two elegant items high up on a back shelf. “What would you like to drink?” Freeman can serve you a latte, cappuccino, espresso, hot chocolate, Italian soda or any number of coffee shop drinks. You can sip your drink in peace, browse his natural history bookstore, or you can ask him about hats. “My best seller is the Indiana Jones hat. You can crush it and it springs back into shape,” he said, demonstrating the crushing and springing back qualities of this famous adventurer’s hat. “It’s my best selling hat. I ship it all over.” The standard Indiana Jones hat is made from wool felt. There is a more expensive version made from rabbit fur felt. It’s not crushable. Indiana Jones didn’t wear a pith helmet, but other adventuresome types did. Freeman sells quite a few but they go to working stiffs who spend long hot days under the sun. “The brim is nice and wide all around and the material is woven so heat can escape through the top,” he points out. “The inside is a little like a hard hat so it also provides some head protection on the job.” Freeman will point out the merits of a pith helmet versus a baseball cap with a seed company logo on it and he’ll tell you the difference between a fedora and a homberg. A fedora, whether made from felt, straw or any other material, has a deep valley down the middle, two indentations on either side in the front and a turned down brim. The homberg has the valley but it does not have the indentations or the turned down front brim. On many hombergs, such as the Godfather Homberg, the sides are turned slightly up. Both styles often sport bright little feathers in their hatbands. The Hats Off Coffee hat business is in a former bank building. “If you don’t see what you want I’ve got more in the vault,” Freeman said. You can learn more about the coffee and hat shop at www.hatsoffcoffee.com. ❖

Hats Off Coffee, Long Prairie, Minn.

Do you have a Back Roads story suggestion? E-mail editor@TheLandOnline.com or write to Editor, The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002.


Š 2014

February 7, 2014

(800) 657-4665 www.TheLandOnline.com theland@TheLandOnline.com P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002

NORTHERN EDITION

Saturday, February 15, 1-4 Monday, February 17, 8-12 Tuesday, February 18, 1-4


Page 2 - February 7, 2014

THE LAND, Advertising Supplement


THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

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THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

THE LAND ~ Feb. 7, 2014 ~ Northern Edition  

"Since 1976, Where Farm and Family Meet in Minnesota & Northern Iowa"

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