Page 1

© 2013

November 15, 2013

NORTHERN EDITION

Producers are happy to be nearing the end of the 2013 growing season. Check out the latest “From the Fields” reports on Page 9A.

(800) 657-4665 www.TheLandOnline.com theland@TheLandOnline.com P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002


THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

2 A

P.O. Box 3169 418 South Second St. Mankato, MN 56002 (800) 657-4665 Vol. XXXII ❖ No. XXIII 64 pages, 2 sections, plus supplement

Cover and Page 2A photos by Tom Royer

COLUMNS Opinion Farm and Food File The Bookworm Sez Pet Talk The Back Porch In the Garden Cookbook Corner BBQMyWay The Outdoors Milker’s Message Mielke Market Weekly Back Roads Marketing Farm Programs Calendar Auctions/Classifieds Advertiser Listing

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

www.TheLandOnline.com facebook.com/TheLandOnline twitter.com/TheLandOnline

2A-6A 5A 8A 11A 12A 14A 15A 16A 19A 22A-25A 22A 40A 1B-4B 3B 5B 8B-24B 8B

STAFF

Publisher: Jim Santori: jsantori@cnhi.com General Manager: Kathleen Connelly: kconnelly@TheLandOnline.com Editor: Kevin Schulz: editor@TheLandOnline.com Assistant Editor: Tom Royer: troyer@TheLandOnline.com Staff Writer: Dick Hagen: dickhagen@mvtvwireless.com Advertising Representatives: Kim Henrickson: khenrickson@TheLandOnline.com Mike Schafer: mike.schafer2@gmail.com Danny Storlie: theland@TheLandOnline.com Office/Advertising Assistants: Vail Belgard: vbelgard@TheLandOnline.com Joan Compart: theland@TheLandOnline.com Ad Production: Brad Hardt: lndcomp@mankatofreepress.com

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

For Customer Service Concerns: (507) 345-4523, (800) 657-4665, theland@TheLandOnline.com Fax: (507) 345-1027 For Editorial Concerns or Story Ideas: (507) 344-6342, (800) 657-4665, editor@TheLandOnline.com National Sales Representative: Bock & Associates Inc., 7650 Executive Drive, Minneapolis, MN 55344-3677. (952) 905-3251. Because of the nature of articles appearing in The Land, product or business names may be included to provide clarity. This does not constitute an endorsement of any product or business. Opinions and viewpoints expressed in editorials or by news sources are not necessarily those of the management. The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The Publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any monies paid for the advertisement. Classified Advertising: $17.36 for seven (7) lines for a private classified, each additional line is $1.30; $23 for business classifieds, each additional line is $1.30. Classified ads accepted by mail or by phone with VISA, MasterCard, Discover or American Express. Classified ads can also be sent by e-mail to theland@TheLandOnline.com. Mail classified ads to The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002. Please include credit card number, expiration date and your postal address with ads sent on either mail version. Classified ads may also be called into (800) 657-4665. Deadline for classified ads is noon on the Monday prior to publication date, with holiday exceptions. Distributed to farmers in all Minnesota counties and northern Iowa, as well as on The Land’s website. Each classified ad is separately copyrighted by The Land. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Subscription and Distribution: Free to farmers and agribusinesses in Minnesota and northern Iowa. $24 per year for non-farmers and people outside the service area. The Land (ISSN 0279-1633) is published Fridays and is a division of The Free Press Media (part of Community Newspaper Holdings Inc.), 418 S. Second St., Mankato MN 56001. Periodicals postage paid at Mankato, Minn. Postmaster and Change of Address: Address all letters and change of address notices to The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002; call (507) 345-4523 or e-mail to theland@TheLandOnline.com.

Everything I know, and then some chain of command, and absolute fealty to A couple of years ago I wrote a “Land Minds” column about my experience the commander, there is chaos. That’s returning to my family’s farm to help with what Jeff said, anyway. the corn harvest. It was pretty well Rule No. 2: Put the corn in the truck, received — my mom put it on her fridge not on the ground — but, looking back, it was incomplete. This is the only rule that is actually someWith the 2013 growing season wrapping what flexible. My dad informed me that if up, and another three grueling days back preferred, I was certainly welcome to grab a on the home farm under my belt, I felt it shovel and hand-scoop each cart-full of corn was time to dust off the old column and off the ground and into the truck. LAND MINDS round ’er up to an even ten rules ... Rule No. 3: The early bird gets the By Tom Royer ■ push-button transmission, tape deck and cup holder “Everything I know, I learned from driving a grain cart” ~ The Land, Nov. 4, 2011 It can be tough to force yourself out of bed on a crisp autumn morning. But when I grew up on a farm, but I’m definitely the alternative means you’re stuck all day in a tractor not a farmer. My friends and family know I’m nowhere near smart enough, skilled enough or tough without access to even the basics of modern comfort, you’ll soon realize the importance of such extra effort. enough to be a farmer. Thus, I’m in journalism. When I need an extra dose of smarts, or humility, I Rule No. 4: Don’t try to guess where the combine head back to the home farm. My most recent visit — operator wants you to be; you will be wrong a six-day, seven-night vacation to the beautiful, A common rookie mistake. The young grain cart operrolling Loess Hills of western Iowa — coincided with ator thinks to him/herself, “The combine is just finishthe tail end of corn harvest. ing that row, so that means he’ll come back around on At harvest time, hired hands who meet modest com- the next terrace down and I should meet him there.” petency requirements get put behind the wheel of a Wrong. tractor and grain cart. As I drove that cart here and Did you plant this field? Did you spray this field? there and everywhere, I kept a small spiral notebook Do you know precisely the lay of every acre in this to jot down the sage bits of wisdom I picked up on. field? No? Then I guarantee you, you will not be in The following is what I learned. the right spot. Rule No. 1: The combine operator is always Rule No. 5: Hurry up and wait right This lesson is not unique to grain cart operators, or My brother Jeff (the combine operator) made this known from the start. Without a clearly established See MINDS, pg. 4A

OPINION

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: 26A — Increasing productivity without increasing costs 30A — Minnesota’s Department of

Agriculture providing ‘dating service’ 35A — Livestock losses from South Dakota storm “hard to comprehend” 6B — Cattlemen, sportsmen, DNR sometimes at odds over grazing land


3 A

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

4 A

Don’t know what you’re doing? Stop doing it, dummy

MINDS, pg. 2A even farming, but that doesn’t make it any less important. Foolish is he who does not bring a novel, or magazine, or sudoku puzzle book, or iPod, or smartphone. You will need to bring the cart here. NOW. And yet you may need to sit there patiently for half an hour as the combine navigates the rows. That’s just the way it is. Rule No. 6: Being fired is not an option This is also known as the “the beatings will continue until morale improves” rule. Some disgruntled grain cart operators may get the big idea that if they screw something up

with precisely the right amount of faux-incompetence, they’ll be taken off the grain cart crew and given a more ... intellectually stimulating role. This does not work. If you make a mess, you will clean it up and be sent right back out again. Do not try to fight this rule; you’ll only make things tougher for yourself later. Rule No. 7: Never leave your lunch in the other tractor Let nothing tear you asunder from your lunch sack. Carry a backpack with you all day long if you have to, but do not let your lunch out of your sight. Rule No. 8: Something doesn’t work? Turn it off, turn it back on.

OPINION

For example, hypothetically, one Still broke? Do it again. thing you would want to avoid is slipThe Diagnostics for Dummies rule. ping while climbing out of a tractor There will be times when you are in cab, stumbling backwards several feet, the southwest 40 acres, and the comtripping over a gravity bine operator (a.k.a. wagon hitch, then boss) is in the northeast falling unceremoni40, and something goes ously on your butt. wrong with your Let nothing tear machine. Do not panic. That would be mildly you assunder Just turn everything off, bruising and pretty from your lunch wait 30 seconds, then embarrassing for you. sack. Carry a turn it all back on again. Hypothetically. backpack with Rule No. 10: If you If this does not work you all day don’t know what after three or so repetilong if you you’re fiddling with, tions, you probably seristop fiddling with it have to, but do ously wrecked something and you’re about to be not let your Sure, the boss says fired. he wants you to be lunch out of proactive and just take ■ your sight. care of things without Okay, so those were the bugging him with original eight rules. For dumb questions left the record, they’re all and right, but when you do exactly that still 100 percent true AND enforced. and there’s hydraulic fluid pouring out But for this old farm-kid-turned-officeeverywhere for what seems like five jockey who only gets behind the wheel minutes because you forgot about how of a tractor a few days a year, I found the couplers have tiny shutoff levers there are at least two additional rules next to them that you’re supposed to to keep in mind... flip before yanking hoses out, whose Rule No. 9: Safety first fault is that? Farming is a very dangerous busiYours. It’s your fault. ness, and every precaution should be And no, you’re still not fired. Now made to ensure everyone’s safety and well-being around the multitude of rap- grab a roll of shop rags and clean up idly rotating PTO shafts, auger screws that mess. and drive belts, among the many hazTom Royer is assistant editor of The ardous situations that present themLand. He may be reached at selves on a regular basis on a farm. troyer@TheLandOnline.com. ❖


Why do farm, ranch groups not trust U.S. consumers?

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

Henry Ford heard the ture that inspires farm and ranch jeers for years before his groups to not trust American conhorseless carriage remade sumers? What do we fear? Are we in American agriculture the nay-saying culture forever. Orville and Golly, it’s not like we’re selling buggy same; are we maligning and castigating anyone Wilbur Wright were called whips or maps of the solar system that who questions or challenges ‘the way we do bird brains before their show the earth at its center, right? dreams carried them over a things’? Right? North Carolina sand dune and mankind to distant Alan Guebert’s “Farm and Food File” is galaxies. published weekly in more than 70 newsquestioned because, as one read the actual Pew report. papers in North America. Contact him at FARM & FOOD FILE old-timer liked to say on the They had thousands of What is it about American agriculagcomm@farmandfoodfile.com. ❖ farm of my youth, “If everypredecessors. Archimedes By Alan Guebert one’s thinkin’ the same, was thought to have a screw then only one person’s loose. The Vatican saw doing the thinkin’.” Galileo as a heretic. Darwin was denounced from Big Ag, however, doesn’t pulpits the world over. Still tolerate much independent is. thought. It has its own muscle, its selffunded enforcers, to ensure singleDespite the bombast and bashing, history proved these oddballs right and mindedness confronts new ideas or methods. the know-it-alls and naysayers all wrong. The latest proof of this “we’ll-dothinking” approach came in late OctoAre we in American agriculture the nay-saying same; are we maligning and ber when the Pew Charitable Trusts and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School castigating anyone who questions or of Public Health issued a 122-page, challenges “the way we do things”? fact-laced report that again questioned We are, and we’re doing it so often that we don’t even question it anymore. Big Meat’s massive use of antibiotics in its industrial production systems. For example, a meatpacker-funded Twenty-four hours before the Pew effort is now underway to outlaw report was released Oct. 22, however, county of origin labeling — COOL — of something called the Animal AgriculU.S. food in U.S. markets. The reason is simple: the Meat Gang’s pony boys are ture Alliance, an Arlington, Va.-based stoking fears that Mexico and Canada, lobbying group, issued a 24-page rebuttal to it without ever having seen or important sources of cheap livestock for U.S. meatpackers, would retaliate if read the report. What, antibiotic use in American COOL stands. The threat may be real, but do we as agriculture not only improves animal a nation believe more strongly in “free health but makes Big Ag clairvoyant enough to compile, print and distribute trade” — actually corporate trade a report denying a five-year study on because companies do it, you and I antibiotics without even waiting to see don’t — than in our own farmers and it? ranchers’ birthrights and livelihoods? U.S. Farmers & Ranchers Alliance, We must because our commodity and the rich coalition of big farm groups farm groups unreservedly support free trade despite irrefutable evidence — a and big corporate ag players, at least had the rural politeness to wait until collective $8 trillion U.S. trade deficit Pew and Hopkins issued their report since the 1993 passage of the North before it “mobilized its F.A.R.M. American Free Trade Agreement; the (Farmer And Rancher Mobilization) closing of 60,000 U.S. factories since team” late Oct. 22. 2000 — that few Americans actually Kimball, Glencoe, The USFRA e-mail to its “Rapid gain anything from it. Responders,” however, did include a Albert Lea, MN Worthington, MN North Mankato, MN Moreover, if anyone, a modern day draft letter to the editor of any local Galileo, say, chooses to look at the world and our role in it any differently, newspaper that covered the Pew report so “responders” could address “popular American ag orthodoxy excommunimisconceptions” about antibiotics withcates him or her without pause or out, of course, the Astroturf writer of Miesville, MN Willmar, MN New Ulm, MN thought. the Astroturf letter having actually That dogmatic certainty needs to be

5 A

OPINION

Jaycox Implement

Niebur Implement

HaugKubota

New Ulm Tractor

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Thermo King

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Call to subscribe (800) 657-4665

Arnolds of


<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

6 A

Commentary: Task force aims to grow value of U.S. beans Raising soybeans looks simple. FarmWe are also looking for potential methers plant the seeds and the plants grow, ods to improve the way soybeans are then we harvest the mature soybeans processed through companion technoloand take them to elevators for processing. gies. In addition, the task force has funded But any soybean farmer will tell you that growing exploratory research to examine the U.S. soy value this crop is much more difficult than it looks. There’s chain for any other opportunities. soil health to contend with, as well as pests and disJust like soybean plants don’t spring from the eases. And, of course, there’s the weather. ground the day after you sow the seeds, the U.S. soy industry isn’t going to transform overnight. We know At first glance, the curthat our work to add value rent soybean-pricing systo the industry has just tem seems easy to underbegun. stand, too. U.S. soybean We know that our work to add farmers get paid by the But the checkoff and its value to the industry has just bushel at the elevator. But partners are working begun. But the checkoff and its it’s actually much more toward increasing U.S. partners are working toward complicated. soybean farmers’ profincreasing U.S soybean farmers’ itability and keeping our The cash price we profitability and keeping our industry strong. receive for our bushels is industry strong. actually based on the estiSo I would suggest that mated value that procesall American soybean sors think they will farmers take a moment to receive for the meal and oil in the soybeans. consider the protein and oil content of the beans they The soy checkoff realized the market isn’t as trans- harvest this year. Don’t know it? parent as it could be, and this could mean U.S. soyMight be interesting to find out. Making the indusbean farmers are missing an opportunity to improve try more profitable for all of us will take all of us to their profitability simply by improving their soy- make it happen, one step, or bean, at a time. beans’ quality. The checkoff established the Value This commentary was was submitted by the United Task Force to explore ways to increase the overall Soybean Board, and was written by Dan Corcoran, value that farmers receive from the U.S. soybean USB Value Task Force Lead and a soybean farmer crop. from Piketon, Ohio. Just as the pricing system is complicated, there For more information on the United Soybean isn’t a cut-and-dried solution. Adding more value to Board, log on to www.unitedsoybean.org, www.face the industry could mean changing the pricing sys- book.com/UnitedSoybeanBoard, follow on Twitter at tem, so we’re examining strategies used by other www.twitter.com/unitedsoy or view on YouTube at commodities, such as canola and wheat, that add www.youtube.com/user/UnitedSoybeanBoard. ❖ value to their products.

OPINION

Cheminova launches Crusher herbicide Cheminova Inc. announced the launch of Crusher Herbicide, a selective herbicide that offers both burndown and residual control of annual grass and broadleaf weeds. Crusher contains two active ingredients: thifensulfuron and rimsulfuron, and can be used in fall to early winter or spring to clean up your fields in preparation for corn, cotton, soybean or peanut planting. Crusher is labeled for use on field corn when applied at preplant and preemergence

and preplant to cotton, soybeans and peanuts. Crusher can also be tank-mixed with other suitable herbicides such as GLYFOS X-TRA Herbicide, dicamba, glufosinate, paraquat and 2,4D, to control additional weeds. Crusher is on sale now at agricultural retailers throughout the United States. Log on to www.cheminova-us.com or www. cheminova.com for more information. ❖

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Schweiss lift strap conversion kit available to retrofit cable doors No matter who made your door, if you currently have cables on your bi-fold doors, Schweiss Doors now has an easy-to-install lift strap retrofit conversion kit available to upgrade your existing door. Schweiss designed and patented custom-made polyester lift straps provide a new and much safer alternative to steel cables. No more cables or pulleys to adjust. Lift straps offer more lifting ability and will vastly outlast cables. The strength-to-weight ratio on the 3-inch straps are rated at 29,000 pounds tensile strength, compared to a 1/4-inch cable which

only gives you a 7,200-pound rating. The lift straps wrap around the lift drum as the door opens, increasing the size of the drum. The larger the drum’s circumference, the faster the door opens. It’s ideal: the door opens slowly at first and quickly picks up speed. Schweiss lift straps, never rust, never tangle or overwrap, and are warrantied for 10 years. They’re also available with autolatches and remotes. Log on to www.schweissdoors.com or call (800) 7468273 for more information. ❖


7 A

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

8 A

‘Flying Blind’ shares farmer’s battle with buckthorn, authority Last spring, the gauntlet was thrown down. It was an us-or-them situation, a full-out battle of endurance, a fight to the death with only one winner. On one side, a challenger with rugged persistence. On the other side: you. THE BOOKWORM Plus shears, gardening SEZ gloves, a strong back and willingness to eradicate By Terri Schlichenmeyer each weed with ruthlessness — which is something author Don Mitchell knows all too well. In his new book “Flying Blind,” he explains. Following a few years of cross-country travel and a colorful hippie lifestyle, 24-year-old Mitchell bought a farm. It was 1972, he and his wife had spent time in Vermont , and they liked it there. When they found a 130-(“more or less”)acre farm, they put money down, bought some sheep, and became farmers. The farm was ringed by woods and cliffs. It was in

“Flying Blind: One Man’s Adventures Battling Buckthorn, Making Peace with Authority, and Creating a Home for Endangered Bats” By Don Mitchell c.2013, Chelsea Green $24.95/$29.95 Canada 209 pages

a bucolic rolling valley with wildlife and birds, and the Mitchells kept their footprint small. They didn’t do much with the thickly wooded area, but they grew crops and they constructed a large pond with the help of government money, even though Mitchell wasn’t happy with government rules. He says he’s always chafed under authority, but the pond was a welcome addition to their property. Life in the valley was good. See BOOKWORM, pg. 10A


<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

9 A

From the Fields: The end is near, thankfully The Brandts Ada, Minn.

On Oct. 23 Danny Brandt finished up sugar beet harvest without a hitch. His veteran crew made this year’s harvest go “fantastic,” he Danny Brandt said. The Land spoke with Brandt on Oct. 29 as he proudly announced that his beet lifter celebrated its 22nd birthday. “It’s built like a brick house,” he said, and expects it to last many more harvests to come. With beet harvest complete, Brandt’s focus is now on corn. The corn moisture is starting to get “down to 16 to 17 percent,” he said, noting that he’s “not wild and crazy about putting 20 percent (corn) away.” So the corn may wait in the field for a while as it continues to dry out. With the liquid propane gas shortage, drying the corn isn’t such an easy task — or a cheap one. “The weather has been pretty good,” Brandt said. He hopes that trend continues, to get the corn dry enough to get out of the field. Looking at the long-range forecast, he expects conditions will be favorable for a late harvest. “The best thing is to take dry corn off the field,” he said. Brandt is happy to report that harvest is “going right as it should.” It just may take a while longer this year, and he’s OK with that.

The Johnsons Starbuck, Minn.

Waiting. So many parts of harvest are fast-paced, but there is also the waiting aspect of it. That’s what Scott Johnson was doing Scott Johnson when The Land spoke with him on

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

His corn dryer has been working so hard that it decided to take a break. The repairman was heading out to Messner’s farm to get it back up and running. Messner said he expected to finish picking corn the following week. Once that’s finished, it will be time to spread fertilizer, get bins ready for winter and put equipment away. “For the most part the fall has gone fairly smooth,” he said. “I’m looking forward to putting the 2013 season to bed.”

By KRISTIN KVENO The Land Correspondent

The Laubenthals Swea City, Iowa

Oct. 30. With rain continuing for the last 24 hours, he was waiting for conditions to improve before heading back to the field to get the rest of the corn harvested. Once Johnson can get back in the field he estimates that it should take four to five days to finish the corn. Like many other farmers this year he has been utilizing their corn dryer, thus experiencing a number of breakdowns with the dryer. All of the corn Johnson has harvested has needed to be dried. Although he has started to see corn in the field dry down more, it’s still “wetter than it’s been in the last few years.” Johnson hoped to be back in the combine by the weekend. He has been able to keep up with the tillage and fertilizing. Once corn harvest is complete, Johnson will work on cleaning up and putting things away for the winter. This corn harvest has been a challenge for Johnson as he’s “seen a lot of rain” and had to deal with wet corn. He hopes to get done “as soon as possible. ... This time of year you just want to get done.” The end of harvest is so close for Johnson — now if only the weather

would give him a break.

The Messners Northfield, Minn.

The weather has been a factor all growing season for Chris Messner. The challenging weather earlier this year has become relatively Chris Messner unchallenging so far this harvest, and he is very much relieved. The Land spoke with Messner on Oct. 28 as he reported that even with a little rain forecast for the next few days, this year’s harvest has gone well. Corn yields have been about the same as last year’s, with the moisture being at 18 percent. “Pretty happy with that,” he said. The dryer has become vital to farmers all over the region this year, and Messner is no exception. “We haven’t had any corn that’s coming out of the field dry,” he said. He hasn’t seen any corn with moisture levels above 20 percent and feels fortunate that his corn has dried out so much.

Charlie Laubenthal finished harvesting his soybeans, and here’s his bottom line: “The beans aren’t good.” While the bean Charlie Laubenthal yields were average, he was certainly happy to get the crop out of the field. Another positive: When The Land spoke with Laubenthal on Oct. 28, he was thrilled to report that it has been a “virtually maintenance-free fall.” The corn harvest was nearly coming to a close as well, with only 120 acres left for him to combine. “It’s been a good run,” he said. Corn is down to 15 percent moisture, and he hoped to finish corn harvest that week. “Yields are really across the board, with an 80-bushel-an-acre spread across fields,” Laubenthal said, “which is huge.” He attributes the spread in yields to drowned-out areas. Once corn harvest is complete, he’ll start spreading fertilizer and do some tillage work. He is also slowly starting to sell seed. Laubenthal is sticking with his goal of having “everything put away by the 25th of November.” There’s nothing better than to know that harvest is complete, fall field work is done, and equipment is put away just in time to eat some turkey. ❖

Look for ‘From the Fields’ reports every week during the growing season in THE LAND


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

10 A

Surprising story runs dark BOOKWORM, from pg. 8A And then came “The Great Vermont Ice Storm” of 1998. For three straight days, freezing rain coated everything, breaking limbs from trees and powerlines from poles. In the aftermath, Mitchell toured his land and was sick at heart from the “carnage.” For nearly a decade, he couldn’t bear to enter his woods. That’s why, he says, he “didn’t make a fuss” when a Vermont Fish and Wildlife bat expert asked to set nets to see what kind of bats were attracted by Mitchell’s pond. The fuss, in fact, didn’t come until well after the bat man found endangered critters. By that time, an intrigued Mitchell had a chance to retire. Retirement would allow time to clean out his woods. That would give him impetus to eradicate two invasive plant species from his land, on hands and knees, to offer the bats better habitat for breeding. And that would give him time to reflect on his childhood, and memories best left undisturbed. “Flying Blind” is quite a surprise of a book. With a droll sense of humor and willingness to

admit his peccadilloes, Mitchell delights his readers with a wandering tale that he likens to the flight patterns of bats: straight and linear, then turning fast in another direction. That’s enjoyable, like spending a few hours chatting with a new friend. But every now and then, Mitchell’s story runs dark, and therein lies the surprise. It’s a cockyour-head kind of thing; a did-you-see-that, fleeting squirm that disappears as quickly as it flew in. Much, I’m sure, like a bat. In the end, I came to like this book a great deal, and I think you will, too — particularly if you’re an environmentalist down to your toes. For you, “Flying Blind” is a book to pick up. Look for the reviewed book at a bookstore or a library near you. You may also find the book at online book retailers. The Bookworm is Terri Schlichenmeyer. Terri has been reading since she was 3 years old and never goes anywhere without a book. She lives in Wisconsin with three dogs and 10,000 books. ❖

Work safely this fall ...

... your life depends on it

theland@TheLandOnline.com 800.657.4665 www.TheLandOnline.com 418 South Second Street, Mankato, MN 56001


Loving pets can share their ills with their owners “A large percentage of the new puppies I see have hookworms and roundworms,” Eckman said. So what are symptoms of intestinal parasitic infection in pets that one should watch out for? “Poor skin and hair, and a potbellied appearance,” she said. These zoonotic diseases are, however, more common in Third World countries because of poor sanitary conditions. Proper hygiene is essential to help prevent the spread of these diseases to humans, she said. Cat owners need to be aware of toxoplasmosis — a disease transmitted through the feces of cats that can affect the unborn child in pregnant women. Eckman recommends that households with pregnant women and cats contact their veterinarian and physician about precautions. Cleaning the kitty’s litter box twice a day, preferably by other members of the household is a good option, she said. One could also get diseases from larger animals as well. Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection that can

cause serious liver and kidney problems. The infection can occur through skin contact with infected water contaminated with urine. “Large animals like cattle, goats, pigs, sheep and horses are reservoirs for this disease and may pass this to our companion animals,” Eckman said. What can pet owners do to prevent these infections? “When you first get a new pet, contact your veterinarian and have an exam performed. Most veterinarians talk to you about these things to protect yourself and your pets,” Eckman said. Zoonotic diseases need not always be transmitted by pets. Other animals which we encounter can also pass on diseases. For example, bats are potential carriers of rabies, a fatal disease. Eckman warns that people should never touch bats. The good news is that all these zoonotic diseases can be avoided with a little bit of preparedness. Veterinarians do routine exams for dogs to check for different diseases such as intestinal parasites and external parasites that may transmit blood-borne disorders.

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

The little puppy you brought home is adorable. She saves the best of her sweet looks and affectionate gestures for you. In turn, you want her to have the best of everything you can give. In this mutual exchange of love, you also need to ensure that the pet doesn’t give you something you may not want to take — a zoonotic disease, which is a disease that can spread from animals to humans. We usually do not think that we get diseases from animals, but these instances happen more than we think. In many cases, people do not realize that they may have got the infection from their pets, said Stacy Eckman, lecturer at Texas A&M University’s College of Veterinary Medicine. In some cases, the animals themselves suffer from the disease while in other cases they are not affected by it, she said. Infestation with intestinal parasites such as roundworms and hookworms are common zoonotic diseases affecting household pets like dogs and cats.

11 A

See PET TALK, pg. 12A << www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

12 A

Give thanks, and let go of regret, misunderstandings According to a recent Barna Group survey “Ten years ago, slightly over one out of 10 Americans self-identified as lonely. Today, that number has doubled — a paradoxical reality in the full swing of the social media age.” Lack of friendship is not for lack of desire. Barna reports, THE BACK PORCH “the desire to find one’s place among a few good friends has By Lenae Bulthuis likewise increased from 31 percent a decade ago to 37 percent today.” In spite of having Facebook friends and Sunday morning coffee in the church fellowship area, it’s entirely possible to be lonely. Have you ever gathered around the family table, been on break with coworkers, or sat in a roomful of beautiful Bible study women and felt completely isolated, rejected, misunderstood or alone? For you burly guys, don’t skim or stop reading. This friendship thing applies to you, too. Just put yourself in Pete Loescher’s shoes. He blogs, “the tragedy at my father’s funeral was not that I had to help carry the casket. It was that I had to grab the hearse driver to make four carriers: two relatives, the hearse driver and myself. No friends.” What a picture of heartache within heartache. Both men and women, introverts and extroverts, are created for relationships. God designed us that way. He wired us for relationships with Himself and with others. Not that there aren’t days you’d prefer

That doesn’t change the fact that we need one another. Especially when No matter how hard we try to paint lovely pictures of you’re family. This past our families on Facebook and Christmas cards, the year has held too many hosreality is that we don’t live in a Norman Rockwell pital visits, funerals, and emails and phone calls from painting. across North America from those who are sick, sad and sorrowing. There will be first-time, to live solo on a desert island, but the reality is we permanent empty places at the table and as a comneed each other. For better or for worse, we need peomunity we ache with you. But for every chair that is ple — especially relationships that go deeper than empty not from death, but from misunderstanding, conversations about the weather and the price of now is the time to return to the table. corn. Phillips Brooks writes, “you who are letting miserReal friends strengthen and sharpen us. They tell able misunderstandings run on from year to year, the truth, even when it hurts. And when you hurt, meaning to clear them up some day; you who are they hurt. When you rejoice, they push jealousy out keeping wretched quarrels alive because you cannot the front door and celebrate with you. They have a quite make up your minds that now is the day to sackeen sense to know when to give good advice, and rifice your pride and kill them; if you could only when to stop talking. know and see and feel all of a sudden that time is One of the quips my mother has often quoted over short, how it would break the ‘spell.’ How you would the years is “You can choose your friends, but you go instantly and do the thing which you might never can’t choose your relatives.” It’s an old adage with have another chance to do.” honest transparency. Family life can be messy. ParAs you pass the turkey, potatoes and pumpkin pie, ents don’t always get it right. Nor do their children. Poor choices come with consequences that ripple fur- don’t miss the opportunity to pass out second chances and bowlfuls of grace. Happy Thanksgiving. ther than we could’ve ever imagined. Lenae Bulthuis is a wife, mom and friend who Misunderstandings and regrets muddy the waters, and when the water won’t stay under the bridge, the muses from her back porch on a Minnesota grain and livestock farm ❖ holidays increase the temptation to book a one-way ticket to anywhere, but home. No matter how hard we try to paint lovely pictures of our families on Facebook and Christmas cards, the reality is that we don’t live in a Norman Rockwell painting.

‘Each patient is different’

PET TALK, from pg. 11A Routine vaccinations for both cats and dogs are available with different protocols in different states. Monthly heartworm preventive medications also help prevent against parasites like hookworms and roundworms. Many zoonotic diseases depend on the local conditions prevalent in the area. Her take-home message: To consult your veterinarian regarding your pet. “Each patient is different,” she said. With awareness and care, zoonotic diseases can often be prevented to ensure a healthy pet and a healthy owner. Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. More information is available at http://tamunews.tamu.edu. This column is distributed by CNHI News Service. CNHI is parent company to The Land. ❖

Jungclaus Implement Glencoe, MN

Smiths Mill Implement Janesville, MN

J&S Repair

Grand Meadow, MN

Isaacson Implement Nerstrand, MN

Judson Implement Lake Crystal, MN

Tjosvold Implement Granite Falls, MN

Midway Farm Equipment Mountain Lake, MN

The Land w ants y our feedback “LIKE” Facebook.com/TheLandOnline “FOLLOW” Twitter.com/TheLandOnline E-MAIL editor@The LandOnline.com


13 A

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”


<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

14 A

Bottle up some haints in your yard Got any haints hanging around your place? Haint is a colloquial term used for ghost or evil spirit. Long ago, trees adorned with colored bottles were believed to have the magical ability to capture evil spirits and prevent them from entering a house. IN THE GARDEN The spirits would enter the By Sharon Quale bottle and get trapped inside. This folk lore legend about ghosts, bottles and trees began in the old South. Today, bottle trees are enjoying new popularity as funky garden accessories. We have a bottle tree made from an assorted collection suspended on shoots around the base of a basswood tree. It is a cheerful sight as the sun hits the colored bottles in the morning and brightens November days. The glass bottles glisten, sway and sparkle while showing off their jewel tones against the muted landscape. Bottle trees can be of any size, color or shape that a gardener fancies. Rebar stakes will support a small collection used as a focal point near a conifer shrub. A fencepost with holes drilled and round dowels inserted to hold the bottles is a good method for a large display. Dead tree limbs work well as places to hang bottles. Constructed metal tree forms are also

available for purchase. Cobalt blue was considered the “best” color to combat evil spirits and years ago milk of magnesia bottles were coveted. Designs and color combinations will develop as new bottles are added to the tree. Now is a good time to make a unique bottle tree to enjoy Now is a good through the winter. time to make a They are fun, great unique bottle conversation pieces tree to enjoy and a way to move a bottle collection from through the inside the house to your winter. They garden. Mention to your are fun, great friends that you need colconversation ored glass bottles for a pieces and a new garden art project and you will soon be way to move a swamped with them. bottle collection Readers ask: from inside the house to your Is it possible to save ornamental sweet garden. potato vines over the winter? Yes, the plants can be brought inside, cut back and treated as a house plant. The tubers can also be saved for planting next spring. Dig them, remove foliage, wash soil off and let them dry for a few days and then store in a basement as you would dahlia tubers.

