Page 1

Supreme Court strikes down key part of Voting Rights Act. A5

Sumter P-15’s Andrew Reardon returns to mound after long pitching absence

B1 VOL. 118, NO. 212 WWW.THEITEM.COM

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 | SUMTER, SOUTH CAROLINA

FOUNDED OCTOBER 15, 1894

60 CENTS

Government: Tuomey team to blame Sides file new motions in ongoing legal battle BY BRADEN BUNCH bbunch@theitem.com In very direct terms, federal prosecutors place the blame for Tuomey Healthcare System’s current legal dilemma at the feet of the local hospital’s management team and board of directors in a brief filed with the

United States District Court late Monday night. “It is Tuomey’s own management and board who are responsible for permitting the damages and penalties to amount to the level ultimately found by the jury,” the federal government writes in its motion supporting the request for a judgment of more than $237 million

against the local hospital. The motion later argues, “Tuomey’s executives and management decided to throw caution to the wind and refused to terminate the contracts until the first jury declared them illegal.” In fact, the government said if Tuomey ended the contracts when it initially learned of potential illegali-

ties, the fines would have amounted to less than $5 million — much less than what it now faces. Last month, Tuomey was found guilty by a 10-person federal court jury of violating both Stark Law and the False Claims Act by collecting more than $39.3 million in fraudulent Medicare claims between 2005 and 2009. They did so, the government argued, by signing 19 local physicians to lucrative part-time

New general takes command of Third Army Cannons are fired at Shaw Air Force Base on Tuesday to signal the change of command from Lt. Gen. Vincent K. Brooks to Lt. Gen. James L. Terry on Tuesday, the first commander of the Third Army installed at the command’s Sumter headquarters.

PHOTO BY SGT. 1ST CLASS NICHOLAS SALCIDO, THIRD ARMY/ARCENT PUBLIC AFFAIRS

SEE TUOMEY, PAGE A8

Dixon owns SWEET 16, not district Bynum asked chief of schools to copyright evaluation system BY BRADEN BUNCH bbunch@theitem.com

PHOTOS BY BRISTOW MARCHANT / THE ITEM

INSET: Lt. Gen. Terry receives the Third Army colors from Vice Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. John F. Campbell assuming command of Third Army/ARCENT during a change of command ceremony held at Patton Hall’s Lucky Park.

Lt. Gen. Terry takes reins during ceremony BY BRISTOW MARCHANT bmarchant@theitem.com A new general is now in charge of administrative control of U.S. Army forces throughout the Middle East, including supporting ground operations in the ongoing war in Afghanistan. In a Tuesday morning ceremony, Lt. Gen. James L. Terry assumed command of the Third Army and U.S. Army Central, the first change of command since the Third Army moved to its current headquarters at Shaw Air Force Base. Terry is familiar with the challenges facing American soldiers in the

nearly 12-year war against the Taliban and al-Qaeda elements. He served in Afghanistan from June 2012 as commander of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) Joint Command, part of the NATO-led security mission. He was simultaneously deputy commander of U.S. Forces-Afghanistan and commander of the U.S. Army V Corps, responsible for command and control for all U.S. forces in Afghanistan. Now, as head of the Third Army, Terry will oversee the “retrograde” action of moving thousands of soldiers and SEE CHANGE, PAGE A6

The SWEET 16 teacher evaluation system used by the Sumter School District is the property of Cassandra Dixon, the district’s chief of schools, and not the district itself, several members of the district’s board of trustees discovered during their meeting Monday night. The revelation, which caused further concerns with trustees regarding the embattled evaluaDIXON tion system, came while INSIDE trustees were Trustees OK $9.7M questionbond for technoloing Dixon gy upgrades. A4 about the end-ofthe-year review of the program. During the first two hours of a three-hour meeting, trustees raised several questions with both Dixon concerning SWEET 16 — or “Systematic Way to Ensure Effective Teaching” — and Lisa Norman, chief curriculum officer for the district, concerning the district’s standardsbased report card grading system. At the trustees’ previous meeting this month, officials discussed changes to both programs, including reducing the number of SWEET 16 evaluations by half in the coming school year, and the modification and expansion of the standards-based report cards for earlier grades to include third grade next school year. After acknowledging her ownership of the system during questioning by trustee Karen Michalik, Dixon SEE SWEET 16, PAGE A4

An Army trumpeter plays as part of Tuesday’s change of command ceremony.

DEATHS

20 N. Magnolia St. Sumter, SC 29150 (USPS 525-900)

www.theitem.com

Information: 774-1200 Advertising: 774-1236 Classifieds: 774-1234 Delivery: 774-1258 News, Sports: 774-1226

OUTSIDE HUMID

William K. Bradham Sr. Harriett Martin Ray Branham Michael E. Cox Sr. Vermell A. McFadden

INSIDE 3 SECTIONS, 24 PAGES

Partly sunny and humid with a storm today B6

HIGH: 90 LOW: 72 A8

Classifieds Comics Daily Planner Opinion Television Classifieds

B7 C6 A8 A7 C7 B7


A2

SECOND FRONT THE ITEM

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013 Contact the newsroom at 803-774-1226 or e-mail news@theitem.com

Free, rapid HIV testing happening Thursday BY JADE ANDERSON janderson@theitem.com Treatment for HIV has improved during the years, but the first step is getting tested. Thursday is National HIV Testing Day, and as an S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control Expansion Rapid HIV Testing Site, Sumter Family Health Center is promoting the free, confidential test that takes only 10 minutes for a preliminary result. “It’s a finger stick test just like for testing blood sugar,” said Tonya Bozeman, the HIV nurse and official tester. “It basically looks like a pregnancy test. One line, you’re good. Two lines, we need to do some counseling.” Interested individuals can walk in any time the clinic is open. They don’t need to be regular patients at the center or have an appointment, she said. “Nobody knows what you’re coming for,” Bozeman said. “That’s one of the pluses of having an HIV clinic in a family health center.” Ramelle Coker, director of case management, agreed. “People have no idea what you’re in there for,” she said. “You could be there for family health, behavioral health, peds

(pediatrics). It’s a lot easier to remain anonymous.” Remaining stigmas, she said, often hold people back from being tested, and that is why the clinic works so hard to keep everything as confidential as possible. About 1.1 million Americans live with HIV, and one in four don’t know they are positive, said Holly Chase, director of community development for Sumter Family Health Center. “Knowing your status is hugely important,” Coker said. “A lot of people come into the hospital sick and find out or when they get pregnant. If they had been tested, they might have prevented some of those major illnesses.” A person may get a free test every three months, Bozeman said, and that is recommended for people with risky behaviors such as intravenous drug use. The Centers for Disease Control would like everyone ages 15 to 65 to be tested annually. “If you are sexually active, even if you don’t have several partners, you need to be tested,” she said. “I know I’m behaving, but you don’t always know if the other person is. You can’t look at somebody and tell. The only way to know

BY THE NUMBERS 1 in 4 Number of Americans who don’t know they are HIV positive

3rd Where Sumter County ranks in the state for HIV infections

3 months How often people can get free rapid HIV testing

8th Where South Carolina ranks in the nation among HIV infection rates

15 to 65 The age range the Centers for Disease Control recommends is tested annually

99.9 percent How accurate the rapid test is

100 a month The number of new people the center would like to see getting tested

300 The estimated number of HIV-positive clients Sumter Family Health serves monthly

1.1 million The estimated number of Americans living with HIV infection

is to be tested.” If the preliminary test does come back positive, the next step is drawing blood to send off for a confirmatory test, which takes a few days to come back, Bozeman said. While she

has had a false positive, the test is 99.9 percent accurate, so it’s rare. “They are usually shocked,” Bozeman said. “We give them education and explain to them HIV is not the death sentence it used to be. Now it’s basically a chronic illness like diabetes and high blood pressure.” Sumter Family Health Center currently serves about 300 clients monthly who are HIV positive, she said, and the center is not the only HIV clinic in town. Sumter County is third highest in the state among HIV infection rates, and South Carolina is eighth in the nation, she added. If a person is diagnosed HIV positive, the next step is meeting with Wanda Gregg, linkage care coordinator and medical case manager. She helps them understand their care options at the center or helps them get referred out to receive care of their choosing, Gregg said. Rosa Nowell, public health assistant, also helps individuals with treatment. While some clients still need a collection of medication, some companies now offer one dose that combines multiple medicines. “It’s still up to the individual and the doctor’s discretion,” she said. “They do tests and

look at overall lifestyle to determine the class of medication.” The biggest step is getting past the initial news of it. “They might have a little slip along the way, but they’ll call and talk to me or one of the case managers,” Nowell said. “The majority of them we treat as if they are family, friends or classmates. We just keep it real, and they pretty much are managing, doing what they need to do.” As part of the Midlands Care Consortium — which serves eight counties including Sumter, Clarendon and Lee — case managers can help clients with transportation, emergency assistance, housing, etc., Coker said. “Our biggest goal is getting them in care, getting them to stay in care and making sure they take their medicine,” she said. And while National HIV Testing Day is a good reminder to get checked, Coker hopes that people will remember they can get tested any day Sumter Family Health Center is open. She wants to see their numbers increase to 100 per month, Coker said. Reach Jade Anderson at (803) 774-1250.

Wade through muck of human interference to discover your faith

A

long with millions of viewers across the world, my husband and I watched with great interest this past Sunday as sky walker Nik Wallenda, a professional daredevil, traversed a gorge near the Grand Canyon about 1,500 feet high on a 2-inch cable. Wallenda narrated his 23-minute walk across the canyon with a sort of streaming prayer, praising God for His creation and asking Him to still the winds that swayed the line. In the name of his faith, Wallenda said, was the power to perform the stunt. In a half hour, Wallenda held the attention of a captive audience, most of whom watched rapt at the death-defying event. “In Jesus’ name,” Wallenda said over and over. It certainly made me feel a sense of pride in the fact that I share Wallenda’s convictions, that great things can be done in the name of faith. I don’t know the direct blessing Wallenda got from the stunt, but I know that his prayer echoed in the hearts of many who can relate, at least metaphorically, to the feat. Wallenda’s successful crossing of the gorge

stood in juxtaposition with a local recent happening in which another person supposedly used faith to accomplish something sinister. Last Friday, local pastor Kevin DuRant of Word International Ministries was charged with multiple sexual batteries against three female church members, at least one of whom is a minor. The pastor allegedly coerced his victims by promising spiritual blessings in exchange for sexual contact, according to police reports. It’s heinous to contemplate that anyone would manipulate a child in this manner, not to mention a man charged with the spiritual guidance of a church. We know that such an act repulses the Almighty. In Matthew 18:6, the biblical author spells out the severity of such depravity: “If anyone causes one of these little ones — those who believe in me — to stumble, it would be better for them to have a large millstone hung around their neck and to be drowned in the depths of the sea.” My prayer is — if DuRant is guilty of these crimes — that the alleged victims are able to heal through their

REGULAR SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Home Delivery — Tuesday through Sunday: One year $144; Six months - $75.25; Three months - $40; Two months - $27.50; One month - $13.75; EZPay - $12 per month. Saturday and Sunday: One year - $72; Six months - $36.75; Three months - $18.50; One month, $6.25. Mail — One year - $249; Six months - $124.50; Three months - $62.25; one month - $20.95. OUTLYING RURAL ROUTE SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Home Delivery — Tuesday through Sunday: One year -

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Aerialist Nik Wallenda walks a 2-inch-thick steel cable taking him a quarter mile over the Little Colorado River Gorge, Ariz., on Sunday. The daredevil successfully traversed the tightrope strung 1,500 feet above the chasm near the Grand Canyon in just more than 22 minutes.

faith. I hope they do not carry hesitation in their own spiritual lives because of the possible actions of one person. Two people, two instances where one’s faith was invoked to accomplish something. While we smile at Wallenda’s gusto, the vast majority of us cringe in disgust at the idea of a pastor abusing his position in the church to harm another person. As disheartening as it is, some use their faith for personal gain and not to the glory of an Almighty being. These people wield their knowledge of spiritual matters as a tool, crudely fashioned into something it was never meant to be and perverted to suit their impulses. Throughout history,

$153; Six months - $81.25; Three months - $43; Two months, $29; One month - $14.50. EZPay, $12.75 per month. Saturday and Sunday: One year - $84; Six months - $43; Three months - $22; One month - $7.50. HOME DELIVERY: Call (803) 774-1258, Mon-Fri, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sat./Sun., 7 to 11 a.m. The Item is published six days a week except for July 4, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years Day (unless it falls on a Sunday) by Osteen Publishing Co., 20 N. Magnolia St., Sumter,

mankind has done some truly horrible things in the name of a faith, creed or religion — the Crusades, violent jihad, bombing of abortion clinics, cult suicide. The remarkable thing is that very rarely do tenets of a particular faith condone harmful action. Every person who labels his or her actions as the manifestation of religious beliefs is not necessarily beholding to the intent of that faith. The question becomes: How do we sort through the muck of human interference in religion? How does one know what is true and what is a manipulation? Spiritual faith is the framework for our everyday lives, for those of us who believe. Our decisions or personal inter-

actions are to be guided by our faith. Any joy should spring from a conviction to see others know that unconditional love from our Creator. Any righteous indignation should be founded in a desire to see justice done around us. If we are to be vigilant, then our first step is to become familiar with what we believe. A guarded heart is one girded with information. Spiritual faith is not just a warm feeling in the pit of your stomach. Its foundations are rooted in intellectual pursuits by various people since the beginning of time. Simply put, God gave you a brain. Use it. Certainly it is a good practice to be dubious of any practice that stands in contrast to years and

years of tradition, but don’t let tradition dictate your understanding. Find out for yourself what you believe, then teach your children to do the same so the knowledge of their faith is not just inherited but earned. Finally, accept the fact that people are flawed, but our Heavenly Father is perfect and loves us completely. Even the most spiritual among us will inevitably trip up, and they will have to deal with the consequences of their actions. That is why we must not look to others for a sense of security but in the one who holds our hearts. Reach Jamie H. Wilson at faithmatterssumter@gmail.com.

SC 29150. Periodical postage paid at Sumter, SC 29150. Postmaster: Send address changes to Osteen Publishing Co., 20 N. Magnolia St., Sumter, SC 29150 Publication No. USPS 525-900 Member, Verified Audit Circulation.

Publishing Co. as agent. No responsibility for advance payments is assumed by the company until the money is received at this office.

NATIONAL ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE: All carriers and dealers of The Item are independent contractors. Advance payment for subscriptions may be made directly to Osteen

RECYCLING: This newspaper is printed on recycled paper and uses environmentally safe soy inks to reduce ruboff. It is recyclable.

CORRECTIONS: If you see a statement in error, contact the City Desk. Corrections will appear on this page.


LOCAL / STATE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

POLICE BLOTTER CHARGES:

Ozie Swinton, 55, of 4760 Peach Orchard Road in Rembert, was charged June 19 with driving under suspension, fifth offense, and violation of the state habitual traffic offender statute after a Sumter sheriff’s deputy stopped his Mercedes on S.C. 441 after seeing a small child sitting in the lap of a female passenger. According to reports, Swinton exited the vehicle and told deputies that he lacked a valid driver’s license. There were reportedly six minor children in the vehicle without seatbelts or car seats. Diana Susanne Wheat, 25, of 740 Bay Springs Drive, Sumter, was arrested and charged with driving under the influence and unlawful conduct toward a child following an incident that reportedly occurred about 9:05 a.m. Thursday. Deputies found a 6-year-old boy riding his bike on McCrays Mill Road near a fast food restaurant, and when they returned him to his home, the door was open, and the place was empty. The suspect returned home and was stumbling when she got out of the truck, according to reports. She allegedly told deputies she’d been out since 11 p.m. drinking and had left her son home alone. Durell Allen James, 27, of 316 Church St., Apartment B, was arrested and charged with failure to stop for blue light; driving under the influence, second offense; and driving under suspension, third offense, following an incident that reportedly occurred about 10:15 p.m. Friday at the intersection of Manning Avenue and Harvin Street. An anonymous person reported a possible drunken driver in a dark-colored Pontiac headed north on U.S. 15 South, and when deputies located the vehicle, they reportedly watched the driver cross the center line

| three times. Despite activating blue lights, the driver did not stop until he pulled into the driveway at 316 Church St. The suspect then failed sobriety tests, and a records check indicated this would be his second offense for DUI and third offense for DUS. Jade Nicole King, 27, of 2910 Dutch Branch Road, was arrested and charged with drug possession, disorderly public conduct and transporting alcohol with a broken seal in a motor vehicle about 11 p.m. Friday in the 2000 block of Dutch Branch Road. Deputies responded to a suspicious vehicle and found the suspect passed out. Behind the driver’s seat, deputies reportedly found a half-empty bottle of vodka. When awoken, the suspect became combative and was placed in handcuffs. A search of the vehicle revealed a clear bag with a green, leafy substance thought to be marijuana in the center console. Westley Allante Brown, 24, of 5695 Brogdon Road, Alcolu, was arrested and charged with credit card fraud and simple possession of marijuana following an incident that reportedly occurred about 1:49 p.m. Saturday at a business in the first block of Sawgrass Court. The suspect reportedly got cash for letting individuals use a credit card to get gas. Deputies witnessed it, the suspect admitted it and witnesses confirmed it. A small, rolled cigar that he confirmed was marijuana was found in his lap. Phillip Victor Pridgen, 41, of 34 Glenwood Drive, was charged with possession of marijuana, third offense, and possession of drug paraphernalia about 5:42 p.m. Saturday. Besides the two grams of suspected marijuana, deputies found a 12-ounce soda can with a hole punched in the side and a six-inch white tubelike straw.

THE ITEM

STOLEN PROPERTY:

Four new tires valued at $800, one Frigidaire air-conditioning window unit valued at $400, a 60foot piece of copper wire valued at $2,000 and an orange-and-yellow Poulan chain saw valued at $400 were reportedly stolen from a business in the 5000 block of Rooster Circle, Pinewood, about 10:27 a.m. Thursday. The front door sustained an estimated $100 in damage. A Stihl gas weed trimmer valued at $400, a gas Stihl edger valued at $400 and a Dumount gas weed trimmer valued at $400 were reportedly taken between 10 p.m. Saturday and 6:30 a.m. Sunday from a backyard in the 2000 block of Kolb Road. DAMAGED PROPERTY:

A white Cadillac SRX reportedly sustained an estimated $6,000 in damage from at least seven bullet shots about 4:03 a.m. Sunday in the 4000 block of Broad Street. Multiple bullet fragments and one .40-caliber shell casing were found at the scene. Two air-conditioning units reportedly sustained an estimated $1,000 in damage about 2:55 a.m. Tuesday in the 800 block of Salterstown Road, Sumter. CRIMINAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE:

A 33-year-old man reportedly told deputies that a 26-year-old woman cut him in the chest with an unknown object, and she reportedly told law enforcement he choked her and held her down on the bed about 8:30 p.m. Saturday at a home in the 4000 block of Wrangler Trail. The man had two marks on the left side of his chest, and the woman did not have any visible injuries. Both refused EMS, and both were advised to seek warrants.

Start the day right. Read The

Item.

A3

Court: Child not required to go to Indian father WASHINGTON (AP) — A divided Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that federal law doesn’t require that a Native American girl be given back to her biological father, but also doesn’t clear her adoptive parents to immediately regain custody of the now 3-year-old child. In a resolution that one justice said could compound “the anguish this case has caused,” the high court voted 5-4 to send the case back to courts in South Carolina to determine the final home for an adopted little girl named Veronica. South Carolina courts originally said the 1978 Indian Child Welfare Act — a federal law intended to keep Indian children from being taken from their homes and typically placed with non-Indian adoptive or foster parents — favored her living with her biological father, who took custody of her in 2011. But the South Carolina couple who raised her for the first 27 months of her life appealed that decision, and justices have ordered her case reconsidered. Justice Samuel Alito, writing for the court’s majority, said the ICWA didn’t apply in this case because the biological father never had custody of the child and abandoned her before birth. The law “doesn’t apply in cases where the Indian parent never had custody of the Indian child,” said Alito, who was joined in his opinion by Chief Justice John Roberts, and Justices Anthony Kennedy, Clarence Thomas and Stephen Breyer.

WE BUY GOLD! Per Penny Weight Per Gram 10 KT $24.00 14 KT $35.00 16 KT $42.00 18 KT $46.00 22 KT $59.00

10 KT $15.72 14 KT $22.76 16 KT $27.24 18 KT $29.80 22 KT $38.12

All prices above based on gold market price.

“We buy Silver Coins & Sterling also”

Gold Shop & Big T 6600 60 00 BBultman l Drive D i | Sumter, S SC 29150 | (803) 774-6767 46 6 520 West Boyce Street | Manning, SC 29102 | (803) 435-8094

Need to lose some extra energy spending? Get a free Home Energy Report.

In Manning as of July 1st Shrink your energy bill this summer. Get started with a free Home Energy Report: „ Learn

easy ways to save energy and money the best energy improvements for your home „ Qualify for great rebates „ Identify

Get your personalized, no-obligation report today at duke-energy.com/energydiet

Art Bradham CPA 2 Law Range, Sumter

774-1040 art@artbradham.com


A4

LOCAL

THE ITEM

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

Trustees OK $9.7M bond for technology upgrades • Approved resolutions naming Bynum as the district’s official representative for Title I & Title III Authorization grants. • Appointed trustees Larry Addison and Barbara Jackson as the Public Information Committee. • Announced the next meeting of the Policy and Procedures Committee will be July 18. • Approved a trip by the Sumter High School theatre department to the American High School Theatre Festival in Edinburgh, Scotland in August 2014. Contact Braden Bunch at (803) 774-1201.

concerns that the district would be left without a teacher evaluation system should Dixon end her current employment. “If she goes or something, it’s not going to be a situation where we’re going to have somebody telling us we can’t use it,” Bynum said. “Because, again, the purpose of it was to be utilized here.”

Plush or Firm

Locally Owned & Operated Since 1976

$799 $499 King Set Queen Set $299 $249 Queen Set Full Set

The Ultimate Sleep Shop LARGE SELECTION IN STOCK / FUTONS / IRON BEDS / WATERBED SUPPLIES

CENTER

Eddie C. Durant, Jr., D.D.S.

ens

t.

Dr.

Bro ad

Gregory A. Wheeler, D.M.D.

Due to circumstances out of our control we are currently operating at this temporary location. Please call to conirm appointments. We plan to rebuild at our original 852 W. Liberty Street location. St.

NEW PATIENTS ARE WELCOME MEMBER OF

Bultman

S. Wise Dr.

ad S

Bultman

Us!

TEMPORARY LOCATION

Bro

FINANCING AVAILABLE

748 BULTMAN DR. SUMTER SC 803.773.0980

DENTAL

re Walg

Dixon pointed out that the copyright ownership would allow her to use the evaluation program should she become employed with another district. “Can I take SWEET 16 with me? It is mine to take with me,” Dixon said. Contact Braden Bunch at (803) 7741201.

SALE STARTS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26

Dr.

