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lamp the

magazine of the NSW Nurses’ Association

volume 68 no.7 August 2011

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Protect your membership

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2 THE LAMP august 2011


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About The Lamp

c o n t e n t s

Contacts NSW Nurses’ Association For all membership enquiries and assistance, including Lamp subscriptions and change of address, contact our Sydney office. Sydney Office 50 O’Dea Avenue, Waterloo NSW 2017 (all correspondence) T 8595 1234 (metro) 1300 367 962 (non-metro) F 9662 1414 E gensec@nswnurses.asn.au W www.nswnurses.asn.au Hunter Office 8-14 Telford Street, Newcastle Ease NSW 2300 Illawarra Office L1, 63 Market Street Wollongong NSW 2500

Cover story

lamp the

magazine of the NSW Nurses’ Association

volume 68 no.7 August 2011

Protect your membership GO Direct Debit 10

Print Post Approved: PP241437/00033

Protect your membershiP

Go Direct Debit

Cover Gloria Martinez, RN, Liverpool Hospital Photography by Sharon Hickey.

The lamp produced by Sirius Communications T 9560 1223 W www.siriuscommunications.com.au Press Releases Send your press releases to: F 9662 1414 E gensec@nswnurses.asn.au

News in brief

Because we care

8 Participate in your local Hospital Clinical Council 8 Nurses can print registration certificates online 8 Protest against income management at Bankstown 8 NSWNA photographic competition 9 Sydney Alliance supports aged care 9 UK hospitals could lose nearly 100,000 nurses

34 Aged care can’t wait 35 ACS template roadshow

NSWNA education program 9

NSWNA communications manager Noel Hester T 8595 2153 NSWNA communications assistant Janaki Chellam-Rajendra T 8595 1258 For all Lamp editorial enquiries, letters and diary dates: Editorial Enquiries T 8595 1234 E lamp@nswnurses.asn.au M 50 O’Dea Avenue, Waterloo NSW 2017

What’s on

NSWNA 66th Annual Conference 14 Organising for Safe Patient Care 20 Dancing queens

NSWNA Professional Day

NSWNA matters 42 NSWNA Branch News

Regular columns 5 Editorial by Brett Holmes 6 Your letters to The Lamp 37 Ask Judith 39 Nurses online 41 Nursing research online 45 Books 47 Our nursing crossword 48 Diary dates

Competition 31 Win fabulous MBT shoes

18 Nurses must embrace IT

Special offers

Industrial issues

44 Win 25 double passes to The Guard and 15 double passes to Beginners

22 O’Farrell put nurses’ conditions at risk 28 Wards converting to the new system 30 Bringing nurses back 33 Strike action at Macquarie

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The Lamp Editorial Committee Brett Holmes, NSWNA General Secretary Judith Kiejda, NSWNA Assistant General Secretary Coral Levett, NSWNA President John Lyons, Baradine MPS Roz Norman, Tamworth Base Hospital Elsie May Henson, Barraba Multi Purpose Service Peg Hibbert, Hornsby & Ku-Ring-Gai Hospital Michelle Cashman, Long Jetty Continuing Care Richard Noort, Justice Health Advertising Patricia Purcell T 8595 2139 or 0416 259 845 F 9662 1414 E ppurcell@nswnurses.asn.au Records and Information Centre – Library To find old articles in The Lamp, or to borrow from the NSWNA library’s nursing and health collection, contact: Jeannette Bromfield, RIC Coordinator T 8595 2175 E gensec@nswnurses.asn.au The lamp ISSN: 0047-3936 General disclaimer The Lamp is the official magazine of the NSWNA. Views expressed in articles are contributors’ own and not necessarily those of the NSWNA. Statements of fact are believed to be true, but no legal responsibility is accepted for them. All material appearing in The Lamp is covered by copyright and may not be reproduced without prior written permission. The NSWNA takes no responsibility for the advertising appearing herein and it does not necessarily endorse any products advertised. Privacy Privacy statement: The NSWNA collects personal information from members in order to perform our role of representing their industrial and professional interests. We place great emphasis on maintaining and enhancing the privacy and security of your personal information. Personal information is protected under law and can only be released to someone else where the law requires or where you give permission. If you have concerns about your personal information please contact the NSWNA office. If you are still not satisfied that your privacy is being maintained you can contact the Privacy Commission. Subscriptions Free to all Association members. Professional members can subscribe to the magazine at a reduced rate of $50. Individuals $73, Institutions $120, Overseas $130.


DON’T PUT YOUR NSWNA MEMBERSHIP AT RISK! The State Government could at any time stop payroll deductions. As a matter of urgency please convert to the Direct Debit or Credit method of paying your fees.

BE PREPARED. CHANGE TODAY. Download, complete and return your Direct Debit form to the Association.

www.nswnurses.asn.au Alternatively call us on Metro 8595 1234 or Rural 1300 367 962 Authorised by B Holmes NSW Nurses’ Association. 4 THE LAMP august 2011


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e d i t o r i a l BY BRETT HOLMES GENERAL SECRETARY

Attracting nurses back to the system g Our nurse-to-patient ratios campaign delivered funding for around 1,400 extra nurses for our Public Health System. Now, we need to attract nurses back into the system.

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rganising for safe patient care was the theme of our annual conference just concluded at Randwick race­course. It is a theme that en­ capsulates the challenge that now lies before us in the Public Health System: implementing the ratios package and making it work so we are able to deliver better patient care in a safer environment. We are aware we will have to fight all the way to have the ratios put in place properly. There has been a slow uptake to the first tranche of positions that have become available. First and foremost, this is an indict­ ment of the feeble efforts by NSW Health to advertise the positions. The funding has been made available by Treasury and we expect the Department to pull out all the stops to attract nurses back to the profession. The NSWNA is committed to doing what we can to make this happen. We have just started TV advertising to inform the public that our nurse-to-patient ratios campaign was successful in winning the funding for more nurses and that this should translate into better patient care. The ads also aim to alert nurses who have left the profession that there are a large number of new jobs available and the implementation of the ratios will make our Public Health System a better place to work.

Barry O’Farrell’s new laws will not help to bring nurses back Attracting nurses back into the profession should be a high priority for the State Government as well as NSW Health, but

There has been a slow uptake to the first tranche of positions … and the difficulty in finding nurses is now complicated by Barry O’Farrell’s new IR laws. the difficulty in finding nurses is now com­ plicated by Barry O’Farrell’s new IR laws. Last month, we reported in The Lamp that the new Liberal Government has virtually legislated a wage freeze well below the rate of inflation and stripped the power of the NSW IR Commission to arbitrate fairly and independently in wage

negotiations. This effectively gives all power to management during pay campaigns. Since then, the Government has introduced regulations that give it the power to unilaterally roll back public sector work conditions that can include penalty rates, annual leave loading and study leave, among many others (see p 22). We are not saying the Govern­­ment will do these things automatically, but it has given itself the muscle to do so if it wants to, at whim. This is an unnecessary and unhealthy appropriation of power. It is alarming considering the track record of Liberal governments on industrial relations. It does raise an important question: how will this deeply ideological agenda improve the quality of our public services? In particular, how will a wage freeze and a possible diminution of conditions alleviate the long-standing shortage of nurses that has been a key problem for our Public Health System? There are other unnecessary obstacles for nurses who want to return to nursing. The Association has been made aware of several cases of nurses who have been out of the profession for a little over five years to have a family, and whose pathway back to the workplace has been blocked by the dogmatic application of ‘recency of practice’ requirements coupled with exorbitant course costs. The State Government, NSW Health and all other bodies responsible for the delivery of quality healthcare need to prioritise and facilitate the return of nurses to the profession so we can finally get our Public Health System back on track.n THE LAMP august 2011 5


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letter of the month Thank you and goodbye I thank you The Association for acknowledging my resignation. I will not be returning to nursing as a result of injury incurred on the job. My great thanks goes to the Asso­ ciation for its support through an eightyear battle. My thanks to the Association’s solicitors who helped me stay focused, believed in me and negotiated a result. After my experience I can understand why people often don’t report work injuries or problems because the process can be drawn out, draining and at times very threatening. I can only say to other nurses that if you are not in an association, get into one as soon as possible because it is nigh on impossible to fight work claims on your own. I wish the Association well in its future endeavours. Robert Jackson, former CNC Robert Jackson won the prize for this month’s letter of the month, a $50 Coles Myer voucher.

letter of the month

The letter judged the best each month will be awarded a $50 Coles Myer voucher courtesy of Moore Equipment. Clever carts to help clever nurses. For details on the range of clax carts please visit www.moore equipmentcom.au or call (02) 9519 5540

Every letter published receives the Sydney Morning Herald and Sun Herald delivered 7 days a week for 26 weeks Subscribe to the Herald today to save 41% off the newsstand price and enjoy the convenience of the paper delivered to your home each morning. Visit www.subscribe. smh.com.au/lamp for more details. 6 THE LAMP august 2011

Helen Blacklaws

Short memories The current threat by the O’Farrell Govern­ ment to nurses’ pay is of great concern, and an issue I’m sure the NSWNA will continue to work against on our behalf. But, for those who voted this government in: What did you expect? Are memories so short that John Howard’s WorkChoices legislation was forgotten? Helen Blacklaws, Nurse Practitioner

Grateful patient I’m not a nurse but like most of us I have been a patient more than once. I would just like to say a big thank you for taking on the Government and gaining so many extra nurses for the benefit of both nurses and patients. There are those who do not understand that what you do cannot be measured in ‘efficiency dividends’ or expressed in dollar terms. The fight must have been hard. Thank you. Kate Ward, Harden, NSW

The true value of the Union In January this year I needed the help of the Union to resolve a work issue. I would just like to pass on my heartfelt thanks to the NSWNA staff members who helped resolve my issue. I could not have gained the outcome without their help, guidance, patience, understanding and genuine concern. Many, many thanks to them and everyone at the Association. I have been a member for several years and always find everyone extremely helpful. This is not the first time I have needed the help of the NSWNA and it will probably not be the last. Keep up the great work. Jenny Amor, CNS

Gordon Blair

NSW Health mismanages criminal record checks As a Registered Nurse of almost 20 years, I have experienced first hand the deteriorating efficiency of NSW Health to manage the recruitment of nurses of all grades into public health positions. My current situation has seen me waiting two full months for a criminal record check (CRC) to be returned. I am waiting, and so are the public hospitals to which I have applied for employment. So much for the promises of quickly and efficiently filling the many vacancies made available by the recent ratios campaign by the Association. NSW Health has mismanaged CRCs for over 10 years now. I recall, in 1998, when the legislation first began to consider all nurses as criminals until proved otherwise, I was able to commence employment while awaiting the official result of the check. These days, I am waiting between two and three months, which causes me to lose virtually every job I apply for, as the employers consider there must be ‘something wrong’ with my integrity, and employ overseas nurses, as their CRCs seem to be able to be cleared in 48 hours. So much for NSW Health supporting local nurses! I would be very pleased to see the Association take up this issue, and engage with NSW Health, in order to streamline the CRC process into a faster, more efficient process. This will assist nurses of all grades to get to work in our Public Health System quicker than is currently the case. Gordon Blair, RN

Gotto something say?

Send your letters to: Editorial Enquiries email lamp@nswnurses.asn.au fax 9662 1414 mail 50 O’Dea Avenue, Waterloo NSW 2017 Please include a photograph along with your name, address, phone and membership number. Letters may be edited for clarity and space.


Charles Linsell

Nurses must take a stand on issues such as gay marriage I am a life member of the Association. This means I have retired from working as a nurse but I have the honour of being invited to the Annual Conference of the NSWNA. I cannot speak or vote, which is appropriate, as, unlike the Delegates to Conference, no one elected me to do so. I can, however, write. At this year’s Conference a motion was carried that declared the NSWNA’s support for the rights of people other than those in a traditional male and female relationship to marry their partner. I was very pleased to see the motion carried and thus become the formal position of our Union. I admit that I was concerned it may not prevail, which may have resulted in the contrary view being perceived as the position of the nurses of NSW. But there was no need to worry as the motion was one of the better written and was virtually unamendable. Further, the case for it was prosecuted with commendable skill. What really annoyed me was the resurrection of very old, utterly indefensible arguments offered against the motion, which had nothing to do with the substance of the matter. Please, please, don’t let me hear them again. If Delegates or their members have a moral or ideological view that gay

people should not be allowed to marry, they should ‘come out’ and say so. The first of these myths is that as a union we should only be involved in matters of direct industrial concern. Rubbish. We, as the Union that represents thousands of nurses, have not only a right but a duty to speak out and to develop a collective position on matters of social justice. We must communicate our views to our national Union, the ANF, to the wider union movement, to politicians, State and Federal, and anyone else who is listening. Everyone should know what nurses think about immigration policy, Indigenous affairs, climate change and a host of other matters that need to be addressed. Sure, it is parliaments that make the laws but these laws are not made in a vacuum. The second nonsense is to use the argument that we should not divert our attention and resources from the main game: the pursuit of better wages and conditions for our members. Of course this is core business. Yet it costs virtually nothing in dollar terms to stand up and be counted on, and indeed lead opinion on, matters of social justice. If we do not do these things we will be rightly viewed as self-interested and self-serving. It would be a disgraceful waste of power. Charles Linsell

The trouble with Tuesdays You may be finding it hard to talk to our infor­mation officers on Tuesdays. This is because Tuesday is the one day of the week when all our staff are in the office for staff and team meetings. These meetings are essential for information distribution and planning activities. If at all possible, please don’t ring on this day as there can be considerable delays. But if you need urgent assistance, you will get it. Our information department receives approxi­mately 900 calls per week, and the phones are ringing hot from 8.30am to 5pm. NSWNA Information Officers are available until 5pm.

