Issuu on Google+

REMINDER: ALICE DRIVE DETOUR STARTS TODAY WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014 | SUMTER, SOUTH CAROLINA

VOL. 119, NO. 83 WWW.THEITEM.COM

FOUNDED OCTOBER 15, 1894

60 CENTS

Stinney hearing begins

BRISTOW MARCHANT / THE ITEM

Katherine Stinney Robinson — the 79-year-old sister of George Stinney, who was executed by the State of South Carolina in 1944 after being found guilty of killing two young Alcolu girls — testifies Tuesday morning at the Sumter County Judicial Center during a hearing to determine whether to grant her brother a new trial posthumously.

Case of executed 14-year-old boy back in S.C. courtroom BY BRISTOW MARCHANT bmarchant@theitem.com Almost 70 years after his death, George Stinney’s fate is once again in the hands of a South Carolina court. The first time, 14-year-old Stinney was convicted and executed for the murder of two young girls found dead outside the town of Alcolu. On Tuesday morning, with the national media spotlight focused on the Sumter

County Judicial Center, Stinney’s surviving relatives asked a judge to overturn that conviction and grant their late brother a new trial. In 1944, two young STINNEY white girls, Betty June Binnicker and Mary Thames, disappeared after they went out to pick flowers and were later found dead in a shallow ditch with head wounds.

The same day, black youth Stinney was arrested, quickly convicted and executed in a racially charged atmosphere, becoming the youngest American put to death in the 20th century. Representing the Stinney family, attorneys from the Manning law firm of Coffey, Chandler and McKenzie presented evidence from George Stinney’s siblings they contend couldn’t have been presented at

More military families opting to teach their kids at home BY RAYTEVIA EVANS revans@theitem.com A number of military families are opting to home school their children while living on various bases across the country. Because military families often move around, their children often attend multiple schools before graduating. To make transitions a little easier, many have started to home school their children. Rachel Ward with Homeward Education Association said the association serves about 300 families in the Sumter area who home school their children, meaning about 600 or more children are home schooled in the area, including some whose parents are members of the military. “Military families do a lot of moving around to different states. Home schooling creates stability for the children when they have to pick up and move,” Ward said.

‘Home schooling for our kids has created a constant. That constant provides closeness between siblings and an understanding with other children whose parents are in the military and move often as well.’

Gigi Prichard Gigi Prichard and her family have moved 11 times during her husband’s 20 years with the Air Force. They have four children, ages ranging from 6 to 14, with the 6-year-old having lived in five states so far. Prichard said she has home schooled her children in several different

www.theitem.com

Information: 774-1200 Advertising: 774-1237 Classifieds: 774-1234 Delivery: 774-1258 News, Sports: 774-1226

SEE STINNEY, PAGE A6

Crime drops in Sumter in 2013

states, and it has created a sense of community in each of their locations. Her oldest child attends Thomas Sumter Academy and really enjoys it. But before to attending TSA, Prichard said she home schooled her daughter along with her other children. “Home schooling for our kids has created a constant. That constant provides closeness between siblings and an understanding with other children whose parents are in the military and move often as well,” she said. The societal stigma about home schooling usually references the lack of social opportunities and bonding with other children. However, families who decide to home school build their own community and interact with each other and get involved in their towns, Ward explained. Prichard said she has home

Police report 6.6 percent drop in citywide criminal activity

SEE HOME SCHOOLING, PAGE A8

SEE CRIME, PAGE A8

BY TYLER SIMPSON tyler@theitem.com The annual report on crime statistics from the Sumter Police Department reveals an overall reduction in crime in the city. Sumter Police Chief Russell Roark attributed the drop in large part to department’s numerous attempts to reach out to the community. According to the reports, Sumter saw a 6.59 percent decrease in crime while the department has surpassed national averages in the number of crimes solved. The statistics show that murder saw a huge drop with a 66.7 percent from six in

DEATHS

20 N. Magnolia St. Sumter, SC 29150 (USPS 525-900)

Stinney’s trial in 1944. George’s brother Charles Stinney testified his family was told to leave their Alcolu home by his father’s employers just hours after George Stinney was taken from the house by law enforcement. “We had to leave that night,” he said in a videotaped deposition from his home in New York.

Abraham Thomy Richard E. Lawrence Robert Hammond Mildred Moore-Helton

TYLER SIMPSON / THE ITEM

Sumter Police Chief Russell Roark speaks to city council on Tuesday.

2012 to two in 2013, while huge drops were also seen in auto breakins by 28.61 percent and

OUTSIDE CLEAR AND COLD

Theolander M. Taylor Edward Hilton Ann Lucas B6

INSIDE 4 SECTIONS, 26 PAGES

Mostly sunny and much colder in the day; clear to partly cloudy at night; very cold. HIGH: 38 LOW: 22 A8

Classifieds Comics Daily Planner Opinion Panorama Television

D1 C6 A8 A7 C1 C7


A2

SECOND FRONT THE ITEM

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014 Contact the newsroom at 803-774-1226 or e-mail news@theitem.com

LOCAL & STATE BRIEFS

|

FROM STAFF & WIRE REPORTS

Waterline repairs will cause service disruptions The City of Sumter will make repairs to the waterlines on Lewis Road between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. today. Water service along Lewis Road between McCrays Mill Road and Woodcrest Street, White Pine Subdivision, Club Forest Subdivision, Huntington Subdivision, Haywood Subdivision, Ivey Hall and Huntington Place Apartments will be disrupted while these repairs are made. Customers in the surrounding area may experience temporary discolored water. Direct questions or concerns to the City of Sumter Public Services Department at (803) 436-2558.