Print your celebrations in The Item: New Arrivals, Engagements, Weddings, Anniversaries and Renewal of Vows. Call 774-1226.

ise

Randolph Bynum, who brought both Dixon and Norman with him from Atlanta Public Schools when he was hired to oversee the local school district. “We don’t have any designs of going out and trying to raise money.” Bynum added he personally asked Dixon to copyright the SWEET 16 program. “SWEET 16 was developed before I came to Sumter School District,” Dixon said. “I brought SWEET 16 to Sumter School District with me.” In fact, a search with the United States Copyright Office shows Dixon filed for the copyright on the text of the program on

• Presented ex-officio board member Lt. Col. Robert Snodgrass a certificate of appreciation for his service with the board of trustees as the Shaw Air Force Base representative. Snodgrass and his family are transferring to San Antonio. • Unanimously approved an $18.7 million tax anticipation note for the coming fiscal year. This is a procedure often performed by governmental entities to provide funding. • Approved a low-cost $480,000 loan to retrofit the lighting at Sumter High, Bates Middle and Alice Drive Middle schools to be more energy efficient.

tainly wasn’t and Dr. Dixon certainly wasn’t,” Bynum responded. “We protected it so nobody, no other district, could go out and claim it was theirs.” Since its development, Dixon said she has presented SWEET 16 at several educational conferences. Trustee Barbara Jackson also echoed

S. W

stressed there are no attempts being made by her or others to profit financially from the program and reiterated the local district still owns the data and what has been developed so far with the system. “I understand that what we’ve done so far belongs to us, but if we fall out of love and you leave, you can take it with you, and you can also prevent us from further using it,” Michalik asked, to which Dixon replied, “Why would I do that?” When pressed by Michalik, however, Dixon recognized that she would have the legal right to either stop the school district from using the evaluation system, or force the district to pay a fee to continue using SWEET 16. Superintendent Randolph Bynum defended the decision to privately copyright the program, saying it was to protect the interests of the local district. “We did that at the time so we could own it and bring it here,” said Superintendent

May 18, 2011. “I have a problem with that,” trustee the Rev. Ralph Canty said during the meeting. “I have a problem that we’ve had this program in place for two years, going into its third year, and I’ve never heard that before.” “It’s not something that somebody was trying to hide. I cer-

Dr.

SWEET 16 from Page A1

are also included in the approved bond issue. And while there was a brief discussion among the trustees concerning how it was determined which schools were chosen to receive upgrades, ultimately the bond passed unanimously. Despite the sizeable investment in technology, most of the money — more than $6.2 million — will be used to pay back previous bond issuances. Steve Mann, chief financial officer of the district, said by doing this the new bond will not result in an increase in taxes for local property owners. In other action, the trustees:

ise

The Sumter School District Board of Trustees approved a $9.7 million bond to make various technology purchases for the district, including 1,000 computers for classrooms and additional laptop computers for all teachers in the previous Sumter School District 2 schools. The classroom computers, the second installment in a five-year plan to replace all of the nearly 6,400 computers in the district’s schools, will cost more than $926,000 and will include the purchase of 150 classroom printers, as well.

The laptop computers, specifically for teachers at former District 2 schools, are expected to cost more than $1 million. Superintendent Randolph Bynum said the purchase is to give these teachers the same technology former District 17 teachers already had available to them. The bond will also pay to replace the district’s main server, as well as iMac labs for the district’s three high schools, phone systems for six schools and new interactive projectors for four schools. Various roofing, painting and parking lot improvements for various locations throughout the district

S. W

BY BRADEN BUNCH bbunch@theitem.com

Dr.

TEMPORARY LOCATION

740 Bultman Drive Convenient Office Hours: 7:00 a.m.–7:30 p.m. Monday–Friday

CARDS

AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION

436-2934 INSURANCE ACCOUNT INFORMATION

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR APPOINTMENT!

803.773.3328 www.SumterDental.com


NATION

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

THE ITEM

A5

Supreme Court strikes down key part of voting law BY MARK SHERMAN The Associated Press WASHINGTON — A deeply divided Supreme Court threw out the most powerful part of the landmark Voting Rights Act on Tuesday, a decision deplored by the White House but cheered by mostly Southern states now free from nearly 50 years of intense federal oversight of their elections. Split along ideological and partisan lines, the justices voted 5-4 to strip the government of its most potent tool to stop voting bias — the requirement in the Voting Rights Act that all or parts of 15 states with a history of discrimination in voting, mainly in the South, get Washington’s approval before changing the way they hold elections. Chief Justice John Roberts, writing for a majority of conservative, Republican-appointed justices, said the law’s provision that determines which states are covered is unconstitutional because it relies on 40-year-old data and does not account for racial progress and other changes in U.S. society. The decision effectively puts an end to the advance approval requirement that has been used to open up polling places to minority voters in the nearly half

century since it was first enacted in 1965, unless Congress can come up with a new formula that Roberts said meets “current conditions� in the United States. That seems unlikely to happen any time soon. President Obama, the nation’s first black chief executive, issued a statement saying he was “deeply disappointed� with the ruling and calling on Congress to update the law. But in the South, Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley said that, while the requirement was necessary in the 1960s, that was no longer the case. He said, “We have long lived up to what happened then, and we have made sure it’s not going to happen again.� The advance approval, or preclearance, requirement shifted the legal burden and re-

quired governments that were covered to demonstrate that their proposed election changes would not discriminate. Going forward, the outcome alters the calculus of passing election-related legislation in the affected states and local jurisdictions. The threat of an objection from Washington has hung over such proposals for nearly a half century. Unless Congress acts, that deterrent now is gone. That prospect has upset civil rights groups which especially worry that changes on the local level might not get the same scrutiny as the actions of state legislatures. Tuesday’s decision means that a host of state and local laws that have not received Justice Department ap-

proval or have not yet been submitted can take effect. Prominent among those are voter identification laws in Alabama and Mississippi. Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott, a Republican, said his state’s voter ID law, which a panel of federal judges blocked as discriminatory, also would be allowed to take effect. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, dissenting from the ruling along with the court’s three other liberal, Democratic appointees, said there was no mistaking the court’s action. “Hubris is a fit word for today’s demolition�

of the law, she said. Reaction to the ruling from elected officials generally divided along partisan lines. Mississippi Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves, a Republican, said in a news release, “The practice of preclearance unfairly applied to certain states should be eliminated in recognition of the progress Mississippi has made over the past 48 years.� But Democratic Rep. Bennie Thompson, the only black lawmaker in Mississippi’s congressional delegation, said the ruling “guts the most critical portion of the most important civil

rights legislation of our time.� Alabama Gov. Bentley, a Republican, pointed to his state’s legislature — 27 percent black, similar to Alabama’s overall population — as a sign of the state’s progress. The prior approval requirement had applied to the states of Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Texas and Virginia. It also covered certain counties in California, Florida, New York, North Carolina and South Dakota, and some local jurisdictions in Michigan.

ATTENTION FORMER

YUASA-EXIDE EMPLOYEES

...........Think.......... Lafayette L f Gold G ld & Silver Exchange We Buy Gold & Silver Jewelry Silver Coins/Collections Sterling/925 Diamonds, Antique Guns, Swords & Knives

.DUDW 10K 14K 16K 18K 22K

3HQQ\ZHLJKW ':7

$23.00 $34.00 $41.00 $45.00 $58.00 Price per

*UDP *U

$14.72 $21.76 $26.24 $28.80 $37.12

Price per

“Based on Gold Market�

803-773-8022

143 S. Lafayette Dr. Sumter, SC 29150 (at the foot of the bridge inside Vestco Properties)

Classes begin August 19

Did you work for Yuasa-Exide at the Sumter, SC plant between 1972 & 2002?

EXPLORE DISCOVER SUCCEED

Are you sufering from high blood pressure, gout, kidney disorders or heart conditions?

your options.

your future.

If so, those conditions may be related to your exposure to chemicals and lead during your employment at the Yuasa-Exide plant. If you or a loved one worked there, the Lee Law Firm and the Steinberg Law Firm want to hear from you. Our irms are helping secure care and compensation for victims, families and survivors of former Yuasa-Exide employees.

in your chosen n path. th.

We can help. Contact us today.

LEE LAW FIRM

CHARLESTON 61 Broad St. | 843.720.2800

SUMTER 126 W. Main St. | 803.778.2471

Central Carolina Technical College does not discriminate in admissions or employment on the basis of jY[]$k]p$[gdgj$Y_]$j]da_agf$fYlagfYdgja_afgj[]jlYafd]_Yddq\]Ăšf]\h`qka[Ydgje]flYd\akYZadala]k&

Early July 4th Sale!

PRICES GOOD JUNE 26TH THROUGH JULY 4TH

LADIES EVENING DRESS SANDAL

LADIES DRESS & CASUAL SHOES BY Sam & Libby, Rockport, Aerosoles, Soft Spots, Sanita, Life Stride & more.

Sale $ Price

10

Over 400 Pairs To Choose From!

WORLD TOUR

SILVER AND BLACK IN CLEAR AND FABRIC

Sale Price

6999

AVAILABLE IN 3 COLORS – M (SIZES 7-16), W (SIZES 7.5-16), XW (SIZES 8-14)

Childrens

Ladies Clogs

Athletic Shoes

INGARO & SCRUBS

24

.99

7BMVFTVQUPr"MTP"WBJMBCMFJO8JEFT

$

Reg. $60

Entire Stock Of

REEF & SANĂœK SANDALS

24.99

$

Jack’s Shoes Suggested Retail Price Up To $125

24.99

SIZES UP TO 13 MED., WIDE, & EXTRA WIDE

Sale Price

Sale Price

$

Sale Price

$

Values up to $70

SAUCOMY & NEW BALANCE

For that Special Occassion.

SUGGESTED RETAIL $100

Mens, Womens & Children

25%Off Reg. Price

KBDLTTIPFT!ZBIPPDPN Hours: .PO4BU".1.

8-JCFSUZttVoted Best Shoe Store 13 Years In A Row!


A6

LOCAL

THE ITEM

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

CHANGE from Page A1 military equipment out of the landlocked nation ahead of the planned end of combat operations in 2014. “The people will be the easy part,” Terry said after Tuesday’s ceremony. “There are billions of dollars worth of equipment that needs to be harvested ... that is needed to sustain the security of the United States.” The Third Army provides support to servicemen and women throughout the Central Command area of responsibility, which includes 19 nations other than Afghanistan throughout the Middle East and Central Asia, stretching from Egypt to Kazakhstan. Terry takes over responsibility for this area from Lt. Gen. Vincent K. Brooks, who took command of the Third Army in June 2011 while the command was still located at Fort McPherson in Georgia. Brooks will be promoted to a four-star general and take command of U.S. Army Pacific in Hawaii. Brooks oversaw a similar withdrawal effort when U.S. forces left Iraq at the end of 2011, for which he was praised Tuesday by Gen. John F. Campbell, U.S. Army vice chief of staff. “That was a monumental and intensive task,” said Campbell, who formally oversaw the change of command at Patton Hall.

Troops of the Third Army march in front of Patton Hall, headquarters of U.S. Army Central, as part of a change of command ceremony on Tuesday. This was the first change in the Third Army’s commanding general since the command relocated to Shaw Air Force Base.

BRISTOW MARCHANT / THE ITEM

“Most people don’t understand the scope of it, because Vincent made it look easy.” Addressing Third Army troops in formation for the ceremony, Brooks called Terry “a war fighter of the first order, with a deep experience of combat.” He told the troops he and his wife would miss the home they had made for themselves here. “It’s bittersweet for Carol and myself as we say goodbye to the beautiful presence of Sumter, Shaw and Patton Hall,” he said. From future military budget cuts to the direction of U.S. engagement in the region, Brooks said the way forward for Army Central looks uncertain, but his staff has become accustomed to making decisions in the midst of uncertainty.

“We’ve met an endless supply of tough challenges,” he said, “and we got better the longer we served together.” For his part, Terry said it would take him some time to settle into the position most famously held by George S. Patton during World War II, one of several past commanders whose portraits hang in the building that bears Patton’s name. “I was walking through what I call the Hall of Heads, and we’ve got quite a legacy from 95 years of service,” he said. Born in Chatsworth, Ga., Terry said he felt at home in Sumter after lengthy deployments to Afghanistan and Germany. “As someone who grew up in north Georgia, it feels great to be in the pines of South Carolina,” Terry said.

“We might be a house divided when Georgia plays South Carolina, but we’ll be a house united when they play against Florida, Alabama and Tennessee.” With the Third Army’s responsibilities for the Middle East, commanders in that region also took notice of Terry’s appointment. Vice Adm. Robert S. Harward, deputy commander of U.S. Central Command, spoke about the importance of the Third Army’s mission in addressing the “enemies of the future,” especially with the changing nature of military operations in the area. The admiral singled out Brooks, Campbell and Terry for their commitment to Army readiness. “The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is concerned that as we come out of 12 years of war, we will lose that

ability,” Harward said. “Looking at these three men today, I’m not.”

Reach Bristow Marchant at (803) 7741272.

Southern Bistro SimplyRotisserie & Grill Southern Cooking with a Cajun Kick

STAY COOL WITH OUR Cool Cucumber Dill Salmon Salmon Grilled to Perfection Then Topped with our Homemade Cucumber Dill Sauce

Half $9.99 Full $14.99 Try this and all of our other fantastic menu items!! $"5&3*/(t(*'5$"3%4t5",&065

65 W. Wesmark Blvd

(ACROSS FROM BILTON LINCOLN)

803-469-8502 Sun., Mon., Tues 11:00AM-2:30PM Wed & Thur Lunch 11:00am-2:30pm Dinner 5:00pm-9:00pm Fri & Sat 11:00am-9:00pm


OPINION WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

THE ITEM

A7

To submit a letter to the editor, e-mail letters@theitem.com

COMMENTARY

|

Bit by bit strategy

T

here’s a move to prohibit Washington’s football team from calling itself “Redskins,” even though a 2009 U.S. Supreme Court decision said that it has that right. Now the name change advocates are turning to the political arena and intimidation. The NCAA has already banned the University of North Dakota from calling its football team the “Fighting Sioux.” This is the classic method of busybodies and tyrants; they start out with something trivial or small and then magnify and extend it. If these people are successful in banning the use of Indian Walter names WILLIAMS for football teams, you can bet the rent money that won’t end their agenda. Our military has a number of fighting aircraft named with what busybodies and tyrants might consider racial slights, such as the Apache, Iroquois, Kiowa, Lakota and Mescalero. We also have military aircraft named after animals, such as the Eagle, Falcon, Raptor, Cobra and Dolphin. The people fighting against the Redskins name might form a coalition with the PETA animal rights kooks to ban the use of animal names. Another example of the strategy of starting out small is that of the tobacco zealots. In 1965, in the name of health, tobacco zealots successfully got Congress to enact the Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act. A few years later, they were successful in getting a complete smoking ban on planes, and that success emboldened them to seek many other bans. The issue here is not smoking but tyrant strategy. Suppose that in 1965, the tobacco tyrants demanded that Congress enact a law banning smoking in bars, in workplaces, in restaurants, in apartments, within 25 feet of entrances, in ballparks, on beaches, on sidewalks and in other places. Had they revealed and demanded their full agenda back in 1965, there would have been so much resistance that they wouldn’t have gotten anything. By the way, much of their later success was a result of a bogus Environmental Protection Agency study on secondhand smoke. I’d like to hear whether EPA scientists are willing to declare that people can die from secondhand

smoke at a beach, on a sidewalk, in a park or within 25 feet of a building. During the legislative and subsequent state ratification debates over the 16th Amendment — which established the income tax — the political task of overturning the Constitution’s prohibition of such tax was considerably eased by political promises that any income tax levied would fall upon only the wealthiest 3 to 5 percent of the population. Most Americans paid no federal income tax, and those earning $500,000 or more paid only 7 percent. In 1913, only 358,000 Americans filed 1040 forms, compared with today’s 140 million. That’s the ropea-dope strategy. To get the votes of the masses, politicians start out small and exploit the politics of envy by promising that only the rich will be taxed. In 1898, Congress imposed a temporary federal excise tax on telephones as a revenue measure during the Spanish-American War. At that time, only the rich owned phones. Soon nearly all Americans owned phones. Both the rich and the poor paid the telephone excise tax. Congress repealed this “temporary” SpanishAmerican War tax in 2006. Nobel laureate Milton Friedman had it right when he said, “Nothing is so permanent as a temporary government program.” The Tax Reform Act of 1969, called the alternative minimum tax, was created to raise revenue from 155 “rich” Americans who legally avoided federal income taxes by buying tax-free municipal bonds. Today more than 4 million Americans are hit by the AMT, and most of them hardly qualify as rich. Here’s another ropea-dope just beginning. The National Transportation Safety Board recently recommended that states reduce the allowable blood alcohol content by more than a third — to 0.05 percent, as opposed to today’s 0.08 percent. The NTSB is calling it a recommendation just to test the waters. If the board doesn’t see resistance, its next move will be to threaten noncomplying states with a cutoff of highway construction funds. Setting the legal limit at 0.05 percent is not these people’s end objective. Their end objective is to outlaw any amount of alcohol in the blood while one is driving. Walter E. Williams is a professor of economics at George Mason University. © 2013 creators.com

GUEST COLUMN

|

Jefferson’s leadership missed The following is an open letter to Zona Jefferson, the former superintendent of Sumter School District 17, from former Sumter teacher Debra Horton.

D

ear Dr. Jefferson, As my family prepares to leave the Sumter community, I feel compelled to write you this belated thank you note. I am so grateful that I had the opportunity to have been a part of the Sumter School District 17 family. Sumter 17 truly was a family, and this was due in large part to your leadership. Thank you for communicating. We never discovered good or bad news about the district from the newspaper. Either you or our principal spoke to us ahead of time when we were going to be in the news. You made sure we knew the “rest of the story.” Of course, as a good leader, you knew that communication breeds trust. Although I never felt the need to go, I knew that I could meet and talk to you in person during your Open Door Wednesdays. I didn’t always agree with every decision you or the board made, but I knew you would listen to and thoughtfully consider my concerns. I didn’t worry about reprisal. We could agree to disagree in a professional manner. I knew your decisions were based on years of experience in education and knowledge of our community. Thank you for listening to the community as well. I remember when you made the sixth-grade academy optional because of an

outcry of community concerns. You listened. It wasn’t about pride, money or politics, because this was your valued community. You lived here, raised children here, taught here, worked your way up through the ranks. You taught us, watched us graduate and saw our children come through as well. Sumter and its students’ success were important to you personally. Thank you for showing your appreciation. It Debra meant a lot HORTON when you came to the school to thank those of us who had spent many afternoons that year working on the consolidated curriculum. The thankyou gift was simply a picture book, perhaps even donated, but it meant so much just to be thought of and thanked personally. Another way you showed appreciation was the annual banquet held to honor longtime employees and retirees for their years of services. I had looked forward to celebrating my 20 years with the district at that event, but it was discontinued when you left. That banquet was a small but meaningful celebration of the loyalty of your staff. Thank you for putting the students first in all of your decisions. Whenever you came to speak to us as a faculty (at least twice a year), you reminded us to always choose what was best for the students. You said it so often that I knew that all the de-

N.G. OSTEEN 1843-1936 The Watchman and Southron

H.G. OSTEEN 1870-1955 Founder, The Item

Debra Horton has lived in Sumter since 1980. She is married with three children, two which graduated from Sumter High School. She spent 22 years teaching fifth grade in Sumter schools.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Baten to blame for county’s financial problems At a recent Sumter County Council meeting, Councilman Baten asked the people to put the blame for council’s financial problems where it belongs on the state of South Carolina and the Republicans for underfunding Sumter County. I ask you, the citizens, to put the blame directly on Councilman Baten where it really belongs. Keep in mind that Mr. Baten has written in a letter to The Item that Sumter County is in great financial condition. Remember the Judicial Center and Law Enforcement building were built on a cost plus a fee. This method invites fraud. Another questionable area is the $500,000 county funds and

H.D. OSTEEN 1904-1987 The Item

|

$200,000 BRAC funds distributed for stopping encroachment on Shaw Air Force Base. Mr. Baten refuses to discuss the circumstances of these disbursals. There is also the issue of $1.5 million paid for worthless land on Airport Road about which Mr. Baten refuses to answer questions. Your taxes paid for community centers which were not needed. Additional blame should be placed on the citizens of Sumter County. We have never held county government accountable or insisted on transparency of action. When we do not attend council meetings and take part, the wolves take over the sheep pen. Less than 10 percent of the citizens know where council meetings are held. If you do not

participate and depend on others to act, you deserve nothing and get nothing. Please get involved today in your county government or you will pay now and leave a lifetime financial burden for your children and grandchildren. Councilman Baten has said he will be glad to pay the proposed tax increase. He may easily absorb that cost. Think of your family finances. Do you have a ready source of money to send to a never-satisfied county government? Sumter County Council normally meets every second and fourth Tuesday at 6 p.m. in the council chambers at 13 E. Canal St. I hope to see you there. GARDNER GORE Sumter

HUBERT D. OSTEEN JR. | EDITOR AND CHAIRMAN

Founded October 15, 1894 20 N. Magnolia St. Sumter, SC 29150

cisions you made were based on this belief. Your decisions weren’t based on politics or pleasing specific community members. You were willing to take the heat because you knew in your heart that your decisions were in the best interest of the students. Thank you for being a great leader. I didn’t think of you as my African-American superintendent or my female superintendent. I just knew you were someone who cared. You held us to a high standard. You respected our hard work. You expected our best, because as you often said, our customers deserve the best. Under your leadership, we celebrated education. I will always miss our big beginning of the year meeting; finding out who was teacher of the year, listening to Mrs. Harper-Baxter’s spirited, inspirational message, watching the administrators dance and cheering to the SHS fight song. It didn’t get any better. I always left that meeting ready to take on the world. I could go on and on. I miss our family. I miss your leadership. I will miss my amazing coworkers. God has a new adventure in store for our family down the road, but I couldn’t leave without saying thank you. It was a privilege and honor to work for you and the families of Sumter.

MARGARET W. OSTEEN 1908-1996 The Item

H. GRAHAM OSTEEN II Co-President

KYLE BROWN OSTEEN Co-President

JOHN DUVALL OSTEEN Vice President and Publisher

LARRY MILLER CEO


A8

DAILY PLANNER

THE ITEM

GOT HOT? - GET COOL!

TUOMEY from Page A1 contracts paying beyond question when it first market value and therelearned of their illegality. by creating an illegal “Tuomey could have kickback of Medicare terminated the contracts funds. in June 2005 after Kevin As a result of the verMcAnaney — a lawyer dict, the U.S. Department jointly retained with Dr. of Justice is seeking more Drakeford — voiced his than $237.4 million in concerns about the subdamages from the local stantial risk that the arhospital. guments violated Stark Tuomey responded Law,” the government arearlier this month to the gues. “At that point, the federal government’s refund for the Stark Law damages request by filviolation would have toing a series of responses, taled less than $5 milsaying the local lion, and False hospital should Claims Act liaON THE NET not have to pay bility could have the financial been avoided.” Read the penalty because And while latest such an exorbithe Eighth round of tant amount Amendment motions filed by would be unprotects people both sides online constitutional, from “excessive violating both its with this story. fines imposed, Fifth Amendnor cruel and www.theitem. ment right to unusual punishcom due process and ments inflicted,” its Eighth the federal govAmendment ernment argues protection from cruel these damages are remeand unusual punishdial and not punitive. ment. At the same time, Citing a previous court Tuomey has also redecision, prosecutors quested U.S. District point out, “It has long Judge Margaret Seymour been recognized that either reverse the jury’s some liability beyond the decision or grant a new amount of the fraud is trial. ‘necessary to compenMonday’s filings from sate the government both sides were part of completely for the costs, another round of modelays and inconvetions as they continue niences occasioned by their post-courtroom fraudulent claims’.” legal wrangling in an efIn another aspect of fort to influence Seythe case, the federal govmour’s eventual ruling. ernment has asked the As part of the new judge to rule in its favor documents, the federal on separate charges begovernment repeated fore the court, saying Tuclaims that it is willing to omey in effect received discuss a settlement with payments by mistake, as Tuomey, as long as the well. hospital shows “willingIn the penalties for ness to accept responsithese counts, which bility for its past miscon- could possibly come into duct and to take concrete play only if the False steps to ensure future Claims Act penalties are compliance with Medioverturned, the governcare and Medicaid proment is seeking nearly gram rules.” $44.9 million in repayStill, the United States ment of the Medicare Attorney’s Office also arclaims, as well as more gues against Tuomey’s than $28.2 million in preConstitutional-grounds judgment interest, for a defense. total of $73,109,067.01. Previously, Tuomey Tuomey has argued argued the judgment ruling in the governwould violate its Fifth ment’s favor would igAmendment right to due nore the fact that both process because, in efsides have recognized fect, officials could not these Medicare services have known the type of were actually performed penalties the hospital at the hospital and, in eswas facing. “… imposing sence, the government a colossal damage award received what it paid for. would deny Tuomey due Defense lawyers also process since it did not say the prosecution’s have fair warning of what total figure illustrates the the law prohibited,” Tugovernment’s true moomey has previously tive in the case. stated in legal filings. “This latter number, “Such a result would ofwhich the government fend fundamental nodoes not even bother to tions of fairness.” round off, shows its inIn response, the feder- tent to squeeze every last al government says Tupenny out of Tuomey,” omey could have, in efthe brief reads. fect, reduced the fines by Contact Braden Bunch ending the contracts in at (803) 774-1201.

