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October 4, 2013

Waverly Lutheran Church near Trimont, Minn., welcomed visitors from Gloria Dei Lutheran Church in St. Paul to share God’s bounty, along with the story of agriculture Story on Page 10

NORTHERN EDITION

Š 2013

Young Mia of Gloria Dei Lutheran Church in St. Paul marvels at holding a baby chick.


THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

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P.O. Box 3169 418 South Second St. Mankato, MN 56002 (800) 657-4665 Vol. XXXII ❖ No. XX 48 pages, plus supplement

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Opinion Farm and Food File Calendar The Bookworm Sez Table Talk BBQMyWay Pet Talk The Outdoors Marketing Mielke Market Weekly Auctions/Classifieds Advertiser Listing The Land Funpage Back Roads

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Publisher: Jim Santori: jsantori@cnhi.com General Manager: Kathleen Connelly: kconnelly@TheLandOnline.com Editor: Kevin Schulz: editor@TheLandOnline.com Assistant Editor: Tom Royer: troyer@TheLandOnline.com Staff Writer: Dick Hagen: dickhagen@mvtvwireless.com Advertising Representatives: Kim Henrickson: khenrickson@TheLandOnline.com Mike Schafer: mike.schafer2@gmail.com Danny Storlie: theland@TheLandOnline.com Office/Advertising Assistants: Vail Belgard: vbelgard@TheLandOnline.com Joan Compart: theland@TheLandOnline.com Ad Production: Brad Hardt: lndcomp@mankatofreepress.com For Customer Service Concerns: (507) 345-4523, (800) 657-4665, theland@TheLandOnline.com Fax: (507) 345-1027 For Editorial Concerns or Story Ideas: (507) 344-6342, (800) 657-4665, editor@TheLandOnline.com National Sales Representative: Bock & Associates Inc., 7650 Executive Drive, Minneapolis, MN 55344-3677. (952) 905-3251. Because of the nature of articles appearing in The Land, product or business names may be included to provide clarity. This does not constitute an endorsement of any product or business. Opinions and viewpoints expressed in editorials or by news sources are not necessarily those of the management. The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The Publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any monies paid for the advertisement. Classified Advertising: $17.36 for seven (7) lines for a private classified, each additional line is $1.30; $23 for business classifieds, each additional line is $1.30. Classified ads accepted by mail or by phone with VISA, MasterCard, Discover or American Express. Classified ads can also be sent by e-mail to theland@TheLandOnline.com. Mail classified ads to The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002. Please include credit card number, expiration date and your postal address with ads sent on either mail version. Classified ads may also be called into (800) 657-4665. Deadline for classified ads is noon on the Monday prior to publication date, with holiday exceptions. Distributed to farmers in all Minnesota counties and northern Iowa, as well as on The Land’s website. Each classified ad is separately copyrighted by The Land. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Subscription and Distribution: Free to farmers and agribusinesses in Minnesota and northern Iowa. $24 per year for non-farmers and people outside the service area. The Land (ISSN 0279-1633) is published Fridays and is a division of The Free Press Media (part of Community Newspaper Holdings Inc.), 418 S. Second St., Mankato MN 56001. Periodicals postage paid at Mankato, Minn. Postmaster and Change of Address: Address all letters and change of address notices to The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002; call (507) 345-4523 or e-mail to theland@TheLandOnline.com.

A hunger for research It’s funny sometimes how the mind makes Born to a farm family near Cresco, Iowa, connections from one thought to another. in 1914, Borlaug was encouraged to pursue higher education by his grandfather Recently my teenage daughter and I Nels Olson Borlaug, who told him “You’re were driving from southern Minnesota to wiser to fill your head now if you want to southern Iowa to visit family. It was a fill your belly later on.” crisp late-September morning. Taking rural county highways the entire way, With the aid of a Depression-era governgreen and brown fields flashed by. Maturment program, the young Borlaug was ing corn and soybean fields were a motley able to enroll at the University of Minassortment of colors; harvest in these nesota where his dedication to fighting LAND MINDS parts was still many weeks away. hunger was shaped. His dramatic successes in later work on high-yield, disAs we zipped past this future food and By Tom Royer ease-resistant wheat in Mexico, India fuel, an audiobook — the final Hunger and Pakistan led to his being awarded Games book, “Mockingjay” — played for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970 for contrius inside the cabin of the car. butions to the world food supply. For those unfamiliar with the Hunger Games trilThis, then, brings my thoughts to the town of ogy, it tells the story of 16-year-old Katniss Everdeen, a girl living in the post-apocalyptic nation Waseca, Minn., home to a University of Minnesota of Panem (a grim future North America). As a means institution established one year prior to Borlaug’s birth — then called the Southeast Demonstration of punishing the other 12 districts for a long-ago Farm and Experiment Station, now known as the failed rebellion, Panem’s powerful Capitol forces Southern Research and Outreach Center. teenagers from each district to participate in an annual televised battle to the death. The sole surBorlaug, who spent time at the station conducting vivor is rewarded with a bounty of food to take back research in small experimental plots, would make to their impoverished district. note of the important role that SROC played in This crumb of hope is a great motivator for a poor American agriculture and the world as a whole. and undernourished population. That role — and Borlaug’s — was celebrated Sept. 19 by thousands of visitors at the SROC centennial Listening to such an engaging work of fiction — celebration. particularly while driving through the bountiful farmland of the Upper Midwest — made me think of SROC chief Forrest Izuno, University of Minnesota Norman Borlaug and the very real hunger that was regent emeritus Dallas Bohnsack, and College of Food, his life’s work to eradicate. Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences interim The Land Editor Kevin Schulz composed a pair of trib- dean Brian Buhr all touched on Borlaug’s impact durutes to “the man who saved a billion lives” — available ing program presentations. In fact, Izuno noted that online at http://goo.gl/3zc9QP and http://goo.gl/F0uYQK his father, Takumi Izuno, who studied at Waseca, per— upon Borlaug’s passing in 2009. See LAND MINDS, pg. 3

OPINION

26 — Farm takes ‘slow food’ to heart 28 — Orchard wins apple variety patent 6 — Far left, far right must compromise on 30 — Bee keeping frustrating, rewarding farm bill 32 — Produce co-op dream surviving a 8 — From the Fields: Ready for harvest few growing snags

INSIDE THIS ISSUE:


Great gains in 100 years Timeline of events in SROC history

OPINION

1911 Minnesota Legislature appropriated funds to establish two demonstration farms where local problems could be explored by Department of Agriculture personnel. 1912 A committee representing the state, the Board of Regents of the University of Minnesota and the Department of Agriculture selected and purchased 246 acres just west and south of Waseca naming it the Southeast Demonstration Farm and Experiment Station of the University of Minnesota. The land was purchased from R.P. and D. Ward at $125/acre. 1913 First year of operations at the Southeast Demonstration Farm and Experiment Station. Albert Hoversten employed as “farm manager” and served as first superintendent of station, 1913-18. 1919 R.E. Hodgson appointed superintendent. Served 1919-60. 1925 Name changed from “Southeast Demonstration Farm and Experiment Station” to “Southeast Experiment Station.” 1940 Station size increased by purchase of 351 acres of land purchased from D., E., and V. Ward for $40,000.

1950-71 Purchased additional 20.75 acres of miscellaneous land from E. and V. Ward and W. and R. Papke and E. F. and Ethel Johnson. 1953 Southern School of Agriculture enrolled first class in January 1953. 1960 Deane A. Turner appointed superintendent of the Southern School and Experiment Station. Served 1960 through 1963. 1964 Edward C. Frederick appointed superintendent of the Southern School and Experiment Station. Served 1964-70. 1969 Legislative action called for phase-out of the Southern School of Agriculture and for creation of a technical college. The new college and the Southern Experiment Station were established as separate administrative units. 1970 Richard H. Anderson appointed superintendent of the Southern Experiment Station. Served 1970-90. 1972 Purchase of 232 acres of land from K. and J. Priebe, at a cost of $145,000, brought the total University land holdings at Waseca to approximately 850 acres.

1982 An advisory committee was commissioned with 15 charter members to “advise the SES on research and related agricultural or other needs.” 1990 David D. Walgenbach appointed superintendent of the Southern Experiment Station. Served 1990-2000. 1994 Purchased 120 acres of land from K. and J. Stendel, at a cost of $162,000 and an additional 80 acres from K. and M. Krassin, at a cost of $108,000. Property named the Agricultural Ecology Research Farm. 1994-95 Relinquished 95 acres of University land to Federal Correctional Institution, reducing land holdings to approximately 955 acres. 1999 Name of Southern Experiment Station changed to Southern Research and Outreach Center. 2001 Forrest T. Izuno appointed head of the Southern Research and Outreach Center 2008 Roughly 29 acres sold to Minnesota Department of Transportation as right-of-way for Highway 14 bypass, reducing total land holdings to approximately 926 acres.

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renewable energy, bio-product development and mitigating environmental impacts. Buhr rattled off a number of statistics — such as the leap over the past 100 years in average corn yields from 30 bushels per acre to 156 bu./acre — as a testament to the dedication of men and women at university research centers across Minnesota, Iowa and elsewhere. It’s impossible to know what the next 100 years will bring, but if public investment in agronomic research continues, and the spirit of Borlaug’s work remains alive, my daughter’s generation and those to follow need never go hungry. Several books have been written on Borlaug’s life and achievements, including Leon Hesser’s “The Man Who Fed the World: Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Norman Borlaug and His Battle to End World Hunger.” Check your local library or online bookstore for this book and others. For more information on the Southern Research and Outreach Center, log on to http://sroc.cfans.umn.edu. Tom Royer is assistant editor of The Land. He may be reached at troyer@TheLandOnline.com. ❖

THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

LAND MINDS, from pg. 2 sonally worked with Borlaug. The humanitarian’s giant impact on agriculture and world hunger aside, SROC’s centennial was marked by a wide variety of entertainment and education. Visitors had been invited to bring garden or field plant samples for identification and insect or disease diagnoses. Such public outreach is nothing new to the Waseca site. Bohnsack said that, as a child, he had visited the center with his father, who brought a problematic weed for agronomists there to identify — it was foxtail. Guests at SROC’s centennial party were treated to free food, a corn-husking contest, horsedrawn trolley rides, a corn maze, games and projects for children, beautifully produced historical displays, and a visit from none other than Goldy Gopher. But despite all the entertainment and family friendly activities going on at the celebration, the bottom line at a place like SROC needs to be hard results to justify the public’s investment. Research today focuses on increasing crop and animal production efficiencies, while also including projects related to

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Source: University of Minnesota Southern Research and Outreach Center website

“Where Farm and Family Meet”


THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

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Minnesota Farm Bureau recognizes Sesquicentennial Farms The Minnesota Farm Bureau is pleased to recognize 15 recipients of the Sesquicentennial Farm award for 2013. A commemorative certificate signed by Gov. Mark Dayton, Minnesota Department of Agriculture Commissioner Dave Frederickson and Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation President Kevin Paap will be awarded to qualifying families, along with an outdoor sign signifying Sesquicentennial Farm recognition. Information on all Sesquicentennial Farm families will be available online at www.fbmn.org. Carver Arlo Kellerman, New Germany,

1861 Daniel J. and Timothy R. Stender, Young America, 1863 Goodhue Robert and Ellen Aakre, Kenyon, 1863 Paul and Mary Lou Nesseth, Nerstrand, 1857 Paul R. Olson, Welch, 1862 Ray Sands, Kenyon, 1859 David and Sherry Sathrum, Kenyon, 1856 Hennepin John and Joyce Meister, Corcoran, 1862

Mower Jeffrey and Kathryn Helle, Lyle, 1863 Pope Robert and Carol Halls, Brooten, 1862 Stearns Gilbert and Judith Bruemmer, Albany, 1863 Alan and Caroline Glatzel, St. Joseph, 1860 Wabasha Roland and Carol Wood, Plainview, 1862 Washington Oliver and Valda Van Alstine, Hast-

ings, 1862 Wright Robert Doering, Waverly, 1858 Minnesota Farm Bureau is comprised of 78 local Farm Bureaus across Minnesota. Members make their views known to political leaders, state government officials, special interest groups and the general public. Programs for young farmers and ranchers develop leadership skills and improve farm management. Promotion and Education Committee members work with programs such as Ag in the Classroom and safety education for children. Join Farm Bureau today and support our efforts to serve as an advocate for rural Minnesota, www.fbmn.org. ❖

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So just what was Congress, and especially the U.S. House of Representatives, doing when it entered the final week of its highspeed game of chicken with the White House and three out of four Americans who said loudly and clearly that they did not want a government shutdown?

Cruz, R-Texas, “General Cruz.”

The Journal went on to hope that this “Cruz campaign” was more than an effort to compile “fundraising lists or getting face on cable TV shows,” but it doubted it.

OPINION

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So, a week before funding for the new federal fisOne part of the answer, By Alan Guebert cal year is needed and two the political part, is indisyears after work on a new putable: In their votes to federal farm bill began, cut food assistance and you, me and the nation link the Affordable Care have no 2014 budget, no Act to any 2014 federal 2012, 2013 or 2014 farm budget deal, about 180 members of bill and no hope of getting either until the 234-member Republican House Speaker Boehner somehow satisfies majority hoped to fireproof their right — or isolates — his Nine Percent flanks from the flame-throwing, tearump group. tossing 40 or so GOP colleagues who In the meantime, the House could have made the House all but marry its two, separately passed eleungovernable for their party and its leader, Speaker John Boehner of Ohio. ments of a farm bill — the farm program title and the contentious food In short, they didn’t vote to cut food assistance title — into one bill so it stamps or defund Obamacare as much can proceed cleanly to a House-Senate as they voted to wall off any rightconference. wing challenge to their jobs despite a That is no simple task. If it were as splendid record of doing nearly noth“procedural” as some suggest, the ing for two years. House would have folded the two A second part of the answer, the together in its barely successful vote farm and food part, is equally indisSept. 19 to cut $39 billion in food putable: For an unprecedented second assistance from the farm bill over the year in a row, the Chicken Liver Caucoming decade. cus of the House ag committee failed Speaker Boehner and Majority to convince colleagues to pass a comLeader Eric Cantor didn’t roll the two prehensive farm bill. into one, however, because they had The Liver Gang can slip part of the the exact number of “yeas,” 217, blame; 41 dead-end House votes to kill needed to pass the controversial cuts Obamacare evidently didn’t leave and feared the addition of even one enough time for one vote on one comcomma would have turned their narprehensive farm bill in two years. row, ugly win into a wide, ugly loss. That inability, however, delivered With or without the marriage, in the fate of the farm bill to the Mighty two pieces or as whole, House leaders Nine Percent, the 40 or so tea party can move the farm bill to the Senate. Republicans who forced Boehner’s One sign of movement would be the hand on both recent votes. Speaker naming House members to These mighty mice knew what to do the Senate-House farm bill conference with the power they unexpectedly to hammer out a final, joint bill. received. Impressively, and without After that — and no one knows blinking an eye, they ran the table on when “that” will be except all include the other 91 percent. the phrase “weeks from now” when But both votes did little to advance offering any timeframe — farm bill the nation’s 2014 farm bill, the 2014 negotiations can begin. federal budget and the need to avoid a But don’t count on it. At least not debt ceiling default by, according to until the charge into fixed bayonets is recent guesses, mid-October. over. On Sept. 24, the Wall Street Journal Alan Guebert’s “Farm and Food editorial page, the always boiling ketFile” is published weekly in more than tle of the Tea Party, called the House 70 newspapers in North America. votes a “charge into fixed bayonets,” Contact him at and sarcastically called its alwaysagcomm@farmandfoodfile.com. ❖ talking architect, freshman Sen. Ted FARM & FOOD FILE

The naïve advice of ardent activists dicted cooler winters until 2030. can kill. Last spring, Paul Beckwith of Most concerning of all is that the Sierra Club Canada predicted that costs of an Arctic sailing mistake are the Arctic seas would be ice-free this horrendous. Wonderfully preserved summer. (So did Britain’s BBC net- hulks of sunken explorers’ ships litwork.) This exciting adventure oppor- ter the sea-bottom around the Northtunity attracted a variety of yachts, west Passage. Some of the vessels sailboats, rowboats and kayaks own- that survived the ice were trapped ers to try sailing the fabled Northwest for as long as three winters. At least Passage. one sailboat recently froze into the As a former sailice near Svalbard. boat owner I can The captain and understand their his boat were excitement, but buried under the No icebreakers are my heart aches heavy snow, 100 for the agonies from going to be able to offer miles they now face. human habitaany assistance. Mother The Arctic sea ice tion. (He actually Nature is mightier than suddenly survived to write all the icebreakers put expanded 60 pera book.) together. cent this fall, The risks run by after the coldest the Arctic boaters — Northwest Passage blog summer in the are obvious. Modmodern Alaska post ern society is runtemperature ning less obvious record. The pasrisks based on the same sort of naïve sage is now impassable. More than a advice coming from the Sierra Club, dozen of the boats are trapped, appar- Greenpeace, the Intergovernmental ently even including a group of tiny Panel on Climate Change and a host American jet-ski “personal water- of like-minded “saviors of the planet.” craft” that were attempting to cross What about the poor and elderly from the east coast of Russia to the Britons and Germans who have North Atlantic. Arctic observers are frozen to death in their homes now warning that even Canadian ice- because they couldn’t afford the breakers might not be able to rescue higher costs of gas and electricity them. imposed by “renewable fuels”? The Northwest Passage blog What about the millions of Third reminds us that fall super storms are World mothers and children who die a potentially deadly fact in Alaska. “It of lung diseases every year as it is is only a matter of time. ... Give politically incorrect to give them Mother Nature her due time and she access to tiny amounts of kerosene will move billions of tons of sea ice for heating and cooking. The alternaand push it up against the Alaska tive is burning dung and charcoal in Arctic coast — effectively closing the indoor, poorly ventilated fires. door to exit the Arctic ice from westCloser to home, what about the milern Canada. ... No icebreakers are going to be able to offer any assis- lions of young Americans who can’t tance. Mother Nature is mightier get jobs in an economy stalled by than all the icebreakers put together.” overpriced “green” energy and Note that the Atlantic exit is already investor uncertainty over the War on Coal? Inevitably, being gullible carproblematic. ries a price tag. We are just beginHelicopter rescues on Arctic ice are ning to realize how expensive the incredibly expensive, involving hun- naïveté of the environmental movedreds of miles of flying by copters and ment has become. crews expensively maintained in that This commentary was submitted by icy and sparsely populated region. Additionally, all the lovely boats Dennis Avery, a senior fellow for the Hudson Institute in Washington, D.C., become write-offs. and the director for the Center for The boaters ignored major warning Global Food Issues. He was formerly a signs. The planet has not warmed senior analyst for the Department of appreciably in at least 15 years. State. Readers may write him at P.O. NASA told us in 2007 that the Pacific Box 202, Churchville, VA 24421 or eOcean had shifted into the cool phase mail to cgfi@mgwnet.com. ❖ of its 60-year cycle and that fact pre-

5 THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

Charge into fixed bayonets Commentary: Arctic grabs gullible sailors in ‘ice-free’ seas


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AFBF’s Moore: Left, right must compromise on farm bill a balance.” By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer Moore said it’s difficult for the free market, “This is one of the strangest farm bills,” by itself, to be the sole determiner of what said Dale Moore in an August interview at goes on for the cattle producer. He noted that Farmfest. the cattle producer is producing a protein which competes against the protein of pork, Moore, executive director for public policy poultry, lamb as well as the vegetable prowith American Farm Bureau Federation, preteins. He also chided the unpredictable viously served as executive director for legnature of consumers who are sometimes islative affairs with the National Cattlemen’s Dale Moore more concerned about what color coveralls Association. He said that he grew up on a farming-ranching operation in Kansas, but has been you were wearing when you worked your fields than utilizing his “BS’ing skills” for several years in Wash- how you raised the product. ington, D.C. “We don’t want over-regulation,” Moore said, “but “This sustained drought for the past four to five we’ve seen what happens when things are under-regyears over much of the cattle country of the south- ulated.” western states has brought cow numbers down to the Feeding the world lowest levels in decades,” Moore said. “Sure, prices Moore believes agriculture needs the whole spechave come up as a result but everytrum of products and technologies one gets squeezed somewhere in the to feed the world’s projected 9 bilprocess. lion people 35 years from now. “What we’re hoping is feeder prices You look at those “There is plenty of room for every that trigger more replacement type and shape and size of agriculfolks getting beat heifers to start rebuilding that beef ture to meet that demand and that up in D.C. and cow herd, assuming of course that even includes organic foods,” he more often than we’ve finally turned the corner on said. “Technologies are not just not it’s those who this lingering drought issue. If we about new bells and whistles; it’s build back at a reasonable pace and have compromised also about techniques and systems have a reasonable corn crop everyto improve production, improve on some issue. thing starts to level off again. But water use efficiency and improve They get hamadmittedly, that’s a big ‘if’ right now.” conservation measures on the land. mered from the far Other countries are going to have to Regulation: Not too much, not left, from the far step up to the plate, too. We can’t too little right. The folks in feed the world just by ourselves. Can the “free market” law of supthe middle are ply and demand work equitably in “These countries who say they’re the cattle industry — even for the taking the beating. not going to take our beef because corn producers — without certain we use growth promotions even provisions in a new farm bill? — Dale Moore though science says they are completely safe, or they’re not going to “The livestock sector has never had take our corn or soybeans or rice any particular provisions that adequately cover them when Mother Nature has a con- because it’s genetically modified. Both these counniption,” Moore said. “That’s why getting away from tries and the U.S. are going to have to figure out how these adhoc disaster relief programs in favor of per- to get around these issues.” manent disaster programs needs to be a consideraMoore said that agricultural legislation in Washtion. ington is a bipartisan process in the midst of a circus “Also the conservation measures in the farm bill that does not reward compromise. are open to all producers, not just the Title I Com“You look at those folks getting beat up in D.C. and modity Programs. I’ve seen ranchers use these provi- more often than not it’s those who have compromised sions to improve water efficiencies and pasture con- on some issue,” he said. “They get hammered from ditions on their range land. the far left, from the far right. The folks in the middle “The language should be such to not over-encour- are taking the beating. One of the tools of the Ameriage or under-encourage production. We need feed can Farm Bureau is finding ways to help farmers grain producers to not only provide cattle producers and ranchers who get into the middle of the playing here in America but also to capture a portion of that field and are taking rocks from both sides. expanding export market. We love to see strong grain “And this doesn’t mean an extension of the current prices but when somebody’s boat is floating there’s a farm bill. Nor is it a compromise. Republicans and tendency that someone else’s boat is taking on water. Democrats still have time to get their heads together. What we’re trying to do is get these markets back to Farm Bureau’s advice in simple terms: Do it.” ❖

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Send us your events by e-mail to editor@TheLandOnline.com Oct. 26 McLeod County Fairgrounds, Hutchinson, Minn. Info: Call (952) 442-4031

Heron Lake Watershed District Cover Crop Field Day Nov. 13 Jerry and Nancy Ackermann Farm, Lakefield, Minn. Info: Farm is located at 39750 820th Street; log on to www.hlwdonline.com Minnesota Farm Bureau Annual Meeting Nov. 21-23 DoubleTree Hotel, Bloomington, Minn. Info: To register, contact county Farm Bureau office, or Lori Wiegand, (651) 768-2102 or lwiegand@fbmn.org by Nov. 1; registration forms and registration can be found at fbmn.org; registration after Nov. 1 will add $5/meal Savoring Wine Class — A ThreePart Series Nov. 23, Dec. 7, Dec. 14, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Minnesota Landscape Arboretum Learning Center, Chaska, Minn. Info: University of Minnesota enologist Katie Cook teaches fundamentals of

wine tasting to inform your appreciation for the fruit of the vine and to enhance your winemaking abilities; $125/arboretum member, $150/nonmember; call (952) 443-1422 or log on to www.arboretum.umn.edu/learn.aspx Pork Quality Assurance Training Dec. 18 University Center Heintz Center, Rochester, Minn. Info: Registration requested to colleen@mnpork.com or (800) 5377675 or log on to www.mnpork.com National Ag Day March 25 Info: www.agday.org; theme is “Agriculture: 365 Sunrises and 7 Billion Mouths to Feed” Dairy Calf and Heifer Association Conference April 1-3 Green Bay, Wis. Info: Keynote speaker is Donald Driver, retired Green Bay Packer wide receiver; to register, call (855) 4003242, log on to www.calfandheifer.org or e-mail info@calfandheifer.org

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Dealers

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Food Safety for Artisan Cheese Making Workshop Oct. 29 Northwood, Iowa Nitrogen in Minnesota Surface Waters Info: $49/person; register by Oct. 15 by Oct. 10, 4-6 p.m. contacting the Iowa Department of McKnight Foundation, Minneapolis Agriculture and Land Stewardship, Info: McKnight Foundation is located (515) 281-3545 or download a form at at 710 Second Street, Suite 400; Minwww.IowaAgriculture.gov nesota Pollution Control Agency’s David Wall will present the agency’s National FFA Convention and report that looks at nitrogen levels in Expo Minnesota’s waterways Oct. 30-Nov. 2 Louisville, Ky. Minnesota Governor’s Pheasant Info: “Ignite: Leadership. Growth. SucHunting Opener cess” is this year’s theme for the gathOct. 11-12 ering of the brightest and best of youth Madelia, Minn. in agriculture; log on to www.ffa.org Info: www.mnpheasant.com 4X4 Culinary Minnesota Wine Series Haunted Corn Maze and Feed Mill Nov. 7, Dec. 12, Jan. 9, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Oct. 11, 12, 18, 19; 6:30-9:30 p.m. Minnesota Landscape Arboretum Farmamerica, Waseca, Minn. Learning Center, Chaska, Minn. Info: Log on to www.farmamerica.org; Info: $55/member/session, $65/non-mem$8/person ber/session; call (952) 443-1422 or log on to www.arboretum.umn.edu/learn.aspx Minnesota State Poultry Association Show Pork Quality Assurance Training

Nov. 13 Minnesota Pork Board Office, Mankato, Minn. Info: Registration requested to colleen@mnpork.com or (800) 537-7675 or log on to www.mnpork.com

7 THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

Animal Swap Oct. 5, 8-11 a.m. Rice County Fairgrounds, Faribault, Minn. Info: All chickens must be tested and banded, testing available; all animals and equipment welcome, also farmers market-type items; $3/person for everyone over 10; call (507) 271-7363

Log on to www.TheLandOnline.com for our full events calendar

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MARZOLF IMPLEMENT Spring Valley, MN

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FREEPORT FARM CENTER Freeport, MN

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From the Fields: Looking forward to getting harvest done The Brandts Ada, Minn.

