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Š 2013

May 31, 2013

NORTHERN EDITION

(800) 657-4665 www.TheLandOnline.com theland@TheLandOnline.com P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002

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Priorities on life

THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

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P.O. Box 3169 418 South Second St. Mankato, MN 56002 (800) 657-4665 Vol. XXXII ❖ No. XI 40 pages

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Cover photo by John Cross, Mankato Free Press

COLUMNS Opinion Farm and Food File The Outdoors In the Garden Cookbook Corner The Back Porch Marketing Mielke Market Weekly Farm Programs Auctions/Classifieds Advertiser Listing Back Roads

2-4 3 13 15 16 18 19-26 23 24 27-39 27 40

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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STAFF

Publisher: Jim Santori: jsantori@cnhi.com General Manager: Kathleen Connelly: kconnelly@TheLandOnline.com Editor: Kevin Schulz: editor@TheLandOnline.com Assistant Editor: Tom Royer: troyer@TheLandOnline.com Staff Writer: Dick Hagen: dickhagen@mvtvwireless.com Advertising Representatives: Kim Henrickson: khenrickson@TheLandOnline.com Mike Schafer: mike.schafer2@gmail.com Danny Storlie: theland@TheLandOnline.com Office/Advertising Assistants: Vail Belgard: vbelgard@TheLandOnline.com Joan Compart: theland@TheLandOnline.com Ad Production: Brad Hardt: lndcomp@mankatofreepress.com For Customer Service Concerns: (507) 345-4523, (800) 657-4665, theland@TheLandOnline.com Fax: (507) 345-1027 For Editorial Concerns or Story Ideas: (507) 344-6342, (800) 657-4665, editor@TheLandOnline.com National Sales Representative: Bock & Associates Inc., 7650 Executive Drive, Minneapolis, MN 55344-3677. (952) 905-3251. Because of the nature of articles appearing in The Land, product or business names may be included to provide clarity. This does not constitute an endorsement of any product or business. Opinions and viewpoints expressed in editorials or by news sources are not necessarily those of the management. The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The Publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any monies paid for the advertisement. Classified Advertising: $17.36 for seven (7) lines for a private classified, each additional line is $1.30; $23 for business classifieds, each additional line is $1.30. Classified ads accepted by mail or by phone with VISA, MasterCard, Discover or American Express. Classified ads can also be sent by e-mail to theland@TheLandOnline.com. Mail classified ads to The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002. Please include credit card number, expiration date and your postal address with ads sent on either mail version. Classified ads may also be called into (800) 657-4665. Deadline for classified ads is noon on the Monday prior to publication date, with holiday exceptions. Distributed to farmers in all Minnesota counties and northern Iowa, as well as on The Land’s website. Each classified ad is separately copyrighted by The Land. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Subscription and Distribution: Free to farmers and agribusinesses in Minnesota and northern Iowa. $24 per year for non-farmers and people outside the service area. The Land (ISSN 0279-1633) is published Fridays and is a division of The Free Press Media (part of Community Newspaper Holdings Inc.), 418 S. Second St., Mankato MN 56001. Periodicals postage paid at Mankato, Minn. Postmaster and Change of Address: Address all letters and change of address notices to The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002; call (507) 345-4523 or e-mail to theland@TheLandOnline.com.

“I’m alive. My wife’s alive. My kids are alive. It’s all good.” That comes from a survivor of the May 20 tornado that tore through Oklahoma. He may have lost LAND MINDS his home and belongings, but he By Kevin Schulz retained what is important. Now that is putting on the proverbial rose-colored glasses to look at the world. Watching news coverage of the devastation that resulted from the EF5 tornado Michael Kinney/The Norman (Okla.) Transcript was just another reminder of who is truly in Shawn Wilson of Moore, Okla., puts on his only dry shirt after charge of our lives and our world. his house was destroyed May 20 as a tornado ripped through the city. Wilson was in his shower when the house came down Follow-up news coverage indicated that the Moore, Okla., area has been hit by mul- on top of him. tiple tornados in recent history, prompting the reaction: “Get the hell out of there.” That time came to an end May 15 and he was laid to rest May 21. That is easier said than done, though. For those Jean preceded him in death in 2010. people, Oklahoma is home, their friends and family Two lives too short, but a legacy left are there, and it is their community. You can’t just to endure. Wayne and Jean had leave it that easily. three children — Haley, Will and Also, with the tornado track record, I have to Wendy. believe it wouldn’t be real easy trying to sell a lot I pray that Haley, Will and Wendy with a big X on it. Wayne Bollum are able to realize and cherish the My heart goes out to all residents of the tornadolegacy of their parents. stricken area. As I write this, the death toll had come Wayne Curtiss Bollum was born Oct. 8, 1955, at down from initial reports, and the unofficial estimate Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., to Henry and Marilyn on property damage was put at over $2 billion. (Friedrich) Bollum. But, as the opening quote says, the only real value After being raised on a farm near Blue Earth, is on that of human life. All else can be replaced. Minn., and graduating Blue Earth High School in Minnesota agriculture loses a friend 1974, he attended the University of Minnesota and You may or may not have known Wayne Bollum. received a bachelor’s degree of animal science in You wish you would have, and I wish that I would 1978. He later received his masters degree from the have known him better. Carlson School of Business. He first followed his dad I met Wayne through my in-laws and I had worked in to the Extension service, working in Steele with his father, Henry, when he was Extension agent County, Minn. in Faribault County and I was a rookie reporter. In the mid-1980s he moved to the Chicago area to The last time I spoke with Wayne was a few years join the Farm Progress Co., starting a career in the ago at the Minnesota State Fair, and he was with his publishing business. wife, Jean. Wayne and Jean Mary Bajadek were married on A little over a month ago, the Bollum family hosted Dec. 30, 1988, in Glen Ellyn, Ill. After marriage they a “WayneFest” in Northfield to celebrate his life. He made their home in Roseville, Minn., and Wayne was battling cancer, and he knew his time here was short. See MINDS, pg. 4

OPINION

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: 7 — Iowa farmer is a frequent flier to Washington, D.C., all in the name of corn 8 — Ag in the Classroom takes center

stage in June in Minneapolis 9 — “From the Fields” farmers finally hit the fields 10 — Volatility is the new norm in global agriculture


Crop growers have theirs; where’s my cow insurance?

OPINION

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

The Farm Resource Guide for 2013 is available upon request at many University of Minnesota Extension County offices across the state. It includes a variety of useful farm business management information. The front of the guide has the most frequently requested information on custom rates, rental rates for various ag commodity, forages, bins and buildings, farmland sales and rents and pasture rental rates. There is flexible rental arrangement information. Marketing information included lists the cash price probabilities for cash corn and soybeans for Worthington, Minn., since 1974. At the end of the guide is a section on feedlot rule highlights and information on manure agreement and easements, including examples of manure spreading lease and land application agreement forms. Included are the average cash prices for corn and soybeans to use as a benchmark along with a statewide listing by county of the last five year average yields for corn and soybeans. Statewide cropland rental information is available for counties with significant farm numbers in Adult Farm Management. Farmland sales information is available for all counties across Minnesota. A second study lists bare farmland sales from 14 counties in southwest Minnesota. This resource guide is available for a $25 fee plus postage and sales tax if you would like to have your own copy. The information can be provided in your preferred format: (e-mail cost $26.72, CD cost $28.50 or hard copy cost $30). If you would like your own copy of the resource guide, e-mail bauxx003@umn.edu or call (507) 372-3900 Ext. 3906 and state what format you would like to receive the Farm Resource Guide. ❖

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Farm Resource Guide available

Sweet as that is — essentially, continue to do what you’re already doing and get even better coverage — some farm bill watchers now suspect the conservation part of the deal won’t survive the Senate-House conference to marry the two bills. They see the House version — no conservation compliance, no limits — gaining traction. If so, my ranching pal’s future will sport more tractors and combines than cows and calves. Landlords and farmers, unleashed from any conservation requirement and able to buy cheap crop insurance that virtually assures a profit, will plow under more grass to plant more corn and beans. But even if the Senate’s conservation linkage remains in the final bill, the rancher is headed for an almost equally woeful future because farm program benefits, be they direct payments or insurance subsidies, end up being capitalized in land. That’s the biggest reason his cows and calves can’t compete with corn and beans now; the land has been made too valuable by the federal crop insurance guarantees paid for, in part, by you and me. In fact, that puts you and me in the business of pretty much putting this rancher out of business as we underwrite the expansion of an already sweetlysubsidized government program. And here I thought one of us was for limited government. Alan Guebert’s “Farm and Food File” is published weekly in more than 70 newspapers in North America. Contact him at agcomm@farmandfoodfile.com. ❖

THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

It was evident from the hello that the rent or buy the land I rent to plant more South Dakota rancher had practiced his corn and beans while you, me and taxpaypitch before he dialed my office. ers buy most of the insurance to guarantee them a profit and me a smaller ranch.” “I’m (so and so),” he said in a clipped, clear voice, “an independent cow-calf proNo, it sure won’t. ducer west of the (Missouri) river with That was late-March and this is late500 cows. I’m calling with one question: May and being right still won’t matter Where do I go to sign up for revenuebecause each version of the 2013 farm bill based cow-calf insurance?” that cleared its respective Congressional I’m sorry, did you say “revenue-based ag committee earlier this month includes FARM & FOOD FILE expanded versions of today’s generous fedcow-calf insurance?” eral crop insurance programs. By Alan Guebert “I did,” replied the cowboy. “You know, like revenue-based federal crop insurIn fact, some of the liveliest debates on ance. Farmers get that now and they’ll the bills centered on how to grow the get even more of it when Congress federal crop insurance program while passes the farm bill, right?” keeping ag outsiders — mostly environmental, nutrition and conservation groups — from Probably, yes, but I’m sure you know there’s no either placing restrictions on the expanding program such thing as revenue-based, federally subsidized or poaching some of its funds. cow-calf insurance. Each bill is far from any finish line, though. The A long, tired sigh came across 750 miles of cellular Senate bill (soon to be voted on by the full Senate), ether. for example, includes compromise wording that links “Well, yeah,” he said finally, “but somebody needs to conservation compliance with the new, bigger insurask why taxpayers are guaranteeing my neighbors ance program. The House farm bill does not. $300 and $400 an acre profit through federal crop But the Senate language carries a distinctive onlyinsurance to farm ranchland when I can’t buy any in-Washington ring: In return for agreeing to tie the insurance — let alone subsidized insurance — to lock-in one-tenth of that by doing the land right and subsidies to conservation guidelines, a standard in almost every farm bill since 1939, the committee ranching it.” agreed to eliminate any provision that would cut It was my turn to sigh. No argument; you’re right. insurance subsidies to farmers with more than “Being right won’t mean much when my neighbors $750,000 adjusted gross incomes.

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“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

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Commentary: Phone record seizure insult to independent press Distrust of government secrecy has been elevated to an exceptional level with the disclosure the Justice Department covertly examined two months of Associated Press phone records to determine who leaked details to the AP about a foiled terrorist plot. This amounts to spying on an American news organization — common practice in dictatorships but scary conduct in a democratic system that prizes the public value of an independent watchdog press. What makes this case so egregious is the Justice Department went about securing an array of phone records from at least 20 AP phone lines, including reporters’ and editors’ personal cell phones, without allowing the news agency an opportunity to object. Furthermore, it violates the department’s 30year-old subpoena guidelines requiring it to make “every reasonable effort to obtain through alternative means” information that might be included in the media’s phone records. The Justice Department’s explanation that it complied with national security laws, and limited its review of last year’s April and May records to the

OPINION

You may be tempted to dismiss as gratuitous wailing the news media’s concern over this serious breach of the constituThis amounts to spying on an American tional wall between government and the news organization — common practice in press. But the chilling consequences of the dictatorships but scary conduct in a demoJustice Department’s overzealous intrucratic system that prizes the public value of siveness could well impact your ability to know what your government is doing or an independent watchdog press. not doing on your behalf. Whistleblowers and confidential sources phone numbers of the callers and not the content of the calls, is thin cover for this affront to the free critical to keeping the government honest and transparent are sure to be discouraged from sharing what press clause of the First Amendment. the public has a right to know if the government can The motive for wanting to know who talked to the AP cavalierly snoop into the work product of the press. is clear but it is also irresponsible. Justice Department The Obama administration owes Americans the sleuths were hell-bent on hunting down the confidential sources for the May 7, 2012, AP story about a CIA oper- public assurance that its pursuit of leakers will no longer extend to secretly culling through the news ation to stop an airliner bomb plot in Yemen. media’s private records. Why this obsession with nailing the leakers? The This commentary was submitted by Community story was an embarrassment to the president, who had assured the American people there was no cred- Newspaper Holdings Inc., the parent company of The ❖ ible terrorist threat last May, around the time of the Land. anniversary of the killing of Osama bin Laden. The AP held the story for several days when told by the White House it would interfere with intelligence gathering. But after assurances any national security risk had passed, the news agency published the story. The Justice Department hound dogs were MINDS, from pg. 2 close behind. began working with Beef, National Hog Farmer and Dairy magazines. In 1992 they moved to Apple Valley, Minn., and in 1999, they bought their farm in Greenvale Township, Dakota County, just west of Northfield. Wayne started Golden Oaks Beef and continued to work as an advertising representative for Farm Journal Publications — Dairy Today. After Jean passed away, Wayne retired to stay home with his children and began his Golden Oaks Consulting business. Wayne attended the Church of St. Dominic, enjoyed golfing and liked raising Limousin and Aubrac cattle. During Wayne’s travels, he visited nearly every state of the union, as well as several foreign countries. Throughout his life he maintained many affiliations with agriculture organizations. Wayne is survived by his children Haley, Will and Wendy; his father, Henry (Sandie) Bollum; brothers: Randy, Terry; his sister, Cindy Grotsun; his fatherin-law, Charles Bajadek; his brother-in-law, Dan Bajadek; his sisters-in-law: Nancy Taylor, Jane Newkirk, Julie Rogers, Amy Caskey; many nieces, nephews, other relatives and many friends. He was preceded in death by his wife Jean, his mother Marilyn, and his mother-in-law Carole. Memorials are preferred to Agribusiness Educa• Builder’s and Contractor’s choice for Factory Direct Steel and Trim tional Foundation — Wayne Bollum Memorial Schol• Manufactured in Henderson, MN arship, and may be sent to Family of Wayne Bollum, • Custom Trim available up to 21’ 8075 330th Street West, Northfield, MN 55057. Funeral arrangements were handled by the Benson & Langehough Funeral Home, and a complete Visit our website for more information obituary can be found at www.northfieldfuneral.com. Kevin Schulz is the editor of The Land. He may be reached at editor@TheLandOnline.com. ❖ Henderson, MN

A strong agriculture voice silenced

RUSH RIVER STEEL


Window of opportunity motivates some to plant ‘early’ Craig Schwarz was putting in long hours in late-April to get the corn crop planted.

THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013 << www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Celebrating 75 years In Hybrid Seed Corn

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“Where Farm and Family Meet”

By EDIE SCHMIERBACH Mankato Free Press LE SUEUR, Minn. — April 29 at 3 p.m. was the “magic hour” for John and Tyler Sunderman. Judy Sunderman was at home, not yet aware of her husband and son’s last-minute change in plans. They had gone ahead and made an annual decision about the family’s livelihood. “OK, it’s time,” the rural Le Sueur farmers had agreed. They then began planting their 2013 corn crop. “We have two 24-row planters and we can do 35 acres an hour,” John Sunderman said that afternoon. Like most other Minnesota crop growers, the Sundermans had put off planting this year, waiting for the weather to warm up and the snow to stop falling. (More snow was in the forecast that week.) Field corn needs a minimum soil temperature of 55 degrees to germinate. The University of Minnesota Southern Research and Outreach Center in Waseca recorded soil temperatures (at 2 inches) of 51 degrees April wrong thing to do. It’s a chance we 28 and 61 degrees April 30. Soil tem- have to take,” Greenough said. peratures at that depth generally are “Last year, we were waiting for the close to the current air temperature. ideal situation and I think we shortIn its weekly crops and weather changed ourselves a bit.” report for the state, the U.S. DepartDespite the late start, experts said ment of Agriculture said Minnesota there was still time to plant. Corn farmers had managed to begin only yields in Minnesota don’t typically sufvery limited field work, mainly on fer unless planting is delayed past higher ground and well-drained fields. mid-May, although there’s some concern about the In the Le Sueur impact on yields area, neighbor for spring wheat Craig Schwarz was We don’t know if it’s the and other small working alongside right or wrong thing to grains. Sunderman, plantdo. It’s a chance we ing 98-day hybrid Greenough had a seed corn into have to take. Last year, down-to-earth attisandy soil. we were waiting for the tude about the risk he was taking this Schwarz was ideal situation and I year. more cautious think we short-changed about putting in “I just wanted to ourselves a bit. his own acres — he get it done before planned to take — John Greenough the next weather care of half of his event starts. ... 80 acres this week, Who knows, this then finish the second half after the could be the best planting ever — or weather improves. the worst planting.” “It’s a bigger risk for him,” SunderProgress has been made across The man said. Land’s circulation area as the Minnesota Rural Lake Crystal, Minn., farmer office of the National Agricultural StatisJohn Greenough and his sons, Mike tics Service showed 82 percent of corn and Matt, decided they would take a and 42 percent of soybeans planted as of gamble on the weather. They went into May 26 (the most recent update). Iowa the field about 4 p.m. April 29 with stats showed 85 percent for corn and 40 their 90-foot planter and by the next for soybeans for the same time frame. afternoon had most of their 300 acres The Free Press of Mankato, Minn., is of corn in. a sister publication to The Land under ❖ “We don’t know if it’s the right or CNHI.

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Weather trend: A little less cold, a lot wetter 













 















â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where Farm and Family Meetâ&#x20AC;?





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&HQWXU\:HDWKHU$QQXDO6QRZ)DOO Annual snow fall since 1900, in inches



By TIM KING The Land Correspondent LONG PRAIRIE, Minn. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Not so long ago, we wrapped up a rather snowy winter. Just like the old days, right? Well, the old days actually werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as snowy as the old timers will tell you. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s true that the winter of 1950-51 had more snow than any other year between 1900 and 2010. That year some 85 inches of snow fell on Long Prairie, in central Minnesota, according to weather records held by Steve and Nancy Potter. The Potters have been collecting weather data, as National Weather Service volunteers, in Long Prairie since 2007. The Potters have snow, precipitation and temperature records kept for Long Prairie, by the NWS, going back to the beginning of the last century. Snowfall in 1900 was only 23 inches. In 2010 total snowfall was still only 38 inches. The Potters have graphed the total snowfall for each of the 110 years between 1900 and 2010. If you calculate the average of all 110 years, Long Prairie had an average annual snowfall of 55 inches in 2010. In 1940 the average snowfall was only 40 inches. In 1938 it was only 38 inches. Throughout the century the average annual snowfall has only gone up. Snowfall seems to vary dramatically from year to year. For example, the years 1958 to 1963 had light snowfall. But over the next seven years there were three years with nearly 70 inches of snow. In the following years a trend of



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THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

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deep annual snowfalls continued. At the same time, the years with comparatively lighter snowfall rarely fell beneath what was the average in 1940. Even the seemingly light snowfall of 2012 was 40 inches, the same as the average in 1940. The results have been a steadily increasing annual snowfall. This winter will likely continue that trend. The Pottersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; graph for average annual precipitation, including rain, snow and hail, shows a steady increase over the last 110 years as well. Average annual precipitation for Long Prairie in 2010 was 31 inches. In 1980 it was 28 inches and in 1940 it was 21 inches. The wettest year was 1972, when precipitation totaled 45 inches. Part of the total precipitation that year came in the form of 70 inches of snow. The driest year was 1910, with less than 10 inches of precipitation. Years with more than 35 inches of precipitation became fairly common, starting around 1965. In the 45 years between 1965 and 2010 there

were seven years with 35 inches or more of precipitation. In the 65 years before that there were only two years with 35 inches or more of precipitation. Total snowfall and total precipitation has been trending upward for a century. Steve and Nancy also analyzed the average annual high and low temperatures. Their analysis showed that the average high temperature for Long Prairie has only increased by one degree over the last century. It is currently just above 53 degrees. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That is not statistically significant,â&#x20AC;? Steve said. The three-degree rise in the average low temperature during that time is significant, however. In the early 1900s the average annual low temperature was hovering just below 29 degrees. By 2010 it was slightly above 32 degrees. Over the last 110 years the climate around Long Prairie has become less cold and substantially wetter. â?&#x2013;

U of M Extension launches websites for forage shortage, late planting issues Untitled-23 1

University of Minnesota Extension has educational resources available for those with questions related to a continuing forage shortage and late-planting issues. Reports of winter injury and winterkill of alfalfa continue to intensify across parts of southern Minnesota, contributing to the existing shortage caused by two years of drought. Producers are examining options in light of their field assessment and inventory; many of these producers face purchasing hay or growing some type of emergency crop to feed livestock. Log on to Extensionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alfalfa Weather Damage and Emergency Foragesâ&#x20AC;? website at www.extension.umn.edu/agriculture/crops/spring-issues. Minnesota farmers were delayed getting into their

5/24/2013 9:53:18 AM

fields, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Statistics Service, after a late-season snow storm brought moisture to areas that were already damp and cold. Warmer, drier weather in much of the state has likely improved planting progress, but challenges still exist in some areas. Log on to Extensionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Late Plantingâ&#x20AC;? website at www.extension.umn.edu/agriculture/crops/late-planting. Also available is Extensionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s phone and e-mail Farm Information Line, (800) 232-9077 or fil@umn.edu). Extensionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Farm Information Line is a resource for questions about water, crops, horticulture and climatology issues. Calls and e-mails are handled within one business day. â?&#x2013;


NCGA head: Drop payments, move to risk management That, in a nutshell, is the primary function of the National Corn Growers Association and its 38,810 members. The Pam Johnson NCGA headquarters are in St. Louis, but a huge traffic center is its Washington, D.C., office. Pam Johnson, a Floyd, Iowa, corn producer, is one of those frequent D.C. visitors. She should be; Johnson is the current NCGA president. And she’s not bashful about speaking up on behalf of America’s corn producers.

Given the moisture relief over much of the Corn Belt, she accepts the early projections of a potential record production year in 2013, with 97 million acres, a 163-bushel yield, 14.4 billion bushels total production and $4 to $5 corn prices. With ethanol utilizing 2 billion bushels of yearly production, she knows renewable fuels are a critical piece of a corn grower’s profitability — now, and going into the future. She’s optimistic that both the Senate and House ag committees will jointly develop a new farm bill, and Congress will approve this collateral effort. “We do not want another extension of the current farm bill (2008 legislation); for many reasons we need a five-year comprehensive farm bill. The 2012 drought should have proved to everyone why

‘risk management’ is so important to farmers. “As NCGA president and as an Iowa farmer,” Johnson said, “I’m OK with giving up direct payments, and so is our NCGA Board. Even in grassroots policy meetings across the Corn Belt, elimination of direct payments wasn’t an issue. But transitioning those payments into a better crop insurance program, and a revenue-based risk management program that protects against multi-year declines in prices and yields, is better logic.” Johnson is aware that southern cotton and rice farmers favor target prices, but if that’s part of the new farm bill moving forward, she pointed out the NCGA would insist that those target price options must be decoupled from planted acres to avoid market distortions.

“Just look at last year,” Johnson said. “We would not have been able to produce 10.7 billion bushels of corn without the seed genetics we now have access to. We know that pipeline of new biotech products is full and robust. We as growers want to continually be able to access that technology, not just to benefit ourselves but to feed a growing world population that sim-

• Keep letters to 250 words or less (We reserve to right to edit for length). • For verification purposes, letters must have the writer’s name, address and telephone number. • Letters sent anonymously will be discarded.

Johnson is adamant that more farmers must speak up on behalf of agriculture. “Agriculture continues to take some strong hits by activists who are poorly informed on the real economic structure of production agriculture. It’s our profession. We need to defend it.” ❖

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“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Send your letters to the editor to Editor, The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002 or editor@TheLandOnline.com

“And food security is such a big piece of that formula, too. If we’re going to provide food security for 9 billion people by 2050, biotechnology is key to that happening.”

“Buy American, Buy Local”

Minnesota Made

“My husband and I have farmed now for a few years. We’ve been through that ‘target price’ era. It’s got many problems,” she said. “How do you set a meaningful fixed price? I think the current price for corn is $3.70. And reflecting on last year’s drought, if you didn’t produce the bushels, that target price program isn’t going to help you one bit with your risk management.”

We want to hear from you.

ply wants to eat better products in the human food chain.

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“Feed production for our livestock industry; feed stock for our burgeoning renewable fuels industry; multiple ingredients for the food industry; and a valuable resource for the expanding export world are what we’re all about,” Johnson said. “We see the U.S. corn industry growing in value to the future of America.”

... Transitioning those payments into a better crop insurance program, and a revenue-based risk management program that protects against multi-year declines in prices and yields, is better logic.

She is not critical of the “licensing agreements” between various biotech companies resulting in a much bigger field of genetically modified products into the marketplace.

THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer We grow it, and we’ve got to sell it.