PUBLIC AGENDA

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

795-4257

Call Now - We Service Your Brand

TODAY

TONIGHT

90°

THURSDAY 93°

FRIDAY

SATURDAY 88°

92°

72° 73°

72°

73°

Partly cloudy and humid

A heavy thunderstorm in the afternoon

Cloudy spells with a thunderstorm; humid

Clouds and sun with a couple of t-storms

Variable clouds, a couple of t-storms

Winds: SW 6-12 mph

Winds: SSW 6-12 mph

Winds: SW 8-16 mph

Winds: WSW 8-16 mph

Winds: SSW 8-16 mph

Winds: SSW 8-16 mph

Chance of rain: 55%

Chance of rain: 25%

Chance of rain: 55%

Chance of rain: 60%

Chance of rain: 65%

Chance of rain: 60%

Sumter through 4 p.m. yesterday

Temperature High ............................................... 88° Low ................................................ 72° Normal high ................................... 89° Normal low ..................................... 68° Record high ..................... 101° in 1952 Record low ......................... 58° in 1999

Greenville 89/70

Gaffney 89/70 Spartanburg 90/71

Precipitation

Bishopville 90/71

24 hrs ending 4 p.m. yest. ............ trace Month to date .............................. 4.73" Normal month to date ................. 4.35" Year to date ............................... 23.41" Normal year to date ................... 21.97"

Lake Murray Marion Moultrie Wateree

Full pool 360 76.8 75.5 100

7 a.m. yest. 357.95 75.73 75.12 97.13

24-hr chg +0.02 none +0.01 +0.09

River Black River Congaree River Lynches River Saluda River Up. Santee River Wateree River

Full pool 12 19 14 14 80 24

7 a.m. yest. 7.37 3.89 6.73 4.31 78.00 5.99

24-hr chg -0.57 -0.52 +0.66 +1.33 -0.37 +0.50

City Aiken Asheville Athens Augusta Beaufort Cape Hatteras Charleston Charlotte Clemson Columbia

Today Hi/Lo/W 90/70/t 86/65/t 87/70/t 90/71/t 90/74/t 86/75/pc 90/74/t 88/70/t 89/71/t 90/71/t

Thu. Hi/Lo/W 93/71/t 85/63/t 91/71/t 94/72/pc 93/75/t 85/76/t 92/75/t 91/68/t 92/71/t 93/73/t

Sunrise today .......................... 6:12 a.m. Sunset tonight ......................... 8:36 p.m. Moonrise today ..................... 11:11 p.m. Moonset today ........................ 9:52 a.m.

Columbia 90/71 Today: Humid with clouds and sun; a thunderstorm this afternoon. Thursday: Humid; an afternoon shower or thunderstorm around.

Sumter 90/72

July 22

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

High Ht. Wed. 12:16 p.m.....3.1 --- ..... --Thu. 12:49 a.m.....3.6 1:13 p.m.....3.1

Thu. Hi/Lo/W 94/72/t 91/74/t 93/73/t 93/72/t 92/73/t 92/72/t 91/69/t 93/72/t 92/75/t 90/69/t

City Greenville Hickory Hilton Head Jacksonville, FL La Grange Macon Marietta Marion Mount Pleasant Myrtle Beach

Today Hi/Lo/W 89/70/t 88/68/t 87/79/t 92/73/t 89/70/t 90/71/t 86/72/t 87/66/t 89/75/t 87/76/t

Thu. Hi/Lo/W 90/70/t 89/67/t 90/81/t 92/72/t 90/71/pc 93/72/t 89/73/t 88/66/t 92/76/t 89/76/t

City Orangeburg Port Royal Raleigh Rock Hill Rockingham Savannah Spartanburg Summerville Wilmington Winston-Salem

Low Ht. 6:49 a.m....-0.8 7:00 p.m....-0.5 7:41 a.m....-0.7 7:57 p.m....-0.3

Today Hi/Lo/W 90/71/t 89/76/t 90/72/t 88/70/t 90/71/t 92/73/t 90/71/t 87/77/t 88/74/t 87/71/t

Thu. Hi/Lo/W 92/72/t 92/77/t 92/74/t 92/69/t 94/71/t 93/75/t 91/71/t 91/80/t 90/75/t 90/69/t

Shown are today’s noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

-10s -0s 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s Stationary front

Cold front Showers Rain T-storms Snow Flurries

Ice

Warm front

Today Thu. Today Thu. City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Albuquerque 97/69/s 106/71/s Las Vegas 103/85/s 112/89/s Anchorage 80/62/s 75/58/pc Los Angeles 82/67/pc 88/69/s Atlanta 86/72/t 90/72/t Miami 88/78/pc 88/79/t Baltimore 94/72/t 90/71/t Minneapolis 87/67/t 88/67/pc Boston 87/68/t 78/68/t New Orleans 90/75/t 90/77/s Charleston, WV 90/70/t 87/67/t New York 90/73/t 86/71/t Charlotte 88/70/t 91/68/t Oklahoma City 100/74/s 102/75/s Chicago 86/69/t 84/67/pc Omaha 90/69/s 94/66/pc Cincinnati 90/73/t 87/67/c Philadelphia 93/74/t 90/71/t Dallas 98/78/s 101/78/s Phoenix 107/82/s 116/86/s Denver 94/64/s 99/58/s Pittsburgh 86/68/t 81/64/t Des Moines 90/69/pc 91/71/pc St. Louis 94/74/t 95/71/pc Detroit 86/71/t 80/65/t Salt Lake City 91/67/s 101/70/s Helena 80/54/pc 88/57/s San Francisco 74/58/pc 76/58/pc Honolulu 87/72/sh 87/72/s Seattle 70/58/sh 78/59/c Indianapolis 88/71/t 86/69/c Topeka 96/73/s 100/73/s Kansas City 94/73/s 96/72/pc Washington, DC 95/75/t 92/73/t Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

especially if what you’re ARIES (March 21-April 19): the last word in astrology doing can influence your Your ability to find reputation. Stick to what’s solutions will be eugenia LAST important to finish and impressive. Sharing your rethink options you have insight will attract that might be difficult to proposals and interest. reverse. Your financial future will be dependent on the people you choose to do business with. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): A money matter, contract settlement or health issue is likely to TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Your kindness and be emotionally draining. Get past any dependability will help you avoid an negative incidents by taking a positive and emotional issue. Spend more time on work, proactive approach. communication and romantic relationships and less on gossip or with meddling people. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Listen carefully or you may misinterpret something GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Activity and physical being offered. A change in how you handle challenge will be your best outlet and also money will make a difference. Creative lead to a new friendship with someone accounting will help you stretch your sharing your concerns and personal goals. currency. CANCER (June 21-July 22): You’ll be inclined to CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Employ caution take on too much or overspend without when dealing with relationships or assets. You thinking. Slow down and make a concerted may feel the need to make abrupt changes, effort to find out all the information you need but be reluctant if you don’t have all the facts to make a wise choice. required to make a sound decision. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Check out your options. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Emotional You may be eager to embrace personal or matters will have an unusual twist that can partnership changes, but before you do, push you into action. Stay calm and refuse to consider how it will affect your family, friends commit to anything until you have proof that or your reputation. it’s worth your while to make a move. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Engage in activities PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Look past minor that will subject you to people who think annoyances. Spend time having fun with differently or have a unique way of doing friends, family or peers. Use your imagination things. What you learn and gain will help you and you’ll come up with ideas, solutions and feel less insecure. suggestions that will add to your popularity. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Proceed with caution,

PICK 3 TUESDAY: 8-4-9 AND 4-3-8 PICK 4 TUESDAY: 5-4-1-4 AND 0-2-8-3 PALMETTO CASH 5 TUESDAY: 6-10-11-32-37 POWERUP: 2 CAROLINA CASH 6 MONDAY: 3-8-13-20-23-33 MEGAMILLIONS NUMBERS WERE UNAVAILABLE AT PRESS TIME

FOR SATURDAY: 13-19-23-33-57 POWERBALL: 28

pictures from the public Have you visited someplace interesting, exciting, beautiful or historical that you’ve taken some pictures of? Would you like to share those images with your fellow Item readers? E-mail your hi-resolution jpegs to sandrah@theitem.com, or mail to Sandra Holbert c/o The Item, P.O. Box 1677, Sumter, SC 29150. Include clearly printed or typed name of photographer and photo details. Include selfaddressed, stamped envelope for return of your photo. Amateur photographers only please.

You’ll find lots of interesting things in your newspaper…

www.theitem.com

July 15

The following tide table lists times for Myrtle Beach.

“I Saw It In the Paper!”

20 N. Magnolia Street

July 8 Full

Charleston 90/74

SUMTER COUNTY DEVELOPMENT BOARD Thursday, 7:30 a.m., Greater Sumter Chamber of Commerce boardroom, 32 E. Calhoun St.

803-774-1200

June 30 First

Aiken 90/70

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013 Today Hi/Lo/W 90/71/t 90/74/pc 90/73/t 90/72/t 90/72/t 91/71/t 89/70/t 90/72/t 90/74/t 88/71/t

New

Myrtle Beach 87/76

Manning 90/72

Today: A couple of showers and a thunderstorm. High 85 to 90. Thursday: A shower or thunderstorm around in the afternoon. High 87 to 93.

City Darlington Elizabeth City Elizabethtown Fayetteville Florence Gainesville Gastonia Goldsboro Goose Creek Greensboro

Last

Florence 90/72

SUMTER CITY-COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION Today, 3 p.m., Planning Department, conference room, 12 W. Liberty St.

• Sports • Fashion • Business

72°

Partly sunny and humid; a p.m. t-storm

|

GREATER SUMTER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Today, noon, chamber office

• Sales • Editorials • Reviews

SUNDAY

85°

• Travel • Weddings …and more

A painted bunting visits Lorraine Rogers’ birdfeeder. Photo taken and submitted by Rogers.


SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

THE ITEM

B1

To contact the Sports Department, call (803) 774-1241 or e-mail sports@theitem.com

Clock ticking on Hamlin’s Chase fate BY JENNA FRYER The Associated Press

DENNIS BRUNSON / THE ITEM

Sumter P-15’s pitcher Andrew Reardon, left, slides past Camden Post 15 catcher Lawson Stokes after being tagged out in Tuesday’s game at Riley Park. Sumter won 10-0 to move one win away from clinching the League III title.

P-15’s closing in on title Reardon makes season debut on mound in 10-0 victory BY DENNIS BRUNSON dennisb@theitem.com The Sumter P-15’s all but wrapped up the American Legion baseball League III title on Tuesday with a 10-0 win over Camden, but they hope they saw something that will help them much farther down the road. Andrew Reardon, the outstanding left-handed pitcher who has been off the mound for the last year because of a torn labrum in his left shoulder, started and threw 3 1/3 scoreless innings before being re-

More racers lead to more action at Speedway BY CODY TRUETT Special to The Item The 2013 season continued at Sumter Speedway on Saturday with several divisions having their largest car counts this season. That led to some of the most intense racing of the season. Luke Wilson highlighted the night by picking up a hard-earned win in the Bomber-4 division. As the green flag flew to signal the start of the feature, Bucky Deberry jumped into the lead with Wilson on his heels. Deberry slipped high in turns 3 and 4, and Wilson dove to the inside to take over the lead. Bruce Denman followed and took over second, sending Deberry back to third. Wilson led the way as Denman began to pressure him for the top spot. Last week’s winner, Chip Infinger, moved up to third and joined the battle, making it a 3-car duel for the top spot. Denman looked to the inside of Wilson, but Wilson held him off and maintained the top spot. Infinger made his way around Denman to take over second and challenged Wilson for the lead. Infinger couldn’t complete the pass and fell back to third as Denman moved back into second. SEE SPEEDWAY, PAGE B5

moved after reaching his predetermined pitch count of 35. Right-hander Will Smith came in to finish the shutout. “Andrew was very good tonight,” said Sumter head coach Curtis Johnson, who saw his team improve to 14-3 overall and 12-1 in league play. “He was pounding the strike zone, and he was able to throw all four pitches for strikes. He was very good.” On the first pitch Reardon threw, Camden leadoff batter Russ Radcliff hit

AMERICAN LEGION STANDINGS W Sumter 11 Camden 8 Cheraw 4 Manning 3 Hartsville 2

L 1 3 6 8 10

LEAGUE III Pct. GB .917 .727 2 1/2 .400 6 .273 7 1/2 .167 9 Tuesday

LEAGUE VIII Pct. GB .889 .818 1/2 .500 4 .300 6 .250 6 1/2 .125 7 Monday Dalzell-Shaw at Lexington, ppd., rain Orangeburg at Columbia Northeast, ppd., rain Irmo-Chapin at West Columbia, ppd., rain Tuesday Dalzell-Shaw at Orangeburg Irmo-Chapin at West Columbia Today Dalzell-Shaw at West Columbia, 7 p.m. Orangeburg at Irmo-Chapin, 7 p.m. Columbia Northeast at Lexington, 7 p.m. Thursday Columbia Northeast at Dalzell-Shaw, 7 p.m. Friday Dalzell-Shaw at Irmo-Chapin, 7 p.m. Columbia Northeast at Orangeburg, 7:30 p.m. Lexington at West Columbia, 7 p.m. W West Columbia 9 Irmo 9 Orangeburg 5 Columbia NE 3 Lexington 2 Dalzell 1

Sumter 10, Camden 0 Hartsville at Cheraw, late Today Manning-Santee at Sumter, 7:30 p.m. Hartsville at Camden, 7 p.m. Thursday Hartsville at Manning-Santee, 7:30 p.m. Camden at Cheraw, 7 p.m. Friday Fort Pierce, Fla., at Sumter, 7:30 p.m. Saturday Jacksonville, N.C., at Sumter, 10 a.m. Texarkana, Ark., at Sumter, 7 p.m. Manning-Santee at Hartsville, 7 p.m. Sunday Sumter vs. TBA (in Florence), TBA

L 1 2 5 7 7 7

SEE SUMTER, PAGE B2

SONOMA, Calif. — Denny Hamlin closed in on a slower car at Sonoma Raceway, changed lanes to make the pass and was instead slammed into from behind — contact that sent him spinning off the course. HAMLIN “Who am I wrecking?” Hamlin asked on his radio to identify which driver had retaliation coming to him. Told the culprit was good friend Tony Stewart, Hamlin quietly went about his day. It ended with a frustrating 23rd-place finish Sunday and another setback in what he had hoped would be a furious charge into the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship. With 10 races remaining to set the field, Hamlin is 25th in the standings and winless. He’s in a frantic race to crack the top 20 — he’s currently 83 points out — and lock up some race wins that would make him eligible to claim a wildcard berth into the Chase. It was the goal he set for himself when he was sidelined four races with a SEE HAMLIN, PAGE B6

Serena sails in opener 6-1, 6-3 BY MATTIAS KAREN The Associated Press LONDON— Back in her comfort zone on Centre Court, Serena Williams delivered an overpowering statement: When her serve is steaming, she’s the woman to beat at Wimbledon. Putting aside her recent comments that led to a couple of apologies and a brief spat with Maria Sharapova, Williams looked every bit the five-time champion. She began her Wimbledon title defense with a 6-1, 6-3 victory over Mandy Minella of Luxembourg.

“For me, it’s the greatest moment for a tennis player, to walk out on Centre Court,” Williams said after her first match at Wimbledon since winning the Olympic gold medal there last year. “That was such a great moment, too. So many great memories on this court.” Top-ranked Novak Djokovic also opened with a straight-sets vic-

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Serena Williams hits a return during her first round singles match on Tuesday against Mandy Minella at Wimbledon in London. Williams won 6-1, 6-3.

tory, beating Florian Mayer of Germany 6-3, 7-5, 6-4. Mayer is a twotime Wimbledon quar-

terfinalist, losing to Djokovic at that stage last year. But he was never in danger of

springing another stunner following Rafael SEE WIMBLEDON, PAGE B3

UCLA on verge of 1st baseball title BY ERIC OLSON The Associated Press OMAHA, Neb. — UCLA was leading Mississippi State 6-0 in the eighth inning of Game 2 of the College World Series championship Series at press time on Tuesday, needing a victory to win the CWS. If a deciding game is needed in the best-of-3 series, it will be played today beginning at 8 p.m. On Monday, the BruTHE ASSOCIATED PRESS ins defeated Mississippi UCLA starting pitcher Nick Vander Tuig throws State 3-1, but the Bullagainst Mississippi State in Tuesday’s Game 2 of dogs pressured them to the end, leaving runners the College World Series in Omaha, Neb.

in scoring position in four of the last six innings. “They’re great hitters, they grind it out every at-bat, and they’re not going away,’’ UCLA closer David Berg said. “They want to win this thing as bad as we do. They’re not going to give it up.’’ UCLA improved to 48-17 with Monday’s

win while MSU fell to 51-19. “What we’re going to try to do is put everything behind us and try to win two ball games,’’ Bulldogs head coach John Cohen said. “I think we’re very, very capable.’’ UCLA followed its script yet again Monday, churning out a few early runs and letting its pitching and defense take care of the rest. “We dodged some bullets, no doubt about it, but you have to give credit to our defense,’’ SEE CWS, PAGE B3


B2

SPORTS

THE ITEM

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

Moore gets 10th win, Rays beat ‘Jays 5-1 ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Matt Moore overcame control problems to allow one run over six innings and the Tampa Bay Rays beat the Toronto Blue Jays 5-1 on Tuesday night. Moore (10-3) tied career MOORE highs with six walks and 11 strikeouts en route to his 10th win this season and second straight after a three-game skid. The left-hander gave up four hits. Mark Buehrle (4-5) gave up four runs, eight hits and four walks in five innings for the Blue Jays, who have lost two in a row since arriving at Tropicana Field after tying a franchise record with 11 consecutive wins. ORIOLES INDIANS

MLB ROUNDUP

|

TV, RADIO TODAY 7 a.m. -- Professional Tennis: The Wimbledon Championships Men’s and Women’s EarlyRound Matches from London (ESPN). 2:30 p.m. -- International Soccer: Confederations Cup Semifinal Match from Belo Horizonte, Brazil -- Brazil vs. Uruguay (ESPN). 4 p.m. -- Professional Golf: PGA Professional National Championship Final Round from Corvallis, Ore. (GOLF). 4 p.m. -- Major League Baseball: Colorado at Boston or Cincinnati at Oakland (MLB NETWORK). 6:05 p.m. -- Talk Show: Sports Talk (WDXYFM 105.9, WDXY-AM 1240). 7 p.m. -- Major League Baseball: Texas at New York Yankees (ESPN2). 7 p.m. -- American Legion Baseball: Manning-Santee at Sumter (WWHM-FM 92.3, WWHM-FM 93.3, WWHM-AM 1290). 8 p.m. -- College Baseball: College World Series Championship Series Game Three from Omaha, Neb. -- Mississippi State vs. UCLA (ESPN). 8 p.m. -- Major League Baseball: Atlanta at Kansas City (SPORTSOUTH, WPUB-FM 102.7). 8 p.m. -- Major League Baseball: Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee (WGN).

MLB STANDINGS

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tampa Bay’s Kelly Johnson, right, races home past Toronto catcher J.P. Arencibia to score on a fourth-inning sacrifice fly by during Tuesday’s 5-1 victory in St. Petersburg, Fla.

6 3

BALTIMORE — Chris Davis and Alexi Casilla homered in a five-run seventh inning, and the Baltimore Orioles beat the Cleveland Indians 6-3

Tuesday night to end a four-game losing streak. YANKEES TEXAS

4 3

NEW YORK — Ichiro Suzuki homered off Tanner Scheppers with two outs in the ninth inning, lifting the New York Yankees to a 4-3 victory over the Texas Rangers on Tuesday

night. INTERLEAGUE MARLINS TWINS

4 2

MIAMI — Marcell Ozuna drove in two runs and Derek Dietrich homered to help the Miami Marlins to a 4-2 win over the Minnesota Twins on Tuesday night in interleague play.

NATIONAL LEAGUE NATIONALS DIAMONDBACKS

7 5

WASHINGTON — Adam LaRoche hit a three-run homer and Gio Gonzalez won for the first time since May 5 as the Nationals defeated the Diamondbacks 7-5 Tuesday night. From wire reports

SPORTS ITEMS

|

Schaffer, Ward qualify for Amateur Championship COLUMBIA — John Schaffer and Dalton Ward of Sumter each earned a spot in the 99th Carolinas Amateur Championship due to their performance in a sectional qualifying tournamen on Tuesday at Spring Valley SCHAFFER Country Club. Schaffer and Ward were two of 11 players to qualify on Tuesday for the Amateur Championship, which will WARD be played July 11-14 at The Ocean Course in Kiawah Island.