Sugar beet prehaul is complete for Danny Brandt. The Land spoke to him on Sept. 18 as he reported that the sugar content was in Danny Brandt the “upper-teens to low-20s.” Brandt planned to begin the soybean harvest that day. He did take some beans off the field on Sept. 12 and found that they ran 11 percent moisture, “a little better than I thought,” Brandt said. All his beans are seed beans grown for Asgrow. He knows that bean harvest “will take quite a while.” Last year it took two weeks to combine 800 acres as Brandt had to clean out the machinery between varieties. The corn is “starting to black layer.” The crop is still in the 30 to 40 percent range. Brandt was happy to see that “our stalks are really strong.” He predicts that he “won’t be doing much corn before the 10th of October.” If the fields get a frost, Brandt expects that it will be a week or two after the frost that he would be able to start combining. He is “a little more optimistic” about this year’s crop — “I think it will be a decent crop.” Brandt is also gearing up for beet harvest starting on Oct. 1. He believes that it should take “10 days to two weeks to dig them.” As a seasoned beet producer he knows there’s bound to be heat and frost shutdowns. With so much going on in the next couple of weeks, Brandt always is cognizant of the importance of being careful: “Safety is a big issue.” A good reminder for all to be careful in the following weeks as the craziness of harvest begins in earnest.

The Johnsons Starbuck, Minn. “Where Farm and Family Meet”

reach full maturity sometime around Sept. 22 to 25. Messner is staying busy as he has “the combines all ready to go.” He is also busy at Central Valley Co-op as it’s now seed-selling season. With harvest still weeks away, rain is welcome on the Messner farm. “I don’t want to chase any rain away.”

By KRISTIN KVENO The Land Correspondent

The combine is ready to go on the

The Laubenthals Swea City, Iowa

Johnson farm. The Land spoke to Scott Johnson on Sept. 18, the night before he planned to begin soybean harvest. He expects that combining will be in full swing by next Scott Johnson week. The inch of rain the farm received a few days ago won’t delay harvest; in fact, Johnson is grateful for the moisture as “hopefully our tillage will work up a little nicer.” The weather is humid with more chances of rain in the forecast for the area. Johnson is “expecting not a great year on the beans,” though he knows that you “can’t tell how they’ll be until we harvest.” The beans that were damaged by hail dried faster than the unaffected beans. “If everything went well we’d be done with beans in two weeks,” Johnson said. While he’s not optimistic for a good bean crop he feels that corn’s “got a chance to get some pretty decent yields.” The dry weather really took a toll on the crops but Johnson is hopeful that corn will fare better than the beans. “By the middle of October we should be getting into corn,” Johnson said.

At the Johnson farm it will be “pretty busy harvesting in the next two to four weeks,” he said. After a growing season that was filled with rain, hail and drought, getting the 2013 crop harvested will be a welcome relief.

The Messners Northfield, Minn.

On Chris Messner’s farm they finally “caught some rain.” Messner hopes that that 1.1 inches of rain is going to “help the Chris Messner beans some.” When The Land spoke to Messner on Sept. 17 he believed that the moisture the soybean fields received “probably saved three to five bushels.” He knows though that it’s “not a very good bean crop,” with harvest at least three weeks away. Messner is hopeful that he will get a 40-bushel crop or something close to that. With the corn crop, Messner expects that there’s “probably going to be some stalk issues,” more specifically cannibalism of the stalk due to the lack of rain. The weakness of the stalks will vary according to the location and hybrid. Messner predicts he will be combining corn sometime in the first week of October. Corn is expected to

The weather around Charlie Laubenthal’s farm has been “pretty decent.” His crops need that “pretty decent” weather to Charlie Laubenthal continue for as long as possible. The Land spoke to Laubenthal on Sept. 18, and he was relieved that frost wasn’t in the forecast. Fall is coming no matter how much farmers are wishing it away to get more time for the crops to mature before a frost. Laubenthal’s soybean crop is “looking all right but are green.” The aphids continue to plague the late-planted beans, though Laubenthal believes that it has just gotten too late in the season to spray them. Corn in the Laubenthal fields is in varying degrees of maturity, with some corn that can be harvested today and corn that won’t be ready for some time. He predicts that “by the first of October we’ll be harvesting corn.” The current grain market prices have been concerning for Laubenthal — “$4 corn is not real profitable.” With the prices where they are, he believes that “there’ll be a lot of corn going in bins.” He also knows that the market could swing the other way — “the prices could rally, you never know.” Bottom line: “there’s lot of uncertainties,” Laubenthal said. This growing season has been a struggle right from the start for Laubenthal and he won’t be sad when harvest finally ends it. “I was ready for this year to wrap up back in May.” ❖

Look for ‘From the Fields’ reports every week during the growing season in THE LAND


9

THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

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“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

10

Cover story: Coming home to share God’s bounty By KEVIN SCHULZ The Land Editor A search for faith has lead to a successful marriage. Liz Rabbe, a senior at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, was looking for a place to worship while off at school when she was a freshman a few years back. That search landed her at Gloria Dei Lutheran Church on Snelling Avenue in St. Paul. “I’d grab my friends and we’d pile in and go to church,” Rabbe said. About that same time, her home church of Waverly Lutheran Church near Trimont in Martin County, Minn., was looking for a way to increase its outreach. And in Rabbe, they had found their conduit. The culmination of that outreach came to fruition on Sept. 15 when two buses of urbanites rolled up to the front door of Waverly Lutheran Church, just in time for church. The trip to the Waverly church is two-fold of sharing: Sharing God’s bounty with fellow man, and sharing agriculture’s story.

Kevin Schulz

Young Mia of Gloria Dei Lutheran Church in St. Paul marvels at holding a baby chick.

Rabbe, an ag education major at the U of M, had intentions of being a Sunday school teacher at Gloria Dei, but that was pared back to coming into the Sunday school classes of second graders four times throughout the year. In those lessons she ties in agri-

cultural lessons into the New Testament agricultural parables. “I try to get across to them (Gloria Dei second graders) that we need to make the most of the gifts God gives us,” Rabbe said. “The same as they make the most of the gifts God gives them, the farmers in the Waverly church also make the most of the resources that God gives them.” Once the second graders become third graders, they and their families are invited to attend a service at Waverly Lutheran for a “Harvest Homecoming.” The day is for the youth. Kirsten Rabbe, Liz’s mother, said the service has been adapted so the children will get more out of the liturgy. The Waverly Players acted out the first reading, Exodus 16, with elder statesmen of the Waverly congregation playing the parts of Moses, Aaron, a representative of the Israelites and God. Waverly and Gloria Dei children played the parts of the Israelites. The service was followed by a sharing

of God’s bounty with pork chop on a stick (of course, you’re in Martin County), hot dogs, sweet corn and many side dishes for which to be thankful. An afternoon of activities, for the young and old alike filled the grounds of the Waverly church. Local parishioners brought their animals for a petting zoo, including horse rides. Farmers also brought examples of their farm equipment, young and old, for the Gloria Dei visitors to climb on and be in awe of. But mainly the afternoon was about bonding and sharing, and realizing how everyone is really the same, regardless where they may call home. “This is great coming out here,” said Gloria Dei member Brielle Stoyke. “I was wondering why it would take so long to get out here when I heard we were coming to Waverly” thinking they were being bused to Waverly, Minn., which is just west of the Twin Cities. “This is a great way for us to tell farmers’ story,” said Jon Helvig, a Martin County farmer. ❖


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Photos by Kevin Schulz

Waverly Lutheran Church near Trimont, Minn., welcomed two buses with parishioners from Gloria Dei Lutheran Church in St. Paul for a day of worship, fellowship, sharing God’s bounty and exploring southern Minnesota agriculture.

THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

Harvest Homecoming

11

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Alforex Seeds announced as Dow AgroSciences’ alfalfa business Dow AgroSciences LLC announced a new name for its growing alfalfa business, Alforex Seeds. On Oct. 12, 2012, the company announced it was expanding its investment in the alfalfa industry by acquiring the assets of Cal West Seeds based in Woodland, Calif. The new Alforex Seeds will include all of Dow AgroSciences’ alfalfa research and development and seed production operations, as well as the global licensing and private-label alfalfa businesses previously managed by Cal West and Dairyland Seed. “The new name denotes the company’s priority on being the alfalfa and forage experts that producers and agribusiness can rely on,” said Paul Frey, Alforex Seeds general manager. “This is a great development for hay, livestock and milk producers. The combined business backed by Dow AgroSciences will allow the development of new products and technologies that will help the forage producers.” Going forward, Dairyland Seed will

continue to market and sell Dairylandbranded alfalfa seed through its dealer network. Also, Producer’s Choice will continue to sell alfalfa and forage products for Alforex Seeds. Dow AgroSciences acquired Cal West Seeds, a leading supplier of alfalfa, clover and other crops to seed compa-

FarmFirst Dairy Cooperative announces its 2013 scholarship recipients, awarding a total of $28,000. The cooperative presented 24 scholarships to high school and collegiate students throughout the Midwest pursuing a post-secondary education. Minnesota and Iowa scholarship recipients are Jordan Hammerand, Sherrill, Iowa; Jennifer Huhe, Cresco, Iowa; Chelsey Johnson, Heron Lake, Minn.; Jacob Johnson, Heron Lake, Minn.; Cody Lubben, Edgerton, Minn.; Taylor Shoen, Truman, Minn.; Kyle Viland, Pipestone, Minn. “FarmFirst Dairy Cooperative is proud to award these 24 scholarships

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to the sons and daughters of FarmFirst Dairy Cooperative members. These young individuals are destined to be future leaders and we are pleased to assist in their continuing education,” said Dennis Donohue, general manager of FarmFirst Dairy Cooperative. Scholarship recipients were selected based on leadership, scholastic achievement, extracurricular activities, essay responses, their future plans and career goals. All members of FarmFirst Dairy Cooperative and their children attending four-year universities, two-year technical programs or short courses, and high school seniors planning for post-secondary edu-

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cation were eligible to apply for the scholarships. Established in 2013, FarmFirst Dairy Cooperative, based in Madison, Wis., is the largest dairy marketing cooperative in the Midwest. Dedicated to its family farm members, the cooperative represents more than 5,000 farms in Wisconsin, Minnesota, South Dakota, Michigan, Iowa, Illinois and Indiana through policy bargaining, dairy marketing services, laboratory testing opportunities and industry promotion. Learn more about FarmFirst Dairy Cooperative by logging on to www.FarmFirstDairyCooperative.com. ❖

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the alfalfa business, and combining our R&D and seed production efforts under Dow AgroSciences into Alforex Seeds will enhance Dairyland’s ability to continue to provide innovative alfalfa genetics and technology to growers,” said Tom Strachota, Dairyland Seed general manager of West Bend, Wis. ❖

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THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

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THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

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‘Very, Very Noisy Tractor’ a very, very good read This morning, you got up and brrrrrrrrooooomed to breakfast. After that, you stomp-hopped to brush A Very, Very Noisy Tractor your teeth, zoomed back to get dressed, By Mar Pavón and Nivola Uyá rummaged around for your favorite toy, c.2013, Cuento De Luz, distributed grabbed your stuff and clomped out the door to greet the day. by IPG $15.95 And your mom knew where you were the whole time because you weren’t 28 pages exactly quiet, were you? THE BOOKWORM SEZ In the new book “A Very, Very Noisy Tractor” by Mar Pavón and Novila Uyá, By Terri Schlichenmeyer everybody in the area knows who’s coming down the road. Soon, she pulled off the It was a quiet day in the country, when a lady road and headed for a with a huge hairdo came putt-putting down the village filled with flowroad on a tractor. A pizza delivery boy heard her ers and happy colors. coming and hollered that “Ladies with crazy hairdos But the villagers shouldn’t drive tractors,” but she never heard it weren’t so happy — because the tractor was too noisy. they shouted at the lady, too, and said A few miles later, someone with thick glasses that people like shouted that “Ladies with glasses shouldn’t drive her shouldn’t tractors!” but the lady on the tractor (who wore thick glasses, too) never heard it because the tractor drive tractors. was too loud. But a young boy on the side Did we say that the lady on the tractor was wear- of the road was curious because he ing a raincoat? She was, and a mailman yelled that hoped to have a tractor just like that one someday. He had a few questions and the lady ladies wearing raincoats shouldn’t be allowed on answered him, but she couldn’t stay long. Her hustractors. Of course, the lady on the tractor didn’t band — who was a very good cook — had dinner hear him. waiting for her, so she jumped on the tractor and cha-chugged off down the road. At the end of the road, there was a man with a huge mustache and a huge smile. He didn’t care what the lady wore or what colors she had on. The little girl with him didn’t care what the lady on the tractor carried, either. They saw what they saw, and it was love.

It’s hard not to be totally charmed by ‘A Very, Very Noisy Tractor.’ It’s cute, filled with positivity, and is curiously inspirational. It’s hard not to be totally charmed by “A Very, Very Noisy Tractor.” It’s cute, filled with positivity, and is curiously inspirational. It’s also a little odd: adult sensibilities might notice that Pavón and Uyá seem to end their book twice — but turn the page, and there’s plenty of story left. That’s not bad, from a kids’ point-of-view, but it’s something for parents to remember as their story-reading starts to wind down. Still, the good here vastly outweighs that relatively minor oddity: kids will love the humor and the appealing characters. Adults will enjoy the dream-affirming message inside, and the illustrations are absolutely irresistible. Translated from a Spanish version, I think this book is just right for 3-to-7-yearolds who love a good read-aloud. If that’s your little one, then “A Very, Very Noisy Tractor” is a book they’ll shout about. Look for the reviewed book at a bookstore or a library near you. You may also find the book at online book retailers. The Bookworm is Terri Schlichenmeyer. Terri has been reading since she was 3 years old and never goes anywhere without a book. She lives in Wisconsin with three dogs and 10,000 books. ❖

Free app offers way to identify plant problems

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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Farmers, homeowners, greenhouse and nursery growers, agricultural specialists and others who need to identify plants, plant diseases, insect pests and other plant problems have a new mobile application resource created by eight university labs, including Purdue’s Plant and Pest Diagnostic Laboratory. The Plant Diagnostic Sample Submission app includes submission forms with customized questions about agronomic crops, weeds, vegetables, houseplants and more. It was developed by IN3 — www.in3applications.com — located in the Purdue Research Park of West Lafayette, Ind. The app allows users to take and send digital photos and plant-problem descriptions to any of the eight participating labs. The university diagnostic labs involved are Alabama Cooperative Extension, University of Connecticut, University of Illinois Extension, University of Kentucky, Michigan State University, University of New Hampshire and Ohio State University. When submitting samples, users answer questions about the specific types of plant problems they need

to identify, such as farm, household or lawn. Submissions are sent to the labs using the iPhone or iPad built-in mail app, which requires an e-mail account on the device. PPDL will charge normal sample-handling fees for samples submitted through the app. Those fees are $11 for Indiana samples and $22 for out-of-state submissions. However, if a physical sample is needed as a follow-up, there is no additional fee. Each of the other diagnostic labs has specific fee policies, so users should check with their preferred lab for details. The PPDL accepts submissions from the 48 contiguous states. International submissions are not accepted. Right now Kentucky and New Hampshire laboratories will only accept samples via the app from Extension educators and specialists who have a proper passcode. The app is available for free download in the iTunes store. For more information, log on to www.ppdl.purdue.edu/PPDL/hot13/8-12.html. ❖


At old-time threshermen show, it’s all about the farming

Dave has some suggestions Vacuum Grain Screene r

pointing and remembering how all of this affected their days as well, in a time when feeding and caring for families was also much more complicated. Children delighted in the potato-digging event, getting to keep the potatoes they gathered. How ironic that it could make today’s child happy — but how wonderful that they could also experience such a simple joy that came from a time of much simpler pleasures. There is so much to see and experience at this annual event and I commend all of those dedicated people who make it happen every year. I wonder if Karl Lind and Keith Sundblad ever dreamed it would turn into all of this. Forty-three years and a dream has educated — and created memories for — so many. And we are grateful. Karen Schwaller brings “Table Talk” to The Land from her home near Milford, Iowa. She can be reached at kschwaller@evertek.net. ❖

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ARE FINES GOING TO BE A PROBLEM THIS FALL?

when that job took the help of the entire family — from the actual threshing job, to feeding all of those sweaty, hungry men and boys — and without the luxury of microwave ovens, frozen pies or even air conditioning. I saw people of literally every age offer undivided attention to the threshing process. They stood quietly, eyes fixed on the machines. It’s beyond words to generations who never experienced it, and it showed on their faces. The old timers were sweating just watching the process, and remembering the choking heat and chaff that combined to make that necessary job so miserable. When the threshing was finished, a modern tractor and baler baled all of the straw left. Even that looked funny after spending the day around the threshing machine and all those horsedriven implements. We don’t even realize how modern we are today. I saw many a retired woman taking in the threshing and corn shelling events,

THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

It’s an event that only 43 wishing it away, they decided years and a dream could proto act on their dream. They duce. But what an event it is. put together a few machines and invited a handful of My husband and I recently neighbors — all in an effort attended the Albert City to help people understand Threshermen and Collector’s how much more physically Show. This community — difficult farming used to be. with a population of just over 700 — sits quietly in Now, 43 years later, it’s eastern Buena Vista County, grown into 70 acres of farmTABLE TALK Iowa, hardly qualifying by ing machines and memoratoday’s standards of what By Karen Schwaller bilia, taking between 300 makes a “happenin’ town.” and 400 volunteers to make it all happen, and beckoning But in early August every people — locals and those who drive year it becomes a boom town — with from across the nation — to see and more than 14,000 people seeking it out experience a day in the life of a farmer like a mecca. Choosing to spend time before advanced technology changed there with their families, often in the the way it was all done. blazing sun. Choosing to find out, or remember, the way farming used to be Walking around the grounds I am when horses were the actual horsealways struck by so many aspects of power, and mechanized farming was the event. It’s an event of the senses — finding its way into agriculture. Choosseeing the old machinery and horses, ing to understand and participate in the smelling the gas engines, hot blacktremendous changes that have taken smith shop and trees being sawed into farmers and farm families from horselumber; tasting the homemade ice driven plows to the mighty four-wheelcream, feeling the hand-made craft drive beasts with which they farm today. items and old tractors, imagining how Farming has evolved from four legs to they were once used. four-wheel-drive, and nowhere is the I heard the whistle from the giant change more evident than at this steam engine just before it turned the tremendous show, which puts Albert long belt that powered the threshing City on the map. machine, and I saw the thick, black Karl Lind and Keith Sundblad shared smoke billow from its smoke stack as it powered up. I thought about all the a common dream all those years ago. They wished their grandchildren could men it took to keep those machines understand the way farming was when going and finish the oat harvest back in the day. It was a time when neighthey were growing up. So instead of bors were as important as family, and

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BBQ My Way: Have you tried swai? It’s great grilled “Swai?” you say. “What in the world is swai?” Swai is a fantastic white fish that comes from southeast Asia. It has a mild, slightly sweet flavor, which is absolutely delicious. It holds up well to grilling, assuming you don’t over handle it while cooking, and it pan sears well, too. It is now available in frozen form in many grocery stores and best of all, it is quite affordable.

For today’s recipe, we sprinkled the fish with a commercial fish rub and prepared a delicious fireroasted salsa to liberally pile on top. A delicious meal that’s fresh, healthy and affordable, and can be prepared over real charcoal or on the gas grill: What’s not to like? We grilled four swai filets for this recipe. Fire Roasted Salsa 2 to 3 tomatoes — depending on size

2 yellow onions 2 jalapeno peppers 2 ears of corn with husk 1/2 tsp cumin Juice of 1 lime Salt and pepper to taste 1 minced garlic clove Chopped cilantro or parsley (optional) Wrap the two ears of corn in a wet kitchen towel. Microwave on high for four minutes. Take out, let cool for a bit and peel off husk and silk. You will find that it comes off easily. Cut the tomatoes and onions into thick slices. Split the peppers and scoop out the rib and seeds. Be careful to not rub your eyes after handling the peppers. Wash hands thoroughly after seeds and ribs are scooped out. Brush the corn, peppers, tomatoes and onions with olive oil and season with salt and pepper on both sides. Place directly over coals or flames on the grill. Stay with the vegetables making sure nothing burns, flipping regularly. After a light char is created (takes 5 minutes or so) pull off the grill and place on a cutting board. Once cool enough to handle, cut the corn off the cob and cut remaining vegetables into small pieces. Be sure your knife is sharp, otherwise you will turn the tomatoes into a mush, soupy mess. Place all vegetables in a bowl (juice and all). Mix the cumin, garlic and lime juice together. Pour onto vegetables and toss gently. Salt and pepper to taste. Sprinkle the thawed filets with your favorite seasoning. Scrub the grill with a wire brush to remove all grilling residue from the vegetables. Apply olive oil to the grates with an old towel or paper towel to prevent sticking. Place fish directly over coals or flame. Allow to cook for 4 to 5 minutes with the lid open. Gently turn and cook for another 3 minutes. Remove the fish and place on platter. Place a piece of fish on a plate and pile some fireroasted salsa on top. Obviously the salsa would go with almost any grilled fish, but I would encourage you to give swai a try. BBQMyWay is written by Dave Lobeck, a barbecue chef from Sellersburg, Ind. Log on to his website at www.BBQ-My-Way.com. He writes the column for CNHI News Service. CNHI is parent company of The Land. ❖

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Take pet burns seriously, but leave it to the vet

Yetter series features pneumatic hydraulic control kit More about the Air Adjust cab-controlled attachments Residue Managers — Height and down pressure on the Air Adjust Residue Managers can be adjusted independently from each other by fine-tuning air bag pressure. Parallel linkage arms allow the residue manager to follow ground contour, just like the row unit. Coulter/Residue Manager Combo — The 2940 Coulter/Residue Manager Combo is adaptable for various situations and fits a wide range of planter models. Air bags used to control the up and down pressure for the residue manager can be independently adjusted from your tractor cab using the digital controller. The coulter can be removed and the residue manager can still be used. 2940 Air Adjust Coulter is available with ripple, 25 multiwave, or 13 shallow wave blades. The residue manager is available with residue manager wheels or with Yetter Farm Equipment’s exclusive SharkTooth wheels. Firming Wheel — The Air Adjust Firming Wheel complements closing wheels by gently firming the seed zone, which helps create an ideal seedbed. For producers who are experiencing challenging soil conditions, the Firming Wheels create a more uniform growing environment and help prevent air pockets. These benefits result in ideal seed-to-soil contact for even emergence. For more information, log on to www.yetterco.com/products?catId=131&productId=231. ❖

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For today’s growers, the ability to make on-the-go adjustments to planting equipment leads to more acres planted per day. It can also help growers make adjustments that may not have been made otherwise. The 2940 Air Adjust series of products from Yetter, including the 2940 Residue Manager, Coulter/Residue Manager Combo, Firming Wheel, Rolling Basket, and the Floating Residue Manager Basket Combo, allow farmers to do just that. Integral to the Air Adjust system is the Yetterexclusive Pneumatic Hydraulic Control Kit, which hooks into an existing or new hydraulic compressor to control air to the 2940 Series product line. This allows growers to adjust up and down pressure without leaving the cab. The Control Kit’s small dimensions, only 12 x 12 x 6-inches, make installation easy. With the 2940 Air Adjust cab controller, the easyto-read digital screen and buttons allow for precise adjustments, making it convenient to change settings between different conditions. Down pressure can be increased to improve results in no-till and heavy residue conditions. In tilled soil and lighter residue, down pressure can be decreased to allow the cleaners to float with field conditions. The residue managers can be raised for waterways, end rows, wet spots, and more. The in-cab controller also features preset options to which you can save up to five different settings. “Now you can make adjustments to settings with the push of a button, leading to even seed emergence and increased yields,” said Yetter Territory Manager Jared Head.

hose that was used for bathing. It is natural for an owner who witnesses a pet getting burned to want to try to help the animal and ease their pain, but again, the best thing to do is to get the animal to a veterinarian as soon as possible. “If it is not a chemical burn, removing some of the burning material can be helpful,” Diesel said. This is the extent to which an owner should try to help a pet with a burn. Owners can sometimes unintentionally burn a pet when drying them off with a hairdryer after a bath. “If the owner wants to use a hair dryer, it should be done on a cool setting only,” Diesel said. Less harmful ways of drying off a pet would include thorough towel drying or allowing the animal to dry outside in the sun when the weather is not too warm. Sometimes more serious situations can occur such as house or barn fires. “Smoke inhalation can be a big problem for dogs and cats, especially if that animal already has any sort of respiratory condition such as asthma,” Diesel said. When it comes to pet burns, time becomes crucial. The best thing an owner can do for their pet is to get them to a veterinarian as soon as possible to be evaluated and monitored. This is the best way to ensure getting fluffy friends back to their playful and loving selves. Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. More information is available at http://tamunews.tamu.edu. This column is distributed by CNHI News Service. CNHI is parent company to The Land. ❖

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illness and potentially death,” Diesel said. Diesel explained that serious burns require hospitalization and care for several days to weeks to monitor and control for any side effects of the burn. Cars are often one of the causes for accidents resulting in pet burns. There are many other scenarios as well that could be the cause of pet burns, such as barbecue grills, space heaters, spilling hot liquids or food when cooking, objects laying in the yard that conduct heat such as hoses or tools, or puppies or cats chewing on plugged in electrical cords. “Different types of burns require different treatments,” Diesel said. “Chemical burns, for example, might become much worse when water is applied to them, so the nature of the burn helps the veterinarian know how best to treat it.” Sometimes owners do not witness the animal getting burned, so it is important to be able to try and distinguish if a mark that is found on a pet is actually a burn. “Severe burns may show up as large areas of exposed deeper skin; this would look like a scraped knee for example, which could be moist, oozing and often very painful,” Diesel said. Even what looks like only a mild burn can become much worse over time. This is particularly true for thermal burns, which may be caused by heat lamps, water blankets, or even hot water from a garden

THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

Accidents happen, and pets can get burned for one reason or another just like their owners can. When this happens, it is best to have a hands-off policy and leave the treatments to the professionals. “The best thing an owner can do in the case of a burn is get the animal to a veterinarian as soon as possible; burns are considered to be emergencies in just about all situations, and the sooner they are brought in, the better,” said Alison Diesel, lecturer specializing in dermatology, at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Sometimes pet owners will not notice the burned area for days or even weeks after the burn has occurred. One thing to keep in mind with burns is that sometimes what is seen initially is only the tip of the iceberg. “What may look like only a red spot of skin on a pet’s side following a burn incident can quickly become devitalized, dead tissue, which is not only painful but also more at risk for infections over the next couple of days,” Diesel said. Infection in the animal is a big concern when dealing with burns, especially if the burn goes deeper into the lower layers of the skin. “If the skin barrier is not intact and normal, bacteria can quickly enter the wound causing not only local infection but also potentially it can get into the blood stream. This puts the animal at risk for serious

17


THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

18

Calm winds and low water conditions made for a poor 2013 Minnesota Waterfowl Opener on Lake Bella in southwest Minnesota.