Another plane on deck of Yorktown on coast MOUNT PLEASANT — The USS Yorktown at the naval museum in Mount Pleasant is adding a new plane to its collection of vintage aircraft. On Friday, a Douglas EA-3B Skywarrior is being added to the ship at the Patriots Point Naval and Maritime Museum on Charleston Harbor. The Skywarrior was introduced in 1956 and is one of the largest aircraft designed to land on an aircraft carrier.

City hopes to protect Shaw with land buy BY BRADEN BUNCH BBunch@theitem.com Shaw Air Force Base is a driving force in the local economy, and with the purchase of a 694-acre tract near the military installation, Sumter City Council thinks it has improved its ability to protect the base for years to come. Working in tandem with the Conservation Fund, city officials have arranged for the purchase of the unused portion of the KelSam Farms property along Thomas Sumter Highway. Both council members and city officials say keeping this property from being developed in the future will help protect Shaw from encroachment, a factor they say is key in keeping the base in Sumter should the military decide to hold another round of base closings. “There’s one thing you learn over the years, dealing with base closures,” said Sumter Mayor Joe McElveen. “Military people will never tell you what

TYLER SIMPSON / THE ITEM

Sumter city attorney Eric Shytle explains the plan to work with the Conservation Fund to purchase a 694-acre tract near Shaw Air Force Base to protect the land from future development.

you cannot do in the property around the base, but if you get encroachment, they just go away.” City attorney Eric Shytle said Tuesday night during council’s meeting at the South Sumter Resource Center the property should be purchased in the next 10 days and is expected to cost about $1.96 million. However, Shytle said a large portion of the cost will be paid for by the Conservation Fund, with the city only expecting to

spend about $25,000 in incidental costs to finalize the contract. “My recommendation: That’s money well spent,” Shytle said. With the purchase, the city will now have about 1,700 acres under its control. And while the city must agree to the Conservation Fund’s environmental preservation land-use requirements for the new tract, city manager Deron McCormick said plans are already being considered

Public hearing being held on DOT tree cutting plan SUMMERVILLE — The South Carolina Department of Transportation expects to balance highway safety and highway beauty as it considers a plan to remove trees from 23 miles of the median of Interstate 26 outside of Charleston. The department wants to remove the trees to improve safety along the interstate between I-95 and Summerville where 44 people were killed between 2007 and 2011. In addition, more than 700 people were hurt in almost 2,000 crashes during the same period.

Sumter City Council Ordinance Status Ordinance

1st Reading

2481: A lease agreement allowing farming operations on 345 acres of city-owned land off Stamey Livestock Road.

Jan. 7: Approved unanimously

2482: A transfer of city-owned land on 4 Walsh Grove to Sumter County.

Jan. 7: Approved unanimously

2483: Annexation of Lot 148 Chippewa Circle into the city.

Jan. 7 Approved unanimously

; ; ;

Public Hearing Not required

Jan. 21: Approved unanimously

Not required

Jan. 21: Approved unanimously

Not required

Jan. 21: Approved unanimously

; ;

;

OA-12-13: Amendments to portions of the Nov. 19: Approved Sumter Zoning and Development Standards unanimously pertaining to landscaping.

;

;

2nd Reading

Held at the Dec. 3 meeting.

;

Jan. 21: Approved by a 6-to-1 vote. (Galiano opposed)

for potential land management and recreational opportunities. “It’s the makings of a considerable city forest,” McCormick said. “It’s a very positive thing for the environment and a positive thing for the base.” Other action taken by the council Tuesday night included the approval of a $104,000 contract to extend the water line along Nettles Road by about a mile, as well as $539,000 in spending on new trucks for the city’s waste-management fleet. These purchases included a knuckle-boom loader truck, a recycling collection truck and a front-load garbage truck. The new garbage truck, which alone cost about $234,000, became necessary after a fire destroyed one of the city’s trucks a few months ago. Al Harris, assistant city manager of public services, said the city received about $162,000 from insurance on the destroyed truck to help pay for the new vehicle. Reach Braden Bunch at (803) 774-1201.