Schaffer shot a 1-under par 71 while Ward broke even with a 72. Andrew Ward of York, Rob Simmons of Beaufort and Ryan Waataja of Rock Hill each shot 2-under 70 to earn tri-medalist honors. DALZELL-IRMO GAME SITE SWITCHED

Dalzell-Shaw Post 175’s American Legion baseball game with Irmo-Chapin on Friday will be played at Chapin High School instead of at Thomas Sumter Academy. Earlier in the season, a game between the teams was switched from Chapin to Dalzell due to a wet field, so this game was switched to give Irmo the home game that was originally sched-

SUMTER from Page B1 it back through the middle, just getting by shortstop Phillp Watcher for a base hit. Reardon said that actually caused him to relax. “I was surprised he hit it because it was a pretty good pitch,” said Reardon, who had surgery on the shoulder on Aug. 15, but had not pitched since the end of June in 2012. “It really helped settle me down though and focus on what I was doing.” That was the only blemish on the night for Reardon, who stepped off the mound to catch Radcliff trying to steal third for the final out of the first. He didn’t allow another baserunner, striking out three and walking none. “I thought I would have good command of my fastball, but I was surprised with the command I had of my offspeed pitches,” Reardon said. “I just wanted to go out there, throw strikes and let my defense play behind me. They did a great job.” The next step for Reardon is a 50-pitch outing against Greenwood on Monday at Riley Park. The hope is Reardon can be a key contributor on the mound by the time the state tournament comes

SCOREBOARD

around. “Having Andrew will make us very, very dangerous,” Johnson said. “He’s a dominant lefthander that you like to have.” Reardon was lifted from the game after throwing his 35th pitch -- to go 1-2 on Radcliff leading off the fourth. Smith came on to get the final strike with the strikeout going to Reardon. Smith went on to get six Ks of his own over his 3 2/3 innings of work. He didn’t walk anyone and allowed four hits. “It was good to see Reardon back on the mound,” said Camden head coach Craig Smith, whose second-place team fell to 8-4. “We went against him in high school (in 2012). He was good tonight, and Smith is good every time he comes out.” The P-15’s jumped on Post 17 starter Cody Tinker for seven runs over the first three innings, scoring two in the first, three in the second and two more in the third. While five of those runs were earned, Camden had a big error in each of the first two innings that prolonged the inning. “Cody Tinker did what we wanted him to

uled. BLOSSOMGAME HAS MORE SURGERY

COLUMBIA— Jaron Blossomgame, one of Clemson’s leading hopes for better basketball times, had more surgery on his injured left leg in a procedure he believes will speed up his recovery for next season. The school said Tuesday that the 6-foot-7 Blossomgame underwent a second operation on his left leg after sustaining a compound fracture during workout while in high school in April 2012. Blossomgame sat out last season for the Tigers as a medical redshirt.

do, He threw strikes, but we didn’t play defense behind him,” said Coach Smith, who saw his team lose to Hartsville 6-5 last week with all the runs being unearned. “We got outhit just 9-5, but the score was like that. We’ve got to play better defense.” Sumter leadoff batter Jacob Watcher reached on an error by Post 17 second baseman Blake Serpass to start the bottom of the first. After being sacrificed to second, Watcher scored on a base hit by his brother, Phillip, to make it 1-0. Phillip Watcher stole second and scored on Reardon’s bad-hop single. The P-15’s missed out on another run when Reardon was thrown out at home following a River Soles single. In the second, Kendall Pack drew a leadoff walk, Javon Martin reached on an infield single and Jacob Watcher singled to load the bases with no outs. Will Smith hit a grounder to Radcliff at shortstop, but he made a bad throw, allowing Pack and Martin to score. Jacob Watcher scored on a fielder’s choice to make it 5-0. Thomas Walker and Jacob Watcher had RBI singles in the third, Will Smith had a 2-out, 2-run single in the fifth to

From wire, staff reports

make it 9-0 and Taylor McFaddin doubled with one out in the sixth and scored on an Ian McCaffrey fielder’s choice to make it 10-0. Johnson wasn’t overly impressed with his team’s offensive output. “We had some good approaches at the plate and did some good things,” he said. “We’ve still got to do a better job.” Jacob Watcher had two hits and a walk while scoring twice, Will Smith had three runs batted in, Phillip Watcher had two RBI, McFaddin reached with the double, a walk and being hit by a pitch while scroing twice, Kendall Pack scored twice on two walks and Martin scored twice on a hit and two walks. The left-handed Tinker allowed nine runs, seven earned, in 4 2/3 innings. He allowed seven hits and walked two. Sumter’s magic number for clinching the league title is any one Sumter victory or Camden loss. If the teams were to finish tied, there would be a special playoff game. The P-15’s can clinch the title today when they play host to Manning-Santee at 7:30 p.m.

American League By The Associated Press East Division W L Pct GB Boston 45 33 .577 – New York 41 34 .547 21/2 Baltimore 42 35 .545 21/2 Tampa Bay 40 37 .519 41/2 Toronto 38 37 .507 51/2 Central Division W L Pct GB Detroit 42 32 .568 – Cleveland 39 36 .520 31/2 Kansas City 35 38 .479 61/2 Minnesota 34 38 .472 7 Chicago 31 42 .425 101/2 West Division W L Pct GB Texas 44 32 .579 – Oakland 44 34 .564 1 Seattle 34 43 .442 101/2 Los Angeles 33 43 .434 11 Houston 29 48 .377 151/2 Monday’s Games Cleveland 5, Baltimore 2 Tampa Bay 4, Toronto 1 Tuesday’s Games Baltimore 6, Cleveland 3 N.Y. Yankees 4, Texas 3 Miami 4, Minnesota 2 Tampa Bay 5, Toronto 1 L.A. Angels at Detroit, late Colorado at Boston, late Atlanta at Kansas City, late N.Y. Mets at Chicago White Sox, late St. Louis at Houston, late Cincinnati at Oakland, late Pittsburgh at Seattle, late Today’s Games Toronto (Dickey 6-8) at Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernandez 4-8), 12:10 p.m. Minnesota (Diamond 5-6) at Miami (Koehler 1-5), 12:40 p.m. Cincinnati (H.Bailey 4-5) at Oakland (Griffin 5-6), 3:35 p.m. Pittsburgh (J.Gomez 2-0) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 8-4), 3:40 p.m. Colorado (Oswalt 0-1) at Boston (Lackey 4-5), 4:05 p.m. Cleveland (Kazmir 4-4) at Baltimore (Hammel 7-4), 7:05 p.m. Texas (Grimm 6-5) at N.Y. Yankees (Pettitte 5-5), 7:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Hanson 4-2) at Detroit (J.Alvarez 1-0), 7:08 p.m. Atlanta (Minor 8-3) at Kansas City (Mendoza 2-4), 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Marcum 0-9) at Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 1-4), 8:10 p.m. St. Louis (Lynn 10-1) at Houston (Bedard 2-3), 8:10 p.m. National League By The Associated Press East Division W L Pct GB Atlanta 44 33 .571 – Washington 37 38 .493 6 Philadelphia 36 41 .468 8 New York 30 42 .417 111/2 Miami 25 50 .333 18 Central Division W L Pct GB St. Louis 47 29 .618 – Pittsburgh 46 30 .605 1 Cincinnati 45 32 .584 21/2 Chicago 31 43 .419 15 Milwaukee 31 43 .419 15 West Division W L Pct GB Arizona 41 34 .547 – Colorado 39 38 .506 3 San Diego 39 38 .506 3 San Francisco 38 38 .500 31/2 Los Angeles 33 42 .440 8 Monday’s Games San Diego 4, Philadelphia 3, 10 innings L.A. Dodgers 3, San Francisco 1 Tuesday’s Games Washington 7, Arizona 5 Colorado at Boston, 7:10 p.m. Miami 4, Minnesota 2 Atlanta at Kansas City, late Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee, late N.Y. Mets at Chicago White Sox, late St. Louis at Houston, late Cincinnati at Oakland, late Philadelphia at San Diego, late Pittsburgh at Seattle, late San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, late Today’s Games Minnesota (Diamond 5-6) at Miami (Koehler 1-5), 12:40 p.m. Cincinnati (H.Bailey 4-5) at Oakland (Griffin 5-6), 3:35 p.m. Pittsburgh (J.Gomez 2-0) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 8-4), 3:40 p.m. Colorado (Oswalt 0-1) at Boston (Lackey 4-5), 4:05 p.m. Arizona (Miley 4-6) at Washington (Zimmermann 10-3), 7:05 p.m. Atlanta (Minor 8-3) at Kansas City (Mendoza 2-4), late Chicago Cubs (Feldman 6-6) at Milwaukee (Gallardo 6-6), late N.Y. Mets (Marcum 0-9) at Chicago White Sox (Joh.Danks 1-4), late St. Louis (Lynn 10-1) at Houston (Bedard 2-3), late Philadelphia (Hamels 2-11) at San Diego (Erlin 1-0), late San Francisco (Lincecum 4-7) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 5-5), late

NASCAR LEADERS The Associated Press Through June 23 Points 1, Jimmie Johnson, 573. 2, Carl Edwards, 548. 3, Clint Bowyer, 528. 4, Kevin Harvick, 510. 5, Matt Kenseth, 481. 6, Greg Biffle, 479. 7, Dale Earnhardt Jr., 479. 8, Kyle Busch, 461. 9, Brad Keselowski, 454. 10, Martin Truex Jr., 453. 11, Kasey Kahne, 445. 12, Paul Menard, 445. 13, Jeff Gordon, 441. 14, Joey Logano, 439. 15, Tony Stewart, 433. 16, Aric Almirola, 428. 17, Kurt Busch, 425. 18, Ryan Newman, 418. 19, Ricky Stenhouse Jr., 406. 20, Jeff Burton, 403. Money 1, Jimmie Johnson, $5,178,970. 2, Kyle Busch, $3,398,265. 3, Matt Kenseth, $3,311,596. 4, Kevin Harvick, $3,187,498. 5, Brad Keselowski, $3,165,460. 6, Dale Earnhardt Jr., $3,063,463. 7, Carl Edwards, $3,006,084. 8, Tony Stewart, $2,765,804. 9, Martin Truex Jr., $2,764,774. 10, Jeff Gordon, $2,760,254. 11, Joey Logano, $2,705,252. 12, Clint Bow-

| yer, $2,695,506. 13, Ryan Newman, $2,637,791. 14, Kasey Kahne, $2,620,733. 15, Greg Biffle, $2,602,789. 16, Ricky Stenhouse Jr., $2,568,474. 17, Aric Almirola, $2,435,172. 18, Kurt Busch, $2,416,058. 19, Juan Pablo Montoya, $2,321,698. 20, Jamie McMurray, $2,299,813.

TENNIS Wimbledon Results The Associated Press Tuesday At The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club London Purse: $34.9 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Jan-Lennard Struff, Germany, def. Blaz Kavcic, Slovenia, 6-1, 6-4, 6-3. Kevin Anderson (27), South Africa, def. Olivier Rochus, Belgium, 6-4, 6-2, 6-1. James Blake, United States, def. Thiemo de Bakker, Netherlands, 6-1, 6-3, 6-2. Michal Przysiezny, Poland, def. Philipp Petzschner, Germany, 6-3, 7-6 (6), 6-0. Denis Kudla, United States, def. James Duckworth, Australia, 6-4, 6-2, 3-6, 4-6, 6-1. Kei Nishikori (12), Japan, def. Matthew Ebden, Australia, 6-2, 6-4, 6-3. Leonardo Mayer, Argentina, def. Aljaz Bedene, Slovenia, 6-2, 6-3, 6-4. Jesse Levine, Canada, def. Guido Pella, Argentina, 6-4, 6-2, 4-6, 3-6, 4-3, retired. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, def. Philipp Kohlschreiber (16), Germany, 4-6, 6-7 (6), 7-6 (3), 6-3, 2-1, retired. Michael Llodra, France, def. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, 7-6 (3), 6-4, 6-3. Tommy Haas (13), Germany, def. Dmitry Tursunov, Russia, 6-3, 7-5, 7-5. Bernard Tomic, Australia, def. Sam Querrey (21), United States, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (3), 3-6, 2-6, 6-3. Jeremy Chardy (28), France, def. Ryan Harrison, United States, 7-6 (4), 4-6, 7-5, 6-2. Juan Martin del Potro (8), Argentina, def. Albert Ramos, Spain, 6-2, 7-5, 6-1. Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Florian Mayer, Germany, 6-3, 7-5, 6-4. Alexandr Dolgopolov (26), Ukraine, def. Gastao Elias, Portugal, 6-1, 7-6 (2), 6-2. Go Soeda, Japan, def. Andreas HaiderMaurer, Austria, 7-6 (6), 7-5, 6-1. Jimmy Wang, Taiwan, def. Wayne Odesnik, United States, 7-6 (5), 4-6, 6-2, 3-6, 7-5. Andreas Seppi (23), Italy, def. Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 7-6 (6), 7-6 (3), 5-7, 3-6, 6-3. Igor Sijsling, Netherlands, def. Alex Kuznetsov, United States, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4. Milos Raonic (17), Canada, def. Carlos Berlocq, Argentina, 6-4, 6-3, 6-3. Grigor Dimitrov (29), Bulgaria, def. Simone Bolelli, Italy, 6-1, 6-4, 6-3. Roberto Bautista Agut, Spain, def. Teymuraz Gabashvili, Russia, 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (3). Richard Gasquet (9), France, def. Marcel Granollers, Spain, 6-7 (2), 6-4, 7-5, 6-4. Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, def. Horacio Zeballos, Argentina, 3-6, 7-6 (4), 6-7 (6), 6-1, 6-3. David Ferrer (4), Spain, def. Martin Alund, Argentina, 6-1, 4-6, 7-5, 6-2. Tomas Berdych (7), Czech Republic, def. Martin Klizan, Slovakia, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4. Feliciano Lopez, Spain, def. Gilles Simon (19), France, 6-2, 6-4, 7-6 (11). Grega Zemlja, Slovenia, def. Michael Russell, United States, 6-7 (3), 6-4, 6-4, 6-1. Daniel Brands, Germany, def. Daniel Gimeno-Traver, Spain, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (4), 6-7 (5), 6-1, 6-4. Paul-Henri Mathieu, France, def. Ricardas Berankis, Lithuania, 7-6 (4), 7-5, 6-7 (3), 6-4. Bobby Reynolds, United States, def. Steve Johnson, United States, 1-6, 7-6 (4), 6-3, 6-7 (4), 6-4. Women First Round Kimiko Date-Krumm, Japan, def. Carina Witthoeft, Germany, 6-0, 6-2. Madison Keys, United States, def. Heather Watson, Britain, 6-3, 7-5. Sam Stosur (14), Australia, def. Anna Schmiedlova, Slovakia, 6-1, 6-3. Olga Puchkova, Russia, def. Arantxa Rus, Netherlands, 6-4, 6-2. Li Na (6), China, def. Michaella Krajicek, Netherlands, 6-1, 6-1. Caroline Garcia, France, def. Zheng Jie, China, 6-3, 6-4. Serena Williams (1), United States, def. Mandy Minella, Luxembourg, 6-1, 6-3. Mona Barthel (30), Germany, def. Monica Niculescu, Romania, 6-3, 4-6, 7-5. Alexandra Cadantu, Romania, def. Tamira Paszek (28), Austria, 6-2, 7-5. Peng Shuai (24), China, def. Anabel Medina Garrigues, Spain, 6-3, 6-2. Simona Halep, Romania, def. Olga Govortsova, Belarus, 6-2, 3-6, 6-3. Marina Erakovic, New Zealand, def. Ayumi Morita, Japan, 4-6, 6-0, 7-5. Jana Cepelova, Slovakia, def. Kristyna Pliskova, Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-1. Mariana Duque-Marino, Colombia, def. Julia Goerges, Germany, 6-4, 6-7 (3), 7-5. Laura Robson, Britain, def. Maria Kirilenko (10), Russia, 6-3, 6-4. Roberta Vinci (11), Italy, def. Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, 6-2, 6-1. Urszula Radwanska, Poland, def. Mallory Burdette, United States, 7-6 (3), 4-6, 6-2. Maria-Teresa Torro-Flor, Spain, def. IrinaCamelia Begu, Romania, 6-3, 6-4. Angelique Kerber (7), Germany, def. Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, 6-3, 6-4. Dominika Cibulkova (18), Slovakia, def. Maria Elena Camerin, Italy, 6-4, 4-6, 6-4. Alison Riske, United States, def. Romina Oprandi (31), Switzerland, 6-7 (5), 7-5, 3-1, retired. Agnieszka Radwanska (4), Poland, def. Yvonne Meusburger, Austria, 6-1, 6-1. Petra Martic, Croatia, def. Anna Tatishvili, Georgia, 6-1, 1-6, 6-3. Mathilde Johansson, France, def. Timea Babos, Hungary, 4-6, 6-1, 6-3. Annika Beck, Germany, def. Nina Bratchikova, Russia, 6-3, 6-2. Karolina Pliskova, Czech Republic, def. Nadia Petrova (13), Russia, 6-3, 6-2. Kaia Kanepi, Estonia, def. Tara Moore, Britain, 7-5, 5-7, 7-5. Tsvetana Pironkova, Bulgaria, def. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (21), Russia, 6-0, 6-1. Elena Vesnina, Russia, def. Andrea Hlavackova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 7-5. Sabine Lisicki (23), Germany, def. Francesca Schiavone, Italy, 6-1, 6-2. Barbora Zahlavova Strycova, Czech Republic, def. Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, 5-7, 6-0, 6-1. Klara Zakopalova (32), Czech Republic, def. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, 6-4, 6-3.

WNBA STANDINGS By The Associated Press EASTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct GB Atlanta 8 1 .889 – Chicago 5 3 .625 21/2 New York 4 3 .571 3 Washington 4 4 .500 31/2 Connecticut 2 6 .250 51/2 Indiana 1 7 .125 61/2 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct GB Minnesota 6 2 .750 – Los Angeles 5 2 .714 1/2 Phoenix 4 4 .500 2 Seattle 4 4 .500 2 San Antonio 3 5 .375 3 Tulsa 3 8 .273 41/2 Monday’s Games No games scheduled Tuesday’s Games Atlanta 76, Indiana 60


SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

THE ITEM

B3

Dutch tennis player loses 17th consecutive match BY HOWARD FENDRICH The Associated Press

LONDON — As loss after loss after loss piles up for Arantxa Rus — a record-equaling 17 in a row after her quick Wimbledon exit — at least give the Dutch tennis player credit for this: She’s not giving up. The 156th-ranked Rus was beaten 6-4, 6-2 Tuesday by Russia’s Olga Puchkova in the first round on Court 9 at the All England Club. The WTA said the only other woman it knows of who lost 17 consecutive main-draw, tour-level matches was Sandy Collins of the U.S., who did

it from 1984-87. Vince Spadea of the U.S. went 0-21 from 1999 to 2000, the longest skid on the men’s tour, according to the ATP. “This year is not a good year for me,” Rus said in what might be considered something of an understatement. “I lost a lot of matches,” she continued. “Yeah, it’s hard, but I try to keep working hard. That’s the only thing you can do.” Rus’ most recent victory in a tour-level match came last year on Aug. 19, when she defeated Romina Oprandi 7-5, 6-4 in the first

round of a hard-court tournament at Grapevine, Texas. Two days later, Rus lost to Jelena Jankovic 7-6 (5), 6-2. And so began the drought for the 22-yearold Rus, a left-hander who has been ranked as high as 61st and known some measure of success in the past. Her most notable win came at the French Open in May 2011, when she surprised second-seeded Kim Clijsters 3-6, 7-5, 6-1 in the second round. Rus saved two match points that day and won 11 of the final 12 games after trailing by a set and 5-2 in the second. Her deepest run at a Grand Slam tournament also came at Roland Garros, where she made it all the way to the fourth round last year. And as a teenager, Rus reached the No. 1

WIMBLEDON from Page B1 Nadal’s first-round exit a day earlier. Djokovic took a 3-0 lead in the first set and broke for a 6-5 lead in the second to take control. He served out the match to love before saluting the crowd with a fist pump. “It was a big pleasure again performing here on Centre Court in front of the packed crowd,” Djokovic said. “For the first round, it was tricky. ... I think (Mayer’s) game is really well suited for grass, so it took a lot of effort.” For Williams, this was a chance to put the focus back on tennis following the verbal jousting with Sharapova over their private lives — and comments about an Ohio rape case for which she had to

apologize — and she took full advantage. As usual on grass, the topranked Williams dominated with her hard serve, winning the first set without dropping a point on her service game. Her main weapon let her down only at the start of the second set, when Minella took a 2-0 lead after Williams double-faulted on break point. She was one point from going down 3-0 but then won 15 of the next 18 points to take a 4-2 lead, and broke again to wrap up the victory. “I feel like I was a little rusty for some reason today,” Williams said. “I don’t feel like I played my best. I felt really upset when I lost my serve in the second set. With that

ranking among juniors and won the girls’ singles title at the 2008 Australian Open But since that win against Oprandi, Rus has failed to win at the WTA level. “After the last month, I played better tennis, but you need to play very good to win matches in this level,” Rus said Tuesday. “I try my best.” She’s lost on hard courts, clay courts and grass courts. She’s lost at tournaments played outdoors and tournaments played indoors. “Yeah, sure, there were a few matches I had chances ... (to) win,” she said. And, actually, she did win three times this season, but not on the main tour. Those victories came in lower-tier events. So for now, all that’s left to do is stay the course

being said, I think Mandy played really well.” Much of the pre-tournament talk was about Williams and Sharapova, the two top players in the game who are on opposite sides of the draw and can’t meet before the final. “It hasn’t been a distraction. Like I said, I’m just here to focus on the tennis,” Williams said. “I’m just here to play Wimbledon. It’s the premier tournament in the world, of the year, so that’s what’s most important.” Williams improved her career record to 68-8 at the All England Club and extended her career-best winning streak to 32 matches, which included her second French Open title. Kimiko Date-Krumm, the 42-year-old Japanese veteran, had an even easier time. She

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Arantxa Rus slams a forehand to Sara Errani during their first round match of the French Open in Paris. Rus lost her 17th consecutive main-draw, tour-level match on Tuesday at Wimbledon, equaling the longest WTA losing streak on record.

and hope to come up on the right end next time. Rus was asked Tuesday whether all of the losing has affected her

needed just 44 minutes to complete a romp over Carina Witthoeft, an 18-year-old German less than half her age and making her Grand Slam debut. Date-Krumm is the second-oldest player to win a match at Wimbledon after Martina Navratilova, who was 47 when she reached the second round in 2004. Nadal, a two-time Wimbledon champion, was knocked out in straight sets by 135thranked Steve Darcis of Belgium on Monday — the Spaniard’s first loss in the opening round of any Grand Slam event. The only top player Tuesday who had any difficulty advancing was French Open runner-up David Ferrer. He overcame a second-set slump and a scary late fall to beat Martin Alund of Argentina

away from the court. “No, I’m still the same person,” she replied. “You have ... life (apart from) tennis.”

6-1, 4-6, 7-5, 6-2. Coming off his first Grand Slam final, the fourth-seeded Spaniard looked as if he could follow Nadal out of the tournament. Alund won the second set and pushed hard in the third. But Ferrer broke for a 6-5 lead and then went 5-1 up in the fourth. At 3-1, however, he fell and grimaced after his left foot slid backward. Ferrer went on to break Alund again. He served out the match with an ace, and afterward said his foot was fine. Most other matches went according to plan. Former U.S. Open champion Juan Martin Del Potro made a winning return to Grand Slam competition, defeating Albert Ramos of Spain 6-2, 7-5, 6-1 after sitting out the French Open because of respiratory problems.

AREA SCOREBOARD BOWLING BOWL A PAW

ROAD RACING CYPRESS TRAIL RUN/WALK

The 2nd Annual Bowl A Paw bowling tournament will be held on Sunday, July 28, at 2 p.m. at Gamecock Lanes. The event is a fundraiser for KAT’s Special Kneads small animal shelter. The event includes three games and a pair of shoes at a cost of $12.50 for adults and $10 for children age 12 and under. For more information, call Kathy Stafford at (803) 469-3906, Gail McLeod at (803) 8404519 or Gamecock Lanes at (803) 775-1197 or send an email to katsspecialkneads@yahoo.com.

The first Cypress Trail 9k Run/Walk will be held on Aug. 17 at Dillon Park. All registrations will be completed using GoGreen Events, with a $22 fee for the run/walk with a t-shirt and a $15 fee without a t-shirt. Awards will be given in the Overall, Masters, and Age Group categories. Proceeds from the event will be reinvested in the maintenance and improvement of the Cypress Trail. Additional information can be found at http://www.gogreenevents.com/CT9k or by emailing race di-

Have a college student? Help them stay in touch by purchasing a subscription to their hometown newspaper. Call (803) 774-1258.

| rector Shawn Delaney at sumterstryders@gmail. com. GOLF SUMTER HIGH TOURNAMENT

The first Sumter High Athletics Golf Tournament will be held Monday, July 22, at Sunset Country Club. The tournament will begin at 9 a.m. The entry fee is $160 per 4-man team. For more information, call Drew Marlowe at (803) 464-5682 or email him at drew.marlowe@yahoo.com. PAR 4 PETS

The 2nd Annual Par 4 Pets Golf Tournament will be held on Saturday, Sept. 21, at Crystal Lakes Golf Course.

