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November 9, 2012

SOUTHERN EDITION

(800) 657-4665 www.TheLandOnline.com theland@TheLandOnline.com P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002


What is your response?

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

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P.O. Box 3169 418 South Second St. Mankato, MN 56002 (800) 657-4665 Vol. XXXVI ❖ No. XXIII 80 pages, 2 sections, plus supplement

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Cover illustration by Tom Royer

COLUMNS Opinion Farm and Food File Calendar The Outdoors Cookbook Corner Pet Talk The Back Porch Back Roads Milker’s Message Mielke Market Weekly Marketing Farm Programs Auctions/Classifieds Advertiser Listing

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STAFF

Publisher: Jim Santori: jsantori@cnhi.com General Manager: Kathleen Connelly: kconnelly@TheLandOnline.com Editor: Kevin Schulz: editor@TheLandOnline.com Assistant Editor: Tom Royer: troyer@TheLandOnline.com Staff Writer: Dick Hagen: dickhagen@mvtvwireless.com Advertising Representatives: Kim Henrickson: khenrickson@TheLandOnline.com Mike Schafer: mike.schafer2@gmail.com Danny Storlie: theland@TheLandOnline.com Office/Advertising Assistants: Vail Belgard: vbelgard@TheLandOnline.com Joan Compart: theland@TheLandOnline.com Ad Production: Brad Hardt: lndcomp@mankatofreepress.com For Customer Service Concerns: (507) 345-4523, (800) 657-4665, theland@TheLandOnline.com Fax: (507) 345-1027 For Editorial Concerns or Story Ideas: (507) 344-6342, (800) 657-4665, editor@TheLandOnline.com National Sales Representative: Bock & Associates Inc., 7650 Executive Drive, Minneapolis, MN 55344-3677. (952) 905-3251. Because of the nature of articles appearing in The Land, product or business names may be included to provide clarity. This does not constitute an endorsement of any product or business. Opinions and viewpoints expressed in editorials or by news sources are not necessarily those of the management. The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. The Publisher’s liability for other errors or omissions in connection with an advertisement is strictly limited to publication of the advertisement in any subsequent issue or the refund of any monies paid for the advertisement. Classified Advertising: $17 for seven (7) lines for a private classified, each additional line is $1.25; $22 for business classifieds, each additional line is $1.25. Classified ads accepted by mail or by phone with VISA, MasterCard, Discover or American Express. Classified ads can also be sent by e-mail to theland@TheLandOnline.com. Mail classified ads to The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002. Please include credit card number, expiration date and your postal address with ads sent on either mail version. Classified ads may also be called into (800) 657-4665. Deadline for classified ads is noon on the Monday prior to publication date, with holiday exceptions. Distributed to farmers in all Minnesota counties and northern Iowa, as well as on The Land’s website. Each classified ad is separately copyrighted by The Land. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. Subscription and Distribution: Free to farmers and agribusinesses in Minnesota and northern Iowa. $24 per year for non-farmers and people outside the service area. The Land (ISSN 0279-1633) is published Fridays and is a division of The Free Press Media (part of Community Newspaper Holdings Inc.), 418 S. Second St., Mankato MN 56001. Periodicals postage paid at Mankato, Minn. Postmaster and Change of Address: Address all letters and change of address notices to The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002; call (507) 345-4523 or e-mail to theland@TheLandOnline.com.

First of all, it shouldn’t need to be said, goals. Our representatives in Congress still but the words that follow are my opinion need to cross party lines to pass a farm — note the big “OPINION” button down bill. Same-sex marriage is still illegal in there below my mugshot — and not that Minnesota. Whether Obama was reelected, of anyone else who works for The Land. or Romney had made him a one-termer, the It most definitely is not the opinion of vast majority of our existence would have The Land itself, which cannot have an remained the same. opinion, seeing as how it’s a corporation. That said, our great nation is constantly Corporations are not people, my friends. changing, and that inexorable movement It would be practically impossible for toward ... whatever, can be frightening. LAND MINDS me to write about the 2012 election Whether it’s a growing Latino population, or results without being flagged for a younger generation denying the discrimiBy Tom Royer unsportsmanlike conduct. Somehow the nations of its elders, change is coming. stars aligned for me, electorally. From Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., may top of the ballot to the bottom, every have nailed it on the head when, back in oval I filled in turned out to be a winAugust, he said of his party, “The demoner. Yes, I am a happy camper. (Woo hoo!) graphics race, we’re losing badly. We’re not generatIt’s difficult, when you believe strongly in a cause, ing enough angry white guys to stay in business for to reign in your passions, but I’ve been on the other the long term.” side enough times to know how frustrating it can be. The first openly gay U.S. Senator, Tammy Baldwin, When our candidate/issue loses, whatever the other was elected in Wisconsin. An independent named side says is often seen as taunting, even when Angus King won his Senate race in Maine. These couched in the familiar “now is the time for the heal- results are not an aberration. Call it a progression, or ing process to begin” mumbo-jumbo. a regression, it is happening; what is your response? We woke up the morning of Wednesday, Nov. 7, to Tom Royer is the assistant editor of The Land. He the sun still rising in the east. The president still may be reached at troyer@TheLandOnline.com. ❖ must work with Congress to accomplish any of his

OPINION

Commentary: Be prepared for the consequences of 2012’s drought The deepening drought is not just a concern for farmers — it’s a concern for all Minnesotans and anyone who cares about our state’s economy. Minnesota’s agriculture and food sector generates nearly $75 billion in total economic activity for our state, and the sector has a total employment impact of more than 340,000 jobs. Anything that hurts our agricultural production puts those economic benefits at risk. The Minnesota Department of Agriculture is working with partner agencies to provide farmers with information about helpful programs, resources and information on our drought website at www.mda.state.mn.us/drought. The site has information about crop and weather conditions, as well as federal and state resources that can help farmers deal with the impacts of those conditions. We will continue to update our site to make sure it includes the best information to help Minnesota farmers dealing with this situation. We are also working with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources to make sure that farmers, lawn and garden centers, plant nursery managers and other land owners are aware of the growing concerns about water availability for 2013. We are encouraging our farmers to take into account the possibility of drought as they make business and cropping plans for 2013. Specific recommendations for lessening drought impacts will vary from one farm to the next, but here are four general tips Minnesota farmers can take to ensure they are as prepared as possible.

• Consider installing a drainage water management plan and structures this fall to capture rainfall and snowmelt. While drainage systems are designed to move excess water off cropland, a properly designed managed system also can help retain moisture. Farmers can start the planning process by talking with contractors, suppliers and their local Natural Resources Conservation Service office. • Consider additional conservation practices, such as leaving old fence rows and field wind breaks intact to reduce wind erosion that might be a bigger problem during dry conditions. Reduced tillage, no-till and other tillage options can be good strategies to conserve soil moisture and reduce wind erosion. • Carefully weigh the prospects of continued dry weather when planning what, where and how to plant in 2013. As always, crop advisers and seed dealers can help farmers weigh their options. • Farmers with irrigated acres may consider tools for managing water as efficiently as possible. This may include water distribution uniformity checks, irrigation scheduling tools and low pressure conversions. We have several months to go before anyone plants crops for 2013, and plenty of things can still happen. As we all know, weather patterns can shift dramatically in Minnesota. We will hope for generous rain and snow between now and springtime, but out of prudence, we must be prepared for the alternative. This commentary was submitted by Minnesota Department of Agriculture Commissioner Dave Frederickson. ❖


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OPINION

INSIDE THIS ISSUE OF 7A — Cover story: From parched to planting — experts give their take on preparing for the 2013 growing season 12A — Drought devastating to beef industry; herd numbers dropping 14A — Looking back at weather patterns, ahead to crop trends 18A — Mushrooms prove to be a growing business in Minnesota 13B — Christensen Farms founder dies 14B-17B — Get ready for the upcoming Minnesota Cattle Convention and Trade Show

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DFA members, however, weren’t in the milk-retailing business; they were in the milk-making business. Hanman’s job was to build member profit by selling DFA milk to processors; not secure processor equity, as the suits allege, by selling DFA milk cheap.

of the Southeast suit for $140 million. A year earlier it settled the Northeast lawsuit for $30 million. “In both cases,” Martin writes, “it admitted no wrongdoing.” The DFA, however, is hanging tough against its own members; the Southeast suit goes to trial in January. Its judge has ordered mediation talks but no one on either side predicts a pre-trial deal. If the DFA loses at trial, estimated penalties could top $1.2 billion under current antitrust laws. That tab, too, will fall on DFA’s members who will lose even if they win. And the milk-marketing minds behind it all? Hanman retired in 2006 and Engles, the Times reports, will relinquish Dean’s top spot by the end of 2012, one year after “Forbes ranked him among its Worst Bosses for the Buck” in 2011. Alan Guebert’s “Farm and Food File” is published weekly in more than 70 newspapers in North America. Contact him at agcomm@farmandfoodfile.com.❖

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Sometimes it takes a newspaper’s ink‘greater market security and an opportustained thumb to right the scale of jusnity to capture income from the retail tice, and no newspaper has a bigger, market.’” inkier thumb than the New York Times. DFA members, however, weren’t in the On Oct. 28, the Times published a milk-retailing business; they were in the 2,900-word tribute to the greedy goodmilk-making business. Hanman’s job was old-boyism that seems to have been the to build member profit by selling DFA only business plan of America’s biggest milk to processors; not secure processor dairy cooperative, Dairy Farmers of equity, as the suits allege, by selling DFA America, upon its creation in 1998. milk cheap. FARM & FOOD FILE According to Times business writer Court documents in the civil suits (one By Alan Guebert Andrew Martin, court documents in two is referred to as “Southeast,” the other antitrust suits by dairy farmers against “Northeast”) draw a deeply tangled web their own co-op, the DFA, and its of business biggest milk customer, Dean Foods, deals, buyallege a decade of cronyism and insider outs and dealing that left the bosses in buttermilk and the payouts by Dean, the dairymen-co-op owners in dust. DFA and numerous other dairy entities over most The DFA-Dean saga began when four regional of the eastern United milk marketing cooperatives merged to form the DFA in 1998. Gary Hanman, boss of one of the four, States. The resulting pictook command. The new co-op claimed to represent ture, allege the plaintifffarmers, is a Dean-DFA nearly 30 percent of all fluid milk in America. deal that milked cooperaThat big bucket caught the attention of Gregg tive members to enrich Engles who, as the 1990s were drawing to a close, dairy executives. was building Dean Foods into a dairy powerhouse. Neither suit has gone Engles had a thirst for milk and Hanman had the to trial so that key allemilk. Soon they were talking. gation remains unad“By normal rhythms of the industry,” writes Mar- dressed. What is more tin, the two milk titans “would be financial advercertain, according to the saries ... because bottlers try to buy raw milk as Times, is the amount cash whipped up and pocketed cheaply as possible (while) ... farmers joined cooper- by Dean and DFA allies and pals as the partnership atives (to) ... leverage their numbers for higher flourished. prices.” “One business partner of Mr. Hanman was paid But the deal Engles and Hanman cut “went $100 million by Deans’ predecessor and the DFA for against normal economics.” his stake in milk plants, the partner had paid $6.9 Engles promised Hanman that the DFA “would be million for it two years earlier. A business partner of Mr. Engles was paid more than $80 million for his the exclusive supplier to Deans’ milk plants” and investment in milk plants; that partner had paid litthe DFA, “in turn, promised a reliable supply of ... tle more than $5 million. raw milk, at the lowest prices, plus rebates and credit so Dean could acquire more milk plants, the “Mr. Hanman was paid $31.6 million during his suit says.” seven-year tenure as chief executive ... As for Mr. Engles, his compensation over the last decade comes Why would Hanman commit his farmers’ milk to to $156 million ...” Engles so cheaply? Dairy observers, though, reckon one-third of the According to the Times, a Hanman trademark was dairy operations in states covered in the two lawto go “against time-honored practices ... For instance, instead of squabbling with bottling compa- suits went out of business during the same period. nies over price, he sought joint ventures with them” Dean Foods remains. In July it bought its way out because, he once noted, the JVs “gave members

— Andrew Martin

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

Creaming the co-op

By normal rhythms of the industry, (Dairy Farmers of America and Dean Foods) would be financial adversaries ... because bottlers try to buy raw milk as cheaply as possible (while) ... farmers joined cooperatives (to) ... leverage their numbers for higher prices.


THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

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Commentary: Tropical rain belts still shifting global crops Michel Nasibu, of stealing the moisture business consultants from the coffee crops in KPMG/East Africa, Colombia and Indonesia. warns that global The Mexican desert can warming has begun to also come to the southdevastate his contiern tier of U.S. states. nent. He writes in Africa at the best of AfricaEagle that: “The times suffers a drought every 30 to 65 years, and mother of all troubles has already started rooting when the rain belts shift they can have awesome her tentacles all over the continent: Global Warm- impacts. For example, Ghana’s Lake Bosumtwi sufing. ... Africa is slowly becoming a desert.” fered a 350-year drought during the Little Ice Age. James Taylor of the Heartland Institute, writing Ethiopia’s Aksum Empire thrived during the at Forbes.com, says “Not so fast.” Taylor notes a heyday of the Roman Empire. In one of history’s 2009 Boston University study that most dramatic rainfall transitions, the found satellite data showing a longtropical rains had moved north about term shift in the Sahara Desert from 200 BC to water North Africa — and drier to wetter conditions. thus fed Rome on the other side of the BBC News, in fact, has reported that, “satellite Mediterranean for nearly 800 years. As the Roman images from the last 15 years do seem to show a Warming ended, however, and the Dark Ages recovery of vegetation in the southern Sahara.” began, the rain belts shifted back south to Kenya Taylor also notes correctly that as the Arctic ice and Ghana. Both Aksum and the Roman Empire has melted, global rainfall has gotten slightly collapsed. heavier due to more evaporation from the seas. Both men’s forecasts are wrong, however. What’s really happening is not that the tropical rain belts that govern Africa’s critical food production are starting or stopping. They’re moving. I have written often about the natural 1,500year Dansgaard-Oeschger climate cycle, which brings us a global Who will win and who will lose warming — and then a during the Modern Warming? global cooling — every What’s really happening is Primitive man could do nothing 15 centuries, give or but try to walk away from the not that the tropical rain take 500 years. Such a droughts. Modern man can probelts that govern Africa’s lengthy time scale duce extra food where the rains seems almost incomprecritical food production are have shifted, and transport the hensible. starting or stopping. food to people where the rains Luckily, we now have hisThey’re moving. have left. Only time will tell torical documents that whether that’s a better strategy record the Little Ice Age than moving the people. But we now have the (1300-1850 AD), the Medieval Warming (950-1300 transport capacity to do either or both. AD), and the Dark Ages (600-950 AD). PaleocliAll of this simply underlines the reality that the mate evidence from ice cores, fossil pollen and the Earth’s human societies are now vastly more sussediments at the bottoms of lakes and seas is now tainable than their primitive predecessors. extending our knowledge of such climate cycling back at least a million years. References Michel Nasibu, “Global Warming and Africa’s When the Arctic ice melts in a global warming period — as now — the tropical rain belts are Future, AfricfaEagle, www.africaeagle.com/2012/ drawn roughly 600 miles north. Julian Sachs of 10/opinion-global-warming-and-africas.html the University of Washington told us in “A Shift- James Taylor, “Contrary To What You Hear, Global Has Been Good To Africa,” ing Band of Rain,” (Scientific American, March Warming www.forbes.com/sites/jamestaylor/2012/10/25/ 2011), that the rain belts are currently about 330 miles north of their location during the depths of contrary-to-what-you-hear Tim Shanahan et al, the Little Ice Age in 1600. He’s been measuring “Atlantic Forcing of Persistent Drought in West the stable isotopes of algae (deuterium and hydro- Africa, Science 324 (2009): 377–380. gen) in the lake sediments of scattered Pacific This commentary was submitted by Dennis Avery, islands. Carbon dated, they clearly show the rain a senior fellow for the Hudson Institute in Washingbelts moving north over time. Sachs predicts they ton, D.C., and the director for the Center for Global will move even farther north as the planet contin- Food Issues. He was formerly a senior analyst for ues to warm. the Department of State. Readers may write him at That will obviously mean problems for the trop- P.O. Box 202, Churchville, VA 24421 or e-mail to ❖ ics, endangering banana crops in Guatemala and cgfi@mgwnet.com.

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OPINION

Commentary: Separating fact from fiction on biotechnology Much is said about biotechnology in our food supply, otherwise known as GMOs. It’s sometimes hard to tell fact from fiction. The United Soybean Board wants to set the record straight regarding this important technology, which enables us to grow more on less land, using fewer inputs and conserving the soil better than conventional crops. What is biotechnology? Simply put, biotechnology takes the DNA from one organism and transfers it into another. For as long as humans have been raising crops, we have cross-bred plants in order to improve them. We’ve done this by taking the pollen from one plant and physically transferring the genes in the pollen to another plant in order to make offspring that produce more seed or that can fight off diseases and pests, for example. However, pollen contains many genes, some good and some bad. So, late in the last century, we identified a way to accomplish gene transfer in the lab. This made it possible to add only the good genes, or fix bad ones already in the plant, in order to improve its usefulness to farmers and mankind. Is it safe? Yes. To ensure they are safe, the U.S. government has established a rigorous approval process for biotech products that includes the Food and Drug Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Moreover, ever since the first biotech crop hit the market in 1996, about 1 billion acres of U.S. farmland have been planted to biotech crops and trillions of pounds of U.S. soybeans and corn have been consumed worldwide, all with no credible reports of harm to human health. In addition, these organizations have come out in support of biotech foods: American Medical Association, U.S. National Academy of Science, UN Food and Agriculture Organization, World Health Organization, International Council for Science and British Medical Association. Why is it important to know about the safety of biotech crops? Some have questioned the safety of biotech crops. That is because there are people, some of whom are even from the academic world, who claim that research has been done that questions biotech’s safety. But it’s important to know that in order for any research to be credible, it needs to be reviewed by the authors’ peers and replicated in their labs. No such “peer-reviewed” research has proven GMOs to be unsafe. As a matter of fact, the opposite is true: Peerreviewed research shows that GMOs are safe. This commentary was submitted by Vanessa Kummer, United Soybean Board chair and a soybean farmer from Colfax, N.D. ❖


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$60.7 million in organic sales in Iowa USDA National Agriculture Statistics Service report shows Iowa fifth in number of organic farms in 2011 Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey recently highlighted a report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Agriculture Statistics Service that Iowa’s 467 organic farms had $60.7 million in sales in 2011, which represented 2 percent of the U.S. total. Iowa ranks fifth in the nation in the number of certified organic farms which cover 81,634 total acres. “This report is the first of its kind to focus solely on organic production and shows the significance of the organic industry in Iowa,” Northey said. “We have seen some increased interest in organic production here in Iowa and this report does a good job of helping us better understand the industry.” “Although NASS published the report, it would not have been possible without the voluntary cooperation of organic farmers across the state,” said Greg Thessen, director of the NASS Iowa field office. “The information not only showcases organic farmers’ contributions to Iowa agriculture, but the survey results will also help shape decisions regarding farm policy, crop insurance, funding allocations, availability of goods and services, as well as other key issues.” Sales of organic crops in Iowa accounted for $29.6 million, livestock and poultry sales accounted for $6.3 million, and livestock and poultry products accounted for $24.8 million. Sales of organic vegetables were $1.09 million, organic fruit sales were

$23,849, and sales of organic berries were $30,777. Iowa lead the nation in organic soybean production with 423,350 bushels and was second in production of organic corn for grain with 2.2 million bushels. Iowa was also first in organic oat production with 426,857 bushels produced. Iowa led the nation in organic hogs and pigs, with a peak inventory of 5,955 head and total sales of $2.68 million in 2011. Iowa also ranked first in organic goat inventory and organic milk from goats. The full results of the 2011 Certified Organic Production Survey can be found at http://bit.ly/2011OrganicSurvey. The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship is one of more than a dozen state departments of agriculture and 51 private organizations that are accredited as organic certifiers. The department is accredited by the USDA’s National Organic Program to certify all aspects of the organic food chain including: organic crops, organic food products, organic feed, organic livestock and handling/processing of organic products. The department currently certifies more than 250 producers and 60 handling/processing operations located in Iowa and neighboring states. This article was submitted by the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship. ❖


Cover story: How will drought impact 2013 plans? Pick hybrids that have a high-yield history (multiple year performance data). Also planting multiple hybrids and a range of relative maturities helps spread risk. — Bruce Potter, University of Minnesota Integrated Pest Management specialist

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including corn root- enhancement example. The traits for insect, disease worm insecticides or weed control only protect yield. That said, matchat planting and at ing the right trait to pest problems in a given field is the VT stages, are important management. Rotation of resistance great management genes is beneficial long-term. tools for high pressure “Bt-corn borer historically has provided a pretty areas. Additional tools consistent payback, however maybe less so now to consider for 2013 with current declining European corn borer populainclude seed and foliar tions. Bt-RW and Goss’ blight and wilt tolerance are fungicides to protect more field-specific. Note also that reduced tillage plant health and help increases the need for northern leaf blight and gray maximize yield potential. leaf spot resistance.” But as every producer Holmes: “The insect resistance traits are very knows, we need God-given important. What you do to protect the health of your moisture and sunshine to corn roots can be critical to yield. The gene providgrow a crop.” ing corn borer resistance is often overlooked yet Potter: “I am not aware of invariably low corn borer infestations equated to any serendipitous yield higher yields. The same can be said about the gene enhancements, however traits providing rootworm protection, especially in envi(genes) for improved water use efficiency could be a yield See 2013, pg. 8A

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By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer In view of the rather challenging crop year that was 2012 — despite some surprisingly good yields — how is 2013 crop planning shaping up, especially as it relates to genetic selections? Michael Marlow, Monsanto crop specialist at Mason City, Iowa, said: “As stewards of the land we must carefully choose the best mix of inputs including traits for weed control, insect management and crop health. Finding the best combination of genetics for your soils including the best trait options and refuge management will be critical for 2013.” John Holmes, Iowa State University Extension field agronomist, gets more specific. “Pick a hybrid that has strong rooting characteristic,” he said. “Hopefully better roots will be a hedge against dry weather. There has been significant promotion of new drought tolerant hybrids. Clearly these genetics perform better under severe moisture stress.” Bruce Potter, University of Minnesota Integrated Pest Management specialist at the Southwest Research and Outreach Center in Lamberton, said, “hybrid selection is always important, even more so today because of high input costs of putting a crop into the soil. Pick hybrids that have a high-yield history (multiple year performance data). Also planting multiple hybrids and a range of relative maturities helps spread risk.” Lisa Behnken, a U of M crop education specialist in southeast Minnesota, said “varietal selection is still No. 1. Look at multiple trials, over multiple environmental conditions. Choose from the top 25 percent of yield performers. Look at hybrids that have yielded well at several locations. Look at our Southeast Regional trials; look at University of Wisconsin, Iowa State, even local dealer and local co-op on-farm results.” Q: How important are certain trait factors? Did they preserve, perhaps even enhance, yields in 2012? Behnken: “Defensive traits are not equally important in all fields, and unnecessary use leads to more rapid development of resistant pests.” Marlow: (Said that in 2012 certain traits were critical to managing the ever-increasing pressure from corn rootworms.) “However proper refuge management and using additional modes of pest control,

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Remember to mix up hybrid selection 2013, from pg. 7A herbicide programs in corn and soybeans. It ronments of heavy rootworm provides a great deal of pressure.” flexibility, crop safety Behnken: “Look at all and still gives broad agronomic traits that are spectrum weed control. important for your farm or We just know it needs to specific fields. Don’t forget to be part of a more robust mix it up. Don’t plant the herbicide system and not Bruce Potter same hybrid with the same Michael Marlow Lisa Behnken relied on as the only hertrait package year after year bicide in the program. Also, SCN resistance is an — I know hybrids change quickly — but watch trait often overlooked trait. Growers could and should do packages on the same field. The corn rootworm trait more to ensure it continues to be effective.” is currently imploding because of poor stewardship Q: In view of back-to-back drought condiand mismanagement. It is difficult to assess the tions over much of Iowa and Minnesota landlong-term value of this trait because of resistance scapes the past two seasons, and so far little issues. recharge of soil moistures, what should pro“The European corn borer trait has been under- ducers consider for 2013? valued; we don’t talk about it much anymore. HowHolmes: “I doubt there will be (much) difference ever, it is truly a success story and has been for between fall and spring nitrogen applications for the many years. Damage from this pest has been pretty low to non-existent — no damage to corn stalks, ear 2013 growing season. It’s necessary to have nearly saturated soils for nitrogen to leach and we’re a long shanks and no yield loss. way from that in most areas. But farmers may want “Even though we have issues with glyphosateresistant weeds, this is still a very powerful tool for See 2013, pg. 10A

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Seed treatments debate Lisa Behnken, a University of Minnesota crop education specialist in southeast Minnesota; Bruce Potter, University of Minnesota Integrated Pest Management specialist at the Southwest Research and Outreach Center in Lamberton and Michael Marlow, Monsanto crop specialist at Mason City, Iowa, offer their insights on the seed treatment debate. Behnken: “We feel much of this is oversold insurance. We have a lot of research data in southern Minnesota that shows no yield advantage to many seed treatments. Choosing a good variety, choosing seed of high quality, planting in good soil conditions — these go a long way to giving you a good stand and top yields. That said, we recognize that there are many different seed treatments being sold, so it is a moving target and we have not tested everything on every environment. If available, check carefully on comparative field performance data in your area.” Potter: “Recognize that seed treatments are a profit center for seed companies. Real yield responses seem to be relatively rare. Yield data needs to be evaluated critically. For example, poorly timed post-emerge soybean aphid control can make insecticide and nematicide treatments ‘look’ like they yield better.” Marlow: “Yes, those who make, market and sell the treatments have a profit potential. But the farmer needs to see a benefit in profit per acre. Over the past four years I have seen a dramatic decrease in crop replants in the markets I serve. A good example is the soybean crop where growers used to plant 155,000 seeds per acre to produce a harvest stand of 135,000. Now growers tell me they are planting 142,000 to get that same final stand.” — Dick Hagen, The Land staff writer

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Moisture conservation impacting tillage plans a result of stalk residue catching snow, which replenishes the soil moisture profile in the spring as it melts. Basol suggested that fall fertilizer application of phosphorus and potash can still be done on level, or

nearly level, fields with little erosion potential. These two nutrients are immobile so there isn’t a concern for nutrient loss before they are needed from the crop next spring. A light incorporation can either be done this fall or next spring. ❖

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By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer Iowa State University Field Agronomist Terry Basol suggests that one of the biggest considerations for 2013 is likely to be moisture conservation and the effects of tillage. “Obviously it appears now that it Terry Basol will be important to conserve as much moisture as possible this fall, and perhaps even next spring. It is estimated that we lose onequarter-inch of plant available water with each tillage pass,” he said. “Why? Each tillage pass breaks up the large soil pores where water easily moves down through the soil profile. Because there is little or no residue on top, rain drops move the soil into the small pores, ‘clogging’ them. This can significantly reduce moisture infilIt is imperative tration into the soil resulting in more that we leave surface run-off. as much “Later rains can residue as we then further increase can on the surthis run-off because face. Crop the soil surface residue keeps becomes crusted. And the soil temperresearch shows that a decreased infiltraature cooler. It tion rate is directly also increases proportional to the the moisture degree of tillage that it can hold, intensity. and decreases Basol referred to the amount of research conducted evaporation by Mahdi Al-Kaisi, that can occur, an Iowa State University professor of especially in the soil management, top two inches which concluded that of the soil surdeep ripping and face. moldboard plowing generated the lowest — Terry Basol infiltration rates. “It is imperative that we leave as much residue as we can on the surface. Crop residue keeps the soil temperature cooler. It also increases the moisture that it can hold, and decreases the amount of evaporation that can occur, especially in the top two inches of the soil surface. Surface residue also helps decrease the impact of the wind simply because more residue decreases moisture evaporation as the wind blows across the soil surface.” Basol said that if tillage needs to be conducted, whether this fall or next spring, do it lightly so evaporation and loss of soil moisture is minimized. Leave at least 50 percent residue or more on high-sloped areas. He even suggested not shredding the corn residue to make it more effective in protecting the soil and conserving moisture. His data indicated that if corn stalks are left standing at eight- to 16-inches tall, as much as one to two inches of soil moisture could be gained. This is

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Plan as if the rains will come 2013, from pg. 8A to consider reducing nitrogen fertilizer rates to the lower end of the recommended range. This year we noted lots of nitrogen from breakdown of organic matter. “Also this year continuous corn showed stress sooner and to a greater level than corn following soybeans. So I think growers need to recognize that additional risk of continuous corn if this drought extends into the 2013 planting season.” Potter: “Planning for a disaster usually turns out poorly. Next spring I would fertilize and plant as if the rain will come. Minnesota soil conditions this fall were much better than 2011, so fall N applications were not a serious issue. I acknowledge fall nitrogen fertilization is more risky with very dry soils but we’ve had just enough October moisture in most parts of the state to provide good soil conditions for nitrogen applications. “Drying your soils with spring tillage can cause problems, but so does a poor seedbed. The point being that farmers will likely still be making decisions on planting rates, fertilization, even tillage until they

pull their planters out of the sheds next spring. We need to be ‘gifted’ by Mother Nature between now and then.” Marlow: “As I travel northern Iowa, I see many fields with minimal fall tillage. Farmers have had time to do fall tillage work but it’s apparent they have chosen to leave the residue to catch the winter snows. Many are leaving their lighter soils untouched until spring tillage. This made sense this fall especially with soil moistures so low. We all know that a few good rains in November and December before the ground freezes will correct just about everything.” Behnken: (Emphasized that early-season weed control is a must, especially if soil moisture is limited.) “Consider impregnating herbicides on your fertilizer on fields and crops where this system will work. It will save time and facilitate the early application of herbicide. Also consider modifying corn seeding rates based on soil productivity — no adjustment on high productivity soil, but perhaps reduce seeding rates on lower productivity soils.” ❖

MGEX announces info exchange website MGEX, a Designated Contract Market and Derivatives Clearing Organization, is pleased to announce the launch of the MGEX Information Xchange. The MIX is an accessible website forum offering registered users a public venue to anonymously discuss trading and market information within the MGEX marketplace. Hours of operation for the MIX will be 7 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. CT Monday through Friday. The MIX is strictly for communication; it is not a trading platform, nor is there any matching that is completed on

the MIX. To become a registered user, one must simply fill out a user agreement. Becoming a registered user allows users to anonymously post messages and reply to messages on the MIX. The general public has view-only access to messages posted on the MIX. The user agreement can be accessed at www.mgex.com. The MIX went live Oct. 26. Any questions can be addressed to mix@mgex.com or (612) 321-7135. On Aug. 13, the MGEX launched the AJC futures and options contract. Additional information about the AJC contract is available at www.mgex.com/ajc.❖

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Hurt: Drought devastating to beef industry; herd numbers dropping High feed prices and large financial losses brought on by a combination of multi-year drought in the Southern Plains and the 2012 Midwestern drought will continue their stranglehold on the nation’s beef industry in the coming months, a Purdue Extension agricultural economist says. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, September cattle placements onto feedlots dropped a sharp 19 percent compared with September 2011. July and August also were months of decline. “Drought has been particularly cruel to the beef cattle industry,” Chris Hurt said. “Brood cows remain the last major livestock industry that is land-extensive. So when dryness causes wide stretches of land to be unable to support cow grazing, producers have to buy feed or send cows to town.” The USDA currently lists 54 percent of the nation’s pastures in “poor” or “very poor” condition — the lowest two pasture condition ratings. That lack of quality grazing land means beef producers have to supplement animal diets with expensive feeds. High feed costs have caused feedlot managers to lose up to an estimated $200 per head, according to Kansas State University. “U.S. beef cow numbers are likely to be 2 to 3 percent lower in the upcoming January inventory report,” Hurt said. “The mid-year estimates were already reflecting a 4-percent decrease in the national beef-cow herd, and that was before the impacts of the 2012 drought began to be felt. The implications are for continued cow reductions until feed and forage supplies are restored.” While drought relief has come to the eastern Corn Belt and the Southeast, 62 percent of the lower continental United States is still covered by varying

degrees of drought — especially in the beef cow rich central Great Plains and western states. “As a result of the slowing placements in the past three months, the number of cattle on feed dropped to 3 percent below year-ago levels on Oct. 1,” Hurt said. “Cattle on feed will play a role in rationing the nation’s short corn supply.” One ray of hope is that those beef producers able to endure the hard times could see cattle prices rise for the remainder of this year and into 2013. A drop in per capita beef supplies combined with steady consumer demand will drive prices higher. Live steer prices for the just completed third quarter of 2012 averaged near $120 per hundredweight. Hurt said prices are expected to be near $125 for the final quarter and $130 in the first quarter of 2013. Spring prices are likely to peak in the high-$130s, and prices in the second quarter of 2013 are likely to average in the mid-$130s. Record-high cattle prices could be in store for 2013. Calf prices won’t recover quite so quickly because high feed prices will continue to discourage feedlot managers from bidding up. That trend is likely to continue until feed prices fall a bit. “That moderation in feed prices could begin in a small way with lower soybean meal prices in the spring of 2013, assuming reasonable South American soybean production,” he said. “Further declines in feed costs could occur with a better grazing season in the spring and summer of 2013 and a return to larger U.S. corn and soybean crops next year. “A more abundant feed supply in the second half of 2013 could result in a robust price recovery for calf and feeder cattle prices.” Hurt also said replenished feed supplies would begin U.S. beef herd expansion in late 2013. A podcast containing Hurt’s full report is available via Farmdoc Daily at http://farmdoc.illinois.edu/ marketing/weekly/html/102212.html. This article was submitted by the Purdue University Agricultural Communications Department. ❖

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Nitrogen calculator helps determine fertilizer needs

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The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship and Iowa State University Extension and Outreach highlighted the Corn Nitrogen Rate Calculator that is available to help farmers find the maximum return to nitrogen fertilizer applications and the most profitable application rate for their farm. The Corn Nitrogen Rate Calculator can be found at http://tinyurl.com/cob68tj. This online tool is rapidly updated to allow for changing hybrid genetics, rotations and climatic conditions. The Iowa database in the calculator was updated in 2012 with 2011 response data and now contains 214 trials for corn following soybean and 111 trials for corn following corn. “Having adequate nitrogen available is critical for corn production, but given the high prices for fertilizer it is important farmers determine the right amount that is needed on their crops,” Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey said. “Every farmer wants to make sure their plants have the fertilizer they need while not over applying, so this calculator is a great tool.” The calculator can be used for both corn and soybean rotations and corn-on-corn operations. It allows farmers to compare up to five price ratios — pricing options for nitrogen and corn. Farmers can reach out to their local fertilizer suppliers to find current fertilizer prices. The calculator then lets farmers determine the optimal rate of application based on up to four different corn prices. “Nitrogen rates determined by the calculator are the total fertilization amounts for each rotation, there is no need to further adjust rate for previous crop,” said John Sawyer, soil fertility and nutrient management specialist with Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. Sawyer reminds farmers they should also wait until soil temperatures remain below 50 degrees Fahrenheit before applying anhydrous ammonia fertilizer this fall. A statewide real-time soil temperature data map is maintained by ISU Extension and Outreach at http://extension.agron.iastate.edu/NPKnowledge and can be used by ag retailers and farmers to determine when fall nitrogen applications are appropriate. This article was submitted by the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship. ❖


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Weather patterns and looking back at 2012 I attended a crop insurance workshop in Mankato, Minn., recently where Elwynn Taylor, well-known climate specialist and agronomist at Iowa State University, offered some discussion about the weather, climate and crop trends. One of the weather patterns Taylor talked about was based on corn yields recorded since 1866 that show about 19 years of fairly stable yields alternating with about 25 years of more volatile yields, meaning wider variations from year to year. He showed that we’re coming out of one of the 19-year periods with more stable yields and he suggested that we are moving into 25 years with more variable weather and yields. That would mean having a strategy for managing risk from year to year and over longer periods of time continues to be important. He also noted that U.S. corn yields have increased at a rate of about 2 bushels per year over the last 30 years; and Minnesota’s corn crop has increased about 2.5 bushels per year during this time. Taylor also cautioned us with the idea that we are as sensitive to the weather as we ever have been — even though we have better genetics in crop varieties and we have learned some things about other crop production practices.

You might think about it like this. Unfavorable weather conditions 40 years ago might have resulted in half a crop or less. We can still have weather conditions that could deal us half a crop or less. Forty years ago, half a crop might have been 50 bushels of an expected 100-bushel yield. Today it might mean 70 bushels of an expected 140 bushel yield, but it’s still half a crop. Economically, it might not serve us much better than half a crop did 40 years ago. It is more feed. Taylor said that along with getting less rain, the corn crop in the southern part of the Corn Belt suffered because of warmer than normal night temperatures. Minnesota did better this year partly because being farther north, night temperatures were not as excessive. He said that if overnight temperatures from pollination to grain maturity are four degrees above normal, this can reduce yields by 20 percent. I found that interesting because I’ve heard the comment many times over the years that “these warm nights are gonna’ make corn.” Taylor said that crops store energy and manufacture dry matter material through the process of photosynthesis during the day. Respiration goes on 24 hours a day and this is where plants use energy. When night temperatures are too high, through respiration, the

plant burns off more of the energy it captures during the day. Taylor said if we stay with warmer weather patterns, Minnesota might have an advantage over other Corn Belt states more often in the future. I asked Jeff Coulter, our University of Minnesota Extension corn agronomist about this recently, and he agreed with Taylor. Coulter said that warm temperatures during the vegetative phases aren’t usually a big deal because this just increases Growing Degree Day accumulation and growth rate; and temperature is usually not high enough during this time in Minnesota to hurt anything. (I’d add that 1988 might be an exception to that.) But, during grain fill it is different because the sugars from photosynthesis are wasted on respiration rather than for storage in kernels when nighttime temperatures are too hot. Coulter said some of the highest corn yield environments in the United States are the irrigated desert regions — small acreages in Arizona, New Mexico, etc. — where it is warm and sunny during the days (upper 80s), and then cool in the evenings. Minnesota will gain market share in U.S. corn production and yield ranking while the I-states (Illinois, Indiana, Iowa) will continue to struggle if the weather becomes more extreme and variable. Coulter said that hot temps (greater than 86 F at normal to low soil moisture or greater than about 90 to 92 F with adequate to abundant soil moisture) during the two weeks before and after silking are the worst because they affect pollination and, more importantly, kernel abortion following pollination. However, soil moisture levels during these critical four weeks are more important than air temperatures. So, if you’re a weather buff, watching crops from year to year, you can think about how that plays out with your experience. In the end, the task seems to be the same — we try to do the best with the cards that are dealt, and we can be thankful for the harvest we have this year. This article was submitted by Dan Martens, University of Minnesota Extension educator for Stearns, Benton and Morrison (Minn.) counties. He may be reached at (320) 968-5077, (800) 964-4929 or marte011@umn.edu. ❖

PUBLIC NOTICE

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by Minnesota Pork Board and the National Pork Board

The election of pork producer delegate candidates for the 2014 National Pork Producers (Pork Act) Delegate Body will take place at 3:30 p.m., Tuesday, December 4, 2012, in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Minnesota Pork Board at the Country Inn & Suites, 1900 Premier Drive, Mankato, MN 56001. All Minnesota pork producers are invited to attend. Any producer who is a resident of the state and has paid all assessments due may be considered as a delegate candidate and/or participate in the election. All eligible producers are encouraged to bring with them a sales receipt proving that hogs were sold in their name and the checkoff deducted. For more information, contact Minnesota Pork Board, 151 Saint Andrews Court, Suite 810, Mankato, Minnesota, 56001; telephone (507) 345-8814.


Study: Warmer climates don’t always mean more fertile soils ... Climate models that assume increased soil fertility in warmer conditions may overestimate the amount of plant productivity in those ecosystems.

Dukes said he would like to test whether the results are similar in other soil types so that climate models can accurately simulate these processes. “Soil fertility can affect carbon storage, and ultimately the rate of climate change,” Dukes said. “I want to see how general this result is so that we can better predict how ecosystems will function in the future. If lots of ecosystems work this way, then nature may not be as good at slowing climate change as we had thought.” The National Science Foundation and U.S. Department of Energy funded the research. This article was submitted by the Purdue University Agricultural Communications Department. ❖

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roofs and sprinklers to change the climate over small plots of land and then tests plant and soil responses to increases in temperature and increases or decreases in precipitation. In this experiment, Dukes tested 36 plots under 12 different climate scenarios — four levels of warming and three different levels of precipitation — over two years. Although Dukes and his team expected to find that warming would speed the return of nitrogen to the soil, they instead found that warming and changes in precipitation rarely influenced this rate. Instead, warming and drought caused the processes involved in nitrogen cycling to become less sensitive to temperature. “It seems that some ecosystems are less responsive than we expected,”

Dukes said. “It may be that as you warm up, the soil microbes in those ecosystems adjust and the rate of nitrogen cycling winds up being the same.” Novem Auyeung, a doctoral student who was involved in the study, added, “soil microbes operate on very short time scales, and many adjustments could have happened in the microbial community over the course of our twoyear experiment.” Dukes said it would take further study to understand just how soil microbes are affected by climate changes. “These responses would have to be based on the abundance or composition of microbes or the activity of these microbes,” Dukes said. “We need to learn which it is.”

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

Warmer climates won’t necessarily speed the return of nitrogen to soils as scientists once thought, according to a Purdue University study. Increased temperatures from climate change have been expected to speed decomposition of plant materials and the return of nitrogen to soils, making the soil more fertile for plants. But Jeff Dukes, an associate professor of forestry and natural resources at Purdue, found that the microbes responsible for returning nitrogen to soils react differently to a range of climate scenarios. “More nitrogen being available is not something we can count on in all ecosystems,” said Dukes, whose findings were published in the journal Global Change Biology. The findings suggest that while warming has been expected to accelerate nitrogen cycling, it may actually have little to no effect on the process in some ecosystems. This means that climate models that assume increased soil fertility in warmer conditions may overestimate the amount of plant productivity in those ecosystems. Dukes runs the Boston-Area Climate Experiment, which measures ecosystem responses to climate change. His research group uses heaters, plastic

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Mushrooms prove to be growing business By RICHARD SIEMERS The Land Correspondent Forest Mushrooms Inc. is a small complex of buildings that sit on 20 acres outside of St. Joseph, Minn., but it is the heart of the mushroom business in Minnesota. Its local presence can also be credited with some of the increase in mushroom consumption. “When we started, we were growing 400 to 600 pounds a week and shipped most of them off to other states,” said Kevin Doyle, owner of Forest Mushrooms. “Now we grow over 2,300 pounds a week and we’ve withdrawn from all those other markets and sell only to the Twin Cities.” Doyle’s degree in natural science prepared him to become a mushroom grower when he started the business with three partners in 1985, but his market sense has made the business successful. From the start he had an approach that differed from his partners, whom he eventually bought out. The first approach was to concentrate on quality, rather than undercutting the price of other suppliers. “We already have an advantage in the market because our product will be fresher and it will be easier for the buyers because we’ll deliver it to them,” Doyle told his partners. “Keep the price the same as other suppliers but give the buyer a superior product which will help them increase their sales.” Concentrating on freshness and quality, which improved the buyers’ bottom line, they were able to break into the market simply by matching the price of other suppliers. His second market move came after he became sole owner. His partners wanted to be growers, not wholesalers, but Doyle realized that some-

one else could come along and offer an array of mushrooms, including the one or two kinds he was growing. Buyers would no longer want to deal with one small grower. “The first week I was on my own I started buying other mushrooms, and now for many, many years only 20 to 25 percent of our gross sales are what we produce here,” he said. By making it possible for wholesalers to fill all their needs with one call, Forest Mushrooms became the heart of the Minnesota mushroom business. “It helped us secure our market position a lot more than just being a grower,” Doyle said. “It is what has allowed us to build these other buildings (it all started in one building), expand our growing, and add a packaging area. Four times a week a driver heads into the Twin Cities to make deliveries.” Doyle had prepared himself for growing mushrooms, but there was plenty to learn once the company became a reality. They have tried different methods and approaches to reach the level they have achieved in growing shiitake and oyster mushrooms, the two that are grown at the facility. “Mushrooms grow on agricultural waste because their role in nature is the opposite of green plants,” Doyle said. “Green plants take carbon from the air and through photosynthesis fix that carbon into plant matter. When

Oyster mushrooms grow out of plastic bags filled with substrate of chopped wheat straw that has been sterilized and wetted. The mushroom spawn is mixed in and the substrate is packed into small plastic bags that have a grid of quarter-inch holes.

Richard Siemers

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the plant dies, fungus will break it down and release the carbon as carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.” Mushrooms, being a fungus, can be grown on agricultural waste. The shiitake mushroom is an Asian native that grows on trees related to oak. Forest Mushrooms grows theirs on small logs or blocks of compressed oak sawdust. The sawdust is sterilized and supplemented with high nutrient grain. Forest Mushrooms purchases the logs with the mushroom spawn already in them. They soak the logs and set them in a climate-controlled room maintaining 64 degrees Fahrenheit and 90 percent humidity. “The best mushrooms are from the first flush,” said Jim Caron, sales manager for the company, “but we can get three or four flushes from each log by resoaking them.” Each block lasts about eight weeks and is then composted. The oyster mushrooms grow in a substrate of chopped wheat straw that has been sterilized and wetted. The mushroom spawn is mixed in and the substrate is packed into small plastic bags that have a grid of quarter-inch holes. They are in a room that is 62 F and 92 percent humidity. Because they need oxygen and give off carbon dioxide, there is a complete air exchange in the room every five minutes. “This is one of the major expenses,” Caron said.

In the winter the air must be heated and humidified, in the summer it is cooled and humidified. There is also a need for constant air movement to evaporate moisture off of the mushrooms so they draw their moisture from the substrate. There is a constant need for vigilance to make sure the temperature and humidity are at their optimum, and because to pick mushrooms at their peak they must be picked every day. The market strategy of quality and diversity has never faltered. Doyle is particular about the mushrooms, fresh and dried, that he will purchase for resale to wholesalers. There is more diversity in the mushroom market than one might think. Their website lists multiple varieties of mushrooms, and of the form in which they can be purchased. “The thing that has allowed us to be successful in one way is we have all these products — fresh cultivated mushrooms, dried cultivated mushrooms, fresh wild mushrooms, dried wild mushrooms, mushroom powders, and in the last five years I’ve gotten into a lot of IQF, or Individual Quick Frozen mushrooms.” IQF mushrooms are used by the frozen food industry. While Forest Mushrooms never actually handles them, Doyle’s reputation in the mushroom market has made him the person food companies turn to for advice, and See MUSHROOMS, pg. 21A


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Massive mushroom discovered in Massachusetts woods BEVERLY, Mass. — Dugie Russell found a fungus so large, it’s difficult to get your arms around. Russell hauled in a 59-pound Hen of the Woods mushroom from the woods of Ipswich, Mass. He won’t reveal its exact location, protecting a prime mushroom picking spot, but says it

was near the place where he found a 52-pounder three years ago. “One tree is quite a producer,” he said. Russell, a retired court officer who lives in nearby North Beverly, has been picking mushrooms for 45 years.