Get your favorite local author’s John Hancock at fair 10 writers will converge on downtown library Saturday BY IVY MOORE ivym@theitem.com The Sumter County Library will host its annual Local Author Fair from 3 to 5 p.m. Saturday in the main meeting room at the 111 N. Harvin St. branch. Ten authors will be available to talk about their books and sign them and will offer several for sale. The authors write on a wide variety of subjects in both fiction and nonfiction. Henry A. Dyson will have his three “The Big Gray House” books and his 2012 nonfiction book, “Outlining Your Bible Study.” “The Big Gray House” books were

written for children ages 6 to 10 and are set in South Carolina. Dyson, who grew up in Sumter County, said he wrote these books featuring young protagonist Franklin Meyers with the aim of getting children to read. He describes the books on his website, www.thebiggrayhouse.com: “Franklin and his siblings turn their daily walks to school into scientific expeditions. The search for doodle bugs and June bugs is like hunting for wild game. Chores turn into games, tending cows turns into science and aviation classes, and shelling peanuts becomes a family activity

REGULAR SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Home Delivery — Tuesday through Sunday: One year $144; Six months - $75.25; Three months - $40; Two months - $27.50; One month - $13.75; EZPay - $12 per month. Saturday and Sunday: One year - $72; Six months - $36.75; Three months - $18.50; One month, $6.25. Mail — One year - $249; Six months - $124.50; Three months - $62.25; one month - $20.95. OUTLYING RURAL ROUTE SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Home Delivery — Tuesday through Sunday: One year -

filled with laughter and storytelling. The one thing we learn from Franklin is that ... every day could be an adventure!” A pastor’s wife and mother of teenagers, Amy Magaw writes books with Christian themes. They have been described as “country-fried Christian romance” novels. Her series Breaking Dawn from her VCP press “is a new Christian Romance Series designed to engage its readers with realistic and entertaining stories while challenging them spiritually,” according to Magaw’s website, www.vcpbooks.com. Included in

$153; Six months - $81.25; Three months - $43; Two months, $29; One month - $14.50. EZPay, $12.75 per month. Saturday and Sunday: One year - $84; Six months - $43; Three months - $22; One month - $7.50. HOME DELIVERY: Call (803) 774-1258, Mon-Fri, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sat./Sun., 7 to 11 a.m. The Item is published six days a week except for July 4, Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years Day (unless it falls on a Sunday) by Osteen Publishing Co., 20 N. Magnolia St., Sumter,

the series are “Home” and “Wheels.” According to Magaw, her books offer “ ... stimulating Christian romance without the blush.” Deanna Anderson will have several of her works at Saturday’s fair. With interests ranging from nature and wildflowers to spirituality, she’s the mother of teenage daughters and a day care coordinator for the Sumter County Disabilities Board. Writing under the pen name Lynn Anders, Anderson collaborated with G.L. Giles on “Unputdownable Tales of Terror.” Under her own name, she’s

published “Magick for the Elemental Witch” and “Magick for the Kitchen Witch,” both of which she’ll have at the library on Saturday. Anderson’s latest book, “365 Tarot Activities,” to be released soon, is described as “A comprehensive title filled with over three hundred activities, journal prompts, discussion prompt, group activities and methods and instructions for learning to read Tarot.” Information on her other works can be found at her website, andersondeanna.weebly.com. Melanie Dees’ “How to Make Lemonade” is a volume of “short de-

MEET THE AUTHORS Authors participating on Saturday include: Deanna Anderson Lakeyshuh Carolina Melanie Dees Henry A. Dyson Yolundra Green Amy Magaw Jacqueline Goodwin Stephanie McKenny Tyora Moody Melissa Weeks-Richardson Admission to the 2014 Sumter County Library Local Author Fair is free. The event will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. in the main meeting room at the library, 111 N. Harvin St. For more information, call (803) 7737273.

votionals intended to appeal to younger generations,” she said.

SC 29150. Periodical postage paid at Sumter, SC 29150. Postmaster: Send address changes to Osteen Publishing Co., 20 N. Magnolia St., Sumter, SC 29150 Publication No. USPS 525-900 Member, Verified Audit Circulation.

Publishing Co. as agent. No responsibility for advance payments is assumed by the company until the money is received at this office.

NATIONAL ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE: All carriers and dealers of The Item are independent contractors. Advance payment for subscriptions may be made directly to Osteen

RECYCLING: This newspaper is printed on recycled paper and uses environmentally safe soy inks to reduce ruboff. It is recyclable.

CORRECTIONS: If you see a statement in error, contact the City Desk. Corrections will appear on this page.


LOCAL / STATE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

THE ITEM

A3

Time Warner announces theme-based lineup Channels will be grouped into themes such as Entertainment, News & Info, Sports, Music, Kids & Teens and Premiums. Likewise, On Demand content will be found on channels 1000 and above in categories such as Primetime On Demand, Entertainment On Demand, Kids On Demand and Music On Demand.

FROM STAFF REPORTS In March, Time Warner Cable will introduce a themebased digital channel lineup to South Carolina customers. The lineup groups channels together, making it simpler for customers to find the programming they want to view — and to discover other content.

“Our new, theme-based lineup will make it much simpler and easier for our customers to navigate through the lineup,” said Charlene Keys, area vice president of operations at Time Warner Cable. “And with the new lineup, customers with an HD box will automatically receive the HD feed of the corresponding stan-

dard-definition channel, providing the best picture available.” Customers will not be required to reprogram parental control settings and will not lose recordings of their favorite shows. All settings will transition automatically. There is no change in channels 1 to 99 and no change in which channels are

part of a customer’s Time Warner Cable TV package. Customers can find out more about the new themebased lineup at twc.com/ mychannels and watch a helpful video by visiting http://youtu.be/Ri833EtCfzw. Time Warner Cable Digital TV customers in Bishopville, Manning and Sumter will receive the lineup March 4.