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THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

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Ag knowledge takes center stage, City Center By KEVIN SCHULZ The Land Editor The Land’s readers do not need to be reminded of the importance of agriculture. They live it. The same is not true for all residents of Minnesota and Iowa, however. Or the entire country for that matter. As the working agriculture population has dwindled with the advance-

ment of mechanization and technology, so has the knowledge of agriculture as a whole. Educating about agriculture can no longer be reserved to the vocationalagriculture departments of high schools. In the case of Minnesota, there are roughly 180 high school ag teachers. “That means roughly 96 percent of our kids are not touched by agriculture lessons,” said Al Withers. That is where Withers’ program,

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Minnesota Agriculture in the Class- those most benefiting from attending room, comes in. “Our ag departments include educators of all grade levels, are doing a great job, but we know the AITC program staff, school adminisagriculture lessons need to reach fur- trators, curriculum and content spether into the schools. We need to cialists and farmers. reach other classroom teachThe MAITC operates out of ers.” the Minnesota DepartWithers doesn’t want ment of Agriculture, and classroom teachers to is staffed by Withers think they are being and Sue Knott, MAITC asked to make room education specialist. for special lessons on Educating the non-ag agriculture in their public through the already crammed curschools is more than a riculum. “We’re just two-person job. Withasking that, for examers and Knott’s mission ple, when they are talkand budget is directed by ing Minnesota history or the MAITC Foundation geography, to discuss the imporBoard, made up of 15 voluntance of agriculture, and how it plays teer members from education into the current lesson.” and business, many with agriculture Getting the teachers on board is the ties. first step. Sometimes, that is the Support from agriculture has also biggest step. been highlighted in advance of this One step in that direction is educat- year’s national conference. CHS, for ing the teacher to be able to educate example, offered $15,000 in scholarships to cover the registration fees for the students. 40 teachers. Once a year the teachWithers lauds all ers become the students sponsors, but highas they attend the lighted the Minnesota Our ag departNational Agriculture in Corn Growers Associaments are the Classroom Confertion, Minnesota Soyence, this year held doing a great bean Research & ProJune 25-28 at the Minjob, but we motion Council, neapolis Marriott City know the agriMonsanto and the U.S. Center. Department of Agriculculture lessons Withers anticipates ture National Institute need to reach about 450 teachers — for Food and Agriculfurther into the kindergarten through ture for supporting at schools. We high school — from the Lake Superior across the country will need to reach sponsorship level be attending the confer($20,000 and above). other classroom ence to take part in 46 “We figured we’d name teachers. workshops and 15 that level after the learning labs to further biggest lake,” Withers — Al Withers expand their ag knowlsaid. edge. The conference wraps Though the intent is to further ag up on June 28 with the keynote knowledge in teachers lacking that address “Global Food and Culture” by expertise, Withers said there will be Andrew Zimmern, chef, food writer more ag teachers attending this year’s and co-creator and host of “Bizarre conference than in conferences in Foods with Andrew Zimmern.” years past. The cost of the conference — featur“Ag teachers are finding themselves ing workshops, traveling tours, an having to educate students coming exhibit fair and keynote speakers — is into ag classes who don’t have the $425. Log on to basic ag knowledge,” he said. “The kids www.agclassroom.org/conference2013 aren’t from ‘plows, sows and cows’ like to register, or contact Withers at when we grew up.” alan.withers@state.mn.us or (651) 201❖ According to the conference website, 6688 for more information.

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From the Fields: The planting wait is finally over The Laubenthals Swea City, Iowa

The Brandts Ada, Minn.

The Johnsons Starbuck, Minn.

believed that by the end of the day he would have 150 to 200 acres of corn in the ground. “We need 10 days of good weather.” If the weather cooperates he should be done with corn by May 19. Messner and his dad put in the long hours together; Messner works the ground, then the planting is done by his dad. Some producers in the area are still dealing with cold, damp ground but he noted that “we’ve been lucky with our ground.” At Central Valley Co-op things are moving, and moving quickly, with anhydrous and dry fertilizer going out. It’s “definitely busy,” Messner said. From the co-op to the fields, snow may have paused the planting season but with improving conditions the countryside is starting to bustle.

The Messners Northfield, Minn. On May 1, the Northfield area received a foot of snow. That would be a lot of snow even in January, but in May Chris Messner it’s a major obstacle for what should be the planting season. When The Land spoke to Chris Messner on May 13, he estimated that “25 to 50 percent” of area fields were ready to be planted. The snow made things wet for quite a while but warmer temperatures and high winds were changing field conditions for the better. “After tomorrow a lot more stuff will be ready to go,” he said. Messner started planting corn on May 11, and

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“Early morning, late nights.” Such is Scott Johnson’s work schedule on the farm right now, but he’s not complain- Scott Johnson ing. He is happy to be able to put in those long hours and finally get the crop in the ground. When The Land spoke to Johnson on May 13 he had been planting corn for a week. On this particular day he was plant-

ing sweet corn, but would soon be back to planting grain corn, with hopes of finishing that in two days. Then, on to beans. Planting is “going really good,” Johnson said, adding that he has also been able to keep up with spraying. He admitted that planting is a “bit behind normal” but things are moving along nicely thanks to a nice stretch of weather. He noted there was dust behind the planter but the forecast called for a chance of rain later in the week. If weather and equipment cooperates, Johnson predicts that he should be done planting in two weeks. The fields in the area are bustling — “Things around here have been pretty busy,” Johnson said. He joked that if you could “only order moisture when we want it, it would make it a lot easier.”

Old Man Winter gave one last glancing blow on May 1, giving Charlie Laubenthal’s farm around 8 inches of Charlie Laubenthal snow that day, closing area schools and planters. That much snow in May? “That’s a first,” he said. Eight days later Laubenthal was back planting and has been “going since.” The Land spoke to Laubenthal on May 13, and he predicted that he should be done planting corn by May 15. He called the field conditions in the area “ideal right now.” Looking around the countryside from his tractor cab he noted three planters in neighboring fields going as well. He hopes that the weather will continue to cooperate for the next week. With a forecast that includes everything from 97 degrees Fahrenheit to the low 70s for the remainder of the week, Laubenthal is hopeful he can get started on beans by the weekend. He has all dry fertilizer down and will now start running liquid fertilizer. “Things are shaping up fast,” he said. With corn prices up $0.20 on May 13 and the crop going in nicely, Laubenthal is feeling optimistic. He does, however, want one thing to be known: “We don’t need any more snow.” Let’s hope Mother Nature is listening. ❖

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Danny Brandt can cross wheat off his planting to-do list. He finished planting on May 12 and said he’s already seeing “good Danny Brandt emergence on the first couple fields.” The Land spoke with Brandt two days later while he was in the tractor “fighting the wind, with gusts up to 60 miles per hour.” After some planter issues he started putting in corn on May 8. He had one more day left of planting beets, with the “first beets just starting to pop up out of the ground.” He no-tilled much of his beet fields this year. “We feel we are right on track now,” Brandt said. Corn should be all planted by the end of the week, with the beans planted after that. He believes they’ll “have everything in the ground by Memorial Day.” There is a chance of rain forecasted later in the week but that’s music to Brandt’s ears: “We could use any light shower we can take.” Brandt’s neighbors are all in the fields — “everybody is able go where they want to go” — as field conditions are good in the Ada area. This season he’ll do some trial work with fertilizers and additives, as well as taking the time to put in a Monsanto Fact Plot (corn) and another variety comparison plot for a local elevator. Trial and plot work is time consuming, but it proves whether new products work or not on his own acres, and keeps the farm progressive in using the latest chemistries, fertilizers, seed genetics and technologies. The Brandt farm is in full swing — a far cry from a few weeks ago when there was little to do but go ice fishing.

THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

By KRISTIN KVENO The Land Correspondent

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THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

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Q&A: Volatility the new norm in global agriculture By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer “The next 20 to 30 years will likely continue (to be) extremely volatile for agriculture. However, because the long-term outlook continues strong, this is the best industry to be in.” Those are the thoughts of Jerry Jerry Gulke Gulke, veteran farm prognosticator and long-time Illinois farmer. A North Dakota native and North Dakota State University graduate, Gulke farms in both North Dakota and Illinois. He also has an office at the Chicago Board of Trade. In a question-and-answer session with The Land, Gulke shared additional comments. Q: Why is agriculture so volatile now? Gulke: Basically because production agriculture has ramped up so rapidly and become a worldwide industry. Farmers in other countries are making some money now, too. This simply intensifies competition. It’s Economics 101 at its best. When prices get high you either stop using that resource, or you incentivize somebody to grow more of it. When you grow too much you either build new demand or you operate in negative margins until the market rebalances the equation. We’ve lost about a billion bushels in corn exports because of $7 pricing and also lack of availability. But the bigger question is what will slow down corn production in the Ukraine, Argentina and Brazil? Once you have that new competitor you can’t put him out of business overnight. It’s the least-cost ‘seller’ — not the least-cost producer — who gets that market. But these countries also have bad weather, bad crop seasons, too, so we may recapture some of that market.

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Somebody wrote a big book questioning ‘Who’s going to feed China?’ but it turns out ... production agriculture has ramped up so rapidly for the most part China is and become a worldwide industry. Farmers in other feeding China by making countries are making some money now, too. This alliances with other countries for feed grains and meat prodsimply intensifies competition. It’s Economics 101 ucts. China has already at its best. invested millions in Brazil, and part of Africa, to build infrastructure to transport Most observers think we’re not ready to do a 160- production to China. They are now doing the same in bushel trend-line corn crop nationwide this year Australia. High prices invite production. Agriculture because there still are moisture concerns in the will feed the world, but not on $2 corn. western Corn Belt, plus much of the new expansion Q: Has the ongoing liquidation of beef cows, of the Corn Belt is in new areas where trend-line dairy cows, hogs and even turkeys and broilers yields aren’t likely. But the reality is that we don’t in the United States now brought the supplyneed an average crop. Last year we did 125-bushel demand issue into balance? yields nationwide and curbed demand to meet that Gulke: That’s what the numbers are now telling lower production. So now we’re starting out this new us. But the broiler and turkey people are strong comcrop season with lower demand and potentially petitors. You look at the price of broiler breast meat we’re going to produce more corn and you have the elements of some serious price challenges from our versus ‘the other white meat’ of pork and right now buyers. It takes about three times longer to rebuild the broiler breast is the cheapest source of protein. demand as it takes to lose that demand. Japan, for And these guys are quick reactors. If the market example, is now buying grain from the Ukraine just tells them there’s too many broilers, they just reduce the egg hatch. That’s how quickly they can adjust to as good as I grow on my farm, and they’re buying it market demands. cheaper. Exports of our meat products, especially pork and, Q: Is innovation in production agriculture to some extent, broilers and turkeys, too, are key to now a worldwide phenomenon? market sustainability anymore. About 25 to 30 perGulke: Absolutely. I have a friend, a top executive cent of U.S. meat production now goes overseas. But with John Deere who just returned from Russia. He if our U.S. dollar ramps up, at some point foreign met with farmers that collectively represent about buyers will no longer be able to purchase U.S. corn, 20 million acres of production. And their biggest soybeans, pork and broilers. Japan’s currency is curquestion: How soon can they start equipping their rently 18 percent less in value to the U.S. dollar than farms with the same technologies in farm equipment last year when they bought $3 billion worth of pork that American farmers are using? The major seed and beef products. Will they be able to afford that companies of America are rapidly working the volume this year with the purchasing power of their genetic strides of their American seed into many of currency going down the tube? these overseas countries where GMO is permitted. Q: As you indicated the broilers industry, and Basically this entire issue of innovation and adop- even the swine industry, can repopulate tion boils down to ‘follow the money.’ quickly. But how about the cattle industry? Look what’s happening in North Dakota, where a Gulke: It will take awhile in the beef industry. 500,000-acre increase in corn is projected for 2013. However, if we have $5 corn, or less, the demand for Because of better seed and better margins, corn is feeder cattle likely will quickly ramp up. But feeders pushing wheat acres right out of North Dakota and are cautious. They tell me they now want to see that Montana. On our North Dakota farm, we’re sick of corn in a grower’s combine before they step up progrowing spring wheat because there’s always some- duction. ‘You’re not going to catch me with a yard full thing wrong with it. Instead we’re growing more of feeder cattle and corn ramping back up to $7 and corn and soybeans. Very likely as wheat acres $8 levels again.’ Right now cattle feeders are bleeddecline in America, Ukrainian farmers will be grow- ing pretty badly. ing more wheat. Q: Is cheap money driving land prices, or $7 Q: Is the ‘genetically modified organism’ corn? When does the land bubble quit inflating? issue still a challenge in some countries? Gulke: It’s both. The ridiculously high write-off on Gulke: European farmers are pressuring to open their fields for GMO crops. But there’s a big demand farm equipment ($500,000 the year of purchase) I for non-GMO foods in Europe. Consumers pay more think is spurring this mind trend. Farmers are but are these higher prices getting back to farmers? thinking, ‘I’m going to buy this zero-interest farm Are farmers grossing more by growing non-GMO equipment; then I’m going to do the full ride on that products? This debate will wrangle indefinitely. You $500,000 depreciation; and then, because I’m not would think China would have to embrace GMO pro- having to pay that additional income tax, I’m going duction but instead they keep increasing their corn to use that money to buy land. So we’re hearing of production because they can buy soybeans cheaper farmers putting 50 percent down on land; even a few in the world market (Brazil in particular) than they examples of 100 percent cash for the entire purSee GULKE, pg. 12 can grow their own.


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THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

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Gulke’s advice to young farmers: Get an education GULKE, from pg. 10 Q: What’s your take on crop insurance in the machinery at least you still have the equipment. Oddly enough high income tax makes that stuff a lot chase. But now you’ve got principal payments on next farm bill? after-tax income which could lead to a cash-flow Gulke: I think it will be designed to be what it was cheaper. If you were only going to tax me 30 percent problem for some of these guys. intended to be — a stop loss not a profit center. Do there’s no incentive for me to spend my money. But at 50 percent income tax I can’t afford to hire I quit buying land a few years ago. If I’m wrong the arithmetic. If you look at 85 percent coverage another person so I can do less and sit more, or put and land goes to $20,000 then I’ve blown it and lost times a $5.60 or something corn price, you’re looking on GPS and all these other technology add-ons that the opportunity to be a millionaire five times rather at a pretty low price for your grain. It’s costing me may return an investment for me. than just two times. For some farmers, it’s just too about $750 an acre to grow corn these days, $350 for Q: Do we really need a farm bill? And if yes, late to run the risk of additional land. I can’t make a the land, $400-plus to put in the crop. what for? mistake anymore; I don’t have 40 years to be right. Gulke: Anymore I really don’t know. I expected the ‘direct payments’ to be gone and I think the bubble on land prices is about now they are. Our government is very good at done. Selling your corn at ‘give-away’ I think it’s the best opportunity going forward of hindsight but very weak on foresight. When prices so that you can make payments on any economic sector. The increasing demand of corn first hit $8 bucks, they should have said your land is simply bad business. Young countries around the world will inevitably keep ‘we need this money to pay off the debt. If you farmers need to be concerned. For many buy $10,000 to $15,000 an acre land you’re on agriculture in the economic limelight. We’re at 7 they haven’t had a bad year since they your own; you’re not on the back of the taxbillion-plus (population) now and that’s projected started. But good times aren’t a forever in payer anymore. You don’t need that $30 an this business either. to be 9 billion by 2050. That will take a huge acre deficiency payment.’ But now that $30 jump in world agriculture production. Crop insurance is the stop gap in this could be your profit. Too often USDA does the risk management issue. If I get a 200wrong move at the wrong time. — Jerry Gulke bushel crop on my Illinois farm or a 120Q: We’ve got sharp young people wantbushel crop, thanks to crop insurance my ing to farm. How do we encourage them with gross revenue will be about the same. So my crop If you’ve got your machinery paid for it may still be a insurance stops the bleeding, so to speak, but the paying proposition, but you’ve got to look at cash flow. so much risk in this farming economy? bigger question is if we have a huge crop this year, After taxes are you going to have enough money to Gulke: Get educated. That’s a simplistic answer and a 2-billion-bushel carryover into 2014, what make your capital payments and still cover your fam- but the complexities of farming today demand a high will next year’s crop insurance be costing me? level of competence. Learning how to run a business ily living expenses? Get focused on that arithmetic. before you start the business is just smart. Farming In 2008 when that bubble burst on grain prices we Q: Implement dealers have really embraced today is all about cash flow. I would suggest beginstayed two-and-a-half years below $4.50 on corn. If the past three to four years. Is leasing farm ners do both a cash accounting and an accrual we can work with $4.50 corn as the low and $6 as equipment smart? accounting basis so they better understand how the high we can be OK if we are good marketers and Gulke: I’ve never leased equipment and never money works in their operation. Manage your cash watch our costs. Cost control is key in this farming will. I’ve always felt I could do a better job buying flow so you don’t find out on Dec. 31 that you have a business. what I needed, when I needed it. And right now I liquidity problem. Paying income tax is not a dirty wouldn’t buy a stitch of equipment until I see what word. You know what you’ve got left after you pay it. this 2013 crop is going to be. I always bought Q: Is farming and agriculture still exciting to machinery after I had income tax problems but even you? then I asked, ‘If I spend $100,000 for equipment Gulke: I think it’s the best opportunity going forwhat will be my return on that $100,000 expense. Back then I said ‘I can pay taxes to Nixon or Ford ward of any economic sector. The increasing demand and only keep 40 percent, or I could write it off and of countries around the world will inevitably keep agriculture in the economic limelight. We’re at 7 billet them reduce my risk.’ * Dual Jacks, Torque Tube, Lockable Chain Box, Combo Dove, lion-plus (population) now and that’s projected to be Once you pay the tax it’s gone. But if you buy the 9 billion by 2050. That will take a huge jump in LED Lights, and more * Prices & Options Subject To Change. world agriculture production. Also, invariably, there’ll be a day when the Ukraine or Russia doesn’t 25’ (20’ + 5’) 14,000 lb. GVW - Fully Equipped — $6,175 have a crop and our corn could rather quickly ramp 32’ (27’ + 5’) 22,000 lb. GVW - Low Profile — $9,175 $9,250 Completely Erected! back up to $8 or more. STRONGHOLD Drop ABU 14000# r e You’ve got to understand the marketplace and Oth ng The Top Choice i ‘N Locks GVW TRAILER Build On what drives it, plus you’ve got to be real good at risk in cattle handling s Size ial! management. Buying crop insurance, thinking it’s a Gooseneck equipment c Spe Since 1965 ‘catchall’ panacea for risk management, is not good Hitch thinking. But behind all this conversation is the Easy to Install, reality that weather around the world really controls Easy to Haul, 18’ + 2’, the destiny of agriculture around the world. It’s That Simple! 2-7000# Axles Until/unless soil moisture recharge happens nationwide we’re going to stay on the nervous side. It looks From: Chutes, Tubs, like the eastern Corn Belt is now abundantly $3,799 Alleys, etc. recharged for the 2013 crop season. 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Veteran legislator undermining Minnesotaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Legacyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; islators are members of the House Legacy Committee that is trying to mess around with Legacy funding.

sion of future Legacy funding or that of the voters. In which case, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll know exactly whose side they are on.

But we need to pay attention to what happens if and when Kahnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s version of Legacy Funding reaches the House floor.

John Cross is a Mankato (Minn.) Free Press staff writer. Contact him at jcross@mankatofreepress.com or (507) 344-6376 or follow him on Twitter @jcross_photo. â?&#x2013;

It will be telling, whether local lawmakers share Kahnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision and ver-

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Four decades is a long always be trusted to do the time, but I seem to recall right thing. that as a student at the UniAs chair of the House versity of Minnesota in the Legacy Committee, in addition fall of 1972, I might have to significantly altering fundhelped Phyllis Kahn get ing recommendations brought elected to her first term in to the committee by the the Minnesota House of LSOHC, she wants to change Representatives. the Outdoor Heritage Fundâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a lot of water schedule of annual appropriaTHE OUTDOORS beneath the bridge since tions to a biennial process. By John Cross then and fortunately, I am In essence, the LSOHCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an older and wiser voter. work then would be meaningless every Not that law-making ever is a pretty other year since they could be disprocess, but Kahnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attempts to tinker cussing projects already approved or with the Outdoor Heritage Funds dur- denied by the Legislature, and for ing the current legislative session have which they had no input. been particularly onerous, some might She also has proposed changing the argue, even arrogant. LSOHCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s make-up to give legislators a We knew exactly what we were vot7-5 advantage in the funding approval ing for in 2008 when, by more than a process, thereby making the process 60 percent majority, the Clean Water, more prone to the vagaries of politics Land and Legacy Amendment passed. than to project merits. By approving an increase of threeKahnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s committee also has dramatieighths of one percent in the sales tax, cally altered and rewrote the LSOHCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s there would be a dedicated source of fund- 2014 funding recommendations, including to â&#x20AC;&#x153;protect, enhance and restore our ing approving more than $50 million wetlands, prairies, forests and fish, game for projects in 2015, projects that the and wildlife habitatâ&#x20AC;? for the next 25 years. Heritage Council hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even had an Key to the amendment was the provi- opportunity to vet. sion that a council Given the advicomprised of prisory nature of the vate citizens and council and the Whatever happens, as elected officials funding recomannually would mendations it a metro-area legislator, review proposed passes along to Kahn is out of reach of projects and make lawmakers, it south central Minnesota recommendations could be argued voters. No local legislators to lawmakers that legislators are members of the House about how the ultimately control Legacy Committee that is estimated annual the purse strings, Legacy monies of that it is their trying to mess around $90 million to responsibility to with Legacy funding. $100 million practice due diliwould be spent. gence and not be Known as the Lessard-Sams Outdoor a rubber stamp. No disagreement there. Heritage Council, the panel was to be But curiously, the Senate accepted comprised of seven private citizens, the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2014 funding recommenappointed by the governor, and five leg- dations unchanged. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more, Gov. islators. Mark Dayton has said he supports the 2014 funding proposals as submitted The LSOHC was weighted toward by the LSOHC. the private citizens to minimize the impact of any political expediency that If the proposals passed muster with might be brought to bear by legislators the Senate and governor, why not in in the recommendation process. the House? Ultimately, recommendations made by In the waning days of this legislative the council would be just that: Lawmak- session, anything can happen. The difers still would have the ultimate say in ferences between the Senate version of which projects would receive funding. how Legacy money should be spent likely will be a dramatically different But Kahnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s efforts during the 2013 legislative session to tinker and under- from the House version. mine the intent and spirit of what votWhatever happens, as a metro-area ers approved in 2008 underscore just legislator, Kahn is out of reach of south what voters feared: Legislators canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t central Minnesota voters. No local leg-

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THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

14

800-DD48-2A113205BT

2013 Neville 48' x 102" Drop Deck Trailer with 11' top deck, 32' main deck plus 5' beavertail with Three spring assist ramps, 102" wide, new 25,000 lb. axles with 16 1/2" x 7" brakes, outboard drums, hub pilot, 255/70R22.5 new Low profile virgin tires on steel rims, Hutch 3 leaf spring suspension, Sealed wiring harness with LED lights, 24" king pin setting, 68,000lb. GVW, 50,000 lb. capacity over 10' of trailer deck, 13,200 lb. empty weight, Price plus Federal and State taxes. • Price: $27,500

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

800-T1616HD

2013 Big Lug 16' dump 17,600 lb. GVWR dump trailer, 12350 lb. payload, Two 8000 lb electric brake axles, ST215/75R17.5H 10 tires on HD steel disc rims, 20" deck height, 80" wide box-24" high side walls with fully boxed top and bottom side rails, Slipper spring equalizing suspension, self maintaining breakaway electric brake system, LED rubber mounted dual tail lights, Trunion mount 3 stage telescopic hoist with electric hydraulic pump with 20' remote control pendant control, Two 6' pull out ramps, Drop leg rear stabilizers for loading drive on equipment, Trailer is completely shot blasted, Primed with polyurethane primer and then top coated with polyurethane paint. • Price: $11,375

800-GT4022VRA

2014 Neville Built 40' Aluminum grain trailer with the following std. equipment: New 25,000 lb. Rockwell axles w/automatic slack adjusters, Hutch 9700 3 Leaf Spring suspension, 10 hole hub pilot with steel wheels w/11R22.5 virgin tires, 2S/1M ABS brake system, Two 19" wide trap openings with bearings on two hoppers, Shur-Loc tarp w/easy off stops, Aluminum ladders front and rear, LED light kit w/sealed wiring system, 2-spd gear boxes on Approximate 1150 heaped bushel capacity, 37.5 degree slope on hoppers, 2-spd 50,000 lb landing legs, Approximate empty weight 8900 lbs. Options added to trailer: Polished aluminum wheels outside, steel inside, Sight windows each hopper, Aluminum cat walks front and rear of trailer, Double ridge straps for tarp, Front cable return assist on tarp. This trailer price delivered to Lake Crystal, MN, PLUS 12% FET, State Sales Tax, and registration. • Price: $29,500

800-T1812LF

2013 Big Lug LowPro Flatbed trailer, 18' long deck, 81" wide deck between fender wells, 12,000 lb. GVWR, 8,840 lb. payload, ST235/80R16E tires on Silver Mod wheels and 6000 lb. electric brake torsion axles with U Lube spindles , Self maintaining break away system, LED rubber mounted lights, HD treadplate steel fenders, spring assist ramps, Chain tray in tongue area, Adjustable 2 5/16" ball hitch coupler, open tie rail with stake pockets, Six 5/8" D-rings, No. 1 southern yellow pine flooring, crossmembers on 12" centers, Shotblasted, polyurethane primer, and polyurethane topcoat paint, 22" deck height. • Price: $4,875

801-20ftebbylowpro

T1214SD

Tag Along hitch, 12’x80”x24” box, 2–7K axles, 15,350 GVWR, 11,200 lb. payload, dump bed box height from ground is 27”, electric brakes on both axles, ST235/80R16E tires, silver mod. wheels, modular wiring, self maintaining breakaway, LED lights - rubber mounted, double acting hyd. pump on 12’ & 14’, 20’ power unit cord, 6’ pull-out ramps, mechanical linkage tailgate, barn door tailgate, sandblasted, polyurethane primer, polyurethane top coat, 2 body props. • $8,025