The format is 4-man Captain’s Choice with an entry fee of $160 per team or $40 per player. Entry is limited to the first 20 teams. There will be $5 per mulligan available at registration with a maximum of two per player. The event is a fundraiser for KAT’s Special Kneads small animal shelter. For more information, call Kathy Stafford at (803) 469-3906, Julie Wilkins at (803) 9685176, Melissa Brunson at (803) 983-0038, Gail McLeod at (803) 8404519 or Crystal Lakes manager Mike Ardis at (803) 775-1902.

BASKETBALL SUMTER CHRISTIAN CLINIC

The final session of the Sumter Christian Basketball Clinic will be held July 15-19. The clinic is under the direction of Bobby Baker, Tom Cope and Jim Davis. The session s for grades 9-12. The clinic will run from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. each day. The cost of the session is $45 per camper. T-shirts will be given and trophies will be awarded. For more information, call Sumter Christian School at (803) 7731902. BATTLE ON THE HILL

The Battle On The

Hill 2013 basketball tournament will be held July 5-7 at the Hillcrest Middle School gymnasium in Dalzell. Players must be age 18 or older to participate in the tournament. The entry fee is $175 per team if signing up by June 27. There will be an additional $25 for those who sign up after that. The last day to sign up is July 2. Teams must have jerseys or T-shirts with numbers printed on the back. Each game will consist of two 18-minutes halves. To enter, call Ronnie Morant (803) 463-7255 or Phil Morant at (704) 345-8427.

JANITORIAL SERVICES FOR SC WORKS CENTER IN SUMTER & CAMDEN The Santee-Lynches Regional Council of Governments operating as the SanteeLynches Workforce Centers is seeking sealed bids from qualified firms to provide janitorial services for three office buildings in the Santee-Lynches Region – (29 E. Calhoun Street & Suite 31-35-39 E. Calhoun Street, Sumter, SC and a location in Camden to be determined). Sealed bids & references must be submitted no later than 3:00 PM, on Monday, July 29, 2013 to Santee-Lynches Regional Council of Governments, attention: Donna Thames. Mailed to PO Box 1837, Sumter, SC 29151 or delivered to 36 West Liberty Street, Sumter, SC 29150. In the lower left corner of the envelope should be written “RFB – Janitorial Services – Bid Date: 7/29/13. No bids will be accepted after this date & time. Bid opening will be held at 3:00 PM on July 29, 2013 in Board Room at the SLRCOG’s Office. Download Solicitation from The Santee-Lynches Website: www.slworkforcedev.org. Direct Inquiries To: Donna Thames via email at dthames@slcog.org.

The Item

www.theitem.com

“WIA is an equal opportunity employer/program”. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities.


B4

SPORTS

THE ITEM

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

James not thinking about ‘14 yet BY TIM REYNOLDS The Associated Press

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Chicago defenseman Michal Rozsival, center, hoists the Stanley Cup after the Blackhawks defeated the Boston Bruins 3-2 in Game 6 of the Stanley Cup Finals on Monday in Boston.

Blackhawks looking toward another Stanley Cup win BY JAY COHEN The Associated Press CHICAGO— When Rocky Wirtz took over the Chicago Blackhawks six years ago, they were among the worst teams in the NHL. Fast forward to Tuesday, when the owner mingled with fans and friends hours after the Blackhawks flew home with the Stanley Cup for the second time in four seasons. It’s been quite the turnaround, and the 60-year-old Wirtz thinks there is more to come. “I think we’re going to see a lot of good years ahead of us,� he said. It sure looks that way. Unlike in 2010, when the titlewinning team underwent changes because of salary-cap issues, the Blackhawks will be able to bring back many of their top players next season when they try to become the first repeat Stanley Cup winner since the Detroit Red Wings in 1998.

Forwards Jonathan Toews, Patrick Kane, Marian Hossa and Patrick Sharp, and defensemen Duncan Keith and Brent Seabrook are all under contract for at least two more seasons. Brandon Saad, one of the finalists for the Calder Trophy given to the NHL’s top rookie, is years away from restricted free agency. “I think there’s something about our core,� said Kane, who won the Conn Smythe Trophy as MVP of the playoffs. “Hopefully we can stay together a long time, because that’s two Cups in four years, and we seem to only be getting better and better as players as time goes on here.� The Blackhawks lost in the first round of the playoffs in each of the previous two seasons, but general manager Stan Bowman decided to stay the course. He kept Joel Quenneville in place even though the coach was hired by his predecessor, Dale Tallon.

MIAMI — LeBron James has this summer on his mind, and is already starting to plan for next season. The summer of 2014, that can wait. James said Tuesday that he is not thinking about the possibility of becoming a free agent in 12 months, though he did acknowledge that the prospects of competing with Dwyane Wade, Chris Bosh, Erik Spoelstra and Pat Riley for several more championships with the Miami Heat is more than a tiny bit intriguing. “That’s the goal,� James said. “That’s the ultimate finish. And we all hope that can happen, obviously.� James’ final interview session of this season revealed plenty in 17 minutes, including that he’s already feeling an itch to get back on the basketball court after just a few days off, that he’ll stop at nothing to give longtime girlfriend Savannah Brinson anything she wants on their wedding day in a couple months, and that he’s making no secret of his hope that the Heat bring back at least the majority of this year’s championship roster. The most interesting news, however, was when he spoke of his short- and long-term plans. First, he’s vowing to come back better

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Miami’s LeBron James, left, and Dwyane Wade celebrate after defeating the San Antonio Spurs 95-88 to win their second straight NBA championship.

next season, which is no small promise from someone with four MVP awards, two Finals MVP awards and who carries the tag of “best player in the world.� And then next summer, it certainly sounds as if he’s going to give the prospects of staying in Miami a good, long look. “This is what we came here for, so that would be the ultimate,� James said. “But you can never ... I don’t know, life changes, things happen, and we have to be prepared for that. But this is what we all want to be here for, that’s to be able to compete for a championship each and every year. And if we can do that, then it’d be awesome.� James scored 37 points in Game 7 of the

NBA Finals against the San Antonio Spurs, carrying the Heat to their second straight championship in a season where he picked up his fourth MVP award. He’s gotten to the championship series in all three of his seasons with Miami, falling to Dallas in 2011, then beating Oklahoma City last season and the Spurs this year. The team gathered for physicals and a quick meeting on Tuesday, and now begins the process of scattering for vacation and other business. James will make his annual trip with Nike to China next month, not long after Wade does some business there. And already, James sounds like he’s missing the group that he spent the past nine months with.

Koepka gets major upgrade in Europe, another major BY DOUG FERGUSON The Associated Press Brooks Koepka played six straight weeks in six countries, knowing only that he would be flying home to Florida on Tuesday for a break he desperately needed. He just didn’t realize how much different the road map would be when he gets back to work. KOEPKA Koepka is another young American who’s taking the European route, and the payoff was measured in more than euros. The 23-year-old from Florida State won a Challenge Tour event in Scotland on Sunday, his third win of the season that gave him an instant promotion to the European Tour. Still running on fumes, he took an early morning flight Monday from Scotland to London, drove straight to Sunningdale Golf Club

and shot rounds of 69-65 for the low score among nine players who qualified for the British Open at Muirfield. “Scotland was awesome. There was a lot of motivation there to get that third win before I headed back to the States,� Koepka said Monday night. “And then the qualifier, I honestly don’t know how I did it. I was running on two or three hours of sleep. I was thoroughly exhausted. Adrenaline or something took over. But as soon as I got off the golf course, I was done.� Instead of returning to a Challenge Tour event in Switzerland or Italy, he will play alongside Phil Mickelson and a host of other stars at Castle Stuart for the Scottish Open, his first event as a full European Tour member. Then, he will drive south to Muirfield for his second major championship. One item on the agenda while he’s home is to sit down with agent Blake Smith at Hambric Sports and

AUTO PLUS PARTS SUPPLIER

Guaranteed Quality parts and value pricing

COOK’S Auto Plus Auto Parts 'SJFSTPO3Et%BM[FMM 4$ Phone: 803-499-9086 Fax: 803-499-4388 Email: ccooks@ftc-i.net

figure out a schedule the rest of the year. “Just getting on the European Tour is big in itself,� Koepka said. “I get to play with some of the best players in the world, and it will be nice to have some feedback with Peter, who’s someone I really enjoy being around.� That would be Peter Uihlein, his roommate in south Florida, and someone who knows these ropes. Uihlein also started his pro career on the smaller Challenge Tour in Europe, and he won the Madeira Island Open last month to secure his European Tour card. One of the house rules in Florida is that whoever wins a tournament has to buy a jet ski. Koepka and Uihlein won two weeks apart in May, and Koepka has added two more titles since. “We’re going to have a whole fleet,� Koepka said. Koepka and Uihlein have known each other since junior golf.

Palmetto Farm Supply OPEN MONDAY - SATURDAY 8AM - 6PM

TRUCKLOAD FEED SALE

SELECT HORSE FEEDS (50lb)

$9

99

BEEF BLEND (50lb)

$799

CHUNK DOG FOOD (40lb)

$1550

#SPBE4USFFUrSumter, SC

803-775-1204


SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

CWS from Page B1 UCLA head coach John Savage said. “Kind of a Bruin game. Tight game, and at the end of the night we were fortunate to come out with the win.’’ Bulldogs second baseman Brett Pirtle said he and his teammates can’t give the Bruins any openings because they’re so capable of capitalizing on them. “Nobody that’s extra special,’’ Pirtle said of the Bruins. “They’re just small ball. They bunt and put pressure on the defense, and that’s what helped them out, and that’s the kind of ballclub they are. So keeping runners off base and just catching the ball and putting pressure on them will help us win the game (Tuesday).’’ Adam Plutko limited the Bulldogs to a run on four hits in six innings and was helped by his defense. Eric Filia made a catch close to the wall against Nick Ammirati and hauled in a liner off the bat of Trey Porter with the bases loaded. Cody Regis made a couple diving stops and also started both of UCLA’s double plays.

The Bruins made it 3-0 in the fourth on Filia’s two-out, two-run single off Chad Girodo, who replaced starter Trevor Fitts (0-1) in the second. That was the last of the Bruins’ six hits. Mississippi State’s fans started the “Maroon and White’’ chant in the bottom of the ninth after C.T. Bradford and pinch-hitter Sam Frost singled to put runners on first and second with one out against Berg. Ammirati flew out, and pinch-hitter Jacob Robson ended the game with his comebacker to Berg, who sprinted toward first base before underhanding the ball to Pat Gallagher. Berg, making his 50th appearance of the season, earned his NCAArecord 24th save for 1 2-3 innings of work. “Records are meant to be broken, but titles are what matter,’’ Berg said. “So if we all win a national championship, I’ll enjoy that. But right now I don’t think about it at all.’’ The loss spoiled a splendid performance by Girodo, who pitched

SPEEDWAY from Page B1 Wilson took the white flag with the lead with Denman on his heels. Denman dove to the inside of Wilson in the exit of Turn 2. The two made contact and Denman nearly spun around, losing several positions. Wilson cruised on to pick up the victory with Infinger second, Deberry third, Brett Siegel fourth and Denman fifth. Danny Norton was sixth, Andy Driggers seventh, Jay Kyle eighth and Ryan Lambert ninth. Daniel Morris picked up the win in the Fender Bender division. Morris swapped the lead several times with David Outlaw and Kiri Welch before finally getting the top spot for good. Outlaw settled for second with Welch third and Marty Horne fourth. Gene Kinard picked up the win in the Crate Late Model division. Kale Green jumped into the lead as the race began, but spun in turns 1 and 2 after five laps of leading, surrendering the lead to Kinard. Kinard led from that point to pick up the win. Trey Shirey was second and Green third. Anthony Hudson jumped into the lead as the Young Guns feature got under way and never looked back, leading flag to flag. First-year competitor Kristin Rhodes came home second with Kaleb Heaton third. Bubba Johnson picked up an exciting win in the Stock-4 feature.

the last 7 2/3 innings in relief of Fitts. He allowed three hits, walked two and struck out nine. Both runs against him were unearned. Plutko (10-3) walked in Mississippi State’s only run in the fourth. The Bruins brought a .248 season batting average into the finals, and a .182 average through their first three CWS games. They eked out enough offense to win again. In the first three innings, they had batters reach on a dropped third strike, infield single, two hit batsmen and a throwing error. But there were big hits, too. Filia, who came in 1 for 9 in the CWS, doubled after Kevin Kramer struck out but reached because strike three was in the dirt. Pat Valaika’s single to center drove in Kramer for a 1-0 lead. “First baserunner of the game kind of spells it out,’’ Bulldogs coach John Cohen said. “I really wish that kid hadn’t swung at that pitch. I’m not saying it to be a smart aleck, but that kid doesn’t swing at that pitch, it lands in front of the plate, I think the ballgame could be different. But crazy things happen in sports.’’

Johnson battled it out with Allen Ridgeway and DJ Carraway throughout the event on his way to the checkered flag. Carraway gave Johnson all he could handle, but couldn’t quite make his way around him. Carraway settled for second with Taylor Geddings third, LJ Sohnemann fourth, Ridgeway fifth, Jason Hodge sixth and Chris Baker seventh. Marty Hudson picked up another win in the Ridge Runner division. Hudson held off challenges from Joey Ayers and Brian Welch on his way to the victory. Ayers finished second with Christina Burns third, Timmy Kimsey fourth and Welch fifth. Heather Welch continued her dominance of the Street Stock division, picking up yet another victory. Welch led flag to flag with Grant Hill second, William Disher third, JJ Bailey fourth, John Pritchard fifth and Jody Truett sixth. Brian Avins picked up the win in the Clone Medium Kart division with Marcus Welch second, Gene Strickland third and Steven Turner fourth. Mike Lighthill was the winner in the Stock Appearing Kart division with Johnny Barrett second, Bobby Bennett third and Billy Barrett fourth. The season continues on Saturday with racing in all division. Gates open at 5 p.m. and racing starts at 7. Grandstand admission is $10 for adults with pit passes $20. Active duty military will be admitted to the grandstands free of charge with proper military identification.

THE ITEM

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

UCLA right fielder Eric Filia makes a leaping catch of a fly ball hit by Mississippi State’s Nick Ammirati in the fifth inning of Monday’s Game 1 of the College World Series in Omaha, Neb.

NCAA’s Leech: Is moving in CWS fences worth cost? BY ERIC OLSON The Associated Press OMAHA, Neb. — The lack of offense, most notably home runs, has been a major topic of conversation among fans and media at the College World Series. The NCAA has noticed, too, but no immediate changes are planned in an attempt bring up the numbers. There were three home runs hit in the first 13 games, and some have suggested that the fences should be moved in at TD Ameritrade Park. “All of that costs money, and we would do that why? So there would be a few more home runs? Is it worth it?� said Damani Leech, the NCAA’s director of championships and alliances. “We’ve only had three home runs, yet we’ve had the highest average attendance in the history of the College World Series.� Leech officially takes over as lead administrator for the CWS on July 1, replacing the retiring Dennis Poppe. Leech said in an interview Tuesday that the offensive issues at the CWS coincide with the drop in offense throughout all of college baseball since the dialed-back metal bats were put into play in 2011. According to the NCAA’s midseason statistics report, the latest data available, the perteam average for home runs was about one every three games. The year before the new bat specifications, the aver-

CWS NOTEBOOK | what it would cost to

age was about one a game. Leech noted that there were nine home runs hit at TD Ameritrade Park in its first year, 2011, and there were 10 last year. “Were folks comfortable with that number?� Leech said. “That’s the kind of conversation we’ve got to have, that the baseball committee’s got to have. Are we comfortable with the kind of baseball that’s being played here at our premier national event?� The fences at TD Ameritrade Park are 335 feet down the lines, 375 in the power alleys and 408 to center field. Those are identical to the dimensions at the old Rosenblatt Stadium, where there were an average of 33 home runs over the last 10 years the CWS was played there. Not only have the bats changed since the CWS was played at Rosenblatt, so has the field orientation. Batters faced the northeast at Rosenblatt and were able to launch flies into the prevailing south wind most days. They face the southeast at TD Ameritrade, meaning they usually hit into the wind. Leech said he spoke with the agency that operates the stadium to see if they could give him an estimate for

move in the fences. They couldn’t come up with a figure, but they pointed out there would be significant costs associated with addressing the angles of some of the outfield seats and having to make changes in grading. The batting average over the three years the CWS has been played at TD Ameritrade is .236. Last year’s .234 was the lowest since it was .227 in 1974, the year metal bats replaced wood. Researchers from Washington State University, representatives of Rawlings Sporting Goods and American Baseball Coaches Association executive director Dave Keilitz met with NCAA officials on Tuesday to discuss possible changes to the ball. Leech said the consensus is there will be no change to the core of the ball, but they did discuss the possibility of switching from the raised-seam ball to the flat-seam ball used in professional baseball. No change in the ball could take effect until 2015, which is at the end of the current moratorium on baseball rule changes. “Generally people don’t want to see us go back to the days of 21run games,� Leech said. THANKS FOR COMING

Mississippi State’s fans were back in force Tuesday night, and the Bulldogs have felt their presence. An estimated 8,000 fans wearing the maroon and white were on hand for Monday’s Game 1.

3 WAYS TO READ Read about it your way. 'RWWH7LOJKPDQ $XWR2ZQHUV,QVXUDQFHRIIHUVEURDGĂ€H[LEOHSURWHFWLRQIRU \RXUFDUDQG\RX&KRRVHIURPDYDULHW\RISURJUDPVGHVLJQHG WRÂżW\RXUQHHGV:HDOVRKDYHPDQ\GLVFRXQWVDYDLODEOHVXFK DVPXOWLSROLF\PXOWLFDUDQGJRRGVWXGHQWGLVFRXQW Call or visit us today!

1.

2. :LOVRQ+DOO5RDG 6XPWHU6&  E\QXPLQVXUDQFHFRP

B5

3.

.com

Call to subscribe: 803-774-1200


B6

OBITUARIES

THE ITEM

WILLIAM K. BRADHAM Sr. William K. “Ken� Bradham Sr., 75, husband of Betty J. Bradham, passed away Monday, June 24, 2013, at NHC Healthcare in Sumter. Born in Alcolu, he was a son of the late King Lee and Willie Mae Thames Bradham. Mr. Bradham was a member of Northside Memorial Baptist Church and the Fellowship Sunday School Class. He was a Mason and a member of St. Peters Masonic Lodge No. 54. He retired from Becton-Dickinson. He was a U.S. Air Force veteran. He was also a member of the McDonald’s Coffee Club. Survivors include his wife of Sumter; a son, William K. “Bill� Bradham Jr. (Allison) of Burlington, Texas; three stepsons, Willie Truesdale, Larry Wayne Truesdale and John Allen Truesdale (Amanda), all of Sumter; a stepdaughter, Barbara Ann Hinson (Terry) of Sumter; a grandson, Jeffrey Kindrick (Nicole) of Kansas, Mo.; two greatgrandsons, Kindrick William and Kaiden Rhea of Kansas, Mo.; two step-granddaughters, Ashley Nicole and Kelly Michel Hinson of Sumter; one step-greatgrandson, Bryson Hinson of Sumter; a sister, Jean Jonte of Chapin; a brother, John Harvin Bradham (Becky) of Mt. Pleasant; and his beloved dog, Snoopy. He was preceded in death by a sister, Frances Bradham Plowden. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday at the Elmore-Cannon-Stephens Funeral

Home Chapel with the Rev. Jimmy Holley officiating. Entombment will be in Evergreen Memorial Park mausoleum. The family will receive friends from 5 to 7 p.m. today at ElmoreCannon-Stephens Funeral Home and other times at the home. Memorials may be made to Northside Memorial Baptist Church, 1004 N. Main St. Sumter, SC 29153. Elmore-Cannon-Stephens Funeral Home and Crematorium, 515 Miller Road, Sumter, is in charge of the arrangements, (803) 7757500.

HARRIETT MARTIN SUMMERTON — Harriett Minnie Lee Caldwell Martin, 83, wife of Grant Sudie Martin, died Sunday, June 23, 2013, at Windsor Manor Nursing Center, Manning. She was born Nov. 9, 1929, in Summerton, a daughter of the late Moses and Belva Randolph Caldwell. She received her formal education in the public schools of Clarendon County. She worked as a custodian for many years. She was a member of Liberty Hill AME Church and served faithfully until her health failed. Survivors are her husband, Grant S. Martin of the home; two sons, Victor (Doris) Martin of Brooklyn, N.Y., and Raymond (Shalanda) Martin of Summerton; four daughters, Carnistine M. Session, Barbara A. Martin and Linda (Curtis) Smith, all of Summerton, and

Roxanne (Joseph) Postell of Silver; one sister, Rosa L. Ladson of Jamaica, N.Y.; seven grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. The celebratory services for Mrs. Martin will be held at 11 a.m. today at the Hayes F. & LaNelle J. Samuels Sr. Memorial Chapel, Manning, with Presiding Elder Joseph Postell officiating, the Rev. Rufus Gaymon presiding, and the Rev. Dr. James Cooper and the Rev. Dr. Leslie Lovett assisting. Burial will follow in Historic Liberty Hill AME Church cemetery, 2310 Liberty Hill Road, Summerton. Mrs. Martin will lie in repose one hour prior to funeral time. The family is receiving friends at the home of her son-in-law and daughter, Presiding Elder Joseph and Roxanne Martin Postell, 5299 Summerton Highway, Summerton. These services have been entrusted to Samuels Funeral Home LLC of Manning.

RAY BRANHAM BISHOPVILLE — Ray Branham, 52, died Monday, June 24, 2013, at KershawHealth in Camden. Born in Sumter, he was a son of Mary White Branham and the late Lindy Branham. He was a member of First Church of the Nazarene in Bishopville and was employed at Park At The Bay. Survivors include his mother of Bishopville; three brothers, Larry Branham, Robert Branham (Teresa), and David Branham (Lynn)

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

all of Bishopville; nephews, Rob Branham, D.J. Branham, Buddy Branham, Michael Branham and Todd Branham (Deana); a niece, Cheryl Branham; great-nephews, Jordan, Tyler and Cale; and stepnieces, Kaylee and Claire. He was preceded in death by a brother, Ronnie Branham. Funeral services will be held at 3 p.m. today at the Hancock-ElmoreHill Funeral Home chapel with the Rev. Garry Lee officiating. Burial will be in Piedmont Cemetery. The family will receive friends from 2 to 3 p.m. today at HancockElmore-Hill Funeral Home and other times at the home, 12 Branham Lane, Bishopville. Hancock-Elmore-Hill Funeral Home of Bishopville is in charge of the arrangements.

of Elmore Hill McCreight Funeral Home with the Rev. Harold Waynick officiating. Burial will be in Evergreen Memorial Park cemetery. Pallbearers will be Thomas Wayne Brown, Michael Leviner, Jimmy Brown, Brent Waynick, Tripp Waynick and Brad Bradley. The family will receive friends from 4 to 6 p.m. today at the home of Mark and Belva Bradley, 1640 U.S. 521 South, and other times at the home of Thomas Wayne Brown, 4 Monoghan Court. Online condolences may be sent to www. sumterfunerals.com. Elmore Hill McCreight Funeral Home & Crematory, 221 Broad St., Sumter, is in charge of the arrangements, (803) 775-9386.