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Sharon Quale

Can I still plant bulbs outside for spring flowering? If you can dig the ground up enough to plant them they will do fine. Be sure to water and add a slow release fertilizer at planting time. How do I force bulbs for spring bloom? Now is a good time to plant bulbs such as crocus, tulips, daffodils and hyacinths for indoor blooms in March and April. Use six-inch bulb pots and plant in potting soil about an inch apart with the pointed nose of the bulb just out of the soil. Water, cover with plastic wrap with a few holes punched in it and place in refrigerator (35 to 48 F) for 13 to 15 weeks. Mark your calendar so you know when it is time to remove the pots. Place them in a sunny spot and water often. Enjoy the blooms. Discard the bulbs after they put on their show as they don’t usually do well in the garden after they were forced. Sharon Quale is a master gardener from central Minnesota. She may be reached at (218) 738-6060 or squale101@yahoo.com. ❖


The Johnson clan gives four out of four ‘yums’ to Cranberry Snack Cake

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

(serves 4) 16 small new potatoes (Yukon Gold, fingerlings, baby reds, etc.) 3-4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil Coarse salt 1 red onion, cut into 1/4-inch rounds 6 pitted kalamata olives, chopped 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley 2 teaspoons chopped fresh oregano 1/2 cup crumbled feta Salt and freshly ground black pepper Preheat the oven to 350 F. Toss the potatoes with just enough oil to lightly coat them, about 1 to 2 tablespoons, and sprinkle with coarse salt. Bake until the potatoes are tender but not too soft, about 25 to 30 minutes. Put the potatoes in a gratin (casserole) dish, and crush them with the back of a fork. In a large skillet, heat the remaining oil and sauté the onion slices until they become light brown, about 6 to 10 minutes. Pour the onions and oil over the crushed potatoes, and then toss in the olives, parsley, oregano and feta, and season with salt and pepper. Put the dish in the oven, and bake until the potatoes are very tender and the cheese is melted, about 10 to 15 minutes. ■ An homage to sunflower producers, Marinated Kale Salad utilizes both the oil and the seeds. Make this dish a day or two ahead for best results. The extra time allows the strong flavor of the kale to mellow a bit. Marinated Kale Salad (serves 4-6) 2 tablespoons sunflower oil 1 tablespoon cider vinegar 1 teaspoon honey 1 pound kale, stemmed and finely chopped 1 small sweet onion, finely chopped 2 large carrots, shredded 1/4 cup dried cranberries or raisins Salt and freshly ground pepper 1/4 cup toasted sunflower seeds

In a large bowl, whisk together the oil, vinegar and honey. Add the kale, onion, carrots and dried cranberries and toss to coat. Season with salt and pepper, and sprinkle with the sunflower seeds. This salad keeps nicely, and tastes better the day after it’s made. ■ We all know about cranberry sauce that comes in a can, as well as the dried variety of cranberry. And then there’s those fresh cranberries in bags in the produce aisle, which usually end up being cooked for sauce as well. But did you know you can just eat those tart, fresh cranberries out of hand? And use them in other delicious ways, such as in this Cranberry Snack Cake? The results are gratifying: Four out of four “yums” from the sweet-toothed Johnson crew! Cranberry Snack Cake (Makes a 9-inch cake) 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup unsalted butter, at room temperature 1 1/4 cups sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla 3 large eggs 1 cup plain Greek-style yogurt or sour cream 1 cup fresh cranberries, chopped Confectioners’ sugar (optional) Preheat the oven to 325 F. Lightly butter and flour a 9-inch square baking pan. In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt. In a separate bowl, cream the butter and sugar until light and fluffy; then beat in the vanilla. Beat in the eggs one at a time. Beginning and ending with the flour mixture, alternate folding portions of the flour mixture and the yogurt into the butter mixture. Fold in the cranberries. Scrape the batter into the prepared pan, spread it evenly, and then tap the pan to release the air bubbles. Bake until a toothpick inserted in the center comes up clean, about 50-55 minutes. Cool the cake on a wire rack. Dust it with confectioners’ sugar if desired. “Minnesota’s Bounty” is published by the University of Minnesota Press — www.upress.umn.edu. If your community group or church organization has printed a cookbook and would like to have it reviewed in the “Cookbook Corner,” send us a copy to “Cookbook Corner,” The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002. Please specify if you wish to have the cookbook returned, and include information on how readers may obtain a copy of the cookbook. Submission does not guarantee a review. ❖

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

By SARAH JOHNSON The Land Correspondent Don’t let the wintry weather forecasts bring you down. Pick up a copy of the new “Minnesota’s Bounty: The Farmers Market Cookbook” where it’s always summertime, and you can daydream away your winter blues. Great cookbooks aren’t just collections of recipes; they’re filled with information that makes you want to run out and try something new. This cookbook is set up according to the ingredient you would find in a typical Minnesota farmers market (sweet corn, green pepper, pork, honey …) with vibrant photos, fresh recipes and, best of all, “quick meal” tips for when you just don’t have much time. This is a great resource for when you end up with a load of produce and not a lot of ideas. And the daydreams of summer are a free added bonus. ■ Locally raised meats such as lamb and pork are often available at markets and farms. Try these tender, succulent lamb burgers with the New Potatoes With Feta and Olives (recipe following) for a Mediterranean-inspired meal your family won’t soon forget. Lamb Burgers With Tzatziki (serves 4) Burgers 1 1/4 pounds coarsely ground lamb 2 tablespoons chopped fresh oregano 1 tablespoon cumin 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped Salt and freshly cracked pepper Olive oil Tzatziki 2 cups plain Greek-style yogurt 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1/2 cup diced cucumber 1 tablespoon minced dill 1 clove garlic, minced In a large bowl, gently work together the lamb, oregano, cumin and garlic. Lightly season the meat with salt and pepper. With a light hand, form four loosely packed patties, and then gently flatten them to about 3/4 inch thick. Brush the patties with some olive oil. In a small bowl, whisk together the yogurt, lemon juice, cucumber, dill and garlic. Prepare a grill for medium-high heat, or preheat a cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat and film it with olive oil. Place the burgers on the grill or skillet, and cook until nicely seared on both sides, about three minutes per side. Continue cooking, brushing with a little more oil if grilling, until the burgers are medium-rare (140 F). Serve topped with tzatziki in sliced pita bread, open-face on a slice of toasted olive bread, or on a hamburger bun. ■ New Potatoes With Feta and Olives

15 A THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

Minnesota’s Bounty: The Farmers Market Cookbook Cookbook Corner


<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

16 A

Favorite foods a glimpse into lives of James Dean, other icons A couple of weekends ago I Bottles of beer, coins, fresh resist, holiday traditions — things that was driving to Fort Wayne, flowers and love letters. One help make each of us who we are. Ind., to participate in a barletter was tucked under a So, today’s column will briefly touch bershop competition. (No, I rock, ready to fall off of the on icons of the past and their favorite don’t cut hair. I sing with the gravestone. I replaced it but foods. To foodies like me, good food is Louisville Thoroughbreds.) felt the urge to read it. I one of the most enjoyable experiences As I was sailing down Interopened it, and the letter in life, and a peek into one’s soul. state 69, I saw a sign for started off with the folJames Dean: It is reported that his Fairmount. lowing: “Jimmy, it’s been favorite food toward the end of his over 50 years since you For some reason, the town short life was a brick oven pizza have been gone, jumped out at me. But why? Ah, at Villa Capri outside of Hollyand I still miss you yes, it dawned on me: James wood, which no longer exists. every day.” Dean grew up in Fairmount, Some say he ate his last meal and he was buried there. The letter was there. handwritten and two full I don’t think I have ever watched a Marilyn Monroe: Warm milk pages. After reading the first full movie starring James with raw eggs blended in for sentence, I immediDean, but what the heck? The breakfast. ately folded it up dude is a cultural icon. I was a and replaced it Marilyn Monroe Steak, lamb or couple of hours ahead of schedliver (all securely under the ule, and I like exploring things broiled) for dinner. rock. This letter was not I come across as I travel. So I meant for me. I felt like I had Frank Sinatra: visited Fairmount, Ind. just spied on a private Eggplant parmigiana What a cute, quaint town. moment, fleetingly, but with marinara sauce. After visiting the museum, I wrongly. Nat King Cole: was given directions to the James Dean I then looked at the beer Bacon cheeseburger Frank Sinatra graveyard and the farm where was his favorite he grew up. Once I located his grave- bottles and packs of cigarettes surstone, I was shocked by the number of rounding the stone, and it reminded me burger. There is also a cole slaw recipe that these icons were in many ways floating around with his name on it, fresh flowers and tokens of love for a normal people, just like you and me. but I’m guessing that’s a play on words kid — he was only 24 when he died — more than anything who passed away more than 50 years They had passions, likes, dislikes, favorite dishes, desserts they couldn’t else. ago. John F. Kennedy: Quite a broad menu but he typically had to be reminded to eat. Clam chowder seems to have been one of his favorite dishes — and Boston beans. Nat King Cole

Leading The Industry

Ronald Reagan: Split pea soup, grilled hamburgers, mac and cheese, and meatloaf, just to name a few. John Lennon: Curry, jelly and tea. (Is there food listed Ronald Reagan there?) Abraham Lincoln: Bacon, apples and coffee. Cooks say he was also preoccupied and ate just to survive. What a pity. Cary Grant: Barbecued chicken as the main course. He also loved hard candies. Cary Grant Arnold Palmer: I gave up. All I could find were references to iced tea and lemonade. Mark Twain: Anything American — steak, biscuits, fried chicken, corn on the cob and pie. Mark Twain It’s possible to go on and on with this exercise. But don’t you feel like you entered into the soul of those above, just a little bit? It’s the simple things. BBQMyWay is written by Dave Lobeck, a barbecue chef from Sellersburg, Ind. Log on to his website at www.BBQ-My-Way.com. He writes the column for CNHI News Service. CNHI is parent company of The Land. ❖

With The Osborne awarded patent for gate Strength You Need! CHECK OUT OUR

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

WINTER DISCOUNTS!

“Your go to Grain Handling People” 320-974-8337 • wbgrain.com

Osborne Industries Inc., of Osborne, Kan., announces that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has awarded Patent No. 8,511,257, on Aug. 20 for the company’s Safety By-Pass Gate for the automated pig weighing and sorting system, the Osborne Weight Watcher Growth Management System. The Osborne Weight Watcher System, introduced in 2002, provides complete growth management of finishing pigs in large pens. An automated weigh scale, coined the Osborne Survey Scale, sorts pigs by weight to enable target feeding, and automatically sorts market-ready hogs to cut sort losses and closely match packers’ matrixes. Pigs pass through the sorting scale as they naturally move between feed and water areas. The newly patented Safety By-Pass Gate allows animals free access to the feed and water areas if an emergency

event occurs. The gate automatically opens if the sort scale experiences less than normal activity owing to any type of system failure. An industrial strength air cylinder with features that prevent rusting, binding or fouling operates the gate mechanically during a no-power or no-air event. According to George Eakin, president and chief executive officer, the concept of the Safety By-Pass Gate arose from over 10 years of research and development with the Osborne Weight Watcher System. The Weight Watcher System was introduced in 2002 at World Pork Expo in Des Moines, Iowa, at a time when feed prices began rising drastically. The capability of the system cuts sort losses by growing more pigs uniformly. Log on to www.osbornelivestockequipment.com or e-mail info@osborne-ind.com for more information. ❖


17 A

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013 18 A


Deer stand berry, berry good

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013 << www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”

Deer hunters for years High above the vegetation, have been constructing elea hunter can be protected and vated deer stands — usually cozy, yet have a commanding a few 2-by-4s, a few sheets of view of the countryside. plywood strategically nailed Situated where a farm to a tree — to give them an field abuts a thick stand of edge over wily whitetails. cattail swamp and a hunNowadays, some ambitious dred or so yards from a deer hunters construct their patch of woods, it is in a deer stands to include heat, seemingly ideal location to THE OUTDOORS carpet, cooking stoves, insuambush a whitetail. lated windows — nearly all But since Stanke put the By John Cross of the comforts of home — stand at its present location all to put venison in the freezer. two years ago — it’s clearly visible from Elden Stanke has about a half-dozen busy Highway 14 — no one has manelevated deer stands strategically placed aged to draw blood while hunting there. in and around the deer habitat on his He admits that the reason may have farm just northwest of Smith’s Mill, Minn. to do with a whitetail’s innate caution Far from luxurious, utilitarian would about new and peculiar things that be a more apt description. But one of suddenly appear in its neighborhood. them has origins that would have to “The deer seem to stay up against the qualify it as one of the more unusual woods,” he said, speculating that it has deer stands to be found in Minnesota. taken some time for the keen-eyed aniStanding about 15 feet tall, a bright mals to get accustomed to the unusual red, giant strawberry overlooks a addition to the countryside. slough, a field and a stand of woods. This year, he is hopeful that it may all Once upon a time, the fiberglass straw- come together with the added attraction berry was a key component in a Tilt-Aof deer’s equivalent of a smorgasbord. A Whirl-type amusement ride aptly named nephew who now farms the property the “Berry-Go-Round.” “My brother-inwas unable to get a conventional crop in John Cross/Mankato Free Press law from Waterville got it from somethis spring due to the wet weather. Elden Stanke’s unique elevated deer stand near Smith’s Mill, Minn. where and thought it would make a good When things finally dried out, he thing for the kids to play on,” he said. planted a cover crop of tillage radishes. However, city fathers and neighbors “The radishes were planted to protect took a dim view of the scarlet orb the soil but I was told that deer really parked prominently in his yard, so in like to eat them, too,” he said of the the interest of neighborhood harmony, vegetables resembling pale cucumbers he decided to get rid of it. that now cover the field by the thousands. Stanke, who was unable to hunt “I said I would take it, figuring it would look good in the yard out here,” last year because of some health issues, is unsure if he will be able to hunt with Stanke said. the gang this fall either. “And I said, no, it wouldn’t,” added But he figures that with the radishes his wife, Merry, who quickly shot down as forage and the deer more accusany notions about yard art. tomed to the strawberry deer stand, After some consideration, he came up the former amusement ride just might with the idea of utilizing it as yet one be a good place for one of his guest more deer stand for the cadre of relahunters to be when the 2013 Mintives and friends come every November nesota Firearms Deer Season begins. to hunt deer on the farm. In the meantime, one might wonder “My nephews welded a stand for it,” why he opted to keep the strawberry he said. “And it used to turn, but they its original, very noticeable red state welded it so that now, it’s stationary.” instead of converting it to a stealthier camouflage cloak of browns and tans to In its original configuration, the strawberry had a hard bench seat run- better blend in with the surroundings. ning all the way around the inside for He thought for a moment. riders and something resembling a “Maybe someday I might want to start round table in the center. growing some strawberries to sell,” he In deference to functionality and joked. “It would make a pretty good sign.” comfort, the table was removed and John Cross is a Mankato (Minn.) replaced with a comfortable chair. Free Press staff writer. Contact him at Windows were added to either side to (507) 344-6376 or enable a hunter to view areas to either jcross@mankatofreepress.com or follow him on Twitter @jcross_photo. ❖ side of the strawberry.

19 A


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013 20 A


21 A

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”


NEWS & INFO FOR MINNESOTA AND NORTHERN IOWA DAIRY PRODUCERS

Milker's Message from

THE LAND

September milk production report a ‘bullish surprise’

<< MILKER’S MESSAGE >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

22 A

MN TRUCK & TRACTOR

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Mankato, MN • 507-388-4599

LODERMEIER’S

LAKE HENRY IMPLEMENT

Goodhue, MN • 651-923-4441

Lake Henry, MN • 320-243-7411

NORTHLAND FARM SYSTEMS

SE SKID LOADER

Owatonna, MN • 507-451-3131

St. Charles, MN • 507-932-3808

This column was written a 5 pound loss per cow but for the marketing week endcow numbers were up 7,000 ing Nov. 8. head. Washington State was up 1.6 percent on 4,000 more September milk production cows. Output per cow was in the top 23 dairy states unchanged from a year ago. totaled 14.8 billion pounds, up 1.1 percent from September ■ 2012, according to prelimiHigh Ground Dairy’s Eric nary data in U.S. Department Meyer says the report “delivof Agriculture’s latest Milk MIELKE MARKET ered a rather bullish surProduction report. This is the WEEKLY prise,” adding that “The first report to again include country’s milking herd has By Lee Mielke milk cow numbers and output not yet turned sharply to the per cow since the sequester. upside and challenges to profitability in Output in the 50 states totaled 15.8 bilcertain regions of the country were still lion pounds, up 1 percent from a year present as monthly cow numbers ago. Revisions lowered the original shrank throughout the third quarter.” August estimate to 15.7 billion pounds, The outlook for dairy farmers is very up 2.5 percent from August 2012. positive for Fourth Quarter into 2014, The July to September quarter outaccording to Meyer, “was bullish versus put amounted to 49.4 billion pounds, expectations and may continue to proup 1.5 percent from a year ago. The vide support to dairy commodity prices average number of milk cows during during the seasonal holiday rally.” He the quarter was 9.23 million head, up warned however that “We still had 1 16,000 from the same period last year. percent growth in September and September cow numbers totaled 8.51 expect production to continue accelermillion head, down 19,000 from August ating for the coming months and as but 33,000 more than a year ago. Out- such, we anticipate lower dairy comput per cow averaged 1,741 pounds, up modity prices once holiday demand 12 pounds from a year ago. subsides towards the end of November California output was up just 0.4 per- into early December.” cent though cow numbers were up September milk production was up 1,000 head and output per cow was up just 1.1 percent from a year ago and 5 pounds. Wisconsin saw a 1 percent that translated into small increases in increase thanks to a 15 pound per cow cheese but lower butter and powder gain and 1,000 more cows being milked. production, according to this week’s Idaho was down 1.5 percent on 9,000 September Dairy Products report. fewer cows. New York saw a 1.8 percent Butter output hit 134 million pounds, gain, thanks to a 30 pound increase per down 1.6 percent from August and 1.9 cow. Pennsylvania was up 1.5 percent percent below September 2012. Nonfat on a 25 pound gain per cow, though cow dry milk, at 76.4 million pounds, was numbers were down 1,000 head. Mindown a whopping 28.6 percent from nesota was unchanged in milk output, August and 9.6 percent below a year ago. cow numbers, and output per cow. ■ The biggest increase was in Florida, American cheese totaled 347 million up 7.1 percent, followed by Kansas at pounds, down 8.9 percent from August 5.9 percent, and Iowa at 5.5 percent. and 0.3 percent below a year ago. ItalIdaho recorded the biggest loss, folian-type, at 385 million pounds, was 0.1 lowed by New Mexico, off 1.4 percent, percent below August but a healthy 4.5 and Missouri, off 1 percent. percent above a year ago. Total cheese Michigan was up 3.4 percent on a 30 production amounted to 892 million pound gain per cow and 7,000 more cows. Texas was up 1.4 percent despite See MIELKE, pg. 23A


Holiday orders pushing cheese prices higher

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013 << MILKER’S MESSAGE >>

United Farmers Coop

Northland Farm Systems

Marzolf Implement

Arnolds

Lafayette, MN

Owatonna, MN

Spring Valley, MN

Kimball, MN, St. Martin, MN Willmar, MN

Judson Implement

A&C Farm Service

Lake Crystal, MN

Paynesville, MN

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

MIELKE, from pg. 22A pounds, down 4.7 percent from August but 2.3 percent above a year ago. Cheese prices plunged the first week of November. It started with the barrels on Wednesday and kept slipping, which pulled the blocks down Friday morning, reversing five consecutive weeks of gain. The blocks closed at $1.8225 per pound, down 8 cents on the day and the week and 9.75 cents below this week a year ago when they were as depressed as supporters of Mitt Romney’s bid for the Presidency, down 19 cents on the week. Barrel closed Friday at $1.7825, down 8.75 cents on the week and 5.25 cents below a year ago when they plummeted 24.5 cents lower. Three cars of block and none of barrel traded hands on the week. The Agriculture Marketing Service-surveyed U.S. average block price hit $1.8248, up 2.7 cents, while the barrels averaged $1.8203, up 2 cents. Cheese production schedules are often below desired levels due to tight milk supplies and competition from other Class II and IV products, according to USDA’s Dairy Market News. Good holiday orders are pushing prices higher as buyers look to secure supplies for the holiday buying season. The Nov. 6 Daily Dairy Report points out that September cheese production was up 2.3 percent from a year ago but Cheddar production was down 1.2 percent “as cheese makers favored mozzarella.” Daily average Cheddar output in September fell to nearly two year lows, according to the DDR, and “This shift away from Cheddar is particularly significant because milk prices are based on Cheddar prices.” Holiday demand from retailers for blocks is firm, and the decline in Cheddar production could tighten fresh supplies and sustain the spot price, the DDR said. “Given prices overseas, it is unlikely that domestic cheese supplies will be augmented by imports, as they were at this time last year.” ■ Cash butter continued its movement higher this week, closing the first Friday of November at $1.56, up 2.75 cents on the week but still 33 cents below a year ago. Twelve cars sold this week. AMS butter averaged $1.4949, down 2.9 cents. Holiday demand has kept manufacturers busy filling retail orders. Demand for 82 percent butter remains good, according to DMN, but butter makers are focusing on finishing 80 percent domestic orders but export interest remains good. Grade A nonfat dry milk closed Friday at a record high $1.9325, up 2.25 S powder averaged $1.8616, up 1.6 cents, and dry whey averaged 57.96 cents, up 1.9 cents. This week’s GlobalDairyTrade price index fell 1.8 percent from October 15, due to drops in butter and whole milk powder. Most other prices were up. The butter price, converted to 80 percent butterfat, averaged $1.60/lb., down 7 percent. Cheddar cheese averSee MIELKE, pg. 24A

23 A


THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

24 A

CWT 2013 cheese exports total 115 million pounds MIELKE, from pg. 23A aged $1.99/lb., up 1.2 percent. High Ground Dairy’s Eric Meyer notes that “Increased milk supplies in New Zealand coming to the auction by

way of whole milk powder provided additional resistance to overall dairy commodity prices,” down for the second auction in a row. Meyer views the event as slightly bearish for whole milk powder

THE LEADER IN FEEDERS!

and U.S. skim milk powder, bearish for butter, but bullish for anhydrous milkfat and New Zealand skim milk powder. Cooperatives Working Together accepted 32 requests for export assistance this week to sell 3.344 million pounds of Cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese and 3.463 million pounds of butter to customers in Asia, Central America, Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. CWT’s 2013 cheese exports now total 114.98 million pounds plus 84.47 million pounds

of butter, 44,092 pounds of anhydrous milk fat and 218,258 pounds of whole milk powder to 37 countries. DMN reports that 4.4 billion pounds of packaged fluid milk products is estimated to have been sold in the United States in August, down 2.7 percent from August 2012. Estimated sales of total conventional fluid milk products decreased 3.1 percent while estimated See MIELKE, pg. 25A

GREAT DEALS GREAT PRICES NOW!

<< MILKER’S MESSAGE >>

H I G H S T E E L I N S E RT I N 20 ’ AR ROW F RON T® F E E D E R

AND MUCH MORE C H E C K O U T T H E L AT E S T F L O W M E T E R S & L AT E S T D E - WAT E R I N G S Y S T E M S F O R D A I RY NEW TANK SPREADERS:

LARGE BALES IN A 30’ TA N D E M A X L E A R R O W F R O N T ® F E E D E R

See Your Local Dealer for information on the complete line. Ask for a full color brochure.

(2) - Houle 6000 (3) - Houle 7300 (2) - Houle 9500

8”x35’, 10”x35’

SEMI-TANKERS:

USED TANK SPREADERS: (1) - Houle 9500’s (4) - Houle 6000’s Coming In (3) - Houle 7300’s (1) - Balzer 4200 (1) - Badger 3300

LOAD CARTS: (25) - 6000 gal. up to 9500 gal. (Aluminum), Stainless), or (Steel)

(1) - Calumet 3750 vac (1) - Calumet 2250 vac (1) - Balzer 2400 vac

NEW PUMPS:

(6) - Various lengths Houle 8’ to 10’ vertical x 6”

USED PUMPS:

(1) - Houle 6”x8’ (2) - Houle 6”x81⁄2’ (12) SEMI TRUCKS – Day Cabs! Sharp!! (1) - Houle 8”x81⁄2’

FULL SIZE BUNKS

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

MANURE HANDLING

S P E C I A LT Y F E E D E R S

Sorensen’s Sales & Rentals

United Farmers Coop

Northland Farm Systems

Marzolf Implement

Hutchinson, MN 320-587-2162 Owatonna, MN 800-385-3911

Lafayette, MN 507-228-8224

Spring Valley, MN 507-346-7227

The Leader In Feeders! Famous for minimum feed waste!

Large

6000 Gal. Rentals - CALL US

Houle

Parts

Inventory

✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰ ✰ ✰ ✰ ✰ ✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰✰

We Repair ALL Used Vac Tanks Full Service Shop For Your Equipment

Courtland 507-359-4230 Waste Handling Inc. For Current Pricing Call: - Chris or Mark

Courtland, MN courtlandwaste.com


Chicago-to-Tampa rail line to expand market reach The 2012 average cost to produce cheddar cheese was 21.71 cents/lb., up from 20.29 cents in 2011 and the highest cost per pound in the past 10 years. It compared to 19.21 cents in 2010; 19.66 cents in 2009; 20.99 cents in 2008; 20.03 cents in 2007; 19.88 cents in 2006; and 19.14 cents in 2005. The average all cheese yield decreased to 12.17 pounds per cwt. of milk in 2012, compared to 12.21 pounds in 2011; 13.7 pounds in 2010; 13.28 pounds in 2009; 13.58 pounds in 2008; 13.71 pounds in 2007; and 12.24 pounds in 2006. The 2012 average cost of manufacturing butter was 16.88 cents/lb., down from 17.75 in 2011 and the lowest since 2008. Among seven plants, 2012 costs ranged from 16.01 cents/lb. for the lowcost group to 17.82 cents for the highcost group. The cost to produce nonfat dry milk was 19.99 cents/lb., up from 19.42 cents in 2011. Among nine plants, the 2012 range was 17.82 cents/lb. for the low-

cost group; 21.16 cents for the mediumcost group; and 25.38 cents for the high-cost group (three plants in each group). The full report is available at www.cdfa.ca.gov/dairy/uploader/ postings/manufacturingcost. ■ Indiana dairy producers may be “taking the train” to expand their market outreach. A yet-to-be-launched nonstop rail service called the “Green Express,” operated by the CSX Rail Company, will link Tampa, Fla., to LaPorte, Ind., and bring fresh fruits and vegetables from the Southeast and the Caribbean to Chicago, the second largest market area in the United States. The train may also bring some “green” to Indiana dairy producers. The Indiana Dairy Producers Organization recently heard details from the Green Express’ Chris McGrath and IDP’s Dave Forgey talked with me about it in Friday’s DairyLine and said they’ve been looking at this since 2011

and believe the first run will take place in March 2014. “Those cars that come up, have to go back,” Forgey said, so IDP is looking for cooperatives or independent processors who will take advantage of this opportunity to reach consumers in the southeastern states, Caribbean, or beyond. He said the improvements made in the Panama Canal could mean product going to China and the Asian markets, South Korea and Japan and possibly compete with Western ports. Plants exist within a five- or sixhour drive of the LaPorte location, according to Forgey, who sees “tremendous opportunity if we can get them (processors) interested and step out of the norm into some new ideas.” Lee Mielke is a syndicated columnist who resides in Everson, Wash. His weekly column is featured in newspapers across the country and he may be reached at lkmielke@juno.com. ❖

REMODELING, EXPANSION OR REPLACEMENT • We Can Handle All Your Barn Steel Needs

“Buy Direct From the Manufacturer and Save!” Strongest Cement in Post System On The Market • Guaranteed Not To Bend • 2 7/8” Hi Tensil (5 gauge) Galvanized Cement in Post • Heavy Duty 8 lb. Clamps that fasten Loop to Cement Post • 2 3/8” (10 gauge) Galvanized Loop with 1.9” (9 gauge) Top Rail Pipe Hi Tensil • 6 1/2 lb. Top Rail Clamp with 1/2” grade 8 bolts and locknuts • Standard Loops are 34” on center from top to bottom, however, can be custom bent to your specifications • Much Stronger than poor imitation stalls • Freudenthal Stalls are unmatched in Quality, Durability, and Workmanship All Of Our Pipe Is • Easy Installation Manufactured • All Freudenthal Stalls are made with Pipe manufactured in the USA In The USA

Since1921 waters ‘em right

If you don’t see what you want here, please check our website or call us WaterMaster Livestock Waterers WaterMaster • • • • •

STALLS BUILT TOUGH & DESIGNED RIGHT!

Auto Release Self Locking Panels

CS-60 COMFORT TIE STALL

Self Locking Panels Also Available • Entire panel made of H.D. 10 gauge tubing • Panels are hot dipped galvanized after welding inside and out • 6 ft., 8 ft., 10 ft., 12 ft. lengths • 12 ft. panel weight 275 lbs.

Custom Made By Farmers Who Know What Cows Can Do • Std. tie stall are 4 ft. wide, most other sizes on hand • Price includes hydraulic pressed on extra long 12” poly-vinyl rust shields • Total weight is 65 lbs. per stall • 20” solid shaft in divider at no extra charge 1.9 Heavy Duty Tie Stalls also on hand, Straight or Sloped Style • 80 lbs. per stall

Heaviest in the industry. The main frame is constructed of high tensile 2-3/8” - 10 gauge tubing supported by a 2-3/8” curb post reinforced with a 3”x18” (5 gauge) steel rust guard with 12” poly-vinyl rust shield and 6-1/2 lb. top rail clamp. Easy installation. Built for maximum durability and cow comfort.

Your Ultimate Choice in Safety, Economy and Durability Supreme COMFORT PAD • Custom Sizing • 1 3/4” Thickness • Easy Installation • Anchors Available • Brisket Boards Compatible • Anti-Fungal

• Anti-Bacterial • Totally Non-Absorbent • Non-Skid Surface • Total Weight - 170# • 5-year limited warranty on Pad PATENT PENDING

Heavy duty arch tie chain assembly. Push in.

Nylon neck strap. High tensile strength. 5-yr. Warranty.

We carry a complete line of stall and stanchion clamps at low prices. Call for the ones you need!

We will UPS Anywhere!

COOLAIR FANS

Performance and Efficiency are the Key Notes to the Coolair NCF Fans. • Baldor and A.O. Smith Motors • Precise Engineering • Top Quality Materials • Heavy Duty Construction • Quiet and Trouble Free • Cast Aluminum Disc with Captured Bearings

SPECIAL

COWMATS

Discounts on Larger Orders

• 100% Pure Rubber • 12 Year Guarantee • Textured Non-Slip Surface • Grooved Underside • 3/4”x4Footx6Foot

Built for rugged feedlot, pasture and dairy conditions All surfaces slope to drain for easy cleaning Finger lift service cover, no tools, springs, or clips Fastest valve in the industry Immersion heater and supply line heater available options

Cast or Plastic

DRINKING CUPS

We make our own exclusive extra heavy duty mounting hardware. It prevents the cup from loosening up and turning. • Vertical Nozzle • Grade A • Plastic Bowl Valve Approved Available • Non-Siphoning • Cast Iron Bowl • Very Trouble Free

NEW

HIGH FLOW VALVES AVAILABLE New Cups or Replacement Cups

POLYDOME CALF WARMER

• 24” wide, 50” long x 45” tall, lower section 16” deep

• Durable medium density poly • Easy cleaning • Deluxe, high performance 110 volt, 2 heat settings • Raised slotted floor Freudenthal Cattle Gates

• Heaviest, strongest gates on the market, guaranteed. • Weight of gate is 16 lbs. PER FT. • Hinge options will fit any size of post. Most hinges come with grease inserts. • Several latch systems to choose from. • Custom lengths made to fit your opening at no additional cost.

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

TIE STALLS

The Toughest Stalls on the market, guaranteed not to bend

CLAMP AND STRAP SPECIAL – Can’t Beat This Price!

<< MILKER’S MESSAGE >>

Buy Direct From Manufacturer and SAVE!

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

MIELKE, from pg. 24A organic fluid sales increased 4.8 percent from a year earlier. Commercial disappearance of dairy products in the first seven months of 2013 totaled 116.4 billion pounds, up 0.2 percent from the same period in 2012. Butter was up 0.5 percent; American cheese, up 2.6 percent; other cheese, up 2.2 percent; nonfat dry milk, down 22 percent; and fluid sales were off 2.2 percent. Looking “back to the futures;” the First Quarter 2014 pack average was at $16.99 per cwt. Nov. 1 and was hovering around $17.01 late morning Nov. 8. ■ California’s Department of Food and Agriculture released its annual report on dairy product manufacturing costs. The 2012 weighted average cost to produce butter was down from a year earlier, but the costs to produce nonfat dry milk and cheese were up.

25 A


<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

26 A

Increasing productivity without increasing costs By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer Getting into inoculant-based products and seed treating services has generated new “farming dimensions” for Chris Schlegel, Kandiyohi County area farmer. “We’re into a diversified product lineup which we feel is very cost-effective and a proven method to increase yields,” said Schlegel, who views the microbial and biological market as the next threshold for advancing the productivity of agriculture. Max Yield Solutions, the name of Schlegel’s new firm headquartered at Schlegel Farms near Lake Lillian, Minn., offers services in seed, seed treatment products, seed treating services, plus biologicals and adjuvants. With these additional technologies he sees producers better able to quantify their inputs and increase yields in an environmentally friendly manner. Might these microbiological products also lessen costs? Because each farmer’s production strategies are different, on-farm testing is the most reliable indicator of what works and what doesn’t. Even though some new products suggest a potential for cutting

You never want to turn a blind eye to things happening in agriculture. With expenses up and risks also ramping higher, we want to utilize technology at the highest level but still being cost-effective with our farming budget and enhancing the overall health of our crops and soils. — Chris Schlegel, Kandiyohi County farmer back commercial fertilizer costs, especially nitrogen, Schlegel said it’s difficult to tell farmers to cut back on inputs when crop production is expanding. “We know these products have the capability to increase productivity without increasing costs. As new products keep evolving, the bottom line is better utilization of our soils and crop production inputs. That’s no guarantee of increased yields but it certainly is trending,” Schlegel said. Corn, soybeans, wheat and sugar beets are on the agenda for these biological products. Already the turf business is big business. “But we’re just in the early stages of wide-scale introduction into row-crop agriculture,” he said, with key factors being environmental safety plus the ability to tailor

FRUSTRATION GOT THE BEST OF YOU? ARE YOU BEING PURSUED BY THE BIG SEED COMPANIES’ SALES PEOPLE? We offer Quality, MN Grown Products at Quality Prices.

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

WE TAKE GREAT PRIDE AT ANDERSON SEEDS OF ST. PETER IN KNOWING THAT WE HAVE DEALT WITH AND CARED FOR THE SEED EVERY STEP OF THE WAY!!

SEEDS AofNDERSON St. Peter, MN 37825 Cty. Rd. 63 •

(507) 246-5032

a plan to fit the specific needs of a grower, on a field-by-field basis. “It’s not a one-size-fits-all concept.” His firm looks at the current inputs, be that conventional fertilizer or livestock manure, then develops a program that fits in with what the producer is already doing. “We’re not talking special applications to work with these products. We’ll tailor a program to be the most cost-effective for each particular customer,” he said. The TerraMax products’ lineup will be a major offering of Max Yield Solutions. Schlegel said, “there are a lot of advancements happening in special research labs and on-farm testing. I tend to think we’re only into the first chapter of putting bacteria and biological materials to work in our farm soils.

For example we’re looking at a bacteria-based treatment that helps control corn nematode and soybean cyst nematode. A double-header with a single product may be just one example of new things happening in this exciting world of microbiologics in farming.” N-Hibit is the name of this Environmental Protection Agency-registered product with harpin as the specific protein. It will be marketed for either seed treatment or foliar application. Pending is a new product which provides biological control of iron deficiency chlorosis in soybeans. With the increasing resistance failures of both trait and insecticides to corn rootworm challenges, just maybe a biological product is waiting in the wings to eliminate this growing threat in the Corn Belt. “You never want to turn a blind eye to things happening in agriculture. With expenses up and risks also ramping higher, we want to utilize technology at the highest level but still being cost-effective with our farming budget and enhancing the overall health of our crops and soils,” Schlegel said. Schlegel can be contacted at (320) 8043553 or schlegel.chris@gmail.com. ❖

twitter.com/thelandonline • facebook.com/thelandonline Editorial concerns: editor@thelandonline.com Advertising questions: theland@thelandonline.com

NEED A NEW FARM SHOP? Steel Prices Are Substantially Lower.

Look No Further

Triad Construction, Inc. Specializes in Shop Buildings The buildings shown are open for tours by appointment

➤➤ Commercial snow

loading. Not farm loading. There’s no need to worry about snow bringing your building down on all your equipment.

➤➤ Star pre-engineered all

steel buildings. No wood to rot.

➤➤ Any building span,

➤➤ Any types or sizes of

doors.

➤➤ In floor heating systems

height or length in one foot increments.

available. Highly recommended.

➤➤ Also available are

machine and crop storage buildings and cattle yard covers.