His neighbors are well aware of his fungusrelated pursuits. A local restaurant lists Dugie’s Wild Mushroom Bisque on its menu. Poison control calls him when a question arises about potentially dangerous mushrooms. The Hen of the Woods is typically found on trees in the Northeast during Photo by The Salem News the fall. It often grows to the size Dugie Russell found this 59-pound Hen of the Woods mushof a ball — or room growing in the woods of Ipswich, Mass. larger. sold. The mushroom can be sautéed, Details for this story were reported by stewed or used as ingredients in ChiThe Salem News of Salem, Mass., a nese and Japanese medicine. sister publication to The Land under Russell’s fungus has been cut up and CNHI. ❖


Company grows as its marketshare has grown

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MUSHROOMS, from pg. 18A he takes care of all of the paperwork to have them purchased, custom processed and shipped directly to the food company. Forest Mushrooms has grown as their markets have grown. Their basic market is wholesalers, but they also supply to the organic food sector, Whole Foods and the growing Asian market in the Twin Cities. They do not sell to individual supermarkets or restaurants (that would be competing with their wholesalers) or to individuals. It should also be noted that Forest Mushrooms does not purchase wild mushrooms from the public, nor act as a source for identifying mushrooms for the public. “Our production is very consistent year-round, which is what allows us to keep our customers and get a decent price,” Doyle said. “We grow approximately 2,200 pounds of oyster mushrooms on a weekly basis, and about 600 pounds of shiitakes. Then I would say we sell about 8,000 to 10,000 pounds of other fresh mushrooms per week.” With his insistence on providing a superior

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Richard Siemers

Kevin Doyle holds some of the mushrooms that Forest Mushrooms buys and resells. In his right hand are some chanterelles and lobster mushrooms in his left hand.

“We’re not just middlemen,” Doyle said. “We provide a service. It is nice for a wholesaler not to have to call 10 farms.” Log on to www.forestmushrooms.com for more information. ❖

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

product, his wholesalers have been able to provide the public with good quality which in turn has increased the public’s consumption. With his strategy of providing one-stop shopping, he’s cemented his own customer base.

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22 Send us your events by e-mail to editor@TheLandOnline.com A Drought — A Game Changer for Beef Operations Nov. 13, 6:30-9 p.m. Hancock County Extension Office, Garner, Iowa Info: $10/person; for other meeting locations, contact your Iowa county Extension office, the Iowa Cattlemen’s

Log on to http://bit.ly/theland-calendar for our full events calendar

Association or log on to Info: Contact Nathan Winter, www.iowabeefcenter.org/events wint0146@umn.edu or (800) /droughtseries2012.html 587-0770 What is a Fair and Profitable Farm Rental Agreement? Nov. 14, 9:30 a.m. McLeod County Fairgrounds Commercial Building, Hutchinson, Minn.

Drought — A Game Changer for Beef Operations Nov. 14, 6:30-9 p.m. Mitchell County Extension Office, Osage, Iowa

Info: See details of Nov. 13 event wint0146@umn.edu or (800) 587-0770 Pro-Ag Meeting: Management Options for Lenders and Minnesota Farmers Union Agribusinesses Annual Convention Nov. 15, 1 p.m. Nov. 17-18 North Iowa Fairgrounds 4-H Ramada Plaza Hotel, MinLearning Center, Mason City, neapolis Iowa Info: Log on to mfu.org Info: $20/person, $25 at the door; call (641) 648-4850 to register; log Iowa Organic Conference on to www.extension.iastate.edu/ Nov. 18-19 agdm/info/meetings.html for University of Iowa Memorial other locations Union, Iowa City Info: Register online at Drought — A Game http://iowaorganicconference. Changer for Beef eventbrite.com or contact KathOperations leen Delate, (515) 294-7069 or Nov. 15, 6:30-9 p.m. kdelate@iastate.edu Community Building, Badger, Iowa Drought — A Game Info: See details of Nov. 13 event Changer for Beef Operations What is a Fair and Profitable Nov. 19, 6:30-9 p.m. Farm Rental Agreement? Public Library, Dumont, Iowa Nov. 16, 10:30 a.m. Info: See details of Nov. 13 event Meeker County Courthouse Community Room A&B, Take Action to Manage Litchfield, Minn. Risk and Succeed in 2013 Info: Contact Nathan Winter, Nov. 20, 8:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

Best Western Inn & Restaurant, North Mankato, Minn. Info: RSVP to Wally Thomas, (507) 386-2214 or wathomas@bremer.com, or Tina LeBrun, (507) 389-7391 or tina.lebrun@southcentral.edu Quality Assurance Training Nov. 21 Nobles County Government Center, Worthington, Minn. Info: Pork Quality Assurance, 10 a.m.-Noon; Transport Quality Assurance, 1-3:30 p.m.; registration requested to colleen@mnpork.com or (800) 537-7675 or log on to www.mnpork.com Environmental Citizens Forum Nov. 27, 9:30 a.m.-Noon Wood Lake Meeting Center, Rochester, Minn. Info: One of six such forums held around the state; log on to http://mn.gov/Environmental Congress for all locations, dates and times


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VENTURA, IOWA — Once upon a time in northern Iowa — not too long ago, really — the pheasant hunting season opener held every year on the last Saturday of October was a big affair. By Friday night, motel parking lots along Highway 18 in Clear Lake would be clogged THE OUTDOORS with pickup trucks bearing out-of-state plates and haulBy John Cross ing dog kennels. Blaze orange was the dominant color the next day as people lined up at the Ventura Volunteer Fire Department’s annual fund-raising pancake breakfast. Then, fortified by stacks of pancakes and sausage, hunters streamed to the parking areas of public hunting areas to claim a spot for the 8 a.m. opener. But a series of severe winters and poor nesting seasons, combined with expiring Conservation Reserve Program contracts, has changed all of that. Friday night, there was plenty of room at motels, no line at the pancake breakfast on Saturday. And as I followed longtime Iowa hunting buddy Tim Ackarman to the private land we were going to hunt, we drove past several large public hunting areas where parking lots were empty just a few minutes before legal shooting time. Apparently, even the positive numbers released in August by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources from roadside surveys weren’t enough to override the dismal pheasant hunting success in the John Cross/Mankato Free Press Hawkeye State in recent years. Tim Ackarman of Miller, Iowa, follows bird dogs into some thin cover near Ventura, Iowa, on the opening day of the Iowa Pheasant Hunting Season. See OUTDOORS, pg. 25A

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Funds available for sustainable farming innovations

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

The Minnesota Department of Agriculture’s Sustainable Agriculture Demonstration Grant Program will award up to $100,000 in 2013 for onfarm sustainable agriculture research or demonstration projects. The MDA is now accepting applications for the grant program which promotes environmental stewardship and conservation of resources and strives to improve profitability and quality of life on farms and in rural areas.

Minnesota Agriculture Commissioner Dave Frederickson said the MDA’s Sustainable Agriculture Demonstration Grant Program has helped move new ideas and concepts into viable production practices. “With these grants, farmers and researchers have the opportunity to pursue their ideas, track the results and then share this valuable information with others,” Frederickson said. “For example, we’ve seen the develop-

ment of high tunnel systems to increase fruit production and new successes with cover crops.” Grant applications are available on the MDA website at http://go.usa.gov/YBSj or by contacting the Agricultural Marketing and Development Division at (651) 201-6012. Completed applications must be received by the MDA no later than Jan. 11. Since 1989, the MDA Sustainable Agriculture Demonstration Grant Program

has awarded 281 grants. Examples of eligible projects include fruit and vegetable production, conservation tillage and weed management, integrated pest management, livestock production, organic farming, alternative energy crop production, and use of cover crops. These and other grant projects are highlighted in the Greenbook, which is free and available at www.mda.state.mn.us/greenbook. This article was submitted by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture. ❖

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Hunt nothing to crow about, but better days are coming yet to come. John Cross is a Mankato (Minn.) Free Press staff writer. Contact him at (507) 344-6376 or jcross@mankatofreepress.com or follow him on Twitter @jcross_photo. ❖

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012 << www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”

OUTDOORS, from pg. 23A hunters is nothing to crow about. According to the DNR, bird numbers were up about But compared to the bad old days of Iowa pheasant 35 percent in north central Iowa and 16 percent of recent years, we weren’t complaining. statewide. And the dozen or so cagey roosters wise enough to While that number is modest, Ackarman, a freeflush beyond shotgun range suggest better days are lance outdoor writer, said DNR biologists had told him that birds may have been undercounted in many areas because of the dry summer that resulted in poor census conditions. A heavy dew in the morning forces birds out of grassy areas to roadsides where they are more easily observed. What’s more, Ackarman told me he had The mild, open been seeing more winter and birds than the numbers suggested in his warm, dry travels along northspring that was ern Iowa’s rural kind to Iowa roads. pheasants has Perhaps even more been a twoimportant, after sevedged sword eral years of negative for wildlife and numbers, positive numbers — even outdoor enthusmall ones — are a siasts. step in the right direction. But even if the birds might prove to be scarce, we agreed as we followed our dogs along a fence line to our hunting spot Saturday morning that a crisp temperature of 29 degrees, barely a hint of a breeze and a clear sky was perfect bird hunting weather. The mild, open winter and warm, dry spring that was kind to Iowa pheasants has been a two-edged sword for wildlife and outdoor enthusiasts. Virtually every wetland in the area is bone-dry. The water level of Clear Lake, a popular recreation lake a few miles southeast of where we hunted, is down nearly three feet. And because of the drought that allowed for haying of some lands enrolled in conservation programs, half of the area we were hunting had been cut for hay earlier. The remaining cover was open and sparse. Nevertheless, just a half-hour into the hunt, we had one rooster in the bag, a we-bird that flushed along the Winnebago River that barely flowed at a trickle. We managed to see another four roosters and just one hen on that parcel before moving to another nearby property, an expansive spread of lush switch grass owned by his father, Craig Ackarman. In two more hours of hunting that area, we managed to bag two more roosters, missed another. Numerous other birds flushed well out of range. We agreed that dry conditions that created poor scenting for the dogs meant we undoubtedly walked passed birds in the expanse of thick cover. By noon, we and our 11-year-old dogs were spent. Measured against the best days of our Iowa openers together, three birds in four hours for two

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THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

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Hate to cook? Try a small dose of kitchen blasphemy Cookbook Corner By SARAH JOHNSON The Land Correspondent Fifty years ago, a cookbook appeared on bookshelves nationwide that was one of a kind. Instead of bubbling with an exhausting culinary enthusiasm, “The I Hate to Cook Book” celebrated those who found cooking a heinous chore to be avoided at all costs. Author Peg Bracken embraced her inner self, wrote a hilarious cookbook, and became a fixture in 1960s-70s kitchen, right up next to Julia Child and “The Joy of Cooking,” bringing a welcome dose of blasphemy to stodgy American kitchens. The publication of the 50th anniversary edition of “The I Hate to Cook Book” (Hachette Book Group Inc.) had me reminiscing and chuckling all over again. The 1960s was a time of women’s liberation, civil rights, public foment, demonstrations in the streets. Bracken decided to have a riot in her kitchen. She writes of fine cooking: “Not only are there pleasanter ways to shorten your life, but, more important, your husband won’t take you out for enchiladas if he knows he can get good enchiladas at home.” Smart. And of women who hate to cook: “We don’t get our creative kicks from adding an egg, we get them from painting pictures or bathrooms, or potting geraniums or babies, or writing stories or amendments, or, possibly, engaging in some interesting type of psycho-neuro-chemical research.” Revolutionary. And of inventiveness in the kitchen: “Sometimes there isn’t much in the house except bacon and eggs.

In that case, you can have Bacon and Eggs.” Ingenious. If you can’t completely avoid the kitchen, it’s important to get out of there as quickly as possible. Bracken’s recipes will do that for you, and you might even get a cocktail for your trouble. “These recipes have not been tested by experts,” she writes. “That is why they are valuable. Experts ... can make anything taste good. But even we can make these taste good.” ■ A simple side dish of Raisin Rice will provide the base to many a meal, particularly of the Mediterranean/curried/Indiantype. Or you could add leftover meat or what-haveyou to make this a meal in itself. The Norwegians among us will probably try to add sugar and cream and call it breakfast, due to the raisins, doncha know. Raisin Rice (Good with Anything Curried) 1 1/2 cups uncooked rice 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 cup onion, thinly sliced 1/4 cup slivered almonds 2 tablespoons butter 1/4 cup seedless raisins

The Johnson clan gives two ‘yums’ to Maxie’s Franks

Cook the rice and salt according to directions. While it cooks, sauté the onions and almonds in the butter until they’re a gentle brown. Then add the raisins, heat thoroughly, and when the rice is done cooking, mix everything together. Now taste it — it may need a little more salt. ■ I love the next recipe because, with both whiskey and ice picks involved, there is a good chance of something interesting happening. “Also, it has a rakish sound that is rather intriguing,” Bracken writes. Not to mention it stays edible for an ungodly long time, like fruitcake. Hootenholler Whiskey Cake 1/2 cup butter 1 cup sugar 3 beaten eggs

1 cup flour 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg 1/4 cup milk 1/4 cup molasses 1/4 teaspoon baking soda 1 pound seedless raisins 2 cups chopped pecans (walnuts will do, but pecans are better) 1/4 cup bourbon whiskey See COOKBOOK, pg. 29A

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THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

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Apply now for beef scholarships; Colvin Fund offers $20K Louis M. “Mick” Colvin is passionate about beef and young people. That’s why the Certified Angus Beef brand rallies its partners each year to support the scholarship fund that honors its first formal leader by helping collegians reach their goals.

For 2013, $15,000 will be split among five undergraduate scholarships, in the amounts of $5,000, $4,000, $3,000, $2,000 and $1,000. College juniors and seniors who have shown commitment to the beef industry, either through course-

work or activities, are encouraged to apply by the Dec. 7 deadline. Applications are evaluated on involvement and scholastic achievement, communication skills and reference letters. A $5,000 graduate level scholarship will also be awarded to a full-time masters or doctorate student conducting research related to high-quality beef production. Applications for that award are due Jan. 11. “The graduate level scholarship builds on what the Colvin Scholarship has always done,” said Mick Colvin, who cofounded Certified Angus Beef LLC in 1978 and served as its chief officer for 22 years. “We will help groom the next great scientist supporting premium beef.” The funds given have more than doubled since 2009. “It’s very, very gratifying to see the amount we’ve offered grow over the years,” Colvin said. “Our partners have really pitched in and they’ve made this scholarship what it is today.” Those supporters raised nearly $75,000 in scholarship monies at a golf outing and auction held during the brand’s annual conference this year in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va. The dollars go into an account that generates the interest proceeds used to fund these scholarships each year. That ensures the longevity of the program and its impact on the industry. The 2013 golf outing sponsorship was purchased by Palmer Food Services/G&C Food Distributors, Rochester, N.Y. The following companies also supported the live auction: Cargill Meat Solutions, Wichita, Kan.; T-Bonz, Charleston, S.C.; Sysco Boston LLC, Plympton, Mass.; and Del Monte, San Francisco, Calif.. The top two recipients also win an all-expense-paid trip to the 2013 CAB Annual Conference, Sept. 18-20 in Palm Desert, Calif. This is an opportunity to interact with leaders throughout the production, packing, retail and foodservice industries. “I can’t say enough good about the past winners,” Colvin said. “They’re great, great students and I’m proud to be associated with them.” The Colvin Scholarship Fund began in 1999 when Colvin retired as CAB executive director. The scholarships recognize his role in making dreams a reality and inspiring others to be their best. Colvin cofounded the CAB program in 1978, leading to establishing the world’s leading brand of fresh beef. For more details, interested students should log on to www.certifiedangusbeef.com/press/colvin. ❖


‘Gussy up’ your hot dogs with Maxie’s Franks recipe and injecting a little more whiskey with an eye dropper. ■ Maxie’s Franks let you gussy up your hot dogs with warm sauerkraut and a sweet and tangy sauce all baked together into a lovely mess. I halved the recipe, popped it into a low oven and forgot about it until a delicious smell started wafting around the house. Ate most of it right out of the pan, significantly saving on cleanup time. Two “yums!” Maxie’s Franks 1/2 onion, chopped (or 2 tablespoons minced dried onion) 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 3/4 cup ketchup 3/4 cup water

H E L P U S G R O W T H E L A N D ’ S C O O K B O O K L I B R A RY Submit your church or organization’s cookbook for review in

Send cookbooks to: “The Cookbook Corner,” The Land magazine, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002 *Submission does not guarantee published review*

1 cup sour cream Shred the cabbage fine, and throw the core away. Cook it up in as little water as possible until it’s tender — five to 10 minutes. Drain it, then add the other ingredients, mixed together, and put in on a low burner to heat through. ■ While Bracken did indeed produce this cookbook, she warns about its overuse. Above all, remember her parting words about these recipes: “For, while they’re all good and easy, still it is more trouble to make them than not to make them.” If your community group or church organization has printed a cookbook and would like to have it reviewed in the “Cookbook Corner,” send us a copy to “Cookbook Corner,” The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002. Please specify if you wish to have the cookbook returned, and include information on how readers may obtain a copy of the cookbook. Submission does not guarantee a review. ❖

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The Cookbook Corner

1 tablespoon brown sugar 1 teaspoon prepared mustard 1 (28-ounce) can sauerkraut 10 or 12 frankfurters or hot dogs You make the sauce first. Sauté the onion in the oil until it’s tender, then add the ketchup, water, sugar and mustard, and bring to a boil. Now open the sauerkraut, drain it well, and put it in a big casserole. Arrange the frankfurters — slashed or split — on top, pour on the sauce, and bake, uncovered, at 350 F for 30 minutes. ■ About vegetables, Bracken advises: “In order to make most vegetables fit to eat, you must cover up the basic taste of the vitamins with calories. You use butter, oil, sour cream, nuts, chopped bacon, mushrooms and cheese ...” And here is her Sour Cream Cabbage, poster child for that theory. Sour Cream Cabbage 1 firm green cabbage 1 egg, well beaten 2 tablespoons sugar 1/2 teaspoon nutmeg Salt and pepper

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

COOKBOOK, from pg. 26A First, take the whiskey out of the cupboard, and have a small snort for medicinal purposes. Now, cream the butter with the sugar, and add the beaten eggs. Mix together the flour, baking powder, salt and nutmeg, and add it to the butter mixture. Then add the milk. Now put the baking soda into the molasses and mix it up and add that. Then add the raisins, nuts and whiskey. Pour it into a greased and floured loaf pan and bake it at 300 F for two hours. Your Whiskey Cake keeps practically forever, wrapped in aluminum foil, in your refrigerator. It gets better and better, too, if you buck it up once in a while by stabbing it with an ice pick

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Obedience training is recommended for all dogs It is a question many pet owners face: Does my dog need some obedience training? “Yes, I recommend obedience training for all dogs, because not only does it help provide basic obedience and command recognition, it also helps bolster basic interactions between people and their pets,” said Stacy Eckman, lecturer at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences.

Eckman suggests that all dogs are good candidates for training school. “Those who are generally more timid may become less fearful or shy around other animals and people after training,” Eckman said. “Those pets that are very boisterous may learn some.” Obedience training now encompasses classes for dogs of all types, whether your dog is a puppy or

needs training in a certain discipline. Classes today are not just for dogs that need correctional discipline due to an unruly attitude. “Most of the classes focus on basic commands and communication between pets and humans, certainly not just for dogs that act out,” Eckman said. “These classes are good socialization exercises also.” Eckman said, “there are ‘puppy’ classes that are offered that can be started when pets have a minimum number of vaccinations. These are great classes for learning interactions, potty training, etc. There are classes for all ages and stages, so they can start at any time.” It is best to start at an early age, because it is much easier to establish consistent rules from the beginning than to go back and try to retrain an undesirable habit the dog has been allowed to develop. Once a behavior has developed, training takes longer. Animal owners have recognized the importance of obedience training and have expressed a need to have opportunities to help train their animals. Therefore, there are many opportunities around the nation available for your dog to attend a class. Before you choose your trainer you should follow a checklist. For instance, you should find out how long the person has been training, and how many animals has that trainer instructed. You should also ask them how they keep up with the current knowledge in the field. One last item is to check their training method. Do they use toys and rewards, or do they verbally explain their disappointment to the effect that it can cause lasting damage to your dog. Then, research trainers in your area who follow the same philosophy that you prefer. After this, word of mouth is the best resource when finalizing your pet trainer. “Once the basics of training are learned, these techniques can be applied at home and expounded on,” Eckman said. “Books can also offer great advice. Online information is also available, but I am skeptical of these due to the large amount of misinformation that can be given over the internet.” Owners should remember that dogs are all different. It is important to understand the needs of your dog so you can match them with the best trainer. It is also important to be patient with your dog, as they all learn at different rates. If understanding, patience and knowledge are in play, obedience training can be very rewarding for all dogs and owners. Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. More information is available at http://tamunews.tamu.edu. This column is distributed by CNHI News Service. CNHI is parent company to The Land. ❖


Jesus first, Yourself last, Others in between; that’s JOY

The Land wants to hear from you. Send your Letters to the Editor to: Editor, The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002 or editor@TheLandOnline.com

Letters must be signed and have writer’s name, address and phone number. Please keep your letters to less than 250 words.

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mously covered the bill of the person behind you, too? It’s a joy giver to the teller, the person you blessed and your own soul. A University of Michigan study revealed that those who regularly volunteer experience dramatically increased life expectancy. Serving and helping others is heart smart. Is there plenty to be happy about as we gather around Thanksgiving tables? More than we can put to words. But when the leftovers are history, the family disperses and the image in the mirror looks toad-faced, there’s only one source of true joy and it’s Jesus. Go and serve up His love to others. It’s good for others, good for you, and will do wonders for your face. Happy Thanksgiving, friends! * GEMS Girls’ Clubs is an international, non-denominational ministry for girls in first through eighth grades whose mission is to bring girls everywhere into a living, dynamic relationship with Jesus Christ. To learn more log on to www.gemsgc.org. Lenae Bulthuis is a wife, mom and friend who muses from her back porch on a Minnesota grain and livestock farm. ❖

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

At a recent training event in a small, rural community Is joy really putting Jesus and others before myself? in South Dakota, I asked the new GEMS* Counselors Well, let’s process it in reverse. How many self-cenwhat qualities they thought tered, egotistical, greedy, me-first, people do you were important in children’s know who are really happy? Point proven. ministry volunteers. Various answers were given, all good like they swallowed a proIt read, “Jesus first, Yourself last and and right. Mentors should be fusely sweating toad.” Others in between.” That’s JOY! considerate, kind, prepared, prayerful, lavish in love, THE BACK PORCH Davis said he’s tired of As I look at those words on the grace-filled and good listenthese swallowed-a-toadscreen, I wonder, “What do people who By Lenae Bulthuis faced people. They need ers. When one woman scoff at Jesus, think of such an answered, “Be joyful!” I some joy! He wants to say acronym?” To some it may seem childsmiled. to them, “You need to send missionarish or over simplistic, to others, it’s ies to your face!” Their faces obviously backwards thinking. Is joy really putThe day before I viewed an online video clip of Ken Davis, comedian and have not yet heard the good news. God ting Jesus and others before myself? is the author of joy! Well, let’s process it in reverse. How author of the inspiring book, “Fully many self-centered, egotistical, greedy, Alive.” Davis’ joy is contagious and he’s I thought back to my Sunday School baffled by people who have been follow- days as a kid. Taped to the brick wall in me-first, people do you know who are ers of Jesus for 20-plus years and yet the basement of my church was a JOY really happy? Point proven. walk around with a face “that looks acronym made from construction paper. Nineteenth-century educator Horace Mann wrote, “Doing nothing for others is the undoing of one’s self. We must be hat do you think about the state and national election results? purposely kind and generous, or we miss the best part of existence. The heart that goes out of itself gets large hat do you think are the odds of getting a new farm bill ironed out soon? and full of joy. This is the greater secret of the inner life. We do ourselves the most good doing something for others.” hat do you think about anything? Try it. Have you ever paid for your meal in the drive-through and anony-

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Restoring memories

This week’s Back Roads is the work of The Land Correspondents Tim King (story) and Jan King (photo)

he marks we leave in this life are T fleeting. And the faint trail we make may puzzle those who follow.

This is especially apparent just north of the intersection of Clearwater County Road 39 and Minnesota Highway 113. In less than 100 years a logging camp with a machine shop, store, bunkhouses, an office building and more — an entire small town — has largely vanished. On the east side of County Road 39, under 40-year-old red pines, a small mound of earth still exists. “It is probably the remains of a root cellar,” said Mike Magner, a Minnesota Department of Natural Resources archaeologist. Magner was studying the site because some pines will be cut soon. He wanted to determine if logging would have a negative archaeological impact on the logging camp remains. Present day loggers won’t disturb the root cellar, however, Magner determined. Across the road are two other artifacts. One is a modern historical marker. It explains that the logging camp operated from 1904 to 1918.

Old logging camp site, Clearwater County, Minn. A Civilian Conservation Corp. camp, known as the Long Lake or Headquarters Camp, was erected on the same site in 1933. Not far away, in the forest, is a stone chimney and fireplace. The outline of a small foundation encircles the stone structure. That’s all. All other signs of habitation have vanished. Magner has a 1940 aerial photo. The area is cleared of trees. The root cellar remains are visible. The camp is abandoned. There are, however, a number of buildings. One is 250 feet long,

Magner estimates. But when we saw him in mid-October, he hadn’t found records on the camp. “I can find no record of a CCC camp at this location,” he said. “It may have been a side camp operated by the nearby Lovelis Lake camp.” When we left the site we assumed that the fireplace, and the buildings on the photo, are from the CCC camp. That seems to be the implication of the historical marker’s information. And, after all, CCC workers were famous for their stone work.

A week later Magner discovered new information. The CCC camp was a tent camp. It lasted only from July 1 to Nov. 4. “I’m beginning to think that the standing chimney could be related to either the office or one of the residences,” he said. The 1940 buildings may be from the logging camp as well, he said. A small part of the memory of two generations of workers has been restored. ❖

Do you have a Back Roads story suggestion? E-mail editor@TheLandOnline.com or write to Editor, The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002.


THE LAND

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November 9, 2012

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Watertown, S.D. — Nov. 27, Dec. 4, 11 and 18 at the SDSU Extension Regional Center from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Pipestone, Minn. — Jan. 8, 15, 22 and 29 at the Pizza Ranch from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Sioux Falls, S.D. — Jan. 10, 17, 24 and 31 at the SDSU Extension Regional Center from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Jamestown, N.D. — March 20 and 21 and April 3 and 4 at the Quality Inn and Suites, Governor’s Meeting Room from 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. the first day and from 8 a.m. to noon the second day. Instructors for the course include Extension educators and specialists from Minnesota, South Dakota and North Dakota as well as outside agency representatives. Registration fee for the conference is due one week before each meeting. Single registration is $125 per person; if more than one person from an operation will be attending, the cost is $125 for the first person and each additional person is $80. Registration includes meals and materials. Note that each workshop is limited to 25 people on a first-come, first-served basis. To register, contact Tracey Renelt, Extension dairy field specialist at the Watertown Regional Extension Center, 1910 W. Kemp Ave, Watertown, SD 57201, e-mail tracey.renelt@sdstate.edu or call (605) 882-5140. Registration checks should be made payable to SDSU and sent to this address, with indication of name and workshop attending or you may contact Renelt for a registration brochure. This project was partially funded through a North Central Risk Management Education Center Grant. It has multi-state partners of South Dakota, Minnesota and North Dakota. ❖

MANURE HANDLING IS OUR BUSINESS!

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The University of Minnesota Extension, South Dakota State University Extension, North Dakota State University Extension, the Southwest Minnesota Dairy Profit Group, ABS and the North Central Risk Management Education Center are conducting Dairy Producer Ag Employee Workshops at four locations this winter which will focus on hiring, motivating and retaining employees. A unique aspect of the program is that each participant or producer will receive a follow-up, on-farm visit approximately five to six months after attending the workshop. Each workshop will consist of four sessions with the following topics. • Session 1: Hiring: Getting the Right People on Board, which will include information on building a reputation as a great employer, inventory of labor needs and development of job description. • Session 2: Hiring: continued ... will include information on recruiting and evaluating applicants, conducting effective interviews and how to check references and hiring. • Session 3: Motivating: Recognize the Supervisor’s Role, which will include information on understanding the Hispanic culture and Motivating: Recognize the Supervisor’s Role, which will include information on engaging employees, defining workplace expectations, providing appropriate training and communicating effective feedback. • Session 4: Retaining: Keeping Employees on Dairy Team, which will include information on fair and competitive compensation package, encourage career management planning and documentation — what is needed. Workshop schedules The workshops are scheduled to be held in following locations.

1 B THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

NEWS & INFO FOR MINNESOTA & IOWA DAIRY PRODUCERS

S E C T I O N


THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

2 B

Hurricane Sandy’s impact on dairy industry lingers This column was written for the marketing week ending Nov. 2. Hurricane Sandy dominated the news this week as it wreaked havoc on the Eastern Seaboard.

New York and the New York Stock Exchange were shut down for the first time since 1888 due to weather, according to FC Stone’s Oct. 30 eDairy Insider Opening Bell. Market analyst

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Ryan Cox warned that highest since November “dairy will be affected by the 2007, but $1.59 below the storm. The upstate New Class III price. Its 2012 York dairy shed is an issue average now stands at but we don’t know how $15.16, down from $16.41 at badly it will be affected yet.” this time a year ago and compares to $13.26 in 2010. Their Nov. 1 issue reported that millions of homes and The 4a butter-powder business remain without price is $17.96, up $1.34 power. FC Stone dairy econfrom September but 33 MIELKE MARKET omist Bill Brooks said “for cents below a year ago. Its WEEKLY dairy companies in New 2012 average is $15.18, By Lee Mielke York City and New Jersey, it down from $19.15 a year ago could be awhile before they and $14.67 in 2010. get back on line. While those plants Cash block cheese closed Nov. 2 at might not be able to process milk, $2.11/lb., down a penny on the week demand from consumers who are but 23 cents above that week a year unable to leave their homes has also ago. Barrel fell to $2 but rallied 8 cents come to a near standstill.” on an unfilled bid Friday to close at The Oct. 29 Daily Dairy Report $2.08, unchanged on the week but 16 pointed out that almost 20 percent of cents above a year ago. Only two cars U.S. milk production is located along of block and four of barrel traded the East Coast and more than 45 per- hands on the week. The AMS-surveyed cent is consumed in the fluid bottle. It U.S. average block price fell 1.7 cents, added that “a storm of this magnitude to $2.0715, while the barrels rolled 3.7 could wreak havoc on the milk supply cents lower, to $2.0274. chain. Areas hardest hit by damaging Cheese plants would like to increase winds and floodwaters are likely to production, but are wary of paying prestruggle to pick up farm milk, and miums for additional milk, according to power outages could prevent dairy the USDA’s Dairy Market News. processors from running plants at Butter closed at $1.8875, down a capacity. The net impact is a lot of quarter-cent on the week but 55-cents dumped milk and stronger milk and dairy product prices in the near-term.” above a year ago. Fourteen cars found new homes on the week. AMS butter ■ averaged $1.8948, down 3.6 cents. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Cash Grade A nonfat dry milk inched announced the October federal order a penny higher to $1.57. Extra Grade benchmark Class III milk price this held at $1.56. AMS powder averaged week at $21.02 per hundredweight, up $1.4861, up 1.4 cents. Dry whey aver$2.02 from September and $2.99 above aged 62.98 cents, up a half-cent. October 2011. Churning schedules across the counThat is the highest it has been since try remain generally active and August 2011 and equates to about dependent on cream availability and $1.81 per gallon. The 2012 Class III price, according to the DMN. Producers average now stands at $16.98, down and handlers report good butter orders $1.27 from this time a year ago but have been placed and continue to be $2.62 above 2010 and $6.26 above the placed. disastrous 2009 average. ■ The November Class III futures conExports continue aided by the Cooptract was trading late Friday morning eratives Working Together program at $21.20 and December was at $20.40. which accepted 26 requests for export The October Class IV price is $18.54, up $1.13 from September and 13 cents assistance this week to sell 4.3 million pounds of cheese, 2.5 million pounds of above a year ago. butter and 85,980 pounds of whole The Agricultural Marketing Service- milk powder to customers in Asia, the surveyed cheese price averaged Middle East, North Africa and South $2.0479 per pound, up 18.3 cents from America. The sales raised CWT’s 2012 September. Butter averaged $1.9168, cheese exports to 106.3 million pounds up 9 cents. Nonfat dry milk averaged plus 61.2 million of butter, 127,868 $1.4636, up 8.7 cents, and dry whey pounds of anhydrous milkfat and averaged 62.05 cents, up 3.6 cents. 85,980 pounds of whole milk powder to California’s comparable 4b cheese 35 countries. milk price is $19.43, up $1.93 from September, $3.65 above a year ago, the See MIELKE, pg. 3B


USDA: Production costs at all-time high

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THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

MIELKE, from pg. 2B September butter production totaled 136 million pounds, according to the USDA’s latest Dairy Products report, up 5.3 percent from August, but 1.1 percent below September 2011. Nonfat dry milk output totaled 84.4 million pounds, down 20.5 percent from August and 18.7 percent below a year ago. American cheese, at 346 million pounds, was down 2.1 percent from August but 2.3 percent above a year ago. Italian type, at 370 million pounds, was down slightly from August and 0.3 percent above a year ago. Total cheese amounted to 871 million, down 1.9 percent from August but 0.3 percent above a year ago. ��� The USDA monthly Milk Cost of Production data for September shows total dairy farm production costs were likely the highest on record, according to Dairy Profit Weekly editor, Dave Natzke, in Friday’s DairyLine broadcast. The index, which covers everything from feed and labor to overhead costs, estimated total costs to run a dairy farm averaged more than $28 per hundred pounds of milk sold in September. Operating costs, such as feed, supplies and services, averaged nearly $20/cwt., slightly higher than the national average price farmers received for milk in September. The USDA also released its monthly milk-feed price ratio, an index based on the current milk price in relationship to feed costs. Natzke reported that the data showed economic conditions improved somewhat last month, with higher milk prices offsetting slightly higher corn and alfalfa hay prices. At 1.68, the October index was the highest since January, but still below a year ago, and the 19th consecutive month below 2.0. “The squeeze on dairy producer margins is having an impact on the value of both cull and replacement dairy cows,” Natzke said. “With high feed prices, more dairy cows are being sent to slaughter, and average prices for cows sold for beef in October, dipped to their lowest average of the year. And, with the nation’s dairy herd shrinking from its peak last April, the average price paid for a replacement cow fell in October, to $1,390 per head, the lowest average since January 2011. “Adding to the improved outlook are announcements that October and November milk prices will be the highest so far this year, helping offset the higher feed costs as we move into winter. ... How long the improved economic conditions last, and what safety nets are in place, could depend on next Tuesday’s elections, and what, if any action is taken on a 2012 farm bill.” ■ The farm bill was a big topic of discussion at this week’s annual meeting of the National Milk Producers Federation, the National Dairy Promotion and Research Board and United Dairy Industry Association in Florida.

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NMPF asks Congress for ‘Farm Bill Now’ after election MIELKE, from pg. 3B NMPF Chairman Randy Mooney and President and CEO Jerry Kozak discussed the organization’s progress over the past year, beginning with the impasse in Congress, where representatives failed to pass a new farm bill before the old law expired on Sept. 30. They reported that the NMPF’s dairy policy reform package, initially known as “Foundation for the Future,”

had come a long way before being introduced in Congress last fall as the Dairy Security Act. “The DSA was included by the members of the Senate agriculture committee in the draft farm bill approved last spring,” Kozak said. “Subsequently, the Senate approved a farm bill containing the DSA. Then, the House agriculture committee approved its own version of the farm bill earlier this summer.”

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4 B

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“Despite this support, and NMPF’s success in defeating challenges to the DSA (like the Goodlatte amendment, which would have stripped the market stabilization plan from the program), the farm bill was not brought to a vote by the full House,” according to an NMPF press release. “The House of Representatives has punted,” Mooney said. “The House ag committee did its job and passed by a wide, bipartisan margin a farm bill in July. There was enough time for the full House to act on the bill, but they didn’t.” With the expiration of the old farm bill, the NMPF has been increasing pressure on Congress and urging its member cooperatives and farmers to ask their representatives for a “Farm Bill Now” when Congress returns after the elections. Attendees were also told that the dairy checkoff ’s strategy of working with powerful partners is helping to “secure dairy’s future” by contributing to billions of additional pounds of milk sales and enhancing dairy’s image. “Working with industry leaders McDonald’s and Domino’s represents a business strategy that helps the dairy checkoff ‘do more with less’,” said California producer Steve Maddox, National Dairy Board chairman. The NDB carries out coordinated promotion and research programs to help build demand and expand domestic and international markets for dairy products, he said. “In the past, checkoff efforts were largely focused on generic promotion to help raise consumer awareness,” Maddox said. “We had some great ads that producers were extremely proud of, but we didn’t grow sustained dairy sales.” ■ In dairy politics, the war of words continues in California where the Milk Producers Council’s Rob Vandenheuvel fired back in his Oct. 26 newsletter at the statement issued last week by the Dairy Institute of California, the main lobbying organization for many of California’s dairy product processors. The main contention is the gap between California’s 4b cheese milk price and the comparable federal order Class III milk price and Vandenheuvel charged that, what was an average gap of 45 cents/cwt. for the first seven years of the chart he posted in his newsletter, has expanded to $1.24 in 2010 and blew up to a gap of $2 in 2011. He reports that so far in 2012, the

California Class 4b price has averaged $1.85/cwt. below the federal Order Class III price. The MPC claims that, if the California Department of Food and Agriculture would have maintained the roughly 45 cents/cwt. gap that existed from 2003 to 2009, California’s cheese manufacturers would have had to pay more than $600 million more into the California “pool” for the milk they purchased and he touched on the question whether it’s the state’s or the processors’ responsibility to manage the milk production by California’s dairy farmers. Details are at www.milkproducers.org. ■ In another California development, the Alliance of Western Milk Producers, a coalition of California dairy processing cooperatives representing 60 percent of California’s milk, announced that it will cease operation as of Nov. 1. A press release stated that “the Alliance members, California Dairies Inc. and Dairy Farmers of America Western Area, have determined that a formal organization is no longer necessary to accomplish a concerted effort of California cooperatives.” “Our commitment to working together for the mutual benefit of our respective members remains strong. However, the landscape of the dairy industry has changed dramatically over the last 21 years,” said Tony Mendes, chairman of the board. “As successful as the Alliance has been, the leadership of CDI and DFA has concluded that the ability to collaborate and communicate is most efficiently and effectively achieved through a less formal and more flexible structure. I look forward to effectuating this new approach to meet the mutual challenges facing the members of CDI and DFA.” ■ Meanwhile, the board of directors for Wisconsin-based Family Dairies USA, Manitowoc Milk Producers Cooperative and Milwaukee Cooperative Milk Producers have unanimously voted to recommend a unified merger for their membership. Combined, these three cooperatives could soon become the largest Midwest dairy marketing cooperative. Lee Mielke is a syndicated columnist who resides in Everson, Wash. His weekly column is featured in newspapers across the country and he may be reached at lkmielke@juno.com. ❖


5 B

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Local Corn and Soybean Price Index

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

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Cash Grain Markets corn/change* Dover Edgerton Jackson Janesville Cannon Falls Sleepy Eye Average: Year Ago Average:

$6.70 $7.28 $7.25 $7.23 $6.77 $7.16

-.26 -.10 -.21 -.13 -.09 -.15

$20

soybeans/change* $14.45 $14.78 $14.68 $14.69 $14.44 $14.61

-.40 -.35 -.40 -.49 -.41 -.42

$7.07

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Nov'11

Dec

Jan'12

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

June

July

Aug

Sep

Oct

Grain prices are effective cash close on Nov. 5. The price index chart compares an average of most recently reported local cash prices with the same average for a year ago. *Cash grain price change represents a two-week period.

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<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Grain Outlook Pre-report estimates fall

Livestock Angles Grain Angles November not Weather unknown positive for meats future factor

The following market analysis is for the week ending Nov. 2. CORN — Corn prices increased throughout the week into the higher end of the recent range, only to give back all of the gains on Friday heading into the weekend as the dollar rallied to two-month highs. A strong U.S. dollar combined with fund selling overshadowed a neutral-to-friendly Informa Economics report and uncertainty over South American weather. Informa Economics updated their crop estimates in anticipation of the Nov. 9 U.S. DepartPHYLLIS NYSTROM ment of Agriculture report. They CHS Hedging Inc. lowered their previous estimate St. Paul of 127 bushels per acre to 122.4 bu./acre and versus the USDA’s October 122.0 bu./acre forecast. For production, Informa went from 11.194 billion bushels estimated in October to 10.738 billion bushels, down 456 million bushels. Last month, the USDA was predicting 10.706 billion bushels. The market absorbed their estimates with nary a blink. Corn spreads were volatile this week with the Rogers index and Deutsche Bank rolling positions and in anticipation of the much larger Goldman Index roll that begins Nov. 7. Indexes are usually passively net long the front month of a commodity. In the month prior to the month they have their positions in, they will sell their position at the same time they buy another month. In many cases they are selling the December contract and buying March, or in some index cases (Deutsche Bank) buying December 2013 contracts.

The beginning of November has not produced a positive picture for the livestock markets. Both the futures and cash markets have turned lower as demand has become the main issue in the pricing structure as we begin the month. The cattle market saw cash prices sag over the past few weeks, despite the futures attempting to rally. With beef cutouts moving toward record highs , the volume in the boxed beef trade began to shrink. Throw in a perfect storm that moved into the heavily populated East Coast and the disruptions in JOE TEALE the logistics in transportation Broker caused by the storm, beef demand Great Plains Commodity really slowed. The problem continAfton, Minn. ues to be the fact that when the beef cutouts move over $190 per hundredweight basis choice, the demand for beef products begins to subside. The fact that the number of cattle is lower than in previous years has not been able to force the consumer to pay the higher prices for beef. It has been reported that restaurants are noting a slowing in patrons which suggests that because of the dismal economy, people are not able to eat out as often. This is a direct reflection that demand remains the main factor affecting beef prices. Because of the fewer cattle on feed and the diminishing consumer demand, it is quite likely that the struggle will continue and cattle prices will remain in a virtual trading range until there is a change in the supply-demand equation. Therefore, producers are urged to keep aware of market conditions and protect inventories when appropriate. The hog market has seen a nice recovery over the past month or so. It now appears to be running into

With the East Coast getting blasted by hurricane Sandy, many in the Midwest were hoping for some much needed moisture to help replenish the soil profile. That did not happen. The weather forecasts seem to be one of the few fundamental aspects of the grain markets that haven’t been ground to a pulp by the trade. How many different ways can we talk about how tight the U.S. and world ending stocks will be? Yet, the future weather is an unknown fundamental factor. The weather in South America is either too wet or too dry, depending what TOM NEHER part of the region one is farming. AgStar VP & Team Leader — Grain Industry The Southern Plains states remain Rochester, Minn. dry and the newly planted winter wheat struggles to get established before it goes into dormancy. This seems awfully early to be talking about a weather market, yet that is one fundamental factor that remains unknown. There continues to be strong commercial interest in owning grain but the inverted market makes it more costly to store grain, so many remain on the sidelines or only step in as buyers when prices challenge support levels on the technical charts. Investors have lost interest in grain, as the markets chop around grinding lower on the charts. Have we become desensitized to the bullish fundamental factors in the grain markets? Has the early harvest caused the industry to wrap up their business for the year, preparing for the holidays? It very well could be that we will see a lightly traded “holiday market” for the rest of the year. Or could an early weather market, start an early “war of

See NYSTROM, pg. 7B

See TEALE, pg. 7B

See NEHER, pg. 7B

Information in the above columns is the writer’s opinion. It is no way guaranteed and should not be interpreted as buy/sell advice. Futures trading always involves a certain degree of risk.