NSW Nurses’ Association gratefully acknowledges the sponsorship provided by the following companies for our Annual Conference held at the AJC Randwick 20, 21 & 22 July 2011. First State Super HESTA Super Fund Health Industry Plan Offset Alpine Printing Scott & Broad Pty Ltd Angel Mah-Chut Architects Fuji Xerox Commonwealth Bank Chifley Financial Services Behaviour Change The Shannon Company

The Association also thanks the following companies for their contribution and assistance. Back Vintage Wine Berocca DB Health Heritage Brands Forte Brands Galderma Lindt Chocolate ME Bank Nivea Nuance Duty Free Polyflor Mints Tulsi Teas Wet Ones

We are working hard to meet your needs and thank you for your patience. Call 8595 1234 (metro) or 1300 367 962 (non-metro). THE LAMP august 2011 7


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n e w s i inn bbrri ieeff

Participate

in your local

Hospital

Clinical Council

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SW Health is implementing a peer selection process for nurses and other eligible clinicians to participate in their local Hospital Clinical Council. Hospital Clinical Councils have been introduced statewide to provide a consistent structure across NSW Health for improving clinician involvement in local decision-making. A position on each Hospital Clinical Council has been reserved for a peer-selected nurse member. Nurses working in NSW Health will be eligible to nominate themselves. Both nominations and the peer selection process will occur through an online voting system that can be accessed from any computer with internet access. Nominations and peer selections will be undertaken in three regional groups with nominations for northern region hospitals commencing on 29 August, western region hospitals commencing on 12 September, and southern region hospitals commencing on 26 September 2011. Nurses who are appointed to their local Hospital Clinical Council through the peer selection process will also form part of a shortlist for the Health Minister’s consideration when selecting clinical members of Local Health District Boards. ‘The NSWNA encourages members to get involved as this is a chance to have influence in their local Hospital Clinical Council,’ said NSWNA General Secretary Brett Holmes. Comprehensive information, in­cluding more detailed information about your local Hospital Clinical Council, eligibility to par­ticipate and the selection process, is available at www. health.nsw.gov.au/peerselection.

8 THE LAMP august 2011

Nurses can print registration certificates online

Protest against income management at Bankstown

Nurses, along with other Australian health practitioners, can now print their own copy of their Certificate of Registration in a new online service launched by the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA) in July. AHPRA Chief Executive Officer Martin Fletcher said the health practitioner information on the Certificate of Registra­tion copy would be taken directly from the National Register of Health Practitioners. According to Mr Fletcher, the new service was developed in response to practitioner demand and gives practitioners the ability to supply a Certificate of Registration – for example, for employer records or to support a skills assessment application for visa purposes. This new service complements the Certificate of Registration, which AHPRA will continue to send all health practitioners when they renew their registration on an annual basis. Mr Fletcher confirmed that the National Register remained the real-time source of registration information about all registered practitioners. ‘Employers should always refer to the online National Register to access the most up-to-date information’, he said. A subscription service for employers to bulk-check employee registration is available on the AHPRA website (www. ahpra.gov.au). Health practitioners can check their details on the National Register by following the link on the home page and using their name and profession to search the Register. The printed certificate of registration is clearly labelled as a copy produced from the National Register. ‘The service prints the information held on the National Register at the time and records the date it was printed. The certificate also directs users to the online public register for the most up-to-date registration information,’ said Mr Fletcher. Nurses will need to use their unique user ID and password provided by AHPRA to print a copy of their Certificate of Registration. To print a copy of the certificate, visit www.ahpra.gov.au

NSWNA members are invited to support a campaign to protest against the Federal Government’s Income Management initiative in Bankstown. Announced as part of the 2011 Federal Budget, the Government plans to spend $117 million over the next five years to introduce Income Management to five ‘disadvantaged’ areas, including Bankstown in NSW. Begin­ ning from 1 July 2012, Income Management is a policy that ‘quarantines’ 50-70% of Centrelink payments onto a BasicsCard, which can only be used to buy ‘priority’ items at government-approved stores. Critics argue the scheme stigmatises and humiliates people who are already vulnerable to financial stress. ‘I believe that nurses need to be informed and then take action on the issue if they see fit,’ said NSWNA Assistant General Secretary Judith Kiejda. Visit the campaign website at www. sayno2gim.info/ to find out how you can help protest the scheme.

NSWNA photographic competition Over the past three years the Association has held very successful International Nurses’ Day Film Festivals. These will continue but the next one will be held in 2013. NIDA introductory courses will still be conducted so, if you are interested in attending, please keep an eye on upcoming issues of The Lamp for details. For International Nurses’ Day 2012 the NSWNA will be running a ‘Nurses at Work’ photographic competition. We know we have a lot of creative and talented members who will be keen to show off their photographic skills. An exhibition of selected works will be shown at the Association’s offices on a date to be announced. Full details will be available in the September issue of The Lamp.


Sydney Alliance supports aged care g The Sydney Alliance, an alliance of more than 30 community organisations, religious organisations, and unions from across Sydney, will soon launch, with aged care, community care, and mental health care top on its agenda. The Alliance has nominated ‘community care, health and support’ as its key theme, with the issues of strong aged care and mental health support two areas of particular concern for its members. After two years of building membership and training members, Sydney Alliance will formally launch on 15 September at the Sydney Town Hall. The Sydney Alliance aims to take action to achieve a fair, just and sustainable city. It will do this by providing opportunities for people to take action and have a say in the decisions that affect them. The Sydney Alliance is a non-party-political organisation. NSWNA Assistant General Secretary Judith Kiejda said the NSWNA had decided to become a member of the Sydney Alliance because it was a good opportunity to share the concerns of the NSWNA and members with the broader community, and join with other community groups to achieve change. ‘Many of our concerns, such as aged care and mental health, are shared by other Sydney Alliance members – but perhaps from a different perspective. For example, aged care is something that affects most people at some stage. They could have family in care or about to enter a nursing home.’ At an Assembly in May, the Sydney Alliance nominated its key agendas for action: community care, health and support; transport; and social inclusion. This agenda will be launched at the Founding Assembly on the 15 September 2011. ‘All three agendas are relevant to NSWNA members both in their work and in their communities,’ said Judith. The theme ‘community care, health and support’ encompasses ageing – access to quality care and affordability; mental health; childcare quality, cost and availability; and pay equity and the community sector. ‘The focus of Sydney Alliance on aged care strongly complements the themes and objectives of the Because we care campaign,’ said Judith. NSWNA members are encouraged to

attend the Sydney Alliance launch at 7pm on 15 September at Sydney Town Hall. For more information, visit the Sydney Alliance website www.sydneyalliance.org.au.

UK hospitals could lose nearly 100,000 nurses Royal College of Nursing (RCN) research has pre­dicted that up to 100,000 nursing jobs in England could be lost over the next 10 years. According to the new research, up to 28% of England’s nursing workforce could be in jeopardy under a ‘worstcase scenario’, which could affect approximately 99,000 nurses out of 352,104 RNs currently working. The research was conducted by the Queen Margaret University under the leadership of Professor James Buchan, who is also an adjunct professor at the University of Technology in Sydney. It examines the vulnerability of NHS nurse staffing numbers to policy changes. The RCN has warned that ‘even a small percentage change in the number of training places or nurses taking retirement is likely to have a serious long-term effect on nursing numbers and ultimately patient care’. ‘The impact of any such policy change on nursing staff numbers will be magnified by the current cuts in nursing posts, which underlines the danger of not addressing job cuts now,’ the RCN said in a statement. It is calling for the Department of Health to set out a clear strategy for the National Health Service (NHS) workforce over the next 10 years, with a renewed emphasis on staffing levels. It has also identified almost 40,000 posts that are earmarked to be lost over the next three years across the NHS in the UK. RCN Chief Executive Dr Peter Carter outlined his concerns in a recent statement, saying that the report highlights the ‘truly shocking scale’ of job losses. ‘A loss of more than a quarter of the nur­­sing work­­force would be hugely dama­ging to pa­tient care,’ he said. ‘We are concerned that many trusts are making staffing cuts to save money. How­ ever, it is cri­­ti­­cal to pa­tient safe­ty that changes to staf­fing levels and skill mix are only made using evi­­dence in line with patient needs rather than as a knee-jerk response to financial pressures.’

s Appropriate Workplace Behaviour – 1 day 25 August, Albury 22 September, Coffs Harbour 5 October, Armidale Members $85 Non Members $170 s Stress Management – 1 day 9 August, Waterloo Members $85 Non Members $170 s Legal & Professional Issues for Nurses and Midwives – ½ day 12 August, Coffs Harbour 9 September, Wagga Wagga 16 September, Tamworth 30 September, Port Macquarie Members $39 Non Members $85 s Basic Foot Care for RNs & ENs – 2 days 17 & 18 August, Newcastle 13 & 14 October, Armidale Members $203 Non Members $350 s Basic Foot Care for AiNs – 1 Day 12 September, Wagga Wagga Members $85 Non Members $150.00 s ‘Workshopping’ CPD for RNs & ENs 6 October, Coffs Harbour Members $75 Non Members $170 s Nurse Practitioner Forum – 1 day 19 August, Waterloo Members $30 Non Members $50 s Mental Health Nurses Forum – 1 day 21 September, Waterloo Members $30 Non Members $50 s Aged Care Nurses Forum – 1 day 21 October, Waterloo Members $30 Non Members $50

TO REGISTER or for more information go to www.nswnurses.asn.au or 9ring THE LAMP august 2011 Carolyn Kulling on 1300 367 962


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Protect your membership

Go Direct Debit

At Conference, delegates were given Direct Debit kits and were asked to convert members on payroll deductions.

g Members and the NSWNA face a major risk that the Liberal State Government could stop payroll deductions and block members’ union fees reaching the NSWNA. Without warning it happened under the Kennett Government in Victoria. If it happens in NSW members may lose industrial protection and the NSWNA financial security. Direct Debit is the only way to ensure all members have union protection, and the NSWNA remains strong and able to campaign on members’ behalf. A major campaign was launched at Annual Conference to convert members to the Direct Debit method of paying their union fees. 10 THE LAMP august 2011


NSWNA Assistant General Secretary Judith Kiejda launched the Direct Debit campaign at Conference.

Direct Debit campaign announced at conference

T

he NSWNA and members achieved a huge win in the campaign for nurse-topatient ratios. It was achieved because of the commitment of members, and also because of a strong Association with good membership. The ability of the NSWNA to win campaigns like nurse ratios and good pay rises will be severely at risk if the O’Farrell Government stops payroll deductions. This Liberal State Government

deduction. Delegates will ask these members to convert to Direct Debit. Brett Holmes told delegates: ‘Payroll deductions can be stopped at whim by Barry O’Farrell. If this happens it could leave the NSWNA in a critical situation. We won’t be able to run the campaigns of recent years that have delivered significant pay rises to nurses and midwives and industrial or professional achievements such as the nurse ratios campaign. ‘We can’t be beholden to the O’Farrell

If you pay your Union fees by payroll deductions, see your workplace delegate, who will assist you in converting your payment method to Direct Debit. has already attacked the pay and conditions of public sector workers with new workplace laws. Another tactic the Government may use to weaken unions is to abolish workers’ right to pay their union fees by payroll deduction. To ensure members and the NSWNA are protected from such an attack, a major campaign was launched at Annual Conference to convert members to the Direct Debit method of paying their union fees. Delegates were given kits that contained Direct Debit forms and a listing of members at their workplace who are still paying their fees by payroll

Government. We saw what happened under the Kennett Government in Victoria: payroll deductions were ceased overnight. It caused havoc for public sector workers and public sector unions. ‘The NSWNA needs delegates’ assistance in taking the Direct Debit campaign to their workplaces. I urge all public sector delegates to approach members at your workplaces who are still paying their union fees by payroll deductions. Ask them to switch to the Direct Debit method of paying their union fees to ensure we are not beholden to the whim of the O’Farrell Government.’n

members can help keep our union strong you pay your 1 IfUnion fees by payroll deductions, see your workplace delegate, who will assist you in converting your payment method to Direct Debit.

2 You can also help by

asking members at your workplace how they pay their NSWNA fees. If they pay their fees by payroll deduction, ask them to switch to Debit Debit. Ask your workplace delegate for a Direct Debit form or ring the Association on 1300 367 962 for Direct Debit forms.

THE LAMP august 2011 11


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‘We need to make sure the Association is not disadvantaged.’ Bernard O’Flaherty, RN, Sydney Western Community Mental Health

Roslyn Cook, RN at Macksville Health Campus (left) and Jacqui Holmes, CNS, MW, Blacktown Hospital

Delegates will be asking members to go Direct Debit

Ruth Rowe, Gunnedah District Hospital

‘All of my Branch is on payroll deductions. I’ll be taking back forms and personally giving them to members. I’ll explain how important it is to go Direct Debit.’ Matthew Lawler, EEN, Bellingen River District Hospital

Peter Jeffree, DON, Casino and District Memorial Hospital 12 THE LAMP august 2011

‘We’re facing a new hostile industrial environment. I’ll be strongly encouraging members to switch over to protect their industrial and professional rights.’ Gil Wilson, CNS, Lismore Base Hospital


Wendy Nunns, EEN, Canowindra Soldiers Memorial Hospital

‘Almost all of my Branch is payroll. I’m going away from conference and asking them to convert to Direct Debit. I’ll be explaining that the Government could bring in changes that threaten their membership. Direct Debit is also more convenient.’