STAR Cattle Covers Any Size (100’ x 390’ shown)

JOHN HALLIDAY

General Contractor Since 1978 - Lic. 4729

1302 West DuPue Ave. • Olivia, MN 56277

320-523-2600 • 800-334-4715 Cell 320-522-0332


Nitrogen tool bar attachment for ‘catch-up’ opportunities and hot and dry weather conditions favoring evaporation. Ohio State University agronomists found approximately a 3-percent loss per day with ureabased products left on the soil surface. “So be concerned about weather conditions when

doing nitrogen work. But also recognize that this nitrogen tool bar attachment lets you greatly reduce the risk of weather,” Bassett said. The tool bar attachment is removed in only 10 to See TOOL BAR, pg. 28A

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013 << www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”

By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer Called a nitrogen tool bar attachment, this unit mounted on a 2014 Hagie STS machine caught lots of attention at the Clay County Fair in Spencer, Iowa. “It’s not unlike any other nitrogen side-dress applicator except this one Doug Bassett stands tall,” said Doug Bassett, northwest Iowa and southern Minnesota territory manager for Hagie Manufacturing Co. of Clarion, Iowa. “This attachment helps minimize weather or rain disturbances that keep you out of your fields when corn is growing rapidly. With this unit you can still get that nitrogen applied if you are doing side-dress applications or even a rescue situation if weather didn’t give you any This attachment other option.” helps minimize Though already on weather or rain the market for about disturbances 10 years, Bassett said the bar became much that keep you more popular when out of your the price of corn went fields when up, along with the corn is growing price of nitrogen. rapidly. “That tended to make producers managing — Doug Bassett for maximum yields and also better managing those expensive inputs,” Bassett said. The tool bar can be set up for 30-inch, 20-inch or 22-inch row configurations. “In the narrower rows we set the applicator knives for every other row, meaning we skip a row and let the corn reach for the N in either direction,” Bassett said, explaining there was too much extra weight if set up with knives every 20 inches in the row. Coulter wheels aren’t set up as gauge wheels controlling application depths but rather slit the ground so the nitrogen is squirted into that slit just before being closed over with soil. “The goal is to position that nitrogen so that it quickly attaches to soil moisture because then it will stay put in the soil,” Bassett said, indicating this is a high-speed nitrogen applicator permitting travel at 10 to 15 mph, thus those coulters virtually roll along on top of the soil. Deep penetrating coulters could be a problem covering the ground at these speeds. So why knife in your nitrogen? Simply because the risk of nitrogen becoming unavailable for plant use dramatically increases when it is surface applied via broadcast, band or otherwise compared with methods that inject or incorporate it. Urea ammonium nitrate (32 percent and 28 percent) commonly used in side-dress corn applications is easily lost through volatilization when surface applied. This occurs when urea converts to ammonia gas which is released into the atmosphere through natural processes. According to Rachel Halback, Hagie agronomist, the speed at which volatilization occurs depends on temperature, humidity, soil pH and wind speed. Nitrogen loss will increase with increasing soil pH,

27 A


THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

28 A

Same system used for regular spray, nitrogen work TOOL BAR, from pg. 27A 15 minutes when switching back to the spray boom for conventional spray work. Perhaps the beauty of this Hagie STS machine is that the same tank, sprayer and pump system is used for both regular spray applications and the nitrogen work. Tanks vary in size from 1,000 gallon to 1,600 gallon. Typical nitrogen application rates would be in

the 30-pound to 70-pound rate. More likely, however, is a starter fertilizer application at planting with a sidedress nitrogen application in season. “Some producers are using this rig twice — early shortly after planting and then later after the corn is waist to chest high,” Bassett said, indicating most of their tool bar units are being purchased directly by farmers, many of whom also may do some custom work for neighbors. “But

big custom applicators are seeing this as a unique customer service which can further extend the work season for their equipment, too. Historically, though, these machines are going to farmers who are trying to better manage their dollar costs of crop production.” The risks of volatilization, immobilization and runoff of surface-applied nitrogen make injected nitrogen much friendlier to those concerned with nutrient management. Hagie Manufacturing dates back to 1947. Its product line of crop application equipment is now marketed worldwide. Preceding the advent of the selfpropelled high-clearance crop sprayers, Hagie Hybrids (seed corn) started the growth of this family owned company. ❖

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Interactive map highlights corn impact An interactive online map created by the Minnesota Corn Growers Association highlights the local impact made by corn farming throughout Minnesota. With a single click, users can access data that breaks down corn production by county along with county-by-county information on corn crop value, stations that sell ethanol-blended fuel such as E85, ethanol plants, grain elevators and MCGA members. The online tool can be accessed at www.mncorn.org/farm-policy/county-stats, or under the “Farm Policy” tab at www.mncorn.org. “It’s another way to show how corn farming helps grow the local economy,” said MCGA president Ryan Buck, a farmer in Goodhue County. “A strong corn crop means more activity at local businesses and more opportunities to create agriculture-related jobs in the region. Corn farming makes an impact beyond just the farm.” Minnesota corn farmers harvested 1.386 billion bushels in 2012, valued at over $9.5 billion. There are 350 stations that sell ethanol-blended fuel such as E85, 20 ethanol plants and 621 grain elevators throughout the state. With more than 46.3 million bushels harvested valued over $324 million, Renville County in western Minnesota led the state in corn production. Redwood County was second with over 40 million bushels valued at more than $280 million. Hennepin County has 23 stations that sell E85, the most of any county in Minnesota. In greater Minnesota, Stearns County in central Minnesota leads the way with 14 stations. Stearns and Kandiyohi counties each have 21 grain elevators. Renville County has the most MCGA members with 873. Corn is grown in 73 of Minnesota’s 87 counties. There are 36 E85 stations and 19 grain elevators in counties where no corn production was reported for 2012. The MCGA has over 6,700 members and represents the interests of more than 24,000 corn farmers throughout Minnesota. To learn more about the MCGA, log on to mncorn.org. ❖


Thiesse: Cow-calf operators see some optimism

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

standpoint. Obviously the first fertilizer we used in growing crops was livestock manure. Properly managed, livestock manure is still an excellent resource for the soil,” Thiesse said, pointing out Minnesota livestock producers have improved their management strategies to the extent that livestock pastures adjacent to rivers, streams and lakes are seldom now an environmental issue. In view of significantly larger corn crops than earlier predicted should feeders contract ahead for feed supplies? Putting on his “banker’s cap,” Thiesse hesitated just a bit and said, “today most producers are looking at margins so it’s hard to suggest locking in. But if feed prices and cattle futures generate a margin, then contracting could be working for you. But if margins are questionable right now, there is no

urgency to contract ahead.” Thiesse is vice president at MinnStar Bank in Lake Crystal, Minn., as well as author of the “Farm Programs” column in The Land, found on page 3B in this week’s issue. “There’s nothing on the horizon to suggest a runup of corn prices. Given the encouraging yields on this 2013 crop and looking at projected planting acres for 2014, it looks like continued pressure on the corn market is inevitable, at least in the short term. It looks like corn supplies nationwide and worldwide are in a more stable situation so volatility in the commodity markets should be lessened.” Being part of the “think tank” team that created the Minnesota Beef Expo 14 years ago, Thiesse is pleased, almost amazed, that it has become such a showcase event for the Minnesota cattle industry. “Yes, this has now become one of the major events in the Upper Midwest,” said Thiesse, who since Day 1 has been coordinator of the junior show. There were about 800 cattle and more than 300 exhibitors in this year’s junior show portion of Beef Expo which was Oct. 18-20 at the Minnesota State Fairgrounds. Expo dates correspond with the annual Minnesota teachers convention which shuts down Minnesota public schools for three days, so students aren’t playing hooky when participating. The junior show is an educational event with things like judging contests, a knowledge bowl, a team fitting contest and the Minnesota Youth Beef Experience Program (see story on Page 32A). ❖

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

CONCRETE CATTLE SLAT

GANG SLATS

• Free Stall • Drive Thru Alleys • Post & Beams

• Because the concrete slat is the backbone of any confinement system, you don’t want to take chances with quality or fit in your facility. • To find out more, please drop us a line, or give us a call - we’ll be happy to supply you with just what you need for your operation.

IF IT’S PRECAST IT’S BUILT TO LAST!

Willmar Precast Co. West Hwy. 40, Willmar, MN

320-235-8527

230/95R32 230/95R36 230/95R44 230/95R48 270/95R36 270/95R48 270/95R54 290/95R34 290/90R38 300/95R46 320/85R34 320/85R38

320/80R42 320/90R42 320/90R46 320/90R50 320/90R54 320/105R54 380/90R46 380/90R50 380/90R54 380/105R50 420/80R46

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer A logical place to zero in on the Minnesota cattle business is the Minnesota Beef Expo, where for 14 years Kent Thiesse has headed up the Youth Program. With considerably cheaper corn prices than one year ago, how does Kent Thiesse Thiesse read the immediate future for Minnesota cattle producers? “Yes, there’s some understandable optimism, especially from the cow-calf producers. Calves are at record prices right now,” Thiesse said, explaining that it is basically a supply and demand situation. Because of three years of drought conditions, beef cow numbers and total beef supply in this country are at near record lows. Add to that the early October blizzard that ripped through western South Dakota and surrounding areas and claimed tens of thousands of livestock. Many of these losses were pregnant cows which directly impact the supply of feeder calves again next year. “In the big scheme of things, not a big deal but, even so, this only exacerbates what already is a tight supply,” Thiesse said. Minnesota feedlot operators are certainly noting the squeeze of escalating feeder prices so even with significantly reduced feed costs the margins are likely staying fairly tight but Thiesse did venture, “there’s now more opportunity for profitability but it’s likely not as profitable as one might think.” So if the drought cycle is diminishing in the southwest will cattle numbers, especially beef cows, rebound? “Yes, but not rapidly,” Thiesse said. “The cattle business simply takes a long time to rebuild numbers. Plus as cow men rebuild their herds, they are naturally keeping more replacement heifers which, in the short term, can put even more pressure on the supply situation.” Unlike the hog industry and the poultry business, cattle cycles are long-term so he’s not seeing much rebound. Will the cattle business eventually become a conglomerate of just a few huge owners and investors? Thiesse doesn’t believe so. “The cattle business is unique. Yes, on the feeding side of this industry there are now huge feedlots often with multiple ownerships. But the nature of the cow-calf business still continues to lend itself to a lot of smaller operations. “There are many areas of our country suited only for pasture land and forage production, often best fit for smaller operations including part-time ranchers who have off-farm jobs. We have quite a bit of this in Minnesota so I don’t see much change in the cow-calf business regardless the financial outlook.” Thiesse recognizes the growing cooperation between the Department of Natural Resources and other public land agencies and ranchers wanting to rent these acres for grazing. It seldom is an environmental issue. He related to earlier times when agriculture was more diversified with livestock always part of that farming landscape. “Livestock was a positive from an environmental

29 A


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

30 A

W

hich columns do you enjoy most in The Land? Are there some you flip to right away in every issue? Any you just don’t care for at all? Let us know!

The Land wants to hear from you. Send your feedabck to: Editor, The Land, P.O. Box 3169 Mankato, MN 56002 or e-mail editor@TheLandOnline.com

To be printed as Letters to the Editor, letters must be signed and have writer’s name, address and phone number.

MDA provides ‘dating service’ for young, old farmers By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer No joke, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture is now in the “dating game” business. A smiling Jim Ostlie, MDA employee said, “in many states this is called a ‘Farm Link’ program but in reality it is much like a dating Jim Ostlie service. We call it the Minnesota Farm Transitions program. “We’re taking information from beginning farmers and/or ‘wanna-be’ guys and gals having aspirations about wanting to farm. Maybe they’ve now completed college, or worked on a farm as youngsters, or grew up on farm but there’s just no room for fitting into the home farm. “We link these young people with retiring farmers looking to the future but don’t have heirs to take over the farm. But if this retiring farmer is willing to take under his/her wing one of these younger folks, then we (MDA) arrange for face-to-face sit-down sessions with both parties.” This starts after the MDA receives a completed farm transitions form. “Once you get the right information in the hands of both parties, it’s then a matter of listening and talking until the ‘retiring’ farm couple feels totally comfortable with the young farmer. That, of course, includes financial details and a host of other items,” Ostlie said. This Minnesota Farm Transitions Information Form is a six-page document that compiles a huge amount of information on behalf of both parties. The MDA form reads “Understanding your goals and objectives is important to matching and transitioning, so complete answers are critical.” The first three questions get right to it: • How do you see yourself benefiting from this program? • How do you feel about transitioning the farm? • What role do you see yourself playing in the transition of the farm? “We’ve been trying to do some informal matches for the last five years. But we decided that we really needed to iron out a specific program that provides enough details so we can really help with the transition through its entirety. Even though in its infancy, interest is building,” Ostlie said. As of Oct. 18, 27 beginning young farmers have filled out the information forms and nine older farmers have expressed similar interest in potentially offering their farms for a transition match up. A call to Ostlie starts the process. Contact him at (320) 291-8657 or jim.ostlie@state.mn.us, or log on to www.mda.state.mn.us for more information. ❖


31 A

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”


<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

32 A

Beef program helps get youth into the industry By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer Called the Minnesota Youth Beef Experience Program, this project now in its 10th year, has placed 84 beef heifers into the hands of youth across Minnesota according to coordinator Claudine Goodrich. Claudine Goodrich “These beef heifers are donated by various Minnesota beef producers to youth who apply to be selected. These youngsters are between 12 and 16 years of age. Most are farm kids but nonfarm youth also apply,” Goodrich said. “What we are doing is creating a mentorship between seasoned beef producers and the youth to encourage the love of beef and the ongoing development of our industry.” She noted Minnesota cattle producers average about 56 years of age. If a non-farm kid is selected, where does the heifer live? She explained that the youth in his/her application has to identify housing arrangements with a nearby farmer to house the critter. Also the applicant will be providing daily care (feeding, etc.) of the newly acquired heifer and getting a local source to impregnate the heifer (two straws of semen are provided by an A.I. cooperator). Clippers are provided and Purina supplies some grain so there’s minimal out-of-pocket costs to these youth selected for their beef heifers each year. “Plus we encourage these youth to make connections with a local vet; with other cattlemen in the area; and of course to learn how to tend and fit their

Pull Type Road Grader 22’9” long w/tandem axle, 14’ blade w/industrial cutting edge, 9’ wide in the narrow position, many options

heifer for the local county fair plus be spokespersons about their experience. In essence we enable them to develop new confidence in themselves while also learning the details and husbandry of raising a beef animal,” Goodrich said. Some of these Minnesota youth are persistent. Goodrich told of Zachary Claire who applied four years in a row before finally being chosen just prior to the 2013 Beef Expo. The Expo does a special recognition of the Youth Experience Program, including color photos of all previous winners, year by year, plus a display of scrapbooks required by each selected youth. Goodrich commented about the difference in the quality of Claire’s first year application which was done in pencil versus his finely prepared application

3 Pt. Snowblower 12.5’ wide, 1000 large PTO, hyd spout, auger drive. Buy this and leave your duals on!

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Dick Hagen

Tyler Doyle of Easton, Minn., with Lucky Lady, a heifer he was awarded during the 2012 Beef Expo. Doyle brought Lucky Lady to be shown at this year’s expo.

Trench Groomer for leveling tile lines

Double B Manufacturing

6666 58th Avenue SE • Willmar, MN 56201 Fax: (320) 382-6253 • Email: brad060154@frontiernet.net

Phone: (320) 382-6623

For Over 51 Years

Insulation Products

all types installed and removed • Free Estimates •

*** Polyurethane Spray Foam Insulation *** Blown Attic Insulation

• Livestock Barns • Grain Bins • Shops & Buildings • Residential Insulation, new or existing Call The Experts: 1-800-722-0543 (MN only) or 1-507-834-6519 • Gibbon, MN Contractor # BC637532 www.northern-insulation.com insulate@centurytel.net

for the 2013 award. “At our seminar here at Beef Expo we give ideas to the kids on how to improve their applications plus we have guest speakers from the beef industry, and we also include a great beef dinner. It’s much like a family affair. The Animal Science Department of the University of Minnesota puts on this entire seminar event,” Goodrich said. She and her husband, Mark, both raised beef as youth and benefited from mentors. “So why not share our passion for this with other youth? We had a neighbor lad who helped us. We gave him a heifer from our herd. We saw what ownership and care of that animal did for him. That was the springboard so to speak for getting this program going here at the Minnesota Beef Expo,” she said. At Beef Expo youth winners from the previous year (10 for 2012) compete in a showmanship contest with their individual heifers, as well as individual interviews and their scrapbook entries, plus their year-long progress reports which are shared with their sponsor (beef producers who provided the free heifers). The winner gets a $750 Achievement Award check plus a plaque. Goodrich said a special surprise at each Youth Seminar awards banquet is when a heifer is awarded to a youth whose name is randomly drawn from a box containing the names of all youth attending the seminar who weren’t selected by the committee to win a free heifer. This particular heifer is courtesy of the Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Association; the other heifers are courtesy of individual beef producers around the state. She said 10 to 12 heifers are provided each year for this program. Sometimes the free heifer program is self-sustaining. Goodrich said a 2012 heifer winner this year provided a free heifer from her parents’ herd for one of the lucky applicants. “We’ve had some really successful kids come out of this program. They develop a new sense of responsibility and respect, plus you can sense their pride in caring for their heifer, especially when it produces its first baby calf. They mature so much. I see the tremendous gain in self-confidence among these youth. Plus they are so grateful,” she said. There are some heart-warming stories, too. Tyler Doyle, 16-year-old son of Kerry and Angie Doyle of Easton, Minn., won a Hereford heifer in 2012 which Tyler brought to the 2013 Beef Expo for competition in the beef showmanship event. Named Lucky Lady, the heifer was Tyler’s pride and joy. His mother said Tyler went to the barn each morning and evening, before and after school. “He was feeding and caring for Lucky Lady but I know he was also talking to her. She really was his special friend and now having Lucky Lady back here at Expo, where Tyler one year ago found out he was one of the lucky winners, is pretty big,” Angie said. Tyler is fighting a bigger challenge. In mid-November he starts a 100-day spinal column bone-marrow transplant session at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. His big hope? “That I’ll be out of the hospital and back home before Lucky Lady has her baby calf,” Tyler said, as he led Lucky Lady into the arena that Friday afternoon at the Minnesota Beef Expo. ❖


33 A

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”


<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

34 A

Meet the new Beef Ambassadors Team At the recent Minnesota Left to right, Seniors: Maria Beef Expo, Minnesota State Weber, Lake Benton; Laura Fair Grounds, the Minnesota Cattlewomen announced the Stobb, Milaca; Shelby Schiefelbein, Kimball (Senior winner); 2013-14 Beef Ambassador Sydney Zehnder, Stanchfield Team which includes Shelby (Junior winner) and Abby Schiefelbein (Kimball), Maria Schiefelbein, Kimball (Junior Weber (Lake Benton), and alternate). Laura Stobb (Milaca); junior members (ages 13-15) are Sydney Zehnder (Stanchfield) and Abbey Schiefelbein (Kimball). Contestants from throughout the state competed for this honor which includes a $500 cash prize provided by the Minnesota State Cattlemen which went to first place winner Shelby Schiefelbein. Additional scholarships totaling $650 were given by the Minnesota Cattlewomen and the Minnesota Beef Council to the other team members. Over this next year, team members assist at various consumer events, do classroom presentations to high school students in various communities, write a media article for newspapers in their local area and complete the Master Beef Advocacy program. — Dick Hagen, The Land staff writer

AG SYSTEMS

‘08 Agco 1074 SS, Cat. C7 275 hp., 2429 hrs., 1000 gal. SS tank, 60’/90’ booms, Raven Viper Pro

‘06 Agco 9203, 425 hp. Cat., 3229 hrs., Air Max 1000, 70’ booms, Falcon II, Smart Trax

‘99 CIH 3185, Cummins 185 hp., Raven 460, 750 sphere, 75’ booms, Raven Enviso

‘08 Agco 8203, Cat., 2320 hrs., Air Max 1000, 70’ booms, Viper Pro

115,000

$

45,000 As Is

$

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

www.THELANDONLINE.com

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Special Of The Month ★ ★ ★ ~ ‘12 JD 4940 ~ 713 hrs, 120’ booms, ★ ★ 380 tires and a set of 620 floats, ★ ★ auto. steer, auto. height, ★ ★ swath pro, Good Clean Unit! $ 270,000 Now $260,000 ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★★ ★ ★

$

$

Caterpillar C12 eng., 410 hp., 10-spd. OD, dsl., air ride suspension, 433,726 mi.

$28,900!

1180 State Hwy. 7 East • Hutchinson, MN www.agsystemsonline.com

Just In – CALL!

USED GRAIN TRAILERS

2009 40’ JET ALUMINUM 2010 38’ JET ST SPRING

Smithcoe S i d u m p Tr a i l e r

120,000

AG SYSTEMS, INC.

(3) JET Drop Decks 53’x102”

Steel with beavertail & ramps, Apitong flooring

115,000

Ask for PAUL LENZ

800-328-5866

‘ 0 4 S t e r l i n g AT 9 5 0 0

Yellow Frame - Black Tub

$

2,000 Year-End REBATE

NEW GRAIN TRAILERS (3) 40’ JET ALUMINUM (1) 38’ JET ALUMINUM

While They Last!

Visit our website @ www.holtmotors.com

320-286-2176 • 1-800-990-4658


Livestock losses from S.D. storm ‘hard to comprehend’

• Seeds • Fertilizer • Chemicals Call:

Visit our website: www.letcherfarmsupply.com

(507) 549-3168 (or 3692)

Submitted photos

winter wheat. The temperature was 85 degrees. By necessity, they keep a pretty close eye on the weather, he said. “My wife, Robin, is a trained weather reporter.” “We knew a winter storm was coming,” he said. “We moved the cattle to shelter and put the horses by the barn. It is what we always do when adverse weather is predicted. It has always been sufficient before.”

It started raining Thursday night, when Reinhold woke the next morning at 5:30 a.m., it was still raining; but soon turned to snow. Chores were done that day. Saturday morning it was still snowing. The storm left behind 24 inches of snow with huge 10-foot drifts. See STORM, pg. 36A

State Bank of Gibbon is looking for good quality Real Estate Mortgage Loans 1) No origination fees 2) No Prepayment penalty. 3) Monthly, Semi-annual, or annual principal and interest payments.

1 Year* 4.75% Annual Percentage Rate Up to 80% financing of in-house appraisal. Ex.: For a 20year amortization, annual payments would be $78.57 for each $1,000 borrowed. A balloon payment is applicable. *Rate is fixed for one year and might increase or decrease. Call or stop by and visit with Mike who has 31 years of farming experience for more information and qualification requirements.

(507) 834-6556 (866) 251-9656

1049 - 1st Ave, PO Box 65 Gibbon, MN 55335

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Serving MN Ag for over 60 years

Following the early October blizzard that devastated livestock herds across South Dakota, the search was on by the Reinhold family — including Molly, 17 — to find surviving cattle and horses.

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

LETCHER FARM SUPPLY, INC

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

By RENAE VANDER SCHAAF The Land Correspondent STURGIS, S.D. — The Lonetree Ranch has been in the Reinhold family for almost a century. It has seen its share of weather storms, but none with the devastation produced by the Oct. 4 storm. Larry and Robin Reinhold are the third generation to ranch and farm the land settled by his grandparents. We knew a winter They and their six storm was comchildren live in the house that has ing. We moved the been the home for cattle to shelter each generation. and put the horses “They named it by the barn. It is The Lonetree what we always Ranch,” Larry do when adverse said. “There was weather is preone lone Cottonwood tree on their dicted. It has land.” always been suffiThe ranch spans cient before. 4,250 acres of western South Dakota — Larry Reinhold land, 20 miles north of Rapid City and 20 miles west of Sturgis. Those are the closest towns. Approximately 350 acres is planted to wheat. “The cattle are the Hereford breed,” Reinhold said. “They have proven their hardiness for our changeable weather, winter cold, summer heat and do well on grass. We also breed and raise American Quarter Horses. They are broke to be dependable cattle horses and can be trusted with children.” That is mighty important to the Reinholds. In addition to their ranching livelihood, they own and operate Rainbow Bible Camp. Throughout the summer months children spend a week at the ranch, riding horses, ranching, experiencing life away from today’s technology. There is time for Bible lessons and the wide open spaces provide opportunity for meditation. “Last summer kids from 19 states spanning San Diego, Calif., to Newtown, Conn., took part in Rainbow Bible Camp activities. We need to be able to have confidence in our horses for the many different riders.” At least 20 of those horses died in the storm. Their monetary value is between $5,000 and $10,000; their proven abilities priceless. Those first days in October, Reinhold was sowing

35 A


Happy Thanksgiving ❖ F R O M Y O U R F R I E N D S AT T H E L A N D ❖

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

36 A

Lano Equipment

Titan Machinery Albert Lea, MN

Sauk Centre, MN • Pierz, MN

Werner Implement

A & C Farm Service

Schlauderaff Implement

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Norwood-Young America, MN

Vermillion, MN

Arnolds Equipment St. Cloud, MN

Modern Farm Equipment

Paynesville, MN

Hyland Motors

Spring Valley, MN

Litchfield, MN

Smiths Mill Melrose Implement Implement Janesville, MN

Melrose, MN

Two feet of snow, 10-foot drifts stranded livestock STORM, from pg. 35A “Ranchers care about their cattle,” said Reinhold. “They put their lives on “Electricity went out on Thursday,” the line all the time. This storm came in said Reinhold. “We moved from our house to the Rainbow Camp building, like tsunami. The judgmental attitude there we had heat and water due to a that we are hearing from many, just gravity flow system. The electricity shows their ignorance.” was off until Wednesday, so we had no Reinhold is doing what he always contact with rest of the world.” does in the storms of life that seek to By Saturday evening, the Reinholds overwhelm. He looks to God for knew they had some losses, but as the strength and help. days unfolded, the extent of the devas“By the Lord’s grace we will keep going,” tation became evisaid Reinhold. “Agrident. Over 90 head culture’s tradition is a of horses and a can-do attitude.” He The cattle still had dozen head of cattle hopes to be an encourperished in the blizager and help to oththeir summer coats zard. Other ranchers ers who have suffered. on; remember it was sustained losses too. Already he has been still 85 degrees just heartened by tele“I can tell you story days before the snow phone calls from forafter story,” said flew. It was early in mer Rainbow Bible Larry Reinhold. “Of the season, it was Camp attendees. young couples just heavy, wet snow getting started. One He looks for practiwith great accumulafamily had invested cal ways to assist all they had to purthese young families. tion, and the wind chase 85 cows, now was ferocious. “Cattle numbers they have just 13 are low, and the catcows left. This kind of — Larry Reinhold tle price is high,” loss is hard to comsaid Reinhold. “That prehend. A young makes it extremely couple were building up a Red Angus cow difficult to rebuild cattle herds. But herd, they are going to have to start over.” there are other opportunities to show Reinhold’s father and other old- that you care.” timers had endured the storm of 1949, One way is to purchase quality nursthose of the ’60s, but none produced ery trees for shelter belts. The storm the livestock loss as this one has. took out trees, much as a tornado leaves “The cattle still had their summer coats an area. Anyone can adopt a suffering on; remember it was still 85 degrees just ranch family; financial gifts make a difdays before the snow flew,” said Reinhold. ference. “It was early in the season, it was heavy, Reinhold said he will act as a waterwet snow with great accumulation, and shed for gifts to those in need. He also the wind was ferocious.” suggests farm associations — such as Livestock is the major industry of South Dakota Stockgrowers, Farmers South Dakota, producing some of the Union and Farm Bureau — as organizabest beef in the nation. To lose thou- tions that can help. sands of cattle in one storm will have As of Oct. 22, 111 ranchers had an impact for years to come, he said. reported their losses to the South What happens in the country affects Dakota Animal Industry Board. Staff the main streets of our towns. Veterinarian Susan Reenders said Ranchers are still in shock. It is diffi- 9,129 cattle, 348 sheep and 186 horse cult to assess the total financial loss as deaths have been reported. the surviving cattle are no longer in Mike Traxinger, South Dakota perfect condition. Pneumonia is a Farmer’s Union Legislative Director, is problem. Then there is the emotional encouraging those who want to help to anguish that comes with seeing the massive death loss. See STORM, pg. 37A

www.TheLandOnline.com www.twitter.com/thelandonline www.facebook.com/thelandonline


12,000 head of livestock reported lost in storm

Submitted

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Caleb Reinhold, 11, cradles a survivor of the severe winter storm that hit South Dakota in early October.

producer lost all his sheep when the building collapsed on them.” The ranchers did the best they could, he said. So many different factors were involved. The storm delivered a more powerful punch than predicted. Forty-plus inches of snow fell in some places in the Black Hills, with wind speeds over 70 miles per hour. In addition to being the largest snowfall ever in October, it also hit at the very beginning of the month. “South Dakota will recover at the end of the day,” said Traxinger. “Support is coming from the local communities and elsewhere.” Three information meetings were held in late October. These gatherings are a joint effort by South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association, South Dakota Farm Bureau, South Dakota Farmers Union, and South Dakota Stockgrowers Association with the support of other industry groups and local businesses. Donations can be sent to: BHACF Ranch Relief Fund, P.O. Box 231, Rapid City, SD 57709. ❖

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

STORM, from pg. 36A contribute financially to the Rancher’s Relief Fund. “It was established by the Black Hills Area Community Fund Association,” said Traxinger, “but it will be administered by the South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association, South Dakota Stockgrowers Association and the South Dakota Sheep Growers. Nearly if not 100 percent will go right to the ranchers.” “Monetary donations are best at this time,” he said. “It is the time of the year that ranchers sell. They use that money to pay living expenses and pay down on bank notes. Now their income is gone.” Traxinger said the three organizations were providing excellent leadership, mobilizing efforts with support and information. Seventeen counties were listed on the South Dakota website has having emergency management teams. “A lot of producers thought they had their cattle in a good place with plenty of bedding,” said Traxinger. “One sheep

37 A

“Where Farm and Family Meet”


THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

38 A

KUHN KNIGHT 8141

Side Slinger Disch. Spreader, 543 cu. ft., new disch. hammers, Very Good Condition. Stk. # 11161

$34,900

KNIGHT 3095

HOULE

Commercial SDL 6,000 Gal., 4 Disc Mixer, slide tray disch. Incorp., flow control w/magnets, very solid ready, hyd. drive, & straight, Gone Thru Excellent Condition. Shop. Stk. # 13135 Stk. # 1386 CALL

$29,900

HOULE

6,300 Gal., 6 Disc Folding Incorp., Excellent Condition, Gone Thru Shop. Stk. # 1305

$62,500

E-Z TRAIL 475

Grain Cart, 14” auger disch., light kit, Very Clean Unit, Gone Thru Shop. Stk. # 12129

$8,400

PENTA 6710

TMR Mixer, 600 cu. ft., dual side front conv. dis., Good Condition, Gone Thru Shop. Stk. # 1313

$22,900

GET THE PROTWIN SLINGER ADVANTAGE

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

• Even and controlled spread pattern • Eliminates material bridging • Simple and dependable • Versatle, multi-purpose unit

TEAGLE 8080

Bale Chopper, 5’x4’x9’11” chamber, 60 hp. tractor required, Good Condition, Gone Thru Shop. Stk. # 1321

$13,500


200,000 free ear tags distributed through ID program

Erica Gunderson

Jim Ostlie

that must be officially identified. They are breeding cattle, rodeo cattle and all cattle for exhibition. Breeding cattle include all cattle except ... • Heifers of beef breed less than 18 months of age and maintained for feeding purposes.

USDA grant to develop youth farm safety training on the eXtension website in the new Ag Safety and Health Community of Practice to be used in both formal and nonformal settings. A national outreach strategy will promote use of the curriculum from youth and farm safety instructors to parents and 4-H youth programs. Additionally, the project will determine the resources required to sustain a clearinghouse for national youth farm safety and education curriculum, state certification requirements and testing. Agricultural education is an important part of an individual’s career and technical education. As such, it needs to provide instruction that leads to industry-recognized credentials. Through federal funding and leadership for research, education and Extension programs, NIFA focuses on investing in science and solving critical issues impacting people’s daily lives and the nation’s future. More information is available at www.nifa.usda.gov. ❖

• Bulls under 10 months maintained for feeding purposes. • Steers and spayed heifers. These free tags are offered in red, green, yellow, blue or white. Call (651) 201-6836 to order. The primary reason for ID tags is for health purposes, Gunderson said, indicating that “traceability” is important if and when there is an animal disease outbreak. Working the same booth at Beef Expo, Jim Ostlie, Minnesota Department of Agriculture Livestock Development/ Planning specialist, said that Minnesota maintains about one million head of beef cattle, both heifers and steers. He said beef cow operations are the primary user of ear tags because many of their cattle are transported to other locations. Many years back, ID tags began

1980 PETERBILT 359

Cat. 3406, 10-speed, 529K miles, air ride suspension

2006 INTERNATIONAL 9200i

ISX Cummins, AUTOSHIFT, 430 hp., NEW 24’ box, tag axle

2003 GMC 2500HD

8.1L V8, 4x4, Allison auto., 107K mi., leather, 11’ flatbed w/hoist

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

The U.S. Department of Agriculture recently announced funding to provide safety training for the more than 2 million youth working in agricultural production. The USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture awarded $600,000 to Pennsylvania State University to develop a national training curriculum that lessens agricultural hazards to young workers. The training will align with Career Cluster Standards of the National Council for Agricultural Education for a unified approach to a national farm safety education and curricula-certification program for youth. The project will establish a national steering committee to engage the Department of Education, Department of Labor, FFA, Farm Bureau, Farmers Union, Ag Safety and Health Council of America, National Council for Ag Education and other relevant partners. The committee will work to identify curriculum and testing gaps, certification needs and industry-recognized credentials. Curriculum materials will be placed

The primary reason for ID tags is for health purposes ... ‘traceability’ is important if and when there is an animal disease outbreak.

replacing the branding iron for animal identification. Ostlie said several states offer various incentives to cattlemen to purchase ID tags. But he said to the best of his information, Minnesota is still the only state to offer free tags, whether it’s just a handful or 200 tags. He noted that animal ID is rapidly becoming a national focus, promoted by the National Cattlemen’s Association as a means of lessening indemnity issues regardless of the triggering factor. Gunderson maintains that the Minnesota cattle industry does a good job of maintaining a clean and healthy cattle inventory. If there is a particular disease break, the Minnesota Board of Animal Health is at the ready to offer assistance. Ostlie points out the Minnesota cattle industry has remained surprisingly steady in numbers. He reasoned that because Minnesota has such a diverse infrastructure and more reliable weather patterns, livestock numbers are fairly constant. He noted the tremendous decline in beef cow numbers in the southwestern states was because of ongoing drought issues over a threeyear period. “Those challenges just don’t happen up here,” Ostlie said. ❖

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer The Minnesota Board of Animal Health has begun providing free identification ear tags to Minnesota cattle producers, veterinarians and bison farmers, and it’s going “great guns,” according to Erica Gunderson, communications specialist with the Board. “Since the first of the year we have now distributed nearly 200,000 tags,” Gunderson said at the recent Minnesota Beef Expo. Are there other ID systems? According to BAH, there are several approved forms of official ID for cattle moving within Minnesota. (Log on to www.mn.gov/bah for a complete list.) But there are certain cattle

39 A

1995 VOLVO WG64T

Cummins, 9 speed, 24’ box, hydraulic gate, tag axle

Rule Tire & Auto We Are Your Authorized Dealers.