Trade talks of China purchases, South American weather

TEALE, from pg. 6B

adequate, a setback in cash prices could be in the offing in the next several weeks. Seasonally, as we move into the holiday season, prices generally find some weakness into December. Because of the disparity between pork and the other competitive meats, the hog market could drop into a trading range between the September lows and the recent highs. Considering this possible scenario, producers should monitor the market and take protection when necessary. ❖

Hogs recover as of late resistance in the mid $80s/cwt. basis lean. As the pork cutouts approached the $90/cwt. level, the volume in the pork trade began to slow, which like the beef, indicated a reluctance by the retailer and the consumer to pay the higher prices. Once again demand is dictating the limits on how high prices will go. Considering the fact that the amount of pork in cold storage is abundant and hog numbers are

cents last year). For the Friday after the holiday: we have closed higher five out of the last 12 years, and only two out of the last five years. SOYBEANS — Soybeans played catch-up throughout the week after starting the week off with a 34-cent decline on Monday. Trade talk of China’s buying beans (no USDA confirmation) and questions about South American weather pushed prices to the upper end of the recent trading range, topping out the week at $15.71 1/2 per bushel. However, thanks to a strong U.S. dollar, fund rolling and neutral Informa numbers, January beans closed 37 cents lower at $15.26 3/4 per bushel for the week. Argentine and southern Brazilian soils have been wet, and even though the coming week is forecast to be drier, it may not last long enough for growers to make much planting progress. There has already been talk about how much production of both corn and beans has been lost due to the wet conditions. Argentina’s bean plantings are 3.6 percent complete, down from last year’s 11.6 percent pace. They will usually have 50 percent of their beans in the ground by the end of November. Brazil is estimated to have about a third of their beans planted, approximately 10 percent behind last year’s pace but ahead of the average. China was thought to be actively buying soybeans from the United States this week, but there were no announcements from the USDA. The USDA did announce a sale of 25,000 mt of soyoil to China for this marketing year. There was also some chatter among the trade that China’s bean

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‘Holiday markets’ tend to be thin

eaten the plants that they would not touch a month ago. This is the time to prepare for winter and the deer seem to know that the Minnesota state holiday call “deer season” is upon us. For many families this is a time of tradition and family reunions. The western Kansas Neher family were not much into hunting; my Dad and Grandpa were more interested in having us working on the farm. I have enjoyed learning about the excitement that deer hunting brings to many of my friends and neighbors. My hope and prayer is that you will have a safe and successful hunt this year. ❖

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NEHER, from pg. 6B acres” type of market? The thing to remember about “holiday markets,” is they tend to be “thin” or lightly traded. In this type of market environment, a surprise can cause exaggerated responses. If you have any buying or selling ideas that you think are wild or impossible to get filled, I encourage you to place them in the market as open orders. You never know, they just might get filled. The hours of daylight are getting shorter, the mornings are frosty and the deer in the woods behind my house are starting to move in larger groups. They have ravaged my wife’s flower beds and

production was not as high as earlier thought. Weekly bean sales were impressive at 27.2 million bushels. China accounted for over half of the weekly figure. We have now committed 75 percent of the total USDA export projection for the year. Argentina threw up more roadblocks for exporters. If an exporter has tax issues with Argentina and are removed from the grain registry, they must pay 15 percent income tax versus 2 percent if they were on the registry, plus the normal 10.5 percent sales tax. Informa Economics latest crop updates included a bean yield of 38.6 bu./acre, up 0.8 bu./acre from their last report and as compared to the USDA’s 37.8 bu./acre. They projected production at 2.925 billion bushels, up 65 million bushels from both their and the USDA’s October estimates. OUTLOOK: The same trading range for January soybeans continues with a short-term range of $15.29 to $15.77 and longer term from $14.84 to $16.14 3/4 per bushel. For October, soybeans were down 54 cents per bushel. January soybeans were down 37 cents for the week, settling at $15.26 3/4 per bushel. Friendly fundamentals are taking a backseat to fund action on a daily basis. Big daily swings for apparently no reason other than fund activity are becoming the norm. Nystrom’s notes: Beginning in January, the USDA will release crop reports at 11 a.m. central time. This material has been prepared by a sales or trading employee or agent of CHS Hedging Inc. and should be considered a solicitation. ❖

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after a week of drying the 11- to 15-day maps look wetter again. Weekly ethanol production was up 24,000 barrels in the week ending Oct. 24 to 825,000 barrels per day. Valero announced the closing of two ethanol plants in Albion, Neb., and Linden, Ind., and Bunge-Ergon said their Mississippi plant will shut down due to poor margins. OUTLOOK: December corn moved to the upper end of the recent trading range, but couldn’t quite push out of it on the upside. The $7.32 1/4 to $7.69/$7.76 range remains intact. Funds are running the show with many cautious about stepping in and getting caught on the wrong side. For October, corn was down just one-half cent. For the week, December corn closed at $7.39 1/2, up 1 3/4 cents. The market is waiting for a signal from the Nov. 9 USDA monthly crop report before breaking out of its trading range. Price action surrounding the Thanksgiving holiday: on the Wednesday before the holiday December corn has closed higher six out of the last 12 years and higher four times out of the last five years (we were down 10 1/4

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

NYSTROM, from pg. 6B Brazilian corn exports for the year were reported at a record 13.1 million metric tons versus the USDA yearly estimate for 16.0 mmt. Their October exports set a record for the third month in a row. Brazil could be on pace to pass Argentina as the second largest corn exporter in the world. The United States is becoming more competitive with Brazilian corn imports into the Southeast poultry market. If this gap continues to narrow, we could see import cancellations and increased demand for Midwestern corn. Domestic basis levels were mostly steady in the western belt this week, but the eastern belt was slightly weaker. Weekly export sales were a measly 6.6 million bushels, keeping year-todate sales 48 percent behind last year. The USDA is projecting sales to only be down 25 percent this year. South American weather bears monitoring. Argentina only advanced corn planting 3 percent this week to 40 percent complete. This is well behind last year’s 57 percent complete pace. Normally their planting is 90 percent done by the end of November, but this year two-thirds of their corn area is wet and

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THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

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Final crop insurance calculations in record claims year Now that the 2012 corn and soybean insured by some type of crop insurance harvest season is completed, many farmpolicy. ers are focusing their efforts on 2012 crop By comparison, only about 15 percent of insurance claims. the nation’s corn acres were under a crop It is anticipated that 2012 crop insurinsurance policy in 1988, which was the ance claims will likely set an all-time last widespread drought causing this record, both for total claim numbers and much loss to the U.S. corn crop. total indemnity payments made to proOn Nov. 1, the U.S. Department of Agriducers. The large number of crop insurculture Risk Management Agency finalance claims is primarily due to the signifized the 2012 crop insurance harvest FARM PROGRAMS icant yield reduction resulting from the prices for corn at $7.50 per bushel and for 2012 drought in many key corn and soysoybeans at $15.39/bu. The harvest prices By Kent Thiesse bean producing states. for Revenue Protection insurance poliSome experts predict that total cies are based on the average Chicago crop insurance indemnity payments Board of Trade December corn for 2012 will be over $25 billion, futures price, and the average CBOT nearly 2.4 times higher than the previous record of November soybean futures price, both during Octo$10.8 billion for crop insurance payments from the ber. 2011 crop year. The established base prices for 2012 Yield ProtecAccording to crop insurance industry estimates, tion and RP crop insurance policies were $5.68/bu. there are 1.2 million crop insurance policies in place for corn and $12.55/bu. for soybeans. This will be the for the 2012 crop year, insuring approximately 281 payment rate for all 2012 YP (yield only) policies for million acres, at a farmer investment of $4.1 billion. corn and soybeans on any indemnity payments. It is also estimated that crop insurance claims on The $5.68/bu. price level for corn and $12.55/bu. for the 2012 crop may be filed on close to half of those soybeans are also used to determine the final rev1.2 million crop insurance policies. It is further esti- enue guarantee for all 2012 RP crop insurance polimated that approximately 80 percent of the over 95 cies, with a Harvest Price Exclusion (RP-HPE). million corn acres in the United States in 2012 are There is no enhanced revenue protection on RP-HPE policies from the increased levels of corn and soybean harvest prices in 2012. For RP-HPE policies, the base price is used to calculate the revenue guarantee and the higher harvest price is used to calculate the value of the harvested yield, which greatly reduces the potential indemnity payments.

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The higher harvest price levels of $7.50/bu. for corn and $15.39/bu. for soybeans will be used to determine final revenue guarantees for standard RP insurance policies. For example, a farm unit with a 190 bushels per acre APH corn yield (proven yield), insured by an 80 percent RP policy, would have a final guaranteed revenue of $1,140 (152 bu./acre. x $7.50/bu.). By comparison, that same farm unit insured by an 80 percent RP-HPE policy with a 190 bu./acre APH, would have a final guaranteed revenue of $863.36 (152 bu./acre x $5.68/bu.), a difference of $276.64 less than the RP policy. Refer to Table 1 for more details and calculations. For corn and soybean producers in the Midwest, RP policies are the most prevalent, due to the potential for enhanced revenue protection with higher harvest price levels, as well as having a minimum revenue guarantee established by the March 1 base price levels. Some farmers may have chose the YP or RP-HPE policies for 2012, due to the lower premium levels. However at comparable coverage levels, most YP indemnity payments will likely be 20 to 25 percent lower than the indemnity payments from comparable RP policies. In many cases, there may be no indemnity payment or reduced indemnity payments for comparable RP-HPE insurance policies. Even though calculations for RP policies are revenue-based, the standard RP insurance policies function similarly to a YP policy when the harvest price is higher than the base price, such as is the case for See PROGRAMS, pg. 10B

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9 B

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

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THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

10 B

‘Optional,’ ‘enterprise’ units present indemnity variations PROGRAMS, from pg. 8B corn and soybeans in 2012. This is because the increase in harvest price increases both the final revenue guarantee and the value of the harvested bushels. So with RP policies, for final harvest yield levels below the yield guarantee, the crop insurance payment rate is $7.50/bu. for corn and $15.39/bu. for soybeans, compared to $5.68/bu. for corn and $12.55/bu. for soybeans with YP policies. For example, a farm unit with a 190 bu./acre APH corn yield (proven yield), insured by an 80-percent RP policy, and a final harvested yield of 130 bu./acre, would receive an estimated

RP crop insurance payment of $165/acre (22 bu./acre x $7.50/bu.), before premium reductions. By comparison, that same farm unit insured by an 80-percent YP policy, also with a final harvested yield of 130 bu./acre, would receive an estimated YP payment of $124.96/acre (22 bushels x $5.68/bu.), before premium reductions. Refer to Table 1 for more comparisons. There is also a large variation in crop insurance indemnity payments for 2012 depending on whether the farmer is utilizing “optional” or “enterprise” farm units for their crop insurance coverage. This will especially be a factor in

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Table 1: Estimated 2012 crop insurance payments Examples using a 190 bu./acre corn APH and a 52 bu./acre soybean APH Calculations for Yield Protection Revenue Protection, and RP with a Harvest Price Exclusion (RP-HPE) crop insurance policies for 2012. Corn Soybeans YP RP RP-HPE YP RP RP-HPE A. 2012 TA APH yield 190.0 190.0 190.0 52.0 52.0 52.0 B. Policy percent coverage 0.80 0.80 0.80 0.85 0.85 0.85 C. Coverage yield (A x B) 152.0 152.0 152.0 44.2 44.2 44.2 D. RP base price/bu. $5.68 $5.68 $5.68 $12.55 $12.55 $12.55 E. Guaranteed insurance $863.36 $863.36 $863.36 $554.71 $554.71 $554.71 coverage/acre (C x D) F. RP harvest price/bu. (Final) N/A $7.50 N/A N/A $15.39 N/A G. Harvest guarantee/acre N/A $1,140 N/A N/A $680.24 N/A (C x F) H. Final guarantee/acre N/A $1,140 $863.36 N/A $680.24 $554.71 (Higher of E or G) I. Actual harvested yield/acre 130 130 130 35 35 35 J. RP and RP-HPE N/A $7.50 $7.50 N/A $15.39 $15.39 harvest price/bu. K. Crop value/acre (I x J) N/A $975 $975 N/A $538.65 $538.65 L. Bushel reduction/acre (C-I) 22 bu. N/A N/A 9.2 bu. N/A N/A M. Gross insurance $124.96 $165 0 $115.46 $141.59 $16.06 payment/acre (LxD for YP) (H-K for RP and RP-HPE) N. RP insurance policy $10.44 $22.10 $14.21 $11.14 $21.92 $16.72 premium/acre O. Net insurance indemnity $114.52 $142.90 <$14.21> $104.32 $119.67 <$0.66> Payment per acre (M-N) Notes: Harvest prices for RP policies were finalized as of Oct. 31. Premium estimates are for “enterprise units” in southern Minnesota, using Trend-Adjusted yield calculations. Minnesota, where corn and soybean yields were higher than in many other Midwest states. Producers who have 2012 crop losses on individual farms, and have crop insurance coverage with “optional units,” may be able to collect crop insurance indemnity payments on their 2012 corn or soybean crop on some farm units, while not on others. Meanwhile, producers with crop insurance policies with “enterprise units” in 2012,

are probably less likely to qualify for 2012 crop insurance indemnity payments, unless they had crop losses on a significant portion of crop acres in a county. Due to the low corn and soybean yields in some areas, resulting from the widespread drought in 2012, there are likely to be more producers with “enterprise units” that qualify for crop insurance indemnity payments in 2012, as compared to previous years. See PROGRAMS, pg. 11B

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Be aware of audit documentation needed at threshold

Tables prepared by Kent Thiesse

audits can delay crop insurance indemnity payments, especially if Another variproducers do not have the able for 2012 required documentation readily crop insurance available. Documentation may indemnity payinclude settlement sheets, yield ments will be the level of coverage that records, etc, for the past three years, was selected. For example, a farm unit which must be verified to specific farm with a 190 bu./acre APH corn yield units. (proven yield), insured by an 85 percent RP policy, and a final harvested A reputable crop insurance agent is yield of 130 bu./acre, would receive an the best source of information to make estimated RP crop insurance payment estimates for potential 2012 crop of $236.25/acre (31.5 bu./acre x insurance indemnity payments, and to $7.50/bu.), before premium reductions. find out about documentation requirements for crop insurance losses and By comparison, that same farm unit for potential audits. It is important for insured by a 75-percent RP policy, also producers who are facing crop losses with a final harvested yield of 130 in 2012 to understand their crop bu./acre, would receive an estimated RP insurance coverage, and the calculapayment of $93.75/acre (12.5 bushels x tions used to determine crop insur$7.50/bu.), before premium reductions. ance indemnity payments. Refer to Tables A and B for more detailed examples. Crop insurance comThey should also be aware of the panies are required to perform an auto- documentation that may be required matic audit for any crop insurance in the event of a crop insurance audit, claims of $200,000 or higher in total which will be required on claims of indemnity payments in a crop year, for a over $200,000. given crop in a particular county. Kent Thiesse is a government farm proIf the total indemnity payments will grams analyst and a vice president at exceed $500,000, the insurance comMinnStar Bank in Lake Crystal, Minn. pany must contact the RMA for possi- He may be reached at (507) 726-2137 or ble involvement in the audit. These kent.thiesse@minnstarbank.com. ❖

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Table B: 2012 Crop insurance payment estimates for soybeans Assumptions: APH — 52.0 bu./acre YP and RP crop insurance base price — $12.55/bu. (CBOT November futures in February) RP crop insurance harvest price — $15.39/bu. (CBOT November futures in October) Yield — Guaranteed yield at various percent coverage Actual 2012 soybean production (bu./acre) Insurance type: (Yield) 45 40 35 30 25 Estimated insurance indemnity payment per acre (Before premium deductions) YP (70 percent) — (36.4) 0 0 $17.57 $80.32 $143.07 YP (75 percent) — (39.0) 0 0 $50.20 $112.95 $175.70 YP (80 percent) — (41.6) 0 $20.08 $82.83 $145.58 $208.33 YP (85 percent) — (44.2) 0 $52.71 $115.46 $178.21 $240.96 RP (70 percent) — (36.4) 0 0 $21.55 $98.50 $175.45 RP (75 percent) — (39.0) 0 0 $61.56 $138.51 $215.46 RP (80 percent) — (41.6) 0 $24.62 $101.57 $178.52 $255.47 RP (85 percent) — (44.2) 0 $64.64 $141.59 $218.54 $295.49

PROGRAMS, from pg. 10B

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

Table A: 2012 crop insurance payment estimates for corn Assumptions: APH — 190 bu./acre YP and RP crop insurance base price — $5.68/bu. (CBOT December futures in February) RP crop insurance harvest price — $7.50/bu. (CBOT December futures in October) Yield — Guaranteed yield at various percent coverage Actual 2012 corn production (bu./acre) Insurance type: (Yield) 160 150 140 130 120 Estimated insurance indemnity payment per acre (Before premium deductions) YP (70 percent) — (133.0) 0 0 0 $17.04 $73.84 YP (75 percent) — (142.5) 0 0 $14.20 $71 $127.80 YP (80 percent) — (152.0) 0 $11.36 $68.16 $124.96 $181.76 YP (85 percent) — (161.5) $8.52 $65.32 $122.12 $178.92 $235.72 RP (70 percent) — (133.0) 0 0 0 $22.50 $97.50 RP (75 percent) — (142.5) 0 0 $18.75 $93.75 $168.75 RP (80 percent) — (152.0) 0 $15 $90 $165 $240 RP (85 percent) — (161.5) $11.25 $86.25 $161.25 $236.25 $311.25

11 B

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THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

12 B

Ag economist: Seed prices going up, but so will revenues Farmers will pay significantly more for the seed they’ll plant in 2013 but make up for it with higher returns on their investment, predicts a Purdue University agricultural economist. Prices for corn seed are expected to rise 5 to 7 percent, 7 to 10 percent for soybean seed and more than 10 percent for wheat seed, said Alan Miller, a farm business management specialist. That would mean a bag of corn seed would sell for between just under $200 to more than $300, depending on whether it is a conventional or biotech variety. Soybean seed would go for about $50 a bag, with wheat seed priced in the low $20s per bag. “Seed supplies could be tight,” Miller said. “This is especially a concern with soybeans, because farmers might surprise the seed industry by deciding to switch to planting more beans next spring.” He urged farmers to place their orders with seed dealers in the next

few weeks. The summer drought is contributing to the projected price increases but is not the only factor, Miller said. “We would have expected prices to go up even if we hadn’t had a drought,” he said. “We’ve seen seed prices go up year after year for many years. There was a period of time in the early 2000s when producers were transitioning from non-genetically modified-type seed products to GMO types of seed products, which generally are more expensive. “Then we had the rise in commodity prices. And, recently, we’ve had two extremely difficult seed corn producing years in a row in the Corn Belt.” Seed companies increased their planted acreage this year, hoping to make up for poorer production in 2011, Miller said. The drought ruined those plans and had an adverse effect on the crop that survived. “No one could have planned for a drought of that magnitude,” Miller

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— Alan Miller, Purdue University agricultural economist said. “Seed quality could be a concern next year.” Fortunately for farmers, they should earn enough from their 2013 crops to more than make up for the costlier seed. “We’ve done some preliminary estimates and we’re looking at some very high levels of return, with the poten-

tial to cover all costs next year, even on our low-yield estimates,” Miller said. “It’s pretty unusual to cover all costs across all three yield levels — low, average and high — in our estimates.” Miller projects that a farmer growing rotation corn on average-yield soil would generate $560 in crop returns above variable costs per acre in 2013. Rotation soybeans would bring in an estimated $466 an acre on averageyield soil, with wheat generating $372 per acre on that same type soil. If realized, those margins would represent an increase in revenue from this year of 24 percent for rotation corn, 17 percent for rotation soybeans and 51 percent for wheat. “The economics at current prices for next fall are very good, even with the higher cost of seed and some of the other inputs,” Miller said. “I’m expecting a good opportunity for profits, if we can avoid another drought.” This article was submitted by the Purdue University Agricultural Communications Department. ❖


Christensen Farms founder dies

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Editor’s note: Bob Christensen of Christensen Farms based at Sleepy Eye, Minn., passed away Nov. 3 while on a hunting trip. Following are portions of his obituary from Minnesota Valley Funeral Home in New Ulm, Minn. Log on to www.mvfh.org to read the obituary in its entirety. Bob Christensen (Oct. 3, 1961-Nov. 3, 2012) Bob Christensen may have been an unlikely person to become a giant in American agriculture. With his beginnings on a small farm outside of Sleepy Eye, Minn., and tending to the farming needs of the family as opposed to getting a college education for himself, one might have predicted a competent solid citizen; not a world class entrepreneur. Using the values and experience of his simple beginnings, Bob became a pioneer for modern animal agriculture and a role model to those who seek excellence. In his work life, evidence of Bob’s imagination, intuitive business sense and hard work are apparent. Bob built a pork production company that is, today, one of the largest family owned livestock production operations in the world. Evidence of Bob’s creativity is apparent elsewhere in the industry. Bob was a pioneer with respect to animal housing, genetics, nutrition and nutrient management, and a host of other specialized activities that have made livestock production more cost-effective and profitable. His methods have been adopted by many of his fellow producers. While Bob was committed to his business enterprises, he was equally committed to support of education about agriculture and making opportunities available for youth. In recognition of his many contributions, Bob has received numerous awards. Noteworthy is the recognition from his peers. Bob was the 2007 winner of the Minnesota AgriGrowth Council Distinguished Service Award recognizing individuals who significantly contribute to strengthening Minnesota’s food and agriculture industry. Bob was the 2009 Production Agriculture recipient of the University of Minnesota Siehl Prize for Excellence in Agriculture. Both of these awards recognize the contribution of someone who is the best of the best in leading American agriculture. Bob was not all business. He loved the outdoors and was especially committed to the sports of hunting and clay shooting. Bob participated in shooting events worldwide. Bob is survived by his loving wife Mary Ann Martin Christensen, his son Robert Alan Christensen Jr. (Cubby), and his daughter Kellen Camille Christensen. He is survived by his parents Larry and LaVonne Christensen,his sister Lisa and her husband Wally Jaster, his brother Glen Christensen and his special friend Valerie Lyman, his brother Lynn Christensen and his wife Laura, and his brother Mike Christensen and his wife Lisa. Bob is also survived by nieces Kalli Christensen, Emma Christensen, and by nephews Caleb Christensen, Keegan Christensen, and Joshua Christensen. Bob is also survived by his mother-in-law Mary Martin, his brother-in-law John W. Martin III and his wife Mary Jane, his brother-in-law Thomas Martin and his wife Lisa, his nieces and nephews John W. Martin IV and his wife Kristin, Jarrett Martin and his wife Sophie, Jamie Martin, Nora Martin, Elizabeth Martin, and Madeline Martin. Bob was preceded in death by brother-in-law Carey McLeod Martin and father-in-law John W. Martin Jr. Funeral services were held Nov. 8, at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in New Ulm. The family encourages contributions in support of scholarships for agricultural education or other character building youth programs as selected by the family. Financial gifts should be addressed to: The Robert A. Christensen Memorial Fund, Attention: Mary Ann Christensen at P.O. Box 3000, Sleepy Eye, MN 56085. ❖

13 B


THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

14 B

2012 Minnesota Cattle Convention and Trade Show

Minnesota cattle convention, trade show set for Dec. 7-8 The Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Association will be hosting the Minnesota Cattle Convention and Trade Show Dec. 7-8 at Arrowwood Resort near Alexandria. The convention will feature nationally renowned sustainability consultant Jude Capper from Montana on Dec. 8. Capper has released groundbreaking scientific results on the sustainability of the U.S. beef sector. Other special guests include National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Vice President Bob McCan from Texas. “I hope cattle producers in Minnesota and the surrounding areas take advantage of the great line-up of educational speakers we have assembled for this convention. In addition to the educational opportunities, this is

a great way for our cattle community to come together to discuss issues confronting our livelihoods and make long-lasting relationships along the way,” said MSCA President Don Schiefelbein. “In a time where there are less and less cattle producers, it is more important than ever that we are organized and engaged in our producer associations. Participating in the Convention is a perfect avenue to do so.” On Dec. 7, the program includes informative topics such as an Upper Midwest market outlook from Tod Kalous from CattleFax; a seminar from Wade Shafer of the American Simmental Association on the use of crossbreeding to increase profitability; and Jessica Igo from the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association will be conducting a meat

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Minnesota Cattle Convention and Trade Show Dec. 7-8 Arrowwood Resort, Alexandria, Minn. www.mnsca.org Page 15B — Schedule of events Pages 15B-17B — Speaker bios cutting demonstration and talking about desired carcass characteristics. Pfizer Animal Health will also be hosting a Cattlemen’s College with John Rodgers on optimizing efficiencies in heifers. On Dec. 8 attendees will have the opportunity to hear a status report on expanded grazing of conservation lands and Minnesota’s Prairie Recovery Plan from Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Commissioner Tom Landwehr and John Jaschke, executive director of the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources. Rounding out the day, will be two education sessions, including a panel discussion on Minnesota’s efforts to expand managed haying and grazing

of conservation lands, and a presentation from John A. Johnson, a nationally renowned cattle consultant from Missouri, who will share strategies on managing risk in marketing cattle and purchasing feedstocks. “In this era of high feed and cattle prices, the risks and opportunities are much greater. The speakers will address several issues that will help cattle producers make the best management decisions to improve the chances for profitability,” Schiefelbein said. During the annual business meeting on Dec. 8, participants will hear from Bill Hartmann, executive director of the Minnesota Board of Animal Health, on proposed rules related to animal identification and traceability, and take action on several policy resolutions for the coming year. Delegates will also be electing a new leadership team for the MSCA, as current-president Schiefelbein is set to pass the gavel. For additional information about the schedule and registration materials, log on to www.mnsca.org. Attendees are encouraged to register by Nov. 25. ❖

Beef ambassadors announced The Minnesota CattleWomen are proud to announce that Kelly Morrison of Belle Plaine, Shelby Schiefelbein of Kimball and Jenna White of Wadena were chosen as the 2013 Minnesota Beef Ambassador Team at the annual Minnesota Beef Ambassador competition. The competition was held at the CHS Miracle of Birth Center, at the Minnesota State Fairgrounds, in conjunction with the Minnesota Beef Expo on Oct. 18. There were seven senior contestants ages 16-19, who were judged in the areas of classroom presentation, media interview technique and issues response. Morrison was chosen as the senior lead winner and is eligible to compete in the national competition next year. Contestants from throughout the state competed for a place on this team of agriculture and beef advocates and a $500 scholarship, sponsored by the Minnesota State Cattlemen, will be given to the winner, Morrison. Additional scholarships totaling $625 were awarded to the other team members from the MCW and the Minnesota Beef Council through the Beef Checkoff program. This year’s contest also hosted a jun-

ior competition for youth beef industry advocates ages 13-15. Two contestants were also judged in the same three categories: media interview, classroom presentation and issues response. The first place winner was Zack Klaers of Arlington and the second place winner was John Morrison of Belle Plaine. They both earned scholarship awards for their scores. During the competition MCW President Penny Zimmerman went over materials on how to do a lesson plan, which is required on the state and national level when they do classroom presentations. Following the competition Susan Anderson and Joanne Buggey gave a short workshop to everyone on how to do a classroom presentation. While preparing for the Minnesota Beef Ambassador competition, contestants learn about beef and the beef industry with support from their families, the MCW, Minnesota Cattlemen and the Minnesota Beef Council. Over this next year the team members are required to assist at consumer events, prepare classroom presentations, write a media article and complete the Master of Beef Advocacy program. ❖


2012 Minnesota Cattle Convention and Trade Show

Council 2:30-3:30 p.m.: Dedicated Trade Show Time, Tennis Center 3:30-5 p.m.: Pfizer Cattlemen’s College: New Thoughts on Optimizing Reproductive Efficiencies in Heifers, John Rodgers, Pfizer Animal Health, Tennis Center 5-6 p.m.: President’s Reception and Social Hour, Rooms 152-154. Sponsored by Form A Feed 6-10 p.m.: Dinner, Ceremonies and Auction, Lake Darling Ballroom. Sponsors: Minnesota Farm Bureau Federation, Minnesota Corn Growers Dec. 8 7:30 a.m.: Registration Open, Lower Conference Lobby 7:30-9 a.m.: Breakfast, Tennis Center 8 a.m.: Status Report: Grazing of Conservation Lands & Prairie Recovery Plan, Commissioner Tom Landwehr, MN Dept. of Natural Resources & John Jaschke, MN Board of Water & Soil Resources, Executive Director, Tennis Center 9 a.m.: Trade Show Open, Tennis Center 9-10:30 a.m.: MSCA Annual Meeting, Lower Conference Center • 9-9:20 a.m.: Update from Bill Hartmann, State Veterinarian and Executive Director of the the MN Board of Animal Health on proposed rules related to

identification and traceability of livestock. • 9:20-9:40 a.m.: Legislative and Regulatory Report from Bruce Kleven, MSCA legislative consultant • 9:40-10:30 a.m.: Business Meeting (Resolutions Report, Executive Directors Report) 10-11 a.m.: Minnesota CattleWomen Annual Meeting, Lake Nokomis Room 10:30 a.m.-Noon: Dedicated Trade Show Time, Tennis Center Noon-1:30 p.m.: Lunch, Tennis Center 12:30 p.m.: How Cattle Enhance our Environment, Jude Capper, Lake Darling Ballroom. Sponsored by Merial Educational sessions 1:30-3 p.m.: Session A: Panel Discussion on Managed Grazing of Conservation Lands, Minnewaska Room 1:30-3 p.m.: Session B: Managing Risk in Marketing Cattle & Purchasing Feedstocks, John A Johnson, Hurley & Associates, Miltona/Osakis Room 3 p.m.: Trade Show and Silent Auction and Convention Closes 5-8 p.m.: Optional: Family Evening Activity BINGO and Bonfire with S’mores, (Pre-registration required), Tennis Center ❖

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Dec. 6 Noon-1:30 p.m.: Nominations Committee, Boardroom 2-5 p.m.: MSCA Policy and Resolutions Committee, Miltona Room 6 p.m.: Social Hour and Exhibitor/Sponsor Appreciation Dinner, Itasca/Vermillion Room 8 p.m.: Hospitality Room, Nokomis Room Dec. 7 8 a.m.-6 p.m.: Individual Registration Open, Lower Conference Lobby Auction Item Registration Open, Lake Darling Ballroom 8-11 a.m.: Trade Show Set-up, Tennis Center 9:30-10 a.m.: Cow-Calf/Feeder Council Meetings, Miltona and Osakis Rooms 10:30-11:30 a.m.: MSCA Quarterly Meeting, Miltona/Osakis Rooms 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.: Lunch and Trade Show Opens, Tennis Center. Sponsored by ROTO-Mix & Blue Hilltop Inc. Noon-12:45 p.m.: Market Analysis and Outlook for Midwest Cattle Sector Tod Kalous, CattleFax, Tennis Center. Sponsored by Purina Animal Nutrition Educational sessions 1-2:30 p.m.: Session A: Increasing Profit via Genetics: The Value of Crossbreeding; Wade Shafer, American Simmental Association, Minnewaska Room 1-2:30 p.m.: Session B: Understanding Carcass Characteristics/Meat Cutting Demonstration, Jessica Igo, National Cattlemen’s Beef Assoc., Miltona/Osakis Room. Sponsored by Minnesota Beef

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

Schedule of events

15 B

Speaker biographies

See SPEAKERS, pg. 16B

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Bob McCan, NCBA vice president McCan of Victoria, Texas, oversees the cattle operations and recreational hunting and wildlife operations for his family’s company, McFaddin Enterprises Ltd. McCan was born in Victoria County on Oct. 16, 1957. He is a graduate of Texas A&M University in College Station with a Bachelor of Science degree in Range Science. Since 1993, Bob has served on the National Cattleman’s Beef Association board. He served as vice chairman of the Private Lands and Environment Committee. From 2005 through 2008, he served as a regional vice president for NCBA and served on the Executive Committee during this time. McCan has also taken an active role with the Grazing Lands Conservation Initiative, and also serves on the King Ranch Institute for Ranch Management Council. One accomplishment Bob and his wife, Julie, are most proud of are their two children, Robert August and Mary Isabel. The children are the sixth generation of their family to work on the McFaddin Ranch.


2012 Minnesota Cattle Convention and Trade Show

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

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Speaker biographies SPEAKERS, from pg. 15B Tod Kalous, CattleFax Kalous joined CattleFax in April 2005. Tod is part of the research and analysis team. He is a Colorado native raised on a cow/calf and diversified crop farming operation in Northeastern Colorado. He received a bachelor’s degree in animal science/agricultural business from Colorado State University and a master’s degree in agricultural economics from Kansas State University. Prior to coming to work for CattleFax he worked for USDA-GIPSA as an agricultural economist. Wade Shafer, American Simmental Association Shafer currently serves as COO at the American Simmental Association in Bozeman, Mont. Prior to his work with the Association, Shafer owned and managed a 500 head seedstock

operation in Detroit Lakes, Minn. He obtained his PhD from Colorado State University in Animal Breeding and Genetics. Jessica Igo, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Igo is the director, Meat Science in the Department of Research, Education & Innovation at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association in Centennial, Colo. Her responsibilities include assisting in meat science research, research dissemination, and technical activities for the beef checkoff ’s product enhancement, beef safety and new product development programs that are intended to increase consumer demand for beef and beef products. Jessica received a B.S. in Animal Science from Texas A&M University, a M.S. in Animal Science with an emphasis in Meat Science from Texas Tech University, and a Ph.D. in Animal

Science with an emphasis in Meat Science from Colorado State University. John Rodgers, Pfizer Animal Health Rodgers is a senior veterinarian, Cattle/Equine Technical Services, with Pfizer Animal Health. After graduation from the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine in 1983, he was a partner in a large animal practice for 13 years in south central Minnesota. Following three years as a technical service veterinarian for a major feed company, Rodgers joined Pfizer Animal Health. In 2008, Rodgers completed his Master’s of Science Degree in Animal Science from the University of Minnesota with a special interest in applied reproductive biotechnologies in beef cattle. Tom Landwehr, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

commissioner Landwehr spent 17 years at the DNR beginning in the early 1980s. He worked as a research biologist, Wildlife Manager and Wetland Wildlife Program Leader. Landwehr later served as state conservation director for Ducks Unlimited and assistant state director for The Nature Conservancy before being appointed as commissioner of the Minnesota Dept of Natural Resources in 2011. John Jaschke, executive director of MN Board of Water & Soil Resources Jaschke serves as executive director of the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources. He was formerly the Dakota County Water Resources Manager and the Administrator of the Vermillion River Watershed. His prior positions were as Land and Water SecSee SPEAKERS, pg. 17B

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His expertise is in developing largescale conservation initiatives, and has successfully negotiated hundreds of real estate transactions for conservation. He is currently the Minnesota project director for The Conservation Fund. Bill Penning, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources Penning is the Prairie Habitat Team supervisor for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Section of Wildlife. He coordinates the section’s farm bill activities, is on the steering committee for the Farm Bill Assistance Partnership, and supervises the Walk In Access and Working Lands programs. He has degrees in biology, anthropology and wildlife conservation from the University of Minnesota. Neal Feeken, The Nature Conservancy Feeken is the Prairie Recovery Project coordinator for The Nature Conservancy of Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota. Since joining the Conservancy in 2008 he has been working to develop market-based drivers for grassland conservation by forging partnerships between industry, government and the conservation community to test and

demonstrate mechanisms for utilizing native and restored grasslands for forage and bioenergy. His previous experiences include serving as assistant regional director for the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation and as the manager of a local Soil and Water Conservation District in south central Minnesota. Neal has a bachelor’s degree in wildlife and fisheries science from South Dakota State University and a master of arts in nonprofit management from Hamline University. John A Johnson, Cattle Marketing consultant After graduating from Arkansas State University with a degree in animal science, Johnson owned and operated a row-crop farm in the Arkansas Delta where he also had a farrow-to-finish hog operation and a cattle backgrounding enterprise. In the mid-’80s, he became an active farm real estate broker, and owned a small manufacturing plant. He joined Hurley and Associates in 2011, where he was responsible for coordinating the company’s cattle marketing plan and risk management strategies. He presently works as a private cattle marketing consultant. ❖

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The Wulfs have been using rotational grazing to help with grass management for a number of years. Jim has worked extensively with US Fish and Wildlife and DNR on grazing government lands. J.B. Bright, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Bright is a wildlife refuge specialist at the Morris Wetland Management District responsible for upland habitat management on 246 Waterfowl Production Area’s in eight counties totaling just over 52,000 acres. He just had his 10th anniversary at Morris where he administers grazing, haying, prescribed burning, weed management, restorations, and seed harvest. He is a native of Washington state and earned a bachelor’s degree in biology from Eastern Washington University. Prior to arriving in Morris his experience in the Partners for Fish and Wildlife program while stationed at Lostwood WMD in northwest North Dakota formed a foundation of grassland management knowledge for him to draw upon. Mark Hayek, MN NRCS NW regional grazing specialist Hayek was born and raised in Lake Elmo, Minn. In 1998 he graduated from North Dakota State University with an undergraduate degree in range management. Prior to joining the NRCS in 2002 Hayek worked for NDSU as a Range Technician and for Minnesota DNR applying land management treatments to prairies across the state. NRCS promoted Hayek to an area grazing lands specialist in 2004, where he now works primarily with livestock producers and NRCS field offices to apply grazing lands conservation practices (such as rotational grazing systems) in northwestern Minnesota. He works out of the NRCS Field Support Office in Thief River Falls, Minn. This past summer he was the planning committee chair for the 2012 TriState Conservation Grazing Workshop which was held in Hankinson, ND. Steve Hobbs, The Conservation Fund Hobbs has been involved in conservation work for more than 27 years, first working in Virginia and Nevada for The Nature Conservancy, and over the last 14 years working for local government and non-profit organizations in Minnesota.

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SPEAKERS, from pg. 16B tion administrator and Wetlands program manager at the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources, and Area Hydrologist with the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources in Duluth and New Ulm. He has B.S. degrees in geology and geophysics from the University of Minnesota and a M.A. in public administration from Minnesota State University-Mankato. He grew up on a dairy farm in central Minnesota (Morrison County) with 10 younger siblings. Jude Capper, Sustainability Consultant and Adjunct Professor Capper is an independent Sustainability Consultant based in Bozeman, Mont.; and an adjunct professor of animal sciences in the Department of Animal Sciences at Washington State University. Jude’s current research and outreach work focuses on modeling the environmental impact of livestock production systems, specifically dairy and beef. Her principal professional goal is to communicate the importance of livestock industry sustainability and the factors affecting sustainability to enhance the knowledge and understanding of stakeholders within food production from the rancher and farmer through to the retailer, policymaker and consumer. Current research projects include comparisons of historical and modern production practices in dairy and beef industries; and the effect of technology use and management practices upon environmental impact. She has an active social media presence and spends a considerable amount of time de-bunking some of the more commonly-heard myths relating to resource use and the environmental impact of livestock production. Jim Wulf, Clear Springs Cattle Co. Wulf is owner of Clear Springs Cattle Co. near Starbuck, Minn. He previously worked with his brothers and their families at Wulf Limousin south of Morris as cow herd manager. In November 2011, Jim and his wife, Twyla, and sons, Travis and Brady purchased Frederickson Hereford Farm and are raising embryo calves for Wulf Cattle and starting a Simmental herd of their own. They also custom feed and calve cows at two sites south of Starbuck.

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

Speaker biographies


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THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

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New tool predicts a piglet’s nursing ability Unlike humans, when pigs are born, they enter the world without any immunity against foreign elements like disease-causing pathogens. Their chance for survival relies heavily on getting enough colostrom — a milklike substance produced by mammals after giving birth. Newborns that fail to nurse and receive colostrum from the sow within the first 24 hours usually die. That’s because piglets are born with limited energy stores, and colostrum also provides the energy they need to stay alive. For the swine industry, preweaning mortality has long been a major problem, costing an estimated $1.6 billion each year. Now, a new tool may help give these at-risk animals a second chance. To improve neonatal piglet survival, Agricultural Research Service physiologists Jeffrey Vallet, Jeremy Miles, and Lea Rempel at the U.S. Meat Ani-

mal Research Center in Clay Center, Neb., have developed a measuring technique referred to as the “immunocrit” that can determine whether neonatal piglets have received adequate colostrum from the sow. Colostrum contains immunoglobulins, which are antibodies made by the sow’s immune system to protect against bacteria, viruses and other foreign substances. Humans receive these antibodies in their mother’s womb, but pigs and other livestock rely on passive transfer through nursing after birth, said Vallet, research leader of USMARC’s Reproduction Unit. Thus, piglets are born with no immunoglobulin, and piglet serum immunoglobulin reflects their colostrum intake. “Colostrum gives piglets their first antibodies so that they can have some immunological protection during the first couple of days of life,” Miles said. “If they don’t suckle, they don’t have any immunoglobulins.”

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A sow nursing her litter of piglets. The immunocrit at work The immunocrit, which measures newborn piglet serum immunoglobulin, is simple, inexpensive, rapid and accurate. It is similar to the hematocrit, used for years by doctors to measure the volume of blood cells and determine whether a patient is anemic, Vallet said. Blood samples are taken from piglets on day one after birth, mixed with ammonia sulfate to precipitate immunoglobulin, put into a microcapillary tube and spun so the precipitated immunoglobulin settles to the bottom. The volume of the precipitated immunoglobulin is then measured and divided by the total volume in the tube. “We can go through a litter of piglets and take blood samples quickly and easily, and the assay itself is very simple to use,” Vallet said. Scientists have demonstrated that immunocrit measurements are predictive of piglets’ mortality and nursing ability and that the average immunocrit of piglets in a litter reflects the sow’s colostrum production capability. Because the test is so rapid, it is possible to identify compromised piglets and take steps to rescue them, Vallet said. Help for the smallest The immunocrit is good at identifying piglets within a litter that haven’t eaten at all or haven’t had the opportunity to nurse, Miles said. In one experiment, scientists used the immunocrit

Agricultural Research Service

to assess colostrum intake in a group of piglets — the smallest from each litter — and then measured the contents of each piglet’s stomach. They found that some piglet’s stomachs were nearly empty. Those same piglets had an immunocrit measurement of nearly zero, validating that the immunocrit accurately detects piglets that receive no colostrum within a 24-hour period. Immunocrit results correlated well with results from a more complicated and expensive traditional method — protein A sepharose combined with electrophoresis — in detecting piglets that had not nursed at all. In another study, using more than 2,000 piglets, researchers found that the immunocrit could predict preweaning survival. They also noted a connection between immunocrit measurements and piglet weight: Heavier piglets were more likely to survive the challenge of not getting colostrum within the critical time frame. Enhancing management practices The immunocrit can be used to test management practices, such as split suckling, and other strategies used by swine producers to help prevent colostrum deficiency, Vallet said. Split suckling is a labor-intensive method that involves marking the first-born group of piglets, putting them aside, and then allowing the last piglets born uninhibited access to the sow. The practice is designed to See NURSING, pg. 19B


Research aims to reduce odds of preweaning mortality

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Agricultural Research Service

Physiologist Jeffrey Vallet collects a blood sample from a 1-day-old piglet. The sample will be used to run a new immunoglobulin immunocrit technique that will tell whether the piglet received sufficient colostrum from its mother.

Immunocrit data collected from 500 litters — about 5,000 piglets — provide a valid sample for genomic research, Vallet said. Data from each individual piglet is an indicator of its nursing ability, but the average across all piglets gives some indication of the sow’s colostrum-production ability. “When it comes to genetic associations, the more numbers, the better,” Rohrer said. “Not only do we have a much higher heritability for the actual piglet’s ability or potential, we also have a lot more records.” Rohrer plans to group DNA from piglets with high immunocrit values and compare it with DNA collected from piglets with low values. “We can efficiently genotype those pools of DNA, estimate frequencies and hopefully identify regions of the genome that are affecting the pig’s ability to acquire and absorb colostrum,” he said. If successful, researchers would be able to recommend genetic markers that allow pork producers to identify and breed sows that ably produce colostrum and piglets with improved neonatal nursing abilities — an outcome that would help reduce the odds of preweaning mortality. This article was published in the October issue of Agricultural Research magazine. It was written by ARS information staff member Sandra Avant. This research is part of Food Animal Production, an ARS national program described at www.nps.ars.usda.gov. ❖

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

NURSING, from pg. 18B improve access to colostrum for later-born piglets, because studies have shown that there is some influence of birth order on colostrum intake. “The immunocrit can be performed 24 hours after the split suckling procedure to find out if progress is being made in improving colostrum in different piglets,” Vallet said. “Producers can also use the immunocrit as a monitoring device for day-one piglet care. For example, they can randomly select piglets and benchmark how those piglets are doing.” The new technique isn’t just for pigs. It could also fit well into management practices of cattle producers. The immunocrit was successfully used to monitor colostrum intake of 96 calves 24 hours after birth. Taking a genetic approach “Another strategy is to use genomics to modify the colostrum-piglet-mother interaction during that first 24-hour window,” Vallet said. “We should be able to use the immunocrit to get some idea of the sow’s ability to produce colostrum and then genetically select for colostrum production.” Preliminary research conducted by Gary Rohrer, a geneticist at USMARC, suggests that individual immunocrit values are heritable, presumably because nursing ability is heritable. From analyses of piglets and their mothers, Rohrer found the most significant portion of the variation — 50 percent — is accounted for by the piglet’s genetics. The mother is responsible for 20 percent of the variation.

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Recycling ammonia emissions as fertilizer

Regis Lefebure/Agricultural Research Service

Ammonia emissions from livestock waste can be more than a nuisance—they can harm animal health. But ARS scientists have shown that gas-permeable membranes can remove and concentrate the ammonia for eventual sale as fertilizer.

One of the costs of running a farm can include buying nitrogen in the form of anhydrous ammonia to fertilize crops. But there are other agricultural costs associated with nitrogen, especially when the nitrogen in livestock waste produces pungent — and potentially harmful — ammonia emissions. But on June 20, 2011, Agricultural Research Service soil scientists Matias Vanotti and Ariel Szogi filed U.S. Patent Application No. 13/164,363 for an invention that could help change on-farm nitrogen management. It’s a system that uses gas-permeable membranes to capture and recycle ammonia from livestock wastewater before the ammonia goes into the air. The two scientists, who work at the ARS Coastal Plains Soil, Water and Plant Research Center in Florence, S.C., found that they could use these membranes to reduce ammonia emissions from livestock waste and capture concentrated liquid nitrogen that could be sold as fertilizer. The membranes are similar to materials already used in waterproof outdoor gear and in biomedical devices that add oxygen and remove carbon dioxide from blood. Using these materials, the scientists recorded an average removal rate of 45 to 153 milligrams of ammonia per liter per day when manure ammonia concentrations ranged from 138 to 302 mg ammonia per liter. When manure pH increased, ammonia recovery also increased. For instance, the scientists were able to recover around 1.2 percent of the total ammonia emissions per hour from manure with a pH of 8.3. But the recovery rate increased 10 times — to 13 percent per hour — when the pH was 10.0. In a follow-up study, Vanotti and Szogi immersed the membrane module into liquid manure that had 1,290 mg of ammonia per liter. After nine days, the total ammonia concentration decreased about 50 percent to 663 mg per liter, and the pH decreased from 8.1 to 7.0. This meant that the gaseous, or free, ammonia in the liquid — the portion of the total ammonia linked to ammonia emissions — decreased 95 percent from 114.2 to 5.4 mg per liter. Using the same process in 10 consecutive batches of raw swine manure, they recovered concentrated nitrogen in a clear solution that contained 53,000 mg of ammonia per liter. The scientists want to scale up the process to see whether the membrane modules would lower ammonia emissions when installed in manure pits below the slotted floors in swine barns or in manure tanks and lagoons. If so, they believe that livestock producers could use the technology to help meet air-quality regulations, save fuel, protect the health of livestock and their human caretakers, improve livestock productivity and recover nitrogen that can be sold as fertilizer. This article was published in the November-December 2012 issue of Agricultural Research magazine. It was written by ARS information staff member Ann Perry. This research is part of Agricultural and Industrial Byproducts, an ARS national program described at www.nps.ars.usda.gov. ❖


Where does E. coli come from? It’s complicated other bodies of water. The bacteria can survive in surface water and sediment because of high nutrient content from manure from livestock facilities, runoff from residential areas, warm temperatures and inputs from other urban sources. Even though most strains of E. coli are nonpathenogenic, bacterial counts in the Santa Ana River Watershed have exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency water-quality standards. Ibekwe, who works at the U.S. Salinity Laboratory in Riverside, California, studied hundreds of E. coli isolates he collected from the middle Santa Ana River Watershed to deterSee E. COLI, pg. 22B

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

“People blame cows for so many things,” said Agricultural Research Service scientist Mark Ibekwe. However, Ibekwe has now identified telltale links between the Escherichia coli bacteria living in the streams and sediments of one southern California watershed and their origins — findings that could help restore the reputation of the local livestock. His studies suggest that the pathogens that end up in local waterways are more often carried there via runoff from urban areas, not from animal production facilities. Public-health officials use E. coli as an indicator of water quality, and cows are often seen as the culprits when E. coli is found in local lakes, rivers and

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A section of the Prado Wetland, part of the vast network of waterways in the Santa Ana River Watershed. ARS microbiologist Mark Ibekwe and his university colleagues sampled 20 sites throughout the watershed for more than a year in a study to determine the origins of Escherichia coli strains.