‘With the potential threat of payroll deductions being cancelled, it’s very necessary to go Direct Debit.’ Lyn Murphy, CNS, Mid Western Mental Health

Delegates switch to Direct Debit

Margaret Berry, EEN, Walgett Community Health

Switching to Direct Debit is easy

2

Direct Debit ensures you have union protection when you need it. It’s also the most convenient method of paying your union fees.

2

All you have to do is fill in a Direct Debit form. Ask your workplace delegate for a Direct Debit form or ring the Association on 1300 367 962.

2

Don’t forget to post your form to the NSWNA at 50 O’Dea St, Waterloo 2017, or via fax 9662 1414.

‘I’ll be encouraging members to go Direct Debit to protect the financial security of the NSWNA.’ Patricia O’Neill, AiN, Nimbin MPS (left), with Sandra MacDonald-D’Silva, RN, Port Kembla Hospital THE LAMP august 2011 13


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NSWNA 66th annual conference

Organising for Safe Patient Care g Organising for Safe Patient Care was the theme of this year’s annual conference attended by over 400 delegates, representing NSWNA members at workplaces across NSW. Two days of evocative presentations and lively discussion examined how we can build on the major achievements of the nurse-to-patient ratios campaign; and how we can prepare ourselves and protect nurses and their union against the risks posed by a Liberal State Government that has already moved to attack public sector workers’ rights.

14 THE LAMP august 2011


General Secretary warns of threats TO NURSES

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n his address to annual conference, NSWNA General Secretary Brett Holmes warned delegates of the se­ rious threats to nurses and their union posed by the new Liberal Govern­ ment, which has already moved to attack public sector workers’ rights. ‘The State election changed the face of the State Government. The new Liberal Government had only been in office 50 days before it launched an attack on public sector workers. The O’Farrell Government wiped out the right of the Industrial Relations Commission to arbitrate during new Award cases when we’re unable to negotiate. ‘Most industrial and professional gains of the past hinged on the Industrial Relations Commission playing a part. We are completely stifled now,’ said Brett.

NSWNA General Secretary Brett Holmes

‘The new workplace legislation is so broad and has only left eight protected areas that can’t be bargained away in order to achieve a wage rise. ‘The new legislation and regulations will have massive impact on all our futures.’ Brett commended the magnificent response from members and support from the community in protesting against these attacks. Delegates received a rousing message of support, via video link, from Linda Silas and the Canadian Nurses’ Association. Brett also commended members who campaigned so hard to win nurseto-patient ratios in public hospitals. ‘One hundred and eighty Branches voted “yes” to take action to achieve ratios and this was pivotal. ‘We had to fight to get ratios, and we will continue to fight to see them implemented,’ said Brett. ‘Nurse-topatient ratios will see improvements in the health system.’n

No case for wage attack

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ata compiled by Dr John Buchanan of the University of Sydney’s Workplace Research Centre dispels the myths that public sector workers are part of the financial woes of NSW. In his address to annual conference, Dr Buchanan explained to delegates the results of his research comparing public sector nurses’ wages to other state and private sector nurses, and examining whether public sector wage increases have led to a wage blowout in NSW. ‘There are unequivocally problems in the Public Health System but nurses are not part of the problem. ‘Government arguments that public sector wage increases have led to a wage blowout are not supported by data. The data reveals that public sector workers are not overpaid and there is no wage blowout.’ Dr Buchanan explained that between 1997 and 2010 NSW public sector nurses’ wages had increased an average of 4.2%. ‘Treasury’s presentation of public sector wage increases is deceptive. Wages oscillated between 4-8% – nothing like 23% as the Government is claiming. You need to compare like with like.’

Dr Buchanan explained the need to compare NSW public sector nurses to workers with similar characteristics. ‘A superficial comparison of public verses private wages finds an 8% difference. However, 7% can be attributed to greater level of qualifications, skills, tenure and experience among public sector nurses compared to the private sector.

‘There are unequivocally problems in the public health system but nurses are not part of the problem.’ ‘When you line up the facts, there’s essentially no difference in public and private sector wages. Nor is there a great difference in what NSW nurses are paid compared to public sector nurses in other states.’ According to Dr Buchanan’s research, there is a major disconnect between wages and productivity.

Dr John Buchanan

‘The data shows that public sector workers are not overpaid. There’s no wage blowout. The key problem is the distribution of prosperity. ‘Science is on your side. There’s no validity in the O’Farrell Government’s claim that NSW can’t afford to pay public sector workers. ‘You are right to feel outrage at the new laws,’ he said.n THE LAMP august 2011 15


Are your workmates or friends members of the NSWNA? Why not ask them. And, if not, invite them to sign up. Like you, they need the security of belonging to a strong and dynamic union. Not only will you be building your union by signing up new members, you and a friend could win this fabulous cruise to the Great Barrier Reef. The more members you sign up, the more chances you have to win! Prize includes return airfares for two from Sydney, a seven-night cruise of the fabulous Barrier Reef in a stateroom on the beautiful Coral Sea Princess Cruises. Multi-award-winning Coral Princess Cruises will introduce the lucky prize winner to Australia’s most famous natural wonder: the Great Barrier Reef. With over 28 years’ experience and an unrivalled reputation for cruising excellence, their exclusive itineraries

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16 THE LAMP august 2011

showcase the very best of the Great Barrier Reef and tropical islands in total comfort and unmatched style. You’ll enjoy the hidden jewels of the Great Barrier Reef: the reef, ancient rainforest and secluded tropical islands most visitors never see. Exclusive reef moorings mean you won’t be surrounded by hundreds of other reef visitors – and the company’s small ships accommodate a maximum of just 44 guests, ensuring an intimate and personalised experience. You can be as adventurous or as relaxed as you please. Explore remote coral cays, deserted but for a myriad of colourful tropical fish, peaceful tropical islands and primordial rainforests well beyond the reach of most visitors, or simply relax on the sun deck or in the open-bridge or spa and cruise serenely through some of the most aweinspiring scenery Australia has to offer. Coral Princess Cruises’ informative crew is always on hand to provide assistance and information about the fascinating reef life and habitats, and an experienced dive instructor can take you for an exhilarating introductory scuba dive, revealing even

more of this breathtaking world heritage-listed wonderland. Three, four and seven-night cruises depart Cairns and Townsville each week, all year round. A special 10% discount is available to NSW Nurses’ Association members on the company’s range of small ship cruises on the Great Barrier Reef, Western Australia’s Kimberley, Across the Top of Australia, Papua New Guinea, Melanesia and New Zealand.

HURRY! Call the Association now for a recruitment kit and recruitment incentive scheme details. Phone 8595 1234 (metropolitan area) or 1300 367 962 (rural) or go to www.nswnurses.asn.au RECRUITERS NOTE: nurses and midwives can now join online! If you refer a new member to join online, make sure you ask them to put your name and workplace on the online application form. You will then be entitled to your vouchers and draw/s in the NSWNA Recruitment Incentive Scheme.


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NSWNA 66th annual conference

Skinner promises to honour ratios but sticks by wage freeze

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n her address to the NSWNA annual conference, the new Health Minister Jillian Skinner said her Government would honour the gains won by nurses in the last Public Sector Memorandum of Understanding but was defiant in her support for the Government’s new wages policy. ‘The O’Farrell Government is committed to meeting the agreements (negotiated by the NSWNA with the previous Labor government) including patient ratios and wages,’ she said. ‘I’m pleased to hear from nurses that they are looking forward to the roll out of the extra numbers to which I am fully committed.’ The Minister batted away delegates’ strong concerns about the Government’s IR laws. ‘I’m not against negotiating increased productivity for increased pay,’ she said. Ms Skinner said one of her highest priorities will be dealing with the culture of bullying in public hospitals and that she had asked for a redrafted staff code of conduct. ‘We must create a more harmonious

environment where values are shared. We need a supportive environment free of bullying and where everybody is respected.’

We’ll fight for our rights

Health Minister Jillian Skinner

In response, NSWNA General Secretary Brett Holmes said the weakening of the IR Commission and the attack on nurses’ wages would not go unanswered. ‘Our members will continue to fight for their rights through the restoration of arbitration,’ he said. ‘One thing about this union is that we are serious about delivering safe patient care. Safe patient care is the bottom line.’ Brett was scathing of the Government’s and NSW Health’s feeble attempts at recruitment of the extra nurses required to meet the ratios. ‘The system is aimed at delaying recruitment and seeing if people can do without,’ he said. ‘I will announce a campaign by the NSWNA to replace the inactivity of the Department and deal with recruitment.’n

THE LAMP august 2011 17


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Nurses must embrace IT g Nurses need to be involved in the design and implementation of new technology in the workplace, according to speakers at the NSWNA Professional Day.

Invent your future Update on e-health records Professor Sohail Inayatullah, health futurist and scientist, kicked off Professional Day by outlining some key innovations in the future of nursing. Sohail said the ‘next big thing’ in IT was Health 3.0: the use of affordable devices to measure what is appropriate to your health. For example, if you have a hamburger, the device will tell you how much water has been used to create it, and what it does to your body or health. Patients will have to ask whether they can afford to have the hamburger if they have health insurance and the insurance company may not pay out if eating the hamburger is going to give them a heart attack. ‘Apps such as the iStethoscope, which can listen to your heart, lungs and bowel sounds, record them and send to your GP, are already available,’ he said. ‘The iPhone is gradually not being seen as just a phone but as a health device.’ Sohail predicts devices that can map out people’s emotional states. ‘You’ll be able to locate where the “bliss spots” are in a building. We’re starting in this direction – it’s about 10 or 20 years away,’ he said.

18 THE LAMP august 2011

By 1 July next year, the frame­works underpinning the national e-health system will be in place, according to Peter Fleming, CEO of the National E-Health Transition Authority (NEHTA). Its aim is to connect systems so medical practitioners can send and receive information easily. ‘Pilots are taking place in regards to secure messaging between the Northern Territory and South Australia at the moment, and IBM has the contract to create the authentication system,’ said Peter. When asked how the rollout of the e-health system would affect nurses, he said it would change the information nurses will have available as well as impacting on workloads. ‘We are putting in place partners to map out the workflow issues for nurses.’ Peter allayed one delegate’s fears that money for the new system would put addi­ tional pressure on local healthcare budgets. ‘There has been substantial provision of funds for e-health – around $880 million from the Federal Government and COAG combined. We’re not looking to put pres­ sure on local healthcare budgets,’ he said.

Nursing informatics: Educate yourselves ‘Nurses are not afraid of techno­logy. May­be they were five years ago but not now. We must debunk this myth,’ said Julianne Oorloff, Chair of the Victorian Branch of Health Informatics Society of Australia. According to the American Nurses’ Association, nursing informatics is a speciality that interlinks nursing science, computer science and information science to effectively manage communications data. ‘Nursing is information-intensive and dependent. Technology can help us in decision-making, with communi­ cations and enhance collaboration with other professionals ... But nurses need IT skills; they need training in information and communications technology,’ said Julianne. ‘Nurses are in the best position to refine and develop e-health systems. In our workplaces we link the workflow. We need to consider what the process is and have the language and tools to describe it. Systems are tools – they will only work if you give them the right information.’


Showcasing e-innovation Three speakers offered delegates the chance to see e-innovation in action.

Video-conferenced Nursing Grand Rounds

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Make technology work for you Nurses need to overcome their barriers of scepti­ cism when it comes to IT and start collecting and analysing patient data, said Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officer at NSW Health, Debra Thoms. ‘Analysing data enables nurses to make decisions on patient care,’ she said. In addition to being involved in the process of the design of the IT systems at healthcare facilities, nurses must also be trained in IT skills. ‘Anecdotally, IT training is low. We need greater investment in education and training. Younger nurses coming into the profession will expect good IT systems and if they are not in place, this may impact retention,’ said Debra. However, nurses should not become so dependent on technology that they start to mistrust their own judgement, she warned. ‘Simulation and virtual technology are complementary to bedside care.’n

enny Preece, a rural health generalist, who has been a community nurse for 25 years in Dorrigo on the NSW North Coast, introduced the concept of Nursing Grand Rounds to link nurses working in rural health facilities for networking purposes. ‘The plan was to link eight sites each month in which nurses gave a Powerpoint presentation of challenging cases, including problems and lessons learned. Then to have a Q&A at the end, after the presentations,’ said Jenny. ‘The aim was to stimulate reflection on clinical care and share information between sites that had similar issues.’ Jenny stressed the importance of the nurses taking charge of the initiative. ‘We had to get local champions – rural nurses had to want it, drive it and own it,’ she said. The outcome of Nursing Grand Rounds was that networking became an accepted form of non-threatening peer review,’ said Jenny.

Home tele-health monitoring

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nvesting in home tele-monitoring systems in clients’ homes makes more effective use of the nursing workforce. This was the message presented to delegates by Kerry Oates from the Royal District Nursing Service (RDNS), the oldest and largest provider of home nursing and healthcare services in Australia. RDNS was one of 19 organisations that formed a national collaboration whose aim was to make better use of the workforce. Nine clients’ homes were installed with tele-monitoring technology to measure their vitals such as weight, lung capacity and blood pressure. The

data was monitored on a daily basis and actions instigated by nurses in the customer service department at RDNS. ‘The aim was to shift the focus from scheduled appointments to targeted appointments based on changes in the clients’ vitals, and to identify exacerbation in client symptoms to reduce visits to the ED,’ said Kerry. ‘Collaboration was very important – we needed GPs to work with us. We achieved self-empowered clients who gained confidence about their health.’