800-T2014DFB

2013 Big Lug 20' x 102" wide 16,092 lb. GVWR deck over trailer, 15' deck plus 5' beavertail, Low Pro deck height, Two 7000 lb. electric brake axles, 11,800 lb. payload, ST235/80R16E tires, Silver wheels, W8x 10" I-Beam main frame rails, Slipper spring suspension, modular wiring with LED lights, Self-maintaining break away emergency brake system, Southern yellow pine wood flooring with 3/16" floorplate steel wheel pans, crossmembers on 16" centers, spring loaded ramps, front bulkhead, Eight 5/8" D-rings, outside stake and 3/8" steel open tie rail, 12,000lb. side wind dropleg jack, 2 5/16" adjustable height ball coupler, 7wire RV style electrical plug, Trailer is completely shotblasted, primed with urethane primer and top coated with poly urethane paint. • Price: $6,700

20' low profile aluminum flat bed trailer, 14,000 gvw, 20' deck length, 82" deck width between fenders, 27" beaver tail with 4 1/2" drop, Permanent formed HD fenders, 10" frame, 7k Dexter torsion axles, 14k: 235/85R16 tires, 4 stake pockets in front of fender per side, (4)Drings, located near the 4 corners of the deck, 60" x 16" fold up ramps, LED lites. • Price: $10,500

999-01025

1998 Jet 34' steel grain trailer, twin rounded hoppers, 11R x 22.5 tires, electric roll tarp, Fresh DOT inspection. • Price: $15,850

Lake Crystal, MN • 800-722-0588 • 507-726-6041 Fridley, MN • 800-795-1280 • 763-571-1902


A rose by any other name would still smell sweet

They’re gross, but bed bugs can be conquered

determine how to make them more effective. Insecticides are far from the only treatment, though. Kells and his team have studied ways that heat treatments can end infestations and worked with companies that develop the heat treatment machinery. “Heat is a viable alternative to controlling these pests and Minnesota is a leader in using this technology to control bed bugs,” Kells said. In addition to homes and hotels, bed bugs may show up in schools, retail facilities, office buildings, libraries and other public areas. Even hospitals have sometimes been challenged keeping them away. The Let’s Beat the Bug! campaign has developed guidelines to help schools and other facilities prevent and control bed bugs. Insecticides available on store shelves are not effective. If you want to control bed bugs with insecticides, you must call a professional. The website provides tips to control and prevent bed bugs via nonchemical practices. Apartment dwellers should contact their landlords; property managers are responsible for keeping units free of infestations. For detailed information, log on to www.bedbugs.umn.edu. You may also call the Bed Bug Information line at (612) 624-2200 or (855) 644-2200, or e-mail questions to bedbugs@umn.edu. This article was submitted by University of Minnesota Extension. ❖

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“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Bed bugs have resurged to become a significant pest of the 21st century, but an entomologist with University of Minnesota Extension has made it his goal to beat the bed bug through research and education. North Americans have had a 30-year reprieve from this pest, after bed bugs were almost completely banished as a result of mass treatments with older types of insecticides. “Recently though, bed bugs have found ample opportunity to increase in numbers, due to changes in the way we use insecticides, lack of public knowledge about the pest and increased mobility in society” said Stephen Kells, University of Minnesota Extension entomologist. Last year, the Let’s Beat the Bug! campaign began helping Minnesotans learn about bed bug prevention and control. “Since then, we’ve expanded our reach by working with public health workers, landlords and others and producing videos and fact sheets in Hmong, Somali, Spanish and Arabic,” Kells said. Resources are available at www.bedbugs.umn.edu/resources. Kells also expanded his research base, for example, studying the natural chemical, or pheromone, the bed bugs use to attract other bed bugs to a location. Such information could lead to better ways to disrupt the insect’s spread and lifecycle. Kells is doing laboratory studies on insecticides to

bred for just that quality. They can be sweet, spicy or fruity, but unmistakably rose-scented. Roses practically beg to be cut for bouquets. Select plump buds on the verge of opening, cut the stem at a 45-degree angle and place them in lukewarm water. Harden them off in a cool place for several hours and then recut the stem and make your arrangement. The rose pictured above is a hybrid tea called “Mom’s Rose.” It was given to me for Mother’s Day several years ago. It came in the form of a gift certificate from a leading rose catalog and I had the fun of browsing through all the choices before making the final selection. A gift certificate from a local nursery or a garden catalog is a great gift for any occasion. I can assure you, gardeners love to get them. Sharon Quale is a master gardener from central Minnesota. She may be reached at (218) 738-6060 or squale101@yahoo.com. ❖

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and disease-resistant hardy rose varieties that have been developed for our climate. Aphids are tiny insects that feed on plant sap of stems and leaves. They come in many colors and reproduce at a prolific rate. Sometimes they can be blasted off by shooting a hard spray of water on them. If more treatment is needed, use an insecticide that has a low impact on beneficial insects. University of Minnesota Extension suggests using insecticidal soap, horticulture oil or insecticide products containing azadirachtin for aphid control. June brings the onset of adult Japanese beetles. These are large, metallic green and bronze pests that can rapidly destroy rose buds and blossoms. A good method for dealing with them is removing them by hand. During their peak infestation I go through the rose bed several times a day to get rid of them. Spraying insecticides to control them is not environmentally friendly and should only be considered as a last resort. Enough about the problems with growing roses, and on to some reasons they are worth pampering. Roses smell good, look good and have cycles of continuous bloom all summer. One of the first things visitors do in our rose garden is lean toward a blossom and inhale the fragrance. Not all of them are fragrant but many are

THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

No one has improved on Gertrude Stein’s poetic observation, “A rose is a rose is a rose.” Other flowers can be referred to as rose-like, but roses are not compared with any other flowers. They stand alone in their beauty and distinctive fragrance. Gardeners agree that roses IN THE GARDEN are a bit finicky to grow but are worth some extra pamperBy Sharon Quale ing. These prima donnas of the plant world are heavy drinkers, like to be well-fed and enjoy lounging in the sun six or more hours a day. Bare-root bushes are readily available and should be planted as soon as the soil can be worked. Buy grade No. 1 plants, if you can, because they have larger stems and better root systems than the lesser grades. If they are labeled “AARS” it means they are one of the All American Rose Selections and have been tested for superior qualities. Follow the planting instructions on the label and be sure the bud graft union is at least two inches below the soil surface. Blackspot, aphids and Japanese beetles are three problems Larry and I battle every year in our small rose garden. The fungal disease, blackspot, causes spotting, yellowing of the leaves and results in eventual leaf drop. It usually won’t kill the plant but it’s unsightly and can be spread by wind and water. Several bushes were badly infected last year, lost most of their leaves and looked like twigs with blossoms on the ends. I finally gave up and removed them from the garden. Fungicides are available for treatment but need to be applied regularly. It’s best to buy pest-

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THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

16

Vintage recipes not necessarily for the faint of heart Cookbook Corner By SARAH JOHNSON The Land Correspondent Desperately seeking that old family recipe that’s been handed down for generations ... until it reached you? Look no further than the treasury of cookbooks at www.vintagerecipes.net, a website devoted to providing classic cookery free to the public. Titles such as “Twenty-Five Cent Dinners for Families of Six” (1879), “A Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes” (1852), “Foods That Will Win the War and How to Cook Them” (1918), the venerable “The Compleat Cook” (1868) and dozens more are available on this highly browsable website. It’s sponsored by Project Gutenberg — www.gutenberg.org — an organization devoted to publishing free books online for the benefit of the public. I love browsing these online books for two reasons: A) to find recipes for my family and this column; and B) the “ick” factor. So many old recipes use delectably disgusting ingredients and oddball cooking methods; even though I’ll never make them, it’s like watching a time meal suitable for brunch, lunch or supper ... scary movie. You just can’t turn your eyes away. ■ Sometimes the quaint language makes you chuckle: “To make an Outlandish dish: Take the Ambushed Asparagus liver of a Hogg, and cut it in small pieces about the Vaughan’s Vegetable Cook Book (1919) bigness of a span, then take Anni-seed, or French1 quart of the tender tops of asparagus seed, Pepper and Salt, and season them therewithRolls or biscuits, a day old all, and lay every piece severally round in the caule 1 pint of milk (2 cups) of the Hogg, and so roast them on a Bird-Spit.” 4 eggs well whipped 1 tablespoonful of butter I’ll get right on that. In the meantime, enjoy these Salt sample recipes, including this one for a light springPepper Use the tender tops of asparagus, and be rid of the white part, which will not cook tender, boil and drain. Cut off with care the tops from the rolls or bis22’9” long cuits, scoop out the inside, and set the shells and w/tandem axle, tops into the oven to crisp. Boil the milk, and when 14’ blade w/industrial boiled stir in the eggs. As it thickens season with the cutting edge, 9’ wide

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The Johnson clan gives one out of three ‘yums’ to Peanut Butter Cream Soup

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butter; salt and pepper to taste. Into this mixture put the asparagus cut up into small pieces. Fill the shells, replace the tops, put into the oven for three minutes and serve very hot. ■ The aromatic flavor of ginger is back in style (did it ever go out?), and these muffins showcase its pungent tastiness. Add nuts, raisins or other chopped fruits if you see fit. Ginger Gems (Muffins) Better Meals for Less Money (1917) 1/2 cup molasses 1/4 cup brown sugar 1/4 cup shortening 1/2 cup boiling water 1 beaten egg 1 1/2 cups flour 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon ginger 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon salt Mix in order given, sifting the dry ingredients together; beat well, pour into greased muffin tins, and bake in a moderate oven 20 minutes. ■ Toad-in-the-Hole is an old English recipe, often using sausages, but in this case using odds and ends of stew meat, baked in a batter that ends up resembling a Yorkshire pudding. (Well, that was helpful. OK, a Yorkshire pudding is not pudding at all, but more like a popover.) It gets extra points for having such a gruesome name. Toad-in-the-Hole The Cooking Manual of Practical Directions for Economical Every-Day Cooking (1877) 2 pounds of the cheapest parts of any good meat Flour Pepper Salt 2 ounces of drippings Cut the meat into small pieces, roll them in flour, pepper and salt, and fry them brown in the drippings; meantime prepare a batter as follows. 1 pound of flour 1 heaping teaspoonful of salt 1/2 whole nutmeg, grated 2 eggs 3 pints (6 cups) of skim-milk Mix the flour, salt, nutmeg and eggs, stirred in without beating; gradually add the skim-milk, making a smooth batter; add the meat and its gravy to this batter, put it in a greased baking dish, and bake it slowly about two hours. Serve it with plain boiled potatoes. ■ I love cream soups of any kind, so I just had to try a peanut butter version. While probably not my family’s favorite new soup, it was an interesting concoction with a light peanut taste and nicely balanced seasonings. One out of three “yums” from the Johnson crew — definitely a taste you either love or would prefer to forget. Peanut Butter Cream Soup Everyday Foods in War Time (1918)

See COOKBOOK, pg. 17


Have your fire extinguisher ready for Planked Steak pose numerous vegetables are suitable, but onions, small mushrooms and sliced tomatoes are especially desirable. When onions are used, they should be sliced thin and then sautéd in butter until they are soft and brown. Small mushrooms may be prepared in the same way, or they may be sautéd in the fat that remains in the pan after the steak has been removed. Tomatoes that are served over steak should be sliced, rolled in crumbs, and then sautéd.

If your community group or church organization has printed a cookbook and would like to have it reviewed in the “Cookbook Corner,” send us a copy to “Cookbook Corner,” The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002. Please specify if you wish to have the cookbook returned, and include information on how readers may obtain a copy of the cookbook. Submission does not guarantee a review. ❖

THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013 << www.TheLandOnline.com >>

LOWS

P ck - In Sto all AC Give Us

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

COOKBOOK, from pg. 16 1 quart milk 1 small onion (grated) 1 tablespoon flour 1 tablespoon melted fat 1 cup peanut butter 1 bay leaf 3 stalks celery (chopped) 1 saltspoon (1/4 teaspoon) celery salt 1/2 teaspoon salt A little white pepper Dash of paprika Heat milk in a double boiler, add peanut butter, onion, bay leaf, chopped celery and other seasoning. While the milk is heating, melt fat in a separate sauce pan, stirring in flour as for cream sauce. When smooth add the hot milk, after straining through a sieve. Serve at once with croutons or tiny squares of bread browned until crisp. ■ The next item is more of a cooking technique than a recipe. I would suggest having a fire extinguisher handy as you broil your plank. And stay away from nasty-tasting wood such as pine. Planked Steak Woman’s Institute Library of Cooking (no date given) A dish that the housewife generally considers too complicated for her, but that may very readily be prepared in the home, is planked steak. Such a steak gets its name from the fact that a part of its cooking is done on a hardwood plank, and that the steak, together with vegetables of various kinds, is served on the plank. Potatoes are always used as one of the vegetables that are combined with planked steak, but besides them almost any combination or variety of vegetables may be used as a garnish. Asparagus tips, string beans, peas, tiny onions, small carrots, mushrooms, cauliflower, stuffed peppers and stuffed tomatoes are the vegetables from which a selection is usually made. When a tender steak is selected for this purpose and is properly cooked, and when the vegetables are well prepared and artistically arranged, no dish can be found that appeals more to the eye and the taste. To prepare this dish, broil or pan-broil one of the better cuts of steak for about 8 minutes. Butter the plank, place the steak on the center of it and season with salt and pepper. Mash potatoes and to each 2 cupfuls use 4 tablespoonfuls of milk, 1 tablespoonful of butter and one egg. After these materials have been mixed well into the potatoes, arrange a border of potatoes around the edge of the plank. Then garnish the steak with whatever vegetables have been selected. Care should be taken to see that these are properly cooked and well-seasoned. If onions, mushrooms or carrots are used, it is well to sauté them in butter after they are thoroughly cooked. With the steak thus prepared, place the plank under the broiler or in a hot oven and allow it to remain there long enough to brown the potatoes, cook the steak a little more, and thoroughly heat all the vegetables. Vegetables served with steak: If an attractive, as well as a tasty, dish is desired and the housewife has not sufficient time nor the facilities to prepare a planked steak, a good plan is to sauté a vegetable of some kind and serve it over the steak. For this pur-

17


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

18

Character of one’s life set in 10,000 little moments Currently there’s a and characterize our lives, Yoplait yogurt ad that feaand ultimately our nation tures a women’s book club. and world. Paul David Tripp Ladies are sharing stories wrote, “You and I live in in a living room when one these little, mundane of them notices the table of moments. The character of a goodies and faces a choice. life is not set in three or four moments of huge sigWill she choose a heartnificance. No, the character shaped cookie or Yoplait of a life is set in 10,000 little yogurt? She doesn’t miss moments, one after THE BACK PORCH what the advertisers define another.” as a swap•por•tu• ni•ty. By Lenae Bulthuis She swaps the opportunity Our natural inclination to grab a high-calorie snack when faced with a seemfor the healthier choice, a 90-calorie ingly inconsequential swap is to go yogurt. with the flow, and do what feels easiest or good at the moment. We make choices daily and not just at a buffet table. Farmers make plantObesity in America didn’t just haping and pricing choices. What should pen. It took place one meal at a time as they plant and where? Do they sell we supersized our drive-through now or wait for a better price? Timing orders. Credit card debt materializes is everything. one swipe at a time; integrity is compromised one little white lie at a time. In light of those weighty decisions, choosing between a sugar cookie and Bullying and unthinkable shootings yogurt seems small potatoes. At least in schools get a lot of finger pointing at first glance. In reality, little swaps through the media and at the local add up to big consequences that shape café. Blame is placed on the govern-

that compromised faith and family, in time the impact of this choice will be keenly felt in every corner of society. Obesity in America We live in a great land of opportunity. didn’t just happen. It Choices abound. And like no other time took place one meal at in America’s history, it’s critical that we a time as we superswap wisely and well. That’s not easy sized our drive-through or glamorous, and it’s certainly not always popular. orders. Credit card debt materializes one swipe Swap out selfishness for sacrifice and the world will receive hope and help at a time; integrity is through our generosity and love. Swap compromised one little out pride with an apology and a relawhite lie at a time. tionship can be restored. Swap silence for wise, winsome words that take a firm stand for faith and family values. ment and guns, home life and Hollywood. You have your thoughts; I have To be sure, each generation has its mine. For me the pivotal swap was the share of missed swap•por•tu•ni•ties decision to ban God and the guiding where people swapped something less principles of His Word from classrooms. for what’s best. Although we can’t Students are the victims of that choice rewrite history, we can write a better chapter for those who follow behind us, today. The latest swap in Minnesota legisla- one swap at a time. Lenae Bulthuis is a wife, mom and ture is redefining marriage. We’re led to believe this poses no threat to fami- friend who muses from her back porch on a Minnesota grain and livestock lies or religious liberty. I pray I’m ❖ wrong, but like the swaps of yesteryear farm.


Local Corn and Soybean Price Index Sauk Rapids Madison Redwood Falls Fergus Falls Morris Tracy Average: Year Ago Average:

$ 20 current average soybeans

corn/change* soybeans/change* $6.66 $6.83 $6.91 $6.61 $6.60 $6.91

+.08 +.23 +.09 +.09 +.03 +.08

$14.64 $14.98 $14.94 $14.63 $14.66 $14.94

+.14 +.48 +.15 +.44 +.47 +.15

$6.75

$14.80

$5.85

$13.38

year ago average soybeans

$ 15 $ 10

current average corn

THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

Cash Grain Markets

19

year ago average corn

$5

June'12 July

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Jan'13

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Grain prices are effective cash close on May 28. The price index chart compares an average of most recently reported local cash prices with the same average for a year ago. *Cash grain price change represents a two-week period.

Grain Outlook

Livestock Angles

Grain Angles

Make sure your team roster is complete

Editor’s note: Tim Emslie, CHS Hedging market analyst, is sitting in this week for Phyllis Nystrom, the regular “Grain Outlook” columnist. The following market analysis is for the week ending May. 24. CORN — The July corn contract reached the highest level this week since the day of the bearish March 28 stocks report. Of course, the now-expired May contract traded above $7 earlier this month, so in a sense the July contract is just positioning itself where the value of spot corn is. Cash market strength is primarily a function of the demand from ethanol producers. TIM EMSLIE Weekly ethanol production rose CHS Hedging Inc. to a new corn marketing year St. Paul high of 875,000 barrels per day, up 17,000 from the previous week. If the industry were to produce at that rate over the remaining 108 days of the corn marketing year, the cumulative total would be 12.888 billion gallons, or an equivalent corn grind of 4.702 billion bushels. That’s about 100 million bushels higher than the May U.S. Department of Agriculture estimate of 4.600 billion bushels. Ethanol stocks continue to decline and are now at 16.2 million barrels, the lowest level since 2011. That will help hold up demand for ethanol production. Ethanol’s discount to gasoline has been slowly eroding and now stands at 23 cents, but discretionary blending is not driving demand for ethanol right now. The Renewable Fuels Standard mandate and the resulting high price of Renewable Identification Numbers used for compliance is creating plenty of incentive for every gallon of gasoline to be blended with ethanol. This year’s RINS are currently over 85 cents.

May might end up being interesting for the livestock markets. Over the past few months there has been quite the disparity between cash and futures. This disparity may be in the process of changing in the weeks ahead. The cattle market probably has the largest disparity between cash and futures of all the meats as the futures market is at a deep discount to the current cash market. Many analysts are at a loss to explain this deep discount because of the lack of numbers of cattle available at the present time. The answer seems to be the lack of demand for beef, not the lack of available supply of cattle. JOE TEALE Since last fall, the demand for Broker beef has been on the decline each Great Plains Commodity month while cattle weights were Afton, Minn. on the increase producing more beef than expected. At the same time the beef cutouts were on the increase culminating in their highest prices at this writing. Given the fact that disposable income is contracting rather than expanding as it has for years, the domestic consumer is being more frugal in their food budget which seems to be lessening the demand for the higher priced beef in favor of cheaper alternatives. To cap this scenario off, the number of cattle ready for market is now in the expansion phase so the increased supplies could grow even higher. On May 17, the U.S. Department of Agriculture released the Monthly Cattle on Feed report which showed: on-feed as of May 1, 97 percent; placed during April, 115 percent; marketed in April, 102 percent. The report was seen as negative as placements were much larger than expected. This would confirm that the futures market had anticipated the increase

See EMSLIE, pg. 22

See TEALE, pg. 22

With the late start in planting and now the mad rush to get our crops planted in a narrow window of time, everyone in the agricultural industry is feeling the stress and pressure of trying to get the job done and do things right. In stressful times, it’s important to remember who’s on our team. Remembering who we can rely on will help manage risk and make things go as well as they can. As a grain producer, this spring you’ll be extremely busy with the chores of getting the crops in the ground, proper fertility, weed and bug control as well as a variety of additional chores during the growing season. As you sit behind your desk or in MARTY KRIENER your tractor, I’d advise you to think AgStar Senior Financial Services Executive about who is on your team and how Rochester, Minn. they can help you manage your time constraints, opportunities and risks. We firmly believe in working side-byside with our clients and offering producers insight in an array of topics so they’re best positioned with the appropriate expertise should the need arise. It’s important that you then touch base with this network of people so you don’t miss good opportunities during busy times. Much like basketball, let’s not miss our easy lay-ups when we have the chance. One of the easy lay-ups producers can take advantage of right now is the attractive long-term interest rates we are experiencing in our industry. Ten-, 15-, 20- and 30-year fixed rates are as attractive as ever and can significantly help manage long-term interest rate exposure. Our industry has been experiencing reasonable interest rates for some time now and I sense some complacency since rates have been attractive for several years. Make sure you don’t miss the opportunity to take See KRIENER, pg. 22

Information in the above columns is the writer’s opinion. It is no way guaranteed and should not be interpreted as buy/sell advice. Futures trading always involves a certain degree of risk.

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Big gap between cattle cash, futures

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Cash corn strength from ethanol demand


KIMBALL, MN • 320-398-3800

20

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

Sales: • Wayne Mackereth • Mike Schneider • Allen Schramm • Rollie Jurgens

GLENCOE, MN • 320-864-5531

Sales: • Richard Dammann • Randy Uecker • Steve Schramm • Mike W

NO. MANKATO, MN • 507-387-55 Sales: • Randy Rasmussen • Ed Nowak • Leon Rasmussen • Jay Pederson • Spencer Kolles • Rick Miller • Eric Hopp