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22 B

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‘Only so much treatment plants can do’ E. COLI, from pg. 21B mine their source. Since the region contains both concentrated animal-feeding operations and a sizable human population, natural-resource managers are concerned about the diverse number of E. coli populations throughout the watershed. “There’s only so much a municipal water treatment plant can do,” Ibekwe said. “There are 11 water treatment plants that discharge into the middle Santa Ana River in our study area, and that discharge makes up 90 percent of the summer flow.” Sourcing solutions Ibekwe, California State Polytechnic University researcher Shelton Murinda and North Carolina State University researcher Alexandria Graves spent more than a year collecting 450 water and sediment samples from 20 sites throughout the watershed. The sites included urban areas, agricultural areas, parks, national forest lands — which provided information about bacterial contributions from wildlife and other background sources in undeveloped areas — and three wastewater treatment plants. Then the scientists extracted E. coli bacteria from each sample and used pulsed-field gel electrophoresis —

known as PFGE — to find distinctive segments of the organism’s DNA that could be used to assign isolates to different groups. These DNA patterns, called “fingerprints,” are detected by separating bacterial DNA into tiny pieces, placing the pieces in a gel, and then sending electricity through the gel. The electrical current separates the DNA pieces according to size to create a banding pattern. This is the fingerprint of each isolate. The individuals can be sorted into different groups, called “clonal populations,” based on their fingerprint similarities. Using PFGE, the researchers identified 600 different isolates of E. coli in their samples, many of which could be placed into six clonal populations. They found the greatest variety of different types of E. coli in runoff discharged from areas dominated by urban development or human activities. “I think this is our most important finding — that E. coli populations in urban runoff are more genetically diverse than E. coli populations in agricultural runoff,” Ibekwe said. Ibekwe and colleagues also found that E. coli isolates collected from water and sediment samples at the same location and at the same time See E. COLI, pg. 23B

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Peggy Greb/Agricultural Research Service

Technician Damon Baptista (left) and microbiologist Mark Ibekwe collect a water sample from a creek that drains into the middle Santa Ana River Watershed. They are studying how the thousands of surrounding dairies affect the creek’s water quality.


E. COLI, from pg. 22B nevertheless exhibited a considerable level of genetic diversity. In addition, water samples often contained a more diverse assortment of E. coli isolates than sediment samples. This suggests that the E. coli found in sediment samples could belong to permanent population reservoirs, not transient populations that fluctuate along with discharge into the water channel. A range of resistance As part of the study, Ibekwe also tested all the E. coli isolates for their resistance to various antibiotics: rifampicin, tetracycline, erythromycin, cephalothin, streptomycin, ampicillin and amoxicillin clavulanate. He found that between 88 to 95 percent of the isolates were resistant to rifampicin and that around 75 percent were resistant to tetracycline, an antibiotic commonly used to treat a range of infections in humans. Tetracycline resistance was by far the most common type of resistance observed in E. coli isolates collected near wastewater treatment plants. The scientists also found that 24 percent of E. coli collected in sediment samples associated with urban runoff — a total of 144 isolates — showed resistance to as many as seven antibiotics. The antibiotics associated with most multiple resistances were rifampicin, tetracycline and erythromycin, and the five isolates with the highest multiple antibiotic resistance

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were found in streambed sediments collected from areas that receive urban runoff. Finally, Ibekwe was surprised when they found 53 E. coli isolates that, based on DNA fingerprinting, they could not assign to any of the six clonal groups. But like the other isolates, these 53 outliers showed a range of resistance to several antibiotics. The sheer range of different antibioticresistant E. coli isolates identified by Ibekwe and his colleagues suggests that public-health officials who track water quality might need to increase their database of E. coli fingerprints. “If we want to use PFGE for source tracking in a large watershed like the Santa Ana River, a very extensive DNA fingerprint library is needed, because our study shows that even a minor change in the DNA fingerprint can significantly affect clonal groupings,” Ibekwe said. “The fingerprint library will have to include isolates from potential multiple-contaminant sources and isolates that vary over time and space throughout the watershed. This will help in correctly identifying isolates that are a health concern.” This article was published in the November-December issue of Agricultural Research magazine. It was written by ARS information staff member Ann Perry. This research is part of Agricultural and Industrial Byproducts and Food Safety, two ARS national programs described at www.nps.ars.usda.gov. ❖

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In 1974, the MPCA launched a program that brought counties into direct participation with regulation of livestock feedlots. Today, 55 counties participate in the delegated county agreement. “They recognized the value of local people being partners in this,” Anderson said. “There was no funding for counties in the early days, but they took it on because it was the right thing to do.” Jackson County in southwestern Minnesota was the first to join the delegated county program. The county was in the process of reorganizing, and in 1974 created an environment office, including parks and feedlots. The Jackson County Extension agent, Ray Palmby, urged the county board to become delegated and name a county feedlot officer. The job went to the late Paul Hartman, a livestock dealer and banker from Okabena. “Paul and I drove around to meet with farmers,” Wayne said. “We were out soliciting in many counties, meeting with county commissioners, and making personal contact. We’ve come a long way since then, with providing training and some funding for counties.” Dennis Hanselman, who succeeded Hartman as Jackson County feedlot officer in 1978 until 1990, recalled the early years: “Overall, it worked fairly well. We were ahead of other counties in planning and zoning, and feedlot permits. Land application was a big problem, and odor complaints, mostly from open pits.” Hanselman later joined the MPCA staff in Detroit Lakes, retiring last year. The MPCA regulates the collection, transportation, storage, processing and disposal of manure and other livestock operation wastes. The rules apply to most aspects of livestock waste management, including the location, design, construction, operation and management of feedlots and manurehandling facilities. There are two primary concerns about feedlots in protecting water in our agricultural areas. The first is ensuring that manure on a feedlot or manure-storage area does not run into water. The second is ensuring that nutrient-rich manure is applied to cropland at a rate, time and method that prevents nutrients and other possible contaminants from entering streams, lakes and groundwater. This article was submitted by the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency. ❖

23 B

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While industrial waste and city sewage captured the spotlight leading up to the Clean Water Act in 1972, agricultural waste was also a growing public concern. For thousands of years, farmers used livestock manure as fertilizer for crops. However, in recent decades, commercial fertilizer took the lead because it was cheaper and easier to use. Often, manure came to be viewed as an odorous waste. And when allowed to run off into waterways, it causes pollution. The “waste” reputation is reflected in Minnesota’s rules enacted in 1971 to regulate livestock feedlots through the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency’s Agricultural Waste Division. Today, that’s changing as rising costs for commercial fertilizer and new technology are restoring the reputation of manure as a valuable fertilizer. Today’s feedlot regulations focus on management rather than disposal of livestock waste. The livestock industry has changed dramatically over the past 40 years. In 1972, Minnesota Agricultural Statistics reported about 100,000 livestock feedlots in the state. Today, there are fewer feedlots, but more of them are much larger. Of the approximately 25,000 registered feedlots in Minnesota today, about 1,200 of the largest house the majority of animal numbers, and operate under federal permits. The initial rules in 1971 required livestock producers to control runoff from feedlots and properly use manure as a fertilizer. It set priorities for making feedlot improvements, triggered by complaints about pollution problems or plans for feedlot expansion. “The whole idea of environmental protection was fairly new, and it received a lot of public acceptance,” said Wayne Anderson, who began working in the MPCA feedlot program in 1972. “We were able to find a way to link the public acceptance of environmental protection to farmer awareness of manure as a resource.” The late Milton “Jim” Fellows, a Worthington area farmer, served on the MPCA citizen’s board in the late-1960s and early ’70s. “It was quite an experience to be writing the first regulations,” Fellows said in an interview in 2003. He received one of the first solid waste-ag permits, not for a pollution problem at his cattle feedlot, but “because if we expected others to do it, I would do it myself. We used the site as example of feedlot pollution control.”

Genetic diversity in E. coli

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

Feedlot rules help manage livestock ‘waste’ as a valuable resource


24 B

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TRACTORS 2WD Continued

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‘07 NH TJ330, 1747 hrs. ..........$139,500 CIH 550 Quad, '11, 500 hrs ..........................................$327,000 CIH 550 Quad, '11, 600 hrs ..........................................$325,000 CIH 535 Steiger, '11, 565 hrs ........................................$309,500 CIH 535 Quad, '11, 685 hrs ..........................................$309,500 CIH 535 Quad, '10, 800 hrs ..........................................$299,000 CIH STX500, '05, 2950 hrs............................................$172,500 CIH 485 Steiger, '09, 2000 hrs ......................................$210,000 CIH STX450Q, '04, 5420 hrs ........................................$129,500 CIH STX450Q, '02, 5200 hrs ........................................$149,000 CIH STX440Q, '01, 3870 hrs ........................................$150,000 CIH 385 Quad, '10, 1825 hrs ........................................$237,500 CIH 350 Steiger, '12, 220 hrs ........................................$235,000 CIH 350 Steiger, '12, 170 hrs ........................................$235,000 CIH 350 Steiger, '12 ......................................................$235,000 CIH 335 Steiger, '11, 550 hrs ........................................$225,000 CIH STX325, '05, 2530 hrs............................................$132,500 CIH 9380, '97, 4755 hrs ..................................................$79,500 CIH 9370Q, '98, 4925 hrs................................................$96,500 CIH 9370, '97, 2830 hrs ................................................$105,000 CIH 9350, '96, 5970 hrs ..................................................$79,500 CIH 9180, '89, 7660 hrs ..................................................$39,900 CIH 9170, '89, 5480 hrs ..................................................$52,500 CIH 9170, '89, 7930 hrs ..................................................$56,500 Cat 75E, '98, 3290 hrs ....................................................$85,000 Challenger MT865B, '06, 3805 hrs ................................$199,500 Ford 846, '93, 5800 hrs ..................................................$39,900 JD 9630, '11, 1050 hrs ....................................$269,900 JD 9630, '08, 2700 hrs ....................................$235,000 JD 9620T, '06, 3485 hrs ..................................$195,000 NH T9060, '08, 1440 hrs ..............................................$212,000 NH T9050, '09, 1350 hrs ..............................................$209,000 NH 9020, '10, 360 hrs ..................................................$165,000 NH TJ330, '07, 1734 hrs ..............................................$139,500 Steiger Cougar, '87 ..........................................................$49,500 Steiger ST280 ..................................................................$12,500

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‘76 Allis 7060, 3140 hrs...............$9,900 CIH 110 Maxxum, '08, 900 hrs........................................$37,500 CIH 110 Maxxum, '08, 900 hrs........................................$37,500 CIH 110 Maxxum, '08, 900 hrs........................................$37,500 IH 5488, '82, 7965 hrs ....................................................$13,900 IH 5288, '82, 3680 hrs ....................................................$26,500 CIH 5130, 7820 hrs ........................................................$27,500 CIH 5130, '92, 7310 hrs ..................................................$22,500 Case 2390, '81, 5930 hrs ................................................$15,500 Case 1570, '78, 3890 hrs ................................................$10,900 Case 800............................................................................$2,500 Case 854C, 7640 hrs ........................................................$9,500 Case Vac, '47 ....................................................................$1,150 IH H, '41 ............................................................................$1,600 IH 1586, '81, 9850 hrs ....................................................$14,500 IH 1086, '76, 7220 hrs ......................................................$7,950 IH 986, 7260 hrs..............................................................$11,000 IH 986, '81, 9130 hrs ......................................................$12,900 IH 986, '78 ......................................................................$11,500 IH 756, '68, 11765 hrs ......................................................$7,500 IH 706, 8400 hrs................................................................$7,000

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‘10 CIH 305 Magnum, 3387 hrs...$151,900 CIH CX90, '99, 3860 hrs..................................................$22,500 CIH 335 Mag, '11, 120 hrs ............................................$219,000 CIH 335 Mag, '09, 1200 hrs ..........................................$189,900 CIH 305 Mag, '10, 780 hrs ............................................$182,500 CIH 305 Mag, '10, 625 hrs ............................................$182,500 CIH 305 Mag, '10, 3385 hrs ..........................................$151,900 CIH 305 Mag, '10, 3410 hrs ..........................................$151,900 CIH 305 Mag, '09, 1710 hrs ..........................................$182,500 CIH 305 Mag Gold, '08, 1700 hrs..................................$169,500 CIH 290 Mag, '12, 390 hrs ............................................$192,500 CIH 290 Mag, '11, 400 hrs ............................................$197,500 CIH 290 Mag, '11, 465 hrs ............................................$192,500 CIH 275 Mag, '11, 425 hrs ............................................$185,000 CIH 275 Mag, '11, 905 hrs ............................................$172,500 CIH 275 Mag, '10, 700 hrs ............................................$172,500 CIH 275 Mag, '10, 1820 hrs ..........................................$165,000 CIH 245 Mag, '09, 2500 hrs ..........................................$129,500 CIH 215 Mag, '11, 810 hrs ............................................$130,000 CIH MX220, '02, 5345 hrs ..............................................$79,500 CIH MX200, '99, 8870 hrs ..............................................$65,000 CIH 190 Mag, '11, 235 hrs ............................................$167,000 CIH 210 Puma, '08, 2780 hrs ..........................................$89,000 CIH 200 Puma, '11, 380 hrs ..........................................$141,500 CIH 125 Pro, '11..............................................................$89,000 CIH 125 Value, '10, 995 hrs ............................................$76,500 CIH 95 Farmall, '08, 640 hrs............................................$34,500 CIH 9110, '87, 4360 hrs ..................................................$33,500 IH 2400, '74, 3565 hrs ......................................................$4,500 Challenger 65E, '01, 5385 hrs ........................................$37,500 Ford 8970, '94, 8150 hrs ................................................$57,500 JD 8520, '03, 400 hrs........................................$98,000 JD 8130, '08, 1865 hrs ....................................$132,500 JD 8130, '08, 1510 hrs ....................................$139,500 JD 5525, 1235 hrs............................................$39,900 McCormick XTX215, '06, 940 hrs....................................$85,000 NH T8040, '10, 1075 hrs ..............................................$179,000 NH TG275, '06, 1935 hrs ..............................................$118,500 NH TG245, '06, 2670 hrs ..............................................$105,500 White 185, '88, 4510 hrs ................................................$29,000

COMPACT TRACTORS / RTV’s CIH 40 Farmall CVT, '10, 125 hrs ....................................$31,900 Deutz 5220, '87, 1540 hrs ................................................$5,995 JD 4310, '04, 1345 hrs ......................................$21,900 JD 4310, '02, 1090 hrs ......................................$21,000 Kubota B2920HSD, '08, 195 hrs......................................$16,250 Kubota B2410, '03, 300 hrs ............................................$10,900 Kubota B7510, '04, 1040 hrs ..........................................$10,500 Kubota B7300HSD, 1265 hrs ............................................$6,500 Kubota BX2360T, '09, 485 hrs ..........................................$8,950 Kubota BX2230, '05, 310 hrs ............................................$8,950 Kubota BX2230, '04, 1985 hrs ..........................................$7,750 Kubota BX2200, '01, 565 hrs ............................................$7,900 Kubota L3430, '03, 2470 hrs ..........................................$22,500 Kubota RTV1100, '10, 725 hrs ........................................$14,900 Kubota RTV900, '06, 1015 hrs ..........................................$7,950 Kubota RTV900, '05, 970 hrs ............................................$8,550 Kubota RTV900W, '04, 840 hrs ........................................$8,200 Polaris ATP 500, '05, 2270 hrs..........................................$3,999 Steiner Hawk, '00 ..............................................................$3,250

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CIH 9120, '11, 345 hrs ..................................................$317,900 CIH 9120T, '11, 825 hrs ................................................$306,500 CIH 9120, '09, 725 hrs ..................................................$289,000 CIH 8230, '12, 375 hrs ..................................................$339,000 CIH 8120, '12, 370 hrs ..................................................$315,000 CIH 8120, '11, 290 hrs ..................................................$309,000 CIH 8120, '11, 215 hrs ..................................................$312,000 CIH 8120, '11, 395 hrs ..................................................$309,000 CIH 8120, '11, 510 hrs ..................................................$311,500 CIH 8120, '10, 1275 hrs ................................................$260,000 CIH 8120, '09, 1030 hrs ................................................$253,400 CIH 8120, '09, 1230 hrs ................................................$265,000 CIH 8120, '09, 1265 hrs ................................................$249,500 CIH 8010, '07, 1215 hrs ................................................$215,000 CIH 7120, '09, 940 hrs ..................................................$252,500 CIH 7088, '11, 585 hrs ..................................................$249,000 CIH 7088, '11, 640 hrs ..................................................$249,000 CIH 7088, '09, 650 hrs ..................................................$219,000 CIH 6088, '09, 965 hrs ..................................................$219,000 CIH 2588, '07, 1655 hrs ................................................$185,000 CIH 2388, '04, 3965 hrs ..................................................$99,900 CIH 2388, '03, 2765 hrs ................................................$135,000 CIH 2388, '03, 2425 hrs ................................................$140,000 CIH 2388, '03, 2550 hrs ................................................$125,000 CIH 2388, '02, 3030 hrs ................................................$107,900 CIH 2388, '02, 2975 hrs ..................................................$99,000 CIH 2388, '01, 2580 hrs ................................................$106,500 CIH 2388, '00, 3325 hrs ..................................................$86,500 CIH 2388, '00, 6400 hrs ..................................................$49,500 CIH 2388, '99, 3670 hrs ..................................................$78,500 CIH 2388, '99, 4370 hrs ..................................................$66,500 CIH 2388, '98, 3230 hrs ..........................................call for price CIH 2388, '98, 3250 hrs ..................................................$85,700 CIH 2388, '98, 3785 hrs ..................................................$82,500 CIH 2366, '00, 3135 hrs ..................................................$89,500 CIH 2366, '91, 2870 hrs ..................................................$79,500 CIH 2188, '96, 3095 hrs ..................................................$79,500 CIH 2188, '96, 4480 hrs ..................................................$59,900 CIH 2188, '95, 3875 hrs ..................................................$56,500 CIH 2166, '96, 3480 hrs ..................................................$63,500 CIH 2166, '96, 4200 hrs ..................................................$59,900 CIH 1688, '94, 2775 hrs ..................................................$43,500 CIH 1688, '94, 2910 hrs ..................................................$43,500 CIH 1688, '94, 4150 hrs ..................................................$48,500 CIH 1688, '94, 4160 hrs ..................................................$39,500 CIH 1680, '90,..................................................................$29,900 CIH 1680, '90, 4860 hrs ..................................................$28,500 CIH 1680, 6235 hrs ........................................................$24,500 CIH 1660, '91, 3520 hrs ..................................................$22,500 CIH 1660, '91, 4195 hrs ..................................................$12,500 CIH 1660, '90, 4365 hrs ..................................................$29,500 CIH 1660, '90 ..................................................................$35,000 CIH 1660, '87, 4605 hrs ..................................................$27,500 CIH 1660, '87 ..................................................................$17,500 CIH 1640, '86, 4700 hrs ..................................................$23,500 IH 1460, '79, 7180 hrs ......................................................$3,500 IH 1460, '79 ......................................................................$6,500 JD 9860STS, '04, 2000 hrs................................$169,500 JD 9760STS, '06, 2350 hrs................................$149,900 JD 9660, '07, 1810 hrs ....................................$169,500 JD 9660STS, '06, 2310 hrs................................$155,000 JD 9610, '96, 3265 hrs ......................................$62,500 JD 9600, '95, 4375 hrs ......................................$39,900 JD 9600, '93, 4290 hrs ......................................$39,500 JD 9500, '89, 4520 hrs ......................................$37,950 JD 4400, '74, 1225 hrs........................................$2,500 NH CR970, '03, 2020 hrs ..............................................$139,000 NH TR97, '95, 3955 hrs ..................................................$29,500 NH TR96, '89, 3860 hrs ..................................................$18,500

BEAN/CORNHEADS Financing as low as 0% available for up to 60 months on select used Combine Heads! CIH 3020, 35' Beanhead ..................................................$34,250 (3) CIH 2062, 36' Beanhead ..........................starting at $43,000 (5) CIH 2020, 35' Beanhead ..........................starting at $27,500 (3) CIH 2020, 30' Beanhead ..........................starting at $26,500 (4) CIH 2020, 25' Beanhead ..........................starting at $18,900 CIH 2020, 20' Beanhead ..................................................$24,000 (20) CIH 1020, 30' Beanhead ..........................starting at $5,900 (24) CIH 1020, 25' Beanhead ..........................starting at $5,500 CIH 1020, 22.5' Beanhead ..............................................$10,500 (5) CIH 1020, 20' Beanhead ............................starting at $4,900 CIH 1020, 17.5' Beanhead ................................................$5,500 Deutz All 320 Beanhead ....................................................$3,500 (3) JD 930F, 30' Beanhead ..............................starting at $8,999 JD 930, 30' Beanhead........................................................$7,450 JD 925, 25' Beanhead........................................................$6,500 JD 920, 20' Beanhead........................................................$5,900 (3) JD 635F, 35' Beanhead ............................starting at $32,000 JD 630F, 30' Beanhead ....................................................$26,500 MacDon FD70, 40' Beanhead ..........................................$55,000 MacDon FD70, 35' Beanhead ..........................................$47,000 CIH 2408, 8R30 Cornhead ..............................................$39,500 (3) CIH 2612 Cornhead ..................................starting at $81,500 (2) CIH 2212 Cornhead ..................................starting at $39,000 (3) CIH 2208 Cornhead ..................................starting at $26,500 (2) CIH 2206 Cornhead ..................................starting at $24,500 CIH 9R22 Cornhead ..........................................................$9,500 (2) CIH 8R22 Cornhead ....................................starting at $5,500 (16) CIH 1083 Cornhead ..................................starting at $7,500 (8) CIH 1063 Cornhead ....................................starting at $8,500 IH 983, 9R22 Cornhead ..................................................$10,500 (2) IH 963, 6R30 Cornhead ..............................starting at $4,800 IH 883, 8R30 Cornhead ....................................................$5,500 (2) IH 863, 6R30 Cornhead ..............................starting at $1,900 IH 843, 4R30 Cornhead ....................................................$3,200 (2) Clarke 1820, 18R20 Cornhead ..................starting at $49,900 (3) Drago 12R30 Cornhead ............................starting at $52,000 (2) Drago 12R22 Cornhead ............................starting at $52,500 (2) Drago 12R20 Cornhead ............................................$84,500 Drago 10R22 Cornhead ..................................................$60,000 (4) Drago 8R30 Cornhead ..............................starting at $29,000 (2) Drago 8R22 Cornhead ..............................starting at $39,500 Drago 6R30 Cornhead ....................................................$52,500 Fantini 8R30 Cornhead ....................................................$34,000 Geringhoff 12R30 Cornhead ............................................$89,750 Geringhoff 12R22 Cornhead ............................................$72,100 (2) Geringhoff 8R30 Cornhead ......................starting at $29,900 Geringhoff GD1600B Cornhead ......................................$98,900 (3) Geringhoff Roto Disc ................................starting at $29,900 Gleaner Hugger Cornhead..................................................$8,950 (4) Harvestec 8R30 Cornhead ........................starting at $25,000 JD 1293, 12R30 Cornhead ..............................................$45,500 (2) JD 1290, 12R20 Cornhead........................starting at $36,000 JD 1290, 12R20 Cornhead ..............................................$49,950 (3) JD 893, 8R30 Cornhead............................starting at $15,900 (5) JD 843, 8R30 Cornhead..............................starting at $5,750 (6) JD 643, 6R30 Cornhead..............................starting at $5,000 Lexion C512R30 Cornhead ..............................................$38,000

FALL TILLAGE

‘03 DMI 9300, 22.5’ ..................$29,500

0% interest financing available on select used fall tillage CIH 870, 18' DL Subsoiler ..............................................$49,000 CIH MRX690, '07, 7 Shank Subsoiler..............................$28,500 CIH MRX690, '04, 7 Shank Subsoiler..............................$22,000 CIH MRX690, '03, 7 Shank Subsoiler..............................$23,900 (2) CIH MRX690, '02, 7 Shank Subsoiler ......starting at $19,000 (7) CIH 9300, 22.5' Subsoiler ........................starting at $24,500 CIH 6800, '03, 18' Subsoiler ..........................................$13,500 (6) CIH 730B Subsoiler ..................................starting at $14,900 (3) CIH 730C Subsoiler ..................................starting at $35,000 (7) DMI 730B, 17.5' Subsoiler........................starting at $14,500 (6) DMI 730, 17.5' Subsoiler........................ starting at $11,900 (2) DMI Tiger II Subsoiler ................................starting at $6,500 Brent CPC2007 Subsoiler ................................................$11,000

FALL TILLAGE Continue

Brillion LCS7-2, '03 Subsoiler .............................. Brillion Land CMDII, '03 Subsoiler ........................ JD 2700, '06, 9S30 Subsoiler ....................... (2) JD 2700, '08, 9S24 Subsoiler ............starti JD 2700, '06, 9S24 Subsoiler ....................... JD 2700, '05, 9S24 Subsoiler ....................... JD 2700, '04, 9S24 Subsoiler ....................... JD 2700, '03, 9S24 Subsoiler ....................... JD 2700, '01, 9S24 Subsoiler ....................... JD 2700, '09, 7S30 Subsoiler ....................... JD 2700, '06, 7S30 Subsoiler ....................... (3) JD 2700, '04, 7S30 Subsoiler ............starti (2) JD 2700, '03, 7S30 Subsoiler ............starti JD 2700, '07, 7S24 Subsoiler ....................... JD 2700, '04, 7S24 Subsoiler ....................... JD 512, '10, 9S30 Subsoiler......................... JD 512, '09, 9S30 Subsoiler......................... (2) JD 512, '08, 9S30 Subsoiler ..............starti JD 512, '04, 7 Shank Subsoiler ..................... JD 512, '01, 7 Shank Subsoiler ..................... JD 510, 7 Shank Subsoiler ......................... Krause 4850, '08, 18' Subsoiler ............................ Landoll 2320, '96, 9S24 Subsoiler ........................ M & W 1875, '00, 17.5' Subsoiler ........................ M & W 1875, 9S24 Subsoiler................................ (2) M & W 1860, 9 Shank Subsoiler ................star Wilrich 6600, '88, 5 Shank Subsoiler .................... (6) Wilrich V957DDR Subsoiler ......................start CIH 6500, 9 Shank Chisel Plow ............................ Summers 36' Chisel Plow...................................... Tebben 7140, 7 Shank Chisel Plow........................ IH 730, 5 Bottom MB Plow.................................... IH 720, 6x18 MB Plow .......................................... JD 3710, 10 Bottom MB Plow ....................... JD 2800, 6 Bottom MB Plow ....................... IH 722, 30' Combo Mulch .................................... JD 724, 44 Shank Combo Mulch ................... CIH 110, 45' Crumbler ..........................................

FORAGE EQUIPMENT

Chase Groskreutz, East - (320) 24 Randy Olmscheid, West - (320) 58

Claas 980, '10, 875 hrs.......................................... Claas 980, '10, 915 hrs.......................................... Claas 980, '09, 1135 hrs........................................ Claas 980, '08, 1570 hrs........................................ Claas 970, '08, 1110 hrs........................................ Claas 900, '09, 1775 hrs........................................ Claas 900, '02, 4015 hrs........................................ Claas 890, '02, 2725 hrs........................................ Claas 870 GE, '06, 2760 hrs .................................. Claas 870, '03, 2790 hrs........................................ JD 7800, '05, 3870 hrs .............................. JD 6950, '00, 1650 hrs ............................... JD 6810, '96, 4590 hrs ............................... NH FX60, '03, 1970 hrs ........................................ NH FX28, '01, 3405 hrs ........................................ NH 1900, '89, 1745 hrs ........................................ Gehl CB1265 PT Forg Harv.................................... Gehl CB1085 PT Forg Harv.................................... Gehl 1075 PT Forg Harv ........................................ NH 790H PT Forg Harv .......................................... NH FP240 PT Forg Harv ........................................ NH FP230 PT Forg Harv ........................................ (3) Claas PU380HD Hayhead ..........................start Claas PU380 Pro Hayhead .................................... (7) Claas PU380 Hayhead ..............................start (2) Claas PU300 Hayhead ................................star JD 640B Hayhead ..................................... NH 3500 Hayhead.................................................. NH 355W Hayhead ................................................ (2) NH 340W Hayhead......................................star NH 3R30 Hayhead ................................................ (4) Claas Orbis 900 Cornhead ......................startin (2) Claas Orbis 750 Cornhead ........................start Claas Orbis 600 Cornhead .................................... (12) Claas RU600, 8R30 Cornhead ................start (2) Claas RU450XTRA Cornhead ....................start (7) Claas RU450 Cornhead ............................start Claas 4R30 Cornhead ............................................ (2) JD 678, 8R30 Cornhead ..................starti Kemper 6008 Cornhead ........................................ Kemper 3000 Cornhead ........................................ NH 3PN Cornhead.................................................. (2) NH R1600 Cornhead ................................start NH R1450 Cornhead..............................................

HAY EQUIPMENT

CIH 8830, '88, 2535 hrs ........................................ CIH 8370, 14' Mow Cond ...................................... CIH 8340, 9' MowCond ........................................ CIH 8312, 12' MowCond ...................................... CIH DC132, 13' MowCond .................................... CIH DCX161 MowCond.......................................... CIH DCX131, '08 MowCond .................................. Hesston 1160, 14' MowCond ................................ JD 160A, 16' MowCond ........................................ JD 1600A, 15' MowCond ...................................... JD 1600, 14' MowCond ........................................


WILLMAR, MN • 320-235-4898 ST. MARTIN, MN • 320-548-3285

Wettengel

515

Sales: • Dan Hoffman • Erik Mueller • Randy Olmscheid • Jamie Pelzer

ALDEN, MN • 507-874-3400

Sales: • Brad Wermedal • Tim Wiersma • Tim Engebretson • Bob Joubert

ed

48-3733 83-6014

..........$17,500 ............$5,500 ............$7,950 ............$9,500 ..........$24,500 ..........$20,500 ..........$22,500 ............$5,350 ............$5,500 ............$5,750 ............$6,995

SKID LOADERS/EXC./TLB Continued Case 430, '07, 4750 hrs ..................................................$16,900 Case 430, '06, 2185 hrs ..................................................$17,900 Case 430, '06, 4060 hrs ..................................................$22,000 Case 420, '08, 3800 hrs ..................................................$18,500 Case 75XT, '01, 3415 hrs ................................................$14,900 Bobcat 773, '00, 3395 hrs ..............................................$12,500 Bobcat 753, 4765 hrs ........................................................$8,500 Bobcat S-250, '05, 4640 hrs............................................$24,500 Bobcat S-185, 5500 hrs ..................................................$13,900 Bobcat T250, '04, 4820 hrs ............................................$17,800 Cat 236B, '06, 1985hrs....................................................$23,500 Gehl CTL80, '08, 795 hrs ................................................$38,000 Gehl 7800, '01, 6420 hrs ................................................$18,500 Gehl 7810 Turbo, '04, 3350 hrs ......................................$34,500 Gehl 5240E, '10, 410 hrs ................................................$27,500 Gehl 4840, '05, 5730 hrs ................................................$12,700 Gehl 4640, '05, 3295 hrs ................................................$18,000 Gehl 4625SX, 440 hrs........................................................$9,950 JD 328, '05, 5180 hrs......................................................$19,500 JD 320D, '11, 450 hrs ....................................................$29,900 JD 320, 2240 hrs ............................................................$19,900 Mustang 2041, '09, 1380 hrs ..........................................$14,750 Mustang 320, 1465 hrs ....................................................$2,900 NH LX865, '95 ................................................................$12,500 Kubota KX121..................................................................$28,950 Kubota KX91-3, 315 hrs ..................................................$23,950 Kubota KX91-3, 1455 hrs ................................................$24,950

BALERS CIH RBX563 Rnd Baler ....................................................$18,500 (2) CIH RBX562 Rnd Baler ..........................starting at $12,500 CIH 8460, 5x6 Rnd Baler ..................................................$5,750 CIH 3650, 5x6 Rnd Baler ..................................................$6,995 Claas 280RC Rnd Baler....................................................$19,500 Gehl RB2880 Rnd Baler ..................................................$10,900 Hesston 5500 Rnd Baler....................................................$2,995 JD 567, 5x6 Rnd Baler ....................................................$19,500 NH 855 Rnd Baler..............................................................$3,500 NH 850, 5x6 Rnd Baler ......................................................$3,250 NH BR780A Rnd Baler ....................................................$17,800 NH BR780 Rnd Baler ......................................................$15,900 NH 664, 5x6 Rnd Baler ......................................................$8,500 New Idea 4865, 5x6 Rnd Baler ..........................................$9,500 (2) CIH 8575 Rec Baler ..................................starting at $27,500 CIH 8530 Rec Baler ..........................................................$4,900 Claas 2200 Rec Baler ......................................................$30,000 JD 327 Rec Baler ..............................................................$4,950 (2) NH BB940A Rec Baler ..............................starting at $49,500 NH 315 Rec Baler ..............................................................$3,500

SPRAYERS - SELF-PROPELLED Rudy Lusk - (507) 227-4119 CIH 4260, 98, 4270 hrs ..................................................$79,900 JD 4930, '11 ..................................................................$279,000 Miller 4365, '10, 1075 hrs ............................................$269,000 Miller 4275, '11, 525 hrs ..............................................$259,000 Miller 2200TSS, '04, 4400 hrs ........................................$84,900 Miller 2200TSS, '02 ......................................................$102,500 Redball Raptor, '05, 1250 hrs..........................................$86,500

SPRAYERS - PULL-TYPE Ag Chem 1000 ................................................................$13,500 Blumhardt 60' ....................................................................$3,350 Century 750, 60' ................................................................$4,900 Demco Conquest ............................................................$19,500 Fast 9500, 2400 Gal ........................................................$45,000 Fast 7446, 2400 Gal ........................................................$29,900 Hardi Commander............................................................$59,500 Hardi 6600, 180 Gal ........................................................$69,000 Hardi CM6600..................................................................$66,000 Hardi 4400 Commander ..................................................$39,900 Hardi NAV1000 ..................................................................$4,250 Hardi NP1100, 60' ........................................................$12,500 Redball 690, 2000 Gal ....................................................$29,500 Redball 670, 1200 Gal ....................................................$21,500 Redball 670, 90' ............................................................$20,000 Redball 565......................................................................$15,500 Top Air 1600R90, '11 ......................................................$39,500 Top Air 1600R90, '11 ......................................................$41,000 Top Air 1600R90, '11 ......................................................$42,500 Top Air 1600, 120' ..........................................................$40,000 Top Air TA1100, 60' ........................................................$18,500

SKID LOADERS/EXCAVATORS/ TLB Case SR250, '12, 15 hrs..................................................$42,500 Case SR200, '11, 945 hrs................................................$32,500 Case 1845C, '97, 5085 hrs ..............................................$12,600 Case 1845C, '94, 5780 hrs ..............................................$12,900 Case 1845C, '92, 3975 hrs ..............................................$11,500 Case 1840, '95, 4415 hrs ................................................$10,500 Case 1840, '91, 6395 hrs ..................................................$9,850 Case 1840, '89, 2570 hrs ................................................$10,900 Case 1840, '89, 3350 hrs ..................................................$9,900 Case 1825, '89, 4000 hrs ..................................................$5,500 Case 445, '06, 2080 hrs ..................................................$30,500 Case 440, '07, 2330 hrs ..................................................$22,500 Case 435, '07, 1095 hrs ..................................................$20,900 Case 430, '09, 1470 hrs ..................................................$27,500

SPRING TILLAGE (3) CIH TM 200, 60.5' Fld Cult ......................starting at $67,500 (7) CIH TM 200, 50.5' Fld Cult ......................starting at $50,900 CIH TMII, 54.5' Fld Cult ..................................................$35,500 CIH TMII, 50.5' Fld Cult ..................................................$42,500 CIH TMII, 49.5' Fld Cult ..................................................$29,000 (2) CIH TMII, 48.5' Fld Cult ............................starting at $44,000 CIH TMII, 46.5' Fld Cult ..................................................$39,895 CIH TMII, 44.5' Fld Cult ..................................................$34,500 CIH TMII, 30.5' Fld Cult ..................................................$27,900 CIH 4900, 53' Fld Cult ......................................................$5,500 CIH 4900 Fld Cult ..............................................................$5,500 CIH 4900, 38' Fld Cult ..............................................call for price CIH 4800, 32.5' Fld Cult ....................................................$8,400 CIH 4800, 32' Fld Cult ......................................................$7,500 CIH 4300, 35' Fld Cult ....................................................$12,500 CIH 4300, 22.5' Fld Cult ..................................................$12,750 IH 4700, 30' Fld Cult..........................................................$3,950 DMI TMII, 49.5' Fld Cult ..................................................$39,500 DMI TMII, 45.5' Fld Cult ..................................................$41,900 DMI TMII, 40.5' Fld Cult ..................................................$34,500 DMI TM, 44.5' Fld Cult ....................................................$12,500 JD 2210, 64.5' Fld Cult ....................................................$61,500 JD 2210, 54.5' Fld Cult ....................................................$69,800 JD 1000, 26.5' Fld Cult ......................................................$1,000 JD 980, 44.5' Fld Cult ......................................................$17,500 JD 980, 42.5' Fld Cult ......................................................$11,900 JD 980, 38.5' Fld Cult ......................................................$16,500 JD 980 Fld Cult ................................................................$14,500 JD 960, 28.5' Fld Cult ........................................................$6,750 White 375 Fld Cult ............................................................$3,500 Wilrich Excel 30' Fld Cult ................................................$29,000 CIH 1830, 12R Row Crop Cult ..........................................$4,800 CIH 496 Disk....................................................................$12,900 CIH RMX340, 34' Disk ....................................................$35,900 (4) CIH 330, 34' Disk......................................starting at $55,500 IH 496, 24' Disk ..............................................................$10,500 IH 490, 32.5' Disk..............................................................$6,500 IH 490, 22.5' Disk..............................................................$4,950 Sunflower 1443, 35' Disk ................................................$27,500 Sunflower 1434, 23' Disk ................................................$33,000 CIH 50' Crumbler ..............................................................$9,000 DMI 45 Crumbler ............................................................$11,500 Mandako 45' Crumbler ..................................................$29,900 Riteway F5-62, 60' Crumbler ..........................................$49,900 Walco 45' Crumbler ........................................................$29,500 JD 400, 30' Rotary Hoe ....................................................$4,000

TEC

MISCELLANEOUS (3) Alloway 20' Shredder..................................starting at $5,500 Alloway 15' Shredder ......................................................$11,500 Balzer 5205M, 30' Shredder ..............................................$7,400 Hiniker AR2000, 20' Shredder ........................................$14,500 Hiniker 1700, 20' Shredder..............................................$11,500 (4) JD 220, 20' Shredder..................................starting at $6,950 JD 120, 20' Shredder ......................................................$12,500 Loftness 240, 20' Shredder ............................starting at $13,500 Loftness 180BP-556 Shredder ..........................................$8,500 (2) Loftness 20' Shredder ................................starting at $3,500 Wilrich 22' Shredder........................................................$12,900 (2) Woods 22' Shredder ..................................starting at $5,500 Woods 20' Shredder..........................................................$5,000 Gehl 970, 14' Forage Box ..................................................$5,500 Millerpro 9015 Forage Box ..............................................$42,000 NH 816 Forage Box............................................................$8,000 (2) CIH 600 Forage Blower ..............................starting at $4,500 Hesston PK5, 60" Forage Blower ......................................$3,800 Millerpro 1060 II Forage Blower ........................................$7,500 NH 679 Manure Spreader ..................................................$3,195 CIH 1360 Grinder Mixer ....................................................$9,500

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

........$335,000 ........$295,000 ........$275,000 ........$275,000 ........$279,000 ........$242,000 ........$130,000 ........$147,000 ........$184,500 ........$162,000 ......$155,000 ........$88,500 ........$59,500 ........$115,000 ..........$58,000 ..........$28,000 ............$7,500 ..........$12,500 ............$9,500 ............$6,500 ..........$23,000 ..........$16,500 ting at $14,500 ..........$24,500 ting at $11,500 rting at $8,500 ........$11,500 ............$6,500 ............$8,500 rting at $5,000 ............$6,500 ng at $110,000 ting at $78,000 ..........$68,000 ting at $24,500 ting at $42,000 ting at $29,000 ..........$11,500 ing at $43,000 ..........$51,500 ..........$22,000 ............$8,500 ting at $39,500 ..........$25,000

HAY EQUIPMENT Continued JD MOCO945 MowCond..................................................$12,500 JD 945, 13' MowCond ....................................................$15,000 NH H7450, 13' MowCond................................................$17,900 NH 1475 MowCond ..........................................................$7,500 NH 1465, 9' MowCond ......................................................$7,950 NH 1431, 13' MowCond ..................................................$12,500 NH 492, 9' MowCond ........................................................$5,500 NH 415, 11' MowerCond ..................................................$5,500 (2) NH 116, 14' MowCond ................................$5,900 & $6,500 CIH MDX81 Disc Mower....................................................$5,800 Kuhn GMD600HD Disc Mower ..........................................$6,000 NH H6730 Disc Mower ......................................................$7,750 NH HM235, 6' Disc Mower................................................$5,750 Landpride AFM4211 Rotary Mower ................................$12,500 (2) H & S TWM9 Wind Merg ............................$26,500 $34,700 (2) Millerpro 310, 30' Wind Merg ..................starting at $68,500 (4) Millerpro 14-16 Wind Merg ......................starting at $26,500 Oxbo 310 Wind Merg ......................................................$78,000 Oxbo 14-16 Wnd Merg ....................................................$48,000 Krone SWADRO Rake ......................................................$16,500 Kuhn GA8521 Rake..........................................................$23,500 Kuhn GA7822 Rake..........................................................$15,500 Kuhn GA7301 Rake..........................................................$14,500 M & W 8 Wheel Rake ........................................................$3,150 Twin Star RA203C Rake ....................................................$9,950

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

..........$11,500 ..........$15,000 ........$29,900 ing at $36,500 ........$29,900 ........$26,500 ........$36,500 ........$26,500 ........$23,900 ........$32,500 ........$26,500 ing at $25,400 ing at $21,500 ........$28,500 ........$27,000 ........$49,500 ........$43,500 ing at $39,500 ........$23,750 ........$18,500 ........$13,500 ..........$43,500 ..........$12,900 ..........$12,900 ..........$14,500 rting at $8,900 ............$5,800 ting at $23,500 ............$4,500 ..........$36,000 ............$7,450 ............$3,000 ............$7,900 ........$49,500 .........$4,500 ............$9,900 ........$15,500 ............$8,900

Stop in at Arnold’s today to learn about our 0% FINANCING SPECIALS on select used equipment

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

Sales: • Bob Pfingston • Nate Scharmer • Brian Lingle • Christy Hoff • Bob Lindahl • Tim Hansen • Jeff Ruprecht

25 B


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

• PO Box 3169 • 418 S 2nd Street • Mankato, MN 56001 • theland@thelandonline.com

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

A D V E RT I S E R L I S T I N G

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

26 B

1 Stop Realty ..................................28B Aasness Auctioneers........................39B Ag Distributing ..............................20B Ag Power Enterprises Inc ..............45B Ag Systems Inc ..............................16B Agri Systems/Systems West ............22A Albert Lea Seed House ..................20A Arnold Companies Inc....12B, 24B, 25B Avoca Spray Service ......................40B Bayer Truck & Equipment Inc ........7B Big Gain ..........................................19B Bob Burns Sales & Service ............46B Boss Supply Inc ..............................17B Brokaw Supply Co ..........................25A Broskoff Structures ........................14B C & C Roofing ................................23A Chris Sonnek ..................................11B Community Bank ............................29A Courtland Waste Handling ..............1B Crysteel Truck Equipment ............24A Custom Made Products Co ............26A Dahl Farm Supply ..........................10A Dairyland Seed Co Inc....................27A Dakota Wood Grinding Inc ..............8A Dan Pike Clerking ..........28B, 33B, 38B Darrell Regnier Clerking ................34B Dave Syverson Truck Centers ........21B Deutz Auctions ................................35B Double B Manufacturing ................19B Dow Agro Science ............................9A Duncan Trailers LLC ......................44B Emerson Kalis ................................44B Excelsior Homes West Inc ................6A Factory Home Center Inc ..............10B Fahey Inc ........................................27B Farm Drainage Plows Inc ..............39B Fast Distributing ............................22A Fladeboe Auction Service................38B Freudenthal Dairy & Mfg Co ..........5B Frundt & Johnson ..................31B, 34B Gehl Co ............................................3B Haas Equipment ............................47B Hamilton Auction Service ..............32B Harpels ..........................................22B Haug Implement ............................39B Heartland Capital Group LLC ........8B Henslin Auctions ............31B, 32B, 33B Hewitt Drainage Equipment ..........13B Hitch Doc ........................................16B Holt Truck Center ..........................21B James Drege & Associates ..............20A K & S Millwright............................30A Keith Bode ......................................29B Keltgens Inc ....................................26A Kennedy & Kennedy Law Office ....26B Kiester Implement ..........................47B Kroubetz Lakeside Camprs ..............8A Lano Equipment - Norwood ..........43B Larson Brothers Implement ..42B, 43B Lawns Are Us..................................23A Leegaard Sale ................................30B M S Diversified ..............................37B Mages Auction Service............35B, 39B

Mankato Implement........................44B Mankato Spray Center Inc ............18A Massop Electric ..............................47B Matejcek Implement ......................48B Matt Maring Auction ....28B, 30B, 36B, 37B Mel Carlson Chev Inc ....................18B Mid-American Auction Co ......30B, 36B Midway Farm Equipment Inc ........41B Mike’s Collision ................................7A MN Pork Producers Assn ..............14A Mustang Mfg Co ..............................4B Mycogen ................................16A, 17A NK Clerking ..........................27B, 31B Northern Ag Service ......................37B Northland Bulding Inc....................10A Northland Farm Systems ................41B Nutra Flo Company ................15A, 36B O/NE Realty ..................................32B Pioneer ..........................10A, 11A, 21A ProfitPro ..........................................8A Pruess Elevator Inc ........................35B Rabe International..........................40B Riverside Tire ..........................8B, 19B Rooney Auction ..............................29B Ryerson Auction..............................31B Schmidts Meat Market ..................31A Schultz Auctioneers ........................27B Schweiss Inc ....................................33B SI Feeder/Schoessow Inc ..................2B Smiths Mill Implement Inc ............42B Sommers Masonry Inc ....................29A Sorensen Sales & Rentals ..............42B South Central Seed & Chemical ....12A Southwest MN K-Fence ..................23A Starr Cycle......................................15B State Bank of Gibbon ....................12A Steffes Auctioneers Inc ..........29B, 37B Sunco Marketing ............................10B Sunrise Ag Sales ............................10B Syngenta ......3A, 4A, 5A, 6A, 12A, 13A, 19A The American Community ..............36B Titan Machinery - Albert Lea ........12B Triad Construction Inc ..................31A Triple R Auction ............................39B United Farmers Cooperative ..........38B Vermeer ..........................................14A Wagner Trucks ..............................23A Wahl Spray Foam Insulation ..........23B Wearda Implement ........................33B Westbrook Ag Power ......................42B Westman Freightliner ....................26A Westrum Truck & Body Inc............38B Whitcomb Borthers ........................11B Willmar Farm Center ....................46B Willmar Precast ................................8B Wingert Realty & Land Service......30B Woodford Equipment......................47B Ziegler ............................................40B Ziegler Rogator ................................9B Zielsdorf Auction Service ..............27B Zierke Built Mfg Inc ......................28A

NOSBUSH FARM SALE DECEMBER 1, 2012

The sale to be held at Old St. George School/Church Gymnasium 63105 Fort Road, New Ulm, MN 56073 at 11:00 a.m. LEGAL DESCRIPTION

That portion of the following described property lying east of County Road 59; The N1⁄2 of the SE1⁄4 and Government Lots 9 and 16, all in Section 19, Township 111 north of Range 31 west and Lots 10 and 11 in Section 19, Township 111 north of Range 31 west, except the following two parcels: (1) beginning at a point on the west line of Lot 10 of said Section, Township and Range, 422 feet south of the northwest corner of said Lot 10; thence south on said west line 78.65 feet; thence south 40 degrees 33 minutes west 124.45 feet; thence south 45 degrees 43 minutes east 114 feet to the west line of said Lot 10; thence south 57 degrees 28 minutes east 143.5 feet; thence north 79 degrees 8 minutes east 77.2 feet to the west line of highway; thence along said west line north 14 degrees 52 minutes west 411.25 feet; thence south 47 degrees 59 minutes west 123.4 feet to the point of beginning; containing 1.35 acres, more or less; and (2) commencing 84 chains and 50 links west of the quarter post between Sections numbered 19 and 20 of said Township and Range; thence south 3 chains and 55 links; thence south 861⁄2 degrees west 15 chains and 55 links; thence north 4 chains and 45 links; thence east 15 chains and 50 links to the place of beginning, all in West Newton Township, Nicollet County, Minnesota. 191 acres more or less.