MICHAEL E. COX Sr. Michael Eugene Cox Sr., 60, husband of Paula Coker Cox, died Monday, June 24, 2013, at his home. Born in Sumter, he was a son of the late Arold Mendall Cox and Nancy Rowland Ruple. Mr. Cox was raised in the Church of the Nazarene and was the retired owner and operator of B&R Septic Tank Co. Surviving are his wife; one son, Michael Eugene Cox Jr.; one daughter, Mechelle Cox Reynolds and husband, Bud; and three grandchildren, McLean Reynolds, Henry Reynolds and Charlie Reynolds, all of Sumter. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday in the chapel

VERMELL A. McFADDEN Vermell “Mell� Anderson McFadden, wife of William “Bill� McFadden Jr., died Friday, June 21, 2013, at her residence, 135 H St., Sumter. She was born April 8, 1952, in Manning, a daughter of the late Thornwell and Alice Vermell Ragin Anderson. She received her formal education in the public schools of Clarendon County and was a 1970 graduate of Manning Training School. She was a dedicated employee of ABC Manufacturing Co. and Gold Kist for many years. Vermell was a member of

Antioch Baptist Church, Manning. Survivors are her husband, William McFadden of Sumter; two sons, Wesley (Anita) McFadden of Manning and Tyrone (Sheila) Anderson of Charleston; stepmother, Sarah Anderson of Manning; seven sisters, Juanita (Fladger) Parson of Manning, Dorothy (George) Nelson of Alcolu, and Deloris (James) Hilton, Inez (Anthony) Jones, Rosa (Leo) Hilton, Gloria (Manuel) Thompson and Louise (Johnny) Johnson, all of Manning; two brothers, Thornwell (Irene) Anderson of Manning and Jimmy Thames of Bridgeport, Conn.; and two sistersin-law, Emma Lyons and Francis (Harvin) Dinkins of Daytona Beach, Fla. The celebratory services for Mrs. McFadden will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday at Antioch Missionary Baptist Church, Jordon community, Manning, with Pastor Sam Livingston, eulogist, Evangelist Shirley Waiters, presiding, and Minister Eloise Jackson, Elder Nichole Blanding and Pastor Cheryl Graham assisting. Burial will follow in Antioch Memorial Gardens, Manning. Mrs. McFadden will lie in repose one hour prior to funeral time. The family is receiving friends at the home of her sister and brother-in-law, Juanita and Fladger Parson, 722 Barnwell St., Manning. These services are entrusted to Samuels Funeral Home LLC of Manning.

SPORTS

|

HAMLIN from Page B1 compression fracture in his back; when he returned to full-time competition, Hamlin seemed to be a man on a mission. Hamlin has never missed the Chase in his Cup career, and he had no intention of allowing his injury to be an excuse to come up short this year. His return race at Darlington was an impressive runner-up finish to Joe Gibbs Racing teammate Matt Kenseth, and he followed it by finishing fourth at Charlotte. Then the air began to leak out of his comeback tour with a 34th-place finish at Dover, a 30th at Michigan and then Sunday’s frustrating day. Those Chase chances now? “I’d have to have a lot of stuff go my way, that’s for sure,� he said. “We’re not gaining anything to 20th. We need a lot of help and a lot of stuff to go our

way, honestly.� Hamlin then talked about his “wheelhouse� portion of the schedule coming up — the fast, slick tracks where he typically excels and could make some noise again in his championship bid. Only problem? “We’re not running that strong, we’re not running as strong as the Chase guys right now,� he said. “You have to earn it. You can’t just expect other guys to make mistakes.� And that’s the problem right now with the No. 11 car, Hamlin said, and not the fractured vertebra that kept him out of the car and put him in this hole. It’s an important distinction because, when Hamlin was healing, he said if he couldn’t save the season he’d consider pulling the plug and focus on getting his back 100 percent healthy. That could involve surgery, or rehabilitation, but it was an option he tossed out there. He was quick Sunday to dismiss his back injury as the performance problem.

“I feel fine. There’s nothing that I feel in the car that keeps me from performing better,� he insisted. “Missed the setup a couple weeks and had bad stuff happen. It’s just frustrating — can’t get a finish.� When asked if he’s still considering getting out of the car this year, Hamlin said it’s too soon. “Not until it absolutely can’t happen, or even think about it,� he said. “Really, like I said, my physical status is not keeping me from performing well. It’s other things at this point.� Those other things are that Hamlin doesn’t believe his Toyota is at the same performance level as JGR teammates Kenseth and Kyle Busch. In the

six races he’s been back, Kenseth has a win and Busch has four top-six finishes. While Hamlin was on the same pace as his teammates when he first returned, he believes he’s taken a step back in the last few weeks. “They’re performing better than us, that’s for sure,� he said. “Honestly, that’s the benchmark we need to set ourselves at — our teammates. We should be able to run with them. We’ve been at the tail end of the trio for the past couple of weeks. “But, you could argue for the first three weeks we were back, we were the best car. It’s circumstantial, you get all emotional over a couple bad weeks.�

Tom & Mary’s Put & Take LAUNDRY AND

CLEANERS

Your community Your news ฀

฀

฀

฀

฀

฀ ฀

฀ ฀ ฀

฀

฀ ฀฀ ฀

฀

฀ ฀฀ ฀ ฀ ฀

฀ ฀

฀ ฀

฀

฀

฀

฀

฀

฀

฀

฀

฀

The Item www.theitem.com

803-774-1200

MEN’S LAUNDERED DRESS SHIRTS OR WOMEN’S LAUNDERED PLAIN BLOUSE wet pressed with or without starch

฀

฀

t0SHBOJD%SZ$MFBOJOHt t-BVOESZt t"MUFSBUJPOTt t0QFO4JY%BZTB8FFLt t2VBMJUZ8PSLBU3FBTPOBCMF1SJDFTt t"MM8PSL(VBSBOUFFEt

฀ ฀

$2.00 Plus Tax - With Coupon. No Limits – Exp 6-30-13

SUMMER SALE STARTS NOW

%

10-50 *O4UPDL OFF .FSDIBOEJTF

All Coupons Must Be Prepaid At Drop Off Time Coupons Valid At 2 Locations:

1784 Peach Orchard Rd (Hwy 441)t 88FTNBSLt (Across From Simpsons Hardware)

Your Sumter Hometown Clothing Store

$PSOFSPG8JTFBOE"MJDF%SJWFrrXXXDBOUIPOZTNFOTXFBSDPN


Classified lassified

CLASSIFIEDS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

THE ITEM

B7

WWW.THEITEM.COM ITEM.COM

DEADLINES

11:30 a.m. the day before for Tuesday. Wednesday, Thursday & Friday edition. 9:30 a.m. Friday for Saturday’s edition. 11:30 a.m. Friday for Sunday’s edition.

803.774.1234

OR TO PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE GO TO WWW.THE ITEM.COM/PLACEMYAD

Reward up to $10,000 Any information on the vandalism of an Inactive Business during the day time, front of 3 other business, Address: 7840 Myrtle Beach Hwy, Sumter, SC 29051 near I-95, exit 135 & 378 intersection. Someone must know who has done this. Offering a $5000.00 reward for anyone who leads to the Arrest, & Prosecution. Please call (215) 245 0560, & Email MyrtleBeachInn@Gmail.com Or you may contact Investigation Wyatt at 803 436 2014.

Beer & Wine License Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 2330 Peach Orchard Rd., Sumter, SC 29154. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110 Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 1487 Main Street, Bonneau, SC 29431. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 1003 Manning Avenue, Sumter, SC 29150. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 370 Pinewood Rd., Sumter, SC 29154. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 1233 N. Main Street, Sumter, SC 29150. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 1950 Myrtle Beach Hwy, Sumter, SC 29153. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 120 W. Clark, Pinewood, SC 29150. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it

Beer & Wine License must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 940 East Liberty St., Sumter, SC 29153. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110 Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 1868 Hwy 15 South, Sumter, SC 29150. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 337 Pine Rd., Sumter, SC 29153. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the

Shaw Flea Market

Legal Notice

Beer & Wine License

"U4IBX"'#r

LEGAL NOTICES

Beer & Wine License

Beer & Wine License

same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110

the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 96 Oswego Hwy, Sumter, SC 29150. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 230 Old Manning Rd, Sumter, SC 29150. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 7 N. Church St., Summerton, SC 29148. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why

Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 226 Broad Street, Sumter, SC 29150. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 1063 Manning Rd, Sumter, SC 29150. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 1970 Camden Rd., Sumter, SC 29150. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it

Beer & Wine License

must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 3120 US Hwy 15 South, Sumter, SC 29150. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 301 East Charlotte Avenue, Sumter, SC 29150. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110

We Want to Sell Your Car

Now! 4 Lines

+ 4 Days

FOR ONLY *PHOTO INCLUDED

$24!

00

Notice Of Application

All Tables Just $1

GOT STUFF?

Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 2264 Peach Orchard Rd., Sumter, SC 29154. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110

We will be happy to change your ad if an error is made; however we are not responsible for errors after the first run day. We shall not be liable for any loss or expense that results from the printing or omission of an advertisement. We reserve the right to edit, refuse or cancel any ad at any time.

20 N. Magnolia Street Sumter, SC www.theitem.com

Limited Time

No refund for early cancellation. Private Party Only! Business and commercial accounts not eligible. All ads must be prepaid. All advertising subject to publisher’s approval. Special cannot be combined with discounts. Other restrictions may apply.

774.1234

803. CALL


B8

CLASSIFIEDS

THE ITEM

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

Check Out

MAYO’S SUIT CITY Sale Held over by popular Demand thru end of June.

063#*("/% 5"--4&$5*0/ 9509 46*546150 4-"$,46150 4*;&

If your suits aren’t becoming to you, #6:0/&46*5(&50/&'3&& It’s a good time to be coming to Mayo’s! 8FTNBSL1MB[Btt.PO4BUtXXX.BZPT%JTDPVOU4VJUTDPN Beer & Wine License Notice Of Application Notice is hereby given that GPM Southeast, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of Beer & Wine at 976 Miller Rd, Sumter, SC 29150. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than July 05, 2013. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, South Carolina 29214; or Faxed to: (803) 896-0110

ANNOUNCEMENTS Happy Ads

PETS & ANIMALS Pets Yellow & Black full blooded lab puppies, 803-983-2020

MERCHANDISE Auctions **PUBLIC AUTO AUCTION**

Monday 7PM 1945 Myrtle Beach Hwy Dinkins Auctions 803 840-0420 www.SumterAutoAuction.com STORAGE AUCTION MOORE'S MINI STORAGE 1117 N MAIN ST. SUMTER SAT. JUNE 29, 2013. 9AM

Garage, Yard & Estate Sales 3090 Sun Valley Dr. Sumter, Sat. June 29th, 7 am. Hunting, fishing, clothes, dishes, furniture & more. Sumter County Flea Mkt Hwy 378 E. 803-495-2281 500 tables. Sat. $8 free return Sun.

Help Wanted Full-Time Morris College, a private four year Liberal Arts College in Sumter, South Carolina, is seeking to fill the following position(s): RESIDENCE HALL DIRECTOR OF A DORMITORY (MALE): To supervise a male residence hall and provide individual and group counseling to residents. Supervise the housekeeping and general cleaning of the residence hall. Provide assistance to residents, ensuring the building is well kept and safe for residents receiving college guest into the residence hall. Bachelor of Science degree required. Effective immediately. Submit a letter of application, personal resume, three letters of recommendation and official academic transcripts to Director of Personnel, Morris College, 100 W. College St., Sumter SC 29150-3599. Morris College is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Experienced Mechanic for heavy equipment and tractor/trailers. Also, Drivers with clean CDL and at least two years experience. Please send resume to P. O. Box 1109, Summerton, SC 29148. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.

CENTIPEDE SOD 80sqft - $20 250 sqft - $50 500 sqft- $95 Call 499-4023 or 499-4717

Assistant Manager & Customer Service Rep needed by Sumter branch of World Acceptance Corporation. Valid drivers license and auto required. A career opportunity that offers excellent salary and a complete fringe benefit package. Promotion to manager possible within 15 months. No experience necessary. Apply in person at: World Finance, 45 S. Main St. EOE, M. Ask for Monique Glisson.

For Sale or Trade

Help Wanted Part-Time

LARGE GARAGE SALE 1st & 3rd Weekend Tables $1 & Up FLEA MARKET BY SHAW AFB

Open every wkend. 905-4242

Lawn / Garden / Nursery

Expert Tech, New & used heat pumps & A/C. Will install/repair, warranty; Compressor & labor $600. Call 803-968-9549 or 843-992-2364

St. Paul AME (Shaw) seeks an experienced church musician. For details call 803-494-3524 or 803-397-6949 or 803-983-0977

Washers, Dryers, Refrigerators, Stoves. Also new Gas stoves. Guaranteed. 803-464-5439

$$$ AVON $$$ FREE TRAINING! 803-422-5555

(4) Cemetery plots in Evergreen Cemetery (Front Acacia Sec). Asking $2,450 each or all 4 $8,500 803-606-6135

Trucking Opportunities

PAYROLL SERVICE TESCO 507 BROAD ST 803 773-1515

SNAPPER 33" High-Vac riding mower. 17.5 HP Briggs Engine. Grass catcher included. Well maintained; excellent condition. Used 2 seasons. Need a larger mower. Call 452-6446 8:00 a.m 8:00 p.m. $1,200 OBO.

Driver Trainees Needed Now! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $800+ per week! No experience needed! CDL Trained and Job-Ready in 15 days! 1-888-263-7364

Hendrix Metal & Shingle roofing. Metal building erectors. Metal building repair. Call Steve at 803-968-0509. Free estimates.

2 Ford 3000 tractors, diesel, good tires, runs good. $3900 each. 5000 Ford tractor, turbo diesel, tires fair, $5,000. Call 803-468-7403.

Concrete

JUNK CARS & BATTERIES, ETC

Happy 25th Madoo We Lubb U!

BUSINESS SERVICES Business Services

Beautify your home w/decorative concrete, cool seal pools, stain, stamping porches patios. 494-5442/ 968-4665

Electrical Services Fulton Town Electric, Service any electrical needs. Cert. Master Electrician, 938-3261/883-4607

Home Improvements TNT Painting & Carpentry for all your household needs. Call 803-460-7629.

Lawn Service JT's Lawn Care: All types of lawn care, Debris removal, Senior discount, 10% off pressure washing. 803-840-0322

Tree Service A Notch Above Tree Care Full quality service low rates, lic./ins., free est BBB accredited 983-9721 Tree Doctor Call us for an appt. Free est. 7 days/week. Prune trees, remove trees, grind stumps, proper limbing & treatment. 803-773-8402. Ricky's Tree Service Tree removal, stump grinding, Lic & ins, free quote, 803-435-2223 or cell 803-460-8747. STATE TREE SERVICE Worker's Comp & General liability insurance. Top quality service, lowest prices. 803-494-5175 or 803-491-5154 www.statetree.net

**CASH** NO TITLE NEEDED Call Gene 934-6734 Sporting Goods Dallas Cowboy's car flag (License product) $15 each. 803-406-5016.

EMPLOYMENT

Medical Help Wanted Pine Grove, Inc. a program dedicated to providing quality care to individuals with developmental disabilities is accepting applications/resumes for the position of LPN. Experience working with individuals with developmental disabilities is preferred. This position involves providing medical oversight including: Dr. visits, medication administration and charting and monitoring client health conditions. Please submit resume to kellyb@pinegroveinc. com or apply at 1500 Chestnut Rd. Elgin, SC 29045.

Help Wanted Full-Time

Work Wanted

The SC Army National Guard wants High School Juniors, Seniors, Grads and GED holders, and Prior Service! Ask about college tuition. Receive paid technical training and more while serving your Country and Community on a part-time basis. Call now for this great opportunity! SFC Jeffrey Hudson 803-427-3104 SSG Lorraine Lordy 803-360-1979

Need Summer $Cash$? Buy Wholesale $100 Min & Sell Retail! Home & Body Oil Fragrances. 774-7823 - 633 Bultman Dr.

Law office seeks employee for Secretarial position requiring efficient typing, dictaphone, computer and office skills. Send resume to: P- 324 c/o The Item, PO Box 1677 Sumter SC 29151

Want to Rent

Sales person needed for new used-car dealership. Exp. req. Please call to schedule an interview 803-494-5900. F/T Cashier needed. Must have some computer knowledge, be self-motivated & energetic. Apply at Wally's Hardware, 1291 Broad St. Sumter New Salon is seeking lic. stylists, Barbers, Braiders. Call Ms. Fredricka @ 803-236-8085

RENTALS

A 59 year old single Christian grandfather is looking for a Garage Apt., Cottage, or Small Apt. to rent in Sumter. Call Steve at 803-491-5646.

Unfurnished Apartments Brick house for rent: Sumter, 2BR 1 BA, Central AC Fenced Yrd, $550 Mo. Call 239-293-5124

Unfurnished Apartments

Homes for Sale

Accepting Applications Oakland Plantation Apts. 5501 Edgehill Rd 499-2157 2 Br apts. available. Applications accepted Monday, Wednesday & Friday 8am - 4:30pm.

3Br 1BA Completely Renovated, den, dining Rm Some appliances washer/dryer hu $525 Mo. & Dep. 5BR 2BA Mobile home, den, dining room, living room ,fireplace, w/d hookup $625 mo. Sect 8 Welcome. Located in S sumter Call 803-316-7958 M-F 9am-6pm Senior Living Apts. for those 62+ (Rent based on income) Shiloh-Randolph Manor 125 W. Bartlette. 775-0575 Studio/1 BR. apts. avail. - EHO

Unfurnished Homes For Rent or Sale remodeled large 3 BR 2 Ba house with large wired storage bldg. Located near lake 2 min. from boat landing 25 min from Sumter, 15 min from Manning Rent $650 mo +Dep. Call 803 478-4625 3BR 2BA Fenced Yard, Nice Quiet Nbhood $550 Mo/Dep Call 803 968-0139 625 Baldwin Dr. 3BR, 2BA home in wonderful neighborhood off Alice Dr. All appliances, fenced yard. $1000/Mo and $1000/sec dep. Call 803-934-6845

Mobile Home Rentals 2BR 2Ba Mobile home off Panola Rd. between Pinewood & paxville $450/mo. 843-884-0346 Oaklawn MHP: 2 BR M.H.'s, water/sewer/garbage pk-up incl'd. RV parking avail. Call 494-8350 1996 2BR 2BA in Sumter All appl. Sect 8 Accepted 469-6978 For Sale, 4Bed/2Bath, Land, $325/mo. 803-494-5090 S/W MH 3Br, 2 full Ba w/big bckyrd, Summerton Area. Voucher accepted. A/C, newly renovated. 804-360-4355 or 804-543-0003 Mobile Homes for Rent: 2 & 3 Bdrms, off Pinewood Rd. Call 803-481-5592 Iris Winds MHP: 3BR/2BA MH No pets. Ref/dep req'd, $500/mo. Call 803-775-6816, 803-460-9444

TRANSPORTATION

Autos For Sale A Guaranteed Credit Approval AUTO LOANS 1785 Titanic Ct. Custom Built Quality Home in Beach Forest.

Property overlooks pond & community clubhouse/pool. 3BR w/maple hardwood floors, 3 full BA w/ceramic tile. Solid maple 42" kitchen cabinetry w/Charleston Style concrete countertops. Oversize 2 car garage. All appliances incl'd w/purchase. Seller will pay $5,000. toward closing. (REDUCED) asking $229,000. Call 803-968-1187 Details & photos @ www.forsaleb yowner.com/23945649 & www.mili tarybyowner.com/MBO 264616

Manufactured Housing HUGE 2003 Fleetwood 4 Bedroom Double Wide Moble Home. Excellent condition. 1 acre lot included. Mobile home is bricked underpinned and has a back porch. Owner financing available! Call 843-389-4215. Iris Winds MHP,Sumter Immediate occupancy. 3BR MH. $25,900. Fin. avail. 803-460-9444, 800-996-9540, 803-775-6816 3 BD/3 BA MH on 1 acre in Bishopville. $5500 down. Easy financing. 803-983-8084

We will arrange financing even if you have been turned down before. Loans available for no credit, bad credit, 1st Time Buyers & Bankruptcy buyers. No co-signers needed. Call Mr. Ashley Brown at 803-926-3235

R& R Motors 3277 Broad Street Sumter 803-494-2886 '08 Mazda 6 $9550 '07 Colorado Crew $10,900 '06 Malibu $5995 '05 Camry (Sunroof) $8995 '06 Camry (Call) '03 Z71 Ext, $10,800 650 V-Star $3495

**PUBLIC AUTO AUCTION**

Monday 7PM 1945 Myrtle Beach Hwy Dinkins Auctions 803 840-0420 www.SumterAutoAuction.com Top $$$ paid for your wrecked or junk car. You call, we haul. Barnette's Auto Parts 494-2800.

Autos For Sale

Farms & Acreage FSBO: Land, Small & Large acreage. Owner financing. 803-427-3888.

Land & Lots for Sale For Sale: Ready to build on lot, corner Winn St. & Willow Dr. 160 x 124. Fin available. 775-4391, 464-5960

Commercial Industrial 1750 Sq Ft Warehouse 1/2 Bath , At 791 E Liberty St Call 803 983-0350

RECREATION

Boats / Motors

‘11 Chevy Malibu FlexFuel, Low Miles, Power Everything, CD Player, Silver, Clean Ride, $12,900. Call 803-494-5900 OPEN Ernest Baker Auto Sales & Equip. Located 3349 N. Main St. SUMMER SPECIALS: 94 Chevy 4X4 $2500: 94 Ford Ranger 4sp/ac $2000: 99 Mazda Protege at/ac $2995: 99 Jeep Chero At/AC 4DR $3995: 2000 Mit Eclip, loaded $3995. Call 803-469-9294

Miscellaneous C&C Recycling Parts & Wrecker Service Top price paid for junk cars! We buy scrap metal, alum cans, batteries, copper. 773-7702

STATEBURG COURTYARD 2 & 3 BRs 803-494-4015

Towing 2-Bike Rack; 10" L drawbar required. $25.00. 803-840-6858

Resort Rentals Ocean Lakes 2BR/2BA C/H/A Sleeps 8, near ocean, Call 803-773-2438 Vacation Rentals Santee, Garden City Beach Michelle Hodge, 803-491-4914

1996 Stump Jumper Apache Boat, 17'9" O/B, 90 hp Merc. mtr, 4 leather seats, new trolling mtr. & trailer. Very good cond. $5,000 for all. Call 803-478-4496.

Campers / RV's/ Motorhomes

Commercial Rentals Guignard Storage: 57 Neal St. Personal storage units. No deposits. Call 803-491-4914

REAL ESTATE Homes for Sale Country Home: 1130 Pudding Swamp Rd. 4BR/2BA, w/3 ac. $115,000. 803-469-9294 or 803-491-6905

Classifieds

YOUR SOURCE FOR A

1989 Fleetwood Terry Resort Camper. Exc cond. $2,500 OBO. Call between 8am-6pm. 803-840-6249

STATEBURG COURTYARD

QUICK SALE! 20 N. Magnolia St. • Sumter, SC 29150

803-774-1234

SHOP 24/7 FOR NEW OR PRE-OWNED VEHICLES

WWW.GOODWINCARS.COM

Spacious 2 & 3 Bedroom Units Paved Streets & Parking Well Landscaped Lawns Central Heat & Air Patrolled by Private Security Quiet Family Living

GOODWIN AUTOMALL

#SPBE4USFFUt4VNUFS 4$

Private lot, Near Shaw, 1 block from Peach Orchard Plaza

For More Info Call: 803-494-4015


PANORAMA In times of peace, their mission was tough: to maintain order in a wild and often lawless region of California, while not arousing feelings of racial prejudice. WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

THE ITEM

C1

Contact Ivy Moore at (803) 774-1221 or e-mail ivym@theitem.com

CONGRESS TO RECOGNIZE

BUFFALO SOLDIERS

ITEM FILE PHOTOS

Henri LeGendre, 88, who served with the 9th Cavalry during World War II, is a retired architect, as well. He is pictured with Henry Black, 66, who joined the Buffalo Soldiers just a few years ago, because he believes in the importance of telling their story, which is a passion for LeGendre.