TRACTORS 4WD

TRACTORS AWD/MFD Continued

CIH 600 Quad, '12, 500 hrs ..................................$359,500 CIH 335 Mag, '11, 1300 hrs ..................................$199,500 CIH 600 Quad, '11, 765 hrs ..................................$355,000 CIH 315 Mag, '12, 330 hrs ....................................$229,500 CIH 600 Quad, '11, 870 hrs ..................................$299,500 CIH 315 Mag, '12, 1450 hrs ..................................$193,500 CIH 305 Mag, '10, 625 hrs ....................................$182,500 CIH 305 Mag, '10, 3585 hrs ..................................$151,900 CIH 305 Mag, '09, 1710 hrs ..................................$182,500 CIH 290 Mag, '12, 390 hrs ....................................$192,500 CIH 275 Mag, '10, 730 hrs ....................................$172,500 CIH 275 Mag, '10, 1820 hrs ..................................$165,000 CIH 275 Mag, '09, 1625 hrs ..................................$159,500 CIH 275 Mag, '07, 1100 hrs ..................................$165,000 CIH MX270, '99, 7780 hrs ......................................$79,000 CIH MX255, '03, 7500 hrs ......................................$92,000 CIH 245 Mag, '08, 1000 hrs ..................................$145,000 CIH MX240, '00, 9140 hrs ......................................$67,500 CIH 225 Mag, '11, 445 hrs ....................................$149,000 CIH 215 Mag, '08, 1235 hrs ..................................$139,500 CIH MX215, '06, 1850 hrs ....................................$119,900 CIH MX200, '99, 8870 hrs ......................................$65,000 CIH 190 Mag, '11, 235 hrs ....................................$167,000 CIH 190 Mag, '09, 3545 hrs ..................................$115,000 CIH 200 Puma, '11, 380 hrs ..................................$141,500 CIH 550 Quad, ‘11, 885 hrs. ......$318,000 CIH 170 Puma, '11, 545 hrs ..................................$120,000 CIH 550 Quad, '11, 885 hrs ..................................$318,000 CIH 165 Puma, '10, 1450 hrs ..................................$98,500 CIH 535 Quad, '08, 825 hrs ..................................$295,000 CIH 125 Maxxum, '11, 890 hrs................................$89,000 CIH 535 Quad, '08, 2275 hrs ................................$269,900 CIH 95 Farmall, '08, 500 hrs....................................$34,950 CIH 535 Quad, '07, 1620 hrs ................................$271,500 CIH 5250, '96, 13745 hrs ........................................$30,500 CIH 530 Quad, '07, 2510 hrs ................................$230,000 Challenger 65E, '01, 5385 hrs ................................$37,500 CIH 485 Quad, '10, 1155 hrs ................................$275,000 Ford 7740, '95, 3000 hrs ........................................$34,500 CIH 485 Steiger, '09, 1220 hrs ..............................$222,000 Holder C9700H, '98, 2245 hrs ................................$12,500 CIH 485 Steiger, '09, 2000 hrs ..............................$210,000 JD 8760, '90, 6545 hrs ............................................$49,500 CIH STX450, '02, 3710 hrs ....................................$144,500 JD 7720, '06, 1185 hrs ..........................................$120,000 CIH STX450Q, '02, 4860 hrs ................................$154,900 JD 4755, '90, 13940 hrs ..........................................$42,900 CIH STX440Q, '01, 3870 hrs ................................$156,000 JD 2555, 8115 hrs ..................................................$15,500 CIH STX440Q, '01, 4125 hrs ................................$156,000 MF 180, 2445 hrs ......................................................$7,950 CIH 435 Steiger, '10, 850 hrs ................................$235,000 NH 8970, '94, 10080 hrs ........................................$42,000 CIH 385 Quad, '10, 1825 hrs ................................$237,500 NH T8040, '10, 1075 hrs ......................................$179,000 CIH 350 Steiger, '12, 65 hrs ..................................$235,000 NH T8010, '08, 1900 hrs ......................................$126,500 CIH 350 Steiger, '12, 375 hrs ................................$235,000 TRACTORS 2WD CIH 350 Steiger, '11, 1590 hrs ..............................$182,500 CIH 335 Steiger, '10, 1200 hrs ..............................$185,000 CIH 335 Steiger, '09, 2100 hrs ..............................$169,500 CIH 335 Steiger, '08, 2280 hrs ..............................$174,500 CIH 9380, '97, 4490 hrs ..........................................$85,000 CIH 9380, '96, 4850 hrs ..........................................$82,000 CIH 9350, '96, 3720 hrs ..........................................$77,500 CIH 9350, '96, 5970 hrs ..........................................$79,500 CIH 9280, '93, 8900 hrs ..........................................$59,500 CIH 9270, '92, 5435 hrs ..........................................$59,900 CIH 9270, '92, 8925 hrs ..........................................$49,900 CIH 9270, '91, 7130 hrs ..........................................$55,000 CIH 9170, '89, 7930 hrs ..........................................$56,500 CIH 9170, '87, 7335 hrs ..........................................$47,500 Ford 846, '93, 5800 hrs ..........................................$39,900 JD 9630, '11, 1050 hrs ..........................................$269,900 JD 9400T, '01, 4370 hrs ........................................$126,500 JD 9620T, '06, 3485 hrs ........................................$195,000 JD 9400, '97, 6200 hrs ............................................$95,500 JD 8440, '79, 9300 hrs ............................................$15,500 NH 9680, '95, 5940 hrs ..........................................$53,500 NH T9.505, '11, 215 hrs ........................................$235,000 CIH 125 Value, ‘08, 710 hrs. ......$59,500 NH T9.505, '11, 300 hrs ........................................$235,000 CIH 125 Value, '08, 710 hrs ....................................$59,500 NH T9050, '09, 1350 hrs ......................................$209,000 CIH JX95, '07, 950 hrs ............................................$25,000 NH 9020, '10, 360 hrs ..........................................$165,000 CIH JX95, '07, 970 hrs ............................................$25,000 Steiger Cougar, '87, 6920 hrs ..................................$49,500 CIH 7220, '94, 6710 hrs ..........................................$52,500 Steiger ST320, '75, 5000 hrs ..................................$19,500 CIH 7110, '89, 4980 hrs ..........................................$46,500 CIH 5140, '90, 7160 hrs ..........................................$29,900 TRACTORS AWD/MFD CIH 5130, '90, 9110 hrs ..........................................$27,500 CIH 340 Mag, '11, 1460 hrs ..................................$206,000 CIH 3230, '96, 2395 hrs ..........................................$12,500 CIH 340 Mag, '11, 1700 hrs ..................................$204,500 Case 1370, '74, 5280 hrs ........................................$12,500 CIH 340 Mag, '11, 1750 hrs ..................................$204,500 Farmall C, '48 ............................................................$2,500 CIH 340 Mag, '11, 1950 hrs ..................................$198,000 Farmall M ..................................................................$1,650 IH 5088, '83, 11,075 hrs..........................................$14,900 IH 5088, '81, 9600 hrs ............................................$18,500 IH 1086, 9955 hrs....................................................$11,500 IH 966, '73, 5500 hrs ................................................$7,500 IH 886, 7440 hrs......................................................$13,500 IH 826, '70, 7185 hrs ................................................$7,900 IH 686, 8175 hrs......................................................$11,750 IH F666, '73, 6185 hrs ..............................................$7,000 IH 656, '68, 4740 hrs ................................................$7,250 IH 560D......................................................................$4,900 IH 454, 2675 hrs........................................................$5,500 Ford TW25, '84, 2870 hrs........................................$19,900 Ford 800, '55 ............................................................$3,500 JD 4650, '83, 6825 hrs ............................................$30,500 JD 4440, '78, 8040 hrs ............................................$25,500 JD 2755, '90, 7480 hrs ............................................$17,900 2440, '77, 1565 hrs ............................................$10,900 CIH 335 Magnum, ‘11, 837 hrs...$212,000 JD McCormick 560..........................................................$4,900 Financing provided by

CNH Capital ® 2013 CNH America LLC. All rights reserved. Case IH is a registered trademark of CNH America LLC. CNH Capital is a trademark of CNH America LLC. www.caseih.com

COMPACT TRACTORS/RTV’s

SPRAYERS - PULL TYPE Continued

Ford 1920, '92, 4840 hrs ..........................................$7,900 Ford 1200, 500 hrs ....................................................$5,200 JD 4610, '04, 4720 hrs ............................................$16,500 JD 4310, '04, 1345 hrs ............................................$21,900 JD 4310, '02, 1090 hrs ............................................$21,000 JD 3520, '10, 215 hrs ..............................................$29,900 JD 2305, 120 hrs ....................................................$12,500 Kubota B7510, '04, 1040 hrs ..................................$10,500 Kubota B7300HSD, 1265 hrs ....................................$6,500 Kubota BX2360T, '09, 485 hrs ..................................$8,950 Kubota BX2360TV, '08, 135 hrs ..............................$10,500 Kubota BX2350T, '07, 485 hrs ..................................$8,250 Kubota BX2350, '07, 200 hrs ..................................$10,500

Spray Air 3600, 120'................................................$31,700 Top Air TA1600, 120' ..............................................$40,900 Top Air 1600R132, '08 ............................................$45,500 Top Air 1600R120, '05 ............................................$40,900

HAY EQUIPMENT Continu

NH HM235, 6' Disc Mower ............................. JD CX20, 20' Rotary Mower ........................... H & S TWM12 Wind Merg ............................. (2) H & S TWM9 Wind Merg ..................startin H & S WMCH30 Wind Merg ........................... (5) Millerpro 14-16 Wind Merg ..............startin (2) Oxbo 14-16 Wnd Merg ....................startin Oxbo 330 Wind Merg ..................................... (2) Phiber SM848 Wind Merg ................startin H & S CR10, 10 Wheel Rake........................... (2) Krone SWADRO Rake ......................startin Kuhn GA7302 Rake......................................... Kuhn GA7301 Rake......................................... Kuhn GA4120 Rake......................................... Twin Star RA203C Rake .................................

BALERS CIH RB564P, '11 Rnd Baler............................. CIH RBX563 Rnd Baler ...................................

Top Air 1600R90, ‘11................$39,500 Top Air 1600R90, '11 ..............................................$39,500 Top Air 1600R90, '11 ..............................................$41,000 Top Air 1600R90, '11 ..............................................$42,500 Top Air 1600, 120' ..................................................$40,000 Top Air 1200, 90' ....................................................$27,500 Top Air TA1100, 60' ................................................$18,500

Kubota BX23, ‘05, 495 hrs. ........$13,950 Kubota BX23, '05, 495 hrs ......................................$13,950 Kubota BX2230, '04, 1985 hrs ..................................$7,750 Kubota BX2200, '01, 565 hrs ....................................$7,900 Kubota BX1800, '00, 1510 hrs ..................................$6,600 White 2-35, '80, 1725 hrs..........................................$4,000 JD 620I, '10, 395 hrs ................................................$8,500 Kawasaki 3000 Mule, '06, 1900 hrs ..........................$3,995 Kawasaki 650, '06......................................................$4,500 Kubota RTV900, '06, 1015 hrs ..................................$7,950 Kubota RTV900W, '04, 840 hrs ................................$8,200

HAY EQUIPMENT CIH WD2303, '09 ....................................................$86,000 CIH WDX1701, '02 SP Windrower ..........................$59,500 CIH 8830, '88, 2535 hrs SP Windrower ..................$17,500 JD 4995, '07, 1345 hrs ............................................$69,500 JD 4995, '05, 1415 hrs ............................................$66,500 JD 4995, '05, 2315 hrs ............................................$53,900 CIH 8340, 9' MowCond..............................................$7,950

CIH RBX562 Round Baler ........

(3) CIH RBX562 Rnd Baler ..................startin CIH 8430, 4x4 Rnd Baler ............................... CIH 3650, 5x6 Rnd Baler ............................... SPRAYERS - SELF-PROPELLED Claas 280RC Rnd Baler................................... Gehl RB2880 Rnd Baler ................................. Rudy Lusk - (507) 227-4119 Hesston 5500 Rnd Baler ................................. (2) JD 567 Rnd Baler..............................startin CIH SPX3200B, '01, 3825 hrs ................................$74,000 NH 850, 5x6 Rnd Baler ................................... Hagie 2100, '02, 2370 hrs ......................................$68,500 (2) NH BR780A Rnd Baler ......................startin JD 4930, '11, 620 hrs ............................................$264,000 NH BR780 Rnd Baler ..................................... Idea 486 Rnd Baler ................................. CIH 8312, 12’ MowCond..............$9,500 New CIH LBX332 Rec Baler ................................... (2) CIH 8312, 12' MowCond ....................starting at $9,500 CIH 8575, 3x3 Rec Baler................................. CIH DC132, 13' MowCond ......................................$24,500 CIH 8520 Rec Baler......................................... CIH DCX161 MowCond............................................$20,500

Spray Coupe 3440, 60’, 1620 hrs. $38,500 Spray Coupe 3440, 60', 1675 hrs ............................$38,500 Willmar 750, '95, 3205 hrs ......................................$22,900

SPRAYERS - PULL-TYPE (2) Ag Chem 750, 60' ..............................starting at $7,500 Century HD1000 ......................................................$11,500 Demco 500 Gal, 60' ................................................$12,500 Hardi Commander, 1200 Gal....................................$29,500 Hardi CM6600..........................................................$66,000 Hardi NAV1000 ..........................................................$4,250 Hardi 500 Gal ............................................................$3,900 (2) Redball 690, 2000 Gal ......................starting at $25,000 Redball 690, 1600 Gal ............................................$25,000 (2) Redball 680, 1600 Gal ......................starting at $19,950 Redball 680, 1600 Gal ............................................$17,900 Redball 680, 1350 Gal ............................................$16,500 Redball 670, 1200 Gal ............................................$21,500 (2) Redball 670, 90' ..............................starting at $18,500 (2) Redball 665 ......................................starting at $12,500 Redball 570, 90' ......................................................$18,900 Redball 565..............................................................$15,500

NH BB940A Rec Baler ............. CIH DCX131, ‘08, MowCond........$22,500 CIH DCX131, '08 MowCond ....................................$22,500 Claas 8550C Plus MowCond....................................$54,000 Claas DD520 MowCond ..........................................$48,000 Hesston 1160, 14' MowCond ....................................$5,350 JD 1600A, 15' MowCond ..........................................$5,750 JD 945, 13' MowCond ............................................$15,000 (2) Krone 9140EV, 30' MowCond ..........starting at $44,000 Kuhn FC4000RG MowCond ....................................$23,900 NH 1475 MowCond....................................................$7,500 (2) NH 1431, 13' MowCond......................starting at $8,900 NH 499 MowCond......................................................$3,500 NH 415, 11' MowCond ..............................................$5,500 CIH MDX31 Disc Mower ............................................$3,500 Agco 3008 Disc Mower..............................................$6,900 Hesston 1004, 5.5' Disc Mower ................................$5,800 Kuhn GMD700HD Disc Mower ..................................$9,500 Kuhn GMD500HSD Disc Mower ................................$3,850

(3) NH BB940A Rec Baler ......................startin

FORAGE EQUIPMENT Bob Joubert East - (507) 402-314 Randy Olmscheid, West - (320) 583-60 Claas 980, '11, 1260 hrs................................. Claas 980, '09, 1860 hrs................................. Claas 980, '08, 2540 hrs................................. Claas 960, '10, 870 hrs................................... Claas 960, '09, 495 hrs................................... Claas 940, '08, 1435 hrs................................. Claas 900, '10, 1080 hrs.................................


515

ued

Sales: • Bob Pfingston • Nate Scharmer • Brian Lingle

• Christy Hoff • Bob Lindahl • Tim Hansen • Jeff Ruprecht

ST. MARTIN, MN • 320-548-3285 Sales: • Dan Hoffman • Erik Mueller • Randy Olmscheid • Jamie Pelzer • Pat Linz

ALDEN, MN • 507-874-3400

Sales: • Brad Wermedal • Tim Wiersma • Tim Engebretson • Bob Joubert FORAGE EQUIPMENT Continued

...........$5,750 .........$17,500 .........$27,500 ng at $26,500 .........$37,500 ng at $22,500 ng at $24,500 .........$99,900 ng at $28,500 ...........$4,500 ng at $16,500 ...........$8,900 .........$14,500 ...........$5,250 ...........$9,950

.........$32,500 .........$18,500

ng at $48,850

.......$305,000 .......$275,000 .......$219,000 .......$312,000 .......$308,000 .......$219,000 .......$248,000

SKIDLOADERS/EXCAVATORS/TLB

Claas 960, ‘10, 870 hrs. ..........$312,000 Claas 900 GE, '09, 1485 hrs ..................................$245,000 Claas 900, '09, 1775 hrs........................................$242,000 Claas 900, '05, 3205 hrs........................................$208,000 Claas 900, '02, 4015 hrs........................................$130,000 Claas 900, '01, 3110 hrs........................................$138,000 Claas 900, '01, 3980 hrs........................................$105,000 Claas 890, '02, 2725 hrs........................................$147,000 Claas 870 GE, '06, 2760 hrs ..................................$184,500 Claas 870, '06, 3295 hrs........................................$164,900 Claas 870, '05, 1930 hrs........................................$165,000 Claas 690, '88 ..........................................................$28,000 JD 7850, '09, 1300 hrs ..........................................$254,000 JD 7800, '05, 3870 hrs ..........................................$155,000 JD 7550, '11, 1055 hrs ..........................................$247,000 JD 6810, '96, 4590 hrs ............................................$59,500 JD 6710, '93, 6270 hrs ............................................$39,500 JD 5460, '79, 4400 hrs ............................................$23,500 NH FX60, '03, 1970 hrs ........................................$115,000 NH FX58, '01, 3660 hrs ..........................................$78,000 NH 1900 ..................................................................$28,000 Gehl CB1085 PT Forg Harv ......................................$15,000 Gehl CB1065 PT Forg Harv ........................................$4,500

NH FP240 PT Forage Harv. ........$23,000 NH FP240 PT Forg Harv ..........................................$23,000 (8) Claas PU380HD Hayhead ..................starting at $14,500 (2) Claas PU380 Pro Hayhead ................starting at $24,500 (9) Claas PU380 Hayhead ......................starting at $12,000 (2) Claas PU300 Hayhead ........................starting at $8,500 (3) JD 640B Hayhead..............................starting at $16,500 JD 630 Hayhead ........................................................$8,500 NH 3500 Hayhead ......................................................$6,500 NH 365W Hayhead ....................................................$7,900 NH 355W Hayhead ....................................................$8,500 NH 340W Hayhead ....................................................$5,000 (2) Claas Orbis 900 Cornhead ..............starting at $111,000 (4) Claas Orbis 750 Cornhead ................starting at $78,000 (5) Claas Orbis 600 Cornhead ................starting at $68,000 (19) Claas RU600, 8R30 Cornhead ........starting at $24,500 (2) Claas RU450XTRA Cornhead ............starting at $42,000 (9) Claas RU450 Cornhead ....................starting at $28,500 Claas 6R30 Cornhead ................................................$8,500 Claas 4R30 Cornhead ..............................................$11,500 Gehl TR330 Cornhead................................................$3,500 JD 688 Cornhead ....................................................$62,000 (2) JD 678, 8R30 Cornhead....................starting at $62,500 Kemper 6008 Cornhead ..........................................$51,500 Kemper 4500 Cornhead ..........................................$26,500 Krone 6000 Cornhead ..............................................$52,000 NH 3PN Cornhead......................................................$8,500 (2) NH R1600 Cornhead ........................starting at $39,500 New Idea 6240 Cornhead ..........................................$2,800

Case 1845C, ‘93, 4580 hrs. ........$11,500 Case 1845C, '93, 4580 hrs ......................................$11,500 Case 1845, '75 ..........................................................$5,500 Case 1840, '95, 4415 hrs ........................................$10,500 Case 1835C, '88, 4175 hrs ........................................$6,500 Case 445CT, '06, 1470 hrs ......................................$35,500 Case 440, '10, 3105 hrs ..........................................$25,900 Case 440, '07, 2330 hrs ..........................................$22,500 Case 440, '05, 4230 hrs ..........................................$19,500 Case 430, '07, 415 hrs ............................................$26,900 Case 430, '07, 1185 hrs ..........................................$25,900 Case 430, '06, 2185 hrs ..........................................$17,900 Case 420, '08 ..........................................................$15,900 Case 75XT, '99, 2705 hrs ........................................$16,900 Case 60XT, '02, 1055 hrs ........................................$16,500 Case 40XT, '05, 4220 hrs ........................................$15,500 Case 40XT, '02, 2620 hrs ........................................$17,900 Bobcat 610, 2810 hrs ................................................$2,595 Bobcat S-250, '08, 1505 hrs....................................$27,900 Bobcat S-250, '05, 4640 hrs....................................$24,500 Bobcat S-185, 2190 hrs ..........................................$23,500 Bobcat S-185, 5500 hrs ..........................................$13,900 Bobcat S-130, '05, 3750 hrs....................................$13,900 Cat 236B, '06, 1985hrs ............................................$23,500 Gehl 7810E, '10, 1770 hrs ......................................$38,000 Gehl 5640E, '08, 3900 hrs ......................................$21,900 Gehl 4835SXT, '99, 5150 hrs ....................................$9,500 Gehl 4640, '05, 3295 hrs ........................................$18,000 Gehl 4625SX, 440 hrs................................................$9,950 Gehl 4625SX, '97, 2100 hrs ......................................$9,600 JD CT322, '06, 725 hrs............................................$28,000 JD 328, '05, 5180 hrs ..............................................$19,500 JD 323D, '11, 695 hrs ............................................$40,900 JD 320D, '11, 450 hrs ............................................$29,900 JD 320, '05, 855 hrs ................................................$18,900 JD 320, 2240 hrs ....................................................$19,900 JD 250, '01, 1850 hrs ..............................................$14,500 JD 250, '00, 1260 hrs ..............................................$13,500 Kubota SVL90, '11, 1025 hrs ..................................$50,000 Kubota SVL75, '11, 1000 hrs ..................................$42,000

Mustang 2066, 3405 hrs. ..........$18,900 Mustang 2066, 3045 hrs ........................................$18,900 Mustang 930A, '97, 2055 hrs ....................................$9,400 NH LX865, '95 ........................................................$12,500 Kubota KX71ST1T3, '11, 175 hrs ............................$31,500

TEC

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

47 , 14

for more equipment listings!

Case SR200, '11, 70 hrs ..........................................$34,000 Case SR200, '11, 725 hrs ........................................$31,500 Case SR200, '11, 1170 hrs ......................................$31,500 Case SV300, '11, 1800 hrs ......................................$41,500 Case 1845C, '96, 6850 hrs ......................................$10,500

ng at $12,500 ...........$7,500 ...........$4,500 .........$19,500 .........$10,900 ...........$2,995 ng at $15,000 ...........$3,250 ng at $16,800 .........$15,900 ...........$3,500 .........$44,900 .........$26,500 ...........$7,500

..$48,500

www.arnoldsinc.com

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..$12,500

Visit Our Website

21

THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

Wettengel

WILLMAR, MN • 320-235-4898


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

22

Soybean basis falls hard, dropping 90 cents EMSLIE, from pg. 19 The old-crop export market remains in the background with just 105,000 metric tons sold on the weekly sales report. National corn planting progress jumped from 28 percent to 71 percent complete, matching the record percentage done in one week last set in 1992 and establishing a new record in terms of number of acres done. Illinois and Iowa set the pace with Illinois planting 57 percent and Iowa planting 56 percent of the crop during the week. While there are pockets where there are still significant acres to be planted — mostly in scattered parts of the northwestern Corn Belt — the weather focus will shift to growing rather than planting conditions now. The USDA daily export reporting system on Wednesday showed 540,000 mt of new-crop corn sold to China/unknown. An additional 120,000 mt was reported on Monday. Weekly export sales were 342,000 mt for 2013-14. It’s interesting to note that next marketing year sales are now behind where they were a year ago, despite a steady climb higher this year. Last year there was a big jump in late-April that essentially doubled the amount of sales on the books, while this year has seen a consistent climb each week to the 4 million mt mark, or 158 million bushels. New-crop sales last year at this point were 195 million bushels. OUTLOOK: The new-crop December price dipped on Tuesday with the bearish planting data to a new

2013 low of $5.12, but rebounded with the demand news to actually finish the week 17 cents higher. It’s easy to say, but clearly weather will dictate where new-crop prices go, heavily influencing the old-crop market direction. We don’t expect to see a condition rating this week yet since emergence is lagging. Last year, the initial crop rating was 77 percent good/excellent, the high-water mark for the year. We would expect to see something less than that this year since other late planted years have seen the initial rating in the upper 60s. The December contract traded like the bearish planting progress report was already discounted, which makes the $5.12 low key support. Previous highs providing chart objectives on the upside are $5.44 and $5.70. SOYBEANS — Soybean basis fell hard this week, dropping 90 cents for the week at one benchmark location we monitor in southern Minnesota. July futures climbed each session through Thursday, when the July contract spiked to the highest level since last September in extremely volatile trade. Similar to the situation in corn, the now-expired May contract had been well above $15 ahead of expiration, so the July contract gains were in a sense just catching up. However, in classic topping chart action, the market ran out of buyers and Friday’s settlement was about 70 cents lower than Thursday’s high. There was talk that the buying that drove the market to the highs was related to Chinese pricing of export

MARKETING

Hogs may be pricing out of consumers’ budget TEALE, from pg. 19 in numbers as well as the weak demand. The futures are moving toward an oversold condition and could see a recovery rally in the days ahead. Producers should be aware of these market conditions and protect their inventory when necessary. The hog market has been on a good rally as of late. Demand for pork has been good and pork cutouts have continued to edge higher over the past month, reflecting good interest in pork products. Considering the value of pork to competitive meats, it appears that domestic demand has shifted to the lower-priced pork. Export demand has been fairly stable despite the increase in the dollar over the same period. The road ahead

still holds a few bumps for the hog market, mainly the seasonal tendency to top the market in the late spring. On May 17, the futures market showed a reversal with a higher high and a lower close. At the same time the futures went from a premium to a discount to the lean index after leading the cash on this recent rally. These technical signals show that there is some weakness developing at these higher price levels which may signal a top or indicate a top is near. As with the cattle, the hog market may be in the process of pricing itself out of the consumers’ budget with the recent advance in pork prices. Therefore, producers should stay on top of current market conditions and protect inventories as needed. ❖

contracts, with the timing of the pricing possibly related to financing terms. When the dust settled, the July contract was up 27.75 cents for the week. Weekly export sales were strong at 183,000 mt for oldcrop, and 839,000 mt for new-crop. Taking a look at the new-crop sales on the books, next marketing year sales are now 356 million bushels, which compares to 381 million bushels in new-crop sales at this time last year. Soybean planting advance to 24 percent complete, still trailing the average of 42 percent. The November contract rallied 19.5 cents on the week. Farmers clearly focused on corn planting during the recently completed week, but soybean planting advanced by 18 percentage points to 24 percent complete, behind the five-year average of 42 percent. OUTLOOK: It appears that the recent run above the $15 mark in nearby beans pulled enough beans into the physical pipeline for another month or so. Old-crop meal and bean sales remain on an unsustainable pace, but the market action this week is consistent with a market that has exhausted the buying. Look for the market to seek a level that uncovers new buying, possibly near the $14.58 level. The new-crop chart has a completely different look, making a new monthly high and closing near the top of the weekly range. Look for an upside chart objective of $12.68 in November. This material has been prepared by a sales or trading employee or agent of CHS Hedging Inc. and should be considered a solicitation. ❖

Need to have solid game plan KRIENER, from pg. 19 advantage of these rates because they may not remain attractive forever. Agriculture is a cyclical industry and if we’ve learned anything from the past, it’s to prepare ourselves during good times for the possibility of a downturn. When looking at large capital purchases, take advantage of a properly structured balance sheet. A properly structured balance sheet will allow you to leverage these great interest rates and in the process you can avoid any increases on short-term rates. Long term, this is one way to protect your working capital. Remember, when rates do go up having long-term fixed funds in place will be a strong advantage over your competitors. Now, marketing that 2013 and future crop is a more complex play. In order to be successful we all need to have a good offensive and defensive plan in place. Once again, having trusted members on your team will help you develop (and stick to) the right game plan for your specific operation. Once your game plan is in place, continue to stay in touch with your marketing partners and consultants to make sure

you keep re-evaluating and adapting to the game (season) you’re playing in. Throughout your career, strive to have close games when faced with limited opportunities and big wins when profitable opportunities are present. If you don’t currently have a marketing plan in place, it’s never too late to start building those relationships and get that plan in writing. Remember to continue communicating with the important members of your team during these busy times. Farming is just like any competitive sports team. In order to be successful we need to put in hard work, have a solid game plan, adjust that plan if the game isn’t going our way and trust our teammates. When we put all the right elements together good things happen. AgStar Financial Services is a cooperative owned by client stockholders. As part of the Farm Credit System, AgStar has served 69 counties in Minnesota and northwest Wisconsin with a wide range of financial products and services for more than 95 years. ❖