BIDDING PROCEDURE:

1. Only those submitting a bid will be allowed admission to the sale. 2. Bids will be received at 99 Navaho Avenue, Suite 104, Mankato, MN 56001 until 5:00 p.m. on November 29, 2012. Bids may also be submitted on the day of the sale until commencement of the sale at 11:00 a.m on December 1, 2012. 3. Each bid must be in writing and state the full amount of the bid. All bids shall be accompanied by a Cashier’s Check made payable to Kennedy & Kennedy Law Office Trust Account in the amount of $20,000.00. 4. All persons submitting bids are entitled to be present and will have an opportunity to increase their bid. The seller reserves the right to reject any and all bids, to waive any formalities or irregularities in the sale process, and to control all rules and procedures of the sale.

TERMS:

1. The successful bidder must enter into an earnest money contract at the conclusion of the bidding on December 1, 2012. At that time 10% of the purchase price will be due as earnest money with the $20,000.00 applied to this earnest money requirement. The balance of the price will be due and payable by certified check no later than December 31, 2012 the date of closing. 2. Seller shall pay all real estate taxes payable in 2012 and prior years; purchaser shall pay all real estate taxes payable in the year 2013 and thereafter. 3. Property is being sold in an “AS IS” condition. The property will not be surveyed and will be sold using the boundary lines established by practical location. 4. Warranty Deed delivered by seller shall be subject to easements, agreements, and restrictions of record, if any. 5. Checks for unsuccessful bidders will be returned immediately after the auction. 6. The described property is being sold pursuant to stipulation of the Nosbush Family under Order and supervision of the Nicollet County Court, Michael H. Kennedy, Court Appointed Referee.

For further information, contact Michael H. Kennedy, Kennedy & Kennedy in Mankato at (507) 345-4582.


Employment

015

Hay & Forage Equip

031

27 B

Advance Notice Outstanding Farm Retirement Equipment Auction Tuesday, Nov 27th • 10:30 a.m.

Located from Madelia, MN, 5 miles south to 60-15 & 30 Interchange then proceed south on Hwy. 15 1⁄2 mile, or 20 miles north of Fairmont, MN. 35252 St Hwy 15, Lewisville, MN

Features Include: Low hr. equipment CIH STX &

020

FARM EQUIPMENT AUCTION! Friday, Nov. 16, 2012 • 10:30 AM

Real Estate Wanted

021

WANTED: Land & farms. I have clients looking for dairy, & cash grain operations, as well as bare land parcels from 40-1000 acres. Both for relocation & investments. If you have even thought about selling contact: Paul Krueger, Farm & Land Specialist, Edina Realty, SW Suburban Office, 14198 Commerce Ave NE, Prior Lake, MN 55372. paulkrueger@edinarealty.com

(952)447-4700

Antiques & Collectibles

026

JD 44 214 hyd disk plow, completely reconditioned w/ hyd cylinder & de-clutcher; JD F350 416 hyd re-set semi mount plow w/ guage whls, good cond; JD #6 1R chopper. 320-630-7456

Directions: From Cambridge, MN: North on MN 65 for 9 miles to Braham, turn west on Isanti County 4 and go 8 miles. Turn right onto Blackfoot St. NW. Farm located .5 miles down road. From Princeton, MN: East on MN 95 for 9.5 miles, turn left (North) onto MN 47 for 9 miles, turn (East) right onto Day Dr NW, Day Dr NW becomes 409th Ave NW continue for 1.5 miles. Turn left (North) onto Blackfoot St NW .5 miles. From Ogilvie, MN: South on Highway 47 to Isanti County Road 4. • Watch for Zielsdorf Auction signs. •

TRACTORS ’09 JD 9430, 4WD, SN:13088, 710/70R42 duals, inside rear weights, auto steer ready, active seat, buddy seat, 4 hyd, HID lights, rock bar, 612 hrs. NH TM190 MFWD, 1884 hrs, 14.9x46 duals, 3 hyd, 3pt, quick coupler, PTO, 22 frt weights, frt fenders ’09 JD 7930, MFWD, SN: 23677, 606.6 hrs, 480/80R46 duals, 380/85R34 frts and fenders, front weights, power quad, left hand reverser, auto steer ready, active seat, buddy seat, 4 hyd, 3 pt, PTO, quick coupler Ford 7700 diesel, 18.4x38, 7093 hrs, cab, heat, air (does not work), frt weights COMBINES & HEADS ’11 JD 9770 STS, 0 hrs, purchased new and hasn’t been in the field, 20.8x42 JD duals, auto steer ready, bin ext, long auger, HID lighting, touch set, and other options. SN:IH09770SAB0742093 ’11 JD 635F, for-aft, new, never been used. HH, poly, stubble lights, SN:0742334 ’11 JD 608 corn head, nonchopping, new, never been used. knife rolls, hyd. deck plates, height sensors, SN:0741058

AUGERS & GRAIN HANDLING Buhler/Farm King 1071 swing hopper w/hyd hopper control, PTO, hyd lift, 10”x 71’ Buhler/Farm King 1071 swing hopper, PTO, hyd lift, 10”x 71’ Farm King 8”x 60’ w/swing hopper, PTO Walinga Agri Vac 614 Deluxe, 1000 PTO, 3 stainless flex pipes and 3 flex tubes w/2 clean up spouts TILLAGE EQUIPMENT 10’ JD 2210 cult, 60’ w/4 bar harrow, depth control, electric hook-ups, oscillating tandems, frt gauge wheels, less than 1000 acres JD 2700 7 shank disk chisel, 24” space Sunflower 1435, 36’ cushion gang disk with spike tooth drag, like new low acres ’04 Rite-way 4425 HL land roller, SN:04-714 JD 3710 auto reset 10/18 pull plow, on land, SN: 755 SKIDSTEER & BACKHOE ’08 Bobcat 5185, cab, air, heat, low hours, radio, hyd quick tach and bucket Case 580C Backhoe, loader, 2WD, open station w/canopy, shows 1615 hrs, 24” backhoe bucket, outriggers. Set of pallet forks for backhoe

PLANTING EQUIPMENT ’10 JD 1770NT-CCS, liquid fert, ground driven, nurse tank hitch, Redball monitor, 300 gal poly fert. tank, 16 Row 30”, row cleaners, 1600 acres Fast chemical tote, 1000 gal poly, 3 wheel pull cart, 13.6x38 tires, adjustable axles, SN: 3006/0140 HAY EQUIPMENT New Holland BR 750A round baler, monitor, done less than 1000 bales Kuhn 3P rake, model 6A300GM, SN:0413 OTHER EQUIPMENT ’96 Alloway snowblower, 3pt, 1000 PTO, hyd spout, 2 auger Industrial compressor IOC, portable, 1492 V-8 engine Unverferth HD 36T head trailer (new) Head trailer, 20’ on running gear ATTACHMENTS 9’ snow bucket, bale fork, rock bucket, pallet forks

Auto Steer Equipment (2) ITC receivers JD 2600 screen SF1 card • SF2 card Processor View Equipment After Nov. 7th

AUCTION

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012 – 6:30 p.m. Auction to be held at: Waterford Township Hall Building, 3847 321st Street West, Northfield, MN (Watch for Auction Signs)

+/- 135 Total Acres in Waterford Township, Dakota County With 114.34 Tillable acres in 2 parcels and a 17.11 Acre Wooded Recreational Parcel with 2 homesite credits. Property Located in the SE Quarter of Section 21, Township 112, Range 19, Waterford Township, Dakota County LAND LOCATION: Located 2 miles North East of Northfield, MN on #19, then 1 mile North on Canada Avenue, then East 1 mile on 320th Street West to the 135 Acre property on the North side of 320th Street West. • (Watch for AmeriBid Auction Signs) Land Has Been Surveyed Parcel A: 89.47 Acres with 88.36 Tillable of Good Dakota Cty. Farmland in a large rectangular field in the SE 1⁄4 of Section 21. Parcel B: 17.11 Acres Wooded Recreation Land with excellent wildlife habitat along waterway providing excellent hunting and natural enjoyment. This parcel fronts 320th St. West on the South with a high land building site near the road. And it also fronts 315th St. West on the North side of the property with another potential high land building site. Providing a great private getaway – Located just 4 miles NE of Northfield with 2 homesite credits.

J & P Robb Trust, Estate

Parcel C: 28.10 Acres with 25.98 Tillable of Good Dakota Cty. Farmland bounded by 320th St. West on the South and Barnard Ave. on the West in the SE 1⁄4 of Section 21.

Auction Terms: Parcel A: $30,000 Non Refundable Deposit. Parcel C: $30,000 Non-Refundable Deposit. Parcel B: $8,000 Non Refundable Deposit. The balance is due and payable in full at closing on or before December 19th, 2012, at which time the buyer shall receive clear and marketable title, and possession. All Real Estate sells AS-IS, WHERE-IS. All Real Estate Taxes for 2012 will be paid by the seller. There is a 5% Buyers Fee that applies to this real estate auction. This 5% shall be added above and beyond the final bid price to equal full purchase contract price. All bidders/buyers are encouraged to do their own due diligence and must have all their finances in order prior to auction date.

For more information call Mike Schultz at AmeriBid 320-232-0850 or 1-800-457-2967 www.SchultzAuctioneers.com For more Information go to www.AmeriBid.com Mike Schultz, CAI, www.SchultzAuctioneers.com 1-800-457-2967 Lic# 4905023 In association with Houghton’s Auctions, Red Wing Dick Houghton 651-388-5870, Todd Houghton 651-764-4285

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Online Live Bidding - Go to www.zielsdorfauctions.com to bid or register

Northfield, MN – Multi Parcel; Dakota County Farmland

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Barn roofing Hip or round MX, AC tractors; CIH 2366 combine, full line of late Sell your land or real estate roof barns & other buildmodel equipment, 4 tandem trucks; 2 Consigned in 30 days for 0% commisings. Also barn & quonset JD 8100 MDF Tractors. Very few small items. sion. Call Ray 507-339-1272 straightening. Kelling Silo 1-800-355-2598 Selling or Buying Farms SANFORD “SANDY” & JEANEE SEIBERT, OWNERS or 1031 Exchange! Stormor Bins & EZ-Drys. Private Sale or Kahler Auctioneers of Auctioneer Alley Wedel, Pike Hall & 100% financing w/no liens Sealed Bid Auction! or red tape, call Steve at Hartung. Sandy’s ph. 507-642-8186, Auc: 507-764-3591 Call “The Land Specialists!” Fairfax Ag for an appointwww.auctioneeralley.com or www.proxibid.com Northland Real Estate ment. 888-830-7757 612-756-1899 or 320-894-7337 www.farms1031.com We have extensive lists of Land Investors & farm buyers throughout MN. We always have interested buyers. For top prices, go with Auctioneer Notes: Zielsdorf Auction Company will sell at public auction the farm equipment owned by Jenison Farms to our proven methods over the highest bidder due to the death of the 2 principle operators of the Jenison Farm. The Jenison’s have farmed in the thousands of acres. Braham area for many years and have one of the finest lines of equipment we’ve had the pleasure to sell this year. This Serving Minnesota equipment is very low houred, some with 0 hours. So mark this day on your calendar, November 16, 2012 and join us at Mages Land Co & Auc Serv the Jenison Farm for this awesome farm equipment auction. The auction will be online live starting at 10:30 am. There www.magesland.com are no small items. Thank you. Zielsdorf Auctions, Inc. 800-803-8761 Real Estate

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

Be An Auctioneer & FOR SALE: JD 5400-5830 Personal Property and 6000 series forage harAppraiser vesters. Used kernel proContinental Auction Schools cessors, also, used JD 40 Mankato, MN & Ames, IA knife Dura-Drums, and 507-625-5595 drum conversions for 5400 www.auctioneerschool.com and 5460. Call (507)427-3520 SEED SALES POSITION. www.ok-enterprise.com Novel, effective, low overhead approach. Seed expe- Pequea round bale transport, rience desired. Path to carries 11 big round bales, ownership for successful inlike new, $4,000; JD #21 hay dividual. Minnesota locaconditioner, steel on steel tion North of I-94 and East roller, good condition, $500. of St. Cloud. Call Doug at 320-328-5794 320-237-7667 or visit www.kleenacres.com Bins & Buildings 033


Grain Handling Equip

28 B

034

Farm Implements

035

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

54' Stanhoist grain elevator, 3 bottom Int'l pull plow, mech & hyd lift $350/OBO; great shape, $500. 953 JD running gear, 712-363-3843 $450/OBO. 515-290-2421 FOR SALE:Used grain bins, floors unload systems, stirators, fans & heaters, aer- 7 shank inline Tebben, w/cover boards, straight, no ation fans, buying or sellwelds or cracks. Belmond ing, try me first and also area, $3,000. 563-212-5509 call for very competitive contract rates! Office hours 8am-5pm Monday – AUGERS: 57' PTO, 32' Elec, Friday Saturday 9am - 12 Sharp! PLOWS: JD 1350 4noon or call 507-697-6133 B plow. GRAVITY WAGAsk for Gary ONS: Parker 400 bu, Demco 365. MOWERS: JD 350, Kinze 640 grain cart, rollover Ford 501, Woods 6' finishtarp, always shedded, ing. JD 148 ldr, Ford, 3, 7, small farm, $17,500/OBO. & 8' blades; bale spear. 515-408-3122 Ford 800, PST; IH 560; Lehman skidsteer, very WESTFIELD 10-71 low prosharp; JD 7000 planter, file swing hopper $8,799. fert, 4R. Plus more! Mike 507-848-6268 Peterson Equipment Farm Implements 035 New Ulm 507-276-6957 or 6958

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

18 Ft Great Plains Turbo-Til B&H Schweiss 8', 2 auger (Heavy Duty Series) Like snowblower, late model, New. John Deere #27 Shred$3,900; 10x34 auger w/lo der 4 Wheels Exc Cond. 500 profile swing hopper, 10 hp, Bu E-Z Flow Wagon w/ sgl phase motor, exc. cond., Tarp w/ Brakes Nice Unit. $3,650; 14.9x46 band duals, 319-347-6138 Can Deliver $1,250; 18.4x42 10 bolt duals, $1,950; Black Miller model 190 XT AC tractor, gas, new 12 rotor, bucket & grapple tires. Also, New Idea 7' cutw/joystick controls, JD ditioner & NH 56 hay rake. mnts., $3,250. 320-769-2756 '10 Maschio 8' tiller, used on less than 100 acres since new. (507) 459-3104

Tuesday, November 27, 2012 at 1:00 pm Auction Location: EVENTS by Daniel's, Saker & Schmitz - 401 8th St. SE Kasson, MN

Auctioneer/Broker’s Comments: 153 ± Gross acres with 146 ± Tillable acres in Canisteo Twp. Dodge Co. MN. This land is being offered for the 1st time in 3 generations of ownership! It has high quality, good producing soils, tile, and an outstanding 97.2 CPI value. Located in a great Ag neighborhood, so don’t miss this opportunity to buy at your price! Land Directions: From Hwy 14, head south on Co Rd 9 for approx. 6 miles, then head east on Co. Rd. K for approx. 1/2 a mile, property located on the north side of the road. Watch for auction signs.

NO BUYER’S PREMIUM! Your high bid is the purchase price

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Terms of the Sale: $50,000 (non-refundable) earnest money day of the auction, enter into a non-contingent MN purchase agreement, balance of funds are due in full on or before December 21, 2012. All real estate sells AS-IS, WHERE-IS, with no warranties or guarantees whatsoever. All buyers are encouraged to fully inspect the property, its condition, etc. and rely on their own conclusions or consult with their own legal counsel. Property offered is subject to owner confirmation. Any announcements by the Auctioneer on the day of the auction takes precedence over any previous printed materials or oral statements.

Lise & Lyle Papenfuss - Owner Kirk E. Swenson Broker/Auctioneer

507-634-7033

Kristine Fladeboe Duininck -

Wendy Forthun Broker/REALTOR®

507-251-1637

Auctioneer, Lic. #34-05-006

www.1stop-realty.com


Farm Implements

035 Farm Implements

035

29 B

FOR SALE: '02 8780XP MF FOR SALE: Oliver pull type w/ 30' flex head; 1680 CIH 3-16 plow, needs restoracombine, 8RN poly 1083 tion, $100. Snow bucket, CH; 964 CIH, 6RW CH; big skin, $100. 507-354-4665 A floater; 175 Michigan loader; 708 & 706 narrow FOR SALE: Tiling EquipCH; 3300 Hiniker cult; 4994 ment-Soil Max Stealth ZD CIH tr, 450 HP. White pull type tile plow, Agri plows & parts; JD 500 grain Drain sgl axle stringer cart; Killbros 690 grain trailer. 320-212-0604 cart. 507-380-5324 Great Plains Turbo-Chisels FOR SALE: '96 JD 8770, Available 7 Thru 23 Shanks 20.8x42 duals, 3050 hrs, 3 reSome On Hand. Great motes, SN H00491; IH 884 Plains Turbo-Max & Turboutility tractor, 2250 IH ldr, Tils Great Plalns Disk Har1996 hrs; JD 512 disk riprows Great Plains Disc-Oper, 7 shank; JD 985 44 ½' vator/Finishers (Largest field cult w/ 3 bar harrow. Selection of One Pass Fin507-220-6810 ishers On The Market). 11 Sizes 15 Thru 52 Ft. Field FOR SALE: 3350 Balzer tank Cults 15-60 Ft. spreader, vac slurry hatch, A.L. Buseman Industries new tank, disk injectors. 319-347-6282 Can Deliver 507-848-4623 www.albusemanind.com FOR SALE: 9 Shank Glencoe Soilsaver with leveler. Hydrostatic & Hydraulic Repair Repair-TroubleshootNew Tires $2,800/OBO. Call ing Sales-Design Custom 507-530-0474 hydraulic hose-making up FOR SALE: Hesston 30A to 2” Service calls made. stacker & mover, excellent STOEN'S Hydrostatic Sershape, always shedded. vice 16084 State Hwy 29 N Call for more info. 507-273Glenwood, MN 56334 3205380 634-4360

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

‘10 NH T8040, MFWD, supersteer, 19 spd. transmission, 480/80R50 duals, front duals, wgts., 5 remotes, 1485 hrs. ..........................................................$134,000 ‘03 JD 8520T, 24” tracks, narrow stance, 5043 hrs. ............................................................$89,000 ‘02 JD 9520T, 36” tracks, wide swing drawbar, 5500 hrs. ..........................................................$119,000 ‘05 JD 7720, MFWD, 16 speed power quad transmission w/left hand reverser, heavy duty front axle, 18.4R42 singles, 746 loader w/96” bucket, 5500 hrs. ............................................................$81,500 ‘06 NH W130 wheel loader, cab, air, 5350 hrs. ....$52,500 ‘10 Sunflower 4412-7, 17.5’ disk ripper, 7 shank 30” spacing, harrow, nice ..........................................$25,000

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

Drago 830 chopping head, FOR SALE: Int'l #11 V-ripplastic snoots, hay trash per, 3pt mounted, 5 shank, reel, 2400 acres, $45,000. auto reset, $5,000. 515-570-0155 515-852-4241

Keith Bode Fairfax, MN 55332 507-381-1291

Located: Hwy. #9, west edge of Armstrong, Iowa, (across from Arts-Way) Partial Listing: For complete listing and photos, check websites: www.howellrealestateandauction.com • www.midwestauction.com

Internet Bidding through Proxibid. For more info. or to register, contact: Paul Strunge @ 320-679-3377, 612-390-0535 cell Consignments are welcome. Yard Hours: Thursday, November 1st thru Sunday, November 11th, 8-5 p.m. No consignments accepted Monday, November 12th

ROONEY AUCTION CO.

Jack Rooney 507-235-5279 eves. • Cell: 712-260-9694

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Features: 2011-JD-8285-R MFD, 982 hrs, w/ transf. warr., loaded; JD-4850 MFD; JD-4555 MFD (pending); JD-4430 P.S; 3010 dsl w.f. (extra nice); JD-4230 w/148 ldr; JD-4010 gas; Case-2090, 6860 hrs; Allis-8030 FWA; IH-966 dsl (restored); White 2-155, 4300 hrs; C-IH1594; IH-460 dsl w/ldr; IH-560 w/ldr; JD-444-C whl-ldr plus others. Spring Tillage: C-IH 4300 241⁄2’‚ fc (like new); C-IH 4300 30’ fc (excellent); JD-2200 45’ fc (ex. cond); JD-726 30’ sf; JD550 21’ mulch tiller; IH-4800, 3-Will. 28-31’ fc; Redball-670 1200 gal 80’ boom spr; Bluejet 1230 fert. appl.; JD-960 36’ fc plus others. Fall Tillage: C-IH 3900 32’ rock fl. disc; 2004-Krause 4000 37’ ch. pl.; 2-JD-3710 10-bot. plows; JD-2800 7-bot.; JD-512 22’ & JD-510 5 sh. disc rippers; JD-630 22’ & Kewanee 1175 22’ discs; White 588 & IH-720 auto reset plows; Glencoe 9sh. disc ripper; Landoll 8-sh. disc ripper. Wagons & Grain Handling: 2006-Rem-2600 gr. vac.; Rem-2100 & 1026-A gr. vacs; 2004-Brent Avalanche 1084 gr. cart; Brent 572 & Parker-450 gr. carts; A&L 572 gr. cart (new tires & augers); 2006-Sukup-T-245 stack gr. dryer, 1300 hrs (to be sold off-site, contact auction co. for info); 2006-Batco 1585 belt conv.; SpeedKing 16” belt drive over pit; 5-Demco-365 gr. wgs; Parker 2600; J&M 350, Brent 400 gr. wgs (past sales have had 50-75 gr. wgs. of all sizes); Several used augers and gr. screeners. Livestock Equipment: 2006-JD-567 rd baler w/surf-wrap, mega wide, push bar; Meyer-5570 ind. Spr.; 2-NH-195 sprds.; A-W-475 gr. w/dig. scale; Orange-Ox 5 bale trl (like new); Case-75-XT, 1270 hrs; Bobcat 843 & 743 dsl skid ldrs; Case-1818; Misc. new skid. ldr attachments; 2-West. WL-42 ldrs, plus other misc. items. Planting & Harvest Heads: JD-7200 16-30; JD-7000 12-30; White 5100 1230; Great Plains 20’ no-till drill; 2007-Harvestec 4306-C & 2004-Harvestec 4308-C chopping corn hd.; 2010-JD-612 corn hd. (pending); 2001-JD-925 ff; 3-C-IH-1020 25‚; C-IH-1020 30’; 2IH-820 15’ & 20’ bean hds.; IH-715 Ger. dsl., hyd combine; 2008-JD-520 st. ch.; 2010 Loftness 30’ st. ch.; JD-220 st. ch.; JD-27 st. ch.; 4-Schweiss & JD sno-blowers. Other Equipment & Vehicles: 1977-Koehring tile machine (good cond.); 2002-Towmaster T-40 tandem trl, 40,000 lb. rating; 1998-Fld-120 w/20’ st. grain box; 1984-34’-Cornhusker alum. hopper trl; 2006-IH9200 daycab semi. w/C-13 eng., 10 sp.; 1995-Kayden 53’ flat bed trl w/ beaver tail; 1999-Ford550 XL powerstroke dsl w/utility bx.; 1992-32’-Motorhome, air, gen. (clean, nice); 1982-Ford Utility Van, 53,000 miles; 1994-Chevy-350 pu w/snowplow. Golf Course Equipment: Ford2610 dsl trac. w/turf tires, 3810 hrs., w/ldr; 2004-Goosen G-350 pull-type vacuum w/27 hp gas eng., 212 hrs.; Toro 3pt. blower; FarmPro 3pt. chipper; plus a nice selection of all other farm equipment of all kinds. Late Additions: 2 - Parker 525 gr. wgs. w/trk. Tires; Balzer 2000 20’ st. cutter; 2000 C-IH 1063, 2007 C-IH 2020 - 30’; 2004 C-IH 1020 30’; 1996 C-IH 1020 20’; 1995 C-IH 1083 corn hd.; Buhler-Farm King 10” x 70 (like new); 2 - JD 9500 combines; 2 - JD 925 gr. hds.; Demco 850 850 grain cart. (new); 2007 C-IH 730-C; 1998 C-IH 730 B and 2010 Krause 4850 Dominator 18’ disc ripper; Ford 2110 gas tractor w.f. turf tires; IH Super MTA; Super H; IH 350; IH W-6 (all restored and sharp).

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

AFTER HARVEST MACHINERY CONSIGNMENT AUCTION Tuesday, November 13, 2012 • 9:00 A.M.


Farm Implements

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

30 B

RETIREMENT SALE

JD 4440 tractor..............................................$20,000 8820 combine................................................$10,000 925F bean head, 25’ ......................................$5,200 8 row cornhead ..............................................$7,000 J&M 350-20 gravity wagon, 12T ....................$2,100 J&M 225 Nu-bilt gravity wagon, 10T gear..........$400 Parker 225 bu gravity wagon, JD 8T gear ........$400 Parker 350 gravity wagon, 1278 gear ............$1,800 Parker gravity wagon 6T wood gear ................$200 JD 8R planter w/monitor ................................$2,250 White 548 plow, 5-18’s ......................................$625 Haybuster H106 rock picker............................$6,000 JD ER014 cultivator ..........................................$200 JD 20’ digger ......................................................$600 Glencoe 12’ soil save ......................................$5,200 ‘00 Allis Chalmers 4-18’s plow ..........................$275 Hutchinson 8”x53’ auger ....................................$600 Kewanee 8”x36’ auger ......................................$400

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507-829-6885

035 Farm Implements

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FOR SALE: Wide front end FOR SALE: JD 148 loader, off 1952 Oliver 77, in good very sharp, Best to call cond., has wheels & tires evenings. 507-847-2638 complete, $650 OBO. Can JD 15' platform w/ Hiniker deliver. 507-330-1715 Bar, Tiger Jaw sickle, serial #178874H, $700. IH 80, 3 pt snowblower, 515-542-3252 $1,650; JD 4100 compact MFW tractor, 3 pt, 540 JD 4450 tractor, 3 hyds, QR, PTO, soft cab, exc. cond., 18.4x42, $23,750; NH BR780 $9,750; JD 4455 tractor, QR, baler, new belts, re-cond, 3 hyds., auto steer, 8,600 nice, $8,750; Meteor 3pt 7' hrs., $36,750; '11 Trail Massnowblower, $3,750; Winco ter 33', 3 axle, flatbed trlr, 20k PTO gen on cart,$1,450; $6,250. 320-769-2756 JD 1075 & Westendorf 12T running gears, $1,550; IH 2250 ldr, 7' bucket, exc IH 883 cornhead, $4,750; IH cond, $3,250. 320-769-2756 810 pickup head, belt, $2,500; 620 28' grain drill Late Model Lorenz 100 end transport, $2,500; IH grinder/mixer, $1,800; JD 300, $1,500; '96 & '94 Ford 338 baler w/40 kicker, dsl, ¾ ton, $1,500/choice; $4,900; Hiniker tractor cab '87 C70 dump truck, $4,000. fits 4020, 3020, 475. 320-864320-980-3522. Or Best Offer 3837

HUGE OUTSTANDING DAIRY HEARD DISPERSAL & EQUIPMENT AUCTION FRIDAY, NOV. 16TH, 2012 10:00 AM LOCATED: 8 MILES WEST OF SAUK CENTRE, MN ON MN STATE HIGHWAY #28

530 HEAD OF VERY GOOD OFFICIAL DHIA HOLSTEIN CATTLE HERD FACTS: OFFICIAL RECORDS 3 X 28,525 MILK, 3.9% 1037 FAT, 3.1% 875 PROTEIN. 90# TANK AVERAGE. SCC 244,000, RECORDS TO 50,000# OF MILK, INDIVIDUALS OVER 150# PER DAY. EXTREMELY WELL UDDERED, EXCELLENT FEET AND LEGS, COWS ALL HEADLOCK BROKE, HOUSED IN FREE STALL FACILITY, MILKED IN PARALELL PARLOR. EXCELLENT HERD HEALTH PROGRAM, ALL TB TESTED, EXCLUSIVELY AI BRED FOR MANY YEARS USING SELECT SIRES. INCLUDES: 410 MILKING COWS, 60 SPRINGING COWS, 35 CLOSE UP SPRINGING HEIFERS: 165 FIRST LACTATION, 137 SECOND LACTATION, 151 THIRD LACTATION COWS, 140 COWS ARE FRESH IN THE PAST 60 DAYS, 151 HEAD ARE MILKING OVER 100# PER DAY. 35 FANCY AI SIRED AND AI BRED SPRINGING HOLSTEIN HEIFERS DUE FROM SALE TIME THROUGH DECEMBER. 15 AI SIRED HERD SIRE PROSPECTS 5 TO 15 MONTHS OLD FROM LEADING ROSEWOOD DAMS. A TREMENDOUS OPPORTUNITY TO PURCHASE HARD TO FIND FARM FRESH HIGH PRODUCING HERD REPLACEMENTS FROM A PROVEN PROGRAM. CATALOGS INCLUDING ALL FRESHENING, BREEDING AND PRODUCTION INFORMATION SENT UPON REQUEST PH. 320-352-3803 OR SEE BROCHURE & CATALOG AT midamericanauctioninc.com THEN CLICK ON ROSEWOOD DAIRY AUCTION

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

ALSO SELLING SELECT FARM EQUIPMENT: INCLUDING JD 7400 DIESEL TRACTOR , (3) MELROE BOBCATS, PATZ 290 TMR MIXER.

ROSEWOOD DAIRY OWNERS FOR MORE INFO PH. STEVE 320-760-2705 OR ARTURO 320-491-5107

AL WESSEL • LIC. #77-60 • PH. 320-760-2979 KEVIN WINTER • LIC. #77-18 • PH. 320-760-1593 ALLEN HENSLIN • PH. 320-979-1808 LADON HENSLIN • PH. 320-365-4120

AUCTIONEERS

MID-AMERICAN AUCTION CO. INC.


Farm Implements

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FARM LAND AUCTION

120 ± Acres Choice Bare Farm Land Sec. 9 - Vernon Center Township, Blue Earth County, MN

31 B THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

JD 215 Platform Black reel, '91 JD 4555 QR Cold A/C, 3 NEW AND USED TRACTOR Specializing in most AC PARTS JD 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, remotes, $27,500. (715)977serial #369825H $1,500. used tractor parts for 55, 50 Series & newer trac1802 515-542-3252 sale. Now parting out tors, AC-all models, Large WD, 190XT, #200 & D-17 Massey Harris 22 tractor, Case IH 9270 4WD, PS, 4900 Inventory, We ship! Mark tractors. Rosenberg hrs, farmer owned, 24.5x32 WF; JD 530, 3 pt & Heitman Tractor Salvage Tractor Salvage duals, $55,000. 515-571-6932 fenders; JD 4020 dsl, pwr 715-673-4829 507-848-6379 or 507-236-8726 shift, WF; JD 148 ldr; JD 46A ldr; CIH 2255 ldr; JD Farmall 560 dsl, fast hitch, WF, ldr, $5,200; IH 300 3 45 ldr; JD F145, 3-16, 3 pt. valve, WF, new paint, plow; JD 3 pt, 5½' disk; JD $2,800; Case SC, recent OH, 613, 6', 3 pt cutter; JD 8W $1,200. 320-979-5643 13' disk; 1000 gal. anhyd. ammonia tank & gear; FOR SALE: '04 JD 9520, 5700 Hiniker cab for JD 4020 hrs, 710x42 rubber, Farmer tractor; JD 4010 gas tracOwned. $86,000. 507-475-7021 tor, NF, 3 pt hitch. Koestler Equip. 507-399-3006 FOR SALE: '76 JD 4630 w/258 Farmhand loader. New Kelderman 4RW corn Powershift, 3pt, PTO, cab, reel, $3,800. 712-363-3843 Auction Date: Mon., Nov. 19 @ 6:30 p.m. FWA. Unknown hours. $13,950/OBO. 320-567-2337 NI 3622 sgl axle spreader, Auction Location: endgate, good cond., $3,600 FOR SALE: Case IH 5250, OBO. 952-240-2193 Community Bank - Vernon Center, MN MFWD, CAH, 6500 hrs, shuttle power shift, good Selling: JD combine shop, Owner: Margaret Lenarz Trust working cond, $27,500. '78 parts, operator manuals for JD 2840, 90hp, 3pt, rebuilt For Informational Brochure Call: 3300-4400, 4425, 4435, 6600eng, clutch, 2spd, & PTO, 7700, 94-95-9600, 96-975-0515 507-995-9311 – or go to: $9,100. 320-543-3523 models. Some other brands www.agri-realty.com available. Mike 715-726-1942 FOR SALE: JD 8760 tractor 5,900 hrs w/ recent engine We buy OH & newer transmission, Salvage Equipment asking $52,000/OBO. 651-380Parts Available 3364 Hammell Equip., Inc. FOR SALE: Used Oliver (507)867-4910 tractor parts for most modP.O. Box 941 • Mankato, MN 56002 els for both gas & dsl, inTractors 036 cluding parts for Super 88 dsl, hyd unit $375, radiator '88 JD 4650 Q.R. Cold A/C. $150; complete tin work & a Auctioneer: #07-12-02 3 remotes. $26,500. lot more. Also, parting '55 (715) 977-1802 Oliver dsl. 218-564-4273 or cell 218-639-0315

Listing Agent: Bill LeDuc

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Auctioneers: Kahlers, Pike & Wedel

“Where Farm and Family Meet”


THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

32 B

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PRIME FARIBAULT COUNTY FARMLAND BID SALE

Norma E. Johnson Trust Farm, 200 acres m/l In Section 24 & 25, Lura Township, 1 mile north of Easton, MN To be sold in 2 parcels, Tuesday, November 20, 2012 at 2:00 p.m. Faribault County Ag Center, 415 S. Grove St., Blue Earth, MN Terms: Cash with 10% earnest money due day of sale. To attend and bid in the sale, buyer must submit a written bid with $10,000 certified check payable to AgriCare Farm Management, Inc. Trust Account. Bids and checks must be delivered to O/NE Realty at the Faribault County Ag Center, Blue Earth before 12:00 noon on Monday, November 19, 2012

Farm managed and co-listed with AgriCare Farm Management Inc. Marv Borcherding, A.F.M., Mason City, IA 50401 For more information, please call Henry Bollum, O/NE Realty Olson:Nelson Ag Center, Hwy. 169, Blue Earth, MN 56013 – (507) 526-7304 www.olsonnelsonrealty.com

415 So. Grove St. • Suite 6 Blue Earth, MN << www.TheLandOnline.com >>

507-526-7304

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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FOR SALE: '06 MX285, 1700 FOR SALE: JD 4640, 18.4x42 FOR SALE: JD A w/loader IH 806, 7,900 hrs., factory IH IH 966 open station, 2 hyd., 3 JD 4320, cab, 3 pt., 9,700 hrs., WANTED: JD 4440, 4640, 4250 or 4450, 2WD, low hrs., hrs, front & rear duals, cab, 3 pt., good 38” tires, pt., 38” tires, 4,800 hrs., near new 38” rear tires, tires, 75%, duals, new cab & snow bucket, $1,975. must be in very good cond. $141,000. 320-987-3177 nice tin, estate tractor, very sharp, $10,000 OBO. straight tin, $10,300. 952-240interior kit, 7400 hrs, 515-852-4241 952-240-2193 $6,800. 952-240-2193 952-240-2193 2193 $22,500. 320-360-6487

Email: olson@bevcomm.net www.olsonnelsonrealty.com

AFTER HARVEST AUCTION Saturday, November 17th, 2012 – 9:30 a.m. Located: Earl Hamilton Auction Co. off Interstate 90 at Dexter, MN exit #193 then 1/4 mile east on Hwy. 16 We will be selling with two rings. For complete listing, pictures, check web site: www.hamiltonauctioncompany.com ON LINE BIDDING AVAILABLE

Nice selection of farm equipment including a 2011 JD 9870STS combine, 846 sep. hrs.; Other combines; HEADS: 2010 JD 612C chopping corn head; 2005 Harvest Tech 4306C 6R corn head; 3 other Harvest Tech corn heads; Cressoni 6R chopping corn head; Other heads; TRACTORS: 1995 #7800 JD Tractor, MFD, 3300 hrs., PS; 1070 Case D; IH 340; MF #304 w/ldr.; B Farmall; EQUIPMENT: #2410 JD chisel plow, 26’; #735 IH 5X plow, var. width; Ag Systems tandem axle nurse tank, w/trf. pump; DK #1063 grain vac, 18” pump, 200’ pipe, sold w/1990 Chev. PU w/pipe rack; Etc.; DK #466 grain vac, 60’ alum. pipe; DOZER-SCRAPER-FORKLIFT: Reynolds #17C scraper, 17 yd.; JCB #930 forklift; Intl. TD 9 dozer, D; #821 Icon scraper w/rear hookup; WAGONS: (2) DMI 400 bu. wagons, center dump; Other wagons; TRUCKS-TRAILERS-DUMP TRUCK-ALUM. END DUMP PICKUPS-CARS-LIVESTOCK EQUIP.; LARGE SELECTION OF GATES; Misc. toys; Fishing equip.; Balers & Hay Equip.; 4-Wheeler; Portable Bldg’s; Lumber; Etc. For complete list check web site: www.hamiltonauctioncompany.com For information call: 507-584-0133 office Terms: Cash or good check – Nothing to be removed until settled for. All announcements the day of the sale take precedence over any advertised material

To consign call: Hamilton Auction Co. at:

507-584-0133 office EARL HAMILTON AUCTION COMPANY 130 State Hwy. 16 • Dexter, MN 55926 Web site: www.hamiltonauctioncompany.com


Tractors

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2007 JD 9660 STS combine 1900 engine hrs, 1307 sep, Contour Master, high speed unload, 9 L motor, 18.4x42 duals, grain tank ext with bubble up very good cond. $140,000 OBO (or best offer) (320) 5220505 454A Row crop head, 36", all chain tighteners, always shedded, looks new. $2,000. 712-358-3324 FOR SALE: '02 Case IH 2366, field tracker, field monitor, chopper, 2200 eng/1600 sep hrs, 30.5x32 tires, real nice shape. 10X61 Feterl grain auger. 507-872-5267 or 507-530-8875

FOR SALE: '96 JD 9600 w/ Contour Master, 3000 sep hrs, always shedded, looks like new, Green Star yield monitor, 600 Series ready, many more options. $54,000/OBO. '96 JD 930 flex head, low acres, $5,500. 320894-6411 FOR SALE: '98 9510 JD combine, duals, 2200 sep hrs, '02 920F platform w/ full finger auger, '93 843 8R cornhead w/ JD plastic & oil drive; '06 JD 120 chopper. 507-8388775 FOR SALE: 2010 JD 9770STS, 760 sep hrs, ext PT warranty till July 2014. Motivated to sell! Priced reduced! $192,500. 507-3511176 FOR SALE: JD 6600 combine; JD 220 bean head, dial-a-matic, black reel & also, stainless steel platform; JD 443 CH, knife rolls. 507-227-7633 Leave Message

NEW EQUIPMENT • Wilrich 957, 7-30

w/harrow • DMI 730B, 7-30 • Tebben 5-30 deep till • IH 800 10-bottom plow • Wilrich Quad X, 55’, rolling basket • JD 985, 55’, harrow • JD 980, 44’, harrow • CIH TII, 45’, harrow • Hardi Com. 1500, 132’ USED EQUIPMENT • Hardi Com. 1200, 90’ • Tebben 45’ Land Roller • Hardi Nav. 1100, 88’ • Pickett thinner, 24-22 • Hardi Nav. 1000, 88’ • Alloway 22’ shredder • Hardi Nav. 950, 88’, (2) • Alloway 20’ shredder • Hardi Nav. 1000, 66’ • Alloway 15’ shredder • Amity 11’, 12-22 • Killbros 1810 cart, tracks • ‘05 Amity, 12-22 • Brent 410 grain cart • Amity 8-22, (3) • Sheyenne 1410, 10x66 • ‘06 Artsway 6812, 12-22 hopper • Artsway 898, 8-22 • Feterl 12x72 hopper • Artsway 692, 8-22 • Feterl 8x51 hopper • Alloway 12-22 topper St. • Batco 1835 belt conveyor Ft. (3) • REM 2100 grain vac. • Alloway 9-22 topper • ‘09 JD 2700, 7-30 • Agco • Hardi Sprayers • REM Grain Vac • Woods Mowers • J&M Grain Carts • Westfield Augers • Sunflower Tillage • White Planters • Wilrich Tillage

Clara City, MN 56222 320-847-3218 www.wearda.com

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FOR SALE: '05 Case IH 2388 combine, AFX rotor, 480/80R42 Firestone deep tread duals, 540/65R24 steer tires, Maurer grain tank exts w/ tip ups, unloading auger ext, rear wgts, Ag Leader yield monitor, hyd reverser, rock trap, chopper, 12R ready, field tracker, exc cond, 2608 eng/2018 sep hrs, $139,000/OBO. 507383-8030

FOR SALE: '96 Case IH 1020 30' bean platform, Crary 3” golden cut, Crary air reel, field tracker, good cond, $10,500/OBO. 507-383-8030

USED EQUIPMENT

33 B THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

FOR SALE: JD 4010 diesel, 4R 36" JD Corn head 444 858 New Idea corn sheller- FOR SALE: '90 JD 9500, 643 High tin, total rebuilt '11. wide front. 507-380-5226 cornhead, oil bath; 220 platgray; 844 corn head, 30”. Always shedded, $2,000. form. All for $36,000. Field ready, make offer. 712-358-3324 Harvesting Equip 037 641-430-3193 (507) 527-2066 FOR SALE: '05 Case IH '06 Cat Lexion 590R combine, 2208 8-30” cornhead, hyd 870 sep hrs, duals, RWD, deck plates, field tracker, exc cond, $185K w/ heads exc cond, not faded, available. 712-830-1600 $29,500/OBO. 507-383-8030

“Where Farm and Family Meet”


THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

34 B

AUCTIONS

Harvesting Equip

037 Harvesting Equip

FOR SALE: JD 9400 combine, 2420 sep hrs, grain bin ext, grain loss monitor, chopper, exc cond. 320-309-4032 or 320-987-3463 FOR SALE: JD 9510 combine, level land, w/ topper & duals, 1982 sep hrs, just thru JD shop, w/ new rasp bars, concave & feeder house chain, $12,000 in repairs, have papers to show; JD 893 CH w/ hyd deck plates & knife rolls, (2) JD 925 flex platforms. Will separate. Gehl 55 mixer/mill. 507-876-2470 or 507-226-6817 FOR SALE: JD 9560 walker SN W705625, 1680 eng/1146 sep hrs; also, 626F beanhead, SN 7257. 507-220-6810 FOR SALE: MF 8560 combine, 9463 CH, 9320 bean head, paint very good, always shedded & well maintained, approx 3520 hrs. 507-232-3705 or 507-327-2678 FOR SALE: Parting out an 8820 combine, 18.4x42 straddle duals, planetary drives, many other good parts. This ad only one time, Call soon. 507-381-3813

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

JD 643 cornheads, low tin, oil bath, new deck plate, 515570-4382 or 515-570-9769

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039

JD 925 Platform, plastic Disk rippers 5-7SH, $6,900 & up; Wagons 400-750bu. snouts/lights, stored inside, $3,500 & up. 515-795-2943 $7,500. 515-570-9003 or 515-545-4209 FOR SALE: Int'l 700 7-18 onland plow, in good cond. JD 9400 Combine, 2350 sep 507-265-3344 or 507-318-9168 hrs, Agleader/GPS, 900 acres on bars, 515-570-4382 FOR SALE: JD 980 21 ½' or 515-570-9769 field cult, 3 bar coil tine harrow, heavy 150# shanks, JD 9610, 4430 eng. hrs., 3071 late model, very good consep. hrs., RWA, Contour dition. $12,500. 507-380-7863 Master, hvy duty drives,

reman reverser, dual chaff JD 714 Disc Chisel, good spreader, 20.8x42 w/duals, blades, tight shanks, hyd Ag Leader YM, $55,000/ofdiscs, $9,750. (715)495-0873 fer; JD 930F w/full finger NEW & USED M&W auger, Contour Master, 3-5-7-9-11 new poly, new sickle, Earthmasters, Shank, Some On Hand $11,000/offer; Shop built JD Rental Units. We Trade/ 12x22 cornhead w/GVL Deliver Anywhere Dealer. poly, oil bath drive, $8,500/offer. 320-510-1222 Lots of M&W Earthmaster Parts. 319-347-6282 Planting Equip 038 WANTED TO BUY: IH dis model 490, 496 or newer, 28' 1995 Kinze 16 Row 30" has all to 32', cushion gang or solid Precision finger unit uptype, also would consider dates & LF. Does not need White or other brand in much to be field ready. good cond. 218-564-4273 or $25,000/OBO. (320) 795-2247 218-639-0315 or (C) 763-486-3975 Machinery Wanted 040 Tillage Equip 039 All kinds of New & Used farm equipment – disc chisFOR SALE: 6 or 7 bottom els, field cults, planters, Melroe pull type plow, 18” soil finishers, cornheads, onland hitch; also 5-18s JD feed mills, discs, balers, auto re-set pull type plow. haybines, etc. 507-438-9782 320-760-5622

Wednesday, November 14, 2012, 10:00 a.m.