Continuing Professional Development: Do it with the ANF

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f you’re concerned about potential high costs of gaining the required 20 hours of continuing profes­ sional development (CPD) training each year, the ANF has the solution. Jodie Davies, ANF Education Officer, explained the online tutorials available to members of the NSWNA. ‘The online tutorials we have consist of a Powerpoint presentation and a quiz, so you can judge your competency at the end of each tutorial. The quiz is automatically marked by the computer. You get three chances at it to give you the opportunity to get the highest mark,’ said Jodie. ‘Each tutorial is peer-reviewed and automatically appears on your CPD records so it becomes a working resumé. The mandatory tutorials go across both nursing and midwifery. Because it’s online learning you can do it anywhere.’ Each tutorial gives you five points and you get 12 months to complete them. ‘You only have to do four ANF tutorials and you have your 20 points for CDP requirements,’ said Jodie. The cost for members for each tuto­ rial is only $7.70, plus you get a free on­ line professional development portfolio. ‘We are about to add around 44 aged care tutorials and will be also adding more midwifery topics in the future,’ said Jodie. THE LAMP august 2011 19


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NSWNA 66th annual conference

g Wednesday night and the lights were low ‌ looking out for a place to go. That place was the NSWNA Annual Conference Dinner 2011 where the fancy dress theme was iconic pop group Abba. An assortment of Agnethas, Fridas, Bennys and Bjorns rocked up to the event in their best spandex, platform boots and 1970s wigs and danced the night away.

* Super Troupers: NSWNA

President Coral Levett and General Secretary Brett Holmes let their hair down.

)O’Bray Smith (left) and Wayne Baxter from RPAH finally face their Waterloo.

Kerry Rodgers from Nepean Hospital (left) lets out her inner witch, while Lyn Dine from Campbelltown Private Hospital breaks free as Freddie Mercury. 20 THE LAMP august 2011

* Master of

the scene: Peter Mason from Nepean Hospital.


0Several partygoers wore felineinspired outfits in homage to Abba’s famous ‘catsuits’.

* Even punk boys love Abba! Greg Ribbons and Dave Bell from Waratah.

A Mamma Mia! Di Tobias (left) and Lyn Sloane from Bathurst Base Hospital gave Frida and Agnetha a run for their money.

+Christine Butler, Peter Jeffree and Shirley Roach from Casino Hospital brought a literal interpretation to the Abba song ‘Waterloo’.

THE LAMP august 2011 21


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O’Farrell puts nurses’ conditions at risk g The O’Farrell Government now has the power to roll back your hard-fought workplace conditions.

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he O’Farrell Government passed a law that would restrict state sector wage increases to 2.5%. Now the Government has introduced regulations that significantly extend this power over nurses’ and other public sector workers’ workplace conditions. The new workplace regulations give the O’Farrell Government the power to unilaterally roll back workplace conditions including penalty rates, hours of employment and travel allowances. The only conditions that are protected are those enshrined in legislation such as the Fair Work Act. According to Unions NSW, the conditions of employment that are vulnerable under the regulations include:

Luke Marks, RN at Orange Base Hospital, spoke at the Orange Rally.

‘It’s great to see so many different unions here today. It’s great to see so many of us prepared to fight these unjust laws. Just remember: we kicked out Howard, we can do the same with O’Farrell if he doesn’t repeal these laws.’ 22 THE LAMP august 2011

c c c c c c

annual leave loading defined benefit superannuation flex leave shift allowances and meal money lunch breaks training leave and study leave. These types of conditions must be reduced in order to get a wage rise above 2.5%. The Government can now also impose restrictions on these types of conditions on employees. The laws also require that: c no wage increases be back-dated c the savings must be proven to have been achieved before any wage rise above 2.5% is actually paid, even if management has delayed implementing the savings c job cuts don’t count towards savings

Lynne Sloane, NUM Bathurst Base Hospital and Bathurst Base Branch President, spoke at the protest rally against the workplace regulations.

‘I’m not sure where Mr O’Farrell expects us to find savings in the system. I’d like to invite him to come to Bathurst Base Hospital. Let him see the nurses’ workloads, the unpaid overtime we do every day just to keep the hospital going.’

Steve Nott, RN at Dubbo Base Hospital and Branch Vice-President.

‘It’s not up to me to tell this crowd how to vote but come election time we need to remember that our sitting members allowed this disgraceful bill to pass through into law.We may need to vote him out!’ c if extra savings are delivered they will

not necessarily flow into a wage rise. All NSW Liberal MPs voted to pass these laws. As reported in last month’s issue of The Lamp, the Industrial Relations Commission has been stripped of its independence and must now comply with any regulation made by the Government in setting public sector wages and conditions. Only eight conditions of employment cannot be traded off. They include: c 12 months’ unpaid parental leave (from the Fair work Act) c 9% superannuation (from the Superannuation Guarantee legislation) c four weeks’ annual leave (from the Annual Holidays Act) c The 11 standard public holidays (from the Public Holidays Act). Even the notorious WorkChoicesguaranteed casual loadings and minimum hours of work are now vulnerable to roll back by the State Government.n


Take Act!on

Tell your MP Online

Unions NSW and public sector unions have a website ‘Better Services For A Better State’ where you can find information about the new laws and their impact on nurses and other public sector workers. You can also tell your local MP by email of your opposition to the new laws. Go to http://betterstate.org. au/reject-workchoices-take-action/

Change to Direct Debit

The State Government could at any time stop payroll deductions and put at risk your NSWNA membership. If you still pay your union fees by payroll deduction convert now to Direct Debit or Credit. Download a Direct Debit form from the NSWNA website www.nswnurses.asn.au or call us on Metro 8595 1234 or rural 1300 367 962.

Rallies for your rights at work

Unions NSW held rallies outside the offices of MPs who voted to take away the rights of NSW public sector workers throughout July. These rallies will continue throughout August. For more information, visit the NSWNA or Better Services Better State websites.

Key implications of the regulations c There will effectively be a wage freeze for public sector workers including nurses of 2.5%, which is well below the current CPI (inflation rate) of 3.3%.

c To achieve a pay increase over 2.5% nurses will have to make cost savings through trade-offs of other conditions. c The regulations give the O’Farrell Government the power to roll back many important conditions of employ­ment. These include penalty rates, overtime rates, travel al­lowan­ces, meal breaks, hours of work (inclu­ding lunch breaks), and any other con­di­tion in the award or agree­ment that is not protected by the mini­mum conditions of employment in the regulations.

c Even if nurses accept a 2.5% wage increase and not bargain away other conditions of employment, the Government could still have these conditions of employment reduced or removed through new regulations. c If major savings are found through restructuring depart­ ments including redundancies, they may not be included as the ‘employee-related cost savings’ now needed to justify a pay increase beyond 2.5%. THE LAMP august 2011 23


CONVERT TO DIRECT DEBIT AND WIN a $2,000 Union Shopper gift certificate Start paying your NSWNA fees by Direct Debit for the chance to win a $2,000 gift certificate to spend on electrical products of your choice or to put towards a motor vehicle through Union Shopper. What an opportunity! Perhaps it’s that automated coffee machine that you have been wanting for ages, or a new large-screen TV? What about a new mixer or ice cream machine for those budding master chefs in the household? With $2,000 to spend, you could treat every member of the family to something special. Or perhaps you want to put the $2,000 towards a new or used motor vehicle? Union Shopper’s Motor Market consultants use their extensive network of reputable car dealers to ensure members obtain the most competitive price available on their new vehicle and aim for 100% satisfaction with every sale. Visit www.unionshopper.com.au for more information about all the products and services that Union Shopper offers.

HERE’S HOW YOU CAN WIN

*

Cancel your payroll deductions and start paying your fees through direct debit and you will go into the lucky draw and/or

*

Convince your colleagues to convert from payroll deductions to direct debit, and you and each of your colleagues who switch to direct debit will go into the lucky draw and/or

*

Sign up a new member using the direct debit method of paying their fees, and you and the new member will go into the lucky draw.

The State Government could at any time stop payroll deductions as part of new industrial relations laws. As a matter of urgency please convert to the Direct Debit or Credit method of paying your fees. Direct debit is not only the easiest and most convenient way to pay your membership, but switching over could win you a $2,000 gift certificate! Don’t risk your membership lapsing from changing workplaces or from changes in industrial relations laws. With direct debit you are always protected on the job.

Membership Application forms or Direct Debit forms can be downloaded from our website www.nswnurses.asn.au. Alternatively, call us on 8595 1234 (metro area) or 24 1300 367august 962l (non-metro area) for more information. THE LAMP 2011

PRIZE DRAWN 31 DEC 2011


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c Nurses from Tamworth and Werris Creek, along with members of their families, rallied outside local MP Kevin Anderson’s office.

) Nurses marched for their rights, alongside other public-sector workers, at the Tamworth rally, led by NSWNA activist Anne Almagro, RN (pictured in red top and jumper).

Rallies for your rights

0 Dubbo nurses gathered to demand their rights. + After marching through the streets of Orange, nurses attended a rally.

Members from Bathurst Base Branch, Bathurst Correctional Facility and Lithgow Branch got together to rally for their rights. Public sector workers marched through the main street of Orange.

Members of Orange Base, Bloomfield and the Riverside Centre prepared to march through the main street. THE LAMP august 2011 25


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ADHC nurses between a rock and a hard place

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egotiations for a new agree­ ment that covers employees of Ageing, Disability and Home Care have started under the dark cloud of Barry O’Farrell’s new IR laws. There are around 1,200 nurses who are affected by the agreement. The previous ADHC agreement expired on 30 June and uncertainty over the Government’s wage policy led to a delay in talks with NSW Health. Barry O’Farrell’s new laws put ADHC nurses in a difficult position. The ‘choices’ dic­ta­ted to them by the government policy are: c accept a 2.5% pay rise without any trade-offs c trade off other conditions to get more than 2.5% c trade off jobs to get more than 2.5%. NSWNA Secretary Brett Holmes says the ADHC negotiations are a preview of what all public sector nurses can expect from the Government’s wage policy now enshrined in law. ‘Unlike previous bargaining environ­ ments, discussions will no longer be about pay increases for increased productivity. The only option under the government’s laws

are take the 2.5%, or sell off conditions and jobs for a bigger increase,’ he said. Chris Bromley, a NUM at the Riverside Centre and on the ADHC Log of Claims Committee, says the money is a secondary issue to the loss of rights. ‘We don’t want our negotiating power taken away. A good relationship between unions and the Government can be taken away with the stroke of a pen,’ he said. Chris says his worry is that it’s just the beginning. ‘There’s no right of appeal, nor a right to arbitration. The worry is: what’s next? Penalty rates? The erosion of everything unions have fought for?’ Chris says it is baffling that the O’Farrell Government is pursuing these policies considering the robust nature of the Australian economy. ‘It’s terrible that this could happen in such a rich country as Australia. Australia was lucky to come out of the GFC so well. We’re the survivors of the economic downturn. Now public sector workers are being punished. O’Farrell can just say, “This will happen”. Workers’ rights are been taken away, there will be no comeback and no independent umpire.’ Any wage gap that opens up with

Continuing Professional Development courses Maintain your CPD hours with a course a month

Chris Bromley, NUM at the Riverside Centre.

‘There’s no right of appeal, nor a right to arbitration. The worry is: what’s next?’

NSWNA Secretary Brett Holmes

‘The ADHC negotiations are a preview of what all public sector nurses can expect from the Government’s wage policy now enshrined in law.’ the Public Health System will have consequences for ADHC, says Chris. ‘We’re finding it difficult to attract professionals now. We’re screaming out for RNs and ENs. With the increasing gap in wages and the financial situation it will make more sense to go and work in the Public Health System not ADHC, which will make the situation even worse.’ Members working for ADHC are conducting meetings to discuss recommen­da­tions from the Log of Claims committee.n

Selected courses September X-ray interpretation Emergency nursing October Pain management November Drug and alcohol issues Diabetes update

Book your place now 1800 265 534 (1800 COLLEGE) Join us on Facebook/ The College of Nursing

The College of Nursing creating nursing’s future

See more CPD courses at www.nursing.edu.au 26 THE LAMP august 2011

CON 11.07 The Lamp 84x176.indd 1

15/07/11 9:34 AM


© Lilian Levesque – www.flickr.com/photos/46327206@N03

750,000 British public sector workers strike over pensions

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n 30 June up to 750,000 public sector workers from four British unions went on strike against proposed changes to their pension schemes by the Cameron Conservative Government. The Government described public sector pensions as ‘gold plated’ and unsustainable. Over 11,000 schools closed or suspended classes and two-thirds of universities cancelled lectures.

More than 30,000 people marched in a rally in London. Brendan Barbour, the British Trade Union Congress General Secretary, said millions of public sector workers were paying for a government deficit they did nothing to create. He told the rally that it was ‘hardly surprising’ that public sector workers’ pay has been frozen while it was ‘bonuses as usual’ in the financial sector.

‘This is gold standard for unfair­ ness,’ he told The Guardian newspaper. The attack on British public sector workers’ conditions comes hard on the heels of similar attacks in other European countries such as Greece and Ireland, as well as in the United States, as governments face dwindling revenues and increased deficits as a consequence of the Global Financial Crisis.n

THE LAMP august 2011 27


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Wards converting to the new system

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g Nurse ratios are commencing in 64 wards in NSW Public Hospitals.

he new ratios/nursing hours per patient day (NHPPD) system is being implemented in the first group of public hospital wards selected by the NSWNA and NSW

Health. The majority of wards in this first group should be converted by the end of August. The conversion of this first group, will result in around 180 extra nursing positions.n

Jen plans to increase her hours

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afternoon shift, there are often only three nurses for 22 beds. That means a ratio of one nurse to seven patients in an acute ward. If we’re hitting surge beds extra staff are called in. It can be difficult at times to get staff in at short notice,’ said Jen. Unfortunately, Level 1 ward was not in the first round of increased staffing allocation. ‘If a patient has to be transferred and needs a nurse escort and staff are not available at short notice one of the RNs or ENs can be taken from the ward,’ said Jen. ‘Our NUM or Nurse Manager can spend a significant amount of time looking for staff.’ Jen says the extra nursing positions will make a big difference to nurse workloads and staff morale. On Level 2 there is currently no clerical support staff and the NUM is required to do admin duties. The extra staff will assist the NUM with her workload, so that she will be able to focus on higher-level clinical duties.