- FARMERS -

~ WITH 2 LOCATIONS ~

104 SE Litchfield Ave. • 606 SW Litchfield Ave. Willmar, MN

320-235-1146 Visit us at www.ruletire.net

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Need Tire Service FAST?

Call our Ag & Truck Tire Division for FAST On-Site Service. We Carry Firestone & Michelin Ag Tires.


Patriotic farmer

This week’s Back Roads is the work of The Land Correspondents Tim King (story) and Jan King (photo)

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

40 A

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

K

Along Stearns County Road 28, Padua, Minn.

arl Perl told the people of Stearns County, Minn., that he nearly starved while escaping the Russian army during World War II. That is why he got into the food business, he said. “He was Jewish,” said Alex Marthaler, of Padua. “He was in the Red Army on a train. He didn’t know where he was going. He thought maybe Siberia.” Years later Perl showed Marthaler his deformed ankles. “He said he got those when he was walking across the Ukraine.” Perl was wounded twice during his long walk, or earlier. Perl told Marthaler about his escape when he was farming near Padua. Before Padua, Perl founded the successful Perl Sausage Co. in Chicago. His obituary says he was a successful businessman in East Germany until 1954.

He was also the father of seven sons. In his 50s he left them, and a divorced wife, in Chicago. “He loved the American farmer,” Marthaler said. “He was very patriotic.” He also knew good farmland. His dream was to farm some of America’s richest, most-productive soils. “His goal was to own 2,000 acres,” Marthaler said. “He ended up with 2,004 acres.” Karl Perl was like that. He accomplished what he set out to do, whether it was to walk across war-ravaged Europe or buy just the right number of acres of rich Minnesota farmland. In the 1990s he set about making a shrine to the American farmer. That shrine stands on a high rise of about four acres on Stearns County Road 28. An American flag flaps in the breeze. A visitor looking north can see thousands

of acres — 2,000 in fact — of corn and soybeans spreading to the horizon. The shrine’s black stone says simply “God Bless America — Land of Opportunity — To the American Farmer.” In small letters at the bottom is carved, “Dedicated by Karl Perl, The Jewish Farmer.” Just beyond the monument are the silos and buildings Perl built as part of his 2,000-acre project. He lived there alone. The stone is dated for the year 2000. Marthaler says it probably was erected a little earlier. But 2000 is an interesting date. Karl Perl died in 2001. The obituary his sons wrote contradicts what he told people in Stearns County. It says he was discharged, with distinction, from the Red Army while recovering from wounds. Perl was his mother’s name. His father was named Katz-Feig. The obituary does not mention his more than two decades as an American Farmer. ❖

Do you have a Back Roads story suggestion? E-mail editor@TheLandOnline.com or write to Editor, The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002.


S E C T I O N

THE LAND

B

November 15, 2013

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

Local Corn and Soybean Price Index Cash Grain Markets Dover Edgerton Jackson Janesville Cannon Falls Sleepy Eye Average: Year Ago Average:

corn/change*

soybeans/change*

$4.08

$12.55

$6.84

$13.56

$4.25 $4.00 $4.22 $3.90 $3.95 $4.15

+.23 +.08 +.09 +.05 +.04 +.09

$12.36 $12.61 $12.66 $12.45 $12.58 $12.66

+.40 +.35 +.33 +.34 +.37 +.38

DEC

JAN ‘13

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

1 B

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

Grain prices are effective cash close on Nov. 11. The price index chart compares an average of most recently reported local cash prices with the same average for a year ago. *Cash grain price change represents a two-week period.

Grain Angles Ag experiencing youth movement

The following market analysis is for the week ending Nov. 8. CORN — Corn trickled down to a new three-year low at $4.15 1⁄2 per bushel this week in front of the longawaited November U.S. Department of Agriculture crop report. This crop report included updates that would have been made on the October report if the government shutdown had not resulted in the cancellation of that report. There were a few surprises on the update, including a 2013-14 carryout number that did not begin with a “2,” which caught PHYLLIS NYSTROM the market leaning to the wrong CHS Hedging Inc. side. Expectations were for a carSt. Paul ryout of 2.0 billion bushels and the new balance sheet arrived with a 1.887 billion bushel number. December corn had closed lower ten out of the last 11 trading sessions before posting a key reversal higher after the friendly/neutral crop update. The leaner ending stocks number was accomplished through a few avenues. Planted acres were cut 2.1 million acres to 95.3 million acres, harvested fell 1.9 million acres to 87.2 million, and yield increased 5.1 bushels per acre from the September number of 155.3 bu./acre to 160.4 bu./acre. This yield matches the second highest on record. Illinois corn yield matched a record 180 bu./acre. Minnesota’s yield stands at 164 bu./acre, a decrease of 2 bu./acre from the September update. Using the new variables, crop production rose 146 million bushels from the September report to 13.989 See NYSTROM, pg. 2B

November has started off in an interesting pattern between futures and the cash livestock markets. Cattle have traded higher in the cash market while the futures market has failed at weekly highs. At the same time the hog futures, which have been discount to a firm cash market, have moved to a premium while the cash market has slipped lower. Cattle are in a battle of supply versus demand, which has been going on for a long time. The battle is becoming more acute as cattle prices at every level of production have risen to levels that in the past have brought consumer resistance. JOE TEALE Broker With competitive meats slowly dropping in price at the same time as Great Plains Commodity Afton, Minn. disposable income to the average consumer declines, the prospect for further consumer resistance is likely to occur. If this scenario continues on its present course, the lack of demand will trump any depletion of the supply of cattle and prices would more than likely decline.At this time it appears that most analysts are concentrating on supply and ignoring the fact that domestic beef demand has declined. Another red flag has surfaced as far as supply is concerned which could have a major future impact on the cattle market. It appears that, from a global perspective, many foreign countries have been increasing their cattle numbers, which poses a threat to the U.S. beef export market. November could end up being the crossroads for the cattle market as to whether supply or demand rule, and thus which direction cattle prices head in the future. Producers are urged to pay close attention the market movements in the weeks ahead and protect their inventories See TEALE, pg. 2B

There has definitely been resurgence in agriculture. When I entered college in the early 1980s, I was told that there were so many opportunities in agriculture you could always find a quality job. At that time, there was a short supply of farm kids who went to college. Then all of a sudden, “the ’80s” happened and suddenly, all of those job opportunities dried up. My friends all thought that “working in town” was so much better than farming. Times have changed. What has been a pleasant trend over the last five years is that the younger generation is starting to come back to the farm. Most of them HUNEKE have gone to college and then deter- ANDY AgStar Director, Agbiz mined that they want to make pro- & Trade Credit/Leasing duction agriculture their life’s work. Northfield, Minn. In the last few years, the grain industry has seen tremendous profits and it has been easy to bring another generation into the operation. The current generation has been able to maintain their income, they’ve purchased new equipment and maybe they’ve even been able to invest in a getaway up north. In addition, the younger generation has been able to afford good housing, new vehicles and a nice standard of living. In most cases, it’s been an easy transition and both generations have been happy. So, you might be wondering where I’m going with this. Today, it appears we could be entering a time of different economics. If you look back, it wasn’t that long ago when we were satisfied with a $50 profit per acre and if we were able to squeeze out $100 per acre, we were pleased. The younger generation, who hasn’t experienced a downSee HUNEKE, pg. 2B

Information in the above columns is the writer’s opinion. It is no way guaranteed and should not be interpreted as buy/sell advice. Futures trading always involves a certain degree of risk.

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Livestock Angles Cattle in supply, demand battle

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Grain Outlook Corn trickles to three-year low


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 8, 2013

2 B

Market still looking for ways to attract soybeans NYSTROM, from pg. 1B billion bushels versus forecasts for a 14 billion bushel crop. On the demand side, feed usage gained 100 million bushels and exports blossomed 175 million bushels or 14.25 percent higher to 1.4 billion bushels. The onfarm national average price was slashed to $4.50 per bushel from $4.80 in September and $6.89 last year. The 2012-13 balance sheet was also revised this month. The supply side was unchanged, but feed usage was cut 142 million; Feed, Seed & Industrial dropped 16 million; and exports were reduced 4 million bushels. Ending stocks saw a resulting 163 million bushel increase to 824 million bushels. This was carried directly to the 2013-14 crop year’s total supply. Global ending stocks for 2013-14 were much higher than anticipated at 164.33 million metric tons, up from 151.42 mmt in September and over 10 mmt greater than the 154.21 mmt pre-report estimate. China’s import projection of 7 mmt was left unchanged. Brazil’s corn production was decreased 2 mmt to 70 mmt.

A couple of interesting takeaways from the report: Brazil’s corn production was cut, but their bean production was left unchanged; corn feeding shows the second-largest year-to-year increase since the 2010-11 crop year and may be overstated with record DDG production; corn ear weights were pegged at the low end of the last 10 years. Weekly export sales were huge at 67.7 million bushels. Using the fresh export projection, we have 62.5 percent of the total export line already committed. We still haven’t heard anything from the Environmental Protection Agency on the 2014 ethanol mandate. China added Brazil as an approved corn provider. This may amount to a 10-15 mmt increase in Brazil’s corn exports, but shouldn’t be a factor until next spring/summer. OUTLOOK: Our downside target of $4.15 was essentially met this week when December corn hit $4.15 1⁄2 per bushel on report day. December corn closed just one-half cent weaker for the week at $4.26 3⁄4 per bushel. The shortterm upside in corn may be limited with 15 percent of the crop left to be harvested and a possible yield increase

HUNEKE, from pg. 1B turn yet, may not be ready for this change. It’s important that you are proactive in addressing this possibility in order to avoid future stress and to prevent the younger generation from coming back to you and saying, “I wish you would’ve warned me.” Now is the time to start the discussion on how lower economics will impact your operation and to start preparing the younger group for lessprofitable years. We need to relay our past experiences without going back to “’80s talk,” as that will make them just roll their eyes. It’s important we tell them about the days when the margins meant you had to decide which piece of equipment to upgrade instead of upgrading four or five pieces a year. Also, warn the younger generation that the pickups they are driving now might be around for quite a few years and they may not be able to take a winter vacation every year. Start preparing the younger generation now for what could be leaner times. If you haven’t brought your younger partners into the financial discussions of the operation, it is a good time to start looking at the numbers together. If they become involved in

understanding your financial picture it will help them understand when cash flow may become tighter, and maybe the family living withdrawals need to be more conservative. The key to any successful partnership is communication. Make sure you are communicating with the younger generation and that you are truly listening to them. Through communication you can make sure there aren’t any issues simmering. Everyone can benefit from the knowledge you have gained from your past experiences. I’m sure there are pieces of advice you could pass on to the new generation of farmers. What advice would you pass on? If you have any advice for the future generation, e-mail me at andy.huneke@agstar.com with your ideas and advice so I can share them in a future column. The future of agriculture is here and we have an opportunity to make it better than ever by passing on your knowledge. AgStar Financial Services is a cooperative owned by client stockholders. As part of the Farm Credit System, AgStar has served 69 counties in Minnesota and northwest Wisconsin with a wide range of financial products and services for more than 95 years. ❖

again in January, but short-term downside may also be limited to $4.00 with a smaller-than-anticipated carryout on the November report. Bottom line, we have plenty of corn, it’s just a matter of getting it to move to meet demand — until supplies become available elsewhere. Longer-term, without a threat to world production it will be difficult for corn to earn the carry presently in the market. SOYBEANS — Soybeans took a sideways track in the week leading up to the monthly crop report. January soybeans closed 44 1⁄2 cents higher for the week at $12.96 per bushel, but the gains in the last two days of the week accounted for 41 cents of the price increase. Let’s first look at the November USDA crop production report. There weren’t any huge surprises on the U.S. balance sheet and was in general a neutral report. Both planted and harvested acres were cut 700,000 acres to 76.5 and 75.7 million acres respectively. The yield increased to 43 bu./acre from 41.2 bu./acre in September and estimates for 42.4 bu./acre. Minnesota’s yield was left unchanged at 39 bu./acre. This brought total production to the third largest ever at 3.258 billion bushels, up 109 million from the September report. On the demand side, crush was raised 30 million bushels, exports jumped 80 million bushels or 5.8 percent and residual fell 6 million bushels. Ending stocks were up 20 million bushels from the last USDA report to 170 million bushels. This was in line with the pre-report projection for a 172 million bushel carryout. The mid-point average on-farm price for 2013-14 was lowered 35 cents to $12.15 and compared to $14.80 last year. Both Brazil’s

and Argentina’s production projections were unchanged at 88 mmt and 53.50 mmt respectively. Changes made to the 2012-13 balance sheet included a 0.2 bu./acre yield increase to 39.8 bu./acre which added 19 million bushels to last year’s production. Imports were lowered 4 million bushels, crush was cut 1 million, exports were raised 5 million, and seed fell 1 million to a new carryout of 141 million bushels. This is 16 million bushels higher than in September. This week’s rally began late in the week when the Food and Drug Administration announced they are proposing eliminating trans fats (partially hydrogenated soybean oil) from the U.S. food supply by 2015. They deemed trans fats have no health benefits and are detrimental to your health. Trans fats add shelf life, add texture, and stabilize flavors in food. This news pushed soybean oil sharply lower and supported the meal and bean markets. Weekly export sales were big at 37.4 million bushels and brought total commitments to 84 1⁄4 percent of the new export sales forecast. OUTLOOK: Harvest is dwindling down with less than 10 percent to go and the market is still looking for ways to attract soybeans into the pipeline. Soybean sales by the grower have been slow throughout harvest. For January soybeans, support has held in the $12.50 area; next resistance is $12.12, then $13.30 per bushel. The inverses in the market are likely to stay with us until other world supplies become available to the market. This material has been prepared by a sales or trading employee or agent of CHS Hedging Inc. and should be considered a solicitation. ❖

TEALE, from pg. 1B when needed. The hog market appears to have run into resistance once again as it moved over the $90 per hundredweight level basis cash and futures. The resistance came in the pork cutout which began to slip as product became more abundant. This forced the packers to be more reluctant in being aggressive in accumulating live inventory and thus the cash prices began to tumble. Because the pork cutout level is at a relatively low level as compared to the beef cutout, demand seems to be gaining momentum mainly due to the

value of pork versus beef and chicken. The recent cold storage report that was released recently suggests a fair draw-down on pork supplies versus a year earlier, which also indicates a fair demand for pork products. This demand, which surfaces as pork prices decline, is likely to provide some support, which will show up as greater packer interest at lower prices which, in effect, reflects better demand. This could ultimately help stabilize the hog prices in the weeks ahead. Therefore, producers should use excess premiums in deferred months to protect inventories if given the opportunity. ❖

MARKETING

Advice for the next generation

Protect your inventories


Conference committee reaching an endpoint on the farm bill

MARKETING

Price protection programs Program name Payment acres

U.S. Senate Adverse Market Payment 85 percent of crop base acres

Payment yields

Current CCP yields

Reference price (Target price) Proposed prices for 2014 Corn (current: $2.63/bu.) Soybeans (current: $6/bu.) Wheat (current: $4.17/bu.) Payment rate

55 percent x five-year “Olympic” average “Olympic” national average price $2.83/bu. $6.19/bu. $3.62/bu. Difference between the reference price and the 12-month national average price or the CCC loan rate

U.S. House Price Loss Coverage 85 percent of planted acres (Up to total base acres) Current CCP yields (Can be updated to 90 percent of five-year average) Fixed prices set by Congress $3.70/bu. $8.40/bu. $5.50/bu. Difference between the reference price and the 12-month national average price or the CCC loan rate

Payment rate x payment yield x payment acres

Payment rate x payment yield x payment acres

Revenue protection programs Program name Coverage criteria Payment acres

U.S. Senate Agricultural Risk Coverage Choice of county or farm level Planted acres up to total base acres

Benchmark guarantee

Five-year “Olympic” average county or farm yield x five-year “Olympic” national average price

Revenue guarantee Actual revenue

Benchmark revenue x 88 percent County or farm Yield x 12-month national average price or CCC loan rate Revenue guarantee – actual revenue Max. amount is 10 percent of benchmark revenue

U.S. House Revenue Loss Coverage County level 85 percent of planted acres up to total base acres Five-year “Olympic average county yield x five-year “Olympic” national average price Benchmark revenue x 85 percent County yield x five-month national average price or CCC loan rate Revenue guarantee – actual revenue Max. amount is 10 percent of benchmark revenue 100 percent of payment acres

Payment amount Payment made on

80 percent of payment acres (County yield) 65 percent of payment acres (Farm yield) Note: “Olympic” average is a five-year average yield or price, with the high and low year eliminated.

Table developed by Kent Thiesse

* Dual Jacks, Torque Tube, Lockable Chain Box, Combo Dove, LED Lights, and more *

Prices & Options Subject To Change.

25’ (20’ + 5’) 14,000 lb. GVW - Fully Equipped — $6,175 32’ (27’ + 5’) 22,000 lb. GVW - Low Profile — $9,175 STRONGHOLD Drop ABU 14000# The Top Choice in cattle handling equipment Since 1965

‘N Locks GVW TRAILER Gooseneck Hitch Easy to Install, Easy to Haul, It’s That Simple!

18’ + 2’,

2-7000# Axles

From:

Chutes, Tubs, Alleys, etc.

$3,799

Diers Ag & Trailer Sales, Inc. MN distributor for Rol-Oyl cattle oilers

(320) 543-2861

Drop ‘n Lock Gooseneck Hitches

www.diersag.com 9283 County Road 6 SW, Howard Lake, MN 55349

(3 miles south of U.S. Hwy. 12 on Wright Cty. Road 6, or 4 miles North of Winsted)

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Payment amount

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Comparison of new farm bill proposals from the U.S. Senate and U.S. House (Commodity program provisions)

SNAP program provisions Much of the focus on the new farm bill debate in Congress has centered on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, which includes the food stamp program, the women, infants and children program, and the school lunch program. Food stamps were added to the farm bill legislation several decades ago, mainly because the food stamp program is administered through U.S. Department of Agriculture. Currently, over 47 million people in the United States are on food stamps, with an average benefit of $133 per month. This was reduced by 5 percent on Nov. 1, due to the expiration of federal stimulus funding. The number of persons on food stamps has more than doubled since 2008, due to the downturn in the U.S. economy and eligibility changes. Approximately 554,000 Minnesota residents get benefits through the SNAP, which is about one-tenth of the state’s population. About one-third of those receiving the benefits are children, with another one-fourth being elderly, and a majority being in families where at least one adult earns a paycheck. Federal standards allow food stamp assistance to any individual who has an income below $15,415 per year, or $26,344 for a family of three. Many states, including Minnesota, have opted for higher threshold income levels for food stamp eligibility. As referenced earlier, approximately 79 percent of the proposed funding for the new farm bill will go to the SNAP-related programs. One of the biggest differences in the U.S. Senate and U.S. House versions of the new farm bill is in the proposed future funding for SNAPs. This was also one of the main roadblocks to passing a new See PROGRAMS, pg. 4B

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

The forty-one members of the U.S. Senate • Conservation programs: $62 billion and U.S. House conference committee des(6.3 percent) ignated to determine a new farm bill met • Commodity support programs: $59 for the first time on Oct. 30. billion (6.0 percent) The conference committee is charged • Other programs: $5.9 billion (0.10 with finding a compromise on the versions percent) of the farm bill that were passed earlier The sequestration legislation approved this year by both the Senate and House. by Congress earlier this year would There are a lot of major differences in the reduce the spending on the new farm bill two versions of the farm bill that have FARM PROGRAMS by $6.4 billion over the next 10 years, been passed to be worked out by the conputting the total spending at $966 billion. ference committee, as well as some other By Kent Thiesse issues that will likely impact the debate. The proposed U.S. Senate farm bill would reduce total spending by $17.9 The current farm bill extension expired billion over the next 10 years, and by on Sept. 30, with many programs and $24.3 billion, if the sequestration provisions set to expire by Dec. 31. cuts are included. By comparison, the The Congressional Budget Office in May estimated U.S. House version of the new farm bill would reduce that the current farm bill would require $973 billion over total spending by $51.9 billion over the next decade, the next 10 years (2014-23), or $97.3 billion per year, and by $58.3 billion with the inclusion of the sequeswithout any reductions in expenditures. The breakdown tration cuts. of federal expenditures by the CBO is as follows. Following are some of the items that will likely be • Food and nutrition (SNAP) programs: $764 bilkey issues and factors in reaching a compromise on a lion (79 percent) new farm bill. • Crop insurance program: $84 billion (8.6 percent)

3 B


<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

4 B

Minor adjustments proposed to federal crop insurance PROGRAMS, from pg. 3B farm bill in the U.S. House. The new farm bill passed by the U.S. Senate would cut the spending on SNAPs by about $400 million per year (0.5 percent), or $4 billion over 10 years. By comparison, the U.S. House proposal would cut SNAP funding by about $3.9 billion per year (5.1 percent), or approximately $39 billion over 10 years. The proposed funding levels for the SNAPs are likely to be a major “sticking point” in reaching a compromise on a new farm bill, as both sides are fairly well entrenched in their positions. The U.S. House also proposed to tighten limitations on how various states administer some of the SNAPs, which were not included in the U.S. Senate farm bill. The farm ‘safety-net’ programs The Senate version of the farm bill would give producers a one-time choice of the Adverse Market Payment program or the revenue-based Ag Risk Coverage program. The U.S. House farm bill would offer producers a choice between the target-price based Price Loss Coverage program and the revenue-based Revenue Loss Coverage. The program options available in both the Senate and House versions would be available to producers for all eligible commodities, including corn, soybeans and wheat. The reference prices in the Senate AMP program would be adjusted annually to a rate that is 55 percent of the five-year “Olympic” national average price for a commodity, with the exception of rice and peanuts. The proposed initial AMP reference prices would be $2.83 per bushel for corn, $6.19/bu. for soybeans and $3.62/bu. for wheat. Current target price levels in the DCP Program are $2.63/bu. for corn, $6/bu. for soybeans and $4.17/bu. for wheat. In the new AMP program, payments would be

DAHL FARM SUPPLY 507-826-3463 • 507-383-4931

Introducing 2 “New” Seed Companies LG Seed & Gold Country Broad Range of SmartStax, VT Triple & Double Pro, Roundup Ready and Conventional Varieties Seed Tenders - DEF TANKS “Where Farm and Family Meet”

made when the 12-month national average price falls below the reference price for a specific commodity. Payments would be based on current counter-cyclical payment program yields, and would be paid on 85 percent of the farm unit’s current crop base acreage. By comparison, the U.S. House PLC program would utilize fixed crop reference prices for the five-year farm bill, which are set by Congress. The PLC reference prices would be $3.70/bu. for corn, $8.40/bu. for soybeans and $5.50 bu. for wheat. PLC program yields would also be current CCP program yields; however, payment yields could be updated from current levels up to 90 percent of the five-year “Olympic” average farm yields for a specific crop from 2008-12. In addition, the PLC payment acres would be based on 85 percent of the current year planted crop acres, up to a maximum of a farm unit’s total crop base acres. The ARC program in the Senate farm bill would give producers a choice between utilizing either countybased or farm-based five-year “Olympic” average crop yields. However, the payment rate when using farm yields would be 65 percent of payment acres, as compared to 80 percent of payment acres when using county yields. The ARC benchmark revenue would be the “Olympic” average county or farm yield times the five-year “Olympic” average national average price for a commodity, with the revenue guarantee being set at 88 percent of the benchmark revenue. ARC payments would be made when the actual revenue in a crop year falls below the revenue guarantee, up to a maximum of 10 percent of the benchmark revenue. The actual revenue would be the actual farm or county yield times the 12-month national average price for the crop marketing year. The Revenue Loss Coverage program offered by the U.S. House will function similarly to the U.S. Senate’s ARC program, except that the RLC program will be on county average yields, and will not offer a choice for farm-based yields. The RLC benchmark revenue will be calculated similar to ARC, with the RLC revenue guarantee being set at 85 percent of the benchmark revenue. RLC payments will be made on 100 percent of planted crop acres, up to a farm unit’s total crop base acres. RLC would use a five-month national average price to determine the actual crop revenue in a year for a given commodity, rather the 12-month national average price proposed in the ARC program. However, the RLC program payments still would not occur until October in the year following harvest. The 12month crop marketing year for corn and soybeans runs from Sept. 1 in the year of harvest until Aug. 30 the following year. The five-month price starts on Sept. 1 and ends on Jan. 31. There are obviously some differences to be worked out between the Senate AMP/ARC programs, and he U.S. House PLC/RLC programs in the conference committee; however, those differences appear to be quite manageable. The table contains a comparison of the various provisions of proposed U.S. Senate AMP/ARC and U.S. House PLC/RLC program proposals. Payment limits and means testing Both the Senate and House versions of the new farm bill would have payment limits of $50,000 per individual for the commodity program payments (listed pre-

MARKETING

Farm Chemicals-Major and Generic Enduraplas Poly Tanks-Liquid Fertilizer Traeger Smoker Grills

Chris and Holly Dahl

27296 730th Avenue - Albert Lea, MN 56007 www.dahlfarmsupply.com

viously), and $75,000 per individual for gains from Commodity Credit Corp. marketing loans and loan deficiency payments. The Senate version of the farm bill would restrict payments to anyone with an adjusted gross income over $750,000, while the House version would set the AGI threshold at $950,000. Crop insurance The federal crop insurance program has been proposed to remain largely intact with the new farm bill, with some minor adjustments and possible enhancements; however, there are likely to be several proposals to alter crop insurance provisions in the new farm bill. Crop insurance programs have come under some criticism in recent months, due to the large federal cost for the program and some eligibility requirements. The federal government subsidizes about 62 percent of the annual cost of crop insurance premiums to producers, with the farmer paying the balance. The government also subsidizes large crop insurance losses, such as with the 2012 drought. The Senate farm bill would link conservation compliance to the purchase of federal crop insurance, a provision that is not included in the house farm bill. Some would like to see the crop insurance subsidy reduced, while others would like it eliminated for farmers above $750,000 AGI, or see limits placed on crop insurance benefits that a producer can receive. Another proposal has been to put more restrictions on the harvest price option from revenue protection crop insurance coverage, which could increase the financial risk to farmers. Many activist groups and some members of Congress are pushing for changes in the crop insurance program. Bottom line There are also many differences in dairy support programs, conservation programs and other programs to be worked out in the conference committee. Another major difference in the two versions of the farm bill is that the House farm bill would end the permanent farm legislation, which dates back to the 1938 and 1949 farm bills, which was not addressed in the Senate farm bill. This measure is strongly opposed by most farm organizations, who want to make sure there is some continuation to farm “safety net” programs for the future. Will there be a compromise farm bill that comes out of the conference committee? There are certainly reasons that this could become reality. However, there are some major legislative and philosophical differences that need to be worked out, especially related to the SNAP funding and program provisions. Even if a new farm bill passes out of the conference committee, it must then be passed by both the full U.S. Senate and the U.S. House, which could be difficult to achieve. There is some possibility that a new farm bill could somehow be linked to federal budget legislation later this year, or in early 2014. Of course, if no agreement can be reached on a new farm bill by the end of 2013, there is always the possibility that the current farm bill could be extended for another one or two years. Kent Thiesse is a government farm programs analyst and a vice president at MinnStar Bank in Lake Crystal, Minn. He may be reached at (507) 726-2137 or kent.thiesse@minnstarbank.com. ❖


Send us your events by e-mail to editor@TheLandOnline.com

4X4 Culinary Minnesota Wine Series Dec. 12, Jan. 9, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Minnesota Landscape Arboretum Learning Center, Chaska, Minn.

Pork Quality Assurance Training Dec. 18 University Center Heintz Center, Rochester, Minn. Info: Registration requested to colleen@mnpork.com or (800) 537-7675 or log on to

www.mnpork.com Farm Futures Summit Jan. 7-8 Hilton at the Ballpark, St. Louis, Mo. Info: Log on to www.farmfutures.com/summit2014 Upper Midwest Regional Fruit & Vegetable Growers Conference & Trade Show Jan. 16-17

River’s Edge Convention Center, St. Cloud, Minn. Info: Log on to www.mfvga.org; Beginning Grower Workshop and a Farm Finance Workshop will both take place Jan. 15, also at the River’s Edge Convention Center National Ag Day March 25 Info: http://www.agday.org; theme is “Agriculture: 365

Sunrises and 7 Billion Mouths to Feed” Dairy Calf and Heifer Association Conference April 1-3 Green Bay, Wis. Info: Keynote speaker is Donald Driver, retired Green Bay Packer wide receiver; to register, log on to www.calfandheifer.org or call (855) 400-3242 or email info@calfandheifer.org

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Minnesota Farmers Union State Convention Nov. 23-24 Ramada Plaza, Minneapolis Info: Log on to www.mfu.org or call (800) 969-3380

Grazing and Soil Quality Videoconference Dec. 5, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Seven locations around Minnesota What is a Fair & Info: Presented by the MinProfitable Farm Rental nesota Department of AgriAgreement? culture and the Minnesota Nov. 20, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Grazing Lands Conservation Meeker County Courthouse Association; for more details Community Rooms A&B, and to register, log on to Litchfield, Minn. Info: There are 25 workshops http://bit.ly/1hHKD8f; held throughout the state, log $25/GLCA members, on to http://z.umn.edu/hdp for $50/non-member, $45 for onemore info, or check with your year GLCA membership and county Extension office registration to the videoconference; seating is limited at What is a Fair & each site Profitable Farm Rental Agreement? ‘Fearless Farm Finances’ Nov. 21, 2-4 p.m. Workshop Event Center, Hutchinson, Dec. 6-7 Minn. Michael Fields Agricultural Info: See Nov. 20 event Institute, East Troy, Wis. Info: See Nov. 15-16 event Minnesota Farm Bureau Annual Meeting 20th Annual Nov. 21-23 DoubleTree Hotel, Blooming- Drive-Through Live Nativity ton, Minn. Dec. 6-7 Info: To register, contact county Farm Bureau office, or New Life Christian Church, Lori Wiegand, (651) 768-2102 Albert Lea, Minn. Info: Free admission; located or lwiegand@fbmn.org by Nov. 1; registration forms and at 1705 SE Marshall (between Advance Auto and registration can be found at NAPA Auto Parts); call (507) fbmn.org; registration after 373-0814 or (507) 373-1533; Nov. 1 will add $5/meal canceled in case of inclement weather Savoring Wine Class — A Three-Part Series Old Fashioned Danish Nov. 23, Dec. 7, Dec. 14, 10 Christmas a.m.-1 p.m. Dec. 7 Minnesota Landscape Arboretum Learning Center, Danebod Campus, Tyler, Minn. Chaska, Minn. Info: University of Minnesota Info: 2-5 p.m. shop the Juleenologist Katie Cook teaches butikker; 4-6 p.m. traditional fundamentals of wine tasting Danish supper, advanced tickets preferred by calling to inform your appreciation for the fruit of the vine and to (507) 247-3000, $8/adult, $4/child 10 and under; 6:30 enhance your winemaking p.m. free evening entertainabilities; $125/arboretum ment by Marilyn (Buhl) member, $150/non-member; Parker and the Jazz Intercall (952) 443-1422 or log on to www.arboretum.umn.edu/l preters followed by dancing around the Christmas tree earn.aspx

Info: $55/member/session, $65/non-member/session; call (952) 443-1422 or log on to www.arboretum.umn.edu/ learn.aspx

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Bison Fundamentals Nov. 29, 2-4 p.m. Central Livestock Sales Barn, Albany, Minn. Info: Registration encouraged to reserve a take-home educational packet by e-mailing info@mnbison.org, calling (507) 454-2828 or by logging on to www.mnbison.org/events

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

‘Fearless Farm Finances’ Workshop Nov. 15-16 Best Western Riverfront Hotel, LaCrosse, Wis. Info: Presenters are authors of “Fearless Farm Finances;” $125/person covers meals, copy of book and admission to wrap-up program on Jan. 10 at Badgerland Financial in Prairie du Sac, Wis.; log on to www.mosesorganic.org/farmfinances.html to register and for more information, or call (715) 778-5775

Log on to www.TheLandOnline.com 5 for our full events calendar B


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

6 B

Grazing public lands good for livestock, wildlife habitat By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer Started just two years ago with about 10,000 acres of public land being opened for cattle grazing, the goal is at least 50,000 acres for this dual mission of grazing land for cattle and better habitat for wildlife. “We’re at about 26,000 acres currently,” said Kelly Anderson, a Minnesota Department of Agriculture employee. Originally the cattle owner was responsible for fencing the grazing area in his lease agreement with the Department of Natural Resources. But Anderson said going forward the DNR will be responsible for perimeter fencing around a designated grazing area. However additional fencing to permit rotational grazing within that designated area will be the responsibility of the individual cattleman. Fees for grazing DNR land are variable because it somewhat depends upon the decisions of the local DNR office in a given area. “Some lands are put out on a bid basis; some are a flat fee subject to application procedures,” Anderson said. Regardless, differences of opinion between sportsmen, the DNR and cattlemen will always tend to happen. “Hunters who hunt the land after grazing are generally very satisfied with the results. Easier hunting and more wildlife are their general comments,” said Jim Ostlie, also with the MDA. By the same token he’s taken a few harsh phone calls from hunters who simply don’t accept the data that science is providing. Available on the MDA website is a listing of grazing lands available through the DNR, U.S. Fish and Wildlife and other public agencies. Log on to www.mda.state.mn.us. “You’ve got to get your name into the hat, so to speak. Then the selection process starts and it typically is a competitive bidding process,” Ostlie said. How does Minnesota agriculture advance in this ongoing struggle for access to public land, especially with more acres getting into public ownership each year? Ostlie said that Minnesota agriculture continues to grow, if not in more production acres each year certainly in the productivity of each acre. “I credit Minnesota farmers for being very environmentally conscious while still providing a strong and healthy livestock industry. There are always objectors on either side of the fence but in my

opinion Minnesota farmers are doing everything right. Our farmers diligently practice conservation and quickly adapt programs that enable them to be even more conservation correct,” Ostlie said. Conservation grazing talking points • The DNR plans to use conservation grazing as a management tool on approximately 50,000 acres of Wildlife Management Areas. An additional 6,000 acres in Region 3 are now identified as land suitable for grazing so possible grazing is now 56,000 acres. • In 2013, there were eight new sites for an additional 3,227 acres with fencing, water and other infrastructure installed and prepared for grazing. • On July 1, $600,000 of LegislativeCitizen Commission on Minnesota Resources funding became available to install grazing infrastructure on 5,000 acres. This work is contracted out to private vendors over the next two to three years. • One of the largest grazing projects in Minnesota is on Chippewa Prairie in Chippewa and Swift counties. This joint venture between the DNR, The Nature Conservancy and local cattle producers demonstrates conservation grazing practices. • Each new grazing location will have a grazing plan written that will address objectives, rare features, sensitive areas, invasive plants, livestock rates, fencing, water and monitoring. “Informally we have heard from the Lac qui Parle WMA and the Glacial Ridge NWR manager that producers are ecstatic about the weight gain they are seeing on their livestock with conservation grazing,” said Carmelita Nelson, DNR Division of Fish & Wildlife Prairie Grassland coordinator. She can be reached at (651) 259-5014. Time of grazing on WMAs depends on objectives. However grazing will usually start in mid-May with cattle removed before the fall hunting seasons, generally not later than Aug. 15. Some areas may be grazed season long, others rotated through a series of paddocks, and others flash grazed for a brief period of time. Current vegetation and management objectives will drive the timing and stocking rate for each site. Primary livestock will be cow-calf pairs. Cattle producers are responsible for moving and caring for the livestock. Hunting is allowed on grazed WMA land. Signs will be posted and hunter access gates will be provided at strategic locations. ❖


<< www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”

Jaycox Impl. Worthington, MN Jaycox Impl. Luverne, MN Trueman-Welters Inc. Buffalo, MN Arnold Equipment Sauk Rapids, MN Miller Sellner Slayton Slayton, MN Miller Sellner Equip. Bingham Lake, MN Miller Sellner Impl. Sleepy Eye, MN Domeyer Implement Ellsworth, MN Rabe International Fairmont, MN Arnold’s of Alden Alden, MN Arnold’s of Mankato North Mankato, MN Arnold’s of St. Martin St. Martin, MN Arnold’s of Willmar Willmar, MN Arnold’s of Glencoe Glencoe, MN Arnold’s of Kimball Kimball, MN Caledonia Implement Caledonia, MN Kalmes Implement Altura, MN Bancroft Implement Bancroft, IA Hammell Equipment Chatfield, MN Pederson’s Agri Service Herman, MN

7 B THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

STOP IN OR CALL TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION


AUCTIONS & CLASSIFIEDS

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

November 15, 2013 Announcements

Ag Power..................................17B Ag Systems ..............................34A Agri Systems ..............................6B Agro-Culture ............................33A Anderson Seeds........................26A Arnold Companies ..........12B, 13B Bayer Truck..............................39A Case IH ......................................7B Country Cat..............................37A Courtland Waste Handling ......24A Dahl Farm Supply ......................4B Dairyland Seed ........................31A Dairyland Supply ....................38A Deutz Auctions ........................10B Diers Ag Supply ........................3B Double B Mfg ..........................32A Duncan Trailers ........................15B Excelsior Homes ......................14A Fahey Sales ..............................11B Farm Drainage Plows ..............14B Freudenthal Dairy ....................25A Gehl..........................................23A Henslin Auctions ..............9B, 11B Hewitt Drainage ......................28A Holt Truck Center ....................34A Hotovec Auction ........................8B Hughes Auction..........................9B K & S Millwrights ....................5B Keith Bode ..............................15B Keltgens ..................................29A Kibble Equipment ..........18B, 19B Kohls Weelborg Ford ..............23B Kubota........................................5A Larson Bros ....................16B, 21B Letchers Farm Supply..............35A Mages Auction ........................10B Mankato Spray Center ............39A Massop Electric........................15B

Matejcek Implement ................24B Meyer Auction Service ............14B Midway Farm Equipment ........16B Miller Sellner ..........................20B Monsanto....................................3A Mustang....................................22A Mycogen ........................20A, 21A New Holland ............................36A Northern Ag Service ................14B Northern Insulation Products ..32A Northstar Genetics ..................30A Nutra Flo ..........................4A, 21B Pfeffer Construction ................35A Pioneer Corn ......................6A, 7A Pioneer Hi Bred ......................13A Pruess Elevator ..........................9B Rabe International ....................16B Rule Tire ..................................39A Rush River Steel ........................8A Schweiss Inc ............................21B SI Feeder ..................................24A Smith Mills ..............................21B Sorensen Sales..........................18B State Bank of Gibbon ..............35A Steffes Auctioneers..............8B, 9B Sunco Mktg................................4A Syngenta..........................10A, 11A Syngenta ..................................17A Syngenta Corn..........................27A Triad Construction ..........19A, 26A Vermeer ......................................8A Versatile....................................12A Whitcomb Bros ........................16A Willmar Farm Center ..............22B Willmar Precast........................29A Woodford Ag ............................15B Ziegler ......................................18A

• PO Box 3169 • 418 S 2nd Street • Mankato, MN 56001 • theland@thelandonline.com

WEEKLY AUCTION

★★★★★★★★★★★★★ Every Wednesday

10:30 AM - Farm Misc. 11:00 AM - Hay & Straw 12 Noon - Livestock Sheep & Goats 2nd Wed. at 8:00 PM

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

ADVERTISER LISTING

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

8 B

HOTOVEC AUCTION CENTER N Hwy 15 Hutchinson, MN

320-587-3347

www.hotovecauctions.com

★★★★★★★★★★★★★

010

ADVERTISING NOTICE: Please check your ad the first week it runs. We make every effort to avoid errors by checking all copy, but sometimes errors are missed. Therefore, we ask that you review your ad for correctness. If you find a mistake, please call (507) 345-4523 immediately so that the error can be corrected. We regret that we cannot be responsible for more than one week's insertion if the error is not called to our attention. We cannot be liable for an amount greater than the cost of the ad. THE LAND has the right to edit, reject or properly classify any ad. Each classified line ad is separately copyrighted to THE LAND. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited.