Inmate OK after wall falls on him 22-year-old hospitalized BY TYLER SIMPSON tyler@theitem.com An inmate at Sumter-Lee Regional Detention Center was hospitalized Monday after a wall collapsed on him. Larry Andre Archie, 22, was airlifted to Palmetto Health Richland after a cement wall collapsed on him while he was cleaning the shower in the A Pod of the detention center. SLDC staff recently received word from the hospital that Archie

BRADEN BUNCH / THE ITEM

Larry Andre Archie, an inmate at Sumter-Lee Regional Detention Center, is loaded into a Life Net helicopter to be flown to Palmetto Health Richland after a wall collapsed on him. Archie was reportedly cleaning a shower in the A Pod at the center when the incident occurred.

did not appear to have serious injuries, and the staff was waiting for further testing at the hospital. According to the report, an officer entered the shower area to find Archie on the floor

STATE BRIEFS

the wall was always wobbly, but no one thought it would fall. Archie was charged in March 2013 with attempted murder, kidnapping and armed robbery after he, along with three associates,

Archie was standing by the wall waiting for supplies to clean with when he put his arm on the wall. The wall began to lean and fell on Archie when he tried to push it back. Inmates further stated

pinned down by a cement block wall. The officer and other inmates were able to move the wall off Archie before calling medical staff to treat him. Inmates stated that

|

Eddie C. Durant, Jr., D.D.S. Gregory A. Wheeler, D.M.D.

From Associated Press reports

Bill would raise teachers’ salaries

House critical of DOT maintenance work

COLUMBIA — A bill raising teachers’ salaries to the national average has been introduced in the South Carolina Senate. The idea is being pushed by Gov. Nikki Haley’s Democratic opponent, Sen. Vincent Sheheen of Camden. He’s a co-sponsor of the measure that would phase in the increase over five years. Five Democrats and four Republicans have signed on to the bill filed Tuesday. According to the U.S. Department of Education, the average salary for teachers nationwide in school year 2010-11 was $56,069.

COLUMBIA — Legislators say the South Carolina Department of Transportation needs to do a better job repairing potholes and responding to other constituent

10 KT $24.00 14 KT $35.00 16 KT $42.00 18 KT $46.00 22 KT $59.00

averted

Fun for all at the

inventory nents of and seizing all com Syri ons programa’s chemical wea popalties if Pre and imposin g governmensident Bashar Asspenthe term t fails to comply ad’s s. with After day night neg s of intense day -andotiations Secretary between U.S. of State John Russian Fore Kerry Lavrov and ign Minister Sergand powers ann their teams, the ey two framewo ounced they had rk Syria’s che for ridding the wora micals wea ld of pons.

Festival!

IVAL

Making u p lost grounfor d

the teamed up with on Museum present the Carolina Cott Commerce to ar, the South Chamber of . Lee County on Saturday the in Cotton Festival k nty Wal Cou a 5K Lee Coca me-Col ded aGa Bishopco ckntow s rebn ou The event inclu dow thro nds with dewi ride nugh againstvend morning, a para Vae.ors, ville, food nderbilt B1 mor and

r

an dman made LEFT: The Lizar & Harry on the Harry

appearance

m Acres ures from Screa BELOW: Creat day. parade Satur march in the

THE ASSOCIATED

PRESS

Kerry, left, y of State John U.S. Secretary an Foreign Minister Serge va, Russi speaks with a news conference in Gene g Lavrov durin on Saturday. Switzerland,