‘The DoN wrote to existing parttime and casual staff asking whether they wanted to convert to increased hours or become permanent. I work part time and I plan to increase my hours,’ said Jen.

NC263354

acLean District Hospital has two wards that are eligible for additional staffing under the new award. Both wards have significant problems with staffing, according to Jen Smith, RN and Branch Secretary at MacLean District Hospital. Level 2 is among the first group of wards to convert to the new ratios system. Level 2 will receive an additional 3.38 FTE nursing positions. ‘Like many small district hospitals, MacLean District Hospital has significant problems getting staff. Most nurses are highly experienced and some have been here for a long time but the relentless workload is very wearing. Staff can get injuries and become sick partly because of the pressure,’ said Jen. ‘So, we are all delighted with the extra positions. It’s a great start. ‘Level 1 has 22 beds and six surge beds, so it’s staffed for 22 beds but 28 beds could be occupied. In the

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28 THE LAMP august 2011


These wards have converted to the new system Facility

Ward

Speciality

Wyong

Medical 2

C3

Urology/Colorectal

6 South

Neurosciences/Stroke

Cardiology/Respiratory

6 West

Rehabilitation

7 West

Aged Care

7 South

Aged Care/Rapid Assessment

Barkala

Aged Care

Medical

Hunter New England Armidale

Surgical Ward

John Hunter

RNC2

Urology/Rheumatology

Manning Base

L3

Surgical

Tamworth

Ward 3

Medical/Stroke

Mid North Coast Coffs Harbour Port Macquarie

Sutherland

Southern Bourke Street

Rehabilitation

Queanbeyan

Medical /Surgical HDU/MH

South Western Sydney Bankstown

Medical/HDU 2BS

Surgical

Murrumbidgee Deniliquin Ward 2

Surgical

Campbelltown Liverpool

Nepean Blue Mountains Lithgow

General Ward

Medical/Surgical/General

Nepean

S4D/S3W

Haematology/Oncology

Ward 1C Pialla

Adult Acute Mental Health

Northern Sydney Hornsby

Lumby 1B

Medical/ CCU

2A

Orthopaedics

Geraghty

Rehabilitation

Manly L2

General Medicine

Royal North Shore

11D

Aged Care

9A

Orthopaedics/ Rheumatology

9B

Orthopaedics/ Rheumatology

12B

Oncology

Northern NSW Casino

Block 1

Medical

McLean

Level 2

Medical

Tweed Hosp.

Ward 1

Surgical

South Eastern Sydney POW

P9 West

Renal Unit

Dickenson 4

Respiratory & ID

P1W

Rehab Ward

General Medicine/ Gastro/ Renal

3J/3H

CCU/ Cardiac Stepdown Palliative Care

Ward A

Surgical

Ward B

Surgical

AG2 East

Respiratory Medicine

CB5D

Orthopaedic Trauma

Sydney Canterbury

Boronia

Medical

Concord

Ward 15

General Medicine

6 East

Respiratory medicine

6 East 1

Renal Metabolism Dialysis

6 East 4

Cardiology Stepdown

7 East 2

Urology/Medical/ Radiology Oncology/ Palliative care/Gyn

9 West 1

Colorectal/Gastro

RPA

Orthopaedics

Mona Vale

2J

Camden

Medical

Wagga

Speciality Renal& Gastro

Illawarra Shoalhaven Wollongong

Ward 4 South

Central Coast Gosford

Facility St George

Western NSW Bathurst

Rehabilitation

Forbes

General Ward

Mudgee

Tilecote

General Ward incl. HDU

Parkes

Gibbons

Medical /Surgical

Blacktown

Medical 1

General Medicine

Medical 2

General Medicine

Surgical2

General Surgery

Hainsworth

Adult Acute Mental Health

Riverview

Adult Acute Mental Health

D4A

Trauma/Orthopaedic

D4C

Geriatric Medicine

Western Sydney

Cumberland Westmead

Adult Acute Mental Health THE LAMP august 2011 29


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The star of the ad RN Katrina Wilczek 30 THE LAMP august 2011

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c o m p e t i t i o n

Bringing nurses back g NSWNA ad promotes nurse-topatient ratios and invites nurses back to the profession.

Left: RN Jacinta Nicholson. Right: RN Clare Sheeran .

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he NSWNA has launched a new TV ad to inform the public that our nurse-to-patient ratios campaign was successful in winning funding for more nurses and that this should translate into better patient care. The ads also aim to let nurses who have left the profession know there are hundreds of new jobs now available in the NSW Public Health System, with more to come. ‘The implementation of ratios will make our public health system a better and more rewarding place to work,’ said NSWNA General Secretary Brett Holmes. ‘Now we have won the funding, our next priority is to make sure those positions are filled. We expect the State Government and NSW Health to pull out all stops to attract nurses back to the profession but the Association intends doing its bit too.’ The star of the ad is Katrina Wilczek, an RN from Royal Prince Alfred Hospital in Sydney. ‘When I found out what the ad was about I was interested because I want more nurses to come back and make it easier for all of us,’ she told The Lamp. ‘Everyone is stretched to the limit and it will be great to have more help.’ Katrina says she enjoyed the experience of making the ad. ‘It was loads of fun. Everyone on the shoot was very nice and it was fun to work with the patients who really enjoyed it as well.’ The ad also features other nurses from RPA, including Clare Sheeran and Jacinta Nicholson.n

The Lamp is offering four lucky readers a chance to win a pair of MBT Pata shoes – valued at $299 a pair. Thousands of Australian nurses are turning to MBT footwear to prevent back pain, joint injuries and reduce the discomfort associated with spending extended periods of time on their feet. Research shows that wearing MBTs decreases stress on knee and hip joints by 19%; increases muscle activity by 28% in the buttocks, 37% in the hamstrings and 38% in the lower limbs, compared to conventional footwear.* This makes MBTs ideal for nurses who are constantly on the go. Available in black, the MBT Pata is designed to keep feet cool, dry and comfortable. Like all MBT footwear, the Pata has a raised, curved and cushioned sole that spreads pressure over the whole sole of the foot and promotes comfort. To enter this month’s competition, simply write your name, address and membership number on the back of an envelope and send it to: MBT Pata Competition, 50 O’Dea Avenue, Waterloo, NSW 2017. Competition closes 31 August 2011. Please note: only one entry per member will be accepted. *According to studies at the University of Calgary, CAN; Sheffield Hallam University, UK; Rennbahnklinik Basle, CH.

THE LAMP august 2011 31


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This information from Health Industry Plan contains general advice only. It is not specific to your personal financial situation, objectives or needs. Get the facts (including a Product Disclosure Statement) from www.hipsuper.com.au or talk to a financial advisor before making any super decisions. The Trustee of HIP ABN 50 030 598 247 is Private Hospitals Superannuation Pty Ltd ABN 59 006 792 749, AFSL 247063.* This calculation is based on members aged between 16-36 at four units of cover, and only if members apply for an additional three units of cover within 60 days of joining the Fund. Insurance benefit is reduced each subsequent year. Please refer to the HIP Insurance Booklet or PDS for full details. ** Subject to a maximum monthly benefit of 75% of the 32 THEmonthly LAMP august 2011 refer to the HIP Insurance Booklet or PDS for full details. member’s income. Please


STOP

P r e s s

Strike action at Macquarie g Nurses at Macquarie Private Hospitals stopped work for 24 hours and rallied against poor pay and conditions.

N

urses at Macquarie Private Hospitals took strike action as The Lamp went to print. Twenty-fourhour work stop­pages took place on Tuesday 26 July at Minchin­bury Community Hospi­tal (Mount Druitt), Delmar Private Hospital (Dee Why), Manly Waters Private Hospital (Manly), Eastern Suburbs Private Hospital (Randwick) and President Private (Kirrawee). During the 24-hour work stoppage, nurses rallied outside the offices of Channel Seven’s Sunrise show in the Sydney CBD. Around 70 nurses from the five Macquarie Hospitals rallied at Martin Place, with many returning to their hospitals to gather outside and let

their local communities know about their situation. The nurses carried out the strike action in protest against their employer refusing to improve substandard pay and maintain conditions. Most nurses have not had a pay rise in two years and wages are dragging over 15% behind public health sector wages and up to 12% behind other private hospital sector wages. Despite 19 months of negotiations for an Enterprise Agreement, the employer continues to offer a grossly substandard pay offer and demand that conditions be reduced. In May, the NSWNA sought and won an order from Fair Work Australia for nurses to vote on taking protected industrial action, and by 21 June nurses at

Around 70 nurses from the five Macquarie Hospitals rallied at Martin Place. all five facilities had voted overwhelmingly in favour of a range of industrial actions. ‘This strike action shows the strength of feeling experienced by nurses at Macquarie Private Hospitals,’ said NSW Assistant General Secretary Judith Kiejda. ‘They want an Enterprise Agreement that brings their wages and maintains conditions to the level received by other nurses in the State, which is only right and fair.’ Stay tuned to The Lamp for further deve­lop­ments.n

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THE LAMP august 2011 33


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c a r e

Aged Care can’t wait g The NSWNA is piling the pressure on the Federal Government to ensure that 2012 is the year of the Aged Care Budget.

A

postcard campaign to the Prime Minister and visits to MPs urging them to sign a pledge are part of a new push to keep aged care on the Federal Government’s agenda. The next stage of the national Because we care campaign is determined to see 2012 as the year of the Aged Care Budget, and the ANF is asking for an initial injection of $494 million to fix the wage gap between nurses working in aged care and their public-sector counterparts. The NSWNA is calling on all Branches to pass a resolution asking the Prime Minister to make 2012 an Aged Care Budget and distribute and sign postcards to Julia Gillard. NSWNA members and the general public are asked to send the postcard – which is emblazoned with the message ‘Aged care can’t wait’ – directly to the PM’s office to ensure she receives them continually. In addition, representatives from the Association are visiting NSW federal MPs,

34 THE LAMP august 2011

Aged care needs you Here’s what you can do to help keep aged care on the Federal Government’s agenda:

c Let the NSWNA know if you can visit your local federal MP with a representative from the Association.

c Make sure your Branch passes a resolution asking the Prime Minister to make 2012 an Aged Care Budget.

c Go to the Because we care website to keep up to date with the campaign, and leave your comments and stories.

c Distribute ‘Aged care can’t wait’ brochures and postcards and encourage people to send their postcard to the Prime Minister. c Run a community stall in your local area or shopping mall asking people to sign the postcards.

requesting they sign a pledge to support aged care reform, including the right mix of staff and skills, wages comparable to the public sector, more funding tied to wages and staffing, and a focus on quality care. As The Lamp went to press, three NSW MPs had signed the pledge: Senator

If you would like to run a community stall in your area or receive more brochures and postcards, contact Stella Topaz at the NSWNA on 02 8595 1234 or email stopaz@nswnurses.asn.au.

Doug Cameron, MP Craig Thompson, member for Dobell, and MP Ed Husic, member for Chifley. Each MP the NSWNA and members visit will receive a copy of a new report by the ANF, which sets out detailed infor­mation about the wages gap in aged


NSWNA members visited their Federal MP Craig Thompson to ask him to sign a pledge that he will push to keep aged care on the Federal Government’s agenda. Left to right: Debbie Lang, RN acute sector; Irene Clarke, Quality Aged Care Action Group (QACAG) member; Craig Thomson, MP for Dobell; Denise Huntley, RN in aged care and QACAG member.

ACS template roadshow g NSWNA hits the road to discuss the Aged and Community Services (ACS) template with members.

T

Members also visited Senator Doug Cameron.

care. All NSWNA Branches have been sent a copy of the report and a new brochure too. NSWNA General Secretary Brett Holmes said it was crucial that proper funding be allocated to aged care to en­sure a fair deal for nurses as well as quality care for elderly residents in nursing homes. ‘The recently-released Bentley report shows that a Registered Nurse was

delivering, on average, just 22 minutes of care per day per resident in a nursing home. It’s essential that aged care receives adequate funding for enough qualified nurses and the right mix of staff and skills overall. This will ensure there are enough nurses to provide quality care for residents, including attracting more nurses to aged care to fill the staff shortages,’ said Brett.n

he NSWNA is visiting work­­ places across NSW and holding night-time meetings for members to ex­plain how the Association is using the results of our re­cent survey of members working in the not-for-profit aged care sector, to nego­tiate improvements to their pay and conditions. Several visits and meetings took place in July and will continue through August. Negotiations for the renewal of the ACS, NSWNA and HSU Enterprise Agreement began in June and are continuing. ACS initially offered a wage increase of 2.5% per year over the duration of the three-year agreement. The most recent offer was 3%, in the first year and 2.8% in the second and third years of the agreement. The Association has not accepted this offer and, as The Lamp went to press, the NSWNA was seeking an improved wages offer. Part of the Association’s claim is for any wage increase to start from 1 July 2011. ACS has agreed to wage parity for AiNs by removing the under-18 AiN rates. In addition to the wages offer, ACS has agreed to pay for the renewal of criminal checks for existing employees and to include in the Workloads Management clause a process to replace employees who are on leave. Casual employees who have been rostered on a regular and systematic basis over 26 weeks will have the right to request conversion to permanent employment, and there is now a clause that makes clear provisions for the payment of overtime and consistency when overtime rates apply.n THE LAMP august 2011 35


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f you think you may have a problem with your sight, you are not alone. By 2020, around 400,000 people in Australia could have a vision impairment that affects their daily life. But that’s where we can help. Guide Dogs NSW/ACT offers a range of free mobility services to help people with different levels of vision impairment. You don’t have to be blind, and you don’t have to get a Guide Dog. To find out how we can assist people with impaired vision to get around safely and independently, call 1800-GUIDEDOGS or visit guidedogs.com.au today.