WANTED

DAMAGED GRAIN STATE-WIDE

Storm Date Thurs. Dec. 6th

Directions: 1846 County Road 11 • 5.5 miles N. of Tracy, MN 1/2 hour misc items then on to major items. Randy and Elaine have sold their farm and will sell all their very clean equipment to the highest bidder.

We pay top dollar for your damaged grain. We are experienced handlers of your wet, dry, burnt and mixed grains. Trucks and Vacs available. Immediate response anywhere. CALL FOR A QUOTE TODAY

PRUESS ELEV., INC. 1-800-828-6642

ESTATE AUCTION

AM

ADDRESS: 7657 - 195TH ST., SILVER LAKE, MN Directions to Site: Go east from Silver Lake on St. Hwy. 7, turn right (south) onto Falcon Ave. (aka Cty. Rd. 15) and go 1 mile, turn right, (west) onto 195th St., 1 mile to property on south side of road.

Land: Hale Twp., McLeod County, T-117-N, R-28-W, Section 36 Acreage: 80 acres Tillable: 55.2 acres Sold as one parcel

EDWARD KULINSKI ESTATE

• 2x Brent 740 Wagons with duals • J&M Wagon, 450 bu • 12Row Bander • Feterl 12”x72’ Auger with hydraulic swing hopper • 2011 Batco 1535 Belt Conveyor Field Loader, 10hp electric motor • Westfield MK 100-71 10” Auger with swing hopper • Unverferth 1000 bu Grain Cart, Tarp, Scale • 30’ Chain link harrow on Melroe cart TRUCKS • 2005 Freightliner Semi-Tractor Day Cab, 410 Mercedes Diesel, 6 speed Auto, 179,000 miles • 43’ Wilson Grain Trailer, 78” Sides. Salvage Title • 48’ Benson Flatbed Air Ride, Toolboxes, Hay hauling attachments • 35’ Van-Trailer Set up as a Sprayer Tender, Aluminum floor, 6,000 gal, 3” Honda Pump • 1995 Freightliner FL 80 Dump Truck, Twin Screw, Cummins Diesel, with 3 Ax Lift Tag Axle 100,000 miles 16’ plastic lined box LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT • Knight 8030 Sling Spreader • Hagedorn 412 HydraPush Spreader • Hay Buster 1100 Tub Grinder, Tilt, recently Rebuilt • Vermeer Bale Shredder • 2009 DF-12 Dual Rhino Rake 12 wheel • 21’ Trailer 10’ wide used for Round Bales. • 16’ Hay Wagon • 26’ 2 Wheel Trailer on truck frame with hay attachments • 2000 Gal Water Trailer on Tandem Gear • 2004 Knight #3150 Feed Wagon w/Scale • 15’ Plastic Lined Manure Box on Pull Type Gear. 800 bu with new Hoist. • 50 gal. 3pt Cattle fly sprayer • JD3960 Chopper 3 row 20” head • IH #56 Blower • Balzer 14’ Silage box front unload • Balzer 16’ Silage box • Forage King 16’ Silage box • Bear Cat 24R Roller mill

SALE MACHINERY • 12’ Take Away Auger, 10” 1.5Hp • 1000 Gal. Fast Spray Tank • JD 8W mower • IH 11’ Chisel Plow • 30’ Folding bar with gauge wheels • NH Rake #56 • 3pt. Blade • Koyker Auger 7 1/2” x 25’ 5hp mtr • Portable Cattle Loading Chute • Band Saw • 1000 Gal. Fuel Tank • 500 Gal. Fuel Tank • Big Skid Loader Bucket Skid Loader Bale Fork • Tire Tank • Hog Tank (Never used) • 102’ Bucket for JD loader • Lick Tanks • Round Bale Feeder • Several Cattle Gates • 5T New Holland Running Gear • 5T JD Running Gear with Hoist • 8’ Tire Scrapper for Loader • Various sizes of tires and rims • Approximately 60 42x64” seed pallets • Demco 250 gal Quicktach Saddle Tanks • 2 Demco 6 row Squeeze Pumps • 12 Ridge Guides for 12 Row Planter • Several steel T-posts • Brillion 20’ packer • New 10hp electric motor CONSIGNED ITEMS •1980 IH Boom Truck •30’ High 24” auger, port Welder & air tank •1978 IH Twin screw 20’ box & hoist •1998 IH New 22’ box hoist & Hyd end gate •1989 IH 20’ box & hoist Call on above trucks 507-823-4671 Jeff or 507-829-0266 Rachel Cattle equip from Mike Hinz 507-829-4404 • 42’ Trail Star Trailer belt unloader • Hyd Head gate • Vemeer bale processor Top gun • 1997 Freightliner FLD 120 72” & Sleeper • 1882 Int feed truck & Knight 2450 feed box, auto 5-speed automatic & scale

Lunch on Grounds

OWNERS: Randy & Elaine Tholen Randy’s cell 507-993-1803 No Buyers Fees ever charged, all are welcome!

For Complete Information Packet & Maps: Call Auctioneers: Joe Maidl • 507-276-7749 Matt Mages • 507-276-7002 – Lic. # 08-12-006 Broker & Clerk: Mages Land Co. & Auction Service LLC

www.magesland.com

Ted Deutz, 42-16, 507-530-0740; Tim Deutz, 507-532-9730; Chuck Deutz, 507-532-6710; CLERK: Bob Deutz

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Auction Also Includes: Tractors, Farm Equipment, Combines, Vehicles, Shop Items, Collectibles

COMBINE • 2008 J.D. 9660, STS 800 sep. hrs., 20.8 42 tires with duals, Contour Master Heavy Duty Reverser, Maurer Topper • 2011 J.D. 635 F Bean Hydraflex Bean Head • 2010 J.D. 608C 8x30” chopping corn head • 2011 Stud King 38‘ Head Mover • JD oats head TRACTORS • 2008 J.D. 8530 MFWD 1600 hrs, 31mph IVT, ILS, Active Seat, On Board Air with Trailer Brakes, Intelligent Power Management, 540/1000 PTO, 480/80R50 tires, front duals, AutoTrac Ready • 2005 J.D. 7920 MFWD, 3500 hrs, IVT, AutoTrac Ready, TLS, 540/1000 PTO, Active Seat, 710/70R38 Tires, On Board Air with Trailer Brakes, Front 3pt, hitch, Front SCV, Front PTO, Joystick • 1992 4960 MFWD. 3400 hrs., 18.4 .46 Duals • 1996 J.D. 7700 MFWD, 5900 hrs. 18.4R46, front 3pt. hitch, Front SCV, PowerQuad with E Range, On Board Air with Trailer Brakes • 1982 IH 5288, 5400 hrs., no cab 18.4R46 tires • Hydralic Center Links for 3pt • JD 2630 Display, RTK Activation ITC Receiver with RTK Radio • Clark Forklift 4000lb cap. pneumatic tires EQUIPMENT • 2011 J.D. 1720 Stack Fold Planter, 16x30”, CCS, eSet vac meters, spiked closing wheels, Variable Rate Drive, RowCommand, Row Cleaners, 2020 Seed Sense Monitor • 8 rows E sets and 24 rows of new opening discs for JD 1700 Series planters • BH 9100 Ridge-Till Cultivator, 16x30” cutaways, shields, new bearings, new discs, new tires • 2011 Top Air TA2400 Pull Type Sprayer on tracks, 2400 gal tank, 120ft boom, 10 section swath control, Raven sonic boom height control, ISO Compatible • 400 gal, Hardi 3pt sprayer with 40’ boom • 2009 Convey All Seed Tender, 280 Units, Scale • 2x Brent 744 Wagons with duals

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

80 ACRES OF LAND, FARM EQUIP., VEHICLES & COLLECTIBLES TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13TH, 2012 • 10:30 (LAND SELLS AT NOON)

Monday, Nov. 26, 2012 • 10:30 am

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

Large Machinery Auction

35 B


THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

36 B

Machinery Wanted

040

Disc chisels: JD 714 & 712, Glencoe 7400; Field Cults under 30': JD 980, small grain carts & gravity boxes 300-400 bu. Finishers under 20', clean 4 & 6R stalk choppers; Nice JD 215 & 216 flex heads; JD 643 cornheads Must be clean; JD corn planters, 4-6-8 row. 715-299-4338 LOOKING TO BUY: CIH 1680 combine w/less than 4000 hrs., in good cond., price range of $10,000$20,000. 320-392-5380 WANTED TO BUY: Magnum tractor, hours. 320-352-3878

CIH low

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

WANTED: Buying Tractors, Skid Loaders, Equipment one piece or entire line or Estate. Send list to: PO Box 211, Oronoco, MN 55991

LARGE COMPLETE DAIRY DISPERSAL AUCTION

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20th, 2012 • 11:30 AM 6 MILES NORTH OF ST. CLOUD, MN OR 4 MILES SOUTH OF RICE, MN ON US HIGHWAY #10 THEN 5 MILES EAST ON COUNTY TAR #13 THROUGH MAYHEW LAKE, MN THEN 1/2 MILE SOUTH ON COUNTY TAR #58 THEN 1/2 MILE EAST ON 95TH ST. NE THEN 1/10 MILE SOUTH ON 45TH AVE. NE TO FARM #9404

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

160 OUTSTANDING OFFICIAL DHIA HOLSTEIN CATTLE

NOTE: SUCCESSFUL FAMILY FARM SINCE 1943 WITH HERD ORIGINATING AT THAT TIME. OFFICIAL RECORDS 2 X 21,794 M, 758 F, 660 P, 82# TANK AVG., NO BST, NO TMR. SCC 90 TO 130,000. INCLUDES 31 RED CARRIERS, HANDLED IN TIE STALL FACILITY. AI SINCE EARLY 50’S USING LEADING SIRES. EXCELLENT HERD HEALTH PROGRAM. MANY RECENTLY FRESH OR DUE SOON. EXTREMELY WELL UDDERED. INCLUDES MANY 1ST AND 2ND LACTATION. ONE OF THE MOST STYLISH HERDS OFFERED THIS AUCTION SEASON. INCLUDES 80 HIGH POWERED YOUNG HOLSTEIN COWS, MANY JUST FRESH OR DUE SOON 34 FANCY SPRINGING AND BRED HEIFERS DUE FROM SALE TIME ON 48 OUTSTANDING OPEN HIEFERS FROM BABIES TO 15 MONTHS OLD, MORE BABIES BY SALE DATE. VERY GOOD RED AND WHITE REDLLINE SON FROM DAMS WITH 30,370M, 1530 F, 1022 P For Complete Brochure Ph. 320-352-3803, or www.midamericanauctioninc.com

ROCKY TOP ACRES DUANE & SANDY THENE OWNERS Ph. 320-251-6720 9404 45th Ave. NE, Sauk Rapids, MN

AL WESSEL - LIC. #77-60 • PH. 320-760-2979 KEVIN WINTER - LIC. #77-18 • PH. 320-760-1593

MID-AMERICAN AUCTION CO. INC


Machinery Wanted

040

Machinery Wanted

ANYWHERE We buy damaged corn and grain any condition - wet or dry TOP DOLLAR We have vacs and trucks

NORTHERN AG SERVICE INC 800-205-5751

‘10 JD 9770STS Combine, 430 hrs., Premier cab, Pro-Drives, CM w/hi-torque rev., chopper, 20.8x42’s w/duals ............$239,500 CASH NO-TRADE ............................$219,500 ‘09 JD 9770STS Combine, 463 hrs., Premier cab, CM w/hi-torque rev., chopper, 20.8x42’s w/duals ............$219,500 CASH NO-TRADE ............................$209,500 ‘04 JD 9760STS Combine, 4WD, 1548 hrs., Touchset, CM w/HD rev., chopper, 20.8x42’s w/duals..............................................$134,500 CASH NO-TRADE ............................$125,000 ‘12 JD 9460R, 4WD, 130 hrs.!, leather trim, Michelin 710/70R42’s w/duals, high flow hyd., extended warranty............................$264,500 ‘08 JD 9530, 4WD, 1706 hrs., Premier lighting pkg., 800/70R38’s w/duals, Active seat, weight pkg. ......................................$194,500

Financing Available!

800-432-3565

• 320-894-6560

www.ms-diversified.com

For More info Call 1-800-726-8609 or visit our website: www.steffesauctioneers.com

Opening Thursday, November 1 & Closing Monday, November 12: IQBID November Auction, Call now to consign your excess equipment! Selling Ag, Construction, Trucks, Vehicles, RV’s & more! Opening Friday, November 2 & Closing Wednesday, November 14: IQBID True North Equipment Year End Auction, Grand Forks, ND, Combines, Heads, Drills, Tillage, Lawn Tractors, Recreation & More! Friday, November 2 @ 10 AM: Meeker County Farmland & Farmstead, Leonard & Doris Peters and Kevin & Donna Koecher, Watkins, MN, 193 +/- Acres in Forest Prairie Plat with home, garage, shop, pole sheds & more!

37 B THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

DAMAGED GRAIN WANTED

CALL HEIDI OR LARRY

Steffes Auction Calendar 2012

040

WANTED TO BUY: JD 16R WANTED TO BUY: JD 300 7000 planter any condition. pull type corn picker. 507Also, 23.1x30 used tractor 354-4665 tires. 507-931-5564

Monday, November 5 @ 1 PM: Multi-Tract Farmland Auction, The Brown Family Farm, Mountain Chalet & Event Center in Mountain, ND, 291 +/- Acres, Pembina County, ND, Park Township Tuesday, November 6 @ 10 AM: Clay County Farmland Auction, Hartvig Anderson Family Land, Steffes Auctioneers Facility, West Fargo, ND, NW1/4 17-137-44, less 6.73 +/- Acres Farmstead Wednesday, November 7 @ 10 AM: High Plains Equipment, Devils Lake, ND, Inventory Realignment Thursday, November 8 @ 11 AM: Dennis Fowler Farm Retirement, Casselton, ND, Tractors, Harvest Equip., Air Drill, Tillage, Grain Handling & More! Thursday, November 8 @ 3 PM: McLeod County, MN, Executive Home & Farmland, Camon & Darla Simon, Lester Prairie, MN, 3,500 sq. ft. custom built home on 4 acres with 94.88 +/- acres in Winsted Township Wednesday, November 14 @ 10 AM: Daniel Pavelko Estate, Glyndon, MN, Farm Equipment & , 80 +/- acres RE in Riverton Township

Monday, November 19 @ 1 PM: Barnes & Cass Counties Multi-Tract Land, Steffes Auctioneers Facility, West Fargo, ND, 1280 +/- prime acres in Cornell & Weimer Townships Tuesday, November 20 @ 10 AM: Randy Evans Estate, Langdon, ND, Farm Equipment Auction Wednesday, November 21 @ 10 AM: Richland County ND Farmland, Steffes Auctioneers Arena, West Fargo, ND, 80 +/- farmland acres in Abercrombie Township Wednesday, November 28 @ 10 AM: AgIron 62 Event, Red River Valley Fairgrounds, West Fargo, ND, Consigning Tractors, Combines, Heads, Trucks, Semis, Tillage, Construction Equipment, Hay & Livestock Equipment and Much More! Advertising Deadline: Friday, November 2

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Thursday, November 15 @ 10 AM: King Coal Furnace Corp., Bismarck, ND, Complete Liquidation to include Welders, Brake, Shear, Lathe, Milling Machine, CNC Plasma Table, Forklifts, Crane, New Steel Inventory

Thursday, November 29 @ 10 AM: Becker County ND Land & Rural Farm Site, Osage, MN, rural farmstead, cropland, fenced pasture & wooded acreage in Toad Lake Township Friday, November 30 @ 10 AM: Wright County MN Farmland Auction, Hudson Family Land, 153 +/- acres Opening Saturday, December 1 & Closing Monday, December 10: IQBID Private Toy Collection, Steffes Auctioneers Facility, Litchfield, MN, Large Collection of Farm & Construction Toys Opening Saturday, December 1 & Closing Tuesday, December 11: IQBID December Auction. Call now to consign your excess equipment! Selling Ag, Construction, Trucks, Vehicles, RV’s & More! Advertising Deadline: Thursday, November 15 *Opening Monday, December 3 & Closing Wednesday, December 12: IQBID Charles Hajek JD Toy Collection, Litchfield, MN. Lifetime collection of JD Tractors and Implements, most are new in box & excellent condition

Wednesday, December 5 @ 1 PM: Monte Schmalz Hay Dispersal, Dickinson, ND, Selling round bales of alfalfa/grass mix hay Friday, December 7 @ 10 AM: AQ3 Farms Estate Auction, Litchfield, MN, late model line of farm equipment Tuesday, December 11 @ 2 PM: Midwest Forage Dispersal, Steffes Auctioneers Facility, Litchfield, MN, Selling 100+ lots of quality tested hay & straw Thursday, December 20 @ 10 AM: AgIron 30 Event, Steffes Auctioneers Facility, Litchfield, MN. Consigning Tractors, Combines, Heads, Trucks, Semis, Tillage, Construction Equipment, Hay & Livestock Equipment and Much More! Advertising Deadline: Friday, November 16

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Tuesday, December 4 @ 10 AM: Mark Andrews Farm Retirement, Mapleton, ND, Large Farm Retirement Auction


Machinery Wanted

38 B THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

WANTED: JD 7600 2WD tractor, also 6R JD 30” planter. Both in Good to exc condition. 612-210-6371

1907 E. Main. Albert Lea, MN 56007 www.westrumtruck.com

‘01 Volvo, low miles, $21,500 ‘04 Columbia, auto shift, $27,900 ‘06 IH 8600 ‘81 Chev w/contractor box, $3,500 *Special Price on AL Trailer With Year End Rebate*

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United Farmers Cooperative United Farmers Cooperative

Main Office: Ag Service Center 840 Pioneer Avenue P.O. Box 4 Lafayette, MN 56054-0004

USED DRYERS & AUGERS Good Selection of Used Dryers - Call! Sheynne-Westco 10x91 swing, 1 year old ....CALL GSI 1226, FF 190, GSI 260, GSI 1218 ............CALL Westfield MK 13”x91’, MK 13”x71’ ................CALL Feterl 10x66 swing ........................................$4,495 Sudenga 8”x51’, electric ..............................$3,990 Feterl 10”x34’, electric ..................................$3,495 Feterl 10”x34’, electric ..................................$2,495 Sudenga 10”x31’, electric ............................$3,495 Feterl 12”x72’, swing drive ..........................$7,495

SKIDLOADERS

Bobcat S650, 2-spd. ..................................$32,900 Bobcat S300, heat/AC, 2-spd.....................$28,500 Bobcat S175, 2-spd. ..................................$22,500 Bobcat T190, heat ......................................$20,600 (3) Bobcat S130, heat..................................$15,600 (3) Gehl 4240E ..........................Starting at $15,600 ‘05 Gehl 3935 ..............................................$12,900 Bobcat 773T, heat ......................................$16,500 Bobcat 742B, bucket ....................................$7,450 Gehl 4240E, heat, 2007 ..............................$17,400 NH 175, 2-spd., hi flow ..............................$31,500

TILLAGE

Wishek 862NT, 26’, 3 bar ............................$45,900 (2) Krause 18’ ripper....................................$44,800 Krause 12’ ripper ........................................$25,500 (3) Wilrich 957, 7 shank ....................From $22,600 (2) DMI 730 ripper........................................$16,900 DMI 530, 5-shank ..........................................$14,800

507-228-8224 or 800-642-4104 www.ufcmn.com LeSueur • 800-252-5993

JD 2700, 7-shank ..........................................$27,900 Wilrich 513, 9-shank ......................................$44,500 Wilrich 957, 9-shank ......................................$39,600 Wilrich 357, 5 shank, 3 pt ............................$6,250 Great Plains Turbo Till, 24’..........................$39,800 Sunflower 5055, 50’, 4 bar ..........................$43,900 JD 980, 44.5’, 3 bar ....................................$19,600 JD 960, 31.5’..................................................$7,450 CIH 4800, 36.5’, 3 bar....................................$6,975 JD 3 pt. plow, 5 bottom ................................$2,850

SPRAYERS

Fast 1000 gal., 90’ boom ..............................$9,900 Fast 1000 gal., 60’ boom ..............................$7,850 Redball 580, 80’, 1600 gal...........................$18,900 L&D 1000 gal., 60’ boom ............................$11,900 Century 1300 gal., 90’ boom, Big Wheel ..$17,500 Hardi 6600 Commander, 132’ boom ..........$65,900

MISCELLANEOUS

Demco grain cart, 750 bu. ............................$17,500 (2) J&M 350, 12 ton gear ..............Starting at $3,450 Minnesota 250, 10 ton gar ..............................$1,900 Used grain legs ....................................................Call H & S 430 spreader, hyd drive ........................$9,900 NI 3739 spreader..............................................$7,950 Gehl 1410 spreader..........................................$8,250 NH 514 spreader, end gate..............................$4,250 Woods Batwing mower, 15’ ............................$8,475 Top Air 30’ belt conv., elec ..............................$3,150 Used Snowblowers ..............................................Call

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507-383-8976 Cell 507-373-4218 • 507-448-3306

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

040

WANTED: corn planter, 4 or 6 row, 30''. 715-821-1975

WANTED: Plow parts & accesories for JD 44, Massey Harris 28, Massey Harris 66 plows. 920-323-2649 lukesnmeidl@aol.com WANTED: Small square baler, in good working condition. 507-236-8678 Spraying Equip

041

FOR SALE: 1100 TA sprayer 60' boom w/ Raven 440 monitor, $8,500. 507-227-9420 Feed Seed Hay

050

Dairy Quality Alfalfa Tested big squares & round bales, delivered from South Dakota John Haensel (605) 351-5760


39 B

050 Feed Seed Hay

050

Dairy quality western alfal- FOR SALE: 1st cutting of fa, big squares or small alfalfa mixed round hay squares, delivered in semi bales. (218) 879-8451 loads. Clint Haensel (605) 310-6653

Yes, another Auction by Triple R Auctioneering!

LAND AUCTION

Friday, Nov. 30th, 2012 • 1:00 pm

75 Acres More or Less, 70 Acres Tillable More or Less. Mower County, Frankford Township, Section. 14 Here is some good land to add to your present operation, has CER 70.06. If your in the market for additional land you will want to check this one out. Located 3 miles south of Racine, MN on State Hwy.. 63, on west side of road. This land would make good development land or just good farm land. Great location on Hwy 63. Property is being sold as is condition. Please feel free to view at your own leisure. Terms: $25,000 down day of sale, non-refundable, noncontingent, balance due on January 3, 2013. 6% buyers premium applies that will be added to high bid to equal full purchase price. Travis Ohly attorney will handle purchase agreement and earnest money.

AUCTION WILL BE HELD AT THE RELAX INN, 1700 NW 2ND AVE. • STEWARTVILLE, MN

AUCTIONEER Ray R. Rew #81-27 507-339-1272

301 - 14th Avenue NW Waseca, MN • Office: 507-835-1958 Home: 507-835-3387 Cell: 507-339-1272 Visit our websites for upcoming auctions: triplerauctions.com or auctionsgo.com

They want how much to sell your Farm?? We have sold thousands of acres using proven methods throughout MN at commissions that are often half that of other companies

Best of Country Living! 2001 home on 10 acres w/3&4 season proches, deck, full w/o basement, 2 stall attached garage w/detached 36x64 shop/utility bldg w/Office • $379,900 • 58638 382nd St, Lafayette, MN Perfect Hobby Farm, perfect for horses/livestock, 3 bedroom rambler w/updates, large insulated 2 stall garage, shed, fenced in horse pasture • $127,900/10 acres or $114,900/5 acres • 57821 300th St, Winthrop, MN Totally Renovated 11⁄2 Story Home on 1.25 Acres, with 2 stall attached garage & 2 sheds, huge master suite, kitchen w/granite & slate, hardwood floor, Must See!!, $157,900 • 45950 330th St., Gaylord, MN Excellent Business Opportunity! Turnkey business, excellent location, established restaurant and event venue w/2.2 acre real estate w/2 adjoining buildings, and all equip • $170,000 • E 11th St, Gibbon, MN Income Generating Business, Own your own bakery, a turnkey business, also comes with a salon & apartment already leased out. • $64,900 • 1021 1st Ave, Gibbon, MN Attention Hunters! 66 acres in Brown Cty. outside of Sleepy Eye, MN, mixed grass w/small trees and conservation land just north of property • $1200/acre w/payment • Mulligan Twp Sec 3

Mages Land Co. & Auction Service

magesland.com 507-276-7002

TRACTORS

‘90 JD 2955, 2WD, 97 hp, 18.4x38, 2856 hrs......$33,000 ‘65 JD 4020, 4WD, 92 hp, 16.9x38 ........................$8,900 ‘83 JD 4050, 2WD, 130 hp, 14.9x46, 9004 hrs....$22,900 ‘08 JD 4120, MFWD, 43 hp, 44x18-20, ldr...........$29,000 ‘76 JD 4630, 2WD, 150 hp, 18.4x38, 1598 hrs....$14,500 ‘69 Ford 5000, 2WD, 62 hp, 15.5x38 ....................$6,500 ‘10 JD 6115, MFWD, 118 hp, 18.4x38, 128 hrs ..$39,900 ‘98 JD 6410, MFWD, 104 hp, 18.4x38, ldr ..........$28,500 ‘05 JD 7820, MFWD, 155 hp, 18.4R42, 4335 hrs $89,500 ‘08 JD 7930, MFWD, 180 hp, 710-70R38 ..........$134,000 ‘07 JD 7930, MFWD, 180 hp, 380-50, 4125 hrs $130,500 ‘09 JD 8130, MFWD, 180 hp, 480-80R46 ..........$155,000 ‘11 JD 8225R, MFWD, 380-90R54, IVT ............$173,000 ‘06 JD 8330, MFWD, 225 hp, 380-90R50..........$160,000 ‘10 JD 8345R, MFWD, 345 hp, 380-85R38........$249,000 ‘00 JD 8410T, 235 hp, 24” tracks, 7755 hrs ........$72,500 ‘07 JD 9220, 4WD, 480-80R46, 1900 hrs..........$152,000 ‘11 Kubota L3540, 4WD, 35 hp, cab/ldr/bkt ........$32,900 ‘01 CS/IH MX180, MFWD, 180 hp, 480-80R46....$59,500 ‘80 JD 8640, 4WD, 275 hp, 18.4x38, 7277 hrs ..$23,000 ‘96 JD 8770, 4WD, 300 hp, 20.8x42, 7916 hrs....$65,000 ‘08 JD 9230, 4WD, 325 hp, 380-54, 1785 hrs ..$179,000 ‘07 JD 9330, 4WD, 18.4x46, 2410 hrs ..............$208,000 ‘99 JD 9400, 4WD, 425 hp, 710-38, 4058 hrs ..$109,500 ‘04 JD 9420, 4WD, 425 hp, 710-70R42 ............$168,000 ‘06 JD 9620, 4WD, 500 hp, 800-38, 3154 hrs ..$189,500 ‘04 JD 9620, 4WD, 800-80R38, 3155 hrs..........$185,000 JD 9630’s, 530 hp, SEVERAL ON HAND! ..................CALL

‘11 JD 323D, 499 hrs., ‘04 JD 325, 923 hrs., tracks, 2 spd., cab, 76” 2 spd., cab, 78” bucket, bucket..............$41,000 ........................$28,900

‘06 JD CT322, 1340 ‘07 JD CT332, 678 hrs., 69 hp., 18” tracks, hrs., 82 hp., 18” tracks, 84” bucket ......$35,900 cab, 84” bucket ........................$47,995

FALL TILLAGE

‘02 JD 2400 Chisel Plow, 33-shank, 3” shovels ..$30,500 ‘05 JD 2410 Chisel Plow, 57-bottom, AccuDepth $59,900 JD 2500 Plow, 6-bottom, coulter ............................$2,900 ‘09 JD 2700 Rippers, 7-shank & 9-shank..................CALL JD 2800 Plow, 6-bottom ........................................$5,900 JD 2800 Plow, 8-bottom ........................................$8,450 JD 3710 Plow, 8-bottom ......................................$18,900 ‘00 JD 512 Disk Ripper, 7’6”, 7-shank..................$18,250 ‘01 JD 512 Disk Ripper, 17.5’, 7-shank ................$16,900 ‘97 JD 680 Chisel Plow, 27’..................................$21,900

‘11 Melroe Bobcat, ‘98 CS/IH 2388, 2996 1149 hrs., 99 hp., 18” hrs., 2092 sep. hrs., tracks, 84” bucket, cab 18.45x42 duals ........................$53,500 ........................$89,000

GRAIN HANDLING

‘09 Killbros 110 Grain Cart, 1100 bu, 20” dbl aug ..$41,500 ‘00 Killbros 690 Grain Cart, 600 bu, corner auger ..$13,900 ‘93 CS/IH 9400 Grain Truck, tri-axle, 22’ box ......$40,000 Brent Grain Cart, 450 bu, corner auger ................$10,900 Farmking 13X85 Auger, 13x85, swing hopper ......$8,900

PLANTERS

‘04 JD 1720, 16R30, 3.0 box ..............................$44,900 ‘10 JD 1770NT, 24R30, CCS, liquid fert ............$157,000 ‘10 JD 1770NT, 16R30, CCS ..............................$110,000 JD 2422, 24R22, Moore bar, 1.6 bu ....................$55,000 JD 7300, 12R30, 1.6 bu, vacuum ........................$13,900 ‘96 JD 7300, 12R22, liquid fert ............................$15,500 ‘05 JD DB66, 36R22, fert ..................................$155,000 ‘12 JD DB66, 36R22, CCS, fert ..........................$218,000 JD DB90, 36R30, CCS, vacuum..........................$215,000

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- Owner: Eugene Cassidy -

‘10 JD 320D, 875 hrs., 68 hp., cab, 76” bucket ........................$29,900

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

Feed Seed Hay

‘01 JD 9650STS, 2731 ‘02 JD 9750STS, 1805 hrs., 2052 sep. hrs, hrs., AWD, 1382 sep. 18.4x42 duals hrs., 20.8x42 duals ......................$113,900 ......................$132,500

SPRING TILLAGE

Buy Factory Direct & $AVE!

‘06 JD 2210 Field Cult, 15’ ..................................$39,900 ‘08 JD 2210 Field Cult, 64’6”, 7” swp, 129-shk....$62,500 CS/IH 4800 Field Cult, 57-shk, harrow....................$9,250 JD 960 Field Cult, 41’6”, 83-shk, harrow ................$7,495 JD 960 Field Cult, 30’, 6” swp, harrow ..................$3,450 ‘06 JD 980 Field Cult, 30.5’, 61-shk, 7” swp ........$14,900 ‘97 JD 980 Field Cult, 73-shank, 7” swp, harrow $16,900 DMI 45 Seedbed Finisher, 45’ ................................$8,900 DMI Crumbler ........................................................$9,750 Mandako Land Roller, 40’, 42” drums ..................$26,500

‘07 JD 9760STS, 1658 ‘10 JD 9770STS, 685 hrs., 11634 sep. hrs., hrs., 566 sep. hrs, 520AWD, 20.8x42 duals 42 duals ........$247,000 ......................$205,000

HAY & FORAGE EQUIPMENT

‘94 NH 488 Moco....................................................$8,950 NH 489 MoCo ........................................................$3,000 ‘97 CS/IH 8312 MoCo ............................................$8,950 ‘06 JD 567 Round Baler, 9650 hrs........................$24,950 ‘98 NH 664 Round Baler ........................................$8,900 ‘06 NH BR740A Round Baler, 7600 hrs ................$22,000

Paal

Neil G

Hiko

Felix

‘07 JD 9860STS, 1755 ‘93 NH TR96, 6208 hrs., 1222 sep. hrs., hrs., 420-46 duals, PRWD, 20.8x42 Contour Master ......................$215,000 ........................$23,500

Jason

Dave

Neil C

Matt

Tyler

Visit Us Online At: www.haugimp.com

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

UV’s & ATV’s

‘09 Arctic Cat 650, gas, 4x4 ..................................$6,750 ‘06 Kawasaki 650, 4WD, winch ............................$4,500 ‘11 JD Gator 825i, cab, camo, 150 hrs ................$18,000 ‘07 JD Gator 620i, 4WD, cab, 850 hrs ..................$7,495 ‘08 JD Gator 620i, bed lift, 450 hrs........................$8,900


LOCAL TRADES TRACTORS COMBINES

‘11 CIH Farmall 35 w/loader - $21,000 ‘97 CIH MX135, MFD, w/TA46 loader ‘92 CIH 5240, 2WD ‘08 CIH MX275, MFD ‘88 CIH 2110, 2WD

TILLAGE

JD 512, 5-shank, Nice JD 2700, 5-shank, Nice CIH Tigermate II, 441⁄2’ IH 735, 5-toggle CIH 4900, 34’, 3 bar

PLANTERS

‘08 1200, 16-30, bulk fill ‘09 1250, 24-30, bulk fill JD 1760, 12-30

‘07 CIH 2588 ‘09 CIH 6088 CIH 2388 ‘91 CIH 1680 CIH 1660 ‘06 CIH 1020, 30’ CIH 1083, 8-30 CIH 2208, 8-30 CIH 1020, 25’ ‘09 CIH 2608, 8-30 chopping head ‘06 Geringhoff 8-30 JD 893, 8-30

MISCELLANEOUS

EZ Trail 510 grain cart NH 1412 mower cond.

RABE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

1205 Bixby Road (across from fairgrounds), Fairmont, MN 507-235-3358 or 800-813-8300 • Get the Rabe Advantage

Case IH and CNH Capital are registered trademarks of CNH America LLC

Visit our Web Site at http://www.caseih.com

Hundreds more at www.zieglercat.com/used ‘95 Cat 35 16 Speed, 3 Hyd. Valves, Air Seat, A/C, quick Hitch, PTO, 12 Chin Weights, 18” Track Belts at 60% B10086

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

$50,000

Feed Seed Hay

FOR SALE: All types of hay & straw in round bales & lg squares, tested separately, net & twine wrapped, delivered in semi loads. Tim 320-221-2085

AVOCA SPRAY SERVICE

888 210 Ave. • Avoca, MN 56114 • Ph. 800-653-2676 or 507-335-7830 • Fax: 507-335-7808 • Mobile: 507-227-6728 40+ Used Sprayers On Hand We are dealers for Top Air, Sprayer Specialties, Gregson Sprayers, new & used on hand Wheathart, Westfield, FarmKing, Brandt Vacs & Balzer Equipment • We have NEW Balzer stalk choppers on hand • Truckload prices on NEW Westfield augers, Brandt grain vacs, Batco belts Financing Available

NEW SPRAYERS

Top Air 1600 gal., 120’ boom, Raven 4400, (Hard To Find) ....................................CALL

USED SPRAYERS Top Air 1600 gal., 120’ boom, 380x60 duals, Raven 450 ....................................$55,000 Top Air 1600 gal., 120’ boom, 20” no- drip plumbing, hyd. pump, adj. axle, 380x46 duals, Raven 450........................$53,000 Top Air 1600 gal., 90’ new boom, hyd. pump, Raven 450, adj. axle, 14.9x46 tires ........$38,000 Top Air 1600 gal., 90’ boom, hyd. pump, rinse tank, Raven 450, 320x90x46 tires $30,000 Top Air 1600 gal., 90’ boom, Raven 450, adj. axle, 15” spacing, command center, rinse tank, hyd. pump ............................$29,000 Schaben 1600 gal., 90’ boom, Raven 450, inductor, rinse tank..................................$29,000 Brandt 1600 gal., 90’ boom, adj. axle, 46” tires....................................................$29,000 Top Air 116, 1600 gal., 90’ bi-fold boom, inductor, Raven 440, adj. axle, rinse tank ..................................................................$27,000 Red Ball 680, 1000 gal., 90’ boom, Raven 450, rinse tank, foamer, 320x90x42 walking tandems ....................................$23,000 Sprayer Specialties 1250 gal., 90’ boom, Raven 440, foamer ..................................$21,000 Top Air 1100 gal., 80’ boom, hyd. pump, Raven 440, adj. axle 60-120 ..................$19,000 Gregson 1000 gal., 90’ boom, 20” plumbing, Raven 440, hyd. pump, rinse tank, 72-120 axle, 14.9x46 tires, Red....................................$18,000 Demco Conquest 1100 gal., 90’ boom, adj. axle, hyd. pump,, foamer, elec. over hyd., 844 Teejet control ....................................$16,000 Spraymaster 1000 gal., 80’ boom, hyd. pump, rinse tank, Raven 440, 88-120” adj. axle, 13.6x38 tires ............................................$14,000 Red Top Air 1100 gal., 60’ X-fold boom, Raven 440, 13.6x38 tires, rinse tank, adj. axle, hyd. pump, hyd. fold ......................................$13,000 Red Ball 680, 90’ boom, Raven 440, hyd. pump, 380x90x46 tires, elec. over hyd. control, (Choice of Two)........................................$13,000 Great Plains 1000 gal., 80’ TopAir X-fold boom, Teejet control, hyd. pump, 120” axle, 13.6x38 tires ..........................................................$12,500 Hardi 1000 gal., 66’ hyd. fold boom, 120” axle, Raven 440, solid 13.6x38 tires................$12,500 Top Air 1100 gal., 60’ X-fold boom, hyd. pump, adj. axle, 13.6x38 tires ............................$12,000 Blumhardt 1000 gal., 90’ boom, Big Wheel, PTO pump, 203 controller ........................$8,500 NYB Tandem 1000 gal., 90’ boom, hyd. pump, Raven 440 ..................................................$7,800 Top Air 550 gal., 60’ X-fold M boom, hyd. pump, Raven 440, adj. axle ..................................$7,000 Blumhardt 1000 gal., 90’ boom, Raven 440, radar, foamer ........................................................$6,800 Blumhardt 1000 gal., 72’ boom, tandem, hyd. pump. 203 controller ................................$6,500 Blumhardt 1000 gal., 90’ boom, tandem, hyd. pump, Raven 440 ......................................$6,500 Blumhardt 750 gal., 90’ boom, tandem, Raven 440 ..................................................$6,000 Top Air 750 gal., 60’ boom, vertical fold, 203 control, hyd. pump ............................$5,500 Blumhardt 1000 gal., 60’ boom, hyd. tip & center lift, hyd. pump, Spray System plumbing, no control ........................................................$5,500 Blumhardt 1000 gal., 60’ boom, hyd. fold, hyd. center lift & fold, hyd. pump, rinse tank, foamer, Micro Trak (Choice of Three) ....................$5,500 Top Air 800 gal., Blumhardt boom, foamer, 203 control, hyd. pump ....................................$4,500 Bestway 750 gal., 60’ Top Air boom, vertical fold ............................................................$4,500 Pleasure Products 1230 gal., 90’ boom, Raven 440, Honda gas w/pump, tandem $4,500

050

Broyhill 750 gal., tandem, 60’ boom, 203 control ....................................................................$4,200 Home Made 750 gal., Big Wheel, AgChem boom, Raven 440, PTO Pump ..............................$3,500 Blumhardt 1000 gal., 60’ boom, tandem, hyd. pump - SOLD - ..........................................$3,500 Big John 500 gal., 60’ X-fold boom, Raven 440, hyd. pump ..................................................$3,500 Home Made 500 gal. RD tank, 60’ Demco boom, tandem, foamer ........................................$3,500 Bestway 500 gal., 60’ boom, hyd. pump, 203 control, tandem..........................................$3,000 Demco Single Wheel, 203 control, hyd. pump ....................................................................$2,500 Horvick 500 gal. Pull Between, hyd. pump, 203 control, 60’ NYD boom ......................$2,500 JD 500 gal., 45’ boom, Raven 440 ............$2,500 Hardi 500 gal., 50’ boom, Hardi control, Hardi PTO pump..................................................$2,500 Rodman 300 gal., 50’ hydra-fold, foamer, PTO pump, 203 control, foamer........................$2,400 Demco Pull Between, 60’ hyd. tip lift boom, no pump ....................................................$2,000 Demco 500 gal., 3-wheel 45’ boom, 203 control ....................................................................$2,000 Kuker 500 gal., 45’ boom, single wheel, 203 control ................................................$1,500 500 gal. Pony Cart, hyd. pump, boomless nozzle ....................................................................$1,200 500 gal. Pasture Spreayer w/water tank ......$600

FOR SALE: Large Round Bales, 800-1,000 lbs. First crop, no rain. Mostly grass, some clover. $75 per bale + delivery. (715) 340-5655 HAY FOR SALE: Round or large square bales alfalfa or grass hay. Delivery available by semi. Ose Hay Farm, Thief River Falls, MN. Call or text LeRoy at 218-689-6675 SEED CORN ONLY $89! Top quality, new production. Order early, last season we sold out! Catalog at WWW.KLEENACRES.COM

or call 320-237-7667. “It's the place to be!”