ord Weapons conc s m temporarily ste se on military reA sp diplomatic

— GENEVA (AP) rday on securing Satu breakthrough g Syria’s chemical weap U.S. and destroyin averted the threat of ons stockpile n for the moment and B military actiomomentum toward endcould swing civil war. U.S. Jaton Rum a horrific ing 11, and negotiations between Bernice Kers the Lee Coup, his brother at a Geneva thon Mara James A. haw nty Cott Malachi Oro Smit Name here on diplomats eme5,nttry agrezco, Name here h and Russian Festival pingrday on Satu Name here a swee i- to give t amb . SEE mos MORE PICT their father a high PHOTOS BY KEITH GEDA hotel produced Name here ire one of the MKE / SPECI URES ON AL PAGE A4. five while riding that will requ trol efforts in history. none of the TO THE ITEM -con inve arms an rides at tious lves making The deal invo all components of Syrng BYand BRISTOW MAR tory and seizi weapons program MOSTLY SUN Excellent weat ar CHANT ical NY Bash t bmarc ia’s chem Presiden hant@theitem.com the day; partl her with passing penalties if ply Blanding clouds and sing com y cloudy and to impo fails will sunshine in chair the cool throu rnment tee, which Sumter Cou ghout the Assad’s gove s. will also incl commitnight. t HIGH 84, LOW nty cou term goesnigh voters, ncil mem ude andaccording with the 65 intense day- yeatary of to plan nexif all and Vivian bers Charles Ede r, will After days of een U.S. Secre t Flemingns be asked betw ign tleFore McGhan “The nex som negotiations ethis,ng extr to pay a litand Russian same proc t step is to follow ey. new a for a list team theircou State John Kerry the nty Business of y Lavrov and they a project ding said ess as last time,” Blan D1 evehad rything’s froms, address. “There will Minister Sergers announceding Classified Informati s D3 Syria be a six- infrastruc- member com d of rove on: worlimp Comics E1 the two powe ridding the ture Advertisin 774-1200 mis men sion requires to ts to qua of-life con as the law g: Daily Plan framework for ons. lityClassifieds: 774-1236 cern ner A10 ans. to council suggest projects bac in weap 774-1234 Thi Opinion A8 icals them s wee chem Delivery: Assad used of projects. They should get a k 774-1258 Council too k, Sumter County Television The U.S. says News and list to E3 k the A9first step Spor warSEE Still in its us next year.” , PAGE d put SYRIA s toting 774-1226 ts: a questio posal wou early stages, the ballot for n on pro ld ing voters November 2014, the for Progres prolong the Penny s sale ask- tiall VISIT US ON endum a to approve by refe y approve s tax voted iniLINE AT th more than d in 2008. In the of the couseven-year extensiore four n been .com sales tax. nty’s capital pen collecte years the tax has ny million has d, more than $48 An ad ens of diffe been spent on doz named athoc committee was Tuesday’s eral other rent projects. But council mee county sevbe completprojects still need lecting com ting to begin colto ed before munity feed sun abo the tax’s set ut the date bac ut Octo county offic of April 30, 2016, e througho different proposal and howk grou will take plac ng in Celebration hasn’t coll ials admit the tax and see the exte ps would like God, ected as muc to ber, culminati 20. That event will nded sale theme is “Oh The nue on. Oct. s Council Cha as expecte h revetax brati Sunday on ed tours of the new d. Ages Past.” l sweetirman Larr spent. Our Help in y wonderfu include guidarchives room as well “All was not but through God’s SEE PENNY s for a history and , TAX, PAGE A9 ction of item ed in ness and light ived it all,” Pitts as the colle open nts years. time capsule to be grace, we surv mter heon. Docume ratsaid. s such , and a lunc been celeb “We com item 2063 has or the de ch e inclu sweetn outlay a heriThe chur heritage,”on disp of will a goo , hand ess and dly , starting with said Sue of rporation ligh inco throthe chach ing all year women in the chur lesPitts, irwomas God’s gra t, but co-billsvive for ughcoal herianartic ofen tes, tea for moth ce, we sur- throughout the nia er d itthe minu Bicent all,” Octobe writt a tour of therch ofl Commit rwom- tage en- to heat nating in tee. used The chu Pitts said. the spring, The second Celebratior, culmithat was once rch has bee mittee. in ch — the Baptist Chu an HISTORICA brating all and A7 BY chur n cele- day on Oct. 20. Tha n Sunis aSandra co-chairwom 200 L HIGHLI YEARS, PAGE yea of Santee — man isjanderJADE AND -SEE a her GHTS ERSOHills N High ram. The fest Wallace. 1813 A grou itage tea r, starting with will include guided t event the prog son@t ical heitemren’s ivit for wom the new p of Sumtervi ies too the church is to tou years rs of townsfolk child .com mus of High Hills history and IDE lle plan. Now k two INS in the spr en in attending years to tour roo ts tou m ther arch even mit r as the Baptist Ano ing Church of well , a SIDE PAGES yFirst Baptist d for Sept. 22, and tee is ready to the com- the of the mother OUT NS, 34ives the s read SECTIO coll church — tion of items as 5the ers to join duleChurch of invite oth Baptist Chu ec- D1 broke off to High Hills of Santee Sum sche ter for has - High form a tim sule to be he celerch of the esse cap The theme in the S cele Busin munity for served the com Hill SUNNYand - D3 ship group that their own woropened TLY ATH MOS is “Oh Godbration. childre s of San - Help DE the past fieds in tee wou clouds 206 a Classi ld — andr awith passing luncheon. become 3, n’s musica nt E1 First Baptist of 200 in Ages Pas , Our weathe on disp s Docum Sumter. Excelle l progra Comic t.” Another Kershaw “AllBerni lay ent cloudy A10 s will partly m. nolia St. wascenot 181 er day; tou includPlann in the such as r of is schedu wonderful sunshi e items A8woo 8 Work began on a andHig h ne articles ofDaily C 29150 James A. Smith Hills tion simple night. on den meeting Opini incorp and eventsled for Sep , handwr 774-1200 throughout the E3serve 5-900) cool22, house that and t. Information: A9 itten Televi sionorawill take d this grou minute 774-1236 LOW: 65 pla 84 ce p as well as A10 s, HIGH: Advertising: tem .com Presbyteri 234 area NA

FOUNDE

SEE SYRIA,

D OCTO

PAGE A9

Dr. S. W

ise

St.

S. Wise Dr.

Dr.

ad

ise

Bro

Dr.

is averted

eapons co ncord tem porarily st ems U.S. ac tion

ad

Bultman

IL WAR

Militar y str ike W

Us!

Bro

Dr.