36 THE LAMP august 2011


s

Q & A

ASK

JUDITH

when it comes to your rights and entitlements at work,

nswna assistant general secretary judith kiejda has the answers.

Why have you moved away from payroll deductions? We are being cautious and prudent. We can’t say for sure if or when the State Government will stop payroll deductions. Payroll deduction of union fees is always unpopular with Liberal governments. John Howard made it illegal to negotiate them in workplace agreements and Jeff Kennett removed them altogether in Victoria. There is so much beyond your control when fees are left to the whim of the government. The only thing we know for sure is that you can only control your membership if you take charge of payment.

How does Direct Debit work? Payment via Direct Debit/Auto Credit Card is an agreement between you and the NSWNA. It requires a signed authority form from you to give permission for these payments to take place. You have the option of paying fees either fortnightly or monthly. Fortnightly DD/ACC payments are run every Thursday. Monthly DD/ACC is run on 1st of the month (or on the first working day if it falls on a weekend or public holiday).

What are the advantages of Auto Credit Card/Direct Debit? They are reliable – recurring payments are

scheduled and you do not need to manage this. Regular payments mean you stay financial and we do not have to rely on a third party to provide correct payments. You deal directly with your union. Payments are applied directly to our membership department on the designated day – there is no lag in payments as there is with payroll deductions. They are flexible – payments can be aligned to your pay week, or you can pay monthly if that suits you better. Paying by account or DD/ACC puts you in control, not the employer. NSWNA membership staff are always available to discuss payment options and facilitate changes to payment arrangements. If you move workplaces, your pay­ments come with you – you do not have to set up direct debit each time you change jobs. You maintain an ongoing record of payments via CC/Bank Statement as well as receiving a tax receipt issued by the NSWNA at the end of the financial year.

Does the NSWNA have effective security protection for my bank/credit card details? The NSWNA takes your privacy and security concerns seriously. Our database is protected by a number of levels of security and only membership staff have access to that database. For extra security credit card

numbers are encrypted so that once they are entered, even our membership staff only see the last four digits of the number. Any written information regarding your bank account is stored securely as per banking compliance requirements.

Are there other options besides Direct Debit to get off payroll deductions? You can opt to receive a quarterly account that is sent out in December, March, June and September. You can pay these accounts by BPay, Post BillPay (either in person at the post office or at the Australia Post website) or online at the NSWNA website: www. nswnurses.asn.au. You can also pay over the phone with a valid credit card by calling our membership department during office hours. We accept Visa and Mastercard.

How long does it take to be put on DD/ACC? Once our Membership department receives a signed, correct, fully completed authority form it is usually processed within 24 hours. You are advised in writing of your direct debit commencement day. It is important to take the time to provide the correct details to the Association, to prevent unnecessary delays in processing.n

Wondering how you can reach

over 54,000 nurses in NSW to advertise your product or service?

lamp the

The Lamp is the most direct and credible way to reach nurses in NSW. Mailed directly to residential addresses (97.4%), you can be assured your message will hit home.

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volume 68 no.1 February 2011

A historic

win

For The Lamp advertising enquiries contact: Patricia Purcell Tel: (02) 8595 2139 • 0416 259 845 • Email: ppurcell@nswnurses.asn.au THE LAMP august 2011 37


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n u r s e s o n l i n e

What’s hot on Nurse Uncut g The Future of the RN series; the importance of converting to direct debit; the new state-wide rostering program; people with disabilities encouraged to have their say; domestic violence is a workplace concern; and how do nurses fit in exercise? Read all about this and more on www.nurseuncut.com.au

Hot topics

What nurses are talking about?

Covert to direct debit to keep the NSWNA strong

EENs: what are we worth?

www.nurseuncut.com. au/covert-to-direct-debitand-keep-the-nswnaunited-and-strong

One tactic the Government may use to try to weaken the Association is to abolish your right to have your union fees paid through payroll deduction and cut members off from their union. You can protect yourself by immediately converting your payment method to direct debit. Read how at Nurse Uncut.

The Future of the RN – a three part series www.nurseuncut.com. au/series/the-future-ofthe-rn

RN and NSWNA member Jennifer Tuckwell has written a three-part article on the future of the registered nurse, which raises concerns about the current university training system and role of the clinician in today’s nursing system. It’s been very popular on Nurse Uncut and we encourage you to check it out and leave your opinions.

People with disabilities encouraged to have their say www.nurseuncut. com.au/people-withdisabilities-encouragedto-have-their-say

The NSW Government is

www.nurseuncut.com.au/forum/component/option,com_ccboard/Itemid,24/ forum,13/limitstart,20/topic,174/view,postlist/#ccbp3906

‘Furthermore, we will not rise up in our massive numbers and steal your jobs. We, too, are subject to the same political manoeuvering as RNs. We are simply cheaper labour than RNs.’ Don’t forget to enter our two-year anniversary contest – you could win a $500 account card from ME Bank! See all the details here: www.nurseuncut.com.au/ celebrate-nurse-uncuts-two-year-anniversary-and-win-500 committed to imple­ment­ing key reforms to the disability sector – individualised funding packages that will put people with a disability and their carers at the centre of decision making.

Domestic violence is a workplace concern www.nurseuncut.com. au/domestic-violenceis-a-workplace-concernfor-nswna-nurses

‘One colleague used to come to work with bruises on her face almost every week. Her husband would turn up in the middle of the night when she was on night shift to check she was at work. She constantly lived in fear.’ Read the full story at Nurse Uncut.

How do nurses fit in exercise around shift work? www.nurseuncut.com.au/how-donurses-fit-exercise-in-around-shift-work

Many nurses find it hard to fit exercise in around shift work, and eating habits during shift work can also contribute to an unhealthy lifestyle. What exercise do you do while you’re not working? Do you find you are often too tired?

The new state-wide rostering system www.nurseuncut.com. au/new-state-widerostering-programwhats-in-it-for-nurses

NSW Health initiated a review of rostering practices across public healthcare facilities in NSW because it recognised that a consistent statewide approach would deliver patient, staff and or­ga­ni­sational benefits. Read about the be­nefits to nurses and patients at Nurse Uncut.n THE LAMP august 2011 39


40 THE LAMP august 2011


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nursing research online

Latest nursing research g The latest edition of the Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing is available free online at ajan.com.au. Team nursing: experiences of nurse managers in acute care settings Dr Lorraine Ferguson and Dr Jane Cioffi, University of Western Sydney.

This study aimed to explore and describe nurse managers’ experiences with a team based approach to nursing care in hospital settings. Five nurse managers (four female and one male) volunteered to participate following calls for ‘expressions of interest’ in three acute care hospitals. The team nursing experiences of nurse managers are described using three main categories: adapting to team nursing, gains with team nursing and concerns with team nursing. The study concludes that nurse managers considered gains for staff and patients were made with the im­plemen­ta­ tion of a team based approach to nursing care. This team based approach to care was regarded by managers as enabling nursing staff of varying experience and skills to provide care more safely as direct supervision by more experienced staff was possible. However, the role of team leader necessitated staff development and support to enhance clinical leadership skills involved in this new role. www.ajan.com.au/Vol28/ 28-4_Ferguson.pdf

Patient satisfaction with Nurse Practitioner care in primary care settings Mary Jo Gagan and Patricia Maybee, University of Otago Centre for Post­ graduate Nursing Studies, New Zealand.

The aim of this study was to determine the level of satisfaction with care and acceptance of the role of Nurse Practitioners (NPs) in New Zealand. A descriptive co-relational study was conducted using a 15-item satis­ faction survey distributed to participants by

the clinic receptionist after a clinic visit to the NP. Patient satisfaction and acceptance was measured using a modified 15-item version of the Thrasher and Purc Stephen­ son (2008) satisfaction survey. The authors concluded that while this study contained limitations, the overall positive findings were similar to previous study findings on patient satisfaction with Nurse Practitioners’ care. The instrument, methodology, and findings of this study can be used as initial data on the evaluation and continued monitoring of the role in New Zealand (NZ) to determine the level of satisfaction with care and acceptance of the role of Nurse Practitioner in New Zealand. www.ajan.com.au/Vol28/ 28-4_Gagan.pdf

‘I don’t want to become a scientist’: undergraduate nursing students’ perceived value of course content Dr Melanie Birks, CQ University, QLD; Dr Robyn Cant, Monash University, VIC; Dr Mohammad Al-Motlaq, Hashemite University, Kingdom of Jordan; Janet Jones, Monash University, VIC.

In the development and delivery of preregistration baccalaureate nursing programs, universities must address both the needs of industry and the registering authorities that regulate health professional practice. Bal­ anced with this, providers of education at this level also wish to deliver an experience to students that they both value and enjoy. This paper describes the findings of a study examining these factors in the first year of four pre-registration programs at a rural campus and outreach centre of one Australian university. Results indicate that students found units such as fundamental nursing subjects and law most enjoyable and valuable. Units with a sociological foundation were con­ sidered less enjoy­able and valuable. Over­all, students recognised the value of the bio­ science units while contrarily not expressing enjoyment of this aspect of their studies. These findings have implications for nurse educators in respect of the content and delivery of pre-registration nursing programs. As first-year students,

the participants may have been focused on learning fundamental nursing tasks, lacking an understanding of the breadth of knowledge required for their professional role. Future research into aspects of nursing studies found to be most valuable may provide a different perspective if conducted in the period post-graduation. www.ajan.com.au/Vol28/ 28-4_Birks.pdf

Occupational stress in the Australian nursing workforce: a comparison between hospitalbased nurses and nurses working in very remote communities Tessa Opie, University of South Australia; Sue Lenthall, Back from the Edge Study, Prof. John Wakerman, Centre for Remote Health, NT; Prof. Maureen Dollard, University of South Australia; Prof. Martha MacLeod, University of Northern British Columbia; Assoc. Prof. Sabina Knight, Centre for Remote Health, NT; Greg Rickard; Prof. Sandra Dunn, Charles Darwin University, NT.

The objective of this work was to compare workplace conditions and levels of occu­ pational stress in two samples of Australian nurses. Three hundred and forty nine nurses working in very remote Australia and 277 nurses working in three major hospitals in South Australia and the North­ ern Territory participated in the study. The main outcome measures were psychologi­ cal distress, emotional exhaustion, work engagement, and job satisfaction. The results revealed that nurses working in major Australian hospitals reported higher levels of psychological dis­tress and emotional exhaustion than nurses working very remotely. However, both groups re­­ported relatively high levels of stress. Nur­ses working very remotely de­mon­stra­­ted higher levels of work engage­ment and job satisfaction.There are common job de­mands and resources associated with out­come measures for both nurses working very re­motely and nurses working in major hospitals.n www.ajan.com.au/Vol28/ 28-4_Opie.pdf THE LAMP august 2011 41


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NSWNA

MATTERS

NSWNA Branch News

active across NSW. t ge rs be em m A N c NSW

, Marsden Centre members vote to stop work for IR rally ... Members from Marsden Centre Branch , Walcha members welcome Organisers ...

Members from Walcha MPS were happy to have NSWNA Organisers attend their branch meeting and discuss workplace and professional issues. Back row, left to right: Vicki McIvor, EN; Cherylynne Perry, RN; Pam Clare, RN; Barbara McHattan, RN; Mary Boyd, EN; front: Gemma Yarnold, RN.

(Ageing, Disability and Home Care) voted to stop work for the IR rally held on June 20. Branch President Douglas Craig, RN (pictured fourth from left), said members were glad they were taking a stand against the IR laws. ‘They feel discriminated against by the Government because they’re disability nurses. If other government-sector nurses have received a 10% pay increase then why shouldn’t we?’ he said.

, Fairfield nurses discuss IR laws with MP... Nurses from Fairfield Hospital met Opposition Leader John , First-year RNs get in on the action...

Three first-year RNs from St George Hospital rallied for their rights in front of Parliament House on 20 June to protest against Barry O’Farrell’s IR reforms. ‘As first-year RNs, we’re very concerned about this and what the cuts will mean. We need more nurses, and recruitment will become a real problem, unless we do something about this,’ said Amber Louden, RN.’ Pictured left to right: Shreya Patel, RN; Amber Louden, RN; and Amy Sykes, RN.

* Gunnedah members hail workloads committee... At a branch meeting, members from the Gunnedah District Hospital discussed workplace issues and the importance of having a Reasonable Workload Committee. Standing from left to right: Liz Worboys, RN; Lee Gill, RN; Heather Franke, RN; Ruth Pope, RN. Sitting, left to right: Liz Bailey, RN; and Felicity Eason, EN. 42 THE LAMP august 2011

Robertson to discuss the changes in the industrial relations laws. ‘I think the biggest thing for us about these laws is that we wouldn’t have a right to an independent arbitrator. After everything we fought for, that doesn’t seem right,’ said Leanne Gray, NUM. Pictured from left to right: John Robertson, MP; Leanne Gray, NUM Orthopaedics; and Louise Noreika, NUM Surgical/Chronic Care.