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This column was written with strong world demand for the marketing week endcould draw stocks down ing May 24. fairly quickly.” April milk production in American-type cheese, at the top 23 dairy producing 698.8 million pounds, was states totaled 16.1 billion up 2 percent from March pounds, up 0.3 percent from and 5 percent above a year April 2012, according to preago. Total cheese stocks liminary data in the U.S. amounted to 1.12 billion Department of Agriculture’s pounds, up 1 percent from MIELKE MARKET latest “sequestered” Milk March and 4 percent ahead WEEKLY Production report. of a year ago. By Lee Mielke ■ The 50-state output DairyBusiness Weekly amounted to 17.3 bilreports that USDA’s lion pounds, up 0.2 perweekly Crop Progress cent. The total was more than expected but not overwhelmingly update showed a surge in corn planting progress, nearly catching up to the fiveso. The March data was not revised, remaining at 16.4 billion pounds, down year average, but still lagging last year. 0.1 percent from a year ago. As of May 19, just 71 percent of intended corn acreage had been California milk output was down just 0.2 percent from a year ago. Wisconsin planted, compared to 95 percent for the same date last year, and the 79 percent was up 1.3 percent, New York was up average for the comparable date over 1.7 percent, Idaho was up a half-percent, Pennsylvania was unchanged and the past five years. About 19 percent of the corn crop has emerged, compared Minnesota was up 1.8 percent. to 73 percent last year and the fiveOther states of interest saw Michigan year average of 46 percent. up 1.3 percent, New Mexico was down About 24 percent of intended soybean 2.5 percent, Texas was down 3.2 percent acreage was planted as of May 19, comand Washington was up 1.7 percent. pared to 71 percent on the comparable Cow numbers and output per cow date a year ago, and the five-year averdata was suspended because of the gov- age of 42 percent. About 3 percent of ernment sequester, however the the soybean crop has emerged, comUSDA’s latest Livestock Slaughter pared to 32 percent last year and the report shows an estimated 259,400 five-year average of 14 percent. The culled dairy cows were slaughtered data is summarized from weekly surunder federal inspection in April, down veys conducted in early April through 5,800 from March, but 28,600 more the end of November, with input from than April 2012. approximately 4,000 respondents, according to the DBW. While 2013 weekly slaughter totals have slowed somewhat, cull dairy cow Feed price volatility is not going away slaughter has surpassed the compara- according to Scott Stewart of Stewart ble week a year ago in 13 of the first 19 Peterson in a May 22 DairyLine interweeks of the year. The January-to-April view. Corn will lead the way, he said, 2013 total was estimated at 1.099 mil- and quickly admitted that forecasting lion head, 56,100 more than the same the year’s highs and low is nearly period in 2012. impossible, citing weather as the pri■ mary reason. Checking the cooler, the USDA’s latHe said it’s important dairy producers est Cold Storage report shows plenty of dairy products in storage. April butter carefully consider what they can do to stocks totaled 310.7 million pounds, up position themselves. He warned that it’s possible to see $8 to $10 corn prices this 55.7 million pounds or a whopping 22 year if there’s a serious weather scare or percent from March and 56.5 million pounds or 22 percent above April 2012. they could fall below $4 if we have really The Daily Dairy Report said American good crops. Supplies are tight, he said, and “weather is going to be key.” cheese and butter stocks are both “at historically high levels.” Lee Mielke is a syndicated columnist who resides in Everson, Wash. His FC Stone’s read is that the butter buildup was larger than expected. But, weekly column is featured in newspapers across the country and he may be FC Stone dairy economist Bill Brooks reached at lkmielke@juno.com. ❖ adds that “a weather event coupled

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April milk production up a little more than expected


THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

24

After two years, a new farm bill appears close to reality \After nearly two years remaining to be worked out of discussions and debate, a related to nutrition (SNAP) new farm bill appears a bit programs, dairy policy, the closer to being enacted into sugar program and other law. The agriculture comissues. mittees of both the U.S. Both the U.S. Senate verSenate and the U.S. House sion of the new farm bill — have passed versions of a the “Agriculture Reform, new farm bill in recent Food and Jobs Act of 2013” weeks. — and the U.S. House verFARM PROGRAMS sion — the “Federal AgriculIn 2012, the U.S. Senate passed legislation for a new tural Reform and Risk ManBy Kent Thiesse farm bill, as did the U.S. agement Act of 2013” — House agriculture comwould eliminate most mittee. However, the provisions contained in legislation was never the current commodity brought before the programs. Current provientire U.S. House for consideration. As sions for fixed annual direct payments a result, the previous 2008 farm bill, and potential counter-cyclical paywhich expired in 2012, was extended ments in the existing Direct and for one more year through Sept. 30, Counter Cyclical Payment Program 2013. This time around, there appears would be eliminated by a new farm bill. to be considerable similarities in the Both the Average Crop Revenue provarious commodity provisions congram and the permanent disaster protained in the new farm bill legislation. gram (SURE) will also be eliminated. There are still some differences The Commodity Credit Corp. market-

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tee farm bill in 2012 contained a producer choice between the target-price based Price Loss Coverage program and the Revenue Loss Coverage. The new farm bill legislation passed in 2013 by the House ag committee contains similar provisions to the 2012 legislation, with only minor changes. So, it appears highly likely that producers will have to make a one-time choice for either a target-price based commodity program (AMP, PLC) or a revenue-based program (ARC, RLC) for the years covered by the new farm bill (2014-18). Both AMP and PLC, the price-only based program options, contain provisions to change the “target prices” to “reference prices”, and would allow for these commodity reference prices to be updated. The biggest difference from the current DCP program is that there will no longer be annual fixed direct payments. It should be noted that any time See PROGRAMS, pg. 25

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base acres. There are obviously some differences to be worked out between the U.S. Senate AMP program and the U.S. House PLC program before a final farm bill is enacted; however, those differences appear to be quite manageable. The attached table (at right) contains a comparison of the various provisions of proposed U.S. Senate AMP and U.S. House PLC program proposals. Revenue-based program options The revenue-based program concept was introduced in the 2008 farm bill with the initiation of the ACRE program, which was somewhat complicated, and not well-accepted by many producers. The revenue-based programs are intended to make payments when the crop revenue in a given crop year falls below a certain percentage of benchmark revenue guarantees, which are based on five-year “Olympic” average yields and prices. Payments in these programs tend to occur when crop prices decline and stay low over multiple years. By comparison, crop insurance provides protection in the year of production, but does not provide protection over multiple years. The intention of the revenue-based programs is to supplement crop insurance coverage, while not duplicating the coverage. The U.S. Senate and U.S. House versions of the new farm bill have tried to simplify the revenue-based concepts in the farm program legislation, and will limit payments to 10 percent of the benchmark revenue for a crop. The U.S. Senate version offers the Ag Risk Coverage program as the revenuebased commodity program alternative

MARKETING

Table 1: Price Protection Programs U.S. Senate

U.S. House

* Program Name

Adverse Market Payment (AMP)

Price Loss Coverage (PLC)

* Payment Acres

85% of Crop Base Acres

85% of Planted Acres Up to Total Base Acres)

* Payment Yields

Current CCP Yields

Current CCP Yields (Can be updated to 90% of 5-Year Avg.)

* Reference Price 55% x 5-Year “Olympic” Avg. (Target Price) “Olympic” Nat. Avg. Price Proposed Prices for 2014: Corn (current = $2.63/bu.) $2.83/bu. Soybeans (current = $6/bu. ) $6.19/bu. Wheat (current = $4.17/bu.) $3.62/bu.

Fixed Prices set by Congress

* Payment Rate

Difference between the Ref. Price and the 12-month Nat. Avg. Price or the CCC Loan Rate

Difference between the Ref. Price and the 12-month Nat. Avg. Price or the CCC Loan Rate

* Payment Amount

Payment Rate x Payment Yield x Payment Acres

Payment Rate x Payment Yield x Payment Acres

25

$3.70/bu. $8.40/bu. $5.50/bu.

Note: “Olympic” average is a five-year average yield or price, with the high and low year eliminated.

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PROGRAMS, from pg. 24 “Olympic” average yields or prices are referenced, it usually refers to a five-year average, with the high year and low year being dropped before the average is calculated. Reference price-based program options The reference prices in the U.S. Senate AMP program would be adjusted annually to a rate that is 55 percent of the five-year “Olympic” national average price for a commodity, with the exception of rice and peanuts. The proposed initial AMP reference prices would be $2.83 per bushel for corn, $6.19/bu. for soybeans and $3.62/bu. for wheat. Current target price levels in the DCP program are $2.63/bu. for corn, $6/bu. for soybeans and $4.17/bu. for wheat. In the new AMP program, payments would be made when the 12month national average price falls below the reference price for a specific commodity. Payments would be based on current CCP program yields, and would be paid on 85 percent of the farm unit’s current crop base acreage. By comparison, the U.S. House PLC program would utilize fixed crop reference prices for the five-year farm bill, which are set by Congress. The PLC reference prices would be $3.70 per bushel for corn, $8.40 per bushel for soybeans, and $5.50 per bushel for wheat. PLC program yields would also be current CCP program yields; however, payment yields could be updated from current levels up to 90 percent of the five-year “Olympic” average farm yields for a specific crop from 2008-12. In addition, the PLC payment acres would be based on 85 percent of the current year planted crop acres, up to a maximum of a farm unit’s total crop

Comparison of new farm bill proposals from the U.S. Senate and U.S. House

THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

Differences to work out between House, Senate

See PROGRAMS, pg. 26

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Supplemental coverage option available on corn, beans PROGRAMS, from pg. 25 to producers. The ARC program would give producers a choice between utilizing either county-based or farm-based fiver-year “Olympic” average crop yields; however, the payment rate when using farm yields would be 65 percent of payment acres, as compared to 80 percent of payment acres when using county yields. The ARC benchmark revenue would be the “Olympic” average county or farm yield times the five-year “Olympic” average national average price for a commodity, with the revenue guarantee being set at 88 percent (0.88) of the benchmark revenue. ARC payments would be made when the actual revenue in a crop year falls below the revenue guarantee for that commodity, up to a maximum of 10 percent of the benchmark revenue. The actual revenue would be the actual farm or county yield for a commodity in a given year times the 12-month national average price for that commodity for the crop marketing year. The Revenue Loss Coverage program offered by the U.S. House will function similarly to the U.S. Senate’s ARC program, except that the RLC program will be on county average yields, and will not offer a choice for farm-based yields. The RLC benchmark revenue will be calculated similar to ARC, with the RLC revenue guarantee being set at 85

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Comparison of new farm bill proposals from the U.S. Senate and U.S. House

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Table 2: Revenue Protection Programs

Both versions of the new farm bill contain changes and reforms in dairy policy, as well as milk support price calculations and payments; however, there remains a lot of differences to be worked out in the dairy provisions.

U.S. Senate

U.S. House

* Program Name

Agricultural Risk Coverage (ARC)

Revenue Loss Coverage (RLC)

* Coverage Criteria

Choice of County or Farm Level

County Level

* Payment Acres

Planted Acres up to Total Base A.

85% of Planted Acres up to Total Base Acres

* Benchmark Guarantee

5-Year “Olympic” Ave. County or Farm Yield x 5-year “Olympic” Nat. Avg. Price

5-Year “Olympic Ave. County Yield x 5-year “Olympic Nat. Avg. Price

* Revenue Guarantee

Benchmark Revenue x 88% (0.88)

Benchmark Revenue x 85% (0.85)

* Actual Revenue

County or Farm Yield x 12-Month Nat. Avg. Price or CCC Loan Rate

County Yield x 5-Month Nat. Avg. Price or CCC Loan Rate

* Payment Amount

Revenue Guar. – Actual Revenue Max. Amt. is 10% of Benchmark Rev.

Revenue Guar. – Actual Revenue Max. Amt. is 10% of Benchmark Rev.

* Payment Made On :

80% of Paymt. Acres (County Yield) 65% of Paymt. Acres (Farm Yield)

100% of Payment Acres

percent of the benchmark Note: “Olympic” average is a five-year average yield or price, with the high and low year eliminated. revenue. RLC payments Tables 1 and 2 developed by Kent Thiesse will be made on 100 percent of planted crop acres, up to a farm unit’s total crop base acres. RLC posals for the new farm bill would also combine some of the existing conservation programs being adminiswould use a five-month national average price to tered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, with determine the actual crop revenue in a year for a given commodity, rather the 12-month national aver- some minor adjustments in funding levels. age price proposed in the ARC program. However, • Both versions of the new farm bill contain the RLC program payments still would not occur changes and reforms in dairy policy, as well as milk until October in the year following harvest. The 12support price calculations and payments; however, month crop marketing year for corn and soybeans there remains a lot of differences to be worked out in runs from Sept. 1 in the year of harvest until Aug. 30 the dairy provisions. the following year. The five-month price starts on • One of the biggest differences in the new farm Sept. 1 and ends on Jan. 31. bill proposals is for the Supplemental Nutrition Proposals for the U.S. Senate ARC program and Assistance Program. Approximately 75 percent of the U.S. House RLC program are fairly similar, with annual farm bill expenditures are for SNAP related some minor differences in program criteria and pay- programs. The U.S. Senate farm bill proposal calls ment calculations to be worked out. It appears that a for a reduction of $4 billion in SNAP expenditures revenue-based program option, which will replace over the next 10 years, while the U.S. House proposal the current ACRE and SURE programs, will be part would reduce SNAP expenditures by about $20 bilof a new farm bill. The table above contains a comlion. The U.S. House farm bill would also tighten cerparison of the various provisions of the proposed U.S. Senate ARC and U.S. House RLC program proposals. tain restrictions for SNAP eligibility, which are not part of the U.S. Senate legislation. The issues related Other farm bill provisions to SNAP funding and eligibility requirements are • It appears that the Supplemental Coverage likely to be controversial in upcoming farm bill disOption will be available to producers of many crops, cussions. including corn and soybeans, which would allow proWe are moving closer to getting a new farm bill, now ducers to purchase crop insurance coverage up to the that both the U.S. Senate and U.S. House ag commit90 percent level. Few other changes are being protees have passed their versions, but there are still a posed in the crop insurance program, even though few hurdles to cross before a new farm bill becomes there have been numerous proposals forwarded for final. Next step is for the two versions of the farm bill some changes. The U.S. Senate did include a provision to link participation in crop insurance to conser- to be approved by the entire U.S. Senate and U.S. House, before going the Conference Committee to work vation compliance requirements. out differences in the two proposals, resulting in a final • Both versions of the new farm bill would reduce vote, and finally a presidential signature. the maximum program acres in the Conservation Kent Thiesse is a government farm programs anaReserve Program to 25 million acres or less by 2018, lyst and a vice president at MinnStar Bank in Lake which is a reduction from a maximum of 32 million Crystal, Minn. He may be reached at (507) 726-2137 acres in the current farm bill. There are currently approximately 27 million acres in the CRP. The pro- or kent.thiesse@minnstarbank.com. ❖


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SACRIFICE Dairy farm, Grade A Was $160,000 Reduced to $140,000. New barn, new home 15 AC., 6 cow parlor. (715)474-2299 Sell your land or real estate in 30 days for 0% commission. Call Ray 507-339-1272 We have extensive lists of Land Investors & farm buyers throughout MN. We always have interested buyers. For top prices, go with our proven methods over thousands of acres. Serving Minnesota Mages Land Co & Auc Serv www.magesland.com 800-803-8761 Real Estate Wanted

021

paulkrueger@edinarealty.com

(952)447-4700

Antiques & Collectibles

026

FOR SALE: 1939 IH-H parts tractor. 715-983-5762

1 Stop Realty ....................28 Ag Power Enterprises........34 Ag Systems Inc ................24 Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers ..........................11 Anderson Seeds ..................5 Arnold Co. ..................20, 21 Bayer Truck & Equipment Inc ..................................25 Belle Plaine Block & Tile Inc ..................................31 Brokaw Supply Co ............18 Country Cat ........................7 Courtland Waste Handling ..8 Crysteel Truck Equipment 14 Dahl Farm Supply ............16 Diers Ag Supply ................12 Discipline Adviser ..............4 Double B Manufacturing ..16 Duncan Trailers LLC ........35 Emerson Kalis ..................32 Excelsior Homes West Inc ..3 Farm Drainage Plows Inc..31 Fast Distributing................13 Fladeboe Auction Service ....................29, 31 Greenwald Farm Center ....32 Harpels ..............................23 Henslin Auctions ..............29 Hewitt Drainage Equipment17 Hotovec Auction Center Inc28

Hughes Auction Service LLC ..........................27, 28 Keith Bode ........................36 Keltgens Inc ........................6 Kerkhoff Auction & Real Estate ................................29 Kiester Implement ............35 Lano Equipment - Shakopee......................24 Larson Brothers Implement ................35, 39 Letchers Farm Supply ......15 Mankato Spray Center ......10 Massop Electric ................32 Matejcek Implement..........37 Midwest Machinery Co ....38 NK Clerking ......................29 Northern Ag Service..........33 Nutra Flo Co......................36 Pete Schilling ....................12 Pruess Elevator Inc............36 Rabe International ............32 Rush River Steel & Trim ....4 Schweiss Inc......................35 Smiths Mill Implement ....36 Sorensen Sales & Rentals 39 Waseca Motor & Bearings 25 Wieman Land & Auction ..30 Willmar Farm Center ........33 Willmar Precast ................15 Woodford Ag LLC ............33

• PO Box 3169 • 418 S 2nd Street • Mankato, MN 56001 • theland@thelandonline.com

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

WANTED: Land & farms. I have clients looking for dairy, & cash grain operations, as well as bare land parcels from 40-1000 acres. Both for relocation & investments. If you have even thought about selling contact: Paul Krueger, Farm & Land Specialist, Edina Realty, SW Suburban Office, 14198 Commerce Ave NE, Prior Lake, MN 55372.

ADVERTISER LISTING

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Be An Auctioneer & Personal Property Appraiser Continental Auction Schools Mankato, MN & Ames, IA 507-625-5595 www.auctioneerschool.com Real Estate

May 31, 2013

27 THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

AUCTIONS & CLASSIFIEDS


Hay & Forage Equip

WEEKLY AUCTION

Every Wednesday

5:00 PM - Farm Misc. 6:00 PM - Hay & Straw 7:00 PM - Livestock Sheep & Goats 2nd Wed. at 8:00 PM

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

★★★★★★★★★★★★★

HOTOVEC AUCTION CENTER N Hwy 15 Hutchinson, MN

320-587-3347

www.hotovecauctions.com

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

★★★★★★★★★★★★★

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

031

EARLY SUMMER SALE on New Rhino 7-8-9-10 Ft 3 Pt Heavy Duty Disk Mowers (Some On Hand.) Also Rhino Hay Tedders & Wheel Rakes Dealer 319-347-6282 Can Del

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★

THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

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Hay & Forage Equip

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FOR SALE: JD 946 MoCo discbine excellent condition, always shedded, It works so good you can cut hay without looking back!! $17,500 OBO (or best offer) (320) 965-2411

FOR SALE: Bale handler for FOR SALE: New Idea #4865 small square bales, red round baler (same as $1,000/OBO. Ray Moeller Case IH 8480), does twine 712-297-7951 or net wrap, monitor, 540RPM PTO, all new floor belts, very good cond, field FOR SALE: JD 5400-5830 ready, $5,900/OBO. 320-286and 6000 series forage har5805 vesters. Used kernel processors, also, used JD 40 FOR SALE: NH 451 sickle knife Dura-Drums, and mower, used very little, drum conversions for 5400 507-259-2677 and 5460. Call (507)427-3520 FOR SALE: NH Hayliner 68, www.ok-enterprise.com for small square bales, $1,250/OBO. 712-297-7951 FOR SALE: JD 566 round baler, 5x6 bales, double IH 120 sickle mower, 7', F.H. twine tie, crowder wheels, semi mount, extra sickle, good belts, nice shape. newer guards, very good $6,500. 507-639-3592 or 507condition; JD #21 hay con317-6565 ditioner, steel rollers, good condition. 320-328-5794


Hay & Forage Equip

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29

Bins & Buildings

033

160 Acre Estate Land Auction

SILO DOORS Wood or steel doors shipped promptly to your farm stainless fasteners hardware available. (800)222-5726 Landwood Sales LLC

Tuesday Eve June 11th-7:00p.m.

Top Bare Farmland with a 92.6% Productivity index, top of watershed, does contain an old grove site. Location of auction: to be held at the KC Facility in Fairmont at 920 E. 10th St. just West of Grahm Tire. Location of Farm: SW 1⁄4 Section 32 Waverly Twp. Martin County located approx. 10 mi. NW of Fairmont, or 8 mi. SW of Truman. Call our office 507.238.4318 or check our website www.auctioneeralley.com for complete pre- auction information or call Allen Kahler 507.764.3591

Stormor Bins & EZ-Drys. 100% financing w/no liens or red tape, call Steve at Fairfax Ag for an appointment. 888-830-7757 Grain Handling Equip

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50' galvanized auger, 8" diameter, $750/OBO. 515-3878707 or 515-864-8098

Estate of Thorall & Dorothy Oltman Oltman Children, Owners

BRAND NEW! WESTFIELD 10-71 low profile swing hopper $8,925. All sizes available. Mike 507-848-6268

John Edman of Edman & Edman Att. Kahlers, Pike, Wedel, Hall & Hartung Auction Staff John (Pal) Eisenmenger Sale Coordinator • Larry Bremer-Real Estate

FOR SALE:Used grain bins, floors unload systems, stirators, fans & heaters, aeration fans, buying or selling, try me first and also call for very competitive contract rates! Office hours 8am-5pm Monday – Friday Saturday 9am - 12 noon or call 507-697-6133 Ask for Gary 035

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Farm Implements

THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

WANTED: Self-loading round bale trailer, any make or model. 507-696-2176

'02 MF 8780XP combine; '89 IH 1680 combine; '99 IH 1083 8R poly CH; IH 964 CH; White 708 & 706 CH's; Michigan 179 ldr; Big A floater; Hiniker 5700 rotary hoe; JD 500 grain cart; White plows & parts. 507380-5324 '93 R52; 630 CH 3000 Elec plates; 20' flex 800; Artsway 180 chopper. 515368-4492 16 ft. Badger Chopper Box. Excellent Cond. $3,500. (715)647-5679

If you’re having a Farm Auction, let other Farmers know it! Upcoming Issues of THE LAND

Southern MNNorthern IA June 7 June 21 July 5 July 19 August 2 August 16

Northern MN June 14 June 28 July 12 July 26 August 9 August 23

PO Box 3169 Mankato, MN 56002 Phone: 507-345-4523 or 800-657-4665 Fax: 507-345-1027

Ask Your Auctioneer to Place Your Auction in The Land!

Website: www.TheLandOnline.com e-mail: theland@TheLandOnline.com

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Deadlines are 1 week prior to publication with Holiday deadlines 1 day earlier ** Indicates Early Deadline


THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

30

- LARGE AUCTION -

TRACTORS – SKID LOADERS – PAY LOADER – CONSTRUCTION – FORKLIFTS COLLECTOR TRACTORS & EQUIP. - COMBINES – HEADS - HAY & FEEDING EQUIP. TILLAGE – PLANTERS – ASST. MACHINERY – TRUCKS – TRAILERS – FARM MISC. Our Spring Auction Event will be held at the Wieman Auction Facility located 1 mile south and 1⁄2 mile west on Highway 44 from Marion SD on:

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12TH • 8:15 CDT Lunch by Presbyterian Church Ladies

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

TRACTORS – SKID LOADERS –PAY LOADER – CONSTRUCTION – FORKLIFTS 4x4 TRACTORS: 08 CIH 435 CAH, PS, 2200 hrs, sharp; 04 JD 9420, CAH, 4112 hrs. w/Duals; 04 JD 9320, CAH, 24 sp, 4826 hrs.; 91 JD 8560, CAH, 24 sp, 6600 hrs.; 93 JD 8570, CAH, 12 sp, 5000 hrs.; 84 JD 8450, CAH, 16 sp., 8900 hrs., sharp; 81 Versatile 895, CAH, sharp; 88 CIH 9130, CAH, 4x4, PS, 8562 hrs. (needs trans work); Versatile 946, CAH, PS, 9000 hrs.; JD 8440, CAH, 4x4; Stieger Bearcat II 4x4, CAH, 3 pt, Duals; MFD TRACTORS: 2011 CIH 290, MFD, CAH, 1117 hrs., sharp; 04 CIH MX210, MFD, 3873 hrs, duals w/09 Koyker 2785 Ldr; 08 CIH Puma 195, MFD w/Miller Ldr, 1700 hrs.; 2010 JD 8295R, CAH, 2900 hrs. w/Duals; 03 JD 7520, MFD, IVT, 6500 hrs. w/JD 741 Ldr; 08 CIH 125, MFD, CAH, 5700 hrs. w/CIH L750 Ldr; 98 NH TV140 Bi-directional, CAH, 6100 hrs. w/Ldr; 08 NH T5070, MFD w/Ldr, 1200 hrs.; 08 NH T5050, MFD, CAH, 1092 hrs.; Agco 9745 MFD, CAH, 2300 hrs, 1 owner; MF 3650 CAH, 6000 hrs.; 95 JD 8300 MFD; Ford TW25 MFD, 6200 hrs; 98 JD 7810 MFD, CAH, PQ, w/LHR, 8100 hrs., w/JD 740 Ldr; JD 4455, MFD, PS, CAH; JD 4450, MFD, PS, CAH w/JD 740 Ldr; CIH 7120 MFD, 8000 hrs; JD 4650 MFD, 7000 hrs.; 01 JD 7410, MFD, PQ, 6595 hrs.; 97 JD 7410, MFD, PQ, LHR; 96 JD 7400, MFD, PQ w/JD 740 Ldr; 84 JD 4050, MFD, PS w/JD 260 Ldr; 89 JD 2955, MFD, CAH, 8300 hrs. w/JD 740 SL Ldr, sharp (has major oil leak); 07 JD 3320, MFD w/Ldr & 72” deck; 88 JD 4650, MFD, PS; 65 JD 3020 gas, PS, WF; 93 JD 5400, WF; 83 AC 8070, MFD, PS, CAH; 91 CIH 5130, MFD, CAH, 9100 hrs w/Dual Ldr; 2WD TRACTORS: Case 2294, CAH, 7000 hrs.; 88 CIH 7120, CAH, 9100 hrs.; 80 JD 4040, CAH, PS; 93 JD 7600, PQ, CAH, 6400 hrs. w/JD 725 Ldr; IHC 986 CAH, WF; 73 JD 4230, CAH, QR w/FH Ldr; 74 Ford 9600, Cab, WF; IHC 1086, CAH, 6000 hrs.; 75 JD 2630 D. w/JD 146 Ldr; 72 IHC 966 w/Dual 3100 Ldr; 74 IHC 574 D., WF; 67 MF 150, gas, WF; SKID LOADERS-PAYLOADERS-CONSTRUCTION: 06 NH L170 Skid Ldr 1292 hrs; 02 JD 250 Skid Ldr, new engine, sharp; 2000 Bobcat 873G w/3700 hrs; 2 – Mustang 940 Skid Loaders w/backhoe att., 3310 and 3590 hrs; Case 1816 Skid Ldr; Rounder L600 Skid Ldr; 05 JD 644J Pay Ldr, 4877 hrs, CAH; 2000 Komatsu WA250-3MC Pay Ldr, 6500 hrs; 83 CAT 930 Pay ldr, 7000 hrs; 88 CAT 215CLC Excavator w/2 buckets; 86 Case 880D Excavator, 5500 hrs; Komatsu 200 Excavator; CAT D3 Dozer w/6 way blade; 01 Truax 6000 lb Telehandler, 34’; JD 480 Gas forklift; IHC 4000 forklift; Clark LP warehouse forklift; Kelly 3 pt backhoe; Swift 24” x 50’ gravel screener conveyor; Large asst. of skid loader attachments (buckets, grapples, rock buckets, Lowe hyd. post augers, pallet forks & etc.)