6600 Bultman l Drive | SSumter, SC 29150 | ((803)) 774-6767 46 6 520 West Boyce Street | Manning, SC 29102 | (803) 435-8094

U.S INin y go SIDg? E SUNDAY ria our pennure of 1-cent tax on Sy

FEST Y COTTON

NEW PATIENTS ARE WELCOME

Gold Shop & Big T Jewelers

ITEM . strike

, fut

TEMPORARY LOCATION eens Walgr

S. W

“We buy Silver Coins & Sterling also”

GENEVA breakthrou (AP) — A diplom atic curing and gh Saturday on chemical destroying Syri sea’s weapons $1.50 ave 1894the stockpile BER 15,rted threat of FOUNDED OCTO tary action U.S. mil could swi for the moment iLINA CARO H ng and mo SOUT mentum ending a | SUMTER,SER VING SOU tow hor TH CAROLIN EMBER 15, 2013 Maratho rific civil war. ard A SINCE OCT SUNDAY, SEPT tween U.S n negotiations OBER 15, 189 be4 mats at a . and Russian dip a sweepinGeneva hotel pro loduc g agreeme require one nt that willed tious arm of the most amb s-control 5 SECTIONS tory. efforts in i, 34 PAGES his| VOL. 118, THE ASSOCIATE U.S. Secretar The deal NO. 281 D involves left, worked y of State John Kerr PRESS making an mittee An ad hoc com Minister Sergwith Russian Fore y, ign ovements to was named at Tuesday’s to ey Lavrov ting on the structure imprconcerns. mee cil county coun quality-of-life, Sumter commucting colle n begi the This week back about cil took the County Coun rd putting a nity feed and how differproposal steps towa ld like to ers, if first tion on the ballot for ent groups wou sales tax ques ded , asking plan see the exten November 2014 ed to ove by refer spent. voters to appr n-year exg PAGE A9 endum a seve county’s SEE PENNY TAX, tension of they sales tax. resscapital penn infra-

discuss reach

10 KT $15.72 14 KT $22.76 16 KT $27.24 18 KT $29.80 22 KT $38.12

All prices above based on gold market price.

ND cenOU ts R LOST60GR SYRIAN CIV

Sumter e

to Gamecocks look rebound from Georgia loss with win against B1 Vanderbilt

CENTER

Bultman

G UP FO MAKIN th

DENTAL

WE BUY GOLD! Per Penny Weight Per Gram

Sunday, Sep tember 27, 2013

mter D1 w gym in Su

complaints to prove it can spend any extra allotment correctly. Agency Director Robert St. Onge encouraged a House budget-writing subcommittee Tuesday to put more money toward fixing the state’s roads.

was arrested in connection with the continuous beating of a man that rendered him unconscious. He also reportedly stole the victim’s wallet. Reach Tyler Simpson at (803) 774-1295.

St.

740 Bultman Drive Convenient Office Hours: 7:00 a.m.–7:30 p.m. Monday–Friday

C A L L T O D AY F O R Y O U R A P P O I N T M E N T ! MEMBER OF

CARDS

AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION

803.773.3328

www.SumterDental.com

Our improved Sumter Item Is coming Tuesday, January 28th! We’re building a better newspaper to better serve our readers and advertisers! The Sumter Item is locally owned and run. We’re part of this community and we believe in Sumter. News, information and advertising are vital services for the growth and future of the region, so for the past several months and throughout 2014, we’ve been reinvesting in your newspaper.

We’ve hired more staf to improve our content. We’ve improved visuals and typography, and freshened our branding. And we’re building a new and better web site. Our content will be more visual, more actionable and more engaging — and that makes The Item an even better vehicle to help you grow your business.

DEATHS, A9

WEATHER, A10

INSIDE

CONTACT US

Where is your penn tax going?y

Local figur es di reach and scuss futur of 1-cent ta e x

es 200 years mter celebrat t of Su Celebratin g 200 year Festivities s: ‘Through be the First Ba gin for God’s grac ptist Church of e, we surv Sumter’ bicentennia

l

s

Classifieds: 774-1258 Delivery: 774-1 226 s: 774-1 News, Sport

SEE 200 YEA RS, PAGE A7

ived it all’

ans and Meth

odists

SEE HISTORY , PAGE A7

Wider columns: Better for readers and better for your message We’ve changed the sizes of our columns and advertising, both in print and online. And we’re ofering more targeted advertising options to improve the

efectiveness of even our least expensive advertising options.

Getting your business more exposure online and in print Our combined print and online audience is larger than ever in our history. And we know it’s important for your message to appear in both for maximum reach and efectiveness.

Beginning in 2014, every print ad will be showcased online, providing a web presence for your business. Many of our print packages will also include web ad components. And we’ll continue to ofer high-

profile web advertising options. Growing your audience, reach and effectiveness in print and online — it’s all part of doing a better job for you, our community and our readers.


A4

LOCAL / NATION

THE ITEM

Restructuring bill heads to governor’s desk

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

POLICE BLOTTER

|

CHARGES:

COLUMBIA (AP) — After a decade of debate, the Legislature approved a bill overhauling state government, giving a victory to both Gov. Nikki Haley and her Democratic opponent. Legislators say the bill heading to Haley’s desk represents the largest restructuring of government in 20 years, since the late Gov. Carroll Campbell began the effort. “Carroll Campbell is smiling today,� Haley wrote on her Facebook page — the only response

provided by the governor’s office. “South Carolina is showing the world that we are no longer in the dark ages!� The bill’s fate again rested with the Senate, where opponents held up a vote for hours. The House has passed similar versions of the bill repeatedly over the past decade. Sen. Shane Martin took the podium to argue the compromise is reform in name only. The bill breaks apart the muchmaligned-but-little-understood

Budget and Control Board and divides its various responsibilities — which range from economic forecasts to janitorial services — among new and already existing agencies. Job losses are not expected. Most workers would transfer to the new, Cabinet-level Department of Administration, giving the governor’s office responsibility of bureaucratic functions of government, such as human resources and property and fleet management.