‘Lighting the Way’ The Enrolled Nurse Professional Association of NSW : a voice for all Enrolled Nurses.

www.enpansw.org.au

FOCUS : • to pursue the professional, career and educational interests of EN’s • support and advocate for Enrolled Nurses in the NSW Health sector. • yearly enrolled nurse conference for networking and information.

, Shame Barry Shame... These NSWNA members

weren’t afraid to show how they felt at the rally on 20 June in front of Parliament House, chanting loudly “Shame Barry shame!” in protest against Barry O’Farrell’s IR laws. Rydalmere ADHC AiN Neli Hegy was especially upset about disability nurses not getting the same treatment as other public sector nurses. ‘Why shouldn’t we get the same pay as other nurses? It’s not fair. The work we do in the community is difficult and necessary.’ From left to right: Ruth Dawe, RN; Nelinda Hegy, AiN, Rydalmere ADHC; Josie Cristobal, EN, Rydalmere ADHC.

• to promote extended roles through further education. Join this progressive organisation and participate in the enhancement of your career. Membership fee’s are tax deductible. Membership $30 per annum FOR FURTHER INFORMATION Phone: 1300 554 249 Forward cheque/ money order & details to : ENPA, PO Box 775 Kingswood 2747

Name: Address:

, Rally for your Rights in Penrith... Kerry Rodgers, Branch President

Nepean Hospital and NSWNA Councillor, delivered a stirring speech to the crowd at the Rally For Your Rights event at Penrith. NSWNA members were joined by teachers and other public sector workers to protest against Barry O’Farrell’s IR laws.

Work Place: Contacts: (H)

(W)

MOB

Email

THE LAMP august 2011 43


s

a t

t h e

m o v i e s

This month’s film giveaways for NSWNA members “

HILARIOUS ”

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Official Selection Berlin Film Festival 2011

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TheGuardMovie.com.au

The Guard

BEGINNERS

The Guard is a comedic fishout-of-water tale of murder, blackmail, drug trafficking and rural police corruption. Two policemen must join forces to take on an international drug smuggling gang – one, an unorthodox Irish policeman and the other, a straitlaced FBI agent.

Ewan McGregor stars as Oliver, who falls in love with the beguiling and cheeky Anna (Melanie Laurent), only months after his father Hal (Christopher Plummer) has passed away. This new love floods Oliver with memories of his father who, after the death of his wife of 45 years, came out of the closet to live a wonderfully full gay life. Now Oliver endeavours to love Anna with all the bravery, humour and hope that his father taught him.

august 25

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The Lamp has 25 double passes to The Guard, thanks to Paramount Pictures and Transmission Films, and 15 double passes to Beginners from Hopscotch Films. To enter, email lamp@nswnurses.asn.au with your film preference, name, membership number, address and contact number. First entries win!

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You’ll gain the skills and knowledge to provide optimal care for people and contribute to important decisions about future trends in treatment, patient care and disease prevention. Choose from: – Clinical Nursing – Cancer and Haematology Nursing – Clinical Trials Practice – Emergency Nursing – Intensive Care Nursing – Mental Health Nursing – Master of Nursing (Nurse Practitioner) Join us to help shape the future of health care. For more information head to:

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44 THE LAMP august 2011

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NEW REFERENCE BOOK

Headstarts: 100 Tips for Raising Clever, Confident, Creative Kids

Book me Meeting the Leadership Challenge in Long-Term Care By David Farrell, Cathie Brady and Barbara Frank with forward by V. Tellis-Nayak and Mary TellisNayak, Footprint Books (or available from your local bookshop ), RRP $69.00: ISBN 9781932529708 Meeting the Leadership Challenge in Long-Term Care is essential reading for nursing home owners and managers, as its central premise is the challenge of long-term care and the responses it elicits from them. It also examines how nursing home managers relate to their staff and in particular to certified nursing assistants. This book is a wake-up call to leaders who doubt their impact and as an affirmation to leaders who vigorously take up the challenge each day of making the most of their impact.

Using Research in Healthcare Practice (1st Australian and New Zealand ed.) By Sue Nagy, Jane Mills, Donna Waters and Melanie Birks, Wolters Kluwer / Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, RRP $73.99: ISBN 9781920994020 Using Research in Healthcare Practice provides a comprehensive overview of the core topics required for an understanding of both qualitative and quantitative research.

Its main focus is to encourage students to understand the value of seeking out studies when they need to explore practice concerns or dilemmas and to demystify research and make it more accessible to the practitioner, teacher or student.

The ICU Book

(3rd ed.) By Paul Marino, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, RRP $93.46: ISBN 9780781748025: 078174802X In this 3rd edition of The ICU Book a general overview is provided including basic infor­ mation for all adult intensive care units. The material is presented in a concise and quick-access format, which allows for topic and exam review. It provides enough detailed and specific information to ad­ dress almost all questions and problems that arise in the ICU. New chapters in this edition include hyperthermia and hypo­ thermia syndromes; infection control in the ICU; and severe airflow obstruction.

The Encyclopedia of Energy Medicine Written and compiled by Linnie Thomas, edited by Carrie Obray with a forward by James L. Oschman, Fairview Press (available through Footprint Books or from your local bookshop ), RRP $45.95: ISBN 9781577492375

Where to get this month’s new releases These books are all available on order through the publisher or your local book­shop. Members of the NSWNA can borrow any of these books and more from our Records and Information Centre. For borrowing information, contact Jeannette Bromfield, 8595 2175, jbromfield@nswnurses.asn.au or Cathy Matias, 8595 2121, cmatias@nswnurses.asn.au Reviews by NSWNA librarian, Jeannette Bromfield.

Disclaimer: some of the items featured in Book Me are based on information received and have not been independently reviewed.

Publishers’ websites c Allen & Unwin Pty Ltd: www.allenandunwin.com.au c Wolters Kluwer|Lippincott Williams and Wilkins: www.wolterskluwer.com c Lippincott Williams and Wilkins: www.lww.com c Footprint Books: www.footprint.com.au

By Dr Cindy Pan and Vanessa Woods, Allen & Unwin Pty Ltd, RRP $24.99: ISBN 9781741755749 Most modern parents are keen to make sure their children perform as well as they possi­ bly can while remaining happy and positive. Cindy Pan and Vanessa Woods condense key findings from the latest international cognitive science research into short, easy-to-understand pieces covering an array of areas including: the importance of teaching your child positive thinking patterns; the benefits of hugs on brain development; how to help your child tackle maths and science; the best age to learn a new language; and the benefits of good nutrition. Headstarts helps parents do just this with 100 easy-to-follow tips for raising clever, confident, creative kids. The Encyclopedia of Energy Medicine is a comprehensive and authoritative guide to the history of medicine and the modern use of energy-related complementary medicines. Filled with insightful, practical, and easy-to-understand information, this encyclopedia examines the history and modern uses of such alternative therapies as acupressure, healing touch, reiki, reflexology, the Tellington Method, therapeutic touch, and many others. It also provides training in any of the disciplines, giving the reader an opportunity to determine if they want to pursue a new career in the field of complementary and alternative medicine.

Practice Teaching in Healthcare By Neil Gopee, Sage Publications (available from Footprint Books or any good bookseller), RRP £21.99: ISBN 9781848601352 (pbk), RRP £65.00: ISBN 9781848601345 (hardcopy) Practice Teaching in Healthcare encourages a critical understanding of the knowledge and competence required to fulfil the practice teacher role. This book examines and evaluates the concepts, theories, and frameworks underpinning the necessary skill set.n THE LAMP august 2011 45


s ip h s r a l o h c s g iN s Nur is it time to begiN or grow your NursiNg career?

Nursing scholarships are available in the following areas: „„ Pre-registration„nursing„„ (available„for„university„and„TAFE)„ –„„enrolled„ –„„midwifery„ –„„registered„nursing „„

„„

Postgraduate„including:„ –„„emergency„department„nursing„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„ –„„nurse„practitioner„ –„„general„practice„nursing„ –„„mental„health„nursing„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„ –„„midwifery –„„„nurses„working„in„an„Aboriginal„ Medical„Service

Continuing„Professional„Development„ including:„ –„„emergency„department„nursing„ –„„general„practice„nursing„ –„„mental„health„nursing„ –„„midwifery„ –„„nurse„practitioner„ –„„nurse„re-entry

For the details, eligibility and applications please go to our website

RCNA

46 THE LAMP august 2011

freecall„1800 117 262 scholarships@rcna.org.au„ www.rcna.org.au

„„

Clinical„placement:„ –„„emergency„department„nursing„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„ –„„Aboriginal„Medical„Service„„

„„

Continuing„Professional„Development„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„ –„„non„clinical„support„staff„in„an„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„ „„„„emergency„department„ „„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„„

Hurry! Applications for this rou nd of scholarships close 16 Septe mber 2011 Nursing„and„Allied„Health„Scholarship„and„Support„Scheme„(NAHSSS)„„ is„funded„by„the„Australian„Government. RCNA,„Australia’s„peak„professional„nursing„organisation,„is„proud„„ to„partner„the„Australian„Government„as„the„fund„administrator„„ for„this„program.


s

Crossword Test your knowledge in this month’s nursing crossword. 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8 9

10 11 12

13 14

15

16 17

18

19

20 21 23

24

22

25 26

27

28

29

30

31

32

33 34

s

across

1. Relating to the heart and blood circulation (14) 9. Carbon monoxide (1.1) 10. To remove a part (9) 11. Loss of ability to hear (8) 12. A rupture of the cornea through which a portion of the iris protrudes (9) 14. A raspatory (8) 15. Constructive metabolism (9) 17. Cell’s recognised by monoclonal anti­­ bodies to T-lymphocyte antigens (1.1.1) 18. Post-traumatic stress disorder (1.1.1.1) 20. The outer layer of the skin (9) 21. Nasal (6) 23. Reparative surgery of tendons (11)

35

26. Acute anxiety (5) 27. An instrument used to examine the interior of a body cavity (9) 31. In the open-air (8) 34. Inflammation of a joint (9) 35. Term for aspects of the mind, self, soul (6)

s 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

down

A flexible connective tissue Breathing (11) Inferior vena cava (1.1.1) Sound made using the vocal folds (5) A connection of bones other than in a joint (11) 6. The main blood vessel of the medial aspect of the forearm (5.6)

7. Enzyme catalysing the breakdown of peptide (14) 8. Eaten or drunk up (8) 13. Originating within the ear (9) 16. International Confederation of Midwives (1.1.1) 19. Spinal muscular atrophy (1.1.1) 22. Milk sugar (7) 23. Tapeworm (6) 24. Ansae (4) 25. Tuberculosis (1.1) 28. Reduction of caloric intake (4) 29. Organs of hearing (4) 30. Individual family service plan (1.1.1.1) 32. A pouch or bursa (3) 33. Emergency room (1.1) Solution page 49 THE LAMP august 2011 47


DIARY DATES

Conferences, seminars, meetings SYDNEY, Hunter & Illawarra Women’s Health & Midwifery Conf. 6 August, Woolworths Corporate Head Office’s Auditorium, 1 Woolworths Way, Bella Vista. Contact: Marian Piper, marian.piper@ healthscope.com.au A.C.A.T Nurses 16 August, 1-3pm, Bankstown Hospital 2A / 2B Conference Room. Contact: Wendy Oliver, wendy.oliver@ sswahs.nsw.gov.au or 9722 7236 21st Annual Spinal Injury Conference 25-26 August, College of Nursing Burwood Contact: 4736 3592, jhebblewhite@ bigpond.com, joannacartwright @ optusnet.com.au Navigating Neuro 27 August, The Chifley, Wollongong Cost: $88. Contact: Megan Sims, 4253 4400, megan.sims@sesiahs.health.nsw.gov.au The NSW Urological Nurses’ Society Education Day 2 September, Burwood RSL Contact: Karina So, 9767 5000 pager 60264, karina.so@sswahs.nsw.gov.au www.anzuns.org The ‘ALERT’ Course - Acute Lifethreatening Emergencies, Recognition & Treatment, 2-day seminar 9-10 September, Westmead Hospital 25-26 Nov, Wests Mayfield, Newcastle. Contact: (03) 9390 8011 or info@criticalcare. edu.au, www.criticalcare.edu.au

Skin Care & Oral Hygiene 13 Sept, 11am-3pm, Bloomfield Hospital, MHECRAP/ Ward 22, Forest Rd, Orange or 14 Sept, 11am-3pm, Holy Trinity Anglican Church, 158 Brisbane St, Dubbo Contact: Jill Sparks, 8887 44849 (July)/ Amy Keogh, 6841 5555, 0427 150 649 (Aug/Sept) The Whitlam Musculoskeletal and Rehabilitation Symposium 20 September, 2-6pm, Conference Room 3, Education Centre, Liverpool Hospital Contact: Maria Lingam, maria.lingam@ sswahs.nsw.gov.au or Lynette McEvoy, lynette.mcevoy@sswahs.nsw.gov.au or 8738 3886 Enrolled Nurses Professional Association Annual Conference 22-23 September, Armidale Cost: $240. Contact: 1300 554 249 Nurses Christian Fellowship Australia in NSW Workshop ’Cultural Issues in Nursing’ Facilitator Dr. Lydia Tan 27 September, 7.30 pm, Shalom Centre, 157-163 Balaclava Road, Marsfield Contact: Jane, 0412 862 776, ncfansw.org Riding The Waves of Change, Nursing & Midwifery Unit, Managers’ Society of NSW 21 Oct, Citigate Hotel, Thomas St, Sydney Contact: numsexecadmin@optusnet.com.au Basic & Advanced Cardiac Life Support 1-day Update 29 October, Westmead Private Hospital. Contact: (03) 9390 8011 or info@criticalcare. edu.au, www.criticalcare.edu.au