John Cross/Mankato Free Press

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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Ducks, water scarce in Minnesota’s waterfowl opener In Nobles County, located in extreme by several hundred blue-winged teal that southwest Minnesota and just a stone’s bobbed on the waves, occasionally taking throw from arid South Dakota, water can to wing, circling, then settling onto the be a scarce, precious commodity even in water again. the best of times. Since teal are some of the earliest But that is especially so in years such waterfowl to migrate from Minnesota, we as this, when rainfall has come sparingly presumed these were migrants taking over the summer months. advantage of the brisk, chilly northwest wind, the result of the weather change So Dale VanThuyne and I were not earlier in the day. altogether surprised at what we found on THE OUTDOORS the eve of Minnesota’s waterfowl opener, After scouting the area, we decided we By John Cross as we scouted Lake Bella, located seven could reach a good miles south of Worthington. hunting area by making a short hike along the edge of After several months of meager rainfall, the manthe lake. made lake that was created in the 1960s as a reservoir to assist in recharging that community’s chronAt 6:15, Saturday morning, ically thirsty water wells, was extremely low. duck and goose decoys placed, we tucked back into the high-andThe wide expanses of mud that separated the thick ring of cattails from the water’s edge made it dry cattails and waited for legal shooting time. clear the lightweight boat we had brought along would be useless. In the pre-dawn, a couple of teal settled briefly into the What’s more, even if we could have launched the decoys, milling nervously before craft, the area we had hoped to hunt — the upper once again taking flight, vanishreaches of the lake where a meandering creek ing into the fog that hung in the widens to form the lake basin — was bone-dry. still air. Three years ago, we were able to motor easily to Legal shooting time finally arrived, heralded with the spot. Hunting was excellent. the boom of distant shotguns. Two years ago, we could reach the spot, but only A few minutes later, against the eastern sky, the after closing the last several hundred yards with silhouettes of four Canada geese loomed, heading push-poles and middle-aged muscle. But once there, straight for our set-up. the waterfowl hunting once again was worth the effort. Last year, during the Drought of 2012, we In range, they banked to the left. “Let’s take ’em,” I didn’t even bother. Months with virtually no rainfall said to my hunting partner. Shotguns boomed. had transformed our hunting spot to an expanse of All four birds continued flying untouched as we cracked, dry mud better suited to hunting pheasexchanged excuses for our poor shooting. ants than waterfowl. Over the course of the morning, shotguns boomed In spite of the current low-water conditions on sporadically to our north where several Wildlife this year’s opener, we nevertheless were encouraged

Management Areas dotted the countryside. To our south, where we could hear another party calling to what we presumed to be passing waterfowl, the guns were silent. And mostly, so were ours. Early on, a few teal ripped past us from behind, our middle-aged reflexes too slow to catch up with the speedy birds. Finally, a trio settled into the decoys. I stood and scratched one as it flew dead-away. Later, I tumbled one from the pair that sped by, left to right. But apparently the hundreds of teal we had seen loafing on the lake the previous afternoon had headed for warmer climes. Two teal, along with a lone mourning dove that VanThuyne tagged as it settled onto the mudflat, were the extent of our opening day action. By 10 a.m., the fog was gone and under a high, blue windless sky, so were the ducks. The seagulls, a few pelicans and myriad shorebirds that found the mud-ringed lake to their liking winged past us. But the only waterfowl in the air were a few highflying, hunter-educated Canada geese. Curiously, during the course of the morning, we never saw a wood duck and only a mallard or two. In Nobles County, water can be a scarce commodity. So can the ducks. John Cross is a Mankato (Minn.) Free Press staff writer. Contact him at (507) 344-6376 or jcross@mankatofreepress.com or follow him on Twitter @jcross_photo. ❖


Local Corn and Soybean Price Index

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Sauk Rapids Madison Redwood Falls Fergus Falls Morris Tracy Average: Year Ago Average:

THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

Cash Grain Markets corn/change* soybeans/change* $4.14 $4.24 $4.31 $3.94 $3.94 $4.04

-.25 -.25 -.35 -.29 -.30 -.70

$11.18 $12.13 $12.23 $12.08 $12.15 $12.23

-1.44 -.89 -1.19 -.74 -.67 -.74

$4.10

$12.00

$7.13

$14.48

NOV

DEC

JAN ‘13

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

SEP

OCT

Grain prices are effective cash close on Oct. 1. The price index chart compares an average of most recently reported local cash prices with the same average for a year ago. *Cash grain price change represents a two-week period.

Grain Outlook

Corn ‘bore’ week waits on harvest

Livestock Angles

Erratic or mundane, take your pick

Grain Angles

The following market analysis is for the week ending Sept. 27. CORN — Harvest is slowly getting under way, field by field, but it hasn’t reached a fever pitch by any means. Add to that a general lack of fresh news, and we have a resulting boring week. December corn rallied a modest 3 cents to settle at $4.54 per bushel. Early yield reports continue to come in better than expected with many observations of 200 bushels per acre or higher. Upside price potential is being limited by these reports. As of PHYLLIS NYSTROM CHS Hedging Inc. Sept. 22, U.S. corn harvest was 7 St. Paul percent complete when we normally have 16 percent of the harvest under our belt. Illinois was 5 percent harvested versus 24 percent on average, Iowa was 3 percent complete versus 9 percent on average, and Minnesota was at zero. Harvest is anticipated to hit 15 percent as of Sept. 29. Sept. 30 brings us the Quarterly Grain Stocks as of Sept. 1 report, which essentially reflects the ending stocks number for the 2012-13 crop year. The average corn estimate is 681 million bushels compared to the September U.S. Department of Agriculture 2012-13 ending stocks figure of 661 million bushels. The range of estimates runs from 552 million to 765 million bushels. If the estimate is proven, it would be a 17-year low for corn stocks as of Sept. 1. In four of the last six years, the actual Sept. 1 grains stocks surpassed trade expectations. See NYSTROM, pg. 20

The livestock markets have either been erratic or mundane as of late depending on whether it be the hog market or the cattle market. The hog market is the culprit of being erratic of late as prices have been either up or down sharply over the past few weeks. The cattle market has continued in a quiet and narrow price range in that same two-week period. On Sept. 20, the U.S. Department of Agriculture released the Monthly Cattle on Feed Report which indicated the following: onfeed Sept. 1, 93 percent; placed during August, 89 percent; marketed during August, 96 percent. This report was seen as positive JOE TEALE for cattle prices as placements Broker were much lower than analysts Great Plains Commodity Afton, Minn. had expected as well as the marketing number greater than anticipated. This could help the cattle market break out of the trading range that has persisted over the past several months. Of course this information is just one side of the fundamental equation. The supply side is the other side of the equation and the demand side continues to languish. Beef cutouts have rallied over the past month and the domestic boxed beef movement continues to be relatively slowed in comparison to previous years. Export business has been sporadic and overall better than last year. Combined the demand for beef at higher levels would have to be questionable given the current economic conditions now and in the foreseeable future. Therefore if beef prices advance much more from current levels, look for more pressure on the volume

If the uncertainty of the weather and the volatile markets had you waiting to sell your corn this year, you are not alone. The delay in forward selling by most farmers will lead to unusually heavy selling pressure as harvest progresses. Even with the recent slight decrease in corn yields by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, this year’s corn crop is large and farmers will need to move large amounts of their grain at harvest. For 2013, the third week in September clearly illustrates the harvest pressure the corn market is just starting to feel. The USDA has updated the GLENN WACHTLER prevent-plant acres to 3.57 mil- AgStar Assistant VP Financial Services lion acres of corn and 1.69 milBaldwin, Wis. lion acres of soybeans. Many of these acres are located in the prime growing areas of our country. To a large degree, the corn market has shrugged off news that this could cause an increase in prices. On Sept. 18, the Federal Reserve tried to breathe some life into the asset markets by extending their $85 billion per month bond buying program. The grain markets rallied briefly, but failed to see much follow-through on Sept. 19. By now, the markets have also had time to absorb the impact of limited rainfall over late summer and corn yields have been higher than expected in the South. The bottom-line in the corn market is that it has been tough for prices to gain any momentum and break the downward-trend in prices.

See TEALE, pg. 20

See WACHTLER, pg. 20

Focusing on the market

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Information in the above columns is the writer’s opinion. It is no way guaranteed and should not be interpreted as buy/sell advice. Futures trading always involves a certain degree of risk.


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THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

20

New crop soybean bushels sorely needed for pipeline NYSTROM, from pg. 19 Weekly export sales this week at 25.2 million bushels were the single largest weekly sales number since November 2012, bringing total commitments to 37 percent above last year. The USDA is projecting corn exports to increase 67 percent this year. In daily USDA reporting this week, Columbia bought 180,000 metric tons of U.S. corn and Mexico bought 197,200 mt. Ethanol production fell 6,000 barrels per day to 832,000 barrels per day. This is 3 percent lower than last year at this time. Ethanol stocks fell from 680 million gallons to 656 million gallons. Inventory is near the lowest levels since weekly data reports began over three years ago. China this week announced they expect their self-sufficiency in corn to fall to 93 percent by 2018 and to 90 percent by 2020. In 2012, their selfsufficiency was 98 percent. Argentina’s ag minister updated their corn production estimate to at least 30 million mt. This is 4 mmt higher than the USDA’s 26 mmt projection. The Chicago Mercantile Exchange this week indicated they will stop accepting Zilmax-fed cattle in the

delivery process of live cattle. According to the delivery regulations, no cattle which are unmerchantable shall be deliverable. Earlier in the month, both Cargill and Tyson announced they would not buy cattle that had been fed zilpaterol. Adding a level of uncertainty to markets is the looming government shutdown Oct. 1 if no budget agreement is reached. If a government closure occurs, it’s estimated the government could run out of money by Oct. 18. OUTLOOK: The $4.45 3/4 support level has held, for now. It will be an act of keeping prices high enough to attract corn into the pipeline and out of on-farm storage versus the knowledge that the carryover will likely exceed 1.5 billion bushels. It’s a question of total supply and “available” supply. Basis premiums for quick shipment are gradually being erased as harvest progresses and full harvest basis was steady this week as grower sales were once again slow. The Oct. 11 monthly crop report will quickly become a market focus once Monday’s report is behind us. On that report, acreage numbers are projected to be tweaked

WACHTLER, from pg. 19 Until now, most producers have had a floor with respect to the minimum revenue per acre provided by their crop insurance revenue plan. For the Upper Midwest, that protection expires at the end of the fall revenue pricing period in October. Your crop insurance does not protect you if crop prices continue to drop after the fall pricing period is over. Many producers were able to insure close to break-even profit levels on their corn acreage. Given the trend of the 2013 corn market, don’t let your profitability disappear or risk earning less than your insurance revenue per acre after your guaranteed revenue protection is up in October. This time of year has typically been a good time of year to “Capture the Carry” in the corn market and may allow your storage to pay for itself. The spread between the December 2013 and July 2014 futures prices on corn is currently around 26 cents and tends to get more attractive during harvest. This spread is the futures market “incentive” for farmers to store your corn, especially in years with a lot of harvest selling pressure. The reward for storing corn may be even greater in those areas that tend

to have a strong spring basis. Producers who have not locked-in the basis on their fall corn contracts may also have an attractive option to move some of those contracts to the spring months. As the corn yields on your farm become more of a certainty, think about reducing your risk if you haven’t made any sales yet. Start by forward selling some of the corn you plan on storing for next spring and summer. This will help pay for grain storage costs by capturing the carry in the market. Study the basis in your local area. Leaving the basis open on your contracts may be an acceptable risk if you believe there will be more demand in your area for corn a few months from now. As the harvest pressure increases and the revenue blanket of crop insurance expires; the uncertainty of this year’s crop will become reality. It’s important to take some risk off of the table if you haven’t done some crop marketing. AgStar Financial Services is a cooperative owned by client stockholders. As part of the Farm Credit System, AgStar has served 69 counties in Minnesota and northwest Wisconsin with a wide range of financial products and services for more than 95 years. ❖

lower and yield possibly increased. I will repeat myself; it’s difficult to be bullish corn with what looks like a big crop coming. Have you begun to look at 2014 sales? SOYBEANS — Soybean harvest is gaining and those bushels are sorely needed in the pipeline. Boats are arriving at the Gulf for execution. Early yield reports lean to the better than expected rather than less, but the range of reports is highly variable. The market seemed tired with everyone just waiting for something to happen — heavier harvest, yield reports, demand, etc. Soybean harvest was reported at 3 percent complete as of Sept. 22 compared to 9 percent on average. In the Delta, Louisiana was 46 percent complete versus 54 percent average, Arkansas on average at 18 percent, and Mississippi was 13 percent done versus 43 percent average. In the Midwest, Illinois was 1 percent complete versus 6 percent average, Indiana 5 percent versus 9 percent average, Iowa 1 percent versus 7 percent average, Nebraska at 3 percent versus 5 percent average, and Minnesota 1 percent versus 10 percent average. Both North Dakota and South Dakota were 3 percent complete versus 12 percent and 10 percent on average, respectively. Harvest progress as of Sept. 29 is pegged at 15 percent complete. The Quarterly Grain Stocks as of Sept. 1, essentially the 2012-13 ending stocks number, is forecasted at 124 million bushels, just 1 million below the USDA’s last estimate. If realized this would be a nine-year low for Sept. 1 stocks. The range of guesses is 106 million to 155 million bushels. As in corn, actual Sept. 1 grains stocks were higher than trade esti-

MARKETING

Study the local area basis levels

mates in four of the last six years. Weekly export sales were huge, but mostly as expected due to China’s announcements last week. Sales were 103.5 million bushels. Total commitments are 16 percent above last year when the USDA is forecasting a 4-percent increase. A total of 140,000 mt of beans were sold to unknown this week. China will be closed from Oct. 1-7 for Golden week, so next week could be a slow sales week. Argentina raised their 201314 bean production to at least 50 mmt. The USDA’s last forecast was 53.5 mmt. OUTLOOK: The gap in the November soybean contract from $12.72 to $12.72 1/2 remains as support. Early ideas for the monthly Oct. 11 balance sheets are for a relatively small decrease in acreage. November soybeans gained just 4 1/2 cents this week to settle at $13.19 3/4 per bushel. The great unknown in beans is the yield, with early reports exhibiting a wide range. This may be enough to keep beans in a $13 to $13.75 range until there is more confidence that the yield won’t slip below 40 bushels per acre. Nystrom’s notes: Contract changes for the week ending Sept. 27: Minneapolis wheat jumped 31 3/4 cents higher, Kansas City soared 39 cents higher and Chicago rallied 36 3/4 cents on higher demand. November crude oil fell $1.88 to $102.87 this week, ultra-low-sulfur diesel declined 2 cents, gasoline was only down 3/4 cents and natural gas was 17 1/2 cents lower. Oct. 11 is the next monthly USDA crop production report. This material has been prepared by a sales or trading employee or agent of CHS Hedging Inc. and should be considered a solicitation. ❖

Pork futures under pressure TEALE, from pg. 19 of beef products in the months ahead. Producers should not become overly optimistic to the point of not protecting inventories when available. The hog market has been the recipient of fewer numbers of available market-ready animals. This rallied prices back to nearing the $100 per hundredweight level basis cash in the Midwest. The futures market on the other hand has been under pressure which prices falling from liquidation of commodity funds and speculative interests. This selling in futures has also come from the idea that hogs season-

ally top around this time of the year. This has widened the basis once again between futures and the cash market allowing a positive basis for producers who are hedged. Pork product movement has been fairly good reflecting good demand for pork. This might reflect a consumer switch to the better value in pork versus beef. Until we see numbers of market-ready hogs increase, hog prices are likely to remain firm as long as the demand for pork remains as firm as it is at the present time. Producers are encouraged to monitor market conditions and protect inventories as needed. ❖


MARL endowment established in honor of Curt Watson

MAKE A LASTING IMPACT.

answer. If he didn’t get the answer he would go and seek the answers out. Sometimes, instead of asking why, he’d ask ‘why not’? Why can’t we do this?” Watson was also passionate about helping younger people in agriculture, and served as a mentor to many. Watson valued family, agriculture and leadership. A group of farmers from around the United States who knew and respected him have contributed seed money for the Curt Watson-MARL Endowment. Watson’s friends, family and colleagues hope that this seed money will be leveraged by contributions from others. Proceeds from the Curt Watson Endowment will be used to help the

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MARL Program provide a dynamic leadership development program for active and engaged adult agricultural and rural leaders in Minnesota. Every two years a MARL class of approximately 30 participants is selected following an open application and interview process. These leaders participate in a series of nine in-state seminars, a national study tour and an international study tour.

The MARL Program is privately funded. Participants pay a fee, which covers approximately 25 percent of the cost of operating the program. The remaining 75 percent is raised through generous investments from individuals, businesses and foundations. Contributions to honor Curt Watson may be sent to SMSU Foundation, Curt Watson — MARL Endowment, 1501 State St., Marshall, MN, 56258. ❖

THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

In recognition of one of the agricultural industry’s leaders, the Minnesota Ag and Rural Leadership Program has established an endowment in honor of Curt Watson from Renville, Minn. Watson passed away in 2012, but leaves a lasting impact on his family, community and the agricultural industry. Watson served as a past president of the Minnesota Corn Growers Association and farmed with his family. Jerry Demmer, another leader, friend and fellow farmer, said that Watson “was a great advocate for corn growers and their mission. He didn’t hold back on asking tough questions that sometimes people didn’t want to hear the

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THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

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Cash cheese slide continues, butter gains carry on This column was written for the marketa year ago when the spot price hit $1.95. ing week ending Sept. 27. Twenty-eight cars traded hands on the week. AMS butter averaged $1.4304, up As said before, roller coasters go down 3.1 cents. in the course of events and the last week of September saw cash cheese continue Demand increased both domestically and the previous week’s downturn. The Chedin the export market, forcing butter manudar blocks closed Friday at $1.75 per facturers to decide which market to sell to. pound, down 4.5 cents on the week and Manufacturers have been taking advantage 32.5 cents below a year ago when they of the greater profits in the export market, were at $2.0750. The barrels were down according to the DMN. Several butter manuMIELKE MARKET 4.75 cents on the week, to $1.72, 31.5 facturers are facing tight cream supplies due WEEKLY cents below a year ago. Twelve cars of to declining milk production and lower butBy Lee Mielke block and nine of barrel sold on the week. terfat levels. Retail buyers are trying to The Agricultural Marketing Serviceplace orders to stay ahead of the recent surveyed block price averaged upswing in butter prices but are finding $1.7798, up 3.3 cents, and barrels it difficult. averaged $1.8203, up 2.9 cents. Cash Grade A nonfat dry milk closed Friday at Cheese production is lower as milk supplies across $1.83, down 1.5 cents on the week, while Extra much of the country are described as tight, accord- Grade remained at $1.78. AMS powder averaged ing to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Dairy $1.8149, up 1.1 cent. Dry whey averaged 58.23 cents Market News. Increased Class I usage along with per pound, up 0.7 cent. seasonally reduced milk volumes have cheese makPreliminary data in this week’s Cold Storage ers reporting a harder time finding milk. Good report shows Aug. 31 butter stocks at 268.5 million retail demand is moving cheese from storage and pounds, down 9 percent, or 27.3 million from July, reducing stocks. Export demand is adding to the 2013 but up a healthy 34 percent, or 67.4 million pull of cheese from storage. Cheese manufacturers pounds from August 2012. would like to increase production, but are having to American cheese, at 670.4 million pounds was choose where to best use available milk supplies, down 4 percent from July and 3 percent above a year according to the DMN. ago. The Daily Dairy Report said this is the strongest Butter saw a third week of gain this week, closing July-to-August drop in American cheese since 2004. Friday at $1.61, up a penny on the week (up 18 The total cheese inventory stood at 1.1 billion cents in the last three weeks) but is 34 cents below

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pounds, down 4 percent from July and 5 percent above a year ago. Butter stocks ballooned to over 300 million pounds this spring, the first time since June 2003, according to FC Stone risk management adviser Ron O’Brien. Speaking in Tuesday’s DairyLine, O’Brien said, “that’s what pressured the butter market lows to $1.36 this year. We’ve been rallying since the middle of August.” He said that butter prices were only around $1.10 in June of 2003 when stocks were over 300 million pounds, but then rallied to $2.3725 the following spring. “Markets can rally despite heavy stocks and we really have to turn our attention to demand. The first seven months of this year we have exported 15.1 percent of our total milk solids. January-to-July exports of butter are up almost 30 percent from a year ago. Demand is the big variable moving forward,” O’Brien said. “Adding an uptick in butter prices could bring record setting Class IV prices.” ■ Meanwhile, DairyBusiness Update reports that U.S. per capita cheese consumption totaled 33.51 pounds in 2012, up about one-quarter pound from 2012 and surpassing the previous high of 33.50 pounds in 2007, according to preliminary figures released this week by USDA’s Economic Research Service. Annual U.S. per capita cheese consumption has increased in eight of the past 10 years, and is now about 2.9 pounds higher than 2002. About 82 percent (27.43 pounds) of all cheese consumed in 2012 was “natural,” with the remainder (6.08 pounds) consumed as a processed cheese in other food products. Mozzarella and cheddar continue to be the favorites among U.S. consumers in 2012, at 11.51 pounds and 9.43 pounds, respectively. Mozzarella consumption rose slightly in 2012, pushing total Italian cheese consumption to 14.93 pounds per person. In contrast, cheddar consumption declined slightly in 2012, but a small increase in “other” American cheese consumption pushed the total American category to 13.22 pounds, according to the DBU. ■ New Zealand’s Fonterra Cooperative provided some food for thought to the market this week by increasing its forecast farm gate milk price for the 2014 season, the third time in two months. Chairman John Wilson said the cooperative announced that it has increased its forecast by 50 cents to $8.30 per kilograms of milk solids. The increase, along with an estimated dividend of 32 cents per share, amounts to a forecast cash payout for 2014 of $8.62. That’s equivalent to a $21 to $21.55 per hundredweight U.S. All-milk price, after converting currency differences and fat and protein content of the milk, according to High Ground Dairy’s Eric Meyer in Friday’s DairyLine. He said this would be a record high, if realized, and could have a bullish impact across the entire global dairy complex and “mean good things for U.S. dairy farmers.” He credits solid demand and pointed to New Zealand’s close relationship with China. Chinese See MIELKE, pg. 23


Milk supplies tight across much of United States

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NMPF press release stated, “now that the House has passed its nutrition policy portion of the farm bill, the Federation urges House leaders to quickly appoint conferees who should, with their counterparts in the Senate, finish work on a new farm bill and get it passed into law.” The NMPF charged that “for the nation’s dairy farmers, it is critical for agriculture leaders in the House and Senate to include in the 2013 farm bill the provisions of the Dairy Security Act, which has already been approved this year by both the House and Senate agriculture committees. “The Dairy Security Act will provide dairy farmers with a cost-effective safety net, while protecting consumers and taxpayers at the same time. Dairy producers have been waiting two years to know the details of the federal dairy safety net. They need this information to make business decisions. Along with the rest of American agriculture, milk producers nationwide urge lawmakers to take this critical last step in the evolution of a better farm program.” Looking “back to the futures,” the Fourth Quarter 2013 pack average was at $17.35/cwt. on Sept. 6, down 24 cents from the previous week. It averaged $17.67 on Sept. 13, $17.62 on Sept. 20, and was averaging around $17.64 late-morning Sept. 27. Lee Mielke is a syndicated columnist who resides in Everson, Wash. His weekly column is featured in newspapers across the country and he may be reached at lkmielke@juno.com. ❖

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then the 1949 Ag Act would be implemented. ■ An IDFA press release charges that food manufacturer, restaurant and retailer groups recently voiced strong support for the dairy provisions as included in the House-passed farm bill. In a letter to Senate agriculture committee Chairwoman Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., and Ranking Member Thad Cochran, R-Miss., the groups urged the senators to reject “any new government dairy ‘supply management’ program.” A new program to impose quotas on milk supplies, called the Dairy Market Stabilization Program, was included in the farm bill as passed by the Senate in June. In July, the House rejected the controversial Dairy Market Stabilization Program by more than a twoto-one margin, 291-135. Ninety-five Democrats joined 196 Republicans in support of compromise dairy language that calls for a strong safety net for dairy farmers without also imposing limits on the amount of milk they can sell. “The House bill has accepted and incorporated over 75 percent of what was approved by the Senate,” the letter continued. “It establishes an effective and expanded revenue insurance program for dairy farmers that will help them endure tough economic times, while removing an unnecessary regulatory burden on dairy businesses and providing opportunity for market expansion, new jobs and economic growth.” The National Milk Producers Federation sees it differently and called on lawmakers to get to work. An

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THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

MIELKE, from pg. 22 demand has been fairly insatiable throughout the course of this year, he said, with whole milk imports up over 40 percent from a year ago. A Fonterra press release stated that “the record forecast farm gate milk price reflected continuing strong international prices for dairy, particularly Whole Milk Powder driven by robust demand from Asia, especially China. We are still facing high levels of volatility around the world.” Speaking of the world market, Cooperatives Working Together accepted 18 requests for export assistance this week to sell 4.041 million pounds of Cheddar, Gouda and Monterey Jack cheese and 992,080 pounds of butter to customers in Asia, Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. The product will be delivered through February and brought the CWT’s 2013 cheese exports to 100.97 million pounds plus 71.54 million pounds of butter, 44,092 pounds of anhydrous milk fat and 218,258 pounds of whole milk powder to 37 countries. ■ Milk supplies across much of the country continue to be described as tight. The Northeast and MidAtlantic states are sending milk to the Southeast for increased Class I demand. Florida imported more than 200 loads of milk the week of Sept. 16 from outside of the state. Milk production in the Central region bounced back some from the recent hot weather, but remains tight for manufacturing needs. California milk production was mostly flat with recent weeks. Arizona production also recovered some from recent unfavorable weather conditions. Northwest milk supplies are seasonally tight and production is steady to fractionally lower. Milk supplies are sufficient for Class I needs, but manufacturing milk supplies are tight with many plants working on reduced schedules. Cream demand is good as production of products using cream increases for the fall. ■ In dairy politics, International Dairy Foods Association senior vice president Jerry Slominski said the USDA should not move quickly to enforce the 1949 law that will come into effect Jan. 1 if the farm bill is not extended or updated before the end of the year. His comments came in response to U.S. Rep. Collin Peterson, D-Minn., ranking member of the House ag committee, who called on the USDA to pressure Congress to pass a new farm bill. Slominski said early implementation of the “outdated law” would “dramatically and artificially raise consumer prices of dairy products and harm the dairy industry.” “Some members of Congress are again using scare tactics on consumers in an attempt to obtain a new farm bill,” according to Arden Tewksbury, Pro-Ag manager. In addition, dairy farmers are being used as pawns by the same Congressmen as an example to what the consequences could be to consumers if a new farm bill is not passed. These same Congressmen are saying that prices to consumers could double in price if a new farm bill is not passed by Oct. 1. The assertion is that if a new farm bill is not passed,

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Moonstone Farm takes ‘slow food’ movement to heart Association. The couple joined a grazBy RICHARD SIEMERS ers circle of folks already involved in The Land Correspondent There is a wealth that is not meas- grass-based agriculture or wanting to ured by money. Audrey Arner and do so. The group developed a feed mixRichard Handeen are enjoying that ture of 13 different grasses and wealth on their 240-acre Moonstone legumes. Farm in Chippewa County, Minn. With that support Arner and HanThe year after Arner and Handeen deen took the last big step — they took were married, 1973, they moved to the rest of the land out of corn and soythe farm that had been in Handeen’s beans and planted it to perennials. family since 1872. In the past 40 Today their grass-fed beef is the priyears they have moved away from mary enterprise that supports their cropping and have slowly transitioned farm. the farm to all perennials. With the price of corn and soybeans “Richard’s father, like so many peo- these days, one may question the wisple of his generation, abandoned dom of their decisions, but none of diversity for the sake of specializing these moves came without deliberaand using the tools of the modern tion. Handeen shared the philosophy by which their farm was guided. era,” Arner said. “Farmers need to make a living out Federal farm programs encouraged here on the land,” he said. “That living and supported that change. “We have respect for what that gen- relies on the health of our ecosystem. eration did,” Arner went on, “but How do we take that long-enough view when it became our responsibility to to recognize how what we do, the way take the next step, we wanted to farm we do it, affects that basic ecosystem? So in a way that was congruent with how we try to take as long a view as we can.” There is a small creek that runs we felt about food.” through their property, Today they describe and they are able to see that in the terms of the the improvement in We have respect Slow Food movement: water quality that has food that is good, clean for what (Hancome from their man(as uncontaminated as deen’s father’s) agement practices by possible, not relying on generation did, comparing the color of pesticides or contributrun-off from their fields but when it ing to pollution), and with that from tiled became our fair (giving growers row crop fields. just compensation for responsibility to Both economic prestheir labor). take the next sures and environmenThis was not a sudstep, we wanted tal pressures need to be den turnabout when to farm in a way considered. they took over the that was congru“Row crop farming farm. The changes ent with how we right now is a very profcame slowly, informed felt about food. itable enterprise, and it by previous generais also an easy one to tions but gradually — Audrey Arner abuse,” Handeen said. modified to fit their “We human beings vision. have to recognize at “First we went from broadcasting herbicides to banding them, then to some point that we are going to have to ridge-tilling, then we started to do take steps that aren’t just driven by organic cropping,” Arner said. “We immediate economics.” That long-range view undergirds came to plant our first perennials on cropland when there was an alfalfa co- their approach to agriculture. op (Minnesota Valley Alfalfa ProducThey direct market their beef cattle ers) that was going to be producing to individuals and Minneapolis/St. power, pelletizing alfalfa. It gave us a Paul restaurants, and retail some from confidence to be planting perennials.” Bill’s Grocery in Montevideo and their That confidence grew in the early on-farm store, which also stocks meat, 1990s when Arner was working for cheese and flour from area growers. Land Stewardship Project and organizing for the Sustainable Farming See MOONSTONE, pg. 27

Handeen with some of his pottery, in the Moonstone Farm store.


enjoying a rd Handeen say they are Audrey Arner and Richa rm that is not measured by money. Fa wealth at Moonstone

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The couple built a beac h where friends and fam along Moonstone Farm’s retention pond, ily often relax on Sund ay afternoons.