Snowstorm hits urban Northeast PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A swirling storm with the potential for more than a foot of snow clobbered the mid-Atlantic and the urban Northeast on Tuesday, grounding thousands of flights, closing government offices in the nation’s capital and making a mess of the evening commute. The storm stretched 1,000 miles between Kentucky and Massachusetts but hit especially hard along the heavily populated Interstate 95 corridor between Philadelphia and Boston, creating a perilous ride home for millions of motorists. The snow came down harder and faster than many people expected. Forecasters said some places could get 1 to 2 inches an hour, with wind gusts up to 50 mph. A blizzard warning was posted for parts of Massachusetts, including Cape Cod. Late in the afternoon, highways in the New York City metropolitan area were jammed, and blowing snow tripled or even quadrupled drive times. “I just want to get to the Bronx,� motorist Peter Neuwens lamented. “It’s a big place. Why can’t I get there?� In Jersey City, N.J., Stanley Gaines, wearing just a thin jacket and huddling beneath an overhang as snow stung his face, said he had been stuck for more than an hour waiting for a ride home from his appointment at a Veterans Affairs clinic.

Eric Lamont Wilson, 34, of 71 Jonathan St., was charged with unlawful possession of a firearm at 8:57 p.m. Friday in the 40 block of West Red Bay Road. According to reports, officers responded to the incident location in reference to a white Acura Legend with dark-tinted windows firing shots out of a window. Officers located a vehicle matching the description along West Red Bay road and detained Wilson. An inventory of the vehicle led to finding a black Glock model 26 9 mm pistol under the front passenger seat with a 15-round magazine with 15 FMJ rounds beside the pistol. Inside the trunk was a 30-round magazine for a 9 mm Glock with 11 9 mm FMJ rounds. Wilson was placed under arrest and sent to Sumter-Lee Regional Detention Center. STOLEN PROPERTY:

A refrigerator, a microwave, two window air-conditioning units, two televisions, a television stand and miscellaneous clothing were reportedly stolen from a residence in the 40 block of L Street between 5 p.m. Jan. 9 and 9:33 a.m. Thursday. The estimated value of the stolen items is $800. A Goldman air conditioner and a white water heater were reportedly stolen from a residence in the 10 block of Gates Street between 8:30 a.m. Jan. 15 and 4:20 p.m. Thursday. The estimated value of the stolen items is $3,300. A yellow John Deere 310 D Backhoe valued at $15,000 was reportedly stolen from a residence in the 800 block of North Main Street between 6 a.m. Jan. 14 and 6 a.m. Saturday. A black Samsung 40-inch flat-screen television, a black Xbox One game system and five paintings were reportedly stolen from a residence in the 20 block of Burkett Drive between 2:40 and 2:53 p.m. Sunday. The estimated value of the stolen items is $1,400. A black and gray laptop, miscellaneous boys’ clothing, miscellaneous women’s jewelry and $2,000 in cash were reportedly stolen from a residence in the 10 block of Rovena Street between 2 a.m. and 4:46 p.m. Sunday. The estimated value of the stolen items is $4,380. VANDALISM:

An unknown suspect reportedly scratched every surface of a silver 2007 Honda Accord in the 200 block of Burns Drive between 5 p.m. Thursday and 10:30 a.m. Friday. The estimated total cost of the damage is $2,500.

...........Think.......... Lafayette L f Gold G ld & Silver Exchange THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Wind picks up snow from the ground on Tuesday as a man waits to take a photograph of a statue dedicated to the victims of the Katyn massacre in 1940 in Jersey City, N.J.

“I’m waiting on anything I can get: a taxi, a shuttle, a bus,� Gaines said, squinting to read the destination on an approaching bus in near white-out conditions. “I didn’t really

Tom & Mary’s Put & Take

pay attention to the weather this morning because there was no snow on the ground, and now — this.� The storm was blamed for at least one death in Maryland

after a car fishtailed into the path of a tractor-trailer on a snowcovered road about 50 miles northwest of Baltimore. The car’s driver was thrown from the vehicle.

We Buy Gold & Silver Jewelry Silver Coins/Collections Sterling/925 Diamonds, Pocket Watches & Wrist Watches

Karat 10K 14K 16K 18K 22K

Price per

Price per

Pennyweight (DWT) $24.00 $35.00 $42.00 $46.00 $59.00

Gram (Gr) $15.72 $22.76 $27.24 $29.80 $38.12

All prices above based on gold market price with this ad.

803-773-8022

143 S. Lafayette Dr. Sumter, SC 29150 (at the foot of the bridge inside Vestco Properties)

Superb Events Venue Palmetto Farm Supply OPEN MONDAY - SATURDAY 8AM - 6PM

AND

We Offer Pet Grooming!