THE LAND

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

40 B

USED SELF-PROPELLED SPRAYERS

(3) Spra-Coups 220, 3-wheel, foamer, air, Raven 440, (Choice) ..................................$7,000 Hahn 670......................................................$3,000

PICKUP SPRAYERS

NYB 500 gal., 90’ boom, Raven 450, Honda motor..............................................$5,000 NYB 500 gal., 60’ boom, foamer, Raven 450, ball valves ..................................................$3,000 F&S 500 gal., 80’ boom, hyd. tilt, manual height, triple nozzle body, no-drip plumbing, 8 hp. Honda engine ..................................$3,000 AgChem 450 gal., 58’ boom, Micro Trak controller ....................................................$2,500 Blumhardt 500 gal., 60’ boom, Raven 440 ....................................................................$2,000 Blumhardt 300 gal. ......................................$1,800 Blumhardt 500 gal., 60’ boom ....................$1,200

3PT SPRAYERS

Marflex 1000 gal., 80’ boom, Raven 440 $10,500 (2) Top Air 500 gal., 80’ X-fold boom, hyd. pump, 4-section ....................................................$9,500 NYB 500 gal., 90’ boom, pump & control ..$7,500 NYB 500 gal., 90’ boom, hyd. pump, hyd. tilt, ball valves, 203 control..............................$5,500 Marflex 1000 gal., 80’ boom - SOLD - ......$3,800 Blumhardt 500 gal., 90’ boom ....................$3,500 500 gal., 45’ boom ......................................$3,500 JD 9300 300 gal. front mount ....................$2,000 Sprayer Specialties 500 gal. ......................$2,000 300 gal., 45’ boom ......................................$1,800 Demco 300 gal., 45’ boom..........................$1,750

BOOMS Marflex 90’ front fold, hyd. boom, 1000 gal. tank, Raven 440, radar, hyd. pump..................$12,000 Top Air 90’ X-fold ........................................$9,000 Top Air 80’ X-fold ........................................$8,000 Top Air 80’ X-fold (4)....................................$7,500 Top Air 60’ X-fold (2)....................................$4,000 JD 60’ X-fold ..................................................CALL Blumhardt 80’ & 90’ (Choice) ......................$2,800 Frame-mounted Magnum 300 gal. front mount - SOLD - ....................................................$2,200 Weatherall 60’ hyd. fold ..............................$2,000 (2) 60’ wheel booms, flat fold, 20’ no-drip plumbing (Choice) ........................................$700


41 B MF 8280, 2800 hrs. ......................................$87,500 ‘08 MF 1552 w/loader, 120 hrs. ....................$19,900 AC 8050, FWD ..............................................$27,500 AC 7020 DP, 4500 hrs.....................................$9,950 AC 170, gas, cab ............................................$5,950 AC 170 w/loader ............................................$4,950 Ford 876, 4WD, 6000 hrs., good rubber ......$29,500 Deutz DX90, 2WD, cab ..................................$8,950

USED COMBINES & HEADS

FARM SYSTEMS 3695 HWY 14 WEST Owatonna, MN 55060 800-385-3911 • 507-451-3131 www.northlandfarmsystems.com

Mustang 2076, H/F controls, cab, heat, single spd - $19,700

‘10 Gehl 5640E, T-bar, single spd, 399 hrs $26,995

‘03 Gleaner R-75’s, 1100 hrs. ....................$139,500 ‘02 Gleaner R72, duals, 1100 hrs. ..............$129,500 ‘93 Gleaner R72, 2800 hrs............................$59,500 ‘08 Gleaner R65, 600 hrs............................$189,500 ‘09 Gleaner R66, 397 hrs............................$219,500 ‘01 Gleaner R62, duals, 1500 hrs ................$99,500 ‘98 Gleaner R62, 1200 hrs............................$69,500 ‘92 Gleaner R62, 2300 hrs. ..........................$39,500 ‘89 Gleaner R60, 3200 eng. hrs. ..................$22,900 ‘08 Gleaner 8200, 25’ R series......................$24,900 ‘04 NH CR970, 1000 hrs.............................$149,500 ‘89 Gleaner R50, 3400 hrs. ..........................$14,900 ‘05 Gleaner R75, 1000 hrs..........................$159,500 ‘86 Gleaner R-7, 2700 hrs. ..........................$14,900 ‘81 Gleaner N5 ................................................$5,950 ‘81 Gleaner N5 w/20’ ......................................$5,950

‘05 Gleaner 3000, 8R38 cornhead ................$29,500 ‘99 MF 8780, Smart track, 1800 hrs. ............$79,500 ‘03 MF 8000, 25’ w/Crary air reel ................$24,900 ‘09 Challenger or Gleaner 30’ flex w/air reel $29,900 ‘00 Gleaner 830 flex head w/air reel..............$24,900 (5) Gleaner 8R30 huggers ..............$11,900-$39,900 (6) Gleaner 6R30 huggers ................$9,950-$15,900 ‘93 Gleaner 8R36 hugger..............................$11,900 ‘90 Gleaner, 4R36 hugger ..............................$4,950 ‘08 Harvest Tech 6R30..................................$29,900 JD 843 cornhead, 8R30, Gleaner or MF..........$9,950 Clark Machine 12R22 cornhead ....................$19,500 ‘99 Gleaner 830C, SCH ................................$15,900 ‘80 Gleaner LM538A cornhead ..........................$995 (15) Used Flexheads ............................................Call Fieldstar II yield monitor for GL, MF, CH ........$3,950

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

USED TRACTORS

Challenger MT655B, 1500 hrs. ..................$129,500 ‘08 Challenger 665B, 2400 hrs. ..................$129,500 ‘White 6175, 2WD, 5100 hrs ........................$39,500 ‘04 Agco RT150 CV, 2700 hrs ......................$84,500 ‘02 Agco DT200, 3000 hrs. ..........................$82,500 AC 180D w/loader ..........................................$7,950 ‘81 Deutz DX160, FWD, duals ......................$14,950 ‘10 MF 8650, 500 hrs., all options..............$149,500

MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT FORAGE BOXES

TELEHANDLER

TRACTORS

‘10 Cub Cadet EX450 Yanmar, full cab, 4WD, backhoe, CL400........................................................................................$28,500 Ford 1000, 540 PTO, 2WD, 2563 hrs, SN: 0212 ..........................$3,900

TMR’s/MIXERS

Knight 3036, 540 PTO, slide tray, Digi-Star EZ210 sacle, SN: 0397 ..................................................................................$13,900 ‘05 Artsway PM25, 105 bu., Weigh-Tronix scale Model 615 ....$13,900

MISCELLANEOUS

‘92 Redi Haul trailer, skid loader trailer, SN: 77691 ....................$2,400 Mensch M1100 sawdust shooter, SN: 2562 ................................$2,200 Woodchuck sawdust bucket, 78” ................................................$3,750 NI 517 snowblower, 7’ W, 2-stage, dbl. auger, 540 PTO, SN: 1612 ....................................................................................$1,395 MDS bale hugger, round bale hugger attachment for skid loaders, excellent condition - Demo Unit, Universal attachment, handles 4’-6’ bales ..................................................................................$2,450

SPREADERS/PUMPS

Agco 3732, 540 PTO, endgate, hyd variable spd drive, SN: 262, ........................................................Sold As Is $4,000 Doda AFI, 540 PTO, manure pump..............................................$3,495 Knight Mfg. 8032, 3200 gal. capacity, SN: 0054........................$17,200 Balzer 4200, top fill slurry tank ..................................................$15,500 Badger BN338, slurry manure tank, 3350 gal., SN: 25561 ........$3,500 H&S 430W spreader, 2 spd, upper beater, SN: 209730 ............$11,750 ‘05 Knight MFG 8132 slinger, SN: BO337..................................$23,500 Knight 8014, front splash, wood rails, tandem flotation tires ....$8,100 N-Tech manure pump, 3 pt. 6”x8’, impeller, 1000 RPM..............$5,250 Kuhn Knight 8132 slinger, SN: BO306 ......................................$23,500 Kuhn Knight 8132 slinger, SN: BO237 ..........................................CALL Kuhn Knight 8118 slinger, 540 RPM, truck tires, SN: BO442 ..$16,200 ‘04 Kuhn Knight 8124 Pro Twin slinger, 1000 PTO, SN: B0013 $18,000 NuHawk 240 spreader ..................................................................$3,750

HAY & HARVEST EQUIPMENT

‘05 JD 956, 13⁄8 PTO, 14’6” cut, rubber rolls, SN: 0763..............$21,500 Gehl 960, 16’ forage box, 540 PTO, running gear, SN: 2837......$1,500 Case 600, 540 PTO, 60” blower bin, SN: 6034............................$2,750 Val-Metal 5600, 540 PTO, hyd. spout rotator, hyd. tub drive, hyd. deflector, Demo Unit........................................................$21,900 JD 1209, 540 PTO, 9’ cut, 2 rubber rollers, SN: 6045 ................$3,300 Gehl 2170, 540 PTO, 9’ cut, clevis hitch, SN: 1917 ......................CALL Artex VC1004SP bedding machine, 540 PTO, capacity 5 yards, SN: 2102 ....................................................................................$8,250 JD 1209 mower conditioner, 9’ cut ..............................................$3,500 Gehl 1090 haybine, 540 PTO, 9’ cut ............................................$1,900 Gehl 1580 forage blower ..............................................................$3,495 Gehl 940, 16’, tandem gear, forage box ......................................$2,695 NH 27 forage blower........................................................................$700 ‘92 Gehl 970 forage box, Gehl tandem running gear, 16’ ..........$4,500 ‘08 H&S BW1000 bale wrapper, Honda engine, light kit, remote start & steer, SN: 1685 ............................................................$21,500 ‘10 Tonutti 12TCR, 12 wheel rake ................................................$4,850 Gehl 1210 hay head ......................................................................$1,350 H&S CR10 (10 whl V rake) ............................................................$3,750

Hesston 5800, 5x6 baler ................................$2,950 ‘11 MF 1326 disc mower ................................$6,500 IH 1100, 7’ sickle mower ..................................$995 Woods U306 mower, “C” Farmall mtg. ..............$795 Artsway 240, 20’ shredder..............................$4,450 ‘09 Parker 739 grain cart ..............................$22,900 ‘02 Parker 737 grain cart, duals....................$18,900 Unverferth GC5000 grain cart ......................$11,900 Killbros 490 grain cart ....................................$8,950 Brandt 4500 EX grain vac ..............................$6,950 Parker 510 grain cart ......................................$9,950 J&M 500 grain cart ........................................$5,950 Demco 365 wagon..........................................$4,450 ‘07 Feterl 12x72 CSW ....................................$9,950 Feterl 10x55 Red TD auger ................................$995 Feterl 10x60 HF w/hopper ..............................$2,950 Westgo 10x71 w/hopper ................................$1,950 ‘06 Feterl 14x116, CSW ................................$19,900 ‘06 Feterl 12x122, CWS ................................$12,900 ‘04 Feterl 10x62 GSW auger ..........................$5,450 ‘11 Peck 12x43, PTO ......................................$4,950 Feterl 8x46 PTO auger ....................................$2,950 Feterl 8x60 PTO auger ....................................$1,995 White 588, 4x18..............................................$2,495 Schweiss 6’ snowblower, 2 auger ..................$1,995 Loftness 8’ snowblower, single auger ............$2,995 ‘10 Farm King Y840, 84” snowblower ............$2,950

JUST IN Salford 570 RTS, 41’, vertical till ..................$49,500 Deutz-Allis 1400, 23’ field cult. ......................$3,950 ‘11 Gleaner R-66, 170 hrs ..........................$249,500 Agco DT 200, 2500 hrs ................................$79,500 AC 6080, 2WD, ROPS ....................................$8,950 Oliver 1600, gas..............................................$4,950 ‘07 wishek 862NT, 16’ ..................................$27,900 Prker 2500 wagon ..........................................$1,795 Killbros 350 wagon ............................................$795 Peck 10x41 PTO auger w/bin hopper ............$4,450

‘98 Balzer 1200 shredder................................$3,950 ‘09 JD 520A, 25 hp, 60” Zero turn..................$6,950 Bush Hog PZ3061, Zero Turn, New Demo ......$8,450 ‘01 CIH 530B ................................................$17,900 Hutchinson 10x61 w/low pro hopper..............$3,950 Corn head reel ................................................$1,250 ‘05 Gleanr 3000, 8RW ..................................$29,500 Wilrich Quad 5, 32’ field cult.........................$13,900 ‘12 Gleaner S67, 130 hrs ............................$269,500 ‘04 Wilrich 5810, 20’ chisel plow..................$17,900

We Rent Brandt Grain Vacs

We Rent and Sell Wishek Discs

Midway Farm Equipment

507-427-3414 or 800-657-3249

www.midwayfarmequip.com

AGCO WHITE GLEANER Hesston

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

‘06 Gehl RS8-44, 44’ reach, 700 hrs, SN: 5859 ........................$43,900 ‘05 Mustang 844, 44’ reach, 2300 hrs, SN: 0113 ......................$33,000 Gehl RS6-XR42, 42’ lift height, w/forks, 1500 hrs., SN: 3533 ..$38,800 Gehl RS8-42, 42’ lift height, w/forks, 2300 hrs., SN: 5594 ......$39,700 ‘99 Terex TH528 w/forks, Cummins eng., 28’ boom ................$19,000

Penta 6720HD, 540 PTO, EZ View 2000 scale, 8” rubber ext., magnets, SS dual discharge conveyor, SN: 0701 ..................$27,000 Schuler 6110 TMR vertical ........................................................$11,900 Knight Mfg. 5185, twin vertical mixer, w/’07 Peterbilt..............JUST IN ‘06 Kuhn Knight 3160, 600 cu. ft. capacity, commercial reel, SN: C0042 ................................................................................$28,500 Gehl 7335, 540 PTO, Digi Star EZ 210 scale, 300 cu. ft. capacity, SN: 9865 ....................................................................................$4,500

‘12 White 8816, 16R30, CFS, 1500 acres ....$89,500 ‘09 White 8516, 16R30, CFS, low acres ......$79,500 ‘05 White 8722, 16R22 ................................$39,500 ‘08 White 8524, 24x30, CFS ........................$89,500 ‘08 White 8186, 16R30, 3 bu........................$59,500 ‘09 White 8186, 16R30, 3 bu, LF..................$64,500 White 6900, 11R30 splitter ............................$8,950 White 5100, 8R30, VF ....................................$3,950 CIH 900, 16R30, rear fold ............................$11,900 Wilrich Quad X, 55’, 4 bar harrow ................$34,500 White 5100, 8R36, VF ....................................$3,950 DA 385, 8R30 ................................................$2,495 CIH 4800, 32’..................................................$9,950 Bush Hog 12R30 cult.........................................$795 CIH 4900, 30’..................................................$6,950 ‘05 Krause 7300, 27’ rock flex disc ..............$29,900 Sunflower 4511, 15’ disc chisel....................$34,900 JD 510, 7x30 disc rippper ..............................$9,950 WilRich Quad X 50’ w/baskets ....................$47,500 ‘11 WilRich 513, 9x24 Soil Pro ....................$44,500 ‘06 WilRich V957, 5x30 ................................$24,900 WilRich V957, 7x30 ......................................$24,900 Wilrich V957, 7x30 ......................................$34,900 ‘05 Wilrich V957, 7x30 ................................$17,900 ‘03 JD 2400, 25’ chisel plow ........................$26,900 Wilrich Excel, 32’ ..........................................$21,500 M&W 1865, 9x24 Earthmaster ......................$9,950 Hesston 1091 haybine ....................................$1,295

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

USED SKIDLOADERS ‘96 Gehl 5625SX, Hand/T-bar, single speed, 1950 hrs., SN:0887 ....................................................................................$13,000 ‘11 Gehl 5640E, T-bar Gehl controls, 2-spd., cab, heat, 3300 hrs., SN: 2975 ..................................................................................$22,750 Gehl 6635DXT, Gehl T-bar control, single spd., 7420 hrs, SN: 0059 ....................................................................................$9,950 Gehl 6640, SN: 605594 ..............................................................$24,900 Gehl 5640, T-bar, single spd., 4000 hrs., SN: 4046 ..................$14,500 Gehl 5240, Gehl controls, cab, heat, single spd., 3050 hrs. ....$20,900 Gehl 5635DXT II, Gehl T-bar, single speed, SN: 1128 ..............$11,500 ‘98 Gehl 3825, T-bar, single speed, side windows, SN: 12364 ..$8,500 ‘94 Gehl 5625SX, T-bar, single speed, 2950 hrs., SN: 0958 ....$12,400 Gehl 4840, 3900 hrs., Gehl T-bar................................................$16,900 Gehl 3510, 55” width, Ford gas engine ......................................$5,750 ‘83 Gehl 3310, Gehl controls, 1425 hrs., SN: 1215 ....................$4,700 ‘05 Mustang 2109, H/F controls, CAH, 2 spd, 1401 hrs, SN:2250 ....................................................................................$28,900 ‘09 Mustang 2076, JS controls, cab, heat, 2-spd., 740 hrs. ....$27,900 Mustang 2700V, DL foot controls, 2 spd., 550 hrs., SN: 1016..$28,900 Mustang 2060, T-bar controls/foot pedal, S spd. ....................$10,800 Mustang 2066, H/F controls, S spd., SN:4811 ..............................CALL ‘08 Mustang 2041, H/F controls, head, S spd., 1150 hrs., SN: 1337 ..................................................................................$13,900 ‘92 Mustang 911, H/F controls, SN: 0144....................................$3,600 Mustang 2050, 2950 hrs., dual/lever foot, SN:0805..................$11,500 Mustang 2076, dual lever/foot, cab, heat, 3900 hrs., SN: 3969 ..................................................................................$18,500 ‘06 Mustang 2076, hand/foot controls, cab, heat, single spd. $21,900 Mustang 2066, Gehl controls, 2177 hrs., SN: 5356 ..................$20,900 ‘02 Mustang 2044, single pin, 3800 hrs. ....................................$12,200 ‘09 Mustang 2044, T-bar, S-single, 1100 hrs., SN: 6671 ..........$20,500 Mustang 921, T-bar, SN: 0137 ......................................................$5,300 ‘06 New Holland LS180B, hand foot controls, cab, heat, 2-spd..CALL NH LS170, H/F controls, cab, heat, single spd, 3584 hrs., SN: 4287 ..................................................................................$13,900 ASV Posi-Trak RC100, Pilot CTL, cab, heat, air, 2 spd., 2169 hrs., SN: 0652 ..................................................................................$27,900

‘11 Kuhn Knight 8132 manure spreader Call For Price

‘03 Knight Mfg 8032, 1 3/8 1000 PTO, SN: 0033, $20,500


42 B

~ NEW EQUIPMENT/BIG INVENTORY ~

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

Notch Equipment:

• Rock Buckets • Grapple Forks • Manure Forks • Bale Spears • Hi-Volume Buckets & Pallet Forks • Bale Transports & Feeder Wagons, 16’-34’ • Adult & Young Stock Feeders & Bale Feeders • Land Levelers

Smidley Equipment:

• Steer Stuffers • Hog Feeders • Hog Huts • Calf Creep Feeders • Lamb & Sheep Feeders • Cattle & Hog Waterers • Mini Scaler

Sioux Equipment:

• Gates • Calving Pens • Haymax Bale Feeders • Cattle Panels • Feeders Panels • Head Gates • Hog Feeders • Squeeze Chutes & Tubs • Port-A-Hut Shelters (Many Sizes) • Bergman Cattle Feeders • Lorenz & Farm King Snowblowers • Mandako Land Rollers, 12’-60’ • GT (Tox-O-Wic) Grain Dryers, 350-800 bu. • Sheep & Calf Feeders • Livestock Equipment by Vern’s Mfg. • Powder River Crowding Tub & Alley • Mister Squeeze Cattle Chutes & Hd. Gates • Garfield Earth Scrapers • Peck Grain Augers, 8” - 10” - 12” • Special Price • MDS Buckets for Loaders & Skidloaders • Powder River Livestock & Horse Equipment • Tire Scrapers for Skidsteers, 6’-9’

• Jari Sickle Mowers • Grasshopper Lawn Mowers - Special Price Now! • “Tire” feeders & waterers • MDS Roto King Round Bale Processor for skidsteers, tractors, loaders or telehandlers • Good Stock of parts for GT Tox-O-Wic Grain Dryers, Also, Some Used Parts • Sitrex Wheel Rakes - MX Model In Stock • Brillion Alfalfa & Grass Seeders • Bale Baskets • SI Feeders & Bunks • (Hayhopper) Bale Feeders (Prices Lowered) • Enduraplas Bale Feeders, Panels & Tanks • E-Z Trail Wagons, Boxes & Grain Carts • Calftel Hutches & Animal Barns • R&C Poly Bale Feeders • Farm King Augers and Mowers • Corral Panels & Horse Stalls • EZ-Trail Head Movers & Bale Racks • Roda Mini-Spreaders • Amish Built Oak bunk feeders & bale racks • Walco log splitter • Goat & Sheep feeders

DR® POWER EQUIPMENT • Field & Brush Mowers • Roto-Hog Power Tillers • Stump Grinders • Log Splitters • Chippers • Power Graders • Power Wagons • Leaf & Lawn Vacuums • Versa-trailers

~ USED EQUIPMENT ~

• Formost 125 squeeze chute w/450 headgate, palp cage • GT (Tox-O-Wic) 580 PTO grain dryer, rebuilt • Brady 5600 stalk chopper or windrower • Toro Z-Master zero-turn mower, 72” deck, dsl., • (2) Apron spreaders, 125-225 bu. • 15’ Hiniker stalk shredder, exc. shape w/end transp. • Hesston 30A Stakhand, very good • 141⁄2’ Kewanee rock flex disk, 22” blades • Skidsteer trailer

• Steer Stuffer & Hog Feeders • 6’ Gehl green chopper • Grasshopper 723 Zero turn mower w/52” power fold deck, DEMO unit, 27 hrs. • Smidley hog scale, 400 lb. capacity • 300 bushel EZ Flow gravity box w/10 ton EZ Trail wagon • JD BWA disc, 20’ • Vermeer 206 stump chipper

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

FARM, HOME & CONSTRUCTION

Office Location - 305 Bluff Street Hutchinson, MN 55350

320-587-2162, Ask for Larry

USED TRACTORS

www.westbrookagpower.com Hwy. 30 West • WESTBROOK, MN • Ph. (507) 274-6101 USED EQUIPMENT TRACTORS

‘97 NH 9482, 3800 hrs.............................................$72,500 ‘90 Ford 976, 6200 hrs. ..........................................$49,900 ‘10 NH T8040, 700 hrs...........................................$179,900 ‘10 NH T8040, 1300 hrs.........................................$169,900 ‘95 NH 8970, FWA, 7500 hrs. ..................................$52,900 NH 8770, FWA, SS, 4800 hrs....................................$59,900 Ford 8830, FWA, 3335 hrs. ......................................$34,900 ‘02 NH TM165, 2WD, 1600 hrs.................................$54,900 ‘05 NH TV145, bi-directional, 1600 hrs.....................$84,900 ‘98 NH 1530, Boomer, hydro., 1800 hrs. ....................$9,900 ‘09 Versatile 435, 1800 hrs. ..................................$159,900 ‘06 Versatile 485, 1800 hrs. ..................................$162,900 ’05 Genesis 2160, SS, PS, FWA, 5000 hrs. ..............$75,900 ‘89 Wildcat 1000 Steiger, 5890 hrs., PS, PTO, 3 pt...$43,500 IH 1486, 6800 hrs. ..................................................$11,000 ‘84 IH hydro, 2250 loader ..........................................$9,900 IH 826 w/WL-40 ........................................................$8,900 IH 706, gas, w/blower ................................................$4,000 Farmall M w/loader ....................................................$1,500

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

MISCELLANEOUS

‘12 Mandako 42’ roller 36”, Demo Unit ....................$33,900 Killbros 690 cart ......................................................$11,900 Demco 650 wagon, fenders, tarp ............................$12,500 ‘07 Wilrich 20’ shredder ..........................................$16,900 Artsway 20’ shredder ................................................$5,900 Miller P-12 loader (off JD 4020) ................................$4,900 Rem 2700 vac. ........................................................$15,900 Bradco 609 SSL backhoe ..........................................$5,450

COMBINES

‘09 NH CR9060, 600 hrs. ......................................$229,000 ‘07 NH CR9060, 775 hrs ........................................$199,000 ‘00 NH TR-99, 1612 hrs. ..........................................$84,900 ‘00 NH TR-99, RWA, 2255 hrs. ................................$69,900 ‘92 NH TR-96, 4000 hrs. ..........................................$19,900

‘01 NH LS-170, 4800 hrs ........................................$12,900 Gehl 4840, 2600 hrs., cab & heat ............................$16,900 Bobcat 553, 2200 hrs...............................................$11,500 ‘94 Case 1825, 3100 hrs............................................$4,500

CORN HEADS

‘09 NH 99C, 8R30 ....................................................$59,900 ‘08 NH 99C, 8R30 ....................................................$54,900 ‘09 NH 98D, 8R30 ....................................................$38,900 ‘08 NH 98C, 8R30 ....................................................$31,000 NH 974, 6R30 ............................................................$3,500

GRAIN HEADS

‘10 NH 74C, 35’ w/Crary air ....................................$34,900 ‘07 NH 74C, 35’ w/Crary ..........................................$32,900 ‘08 NH 74C, 30’ w/Crary air ....................................$29,900 ‘03 NH 74C, 30’ ......................................................$17,500 ‘98 NH 973, 25’..........................................................$4,000 ‘02 Gleaner 800, 30’ w/Crary air ..............................$17,900 JD 930F w/Crary ........................................................$9,900

TILLAGE

‘12 Wishek 862NT, 16’ w/harrow, Demo Unit ..........$36,900 ‘08 Wilrich 957, 7-30 ..............................................$27,900 ‘04 Wilrich 957, 7-30 ..............................................$19,900 JD 2700, 7-24..........................................................$26,900 ‘09 Kraus Dominator 18, 11-shank ..........................$39,900 M&W 2200 Earthmaster ..........................................$24,900 Wilrich Quad X2, 60’ w/basket ................................$59,900 Wilrich Quad X, 47.5’, 4-bar ....................................$29,900 Wilrich Quad 5, 41.5’, r bar ..................................Coming In JD 985, 50’, 3-bar....................................................$21,900 Allis 1400 F.C., 34.5’ ..................................................$3,900

DRILLS & PLANTING

Kinze 3600, 16/31....................................................$74,900 Kinze 3600, 16/31....................................................$64,900 Kinze 2600, 16/31....................................................$39,900 ‘97 Kinze 2600, twin row 12/24 ..............................$41,900 ‘97 Kinze 2600, 12/23..............................................$39,900 SKIDLOADERS ‘12 NH L-220, E-H, 140 hrs......................................$31,900 JD 7200, 12R30 ......................................................$17,900 ’06 NH L-190, 1650 hrs. ..........................................$26,900 JD 520 drill, 10” spacing............................................$4,900 ‘08 NH L-175, 3750 hrs., cab, heat ..........................$18,900

NEW Versatile 435, 4WD ..................................CALL NEW NH T9 560, 4WD......................................CALL NEW NH TD5050, FWA, w/cab ........................CALL NH T8 330 ........................................................CALL NEW Massey 8670, FWA ................................CALL NEW Massey 5450, FWA, cab, loader ............CALL ‘08 NH 6070 w/cab, 2WD ............................$69,000 NH 8870 ........................................................$69,000 NH 8870, SS................................................COMING ‘83 Allis 8070, FWA ..........................................CALL Ford 5000, diesel, w/cab ............................COMING ‘06 IH 560, WF ................................................$5,200 IH 806, gas, w/Allied loader ..........................$7,850 ‘66 Allis 190, gas ............................................$6,000 Allis 7060 ........................................................$6,950 Allis 7045 ....................................................COMING ALLIS 5020........................................................CALL ‘54 Farmall 300 w/loader................................$2,550

TILLAGE

JD 985, 54.5 field cult. w/3 bar........................CALL M&W 9-shank, 24” w/leveler........................$14,500 Salford RTS, 32’................................................CALL Brillion HC 32’ ..............................................$13,950 DMI Econo Champ II, HD, 11-shank ............$7,500 DMI Chisel Champ, 11-shank ........................$2,500 JD 960, 36’ w/3-bar ........................................$6,950 ‘05 JD 2700, 9-24 shank ..............................$27,000 White 588, 4-bottom ......................................$1,800 Wilrich 3400, 50.5’ w/4 bar ..........................$14,900

SKIDSTEERS

NEW NH skidsteers on hand ............................CALL

USED PARTS LARSON SALVAGE Good selection of tractor parts - New & Used All kinds of hay equipment, haybines, balers, choppers parted out. New combine belts for all makes. Swather canvases, round baler belting, used & new tires. 6 miles East of

CAMBRIDGE, MN 763-689-1179 We Ship Daily

Visa and MasterCard Accepted

‘06 NH L170 ..................................................$17,500 Westendorf WL40 w/IH mts ............................$2,600

PLANTERS

NEW White planters ........................................CALL White 6222, 12-30 front fold ............................CALL

COMBINES

‘94 Gleaner R72 w/new engine....................$58,000 ‘01 Gleaner R72, just thru shop ................COMING ‘03 Gleaner R65, CDF, lat ................................CALL ‘90 Gleaner R60 w/duals ............................COMING ‘08 Fantini 12-30 chopping cornhead ........$68,000 Gleaner N6 ......................................................$6,750 NEW Fantini chopping cornhead ....................CALL

HAY TOOLS

New Hesston & NH Hay Tools On Hand

MISCELLANEOUS

NEW Salford RTS units ....................................CALL NEW Unverferth seed tenders ................ON HAND NEW Westfield augers............................AVAILABLE NEW Rem 2700 vac..........................................CALL NEW Century HD1000, 60’ sprayers ..............CALL NEW Riteway rollers ........................................CALL NEW Lorenz snowblowers ..............................CALL NEW Batco conveyors ....................................CALL NEW Brent wagons & grain carts ....................CALL NEW E-Z Trail seed wagons ............................CALL NEW rock buckets & pallet forks.................... CALL NEW Hardi sprayers ........................................CALL REM 2700, Rental ............................................CALL Unverferth 8000 grain cart ..........................$19,000 Kinze 1050 w/duals ......................................$48,500 (DMI Parts Available)

SMITHS MILL IMPLEMENT Hwy. 14, 3 miles West of Janesville, MN

Phone (507) 234-5191 or (507) 625-8649 Mon. - Fri. 7:30-5:00, Sat. 7:30-Noon www.smithsmillimp.com


Feed Seed Hay

USED EQUIPMENT FROM A NAME YOU CAN TRUST!

050

Dairy

055

80 Parlor free stall cows from a 95 cow herd, 23,800 lb. avg. Low SCC, $1,675/ea. (608) 214-1859 FOR SALE: 14 stall Germania parlor 36” spacing, auto takeoffs, milking claws & De Laval shells. Alfimilk system milk meters w/12 displays. Germania crowd gate & controls air 20'. Complete milking parlor system. For more complete details please call 507-391-0098 or 507-874-3424 SPECIAL Dairy Cattle Sales - Every 1st & 3rd Friday. Selling all classes of dairy cattle. Cows, heifers, bulls, calves & etc. Just of a handful or your whole herd. Low commission good demand for quality dairy cattle. Free statewide advertising. Horst Stables, 715-937-4643 or 715-669-3136

WANTED TO BUY: Dairy heifers and cows. 320-2352664 Cattle

056

350lb to 800 lb. fancy Holstein steers. 800 lbs will advance about 18 cents per pound. (319) 448-4667 4 Polled Hereford cows, bred for March calves. 8 open Heifers. Fully vacc. (715) 533-2470 FOR SALE OR LEASE REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS Bulls, 2 year old & yearlings; bred heifers, calving ease, club calves & balance performance. Al sired. In herd improvement program. J.W. Riverview Angus Farm Glencoe, MN 55336 Conklin Dealer 320864-4625 FOR SALE: 30 young blk & bwf summer calving pairs, 9/1 delivery. Can keep longer at buyers expense, $1,750. 605-832-2076 FOR SALE: 300-400 lb. Holstein steers, all work done, can sell any number with load lots available. Call Marv at 320-249-2179

WANT TO BUY: Butcher cows, bulls, fats & walkable cripples; also horses, sheep & goats. 320-235-2664 Horse

057

ARABIANS: Going to Auction in Nov. unless sold, chestnuts: weanling filly, yearling colt, mare. Others: sell, lease, trade (ear corn, rake, Cremello colt). (608) 297-2021

‘01 JD 8110, cab, 2WD, 4810 hrs, 3 hyd, 540/1000 PTO, 20.8x42” tires & duals ......................................$63,500 ‘10 JD 8295R, cab, MFWD, 1600 hrs, powershift transm, 4 hyd, 380x54 tires & duals ....................................$169,000 ‘09 JD 6430 Premium, cab, MFWD, 2450 hrs, 3 pt 2 hyd, 540/1000 PTO ..$55,000 ‘08 JD 8430 MFWD, 1967 hrs, IVT transm, big hyd pump, 1000 PTO, 3 pt, 520x46 tires & duals ..............$165,000 ‘07 NH TJ275, MFWD, power shift, 2100 hrs., 3 pt., 5 hyd., Super Steer, 380x50 tires & duals, front wgts. ................................................$115,000 ‘04 JD 8420, MFWD, 2980 hrs., 3 pt, 4 hyds., 540/1000 PTO, 18.4x46 tires & duals ........................................$129,000 ‘07 JD 7930, MFWD, 3600 hrs, 16 spd pwr quad, front wts., 4 hyds, 3 pt, 1000 PTO, 380x50 tires & duals ......$105,000 ‘95 JD 8100, 2WD, cab, 540/1000 PTO, 3 pt., 3 hyd., 9426 hrs., 18.4x46 tires & duals ..............................$42,500 ‘94 JD 7800, 2WD, cab, air, 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, 9760 hrs., 14.9x46 duals, duals, front wgts. ............$39,500 ‘98 JD 6410, cab, air, MFWD, 16 spd. pwr quad, w/reverse, 8795 hrs., 18.4x38 tires ..............................$31,000 ‘89 JD 4755, 2WD, 9500 hrs., 3 pt., 3 hyd., PS, 1000 PTO, 18.4x42 tires & duals ......................................$31,000

‘10 JD 9670, 399 eng. hrs., Contour Master, chopper, 520x42 duals$190,000 ‘10 JD 9670, 613 sep./800 eng. hrs., Premium cab, Contour Master, chopper, 18.4x42 duals ..........................$175,000 ‘05 JD 9660, 1777 eng./1282 sep. hrs., Contour Master, chopper, 20.8x38 duals ........................................$119,000 ‘98 JD 9610, 3578 eng/2379 sep hrs, chopper, dial-a-matic, fore & aft, bin ext., 20.8x42” tires & duals ......$55,000 ‘94 CIH 1688, 3734 eng. hrs., rock trap, chopper, auto header, thru shop ..................................................$32,500 ‘90 JD 9600, 5100 eng./3651 sep. hrs., 18.4x42 tires & duals, chopper, Dial-A-Matic ..............................$32,000

COMBINE HEADS ‘06 JD 630F, fore & aft, single point, low DAM ....................................$19,500 ‘06 JD 635 flex, fore & aft............$19,000 JD 693, 6R30” cornhead..............$12,500 ‘08 CIH 2020, 35’ flex head ........$19,500

LOADER TRACTORS

‘07 JD 7830, MFWD, 4510 hrs., 4V, 710x38, JD 746 loader ............$105,000 ‘09 NH T7030, MFWD, cab, 1080 hrs., 3 pt, 540/1000 PTO, NH 860TL loader, 20.8x4 tires........................$92,000 ‘08 NH T7030, MFWD, cab, 1325 hrs., 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, NH 860TL loader w/joystick, 20.8x42 rear tires ....$88,000 4WD & TRACK TRACTORS ‘07 NH T7040, MFWD, cab, 3056 hrs., ‘95 JD 8970, 6443 hrs., 12-spd. synchro, 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, NH 860TL loader, 4 hyd., Ezee steer, 20.8x42 tires & duals 18.4x42 tires..............................$78,000 ..................................................$60,000 GRAIN CARTS ‘11 JD 8360RT, 698 hrs., Deluxe cab, ‘07 Brent 880, 850 bu., w/roll tarp, 5 hyd., 3 pt., 1000 PTO, 25” tracks, 30.5Lx32 tires, very nice ............$27,500 Warranty ..................................$239,500 CIH 9280, 7526 hrs., power shift w/skip ‘07 Brent 780, 750 bu., w/roll tarp and scale, nice cart, augers sharp! ....$21,000 shift, 4 hyds., 20.8x42 tires & duals ..................................................$48,000

www.larsonimplements.com

LARSON IMPLEMENTS 5 miles east of Cambridge, MN on Hwy. 95

763-689-1179

Free delivery on combines in MN, Eastern ND & SD

Look at our Web site for pictures & more listings www.larsonimplements.com

www.bobcat.com

Norwood Young America 952-467-2181 A family business since 1946 with the Lanos: Jack, Paul, Bob and Andy

USED TRACTORS

‘11 NH T9615, cab suspension, 850 hrs. ............$253,000 ‘09 NH T7040, MFD, 178 hrs. ..............................$95,000 ‘02 NH TL80, 52LA loader, ab, 596 hrs..................$28,900 ‘55 Ford 800, Woods loader, box blade ..................$6,500 ‘56 Ford 640 ..........................................................$3,750 ‘91 Ford 260C, ind tractor loader, 3 pt, PTO............$5,500 ‘69 Oliver 1650 ......................................................$4,995 ‘46 Oliver 70, Restored ..........................................$4,500 AC D-14, loader ......................................................$3,250 ‘47 AC C ................................................................$1,800 ‘68 IH 656, hydro, gas, cab, loader..........................$5,500 ‘68 IH 544 ..............................................................$6,000 ‘62 IH 404, gas, 3 pt ..............................................$4,000 ‘58 IH 340, gas, fast hitch ......................................$4,500 ‘53 JD 40................................................................$3,575

USED COMBINES

‘84 Gleaner N6 ......................................................$8,500 ‘08 Gleaner 8200, 30’ flex header........................$26,500 ‘97 Geringhoff 6x30, rotary chopping, JD adp ......$16,000 ‘05 JD 630F, 30’ bean head..................................$22,500

USED TILLAGE

‘09 Wilrich XL2, 60’, 3 bar harrow w/rolling basket ..........................................................................$54,000 ‘07 Wilrich Quad X, 58’, 3 bar harrow w/rolling basket ..............................................................$52,500 ‘07 Wilrich Quad X, 55’, 3 bar harrow w/rolling basket ..............................................................$52,000 ‘96 Wilrich Quad 5, 47’, 4 bar harrow..................$17,500 ‘09 JD 2210, 53’, 5 bar spike harrow ..................$52,300 ‘96 JD 980, 44.5’, 3 bar harrow............................$18,500 JD 980, 38’, 3 bar harrow ....................................$12,500 ‘94 JD 980, 36.5’, 3 bar harrow............................$14,900 JD 960, 34.5’, 3 bar harrow....................................$9,500 Brady 27’ cult., 3 bar harrow..................................$2,250 Wilrich 6600, 5-shank ripper..................................$7,950 Wilrich 6600, 7-shank ripper..................................$5,850 ‘00 DMI 530B, lead shanks, hyd levelers ..............$19,500 ‘93 DMI Ecolo Tiger 530, 5-shank ripper ............$11,900 Kent 2109, 9-shank disc-o-vator ............................$2,850 ‘07 JD 3710, 10-bottom, coulters, very nice ........$29,500

White 598 plow, 4+1, coulters................................$3,500 IH 4470 disk, 18.5’ ................................................$1,550 Kovar 30’ Multi Weeder, 400 gal. tank ....................$2,500

USED HAY EQUIPMENT

‘88 Hesston 8200, high contact rolls ....................$20,750 ‘03 NH 1431, 13’ discbine ....................................$14,500 ‘97 NH 1411, 10’ discbine ....................................$10,900 ‘97 NH 14165, 9’ haybine ......................................$8,200 (2) ‘85 NH 489, 9’ haybine................................Ea. $4,000 ‘99 CIH DC-515, 15’ discbine ..............................$12,500 ‘98 JD 1600A, 14’ MoCo ......................................$7,500 ‘93 JD 1600, 12’ MoCo ..........................................$4,750 ‘83 JD 1219, 9’ MoCo ............................................$3,600 ‘06 Hesston 1120,9’ haybine..................................$7,950 ‘01 Gehl 2412, 12’ discbine....................................$9,500 ‘84 Versatile 4814, 14’ haybine for 276/9030........$3,500 ‘08 NH BR-7080 round baler, Only 1500 Bales ....$17,350 ‘07 NH BR-780A round baler ................................$20,000 ‘05 NH BR-780 round baler ..................................$16,100 ‘06 NH BR-750A round baler, net wrap ................$17,500 ‘98 NH 664 round baler ..........................................$8,750 ‘01 NH 648 round baler ........................................$10,000 (2)’84 NH 885 round baler ..................Starting at $2,750 NH 853 round baler ................................................$4,500 (2) ‘89 NH 848 round baler ..................Starting at $3,950 ‘01 Vermeer 554XL round baler, net wrap & twine ..........................................................................$12,500 ‘91 Hesston 514 round baler..................................$4,950 ‘89 NH 570 baler w/77 kicker ................................$7,900 JD 336 w/40 kicker ................................................$2,750 ‘95 NH 900 chopper, 2 heads................................$10,900

USED PLANTERS

‘89 White 5100, 12x30, vertical fold ..................$8,950 ‘01 JD 1770, 16 row, 30” spacings, liquid fert. $47,500 JD 7000, 4R, dry fert, insect, herb, mon ............$2,750

USED MISC.

‘06 NH 185 spreader ..............................................$9,000 NH 680 spreader, new apron ..................................$4,500 ‘09 H&S 370 spreader ............................................$8,950 ‘99 H&S 370 spreader ............................................$5,950 NI 3743 sperader ....................................................$8,500

✔ Check us out at: www.lanoequipofnorwood.com

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Registered Texas Longhorn breeding stock, cows, heifers or roping stock, top blood lines. 507-235-3467

COMBINES

‘79 630 ............................................$4,750 ‘73 610 ............................................$2,950 ‘71 600 ............................................$2,500 ‘07 NH L-190, glass cab/htr, 2 spd., 3500 hrs.......................................$24,450 ‘06 NH LS-190B, glass cab w/AC, 1520 hrs.......................................$25,900 ‘01 NH LS-190, cab/htr, 4800 hrs. ..$16,900 ‘05 NH LS-185B, glass cab/htr, 2-spd., 1500 hrs.......................................$24,900 ‘07 NH L-175, cab/htr, 2500 hrs. ....$20,750 ‘01 NH LS-160, glass cab/htr., 4900 hrs.......................................$11,500 ‘08 Gehl CTL75, glass cab w/AC, 1200 hrs.......................................$33,000 ‘06 Gehl 4240E, cab & heater, 2375 hrs.......................................$14,500 Case 1816C, 1700 hrs. ....................$3,950 Berlon Silage Defacer ......................$3,000 Bobcat 8A chipper, used very little....$6,250 ‘11 Bobcat 84” snow blade ..............$1,800 ‘10 Bobcat 60” V snow blade ..........$3,250 Loegering LVP90, 90” V snow blade $1,995

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

WANTED TO BUY! USED BULK MILK COOLER ALL SIZES. 920-867-3048

ROW CROP TRACTORS

‘10 V-638 Versahandler, 38’ lift ....$49,500 ‘01 T-200, glass cab & heater, 2600 hrs ......................................$19,995 ‘11 S-750, glass cab w/AC, 2-spd., 550 hrs ........................................$40,500 ‘07 S-330, cab w/AC, 2-spd., 4000 hrs.......................................$29,500 ‘08 S-300, glass cab w/AC, 3681 hrs. ....................................................$29,900 ‘10 S-250, glass cab w/AC, ACS controls, 1800 hrs.......................................$30,000 ‘07 S-220, cab w/AC, 105 hrs.........$28,000 ‘07 S-205, cab w/AC, 2-spd., 4250 hrs.......................................$20,500 (5) S-185, cab w/AC, 2-spd., 1200 hrs ....................Starting at $16,500 ‘05 S-175, glass cab & heater ........$15,500 ‘01 773K glass cab w/AC, 8500 hrs ..$9,950 ‘10 S-160, cab w/AC, 2-spd., 2850 hrs.......................................$21,500 ‘04 S-160, cab & heater, 3650 hrs. $18,900 ‘05 S-150, cab, 2750 hrs. ..............$14,400 (3) S-130, cab & heater, 3200 hrs. & up ..........................Starting at $14,500

43 B THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

WANTED AND FOR SALE ALL TYPES of hay & straw. Also buying corn, wheat & oats. Western Hay available Fox Valley Alfalfa Mill. 920-853-3554


Sheep

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

44 B

Midwest Ag Equip Farm Equipment For Sale

Office will be CLOSED the FRIDAY after Thanksgiving, November 23, 2012

(2) ‘12 Challenger 665D, Brand New, Loaded ................................................CALL ‘08 Cat 965B, 1300 hrs ..............$196,500 ‘04 Cat 855, 3000 hrs. ................$185,000 ‘07 JD 9860STS, 800 hrs., loaded w/all options ................................$170,000 ‘07 Cat MT755B, 2100 hrs. ........$150,000 ‘89 Versatile 846, 4000 hrs., (So. MN tractor) ............................$40,000 ‘08 Lexion 595R, 650 hrs. ..........$245,000 ‘08 Krause Dominator, 18’ ..........$38,000 ‘04 DMI Tiger Mate II, (50.5’) ......$37,500 ‘96 Terragator 1844, 1800 gal., 3900 hrs. ........................................$45,000 ‘03 Wilrich 957 VDR, nice shape $12,000

Financing Available

Emerson Kalis << www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Easton, MN 56025 • 507-381-9675

4WD/TRACKS

MFWD TRACTORS

‘11 JD 5075M, open station, JD 563 ldr., 120 hrs. ........................................................................$47,500 ‘97 JD 8100, 3 SCV, 380/90R46, 7500 hrs. ....$63,500 ‘95 JD 8200, 5800 hrs, 3 SCV’s, 18.4-46 ......$67,500 ‘07 JD 8230, 5 SCV, 18.4-46, 2400 hrs. ......$147,500 ‘03 JD 8520, ILS, 480/80R50, 4590 hrs. ......$139,500 ‘03 JD 8520T, WS, Xenon, 18” tracks, 3136 hrs. ......................................................................$137,500 ‘11 JD 8335R, IVT, ILS, 480/80R50, warranty, 485 hrs. ........................................................$249,500 ‘10 JD 8345RT, 4 SCV, 25” tracks, 1250 hrs. ......................................................................$239,000

2WD TRACTORS

‘75 JD 4430, PS, 18.4-38, JD 725 ldr., 6030 hrs. ........................................................................$28,500

COMPACT/SKID STEERS

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

‘03 JD 2210, hydro, 62” deck, 928 hrs.............$9,750

‘01 JD 240, skid, hand controls, 72” bkt. ......$14,500

HARVEST EQUIPMENT

‘94 CIH 1688, 3561/2361, 18.4-38, TPR ........$35,000 ‘05 JD 9660, 1421/962, CM, 20.8-38 duals $145,000 ‘05 JD 9860, 1910/1431, CM, 20.8-42, TPR ..............................................................$169,000 ‘08 JD 9770, 1530/1210, CM, 20.8-42 duals, TPR ..............................................................$185,000 ‘10 JD 9770, 477/350, CM, 20.8-42 w/duals ......................................................................$245,000 ‘09 JD 9870, 1479/1031, CM, 650’s, PRWD $219,500 ‘10 JD 9870, 852/562, CM, 650’s, PRWD ....$255,000 ‘05 JD 630F, F/finger, air system ....................$27,500 ‘10 JD 635F, F/finger, Crary wing system ......$35,000

TILLAGE

‘10 JD 2310 M/finisher, 45’, rolling basket ....$87,500 ‘11 JD 2310, M/finisher, 45’, 5 bar harrow ....$79,500 ‘10 JD 3710, 9-btm., spring reset, coulters ..$38,500 ‘11 JD 512, R/ripper, 9/30, 1500 acres ..........$52,500 ‘10 JD 2410, 50’, 12” spacing, new stnd. ......$59,500 ‘07 JD 2410 C/plow, 61’, 30” spacing ............$42,000 ‘10 JD 2510H, hi speed bar, 16R30, mtd. ......$52,500

SPRAYERS

Hardi 1000, pull type, 1000 gal., 90’ ..............$19,500 ‘00 AgChem 1254, 2468 hrs., 90’ boom, Raven ........................................................................$89,500 ‘07 JD 4720, 7150 hrs., 90’ boom, 320/90R45, AT..................................................................$157,000 ‘11 JD 4730, 150 hrs, 90’, 380/90R46, L/inj ..............................................................$227,500 ‘11 JD 4940, 377 hrs, 120’, Load Cmnd, B/Trac ..........................................................$370,000 New ‘11 Fast 9518, 1850 gal., 120’, Norac ..$72,500

PLANTERS

‘97 JD 1710, 12R30, vert. fold, 1.6 bu, 250 mon..........................................................$18,500

HOPPERS

‘96 JD 1760, 12R30, 3.0 bu., R/cleaners........$34,500 ‘10 JD 1760, 12R30, 1.6 bu, R/cmnd, R/clnrs, ............ L/fert ..............................................................$62,500 ‘03 JD 1720, 16R30, 3.0 bu., R/cleaners........$49,900 ‘97 JD 1780, 24R20, 3.0 bu., R/cleaners........$45,000 ‘04 JD 1770, 16R30 CCS, l/fert, Tru Cnt, R/clnrs ............................................................$92,500 ‘01 JD 1780, 24R20, 3.0 bu., R/cleaners, field ready ........................................................................$47,500 ‘97 Kinze 2600, 16R30, (3) interplant units, 1.6 bu. ............................................................$45,000 ‘05 JD 1770, 24R30, CCS, liquid fert., R/cleaners ........................................................................$92,500 ‘10 JD 1790, 24R20 CCS, L/fert, R/clnr ........$132,500 ‘11 JD DB60, 24R30, CCS, R/cmnd, R/clnrs $172,500

MISCELLANEOUS EQUIPMENT

New Set of 380/80R38 Firestone front duals ....$6,000 ‘08 JD 520 Flail, mtd., 4-wheels ....................$17,500 ‘08 JD 568 baler, Megawide, surface wrap ....$26,500 ‘07 Brent 1084 cart, 1000 bu., 18.4-42 w/tandem, tarp ................................................................$42,500 ‘07 Parker 938, 36” tracks, 1000 bu. ............$56,000 ‘05 Frontier 1107 grain cart, 750 bu., 30.5x32 ........................................................................$19,500

John Deere Crop Insurance Available at Our Locations

Contact: Kory Bundy (507) 327-1084

kory.bunde@mycropsolutions.com

Check Out Our New Website

www.mankatoimplement.com

Mankato Implement

Potter Implement

Hwy. 22 South • Mankato, MN • www.mankatoimplement.com

1426 S. Broadway • New Ulm, MN

(507) 354-6818

(507) 387-8201 • (800) 624-8983

Zins Implement Hwy. 11 No. • Nicollet, MN

(507) 225-3464

Erlandson Implement

Minnesota Lake Implement

Erlandson Implement

214 East State St. • Kiester, MN

Hwy. 22 South • Minnesota Lake, MN

35W & Int. 90 • Albert Lea, MN

(507) 294-3244

(507) 462-3828

060

HANCOCK, MN

— 6 convenient locations —

‘04 JD 9220, PS, 710/70R38, d/lock, 3162 hrs. ......................................................................$145,000 ‘10 JD 9630T, 1500 hrs., 36” tracks, ext. warr. ......................................................$275,000 ‘01 JD 9300T, 24-spd., 30” tracks, 3225 hrs. ......................................................................$124,500 ‘11 JD 9530T, 36” tracks, fact. warr., 398 hrs. ......................................................................$315,000 ‘02 JD 9520T, 36’ tracks, at ready, 6783 hrs. ......................................................................$109,500 ‘04 JD 9620T, 30” tracks 80%, 4 SCV, 6500 hrs. ......................................................................$147,500 ‘09 JD 9630T, 36” tracks, 4 SCV, 1307 hrs...$275,000 ‘11 JD 9630T, 36” tracks, leather, Xenon, fact. warr., 785 hrs. ........................................................$295,000 ‘11 JD 9630, 800/70R30, fact. warr., 478 hrs. ......................................................................$290,000

060 Sheep

3 yr old registered Suffolk Minnesota Bred Ewe Sale, rams, $300/OBO. 715-568Saturday, Nov 24,2012. 1186 Fairgrounds in Rochester, MN. 9 a.m. Show, 1 p.m. FOR SALE: 25 wether/type Sale. For catalog, call 507Hamp/Suffolk bred ewes. 836-8319 or go to Bred to Hamp ram for Jansheepsales. com. uary & February lambs. Check out pictures @ Wether type Suffolk/ Hamp paulsonclublambs.com Also X. Lambs & ewes bred to (2) Hamp rams. Call for Skidgel #705. Luther Club prices. 507-240-0107 Lambs. (701) 212-8385 or (715) 613-2684 FOR SALE: Dorset & Suffolk ewe lambs. Dorset fall Swine 065 rams & (2) Boer cross bucks. Arndt Acres 952-466- Dec-Mar PB Hamp boars & 5876 Call after 7 p.m. open gilts, starting $200. Del. avail. Ron Warrick 515-352-3749 FOR SALE: Dorset rams, RR, twins, not Dorumbias, Compart's total program bred for mothering, milkfeatures superior boars & ing, muscle & twinning. open gilts documented by Doug Rathke, Hutchinson BLUP technology. Duroc, MN 320-587-6094 York, Landrace & F1 lines. Terminal boars offer leanFor Sale: Suffolk, Suffolkness, muscle, growth. MaPolypay, Suffolk-Hamp ternal gilts & boars are ram lambs. Lots of meat. productive, lean, durable. 507-445-3317 Leave message. All are stress free & PRRS free. Semen also available FOR SALE: Targhee sheep, through Elite Genes A.I. rams (1) 4 yr old, (1) yearMake 'em Grow! Comparts ling, (2) lambs, ewes availBoar Store, INC. Toll Free: able. 218-924-2466 877-441-2627

(507) 373-6418

‘10 Timpte hopper, AR, 20” hopper height, new brakes, roll tarp Clean ....................................$28,500 ‘99 Timpte, 42’ AL hopper, 78” sides, roll tarp ................................$17,500 ‘90 Timpte, 42’ AL hopper, 78” sides, roll tarp ................................$15,000 15’ Steel Box & Hoist, 54” sides ..............................................$2,500 Lift Kits for your existing hopper. Our Lift Kits will help you achieve a 20” hopper height ............Kit $650 ................................Installed $1,350 Engineered Beavertail for Drop Deck ..............Installed $5,500 ..........................................Kit $3,500

DAY CAB TRUCKS

NEW Tip-In Tip-Out....................$1,750 Extensions....................................$350

DROPDECKS

‘07 Fontaine 48/102, Brand New Never Pulled ........................$27,500 ‘98 Wabash Drop Deck, 48/102, Clean, Good Paint, Add a Beavertail & it becomes a 53’ trailer. Have 2 of these ....................$18,500

VAN TRAILERS

Good Selection (over 30) of Van Trailers ‘95-’01, 48/102-53/102, Great for water storage or over the road hauling ..............$3,500-$7,500 48’ & 53’ Van Trailers to rent. ............$135.00 per month plus tax. ......$2.00/mile for pickup & delivery

MISCELLANEOUS

Axles, Suspensions ‘03 Kenworth T800, 380/410 For Trailers ..............$1,000 AR/Axle Caterpiller, 13-spd., 3.70 ratio, AR, Walk-In Sleeper..............$22,500 ....................................$500 SR/Axle Rims - 22.5 & 24.5 steel & ‘02 Freightliner, CL12064ST, 410 hp. Cummins, 10-spd., 800K, 3.90 ratio, aluminum ..........................$60/steel 230” WB, new rods & main, ............................................$175/AL new recaps, 48” flattop........$18,500 ‘94 Ford Van Truck, 7.3L dsl., ‘74 Ford LN800 Implement Truck, 391 auto., 14’ AL body, 96” wide, V8, gas, 5+2 trans., 26’ steel bed, roll-up door ............................$2,900 hyd. winch, hyd. tip down, sgl. axle, Kubota Tractor L2950, 3,079 hrs., Clean, Exc. Cond.....................$6,000 3 cyl. dsl., 4WD, live PTO, Roll-Over FLATBEDS Protection ..............................$8,500 ‘00 Wabash, 48/102, Conestoga, Tires: (4) 385 Super Singles New Tarp, AL Wheels Outside, w/polished AL rims; 2 new, 1 @ 50%, 1@ 40% ..........$2,000/set of 4 Winches & Chain Tiedowns, SPR ......................................$13,750 Tires: (2) 445 Super Singles w/AL rims ..........................$1,000 pr. ‘99 Transcraft, 48/102, AL Combo ..............................$9,250 Pre-Hung Interior Doors: Oak, Cherry, Maple, Pine & Painted. ‘99 Dorsey, 48/102, SPX/AR, 50% tires, 80% brakes ..........$9,500 Sizes from 18x80-36x80. LH/RH ‘94 Fontaine, 48/96, SPX/AR ....$8,000 openings. Styles from 2 panel to 6 panel. Over 50 doors to choose from ‘93 Fontaine AL Combo, 48/96, SPX/AR ..................................$8,000 Call For Details We can also convert flatbed ‘74 Fontaine, 40’ ......................$4,750 trailers to be used as a bridge. Custom Haysides & Extensions See our website. Standard ..................................$1,250

• All Trailers DOTable •

Will Consider Trades!