Anaesthesia & Post-Anaesthesia Care Nursing 2-day seminar 18-19 November, Westmead Hospital. Contact: (03) 9390 8011, info@criticalcare. edu.au or www.criticalcare.edu.au

Understanding Blood Results Birmingham: 26-27 Sept; Dublin: 17-18 Nov; London: 6-7 Dec; Manchester: 8-9 Dec Contact: bookings@mkupdate.co.uk, 017687 73030

The ’ALERT’ Course – Acute Lifethreatening Emergencies, Recognition & Treatment 2-day seminar 25-26 Nov, Wests Mayfield, Newcastle. Contact: (03) 9390 8011, info@criticalcare. edu.au or www.criticalcare.edu.au

Perioperative Nurses’ Association Queensland Inc (PNAQ Inc) Annual Conference 2011 29 September-1 October, RACV Royal Pines Resort, Gold Coast Contact:pnaqconference@arinex.com.au Website: www.pnaqconference.net.au

REGIONAL Skin Care Presented by Wound Care Association of NSW Inc. 12 August, Peter Reed Lecture Theatre, UNSW Rural Clinical School, Wrights Road, Port Macquarie Contact: Libby Nivison Smith, 0434 510 607 Western Sydney Wound Interest Group 29 Aug, the Hall, Our Lady of Consolation Aged Care Facility, 32 Evans Rd, Rooty Hill Contact: Jill Sparks, 8887 4484, 0414 192 691, Jill_Sparks@wsahs.nsw.gov.au Three Bowl Triples Tournament 16 Sept, 9am, St John’s Park Bowling Club Contact: Paul.Sillato@swsahs.nsw.gov.au Interstate and overseas Optimising the Management of Pain 18-19 August, Melbourne, VIC Contact: (02) 9692 0533, www.changechampions.com.au 12th International Mental Health Conf. 24-26 August, Radisson Resort, Gold Coast Contact: www.anzmh.asn.au/ conference2011

The ECG Workshop Dublin: 3-4 Oct; Birmingham: 10-11 Oct; Liverpool: 20-21 Oct; Glasgow: 5-6 Dec Contact: bookings@mkupdate.co.uk, 017687 73030 7th European Congress on Violence in Clinical Psychiatry 19-22 Oct, Clarion Congress Hotel, Prague Contact: info@oudconsultancy.nl 7th International Meeting On Intensive Cardio Care 31 Oct-1 Nov, Tel Aviv, Israel Abstract 300 words by 1 August. Contact: 972 2 6520574, conventions@ isas.co.il, www.isas.co.il//cardiaccare2011 3rd Rural & Remote Mental Health Symposium 14-16 November, Mercure Hotel, Ballarat VIC. Contact: Laura Hancock, ruralhealth@ anzmh.asn.au, www.anzmh.asn.au/rrmh11 The Future Role of Support Workers in Perioperative & Critical Care

“Breastfeeding: A changing paradigm” Presenters: Pam Heselev and Fay Paxton. Date: Saturday September 24, 2011. Venue: Citigate Central, 169-179 Thomas Street, Haymarket, NSW 2000 Conference program 8.30am Registration (lunch, morning and afternoon tea included) 9.00am Welcome 9.15am ABC or CBA? Attachment or calories: which comes first? 10.15am Nutrition and natural therapies for new mothers 11.00am Morning Tea 11.30am Floppy Poppies: The effects and assessment of poor tone 12.30pm Lunch 1.30pm Vitamins and minerals Vitamin D, Zinc, Iron and others 2.15pm Fathers: an undervalued resource 3.00pm Afternoon Tea 3.15pm Increasing and decreasing milk supply using herbs 4.15 pm Close

Who should attend? Lactation consultants, midwives, maternal and child health nurses, medical doctors, breastfeeding counsellors and allied health professionals - in fact anyone who works with mothers and babies. The seminar will be highly interactive, with sufficient time for discussion in each session. Accreditation 5.25 IBCLC CERPs have been awarded for this program. Midplus points have been applied for.

For more information and to book online please go to

www.breastfeedingconferences.com.au 48 THE LAMP august 2011


EXPRESSIONS of INTEREST

Diary Dates Diary Dates is a free service for members. Please send diary date details, in the same format used here – event, date, venue, con­tact details, via email, fax and the web, before the 5th of the month prior, for example: 5 May for June Lamp. Send information to: Editorial Enquiries Email: lamp@nswnurses.asn.au Fax: 9550 3667 50 O’Dea Ave, Waterloo NSW 2017 Please double-check all information is correct. The Lamp cannot guarantee that the issue will always be mailed in time for the listed event. 24 November, Manchester Contact: : www.mkupdate.co.uk The International Conference on Integrative Medicine 13-15 May 2012, Jerusalem Contact: +41 22 5330 948, rlevy@ paragon-conventions.com www.mediconvention.com

Reunions Lewisham Hospital Reunion Graduates of 1986 20 August, 5.30pm till late, Haberfield Rowers, Dobroyd Parade, Haberfield Contact: Virginia Carroll, arthurianfan@ hotmail.com, 0419 423749 or Sandy Perazza, sandyperazza@hotmail. com, 0418 971097

Due to high demands on the page, some dates, too close to publica­tion or too far in the future, may be cut. Only Diary Dates with an advised date and contact person will be published. Special Interest Groups Special Interest Groups is now part of Diary Dates. If you are a special in­te­rest group, you must send infor­ mation about your event as above. Diary Dates are also on the web – www.nswnurses.asn.au/events

Send us your snaps If you’re having a reunion, send us some photos and any information from the night, and we’ll try to publish them. Contact: Jeanette Fox, 4751 4829 Charles Sturt University Bathurst 1989-1991 Reunion 5 November, 7pm, Church Bar, Bathurst Contact: Grant Frecklington, 0418 610 288 St Vincents Hospital Darlinghurst January and March 1972 PTS 40-year Reunion Feb 2012. Contact: Jennifer Purcell 0418944320 jennacell86@gmail.com RPAH April 1979 Grad. Reunion April 2012. Contact: Jane Howland, 6581 3381

Crossword solution

Mount Warrigal Nursing Home Reunion 17 September, 3-12pm, Seaspray Function Centre, Beach Rd, Shellharbour. Contact: Jeanette van Hees, 0402 811 208, 4297 3027 or Kathy Breeze, 4256 3645

The Nursing and Midwifery Council of New South Wales regulates registered nurses and midwives in New South Wales (NSW) in accordance with the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law (NSW). The Nursing and Midwifery Council is seeking to identify suitably qualified nurses and midwives to become professional panel members of the Nursing and Midwifery Tribunal, Professional Standards Committee and Performance Review Panel and Impaired Registrants Panel. NURSES AND MIDWIVES – PROFESSIONAL PANEL MEMBER Registered nurses (Div I or Div II enrolled nurses) and midwives with suitable registration, experience and current knowledge and skills are required to act as a professional member of a three or four member Tribunal, Committee or Panel. Applicants must demonstrate: n Current ‘general’ registration in accordance with Section 52 of the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law (NSW) n Recency of practice * n A minimum of five years experience in the practice of nursing and/or midwifery n Evidence of continuing professional development* n Knowledge of the Code of Professional Conduct, Code of Ethics, National Competency Standards and Boundaries of Professional Practice* and n Evidence of leadership activity within clinical/professional/ educational/governance contexts. * the registration and competency standards, codes and guidelines are available at www.nursingmidwiferyboard.gov.au

Common criteria: n Understanding of the jurisdiction and functions of professional people on Tribunals, Committees and Panels n An understanding of the role of professional people on Tribunals, Committees and Panels n A commitment to public protection n An understanding of relevant ethical concepts including conflict of interest n The ability to act fairly, independently and objectively n The ability to understand and analyse complex factual issues relating to the provision of health care services, and n Good written and oral communication skills and interpersonal skills.

Sydney Hospital Graduate Nurses Annual Reunion Lunch 5 October, 12noon, Parliament House – Macquarie Street, Sydney

FREE taxation advice given with all consultations. Electronic lodgment (10 day refund) 16 years taxation experience Competitive rates Fee from refund

Nursing and Midwifery Professional Members for Tribunal, Professional Standards Committee, Performance Review Panel and Impaired Registrant Panel

Enquiries by day, nights or weekends or by phone, fax or email if that suits you Advice based on occupational rulings Location – Randwick Derek Ryder is a CPA Practice

• tax243@bigpond.com.au Licensed Tax Agent

Registrants are requested to submit their interest in writing addressing the above points and provide a brief curriculum vitae and the names and contact details of two referees. The expression of interest including the curriculum vitae should be no more than eight (8) pages. If you require further information contact Kim Bryant on 02 9219 0249 or mail@nursingandmidwiferycouncil.nsw.gov.au Expressions of interest are to be submitted to Kim Bryant, Nursing and Midwifery Council of New South Wales, Locked Bag 20 Haymarket NSW 1238 or mail@nursingandmidwiferycouncil. nsw.gov.au by 19 August 2011.

THE LAMP august 2011 49


!

DID YOU WORK FOR THE NHS IN THE UK? !

THE NHS UK PENSION FUND PROVIDES EXCELLENT BENEFITS, BUT THERE ARE SIGNIFICANT BENEFITS AVAILABLE BY TRANSFERRING YOUR PENSION TO AUSTRALIA

If you worked for the NHS in the UK you have probably subscribed to the NHS Pension Fund. This is one of the better pension plans in the UK and provides excellent benefits to its members. You can transfer your NHS pension into the Australian superannuation system; the systems are regulated differently and there are a number of factors to be considered before transferring your fund to Australia. Your NHS Pension currently provides a guaranteed pension on retirement. In the event of your death it also provides for a reduced rate of pension to be paid to your surviving spouse and dependent children. The promise of a guaranteed income in retirement offers a real feeling of security and is definitely not something which should be given up easily.

Any pension you receive from your UK fund will be classed as income in Australia and will be taxable regardless of whether you actually bring it into Australia or not.

If your UK pension is used to provide you an income in Australia, it will be subject to exchange rate fluctuations. People living in Australia who rely on UK pension payments have seen their ‘living income’ fall by 24% during the last 3 years. If you transfer your fund to Australia, you will receive a consistent tax free income in retirement.

However, there are number of advantages available should you decide to transfer, for example:•

If you leave your pension fund in the UK, you will be entitled to a lump sum on retirement which is completely tax free in the UK but part of which will be taxable in Australia. Lump sums paid on retirement from Australian superannuation funds are not taxed.

Once transferred, you can continue to grow your superannuation fund during your retirement. In the UK your pension will be a fixed amount with inflationary increases. On your death the entire unused balance of your superannuation fund can be passed to your nominated beneficiaries. This is a significant benefit when compared with the reduced benefits paid from the UK pension scheme.

Michael Bennett Director – Chief Executive UHY Haines Norton Chartered Accountants You are required to pay tax on the growth within the fund from the date you became tax resident in Australia to the date of the transfer. This tax can be paid by your superfund at a rate of only 15% rather than your personal tax rate. The payment of this tax is generally a small price to pay for the future tax benefits gained by making the transfer. Your visa status is also relevant when considering whether or not to transfer. Whilst there are tax benefits to be gained by doing so within 6 months of your arrival in Australia, there are ‘pitfalls’ that are often overlooked. If you are attracted by the advantages of transferring we would recommend you seek financial advice. We can help you with the decision making process through our free consultation service and the production of a free transfer report which includes a tax analysis. Having obtained your report you are under no obligation to use our transfer service. We want you to be absolutely sure that you are doing the right thing for yourself and your family before you decide to proceed. If you do decide to proceed to transfer, our specialist team would be delighted to assist. You will be advised of the cost of the service before proceeding. If you would like to know more please contact us

pensions@uhyperth.com.au 16 Lakeside Corporate 24 Parkland Road OSBORNE PARK WA 6017 Telephone:+ 61 (8) 9444 3400 Facsimile: + 61 (8) 9242 3762 www.uhyperth.com.au

An association of independent firms in Australia and New Zealand and a member of UHY, an international association of independent 50 THE LAMP august 2011 accounting and consulting firms


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First State Super

the fund for all Nurses

First State Super options are simple-to-understand, well priced and what our members want. First State Super has made super a whole lot easier for nurses

First State Super – take us with you whenever you work!

…And stay with us when you retire with a choice of two First State Super income streams.

More information Web:

www.firststatesuper.com.au

Phone: 1300 650 873 Email: enquiries@firststatesuper.com.au

Low fees | Simple | Open Consider the First State Super Product Disclosure Statement having regard to your own situation before deciding whether becoming a member or continuing your membership is right for you. A copy is available by calling us or visiting our website. The information contained in this document is current as at June 2011. Prepared by FSS Trustee Corporation ABN 11 118 202 672, AFSL 293340, the trustee of First State Superannuation Scheme ABN 53 226 460 365. 52 THE LAMP august 2011

FSS NURSES LAM 0611

If you work in either a public or private hospital (or perhaps both) you can use First State Super for all your super requirements. This could include your employer’s superannuation guarantee (SG) contributions if they provide choice of fund. You may need to complete a Standard Choice form – visit Brochures and forms on our website for a copy.

The Lamp August 2011  

In this issue: Funding for 1400 extra nurses has been delivered to the Public Health System due to the ratios campaign. how do we attract th...

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