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mers Photos by Richard Sie

MOONSTONE, from pg. 26 And the couple makes sure there is Grass and alfalfa are not the only balance so life is not all work. They perennials on the farm. They have a have created a beach on their retention pond where family and friends vineyard and trees and bushes. spend Sunday afternoons. Both are “We still have about 25 acres in tree members of performing music groups, strips that are in the Conservation and Handeen makes pottery. Reserve Program,” Arner said, “plus 15 All of this variety sounds like a good acres that are no longer in CRP. We life, but it’s not a way to get rich, is it? have over 7,000 trees, 42 different That depends on your definition. species, planted in what were corn and “We are rich,” soybean fields, creatArner said. “It’s a ing windbreaks and different kind of If your goal in life is wildlife habitat but wealth. If your goal just to make money, also that will have in life is just to then there’s a kind of eventual potential make money, then agriculture (for doing for production of there’s a kind of timber, fruit, nuts, agriculture (for so) that excludes a lot ornamentals, and doing so) that of people. But if the medicinals.” excludes a lot of goal of living on the people. But if the About 5 years ago earth includes a qualgoal of living on the a storm blew down ity of life that has balearth includes a 200 older trees, quality of life that ance in it, and pleasopening up the has balance in it, ure (there’s a kind of canopy in their pleasure, grove. Learning agriculture) that works and (there’s a kind of from permaculture with nature and agriculture) that design, they are enchances diversity. works with nature making an “edible and enhances forest” out of the — Audrey Arner diversity.” grove, planting a variety of fruit and (Speaking of nut trees, and on the bush level plant- diversity, close to 90 species of birds ing currants, gooseberries, josta have been identified on their farm.) berries, seaberries, raspberries, and This approach is working for Arner more. and Handeen. Honoring those who To see all of this first-hand, guests have gone before and working with can rent the Broodio for an on-farm extended family, they have drawn up stay. The Broodio began life as a long-range goals for Moonstone Farm. brooder house, became an art studio, Those goals read in part: “We will cultiand is now furnished as a one-room vate a sense of self-worth among all, to cottage. It is rented out most week- contribute to the betterment of our ends, even a couple times a month in neighborhood and community, and to the winter. be agents of change in fostering a susDuring the winter Arner consults tainable civilization. We will live within with groups on organizational develop- our means and be able to pass on to ment — visioning, strategic planning, future generations the gifts of Creation conflict resolution — drawing on her that have been passed on to us.” 17 years of experience organizing and Long-range encompasses looking to leading activities for Land Steward- the past as well as the future. Arner ship Project. and Handeen recognize that their Arner and Handeen continue to pass responsibility for this piece of the their vision on to a new generation. landscape is just “a blink of the eye” Their daughter and son-in-law operate in its long history. They promote that a Community Supported Agriculture outlook whenever the opportunity farm nearby. And they have had over arises. 20 interns work on their farm, all of “The key,” said Handeen, “will be whom have been screened for their that we as a society recognize that we interest in farming as opposed to sim- have to incentivize those choices that ply wanting a rural experience. take the longer view of the planet.” Perennial polyculture requires more For more information, log on to their human labor, but it is a labor of love. website at www.moonstonefarm.net. ❖

27 THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

‘We need to incentivize choices that take the longer view’


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Photos by Carolyn Van Loh

Rare fruit — Orchard wins patent for apple variety By CAROLYN VAN LOH The Land Correspondent The Ocheda Orchard south of Worthington in Nobles County (Minn.) has been growing and marketing apples for nearly 50 years, according to owner Chuck Nystrom, but apple orchards have been a part of the Nystrom family for four generations. In the early 1900s, Chuck’s greatgrandfather, grandfather and greatuncles founded Nystrom Brothers Fruit Farm. Nystrom’s grandfather helped his dad establish Ocheda Orchard in 1964. Although he was in junior high school, he enjoyed assisting with the planting. “I skipped school to plant apple trees,” he chuckled. “Then I’d go back to school with a sunburn.” Nystrom knows his apples. When he gave The Land a tour of the 30-acre orchard in early September, he picked a Honeycrisp from a tree, taste tested it and determined the fruit wasn’t quite ready to harvest. A highly popular variety developed by the University of Minnesota and marketed since 1991, Honeycrisp is described as “explosively crisp.” A number of years ago, Nystrom’s curiosity prompted him to wonder what kind of apples the seeds would produce. “You have to have cross pollination,” Nystrom said, “but the fruit is still the mother’s variety.” What followed was a labor-intensive process of planting the seeds and later

transplanting them to a greenhouse to grow a season. To observe the tree’s characteristics and to evaluate the fruit, the plant is then planted in the orchard until it fruits. If it looks promising, Nystrom would graft more trees of the variety to continue the evaluation. “Apple breeders can’t plan. There’s no way to predict the outcome. Only 1 in 20,000 experimental plants will make its way into a productive orchard,” he said. Fruit from one of his “trial and error” experiments caught the eye of a company in Washington state that Nystrom has worked with for years. That apple

tree became the one out of 20,000 to people like this other apple that isn’t receive a patent. The new variety will patented yet,” he said. “They like it go by B-51 until it receives its trade better than B-51.” name, hopefully by the end of the year. Consumers dictate the type of apple In August, Nystrom that producers need to received notification develop. “We’ve got a that his B-60 variety had lot of good apples We’ve got a lot been approved for a growing in our of good apples patent, while another is orchard, but they’re still awaiting approval. not for the supermargrowing in our They were also grown ket because of their orchard, but from Honeycrisp seed. appearance,” Nystrom they’re not for Nystrom said both said. Consumers want the supermarket apples are quite notean apple that looks because of their worthy. good, as well as one that pleases their appearance. “I know the horticulture taste buds. — Chuck The University of Minnesota also Nystrom researched and developed the Zestar (1999) and SnowSweet (2006). The university has the financial resources and personnel to do the meticulous hands-on work. Nystrom did all the work himself until he had a viable product to present to the company in Washington. Most of Ocheda Orchard’s apples are sold directly to customers at the orchard. The new variety is presently being test grown in select Minnesota orchards near Fairmont, Mazeppa, Webster, Buffalo and Delano. B-51 should be available in early October, and Nystrom predicts that it will sell out quickly because of the limited supply. Log on to www.ochedaorchard.com for more information. ❖


It’s a Honey(crisp) of a year for apple harvest

Photos by John Cross/Mankato Free Press

Above: Larry Harbo checks on apples at the Welsh Heritage Farm orchard. The orchard is being replanted using a post and wire trellis system that makes caring for and picking the apples easier. Below: Some of the most popular Minnesota apples, including Zestar and Honeycrisp, are being picked now.

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the 700-tree orchard. “We’re a mom-and-pop operation. We pick ’em all, bag ’em all and sell them out of our apple barn,” she said. The Welsh Heritage orchards, with 1,500 trees, were started 33 years ago and the operation is in the midst of a major replanting. “We’re in the process of replanting the orchard to new trellis systems,” Harbo said. “The apples are all on a trellis, they’re planted three feet apart and are eight-feet tall and three wires support them,” Harbo said. The closer plantings means about 50 of the old, large trees are taken out and replaced with 150 of the more compact trees. The trellis system makes it easier to spray and manage the trees and provides a little more sun and air circulation. But the big payoff comes this time of year, Harbo said. “The big thing in this business is getting the apples picked and it’s easier with a trellis. There’s more pruning and work when you start but they’re easier to pick. It’s the way the apple business is moving.” Inside the Welsh store just south of Minnesota Highway 60, Harbo’s wife, Libby, has been busy peeling apples and baking pies. In a nearby building, their son, Tim, has been making hard cider, a fairly new offering at the farm. “Pressing apple cider is dictated by the number of varieties available. You need five or six different apples to make a good cider blend,” Harbo said. Rodenberg said most customers have a favorite apple they wait for, be it a Red Baron, Wealthy or Honeycrisp. “But people try new ones and they take off. A lot of people really love Sweet 16, it has crunch to it and it’s sweeter.” For her, though, the old Minnesota standard — the Haralson — is hard to beat. “The Legislature made the Honeycrisp the official Minnesota apple, but the Haralson is the unofficial one.” The Mankato Free Press is a sister publication to The Land under The Free Press Media. ❖

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By TIM KROHN Mankato Free Press Even the names can make your mouth water: Sweet Tango, Honeycrisp, Sweet 16. With a near-perfect growing season behind them, area apple orchards are seeing a bountiful harvest. “Things are looking very good. We have a very large crop this year,” said Larry Harbo of Welsh Heritage Farm near Lake Crystal, Minn. At A-Peeling Acres Orchard at New Ulm, Minn., Dianne Rodenberg was busy helping harvest trees heavy with produce. “Right now it’s McIntosh, the Beacon and William’s Pride have come and gone. The Zestars are ready and we’re getting into the Honeycrisps,” she said. “The Sweet Sixteens and Haralsons should be ready in a week or two.” This season’s abundance is a turnaround from last year when a warm March, followed by a hard frost in April, killed off apple blossoms. The tough start was followed by widespread hail storms that damaged apples and slashed the harvest. Minnesota is home to 150 apple growers who generate some 16 million pounds of fruit and generate $12.6 million. There was a slow start to the growing season, with cool wet weather putting the bloom off by two weeks, to late-May, but warm weather and good rainfall over the summer was perfect for the apple crop, Harbo said. A new favorite at Welsh Heritage is the Sweet Tango, a newer variety developed by the University of Minnesota. “The Sweet Tango, Honeycrisp and Zestar are the three stars of the U of M,” Harbo said. Rodenberg said the work done at the university over the years has given a big boost to apple growers. “The U of M does a fabulous job with their fruit development.” Her family’s orchard was started in 1985 and is owned by her mother-in-law, Patricia Rodenberg, with Dianne’s husband, John, and son, David, managing

THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

Harvest far better than last year’s ice, storm damaged crop

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Bee keeping a frustrating yet rewarding endeavor By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer Bee keeper Warren Schave always has an audience when talking bees at the Minnesota State Fair. He speaks of himself as being a hobby apiarist — the technical term for bee keeper — but he’s been doing bees and making honey for 20 years. He lives at Wyoming, Minn., about 25 miles north of St. Paul off Interstate 35. He has 18 hives in four locations around Forest Lake, Lindstrom, Shafer and Wyoming — all nearby locations, and all environments with the important combination of woods, fields and flowering plants, both field and wild. Working at the Bee and Honey Exhibit in the Horticulture Building Schave said, “if your hives are located in basically a monoculture environment with mostly cultivated crops like corn and soybeans you don’t get the variety of flowers that the bees gather the nectar from.” Honey bees prefer a mixture of clovers, wild flowers, alfalfa and some basswood trees. “Basswood is an excellent honey source. The basswood trees flower for just a short period of time, typically late-June and early July. It’s Minnesota’s lightest honey. It’s just very good honey,” Schave said, indicating it’s also his favorite honey. The color of honey is determined by the nectar that the bees bring into the colony from a variety of flowering plants. “A bee typically will travel 2 1/2 to 3

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miles in any direction. They have scouts out searching for the favorite source of nectar. When they come back to the hive they do what we call the ‘waggle dance’ which tells the rest of the working bees that this is a good nectar. Then it’s sort of a ‘follow me’ flight back to this particular nectar source,” he said. Production figures Since we’re not talking bushels per acre in the honey business how do bee keepers measure the production of their hives? For Schave if he gets only 30 to 60 pounds of honey per hive he would call that a poor year. “But if I get 75 to 80 pounds, I call that a pretty good year and anything over 100 pounds per hive is an excellent year.” He leaves about 100 pounds of honey in the hive if he is wintering his bees. As you might expect, production varies from hive to hive and from year to year. According to Schave, a few strong hives offset the lesser production from the poorer hives but his average over the years has been 75 pounds to 100 pounds of honey per hive. “A strong hive this time of year will have anywhere from 50,000 to 65,000 bees. And one queen bee is the boss and runs the entire show,” he said. Despite all this royalty, queen bees are rather short lived. “Typically bee keepers will winter a queen over just one year so she’ll be an egg layer for two years in the hive. She could live for several years but her egg laying capacity declines rapidly after that second

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year. The name of the game is • Support the University of having maximum number of Minnesota Bee Lab in their bees in that hive when the necefforts to keep bees healthy. tar flow hits,” he said. Is bee keeping for you? The fall issue of a newsletter A good queen will lay up to for members of the Minnesota 2,000 eggs per day. That Honey Producers Association demands a lot of energy. She simply says that bee keeping is gets fed royal jelly by the workers (her daughters) who Warren Schave not as hard as you might think. Bees are easier to care also consume a lot of honey in their work. As Schave explained, for than dogs (perhaps even cats). there’s also quite a few drones hanging Honey bees are actually pretty good at out in each hive with nothing much to taking care of themselves. They don’t need much space or time. They basido except “service” the queen mother. cally gather their own food and water. Death loss continues And you don’t need to ask someone to Honey bee colonies are dying at take care of your bees when you go on unprecedented rates. Every year an avervacation. age of 30 percent of all honey bee colonies If you are interested, a good way to in the United States die. These losses occur by both commercial and backyard start is by signing up for the annual beekeepers in every state. This ongoing classes held at the Minnesota Landloss threatens the production of fruits scape Arboretum in November and Log on to and vegetables across the United States, February. plus the production of honey, an amazing www.beelab.umn.edu for information. natural sweetener. Schave does make money on his bees, Minnesota, one of the top honey-pro- but “I don’t have to depend on my honey ducing states in the nation, has seen income.” Commercial producers losing its honey production diminish every 50 percent or more of their colonies two years in a row are likely out of business, year for the past 20 years. said Schave. Why the huge decline in bee numbers “Like farming, it’s a challenge every across the nation? Schave said most year,” he said. “It’s very people think it’s that weather-dependent family of insecticides and now with these (neonicotinoid insecother issues, bee ticides) primarily keeping is both used in urban setfrustrating but tings. But lack of rewarding. Danhabitat is perdelions were so haps a growing late this spring concern also, I had to feed since most my colonies highway sugar water to ditches are keep them now being alive. But I do it mowed, Conserbecause it satisvation Reserve fies.” Program land is being plowed back Did you know? into row-crop agri• Honey bees visit culture, and there’s two million flowers to just a general reducmake one pound of tion in forage crops honey. across the nation — these are the life• Honey is nature’s original sweetline of a healthy bee population. ener. Humans have enjoyed honey for Parasitic mites are also now a major at least 8,000 years ago. problem, especially since they are • A worker honey bee will gather just becoming resistant to certain medicaone-twelfth teaspoon of honey during tions. Plus bees have a few diseases that infect and kill. These several fac- its lifetime. tors have pushed all bees to the tip• Honey bees were brought to North ping point, but you can help: America by the colonists. • Plant bee flowers everywhere • The keeping of bees is known as apiculture. • Reduce or eliminate pesticide use For more information, log on to • Provide nesting sites for wild bees www.MinnesotaHoneyProducers.org. ❖


Protect pollinators while trying to protect your crops Honey bees and native bees can be found foraging in cornfields, especially when pollen is available during tasseling and silking. Pesticide applications made during these growth stages may put pollinators at risk. The emerging problem of corn rootworm resistance to Bt traits may result in increased pesticide applications during these crop growth stages when the adult rootworm beetles are active. Furthermore, these growth stages are critical for protection of sweet corn against certain caterpillar pests. Consider pollinators when making manage-

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”

the pesticide and the application. • Use pesticides with low toxicity and low residual to bees. For example, avoid using dusts or wettable powder insecticide formulations because they generally are more toxic to bees. • Evening or early morning applications are the least harmful to bees because fewer bees are foraging. • Never apply pesticides outdoors on a windy day (winds higher than 10 mph) which could cause spray drift problems. Honey bees and native bees visit the flowers of soybean and many flowering weeds growing in and near soybean fields. As soybean aphid populations continue building throughout the state, aphid management should take these pollinators into consideration. The University of Minnesota recommends making treatment decisions based on scouting program (i.e., getting into the field and counting aphids) and the following economic threshold for R1 (beginning bloom) to R5.5 (seeds expanding in pods) soybean: treat if populations are increasing, the majority (at least 80 percent) of plants are infested and average aphid counts exceed 250 aphids per plant. This threshold can protect yields, reduce costs, conserve natural enemies of aphids and other pests, and reduce the risk of pests developing resistance to pesticides. Treating soybean aphid populations when they exceed this threshold will minimize unnecessary pesticide applications and reduce pollinator exposure to pesticides.

ment decisions for certain corn pests. When using pesticides, always read and follow the label directions. Labels for some products/formulations with high toxicity to bees will provide specific directions for minimizing risk to pollinators. The label is the law. Keeping these recommendations in mind will help you to protect honey bees and other pollinators while you use pesticides to protect your crops. To learn more about bee health, log on to www1.extension.umn.edu/ garden/honey-bees. This article was submitted by University of Minnesota Extension, and written by Robert Koch and Marla Spivak, U of M Extension entomologists. ❖

THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

Honey bees and native bees forage in and near soybean and cornfields, especially during dry weather. When treatment decisions are being made for pests of these crops, it is important to consider minimizing the risk to these pollinators. Bees are the most important pollinators of our fruits, vegetables and crops including alfalfa hay that feed our farm animals. Honey bees and thousands of native bee species rely on the flowers they pollinate for good nutrition and health. Bees are being pushed to the tipping point by various factors, such as disruption of natural habitats, diseases and parasites, and widespread overuse of pesticides. Producer knowledge of basic bee biology can help protect bees from pesticides. Bees forage throughout the growing season from sun up to sun down when temperatures are above 50 to 55 degrees Fahrenheit. Honey bees fly an average of two miles on each foraging trip, searching for flowers over an 8,000-acre area surrounding the hive or apiary. Native bees generally fly within half mile of their nest. If flowers are blooming, bees will forage on them. Beekeepers cannot close up the hive during a pesticide application because the bees will suffocate. Moving the bees is not a viable option because bees return to their original site unless they are moved out of their foraging range, which is more than three miles away. Locations to place bee hives are difficult to come by, and it is even harder to find locations where the bees are out of range of pesticide application. In a July 3, article in the North Dakota State University Crop and Pest Report, Janet Knodel provided several general recommendations for reducing pesticide risks to pollinators. • Know and communicate with beekeepers about pesticide application schedules and products. • Use economic thresholds and other Integrated Pest Management strategies. Economic thresholds ensure that pesticides are used only when crop losses prevented by pesticide use are greater than the cost of

31


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

32

Produce co-op dream surviving a few growing snags By TIM KING The Land Correspondent LONG PRAIRIE, Minn. — Over the past two summers a group of packing house workers here has carved time out of their often fiveand-a-half day per week 10-hour work days to create a dream they brought with them from Mexico more than a decade ago. The dream they’ve created is the Agua Gorda Cooperative. This year the members of the Agua Gorda Cooperative are growing specialty vegetables for the Mexican restaurant and grocery business on four acres of irrigated land. Agua Gorda is the name of the impoverished town they came from in the state of Michoacan. “The cooperative had its beginnings at the end of 2011 when members were located,” said Jaime Villalaz, of the Latino Economic Development Center. The LEDC provided early leadership, training and financing with the use of a U.S. Department of Agriculture grant. “LEDC has helped us with technical assistance, training, finding markets, and to get a loan,” co-op member Filoberto Abonce said. “We are lucky that LEDC has these programs in the rural areas of the state. No other organization offers these services in our language and for free.” For the 2012 growing season the Agua Gorda Cooperative rented land from the Long Prairie Community Garden project and from a farmer north of town. They grew tomatillos, hot peppers, Roma tomatoes, cucumbers and cantaloupe. The community garden plots were irrigated by the city’s Economic Development program but the plot north of town was dry. Even with last summer’s extended dry period the co-op squeezed nearly $7,000 in sales from their half acre. With their modest success in 2012 behind them, the co-op members began negotiating for more land for 2013. With the assistance of Long Prairie Economic Development Director Lyle Danielson they rented three-and-a-half acres of vacant land in the town’s industrial park. The land is adjacent to a city fire hydrant. They also rented some community garden plots again. Addition-

Jaime Villalaz and Enrique Garcia pick serrano peppers to make a sample batch of salsa.

ally, each member contributed toward the purchase of a machine to lay plastic mulch. Like most farmers, the Agua Gorda farmers have struggled with the difficult 2013 growing season. “This year we have battled with too much rain, pests and cool weather,” Rafael Becerra said. “It is all part of the risk we take when we decide to become farmers.” Based on the 2012 harvest and yield numbers from the University of Minnesota, the Agua Gorda Cooperative projected a harvest of 90,000 pounds of tomatillos, chiles, Roma tomatoes, onions and other produce for the 2013 season. With those numbers in hand, co-op treasurer Jose Garcia negotiated a contract with Twin Citiesbased La Loma Tamales. In June, La Loma advanced Agua Gorda $6,000 of a $12,200 price for the August delivery of 20,000 pounds of tomatillos and 2,000 pounds of Serrano peppers. “We like their peppers,” said Noelia Garcia Urzua, of La Loma. “They are hotter than what we can buy in Mexico. We don’t have to use so many.” Currently, La Loma Tamales pur-

Jan King

This year we have battled with too much rain, pests and cool weather. It is all part of the risk we take when we decide to become farmers. — Rafael Becerra chases most of their produce from Mexico. Unfortunately, by the end of August, Agua Gorda was unable to meet its delivery requirements. Because of the late start to the season and the cool nights earlier in the month the green fruit was still small and not as numerous as expected. “I believe our harvest estimates were unrealistic,” Jaime Villalaz said at a meeting that included La Loma officials and city of Long Prairie officials. “It has been a very difficult year.” “We don’t want to buy from somewhere else,” Garcia Urzua of La Loma said. “We want to buy locally produced products if we can.” Villalaz, along with Becerra and

Abonce, from Agua Gorda Cooperative, said they still believed they could meet their delivery commitments to La Loma Tamales. “I believe we can be your supplier,” Villalaz said. The warm weather during the State Fair week has caused the Agua Gorda crop to advance some. La Loma Tamales operates five restaurants and a catering business in the Twin Cities. They are planning to continue to expand. The long-term dream of the Agua Gorda Cooperative members is to expand also. Eventually they want to own their own land and become full time farmers. ❖


010 Employment

015

Be An Auctioneer & Personal Property Appraiser Continental Auction Schools Mankato, MN & Ames, IA 507-625-5595 www.auctioneerschool.com

WEEKLY AUCTION

ADVERTISER LISTING

★★★★★★★★★★★★★ Every Wednesday

5:00 PM - Farm Misc. 6:00 PM - Hay & Straw 7:00 PM - Livestock 8:00 PM - Sheep & Goats 1st. Wed. of Month

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320-587-3347

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The Affordable Way to Tile Your Fields 3 Point Hitch & Pull Type Models Available • Walking Tandem Axles • Formed V Bottom on w/425/65R22.5 Tires for Superior Grade Control • Tile Installation Depth Gauge

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LAND FOR SALE List with us today...get results tomorrow!

WE HAVE MOTIVATED LAND BUYERS!