Call 320-212-5220 or 320-392-5361

CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE!!! www.DuncanTrailersInc.com Delivery Available!


Livestock Equip

YOUR HARVEST HEADQUARTERS (B) Belle Plaine, MN • 1051 Old Hwy. 169 Blvd.

075

Cars & Pickups

(952) 873-2224

(H) Hollandale, MN • W. Hwy. 251

(507) 889-4221

080

(O) Owatonna, MN • 3555 SW 18th St.

(507) 451-4054

'97 Ford F250 4x4 extended cab, 7.3 dsl., auto, clean, rust free, western truck, new tires & batteries, 137,000 mi., $6,950. 218-3896961 Trucks & Trailers

084

FOR SALE: '72 Mack triaxle, beet & grain endgate; 22' box w/air shift PTO & rear controls, all Mack truck, 237 w/5 spd., 3rd axle air up/down, new brakes, new 11R22.5 tires, runs great & very reliable, $16,500. 320-226-4443

‘08 JD 9630, 454 hrs., 800/70R38’s ..............$269,900

‘08 CIH 535, 2275 hrs., ‘07 JD 4930, 3093 hrs., New ‘06 JD 1770NI, 16R30”, CCS, Rear PTO....................$249,500 Leader Dry Box..........$200,000 Liquid Fert. ..................$89,500

4WD TRACTORS

TRACK TRACTORS

(O)’12 JD 8335RT, 113 hrs., IVT, 25” tracks ......................$274,900 (O)’12 JD 8310RT, 218 hrs., IVT, 18” tracks ......................$264,900 (B)CIH 535 Quadtrac, 2262 hrs. ........................................$249,500 (B)’07 JD 9620T, 2283 hrs. ................................................$209,900 (O)’05 JD 9320T, 3500 hrs., 3 pt, PTO ..............................$184,900

ROW CROP TRACTORS

(O)’11 JD 8310R, 356 hrs. ................................................$219,900 (O)’12 JD 7330, 441 hrs, IVT ............................................$119,900 (O)’11 JD 7330, auto quad, 237 hrs. ..................................$117,500 (B)’97 JD 8400, 7317 hrs. ....................................................$79,900 (B)’05 JD 7320, 1454 hrs., power quad ..............................$79,000 (B)’89 JD 4755, 9781 hrs. ....................................................$49,900 (B)’11 JD 5085M, 275 hrs., reverser ....................................$45,900 (B)’98 JD 6410, 4594 hrs., power quad ..............................$37,900 (B) ‘01 NH TM165, 10,136 hrs., MFWD ..............................$37,900 (B)’79 JD 4440, 7746 hrs, quad ..........................................$24,500 (O)JD 2840, 6870 hrs, 148 loader........................................$13,500 (H)’78 Case 2390, 7173 hrs, 18.4x38’s ................................$12,900 (B)’80 AC 7020, 4688 hrs, power shift ..................................$9,500 (O)IH 560, loader, diesel ........................................................$5,495 (B)’65 David Brown 990, 1 owner ..........................................$4,900

(H)’88 Case IH 1660, 2481 hrs.............................................$23,500 (B)’82 JD 6620SH, side hill, 3231 hrs. ................................$20,900 (B)’79 JD 6620 ....................................................................$15,900 (B)’82 JD 8820, 5571 hrs., duals ........................................$13,900 (B)’80 JD 7720, 5000 hrs. ....................................................$12,900 (H)’80 JD 7220, 4365 hrs.....................................................$11,900 (H)’79 JD 7720 ....................................................................$11,900 (O)’81 JD 7720, 3927 hrs.....................................................$10,500

PLANTERS/SEEDERS

(B)’09 JD DB60, 36R20”, precision meters ........................$159,900 (O)’11 JD 1770NT, 24R30”, liq fert ....................................$154,900 (H)’06 JD DB66, 36R22”, CCS............................................$143,900 (O)’08 JD 1770NT, 24R30”, liq fert ....................................$132,900 (H)’11 JD 1790, 24R20”, liq fert ........................................$127,900 (O)’08 Case IH 1250, 24R30”, CCS ....................................$126,900 (O)’10 JD 1770NT, 16R30”, liq fert ....................................$109,900 (H)’10 JD 1770NT, 16R30”, CCS ..........................................$99,900 (H)’08 JD 1770NT, 16R30” ..................................................$89,900 (H)’06 JD 1770NT, 16R30”, liq fert ......................................$89,500 (B)Case IH, Bauer bar, 36R20” ............................................$79,900 (B)’06 JD 1770NT, 16R30”, liq fert ......................................$79,900 (H)’03 JD 1790, 16/31 row, liq fert ......................................$79,500 (O)’08 JD 1770NT, 16R30”, liq fert ......................................$74,900 (H)’02 JD 1860, 22.5’, 7.5” spacing ....................................$65,000 (B)’05 JD 1770NT, 12R30”, 3 bu ..........................................$54,900 (O)’99 JD 1760, 12R30”, liq fert ..........................................$54,000 (B)’96 JD 1770, 16R30” front fold ......................................$44,900 (H)’01 JD 1760, 12R30”, liq fert ..........................................$44,900 (H)’05 JD 1760, 12R30”, liq fert ..........................................$43,900 (H)’01 JS 1760, 12R30”, liq fert ..........................................$43,900 (O)’99 JD 1760, 12R30”, liq fert ..........................................$42,500 (O)’08 JD 1720, 12R30”, finger............................................$39,900 (O)White 6100, 12R30” ........................................................$15,500 (B)JD 7000, 4R36”, dry fert ..................................................$2,950

CORN HEADS

(H)’12 JD S680, 232 sep. hrs. ............................................$339,900 (O)’10 JD 9870, 671 sep. hrs., PRWD................................$299,000 (O)’11 JD 9870, 261 sep. hrs. ............................................$297,500 (O)’11 JD 9870, 700 sep. hrs., PRWD................................$294,900 (O)’11 JD 9770, 213 sep. hrs., PRWD................................$284,900 (B)’10 JD 9670, 275 sep hrs., PRWD ................................$259,900 (H)’10 JD 9870, 559 sep. hrs. ............................................$259,900 (B)’10 JD 9670, 275 sep hrs., PRWD ................................$259,900 (H)’09 JD 9870, 629 sep. hrs. ............................................$257,900 (O)’12 JD S550, 126 sep. hrs. ............................................$245,900 (O)’11 JD 9670, 534 sep. hrs. ............................................$244,900 (B)’10 Gleaner A76, 382 sep. hrs. ......................................$199,900 (B)’08 JD 9770, 1011 sep. hrs. ..........................................$188,000 (B)’08 JD 9570, 923 sep. hrs., PRWD................................$185,900 (O)’04 JD 9760, 1121 sep. hrs. ..........................................$173,500 (B)’06 JD 9760, 1661 sep hrs., PRWD ..............................$169,900 (B)’06 JD 9760, 1618 sep. hrs., PRWD..............................$168,900 (H)’06 JD 9760, 1500 sep. hrs., 20.8x42’s ........................$167,500 (H)’07 JD 9760, 1556 sep hrs., duals ................................$159,900 (O)’06 JD 9660, 1214 sep hrs. ..........................................$162,900 (H)’04 JD 9560, 1200 sep. hrs., duals................................$153,900 (H)’03 JD 9660, 1547 sep. hrs., duals................................$133,500 (O)’00 JD 9650STS, 1567 sep. hrs., 30.5x32’s ....................$99,900 (O)’01 JD 9550, 3060 hrs., PRWD ......................................$99,500 (O)’01 JD 9650, 2932 sep. hrs., PRWD................................$99,500 (H)’98 JD 9510, 1930 sep. hrs., duals..................................$75,000 (O)’11 JD 2410, 52’ chisel plow ..........................................$60,000 (H)’97 JD 9500, 2383 sep. hrs. ............................................$54,500

FALL TILLAGE

(O)’12 (O)’12 (O)’12 (O)’12 (O)’10 (O)’11 (O)’11 (O)’12 (O)’12 (O)’12 (O)’12 (O)’12 (O)’11 (O)’09 (O)’07 (O)’09 (O)’11 (O)’11 (O)’09 (O)’09 (O)’10 (O)’10 (O)’09 (O)’06 (O)’07 (O)’97

SPRAYERS

JD 4940, 489 hrs., 120’ boom ................................$292,750 JD 4940, 467 hrs., dry box......................................$290,500 JD 4830, 358 hrs., 90’ boom ..................................$235,000 JD 4830, 90’ boom ..................................................$235,000 JD 4930, 1053 hrs., 120’ boom ..............................$224,900 JD 4830, 543 hrs., 90’’ boom..................................$219,900 JD 4830, 633 hrs., 90’ boom ..................................$219,800 JD 4730, 275 hrs., 90’ boom ..................................$219,500 JD 4730, 242 hrs., 100’ boom ................................$216,750 JD 4730, 251 hrs., 90’ boom ..................................$211,500 JD 4730, 520 hrs., 90’ boom ..................................$209,700 JD 4730, 490 hrs., 90’ boom ..................................$209,600 JD 4730, 658 hrs., 90’ boom ..................................$208,500 JD 4830, 710 hrs., 90’ boom ..................................$202,500 JD 4930, 3093 hrs., dry box....................................$200,000 JD 4930, 2213 hrs., 120’ boom ..............................$199,750 JD 4730, 625 hrs., 90’ boom ..................................$191,500 JD 4730, 859 hrs., 90’ boom ..................................$190,750 JD 4730, 1050 hrs., 90’ boom ................................$185,900 JD 4930, 1808 hrs., 90’ boom ................................$179,900 JD 4730, 1401 hrs., 90’ boom ................................$177,100 AgChem 1184, 1350 hrs., 90’ boom ......................$174,900 AgChem 884, 1374 hrs., 100’ boom ......................$164,900 JD 4720, 1520 hrs., 120’ boom ..............................$160,500 AgChem 1074, 1797 hrs., 100’ boom ....................$142,900 Willmar 8400, 3221 hrs., 120’ boom ........................$71,900

SPRING TILLAGE

(B)’12 JD 2210, 58.5’ ..........................................................$69,900 (B)’11 JD 2210, 60.5’ ..........................................................$69,900 (O)’09 JD 2210, 64.5’ ..........................................................$63,900 (H)’10 CIH Tigermate 200, 54.5’ ..........................................$59,900 (O)’04 JD 2210, 54.5’ ..........................................................$43,900 (O)’06 JD 2210, 45’5’ ..........................................................$42,500 (B)’05 JD 2210, 36.5’ ..........................................................$37,900 (O)Wilrich Quad 5, 42’ ..........................................................$35,900 (B)’03 JD 2200, 38.5’ ..........................................................$33,900 (O)’03 JD 2200, 34.5’ ..........................................................$32,900 (B)’98 JD 980, 44.5’ ............................................................$21,900 (H)’98 JD 980, 36.5’ ............................................................$17,900 (O)’96 JD 980, 38.5’ ............................................................$16,900 (O)’87 JD 960 ........................................................................$7,900 (H)CIH 4300 ..........................................................................$7,500 (B)International Harvester 4900 ............................................$5,900 (B)JD 1010 ............................................................................$2,900 (B)Hiniker 35’ ........................................................................$2,900

Your Southern Minnesota & Western Wisconsin John Deere Commercial Sprayer Center

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

(B)’12 JD 618C, 18R20”, chopping ....................................$152,900 (O)’12 JD 612C, 12R30”, 1400 acres ................................$108,900 (O)’11 JD 612, 12R20”, chopping ........................................$99,500 (O)’10 JD 612, 12R30” ........................................................$76,900 (B)’08 JD 612, 12R30” ........................................................$74,900 (H)’11 JD 608C, 8R30”, chopping ......................................$72,500 (O)’12 JD 608C, 375 acres ..................................................$71,500 (B)’05 Geringhoff, RD1800, 18R22” ....................................$59,900 (H)’08 JD 612, 12R20” ........................................................$67,500 (B)’10 JD 608, 8R30”, chopping ..........................................$64,900 (H)’10 JD 608 8R30”, chopping ..........................................$53,900 (B)’11 Harvest Tec, 8R30”, chopping ..................................$49,900 (H)’06 Geringhoff, RD830, 8R30” ........................................$49,900 (B)’07 Geringhoff, RD830, 8R30” ........................................$49,900 (B)’05 Calmers, 18R20”........................................................$39,900 (O)’06 Geringhoff, RD830, 8R30” ........................................$49,500 (O)’06 Geringhoff, 8R30”......................................................$48,500 (B)’07 Cat 1822, 18R22” ......................................................$32,900 (O)’02 JD 1293, 12R30” ......................................................$29,900 (O)’06 JD 893 ......................................................................$27,900 (O)’97 JD 893, knife rolls......................................................$19,500 (O)’95 JD 893, knife rolls......................................................$17,900 (B)’98 JD 893, knife rolls......................................................$16,900 (B)Case 1063, 6R30”, poly ..................................................$15,900 (O)’82 JD 843 ......................................................................$10,900 (B)JD 1222, 12R22”, poly ......................................................$9,500

(O)’11 JD 3710, 10-bottom ..................................................$52,500 (B)’08 JD 2700, 7-shank ripper ............................................$37,900 (H)’10 JD 2410, 33’ chisel plow ..........................................$36,900 (O)Krause 4850, 5-shank ripper ..........................................$29,900 (O)’05 JD 2700, 5-shank ......................................................$26,900 (O)’03 JD 2700, 9-shank ......................................................$20,900 (H)’02 JD 2400, 24’ chisel plow ..........................................$26,900 (H)M&W 1700, 7-shank, 24” spacing ..................................$19,900 (H)Case 730B, 7-shank ........................................................$18,500 (H)Wilrich 6500, 5-shank ....................................................$13,900 (B)’00 JD 115, 15’ ................................................................$10,900 (H)M&W 1465, 7-shank, 24” spacing ....................................$7,950 (H)M&W 1465, 5-shank ........................................................$6,500 (B)Hiniker 1325, 25’ chisel plow ............................................$4,595 (B)White 588, 5-bottom plow ................................................$2,900 (B)Ford 152, 4-bottom plow ..................................................$1,795

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

(O)’11 JD 9630, Lease Return ............................................$279,900 (O)’11 JD 9630, Lease Return ............................................$279,900 (B)’08 JD 9630, 454 hrs. ....................................................$269,900 (H)’11 JD 9330, 475 hrs.....................................................$245,000 (O)’04 JD 9620, 2854 hrs., 710/70R42’s............................$184,900 (H)‘00 JD 9400, 3282 hrs., 710/42’s ..................................$119,900 (B)’94 Ford 9880, 4450 hrs. ................................................$85,500 (H)’96 JD 8870, 4871 hrs. ....................................................$72,500 (H)’94 JD 8970, 7338 hrs. ....................................................$69,900 (H)‘95 JD 8770, 4775 hrs., 20.8x42’s ..................................$69,500 (H)’80 Case 4690, 6481 hrs., 3 pt., PTO ..............................$16,900 (O)‘74 JD 7520, 8856 hrs., 3 pt., PTO..................................$10,500

COMBINES

45 B THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

FOR SALE: 16' Triple H livestock trailer, good tires, $995. 507-236-4835 or 507-2364366


Trucks & Trailers

THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

46 B

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Miscellaneous

FOR SALE: 32' steel Jaycraft trailer '94 model, 22.5 Lo Pro tires, Air Ride, 2 compartments. 320-664-4804

BALZER BUILDS THE BEST LIQUID MANURE HANDLING EQUUPMENT

Balzer Express Tank

• 1/4” Uni-body Construction • 5” and 6” Solid Steel Spindles in Sleeves • Long Tongue and PTO • 5,000, 6,000 and 6,750 gallon sizes available

Express Lagoon Pump

V-Pump

• Up to 4000 gallons per minute The most durable and dependable high capacity pump available.

Used Tanks:

• Balzer 10,000 gal. 5th wheel slurry • Balzer 7400 gal. disc wheel slurry w/5 unit injector • Balzer 6750 gal. Express slurry tank w/5 unit disk injector • Houle 6000 gal. slurry w/5 unit disk injector • Balzer 4800 gal. slurry w/5 unit disk injector • Balzer 4200 gal. slurry w/5 unit spring shank injector • Better Bilt vacuum, 2600 gal. w/3 shank std. injector • Better Bilt 2300 gal vac. • Better Bilt 1500 gal. vac tank • Better Bilt 1100 gal. vac tank • Badger 800 gal. single axle vacuum tank • Dietrich 5 unit sweep injector

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

084

FOR SALE: '75 Ford LTS900, gas, twin screw, 5 & 4 trans, nice cab. 507-359-9027

New Tanks & Pumps: Any Size Available Other - Doda 13’ vertical pump - Clay 12’ vertical pump - N Tech vari width vertical manure pump - ‘09 Doda 10’ vertical pump - Husky 10’, 1000 RPM trailer type pump - Balzer V-6, 8‘ pump - Balzer Doda 6’ Super 150 vertical pump - Balzer 314 agitator - 8”x30’ wheeled load stand - Balzer 38’ lagoon pump - ‘06 Hydro Engineering, 16 shank, 30’ folding injector bar Misc.Equipment: - Top Air TA116, 1600 gal., 80’ boom, Raven 440 - Spray Specialites XLRD 1500 gal., 80’ boom sprayer - Top Air 1100 gal., 88’ boom, Raven 450 monitor - Top Air 1100 gal., 60’ boom - Blumhardt tandem axles, 1000 gal., 90’ boom w/foamer - Century HD 1000 gal., 60’ boom - Demco Conquest 1000 gal., 60’ boom, Raven 440 - Red Ball 565, 1000 gal., 60’ front fold boom - Ag Chem 750 gal., 60’ X-fold boom - Walsh 500 gal., 45’ boom - New Hardi 150 gal., 32’ PTO sprayer - Parker Model 5500 gravity wagon - JD 1210A, 400 bu. grain cart - Krause Model 8200, 36’ disk - IH 706, gas, WF - JD Model 2700, 7 shank chisel plow - JD 980, 30.5’ field cultivator - JD 960, 32.5’ field cultivator w/3 bar harrow - Brady 14’ stalk chopper - JD 9620T w/2165 hrs. - JD 7720 w/1750 hrs. - ’97 JD 7810, MFWD, w/2330 hrs. - C-IH Puma 165, MFWD, 14.9x46 rears, 535 hrs. - C-IH 7120, MFWD, 2942 hrs. - Loftness 8’ sgl. auger 2-stage snowblower - Tox-o-Wic 370 PTO drive grain dryer - Vermeer WR22 10 wheel rake - JD 7000 corn planter - Roose 16’ hyd. hog cart - Case 490, 31’ disk - Balzer 2000, 20’ stalk chopper - White model 445, 11-shank disk chisel

Ready for Fall - 42' semi trailer, repainted, ag hoppers, good tarp, $12,750/OBO. 515-408-3122

HARVEST SPECIALS 18-24 Month Interest Free Financing COMBINES

• ‘06 MF 9690, duals, 429 hrs. • ‘07 MF 9790, duals, 1034 hrs. • ‘92 Gleaner R62, 2063 hrs. • ‘98 Gleaner 800, 25’ flexhead • ‘86 MF 8560 • ‘85 MF 9720, 3292 hrs. • MF 9118 bean table • MF 1858 bean table, 18’

TRACTORS • ‘12 MF 8660, MFD, cab, 225 PTO hp. • ‘07 MF 7495, MFD, 155 PTO hp., 2625 hrs. • MF 5460, MFD, cab, 95 PTO hp. • MF 1529 Compact, 29 hp., loader, hydro • MF 1652 Compact, 42 hp., loader, cab, hydro • MF 1652 Compact, 52 hp., 12x12 Power Shuttle • ‘05 MF 451, 45 PTO hp., 400 hrs. • ‘07 MF 3645, MFD, 75 PTO hp., cab, ldr • ‘78 MF 1085, cab, 83 hp., 365 hrs. • ‘74 MF 1155, 150 hp • JD 430 compact dsl, 22 hp, cab, 60” mower, snowblower • Case 2590

CORNHEADS

• ‘08 Geringhoff 1622, RD • ‘09 Geringhoff 1230, RD • ‘08 Geringhoff 1230, RD • ‘07 Geringhoff 1222, RD • ‘03 Geringhoff 1222, RD • ‘07 Geringhoff 1220, RD • ‘05 Geringhoff 1220, RD • ‘04 Geringhoff 1220, RD • ‘08 Geringhoff 830, RD • ‘04 Geringhoff 830, RD • ‘03 Geringhoff 830, RD • ‘01 Geringhoff 830, RD • ‘04 Geringhoff 822, RD • ‘07 Geringhoff 820, RD • ‘07 Geringhoff 630, RD • ‘00 Geringhoff 630, RD • ‘97 Geringhoff 630, RD • ‘99 NH 996, 12R20” • JD 822 • JD 843, steel • CIH 2208, 8R22” • ‘90 CIH 1083, GVL, poly • ‘04 CIH 2208, 8R30”

090

Miscellaneous

090

One deer hunter needs a One call does it all! place to hunt deer & With one phone call, you can turkey, sometimes with place your classified ad in daughter. Responsible, conThe Land, Farm News, siderate, law abiding AND The Country Today. hunter. Area 200, zones 291, Call The Land for more 292, 230, prefer 299. In the info @ 507-345-4523 • 800-657counties of Blue Earth, 4665. Nicollet, Le Sueur, Brown, & Watonwan. I just bow & PARMA DRAINAGE black powder hunt; shotgun PUMPS New pumps & if nobody on property at parts on hand. Call Minsame time. Call 507-380nesota's largest distributor 4167, or email me at HJ Olson & Company 320goldwing040@yahoo.com 974-8990 Cell – 320-894-5336 Dan

GRAIN HANDLING • Brandt 7500 hp. grain vac. • Brandt 5200 EX grain vac. • Brandt 4500 EX grain vac. • Brandt GBU-10, bagger • Brandt drive over grain deck • Brandt 1070, 1080, 1390 swing hopper augers • Brandt 1515 LP, 1535, 1545, 1575, 1585 belt conveyors • Brandt 10x35 auger • Brandt 8x45 auger, 18 hp, Briggs • Brandt 845 auger, 18 hp, gas • EZ Flow 220 bu. gravity box w/auger, tarp • Hutchinson 10x61 auger • Parker 2620 seed tender • Parker 839 grain cart • Parker 1048 grain cart

HAY & LIVESTOCK

• JD sickle mower • JD 275 disc mower, 9’ • IH 5-bar rake • CIH 8480 round baler • Kodiak 60”, 72”, 84” 3 pt. rotary cutters • MF 1375 disc mower conditioner, 15’ • MF 1328 & 1329 3 pt. disc mowers • MF 200 SP windrower, cab • NI 528 disc mower, 6-disc • ‘11 NH H6750, 3 pt disc mower, 110” • Sitrex DM5 disc mower • Sitrex RP2 or RP5 3 pt. wheel rake • Sitrex MK 14 wheel rake • Sitrex 10 & 12 wheel rakes on cart • Sitrex TR 9 wheel rake • Westendorf 3 pt. bale spear • H&S 16’ bale wagon

MISCELLANEOUS

• Sunflower 5055-62 field cult., 5-section, 62’ • Sunflower 4610-9 disc ripper • Sunflower 4412-07 disc ripper • Sunflower 4530-19 disc chisel • Sunflower 1444-36 disc • Sunflower 4511-11 disc chisel • ‘08 JD 520 stalk chopper • Loftness 30’ stalk chopper, SM • Niemeyer 15’ soil finisher • Maurer 28’-42’ header trailers • ‘12 Degelman LR7645 land roller • ‘12 Degelman 6000 HD rock picker • Woods 8400, 3 pt. finish mower, 7’ • Everest 3 pt. finish mower, 7’ • ‘11 SB Select snowblowers, 97” & 108”, 3 pt. • Lucke 8’ snowblower, 3 pt.

WILLMAR FARM CENTER a division of aemsco 3867 East Highway 12, Willmar, MN • Phone 320-235-8123


Miscellaneous

090

Miscellaneous

090

If you’re having a Farm Auction, let other Farmers know it! Upcoming Issues of THE LAND Northern MN November 16 November 30 December 14 December 28 January 11 January 25

Deadlines are 1 week prior to publication with Holiday deadlines 1 day earlier ** Indicates Early Deadline

PO Box 3169 Mankato, MN 56002 Phone: 507-345-4523 or 800-657-4665 Fax: 507-345-1027

Ask Your Auctioneer to Place Your Auction in The Land!

REMINDER EARLY D EADLINE for CLASSIFIED

LINE ADS

Due to the Thanksgiving holiday our ‘deadline’ for the November 23rd issue is Friday, November 16th at Noon

Website:

www.TheLandOnline.com

e-mail:

theland@TheLandOnline.com

KIESTER IMPLEMENT, INC. 110 S. Main, P.O. Box 249 • Kiester, MN

507-294-3387

www.midwestfarmsales.com

USED DRYERS 10”x61’ MAYRATH

SWINGAWAY DELUX 13575, 10”x71’ MAYRATH 1350 BPH SWINGAWAY MC 690, 1 Ph. 8”X57’ KEWANEE BEHLEN 380, 1 Ph. PTO

USED AUGERS

12”x71’ MAYRATH HOPPER TANKS BEHLEN, 1600 bu. SWINGAWAY We carry a full line of Behlen & Delux dryer parts; Mayrath and Hutch augers parts. Large inventory of Welda sprockets, hubs, bearings, chain & pulleys.

1409 Silver Street E. Mapleton, MN 56065 507-524-3726 massopelectric.com

‘11 CIH 5088 combine, duals, 160 hrs., loaded ..........................................$195,000 (2) CIH 2020 30’ flex head ......................Call CIH 2208 8RN cornhead ..................$19,000 CIH 8010, RWA, loaded, inspected $110,000 IH 2020 35’ flex head ......................$25,000 IH 2020 35’ flex head ......................$17,500 IH 1020 25’/30’ flex heads ......................Call IH 2208, 8RN cornhead (off 2388) ..$20,000 JD 8R20” cornhead, IH adapter..........$2,400 JD 444 4RW cornhead ......................$1,500 IH 300, nice tires ................................$1,750 JD 2510, gas, nice..............................$6,500 ‘70 JD 3020, gas, late ........................$6,500 JD 4010D, loader ..............................$7,500 JD 4020 D, new clutch, synchro ......$6,750 JD 4020, PS ......................................$7,500 JD 4250, PS, FWA............................$28,500 JD 4450, PS, FWA............................$32,500 JD 4450, PS, FWA/JD 740 ldr. ........$48,000 JD 4255, Quad, new engine ............$37,500 JD 4455, PS ....................................$36,000 JD 843 loader, Like New ..................$12,500 JD 840 loader, JD 8000 mts...............$9,500 JD 720 loader ....................................$5,500 (2) JD 725 loaders ................$6,500/$7,500

JD 740 loader, self leveling ................$8,500 JD 260 loader, grapple........................$4,000 (2) JD 280 loaders ................$7,500/$8,500 JD 741 loader, Sharp, hardly used ..$11,500 (2) JD 158, (2) JD 148 loaders ............................................$2,500/$4,500 JD 145 loader ....................................$2,500 (2) IH 2350 loaders ..............$3,000/$3,250 CIH 520 loader....................................$3,750 Dual 345, (off IH 856)........................$1,250 (2) K5 loaders ........................$1,500/$2,250 Farmhand F358 loader, (IH mts.) ......$3,250 Miller PL-4 loader ..............................$3,500 Miller PL-3, grapple, JD mts. ............$6,500 New Box Scrapers, 10’/12’....$1,750/$1,850 New & Used Skidsteer Attachments......Call Pallet Forks, Grapples, Rock Buckets ..Call New & Used Batco & Conveyall belt conveyors ............................................Call Bobcat T300, T320 skidsteers ........................$27,500/$32,500 Leon 1030, 10’ dozer blade, 4-way....$2,500 JD 24’ chisel plow, walking tandem ..$3,250 JD chisel plow shanks, light, hvy., True Depth ............................................Call

NEW 2012 WAGONS AND GRAIN CARTS ARE IN CALL NOW FOR BEST SELECTION

NEW EQUIPMENT

E-TRAIL GRAIN CARTS 710 Bu. - On Hand ............................$18,795 510 Bu. - On Hand..........Starting at $10,995 GRAVITY WAGONS 500 E-Z Trail - On Hand ........$7,995-$9,020 400 E-Z Trail............................$6,895-$7,250 HARVEST INTERNATIONAL/AUGERS T10-32 - 52 Truck Auger ........$3,500-$4,950 H10-62 - 82 Swing Hopper ....$8,500-$9,750 H13-62 - 92 Swing Hopper $13,500-$18,500 12 Volt Auger Mover ..........................$1,995 Hyd. Auger Mover ..............................$1,350 AZLAND SEED TENDERS 2 Box, Standard ..................................$9,950 4 Box, Scale & Talc ..........................$20,950 4 Box, Skid Type ..............................$13,610 SEED SHUTTLE BULK SEED TENDERS SS290 ................................................$17,250 SS400 ................................................$20,500 SS500 ................................................$26,000

STROBEL SEED TENDERS 2 Box ..................................................$8,950 4 Box ................................................$14,900 STROBEL BULK SEED TENDERS BT-200................................................$20,710 BT-300................................................$26,315 NEW KOYKER LOADERS 510 Loader - On Hand............Call for Quote Koyker 210 Auger Vac ......................$23,500 Koyker Stor-Mor Grain Baggers & Bag Unloaders ..............................In Stock COMBINE HEAD MOVERS E-Z Trail 4-wheel 21’-30’ ....................................$2,750-$3,520 NEW ROUND BALE RACKS 10’x23’ - On Hand ..............................$1,995 NEW WHEEL RAKES 14 Wheel, high capacity ....................$8,995 12 Wheel, high capacity ....................$8,495 Land Levelers, 10’ & 12’ ..............On Hand SNOWBLOWERS All Sizes ..........................................On Hand

USED EQUIPMENT

WAGONS

Walco 12’ Land leveler ......................$2,900 Parker 525, Like New..........................$8,000 Westfield 10”x71’ swing hopper w/right angle drive........................................$4,750 MISCELLANEOUS ‘91 Ford 946 ......................................$39,000 TELESCOPING FORKLIFT RENTALS Maurer gooseneck grain trailer ..........$8,500 GRAIN BAGGER AND ‘89 Skytrak 6036 telescoping BAG UNLOADER RENTALS forklift ............Was $14,000 - Now $10,500 ‘96 Skytrak 6036 telescoping GRAIN VAC RENTALS forklift..............................................$16,000 SKID LOADER RENTALS Brillion 7-shank Land Commander ....$6,250 CIH 7-18 on-land pull type plow ........$5,250 3 TELESCOPING FORKLIFTS Bobcat 530 ..........................................$3,750 FOR RENT H&S 12 wheel V-rake ..........................$2,750

Woodford Ag 507-430-5144

37666 300th St. • Redwood Falls, MN WWW.WOODFORDAG.COM

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

JD 4050, MFD ............................................$32,900 JD 4240, PS ................................................$19,900 JD 4440, Quad ............................................$22,900 (2) IH 1026, hydro ..............................From $12,900 IH 1256 ..............................................Coming Soon IH 1456 ..............................................Coming Soon JD 4650, 2WD ............................................$29,900 CIH MX270 ..................................................$69,900 JD 4630, PS ................................................$16,900 IH 460, 560, 560D ..........................................CALL JD loaders, many to choose, ....Starting at $2,495 New Koyker loaders ......................................CALL Gehl 4635 skid loader ................................$12,900 CIH 4800, 30’ field cult. ..................$9,900 or B.O. IH 826, German diesel ......................Coming Soon CIH 5120, MFD ................................Coming Soon JD 4030..............................................Coming Soon Cub Cadet HDS 3225, 280 hrs. ....................$2,995 Cub Cadet 782 ..............................................$1,695 IH Super MTA ....................................Coming Soon IH 856D..........................................................$8,900 IH 756, gas ....................................................$7,900 IH 810 oat head w/pickup ..............................CALL JD Loaders - Special: 46, 48, 148, 158, 640 CALL New Koyker 510 loader ..................................CALL

• 320-598-7604 •

Madison, MN From Hwy. 75 & 212 Jct., 3.5 mi. W., 2.5 mi. S.

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Southern MNNorthern IA November 23 December 7 December 21 January 4 January 18 February 1

HAAS EQUIP., LLC

47 B THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

RANGER PUMP CO. WANT MORE READERS Custom Manufacturer of TO SEE YOUR AD?? Expand your coverage area! Water Lift Pumps for field drainage & lagoon agitation The Land has teamed up pumps. with Farm News, and The Sales & Service Country Today so you can 507-984-2025 or 406-314-0334 do just that! Place a classiwww.rangerpumpco.com fied ad in The Land and have the option of placing it in these papers as well. Winpower Sales & Service More readers = better reReliable Power Solutions sults! Call The Land for Since 1925 PTO & automatmore information. 507-345ic Emergency Electric 4523 • 800-657-4665 Generators. New & Used Rich Opsata-Distributor 800-343-9376


THE LAND, NOVEMBER 9, 2012

48 B

‘12 CIH Steiger 450Q, 490 hrs. ..........................................$299,500

‘10 CIH Puma 155, PS, 579 hrs., w/loader. ............................$114,900

‘08 CIH 730C, 7-shank ripper ............................................$29,900

‘12 Farmall 50B, MFD, hydro, w/loader ..............................$24,500

‘08 Wilrich 957, 7-shank ripper ............................................$24,500

‘11 CIH 9120, Tracks, RWA, 290 hrs. ..............................$359,000

USED 4WD TRACTORS

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Up To One Year Interest Free ••• Call For Details ••• ‘12 CIH 600Q, 400 hrs., sus. cab, lux. cab, HID lites, full Pro 700 steering, PTO, loaded ......$389,900 ‘12 CIH 600Q, 247 hrs., sus. cab, lux. cab, HID lites, Pro 700 steering, PTO, 6 remotes ......$375,000 ‘12 CIH 600Q, 269 hrs., sus. cab, lux. cab, HID lites, Pro 700 steering, 6 remotes ................$369,900 ‘11 CIH 600Q, 371 hrs., sus. cab, lux. cab, full HID lites, full Pro 700 steering, PTO, loaded $379,900 ‘11 CIH 600Q, 459 hrs., sus. cab, lux. cab, full HID lites, full Pro 700 steering, loaded..........$359,500 ‘12 CIH 550Q, 968 hrs., sus. cab, lux. cab, HID lites, full Pro 700 steering, loaded................$291,500 ‘12 CIH 550Q, 1064 hrs., sus. cab, lux. cab, HID lites, full Pro 700 steering, loaded..............$289,900 ‘12 CIH 550Q, 1745 hrs., sus. cab, lux. cab, HID lites, full Pro 700 steering, loaded..............$279,500 ‘12 CIH 500Q, 400 hrs., sus. cab, lux. cab, HID lites, full Pro 700 steering, loaded................$324,500 ‘12 CIH 500Q, 400 hrs., sus. cab, lux. cab, HID lites, full Pro 700 steering, loaded................$317,900 ‘11 CIH 535Q, 2017 hrs., lux. cab, HID lites, big hyd. pump ....................................................$250,000 ‘12 CIH 450Q, 450 hrs., sus. cab, lux. cab, bih pump, HID lites, loaded ................................$299,500 ‘12 CIH Steiger 400, 400 hrs., lux. leather cab, PTO, HID lites, 520R46 tires ......................Coming In ‘12 CIH Steiger 400, 251 hrs., susp. lux. leather cab, HID lites, HD hyd., full Pro 700 steering ....................................................................................................................................................Coming In ‘12 CIH Steiger 450, 400 hrs., susp. lux. leather cab, HID lites, HD hyd., full Pro 700 steering ....................................................................................................................................................Coming In ‘12 CIH Steiger 450, 400 hrs., susp. lux. leather cab, HID lites, HD hyd., full Pro 700 steering, PTO ....................................................................................................................................................Coming In ‘12 CIH Steiger 450, 400 hrs., susp. lux. leather cab, HID lites, HD hyd., full Pro 700 steering, PTO, 800R38 tires ......................................................................................................................Coming In STX and STEIGER PTO, TOW CABLE & 3 PT. KITS ON HAND!!! UP TO ONE YEAR INTEREST FREE...CALL FOR DETAILS!

USED COMBINES

24 Month Interest Waiver Thru Case Credit ••• Call For Details

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

‘12 ‘12 ‘11 ‘12 ‘12 ‘10 ‘10 ‘12 ‘07 ‘06 ‘06 ‘11

CIH 9230, track drive, RWA, 295 eng. hrs. ..........................................................................$359,900 CIH 9230, track drive, RWA, 315 eng. hrs., folding covers ................................................$359,900 CIH 9120, track drive, RWA, 308 eng. hrs. ..........................................................................$327,900 CIH 7230, 330 eng. hrs. ........................................................................................................$279,900 CIH 7120, 384 eng. hrs. ........................................................................................................$259,900 CIH 7120, 801 eng. hrs. ........................................................................................................$219,000 CIH 7120, 727 eng. hrs. ........................................................................................................$219,000 CIH 7120, 280 eng. hrs. ........................................................................................................$259,900 CIH 8010, 1050 hrs., duals ....................................................................................................$189,900 CIH 2388, 1986 eng./1563 sep.hrs, duals ............................................................................$135,900 CIH 2377, 1950 eng hrs, 4WD, chopper, rock trap, Pro 600 ..............................................$129,000 CIH 2608, 8R30” chopping cornhead ....................................................................................$64,500

‘12 Farmall 95 w/loader ....$47,650

‘12 CIH 7120, 384 eng. hrs. ..........................................$259,900

Brent 678 Grain Cart, 630 bu., w/trap, 24.5x32 tires ............$21,900

‘93 CIH 8600, 30’ air drill, 48 openers..............................$8,900

LOW RATE FINANCING AVAILABLE thru Call For Details COMBINES CONTINUED ‘09 CIH 2162, 40’ flex draper head................................................................................................$49,900 ‘11 CIH 3020, 35’ platform w/Crary air reel ................................................................................$42,900 ‘10 CIH 2020, 35’ platform............................................................................................................$30,500 ‘03 CIH 1020, 30’ platform, 11⁄2” knife, tracker ............................................................................$14,900 ‘92 CIH 1020, 20’ platform, 3” knife ..............................................................................................$6,500 CIH 1020, 16.5’ ..............................................................................................................................JUST IN

USED 2WD TRACTORS

Up To One Year Interest Free ••• Call For Details ••• ‘12 CIH Farmall 50B, w/loader ..............................................................................................$24,500 ‘12 CIH Farmall 95, MFD, cab, w/ loader, 27 hrs. ..............................................................$476,500 ‘10 CIH Puma 155, PS, suspension axle, L760 loader, 555 hrs. ........................................$109,900 ‘12 CIH Magnum 235, susp. lux. cab, 360 lite pkg., full Pro 700 steering, 400 hrs. ........$174,900 ‘12 CIH Magnum 235, susp. lux. cab, 360 lite pkg., full Pro 700 steering, 400 hrs. ........$174,900 ‘12 CIH Magnum 260, susp. lux. cab, 360 lite pkg., full Pro 700 steering, 380R50 rear tires & duals, 400 hrs. ..................................................................................................................Coming In ‘12 CIH Magnum 290, susp. lux. cab, 360 lite pkg., full Pro 700 steering, 480R50 rear tires & duals, creeper susp. front axle, 400 hrs. ........................................................................Coming In ‘12 CIH Magnum 290, susp. lux. cab, 360 lite pkg., full Pro 700 steering, 480R50 rear tires & duals, creeper, susp. front axle, 400 hrs. ........................................................................Coming In ‘12 CIH Magnum 315, susp. lux. cab, 360 lite pkg., full Pro 700 steering, 480R50 rear tires & duals, susp. front axle, 400 hrs. ......................................................................................Coming In

USED SKIDLOADERS

‘12 Bobcat S175, 2-spd. hydro., cab w/heat, 53 hrs. ................................................$26,900 ‘09 Bobcat E-32, Dlx. seat, cab w/air, hyd. X-Change, 24” trenching bucket..........$36,900

I-35 & Highway 60 West • Faribault, MN • 507-334-2233

Paul

CNH Capital’s Commercial Revolving Account provides financial assistance for parts and service when you need it, keeping your equipment running as its best with the quality parts and service you’ve come to expect from Case IH. Contact your local dealer or visit www.cnhcapital.com today for details. ©2012 CNH Capital America LLC. All rights reserved. CNH Capital and Case IH are registered trademarks of CNH America LLC. Printed in the USA.

‘08 CIH 1250, 24R30”, liq. fert., 3 pt. mount, bulk fill ..................$108,900

www.matejcek.com

Herb


Š 2012

November, 2012

(800) 657-4665 www.TheLandOnline.com theland@TheLandOnline.com P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002


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THE LAND, Advertising Supplement

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Nov. 9, 2012 :: Southern :: The Land