BY TRACIE CONE • ASSOCIATED PRESS

Black cavalrymen honored at annual Rembert festival

S

ACRAMENTO, Calif. — In the decades after the Civil War, the nation’s first black Army regiments guarded Yosemite and Sequoia national parks against poaching and timber thefts, a role that in hindsight made them some of the United States’ first park rangers. Now as the National Park Service prepares for its 100th anniversary in 2016, there is a move in Congress to formally recognize the role of these “Buffalo Soldiers,” who set aside their guns to build the first trail to the top of Mt. Whitney and the first wagon road into the Giant Forest. Last week, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill by Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Francisco, allowing the federal government to study creation of a national historic trail along the 280-mile route the soldiers traveled between The Presidio in San Francisco, where they were stationed, and the Sierra Nevada they patrolled. “This relates to a bigger goal we have — and that is to celebrate the centennial by diversifying our national parks so that they reflect all of our cultural heritages,” said Ron Sundergill, senior regional director for the National Parks Conservation Association, which has pushed for the Buffalo Soldiers to be honored. Companion legislation is being sponsored by California’s Democratic senators Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer. “Many African-Americans don’t feel a cultural connec-

tion to the national parks because they don’t feel a connection to the history,” said Yosemite Ranger Shelton Johnson, a historian who interprets the park soldiers’ lives. “It’s good for the entire country to know that people of color and women made contributions to our parks.” Mark and Sandra Myers of Greenfield Farm near Rembert always make

the Buffalo Soldiers a prime part of their annual Black Cowboy Festival in May. Sandra said the Buffalo Soldiers 10th Cavalry from Augusta, Ga., presents a historical reenactment that is a highlight of the weekend-long event. The original unit was a regiment of African-American soldiers formed during peacetime at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., in 1866, along with five others. Many were veteran United States Colored Troops from the Civil War. They were organized as the 9th and 10th Calvary and the 38th through 41st Infantry. Each regiment consisted of approximately 1,000 men. In 1869 the infantry regiments were consolidated into two, the 24th and 25th. Because many people were opposed to the recruit-

ment of blacks, exceptionally high standards were set for the soldiers. The Buffalo Soldiers served with valor, pride and distinction in the American West during the 19th century despite the hardships they encountered. During almost a century of service, the Buffalo Soldiers became one of the most decorated U.S. Army units of all time. Among the Buffalo Soldiers who have participated in Greenfield Farm’s Black Cowboy Festival is Henri A. LeGendre. A retired architect and New York native, LeGendre attended the festival two years ago, coming from his home in Charlotte. He served with the 9th Cavalry during World War II, patrolling the Mexican border to prevent German and Japanese spies from entering the U.S.; he is now the historian for the 9th and 10th Cavalry Association of the Buffalo Soldiers, Greater North Carolina Chapter. LeGendre said at the time that sharing the story of the soldiers is very important to him, as there are many, especially children, who are unaware of the black soldiers’

contributions to the settling of the American West. The all African-American regiments comprised men from the South who faced limited economic opportunities. Native Americans named them “Buffalo Soldiers” because they thought their curly hair resembled the tuft between the horns of a buffalo. In times of peace, their mission was tough: to maintain order in a wild and often lawless region of California, while not arousing feelings of racial prejudice. The route they rode took them south through San Jose then over the Diablo Mountains and through the Central Valley. Supporters hope that recognizing the soldiers leads to a broader awareness of the role African-Americans troops played in protecting resources, as well as fighting wars in Cuba and the Philippines. “Children learn about Spanish missionaries, the 49ers, and the railroad barons, but how much do they know about the Buffalo Soldiers?” Speier said. “My hope is that their remarkable service to this country takes its rightful place alongside other great stories... .” Item Features Editor Ivy Moore contributed to this article. Reach Tracie Cone at www.Twitter.com/TConeAP.


C2

FOOD

THE ITEM

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

Shishito peppers: From hipster menus to your grill J.M. HIRSCH AP Food Editor

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

From top down, Black and Red, Double Chocolate and Shortcake ice cream sandwiches are served up in a bowl.

A cool, sweet take on a summer sandwich BY ALISON LADMAN Associated Press The beauty of ice cream in summer is you really don’t need to do anything to it to enjoy it. A big unadorned bowl is a simple, delicious pleasure all on its own. Still, sometimes we can’t help but tinker with perfection. So for our July Fourth celebration, we decided to take the season’s finest treat and make it even finer. We created a DIY ice cream sandwich buffet perfect for any backyard barbecue event. And we quickly discovered the possibilities were boggling. Start with the “bread” of the sandwiches. We’re going to assume you don’t want to bake your own cookies. That’s fine, because there are all sorts of choices available at the grocer. And don’t hesitate to get creative. Graham crackers, slices of cake, even cinnamon buns or doughnuts can be pressed into service. Play around with different sizes, too. Small cookies can be used for ice cream sandwich “sliders.” And don’t forget to dress your sandwiches. Smear toppings such as fudge, caramel or peanut sauce onto the cookies (much as you would when assembling a PB&J) before adding the ice cream. Then there are the many choices of fillings — ice cream, frozen yogurt, sorbet, gelato, sherbet... We suggest serving them one of two ways. The easiest way is to soften the frozen treats slightly so they are easily scooped and spread on the “bread.” To soften them, you can either leave them at room temperature for 10 or so minutes, or microwave them for 10 to 20 seconds. Alternatively, select frozen treats packed in pint-sized cardboard tubs. Use a serrated knife to carefully slice each tub crosswise into four or five rounds, then arrange the rounds on a baking sheet. Keep the rounds frozen until ready to assemble. Just don’t let the rounds sit out at room temperature too long while people are assembling their sandwiches; the ice cream will soften quickly. We start you off with ideas for some creative combinations, but your best bet is to wander the grocery store and explore the options. When it comes to enjoying the buffet, encourage your guests to get a little crazy. Why sandwich just one variety of ice cream when you could combine two or more? And assure

them that creating totally over-thetop treats is not just appropriate, but expected. Try sandwiching chocolate ice cream between two whoopie pies with layers of peanut sauce and marshmallow spread, for example. ICE CREAM SANDWICH BUFFET INGREDIENTS

For the “bread”: Graham crackers Pound cake, sliced and toasted Chocolate wafer cookies Oatmeal raisin cookies Chocolate chip cookies Molasses cookies Sugar cookies Whoopie pies

Never had shishito peppers? You need to track them down. Right now. First, a primer, then I’ll explain why. Shishito peppers are small, thin Japanese peppers. They look a bit like a longer, thinner jalapeno. But the flavor is quite different. While jalapenos have thick flesh and an assertive heat most of us a familiar with, shishitos are thin skinned and generally sweeter than they are hot. Except when they are not. For reasons that are debated online, one out of every dozen or so shishito peppers packs a punch. Nothing that will leave you gasping for air, but enough of a bite to wake you up. During the past year or so, shishito peppers have become a darling of the restaurant scene. Nothing on the epic scale of ramps, which New York chefs in particular went a little crazy for a few years ago. And certainly nothing on the scale of the cupcake or slider. But they have been showing up on more and more menus across the country. Shishito peppers generally are served as a starter, often heaped in a bowl and munched. And the prep couldn’t be easier. They are cooked whole, usually with a splash of oil and just enough time in the skillet to lightly brown in spots. Seasonings can vary, though coarse salt is a must. In addition to having a wonderfully ad-

For the spreads: Chocolate fudge sundae sauce Caramel sauce Butterscotch topping Fruit jams, such as raspberry or strawberry Marshmallow spread Nutella For the frozen fillings: Ice cream Sorbet Frozen yogurt Sherbet Gelato SHORTCAKE SANDWICH

Spread 2 pieces of thinly sliced and toasted pound cake with strawberry jam, then fill with vanilla or strawberry ice cream. BLACK AND RED

Sandwich raspberry sorbet between chocolate wafer cookies. CREAMSICLE

Sandwich orange sherbet between vanilla sugar cookies. Add a smear of chocolate fudge sauce, if desired. S’MORE

Spread marshmallow topping on 2 graham crackers, then fill with rocky road or chocolate ice cream.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Grilled Shishito Peppers are full of flavor and ready in 15 minutes.

dictive flavor — the trinity of oil, salt and a gentle heat helps here — shishito peppers are perfect for summer. They generally are shared, making them perfect for a backyard barbecue. And because they cook quickly and require intense heat, they adapt perfectly to the grill. So here’s my effort to get shishito peppers off the restaurant menus and into your summer grilling repertoire. I’ve tarted them up a bit with chopped almonds, but feel free to leave those off. GRILLED SHISHITO PEPPERS

Start to finish: 15 minutes Servings: 4 1 pound shishito peppers, left whole 2 tablespoons toasted sesame oil, divided 1 tablespoon coarse or flake salt, such as Maldon or kosher 1/4 cup finely chopped almonds Heat a grill to high. In a large bowl, combine the peppers and 1 tablespoon of the oil. Swirl and toss

the peppers until evenly coated with the oil. Using tongs, arrange the peppers on the grill so they lay across the direction of the grates (not with them). The goal is to prevent the peppers from falling through the grates. Cook, turning often, until the peppers begin to brown and blister, about 4 to 6 minutes. Return the peppers to the bowl (no need to wipe it out). Add the remaining oil, the salt and almonds, then toss well. Transfer to a serving bowl and serve immediately. Nutrition information per serving: 140 calories; 90 calories from fat (64 percent of total calories); 10 g fat (1 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 0 mg cholesterol; 12 g carbohydrate; 6 g fiber; 5 g sugar; 4 g protein; 1,450 mg sodium. J.M. Hirsch is the food editor for The Associated Press. He blogs at http://www. LunchBoxBlues.com and tweets at http:// twitter.com/JM_Hirsch

FOR FREE! ARE YOU AN ITEM SUBSCRIBER? Do you want to sell something for $100 or OHVV"7KH,WHP&ODVVL¿HG'HSDUWPHQWZLOOUXQ \RXUDGFREELQWKHSDSHUIRUGD\V

‡ 3 Lines (up to 16 words) For 3 Days ‡ Price & Phone number must be in ad ‡ One item, per household, per week ‡ May repeat ad at regular cost

Name $GGUHVV City Home Phone # 3ULQW<RXU$G+HUH

‡ Must submit ad on provided coupon ‡ Businesses/Commercial Accounts not eligible ‡ Additional Lines $5.49 Each ‡ Add a Photo - $5.00

State

=LS

UP TO 16 WORDS

LEMON SPICE

Drizzle a touch of butterscotch on a soft molasses cookie, then top with lemon sorbet or sherbet, then a second molasses cookie. EDITOR’S NOTE: Alison Ladman is a recipe developer for the AP. Follow her on Twitter at https://twitter. com/CrustAndCrumbCo

Mail To:

&ODVVL¿HG'HSW P.O. Box 1677 Sumter, SC 29151

NO REFUNDS. CANNOT BE COMBINED WITH OTHER DISCOUNTS. GARAGE & YARD SALES EXCLUDED. ALL ADVERTISING SUBJECT TO PUBLISHERS APPROVAL. MUST HAVE PAID CURRENT SUBSCRIPTION.


FOOD

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

THE ITEM

C3

Craft brews abound for warmer weather MICHAEL FELBERBAUM Associated Press RICHMOND, Va. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the unofficial rule of summer â&#x20AC;&#x201D; when the sun comes out, so do the coolers. For many, that means stocking up on light beers that are crisp and refreshing, but pack less alcohol. Because when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hiking, heading to the beach or pitching a tent, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to be weighed down by a beer with too robust a body or whose alcohol content impedes the pleasure of all-day sipping. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for options beyond the typical mass-market beers, the booming craft beer industry luckily has plenty of options to quench this thirst. Recently, a number of craft brewers have brought out crisp, refreshing choices like the farmhouse ales known as saisons and sessionable beers, which are perfect for summer sipping. Added bonus â&#x20AC;&#x201D; these beers also pair well with grilling staples such as burgers, chicken and sausage, summer salads and pizza, as well as spicy foods like Mexican, Thai and Indian. The trouble with craft beers is that by definition they can be hard to find. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s part of the appeal, of course, but also a bummer when a buddy raves about a recent find that you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t find. So to make your summer that much better, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gathered a list of some favorite summer-friendly craft brews that are more widely available.

heads â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in mind. The light-bodied ale is crisp and refreshing, but also offers up the citrus and pine tastes and aromas that IPAs are known for. And with an alcohol content below 5 percent, Founders brewed what it called a session ale to be enjoyed all day â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and night. SUMMER LOVE ALE (FROM VICTORY BREWING CO. IN PHILADELPHIA)

Style: Golden Ale Alcohol: 5.2 percent Notes: A few years back, Victory Brewing teamed up with the Philadelphia-area tourism folks to come up with a beer to help promote the City of Brotherly Love â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and Summer Love was born. The beer became popular among aficionados for its combination of German hops and pale malt that creates a light-bodied ale with a lemony finish.

fruit. The beer, which is clean, dry and refreshing, is fermented twice with the breweryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unique house yeast to impart complex and spicy notes.

COLETTE (FROM GREAT DIVIDE BREWING CO. IN DENVER)

Style: Saison/Farmhouse Ale Alcohol: 7.3 percent Notes: Colette is an homage to traditional farmhouse ales. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a complex beer thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crisp, fruity, spicy and fairly tart. Originally a seasonal offering, the demand became so great that Great Divide began brewing it as a year-round offering.

TRADE WINDS (FROM THE BRUERY IN PLACENTIA, CALIF.)

Style: Tripel/ Belgian-style Golden Ale Alcohol: 8 percent Notes: While a little higher in alcohol content, this Belgian-style ale with sparkling winelike qualities is definitely a good summer beer, but maybe not all day long. It uses rice in its brewing to give it a lighter body and is spiced with Thai basil. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dry, fruity and has a good amount of carbonation.

FLEUR DE HOUBLON (FROM BREWERY OMMEGANG IN COOPERSTOWN, N.Y.)

Style: Belgian-style Summer Ale Alcohol: 6.8 percent Notes: Ommegangâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brand new summer ale is named for the hop flowers used to make the beer. This Belgianstyle golden ale blends flavors of citrus from the whole Bravo hops with aromas of fresh cut grass and the sweetness of tropical

Š 2013 by Vicki Whiting, Editor

Jeff Schinkel, Graphics

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. shows a bottle and glass of Summerfest crisp summer lager.

Vol. 29, No. 28

L ots of insectss and animals a dig tun nnels o or Lots tunnels live in n burrow ws. M e a few eet w of th hese .... burrows. Meet these In rainforests, dung beetles roll up balls of monkey dung containing fruit seeds from the monkeyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s meal. They bury the monkey dung, seeds and all. After a while, the seeds sprout and grow new trees.

Do the fill thiss crossw crossword th he math h to fi lll in thi word puzz zle featu zle uring burrow b burrowin ng critt ters. puzzle featuring burrowing critters.

1

2

3

4

Prairie dogs are cute to look at, but they can cause problems for farmers.

5

6

7

SUMMERFEST (FROM SIERRA NEVADA BREWING CO. IN CHICO, CALIF.)

Style: Czech Pilsner Alcohol: 5 percent Notes: This golden lager is, of course, refreshing, but it also has a sweet, malty flavor and subtle spicy character that lets you know youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not drinking just another mainstream beer.

Moles live underground, they have tiny ears and eyes and powerful front paws for digging.

ALL DAY IPA (FROM FOUNDERS BREWING CO. IN GRAND RAPIDS, MICH.)

Style: American IPA Alcohol: 4.7 percent Notes: Craft beer drinkers have an affinity for hops, which are known for providing a certain bitterness to beer. For some, the more, the better. For others, that â&#x20AC;&#x153;hoppinessâ&#x20AC;? keeps them away. This beer was brewed with summer â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and hop-

8 9 10

11

Most ants build theirr nests rground. underground.

ARMADILLO PLATYPUS FARMERS TUNNELS MOVERS MONKEY SPROUT EARTH MOLES ODORS SHREW OTTER DUNG CUTE MEAL

Find the words in the puzzle. Then look for each word in this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kid Scoop stories and activities. M O W E R H S V A

I

S P R O U T T R S N G R S E L O M R R S M O O C U A E E A R G N U D D V T N T E A T

I

I

O T L A E M

E N L M O N K E Y R S L S

L E N N U T A

O S U P Y T A L P

F

Standards Link: Letter sequencing. Recognized identical words. Skim and scan reading. Recall spelling patterns.

When an ant finds a large piece of food, it returns to the nest and enlists other worker ants to help carry the food. On the way back to the nest, the ant leaves a trail of odors as landmarks, so that it can find its way back to the food.

QUEEN

REST AREA

SAISON DUPONT (FROM BRASSERIE DUPONT IN BELGIUM)

Style: Saison/Farmhouse Ale Alcohol: 6.5 percent Notes: Saison Dupont is the classic farmhouse ale against which many of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s modern takes on saisons are measured. This style of beer originally was made by farmers in Belgium during the cooler harvest months and stored for drinking during the summer. This unfiltered ale is fullbodied and malty, but has lots of citrus and spice. It finishes dry and has a good amount of carbonation, which heighten its refreshing and complex characteristics.

ow can Andy be inventive and imaginative in an essay contest on conservation? He comes up with the idea of people eating insects as a way of conserving their food budgets. Before long heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s making toasted beetles and more! Unscramble the title of this book. Then, check it out at your local library this summer!

NURSERY

FOOD STORAGE

Workers in ant colonies have a variety of different jobs. Many of these are similar to jobs people have. Look through the newspaper to find people that do the following ant colony jobs: < childcare < security < communications < armed forces < earth movers < engineers < flood control

Count all the exclamation points you can find in each section of the newspaper. Graph your results. Which section has the most? Why do you think this is?

Send your story to:

What would your life be like if you had lobster claws instead of hands? Deadline: July 21 Published: Week of August 18 Please include your school and grade.

Carolina Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dentistry

Â&#x2021;6PDOO&RPPHUFLDO 5HVLGHQWLDO3OXPELQJ,QVWDOODWLRQV Â&#x2021;*HQHUDO5HSDLUVÂ&#x2021;-HW&OHDQLQJÂ&#x2021;&DPHUD,QVSHFWLRQRI'UDLQ3LSHV

#1 IN THE #2 BUSINESS! Columbia, SC (803) 736-6000

Sumter, SC (803) 775-4793

Specializing In Infants, Children, and Adolescents

438 N. Main Street, Sumter 800-849-8884 / 803-773-6689 24/7 EMERGENCY SERVICES

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Investing In Our Futures by â&#x20AC;&#x153;Promoting Literacy For Our Kidsâ&#x20AC;?

'SFF*O5PXO%FMJWFSZ 4JODF

)PVST.'".1.t4BU".1. XXXTVNUFSDVUSBUFESVHTDPN

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Proud Supporters Of Literacy In Our Communityâ&#x20AC;?

Quality Service Since 1989

Quality Manufactured and Modular Homes at great prices Financing Available 2735 Broad Street - Sumter, SC

803-469-3222

www.claytonhomesofsumter.com

Sumter Beauty College &DUROLQD$YHÂ&#x2021;6XPWHU6& Phone: 773-7311 Fax: 773-7312 Faye Smith - Owner

Sumter Family Dental Center 740 Bultman Drive, Sumter, SC 29150

1283 Broad Street Sumter, SC 29150

(803) 773-3328

803-905-5500

Sumter Laundry & Cleaners

This page is brought to you by these community minded businesses.

FREE Home Pick-up & Delivery 1091 Broad St., Sumter 938-9767

Call 803-773-8022 anytime

2535 Tahoe Dr. Sumter, SC 803-905-3473

4 Locations To Serve You Better

4.BJO4Ut4VNUFS

Buying used Mobile Homes, Lots, Acreage, or Houses In Need of Repair

South Carolina Safety Company, Inc.

piggly wiggly

Sumter Cut Rate Drugs 803-773-8432

VESTCO PROPERTIES

775-3962

Call 1-800-293-4709 to sponsor this Exciting Page!

Buy a Happy Meal or a Ea_`lqCa\kE]YdYf\ GET A

FREE COOKIE


THE ITEM

COMICS

BIZARRO

SOUP TO NUTZ

DOG EAT DOUG

GARFIELD

ZITS

BEETLE BAILEY

BLONDIE

ANDY CAPP

DILBERT

BORN LOSER

MOTHER GOOSE

Jeff MacNelly’s SHOE

THE DAILY CROSSWORD PUZZLE

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

Tradition of ringing bells is revived for Fourth of July

D

SUDOKU

EAR ABBY — unions along with other President John F. AFL-CIO affiliates. As we celebrate our Kennedy proclaimed the ringing of the freedom, let us also bells nationwide on Inde- honor the lives of those who sacrificed theirs for pendence Day, July 4, our precious liberty. Your 1963, with the words, “Let’s ring freedom bells!” millions of readers can I was a White House spe- help “let freedom ring.” CARMELLA cial projects aide at the LaSPADA, time, and I recall FOUNDER, NO vividly how excitGREATER LOVE ing it was when bells rang DEAR CARthroughout the naMELLA — I’m tion. pleased to join I’m writing now you in this nato ask your help in tional effort. getting the Ameri- Abigail Readers, engraved can people to ring VAN BUREN on the Liberty Bell bells again on this are the words, “Proclaim Fourth of July, and each LIBERTY throughout all Fourth every year from the Land unto all the innow on. habitants thereof.” So let’s As a grateful Amerido it. Shake any bell you can, I hope to resurrect happen to have. Our freethis proud tradition. Let dom is something to celeus tune in with each brate! other and our history by ringing bells at 2 p.m. this July 4 in honor of the Abby shares more than 237th anniversary of our 100 of her favorite recipes in independence. Encourtwo booklets:“Abby’s Favorage churches and civic ite Recipes” and “More Fabuildings with bells to vorite Recipes by Dear ring them. It doesn’t cost Abby.” Send your name and any money to do it. mailing address, plus check The first groups to or money order for $14 (U.S. support this national effunds) to: Dear Abby, Cookfort include baseball booklet Set, P.O. Box 447, teams, the National CarMount Morris, IL 61054toonists Society, and the 0447. (Shipping and hanIron Workers, Firefighters dling are included in the and Sheet Metal Workers price.) dear abby

C6


TELEVISION

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

AROUND TOWN

TW FT

|

The Sumter Unit of the National Association of Parliamentarians (NAP) will meet at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, June 27, in the office of the Sumter County Historical Commission, 155 Haynsworth St. Designed to assist clubs and businesses conduct orderly, productive meetings through the correct use of parliamentary procedure, the meetings are open to the public. Contact Laura LeGrand at (803) 775-0830 or lauralegrand@sc.rr. com. The Springhill Education Scholarship Banquet will be held at 7 p.m. Friday, June 28, at Springhill Community Center, 137 Shiver Pond Road, Rembert. The attire is black and white evening (cocktail) attire. Adriana Dubose, a 2013 Camden High School honors graduate, and Decius Sumpter, a 2013 Blythewood High School graduate, will speak. Tickets are $20. Contact Wendy Wilson at (803) 427-4578 or via email at wendy.llwilson@yahoo.com. Register now for the upcoming American Red Cross adult CPR, first aid, AED class scheduled for 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, June 29, at 1155 N. Guignard Drive, Suite 2. Call (800) 733-2767. Advance registration and payment required. For Belle’s Sake Rescue and Rehabilitation will sponsor a Sumter Bully Walk from 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday, June 29, at Dillon Park. All dog breeds are welcome, and dogs must be up to date on vaccinations and not aggressive. Entry fee is $5 per dog, and all proceeds go to For Belle’s Sake for medical treatment of rescued dogs. The National Federation of the Blind (Sumter Chapter) will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday, July 9, at Shiloh-Randolph Manor, 125 W. Bartlette St. Transportation provided within the mileage radius. Contact Debra Canty at (803) 775-5792 or via email at DebraCanC2@frontier.com. Call the 24-hour recorded message line at (206) 376-5992 to place ads for the “Commemorative Album.” The Ashwood Central High School Classes of 1976 and 1977 will meet at 5 p.m. Sunday, July 14, at McDonald’s in Bishopville. Plans are being made for the class reunion scheduled for Aug. 2-4. Reunion costs: $30 per person or $60 per couple. Contact Debra Martin Mickens at (803) 229-2445 or Barbara Mathis Wactor at (803) 660-6706.