COLLECTOR TRACTORS & EQUIPMENT IHC 826D Wheatland tractor (1 of 300); IHC 600 Gas Wheatland, sharp (1 of 32); IHC 100 Hydro, Diesel, MFD, cab, 4600 hrs; IHC 656 Diesel, LowPro, sharp; IHC Super WD9 D. Standard w/twin stack; Coop E4, WF; Case 630, Gas, WF; 58 Ford 840; JD 3010 D.; IHC 460 D w/FH-F11 Ldr; 3 – Ford Major Diesel; 50 Case DC4; 55 Case 400 D, WF; Case DC, Eagle hitch; Case 400 Gas, WF; Case 900; 45 MM R; Leader Tractor; JD 4020 D; 68 AC 190XT D; IHC 656 D, Hydro, restored; IHC B, restored; Case 900; Case 400; Case LA; 2 - IHC 450 D; IHC MD; IHC C w/mower; Oliver 1855 D, WF, sharp; IHC 300, NF; JD 630 Gas, WF, 3 pt, sharp; JD 530, Gas, WF, 1890 hrs, sharp; JD 530, NF, restored; JD 520, NF, restored; JD 50, NF, restored; JD A NF, restored; JD H, NF, restored; JD B, restored; IHC 560 D w/3 pt; JD 4020 w/loader; IHC W4; Case DC, WF; 29 JD D on steel; IHC 10-20; 50 JD G; IHC F12; IHC M, WF; IHC 656 Gas, WF; IHC H, WF; IHC B, NF; IHC Cub w/belly mower; Cockshutt Deluxe 35, Gas; IHC 10-20 on steel; Cockshutt 40, Gas; Case 1030 D, Standard; Oliver 880 D. Standard; White 1870 D. Standard; Avery tractor single front wheel, not running Todd Ashley – Kimball SD 605-680-0142 will sell: Restored Tractors: 1946 JD G, NF; 1947 JD B, new tires; 1951 JD A, WF; 1950 JD MT; 1954 JD 50; 1955 JD 40, 3 pt, WF; 1955 JD 60; 1955 JD 70 Gas, WF; 1955 JD 80 Diesel (1 of 487) w/pony starter; 1957 JD 620, WF; 1958 JD 420, slant dash, WF; JD 720 Diesel, WF w/pony start; Original Tractors: 1957 JD 420, WF; JD 630 Gas, complete; JD A, NF, complete; 2 – JD 110 lawn tractors

COMBINES – CORN HEADS – FLEX HEADS – GRAIN CARTS & GRAIN HANDLING 09 CIH 5088, chop RT, 911/725 hrs., 30.5’s, sharp; 09 JD 9770STS, 1400/1100 hrs., loaded, singles, sharp; 01 JD 9650STS, 2700/2000 hrs, CM, 42” Dual; 3 – JD 9510’s; 4 – JD 9500’s; 3 – JD 9600’s; 2 – CIH 1660’s; 81 IHC 1420; 01 JD 9750STS, 3000/4230 hrs; 94 JD 9600 2800/3600 hrs; JD 8820 Hydro chopper; Case IH 1660, RT, chop; 25 - Corn Heads: (JD – CIH – Gleaner – MF – Geringhoff); 25 – Flex Heads: (JD – CIH – Gleaner – MF); Ridgid Headers; 5 – Grain Carts; 10 – Header Trailers Adella Walter Estate – Freeman SD (Lavern Walter 605-925-7755) will sell: JD 4450 MFD, Quad w/JD 280 Ldr, 6400 hrs, CAH, 1 owner - sharp; IHC 856 D., WF, 3 pt, 5449 actual hrs; JD 630 disk, 21’ w/harrow; JD 1000 FC, 21’, 3 pt; JD 750 NT, 15’ drill, 71⁄2” w/markers; JD 7000 8RW planter; IHC 370 disk, 13’; IHC 45 FC, 15’, 3 pt; IHC 5x16 plow; JD RM 4RW cult.; JD 530 R. baler; JD 890 rake; JD 640 rake; 2 – Demco 365 gravity boxes w/12 ton gears; Parker 300 gravity box w/JD gear; Demco 285 gravity box w/JD gear; Rural Mfg. single and double bale fork; Willrich 14’ chisel, 3 pt; 9 section hyd. drag w/cart; barge box w/JD gear; Winco 15KW PTO generator Don Reinesch – Kimball SD 605-680-2800 will sell: 74 JD 4230, CAH w/FH 258 Ldr; 80 IHC 3788 2+2 tractor, 6100 hrs; IHC 490 disk, 21’; IHC 45 FC, 20’; IHC 181 rotary hoe, 21’; Hiniker 4RW, NT cult.; IHC 8480 R. baler; 2 – NI 324 PT pickers, 2RW; 400 bu. gravity box on 5th wheel gear; Coleman 5000 watt generator; liquid fert. att for JD planter

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

HAY & FEEDING EQUIP. – SILAGE EQUIP. – GRINDER-MIXERS – MANURE EQUIP. PLANTERS – DRILLS – SPRAYERS – LOADERS – TILLAGE EQUIP. – MACHINERY – TRUCKS TRAILERS – VEHICLES – RIDING MOWERS – TIRES & MISC. Auctioneers Note: A portion of the Auction will be available on wiemanauction.com for online bidding with a 2% buyers premium with a max of $750.00 per item. Another large interesting sale! Bring a friend, come prepared. Misc. items start @ 8:15 w/ 3-4 rings. Machinery starts at 9:15 AM sharp with 2 auction rings all day, 3rd ring @ 11:00 will sell payloaders-construction items-forklifts-augers-vehicles-trailers-trucks. South Dakota sales tax will be charged. This ad is subject to additions and deletions. All consignments must have been approved by the Wieman’s. We have excellent loading and unloading equipment. We appreciate your business. We are in our 65th year of selling. Honest and fair treatment to all. Financing and trucking available. Sorry we are full! Come prepared to Buy! If you are driving a good distance – call to make sure your item is here. (Welcome to the “Machinery Mall of South Dakota”). - Our Next Auction is August 7, 2013 -

WIEMAN LAND & AUCTION CO., INC. (SINCE 1949) MARION SD – 605-648-3111 or 1-800-251-3111 AUCTION SITE: 605-648-3536 or 1-888-296-3536

EVENINGS: Richard Wieman – 605-648-3264 • Mike Wieman – 605-297-4240 Kevin Wieman – 605-648-3439 • Derek Wieman – 605-660-2135 • Gary Wieman – 605-648-3164 For a detailed ad and some pictures call our office or visit our website at: www.wiemanauction.com • e-mail address: wiemanauction@yahoo.com


Farm Implements

035 Farm Implements

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7x7 tool bar, 30', folding 2 lift assist, made for tank on lift assist, $1,500/OBO. 712-2608003 Brittonia 500 gal 80' pickup sprayer, mid mount booms, 8HP Honda, 440 Raven, hyd tip lifts, $1,750; JD 7800 2WD tractor, PQ, 3pt, 3 hyds, 14.9x46 tires, $33,500; Case IH 950 16R22 planter, $4,900; Case IH 1830 12R30 cult, $4,900; Case IH 183 6R30 cult, $750. 320-769-2756

THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

18' Bush-Hog disc, field Harms Mfg. Land Rollers, brand new, 16', $7,200; 32', ready, $2,200. 10' hyd box $16,500; 42', $19,500; any blade/land leveler, brand size avail. (715)296-2162 new, $2,200. (715)340-5655 Hydrostatic & Hydraulic Repair Repair-Troubleshooting Sales-Design Custom hydraulic hose-making up to 2” Service calls made. STOEN'S Hydrostatic Service 16084 State Hwy 29 N Glenwood, MN 56334 320634-4360 JD M or MT implements: 1 btm plow, 2 btm plow, 4' digger, 1R cult., rear mnt 6' sickle mwr. 320-584-8277 after 4 p.m. Royalton, MN

The Affordable Way to Tile Your Fields

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

NI 3739 spreader, tandem FOR SALE: '73 MF 1135 axle, end gate, 1 owner, tractor w/band duals, 3880 2007 model. Sharp. $10,500. hrs., real good cond.; JD (563)590-6930 7000, 8R30” planter w/mon., real good cond.; Adams Rock picker (Westgo) with hydraulic cylinders, $850. #12 leaning whl grader. 507515-852-4241 334-0025 or 507-838-5388 We buy FOR SALE: 2 Parker graviSalvage Equipment ty boxes w/ running gear, Parts Available 300 bu, 10:00 x 20 tires, 1 w/ Hammell Equip., Inc. roll tarp, hyd auger & di(507)867-4910 vider. 60' Flex-coil drag. Woods Dixie cutter weed & 507-384-1722 brush chopper, 5' 3pt. mount, $750. 515-852-4241 FOR SALE: 3pt grader blade, 10' wide, will fit 2pt 036 or 3pt or log chain, Tractors $250/OBO. 712-297-7951 '81 JD 4640, 10k hrs, 18.4x42 duals, $18,000. 320-221-4327 FOR SALE: JD 336 throw baler, mint cond, $3,500; 3 '92 Case IH 1680, 4530 hrs, metal bale wagons, all good 400 hrs on new engine, field tires, $800/ea. NH haybine, tracker, $39,500. 712-790488, 6 yrs old, $14,000; JD 6698 side rake 640, $500; Some stored inside. 952-237-6442 '98 JD 6410L, FWA, ROPS w/canopy, 16.9x38 85%, 9000 FOR SALE: Red River Speeasy hrs., $17,400; JD 4030, cial threshing machine, 22”, CAH, 3900 hrs, $14,300 always shedded, looks like OBO/trade. 320-543-3523 new, w/ belts. Also, 8' MN grain binder w/ all the can- 1954 AC WD45 WF w/loader. Tires 90%. Conv. to 12v. vases, works good. 507-829$3,000/OBO. 515-408-7960 3793

3 Point Hitch & Pull Type Models Available • Walking Tandem Axles • Formed V Bottom on w/425/65R22.5 Tires for Superior Grade Control • Tile Installation Depth Gauge

Shoe & Boot forms to Tile. No more Crushed Tile • Paralled Pull Arms, Zero Pitch for the Most Accurate Tile Placement

Buy Factory Direct & $AVE!

“Where Farm and Family Meet”


Tractors

THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

32

• 5/8” drum roller wall thickness • 42” drum diameter • 4”x8” frame tubing 3/8” thick • Auto fold

MANDAKO

FOR THE BEST DEAL ORDER NOW!

12’-60’ LONG ROLLERS

GREENWALD FARM CENTER Greenwald, MN • 320-987-3177

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

14 miles So. of Sauk Centre

LOCAL TRADES TRACTORS COMBINES

‘92 CIH 5240, 2WD, PS - $26,500 ‘06 CIH MX305, MFD - $163,500 ‘11 CIH Farmall 35, MFD w/loader, 50 hrs. - $21,000 New Farmall 31, MFD w/60” ‘09 CIH 485 Quad - Call ‘11 CIH 550 Quad - Call

TILLAGE

‘99 DMI, 32’, 3 bar - $16,500 CIH 4300, 32 1/2’ - $8,950 ‘06 JD 1760, 12-30 - $43,500

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

PLANTERS

‘05 1200, 16-30 pivot, bulk fill - $56,500 ‘08 1200, 16-30 pivot, bulk fill, 2500 acres - $79,500

‘89 1660, monitor - $24,500 ‘90 1680, duals, - $28,500 ‘93 1666 - $32,500 ‘07 CIH 2588 - Call ‘09 CIH 6088 - Call ‘10 7120 - Call ‘06 CIH 1020, 30’ - Call ‘03 CIH 1020, 30’ - Call ‘98 CIH 1020, 25’ - $7,950 ‘81 JD 983, 8-30 - $4,500 ‘92 CIH 1083, 8-30 - $8,500 ‘95 CIH 1083, 8-30, plastic - Call ‘08 CIH 2608, 8-30 - Call ‘09 CIH 2608, 8-30 - Call ‘06 Geringhoff 8-30 - $45,000 JD 893, 8-30 - $17,500

Midwest Ag Equip Farm Equipment For Sale ‘13 Challenger MT755D, loaded ................................$229,500 ‘08 Cat 965B, 1300 hrs. ....$190,000 ‘08 Cat 755B, 1000 hrs. ....$179,000 ‘04 Cat 855, 3000 hrs. ......$185,000 ‘07 JD 9860STS, 800 hrs., loaded w/all options ..........$160,000 ‘07 JD 8230, 2000 hrs. ......$155,000 ‘03 JD 8520, 4000 hrs. ......$147,500 ‘08 Lexion 595R, 650 hrs. $225,000 ‘12 Krause Dominator, 18’, Demo ....................................$58,500 ‘10 JD 8345RT, 1600 hrs. ..$232,500

Financing Available

Emerson Kalis Easton, MN 56025 • 507-381-9675

USED DRYERS

USED AUGERS

MC 690, 1 Ph., LP 12”x71’ MAYRATH BEHLEN 380, SWINGAWAY 1 Ph. 10”x61’ MAYRATH BEHLEN 700 SWINGAWAY 10”x71’ MAYRATH HOPPER SWINGAWAY TANKS BEHLEN, 1600 bu. 8”X57’ KEWANEE PTO We carry a full line of Behlen & Delux dryer parts; Mayrath and Hutch augers parts. Large inventory of Welda sprockets, hubs, bearings, chain & pulleys.

RABE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

1205 Bixby Road (across from fairgrounds), Fairmont, MN 507-235-3358 or 800-813-8300 • Get the Rabe Advantage

Case IH and CNH Capital are registered trademarks of CNH America LLC

Visit our Web Site at http://www.caseih.com

1409 Silver Street E. Mapleton, MN 56065 507-524-3726 massopelectric.com

036 Planting Equip

038

FOR SALE: '05 JD 7420 Great Plains #1525P MFWD, 1800 hrs., 18.4x42 6-30 TWIN Row (07) No-Til tires, axle duals, very Planter(FINGER Pick up) sharp! 651-338-6861 (Have Complete Units For Both Corn & Beans) FOR SALE: '05 JD 8320 tracPLANT in Standing Stalks tor, FWA; Hardi 1000 Navi3 Pt or Pull Type gator sprayer w/ 60' boom, Loaded Almost New. foam markers. 651-345-4362 New #1525P List $52,400 FOR SALE: '81 525/550 Big Same Equip Only 850 Acres Bud 7500 hrs, very nice Sale $23,900 Plus Delivery. KT 1150 motor, twin disk 319-347-6138 Can Deliver Power Shift, one owner, $125,000 Cell: (320) 282-5313 JD 7100, 12R30” planter, hyd fold, precision corn units, FOR SALE: 856 Int'l dsl, 3pt, JD radial bean units; Intl 18.4x38 tires; also set of 153, 12R30” cult., hyd. flat 18.4x38 tires. 320-594-2763 fold, rotary shields. 507-3808597 FOR SALE: 930 Case dsl w/ cab, 3pt; also, 5-16s auto re- No till planter, 6100 White set plow, pull type; also, 6R30”, stainless cross set of duals, 18.4x34s. 320auger, trash whippers, flut594-2763 ed coulters, HD down pressure springs, exceptionally FOR SALE: Case IH 8910, clean, low acres, 2WD, 3 remotes, dual PTO, $18,500/OBO. (608)387-2679 radar, 18.4x42 duals 70%, 7500 hrs, serviced and field ready, good shape, $47,500. Tillage Equip 039 507-327-0858 FOR SALE: IH 5088 tractor FOR SALE: '02 JD 980 24' cult, 3 bar harrow, new 4349 hrs.,18.4x38 tires and style shanks, very nice, duals, in very good condi$16,900; JD 630 22' disk, tion,transmission update, $10,750. 507-380-7863 air adjustable seat, 3 hyd valves, dual PTO, newer FOR SALE: '92 DMI 730 AC compresser $27,500 20', 7 large shanks & 7 OBO (or best offer) (320) smaller ones w/ follow up 583-9896 disc. Cell: (320) 282-5313 FOR SALE: IH Super WD-6, FOR SALE: Case IH 4800, channel frame, strong en32½' field cultivator, good gine, $4,500. 712-288-6442 cond, $8,000 OBO. 507-3802956 FOR SALE: JD 8630, rubber 80%, 3pt, 7800 hours, 50 Se- FOR SALE: CIH 1830 12R30” ries engine, good condition, vibra shank row crop cultirock box, $18,000/firm. 507vator, rolling shields, rear 430-0591 speed shields, like new, always shedded. 507-238-4564 Ford 9700, cab, air, heat, 6000 hrs, front weights, 135 FOR SALE: JD 3710 8 btm hp, $12,500. 6600 Ford tracvari width plow, like new, tor w/ Westendorf quick atalways shedded. tached loader, 3600 hrs, $20,500/OBO. 507-227-0972 $10,500. (715)340-5655 IHC 183, 8R36” flat fold cult., NEW AND USED TRACTOR always shedded, like new. PARTS JD 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 507-764-3609 55, 50 Series & newer tractors, AC-all models, Large Miller 6RN high clearance cultivator, always been Inventory, We ship! Mark shedded, 3 sweeps/row. Heitman Tractor Salvage Priced to sell. (715)495-1984 715-673-4829 We have parts for MM tractors & others. River Dale Farms. (920)295-3278 Harvesting Equip

037

Several Used Mandako Rollers

4 RENTAL UNITS CAN DELIVER Dealer 319-347-6282

'00 JD 9650STS, CM, duals, 2300 sep hrs, $84,400; '07 JD Sunflower 5034 field cult, 34', 635 hydro flex, sgl pt new tires, knock on sweeps, hookup, $18,400. 507-461-1364 $16,000/OBO. 515-291-5530 FOR SALE: Case IH 1680 040 combine, long sieves, Cum- Machinery Wanted mins, cross flow fan, chopper, good rubber, 3000 hrs, All kinds of New & Used farm equipment – disc chis$16,500/OBO. 507-327-0858 els, field cults, planters, FOR SALE: Case IH 1688 soil finishers, cornheads, combine, well equipped, feed mills, discs, balers, completely reconditioned, haybines, etc. 507-438-9782 field ready, very nice Disc chisels: JD 714 & 712, shape, $36,500. 507-327-0858 Glencoe 7400; Field Cults under 30': JD 980, small Planting Equip 038 grain carts & gravity boxes 300-400 bu. Finishers under 1996 Great Plains CPH-20, 20', clean 4 & 6R stalk chopno-till grain drill, markers, pers; Nice JD 215 & 216 nice, $15,000. 319-404-3415 flex heads; JD 643 cornheads Must be clean; JD CIH 800 planter, w/ DJ Feedcorn planters, 4-6-8 row. master 12R30", vertical 715-299-4338 fold, $4,800/OBO. 515-3878707 or 515-864-8098 WANTED: Buying Tractors, FOR SALE: Hyd flat fold markers, to fit planter/ tool bar, or custom fit, $3,000. 712-297-7951

Skid Loaders, Equipment one piece or entire line or Estate. Send list to: PO Box 211, Oronoco, MN 55991


Machinery Wanted

10% - 25% Fuel Savings

040

Spraying Equip

Dynamic Tractor Management Massey Ferguson Exclusive

041

'01 Rogator 1254, 2500 hrs, 90' boom, air ride, tires are 80%, $72,400. 507-461-1364 Fast 1600 gal., 65' boom, 18.4x42 tires, Raven mon., priced to go, $7,500. 507-9208433 FOR SALE: 60' Blumhardt mounted sprayer, 300 gal, 1000 PTO, foam marker, in cab electric control, $1,000. 612-741-7949 FOR SALE: Fast 60' 3 pt wheel boom sprayer w/ 1000 gal pull behind spray caddy. 507-259-2677

DAMAGED GRAIN WANTED ANYWHERE We buy damaged corn and grain any condition - wet or dry TOP DOLLAR We have vacs and trucks

FOR SALE: Red Ball 670 pull type sprayer, 80' boom, foamer, rinse tank, Raven 450 monitor, 320x46 tires, sharp, $19,750 offers. 641561-2739 Feed Seed Hay

050

FOR SALE: All types of hay & straw in round bales & lg squares, tested separately, net & twine wrapped, delivered in semi loads. Tim 320-221-2085

CALL HEIDI OR LARRY

NORTHERN AG SERVICE INC 800-205-5751

Livestock

Woodford Ag

Woodford Ag

507-430-5144

507-430-5144

Woodford Ag

Woodford Ag

507-430-5144

MF 1705, compact tractor MF 8690, 350 hp., CVT MF 8660, 225 PTO hp. MF 1652, compact, 52 hp., loader MF 1529, compact, 59 hp., loader MF 451, 45 PTO hp., 400 hrs. MF 1220 Compact, MFD, loader, hydro. IH 656 hydro w/loader & cab, dsl.

507-430-5144

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Geringhoff 1822RD, ‘09 Geringhoff 822RD, ‘08 (3) Geringhoff 1622RD, ‘08, ‘07, ‘04 (2) Geringhoff 1230RD, ‘09, ‘08 (5) Geringhoff 1222RD, ‘12, ‘08, 07, ‘03 (5) Geringhoff 1220RD, ‘12, ‘11, ‘05, ‘04, ‘02 (11) Geringhoff 830RD, ‘12, ‘10, ‘08, ‘05, ‘04, ‘01 (3) Geringhoff 630RD, ‘05, ‘00, ‘97 Geringhoff 630RD, ‘97 NH 996, 12R20", '99 JD 893, KR, HDP, ‘04 JD 643, GVL poly JD 843, LT, ‘80 JD 622, GVL, poly ‘98 CIH 1083 ‘95 CIH 1063 w/crop sweeper MF 883, 8R30”, ‘97

Dairy

JD 9420T, new 30” tracks........................................... 129,900 2010 New Holland S G110 50’ Coil Packer, like new. .$26,500 470 Unverferth, grain cart.............................................$6,500 510 E-Z Trail, grain cart, like new..................................$9,250 2013 Seed Shuttle 400, self loader, seed tender, like new, green.........................................................$25,500 10-41 Westfield, auger...................................................$2,100

Woodford Ag

507-430-5144

USED EQUIPMENT $

507-430-5144

NEW SEED TENDERS

290 Seed Shuttle,.................$15,000 BT200 Strobel,......................$18,500 4 Box HitchDoc,....................$14,500 2 Box Strobel,.........................$8,900 2 Box Azland,.......................$10,550 500 gal. Azland Fuel Tender,. $7,800

Woodford Ag

37666 300th St - Redwood Falls, MN • 507-430-5144 WWW.WOODFORDAG.COM • WWW.SEEDCADDIES.COM

• • • • • • • • •

‘07 MF 9690, duals, LTM, 1300/970 hrs. MF 8570, RWA ‘86 MF 8560 '98 Gleaner 800, 25' flexhead ‘97 Gleaner R62, duals, 2052 sep. hrs. ‘92 Gleaner R62, 2063 hrs. MF 9750 PU table MF 9118 bean table MF 8000 30' bean table

• • • • • • • • •

Brandt 7500HP, grain vac. Brandt 5200EX, grain vac ‘09 Brandt 8x47 auger ‘00 Brandt 4500 EX, grain vac. ‘05 Brandt 1070, auger, PTO Drive, w/swing hopper Brandt GBL-10, bagger Brandt 1515, 1575, 1585 belt conveyors Brandt 8x45 auger, 18 hp., Briggs Brandt 8x35, 8x37, 8x40, 8x47, 8x52, 8x57, 8x62, 8x67, 10x35, straight augers

GRAIN HANDLING

GRAIN HANDLING (CONT.)