HUNTING LAND FOR SALE:

Deer, Turkeys, Pheasants, Ducks • 50 Acres in Weimer Township, Jackson Co. • 51.36 Acres in Springfield Township, Cottonwood Co. • 52.69 Acres in Redwood Co along the Cottonwood River • 44.47 Acres in Jackson Co. along the Des Moines River

HOBBY FARMS: From $65,000 & up

Gary “Landman” Vanderwerf • 507-830-0471 John Croatt • Auctioneer • 507-830-1984

Kibble Equipment Inc40, 45 Kiester Implement ..........38 Kohls Weelborg ........12, 13 Lano Equipment - Norwood ....................42 Larson Brothers Impl 40, 43 Massey Ferguson ..............7 Massop Electric ..............41 Matejcek implement ........46 Midwest Machinery Co ..39 Mycogen....................24, 25 Northern Ag Service........43 Northwestern Farm Co ....34 Nutra Flo Company ....4, 36 Pride Solutions ................38 Pruess Elevator Inc..........36 R & E Enterprises of Mankato Inc ....................41 Rabe International Inc ....38 Schweiss Inc ....................41 Smiths Mill Implement Inc43 Sorensen Sales & Rentals40 Syngenta ........................3, 9 Versatile ..........................23 Wearda Implement ..........38 Willmar Farm Center ......41 Woodford Ag LLC ..........36

• PO Box 3169 • 418 S 2nd Street • Mankato, MN 56001 • theland@thelandonline.com

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

We have other land available not listed here! We have registered buyers in specific areas -list your land with us! • SEE US TO LIST YOUR LAND FOR SALE •

Ag Power Enterprises Inc37 Ag Systems Inc..................4 Bayer Truck & Equipment Inc ....................................30 Brokaw Supply Co ..........10 Broskoff Structures..........15 Clark Properties ..............33 Courtland Waste Handling21 Crary Co ..........................41 Diers Ag Supply ..............17 Duncan Trailers LLC ......42 Emerson Kalis ................40 Excelsior Homes West Inc22 Fahey Sales Agency Inc ..34 Farm Drainage Plows Inc33 Fladeboe Auction Service....................34, 35 Greenwald Farm Center ..35 Haas Equipment ..............44 Hewitt Drainage Equipment ....................16 Hotovec Auction Ctr Inc 33 Hughes Auction Service LLC ................33 K & S Millwrights ..........31 Keith Bode ......................42 Keltgens Inc ....................14

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ADVERTISING NOTICE: Please check your ad the first week it runs. We make every effort to avoid errors by checking all copy, but sometimes errors are missed. Therefore, we ask that you review your ad for correctness. If you find a mistake, please call (507) 345-4523 immediately so that the error can be corrected. We regret that we cannot be responsible for more than one week's insertion if the error is not called to our attention. We cannot be liable for an amount greater than the cost of the ad. THE LAND has the right to edit, reject or properly classify any ad. Each classified line ad is separately copyrighted to THE LAND. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited.

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Announcements

October 4, 2013

33 THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

AUCTIONS & CLASSIFIEDS


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THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

34

Real Estate

020 Real Estate Wanted

021 Real Estate Wanted

Deer Hunting Land Wanted By Owner STURGEON LAKE ONTARIO 250 acres Single hunter looking for land to hunt deer on. Only w/ shoreline on 3 lakes! hunt by bow & muzzleloadRoad access. No neighbors. er, will hunt after gun sea$150,000/OBO. son. Ethical, respect for Call Ted 415-891-8758 your property, references tcottingham@comcast.net available. Prefer Blue Sell your land or real estate Earth County or surroundin 30 days for 0% commising counties Contact me by sion. Call Ray 507-339-1272 email or cell phone. montana_dan54@yahoo.com Selling or Buying Farms 507-380-4167 Daniel C. or 1031 Exchange! Private Sale or Sealed Bid Auction! Call “The Land Specialists!” WANTED: Land & farms. I have clients looking for Northland Real Estate dairy, & cash grain opera612-756-1899 or 320-894-7337 tions, as well as bare land www.farms1031.com parcels from 40-1000 acres. We have extensive lists of Both for relocation & inLand Investors & farm buyvestments. If you have ers throughout MN. We aleven thought about selling ways have interested buycontact: Paul Krueger, ers. For top prices, go with Farm & Land Specialist, our proven methods over Edina Realty, SW Suburban thousands of acres. Office, 14198 Commerce Serving Minnesota Ave NE, Prior Lake, MN Mages Land Co & Auc Serv 55372. paulkrueger@edinarealty.com www.magesland.com (952)447-4700 800-803-8761

021 Antiques & Collectibles

026

Hay & Forage Equip

031

Grain Handling Equip

034

Grain Handling Equip

034

WANTED TO RENT: Farm- FOR SALE: JD model 44, FOR SALE: NH 489 haybine FOR SALE: 10”x60' Kewan- FOR SALE:Used grain bins, $4,500. 515-827-5162 floors unload systems, stiland in the following counnee grain auger, 214 hyd lift plow w/ cylinder rators, fans & heaters, aerties: Waseca, Steele, Free$1,100/OBO; 8”x66' Feterl & de-clutcher, completely NH 256 rake, good solid conation fans, buying or sellborn. Bonus incentives ofgrain auger, $1,000/OBO. rebuilt & field ready, $900; dition. Call 507-458-7970 ing, try me first and also fered. 507-327-6430 Both in good shape. 507-327McCormick Deering 1 ½ call for very competitive 6430 or 507-465-8233 horse gas engine; Engine Round Bale transport, 6 contract rates! Office parts for late style B JD. Antiques & Collectibles 026 place, tip off, $1,000. NH FOR SALE: Behlen 380 corn hours 8am-5pm Monday – 320-630-7456 haybine, good head, bad dryer w/ heat savers, Friday Saturday 9am - 12 1941 W4 IH, good metal, runs eng, $4,000. 507-250-6093 Feterl rotary grain screennoon or call 507-697-6133 good, rubber average, NEW # Hay & Forage Equip 031 er, $2,500/ea. 507-276-3289 Ask for Gary $1,500. (715)983-5762 033 Drag line for Moline model FOR SALE: Case IH 600 Bins & Buildings D corn sheller, always blower; (2) JD 716 chopper SILO DOORS shedded, $60, original manboxes; Ford NH windrow Wood or steel doors shipped ual for sheller, $15; 40' inverter; JD 16A flail choppromptly to your farm Mulkey corn elevator, PTO per. 507-254-9128 stainless fasteners driven, $60. Zimmerman hardware available. 763-856-2950 FOR SALE: Hesston 4790 (800)222-5726 3x4 big square baler, exc FOR SALE: '54 Farmall SuLandwood Sales LLC condition. 440-812-8446 per MTA dsl, new tires, Stormor Bins & EZ-Drys. completely restored & 100% financing w/no liens painted. 763-434-5282 or 612- FOR SALE: JD 5400-5830 & or red tape, call Steve at 6000 & 7000 series forage 209-4295 Fairfax Ag for an appointharvesters. Used kernel FOR SALE: (4) upright gas ment. 888-830-7757 processors, also, used JD pumps restored; Cast iron 40 knife Dura-Drums, & horse hitching posts, 100 drum conversions for 5400 Grain Handling Equip 034 yrs old; Blacksmith's cone. & 5460. Call (507)427-3520 All items are A-1 condition. www.ok-enterprise.com 2005 FETERL 12x116 Ft 507-951-8401 White Comm Auger w/ dual FOR SALE: Tonutti jumbo Auger Hopper All Good pull type V rake, V10, good Flighting (Guaranteed). condition, $4,000. 507-380J&M 750 Bu Grain Cart w/ 0569 Tarp (New Augers) Real Good. 319-347-6677 Can Del JD 220 8R stalk cutter, new knives always shedded Conveyall 70' PTO driven great condition. 515-851-1040 belt conveyor, 10” tube. 507or 515-851-0003 236-0628

FOR SALE: Brent 644 grain Gravity Wagons wagon, fenders, light kit, 600, 550, 400, 285, Demco, $12,500; Flo EZ, model 300 Parker, Brent, J&M; stalk gravity wagon w/ 10T EZ shredders IH 60, Hiniker 8Trail gear, $1,500; Westgo 30;all nice cond. Peterson 10”x61' w/ hyd swing hopEquip. 507-276-6957 or 6958 per, $1,000; Hutchinson 10”x50' w/ hyd swing hop- New 30' tri core floor & flashing, $1,950; Used 48' per, $1,000. 507-438-6742 floor, supports, flashings, FOR SALE: FARM FANS $4,500; Used Hutch 10” unCORN DRYER CMS-320 J load for 48' bins, $1,350; cont flow or auto batch 4000 bu 18' 5 ring wide core $4,500. JD 216 flex head w/ floor, like new, $3,800; w/ poly, SS, nice shape, (3) 3200 bu 18' 4 ring wide $1,800/OBO (507) 273-1065 core w/ floors, like new, $3,200/ea; Used 24,000 bu 36' FOR SALE: Hutchinson bin only, $8,500; New 66,000 auger, 10”x66' PTO drive, bu Brock fully loaded, comgood shape, $650/OBO. Can plete, call for details. 507Deliver 320-220-3114 697-6133 www.usedbinsales.com FOR SALE: Lowry portable wet holding bin, $1,600; (3) Used Dakota aeration 10” & Minnesota 250 gravity boxsome 12” tubing, will fit up es w/ 10T-12T running to 30' bin, also, 1½ hp, 220 gears, very good cond; 3pt amp, Farm Fans, aeration JD head mover. Call cell fans, $500 buys all. Don 507952-769-3277 or 952-467-9697 370-2149

LAND FOR RENT Western Todd, Eastern Ottertail and Eastern Douglas Counties 2,800+ Tillable Acres, Productive Soils, Offered in multiple sizes from 166 to 2,518 acres. Bid on the size that works best for your operation. For more information please visit www.nfmco.com and click on Aspen Plantation, or call 507-532-5120 AFM

NORTHWESTERN FARM MANAGEMENT CO. 310 South O’Connell * Marshall, MN * 507-532-5120

Website: www.nfmco.com Email: land@nfmco.com

Farm Implements

035

'06 CIH 1020, 30' flex head, 3” cut, $11,900; '07 CIH 2588 combine, chopper, rock trap, 12R ready, 800 metrics, $112,500; CIH 700, 8x18 spring reset plow, black springs & coulters, $7,900; (2) Parker 2500 grav. boxes on 12T trlrs, 16.1x16.5 tires, $2,400 ea. 320-769-2756 (2) 550 Bu Unverferth #530 Wagons w/ Tarps & Fenders Like New. John Deere #27 Shredder (6-30) 4 Wheels Excellent Condition. 319-347-6138 Can Del 20' Alloway stalk chopper, $2,600. 952-457-1413 Case IH 1083, 8x30 cornhead, $4,900; Case IH 1043 4x30 cornhead, $2,900; JD 9350 28' press drill 6” spacing, $2,900; Melroe 204 16' press drill, $1,250; Both shedded & good condition; JD 4455 2WD tractor, QR, 3 hyds, rock box, $34,900. 320-7692756 Feterl 10x66 & 10x76 straight augers; Kewanee 1025, 30' tandem disk; '76 Ford F880, tandem truck, 18' B&H; snap-on Polaris tool chest. 320-981-0276

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

FOR SALE: AC 190 XT Series 3 diesel tractor; Also, 710 Int'l 4-16 automatic reset plow. 320-848-2385 FOR SALE: Case IH 2020 30' head, 3" cut, w/newer air reel, $12,900. (715)792-2267 FOR SALE: IH 5088, new motor; also, 886 tractor. 320-249-4715 FOR SALE: IH 5500 high clearance chisel plow - 15' pull type, very good condition, $1,575. Demco 325 bu gravity wagon, 10:00/20 truck tires, light kit, spare tire, very good, $3,900. Equipment always shedded. (507) 426-7672


Farm Implements

035 Tractors

036 Tractors

036 Tractors

JD 843 cornhead, 8 30'' rows, $6,200. JD 946 MoCo 13', cut less than 1000 acres, $18,500. (715)296-2162 JD 8820, duals, RWA, & long auger; 6620 Titan II side hill, 7700; TW35, MFWD; cornheads; beanheads; augers; forage harvester & blower; grav. boxes; & numerous tires. 320-351-8990 We buy Salvage Equipment Parts Available Hammell Equip., Inc. (507)867-4910 Tractors

036

'00 Agco 9735 FWA tractor, 2200 hrs., full wgts & duals, pwr shift, 1 owner, retiring from farming, $55,000. 712744-3651 or 712-579-8268

1959 MF model 65 utility, hyd ldr, 540 PTO, good tires, $4,500/OBO. 515-314-5951 6410 JD MFD Cab, power quad transmission, rebuilt by JD dealer w/warranty. Nice tractor, $33,500. (715) 223-3600

JD 4020 dsl. Power shift, exc condition. (608)214-1859 JD 4840, PS, 18.4x42 w/duals, 3 valves, 5975 hrs., $24,500. 612-483-2279 NEW AND USED TRACTOR PARTS JD 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 55, 50 Series & newer tractors, AC-all models, Large Inventory, We ship! Mark Heitman Tractor Salvage 715-673-4829 Harvesting Equip

037

'06 Brent Avalanche 1084 grain cart w/ track, $42,500. (715)556-9090 or (715)6322319

MANDAKO

12’-60’ LONG ROLLERS

• 5/8” drum roller wall thickness • 42” drum diameter • 4”x8” frame tubing 1/4” thick • Auto fold New Rock Wagons AVAILABLE!

USED EQUIPMENT LARGE SELECTION OF WHEEL RAKES IN-STOCK

‘08 CIH 215, FWA, 900 hrs., 3 PTO......................................................$135,000 CIH 8920, FWA, 4800 hrs. ......................................................................$78,000 CIH 7120, 2WD, 7500 hrs. ......................................................................$45,000 IH 5488, 2WD, 5200 hrs., 18.4x38 tires, New Paint ..............................$27,500 IH 5488, 2WD, 12.4-50 tires, 5400 hrs., 540/1000 PTO, New Paint......$27,000 IH 5288, FWA, 4000 hrs...........................................................................$41,000 IH 1566, 2WD, dual PTO, 6800 hrs. ........................................................$17,000 CIH 7220 Magnum, FWA, 941 hrs., duals, Sharp ................................$97,000 CIH 7220, FWA, 20.8x38 rear w/duals, 5400 hrs. ..................................$59,000 CIH 7210, 2WD, 18.4-42, 2500 hrs. ........................................................$59,500 CIH 4800, 24’ field cult. ............................................................................$9,500 CIH 4800, 26’ ............................................................................................$9,500 CIH 4300, 30’ ..........................................................................................$10,900 CIH 3900, 24’ cushion gang disk............................................................$18,500 CIH 6500, disk chisel, 9- & 12-shank ......................................................$7,500 CIH 6750, 6-shank w/lead shank, w/hyd. lever ....................................$16,500 CIH 527B ripper ......................................................................................$20,500 (2) CIH 2500, 3 pt., 5-shank rippers, Like New ....................................$10,500 DMI 530B ................................................................................................$21,000 DMI 500, 5-shank, 3 pt., w/disc leveler ....................................................$6,500 DMI 527 w/disk leveler ............................................................................$15,000 Glencoe 7-shank w/leveler ........................................................................$9,500 White 445, 11-shank disc chisel ..............................................................$8,500 IH 55, chisel, 12-shank ..............................................................................$2,500 CIH Tigermate II, 26’ & 28’ ....................................................................$26,000 CIH 600, blower..........................................................................................$3,900 (3) Demco 450 boxes..................................................$8,500/$9,500/$10,500 DMI Tigermate II, 28’..............................................................................$22,500 CIH 3950, 25’ cushion gang disk w/mulcher ........................................$26,500 CIH 496 w/mulcher, cushion ..................................................................$16,500 (6) Demco 365 boxes........................................................From $5,500-$6,500 (2) Demco 550 boxes..............................................................................$10,500 Demco Used Gravity Boxes, All Sizes Available ............................................Call Gehl 125 ..................................................................................................$16,000 New Mandako Land Rollers, In Stock ..........................................................Call H&S 10-wheel V-rake..................................................................................$2,900 Gehl 135 grinder ......................................................................................Coming Gehl 125 grinder ......................................................................................Coming

New Sitrex Rakes Available Many New & Used Rakes Available

GREENWALD FARM CENTER Greenwald, MN • 320-987-3177 14 miles So. of Sauk Centre

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

'10 JD 7230 FWA Premium, 24 spd AQ transm., frt fenders, 14.9x46 tires w/duals, 38 actual hrs., 2 PTO's, rock box, quick hitch, warranty until 10/13, estate, $109,500. 507-220-6810

35

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JD 230 25' tandem disc, $3,900; JD 31' 1600 chisel plow, $3,250; JD 1075 & Westendorf 12T running gears, $1,450/ea; JD 946 13' MoCo, 2pt hitch, impeller conditioner, $11,900; JD 3020 D tractor, JDWF, 3pt, $6,900. 320-769-2756

036

JD 3020 gas, pwr shift, 3 pt, JD WF, Lundeen cab & fenders, $6,750; JD 720 quick tach ldr., exc. cond., $4,950; JD 3020 dsl, JD WF, 3 pt., $6,900; JD 2510 dsl, JD WF, 3 pt., $7,900; IH 720, 5x18 plow, $1,850. 320769-2756

THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

FOR SALE: JD 920 flex bean Case IH 8910, MFD, 3 re- FOR SALE: '66 4020 JD w/ head, poly stainless, $3,000; motes, dual PTO, 2480 actuKoyker K-5 loader, diesel, 20' Wilson gooseneck trailal hrs, 18.4-42 duals, all PS, cab, good condition, er, $1,200; Scott 12' truck tires are new, serviced, su$11,900/OBO. 320-848-2453 stake bed, new, $1,000. 507per sharp mint condition FOR SALE: 6105 White trac852-3875 or 507-383-9056 unit, $79,500. 507-234-5679 tor w/ 670 Agco ldr, 8 atFOR SALE: JD 9200, 4WD, tachments for ldr; Oliver $70,000 trades?; JD 7720 Case IH STX 425, runs & Super 66, WF tractor w/ shifts nice, metric tires, 6 TII combine, RWD, rebuilt hyds. 507-951-8401 remotes, powershift, 9400 w/843 CH & 220 BH , hrs, good shape, ag use, FOR SALE: Case 2090 w/ $27,500; IH 710 6x18 onland $65,000. 507-234-5679 18.4x38 duals at 75%, 3370 plow, $4,250;Super B grain hrs, air ride seat, 4 redryer & holding bin, $4,000. motes, AC, 540/1000 PTO, 507-330-3945 CIH Magnum 7240, 2200 hrs., very clean, $17,000. 507-240duals, frt wgts., new rubGleaner A75 combine; '89 0247 ber, $90,000; Wilrich 34½' IH 1680 combine; IH 964 digger, shedded, exc. cond. FOR SALE: Case IH 9330 CH; White 708 & 706 CH's; $8,000. 507-462-3589 Steiger, 3pt hitch, PTO, exc Michigan 175 ldr; Big A tires, exc cond. 715-896-0828 floater; JD 500 grain cart; Farmall 300 w/loader, new White plows & parts; FOR SALE: JD 1950 B tracTA, $3,600. 651-686-8247 Gleaner 3000 CH parts; (2) tor, $1,100; #5 JD mower, older 454 Dually pickup 7', $200. Call 320-294-5223 trucks. 8RN Artsway stalk FOR SALE: '81 4690 Case Ask for Don. 4WD tractor, 4900 hrs, new chopper. 507-380-5324 inside Firestone radials, Intl 966 tractor w/595 Allied Hiniker 1325, 13' chisel plow, 20.8x34 tires, new turbo & loader, grapple, forks & $2,900; '82 Flex-i-coil 60' injectors, PTO, 3pt hitch, spear, 2 sets of duals: 1tine harrow drag, $5,500. good shape, $18,500/OBO. band & 1 hub, wgts., 507-327-6430 or 507-465-8233 507-430-0255 chains. 320-277-3339 Hydrostatic & Hydraulic Repair Repair-Troubleshooting Sales-Design Custom hydraulic hose-making up to 2” Service calls made. STOEN'S Hydrostatic Service 16084 State Hwy 29 N Glenwood, MN 56334 320634-4360 Int'l 1600 grain truck, twin cyl hoist, exc box, 2spd trans, good older truck, $2,500. Deere 1210A grain cars, hyd, exc augers, $3,000. Deere bracket to put snapper head on chopper (244), $650. (815)979-0654


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THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

36

If you’re having a Farm Auction, let other Farmers know it! Upcoming Issues of THE LAND

Southern MNNorthern IA October 11 October 25 November 8 November 22 December 13 December 27

Northern MN October 18 November 1 November 15 November 29 December 6 December 20 January 3

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

PO Box 3169 Mankato, MN 56002 Phone: 507-345-4523 or 800-657-4665 Fax: 507-345-1027

Ask Your Auctioneer to Place Your Auction in The Land!

DAMAGED GRAIN We pay top dollar for your damaged grain. We are experienced handlers of your wet, dry, burnt and mixed grains. Trucks and Vacs available. Immediate response anywhere.

Website: www.TheLandOnline.com e-mail: theland@TheLandOnline.com

037

FOR SALE: '82 JD 7720 tur- FOR SALE: 6080 C-IH combine, '91, Cummins engine, bo, 4600 hrs, hubs for duals, specialty rotor, long sieves, duals not included, long many repairs & updates, auger, buddy seat, grain too much to list, have tank extension, extra records, new tires; 25' C-IH lights, grain tank full sen1020 flex head; 810 C-IH sor, new front 24.5 tires, dummy head; 20' 260 Owagood A/C, $13,500/OBO. tonna swather. 701-899-3693 Come & try in my field. Greg, Breckenridge MN 320-309-2329

CALL FOR A QUOTE TODAY

PRUESS ELEV., INC. 1-800-828-6642

WOODFORD AG

HARVEST INTERNATIONAL AUGERS

H 13-62, 72, 82, 92, 102, 112 H 10-62, 72, 82 T 10-32, 42, 52, 62 Auger Joggers - on hand ........$1,950

WHEATHEART AUGERS All Sizes

16-82 and 16-112 ..........................Call

COMBINE HEAD MOVERS

Renegade 25’ & 30’ - 4 Wheel Harvest International 35’, 40’ & 45’

KOYKER LOADERS & AUGERS

510 - on hand ............................$5,895 585 - on hand ............................$6,995 1050 Grain Bagger 210 Gran Vac

WHEEL RAKES - High Capacity

12 Wheel ....................................$8,500 14 Wheel ....................................$8,900

WOODFORD WELDING BALE RACKS

18’ - 23’ - 28’ “Where Farm and Family Meet”

WANTED

STATE-WIDE

Deadlines are 1 week prior to publication with Holiday deadlines 1 day earlier ** Indicates Early Deadline

037 Harvesting Equip

'65 GMC 4000 grain truck, 350 FOR SALE: '84 JD 6620 combine, hydro, 3400 hrs, bu. steel box, hoist, near 24.5x32 tires, factory heavy new roll tarp, nice truck! rear axle, 14.9x24 rear JD '50 Model B tractor, tires; 920 flex head, SS. 507original, new seat, back 215-0046 rest, motor work done. Allied 38' bale elevator on FOR SALE: '87 Case IH 1680 whls; White 466 10' chisel combine, 4620 hrs, 30.5x32 plow. 320-864-4583 or 320tires, rock trap, cross flow 779-4583 fan, chopper, $10,000/OBO. 507-327-3476 '77 JD 4400 combine, dsl., w/chopper, 3100 hrs., rotor FOR SALE: '94 Bidwell comscreen. 507-334-8562 bine, 666, field ready, $25,000. 320-632-5783 2005 Drago 8R cornhead, w/choppers, steel, nice FOR SALE: '98 JD 9510, 1824 head, $19,000. 515-351-1054 sep hrs 18.4x38 duals at 90%, 20' unload auger, exc Batco pit stop truck drive cond, 2nd owner, $69,500. over conveyor unload sys320-296-9106 or 320-221-2616 tem, used 1 season, $12,000 firm. 320-848-2462 or cell FOR SALE: (3) Demco 365 320-522-0704 green gravity wagons. $4,200ea/OBO. 507-360-4805 FOR SALE: '06 120 JD chopor 507-478-4118 per, 20', excellent condition, $12,500/OBO. 507-838-8775 FOR SALE: 1859 Massey combine bean head, sell FOR SALE: '12 Brent 1082 reasonable w/ lots of parts. grain cart, 20 ply 35.5L-32 U2 reel. Call 507-526-2268 diamond tread tires, roll tarp, scale, green, used on FOR SALE: 1978 JD 6600 combine, good condition, 700 acres. $38,000/OBO. Can $1,900. 515-832-5677 deliver. 715-797-9510

E-Z TRAIL GRAIN CARTS

510 - 710 - on hand

– GRAIN CART SALE –

E-Z TRAIL WAGONS

400 Bu. & 500 Bu. - on hand

AZLAND SEED TENDERS

2 Box - on hand ......................$10,550 4 Box Scale & Talc - on hand 4 Box Skid - on hand

STROBEL SEED TENDERS

2 Box - on hand ........................$8,900 BT-200 - on hand BT-300 ............................................Call

New E-Z Trail 710 Cart, w/tarp, green......................$16,850

New E-Z Trail 710 Cart, red ............................$15,800

New E-Z Trail 510 Cart, 23.1x26 tires, green....$10,950

New E-Z Trail 510 Cart, 23.1x26 tires, red ..........$10,950

SEED SHUTTLE SEED TENDERS

SS-290 - on hand SS-400 - on hand SS-500 - coming in ......................Call

New E-Z Trail 510 Cart, 18,4x42 tires, red ............$9,999

ENDURAPLAS NURSE TANKS

1100 Gal., 6.5 Honda & hoses $5,750

AZLAND FUEL TRAILERS

500 Extended Platform ................................$7,800

*************** USED EQUIPMENT ***************

AC 6080 Tractor w/ldr. & cab, 2WD, Nice ......................................................Call 1981 Versatile 555 ............................$12,750 2012 SS-400, Scale ..........................$24,500 2012 SS-400......................................$21,500 EZ Trail 860 Grain Cart, red, Like New ......................................................$21,500

LLC When the Harvest Starts...You’ll Want New Carts.

JD 1210A Grain Cart ..........................$2,750 Feterl 12” Drive Over, Like New ........$4,500 Westfield 10-41 Auger ........................$2,150 Westfield 10-71 Auger ........................$3,750 Hutch 10-71 Auger..............................$3,750 Land Pride 1872 Mower ....................$1,250

New E-Z Trail 510 Cart, 18.4x26 tires, red ........$9,999

Used E-Z Trail 860 Cart, 30.5x32 tires, red ......$21,000

Used John Deere 1210A Cart ..............................$2,750

New E-Z Trail 3400 Wagon, 400 bu., lights & brakes ............$6,400

WOODFORD AG

New E-Z Trail 500 Wagon, 500 bu., lights & brakes ............$8,450 no brakes $7,400

LLC

37666 300 St., Redwood Falls, MN • 507-430-5144

WWW.WOODFORDAG.COM


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YOUR HARVEST HEADQUARTERS (B) Belle Plaine, MN • 1051 Old Hwy. 169 Blvd.