CHRISTMAS IDEAS!! Church cookbook $12 plus $3 shipping. Features recipes from 1912 as well as 2012! First Presbyterian Church, 108 S Galbraith, Blue Earth, MN 56013 507-526-3486

Employment

015

Be An Auctioneer & Personal Property Appraiser Continental Auction Schools Mankato, MN & Ames, IA 507-625-5595 www.auctioneerschool.com WANTED: A person to feed calves & to help w/ herdsmanship duties on a modern 480 cow dairy farm w/ every other weekend off. Eau Galle, WI. (715)4951984 Real Estate

020

Sell your land or real estate in 30 days for 0% commission. Call Ray 507-339-1272 Selling or Buying Farms or 1031 Exchange! Private Sale or Sealed Bid Auction! Call “The Land Specialists!” Northland Real Estate 612-756-1899 or 320-894-7337 www.farms1031.com We have extensive lists of Land Investors & farm buyers throughout MN. We always have interested buyers. For top prices, go with our proven methods over thousands of acres. Serving Minnesota Mages Land Co & Auc Serv www.magesland.com 800-803-8761


Real Estate

020

Real Estate Wanted

021

WANTED: Land & farms. I have clients looking for dairy, & cash grain operations, as well as bare land parcels from 40-1000 acres. Both for relocation & investments. If you have even thought about selling contact: Paul Krueger, Farm & Land Specialist, Edina Realty, SW Suburban Office, 14198 Commerce Ave NE, Prior Lake, MN 55372. paulkrueger@edinarealty.com

(952)447-4700

Merchandise

025

Buying/Selling Gold & Silver bars, coins, rings, diamonds, pocket watches, silver dollars, rare coins, currency, $5.00, $10.00, $20.00 Gold coins, Krugerands, sterling silver sets, anything marked 10-K, 14-K, 18-K, .925. Any gold or silver item. Compare prices before you sell. 32 years at the same retail location, Fairmont, Minnesota, Kuehls, 507-235-3886 026

FOR SALE: '59 530 JD, excellent, WF, new tires, lots of new & re-built parts, $8,500. 507-323-5801 FOR SALE: Cockshott plow, 3-16s, ground lift, big tail wheel, very excellent condition mechanically, needs cosmetic restoration. 320250-4878 Hay & Forage Equip

031

WANTED

DAMAGED GRAIN STATE-WIDE

We pay top dollar for your damaged grain. We are experienced handlers of your wet, dry, burnt and mixed grains. Trucks and Vacs available. Immediate response anywhere. CALL FOR A QUOTE TODAY

PRUESS ELEV., INC. 1-800-828-6642

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Antiques & Collectibles

9 B THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

WANTED: Land investor to buy crop land and lease land back to local farmer on long term basis. Safe investment. Call today 507327-6430

FOR SALE: JD 5400-5830 & 6000 & 7000 series forage harvesters. Used kernel processors, also, used JD 40 knife Dura-Drums, & drum conversions for 5400 & 5460. Call (507)427-3520 www.ok-enterprise.com FOR SALE: NH 489 haybine $4,500. 515-827-5162 Haybuster round bale shredders, stretch hay & bedding supply, helps take out mold & dust. Used #256 self-loading, $5,995; used #2100, $8,250; New 2650, 2 bale machine, call for price. 320543-3523 New oak silage & hay bunks, cedar boxes. (715)269-5258 Bins & Buildings

033

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where Farm and Family Meetâ&#x20AC;?

Do you have a metal roof or a quonset building that has a minor roof leak? Mike's Commercial Painting & Sandblasting offers a two part sealer system that will seal any minor leaks. Small cracks, nail and screw holes, seams, and joints are no problem with this product. Call Tim today for a free no hassle estimate at (507)233-4470. Stormor Bins & EZ-Drys. 100% financing w/no liens or red tape, call Steve at Fairfax Ag for an appointment. 888-830-7757


Grain Handling Equip

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

10 B

The Land

800-657-4665 • 507-345-4523

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

www.thelandonline.com • theland@thelandonline.com

ITH ION W JUNCT IN CON ENZ

KR ERING ONE AUCTI

Tractors, Combine, Farm Machinery, Tools

Estate Auction

Tuesday—Dec 3rd, 2013 - 10:00 AM

33131 533rd Ave Lafayette, MN. Blizzard Date: Dec 5th, 10am From Lafayette, MN go 2 miles North on St. Hwy. 15 to Co. Rd. 8, then East 2 miles Watch for signs! *Auctioneer’s Note: Tom took excellent care of all of his machinery. This is a VERY clean line of equipment! Combine, Heads & Tractors: JD 9770 STS Combine, 522 eng hrs, 365 sep. hrs, bullet rotor, grain tank ext, duals, one owner; JD 608C corn hd, stalk master, 8x30 w/hyd deck plates & row sensors; JD 630 Bean hd, Hydra Flex, less than 400 ac of use; AWS-36 head trailer; AWS 30 head trailer. JD 8120 MFW, 1,989 hrs, w/hub duals, 3 hyd, 380/90R50 rear rubber, rock box; Case IH 9370, 4233 hrs, w/20.8-42 duals, 4 hyds, bare back; JD 3020, 6938 hrs, gas, sync, side console, 2 hyd, WF, rock box, one owner; JD 2440 Utility Tractor, gas, 3 pt, 1 hyd, rock box; Planter, Sprayer & Field Machinery: JD 1760 MaxEmerge Plus Planter, 12x30, front fold, w/monitor; Redball 570 Sprayer w/90’ boom, 1200 gal tank, & controller; Wishek 826-NT disk, 18’; DMI EcoloTiger 530B, disk ripper; JD 680 chisel plow, 27’; CIH 4300 digger, 44’, 3 bar harrow w/dbl fold wings & sprayer nozzles; IH 475 Disk w/hyd wings, 21.5’; Lindsay 9 sec spike tooth drag w/transport; IH 3 pt digger, 16’ w/harrow; White 508 plow, 3x16, auto reset; JD 24T baler; bale rack w/MN gear; bale rack w/no gear; NH Haybine; CIH 183, 12x30

cultivator, flat fold; 250 gal saddle tanks w/brackets; 2x 1500 gal poly tanks; 2” transfer pump. 2x pallet chem tanks, 2- 2wheel trailers. Grain Trailer, Truck & Gravity Wagons: ‘97 Timpte Supper Hopper, Alum, Shur-Lock roll tarp, 42; IH 1910 Fleetstar, tandem truck w/hoist, 20’ Loftness steel box; 3 way end gate, twin screw, gas eng; Brent 644 gravity wagon, fenders, lights & brakes, green color; 2x Brent 640 gravity wagons, lights & brakes, green color; Bradford 250 bu gravity box w/gear; Westfield 60-51 auger w/7.5 hp elec motor; Westfield10x13 hopper auger w/5 hp elec motor & wheels; 6x20 auger, 3 hp elec motor & wheels; 13’ bin sweep w/motor; Snowco grain screener; poly hopper; Fuel Tanks, Tools & Misc: 500 gal gas tank w/pump; 500 gal diesel tank w/pump; 1000 gal diesel tanks w/pump; 1000 gal LP tank; ARPS “V” style snow blower; Lincoln 225 arc welder; Dura-craft floor mdl drill press; Knipco heater; 4’6’ warming shack; 2 loads of tools, shop & farm items; In Case of Severe Weather Listen to 860 AM KNUJ at 8:00 the Morning of Auction for Postponement & Rescheduling Info. Blizzard Date is Dec 5th at 10 AM

034

Farm Implements

035 Farm Implements

035

FOR SALE: 14' Shulte, PTO Kinze model 440 grain cart, size to approx 550 bu, driven rock rake, very $8,500. Krause model 3118 heavy unit, very good narrow frame soil finisher, shape, field ready, one owncoil tine harrow, er, $10,500. 320-360-4458 Declare your independence! $8,850/OBO. (608)987-3401 Having a large propane tank gives you more op- FOR SALE: JD 9200, 4WD, New & Used M&W Earthtions and allows you to ride $70,000 trades?; JD 7720 masters 5 & 7 Shank On through shortages. John at TII combine, RWD, rebuilt Hand. We Like To Trade 651-762-3972 or 612-298-6710. w/843 CH & 220 BH, $27,500; M&W Earthmaster Parts. (612) 298-6710 IH 700 8x18 OL plow, Dealer 319-347-6282 Can Del $7,000; Super B grain dryer FOR SALE:Used grain bins, & holding bin, $4,000. 507- Parker 425 bu. gravity box floors unload systems, sti330-3945 on 12T tandem wagon, rators, fans & heaters, aer$1,500; 200 bu. gravity wagation fans, buying or sell- FOR SALE: Rhino RC20, 20' on, $600; 15.5x38 Goodyear ing, try me first and also tires, like new, $650. 507flail shredder, $9,000 OBO. call for very competitive 330-3945 712-253-4222 contract rates! Office We buy hours 8am-5pm Monday – Hydrostatic & Hydraulic ReSalvage Equipment Friday Saturday 9am - 12 pair Repair-TroubleshootParts Available noon or call 507-697-6133 ing Sales-Design Custom Hammell Equip., Inc. Ask for Gary hydraulic hose-making up (507)867-4910 to 2” Service calls made. STOEN'S Hydrostatic SerFarm Implements 035 vice 16084 State Hwy 29 N Glenwood, MN 56334 320FOR SALE: '06 Artsway 634-4360 180B 15' stalk chopper, 4 whls, hyd lift, $6,000; Case IH 720 5-18 auto reset plow, Int'l model 80 snowblower, 8' wide, very good cond. 507- Zor tile plow on Steiger coulters, $4,500. Both very BearCat tractor w/ Lazer 402-1184 nice condition. 507-380-7863 Guide control, complete w/ Lazer transmitter & Lazer trailer, $19,500 Morreim Drainage, Inc. Office 507-826-3449 Cell 507-383-6550 or 507-330-1889 Tractors

036

'68 JD 4020 diesel, power shift, excellent condition. 608-214-1859 '99 CIH 9330, pwr shift, exc. rubber, 4850 hrs., very good 1 owner tractor, always shedded, $59,500. 641-4956387 2-7420 JDs, MFD cab, power quad trans, high hours, higher model, can lower. $19,900-$23,900. (715)2233600 6410 JD MFD cab, power quad rebuilt by JD/warranty, front fender, nice tight tractor, $31,900. (715)2233664 AC WD-4, OH'd, 3-pt, NF, new rims; 32 bu, CSF feed cart. 715-474-6660 Case IH 8910, MFD, 3 remotes, dual PTO, 2480 actual hrs, 18.4-42 duals, all tires are new, serviced, super sharp mint condition unit, $79,500. 507-234-5679 Case IH STX 425, runs & shifts nice, metric tires, 6 remotes, powershift, 9400 hrs, good shape, ag use, $62,000. 507-234-5679 FOR SALE: '10 JD gas utility, 2900 hrs, new tires w/ TA25 quick attach, Westendorf ldr only 10 hrs on ldr, Nice, $6,750. (608)487-2657 FOR SALE: '91 CIH 7140, FWA, duals, 70%, 6600 hrs, loaded, maintanence records, great shape! $56,500. 507-236-3094

TOM RUBISCHKO ESTATE

FOR SALE: Case IH 9330 Steiger, 3pt hitch, PTO, excellent tires, excellent condition. 715-896-0828

Listing Auctioneer: Larry Mages 507-240-0030 Auctioneers: Matt Mages - New Ulm, Lic #08-13-006 ::: Joe Maidl - Lafayette John Goelz - Franklin ::: Joe Wersal - Winthrop ::: Larry Krenz- Sleepy Eye Clerk: Mages Land Co. & Auction Ser vice LLC - Not Responsible for Accidents at Auction or During Inspection. Everything sold “AS IS”, Everything to be paid for immediately after the auction. Lunch & restroom on grounds FOR COMPLETE LIST & MORE PICTURES GO TO: MAGESLAND.COM

FOR SALE: CIH 7230 magnum, FWA, 3700 hrs, 18.4x46, $76,000. 320-987-3177

For Viewing or Questions: Nancy 507-228-8785 or Vern 507-228-8393

FOR SALE: IH 5288, FWA, 4300 hrs, nice, $41,000. Days 320-987-3177


Tractors

036 Tractors

IHC 7240 MFD, 2200 hrs, front weights, new rubber, $85,000; Wilrich 34½' digger, $7,500. 507-462-3589

Specializing in most AC used tractor parts for sale. Rosenberg Tractor Salvage, Welcome MN 56181, 507-236-8726 or 507848-6379

11 B THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

FOR SALE: JD 2510 w/ Schwartz hydraulic loader JD 2510 w WF & Schwartz all hydraulic loader w/ snow bucket. New tires all around. Good sound tractor, $7,000 (952) 657-3611

036

NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS JD 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 55, 50 Series & newer tractors, AC-all models, Large Inventory, We ship! Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage 715-673-4829

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”


THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

12 B

KIMBALL, MN • 320-398-3800 Sales: • Wayne Mackereth • Mike Schneider • Allen Schramm • Rollie Jurgens

GLENCOE, MN • 320-864-5531

Sales: • Richard Dammann • Randy Uecker • Steve Schramm • Mike W

NO. MANKATO, MN • 507-387-55 Sales: • Randy Rasmussen • Ed Nowak • Leon Rasmussen • Jay Pederson • Spencer Kolles • Rick Miller • Eric Hopp

TRACTORS 4WD

TRACTORS AWD/MFD Continued

COMPACT TRACTORS/RTV’s

CIH 600 Quad, '12, 1350 hrs ........................................$332,000 CIH 600 Quad, '11, 630 hrs ..........................................$353,000 CIH 600 Quad, '11, 820 hrs ..........................................$353,000 CIH 600 Quad, '11, 925 hrs ..........................................$299,500 CIH 535 Quad, '09, 2215 hrs ........................................$271,500 CIH 535 Quad, '07, 1795 hrs ........................................$271,500 CIH 485 Quad, '10, 1155 hrs ........................................$275,000 CIH 485 Quad, '09, 905 hrs ..........................................$222,500 CIH STX440Q, '01, 4150 hrs ........................................$156,000 CIH 435 Steiger, '10, 895 hrs ........................................$235,000 CIH STX375, 8920 hrs ....................................................$85,000

CIH 305 Mag, '07, 2250 hrs ..........................................$159,500 CIH MX270, '01, 6650 hrs ..............................................$76,900 CIH MX270, '99, 4625 hrs ..............................................$74,900 CIH MX255, '05, 3400 hrs ............................................$106,000 CIH 245 Mag, '07, 3510 hrs ..........................................$119,500 CIH MX240, '00, 9140 hrs ..............................................$67,500 CIH MX230, '05, 2335 hrs ............................................$109,500 CIH MX220, '00, 2995 hrs ..............................................$69,900 CIH MX210, '05, 2050 hrs ..............................................$92,500 CIH MX200, '02, 3420 hrs ..............................................$87,500 CIH MX200, '99, 8900 hrs ..............................................$69,500 CIH 190 Mag, '09, 3660 hrs ..........................................$115,000 CIH 180 Mag, '12, 125 hrs, Warranty............................$152,500 CIH MX170, '98, 10,295 hrs............................................$44,500 CIH 200 Puma, '11, 435 hrs ..........................................$141,500 CIH 180 Puma, '12, 200 hrs ..........................................$138,000 CIH 165 Puma, '10, 1395 hrs ........................................$104,500 CIH 155 Puma, '08, 3050 hrs ..........................................$85,000 CIH 145 Puma, ‘11, 2225 hrs. ..................................call for price CIH 140 Pro, '10, 800 hrs................................................$92,000 CIH 125 Maxxum, '11, 1160 hrs......................................$89,000 CIH 125 Pro, '08, 440 hrs................................................$75,000 CIH 125 Value, '07, 5000 hrs ..........................................$49,900 CHI MX100, '00, 7600 hrs ..............................................$29,900 CIH 7240, '96, 4720 hrs ..................................................$68,900 CIH 7120, '88, 7680 hrs ..................................................$45,500 CIH 5250, '96, 13,745 hrs ..............................................$30,500 CIH 5130, '91, 5295 hrs ..................................................$32,500 CIH 3220, '96, 6425 hrs ..................................................$12,900 IH 2404, '68, 6040 hrs ......................................................$4,800 IH 966F, 9875 hrs ..............................................................$9,950 JD 8760, '90, 6545 hrs....................................................$49,500 JD 7820, '06, 3200 hrs..................................................$106,900 JD 7800, '95, 6535 hrs....................................................$59,000 JD 4755, '90, 13,940 hrs ................................................$42,900 JD 2520, '08, 450 hrs......................................................$17,800 Kubota L35, '98, 1395 hrs ..............................................$18,900 Massey 184-4, '81, 5700 hrs ..........................................$10,000 McCormick CX105, 765 hrs ............................................$39,900 NH 8970, '94, 10,085 hrs ................................................$42,000 NH T8040, '10, 1110 hrs ..............................................$175,000 NH T8010, '08, 2010 hrs ..............................................$126,500

COMPACT - Bobcat CT440, '13, 100 hrs ........................$23,500 JD 4610, '04, 4720 hrs....................................................$16,500 JD 4320, '04, 1100 hrs....................................................$22,900 JD 4310, '04, 1345 hrs....................................................$21,900 JD 3203, 795 hrs ..............................................................$9,850 JD 2305, 495 hrs ..............................................................$8,975 JD 855, '95, 1275 hrs......................................................$14,900 JD 855, '92, 110 hrs........................................................$13,500 Kubota B7510, '04, 1040 hrs ..........................................$10,500 Kubota B750HSD, '02, 1310 hrs........................................$8,900 Kubota B7300HSD, 1265 hrs ............................................$6,500 Kubota B2710, '04, 755 hrs ............................................$13,950 Kubota BX2360T, '09, 515 hrs ..........................................$8,950 Kubota BX2230, '04, 1985 hrs ..........................................$7,750 Kubota BX2200, '02, 280 hrs ............................................$7,975 Kubota BX1800, '00, 1510 hrs ..........................................$6,600 Kubota L3130HST, '04, 3485 hrs ....................................$10,800 New Holland Boomer 8N, '09, 60 hrs ..............................$24,500 Artic Cat 700EFI, '11, 1120 hrs........................................$16,500 JD 620I, '10, 395 hrs ........................................................$8,500 Kawasaki 650, '06, 600 hrs ..............................................$4,500 Kubota RTV1100, '08, 1590 hrs ......................................$11,250 Kubota RTV900XTW, '09, 405 hrs ..................................$10,750 Kubota RTV900, '06, 1070 hrs ..........................................$7,950 Kubota RTV900W, '04, 840 hrs ........................................$8,200 Polaris 500HO, '00, 2340 hrs ............................................$4,995

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

CIH 350 Steiger, ‘12, 75 hrs. ....$235,000 CIH 350 Steiger, '12, 75 hrs ..........................................$235,000 CIH 350 Steiger, '12, 380 hrs ........................................$235,000 CIH 350 Steiger, '11, 1590 hrs ......................................$182,500 CIH 335 Steiger, '08, 2225 hrs ......................................$174,500 CIH STX275, '05, 2290 hrs............................................$116,000 CIH 9380, '96, 4850 hrs ..................................................$82,000 CIH 9370, '00, 6705 hrs ..................................................$82,000 CIH 9330, '97, 3875 hrs ..................................................$69,900 CIH 9330, '96, 3040 hrs ..................................................$72,000 CIH 9270, '92, 6415 hrs ..................................................$64,000 CIH 9270, '91, 7130 hrs ..................................................$55,000 CIH 9170, '87, 7360 hrs ..................................................$47,500 IH 3788, '80, 7000 hrs ....................................................$12,500 Challenger MT855B, '07, 4420 hrs ................................$210,000 JD 9930, '09, 1740 hrs..................................................$230,000 JD 9650, ‘12, 320 hrs. ..................................................$320,000 JD 9520T, '05, 3830 hrs ................................................$141,000 JD 9400T, '01, 4560 hrs ................................................$126,500 JD 9620T, '06, 3485 hrs ................................................$195,000 JD 9400, '97, 7125 hrs....................................................$95,500 JD 8440, '79, 9300 hrs....................................................$15,500 JD 8440, '79, 2445 hrs....................................................$24,900 NH 9682, '96, 4965 hrs ..................................................$69,900 NH 9680, '95, 5970 hrs ..................................................$53,500 NH T9.505, '11, 215 hrs ................................................$235,000 NH T9.505, '11, 300 hrs ................................................$235,000 NH 9020, '10, 580 hrs ..................................................$165,000 Steiger Cougar, '87, 6920 hrs..........................................$49,500 Versatile 895, ‘81, 6125 hrs.............................................$23,500

TRACTORS 2WD

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

TRACTORS AWD/MFD CIH 340 Mag, '11, 1665 hrs ..........................................$198,500 CIH 7220, ‘94, 6725 hrs. ............$52,500 CIH 340 Mag, '11, 1780 hrs ..........................................$199,000 CIH 340 Mag, '11, 1920 hrs ..........................................$197,500 CIH 125 Value, '08, 1530 hrs ..........................................$57,500 CIH 340 Mag, '11, 2125 hrs ..........................................$196,500 CIH 125 Value, '07, 500 hrs ............................................$59,900 CIH JX100U, '03, 3305 hrs..............................................$30,500 CIH JX75, '05, 65 hrs ......................................................$22,500 CIH 5130, '90, 6805 hrs ..................................................$22,900 CIH 5130, '90, 9140 hrs ..................................................$27,500 Case 2290, ‘81, 6040 hrs ................................................$13,000 Farmall B, '45 ....................................................................$1,990 Farmall C, '48 ....................................................................$2,500 Farmall H, '46 ....................................................................$1,900 IH 5288, ‘83 ....................................................................$16,900 IH 5088, '84, 7090 hrs ....................................................$19,500 IH 5088, '81, 4975 hrs ....................................................$20,500 IH 1086, '80, 9400 hrs ....................................................$11,600 IH 1086, '78, 8225 hrs ....................................................$12,000 IH 986, 3800 hrs..............................................................$13,500 IH 986, '77, 8770 hrs ........................................................$9,500 IH 966, '73, 5500 hrs ........................................................$7,500 IH 666, '73, 7460 hrs ........................................................$5,300 560D ............................................................................$4,900 CIH 335 Magnum, ‘11, 837 hrs. ..$212,000 IH IH 400................................................................................$1,900 CIH 335 Mag, '11, 875 hrs ............................................$192,500 IH H ..................................................................................$1,200 CIH 335 Mag, '11, 1300 hrs ..........................................$199,500 Allis Chalmers 185 ..........................................................$14,000 CIH 335 Mag, '08, 3600 hrs ..........................................$144,900 Allis Chalmers C ................................................................$2,450 CIH 335 Mag, '08, 2645 hrs ..........................................$144,900 Allis Chalmers D17 ............................................................$3,150 CIH 315 Mag, '13, 200 hrs ............................................$234,500 Ford 4600, '80, 2980 hrs ................................................$10,500 CIH 315 Mag, '12, 1560 hrs ..........................................$190,000 JD 7600, '94, 8000 hrs....................................................$46,900 CIH 315 Mag, '11, 1430 hrs ..........................................$172,500 JD 4010, '63, 1960 hrs......................................................$6,500 CIH 305 Mag, '11, 930 hrs ............................................$192,500 JD 3020D, '66, 7305 hrs ................................................$12,500 CIH 305 Mag, '10, 3695 hrs ..........................................$151,900 JD 2510, '66, 1295 hrs......................................................$8,750 CIH 305 Mag, '09, 1795 hrs ..........................................$182,500 McCormick 560 ................................................................$4,900 Financing provided by

CNH Capital ® 2013 CNH America LLC. All rights reserved. Case IH is a registered trademark of CNH America LLC. CNH Capital is a trademark of CNH America LLC. www.caseih.com

COMBINES

COMBINES Continued

CIH 2388, ‘05, 3110 hrs. ........$1279,500 CIH 2388, '01, 3005 hrs ..................................................$75,000 CIH 2388, '01, 3230 hrs ..................................................$69,500 CIH 2388, '01, 3440 hrs ..................................................$79,000 CIH 2388, '00, 3320 hrs ..................................................$75,500 CIH 2388, '98, 2670 hrs ..................................................$79,500 CIH 2388, '98, 3295 hrs ..................................................$72,500 CIH 2366, '02, 3535 hrs ..................................................$99,500 CIH 2366, '98, 2700 hrs ..................................................$92,500 CIH 2188, '97, 3200 hrs ..................................................$65,000 CIH 2188, '97, 3805 hrs ..................................................$67,500 CIH 2188, '97, 5250 hrs ..................................................$49,500

CIH 9120, '12, 330 hrs ..................................................$319,500 CIH 9120, '11, 605 hrs ..................................................$299,500 CIH 9120, '11, 825 hrs ..................................................$265,000 CIH 9120, '10, 690 hrs ..................................................$282,500 CIH 8230, '13, 230 hrs ..................................................$349,000 CIH 8230, '12, 375 hrs ..................................................$329,000 CIH 8120, '12, 800 hrs ..................................................$264,000 CIH 8120, '10, 745 hrs ..................................................$259,500 CIH 8120, '10, 760 hrs ..................................................$270,000 CIH 8120, '10, 860 hrs ..................................................$246,000 CIH 8120, '10, 1275 hrs ................................................$249,500 CIH 8120, '09, 1030 hrs ................................................$245,000 CIH 8120, '09, 1265 hrs ................................................$245,000 CIH 8010, '08, 1475 hrs ................................................$192,500 CIH 8010, '06, 1905 hrs ................................................$180,000 CIH 8010, '06, 2080 hrs ................................................$159,500 CIH 8010, '04, 2570 hrs ................................................$120,000 CIH 7120, ‘11, 615 hrs ..................................................$250,000 CIH 7120, '10, 1145 hrs ................................................$246,000 CIH 7120, '09, 940 hrs ..................................................$235,000 CIH 7120, '09, 1230 hrs ................................................$248,500 CIH 7120, '09, 1230 hrs ................................................$249,000 CIH 7120, '09, 1715 hrs ................................................$215,000 CIH 7088, '12, 770 hrs ..................................................$239,000 CIH 7088, '10, 640 hrs ..................................................$229,500 CIH 7088, '10, 1500 hrs ................................................$176,500 CIH 2188, '96, 3970 hrs. ..........$51,500 CIH 7088, '09, 815 hrs ..................................................$219,000 CIH 7010, '07, 1415 hrs ................................................$197,000 CIH 2188, '96, 3095 hrs ..................................................$62,500 CIH 2188, '96, 3970 hrs ..................................................$51,500 CIH 2188, '96, 4480 hrs ..................................................$51,500 CIH 2166, '96, 3255 hrs ..................................................$49,500 CIH 1688, '94, 2715 hrs ..................................................$39,500 CIH 1688, '94, 4155 hrs ..................................................$32,500 CIH 1688, '94 ..................................................................$35,500 CIH 1688, '93, 4500 hrs ..................................................$32,500 CIH 1688, '93, 4640 hrs ..................................................$35,500 CIH 1680, '92, 4200 hrs ..................................................$35,900 CIH 1680, '92, 4920 hrs ..................................................$29,500 CIH 1680, '90, 4860 hrs ..................................................$28,500 CIH 1680, '89, 5470 hrs ..................................................$32,500 CIH 1660, '90, 4365 hrs ..................................................$29,500 CIH 1660, '87, 3460 hrs ..................................................$24,900 CIH 1660, '87 ..................................................................$17,500 IH 1460, '81, 5235 hrs ......................................................$5,900 IH 1460, '79, 4795 hrs ......................................................$9,500 JD 9860STS, '07, 1420 hrs ..........................................$179,900 9600, '93, 4290 hrs....................................................$39,500 CIH 6130, ‘13, 285 hrs.............$265,900 JD JD 9600, '92, 3835 hrs....................................................$31,500 CIH 6130, '13, 285 hrs ..................................................$265,900 JD 7720, '79, 4395 hrs......................................................$9,900 CIH 6088, '12, 695 hrs ..................................................$239,000 DRAPER/BEAN/CORNHEADS CIH 6088, '12, 810 hrs ..................................................$235,000 CIH 6088, ‘11, 770 hrs ..................................................$225,000 (2) MacDon FD70, 40' Draper ........................starting at $55,000 CIH 6088, '09, 965 hrs ..................................................$208,000 (2) MacDon FD70, 35' Draper ........................starting at $62,500 CIH 5088, '10, 725 hrs ..................................................$214,500 MacDon 974, 35' Draper ................................................$39,900 CIH 2588, '08, 1225 hrs ................................................$185,900 (9) CIH 2162, 35' Draper ................................starting at $59,900 CIH 2588, '07, 1500 hrs ................................................$169,500 CIH 3020, 35’ Beanhead ..................................................$39,500 CIH 2388, '06, 1965 hrs ................................................$149,500 (3) CIH 2062, 36' Beanhead ..........................starting at $39,500 CIH 2388, '05, 1820 hrs ................................................$137,500 (11) CIH 2020, 35' Beanhead ........................starting at $26,500 CIH 2388, '05, 3110 hrs ................................................$127,500 (4) CIH 2020, 30' Beanhead ..........................starting at $19,900 CIH 2388, '04, 1500 hrs ..................................................$99,000 (31) CIH 1020, 30' Beanhead ..........................starting at $6,500 CIH 2388, '03, 2425 hrs ................................................$129,500 (14) CIH 1020, 25' Beanhead ..........................starting at $5,500 CIH 2388, '03, 2920 hrs ................................................$113,000 (2) CIH 1020, 22.5' Beanhead ..........................starting at $4,900 CIH 2388, '03, 3500 hrs ..................................................$99,900 (5) CIH 1020, 20' Beanhead ............................starting at $4,500 CIH 2388, '02, 2470 hrs ..................................................$99,500 CIH 1020, 15' Beanhead ....................................................$4,500 CIH 2388, '02, 2985 hrs ..................................................$89,500 (2) IH 820, 20' Beanhead ................................starting at $1,995 CIH 2388, '02, 3035 hrs ..................................................$99,500 Deutz All 320 Beanhead ....................................................$3,500 CIH 2388, '01, 2580 hrs ..................................................$99,500 (2) JD 930F, 30' Beanhead ..............................starting at $8,999

DRAPER/BEAN/CORNHEADS Co

JD 930, 30' Beanhead............................................ (2) JD 925, 25' Beanhead ................................sta (3) JD 635F, 35' Beanhead ............................start (2) JD 630F, 30' Beanhead ............................start CIH 3408 Cornhead .............................................. CIH 3208, 8R30 Cornhead .................................... (4) CIH 2612 Cornhead ..................................start (10) CIH 2608, 8R30 Cornhead ......................start (2) CIH 2408, 8R30 Cornhead ........................start CIH 2212 Cornhead .............................................. (3) CIH 2208 Cornhead ..................................start (13) CIH 1083 Cornhead ..................................sta CIH 1064, 6R36 Cornhead .................................... (2) CIH 1063 Cornhead ....................................sta (2) CIH 1044, 4R36 Cornhead ..........................sta (2) IH 863, 6R30 Cornhead .................................. IH 846, 4R30 Cornhead ........................................ IH 8R20 Cornhead ................................................ Agco 838 Cornhead .............................................. Clarke 822, 8R22 Cornhead .................................. Drago 18R22 Cornhead ........................................ Drago 18R20 Cornhead ........................................ (5) Drago 12R30 Cornhead ............................start (2) Drago 12R22 Cornhead ............................start (2) Drago 12R20 Cornhead ............................start Drago 10R22 Cornhead ........................................ (14) Drago 8R30 Cornhead ............................start (8) Drago 6R30 Cornhead ..............................start Fantini 8R30 Cornhead .......................................... Geringhoff 18R20 Cornhead .................................. Geringhoff 12R30 Cornhead .................................. Geringhoff 8R30 Cornhead .................................... Geringhoff RD1600B Cornhead ............................ Geringhoff RD1200B Cornhead ............................ (2) Geringhoff Roto Disc ................................start Harvestec 430C, 8R30 Cornhead .......................... Harvestec 8R30 Cornhead .................................... JD 1293, 12R30 Cornhead .................................... JD 1290, 12R20 Cornhead .................................... JD 1290, 12R20 Cornhead .................................... JD 1243, 16R22 Cornhead .................................... JD 10R22 Cornhead .............................................. JD 693 Cornhead .................................................. JD 608C, 8R30 Cornhead ...................................... (4) JD 643, 6R30 Cornhead..............................sta Lexion C512R30 Cornhead ....................................