7 PM WIS News 10 at 7:00pm Local news update. News 19 @ 7pm Evening news update. Wheel of Fortune: Sightseeing (HD) Rick Steves’ Europe: European Travel Skills, Part 1 The Big Bang Theory: Pilot The new neighbor. Family Feud

7:30

8 PM

8:30

9 PM 9:30 LOCAL CHANNELS

THE ITEM 10 PM

10:30

11 PM

11:30

C7

12 AM

WIS News 10 at (:35) The Tonight Show with Jay 11:00pm News Leno Scheduled: Whitney Cummings. and weather. (N) (HD) Big Brother 15 The new cast mem- The American Baking Competition: Criminal Minds: Through the Looking News 19 @ 11pm (:35) Late Show with David LetterGlass BAU looks for link in a family bers are introduced and prepare to Desserts (N) (HD) A look at the news man Scheduled: Jamie Foxx; Marc face isolation. (N) (HD) murder. (HD) events of the day. Maron; Wale. (N) (HD) ABC Columbia (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live Scheduled: The Middle: The Family Tools: Jack Modern Family: (:31)How to Live ABC’s The Lookout A weekly, Yard Sale Family with Your Par- hour-long broadcast to bring viewers News at 11 Nightly Channing Tatum; Paul Feig. (N) (HD) Bachelor Frankie Steps Up Tony ideas on how to best spend money. news report. (HD) ents (N) (HD) depressed. (HD) helps Terry. (N) yard sale. (HD) Nature: Black Mamba Handlers at- NOVA: Decoding Neanderthals Ge- Secrets of the Dead: Cavemen Cold Tavis Smiley (HD) BBC World News Charlie Rose (N) Case Scientists look into Neanderthal International news (HD) tempt to change the public’s opinion netic links between humans and deaths. (HD) from the BBC. of the world’s deadliest snake. (HD) Neanderthals. (HD) MasterChef: Top 13 Compete; Top 12 Compete Season three winner Christine WACH FOX News at 10 News events Family Lois loses Family Guy: Lois Everybody Loves her holiday cheer. Kills Stewie Stewie Raymond: Capof the day, late breaking news and Ha returns to announce a surprise twist for the chefs; the finalists prepare on the lam. weather forecasts are presented. meals for a wedding party and later macaroons. (N) (HD) tain Nemo How I Met Your It’s Always Sunny Numb3rs: Atomic No. 33 A dangerous Numb3rs: End Game The team inves- Dish Nation (N) The Office: Wel- The King of cult’s mass poisoning leads the team tigates the unusual kidnapping of an come Party Nellie’s Queens: Doug Mother: Despera- in Philadelphia to a complex murder plot. (HD) ex-Marine’s family. (HD) party. (HD) Less, Part 1 (HD) tion Day (HD) Home on fire. (HD)

Entertainment 2013 Stanley Cup Finals: Game 7 (If Necessary): Boston Bruins at Chicago Blackhawks from United Center z{| Tonight (N) (HD) (HD) Inside Edition (N) (HD) Jeopardy! (N) (HD) NatureScene: Theodore Roosevelt National Park The Big Bang Theory: The Maternal Congruence Family Feud

CABLE CHANNELS Duck Dynasty: Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty: Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty (:31) Duck Dy- Duck Dynasty: Samurai Si (HD) (HD) Frog in One (HD) (HD) (HD) Sadie’s dress. (HD) (HD) (HD) Yearly cook-off. nasty (HD) Frog in One (HD) The Sons of Katie Elder (‘65, Western) aaa John Wayne. Four troublemaking brothers return home for their The Shootist (‘76, Western) aaa John Wayne. Terminal cancer motivates Galaxy Quest mother’s funeral and attempt to get their ranch back from the town’s gunsmith, who wronged their family. (HD) gunslinger’s decision to go out in a blaze of glory. (HD) (‘99) Joe Frank. Off Hook (HD) Off Hook (HD) Swamp’d (HD) Swamp’d (HD) Wildman (HD) Wildman (HD) Wildman (HD) Wildman (HD) Swamp’d (HD) Swamp’d (HD) Wildman (HD) (6:00) 106 & Park Amateurs compete American Gangster This examines the rises and falls of some of the most notorious African American criminals, and (:05) Real Husbands of Hollywood: The Wendy Wilfor viewers’ votes. (N) (HD) the impact their infamous lives had on their communities. The Reunion Cast gathering. liams Show (N) The Real Housewives of New Jer- Million Dollar Listing New York: Will Million Dollar Listing New York (N) Chef Roblé & Co.: Fashionable Watch What Million Dollar Listing New York sey: Gym Rats Party ruined. Haze for Listing Frat brother. Foodies New York Fashion Week. (N) Happens: Live (N) The Kudlow Report (N) Crime Inc.: Human Trafficking America’s Gun: AR-15 American Greed: Baby Broker Scam Mad Money Investing advice. America’s Gun Erin Burnett OutFront Anderson Cooper 360° (N) (HD) Piers Morgan LIVE (N) (HD) Anderson Cooper 360° (HD) Erin Burnett OutFront P. Morgan (HD) (:57)The Colbert Daily Show with (:58) Futurama (:29) South Park: South Park: South Park New Futurama Jrr pro- Futurama: 2-D Daily Show with (:31)The Colbert Futurama: T.: The Report (HD) Jon Stewart (HD) (HD) TSST! (HD) Creme Fraiche girl at school. (HD) tects Fry. (N) (HD) Blacktop (HD) Jon Stewart (N) Report (N) (HD) Terrestrial (HD) Jessie: 101 Lizards A.N.T. Farm: res- Gravity Falls: Austin & Ally (HD) Jessie: SomeGood Luck Char- A.N.T. Farm: trANTsferred Students Jessie Man at the A.N.T. Farm: Zenon: 21st Cen(HD) taurANTeur (HD) Boyz Crazy (HD) bunny’s in Trouble lie (HD) go to a boarding school. (HD) fair. (HD) amusemANT park tury (‘99) aa Blood & Oil: Crude Awakening (HD) Naked and Afraid (HD) MythBusters Unsolved myths. (N) King of the Grill Custom grill. (N) (HD) MythBusters Unsolved myths. (HD) King of Grill (HD) 2013 NBA Draft Preview Show 2013 NCAA College World Series: from TD Ameritrade Park Omaha in Omaha, Neb. z{| (HD) SportsCenter: from Bristol, Conn. SportsCenter MLB Baseball: Texas Rangers at New York Yankees from Yankee Stadium z{| (HD) Baseball Tonight (HD) SportsNation (HD) Baseball (HD) Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey: Melissa & Joey Baby Daddy (N) Baby Daddy Ad Melissa & Joey: Twisted: PSA de Resistance AntiThe 700 Club Prince: Knowl(HD) Oh Brother (HD) (N) (HD) (HD) trouble; more. Oh Brother (HD) drunk skit prepped; bonds strained. edge Is Power Restaurant: Impossible (HD) Restaurant: Impossible (HD) Restaurant: Impossible (HD) Restaurant Stakeout (N) (HD) Mystery (HD) Mystery (HD) Restaurant (HD) West Coast Customs Golden Boy Live: from Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas no} (HD) Golden Gloves National (HD) World Poker Tour no} (HD) Reloaded (HD) Frasier: Mixed Golden Girls: Little House on the Prairie: The Wed- Little House on the Prairie: Men Will Frasier: The Two Frasier: Love Bites Frasier: The Im- Frasier: A Crane’s Frasier: Head Game Doubles Comedy of Errors ding Mary gets cold feet. Be Boys Teens are tested. Mrs. Cranes Dog Stolen girl. possible Dream Critique Property Brothers: April (HD) Elbow Room (N) Elbow Room Property Brothers: Kristi & Jay (HD) Hunters (HD) Hunters (HD) Property Brothers (HD) Prop Bro (HD) American Pickers (HD) American Pickers (HD) Larry the Cable Guy (N) (HD) Top Shot All-Stars: Shooting Dice (N) Top Shot All-Stars: Shooting Dice American (HD) (5:30) Maverick (‘94, Western) WWE Main Event (N) Flashpoint: Slow Burn Deadly arson- Flashpoint: A Broken Peace Team One Flashpoint: No Kind of Life The teams Flashpoint: Run to aac Mel Gibson. A big poker game. ist; Simon’s choice. (HD) searches the city. (HD) faces a gunman and a child. (HD) Me (HD) (6:00)Nights in Rodanthe (‘08, Where the Heart Is (‘00, Drama) aac Natalie Portman. A pregnant teen Because I Said So (‘07, Comedy) aa Diane Keaton. A mother meddles in (:02)Where the Drama) Diane Lane. (HD) takes up secret residence in a 24-hour department store. (HD) her youngest daughter’s love life to help her find a guy. (HD) Heart Is (‘00) Marvin Figure It Out (N) Full Hse Full Hse Full Hse Full Hse Nanny Nanny The Nanny: Pilot (:33) Nanny (:06) Friends (5:00) Inglorious Bastards (‘78, Action) Bo Svenson. Soldiers flee. (HD) Fight Master: Bellator MMA (HD) Fight Master: Bellator MMA (N) Fight Master: Bellator MMA (HD) Fight Paranormal Witness: The Curse of Ghost Hunters: Ghost Friends Forever Ghost Hunters: Vintage Spirits Belvoir Paranormal Witness: Dining with the Ghost Hunters: Vintage Spirits Belvoir Paranormal: Lonergan Farm Brothers haunted. Inheritance is curse, not blessing. (HD) Winery in Liberty, Mo. (N) (HD) Dead Haunted restaurant. (N) Winery in Liberty, Mo. (HD) Dining with Dead The Big Bang The Big Bang Conan Scheduled: Elijah Wood; Bill The Office False Seinfeld: The Din- Seinfeld: The Pie Family: Brian Goes Family Guy: Fat Family Church of The Big Bang ner Party (HD) (HD) Back to College Guy Strangler the Fonz. Theory (HD) Theory (HD) Theory (HD) Burr; Ryan Bingham. (N) (HD) fire drill. (HD) (6:00) The Asphalt Jungle (‘50, They Died with Their Boots On (‘41, Drama) Errol Flynn. General George Armstrong Custer’s life Rebecca (‘40, Mystery) aaac Laurence Olivier. A young woman uncovCrime) aaac Sterling Hayden. is told, from his West Point military training and Civil War service to his death at Little Big Horn. ers a tragic secret after marrying a wealthy widower. Breaking Amish: Brave New (HD) Toddlers and Tiaras (HD) Toddlers and Tiaras (N) (HD) My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding (N) (HD) Toddlers and Tiaras First-timer. (HD) Gypsy (HD) Castle: The Late Shaft Talk show host Franklin and Bash: Good Lovin’ Falling Skies: At Castle: Boom! Serial killer taunts Cas- Castle: Wrapped Up in Death Death Franklin and Bash: Good Lovin’ tle, Beckett. (HD) linked to mummy’s curse. (HD) Mom’s prostitution charges. (N) (HD) turns up dead. (HD) Mom’s prostitution charges. (HD) All Cost (HD) (:15) Orange (:45) Gumball NinjaGo (:45) Titans Go! King Guilt trip. King American (HD) American (HD) Family Family Chicken: 1987 Pawn Pawn S. Beach S. Beach S. Beach S. Beach S. Beach (N) (:31) S. Beach (:01) Bait Car (:31) Bait Car (:02) S. Beach ‘Til Death (HD) ‘Til Death (HD) Raymond (HD) Raymond (HD) Friends Friends Hot Cleveland (N) The Exes (N) (HD) The Soul Man (N) Queens (HD) Queens (HD) NCIS: Dog Tags Abby tries to prove NCIS: Recruited Recruitment officer Royal Pains: Lawson Translation (:01)Necessary Roughness: (:02) NCIS: Los Angeles: Tin Soldiers Royal Pains: Lawson Translation dog’s innocence. (HD) murdered. (HD) Facing the unexpected at Village Hall. Swimming with Sharks (N) KGB operative. (HD) Charmed: Witch Way Now? (HD) L.A. Hair: Demotion Commotion L.A. Hair: What Happens in Vegas Marriage Camp: Love and Warfare Marriage Camp: Spouse Swap Pregnant Funniest Home Videos (HD) MLB Baseball: Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee Brewers from Miller Park z{| (HD) News (HD) Home Vid (HD) Rules (HD)

‘Big Brother’ lets viewers cast a vote BY KEVIN MCDONOUGH Are the people who are shocked about government surveillance the same viewers who have been watching a show called “Big Brother” (8 p.m., CBS, TVPG) for the past 14 seasons? Every summer, this exhibitionists-in-a-fishbowl series arrives with some new wrinkle in the rules. This year, CBS invites “America,” or at the last the percentage of Americans who care about “Big Brother,” to vote on something called a “Big Brother Most Valuable Player.” For the rules and your chance to vote, visit cbs. com/BBmvp And, for the first time, three houseguests will be nominated for eviction in a single episode. As always, crack journalist Julie Chen is your host. • If “Big Brother” comes loaded with Orwellian overtones, then the title to special sneak preview “The Challenge: Rivals II” (10 p.m., MTV) means nothing at all. This “Challenge” previews the contest series, which premieres next month. It’s set in Thailand, where so-called “enemies” have to play against each other and cooperate at the same time. It all boils down to priorities. What’s more important: holding a grudge or winning cash prizes? We all know that the answer is neither. The real end to being on reality TV is making a large enough spectacle to get invited back onto reality TV. As if to prove this point, Nicole “Snooki” Polizzi cohosts the special with Kenny Santucci.

• The 1995 comedy “Clueless” (7 p.m., VH1) turned Alicia Silverstone into a star and was made into an ABC sitcom that starred Rachel Blanchard and later migrated to the UPN network. A parody adaptation of Jane Austen’s “Emma” set in Beverly Hills and written by director Amy Heckerling, “Clueless” marked the opening salvo in an onslaught of Austen film adaptations. A movie version of “Sense and Sensibility” with Emma Thompson and Kate Winslet opened that same year. The television miniseries “Pride and Prejudice,” starring Colin Firth, aired in the U.S. in 1996. Helen Fielding’s “Pride and Prejudice”-inspired novel “Bridget Jones’s Diary” was published in 1996, followed by a 2001 film (that starred Firth in a reprise of his Darcy role), a sequel and even a musical. Who knew this would all result in novels like “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies”? • Given the finite number of ways to make outdoor cooking remotely interesting, the new series “King of the Grill” (10 p.m., Discovery, TV-14) puts the emphasis on the members of an eccentric Texas family and their colorful friends.

Tonight’s Other Highlights • If required, the Boston Bruins and Chicago Blackhawks meet in Game 7 of the Stanley Cup Final (8 p.m., NBC). • Mystery ingredients arrive on “MasterChef” (8 p.m., Fox, TV-14). • The Royal Flush gang invades Starling City on “Arrow” (8 p.m., CW, r, TV-14). • Drug addiction consumes a family in the 2000 drama “Requiem for a Dream” (8 p.m., Sundance), starring Ellen Burstyn, Jared Leto and Jennifer Connelly. • Desserts loom large on “The American Baking Competition” (9 p.m., CBS, TV-PG). • Competitive yard sales on “Modern Family” (9 p.m., ABC, r, TVPG). • Peter’s mother faces some embarrassing charges on “Franklin & Bash” (9 p.m., TNT, TV14). • Evidence linked to Boris’ death shocks Hank on “Royal Pains” (9 p.m., USA, TV-PG). • Polly helps Natalie get into her choice school on the series finale of “How To Live With Your Parents (For the Rest of Your Life)” (9:30 p.m., ABC, TV-PG). • Consumer news on “ABC’s The Lookout” (10 p.m.). • Connor takes on a rival talent agency on “Necessary Roughness”

(10 p.m., USA, TV-PG).

Cult Choice Roger Moore and Barbara Bach star in the 1977 James Bond adventure “The Spy Who Loved Me” (6 p.m., Reelz).

Series Notes Frankie takes a reality show to heart on “The Middle” (8 p.m., ABC, r, TV-PG) ... Down with the flu on “Family Tools” (8:30 p.m., ABC, TV-PG) ... Kevin hears voices on “Supernatural” (9 p.m., CW, r, TV-14) ... Mayhem in Kansas on “Criminal Minds” (10 p.m., CBS, r, TV-14).

Late Night Josh Fox is scheduled on “The Daily Show With Jon Stewart” (11 p.m., Comedy Central) ... Eve, Claire Titelman, Fortune Feimster and Jo Koy are booked on “Chelsea

Lately” (11 p.m., E!) ... Bill Moyers sits down on “The Colbert Report” (11:30 p.m., Comedy Central) ... Jamie Foxx, Marc Maron and Wale appear on “Late Show With David Letterman” (11:35 p.m., CBS) ... Jay Leno welcomes Whitney Cummings and John Fogerty on “The Tonight Show” (11:35 p.m., NBC) ... Channing Tatum, Paul Feig and Pharrell appear on “Jimmy Kimmel Live” (11:35 p.m., ABC) ... Christopher Meloni, Cat Deeley and Broken Social Scene featuring Feist visit “Late Night With Jimmy Fallon” (12:35 a.m., NBC, r) ... Craig Ferguson hosts Sandra Bullock and Jim McDonald on “The Late Late Show” (12:35 a.m., CBS). Kevin McDonough can be reached at kevin. tvguy@gmail.com © 2013 United Feature Syndicate

Something the Whole Family Can Enjoy! With a full calendar of events for mom, dad, and kids, Sunset Country Club offers an atmosphere, facility and activities the entire family will relish! You are invited to join Sumter’s only private club, at the most affordable introductory rates in years. Including no initiation fee*, junior membership, and significantly reduced dues.

Schedule your tour today. Call Debbie Teichert, Membership Director at 803-775-5541 ext. 101.

HOME AUTO CYCLE RENTERS

FREE RATE QUOTE 938-8200

*With a 1-year commitment

SUNSETCOUNTRYCLUBSC.COM 1005 GOLFCREST RD. SUMTER, SC 29154


FOOD American Classic C8 THE ITEM

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26, 2013

Contact Rhonda Barrick at 803-774-1264 or e-mail rhondab@theitem.com

POTATO SALAD is the perfect dish for a picnic or potluck

Loaded Baked Potato Salad

FAMILY FEATURES

N

o picnic or potluck is complete without potato salad. Whether it’s served warm, cold, creamy, cheesy or with a splash of vinegar, the dish is a true American cookout classic. Potato salads are easy to make and even easier to pack full of flavor. Craft your own potato salad by cutting a delicious, Idaho® potato into cubes with the skins still on. Boil in water for about 8 to 15 minutes, then check for doneness by piercing a cube with a fork or skewer. If the fork goes through the potato with little resistance, drain the potatoes and return them to the pot. Add your favorite dressing and ingredients while the potatoes are still warm. Warm potatoes more easily absorb the delicious dressing. These decadent dishes are best eaten the day after they’re made to give the flavors time to meld. When you’re ready to serve your potato salad, keep it cold by placing your serving dish in a larger bowl filled with ice. Family meals are always better with delicious, flavorful potatoes. Always look for the “Grown in Idaho” seal to be sure you’re buying genuine Idaho potatoes. For more recipes for salads and other potato dishes, visit www.IdahoPotato.com. OLD FASHIONED HOT GERMAN POTATO SALAD Yield: 6 servings

Potato Picnic Salad

4 medium Idaho potatoes 2 bacon strips 1 diced Spanish onion 1/2 cup diced celery 1/2 teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons sugar 2 tablespoons cornstarch 1/3 cup cider vinegar 1 cup water

Boil potatoes in skins and peel while hot. Slice potatoes thinly. In large skillet, fry bacon until crisp and remove from skillet. In bacon drippings, brown onion and celery. Stir in salt, sugar and cornstarch. Add vinegar and water. Stir in sliced potatoes; as sauce thickens while adding potatoes, more water may be needed. Transfer to serving dish and serve hot.

LOADED BAKED POTATO SALAD

POTATO PICNIC SALAD Yield: 6 to 7 servings For the Salad Dressing 1/3 cup red wine vinegar 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper 1 clove of garlic, chopped 2/3 cup olive oil For the Salad

3 pounds Idaho potatoes, about 7 medium 1/2 pound cooked green beans 12 cherry tomatoes 2 hard boiled eggs, peeled 1 cup cooked corn kernels 1/4 cup minced celery, about 1 stalk 1/4 cup pitted black olives 2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped

For salad dressing, combine vinegar, mustard, salt, pepper and garlic in a large salad bowl. Whisk in olive oil and set aside. For the salad, bring 2 quarts of water to a boil in large saucepan. Cook unpeeled potatoes in water for about 15 minutes until just fork tender. Drain potatoes and cool immediately under cold running water. While potatoes are cooling, cut green beans into 1-inch pieces; halve cherry tomatoes and quarter eggs. Combine beans, tomatoes and eggs with cooked corn and celery in bowl with the salad dressing. Peel cooled potatoes, then cut into 2-inch pieces and toss with the dressing. Sprinkle salad with olives and chopped parsley just before serving.

Yield: 2 quarts 4 pounds Idaho potatoes, peeled 1 pound bacon, crisply cooked, and chopped into 1/2-inch pieces (fat reserved, if desired) 4 ounces unsalted butter, softened 1/2 cup chopped green onions 2 cups grated or shredded cheddar cheese 1 1/2 cups sour cream (regular or low-fat) 1 tablespoon black pepper 1 teaspoon salt Cook whole potatoes in Old Fa boiling, unsalted water shion ed Ho until tender. Refrigt Germ an Po erate until chilled, tato S alad then chop into 1-inch pieces. Transfer potatoes to a large bowl along with the remaining ingredients and thoroughly combine. Add some of reserved bacon fat if desired. Chill at least 2 hours before serving. Adjust seasoning prior to serving. Note: Any condiments or toppings typically added to a loaded baked potato may be used for this recipe.

Potato and Pesto Chicken Salad

POTATO AND PESTO CHICKEN SALAD Yield: 8 servings 2 pounds Idaho potatoes, well scrubbed (peeled, if desired) 1 pound fresh green beans, washed and trimmed

1 tablespoon olive oil 1 1/2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breast, cut into 1-inch cubes

3/4 cup prepared pesto sauce 3 to 6 cups mixed salad greens (optional)

Over high heat, in a large, heavy pot with tight-fitting cover, bring half a pot of water to boil. Meanwhile, cut potatoes in half lengthwise, then cut crosswise in 1/2-inch slices. Add potatoes to boiling water, cover and return to boiling; cook 3 minutes. Add green beans to pot with potatoes and cook another 4 minutes; drain potatoes and beans and set aside. (Vegetables should be firm.) In same pot, heat olive oil over high heat and cook chicken, stirring 6 to 8 minutes or until meat is completely cooked through. Remove from heat; stir in pesto sauce, then gently stir in potatoes and green beans, taking care not to break up vegetables. Serve salad warm or at room temperature on a bed of salad greens, if desired. Source: The Idaho Potato Commission

June 26, 2013  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you