037

(952) 873-2224

(H) Hollandale, MN • W. Hwy. 251

FOR SALE: CIH 1063 cornhead, 6R30”, one owner, always shedded, $8,900/OBO. 320-979-9477

(507) 889-4221

(O) Owatonna, MN • 3555 SW 18th St.

(507) 451-4054

FOR SALE: CIH 2206 cornhead, low acres, very nice. 507-530-8875 FOR SALE: IH 1460 combine w/944, 4RW 38”, cornhead, field ready, always shedded. 320-387-2766

37 THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

FOR SALE: 702 Uni, 729 A sheller, 3R30” head in good shape. $1,000/OBO. 507-6743719

FOR SALE: Int'l 234 mounted corn picker. 952-442-4750 FOR SALE: Int'l 844 4R cornhead, high tin, good condition. 952-758-4539 FOR SALE: JD 443 high tin corn head, good condition, $2,100. 515-832-5677 FOR SALE: JD 444 high tin cornhead, good condition, $1,850. JD 444 low profile cornhead, oil drive, real nice, $3,200. JD 215 flex bean head, hydraulic wheel, $1,500. 320-482-2575 FOR SALE: JD 643 hi-tin cornhead, good cond., $2,500. 507-340-1034

Gleaner LM 16' bean head. Good cond. (612)226-2775 IH bean head 820 15', very nice shape, OBO (or best offer); also, older Gehl, JD, NH choppers for parts & heads; Brady 4-30 stalk chopper; 12' JD digger; Gehl 315 spreader. (507) 920-8923 JD 216 bean head; JD 212 grain pickup, 5 belt, very nice; IH 12' grain drill, low rubber; Have available IH plow parts. 320-864-4583 or 320-779-4583 JD 300 picker, good condition, no head. 920-723-0258 eves or leave message. JD 6620 combine with 216 grain head & 443 cornhead. 3400 EZ Flow gravity box on 8T gear. Always shedded. Phone 507-234-6871

4WD TRACTORS

(O)’12 JD 9560R, 360 hrs., IF tires ..............................$319,900 (O)’13 JD 9560R, 500 hrs., Lease Return ....................$314,900 (O)’13 JD 9560R, 500 hrs., Lease Return ....................$314,900 (O)’12 JD 9560R, 400 hrs., Extended Warranty ..........$312,500 (O)’12 JD 9650R, 400 hrs., Lease Return ....................$312,500 (O)’13 JD 9510R, 300 hrs., Lease Return ....................$299,900 (O)’12 JD 9510R, 306 hrs., Lease Return ....................$289,900 (O)’13 JD 9510R, 450 hrs, Lease Return ....................$284,500 (B)’11 JD 9630, 782 hrs., Extended Warranty ..............$279,900 (O)’13 JD 9460R, 300 hrs., Lease Return ....................$279,900 (O)’13 JD 9460R, 300 hrs., Lease Return ....................$279,900 (O)’13 JD 9410R, 300 hrs., Lease Return ....................$274,900 (B)’11 JD 9430, 474 hrs., 710/42’s ..............................$267,900 (O)’13 JD 9410R, 300 hrs., Lease Return ....................$264,900 (H)’13 JD 9360R, 300 hrs., Lease Return ..................$229,900 (B)’02 JD 9520, 2910 hrs., 710/70R42’s ......................$174,900 (H)’97 JD 9400, 5755 hrs., 650/42’s ..............................$99,900

TRACK TRACTORS

(O)’11 JD 9630T, 644 hrs., Extended Warranty ............$309,900 (B)’11 JD 9630T, 753 hrs., Extended Warrranty ..........$297,900 (O)’10 JD 9630T, 1650 hrs. ..........................................$287,500 (O)’09 JD 9630T, 1720 hrs. ..........................................$283,000 (H)’09 JD 9630T, 1110 hrs. ..........................................$279,900 (B)’12 JD 8335RT, 848 hrs., IVT, 18” tracks ................$269,900 (H)’11 JD 8335RT, 943 hrs., IVT..................................$258,900 (O)’12 JD 8310T, 166 hrs., PS,25” tracks ....................$257,900 (B)’03 JD 9320T, 4621 hrs., 36” tracks ........................$139,900 (O)’04 JD 8420T, 5580 hrs., 16” tracks ........................$110,000 (H)’00 JD 9300T, 4375 hrs., 30” tracks ........................$105,000 (H)’00 JD 9400T, 5160 hrs., PTO..................................$105,000 (O)’98 JD 8300T, 5500 hrs., 16” tracks ..........................$67,900 (O)’97 JD 8300T, 5160 hrs., 16” tracks ..........................$64,900

ROW CROP TRACTORS

(O)’13 JD 8360R, 300 hrs., IVT, Lease Return ............$279,900 (O)’13 JD 8360R, 300 hrs., IVT, Lease Return ............$279,900 (O)’13 JD 8335R, 300 hrs., IVT, Lease Return ............$259,900 (O)’13 JD 8335R, 300 hrs., IVT, Lease Return ............$259,900 (O)’13 JD 8310R, 300 hrs., IVT, Lease Return ............$249,900 (O)’13 JD 8310R, 321 hrs., IVT, Lease Return ............$244,900 (O)’13 JD 8310R, 300 hrs., PS, Lease Return ............$239,900 (O)’13 JD 8310R, 300 hrs., PS, Lease Return ............$239,900 (O)’10 JD 8345R, 1732 hrs., IVT, triples ......................$239,900 (O)’11 JD 8310R, 608 hrs., PS ....................................$223,900 (O)’13 JD 8285R, 300 hrs., PS, Lease Return ............$219,900 (O)’13 JD 8285R, 300 hrs., PS, Lease Return ............$214,900 (H)’10 JD 8295R, 1430 hrs., IVT ..................................$203,900 (O)’11 JD 8260R, 484 hrs., Extended Warranty ..........$194,900 (B)’13 JD 7230R, 259 hrs., IVT ....................................$179,900 (O)’06 JD 8130, 2400 hrs., PS......................................$139,900 (H)’06 JD 8230, 3291 hrs., MFWD, PS ........................$139,900 (B)’13 JD 6150R, 459 hrs., IVT ....................................$131,900 (B)’13 JD 6150R, 501 hrs., IVT ....................................$131,900 (B)’13 JD 6150R, 450 hrs., IVT ....................................$131,900 (B)’13 JD 6150R, 477 hrs., Auto Quad ........................$125,900 (B)’13 JD 6150R, 479 hrs., Auto Quad ........................$125,900 (O)’09 MF 7495, 1500 hrs., MFWD, loader ..................$114,900 (B)’91 JD 4955, 7188 hrs., MFWD, PS ..........................$58,000 (B)’91 CIH 7110, 4261 hrs., MFWD ................................$39,900 (B)’84 JD 4450, 10,000 hrs., MFWD ..............................$34,900 (O)’73 JD 4630, 7948 hrs., PS........................................$19,900

(B)’76 JD 4630, 8105 hrs., Quad ....................................$16,900 (O)’80 Case 2590, 5900 hrs., PS....................................$14,500 (B)AC 7060, 18.4x38’s ....................................................$14,250 (O)’74 JD 4030, open station..........................................$12,900 (O)’78 White 2-135, 5000 hrs. ........................................$12,500 (O)’69 JD 4520, syncro, cab ..........................................$10,900

UTILITY TRACTORS

(B)’11 JD 5085M, 271 hrs., reverser ..............................$48,900 (B)’07 JD 5325, 478 hrs., MFWD, loader........................$35,900 (B)’67 JD 3020, gas, loader ..............................................$7,900 (O)’66 JD 3020, gas, cab..................................................$4,995 (B)’41 JD “B” ....................................................................$2,995

COMBINES

(O)’12 JD S680, 511 hrs., Extended Warranty ............$345,000 (H)’12 JD S680, 232 sep. hrs. ......................................$339,900 (O)’12 JD S670, 225 sep. hrs., PRWD ........................$319,900 (B)’11 JD 9870, 511 sep. hrs., PRWD, 800/70R38 ......$309,900 (O)’11 JD 9870, 700 sep. hrs., PRWD..........................$294,900 (O)’12 JD S670, 263 sep. hrs., duals ..........................$289,900 (H)’11 JD 9870, 508 sep. hrs., duals ............................$284,500 (O)’12 JD S660, 325 sep. hrs., duals............................$279,900 (B)’10 JD 9770, 328 sep. hrs., PRWD ..........................$275,000 (B)’11 JD 9770, 511 sep. hrs., duals ............................$256,500 (B)’09 JD 9870, 814 sep. hrs., PRWD ..........................$249,900 (O)’10 JD 9770, 788 sep. hrs. ......................................$245,900 (B)’10 JD 9870, 1067 sep. hrs., PRWD ........................$244,900 (O)’08 JD 9870, 1068 sep. hrs., PRWD........................$210,900 (B)’10 Gleaner A76, 382 sep. hrs. ................................$199,900 (H)’09 JD 9570, 700 sep. hrs., duals ............................$197,000 (O)’06 JD 9760, 1918 sep. hrs., duals, PRWD ............$164,900 (H)’06 JD 9560, 667 sep. hrs., duals ............................$163,500 (O)’06 JD 9760, 1363 sep. hrs., duals..........................$162,900 (O)’04 JD 9760, 1192 hrs. PRWD ................................$159,900 (B)’06 JD 9760, 1726 sep. hrs., duals, PRWD ............$154,900 (O)’05 JD 9660, 1442 sep. hrs., duals..........................$151,900 (B)’06 JD 9560, 1067 sep. hrs., walker ........................$142,500 (B)’98 CIH 2388, 2750 sep., hrs., duals ........................$75,900 (O)’98 JD 9510, 1766 sep. hrs., duals............................$70,900 (H)’92 JD 9500, 2812 hrs. ..............................................$49,900 (H)’91 JD 9500, 2300 hrs., duals ....................................$39,500 (B)’90 JD 9500, 1273 sep. hrs., duals ............................$34,900 (B)’82 JD 6620SH, 3231 hrs., side hill............................$20,900 (O)NEW Mudhog PRWD for 70 Series Combines..........$16,900 (B)’79 JD 6620SH, 3400 hrs., side hill............................$15,500 (B)’82 JD 7720, 4600 hrs., PRWD..................................$14,900 (B)’82 JD 8820, 5571 hrs., duals ....................................$13,900 (B)’80 JD 7720, 5000 hrs. ..............................................$12,900 (H)’79 JD 7720 ................................................................$11,900 (O)’79 JD 7720, 4158 hrs. ..............................................$10,500 (O)’76 JD 6600, diesel ......................................................$4,500

CORNHEADS

(O)’12 JD 618C, 18R22”, chopping ..............................$159,900 (O)’11 JD 612C, 12R30”, chopping ................................$90,000 (B)’10 Geringhoff RD1820, 18R20” ................................$84,900 (B)’09 JD 612C, 12R22”, chopping ................................$82,900 (O)’06 Drago 12R20”, chopping......................................$75,000 (O)’11 JD 608C, 8R30”, chopping ..................................$69,000 (B)’10 JD 608C, 8R30”, chopping ..................................$64,900 (O)’10 Geringhoff 830B, 8R30” ......................................$62,900 (O)’10 JD 608C, 8R30”, chopping ..................................$61,900 (B)’07 JD 612, 12R30”, chopping ..................................$59,900 (H)’09 JD 608C, 8R30”, chopping ..................................$58,900

(B)’08 JD 606C, 6R30”, chopping ..................................$49,900 (B)’11 Harvest Tec, 8R30”, chopping ..............................$49,900 (O)’07 JD 893, knife, hyd. deck ......................................$32,500 (H)’03 JD 893, 8R30”, hyd. deck ....................................$24,900 (B)’95 JD 893, knife ........................................................$17,900

SPRAYERS

(O)’12 JD 4940, 489 hrs., 120’ boom............................$292,750 (O)’12 JD 4940, 467 hrs., dry box ................................$290,500 (O)’11 JD 4930, 1343 hrs., 120’ boom..........................$249,750 (O)’11 JD 4930, 1216 hrs., 120’ boom..........................$245,900 (O)’11 JD 4830, 610 hrs., 90’ boom..............................$220,750 (O)’12 JD 4730, 800 gal., 90’ boom..............................$210,250 (O)’12 JD 4730, 800 gal., 90’ boom..............................$209,900 (O)’12 JD 4730, 520 hrs., 90’ boom..............................$209,700 (O)’12 JD 4730, 900 hrs., 90’ boom..............................$209,700 (O)’12 JD 4730, 490 hrs., 90’ boom..............................$209,600 (O)’10 JD 4830, 934 hrs., 90’ boom..............................$203,500 (O)’10 JD 4830, 1104 hrs., 90’ boom............................$201,900 (O)’07 JD 4930, 3093 hrs., dry box ..............................$200,000 (O)’09 JD 4830, 2400 hrs., 100’ boom..........................$185,000 (O)’11 JD 4630, 1275 hrs., 80’ boom............................$147,900 (O)’05 JD 4720, 1800 hrs., 90’ boom............................$129,900 (B)’05 JD 4720, 3794 hrs., 80’ boom ............................$124,900 (O)’03 JD 4710, 2000 hrs., 90’ boom ............................$115,000 (O)’01 JD 4710, 2400 hrs., 90’ boom............................$109,900

FALL TILLAGE

(B)’12 JD 3710, 10-bottom..............................................$57,900 (O)’12 JD 512, 9-shank ..................................................$54,000 (B)CIH 330 Turbo, 34’ vertical tillage, rolling basket ......$45,000 (O)’11 JD 2700, 7-shank, 30”..........................................$37,900 (B)’10 JD 2700, 9-shank, 24” ..........................................$33,900 (H)’10 JD 512, 5-shank ..................................................$27,500 (H)’02 JD 2400, 24’ chisel plow ......................................$26,900 (H)’07 JD 3710, 8-bottom................................................$25,995 (B)’04 JD 512, 5-shank ..................................................$20,900 (O)’03 JD 2700, 9-shank ................................................$20,900 (B)’05 Wilrich 957, 7-shank ............................................$19,900 (B)’97 JD 510, 5-shank ..................................................$13,500 (O)’95 DMI 730, 7-shank ................................................$10,500 (H)M&W 1465, 7-shank, 24” spacing................................$7,950

PLATFORMS

(O)’10 JD 635F, 35’ ........................................................$37,900 (O)’10 JD 635F, 35’ ........................................................$34,900 (O)’10 JD 630F, 30’ ........................................................$32,500 (H)’10 JD 630F, 30’ ........................................................$31,900 (H)’09 JD 635F, 35’ ........................................................$31,900 (O)’06 JD 635F, 35’ ........................................................$28,900 (O)’06 JD 630F, 30’ ........................................................$25,900 (B)’04 JD 635F, 35’ ........................................................$25,900 (B)’10 Agco 8235, 35’, full finger ....................................$24,900 (B)’04 JD 630F, 30’ ........................................................$23,900 (O)’06 JD 635F, 35’ ........................................................$23,500 (O)’03 JD 635F, 35’ ........................................................$21,900 (H)’01 JD 930, air reel ....................................................$19,900 (B)’08 CIH 1020, 30’ ......................................................$19,900 (H)’04 JD 625F, 25’ ........................................................$18,900 (H)’00 JD 930, full finger, air reel ....................................$16,900 (B)’02 JD 930, full finger ................................................$15,500 (O)’01 JD 930, 30’ ..........................................................$14,900 (B)’98 JD 920, 20’ ..........................................................$13,900

Visit agpowerjd.com for online auction listing

Your Southern Minnesota & Western Wisconsin John Deere Commercial Sprayer Center

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

JD 6620 side hill combine, been serviced yearly since new, $12,000 OBO. 507-3274258 JD 7720 combine, 216 Black reel, Stainless, Dial-a-matic bean head, 643 cornhead. Combine is totally rebuilt. 608-214-1859 JD 8820 combine, duals PRWD, tank ext, Chopper, always shedded, JD reman eng, w/ 300 hrs, 500 acres on $15,000 JD shop work, $22,000, 643 CH Available; JD 6620 side hill combine, original owner, always shedded, 4,000 hrs, HD rear axle, chopper, tank ext, $13,000, various heads available; JD heads, 444 ($1,500), 643 corn ($5,500), 216 bean ($1,500), 212 pick up ($1000), always shedded 507-250-6093 NEW #

‘13 JD 6150R, 500 hrs., IVT, ‘11 JD 9870, PRWD, ‘04 JD 9760, 1192 sep. hrs., duals, Lease Return ....$131,900 798 sep. hrs. ................$294,900 PRWD ..........................$159,900

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

FOR SALE: JD 643, hi-tin, cornhead, very good cond. 507-828-6905 FOR SALE: New Idea 2RW corn picker, model 324, 12R husking bed, exc cond. EZ Flow 220 gravity box w/ EZ Trail wagon. 507-381-3776

‘11 JD 9630T, 755 hrs., Extended Warranty......$297,900


Harvesting Equip

38 THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013 << www.TheLandOnline.com >>

LOCAL TRADES TRACTORS

‘92 CIH 5240, 2WD, PS - $26,500 CIH 5250, 2WD, cab w/loader - $32,500 ‘09 CIH 385, 4 wheel - Nice ‘11 CIH Farmall 35, MFD w/loader, 50 hrs. - $21,000 New Farmall 31, MFD w/60” ‘11 CIH 550 Quad - $273,500

JD 2200, 33.5’, 3 bar - $28,500 ‘11 CIH 870, 9-shk. w/reel - Call CIH 2500, 7-shk. ripper w/leveler - $9,500 CIH 530C w/leads - Call

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

RABE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

1205 Bixby Road (across from fairgrounds), Fairmont, MN 507-235-3358 or 800-813-8300 • Get the Rabe Advantage

NEW EQUIPMENT • JD 2410, 41’ chisel

EQUIPMENT

CIH 8950, MFD ................................$59,900 CIH 7130 ..........................................$34,900 CIH 7120, 4900 hrs...........................$39,900 CIH MX270, MFD ............................$64,900 (3) IH 1026, hydro ..................From $14,900 JD 4230, w/720 loader ....................$18,900 JD 4040 Quad ..................................$22,900 ‘77 JD 4630, P.S. ..............................$15,900 IH 460, 560, 560D ............................“CALL” Gehl 4635 skid loader......................$12,900 IH 826, 856, 1256, 1456 ....................“SAVE” (2) JD 4030, open station ................$14,900 JD 3020D, P.S...................................$11,900 JD 720, diesel ....................................$6,900

LOADERS

JD loaders, many to choose from ........................................Starting At $2,495 New Koyker loaders ........................“CALL” JD 48, 58, 146, 148, 158; Koyker 510, K5

KIESTER IMPLEMENT, INC. 507-294-3387

Visit our Web Site at http://www.caseih.com

• Wilrich 5830, 39’ chisel/harrow • DMI 730B, 7-30 • Wilrich Quad X, 55’, rolling basket • CIH TII, 55’, rolling basket • Hardi 6600, 132’ • Hardi Com. 1500, 132’ • Hardi Nav. 1100, 90’ • Hardi Nav. 1000, 88’ USED EQUIPMENT • Hardi Nav. 950, 88’, (2) • White 8524-22 planter • ‘12 Amity 12-22/wheel • Pickett thinner, 24-22 • ‘12 Amity 12-22 • Alloway 22’ shredder • ‘10 Amity 12-22 • Alloway 20’ shredder • ‘07 Amity 8-22 • Killbros 1810 cart, tracks • Amity 8-22, (3) • Killbros 1400 cart • ‘11 Artsway 6812, 12-22 • Brent 410 grain cart • ‘10 Artsway 6812, 12-22 • J&M 750 grain cart • ‘11 Artsway 6812, 8-22 • Sheyenne 1410, 10x66 • ‘06 Artsway 6812, 8-22 hopper • Artsway 898, 8-22 • Feterl 12x72 hopper • Artsway 692, 8-22 • Westfield 13x61 • Amity 12-22 topper, • Westfield MK 10x61 St Ft • Coverall 13” drive over • (2) Alloway 12-22 folding • REM 2100 grain vac. topper • ‘09 JD 2700, 7-30 • Alloway 12-22 topper, • NH 770, 7-30 St. Ft, (3) • CIH 9300, 9-30 • Artsway 12-22 topper • Wilrich 957, 9-24 w/harrow • Agco • Hardi Sprayers • REM Grain Vac • Woods Mowers • J&M Grain Carts • Westfield Augers • Sunflower Tillage • White Planters • Wilrich Tillage

JD Soundguard Cabs, Call for info 110 S. Main, P.O. Box 249 • Kiester, MN

Case IH and CNH Capital are registered trademarks of CNH America LLC

039

USED EQUIPMENT

COMBINES

‘90 1680, duals, - $28,500 ‘93 1666 - $32,500 ‘03 CIH 2388, duals, 2000 eng. PLANTERS & hrs. - Call TILLAGE ‘07 CIH 2588 - $189,500 ‘08 1200, 16-30 pivot, bulk fill, ‘96 CIH 2166, 35Lx32 tires 2500 acres - $79,500 - Call ‘07 CIH 1200, 12-30 pivot ‘06 CIH 1020, 30’ - $16,500 planter w/bulk fill & insecticide ‘03 CIH 1020, 30’ - $14,000 - $58,500 ‘99 DMI, 32’, 3 bar - $16,500 ‘98 CIH 1020, 25’ - $7,950 ‘06 JD 1760, 12-30 - $41,500 ‘92 CIH 1083, 8-30 - $6,500 ‘03 CIH Tigermate II 40’, 4 bar ‘08 CIH 2608, 8-30 - Call ‘09 CIH 2608, 8-30 - Call - $34,500 JD 893, 8-30 - $16,000

037 Tillage Equip

JD 9400 Combine, 2,250 Sep, '97 JD 680, 15' chisel plow, 3,400 Engine, asking Tru-depth shanks on 12”, $33,500. 515-570-4382 very good, $12,750; CIH 720, 5-18 btm., AR, coulters, alJD 9660STS combine w/RWA, ways shedded, $4,900. 507974 sep hrs., $150,000; '08 380-7863 JD 630 bean head, $27,000; '08 JD 893 cornhead, $28,000. 507-838-8675 or 507- 2009 Case-IH 7 Shank #730C w/ Leveler (Auto Re-Set) 661-0650 2500 Acres Like New. Kinze 1050 row crop grain Feterl White 12x72 Comm cart, SN 505255, 20.8x38 Auger w/ Twin Auger Hopwalking tandem duals, per Real Good (GUARANscake, tarp, bought new, alTEED)! 319-347-6138 Can ways shedded, mint condiDeliver tion. 320-235-8349 530B ripper, lead New Idea corn sheller, 858 DMI shanks, front & rear disks; Grey, requires 802 power also White & IH 5-18” unit, good condition, make plows, exc cond. Retiring. offer. (507)527-2066 507-359-7471 NEW Unverferth X-TREME Grain Carts ON HAND #1015 FOR SALE: 530 DMI, levelers, front discs, new tires, (1000 Bu) #1115 (1100 Bu) stored inside, exc condition. #1315 (1300 Bu) Call 320-815-1057 20” CORNER AUGER FOLDS Across Front. Also Have 600 & 750 Bu ON FOR SALE: DMI 1300, CoulHAND. Some Used Grain ter Champ 13 shank 18' Carts. Let's Trade/We Dew/disk leveler, good condiliver Anywhere. tion, $8,000. 320-226-3448 A.L. Buseman Industries www.albusemanind.com FOR SALE: IH 700 pull type 319-347-6282 Let It Ring 8-18's, toggle trip; IH 720, 3 pt., 5-16's toggle trip; IH 720, 5-18's, toggle trip, Planting Equip 038 parts. 507-264-3722 JD 7000 Planters, 2-4RW, 6RN w/ trash whippers, FOR SALE: IHC pull type 6 nice shape, $7,500, all w/ bottom 16” plow, coulters, monitors, all always shedgood condition, all new ded. 7100 2R vertical fold, wear parts, very clean, $3,500, w/ monitor. 507-250$4,400/OBO. Can Deliver. 6093 NEW # 320-220-3114

www.midwestfarmsales.com

Clara City, MN 56222 320-847-3218 www.wearda.com


39

THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”


Tillage Equip

40 THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

~ NEW EQUIPMENT/BIG INVENTORY ~

Notch Equipment: • Rock Buckets • Grapple Forks • Manure Forks • Bale Spears • Hi-Volume Buckets & Pallet Forks • Bale Transports & Feeder Wagons, 16’-34’ • Adult & Young Stock Feeders & Bale Feeders • Land Levelers Smidley Equipment: • Steer Stuffers • Hog Feeders • Hog Huts • Calf Creep Feeders • Lamb & Sheep Feeders • Cattle & Hog Waterers • Mini Scale Sioux Equipment: • Gates • Calving Pens • Haymax Bale Feeders • Cattle Panels • Feeders Panels • Head Gates • Hog Feeders • Squeeze Chutes & Tubs • Port-A-Hut Shelters (Many Sizes) • Bergman Cattle Feeders – Special Prices • Lorenz Snowblowers • GT (Tox-O-Wic) Grain Dryers, 350-800 bu. • Sheep & Calf Feeders • Livestock Equipment by Vern’s Mfg. • Mister Squeeze Cattle Chutes & Hd. Gates • Peck Grain Augers – Big Discounts • MDS Buckets for Loaders & Skidloaders • Powder River Livestock & Horse Equipment • Tire Scrapers for Skidsteers, 6’-9’ • Hay feeders for horned animals • Jari Sickle Mowers • Grasshopper Lawn Mowers – Special Price Now!

• MDS Roto King Round Bale Processor • Good Stock of parts for GT Tox-O-Wic Grain Dryers, Also, Some Used Parts • Sitrex Wheel Rakes • Walco 3 pt. Mowers • Bale Baskets • SI Feeders & Bunks • (Hayhopper) Bale Feeders (Prices Lowered) • JBM Bunks w/headlocks • E-Z Trail Wagons, Boxes & Grain Carts • Calftel Hutches & Animal Barns • R&C Poly Bale Feeders • JBM hay & grain feeders & bunks • Corral Panels & Horse Stalls • EZ-Trail Head Movers & Bale Racks • Roda Mini-Spreaders • Amish Built Oak Bunk Feeders & Bale Racks • JBM Bale Trailers • Goat & Sheep Feeders • Mist Sprayers, gas or PTO • NEW ITEM! * 3 Pt. Fence Mowers* • Fainting goats & min. donkeys

DR® POWER EQUIPMENT • Field & Brush Mowers • Roto-Hog Power Tillers • Stump Grinders • Log Splitters • Chippers • Power Graders • Power Wagons • Leaf & Lawn Vacuums • Versa-trailers

~ USED EQUIPMENT ~

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

• #380 GT (Tox-o-wik) PTO Grain Dryer, reconditioned, w/new auger, sump, etc. • #570 GT Dryer – Coming In • 9-Shank Disk Chisel w/individual coulters • Kewanee 141⁄2’ Rock Flex Disk • Brady #5600 15’ Stalk Chopper or Windrower • Smidley Cattle & Hog Feeders

• Tebben V-Ripper, 3 pt., 3 shank • Vermeer Tree Spade, 3 pt. • Roto-Tiller 6’, 3 pt. • Farmhand Grinder Mixer

Wanted to Buy:

Farm Equipment For Sale ‘13 Challenger MT755D, loaded ..............................$229,500 ‘08 Cat 965B, 1300 hrs. ..$190,000 ‘04 Cat 855, 3000 hrs. ....$185,000 ‘07 JD 9860STS, 800 hrs., loaded w/all options........$160,000 ‘07 JD 8230, 2000 hrs.....$145,000 ‘03 JD 8520, 4000 hrs.....$142,500 ‘08 Lexion 595R, 650 hrs. ............................$225,000 ‘12 Krause Dominator, 18’, Demo ..................................$58,500 ‘10 JD 8345RT, 1600 hrs...225,000

Financing Available

FARM, HOME & CONSTRUCTION

Emerson Kalis

320-587-2162, Ask for Larry

FOR SALE: International 700 8-18 pull type plow, good condition. 320-766-9560

Midwest Ag Equip

GT (Tox-o-wik) PTO Grain Dryers, Cattle & Calf Feeders, Hog Feeders, Cattle Handling Equip.