FORAGE EQUIPMENT Bob Joubert East - (507) 402-314 Randy Olmscheid, West - (320) 583-60

Claas, ‘12, 910 hrs ................................................ Claas 980, '10........................................................ Claas 980, '09, 1860 hrs........................................ Claas 980, '08, 1145 hrs........................................ Claas 970, '08, 1530 hrs........................................ Claas 900, '09, 1880 hrs........................................ Claas 900, '08, 1975 hrs........................................ Claas 900, '05, 3205 hrs........................................ Claas 890, '02, 2725 hrs........................................ Claas 880, '97, 4525 hrs........................................ Claas 870, ‘08, 2485 hrs........................................ JD 7850, '09, 1300 hrs.......................................... JD 7500, '04, 2840 hrs.......................................... JD 7300, '03 .......................................................... NH FX58, '01, 3665 hrs ........................................ NH FX38, ‘01.......................................................... NH 1900 ................................................................ CIH FHX300 PT Forg Harv .................................... Gehl CB1275 PT Forg Harv.................................... Gehl CB1265 PT Forg Harv.................................... Gehl CB1075 PT Forg Harv.................................... NH FP240 PT Forg Harv ........................................ NH FP230 PT Forg Harv ........................................ CIH HDX10P Hayhead............................................ (6) Claas PU380HD Hayhead ..........................start (10) Claas PU380 Hayhead ............................start (3) Claas PU300 Hayhead ................................sta Gehl HA1210 Hayhead .......................................... JD 645C Hayhead .................................................. JD 630A, 10' Hayhead .......................................... NH 3500 Hayhead.................................................. NH 365W Hayhead ................................................ NH 355W Hayhead ................................................ NH 340W Hayhead ................................................ CHI HDX3R Cornhead............................................ (3) Claas Orbis 900 Cornhead ......................startin (5) Claas Orbis 750 Cornhead ........................start (3) Claas Orbis 600 Cornhead ........................start (10) Claas RU600, 8R30 Cornhead ................start Claas RU450XTRA Cornhead ................................


515

ontinued

ST. MARTIN, MN • 320-548-3285 Sales: • Dan Hoffman • Erik Mueller • Randy Olmscheid • Jamie Pelzer • Pat Linz

ALDEN, MN • 507-874-3400

Sales: • Brad Wermedal • Tim Engebretson • Bob Joubert FORAGE EQUIPMENT Continued FALL TILLAGE Continued (5) Claas RU450 Cornhead ............................starting at $26,000 (2) Claas 6R30 Cornhead ................................starting at $8,500 Gehl TR330 Cornhead........................................................$4,500 (2) JD 686, 6R30 Cornhead............................starting at $29,000 JD 678, 8R30 Cornhead ..................................................$62,500 JD 666R, 6R30 Cornhead ................................................$13,000 Kemper 6008 Cornhead ..................................................$51,500 Kemper 4500 Cornhead ..................................................$26,500 NH 360N6 Cornhead........................................................$16,000 NH 3PN Cornhead..............................................................$8,500

FALL TILLAGE DEEP TILLAGE SALE DEEP DISCOUNTS (2) CIH 870, 26' Subsoiler..............................starting at $82,500 (7) CIH 870, 22' Subsoiler..............................starting at $57,500 CIH MRX690, '04, 7 Shank Subsoiler..............................$22,000 (2) CIH MRX690, '03, 7 Shank Subsoiler ......starting at $20,900 (2) CIH 9300 Subsoiler....................................................$39,950

JD 2700, '01, 9S24 Subsoiler..........................................$18,820 JD 2700, ‘08, 7S30 Subsoiler..........................................$16,900 JD 2700, '06, 7S30 Subsoiler..........................................$21,700 JD 2700, '04, 7S30 Subsoiler..........................................$20,780 JD 2700, '03, 7S30 Subsoiler..........................................$17,700 JD 2700, '07, 7S24 Subsoiler..........................................$23,300 JD 2700, '03, 7S24 Subsoiler..........................................$20,000 JD 512, '10, 9 Shank Subsoiler ......................................$35,500 JD 512, '09, 9S30 Subsoiler............................................$34,300 (2) JD 512, 7 Shank Subsoiler ......................starting at $15,300 JD 512, ‘04, 12.5’ Subsoiler ............................................$13,500 JD 510, 17.5' Subsoiler ....................................................$8,900 JD 510, 7 Shank Subsoiler ..............................................$12,500 Landoll 2320, '96, 9S24 Subsoiler ..................................$10,820 (2) M & W 2200, 18' Subsoiler ......................starting at $12,420 M & W 1475, 17.5' Subsoiler ............................................$7,620 Sunflower 4411, 18' Subsoiler ..........................................$8,100 Tebben 9 Shank Subsoiler ................................................$3,500

Wilrich V957DDR Subsoiler ........$19,300 (4) Wilrich V957DDR Subsoiler ......................starting at $19,300 Wilrich 6600, 17.5' Subsoiler ............................................$7,900 (10) CIH 730B Subsoiler ................................starting at $13,425 CIH 6650, 9 Shank Chisel Plow ......................................$12,900 (12) CIH 730C Subsoiler ................................starting at $30,500 JD 2410, 30' Chisel Plow ................................................$39,900 CIH 730, 17.5' Subsoiler..................................................$34,500 IH 800, 11x18 MB Plow ....................................................$9,500 CIH 530C, 12.5' Suboiler ................................................$32,500 IH 720, 6 Bottom Plow ......................................................$6,500 CIH 527B, 11.5' Subsoiler ..............................................$23,500 IH 720, 5x18 MB Plow ......................................................$2,950 IH 700, 8x18 MB Plow ......................................................$5,000 JD 3710, 10 Bottom MB Plow ........................................$21,000 JD 3710, 10 Bottom MP Plow ........................................$45,900 JD 2800, 6 Bottom MB Plow ............................................$8,500

‘02 CIH 730B, 17.5’ Subsoiler ....$18,500

SKIDLOADERS/EXCAVATORS/TLB

47 , 14

‘97 DMI 730B, 17.5’ Subsoiler ....$14,820 (5) DMI 730B, 17.5' Subsoiler........................starting at $12,100 (8) DMI 730, 17.5' Subsoiler .......................... starting at $8,900 (2) DMI 530, 12.5' Subsoiler..........................starting at $13,900 DMI CCII, 9 Shank Subsoiler ............................................$4,995 Brillion LCS5-2 Subsoiler ................................................$10,900 Glencoe CC4450 Subsoiler ..............................................$12,000 Glencoe SS7400, 17' Subsiler ..........................................$7,800 JD 2700, '07, 9S24 Subsoiler..........................................$20,100

JD 512, ‘08, 9S30 Subsoiler........$30,500 JD 2700, '05, 9S24 Subsoiler..........................................$21,300 JD 2700, '04, 9S24 Subsoiler..........................................$20,900 JD 2700, '03, 9S24 Subsoiler..........................................$20,500

Case SR200, '11, 785 hrs................................................$31,500 Case SR200, '11, 1210 hrs..............................................$31,500 Case SV300, '11, 2055 hrs ..............................................$41,500 Case SV185, '12, 1645 hrs ..............................................$26,900 Case 1845C, '96, 6855 hrs ..............................................$10,500 Case 1845C, '93, 4590 hrs ..............................................$11,900 Case 1840, '92, 5040 hrs ..................................................$7,900 Case 1840, '89, 3380 hrs ................................................$10,500 Case 1835..........................................................................$4,900 Case 465, '07, 1140 hrs ..................................................$32,000 Case 445CT, '06, 1570 hrs ..............................................$35,500 Case 440, '05, 4230 hrs ..................................................$19,500 Case 430, '07, 415 hrs ....................................................$26,900 Case 430, '07, 1245 hrs ..................................................$25,900 Case 430, '06, 2205 hrs ..................................................$17,900 Case 90XT, 2735 hrs........................................................$19,500 Case 60XT, '02, 1055 hrs ................................................$16,500 Case 40XT, '02, 2620 hrs ................................................$17,900 Bobcat S-250, '08, 1505 hrs............................................$27,900 Bobcat S-250, '05, 4640 hrs............................................$24,500 Bobcat S-205, '08, 3500 hrs............................................$25,900 Bobcat S-185, 2190 hrs ..................................................$23,500 Bobcat S-185, 5500 hrs ..................................................$13,900 Cat 236B, '06, 1990 hrs ..................................................$23,500 Gehl 7810E, '10, 1770 hrs ..............................................$38,000 Gehl 5640E, '08, 3900 hrs ..............................................$21,900 Gehl 5640, '06, 1380 hrs ................................................$26,900 Gehl 4640, '05, 3295 hrs ................................................$18,000 JD CT322, ‘06, 725 hrs....................................................$28,000 JD 328, '05, 5180 hrs......................................................$19,500 JD 323D, '11, 800 hrs ....................................................$40,900 JD 320D, '11, 570 hrs ....................................................$29,900 JD 320, 2240 hrs ............................................................$19,900 Kubota SVL90, '11, 1305 hrs ..........................................$50,000 Kubota SVL75, '11, 1125 hrs ..........................................$42,000 Mustang 2109, '07, 1600 hrs ..........................................$42,900 Mustang 2066, 3045 hrs ................................................$18,900 Mustang 930A, '97, 2055 hrs ............................................$9,400 NH L230, '12, 210 hrs ....................................................$42,500 NH LS190B, '05, 2710 hrs ..............................................$23,500 NH LX865, '95 ................................................................$12,500

TEC

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

.........$335,000 .........$285,000 .........$275,000 .........$289,000 .........$249,000 .........$242,000 .........$229,000 .........$208,000 .........$147,000 ...........$76,500 .........$174,900 .........$254,000 .........$149,500 .........$118,000 ...........$78,000 ...........$78,000 ...........$28,000 ...........$29,000 ...........$16,500 .............$9,500 ...........$15,500 ...........$23,000 ...........$34,000 .............$5,000 ting at $14,000 ting at $12,000 rting at $8,500 .............$1,500 ...........$19,500 .............$8,000 .............$6,500 .............$7,900 .............$8,000 .............$5,000 .............$9,500 ng at $110,000 ting at $73,500 ting at $62,500 ting at $18,500 ...........$42,000

DEEP TILLAGE SALE

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

.............$7,450 rting at $6,500 ting at $20,500 ting at $27,500 ....call for price ...........$41,500 ting at $78,500 ting at $53,900 ting at $37,000 ...........$43,000 ting at $27,500 rting at $5,500 .............$7,500 rting at $8,900 rting at $5,000 .............$1,500 .............$1,999 .............$7,900 ...........$15,995 ...........$15,000 .........$137,000 .........$128,950 ting at $52,000 ting at $45,000 ting at $79,000 ...........$60,000 ting at $29,500 ting at $28,900 ...........$34,000 ...........$99,500 ...........$89,750 ...........$29,900 ...........$98,900 ...........$39,500 ting at $29,900 ...........$29,000 ...........$19,900 ...........$45,500 ...........$46,000 ...........$49,950 ...........$15,500 .............$9,500 ...........$15,500 ...........$77,500 rting at $5,000 ...........$38,000

Sales: • Bob Pfingston • Nate Scharmer • Brian Lingle • Christy Hoff • Bob Lindahl • Tim Hansen • Jeff Ruprecht

13 B

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

Wettengel

WILLMAR, MN • 320-235-4898


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

14 B

LARGE FARM EQUIPMENT RETIREMENT AUCTION

Location: Sale will be held at the farm: 40563 187th St. Carpenter, SD. From Huron, SD 21.6 miles north on SD Hwy 37, turn east on 187th St., 53⁄4 miles to the sale site. If coming from the North at the junction of US Hwy 212 and SD 37, turn South 12 miles to 187th St, then East 53⁄4 miles. Watch for Auction Signs. Please note Hwy 28 Bridge Construction.

WEDNESDAY, NOV 27TH 2013 • 10:30 AM CST Lunch served by Prairie Bible Church Ladies

TRACTORS: ‘12 Case IH 550 Quadtrac – 303 hours – deluxe cab, PTO, software updated for tiling, Reichart Autosteer for tile machine, 30” tracks, 4 hyds, SN: 129326; ‘11 Case IH Maxxum 140-457 hrs3 hydro, joystick, 18.4x42 rear tires, 14.9x30 front tires, 8 front wgts, clamp on duals (new), SN: 03183; ‘07 Case IH 335 Steiger 2230 hrs, Eze Pilot, Duals, 18.4x46 tires, 4 hyds, PTO, HID lights, SN: 708752; ‘04 McCormick MTX120 MFD, 585 hrs, joystick, Miller PL3 Loader, 8’ material bucket, extra bucket, pallet fork, grapple fork, 3 remotes, quick tach, 18.4x42 tires SN: 3335066; Case 1840 dsl Uniloader skidsteer, 2821 hrs, 10x16.5 tires, heater, aux. hyds, cold weather starter kit, bucket, SN: 158822; 3 separate buckets, pallet forks; ‘68 Allis Chalmers 170 gas, hrs unknown but low, 1 owner, 3 hyd. Miller M12 Loader SN: 170-6822, w/mounted 31 Case Backhoe COMBINE & HEADS: ‘10 NH CR9060 combine, Redekop Choppers, 22’ auger, 1112 eng. hrs, 926 sep. hrs, autosteer, 620.70.42 duals, rears 600.65.28, tow cable, rear hitch SN: YAG113466; ‘09 Mod. 88C Honey Bee Draper Head 36’ cutter bar, 3” cut factory, dual drive, SCH Sickle & Guards; Concaves for CR 9060 NH; Lg Wire; 2 Lg rnd corn; Key stock sm. wire, lg. wire; Kuchar Concaves Soybean & Corn; ‘04 Drago 830 Cornhead SN: 20134 TILING: ‘11 Waynes Tiler, tilt control, reinforced, 7” cylinder, 4”, 6” & 8” boots, GPS wired, 2000# remote power winch for changing boots, AGPS SN 51136; Waynes Tile Pro Stinger Trailer, hydro tilt, electric brakes, tandem axle; Ron’s Mfg. 3 point tile dirt closer, reinforced TRUCKS - TRAILERS - 4 WHEELERS: ‘10 Wilson DWH 500 hopper trlr 43’ tandem, air ride, steel whls, air vent, ag hoppers, 66” sides 24.5 tires, VIN# 4WWMBF1A1A5700313; ‘99 Kenworth T600 Semi, Deep Day Cab, 10 spd, Detroit Crate motor w/50K miles, 12.7 L, 470 HP, Air ride, jake brake, air dump, air slide, 899K TMK, 22.5 Virgin Tires; ‘70 Chevy C3, 4 spd, new air compressor, 20 gal. fuel tank, tool box, 350 V8, valve out, VIN# CE330J132185; ‘66 Ford 700, 22’ box hoist scissor lift, lift tag, 330 V8, 5x2 speed; ‘62 Dodge 500 V8 318 4x2, lengthened whl base, roll tarp, twin hoist; ‘67 Chevy 50, 16’ box & hoist, 327, needs points, 4x2 spd, sgl axle; ‘91 Dodge dsl service truck 4x2; 6x20 gooseneck stock trlr, good floor, new tires, SN; 8000; ‘12 Yamaha Grizzly 450, 4x4 auto, power steering, 630 miles, 79 hrs, full racks; ‘94 Polaris 400 2x4 ATV VIN# 7540 PLANTER - TILLAGE: ‘07 Great Plains 16R30” planter, centerfill, Yetter trash whippers saber tooth, mudsmith gauge wheels, Schlagel mfg closing wheels, SS total tubular, redball site glass, 150 bu. Central fill; Great Plains mon., Plus Precision Planting 20/20 monitor w/depth control & Precision Planting corn fingers, 18.4.42 tires Y16251630 SN: GPA1204B1997; Flexi-Coil model 5000 40’ 9”Hoe Drill SN: T074828 w/2320 Commodity Cart SN: T074689 w/rear hitch; YMS Shurloc Seed tender w/Shurloc roll tarp, 250 bu.; ‘12 Case IH Flex-Till 600 Chisel 47’ 4 bar Summers Harrow SN: YBS003191; Wil-Rich 52’ cult. quad 5 w/Summers 104 4 bar Harrow; FlexiCoil chisel 62’ bare w/Summers 104 4-bar harrow, trifold SN: P060340; Ripper-Blue Jet tiller II subsoiler 3 SN: 00694, 8 gauge whls; ‘11 Ground Pounder TM45, Hillcrest Manufacturing TM160037 Land Roller GRAIN CART -WAGONS - AUGERS - BINS: ‘08 J&M 1325 grain cart on tracks 36” Printable Scale Compatible SN: 2080; 350 bu Lundell gravity box, ag topper, on Westendorf gear; (2) Barge Boxes w/hoists, electric gears, running gears are good; (2) Westfield 13x91 grain auger, new style gear box, hydRolift, painted silver; (3) Large Cone Bins, Stor-King, Micada, & Friesen; 8”x60’ Versatile auger; 8x55 Feterl auger SN: 5166; (2) 1,000 bu. steel grain storage, Keyo brand air tubes, 2x4 door; 10x66’ Feterl auger, 1066CSW951010 SHOP ITEMS - SCRAPER - BLADE – BUCKETS - ATTACHMENTS - OTHER MISC. EQUIPMENT Auctioneer Notes: It is a great honor to offer this fantastic lineup of well cared for, late model machinery for auction. Due to health reasons Ron has decided to retire and offer his equipment for sale at auction. Loading Dock on Site. For full ad and pictures of items please visit www.benmeyerauctions.com or www.wiemanauction.com. Terms: Cash or bankable check day of auction, Photo ID required for bid number, No items removed from sale site until paid in full. 4% South Dakota sales tax applies. Announcements day of sale take precedence over written material.

Storm Date: In the event of bad weather sale will be held Wed. Dec. 4th

Owners: Ron and Tamera Tschetter The RT Tschetter Inc., CRUT and the Ron & Tamera Tschetter Two Life Charitable Remainder Unitrust Cell 605-350-2112 or home 605-266-2177

MEYER AUCTION SERVICE • Huron, SD 57350 • Ben Meyer Auctioneer 605-350-0316 • Val Luckett Wieman Land & Auction • Marion, SD • Kevin Wieman 1-800-251-3111

Harvesting Equip

037 Harvesting Equip

037

2005 Drago 8R cornhead, '07 JD 635 hydra flex, $15,500. 507-461-1364 w/choppers, steel, nice head, $19,000. 515-351-1054 FOR SALE: '09 CIH 8120 combine, AFX rotor, laterBrent #874 Grain Cart al tilt, Pro 600 monitor, w/ Tarp Real Good. Glencoe 1,099 sep hrs; '98 MF 8780 9 Shank Stretch Soil Saver combine, RWA, chopper, (Series II). Bush Hog 12 Ft hopper ext, chaff spreader, Pull Type Rotary Cutter 1,955 sep hrs. 218-530-0139 or 1000 RPM, Good Cond. 319218-234-7652 347-6138 Can Deliver FOR SALE: 1978 JD 6600 combine, good condition, FOR SALE: '09 Case IH $1,900. 515-832-5677 chopping cornhead, adj deck plates, model FOR SALE: 2010 JD 2606/30M25/BB, SN 9770STS, 760 sep hrs. Moti666572011, 1700 acres, one vated to sell! Price reowner, $39,900. 507-220-6810 duced! $182,900. 507-351-1176

DAMAGED GRAIN WANTED ANYWHERE We buy damaged corn and grain any condition - wet or dry TOP DOLLAR We have vacs and trucks CALL HEIDI OR LARRY

NORTHERN AG SERVICE INC 800-205-5751

The Affordable Way to Tile Your Fields 3 Point Hitch & Pull Type Models Available • Walking Tandem Axles • Formed V Bottom on w/425/65R22.5 Tires for Superior Grade Control • Tile Installation Depth Gauge

Buy Factory Direct & $AVE!

Shoe & Boot forms to Tile. No more Crushed Tile • Paralled Pull Arms, Zero Pitch for the Most Accurate Tile Placement


Harvesting Equip

037 Tillage Equip

039

Wanted

042

Feed Seed Hay

050

2014 SEED CORN SALE. Avoid the pending price increase. Buy all conventional and technology hybrids at 2013 pricing until Dec. 1. With our 9% prepay discount, conventional hybrids start at only $81. Offer and prices online at WWW.KLEENACRES.COM or call 320-237-7667. “ITS THE PLACE TO BE!” Dairy Quality Alfalfa Tested big squares & round bales, delivered from South Dakota John Haensel (605) 351-5760

JD 7720 combine, completely All kinds of New & Used rebuilt, 643 oil bath, poly farm equipment – disc chis- Dairy quality western alfalhead. (608)214-1859 els, field cults, planters, fa, big squares or small soil finishers, cornheads, squares, delivered in semi Retiring: '08 Drago 6R choploads. Clint Haensel feed mills, discs, balers, ping cornhead, low acres, (605) 310-6653 haybines, etc. 507-438-9782 $45,000 OBO. 651-564-0606 Tillage Equip

039

'09 JD 3710, 8 bottom plow exc condition, always shedded, $28,500. (715) 821-2484

Disc chisels: JD 714 & 712, FOR SALE: Grass Hay 2000 weed-free grass hay net Glencoe 7400; Field Cults wrapped round bales. Feed under 30': JD 980, small tested 9-16 percent protein. grain carts & gravity boxes 1200 lb average. Southwest 300-400 bu. Finishers under MN. (507) 430-0607 20', clean 4 & 6R stalk choppers; Nice JD 215 & 216 Hay For Sale flex heads; JD 643 cornheads Must be clean; JD Round or large square bales, alfalfa, straw or grass hay. corn planters, 4-6-8 row. Delivery Available by semi. 715-299-4338 Ose Hay Farm, Thief River WANTED TO BUY: 10-14 Falls, MN Call or text yard scraper. 320-250-6040 LeRoy at (218)689-6675

WOODFORD AG EQUIPMENT HARVEST INTERNATIONAL AUGERS

H 13-62, 72, 82, 92, 102, 112 H 10-62, 72, 82 T 10-32, 42, 52, 62 Auger Joggers - on hand ....$1,950

WHEATHEART AUGERS All Sizes

16-82 and 16-112 ......................Call

COMBINE HEAD MOVERS

Renegade 25’ & 30’ - 4 Wheel Harvest International 35’, 40’ & 45’

KOYKER LOADERS & AUGERS

585 - on hand ........................$6,995 1050 Grain Bagger 210 Gran Vac

WOODFORD WELDING BALE RACKS

18’ - 23’ - 28’

E-Z TRAIL GRAIN CARTS 510 - 710 - on hand

AZLAND SEED TENDERS

2 Box - on hand ..................$10,550 4 Box Scale & Talc - on hand 4 Box Skid - on hand

STROBEL SEED TENDERS

2 Box - on hand ....................$8,900 BT-200 - on hand BT-300 ........................................Call

SEED SHUTTLE SEED TENDERS

SS-290 - on hand SS-400 - on hand SS-500 - coming in ....................Call

ENDURAPLAS NURSE TANKS

1100 Gal., 6.5 Honda & hoses$5,750

AZLAND FUEL TRAILERS

500 Extended Platform ................................$7,800

*************** USED EQUIPMENT ***************

E-Z Trail 500 bu. Wagon, red ....................................$6,500 Feterl 12” Drive Over, Like New ..................................$4,500 Land Pride 1872 Mower....$1,250 Westfield 1371 Auger w/swing hopper walker, PTO ........$8,500

HOPPERS

TRUSS TRAILER

‘98 Lakeside RollerMaster, 32’-45’/102” Extendable, Elec. over Hyd. Lift, Top Locking Deck Rollers, Winches, 80% T&B ..$10,000 ‘97 JDH Trussmaster, 42’-60’/102” Extendable, 8 Winches, Elec. over Hyd. to Tilt, Elec. over Air to Extend, Tandem Axle ............$10,000

‘03 Timpte, 40’ Ag Hopper, SR, New Brakes, 70% Tires, Auto Roll Tarp ..........$23,000 ‘98 Wilson, 41x96, 66” Sides, Extra Lights, Roll Tarp, 24.5 LP Tires ............$18,500 ‘95 Merritt, 42’ AL Hopper, 68” Sides, 2-Spd. Doors, Roll Tarp, Disc Wheels ....$12,500 ‘94 Wilson Commander, 41’ END DUMPS AL Grain Hopper, SPR, 80% Brakes ......................$16,000 Summit End Dump, 30’, 72” Sides, 3 Axle, AR ......$16,750 SEMI TRUCKS ‘04 Volvo Day Cab, Single Axle, 365 Hp., 10c Trans, 3.90 Ratio, 450,000k ..........$8,500 ‘74 International 4300, 350 Hp. Cummins, 10-Spd., 8 New Tires, Clean ......$5,000

VAN/WATER TRAILERS

(6) Reefers, 36’ to 48’, Roll Up Doors, 2 Side Doors ..........................$6,000 & Up ‘86 Kentucky Furniture Van, AR, 50% T&B ..............$6,750 Van Trailers, 48/102-53/102; FLATBEDS Great for water storage or ‘96 Wilson AL Combo, 48/96, over the road hauling SPX/AR, 24.5 LP 50% Tires, ......................$3,500-$7,000 New Floor, Sandblasted & Painted, Clean ............$9,250 48’ & 53’ Van Trailers To Rent. ‘93 Wilson, 48x96, SPR, Sliding $145.00 per month plus tax. Tandem ......................$7,000 AUTOS ‘98 Great Dane, 45x96, Moffit ‘07 Hyundai Sonata Limited, Forklift Carrier Brackets, 4 door, 86K Mi., V6, Reg. Sliding Tandem ..........$6,250 Maint...........................$7,500 ‘95 Dorsey, 45x96, D-Ring Tie ‘06 Dodge Caravan SXT, Downs, SPX/AR ..........$6,000 108K Mi. ....................$6,000 ‘95 Transcraft, 45’, AL Floors & ‘05 Dodge Grand Caravan SE, Crossmembers, Rebuilt 124K Mi. ....................$4,500 Frame, 50% Tires, 70% Brakes, SPX/AR ..........$5,750 ‘04 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT, 120K Mi., 3.8L, Clean ..$5,500

HAYSIDES

MISCELLANEOUS

Haysides are painted and made out of 11 gauge steel, Complete Suspensions, Air Stationary Haysides....$1,250 Ride or Spring Ride ......................$1,000 AR/Axle Tip-In-Tip-Out Haysides ....................................$1,750 ........................$500 SR/Axle Front & Rear Extensions $350 (8) 385 Super Single Tires w/Polished AL Rims DROPDECKS ......................$1,200/set of 4 ‘99 Wilson, 48/102, New (50) Steel & (25) Aluminum Recaps, New Airbags, AL Rims In Stock ........$50 Steel Crossmembers, Painted & ....................$150 Aluminum Sandblasted..............$18,500 We can also convert flatbed ‘94 Fontaine, 48/102, Steel, New Recaps, Sandblasted & trailers to be used as a bridge. See our website. Painted......................$16,750

Keith Bode Fairfax, MN 55332 507-381-1291

USED DRYERS

MC 690, 16’, 1 Ph., LP, SS Sheets BEHLEN 380, 1 Ph., LP HEAT RECLAIM DELUX DP6030, 20’, 3 PH, LP HEAT RECLAIM SS SHEETS DELUX DPX7040, 15’, 3 Ph., LP, SS OUTER SHEETS TOP, ALUM. BTM. BEHLEN 700 3 Ph., LP DOUBLE BURNER

USED LEGS

60’ 3000BPH PAINTED, 10 HP, 3 Ph. DRIVE & MOTOR, PAINTED

USED AUGERS

10”x71’ MAYRATH SWINGAWAY 8”X62’ MAYRATH BP, PTO 8”X62’ WESTFIELD TD PTO 8”X57’ KEWANEE PTO

We carry a full line of Behlen & Delux dryer parts; Mayrath and Hutch augers parts. Large inventory of Welda sprockets, hubs, bearings, chain & pulleys.

• All Trailers DOTable •

Will Consider Trades!

Call: 320-212-5220 or 320-392-5361

CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE!!! www.DuncanTrailersInc.com Delivery Available!