• Brandt 1060XL, 1070XL, 1080XL, 1380XL, 1390XL, swing hopper augers • Brandt 20 Series Drive Over Deck • Parker 1039, grain cart, w/tarp • Parker 839, grain cart, tarp, 850 bu. • Parker 605 gravity box, 625 bu. • Parker 165-B gravity box • Unverferth 5000, grain cart • Hutchinson, 10x61 auger • A&L 850S grain cart, 850 bu. tarp • ‘10 Westfield WC 1515, grain belt, electric motor

HAY & LIVESTOCK • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

JD 275, disc mower, 9’ JD 38, sickle mower, 7’ CIH 8480, round baler IH 14, 5 bar rake Woods 8400, finish mower MF 2856, round baler, net, twine MF 1745, round baler Gehl 1000 forage harvester, 2R30” Badger 980 forabte box (2) MF 1329 & 1330, 3 pt. disc mower MF 200, SP windrower, cab, auger, header ‘11 NH H6750, 3 pt., disk mower, 110” NI 528, 3 pt., disc mower, 94” Sitrex, 9 wheel inline rake Sitrex DM 5 disc mower Sitrex MK16, 14 wheel rake Sitrex RP2, RP5 wheel rakes Sitrex 10 & 12 wheel rakes on cart Westendorf 3 pt. bale spear H&S 16’ bale wagon Chandler 22’ & 26’, litter spreader

MISCELLANEOUS • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

DMI Coulter Champ II, 13 shank Wil-Rich 36’, field cult. Nyemeyer, soil conditioner '08 JD 520 stalk chopper Loftness 30' stalk chopper, SM Loftness 20’ stalk chopper Melroe 912, 4 bottom plow Loftness 8’ snowblower Mauer 28'-42' header trailers Degelman 6000HD, rock picker 2011 SB Select Snowblower, 97” & 108”, 3 pt. 2013 Sunflower 1444-36 Disk 2013 Sunflower 4412-07 Disk Ripper 2013 Sunflower 4530-19 Disk Chisel

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Woodford Ag

Parlor cows for sale. 350 very good Holsteins, 80# tank average, homebred, 200SCC. Will divide. Owner retiring. (715)273-4638

‘13 ‘13 ‘12 ‘12 ‘12 ‘05 ‘93 ‘72

COMBINES

FOR SALE: Purebred Black Angus bulls, calf ease & good disposition; also Hamp & Hamp-Duroc boars & gilts. 320-598-3790

OPEN HEIFERS - 10 Jersey, 5 Shorthorn & 12 crossbreeds. Will trade for beef cattle or Holstein steers. 608-788-6258 or 608-792-4223

- Lease for $1,610 per month -

CORN HEADS

054

055

MF 8660, MFD, duals, Auto Steer Ready, 265 hp.

• • • • • • • •

or call 320-237-7667. “It's the place to be!”

WANTED AND FOR SALE ALL TYPES of hay & straw. Also buying corn, wheat & oats. Western Hay available Fox Valley Alfalfa Mill. 920-853-3554

Tractors On Hand Now At Very Reasonable Prices

TRACTORS

WWW.KLEENACRES.COM

WANTED & FOR SALE: ALL TYPES of hay & straw. Also buying corn, wheat & oats. Western Hay available. Fox Valley Alfalfa Mill. 920-853-3554

1) MF Exclusive: CVT Transmission with no clutch packs. 2) Option of both suspended cab & front axle for a smoother ride. 3) Headland Management: Can operate up to 35 different tractor & implement functions with the touch of one button. 4) Dual Speed PTO: Allows full 1000 PTO rpm at either 1970 or 1605 engine rpm

NEW EQUIPMENT

HAY or STRAW For Sale: Round or large square bales alfalfa or grass hay. Delivery available by semi. Ose Hay Farm, Thief River Falls, MN. Call or text LeRoy at 218-689-6675 SEED CORN ONLY $89! Top quality, new production. Order early, last season we sold out! Catalog at

Allows operator to preset ground speed. Tractor will automatically control engine rpm & transmission ratio for maximum fuel efficiency.

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Dairy Quality Alfalfa Tested big squares & round bales, delivered from South Dakota John Haensel (605) 351-5760 Dairy quality western alfalfa, big squares or small squares, delivered in semi loads. Clint Haensel (605) 310-6653

33 THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

WANTED TO BUY: 16' rotary hoe, any make or model. 507-450-0745


YOUR SPRAYER HEADQUARTERS (B) Belle Plaine, MN • 1051 Old Hwy. 169 Blvd.

34 THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

(952) 873-2224

(H) Hollandale, MN • W. Hwy. 251

(507) 889-4221

‘07 JD 5325, MFWD, 320 hrs., loader ............................$36,900

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

4WD TRACTORS

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

(507) 451-4054

‘06 JD 735, 11’6” rotary mower ‘10 JD 4830, 934 hrs., Willmar Eagle 8650, 3326 hrs., ........................................$19,900 90’ SS boom ................$203,500 90’ boom ........................$61,500

(O)’12 JD 9560R, 400 hrs., IF tires ............................$319,900 (O)’12 JD 9560R, 400 hrs., Extended Warranty ........$312,500 (B)’12 JD 9650R, 400 hrs., Lease Return ................$312,500 (O)’12 JD 9650R, 400 hrs., Lease Return ................$312,500 (O)’12 JD 9510R, 400 hrs., Lease Return ................$289,900 (B)’08 JD 9630, 572 hrs. ............................................$259,900 (O)’06 JD 9320, 2002 hrs., PS ..................................$169,500 (H)’97 JD 9400, 5712 hrs., 650/42’s ............................$99,900 (B)’04 NH 9682, 4039 hrs. ..........................................$84,900 (H)’90 JD 8760, 4330 hrs. ............................................$67,500 (H)’81 JD 8640, 8572 hrs., 3 pt., PTO ........................$24,500

TRACK TRACTORS

(B)’10 JD 9770, 328 sep. hrs., PRWD ......................$275,000 (B)’09 JD 9870, 814 sep. hrs., PRWD ......................$249,900 (B)’09 JD 9770, 945 sep. hrs., PRWD ......................$239,900 (B)’08 JD 9870, 1068 sep. hrs., PRWD ....................$210,900 (B)’10 Gleaner A76, 382 sep. hrs...............................$199,900 (O)’07 JD 9560, 553 sep. hrs., duals ........................$180,000 (O)’06 JD 9760, 1918 sep. hrs., duals ......................$179,900 (H)’06 JD 9760, 1500 sep. hrs., 20.8x42’s ................$167,500 (O)’06 JD 9760, 1363 sep. hrs., duals ......................$162,900 (O)’04 JD 9760, 1192 hrs. PRWD ..............................$159,900 (H)’03 JD 9660, 1547 sep. hrs., duals ......................$133,500 (O)’03 JD 9650, 1740 sep. hrs., duals ......................$114,900 (O)’00 JD 9650STS, 1567 sep. hrs., 30.5x32’s ..........$99,900 (B)’02 JD 9750STS, 2270 sep. hrs., PRWD ................$95,900 (B)’98 CIH 2388, 2750 sep., hrs., duals ......................$75,900 (H)’98 JD 9510, 1930 sep. hrs., duals ........................$75,000 (H)’99 JD 9510, 2751 hrs., duals ................................$69,500 (H)JD 9500, 2812 hrs...................................................$49,900 (B)’82 JD 6620SH, side hill, 3231 hrs. ........................$20,900 (B)’82 JD 8820, 5571 hrs., duals ................................$13,900 (B)’80 JD 7720, 5000 hrs. ............................................$12,900 (H)’79 JD 7720 ............................................................$11,900

(O)’11 JD 9630T, 1200 hrs., Extended Warranty ......$314,900 (O)’10 JD 9630T, 1650 hrs. ........................................$287,500 (O)’09 JD 9630T, 1720 hrs. ........................................$283,000 (H)’09 JD 9630T, 1110 hrs. ........................................$279,900 (H)’11 JD 8335RT, 880 hrs., IVT ..............................$258,900 (O)’06 JD 9520T, 3504 hrs., Auto Trac ready ............$159,900 (O)’03 JD 9320T, 4545 hrs., 36” tracks ....................$139,900 (O)’01 JD 9400T, 3100 hrs., 3 pt. ..............................$129,900 (O)’06 JD 8230T, 3596 hrs., 16” tracks ......................$127,900 PLANTERS/SEEDERS (H)’00 JD 9400T, 5160 hrs., PTO ..............................$105,000 (H)’02 JD 8120T, 5152 hrs., 16” tracks ........................$88,900 (B)’07 JD 1770NT, 24R30”, CCS ..............................$144,900 (O)’98 JD 8300T, 5500 hrs., 16” tracks ........................$67,900 (O)’08 Case IH 1250, 24R30”, CCS ..........................$126,900 (B)’10 JD 1770, CCS, 16R30”......................................$99,500 ROW CROP TRACTORS (H)’02 Kinze 3600, 16R30”, liq. fert. ............................$58,500 (O)’10 JD 8345R, 1732 hrs., IVT, triples ....................$239,900 (O)’97 JD 1770, 16R30”, liq. fert. ................................$49,500 (O)’09 MF 7495, 1500 hrs., MFWD, loader................$114,900 (O)’00 Kinze 3140, 16R30”, stack fold ........................$39,900 (B)’12 JD 7330, 594 hrs., auto quad ..........................$110,900 (H)’98 JD 1850 air drill, 30” @ 10” spacing ................$36,500 (O)’91 JD 4955, 7188 hrs., MFWD, PS........................$58,000 (O)’92 JD 7200, 16R30” ..............................................$32,000 (B)’94 JD 7700, 5295 hrs., PS ....................................$56,000 (B)’97 JD 1770, 12R30”, liq. fert...................................$29,900 (B)’96 CIH 5240, 2044 hrs., MFWD ............................$42,900 SPRING TILLAGE (B)’84 JD 4450, 10,000 hrs., MFWD ............................$34,900 (H)’78 JD 4440, 7094 hrs., Quad ................................$26,900 (B)’12 JD 2210, 58.5’....................................................$69,900 (O)’73 JD 4630, 7948 hrs., PS ....................................$19,900 (O)’08 JD 2210, 55.5’ ..................................................$57,500 (B)’76 JD 4630, 8105 hrs., Quad ................................$16,900 (H)’09 JD 2210, 45.5’ ..................................................$55,900 (H)’97 JD 985, 48.5’ ....................................................$24,000 UTILITY TRACTORS (O)’96 JD 980, 44.5’ ....................................................$21,900 (B)’11 JD 5085M, 271 hrs., reverser ............................$48,900 (O)’98 JD 980, 36’ ........................................................$21,000 (O)’07 JD 5325, 320 hrs., loader, OS ..........................$36,900 (O)’97 JD 980, 43.5’ ....................................................$20,900 (H)’07 JD 5325, 362 hrs., loader, MFWD ....................$35,900 (H)’98 JD 980, 36.5’ ....................................................$17,900 (H)’81 JD 2940, loader ................................................$16,900 (O)’95 JD 980, 32’ ........................................................$15,900 (B)’77 JD 2440, 5800 hrs., loader ..................................$9,500 (B)’97 JD 980, 38.5’ ....................................................$14,900 (B)’58 JD 620, NF, PS ....................................................$4,500 (B)CIH 4900, 44.5’..........................................................$9,900 (B)’57 JD 520, NF, PS ....................................................$4,500 (O)JD 960, 30.5’ ............................................................$7,500 (B)Ford 8N......................................................................$1,500 (O)JD 1050, 50’ ..............................................................$3,995

COMBINES

(O) Owatonna, MN • 3555 SW 18th St.

(O)’12 JD S680, 511 hrs., Extended Warranty ..........$345,000 (H)’12 JD S680, 232 sep. hrs.....................................$339,900 (H)’12 JD S680, 246 sep hrs. ....................................$329,900 (B)’11 JD 9870, 511 sep. hrs., PRWD, 800/70R38 ....$309,900 (O)’12 JD S560, 231 sep. hrs., 2630 display ............$305,900 (O)’10 JD 9870, 671 sep. hrs., PRWD ......................$299,000 (O)’11 JD 9870, 700 sep. hrs., PRWD ......................$294,900 (O)’12 JD S670, 336 sep. hrs., Extended Warranty ..$289,900 (O)’12 JD S670, 263 sep. hrs., duals ........................$289,900

SPRAYERS

(O)’12 JD 4940, 701 hrs., 120’ boom, inj. system......$297,750 (O)’12 JD 4940, 489 hrs., 120’ boom ........................$292,750 (O)’12 JD 4940, 467 hrs., dry box..............................$290,500 (O)’11 JD 4930, 1343 hrs., 120’ boom ......................$249,750 (O)’11 JD 4930, 1216 hrs., 120’ boom ......................$245,900 (O)’11 JD 4830, 610 hrs., 90’ boom ..........................$220,750 (O)’11 JD 4830, 1030 hrs., 100’ boom ......................$211,950 (O)’12 JD 4730, 800 gal., 90’ boom ..........................$210,250 (O)’12 JD 4730, 800 gal., 90’ boom ..........................$209,900

(O)’12 JD 4730, 520 hrs., 90’ boom ..........................$209,700 (O)’12 JD 4730, 490 hrs., 90’ boom ..........................$209,600 (O)’10 JD 4830, 934 hrs., 90’ boom ..........................$203,500 (O)’10 JD 4830, 1104 hrs., 90’ boom ........................$201,900 (O)’07 JD 4930, 3093 hrs., dry box............................$200,000 (O)’09 JD 4830, 1818 hrs., 100’ boom ......................$189,500 (O)’09 JD 4830, 2400 hrs, 100’ boom ........................$185,000 (O)’10 JD 4730, 1255 hrs., 100’ boom ......................$178,900 (O)’10 Ag Chem 1184, 1350 hrs., 90’ boom ..............$174,900 (O)’08 Miller Nitro 4240, 1810 hrs., 90’ boom ..........$162,500 (O)’05 JD 4720, 3720 hrs., 80’ boom ........................$129,500 (O)’07 Ag Chem SS1074, 2400 hrs., 90’ boom..........$123,900 (O)’03 JD 4710, 2000 hrs., 90’ boom ........................$115,000 (O)’05 Ag Chem 1064, 1835 hrs., 80’ boom ..............$114,500 (O)’01 JD 4710, 2400 hrs., 90’ boom ........................$109,900 (O)’97 Willmar 8400, 3221 hrs., 120’ boom ................$71,900 (O)’03 Willmar 8650 Eagle, 3326 hrs., 90’ boom ........$61,500 (O) Ag Chem 854, 2795 hrs. ........................................$56,500 (O)’96 Ford F350, 60’ boom ........................................$38,750 (H)Tyler Patriot XL, 3500 hrs., 80’ boom......................$29,500 (O)Patriot XL, 800 gal., 75’ boom ................................$28,900 (O)’06 Top Air TA1200, 1200 gal., 90’ boom ................$25,500 (O)’07 Redball 570, 1200 gal., 90’ boom ....................$19,900 (O)’05 Hardi Navigator 1100, 80’ boom........................$19,900

FALL TILLAGE

(B)’12 JD 3710, 10-bottom ..........................................$57,900 (O)’11 JD 3710, 10-bottom ..........................................$52,500 (H)’10 JD 3710, 10-bottom ..........................................$44,900 (H)’12 JD 2700, 7-shank ..............................................$39,900 (O)’11 JD 2700, 7-shank, 30” ......................................$37,900 (B)’10 JD 2700, 9-shank, 24” ......................................$33,900 (H)’10 JD 512, 5-shank ................................................$27,500 (H)’02 JD 2400, 24’ chisel plow....................................$26,900 (B)’04 JD 512, 5-shank ................................................$20,900 (O)’03 JD 2700, 9-shank ..............................................$20,900 (B)’05 Wilrich 957, 7-shank ..........................................$19,900 (H)DMI 530, 5-shank ....................................................$19,500 (O)’98 JD 510 ripper, 7-shank ......................................$13,900 (H)IH 800, 10-bottom......................................................$7,995 (H)M&W 1465, 7-shank, 24” spacing ............................$7,950

HAY EQUIPMENT

(H)’10 JD 568, surface wrap ........................................$33,900 (O)’10 JD 568, surface wrap ........................................$33,500 (O)’06 JD 567, surface wrap ........................................$21,900 (B)’06 JD 735, MoCo....................................................$19,900 (O)’94 JD 535, net wrap ..............................................$14,900 (B)’03 NH BR740 round baler ......................................$13,500 (B)’84 JD 337 square baler, ejector................................$7,500 (B)’85 JD 430 round baler ..............................................$6,500 (B)NH 315 sqaure baler, ejector ....................................$5,900 (O)Hesston 514 round baler ..........................................$5,400 (B)Gehl 1090, moco ......................................................$1,950 (B)Meyer throw wagon ..........................................2 @ $1,750 (B)JD 510 round baler....................................................$1,595 (B)NH 469, moco............................................................$1,600

Your Southern Minnesota & Western Wisconsin John Deere Commercial Sprayer Center

Dairy

055

WANTED TO BUY: Dairy heifers and cows. 320-2352664 Cattle

056

(7) F1 Black Baldy replacement heifers, exc. quality, ready to breed. Jones Farms 507-317-5996 Black Angus bulls For Sale. Built-in genetics to sire calving ease & growth. Good dispositions. Complete performance data. Historic Angus Herd. Good bulls at a price you can afford. www.josephsonangus.com Josephson Angus (Kirby) 507-430-2853 Rost Farms (507)530-5576 Black polled Simmentals, 10 breeding bulls, some AI sired by NLC Upgrade, good disposition, exc. quality, calving vigor, birth wgts. as low as 59 lbs., vacc.; also, open heifers, 40 years of Simmental breeding,. Riverside Simmentals, Gerald Polzin, Cokato, MN, 320-286-5805 Dexter cows, small, beefy black, red. (920)684-1776 FOR SALE OR LEASE REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS Bulls, 2 year old & yearlings; bred heifers, calving ease, club calves & balance performance. Al sired. In herd improvement program. J.W. Riverview Angus Farm Glencoe, MN 55336 Conklin Dealer 320864-4625 FOR SALE OR LEASE: Purebred Registered Charolais bulls, heifers, & cows. Great bloodlines, excellent performance, balanced EPD's, low birth weights. Delivery available. Laumann Charolais Mayer, MN 612-490-2254 FOR SALE: 25 Limousin bulls, 2 yrs old & yearlings, low birth wgts, super growth, 35 yrs of Limousin breeding. John Goelz Franklin MN. 507-557-8394 FOR SALE: One Pinzgauer bull coming to, could be registered, $1200/OBO. (715)837-1469 FOR SALE: Pure bred Black Angus bulls, Long Yearlings & 2 yr olds, great EPD's. John 507-327-0932 or Brian 507-340-9255. JRC Angus Le Center, MN FOR SALE: Reg. Polled Hereford bulls. 320-796-0000 Spicer, MN FOR SALE: Registered Red Angus bulls, 14 months old. 507-931-9428 Gelbvieh & Balancer bulls. Sired by Dash, Thunderbird, Iron Mountain, Predominant, 004, Sons of EXT, Black Impact & Border Patrol. Exc phenotype & growth, good disposition. Will deliver & guaranteed. Since 1975. 320-573-4119 or 320-630-4146 Thick forage based Angus bulls. Yearling & 2 year olds, breeding soundness exam. Tschanz Farms Hwy 53 Blair, WI. (608)989-2223


Cattle

056 Goats

062

ROW CROP TRACTORS

HANCOCK, MN

HOPPERS

SEMI TRUCKS

‘94 Kalyn, 48/102 all steel, 70% T&B ......................................$17,500 ‘74 Trailcraft, 42’, Good T&B, Lights & Floor..................................$10,750

MISC. TRUCKS

‘89 Ford F-700, 6.6L Turbo Diesel, AT, 24’ AL Van Body, Roll-Up Door, 205” WB ................................$4,900

VAN/WATER TRAILERS

‘02 Great Dane Reefer, 36’, Curbside & Roadside doors, Sliding Tandem ..............................................$6,750 ‘00 Great Dane Reefer, 53’, SS Front, White Lined, SS Swing Doors, AR ..............................................$7,750 ‘97 Wabash AL, 42x96, 22.5 LP Tires, Disc Wheels............................$5,550 ‘89 Dorsey Furniture Van Trailer, 48/102, 22.5 LP Tires, AR, 4 side Doors ......................................$7,000 Van Trailers, 48/102-53/102; Great for water storage or over the road hauling ........$4,500-$7,500 48’ & 53’ Van Trailers to rent. ............$145.00 per month plus tax. ......$2.00/mile for pickup & delivery

‘02 Freightliner, CL12064ST, 410 hp. Cummins, 10-spd., 800K, 3.90 Ratio, 230” WB, New Rods, Main & Injectors, New Recaps, 48” Flattop ............................................$16,750 ‘99 International 9400 Conv. Day Cab, 370 hp. Cummins, 10-spd., 3.91 Ratio, 161” WB, AR $12,500 sgl. axle ..........................$16,500 twin screw USED EQUIPMENT ‘97 Mack CH613 Daycab, 9-spd., AR, ‘89 Case 688 Excavator on tracks, 160” WB, 350 hp. eng., New Paint 36” bucket, 6400 hrs., 1 owner ............................................$13,000 ............................................$16,500 ‘81 Intl 9670 cabover, 300 Cummins Hyster forklift, 6000 lb., side shift, 9 spd., good runner ................$2,500 131⁄2’ lift, 15” pneumatic tires $7,250

FLATBEDS

MISCELLANEOUS

flatbed trailers to be used as a bridge. See our website. • All Trailers DOTable •

DROPDECKS

‘04 Transcraft 53/102, SPX/AR AL crossmemebers, AL floor ....$25,900

Will Consider Trades!

Call 320-212-5220 or 320-392-5361

CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE!!! www.DuncanTrailersInc.com Delivery Available!

JD Soundguard Cabs, Call for info

KIESTER IMPLEMENT, INC. 110 S. Main, P.O. Box 249 • Kiester, MN

507-294-3387

www.midwestfarmsales.com

LARSON IMPLEMENTS 5 miles east of Cambridge, MN on Hwy. 95

763-689-1179 Look at our Web site for pictures & more listings Free delivery on combines in MN, Eastern ND & SD

www.larsonimplements.com

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

‘95 Transcraft, 45’, AL floors & Axles, Suspensions & AL or Steel crossmembers, rebuit frame, 50% tires, 70% brakes, SPX/AR ....$8,000 For Trailers ..............$1,000 AR/Axle (2) ‘94 Fontaine, 48/96, SPX/AR $7,900 ....................................$500 SR/Axle Rims - 22.5 & 24.5 steel ............$60 ‘93 Featherlite AL Combo, 48/96, SPX/AR ..................................$8,250 aluminum ................................$175 ‘74 Fontaine, 40’ ......................$4,750 Tires: (4) 385 Super Singles w/polished AL rims; 2 new, GRAVEL TRAILER 1 @ 50%, 1@ 40%....$2,000/set of 4 ‘68 Road King Belly Dump working Pre-Hung Slab Interior Doors: gravel trailer, 40’, 4 new tires, Oak, Cherry, Maple, Pine. 4 tires @50% tread, good paint All Sizes. Over 200 doors to ..............................................$8,500 choose from ..................$10-$80 ea. CATTLE/HOG TRAILER 10,000’ of Oak & Maple trim ....$.50/ft. Barrett 46’, 3 floors-1 removeable We can also convert 50% T 70% B, 24.5 tires ......$11,500

JD 8630, 4x4, 50 Series Eng. ............$19,900 JD 7800, MFD, 740 loader..................$59,000 CIH 8950, MFD....................................$59,900 (3) JD 4440, pwr. shift ..............From $21,900 CIH DX25 w/mower ..................Coming Soon CIH MX270, MFD ................................$69,900 (2) IH 1026 hydro ......................From $12,900 IH 756, gas ............................................$7,900 ‘77 JD 4630, PS ..................................$16,900 IH 460, 560, 560D ..................................CALL JD Loaders, many to choose from ..........................................Starting at $2,495 New Koyker loaders ..............................CALL Gehl 4635 skid loader ........................$12,900 IH 986, w/New TA ..............................$14,900 IH 826, German diesel ..........................$8,900 CIH 5120, MFD w/loader ....................$31,900 JD 4430 Quad ....................................$17,900 JD 4030, open station ........................$14,900 JD 3020 D, pwr. shift ..........................$11,900 JD 720, diesel ......................................$6,900 LOADERS JD 48, 58, 146, 148, 158; Koyker 510, K5 ..............................................................CALL

35

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

‘12 Peerless Grain Hopper, New, 43x96x72, AR, Steel Wheels, Roll Tarp ..............................$32,500 ‘01 Wilson, 41’ AL Hopper, 72” sides, AR, Vibrators, Roll Tarp, AL Disc Wheels..................................$23,500 ‘95 Merritt 42’ AL Hopper, 68” sides, 2-Spd. Doors, Roll Tarp, Disc Wheels ............................................$12,500 ‘96 Wilson 41’ AL Hopper, 66” sides, AR, AL Disc Wheels, Roll Tarp, Clean ....................................$21,750 ‘94 Wilson Convert-a-Hopper, 45x102, 78” sides, 80% Virgin Rubber, AL Wheels, Electric Door Openers ............................................$16,000