Office Location - 305 Adams Street Hutchinson, MN 55350

039

CIH 183, 12R30, 4 gauge whls, super sharp, like new, $2,550. 507-220-6810

Easton, MN 56025 • 507-381-9675

USED PARTS LARSON SALVAGE Good selection of tractor parts - New & Used All kinds of hay equipment, haybines, balers, choppers parted out. New combine belts for all makes. Swather canvases, round baler belting, used & new tires. 6 miles East of

CAMBRIDGE, MN 763-689-1179 We Ship Daily

Visa and MasterCard Accepted

FOR SALE: JD '06 1910 270 bu tow between air cart, variable weight, 6 runs, 26.1-30 tires. (320) 981-0376 FOR SALE: JD 2700 disc chisel, 7 shank, 30”, new pts, always shedded, excellent, $17,000. 507-925-4371 FOR SALE: JD 2800 7 bottom vari width 14”-22” plow, always shedded; Feterl grain screener. 507752-7665 Glencoe 9 shank soil saver w/ hitch hiker leveler, exc cond, $3,500. 507-250-6093 NEW # IHC 720 Plow S-16 Toggle Trip, 19" coulters, side-hill hitch gauge wheel, $875. (608)378-4553 Intl 490, 24½' disk, 9” spacing, blade avg. 20 3/4”, flotation tires, $4,250. 507220-6810 Used parts for IH 720 plows, toggle/auto reset. ½ price of new or less. We ship anywhere. Call Maple Valley Farms Randy Krueger (715)250-1617


Machinery Wanted

040

Machinery Wanted

040

41 THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

All kinds of New & Used WANTED: Stringer cart for farm equipment – disc chistiling. 320-223-4110 Leave els, field cults, planters, message. soil finishers, cornheads, feed mills, discs, balers, Wanted 042 haybines, etc. 507-438-9782 Disc chisels: JD 714 & 712, WANTED TO BUY: Wheel wgts for JD 4440 on 38” Glencoe 7400; Field Cults rims, 2 or 3 pr. 507-766-5083 under 30': JD 980, small grain carts & gravity boxes 050 300-400 bu. Finishers under Feed Seed Hay 20', clean 4 & 6R stalk choppers; Nice JD 215 & 216 Dairy Quality Alfalfa Tested big squares & round flex heads; JD 643 cornbales, delivered from South heads Must be clean; JD Dakota John Haensel (605) corn planters, 4-6-8 row. 351-5760 715-299-4338 WANTED TO BUY: IH 1256 Dairy quality western alfalor 1456. 320-352-3878 fa, big squares or small squares, delivered in semi WANTED TO BUY: IH 5 or loads. Clint Haensel 6 bottom plow. 320-352-3878 (605) 310-6653 WANTED: (1) combine tire FOR SALE: 20 bales of 2nd size 28L-26, good condition. cutting of alfalfa. RFV 320-587-8767 138.93, dry matter protein WANTED: Case IH 14B rip23.86. Herb (605)237-5063. per toggle trip. 507-236-9800 Langford SD

“Have you checked your soil PH lately”

for questions or prices please call

R & E Enterprises of Mankato, Inc.

1-800-388-3320

USED LEGS

60’ 3000BPH PAINTED, 10 HP, 3 Ph. DRIVE & MOTOR, PAINTED

USED AUGERS

10”x71’ MAYRATH SWINGAWAY 8”X62’ MAYRATH BP, PTO 8”X62’ WESTFIELD TD PTO 8”X57’ KEWANEE PTO

We carry a full line of Behlen & Delux dryer parts; Mayrath and Hutch augers parts. Large inventory of Welda sprockets, hubs, bearings, chain & pulleys.

• • • • • • • • • • • •

‘13 MF 1652, cab, loader, hydro ‘13 MF 7624, MFD, cab, CVT ‘13 MF 8690, 350 hp., CVT ‘12 MF 1529, compact, 59 hp., loader ‘05 MF 451, 45 PTO hp., 400 hrs. MF 7620, MFD, cab, 150 hp. MF 6616, MFD, cab, 125 hp. MF 4610, MFD, platform, 90 hp. MF 4610, MFD, loader, cab MF 1705 compact tractor ‘77 JD 4630, 2WD, cab, 320/90R50 duals, Quad ‘72 IH 656 hydro w/loader & cab, dsl.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Geringhoff 1822RD, ‘09 (3) Geringhoff 1622RD, ‘08, ‘07, ‘04 (2) Geringhoff 1230RD, ‘09, ‘08 (4) Geringhoff 1222RD, ‘08, 07, ‘05 (5) Geringhoff 1220RD, ‘12, ‘11, ‘05, ‘04, ‘02 (8) Geringhoff 830RD, ‘04, ‘01 (3) Geringhoff 630RD, ‘05, ‘97 ‘93 Geringhoff 630 PC ‘04 Gleaner 1222, hugger, GVL poly ‘98 JD 893, KR, AC, SL JD 843, GVL, poly JD 822, steel, KR, HT JD 622, GVL, poly CIH 1083, ‘92 ‘97 MF 883, 8R30”

• • • • • • • • • •

‘07 MF 9690, duals, LTM, 1300/970 hrs. MF 8570, RWA ‘86 MF 8560 '98 Gleaner 800, 25' flexhead ‘97 Gleaner R62, duals, 2052 sep. hrs. ‘92 Gleaner R62, 2063 hrs. MF 9750 PU table MF 9118 bean table (4) MF 8000 30' bean table ‘03 Cat Challenger 660, duals, w/30’ flex head

CORN HEADS

COMBINES

GRAIN HANDLING

1409 Silver Street E. Mapleton, MN 56065 507-524-3726 massopelectric.com

Monthly Special

TRACTORS

• • • • • • • • • • •

Parker 2620 seed tender Brandt 7500HP, grain vac. Brandt 5200EX, grain vac ‘09 Brandt 8x47 auger ‘00 Brandt 4500 EX, grain vac. ‘05 Brandt 1070, auger, PTO Drive, w/swing hopper Brandt 20110 swing hopper auger Brandt 1515, 1575, 1585 belt conveyors Brandt 1535LP, 1545LP, 1535TD belt conveyors Brandt 8x45 auger, 18 hp., Briggs Brandt 8x35, 8x37, 8x40, 8x47, 8x52, 8x57, 8x62, 8x67, 10x35, straight augers • Brandt 1060XL, 1070XL, 1080XL, 1380XL, 1390XL swing hopper augers • Brandt 20 Series drive over deck

MF 2856 Baler twine, mesh, kicker - 32,000

GRAIN HANDLING (CONT.) • • • • • • •

Parker 1039, grain cart, w/tarp Parker 839, grain cart, tarp, 850 bu. Parker 605 gravity box, 625 bu. Parker 165-B gravity box Unverferth 5000, grain cart Hutchinson, 10x61 auger A&L 850S grain cart, 850 bu. tarp

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

JD 275, disc mower, 9’ JD 38, sickle mower, 7’ Woods S106 mower ‘07 Chandler 22’ litter spreader (2) NI 5408 disc mowers MF 2856, round baler, net, twine MF 1745, round baler MF 1329 & 1330, 3 pt. disc mower MF 200, SP windrower, cab, auger, header ‘11 NH H6750, 3 pt., disk mower, 110” NI 528, 3 pt., disc mower, 94” Sitrex MK16, 14 wheel rake Sitrex RP2 wheel rake Sitrex RP6 wheel rake Sitrex 10 wheel rake on cart Roto-grind 760 tub grinder Westendorf 3 pt. bale spear H&S 16’ bale wagon

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

DMI Coulter Champ II, 13 shank Wil-Rich 36’, field cult. Wil-Rich 25’ stalk chopper, SM '08 JD 520 stalk chopper Loftness 30' stalk chopper, SM Loftness 20’ stalk chopper Loftness 240, semi-mount stalk chopper Melroe 912, 4 bottom plow Melroe 600 rock picker - prong type Loftness 8’ snowblower Mauer 28'-42' header trailers WRS 30’ header trailers EZ Trail 38’ header trailer Degelman 6000HD, rock picker Degelman 7200 rock picker Degelman RD320 rock digger Degelman LR7645 land rollers - Rental Returns Degelman 60” skid steer buckets ‘11 SB Select snowblower, 97” & 108”, 3 pt. ‘13 Sunflower 4412-07 disk ripper ‘13 Sunflower 4530-19 disk chisel ‘13 Sunflower 4511, 11 ‘13 Sunflower 4511, 15 ‘13 Sunflower 4412, 05

HAY & LIVESTOCK

MISCELLANEOUS

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Advantages we offer: • We unload directly from the trucks to a floater (Terra Gator) without stockpiling material. This gives us a more uniform spread with no foliage to plug up the spreader. • With direct loading there is no stockpile, no wasted lime or mess in your field. • We use a floater (Terra Gator) to spread so we have less compaction. • We are equipped to spread variable rate using GPS mapping. • We service Minnesota and northern Iowa. Why apply Aglime: • A soil ph level of 5.5 nitrogen efficiency is only 77 percent. • A soil ph level of 6.0 nitrogen efficiency still is only 89 percent. • At a soil ph level of 7.0 fertilizer efficiency is 100 percent.

USED DRYERS

MC 690, 16’, 1 Ph., LP, SS Sheets BEHLEN 380, 1 Ph., LP HEAT RECLAIM DELUX DP6030, 20’, 3 PH, LP HEAT RECLAIM SS SHEETS DELUX DPX7040, 15’, 3 Ph., LP, SS OUTER SHEETS TOP, ALUM. BTM. BEHLEN 700 3 Ph., LP DOUBLE BURNER

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Lime Spreading

4412-05 Disc Ripper - 5-shank 4412-07 Disc Ripper - 7-shank 4530-19 Disc Chisel - 19-shank 4511-11 Disc Chisel - 11-shank 4511-15 Disc Chisel - 15-shank 4610-09 Disc Ripper - 9-shank


THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

42

USED EQUIPMENT FROM A NAME YOU CAN TRUST! ‘07 A-300, glass cab w/AC, 2-spd., 2065 hrs. ............................$31,500 ‘04 T-300, glass cab & heater, 2906 hrs. ............................$25,900 ‘12 S-770, glass cab w/AC, 1117 hrs. ............................$43,500 ‘09 S-250, glass cab w/AC, 2-spd., 2886 hrs. ............................$25,500 (2) ‘01 873G, glass cab w/AC, 1578 hrs. & up ..Starting at $17,900 ‘96 873, glass cab & heater, 3675 hrs. ............................$11,900 (2) S-220, glass cab w/AC, 2-spd. ..............Starting at $23,900 (2) ‘11 S-650, glass cab w/AC, 905 hrs. & up ....Starting at $29,900 (7) ‘08-‘12 S-205, glass cab & heater, 1000 hrs. ..........Starting at $17,900 (3) S-175, glass cab & heater, 2-spd., 3875 hrs. & up....Starting at $14,900 ‘01 773, glass cab & heater, Hi Flow Aux..........................$17,000

‘11 S-150, glass cab & heater, 2-spd., 2500 hrs. ................$20,250 (2) S-130, glass cab & heater, 1600 hrs. & up ....................$16,900 ‘91 753, 6500 hrs. ..................$9,000 ‘08 NH L-180, glass cab w/AC ............................................$24,000 ‘12 NH L-218, glass cab & heater, 3950 hrs. ............................$19,250 ‘98 Gehl 5635SXT, glass cab & heater, 1020 hrs. ................$16,500 ‘04 Gehl 4640, glass cab & heater, 2350 hrs. ............................$11,500 ‘05 JD 317, glass cab & heater, 2800 hrs. ............................$14,000 Bobcat 8A Chipper, used very little ..............................................$6,250 ‘10 Bobcat 60” V snow blade ..$3,250 Loegering LVP90, 90” V snow blade ..............................................$1,995 Bobcat 72” sweeper................$2,850

Lano Equipment of Norwood Inc.

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Norwood Young America • 952-467-2181

www.bobcat.com

USED TRACTORS

‘01 NH 9684, 710/70R38 duals, 4430 hrs. ........$79,500 ‘11 NH TV-6070, loader, 456 hrs.......................$97,500 ‘12 NH T7.270, MFD, duals, 453 hrs. ..............$149,500 ‘69 Ford 5000 ....................................................$6,500 ‘56 Ford 640 ......................................................$3,750 ‘77 White 2-70, gas ............................................$5,750 ‘80 JD 4640, 14.9x46 duals ..............................$21,500 ‘45 Farmall H w/loader ......................................$1,350

USED COMBINES

‘92 Gleaner R-72, duals, 3568 hrs. ..................$35,500 ‘91 JD 9500, duals, 2815 hrs. ..........................$24,000 ‘05 JD 630F, 30’ bean head ..............................$22,500

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

USED TILLAGE

USED PLANTERS

‘07 White 8202, 12x30, built to twin row, liq. fert. ......................................................................$60,000 White 5100, 4x38, dry fert. ................................$3,900 ‘98 Kinze 2600, 16x30......................................$34,900 JD 7000, 4x36, dry fert. ......................................$2,950 Great Plains 15’ no till drill, pull cart ................$10,900

USED HAY EQUIPMENT

‘10 NH H-8060, 16’ header, 754 hrs., Circle C Rolls ......................................................................$77,500 (2) ‘01 NH 1431, 13’ discbine ..................Each $14,900 ‘97 NH 1411, 10’ discbine ................................$10,900 (3) NH 499, 12’ haybine....................Starting at $6,000 ‘97 NH 1465, 9’ haybine......................................$8,500 NH 492, 9’ haybine..............................................$5,500 ‘93 JD 1600, 12’ MoCo ......................................$4,750 ‘04 Hesston 1365, 15’ discbine ........................$10,900 ‘05 Hesston 1120, 9’ haybine ............................$7,950 ‘89 Hesston 1130, 9’ haybine ............................$3,750 ‘00 CIH 8312 discbine ........................................$8,900 Ford 535, 9’ haybine ..........................................$1,350 (2) NH 615 disc mowers ..................Starting at $3,850 Gehl 980 forage box............................................$5,950 CIH 600 forage blower ........................................$3,950 ‘08 NH BR-7080 round baler, netwrap & twine..$21,900 ‘07 NH BR-770A round baler, twine only ..........$15,900 ‘06 NH BR-750A round baler, twine only ..........$18,250 ‘06 NH BR-740A round baler, twine & netwrap $18,900 ‘03 CIH RBX-462 round baler............................$13,500 ‘90 Hesston 530 round baler ..............................$4,250 ‘85 Hesston 5530 round baler ............................$2,500 (2) ‘09 NH BB-9060, large square baler, packer cutter ....................................................Starting at $45,000 ‘99 CIH 8575 large square baler........................$31,500 (6) Cond. Rolls for 2300-HS14 NH headers, New ..............................................................Ea. $800

‘12 Wilrich XL2, 60’, 3 bar harrow w/rolling basket ............................................................$62,500 ‘09 Wilrich XL2, 42’, 3 bar harrow w/rolling basket ............................................................$43,700 ‘07 Wilrich Quad X, 55’, 3 bar harrow w/rolling basket ............................................................$49,000 ‘09 Wilrich Quad X, 54’, 3 bar harrow w/rolling basket ............................................................$52,900 ‘97 Wilrich Quad 5, 37’, 5 bar spike harrow ....$18,500 Wilrich 2500, 30’, 3 bar harrow ..........................$2,750 ‘96 JD 980, 44.5’, 3 bar harrow ........................$18,500 ‘94 JD 980, 38.5’, 3 bar harrow ........................$16,500 ‘10 Wishek 862NT, 26’ disc ..............................$50,900 ‘07 Wilrich 957, 7-shank ripper ........................$22,500 ‘03 Wilrich 957, 7-shank ripper ........................$16,500 ‘08 CIH 730C, 7-shank ripper ............................$36,500 ‘00 DMI 530B, lead shanks, hyd. levelers..........$19,500 DMI Coulter Champ 2, 5-shanks w/4 lead shanks ........................................................................$5,950 ‘99 Blue Jet 220, 7-shank disc ripper ................$8,500 ‘05 JD 512, 7-shank disc ripper........................$22,500 JD 2700, 7-shank disc ripper ............................$17,500 JD 915, 7-shank ripper, w/pull cart ....................$5,900 USED MISCELLANEOUS IH 700 plow, 7 bottom, pull type hitch ................$5,500 ‘11 H&S TS120, side delivery spreader ............$13,900 Bobcat 8’ 3 pt. disk ............................................$1,250 ‘10 H&S 270 spreader ........................................$7,250 Flexi Coil S75, 38’ coil packer ..........................$10,000 NI 3743 spreader ................................................$8,500 NI 3626 spreader ................................................$5,250 ‘05 Feterl 10x66 auger........................................$3,950

✔ Check us out at: www.lanoequipofnorwood.com

Norwood Young America 952-467-2181

A family business since 1946 with the Lanos: Jack, Paul, Bob and Andy

Livestock

HANCOCK, MN HOPPERS

Summit End Dump, 30’, 72” sides, 3 axle, AR ......................$16,750

‘98 Wilson, 42x96, 66” sides, MISC. TRUCKS extra lights, roll tarp, 24.5 LP tires ..........................$20,500 ‘89 Ford F-700, 6.6L Turbo Diesel, AT, 24’ AL Van Body, Roll-Up ‘03 Timpte Ag Hopper, 40’, SR, Door, 205” WB, Good for moving New Brakes, 70% Tires, Auto Roll Tarp ................$24,500 cross country ..................$4,000 ‘88 International S1900, DT466, ‘95 Merritt 42’ AL Hopper, 68” Auto., 81⁄2’ from cab to center Sides, 2-Spd. Doors, Roll Tarp, Disc Wheels ..................$12,500 axle ..................................$4,000 VAN/WATER TRAILERS ‘94 Wilson Convert-a-Hopper, 45x102, 78” Sides, 80% Virgin ‘02 Great Dane 36’ Reefer, Rubber, AL Wheels, Electric Door Roll Up Door, 2 Side Doors, Openers..........................$15,000 Sliding Tandem ................$5,750 SEMI TRUCKS ‘01 Utility Reefer, 48/102, Roll Up Door, 2 Side Doors, ‘74 International 4300, 350 Hp. AR, 60%T, 80%B ..............$6,500 Cummins, 10-spd., 8 new tires, Clean................................$5,000 ‘97 Great Dane Reefer, 48/102, Roll Up Door, 2 Side Doors, AR, FLATBEDS 60%T, 80%B, Stainless Steel ‘98 Great Dane, 45x96, Moffit Back ................................$6,500 Forklift Carrier Brackets, Sliding ‘86 Kentucky step van, 3 side drs, Tandem ............................$6,250 AR, 60% T&B, clean ........$7,250 ‘95 Dorsey, 45x96, D-Ring Tie Van Trailers, 48/102-53/102; Downs, SPX/AR ................$6,000 Great for water storage or over ‘95 Transcraft, 45’, AL Floors & the road hauling ..$3,500-$7,000 Crossmembers, Rebuilt Frame, 48’ & 53’ Van Trailers To Rent. 50% Tires, 70% Brakes, SPX/AR ............................$5,750 ......$145.00 per month plus tax. ..$2.00/mi. for pickup & delivery ‘94 Fontaine, 48/96, SPX/AR

AUTOS ........................................$6,500 ‘93 Wilson, 48x96, SPR, Sliding ‘06 Dodge Caravan SXT, Tandem ............................$7,000 108K ................................$6,000 ‘81 Great Dane, 48/96 ........$4,750 ‘05 Dodge Grand Caravan SE, CATTLE/HOG TRAILER 124K ................................$4,500 ‘04 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT, Barrett 46’, 3 floors – 120K, Clean......................$5,500 1 removable, 50% T 70% B,

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Cattle

056

FOR SALE: Purebred Black 3 Pinzgauer Heifers, 1 PinzAngus bulls, calf ease & gauer cow & calf. (715)837good disposition; also York, 1469 Hamp & Hamp-Duroc Angus/Scottish Highland boars & gilts. 320-598-3790 Crosses, 500lb steers & heifers. (608)272-3883 Dairy 055 FOR SALE: 6 bred beef FOR SALE: 6 Holstein cows were w/ bull, springing heifers, A-I sired, $1,100/ea. 7 beef bull bred AI. From high produccalves, 2 beef heifer spring ing herd. Headlock broke. calves, 400 lbs. average. 715-417-2160 (715)647-3053 Reg. Holstein bulls. Good FOR SALE: Dexter cows & maternal lines & good heifers, registered w/ADsires. We also have red & CA. Hayward, 715-634-8303 white. Delivery available. Merritt's Elm-Chris Farm Registered Texas Longhorn breeding stock, cows, (715)235-9272 heifers or roping stock, top Vacuum Pump w/motor, for blood lines. 507-235-3467 universal milker units, w/ elec. pulsators. Milk pump, WANT TO BUY: Butcher two inlet glass receiver cows, bulls, fats & walkable jars, 125' 2” stainless steel cripples; also horses, milk line, stainless steel sheep & goats. 320-235-2664 sink & wash manifold. This whole unit will put you in 057 the milking business at a Horse very reasonable price. Reproduction russett doc(507)498-3263 tor's buggy, exc condition. WANTED TO BUY: Dairy Brakes, double step, trunk. heifers and cows. 320-235$2,400 firm. (715)632-2577 2664 Cattle

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Sheep

060

2 Registered Hampshire 10 Black Baldy bred young rams, 2 yrs old and ram cows, nice bunch. Pure lamb. 507-437-1506 bred 18 mos. old Black Angus bull. 715-637-3280 FOR SALE: 6 Purebred red headed Tunis ewes & 2 FOR SALE OR LEASE rams. Waconia MN 952-442REGISTERED BLACK 4031 ANGUS Bulls, 2 year old & yearlings; bred heifers, FOR SALE: Dorset Truebreed type fall born rams, calving ease, club calves & same breeding that have balance performance. Al won 11 championships & 6 sired. In herd improvement reserve in carcass shows program. J.W. Riverview at MN State Fair, data to Angus Farm Glencoe, MN prove it, bred with a pur55336 Conklin Dealer 320pose, cutability. 320-587-6668 864-4625

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

• All Trailers DOTable •

‘08 JD 9670STS combine, 20.8R42 duals, CM, extended wear pkg., premier cab, 1225 sep hrs., just thru service program ................................................................$139,500 ‘09 NH T8040 MFWD tractor, super steer mega flow hydraulics, 480/80R50 rear duals, front duals, 4 remotes, wgts, 2200 hrs ......................................................$123,500 ‘11 NH B95B tractor/loader/backhoe, 4WD, cab, air, extendahoe, pilot controls, 24” hoe bucket, 235 hrs. ..................................................................$65,000 ‘11 CIH Magnum 290, MFWD, 380/90R54 duals, 380/80R38 front duals, high capacity hyd. pump, 23-spd. creeper trans., 5 remotes, wgts., 1425 hrs. ......................$148,500 ‘03 JD 9420, PS, 710/70R42 duals, 4 remotes, active seat, diff. locks, HID lights, 4600 hrs., 300 hrs. on new tires, Nice Tractor ..........................................................$125,000 ‘10 JD 8270R, MFWD, PS, 1300 frton axle, 380/90R50 duals, 60 GPM hyd. pump, 4 remotes, wgts, new 380/85/r34 single front tires, rear tires are 80%, 3500 hrs, just thru service program ....................................................$134,000 ‘08 JD 512, 9 shank, 22’6” disc ripper, Nice Cond...$28,000 ‘05 JD 9760STS, 2WD, CM, 710/70R42 duals, touchset, high capacity unload, 2115 sep. hrs., Nice Combine ..................................................................$98,000 ‘03 JD 1293, 12x30 cornhead, knife rolls, hyd. deck plates ......................................................................$23,000

Call: 320-212-5220 or 320-392-5361

Keith Bode

24.5 tires ................As Is $5,500

BELTED

‘04 Etnyre, 37’, 48” Belt, Bedliner, Roll Tarp, Great for Sugar Beets or Lime, 70% Tires & Brakes, Air Swing Gate ..............$22,500

TRUSS TRAILER

‘98 Lakeside RollerMaster, 32’-45’ Extension, 102” wide, Elec over Hyd. Lift, Top Locking Deck Rollers, Winches ............$10,000 ‘97 JDH Trussmaster, 42’-60’ Extension, 102” wide, 8 Winches, Elec. over Hyd. to Tilt. Elec. over Air to Extend, Tandem Axle ......................As Is $10,000

DROPDECKS

‘74 Trailcraft, 42’, Good T&B, Lights & Floor ................$10,000

MISCELLANEOUS

Axles, Suspensions & AL or Steel For Trailers ..........$1,000 AR/Axle ................$500 SR/Axle Rims - 22.5 & 24.5 steel ......$60 aluminum ..........................$175 Tires: (4) 385 Super Singles w/Polished AL Rims; 2 new, 1 @ 50%, 1@ 40% ..........................$1,400/set of 4 Pre-Hung / Slab Interior Doors: Oak, Cherry, Maple, & Pine. All Sizes. Over 200 doors to choose from ............$10-$80 ea. 10,000’ of Oak & Maple Trim ........................................$.50/ft.

We can also convert flatbed trailers to be used as a bridge. See our website.

END DUMPS

Will Consider Trades!

CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE!!! www.DuncanTrailersInc.com Delivery Available!