1409 Silver Street E. Mapleton, MN 56065 507-524-3726 massopelectric.com

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

1981 Versatile 555 ..........$12,750 2012 SS-400, Scale ........$24,500 2012 SS-400 ....................$21,500 EZ Trail 860 Grain Cart, red, Like New ........................$21,500 Brent 470 Grain Cart ........$6,500

HANCOCK, MN

‘08 JD 9670STS, 20.8R42 duals, CM, extended wear pkg., Premier cab, 1225 sep. hrs., Just Thru Service Program ......................$139,500 ‘09 JD 608C chopping cornhead, knife rolls ..................................................................$36,500 ‘08 JD 8430, MFWD, PS, 1300 front axle, 380/90R54 duals, 380/80R38 single fronts, wgts., 4 remotes, 4700 hrs. ....................$124,000 ‘09 NH T8040, MFWD, super steer, mega flow hyd., 480/80R50 rear duals, front duals, 4 remotes, wgts., 2200 hrs. ....................$123,500 ‘12 Case 580SN tractor/loader/backhoe, cab, air, extend-a-hoe, 4WD, ride control, 24” hoe bucket, 120 hrs. ..........................$72,500 ‘11 NH B95B tractor/loader/backhoe, cab, air, 4WD, extend-a-hoe, pilot controls, 24” hoe bucket, 235 hrs. ........................................$65,000 ‘07 NH W130 wheel loader, new 20.5R25 tires, JRB coupler, 3300 hrs. ..............................$63,500 ‘11 CIH Magnum 290, MFWD, 380/90R54 duals, 380/80R38 front duals, high capacity hyd. pump, 23 spd. creeper trans., 5 remotes, wgts., 1425 hrs., can change rear tires to 480/80R50 duals if needed......................$148,500 ‘13 JD Gator TX, 4x2, 486 hrs. ....................$5,250

15 B

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

2009 Case-IH 7 Shank #730C Ripper (with or w/o 6 Lead Shanks) w/ Leveler 2500 Acres. 750 Bu Unverferth #7200 Grain Cart w/ Scale & Tarp. Both Like New. 319347-2349 Can Deliver

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

WANTED: 7 or 8 bottom on land plow. 320-241-8462 or 320-597-2544

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

FOR SALE: 650 bu gravity FOR SALE: '01 JD 512 disk ripper, 5 shank, good teeth box & 365 bu gravity box, & blades, nice, $18,000. 507both have cement truck 847-4693 tires, both in good shape. 10X60 grain auger. 507-5308875 FOR SALE: IHC pull type 6 or 7 bottom 16” plow, coulFOR SALE: JD 443 high tin ters, good condition, all corn head, good condition, new wear parts, very clean, $2,100. 515-832-5677 $4,400/OBO. Can Deliver. 320-220-3114 Hiniker 8-30 chopper, field ready, nice, 75%; 5 Gravity IN-LINE 7 Shank 3 Pt Zone wagons, 300-550 bu.; IH 480 Builder Auto Re-set With or disk; '96 GMC extended w/out Pull Hitch. Farm cab, 4x4, plus more. King 13x70 Auger w/ Low Peterson Equipment Hopper Real Good. Balzer 507-276-6957 or 6958 #1500 (6-30) Windrow ShredJD 4400 dsl combine, 16' der A-One Cond. 319-347bean head, 4RN cornhead, 6677 Can Deliver 2,050 hrs., all field ready, $9,500 OBO. 952-873-6270 or Machinery Wanted 040 612-281-6270


THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

16 B

USED TRACTORS Challenger MT655B, 1500 hrs.............$129,500 ‘08 Challenger 665B, 2400 hrs. ..........$124,500 Versatile 2425, 4WD, 3500 hrs. ..........$119,500 Agco DT200, 3300 hrs. ........................$79,500 ‘07 Agco RT155A w/CC360 ldr., 1700 hrs. ..........................................................$115,000 AC 7060 PD ............................................$7,950 ‘09 MF 8650, 1800 hrs. ......................$134,500 ‘05 MF 6480 w/loader, 4200 hrs. ..........$59,500 ‘08 MF 1540 w/loader, 500 hrs. ............$17,900

‘08 MF 1533, hydro, loader, 250 hrs. ....$16,900 ‘10 MF 1533 w/ldr., 100 hrs. ................$16,900 ‘69 MF 1080 ............................................$5,950 AC 8010, PS, FWA, duals ......................$19,900 ‘74 AC 7030 ............................................$4,450 AC WD, PS, w/Woods 3065 mower ..........$995 White 140, 2WD, 6500 hrs., duals ........$27,900 MF 135 w/loader ....................................$5,450 AC 170, gas, cab ....................................$5,950 Oliver 1600, gas ......................................$4,950

USED COMBINES & HEADS ‘03 Gleaner R-75, 2300 hrs.................$109,500 ‘10 Gleaner R76, 300 hrs., duals ........$229,500 ‘10 Gleaner R-66, 300 hrs., duals ......$219,500 ‘03 Gleaner R-65, 1800 hrs., duals ....$119,500 ‘03 Gleaner R-65, 1200 hrs.................$119,500 ‘81 Gleaner N6 w/20’ Cummins, 3200 hrs. ..............................................$7,950 ‘81 Gleaner N5 ........................................$5,950 ‘81 Gleaner N5 w/20’ ..............................$5,950 ‘80 Gleaner N5 ........................................$4,950 ‘79 Gleaner M2 HY, 18’, A430 ........Pkg. $8,950 ‘83 Gleaner L3 hydro, duals, 3200 hrs. ..$7,950 MF 8570, 9320 flex, 1163 ....................$29,500

‘03 Gleaner 3000, 12R30 cornhead ......$39,500 ‘08 Gleaner 3000, 8R30 ........................$39,500 ‘05 Gleaner 3000, 8RW ........................$26,500 ‘09 Chal or Gleaner 30’ flex w/air reel ..$29,900 (5) Gleaner 8R30 huggers ......$11,900-$39,900 (6) Gleaner 6R30 huggers ........$9,950-$15,900 ‘93 Gleaner 8R36 hugger ......................$11,900 ‘90 Gleaner, 4R36 hugger........................$4,950 ‘80 Gleaner LM538A cornhead ..................$995 ‘03 MF 3000, 6R36 cornhead................$17,950 ‘84 F series 315 flex ................................$2,495 (15) Used Flexheads ....................................Call

If you’re having a Farm Auction, let other Farmers know it! Upcoming Issues of THE LAND

Southern MNNorthern IA November 22 December 13 December 27 January 10 January 24 February 7

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT White 8500, 36R20, CFS ....................$109,500 White 8122, 12R30, VF, LF....................$29,500 White 8122 VF, 3 bu., row cleaners ......$29,500 ‘10 White 8202, 12R30, 2 bu. ..............$44,500 White 6700, 20R22 ..............................$17,900 White 6100, 12R30, VF ........................$14,900 White 6100, 8R36 w/splitter....................$8,950 ‘94 White 6100, 12R30 VF, LF ..............$12,900 ‘87 White 5100, 12R30 VF ......................$3,950 JD 7200 12R30, LF ..............................$12,900 Wilrich Quad X, 55’ ..............................$34,500 White 227, 31’ field cult. ........................$3,950 CIH 4800, 32’ ..........................................$9,950 Case IH 4300, 42’ field cult., 3 bar........$14,900 ‘05 Krause 7300, 27’ rock flex disc ......$26,900 Sunflower 4511, 15’ disc chisel ............$34,900 ‘07 Wilrich V957 SX30 ..........................$19,900 Wilrich V957, 7x30................................$24,900 Wilrich V957, 7x30................................$34,900 ‘05 Wilrich V957, 7x30..........................$17,900 Wilrich V957, 5x30................................$14,950 ‘06 Wilrich V957, 5x30..........................$19,900 ‘04 Wilrich 5810, 20’ chisel plow ..........$17,900 ‘04 Sunflower 1444, 40’ disc ................$44,500 ‘09 Wishek 862NT, 22’ disc ..................$49,500 M&W 1865, 9x24 Earthmaster................$9,950 ‘02 CIH 730B ........................................$19,900 White 271, 21’ disc ................................$5,950 White 271, 23’ disc, Needs Repair ..........$1,975

NI 6365 (Hesston 856A), 5x6 baler ........$9,950 ‘05 Hesston 740, 4x4 baler ....................$9,950 Hesston 5800, 5x6 baler ........................$2,950 Hesston 4760 baler w/accumulator ......$49,500 ‘13 Sitrex 9 wheel rake, Demo ................$4,750 Artsway 240, 20’ shredder ......................$3,950 ‘11 MF 1328 disc mower ........................$7,650 ‘08 Agco Hesston 3008 disc mower ......$6,750 ‘02 Parker 737 grain cart, duals ............$17,500 ‘02 Parker 737 grain cart ......................$16,900 Unverferth GC5000 grain cart ..............$11,900 Killbros 490 grain cart ............................$8,950 Parker 5500 wagon ................................$7,450 Killbros 1200 grain cart, 700 bu. ............$5,950 Parker 510 grain cart ..............................$9,950 ‘11 Parker 1048 grain cart, tarp, scale ..$39,500 Feterl 10x60 HF w/hopper ......................$2,950 ‘04 Feterl 10x62 GSW auger ..................$5,450 ‘11 Peck 12x43, PTO ..............................$4,950 Farm King 10” DOH, hyd. drive, NEW ..$10,900 Feterl 8x46 PTO auger ............................$2,950 Feterl 8x60 PTO auger ............................$1,995 White 588, 4x18 ......................................$2,495 Brandt 500 EX grain vac. ......................$12,900 Schweiss 6’ snowblower, 2 auger ..........$1,995 Loftness 8’ snowblower, single auger ....$2,995 ‘10 Farm King Y840, 84” snowblower ....$2,950 Davis loader for 8N Ford ............................$895

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

JUST IN ‘90 Gleaner R-50, 2400 eng. hrs. ..........$14,900 Crustbuster 3400, 15’ no-till drill ............$8,950 Sunflower 1830, 22’ disc, New Demo ..$69,500 ‘05 Challenger MT255B hydro, FWA ......$9,950 Dry Fert. for 5100, 12R30 ..........................$995 ‘06 Hesston 1006 disc mower ................$5,950 ‘92 Ford 846, 4WD, 4300 hrs. ..............$34,500 ‘05 Gleaner 3000, 6R30 ........................$26,900 Sunflower 4511-15, 10’ ........................$39,900 ‘06 JD 265 disc mower ..........................$4,950

‘08 Hesston 3008 disc mower ................$6,750 ‘04 Bush Hog HM2407 disc mower ........$4,950 ‘96 Agco Allis 9655, 2WD, 6100 hrs. ....$39,500 Tebben TR45 roller, New Demo ............$33,500 White 6322, 12R30 ..............................$23,900 (12) Martin row cleaners......................Ea. $175 Westendorf CC360 off RT155A ..............$7,950 Miller 12 loader off AC175 ......................$3,450 M&W 1475 Earthmaster, 5x30 ................$7,950

Midway Farm Equipment

Northern MN November 29 December 6 December 20 January 3 January 17 January 31 February 14

PO Box 3169 Mankato, MN 56002 Phone: 507-345-4523 or 800-657-4665 Fax: 507-345-1027

Ask Your Auctioneer to Place Your Auction in The Land!

USED PARTS LARSON SALVAGE Good selection of tractor parts - New & Used All kinds of hay equipment, haybines, balers, choppers parted out. New combine belts for all makes. Swather canvases, round baler belting, used & new tires.

Website: www.TheLandOnline.com e-mail: theland@TheLandOnline.com

6 miles East of

CAMBRIDGE, MN 763-689-1179

LOCAL TRADES TRACTORS

‘92 CIH 5240, 2WD, PS - $26,500 CIH 5250, 2WD, cab w/loader - $32,500 New Farmall 31, MFD w/60” ‘11 CIH 550 Quad - $273,500

We Ship Daily

Visa and MasterCard Accepted

‘11 CIH 870, 9-shk. w/reel - Call CIH 2500, 7-shk. ripper w/leveler - $9,500 CIH 530C w/leads - Call

COMBINES

‘90 1680, duals, - $28,500 ‘93 1666 - $32,500 PLANTERS ‘03 CIH 2388, duals, 2000 & TILLAGE ‘08 1200, 16-30 pivot, bulk fill, eng. hrs. - Call ‘99 CIH 2388, 2800 hrs 2500 acres - $79,500 ‘96 CIH 2166, 35Lx32 tires ‘07 CIH 1200, 12-30 pivot - Call planter w/bulk fill & insecti‘06 CIH 1020, 30’ - $16,500 cide - $58,500 ‘99 DMI, 32’, 3 bar - $16,500 ‘03 CIH 1020, 30’ - $14,000 ‘06 JD 1760, 12-30 - $41,500 ‘98 CIH 1020, 25’ - $7,950 ‘03 CIH Tigermate II 40’, 4 bar ‘92 CIH 1083, 8-30 - $6,500 ‘08 CIH 2608, 8-30 - Call - $34,500 JD 2200, 33.5’, 3 bar - $28,500 ‘05 CIH 2208, 8-30 - $28,500

RABE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

1205 Bixby Road (across from fairgrounds), Fairmont, MN 507-235-3358 or 800-813-8300 • Get the Rabe Advantage

507-427-3414 or 800-657-3249 www.midwayfarmequip.com For Sales ask for Jerry or Kyle midway@rconnect.com

Case IH and CNH Capital are registered trademarks of CNH America LLC

050

HAY FOR SALE, large squares and round bales for sale. (218)391-3031

Deadlines are 1 week prior to publication with Holiday deadlines 1 day earlier ** Indicates Early Deadline

COMBINE HARVEST SALE - Prices Reduced & 60 mo. 0%

Was NOW ‘08 Gleaner R-65....................................................................................$189,500 ........$179,500 ‘05 Gleaner R-65....................................................................................$139,500 ........$129,500 ‘04 NH CR970, 1000 hrs. ......................................................................$149,500 ........$129,500 ‘03 Gleaner R-75’s, 1100 hrs. ................................................................$139,500 ........$129,500 ‘02 Gleaner R72, duals, 1100 hrs. ........................................................$129,500 ........$109,500

Feed Seed Hay

Visit our Web Site at http://www.caseih.com

Horse hay, small squares, grass, no rain. (715)9463460 WANTED AND FOR SALE ALL TYPES of hay & straw. Also buying corn, wheat & oats. Western Hay available. Fox Valley Alfalfa Mill. 920-853-3554 Livestock

054

FOR SALE: Purebred Black Angus bulls, calf ease & good disposition; also York, Hamp & Hamp-Duroc boars & gilts. 320-598-3790 Dairy

055

10 Jersey Springing heifers, 10 Jersey Crossbred Springing heifers, will trade for feed or cattle, beef steers or cows. (608)792-4223 or (608)788-6258. FOR SALE: Reg. Holstein cows & milking heifers, starting at $1,500 & up. 715234-8978 or 715-651-4515 Call anytime WANTED TO BUY! USED BULK MILK COOLER ALL SIZES 920-867-3048 WANTED TO BUY: Dairy heifers and cows. 320-2352664 Cattle

056

18 mo old registered Black Angus bull, gentle. Delivered within 50 miles. $1,100. (715)637-3280 BEEF CATTLE WANTED: Strong demand for for beef calves, yearlings, bred cows & pairs. 218-391-3031 FOR SALE OR LEASE REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS Bulls, 2 year old & yearlings; bred heifers, calving ease, club calves & balance performance. Al sired. In herd improvement program. J.W. Riverview Angus Farm Glencoe, MN 55336 Conklin Dealer 320864-4625


Cattle

056

17 B

FOR SALE: 2 1/2 yr. old reg. Angus bull from Pinehill Angus herd, $2,000. Fall Creek area. (715)577-5926 FOR SALE: 25-45 Angus bred cows, 30 Angus & cross black calves, 3 registered Angus bulls, 4 bred Angus heifers. 507-334-6334 Faribault MN

YOUR HARVEST HEADQUARTERS (B) Belle Plaine, MN • 1051 Old Hwy. 169 Blvd.

(952) 873-2224

FOR SALE: Angus heifers, some halter broke. Registered Angus, Simmental & Shorthorn cows - pregnancy checked for Spring/Summer calves. 715-271-5012

(H) Hollandale, MN • W. Hwy. 251

(507) 889-4221

(O) Owatonna, MN • 3555 SW 18th St.

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

FOR SALE: 1 Reg. Yearling polled Hereford bull & 1 Reg. Hereford heifer, show quality. 320-796-0000

(507) 451-4054

FOR SALE: Dexter Cows (2), Heifers (3), Steer Calves (3), females are Reg. w/ ADCA. Hayward, (715) 634-8303 Registered Texas Longhorn breeding stock, cows, heifers or roping stock, top blood lines. 507-235-3467 WANT TO BUY: Butcher cows, bulls, fats & walkable cripples; also horses, sheep & goats. 320-235-2664 WANTED: Shorthorn Bull, yearling or younger would be OK. (715)634-8303 057

All types of horses, ponies & mules wanted. (218) 3913031 Sheep

060

FOR SALE: (2) Hampshire ram lambs. 320-859-4180 or 320-766-0197 FOR SALE: (6) Katahdin ewe lambs, born April 1st, $150/ea. Call 218-770-1534 FOR SALE: East Friesian Ewes exposed to Ram, to Lamb in Feb. (715)457-2019 Luther Show Lambs Flock Reduction Sale. Selling 15 mature ewes that have previous produced County Fair Champions & Class Winners throughout the Midwest. 701-212-8385 Swine

065

Pets & Supplies

070

FOR SALE: Heeler pups out of good working stock, $50 ea. Clemens Borntreger W16650 Schermerhorn Rd Hixton, WI 54635

4WD TRACTORS

(O)’12 JD 9560R, 360 hrs., IF tires ............................$319,900 (O)’13 JD 9560R, 500 hrs., Lease Return ................$314,900 (O)’13 JD 9560R, 500 hrs., Lease Return ................$314,900 (O)’12 JD 9650R, 400 hrs., Lease Return ................$312,500 (H)’12 JD 9510R, 306 hrs., Lease Return..................$289,900 (O)’13 JD 9510R, 450 hrs, Lease Return ..................$284,500 (O)’13 JD 9460R, 300 hrs., Lease Return ................$279,900 (O)’13 JD 9410R, 300 hrs., Lease Return ................$274,900 (B)’11 JD 9430, 474 hrs., 710/42’s ............................$267,900 (O)’13 JD 9410R, 300 hrs., Lease Return ................$264,900 (O)’06 JD 9420, 1765 hrs., PS ..................................$184,900 (B)’02 JD 9520, 2910 hrs., 710/70R42’s ....................$174,900 (H)’97 JD 9400, 5755 hrs., 650/42’s ............................$99,900 (H)’90 CIH 9170, 4418 hrs., PS ..................................$54,500 (H)’81 JD 8640, 6441 hrs., 3 pt, PTO ..........................$24,900

TRACK TRACTORS

(O)’11 JD 9630T, 644 hrs., Extended Warranty ........$309,900 (O)’10 JD 9630T, 1650 hrs. ........................................$287,500 (H)’09 JD 9630T, 1110 hrs. ........................................$279,900 (B)’12 JD 8335RT, 848 hrs., IVT, 18” tracks ..............$269,900 (O)’12 JD 8310T, 166 hrs., PS,25” tracks ..................$257,900 (B)’10 JD 9630T, 1995 hrs. ........................................$249,900 (H)’10 JD 8345RT, 1440 hrs., IVT, 18” tracks ............$234,900 (B)’03 JD 8420T, 3430 hrs., 16” tracks ......................$105,900 (H)’00 JD 9300T, 4375 hrs., 30” tracks ......................$105,000

ROW CROP TRACTORS

(O)’13 JD 8335R, 300 hrs., IVT, Lease Return ..........$259,900 (B)’13 JD 8310R, 300 hrs., IVT, Lease Return ..........$249,900 (O)’13 JD 8310R, 321 hrs., IVT, Lease Return ..........$244,900 (O)’13 JD 8285R, 300 hrs., PS, Lease Return ..........$219,900 (H)’09 JD 8530, 850 hrs., IVT, ILS ............................$210,000 (O)’13 JD 8285R, 300 hrs., PS, Lease Return ..........$204,900 (H)’10 JD 8295R, 1430 hrs., IVT................................$203,900 (O)’11 JD 8260R, 484 hrs., Extended Warranty ........$194,900 (B)’13 JD 7230R, 259 hrs., IVT..................................$179,900 (O)’09 JD 8330, 1730 hrs., PS, 540/1000 PTO ........$172,900 (H)’06 JD 8230, 3291 hrs., MFWD, PS......................$139,900 (B)’13 JD 6150R, 459 hrs., IVT..................................$131,900 (B)’13 JD 6150R, 450 hrs., IVT..................................$131,900 (O)’13 JD 6150R, 477 hrs., Auto Quad ......................$125,900 (H)’95 JD 8200, 2533 hrs., MFWD ............................$102,900 (O)’01 JD 8210, 3750 hrs., MFWD ..............................$98,900 (B)’95 JD 8200, 7335 hrs., MFWD ..............................$74,900 (B)’90 CIH 7140, 6700 hrs., 2WD, PS ........................$37,900 (H)’77 JD 4630, PS, 158 loader ..................................$26,500 (H)’79 JD 4240, 7423 hrs., PS ....................................$25,500 (B)’78 JD 4240, 9114 hrs., PS ....................................$24,900 (B)’76 JD 4630, 8105 hrs., Quad ................................$16,900 (O)’74 JD 4030, open station ......................................$12,900 (B)’65 JD 4020, loader..................................................$11,000

UTILITY TRACTORS

(O)’96 White 6105, 5480 hrs., MFWD, cab..................$24,900

(H)’86 JD 2950, 5852 hrs., 148 loader ........................$23,900 SPRAYERS (H)’62 JD 3010, NF ........................................................$5,250 (O)’12 JD 4940, 489 hrs., 120’ boom ........................$292,750 (B)Oliver 1650D, 6507 hrs. ............................................$4,900 (O)’12 JD 4940, 467 hrs., dry box..............................$290,500 (B)’41 JD “B” ..................................................................$2,995 (O)’12 JD 4940, 750 hrs., 120’ boom ........................$281,500 (O)’13 JD 4830, 404 hrs., 1000 gal. SS, 120’ boom ..$269,700 COMBINES (O)’12 JD S680, 511 hrs., Extended Warranty ..........$345,000 (O)’11 JD 4930, 1343 hrs., 120’ boom ......................$249,750 (O)’12 JD S670, 225 sep. hrs., PRWD ......................$319,900 (O)’11 JD 4930, 1216 hrs., 120’ boom ......................$245,900 (B)’11 JD 9870, 511 sep. hrs., PRWD........................$309,900 (O)’12 JD 4730, 800 gal., 90’ boom ..........................$209,900 (O)’11 JD 9870, 700 sep. hrs., PRWD ......................$294,900 (O)’12 JD 4730, 520 hrs., 90’ boom ..........................$209,700 (O)’12 JD S670, 263 sep. hrs., duals ........................$289,900 (O)’12 JD 4730, 626 hrs., 90’ boom ..........................$209,600 (H)’11 JD 9870, 508 sep. hrs., duals..........................$284,500 (O)’12 JD 4730, 490 hrs., 90’ boom ..........................$209,600 (O)’12 JD S660, 325 sep. hrs., duals ........................$279,900 (O)’10 JD 4830, 934 hrs., 90’ boom ..........................$203,500 (B)’11 JD 9770, 511 sep. hrs., duals ..........................$256,500 (O)’07 JD 4930, 3093 hrs., dry box............................$200,000 (B)’10 JD 9870, 1067 sep. hrs., PRWD ....................$244,900 (O)’09 JD 4830, 2400 hrs., 100’ boom ......................$185,000 (O)’08 JD 9870, 1068 sep. hrs., PRWD ....................$210,900 (O)’13 JD 4630, 39 hrs., 80’ boom ............................$177,900 (H)’07 JD 9570, 888 hrs., duals ................................$208,900 (O)’09 JD 4830, 2400 hrs., 90’ boom ........................$160,000 (O)’09 JD 9770, 1041 sep. hrs., duals ......................$204,900 (O)’09 Miller Nav1000M, 2787 hrs., 90’boom ............$133,100 (H)’09 JD 9570, 700 sep. hrs., duals ........................$197,000 (O)’05 JD 4720, 1800 hrs., 90’ boom ........................$129,900 (B)’08 JD 9770, 1100 sep. hrs., duals ........................$179,900 (B)’05 JD 4720, 3794 hrs., 80’ boom ........................$124,900 (B)’07 JD 9660, 1131 sep. hrs., PRWD ....................$169,900 (O)’10 Apache AS715, 1200 hrs., 90’ boom ..............$109,900 (H)’06 JD 9560, 667 sep. hrs., duals ........................$163,500 (O)’01 JD 4710, 2400 hrs., 90’ boom ........................$109,900 (O)’06 JD 9760, 1363 sep. hrs., duals ......................$162,900 (O)’05 Miller Nitro 2200HT, 1200 hrs., 90’ boom..........$89,500 (O)’05 JD 9660STS, 1442 sep. hrs., duals ................$159,900 (O)’95 Tyler WT, 4617 hrs., 75’ boom ..........................$36,900 (O)’04 JD 9760, 1192 hrs. PRWD ..............................$159,900 (O)’94 Tyler Patriot, 3831 hrs., 80’ boom ....................$29,900 (B)’06 JD 9760, 1726 sep. hrs., duals, PRWD ..........$154,900 (O)’01 CIH SPX4260, 3416 hrs., 90’ boom ..................$82,500 (O)’05 JD 9660, 1442 sep. hrs., duals ......................$151,900 FALL TILLAGE (B)’06 JD 9560, 1067 sep. hrs., walker......................$142,500 (B)’12 JD 3710, 10-bottom ..........................................$57,900 (H)’03 JD 9650STS, 1740 sep. hrs., duals ................$114,900 (O)’12 JD 512, 9-shank ................................................$54,000 (H)’92 JD 9500, 2812 hrs. ............................................$49,900 (O)’05 JD 2410, 44’, 16” spacing ................................$36,500 (B)’90 JD 9500, 1587 sep. hrs. ....................................$39,900 (B)’10 JD 2700, 9-shank, 24” ......................................$33,900 (B)’82 JD 6620SH, 3231 hrs., side hill ........................$20,900 (H)’01 JD 2700, 7-shank, 24” spacing ........................$28,500 (O)NEW Mudhog PRWD for 70 Series Combines ......$16,900 (H)’10 JD 512, 5-shank ................................................$27,500 (B)’82 JD 7720, 4600 hrs., PRWD ..............................$14,900 (O)’97 JD 3710, 8-bottom ............................................$24,900 (B)’82 JD 8820, 5571 hrs., duals ................................$13,900 (B)’04 JD 512, 5-shank ................................................$20,900 (B)’80 JD 7720, 5000 hrs. ............................................$12,900 (B)’05 Wilrich 957, 7-shank ..........................................$19,900 (O)’79 JD 6620SH, 3137 hrs, sidehill ..........................$13,500 (B)’97 JD 510, 5-shank ................................................$13,500 (O)’79 JD 7720, 4500 hrs...............................................$8,900 (O)’96 JD 510, 7-shank ................................................$13,400 (O)’79 JD 7720, 4158 hrs.............................................$10,500 (O)’95 DMI 730, 7-shank..............................................$10,500 (O)’79 JD 7720 ..............................................................$8,900 (B)JD 235, 22’ disk ........................................................$9,200 (O)’76 JD 6600, diesel ..................................................$4,500 (O)White 435, 12’ mulch tiller ........................................$7,500 (H)DMI Tiger II, 5-shank ................................................$6,500 CORNHEADS (O)’11 JD 612C, 12R30”, chopping ..............................$90,000 PLANTERS-SEEDERS (B)’10 Geringhoff RD1820, 18R20” ..............................$84,900 (O)’05 JD 1790, 24 row 20” CCS, liq fert ....................$86,900 (B)’09 JD 612C, 12R22”, chopping ..............................$82,900 (H)’04 JD 1770NT, 16 row 30”, 3 bushel......................$79,900 (O)’11 JD 608C, 8R30”, chopping ................................$69,000 (H)’13 JD 1760, 12 row 30”, liq fert..............................$62,500 (O)’10 Geringhoff 830B, 8R30” ....................................$62,900 (O)’03 JD 1760, 12 row 30”, liq fert..............................$49,500 (O)’10 JD 608C, 8R30”, chopping................................$61,900 (O)’97 JD 1760, 12 row 30”, liq fert..............................$46,500 (B)’07 JD 612, 12R30”, chopping ................................$59,900 (B)’01 JD 1780, 24 row 20”, 3 bushel ..........................$45,900 (H)’09 JD 608C, 8R30”, chopping ................................$58,900 (B)’01 JD 1780, 24 row 20”, 3 bushel ..........................$45,900 (B)’08 JD 606C, 6R30”, chopping ................................$49,900 (H)’98 JD 1850, 30’ 10” spacing ..................................$36,500 (B)Geringhoff RD630, 6R30”........................................$42,500 (B)’04 JD 1750, 8 row 30”, dry fert ..............................$36,500 (H)’03 JD 893, 8R30”, hyd. deck..................................$24,900 (B)’01 JD 455, 35’, 10” spacing....................................$25,900 (H)’95 JD 693, knife, hyd. deck plates ........................$17,900 (O)JD 7200, 8 row 30”..................................................$11,500

Your Southern Minnesota & Western Wisconsin John Deere Commercial Sprayer Center

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Compart's total program features superior boars & open gilts documented by BLUP technology. Duroc, York, Landrace & F1 lines. Terminal boars offer leanness, muscle, growth. Maternal gilts & boars are productive, lean, durable. All are stress free & PRRS free. Semen also available through Elite Genes A.I. Make 'em Grow! Comparts Boar Store, INC. Toll Free: 877-441-2627 FOR SALE: Yorkshire, Hampshire, Duroc & Hamp/Duroc boars. Also, Hamp/York/Duroc cross gilts. Tough & durable pigs raised in outside lots. Exc herd health. No PRSS. Delivery avail. 320-568-2225

‘12 JD 8310RT, 200 hrs., ‘06 JD 9760, 1375 sep. hrs., ‘12 JD 4940, 534 hrs., 120’ SF1 Activation ............$257,900 Yield & Mapping ..........$162,900 Boom ..........................$292,750

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Horse

‘11 JD 9430, 500 hrs., PS .......... ....................................$267,900


THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

18 B

Pets & Supplies

~ NEW EQUIPMENT/BIG INVENTORY ~

Notch Equipment: • Rock Buckets • Grapple Forks • Manure Forks • Bale Spears • Hi-Volume Buckets & Pallet Forks • Bale Transports & Feeder Wagons, 16’-34’ • Adult & Young Stock Feeders & Bale Feeders • Land Levelers Smidley Equipment: • Steer Stuffers • Hog Feeders • Hog Huts • Calf Creep Feeders • Lamb & Sheep Feeders • Cattle & Hog Waterers • Mini Scale Sioux Equipment: • Gates • Calving Pens • Haymax Bale Feeders • Cattle Panels • Feeders Panels • Head Gates • Hog Feeders • Squeeze Chutes & Tubs • Port-A-Hut Shelters (Many Sizes) • Bergman Cattle Feeders – Special Prices • Lorenz Snowblowers • GT (Tox-O-Wic) Grain Dryers, 350-800 bu. • Sheep & Calf Feeders • Livestock Equipment by Vern’s Mfg. • Mister Squeeze Cattle Chutes & Hd. Gates • Peck Grain Augers – Big Discounts • MDS Buckets for Loaders & Skidloaders • Powder River Livestock & Horse Equipment • Tire Scrapers for Skidsteers, 6’-9’ • Hay feeders for horned animals • Jari Sickle Mowers • Grasshopper Lawn Mowers – Special Price Now!

• MDS Roto King Round Bale Processor • Good Stock of parts for GT Tox-O-Wic Grain Dryers, Also, Some Used Parts • Sitrex Wheel Rakes • Walco 3 pt. Mowers • Bale Baskets • SI Feeders & Bunks • (Hayhopper) Bale Feeders • JBM Bunks w/headlocks • E-Z Trail Wagons, Boxes & Grain Carts • Calftel Hutches & Animal Barns • R&C Poly Bale Feeders • JBM hay & grain feeders & bunks • Corral Panels & Horse Stalls • EZ-Trail Head Movers & Bale Racks • Roda Mini-Spreaders • Amish Built Oak Bunk Feeders & Bale Racks • JBM Bale Trailers • Goat & Sheep Feeders • Mist Sprayers, gas or PTO • NEW ITEM! * 3 Pt. Fence Mowers* • Fainting goats & min. donkeys

DR® POWER EQUIPMENT • Field & Brush Mowers • Roto-Hog Power Tillers • Stump Grinders • Log Splitters • Chippers • Power Graders • Power Wagons • Leaf & Lawn Vacuums • Versa-trailers

~ USED EQUIPMENT ~

• #7190 Gehl 2 whl bunk feeder wagon, VG • #570 GT Dryer – (Tox-o-wic) • #380 GT PTO Grain Dryer – (Tox-o-wik) • 72” PTO Woods snowblower • Skidsteer snowblower • IHC #80 Snowblower, VG • Brady #5600 15’ Stalk Chopper or Windrower • Smidley Cattle & Hog Feeders

• Tebben V-Ripper, 5- or 7-shank, pull-type • 9 shank disk chisel • Grasshopper 620, 0-turn mwr, 48”, 143 Hrs, VG

Wanted to Buy:

• Good Smaller Manure Spreaders • Cattle & Calf Feeders, Hog Feeders • Cattle Handling Equipment

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

FARM, HOME & CONSTRUCTION

Office Location - 305 Adams Street Hutchinson, MN 55350

320-587-2162, Ask for Larry

REMINDER EARLY DEADLINE for CLASSIFIED LINE ADS

Due to the Thanksgiving holiday, our ‘deadline’ for the November 29th issue is Thursday, November 21st at Noon

070

Miscellaneous

090

FOR SALE: Purebred BorOne call does it all! der Collie puppies, have With one phone call, you can both working parents. (715) place your classified ad in 455-1334 The Land, Farm News, AND The Country Today. Call The Land for more Livestock Equip 075 info @ 507-345-4523 • 800-6574665. WANTED: Sowjoy farrowing pens. 507-456-7746 PARMA DRAINAGE PUMPS New pumps & parts on hand. Call MinTrucks & Trailers 084 nesota's largest distributor HJ Olson & Company 320'07 Freightliner 33,000 GVW, 974-8990 Cell – 320-212-5336 300,000 miles, PTO, no box, 250 hp, $15,000 OBO. 507RANGER PUMP CO. 340-9683 or 507-239-2323 Custom Manufacturer of Water Lift Pumps FOR SALE: '84 Ford 9000 for field drainage tri-axle grain truck, 855 Sales & Service Cummins, 7spd trans, 20' 507-984-2025 or 406-314-0334 box, 300 bu pull behind pup www.rangerpumpco.com trailer. $21,000. Call 763-286WANT MORE READERS 9442 TO SEE YOUR AD?? FOR SALE: '95 Ford L9000, Expand your coverage area! M14 Cummins, 317K miles, The Land has teamed up 10spd, steerable 3rd axle, all with Farm News, and The virgin rubber, 21' Country Today so you can Beet/Grain loadline box. do just that! Place a classi320-212-4462 fied ad in The Land and have the option of placing it in these papers as well. Miscellaneous 090 More readers = better results! Call The Land for FOR SALE: Steel Posts, more information. 507-345$2.00 each. 507-340-6934 4523 • 800-657-4665 Hopper bottom feed tanks & Winpower Sales & Service augers; Patz silo unloader, Reliable Power Solutions bunk feeder, elevator, clean Since 1925 PTO & automatchute funnel, silage blower ic Emergency Electric & pipes. JD 3010 hood & Generators. New & Used other tractor parts. 507Rich Opsata-Distributor 323-5211 or 507-334-6670 800-343-9376


19 B

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”


SE ‘03 REDBALL 665, 1000 GAL. ........................$13,500 TRACTORS-4WD BL ‘96 JD 8870, 4154 ENG. HRS. ........................$79,000 COMBINES BL ‘04 JD 9520, 3033 ENG. HRS. ......................$164,900 BL ‘01 CIH 2388, 3232 ENG./2046 SEP. HRS. ....$119,750 SE ‘08 CIH 535 QUAD TRAC, 2145 ENG. HRS.....$268,500 BL ‘81 IHC 1440, 3881 ENG. HRS. ........................$7,500 BL ‘09 CIH 7120, 1245 ENG./960 SEP. HRS. ......$249,900 TRACTORS BL ‘88 CIH 7120, 11,000 ENG. HRS. ....................$35,500 BL ‘97 CIH 2166, 2540 ENG./2076 SEP. HRS. ......$74,900 BL CIH 255, 1975 ENG. HRS. ................................$4,450 BL ‘98 CIH 2366, 2932 ENG./2240 SEP. HRS. ......$88,900 BL ‘89 CIH 7110, 4274 ENG. HRS. ......................$43,500 BL ‘99 CIH 2388, 2520 ENG. HRS. ......................$98,500 BL ‘10 CHALLENGER MT763C, 2706 ENG. HRS. $189,900 BL ‘78 IHC 1460, 5058 ENG. HRS. ........................$7,500 BL ‘95 CHALLENGER 75C, 5522 ENG. HRS. ........$62,750 BL ‘86 CIH 1660, 3583 ENG. HRS. ......................$28,750 BL ‘71 IHC 966 ....................................................$13,000 BL ‘95 CIH 2166, 3530 ENG./2250 SEP. HRS. ......$64,900 BL ‘13 CIH MAGNUM 260, 333.8 ENG. HRS. ......$210,000 BL ‘01 CIH 2388, 3300 ENG./2500 SEP. HRS. ......$94,500 SE ‘86 CIH 3394, 5991 ENG. HRS. ......................$28,750 BL ‘82 CIH 1460, 5185 ENG. HRS. ........................$8,950 SE ‘04 CIH MX230, 3258 ENG. HRS. ....................$92,000 BL ‘09 CIH 7088, 827 ENG./619 SEP. HRS. ........$239,875 SE ‘48 AG C ..........................................................$2,450 SE ‘04 CIH 8010, 2060 ENG./1564 SEP. HRS. ....$176,500 SE ‘13 CIH MAGNUM 290, 175 ENG. HRS. ........$219,950 SE ‘90 GLEANER R60, 3374 ENG. HRS. ..............$21,500 SL ‘87 CIH 2594, 4440 ENG. HRS. ......................$21,500 SE ‘07 CIH 2577, 1450 ENG./1056 SEP. HRS. ....$169,500 SL ‘80 IHC 986, 8745 ENG. HRS. ........................$14,500 SE ‘01 CIH 2388, 2733 ENG./2117 SEP. HRS. ....$118,850 SL ‘91 CIH 7120, 8527 ENG. HRS. ......................$41,500 SE ‘94 CIH 1666, 4303 ENG. HRS. ......................$36,500 SL ‘09 CIH MAGNUM, 2200 ENG. HRS. ..............$169,500 SE ‘00 CIH 2366, 3404 ENG./2534 SEP. HRS. ......$91,500 SL ‘65 IHC 706, 4963 ENG. HRS. ..........................$6,500 SE ‘03 CIH 2366, 2516 ENG./1835 SEP. HRS. ....$102,500 SE ‘04 CIH 8010, 2060 ENG./1564 SEP. HRS. ....$176,500 DEEP TILLAGE SL ‘03 CIH 2388, 2375 ENG./1861 SEP. HRS. ....$124,500 BL ‘10 CIH ECOLO-TIGER 870-9S ........................$54,500 SL ‘05 CIH 2388, 2030 ENG./1583 SEP. HRS. ....$142,500 BL ‘10 CIH ECOLO-TIGER 870-11S ......................$68,500 SL ‘88 CIH 1660, 3758 ENG. HRS. ......................$15,500 BL ‘96 DMI 730....................................................$12,900 GRAIN AUGERS BL ‘00 CIH 730B ..................................................$19,950 BL ‘08 CIH ECOLO-TIGER 9300............................$44,950 BL FK 1070............................................................$6,950 BL ‘02 WESTFIELD MK 13X71 FT GLP ..................$7,950 BL WILRICH 6600 ..................................................$7,850 BL ‘98 DMI 730B ................................................$17,900 BL ‘99 WESTFIELD MK 13X91 GLP ........................$8,950 BL DMI 530B ......................................................$15,950 BL ‘06 WESTFIELD MK 13X71 GLP ......................$10,500 BL ‘02 CIH 730B ..................................................$19,850 BL ‘94 FETERL 10X66............................................$2,950 BL ‘97 DMI 730B ................................................$16,750 BL ‘90 SUDENGA 450 ............................................$3,950 BL ‘05 WILRICH 357 ..............................................$6,500 BL ‘05 WESTFIELD MK 10X71 GLP ........................$5,965 BL ‘99 CIH 730B ..................................................$19,900 SE ‘90 FETERL 1044R............................................$1,950 SE ‘09 CIH ECOLO TIGER 870-11S ......................$66,850 BL ‘87 ALLOWAY FIELD MASTER 8X61 ..................$2,150 SE ‘00 CIH 9300 ..................................................$33,750 BL ‘09 PECK 1002 ................................................$5,775 SE ‘06 CIH 730C ..................................................$35,500 BL FETERL 12X55..................................................$5,750 SE ‘97 DMI 730B ................................................$17,500 SE ‘95 FETERL 10X60............................................$3,350 SE ‘97 DMI 730B ................................................$17,500 SE SUDENGA 8X60 ................................................$1,650 SE ‘05 JD 2700, 9 SHANK, 24” SPACING ............$23,500 SE WESTFIELD TR100-71 ........................................$795 SE ‘03 JD 2700, 9 SHANK, 24” SPACING ............$21,500 GRAIN CARTS & GRAVITY BOXES SE ‘00 CIH 730B ..................................................$19,950 BL ‘90 KINZE 640 GRAIN CART ..........................$12,900 SE ‘08 JD 2700, 9 SHANK, 24” SPACING ............$29,900 SE DMI D390 GRAVITY BOX ..................................$1,950 SE ‘08 CIH ECOLO TIGER 730C ............................$35,500 SE ‘05 DEMCO 650 GRAVITY BOX ......................$12,500 SE ‘09 JD 2700, 9 SHANK, 24” SPACING ............$29,900 SE ‘98 KILBROS 655 GRAVITY BOX ....................$11,900 SL ‘89 CIH 14 ........................................................$5,500 SE ‘98 KILBROS 655 GRAVITY BOX ....................$11,900 SL ‘02 CIH 730B ..................................................$19,500 SE ‘98 KILBROS 655 GRAVITY BOX ....................$11,900 SL ‘05 CIH 730B ..................................................$26,900 SE ‘98 KILBROS 655 GRAVITY BOX ....................$11,900 SL ‘07 CIH 730C ..................................................$35,500 SE ‘98 KILBROS 655 GRAVITY BOX ....................$11,900 SL ‘07 CIH 730C ..................................................$32,900 SE PARKER 2600 GRAVITY BOX ............................$4,650