‘11 JD 9430, 1100 hrs., 3 pt., ‘12 CIH Magnum 290, MFWD, 1000 PTO, 620x42 tires & 590 hrs., , 3 pt., hyd. valves, duals ......................$229,000 540/1000 PTO, luxury cab, ‘94 JD 8760, 24-spd., 6440 19 hyd. pump, 380x50 tires hrs., 3 pt. hitch, 20.8x38 duals, 4 hyds. ..........$45,000 & duals, front duals, complete Auto Guide system COMBINES ..............................$175,000 ‘09 Case 7088, 1300 eng./ ‘12 CIH Farmall 105U, 2WD, 984 sep. hrs., 4x4, rock trap, 152 hrs., open station, 12x12 chopper, tracker, 18.4x42 trans. w/reverser, 2 hyd., duals, power bin ext. 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, ..............................$155,000 Warranty ..................$28,500 ‘08 JD 9770, 1380 eng./938 ‘04 Buhler Versatile 2210, sep. hrs., 4x4, HID lights, MFWD, 4081 hrs., 18-spd. Contour Master w/hi-torque PS, Super Steer, 4 hyd., variable spd., chopper, 1000 PTO, 20.8x42 tires 1250/45/32 tires ....$162,500 & duals, also front duals ‘98 JD 9610, 3578 eng./2379 & wgts. ....................$75,000 sep. hrs., chopper, 20.8x42 ‘94 NH 8770, MFWD, 5242 duals, bin ext. ..........$55,000 hrs., 3 pt., 1000 PTO, ‘09 CIH 7120, 1065 eng./816 14.9x46 tires & duals, 4 hyd. sep. hrs., Leather seat, ................................$55,000 tracker, chopper, rock trap, ‘94 JD 7800, 2WD, 8500 hrs., Pro 600 w/yield, moisture PS, 540/1000 PTO, & mapping, 20.8x42 tires 3 hyd., 18.4x42 tires & duals & duals ..................$170,000 ................................$41,000 ‘09 CIH 7088, 748 eng./1007 ‘83 JD 2550, 2WD, 4510 hrs., sep. hrs., 4x4, tracker, Year Around cab, 3 pt., 540 chopper, rock trap, power bin PTO w/JD 245 loader ext., 18.4x42 duals $165,000 ................................$15,500 ‘94 CIH 1688, 3734 eng. hrs., ‘12 CIH Magnum 260, MFWD, rock trap, chopper, bin ext., 525 hrs., Deluxe cab, 4 hyd., 30.5x32 tires ............$30,000 540/1000 PTO, 3 pt., 420x46 ‘87 CIH 1640, 3468 hrs., rock tires & duals, complete Auto trap, auto header, 24.5x32 Guide system..........$155,000 tires ..........................$23,000 ‘07 CIH Magnum 245, 3050 BULLDOZERS hrs., 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, ‘07 JD 850J WLT, 6633 hrs., 4 hyd., 420x46 tires & duals ..............................$105,000 cab, air, 13’ 6-way blade, 5-shank ripper ........$120,000 4WD & TRACK TRACTORS ‘07 JD 750 JLT, 6498 hrs., ‘12 JD 9560R, 680 hrs., PS, cab, air, 6-way blade $89,000 4 hyd., 800x32 Michelin ‘08 Cat D5 KXL, 2619 hrs., radials, duals ..........$275,000 cab, air, 6-way blade $85,000 ‘10 JD 9630T, 1055 hrs., ‘06 Cat D6N LGP, 6200 hrs., PS, 30” tracks, front wgts., cab, air, 6-way blade 5 hyds.....................$235,000 ..............................$105,000 Check Out Our ‘12 JD 9510R, 1288 hrs., Large On-line Inventory 710x42 tires & duals, power of Trucks, Semis & shift, 5 hyds., rear wgts. Industrial Equipment ..............................$225,000 @ www.larsonimplements.com

THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

Registered Texas Longhorn Herd reduction. 88 milk breeding stock, cows, goats for sale. All pureheifers or roping stock, top bred. Most in 1st lactation. blood lines. 507-235-3467 Also, 2 purebred bucks. $300 each-will consider disWANT TO BUY: Butcher count for complete group. cows, bulls, fats & walkable (715) 669-3656 cripples; also horses, sheep & goats. 320-235-2664 Swine 065 Horse 057 Compart's total program features superior boars & Reg Percheron Mares open gilts documented by matched team, 7 & 9 years BLUP technology. Duroc, old, have been shown but York, Landrace & F1 lines. not for a while, $5,000. Eau Terminal boars offer leanClaire, 715-874-5262 or 715ness, muscle, growth. Ma577-9155 ternal gilts & boars are Sheep 060 productive, lean, durable. All are stress free & PRRS Complete dispersal of Regisfree. Semen also available tered Southdowns. 6 ewes, through Elite Genes A.I. 6 ram lambs, 4 ewe lambs. Make 'em Grow! Comparts Will separate. (608)857-3315 Boar Store, INC. Toll Free: or (608) 790-7508 877-441-2627


Swine

THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

36

WANTED

PRUESS ELEV., INC. << www.TheLandOnline.com >>

1-800-828-6642

USED TRACTORS

NEW NH T9.560, 4WD..............................CALL NEW NHT9.450 ........................................CALL NEW NH Boomer 50 w/loader ................CALL NEW Versatile 250, FWA ..........................CALL NEW Versatile 305, FWA ..........................CALL NEW Massey 5450, FWA, cab, loader ....CALL ‘08 NH 6070 w/cab, 2WD ....................$69,000 NH 8870, SS........................................COMING Ford 5000, diesel, w/cab....................COMING ‘60 IH 560, WF ........................................$5,200 White 2-105 ........................................COMING

TILLAGE

JD 980, 44.5’ w/3 bar ..............................CALL M&W 9-shank, 24” w/leveler ..............$12,500 DMI Tigermate II, 32.5’ ............................CALL DMI Econo Champ II, HD, 11-shank ....$7,500 ‘05 JD 2700, 9-24 shank ......................$25,000 ‘12 JD 3710, 10 bottom ..........................CALL ‘10 JD 3710, 10 bottom............................CALL JD 3600, 8 bottom, on land ..................$8,000 CIH 4900, 46.5’ ....................................$12,500

SKIDSTEERS

NEW NH skidsteers on hand ..................CALL NH LS170..................................................CALL ‘06 NH L170 ..........................................$17,500

PLANTERS

NEW White planters ................................CALL White 6900, 11-row, splitter ..............COMING White 6700, 12-30, w/res ......................$6,500 White 6222, 12-30 front fold ....................CALL

075

New oak flatbeds, bunks, feeder boxes and fence line bunks. 715-269-5258

STATE-WIDE

CALL FOR A QUOTE TODAY

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Livestock Equip

DAMAGED GRAIN We pay top dollar for your damaged grain. We are experienced handlers of your wet, dry, burnt and mixed grains. Trucks and Vacs available. Immediate response anywhere.

065

FOR SALE: York cross boars, exc. quality, delivery available. Keith Thurston, Madelia, MN, 507-642-8547

Cars & Pickups

080

'91 Ford 350 dually, 4x4, diesel, AT, w/9' contractor dump box, parting out, has bad cab. 320-583-0881 1988 Lincoln Town Car, 60,000 miles, rust free, running condition, $2,250. (608)857-3315 or 608-790-7508

$)ROLDU1XWULHQW%RRVW

FOR SALE: Ford 7.3 used dsl engines, transmissions parts & service, all years. Greg's Diesel 320-583-0881

ZKHQ\RXUFURSQHHGVLWPRVW

Low Salt, Foliar-Safe Fertilizers

Trucks & Trailers

Mixes with Most Crop Protection Chemicals

‡ 6XSHU6ORZ5HOHDVH1LWURJHQ ‡0LFURQXWULHQW%OHQGV Phone 1-800-831-4815 for more information www.PureGrade.com

Recreational Vehicles

Miscellaneous

HAY TOOLS

MISCELLANEOUS

NEW Salford RTS units ............................CALL NEW Salford Plows ........................AVAILABLE NEW Unverferth seed tenders ........ON HAND NEW Westfield augers ..................AVAILABLE NEW Rem 2700 vac ................................CALL NEW Century HD1000, 60’ sprayers ......CALL NEW Hardi sprayers ................................CALL NEW Riteway rollers ................................CALL NEW Lorenz snowblowers ......................CALL NEW Batco conveyors ............................CALL NEW Brent wagons & grain carts............CALL NEW E-Z Trail seed wagons ....................CALL NEW rock buckets & pallet forks .......... CALL REM 2700, Rental ....................................CALL Unverferth 8000 grain cart ..................$19,000 Kinze 1050 w/duals ..............................$43,000 Pre-owned Sprayers ................................CALL

(DMI Parts Available)

SMITHS MILL IMPLEMENT Hwy. 14, 3 miles West of Janesville, MN

Phone (507) 234-5191 or (507) 625-8649 Mon. - Fri. 7:30-5:00, Sat. 7:30-Noon www.smithsmillimp.com

090

FOR SALE: (2) 20.8x42 tires (2) 18.4x38 tires (2) 14.9x28 tires. 507-430-1089

COMBINES

New Hesston & NH Hay Tools On Hand

085

FOR SALE: Airplane, 1966; Alon 82 air coupe, fully equipped, $22,000. 507-8221223

White 6122, 12-30 ..............................COMING JD 7000, 12-30 Econo fold ....................$6,500 ‘08 Gleaner R75, loaded, 880 sep. hrs. ..CALL ‘01 Gleaner R72, just thru shop ........COMING ‘03 Gleaner R65, CDF, lat ........................CALL ‘90 Gleaner R60 w/duals....................COMING ‘08 Fantini 12-30 chopping cornhead $62,000 NEW Fantini chopping cornhead ............CALL Gleaner N6 ..............................................$6,750

084

FOR SALE: '00 Chevrolet C8500, cab & chassis, Kodiak, Cat dsl, twin screw, Allison automatic, 28,700 mi, perfect for a grain box. 320304-2311

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

‘12 NH T8.360, MFWD, suspended front axle, 480/80R50 rear duals, 380/80R38 front duals, 540/1000 PTO, weights, complete guidance, 340 hours ................................$173,500 ‘11 CIH Magnum 290, MFWD, 380/90R54 duals, 380/80R38 front duals, high capacity hyd. pump, 5 remotes, weights, 1425 hours................................................................$148,500 ‘11 CIH Magnum 290, MFWD, 480/80R50 duals, 480/70R34 single front tires, high capacity hyd. pump, 5 remotes, 2130 hours................................................................$141,500 ‘10 JD 8245R, MFWD, IVT transmission, 1500 front axle, 380/90R54 duals, 380/80R38 single front tires, HID lights, active seat, 540/1000 PTO, weights, 60 GPM hyd. pump, 5 remotes, 2100 hours ............................................$148,500 ‘10 JD 8270R, MFWD, PS, 1300 front axle, 380/90R50 duals, 60 GPM hyd. pump, 4 remotes, wgts., 3480 hrs. ....$138,000 ‘10 JD 8270R, MFWD, PS, 1300 front axle, 380/90R50 duals,60 GPM hyd. pump, 4 remotes, wgts., 4410 hrs. ..................................................................$128,000 ‘09 JD 8430, MFWD, PS, 380/90R50 duals, 60 GPM hyd. pump, 4 remotes, wgts., 5210 hrs., nice tractor, just through service program ..................................$126,000 ‘06 JD 7720, MFWD, 20 speed power quad transmission w/left hand reverser, 420/80R46 single tires, 380/85R30 front tires, 3 remotes, 110.5” rear axle, 540/1000 PTO, 5460 hours, just through service program ................$73,500 ‘08 NH T7040, MFWD, 18.4R42 singles, New Holland loader, 2500 hours..................................................................$69,500 ‘08 JD 9670 combine, 20.8R38 duals, Contour Master, 1137 sep. hrs. ..........................................................$149,500 ‘11 JD 635F flexible platform, unused, shedded ........$36,500 ‘08 JD 512, 9-shank, 22’6” folding disk ripper ..........$26,000

Keith Bode Fairfax, MN 55332 507-381-1291

FOR SALE: 2000 gal fuel tank, complete w/ high volume pump, hose & nozzle. 507-326-5861 FOR SALE: Goodyear racing tires, $20/ea. 712-2977951 One call does it all! With one phone call, you can place your classified ad in The Land, Farm News, AND The Country Today. Call The Land for more info @ 507-345-4523 • 800-6574665. PARMA DRAINAGE PUMPS New pumps & parts on hand. Call Minnesota's largest distributor HJ Olson & Company 320974-8990 Cell – 320-212-5336 RANGER PUMP CO. Custom Manufacturer of Water Lift Pumps for field drainage Sales & Service 507-984-2025 or 406-314-0334 www.rangerpumpco.com WANT MORE READERS TO SEE YOUR AD?? Expand your coverage area! The Land has teamed up with Farm News, and The Country Today so you can do just that! Place a classified ad in The Land and have the option of placing it in these papers as well. More readers = better results! Call The Land for more information. 507-3454523 • 800-657-4665 Winpower Sales & Service Reliable Power Solutions Since 1925 PTO & automatic Emergency Electric Generators. New & Used Rich Opsata-Distributor 800-343-9376


37

‘05 CIH STX500Q, 1905 hrs. ..$185,000

‘04 JD 9520T, 36” tracks, 4838 hrs. ................................................$149,900

‘90 CIH 9170, 5641 hrs.............$59,000

‘12 CIH Steiger 450, 522 hrs., PTO, full steering pkg.......................$262,500

‘01 CIH Steiger 375, 6433 hrs. ..................................................$99,800

‘12 CIH Magnum 340, 1633 hrs. ................................................$199,500

‘04 CIH Magnum 210, 2900 hrs. ..................................................$97,800

‘89 Ford 846, 5145 hrs., 3 pt., PTO ..................................................$39,000

‘12 CIH Puma 160, CVT, 300 hrs. ................................................$135,800

CIH 8600, 30’ air drill ........$8,900

Salford 9813, 13-shank ripper ..........................................$64,900

‘99 Bobcat 751, 2675 hrs. ............................................$9,950

USED 4WD TRACTORS

Up To 1 Year Interest Free ••• Call For Details ••• ‘11 ‘12 ‘04 ‘11 ‘12

CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH

Puma 155, 817 hrs., PS, w/L760 loader ........................................$119,800 Puma 160, 300 hrs., CVT trans., L765 loader, susp. axle ............$135,800 MX210, 2900 hrs.................................................................................$97,800 Magnum 290, Loaded....................................................................Coming In Magnum 340, front & rear duals, 1635 hrs., Loaded ....................$199,900

USED COMBINES

Interest Waiver Thru Case Credit* ••• Call For Details ‘12 ‘06 ‘12 ‘12 ‘06 ‘91

CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH

9230, 315 eng. hrs., track drive, RWA, folding covers ..............$359,900 2388, 1986 eng. hrs., 1563 sep. hrs, duals ................................$135,900 2608, 8R30” chopping cornhead..........................................................Call 3020, 35’ platform ......................................................................Coming In 1020, 30’, full finger auger, 3” knife, rock guard ......................Coming In 1020, 20’ platform, 11⁄2” knife ..........................................................$5,500

LOW RATE FINANCING AVAILABLE thru Call For Details

Herb

Paul

CNH Capital’s Commercial Revolving Account provides financial assistance for parts and service when you need it, keeping your equipment running as its best with the quality parts and service you’ve come to expect from Case IH. Contact your local dealer or visit www.cnhcapital.com today for details.

www.matejcek.com

Blake

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

I-35 & Highway 60 West • Faribault, MN • 507-334-2233 ©2012 CNH Capital America LLC. All rights reserved. CNH Capital and Case IH are registered trademarks of CNH America LLC. Printed in the USA.

‘09 Bobcat S130, 1800 hrs., cab, heat ..................................$15,900

USED 2WD TRACTORS

One Year Interest Free ••• Call For Details ••• ‘12 CIH Steiger 600Q, 475 hrs., Lux. cab, susp. cab, HID lites, Pro 700 steering, 36” tracks ....................................................................$369,500 ‘11 CIH Steiger 600Q, 924 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, full Pro 700 auto guide ................................................................................................$344,900 ‘12 CIH Steiger 600Q, 513 hrs., Lux. cab, susp. cab, HID lites, PTO, Pro 700 steering, 36” tracks ....................................................................$369,500 ‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 445 hrs., Lux. cab, susp. cab, HID lites, auto guide ready ......................................................................................$335,000 ‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 1140 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, PTO, big hyd. pump..........................................................................................................$317,500 ‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 1254 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, big hyd. pump ..$295,500 ‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 1241 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, big hyd. pump ..$295,500 ‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 1037 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, big hyd. pump ..$308,500 ‘12 CIH Steiger 500Q, 516 hrs., susp. Lux. leather cab, HID lites, HD hyd., full Pro 700 steering ..................................................................$319,000 ‘12 CIH Steiger 450, 522 hrs., susp. Lux. leather cab, HID lites, HD hyd., full Pro 700 steering, PTO, 710/70R42 tires ............................$249,900 ‘05 CIH STX500, Quad Track, 1902 hrs. ..................................................$185,000 ‘04 JD 9520T, 450 hp., 36” tracks, 4840 hrs. ..........................................$149,900 ‘01 CIH STX375, 6433 hrs., 710/70R38 tires ............................................$99,800 ‘90 CIH 9170, 5641 hrs., 20.8x42 tires, powershift ..................................$59,000 ‘89 Ford 846, 5145 hrs., 3 pt. hitch, PTO ..................................................$39,000 STX and STEIGER PTO, TOW CABLE & 3 PT. KITS ON HAND!!!

‘05 Bobcat S250, joystick control, cab, heat, 2-spd., 1975 hrs. $25,900

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

‘12 CIH 9230, Track, AWD, 260 sep. hrs. ..................$359,000

THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

‘12 CIH Steiger 500Q, 519 hrs. ................................................$319,000


THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

38

(1) = GLENCOE 320-864-5571 800-558-3759

4561 HWY 212, GLENCOE, MN 55336

(2) = HOWARD LAKE 320-543-2170 866-875-5093

5845 KEATS AVE. SW, HOWARD LAKE, MN 55349

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

(3) = STEWART 320-562-2630 800-827-7933

78412 CO RD 20, STEWART, MN 55385

(4) = ST. CLOUD 320-252-2010 800-645-5531

1035 35TH AVE. NE, SAUK RAPIDS, MN 56379

(5) = GLENWOOD 320-634-5151 888-799-1495

1710 N FRANKLIN, GLENWOOD, MN 56334

(6) = SAUK CENTRE 320-352-6511 888-320-2936

1140 CENTRE ST, SAUK CENTRE, MN 56378

(7) = ALEXANDRIA 320-763-4220 888-799-1490

5005 STATE HWY 27 E, ALEXANDRIA, MN 56308

(8) = PAYNESVILLE 320-243-7474 866-784-5535

725 LAKE AVE. S, PAYNESVILLE, MN 56362

(9) = PRINCETON 763-389-3453 800-570-3453

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

3708 BAPTIST CHURCH RD, PRINCETON, MN 55371


39 THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

THE LAND CAN SELL IT!

USED PARTS LARSON SALVAGE

1-800-657-4665

Land classifieds with extended coverage. We offer you the reach and the prospects to get your phone ringing.

To submit your classified ad use one of the following options: Phone: 1-800-657-4665 or 507-345-4523 Mail to: The Land Classifieds, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002 Fax to: 507-345-1027 • Email: theland@TheLandOnline.com Online at: www.thelandonline.com

Reach Over 259,000 Readers!

Start your ad, in THE LAND, then add more insertions DEADLINE: Monday at Noon for the following Friday edition and more coverage. The choice is yours. You can count Plus - look for your classified ad in the e-edition on THE LAND, a Minnesota tradition where farm and family meet!

6 miles East of

CAMBRIDGE, MN 763-689-1179 We Ship Daily

Visa and MasterCard Accepted

~ NEW EQUIPMENT/BIG INVENTORY ~

Notch Equipment: • Rock Buckets • Grapple Forks • Manure Forks • Bale Spears • Hi-Volume Buckets & Pallet Forks • Bale Transports & Feeder Wagons, 16’-34’ • Adult & Young Stock Feeders & Bale Feeders • Land Levelers Smidley Equipment: • Steer Stuffers • Hog Feeders • Hog Huts • Calf Creep Feeders • Lamb & Sheep Feeders • Cattle & Hog Waterers • Mini Scale Sioux Equipment: • Gates • Calving Pens • Haymax Bale Feeders • Cattle Panels • Feeders Panels • Head Gates • Hog Feeders • Squeeze Chutes & Tubs • Port-A-Hut Shelters (Many Sizes) • Bergman Cattle Feeders – Special Prices • Lorenz Snowblowers – Special Prices • GT (Tox-O-Wic) Grain Dryers, 350-800 bu. • Sheep & Calf Feeders • Livestock Equipment by Vern’s Mfg. • Powder River Crowding Tub & Alley • Mister Squeeze Cattle Chutes & Hd. Gates • Peck Grain Augers – Big Discounts • MDS Buckets for Loaders & Skidloaders • Powder River Livestock & Horse Equipment • Tire Scrapers for Skidsteers, 6’-9’ • Hay feeders for horned animals • Jari Sickle Mowers

• Grasshopper Lawn Mowers – Special Price Now! • “Tire” feeders & waterers • MDS Roto King Round Bale Processor for skidsteers, tractors, loaders or telehandlers • Good Stock of parts for GT Tox-O-Wic Grain Dryers, Also, Some Used Parts • Sitrex Wheel Rakes • Walco 3 pt. Mowers • Bale Baskets • SI Feeders & Bunks • (Hayhopper) Bale Feeders (Prices Lowered) • Mandako Land Rollers • E-Z Trail Wagons, Boxes & Grain Carts • Calftel Hutches & Animal Barns • R&C Poly Bale Feeders • JBM hay & grain feeders & bunks • Corral Panels & Horse Stalls • EZ-Trail Head Movers & Bale Racks • Roda Mini-Spreaders • Amish Built Oak Bunk Feeders & Bale Racks • Walco Bale Trailers • Goat & Sheep Feeders

DR® POWER EQUIPMENT • Field & Brush Mowers • Roto-Hog Power Tillers • Stump Grinders • Log Splitters • Chippers • Power Graders • Power Wagons • Leaf & Lawn Vacuums • Versa-trailers

• Hyd. Dump Trailer • Vermeer #206 16 hp. Stump Chipper • Gehl 312 Scavenger II Spdr., 260 bu., very good • Melroe 60’ Harrow • Kewanee #700, 141⁄2’ Rock Disk • ‘05 Toro Z-master Zero Turn, 72” deck, 590 hrs. • Grasshopper Zero Turn, 48” deck • Bush Hog PT 48” cutter w/13 hp. eng.

• Bush Hog 3 pt. 72” Roto-tiller - RTR • Squeeze Chute w/wheels • Reconditioned Smidley 7’ & 10’ Steer Stuffers & Used Smidley Hog Feeders

Wanted to Buy: Reel-type rock picker; Rock windrower; Calf huts & Hog Feeders; GT grain dryers

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Announcements Employment Real Estate Real Estate Wanted Housing Rentals Farm Rentals Merchandise Antiques & Collectibles Auctions Hay & Forage Equipment Material Handling Bins & Buildings Grain Handling Equipment Farm Implements Tractors

             

Harvesting Equipment Planting Equipment Tillage Equipment Machinery Wanted Spraying Equipment Wanted Farm Services Fencing Material Feed, Seed, Hay Fertilizer & Chemicals Poultry Livestock Dairy Cattle Horses Exotic Animals

         

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FARM, HOME & CONSTRUCTION

Office Location - 305 Bluff Street Hutchinson, MN 55350

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Good selection of tractor parts - New & Used All kinds of hay equipment, haybines, balers, choppers parted out. New combine belts for all makes. Swather canvases, round baler belting, used & new tires.

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Catch your limit

This week’s Back Roads is the work of The Land Correspondents Tim King (story) and Jan King (photo)

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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THE LAND, MAY 31, 2013

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Detroit Lakes, Minn.

T

here are an alleged 50 colorful and whimsical sunfish sculptures in Detroit Lakes. Finding them is a challenge and an adventure. The Detroit Lakes Chamber has a list with the names and locations of all 50. On the list you’ll read that Solar Sunfish resides at West River Dental and Sailor Fish can be found at Bremer Bank. Although these fiberglass creations aren’t real fish they do move around a bit. Last fall we went looking for Shoeshe at Ginny’s Boutique. Shoeshe spends her summers in a display window at the attractive little store. “She is purple with lots of red lipstick and jewelry,” a boutique employee told us. “She also has high heels. But she spends the winter in the basement.” The employee seemed relieved to have this glamorous fish tucked away for a few months. Apparently sunfish hunts by tourists fray the nerves of some Detroit Lakes residents during the summer. However, at the Travel Travel agency in Washington Square Mall the office workers gladly abandoned their desks

so we could photograph TT Cruiser sunfish planning its next ocean voyage. Across the hall a trophy-sized Mally sunfish was hanging from a fishing pole. If you want your photo with a really big sunny, Mally — who is a very natural bluegill — is glad to cooperate. We went looking for Groovy and Sunny Disco at Lakeshirts Beach Store. They were in the basement with Shoeshe, apparently. But next door, at Zorbas, a very dapper Fiesta Fish hovered above the restaurant. Sparta is a mysterious and moody sunny. He has an inexplicable tear streaming down his cheek. Perhaps it’s all just a show, though. Not surprisingly, he resides at the Historic Holmes Theater. We found a pretty sparkly blue and green sunny in the lawn over by the Central Market. We’re not sure if she is the fish known as “Catch the Action” or “Bejeweled to Cover a Checkered Past.” informed. There were lots more sunWe went looking for a fish alleged to nies we could have looked for: Leinie at be at Wells Fargo bank. She, however, Lakes Liquor, Vincent at Holiday Inn, was at the Fargo branch, we were Neptuna’s Wild Ride at the Historical

Society, Miss Blossom at Lake Homes, and on and on. But we’d had a pretty good catch. Besides, it’s always best to leave few for another day. ❖

Do you have a Back Roads story suggestion? E-mail editor@TheLandOnline.com or write to Editor, The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002.


THE LAND ~ May 31, 2013 ~ Northern Edition