Fairfax, MN 55332 507-381-1291


Sheep

060 Pets & Supplies

070

TILLAGE

JD 2700, 5-shank, Nice ..............................$21,500 M&W 9-shank, 24” w/leveler ......................$12,500 Sunflower 4412-07, 7-shank ..........................CALL JD 2700, 5-shank ........................................$21,500 ‘04 DMI 530B w/leveler ..............................$23,900 DMI Econo Champ II, HD, 11-shank ............$7,500 ‘05 JD 2700, 9-24 shank..............................$25,000 ‘12 JD 3710, 10 bottom ..................................CALL ‘10 JD 3710, 10 bottom ..................................CALL JD 3600, 8 bottom, on land ..........................$8,000 CIH 4900, 46.5’ ............................................$12,500

SKIDSTEERS

ANYWHERE We buy damaged corn and grain any condition - wet or dry TOP DOLLAR We have vacs and trucks CALL HEIDI OR LARRY

NORTHERN AG SERVICE INC 800-205-5751 PLANTERS

NEW White planters ........................................CALL (2) White 8516CFS, 16-30 ..............................CALL White 6700, 12-30, w/res ..............................$6,500 White 6222, 12-30 front fold ......................$29,500 White 6122, 12-30........................................$16,500

COMBINES

‘10 JD 9770, Nice, w/warranty ..................$193,000 ‘10 Gleaner R76, loaded ................................CALL ‘08 Gleaner R75, loaded, 880 sep. hrs. ..........CALL ‘01 Gleaner R72, just thru shop......................CALL ‘03 Gleaner R65, CDF, lat ................................CALL ‘90 Gleaner R60 w/duals ................................CALL NEW Fantini chopping cornhead ..................CALL Gleaner N6 ....................................................$6,750

HAY TOOLS

New Hesston & NH Hay Tools On Hand

MISCELLANEOUS

NEW Salford RTS units ..................................CALL NEW Salford Plows ..............................AVAILABLE NEW Unverferth seed tenders ................ON HAND NEW Westfield augers ..........................AVAILABLE NEW Rem 2700 vac ........................................CALL NEW Century HD1000, 60’ sprayers ..............CALL NEW Hardi sprayers ........................................CALL NEW Riteway rollers........................................CALL NEW Lorenz snowblowers ..............................CALL NEW Batco conveyors ....................................CALL NEW Brent wagons & grain carts ..................CALL NEW E-Z Trail seed wagons ..........................CALL NEW rock buckets & pallet forks .................. CALL REM 2700, Rental............................................CALL Unverferth 8000 grain cart ..........................$19,000 Kinze 1050 w/duals ....................................$43,000 Pre-owned Sprayers........................................CALL

(DMI Parts Available)

SMITHS MILL IMPLEMENT Hwy. 14, 3 miles West of Janesville, MN

Phone (507) 234-5191 or (507) 625-8649 Mon. - Fri. 7:30-5:00, Sat. 7:30-Noon www.smithsmillimp.com

‘12 CIH Magnum 290, MFWD, ‘00 JD 9550, 2799 eng./1919 590 hrs., 3 pt., hyd. valves, sep. hrs., 24.5x32 tires, bin 540/1000 PTO, luxury cab, ext., chaff spreader, chopper 19 hyd. pump, 380x50 tires & ....................................$69,000 duals, front duals, complete ‘08 JD 9770, 1380 eng./938 sep. Auto Guide system ....$172,500 hrs., 4x4, HID lights, Contour ‘12 CIH Magnum 260, MFWD, Master w/hi-torque variable 525 hrs., Deluxe cab, 4 hyd., spd., chopper, 1250/45/32 tires 540/1000 PTO, 3 pt., 420x46 ..................................$159,500 tires & duals, complete Auto ‘98 JD 9610, 3578 eng./2379 Guide system..............$150,000 sep. hrs., chopper, 20.8x42 ‘07 CIH Magnum 245, 3050 duals, bin ext. ..............$52,500 hrs., 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, ‘02 CIH 2388, 3412 eng./2570 4 hyd., 420x46 tires & duals sep. hrs., AFX rotor, yield & ..................................$100,000 moisture mon., chopper, rock ‘07 CIH Magnum 245, MFWD, trap, bin ext., 30.5x32 tires 4010 hrs., 4 hyd. valves, 3 ....................................$65,000 PTO’s, front wgts., 420x46” ‘97 CIH 2188, 325 eng./2485 tires & duals ................$95,000 sep. hrs., rock trap, chopper, ‘94 NH 8770, MFWD, 5242 hrs., AFX rotor, 30.5x32 tires$47,000 3 pt., 1000 PTO, 14.9x46 tires ‘94 CIH 1688, 3734 eng. hrs., & duals, 4 hyd. ............$55,000 rock trap, chopper, bin ext., ‘94 JD 7800, 2WD, 8500 hrs., 30.5x32 tires ................$29,000 PS, 540/1000 PTO, 3 hyd., CIH 1660, 4200 eng. hrs., 4WD, 18.4x42 tires & duals ..$41,000 auto header, 30.5x32 tires ....................................$24,000 4WD & TRACK TRACTORS ‘87 CIH 1640, 3468 hrs., rock ‘12 JD 9560R, 780 hrs., PS, 4 trap, auto header, 24.5x32 tires hyd., 800x32 Michelin radials, ....................................$19,000 duals ..........................$259,000 COMBINE HEADERS ‘09 NH T9050, 4WD, 485 hp., 1040 hrs., 710x42” tires & ‘08 Geringhoff 1820B, 18R20” duals ..........................$175,000 chopping cornhead ......$52,500 ‘03 NH 425, 3850 hrs., 710x42 ‘05 Geringhoff 830B, 8R30” tires & duals, 12-spd. gear chopping cornhead ......$33,500 drive, 4 hyds., Nice Clean ‘09 CIH 2020, 35’ flex head Tractor ........................$110,000 ....................................$16,500 ‘07 CIH 2020, 35’ flex head COMBINES ....................................$15,000 ‘11 JD 9770, 880 eng./613 sep. ‘05 JD 630F, 30’ flex head hrs., CM w/5 spd. feeder house, ....................................$16,500 Pro drive, chopper, 520x42 tires ‘07 Lexion F540, 40’ flex head & duals ......................$190,000 ....................................$19,000 ‘10 JD 9670, 4x4, 1471 eng./ ‘97 JD 930 flex, full finger auger, 1076 sep. hrs., CM, chopper, single pt. hookup............$8,500 18.4x42 tires, Ext. Warranty ‘05 JD 893 cornhead, 8R30” ....................................$170,000 w/hyd. decks & knife rolls ‘10 CIH 6088, 514 eng./371 sep. ....................................$15,000 hrs., tracker, chopper, Pro 600 JD 643 oil drive, lo-pro, monitor, 800x32 drive tires, 6R30”..............................$6,000 Sharp! ........................$165,000 Check Out Our Large On-line Inventory of Trucks, Semis & Industrial Equipment

@ www.larsonimplements.com

LARSON IMPLEMENTS 5 miles east of Cambridge, MN on Hwy. 95

763-689-1179

Free delivery on combines in MN, Eastern ND & SD

Look at our Web site for pictures & more listings www.larsonimplements.com

43

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

NEW NH skidsteers on hand ..........................CALL NH LS170 ....................................................$13,750 ‘06 NH L170 ................................................$17,500

DAMAGED GRAIN WANTED

COMBINES - CONT.

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

USED TRACTORS

NEW NH T4.105 w/loader ..............................CALL NEW NH T4.75 w/loader ................................CALL NEW NH T9.560, 4WD ....................................CALL NEW NH Boomer 50 w/loader ........................CALL NH TV6070 bi-directional ................................CALL NH TV140 bi-directional ..................................CALL NH 8870, SS ................................................$67,500 ‘08 NH 6070 w/cab, 2WD ............................$69,000 NEW Massey 4608 w/loader ..........................CALL NEW Massey 4610 w/loader ..........................CALL NEW Massey 5450, FWA, cab ........................CALL NEW Versatile 250, FWA ................................CALL NEW Versatile 305, FWA ................................CALL Versatile 895, 4WD ......................................$23,500 Versatile 400 w/650 hrs, 710 metric ..............CALL Ford/Versatile 876, 4WD, Nice ....................$43,500 Ford 5000, diesel, w/cab ................................CALL ‘60 IH 560, WF ..............................................$5,200 White 2-105......................................................CALL

ROW CROP TRACTORS

THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

FOR SALE:Dorset rams & German Shepherds - 4 years old, male & female to a ewe lambs. Jay Moses 507good country home. 262-677931-3701 1712 Polypay rams For Sale. Adult & 2013 lambs. NSIP Livestock Equip 075 records, RR, OPP, test negative flock. Holly Neaton 952-240-2192 or 952- FOR SALE: 50' Risseler taperboard bunk feeder. 715240-2193 896-1050 Ram Sale: 18 mo East Fresian, 18 mo Fresian/Cor- FOR SALE: New steer riedale cross. Also 2 yr old feeders, calf & finisher twin Corriedale ewes. sizes 1 ton to 8 ton cap. (320)396-2361 920-948-3516 www.steerfeeder.com Swine 065 Stocking Dealer for Arrow Farmquip, Real Industries Compart's total program & Filson livestock equipfeatures superior boars & ment. 30 – squeeze chutes, open gilts documented by 14 – crowding tubs, thouBLUP technology. Duroc, sand gates & panels, free York, Landrace & F1 lines. standing panels, continuous Terminal boars offer leanness, muscle, growth. Mafencing, rubber bottom ternal gilts & boars are bunks, bottomless bunks, productive, lean, durable. bale feeders, $250 & up. All are stress free & PRRS Feeder wagons, 24' bale free. Semen also available wagon frames, $1,595. through Elite Genes A.I. Stenberg Supply, Make 'em Grow! Comparts Motley MN. 218-352-6598 Boar Store, INC. Toll Free: 877-441-2627 Trucks & Trailers 084 FOR SALE: Excellent quality Yorkshire, Duroc, '76 Great Dane 45' van trailHampshire & crossbred er for storage, clean & dry, boars. Keith Thurston, $1,800. 507-340-2820 Madelia, MN 507-642-8547


Trucks & Trailers

THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

44

THE LAND CAN SELL IT! - Your First Choice for Classifieds - Place Your Ad Today Livestock, Machinery, Farmland - you name it People will buy it when they see it in The Land!

1-800-657-4665

Land classifieds with extended coverage. We offer you the reach and the prospects to get your phone ringing.

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

To submit your classified ad use one of the following options: Phone: 1-800-657-4665 or 507-345-4523 Mail to: The Land Classifieds, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002 Fax to: 507-345-1027 • Email: theland@TheLandOnline.com Online at: www.thelandonline.com

THE FREE PRESS South Central Minnesota’s Daily News Source

Reach Over 259,000 Readers!

Start your ad, in THE LAND, then add more insertions DEADLINE: Monday at Noon for the following Friday edition and more coverage. The choice is yours. You can count Plus - look for your classified ad in the e-edition on THE LAND, a Minnesota tradition where farm and family meet!

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“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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Announcements Employment Real Estate Real Estate Wanted Housing Rentals Farm Rentals Merchandise Antiques & Collectibles Auctions Hay & Forage Equipment Material Handling Bins & Buildings Grain Handling Equipment Farm Implements Tractors

             

Harvesting Equipment Planting Equipment Tillage Equipment Machinery Wanted Spraying Equipment Wanted Farm Services Fencing Material Feed, Seed, Hay Fertilizer & Chemicals Poultry Livestock Dairy Cattle Horses Exotic Animals

         

Sheep Goats Swine Pets & Supplies Livestock Equipment Cars & Pickups Industrial & Construction Trucks & Trailers Recreational Vehicles Miscellaneous

 Bold  Italic  Underline  Web/E-mail links = __________ ($2.00 per run)   = __________ ($4.00 per run)

TOTAL = __________ The ad prices listed above are based on a basic classified line ad of 25 words or less. Ads running longer than 25 words will incur an added charge.

Name____________________________________________ Address___________________________________________ City______________________________________________ State_________ Zip__________ Phone ___________________________ # of times _______

Card #___________________________________________________ Exp. Date__________________

CHECK

Signature________________________________________________

NOTE: If category is not marked, it will be placed in the appropriate category ADVERTISING NOTICE: Please check your ad the first week it runs. We make every effort to avoid errors by checking all copy, but sometimes errors are missed. Therefore, we ask that you review your ad for correctness. If you find a mistake, please call (507) 345-4523 immediately so that the error can be corrected. We regret that we cannot be responsible for more than one week’s insertion if the error is not called to our attention. We cannot be liable for an amount greater than the cost of the ad. THE LAND has the right to edit, reject or properly classify any ad. Each classified line ad is separately copyrighted to THE LAND. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited.

084

Trucks & Trailers

084

'96 Freightliner FLD455, Cat FOR SALE: '84 Ford 9000 eng., 10 spd., 623,000 miles, tri-axle grain truck, 855 Timpte hopper trlr. w/roll Cummins, 7spd trans, 20' tarp, $25,000; '79 Int'l box, 300 bu pull behind pup truck, 13 spd., 21' Lafayette trailer. $21,000. Call 763-286box w/tag axle, $16,500. 5079442 838-8675 or 507-661-0650 FOR SALE: '87 Int'l 9370, tri axle, 21' Crysteel box, 855 '99 B&B 20,000 lb. expandCummins, 9spd, very clean. able sprayer trlr., 2 dual 507-456-3007 10,000 lb. axles, exc. cond., $5,000; 6000 gal. steel water FOR SALE: '97 Ford tanker, $2,000; '84 FreightLouisville, 20' B&H, liner cabover, 300 Cum$32,000; '00 Freightliner mins, 9 spd. 218-731-0092 FL80 18' B&H, $22,000; Trades considered. 507-27676 IH Loadstar 1800, 60,000 3289 mi. 18' box & hoist $5,000;'72 Chevy c/50, 14' FOR SALE: Med Equipment box & hoist, 350 eng, $2,000; T122 hoist, twin cyl w/ hyd Grain Dump Box, 20' pump, $800; Scott level lift Feuerhelm box & hoist on hoist w/ pump, $2,500; stantruck frame w/ hitch, dard Olympic hoist, #128 w/ $1,500. 507-250-6093 NEW # pump, $2,000. 320-587-6301 FOR SALE: '74 IH 1800 twin FOR SALE: Tyler 16T fertilscrew truck, 549 engine, izer tender box, side disVG 20' steel box & hoist, charge, exc cond, VG rubber, BO. 20' steel $9,000/OBO. 507-301-1373 grain box & hoist, $3,500. '74 IH 1800 parts truck, 392 IHC 4300 conv semi tractor, 1984 mod, Cummins 400hp, engine, 5-4 trans, 18' steel 13sp, 201” WB, 448,000 mi, box & scissors hoist, BO. always shedded, clean, ex 507-665-3739 shape. 320-235-8349 FOR SALE: '74 International truck, 1910 Fleetstar, 20' 090 box & hoist, near new rub- Miscellaneous ber, recent engine work, 478 gas, good condition, FOR SALE: (2) 20.8x42 tires, (4) 20.8x38 tires, (2) $9,900/OBO. 320-848-2453 20.2x38 tires, (1) 18.4x38 tire, (1) 14.9x38 tire (2) FOR SALE: '78 Chev C70 16.9x34 tire (1) 13.6x28 tire. twin screw truck, 20' steel 507-430-1089 box & hoist, $2,500/OBO. 320-894-8034 FOR SALE: 25” tracks for JD 8000-8030T series tracFOR SALE: '79 40' Timpte tors, less than 200 hrs, use trailer, brakes 85%-90%, w/ mid rollers, good shape, tarp new 2012, trap door rereasonably priced. Call 507built 2012, DOT'd. $8,888. 920-8442 507-327-0786

HAAS EQUIP., LLC

Miscellaneous

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FOR SALE: Steel Posts, $2.00 each. 507-340-6934 One call does it all! With one phone call, you can place your classified ad in The Land, Farm News, AND The Country Today. Call The Land for more info @ 507-345-4523 • 800-6574665. PARMA DRAINAGE PUMPS New pumps & parts on hand. Call Minnesota's largest distributor HJ Olson & Company 320974-8990 Cell – 320-212-5336 RANGER PUMP CO. Custom Manufacturer of Water Lift Pumps for field drainage Sales & Service 507-984-2025 or 406-314-0334 www.rangerpumpco.com WANT MORE READERS TO SEE YOUR AD?? Expand your coverage area! The Land has teamed up with Farm News, and The Country Today so you can do just that! Place a classified ad in The Land and have the option of placing it in these papers as well. More readers = better results! Call The Land for more information. 507-3454523 • 800-657-4665 Winpower Sales & Service Reliable Power Solutions Since 1925 PTO & automatic Emergency Electric Generators. New & Used Rich Opsata-Distributor 800-343-9376

• 320-598-7604 •

Madison, MN From Hwy. 75 & 212 Jct., 3.5 mi. W., 2.5 mi. S.

‘12 CIH 5088 combine, 182 sep. hrs., 255 eng. hrs., RT, 2-spd. hydr., HID, Pro 700 ........................................$185,000 ‘05 CIH 2388 loader, Titan inspect. $110,000 Many Head Trailers ................................Call CIH 2020 flex head ..........................$19,500 (2) IH 1020 flex heads............$3,500/$6,500 CIH 2208 8RN cornhead, CIH 2388 mnts...............................................$19,500 (2) IH 1083, 8RN cornheads..$5,500/$7,500 CIH 12R30 cornhead ........................$37,500 JD 4400 D late, Nice ..........................$3,100 JD 443 4RN oil cornhead, Sharp ........$3,500 (2) MF 750 combines ............$1,750/$2,000 MF 860 combine ................................$2,000 MF 20’ bean head, late..........................Offer MF 4RW, 8RN cornhead ........................Offer JD 230 disk, 22’..................................$3,000 IH 475 disc, hyd. fold; JD 235 ............................................$3,500/$4,500 NH BR 780A round baler ....................$9,500 NH 7060 round baler, 4’, Demo ........$12,500 IH SMTA..............................................$3,900 JD 2510, gas, WF, 3 pt., Nice ............$6,500 (2) JD 3010, gas ....................$4,500/$5,250 JD 3020, gas; JD 4020, gas, PS ......Coming JD 4020, PS; JD 4020, late ..$6,500/$9,000 JD 4040, PS ......................................Coming JD 4230, Quad; JD 4240, Quad ........Coming JD 4320, 5500 hrs. ..........................$11,500 (2) JD 4430, Quad ............$12,500-$15,000 JD 4440, Quad..................................$22,000 ‘88 JD 4450, FWA ............................$39,000

(2) JD 4455, PS, FWA........$39,000/$42,500 JD 4455, PS; JD 4450, PS $36,000/$29,500 JD 7810, FWA, 740 loader, reverser $72,500 JD 280 loader ....................................$6,500 JD 840 loader, JD 8000 mts. ..............$9,500 (2) JD 740 loaders, Nice ........$7,500/$8,500 JD 640 loader ....................................$6,500 NEW JD 740 Legend loader ....................Call JD 260 loader, self-leveling ................$4,250 JD 741 loader, Sharp, hardly used....$11,500 (2) JD 158; (6) JD 148 loaders ............................................$2,500/$4,500 CIH 520 loader ....................................$3,750 Farmhand F11, w/pump ....................$1,500 Farmhand 1140, grapple....................$7,500 Westendorf WL-40; WL-42....$2,250/$3,500 New Box Scrapers, 10’/12’....$1,850/$1,950 New & Used Skidsteer Attachments ......Call Pallet Forks, Grapples, Rock Buckets ..Call Donahue 28’ trailer ............................$1,750 New & Used Batco & Conveyall belt conveyors..............................................Call Wheatheart 13x91 auger, Like New $12,900 Westfield 13x81 auger ......................$7,900 Westfield MK 13x71, swing hopper ..$9,900 Westfield 10x71, swing hopper ........$5,500 Many Other Augers ................................Call Alloway 2000, 20’ shredder ..............$4,000 (4) Pull Scrapers, 1 yd., 3-5 yd., 15 yd. Call Bobcat skidsteer backhoe ..................$4,000 Grizzley 3 pt. backhoe ........................$3,500 JD Chisel Plow Shanks, extensions........Call JD 6-Way Dozer Blade......................Coming


45

THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

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THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

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LEASE THIS USED QUAD $65.00/HR 2013 MODEL CASE IH 550 QUADTRAC

• • • •

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‘90 CIH 9170, 5647 hrs., PS ....$49,900

‘07 Steiger 430, PTO, 3 pt, 2530 hrs. ................................................$169,900

‘11 CIH Magnum 340, 1153 hrs. ................................................$196,000

‘10 JD 9430, 1828 hrs., 800 tires, PTO ................................................$215,500

‘79 JD 4440, 7294 hrs., power shift ..................................................$28,900

‘12 CIH 9230, track, AWD, 260 sep. hrs. ................................................$359,900

JD 2100, 5-shank min-til ripper ..................................................$12,500

‘99 CIH 730B, 7-shank ripper ..................................................$15,000

‘06 Wilrich 957, 7-shank ripper ..................................................$16,900

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‘10 CIH 530C, 5-shank ripper ‘12 CIH 870, 14’ 7-shank JD 712, 11-shank disc chisel ..................................$28,900 ripper ........................$39,500 w/rear mulcher..........$11,900

‘12 CIH Magnum 340, 603 hrs., susp. cab, leather, 360 HID lites, big pump, Full Pro 700 Auto Guide, Loaded ..............................................................$209,900 ‘11 CIH Magnum 340, 1153 hrs., susp. cab, leather, 360 HID lites, big pump, Loaded ........................................................................................................$189,900 ‘11 CIH Magnum 290, 1380 hrs., susp. cab, susp. front axle, leather cab, 360 HID lites, Loaded ................................................................................$172,800 ‘12 CIH Puma 160, 300 hrs., CVT trans., L765 loader, susp. axle ..........$135,800 ‘08 CIH Farmall 95, 414 hrs., MFD, cab ......................................................$33,800 ‘06 JD 5525, MFD, cab, ‘06 JD 5525, 2450 hrs., MFD, cab, 542 JD loader ......................................$39,500 loader, 2450 hrs.........$39,500 ‘79 JD 4440, 7294 hrs., powershift ..............................................................$28,900

USED 4WD TRACTORS Interest Free to January 1, 2015 ••• Call For Details ••• ‘11 CIH Steiger 600Q, 1043 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, Full Pro 700 Auto Guide ......................$329,900 ‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 281 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites ..................................................................$341,000 ‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 604 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites ..................................................................$329,900 ‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 1035 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites ................................................................$299,500 ‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 55 hrs., HID lites, Full Pro 700 Auto Guide..........................................Coming In ‘12 CIH Steiger 450Q, 409 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, 6 remotes, big hyd. pump, 36” tracks, Full Pro 700 steering ....................................................................................................................$310,000 ‘11 CIH Steiger 600Q, 1174 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, Pro 700 Auto Steer ..............................$319,900 ‘08 CIH Steiger 535, 1900 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, 800 tires ..................................................$205,500 ‘07 CIH Steiger 430HD, 2530 hrs., Lux. cab, 3 pt. hitch, PTO ..................................................$169,900 ‘90 CIH 9170, 5641 hrs., 20.8x42 tires, powershift ......................................................................$49,900 ‘10 JD 9430, 1828 hrs., 800R38 tires, 1000 PTO, JD Auto Steer ..............................................$215,500 STX and STEIGER PTO, TOW CABLE & 3 PT. KITS ON HAND!!!

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

• FULL PRO 700 AUTO GUIDE (WAAS) • LEASE BASE ON 3 YEARS, • 450 HOURS PER YEAR

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9230, 315 eng. hrs., track drive, RWA, folding covers ..................................................$359,900 8120, 849 sep. hrs., 620 duals, RWA, HID lights ..........................................................$215,000 2608, 8R30” chopping cornhead......................................................................................$56,500 2208, 8R30” ......................................................................................................................$28,000 2208, 8R30” ......................................................................................................................$25,900 2020, 25’ platform w/Crary air reel ..................................................................................$26,800 1020, 30’, full finger auger, 3” knife, rock guard ..............................................................$14,900 1020, 30’, 3” knife, rock guard..........................................................................................$13,900 1020, 30’, 3” knife, rock guard..........................................................................................$12,900 1020, 20’, 11⁄2” knife ..............................................................................................................$5,500 1020, 16.5’, 11⁄2” knife ..........................................................................................................$4,000

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Call For Details

Herb

Paul

CNH Capital’s Commercial Revolving Account provides financial assistance for parts and service when you need it, keeping your equipment running as its best with the quality parts and service you’ve come to expect from Case IH. Contact your local dealer or visit www.cnhcapital.com today for details. ©2012 CNH Capital America LLC. All rights reserved. CNH Capital and Case IH are registered trademarks of CNH America LLC. Printed in the USA.

www.matejcek.com

Blake


47 THE LAND, OCTOBER 4, 2013

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From feed mill to craft mill This week’s Back Roads is the work of The Land Correspondent Carolyn Van Loh

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“Where Farm and Family Meet”

A

destined for destruction a few ll roads lead to the miles north of Odin. small community of Odin, Minn., two weekShe bought the house, reloends in April-May and three cated it next to the mill and weekends in October. built a hallway to connect the two buildings. Later, a 1927 It began in 1999 when Gordon Van Tine barn comOdin’s 1923 feed mill closed. pleted the exhibit area. The owner said, “I’ll sell it to whoever treats me to dinner.” Nancy Olson All the buildings have original floors and woodwork, and most Nancy Olson responded, “Sold.” rooms in the house have original wallShe had been doing crafts for 20 paper. Customers concentrating on years and had dreamed of opening her own shop. Her husband, Kim, and the abundance of crafts can easily overlook the fact that they have other family members pitched in to walked from one building to another. transform the old mill into a craft The first year, 33 consignors from shop. five states exhibited. “I had hoped to From August 1999 to April 2000, get 35 to 40, just to get a feel for what Kim and family helpers hauled out 27 it would be like,” she said. Today, she flatbed loads of junk from the old mill. personally selects the 150-plus They also displaced rats, mice and exhibitors from six states. even a raccoon before the first craft A wall plaque in the mill proclaims: sale that April. “Volunteers are unpaid, not because The following year Nancy rescued a they are worthless, but because they 1917 Montgomery Wards farmhouse

are priceless.” The show’s growing popularity lies with 38 faithful volunteers. Olson said, “They are a blessing to me.” Volunteers labor with Olson for two weeks in the spring and three weeks in the fall setting up for a show. She also prepares the food. “I bake about 250 pies,” she said. Soup, sandwiches, pie and ice cream also draw visitors not interested in purchasing crafts. Husbands who might make a quick pass through the buildings will chat over coffee while their wives shop. Some customers come just for a delicious lunch in the unique setting. The craft mill has a mailing list of 6,500, and loyal customers come from a 120-mile radius each spring and fall. For more information, log on to www.odincraftmill.com. ❖

Odin Craft Mill, Odin, Minn.

Do you have a Back Roads story suggestion? E-mail editor@TheLandOnline.com or write to Editor, The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002.


Š 2013

September/October 2013

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