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

20 B

SE = Sleepy Eye BL = Bingham Lake SL = Slayton

(507) 794-2131 • (507) 831-1106 • (507) 836-8571

www.millersellner.com

PLOWS, RIPPERS & DISKS

BL BL BL SE BL SE SE BL

‘09 JD 3710 PLOW ........................................$42,350 SALFORD 4510 ..............................................$19,950 ‘10 JD 512-9S30 DISK RIPPER ......................$45,000 ‘09 JD 512-7S30 DISK RIPPER ......................$25,500 ‘05 SALFORD 1434 DISK TANDEM..................$33,775 ‘04 CIH MRX690-7 DISK RIPPER ....................$22,500 IHC 490 DISK TANDEM ....................................$5,950 ‘07 WISHEK 862NT ........................................$49,875

BL BL BL BL SE SE SE SE SE SE SL SL SL

‘09 JD 2210-46.5’ ..........................................$47,000 WILRICH QUAD-X-44.5’ ..................................$29,950 ‘93 CIH 4800-29.5’ ..........................................$8,950 CIH 4600 ..........................................................$3,775 ‘98 DMI TIGERMATE II-50.5’ ..........................$25,750 ‘08 JD 2210-45.5’ ..........................................$41,500 ‘00 TIGERMATE II-48.5’ ..................................$34,500 ‘92 JD 960-38.5’ ............................................$10,850 ‘08 CIH TM200-60’ ........................................$63,500 JD 2210-44.5’ ................................................$47,500 ‘03 CIH TIGERMATE II-32.5’ ............................$19,500 ‘99 JD 980-44.5’ ............................................$17,500 ‘01 CIH TIGERMATE II-54.5’ ............................$36,500

BL BL BL BL BL BL BL BL BL SE SE SE SE SL SL SL SL SL SL SL

‘96 JD 455 ....................................................$13,775 ‘90 CIH 900--12X30 ........................................$8,989 ‘99 JD 1780 ..................................................$52,500 ‘07 CIH 1250--24--FF, 9500 ACRES ..............$79,900 ‘96 CIH 950--12X30 ......................................$16,500 WHITE 1822 ..................................................$29,500 ‘97 CIH 955....................................................$20,900 ‘10 CIH 1250--24--FF ..................................$135,000 JD 7000 ..........................................................$7,295 ‘89 CIH 900-12X30-PULL TYPE ......................$12,500 ‘12 CIH 1250--24--FF ..................................$152,500 ‘06 WHITE 8531 ............................................$68,850 ‘05 CIH 1200 PT--16X30 ................................$64,750 ‘10 CIH 1250--24--FF ..................................$133,000 CIH 900 ............................................................$6,500 ‘06 CIH 1200 PT ............................................$52,500 ‘99 CIH 955....................................................$18,500 ‘12 CIH 1250 24 ROW ..................................$140,000 ‘08 CIH 1240--16X30 PIVOT ..........................$77,500 ‘08 CIH 1250--24, 6500 ACRES ..................$122,500

FIELD CULTIVATORS

PLANTERS & DRILLS

SPRAYERS

SL ‘07 TOP AIR TA 1200 ......................................$22,500 SE ‘07 FASTM 9430 ............................................$27,500

SKIDSTEERS

BL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SL SE SE SE SE SE SE

‘86 CA 1845C, 4800 HRS. ..............................$14,750 ‘11 BOBCAT S850, 1953 HRS. ........................$42,600 ‘02 BOBCAT 553, 1552 HRS. ..........................$11,500 ‘11 BOBCAT S185, 3000 HRS. ........................$26,000 ‘10 BOBCAT S250, 831 HRS. ..........................$31,600 ‘08 BOBCAT S185, 1130 HRS. ........................$25,100 ‘12 BOBCAT S750, 3000 HRS. ........................$41,000 ‘05 BOBCAT S205, 3418 HRS. ........................$17,500 ‘07 BOBCAT S300, 4345 HRS. ........................$26,500 OWATONNA 345 MUSTANG, 6916 HRS. ............$6,250 ‘08 NH L185, 3989 HRS. ................................$22,500 ‘11 CA SR250, 1048 HRS. ..............................$39,500 ‘99 CA 1840, 6113 HRS....................................$9,500 CA 440CT S3, 2250 HRS.................................$33,900 ‘09 CA 440, 3234 HRS. ..................................$22,500 ‘12 CA SR200, 2221 HRS. ..............................$29,500 ‘89 HV 1300, 2386 HRS....................................$7,950

BL BL BL BL BL BL BL BL BL SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SL SL SL SL SL SL BL BL BL

‘91 CIH 1020-25’ ..............................................$9,875 ‘01 CIH 1020-30’ ............................................$15,500 ‘07 CIH 2020-35’ ............................................$23,900 ‘09 CIH 2020-35’ ............................................$29,000 ‘95 CIH 1020-25’ ..............................................$6,900 ‘05 MB 974-36’ ..............................................$43,875 ‘92 CIH 1020-30’ ..............................................$7,300 ‘90 CIH 1020-20’ ............................................$10,875 ‘90 CIH 1020-22.5’ ..........................................$3,000 ‘01 CIH 1020-30’ ............................................$14,000 ‘95 CIH 1020-30’ ..............................................$9,850 ‘90 CIH 1020-25’ ..............................................$7,500 ‘89 CIH 1020-22.5’ ..........................................$4,500 ‘98 CIH 1020-25’ ............................................$10,500 ‘95 CIH 1020-20’ ..............................................$7,900 ‘95 CIH 1020-30’ ..............................................$9,850 ‘90 CIH 1020-20’ ..............................................$6,500 ‘05 CIH 1020-30’ ............................................$19,200 ‘91 CIH 1020-20’ ..............................................$4,900 ‘97 CIH 1020-30’ ............................................$15,900 ‘04 CIH 1020-30’ ............................................$17,000 ‘09 CIH 2020-30’ ............................................$24,500 ‘95 CIH 1020-25’ ..............................................$8,900 ‘04 CIH 2020-30’ ............................................$19,900 ‘09 CIH 2020-30’ ............................................$24,500 ‘00 CIH 1020-25’ ............................................$11,500 ‘08 DRAGO 830 ..............................................$59,950 ‘09 CIH 2608 ..................................................$62,875 ‘04 DRAGO N6TR ............................................$29,000

HEADS


pLOADER

TRACTORS

4WD & TRACK TRACTORS

(2) White 8516CFS, 16-30 ..............................CALL White 6700, 12-30, w/res ..............................$6,500 White 6222, 12-30 front fold ......................$29,500 White 6122, 12-30........................................$16,500

COMBINES

‘00 Gleaner R52 w/CDF 520 flex / 6-30 cornhead Very Clean ....................................................CALL ‘10 JD 9770, Nice, w/warranty ..................$189,000 ‘10 Gleaner R76, loaded ................................CALL ‘03 Gleaner R75, loaded ................................CALL ‘01 Gleaner R72, just thru shop......................CALL ‘90 Gleaner R60 w/duals ................................CALL NEW Fantini chopping cornhead ..................CALL Gleaner N6 ....................................................$6,750

HAY TOOLS

New Hesston & NH Hay Tools On Hand

MISCELLANEOUS

NEW White planters ........................................CALL

(DMI Parts Available)

TILLAGE

M&W 9-shank, 24” w/leveler ......................$12,500 Sunflower 4412-07, 7-shank ..........................CALL ‘04 DMI 530B w/leveler ..............................$23,900 ‘05 JD 2700, 9-24 shank..............................$25,000 ‘12 JD 3710, 10 bottom ..................................CALL ‘10 JD 3710, 10 bottom ..................................CALL CIH 4900, 46.5’ ............................................$12,500 DMI Econo Champ 11-shank........................$7,500 M&W 1875, 9-shank ........................................CALL JD 2700, 5-shank, Nice ..................................CALL

SKIDSTEERS PLANTERS

SMITHS MILL IMPLEMENT Hwy. 14, 3 miles West of Janesville, MN

Phone (507) 234-5191 or (507) 625-8649 Mon. - Fri. 7:30-5:00, Sat. 7:30-Noon www.smithsmillimp.com

‘11 CIH 7120, 796 eng./609 sep. hrs., complete auto guidance systems, Pro 600 yield & moisture monitor, rock trap, lateral tilt, chopper, on board air compressor, 20.8x42 tires & duals ....................................$189,000 ‘11 CIH 7088, 959 eng./624 sep. hrs., luxury cab, rock trap, chopper, 2 spd., hydro, Pro 600 yield & moisture, 800x32 tires ..........................................$155,000 ‘94 CIH 1688, 3734 eng. hrs., rock trap, chopper, auto header bin ext. ....$29,000 ‘87 CIH 1640, 3468 hrs., rock trap, auto header controls, 24.5x32 tires....$18,500 ‘87 CIH 1660, 4200 eng. hrs., 4x4, auto ROW CROP TRACTORS header controls, 30.5x32 tires....$24,000 ‘11 JD 8335R, ILS, MFWD, 1777 hrs., ‘11 JD 9770, 880/613 sep. hrs., CM, 5 268 PTO hp., IVT trans., 3 pt., 1000 spd feederhouse, Pro-drive, chopper, PTO, front duals, 380x54” rear tires & 520x42 tires & duals ................$189,000 duals, 4 hyd. big pump ............$196,000 ‘08 JD 9770, 1380 eng./938 sep. hrs., ‘12 JD 8310R, MFWD, IVT trans., 4x4, CM, chopper, 1250/45/32 tires 1465 hrs., 3 pt., 255 PTO hp, 1000 ................................................$155,000 PTO, 5 hyd., big pump, 18.4x50 tires 10 JD 9670, 4x4, 1471 eng./1076 sep. & duals ....................................$192,000 hrs., CM, chopper, 18.4x42 duals ‘11 JD 8310R, ILS MFWD, 1536 hrs., ................................................$165,000 IVT trans., 255 PTO hp, 380x38 front ‘00 JD 9550, 2799 eng./1950 tires & duals, 380x54 rear tires sep. hrs., bin ext., chopper, 24.5x32 & duals, 4 hyd., big pump, 1000 PTO, tires, ..........................................$69,000 3 pt. ..........................................$194,000 ‘98 JD 9610, 3578 eng./2379 sep. hrs., ‘12 JD 7215R, 808 hrs., triple link, chopper, bin ext., 20.8x42 duals $49,000 MFWD, IVT trans., cab susp., HID lights, COMBINE HEADERS 540/1000 PTO, 3 pt., 178 PTO hp., Tractor Is Loaded ....................$152,500 ‘95 JD 893, 8R30” cornhead, hyd. ‘12 JD 7200R, MFWD, 600 hrs., IVT deck plates, Pixall knife rolls$14,500 trans., 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, 380x50 tires & duals, 165 PTO hp. ......$134,000 ‘00 Geringhoff 1820, 12R30” chopping head ....................$47,500 ‘10 JD 6430 Premium, MFWD, 635 hrs., ‘05 Geringhoff 830B, 8R30” 24-spd., Auto Quad, 3 pt., 540/1000 chopping cornhead ..............$29,000 PTO, w/loader ready pkg. w/joystick ..................................................$69,500 ‘90 JD 643, 6R30” cornhead ..$7,500

Check Out Our Large On-line Inventory of Trucks, Semis & Industrial Equipment

@ www.larsonimplements.com

LARSON IMPLEMENTS 5 miles east of Cambridge, MN on Hwy. 95

763-689-1179

Free delivery on combines in MN, Eastern ND & SD

Look at our Web site for pictures & more listings www.larsonimplements.com

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

NEW NH skidsteers on hand ..........................CALL NH LS170 ....................................................$13,750 ‘06 NH L170 ................................................$17,500

NEW Salford RTS units ..................................CALL NEW Salford Plows ..............................AVAILABLE NEW Unverferth seed tenders ................ON HAND NEW Westfield augers ..........................AVAILABLE NEW Rem 2700 vac ........................................CALL NEW Century HD1000, 60’ sprayers ..............CALL NEW Hardi sprayers ........................................CALL NEW Riteway rollers........................................CALL NEW Lorenz snowblowers ..............................CALL NEW Batco conveyors ....................................CALL NEW Brent wagons & grain carts ..................CALL NEW E-Z Trail seed wagons ..........................CALL NEW rock buckets & pallet forks .................. CALL REM 2700, Rental............................................CALL Unverferth 8000 grain cart ..........................$19,000 Kinze 1050 w/duals ....................................$43,000 Pre-owned Sprayers........................................CALL

COMBINES

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

USED TRACTORS

NEW NH T4.105 w/loader ..............................CALL NEW NH T4.75 w/loader ................................CALL NEW NH T9.505, 4WD ....................................CALL NEW NH T9.560, 4WD ....................................CALL NEW NH Boomer 50 w/loader ........................CALL NH TV6070 bi-directional ................................CALL NH 8870, SS ................................................$67,500 ‘08 NH 6070 w/cab, 2WD ............................$69,000 NEW Massey 8670, FWA ................................CALL NEW Massey 8650, FWA ................................CALL NEW Massey 4608 w/loader ..........................CALL NEW Massey 4610 w/loader ..........................CALL NEW Massey 5450, FWA, cab ........................CALL NEW Versatile 250, FWA ................................CALL NEW Versatile 305, FWA ................................CALL Versatile 895, 4WD ......................................$23,500 Ford/Versatile 876, 4WD, Nice ....................$43,500 ‘60 IH 560, WF ..............................................$5,200

‘12 JD 9560R, cab, power shift, 808 hrs., 4 hyd., Michelin 800x38 tires & duals ....................................$257,500 ‘12 JD 9560R, cab, power shift, 595 hrs., 5 hyd. hi-flow hyd., Michelin 800x38 tires & duals ............................$269,000 ‘12 JD 8560RT, 705 hrs., IVT trans., 3 pt., 1000 PTO, 30” tracks, big pump ................................................$245,000 ‘12 JD 8335RT, 330 hrs., 18” belts, IVT trans., 3 pt., 1000 PTO, Like New ..................................$225,000 ‘10 JD 8320RT, 1152 hrs., 30” belts, IVT trans., 3 pt., 1000 PTO, big pump ................................................$198,000

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

‘12 JD 6170R, cab, 426 hrs., MFWD, 140 PTO hp., 540/1000 PTO, 3 pt., 16-spd. power quad w/reverser, JD 380 loader ............................$128,000 ‘09 JD 6430, Premium cab, MFWD, 3325 hrs., 103 PTO hp, 540/1000 PTO, 16-spd. power quad w/reverser, JD 673 loader ..............................$67,000 ‘06 JD 7920, cab, MFWD, 6172 hrs., 170 PTO hp, 540/1000 PTO, IVT trans., 3 pt., 18.4x46 tires & duals, JD 726 loader w/grapple ..........................$96,000 ‘07 JD 7520, cab, MFWD, IVT trans., 4935 hrs., 125 PTO hp., 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, JD 741 loader w/grapple......$74,000 JD 6410, cab, MFWD, 4777 hrs., 90 PTO hp, 3 pt, 540/1000 PTO w/JD 640 loader ..................................................$44,000

‘12 CIH Magnum 290, MFWD, luxury cab, 21 B 540/1000 PTO, complete auto guidance setup, 3 pt., 4 hyd., duals front & back, 380x50 rears ............................$169,000 ‘12 CIH Magnum 260, MFWD, 525 hrs., 540/1000 PTO, 4 hyd., big pump, complete auto guidance setup, 420x46 tires & duals ............................$150,000 ‘11 CIH Magnum 260, MFWD, 650 hrs., 540/1000 PTO, luxury cab, 3 pt., 5 hyd., big pump, 18.4x46 tires & duals ................................................$145,000 ‘07 CIH Magnum 245, MFWD, 3050 hrs., 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, 4 hyd., 420x46 tires & duals ..............................$98,000 ‘07 CIH Magnum 245, MFWD, 4090 hrs., 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, 4 hyd., 420x46 rear tires w/18.4x42” duals ........$92,000 ‘94 NH 8770, 5250 hrs., super steer, MFWD, 3 pt., 3 hyd., 1000 PTO, 14.9x46 tires &duals ................................$55,000


THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

22 B

THE LAND CAN SELL IT! - Your First Choice for Classifieds - Place Your Ad Today Livestock, Machinery, Farmland - you name it People will buy it when they see it in The Land!

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

1-800-657-4665

4412-05 Disc Ripper - 5-shank 4412-07 Disc Ripper - 7-shank 4530-19 Disc Chisel - 19-shank SOLD SOLD 4511-11 Disc Chisel - 11-shank 4511-15 Disc Chisel - 15-shank 4610-09 Disc Ripper - 9-shank

To submit your classified ad use one of the following options: Phone: 1-800-657-4665 or 507-345-4523 Mail to: The Land Classifieds, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002 Fax to: 507-345-1027 • Email: theland@TheLandOnline.com Online at: www.thelandonline.com

THE FREE PRESS South Central Minnesota’s Daily News Source

Reach Over 259,000 Readers!

Start your ad, in THE LAND, then add more insertions DEADLINE: Monday at Noon for the following Friday edition and more coverage. The choice is yours. You can count Plus - look for your classified ad in the e-edition on THE LAND, a Minnesota tradition where farm and family meet!

Monthly Special

TRACTORS • • • • • • • • •

‘13 MF 7624, MFD, cab, CVT ‘13 MF 8690, 350 hp., CVT ‘05 MF 451, 45 PTO hp., 400 hrs. MF 7619, MFD, cab MF 7620, MFD, cab, 150 hp. MF 6616, MFD, cab, 125 hp. MF 4610, MFD, platform, 90 hp. MF 4610, MFD, loader, cab MF 1705 compact tractor

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Geringhoff 1822RD, ‘09 (3) Geringhoff 1622RD, ‘08, ‘07, ‘04 (2) Geringhoff 1230RD, ‘09, ‘08 (4) Geringhoff 1222RD, ‘08, 07, ‘05 (5) Geringhoff 1220RD, ‘12, ‘11, ‘05, ‘04, ‘02 (4) Geringfhoff 830RD, ‘12, ‘05, ‘04, ‘01 Geringhoff 630RD, ‘05, ‘97 ‘93 Geringhoff 630 PC ‘04 Gleaner 1222, hugger, GVL poly JD 822, steel, KR, HT JD 622, GVL, poly CIH 1083, ‘92

• • • • • • • • • • •

‘07 MF 9690, duals, LTM, 1300/970 hrs. ‘13 MF 9540 ‘12 MF 9540 MF 8570, RWA ‘86 MF 8560 '98 Gleaner 800, 25' flexhead ‘97 Gleaner R62, duals, 2052 sep. hrs. ‘92 Gleaner R62, 2063 hrs. MF 9750 PU table MF 9118 bean table (4) MF 8000 30' bean table

CORN HEADS

COMBINES

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Land classifieds with extended coverage. We offer you the reach and the prospects to get your phone ringing.

MF 2856 Baler twine, mesh, kicker - 32,000

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

GRAIN HANDLING (CONT.)

• Brandt 1060XL, 1070XL, 1080XL, 1380XL, 1390XL swing hopper augers • Parker 839, grain cart, tarp, 850 bu. • Parker 605 gravity box, 625 bu. • Parker 165-B gravity box • Unverferth 5000, grain cart • ‘10 Kilbros 1175 grain cart, 750 bushel w/tarp • Hutchinson, 10x61 auger • A&L 850S grain cart, 850 bu. tarp

NEW STANDOUT OPTIONS: (LAND Only)

HAY & LIVESTOCK • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

JD 38, sickle mower, 7’ Woods S106 mower NI 5408 disc mowers MF 2856, round baler, net, twine MF 1745, round baler MF 1329 & 1330, 3 pt. disc mower MF 200, SP windrower, cab, auger, header ‘11 NH H6750, 3 pt., disk mower, 110” NI 528, 3 pt., disc mower, 94” ‘13 Bale King 2881 bale processor, RH discharge Chandler 26’ litter spreader Sitrex MK16 wheel rake Sitrex RP2 wheel rake Sitrex 10 wheel rake on cart Westendorf 3 pt. bale spear H&S 16’ bale wagon

MISCELLANEOUS

• • • • GRAIN HANDLING • • Parker 2620 seed tender • • Brandt 7500HP, grain vac. • • Brandt 5200EX, grain vac • • ‘00 Brandt 4500 EX, grain vac. • • ‘05 Brandt 1070, auger, PTO Drive, w/swing • hopper • • Brandt 20110 swing hopper auger • • Brandt 1575 belt conveyor • Brandt 1535LP, 1545LP, 1535TD belt conveyors • • • Brandt 8x35, 8x37, 8x40, 8x47, 8x52, 8x57, • 8x62, 8x67, 10x35, straight augers • • Brandt 8x45 auger, 18 hp., Briggs •

Wil-Rich 36’, field cult. Wil-Rich 25’ stalk chopper, SM '08 JD 520 stalk chopper Loftness 20’ stalk chopper Loftness 240, semi-mount stalk chopper Melroe 912, 4 bottom plow Melroe 600 rock picker - prong type Loftness 8’ snowblower Mauer 28'-42' header trailers WRS 30’ header trailers EZ Trail 38’ header trailer Degelman 6000HD, rock picker Degelman 7200 rock picker Degelman RD320 rock digger Degelman LR7645 land rollers - Rental Returns Degelman 60” skid steer buckets ‘11 SB Select snowblower, 97” & 108”, 3 pt.

THE LAND (1 Southern & 1 Northern issue ) 1 run @ $17.36 =____________ 2 runs @ $30.36 =____________ 3 runs @ $45.54 =____________ Each additional line (over 7) + $1.30 per issue =____________ EXTENDED COVERAGE - must run the same number of times as The Land FARM NEWS (FN) - Serving farmers in Northwest Iowa, 14,219 circ. THE COUNTRY TODAY (CT) - Serving farmers in Wisconsin, 25,000 circ. THE FREE PRESS (FP) - Serving south central Minnesota, 22,500 circ. Paper(s) added (circle all options you want): FN CT FP ($7.09 for each paper, and each time) ______ issues x $7.09 = ___________ COMMERCIAL RATE: ______ issues x $23.00 = ___________

19 25

31

20

21

22

23

24

26

27

28

29

30

32

33

34

35

36

CHECK ONE:







             

Announcements Employment Real Estate Real Estate Wanted Housing Rentals Farm Rentals Merchandise Antiques & Collectibles Auctions Hay & Forage Equipment Material Handling Bins & Buildings Grain Handling Equipment Farm Implements Tractors

             

Harvesting Equipment Planting Equipment Tillage Equipment Machinery Wanted Spraying Equipment Wanted Farm Services Fencing Material Feed, Seed, Hay Fertilizer & Chemicals Poultry Livestock Dairy Cattle Horses Exotic Animals

         

Sheep Goats Swine Pets & Supplies Livestock Equipment Cars & Pickups Industrial & Construction Trucks & Trailers Recreational Vehicles Miscellaneous

 Bold  Italic  Underline  Web/E-mail links = __________ ($2.00 per run)   = __________ ($4.00 per run)

TOTAL = __________ The ad prices listed above are based on a basic classified line ad of 25 words or less. Ads running longer than 25 words will incur an added charge.

Name____________________________________________ Address___________________________________________ City______________________________________________ State_________ Zip__________ Phone ___________________________ # of times _______

Card #___________________________________________________ Exp. Date__________________

CHECK

Signature________________________________________________

NOTE: If category is not marked, it will be placed in the appropriate category ADVERTISING NOTICE: Please check your ad the first week it runs. We make every effort to avoid errors by checking all copy, but sometimes errors are missed. Therefore, we ask that you review your ad for correctness. If you find a mistake, please call (507) 345-4523 immediately so that the error can be corrected. We regret that we cannot be responsible for more than one week’s insertion if the error is not called to our attention. We cannot be liable for an amount greater than the cost of the ad. THE LAND has the right to edit, reject or properly classify any ad. Each classified line ad is separately copyrighted to THE LAND. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited.


23 B

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”


<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

24 B

‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 604 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lights, loaded ....$329,900

‘11 CIH Steiger 600Q, 1043 hrs., full Pro 700 steering ................$319,900

‘11 CIH Magnum 290, 1380 hrs., susp. front axle, susp. cab, Lux. cab, 360 HID lites, Loaded! ..........................$172,800

‘90 CIH 9170, 5647 hrs., PS ....$49,900

‘02 CIH MX 240, 4100 hrs., duals ..................................................$79,500

‘08 Steiger 535, 800 tires, 1900 hrs. ................................................$205,500

‘77 JD 4630 ..............................$15,900

‘12 CIH 9230, track, AWD, 260 sep. hrs. ................................................$349,900

‘99 CIH 730B, 7-shank ripper ..$15,000

‘06 Wilrich 957, 7-shank ripper ..................................................$16,900

USED 4WD TRACTORS

USED 2WD TRACTORS - Cont.

18 Month Interest Waiver or Low Rates Available • Call Details •

‘13 CIH Magnum 290, 400 hrs., Creeper Trans, Full Pro 700 auto guide, hi cap. hyd. pump, susp. axle, 360 HID lites ..................................................................................................$194,500 ‘11 CIH Magnum 290, 1380 hrs., susp. cab, susp. front axle, leather cab, 360 HID lites, Loaded..............................................................................................................................$172,800 ‘13 CIH Magnum 260, 300 hrs., susp. Lux cab, susp. front axle, Full Pro 700 auto guide, hi cap. hyd. pump, 360 HID lites ....................................................................................$179,900 ‘13 CIH Magnum 235, 170 hrs., susp. Lux cab, Full Pro 700 auto guide, hi cap. hyd. pump, 360 HID lites ....................................................................................................................$169,900 ‘13 CIH Magnum 235, 200 hrs., susp. Lux cab, Full Pro 700 auto guide, hi cap. hyd. pump, 360 HID lites ....................................................................................................................$169,900 ‘12 CIH Puma 160, 300 hrs., CVT trans., L765 loader, susp. axle................................$135,800 ‘02 CIH MX240, 4100 hrs., front & rear duals ..................................................................$79,500 ‘08 CIH Farmall 95, 414 hrs., MFD, cab ..........................................................................$33,800 ‘77 JD 4630, 10,205 hrs., 18.4x42 tires & duals ................................................................$15,900

‘13 CIH Steiger 600Q, 480 hrs., 36”tracks, HID lites, Full Pro 700 Auto Guide, hi cap. hyd. pump ..............................................................................................................$386,500 ‘12 CIH Steiger 600Q, 702 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, Full Pro 700 Auto Guide ..............$339,900 ‘12 CIH Steiger 600Q, 1159 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, Full Pro 700 auto Guide ............$319,900 ‘11 CIH Steiger 600Q, 1174 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, Pro 700 Auto Steer ....................$315,900 ‘11 CIH Steiger 600Q, 1043 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, Full Pro 700 Auto Guide ............$319,900 ‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 604 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites ........................................................$329,900 ‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 835 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites ........................................................$319,900 ‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 1105 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites ......................................................$295,000 ‘13 CIH Steiger 500Q, 55 hrs., HID lites, Full Pro 700 Auto Guide ................................$339,900 ‘13 CIH Steiger 500Q, 400 hrs., HID lites, 30” tracks, hi cap. hyd. pump, Full Pro 700 steering ..............................................................................................................................$319,500 ‘08 CIH Steiger 535, 1900 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, 800 tires ........................................$205,500 ‘13 CIH Steiger 500Q, 300 hrs., 36” tracks, HID lites, Lux cab, hi cap. hyd. pump, Full Pro 700 auto guide ....................................................................................................$329,500 ‘13 CIH Steiger 500, 450 hrs., cab susp., Lux cab, HID lites, 1000 PTO, hi cap. hyd. pump, HD drawbar, Full Pro 700 auto guide................................................................................$274,900 ‘13 CIH Steiger 450, 198 hrs., Lux cab, PTO, 800 tires, hi cap. hyd. pump, HD drawbar, Full Pro 700 auto guide ....................................................................................................$259,900 ‘13 CIH Steiger 450, 400 hrs., Lux cab, 710 tires, hi cap. hyd. pump, cab susp., Full Pro 700 auto guide ..................................................................................................................$249,900 ‘13 CIH Steiger 400, 250 hrs., Lux cab, Full Pro 700 auto guide, hi cap. hyd. pump, cab susp.............................................................................................................................$239,900 ‘13 CIH Steiger 400, 400 hrs., Lux cab, PTO, hi cap. hyd. pump, Full Pro 700 auto guide ..................................................................................................................................$249,900 ‘90 CIH 9170, 5641 hrs., 20.8x42 tires, powershift ............................................................$49,900 STX and STEIGER PTO, TOW CABLE & 3 PT. KITS ON HAND!!!

USED 2WD TRACTORS 18 Months Interest Free • Call For Details •

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

‘12 CIH Magnum 340, 603 hrs., susp. cab, leather cab, 360 HID lites, big pump, Full Pro 700 Auto Guide, Loaded ....................................................................................$209,900 ‘13 CIH Magnum 315, 500 hrs., Lux cab, frt sus axle, sus cab, 360 HID, 380R54 tires, Full Pro 700 auto guide....................................................................................................$209,900 ‘13 CIH Magnum 315, 400 hrs., Full Pro 700 auto guide, 360 HID lites, hi cap. hyd. pump, susp. cab, susp. front axle ..............................................................................................$209,900 ‘13 CIH Magnum 290, 400 hrs., Creeper Trans, Full Pro 700 auto guide, hi cap. hyd. pump, susp, axle, 360 HID lites ..................................................................................................$194,500

USED COMBINES 5 Years Interest Waiver Available Thru Case Credit* • Call For Details ‘13 ‘12 ‘13 ‘13 ‘13 ‘13 ‘13 ‘13 ‘98 ‘13 ‘13 ‘13 ‘12 ‘13 ‘13 ‘13 ‘89 ‘89 ‘10 ‘05 ‘04

CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH

9230, track drive RWA, HID lites ........................................................................$369,900 9230, 260 sep. hrs., track drive, RWA, folding covers ......................................$349,900 8230, duals, HID lites, Lux cab ............................................................................$305,000 8230, duals HID lites, Lux cab ............................................................................$295,000 7230, duals, HID lites, Lux cab ............................................................................$287,000 7230, duals, HID lites, Lux cab ............................................................................$277,800 7230, duals, HID lites, Lux cab ............................................................................$277,800 7230, duals, HID lites, Lux cab ............................................................................$277,800 2388, duals, 2569 eng./1764 sep. hrs ....................................................................$79,500 2608, 8R30” chopping cornhead ..........................................................................$69,500 2608, 8R30” chopping cornhead ..........................................................................$69,500 3408, New 8R30” cornhead....................................................................................JUST IN 3408, 8R30” cornhead ............................................................................................$44,900 3020, 3” knife, cutter bar adj, Crary air reel ..........................................................$44,000 3020, 3” knife, cutter bar adj, Crary air reel ..........................................................$44,000 3020, 3” knife, cutter bar adj, Crary air reel ..........................................................$43,800 1083, 8R30” ..............................................................................................................$8,900 1083, 8R30” ..............................................................................................................$7,900 2020, 25’ platform w/Crary air reel ........................................................................$26,800 1020, 30’, 3” knife, rock guard ..............................................................................$13,900 1020, 30’, 3” knife, rock guard ..............................................................................$12,900

LOW RATE FINANCING AVAILABLE thru

I-35 & Highway 60 West • Faribault, MN • 507-334-2233

Call For Details

Herb

Paul

CNH Capital’s Commercial Revolving Account provides financial assistance for parts and service when you need it, keeping your equipment running as its best with the quality parts and service you’ve come to expect from Case IH. Contact your local dealer or visit www.cnhcapital.com today for details. ©2012 CNH Capital America LLC. All rights reserved. CNH Capital and Case IH are registered trademarks of CNH America LLC. Printed in the USA.

www.matejcek.com

Blake


Š 2013

November 15, 2013

NORTHERN EDITION

(800) 657-4665 www.TheLandOnline.com theland@TheLandOnline.com P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002


Page 2 - November 15, 2013

THE LAND, Advertising Supplement


THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

November 15, 2013 - Page 3


Page 4 - November 15, 2013

THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

THE LAND ~ Nov. 15, 2013 ~ Northern Edition  

"Since 1976, Where Farm and Family Meet in Minnesota & Northern Iowa"

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you