CLEANERS

LeAnn, Jennifer & Suzanne

LAUNDRY

t0SHBOJD%SZ$MFBOJOHt t-BVOESZt t"MUFSBUJPOTt t0QFO4JY%BZTB8FFLt t2VBMJUZ8PSLBU3FBTPOBCMF1SJDFTt t"MM8PSL(VBSBOUFFEt

%3:$-&"/ 48&"5&34

.&/03-"%*&4 1$46*54 %3:$-&"/

$3.00 $8.00 Plus Tax - With Coupon No Limits - Exp. 1-31-14

Plus Tax - With Coupon No Limits - Exp. 1-31-14

All Coupons Must Be Prepaid At Drop Off Time Coupons Valid At 2 Locations:

1784 Peach Orchard Rd (Hwy 441)t 88FTNBSLt (Across From Simpsons Hardware)

A Touch of Southern Charm We invite you to hold your upcoming special event at Sunset CC. This amazing venue is perfect for celebrations of all types. With several different room options and delectable cuisine — an event hosted at this fine southern venue will exceed your expectations! Membership is not required to host an event at Sunset.

To schedule a tour, call Sis Ketchum, Special Events Coordinator at 803-775-5541 ext. 106! SUNSETCOUNTRYCLUBSC.COM 1005 GOLFCREST RD. SUMTER, SC 29154

With 30 years of combined experience. Walk-ins Welcome til 3pm. Call for an appointment. WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF PET FOODS. #SPBE4USFFUr4VNUFS 4$

803-775-1204

Find us on Facebook!


NATION

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

THE ITEM

A5

Study shows nearly half of black men arrested by age 23 NEW YORK (AP) — Nearly 50 percent of black men and 40 percent of white men are arrested at least once on non-trafficrelated crimes by the time they turn 23, according to a new study. One of the authors of the study published this month in the journal “Crime & Delinquency� said the statistics could be useful in shaping policy so that people aren’t haunted by arrests when they apply for jobs, schools or public housing. “Many, many people are involved with the criminal justice system at this level,� said Shawn Bushway, a University at Albany criminologist. “And treating them all as if they’re hardened criminals is a serious mistake.� The peer-reviewed estimates didn’t rely on arrest records but instead on an annual federal Bureau of Labor Statistics survey of about 7,000 young people who answered questions each year from 1997 to 2008 on a range of issues — including if they had ever been taken into custody for something other than a traffic offense. Self-reported crimes ranged from underage drinking to violent assaults.

The authors found that by age 18, 30 percent of black men, 26 percent of Hispanic men and 22 percent of white men have been arrested. By 23, those numbers climb to 49 percent for black men, 44 percent for Hispanic men and 38 percent for white men. Among women, 20 percent of blacks, 18 percent of whites and 16 percent of Hispanics were arrested at least once by age 23. Further research on the arrests themselves, convictions and recidivism rates are in the works, said the study’s co-author, University of South Carolina criminology professor Robert Brame. “Among criminologists, I don’t think they’re that surprised or alarmed by the findings,� Brame said. “The alarm and concern is among people not as familiar with the patterns.� The last time a similar estimate was made was in 1967, when researchers using statistics reported to the FBI found that by age 23, 34 percent of all men would have been arrested at least once. Brame and Bushway’s estimate for all men is 40 percent.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dequan Wright, left, 19, is led from a hearing Sept. 6, 2013, in Wilkes-Barre, Pa., after being arrested in connection with the death of a New York City toddler shot in his stroller, according to authorities. According to a new study, nearly half of black men and 40 percent of white men nationally are arrested at least once on non-traffic-related crimes by the time they turn 23.

Spotting elder abuse becomes new NYC doorman duty BY JIM FITZGERALD Associated Press Writer NEW YORK — New York’s doormen are being enlisted as an army of eyes to look for signs of elder abuse: a stranger picking up the mail, the sudden presence of a rarely seen relative with an attitude, a bruise. “Doormen know everything that’s going on,� Joy Solomon said before conducting a training session for doormen, porters and other apartment workers, fittingly held over the din of whirring dryers in the laundry room of a Manhattan building. “They know who’s going in, who’s going out. They have access, and they have a relationship of trust. They’re a friendly face.� Solomon, director of the Weinberg Center for Elder Abuse Prevention at the Hebrew Home in the Bronx, partnered with the building workers’ union in a grantfunded program to help doormen spot various kinds of elder abuse — physical, sexual, psychological and financial. The training, which began several years ago, has been broadened to include others who come in contact with isolated seniors, such as Meals-on-Wheels delivery workers. An online version is in the works that could spread its message throughout the union’s coverage area, from Massachusetts to Florida. Every new set of eyes counts. The National Center for Elder Abuse says lack of detection makes it impossible to know the extent of elder abuse. Solomon quoted from a 2011 study that said only about 4 percent of elder abuse incidents in New York are reported. As an example of

what can happen, she told the gathering of about 15 doormen and other workers of a woman whose son stole her prosthetic leg and sold it for drug money. “It got him money, and it kept her isolated and dependent on him,� Solomon said, adding that the man eventually drove the elderly woman into poverty,

and she now lives in a shelter. Javier Rosa, who works the 11 p.m.-to-7 a.m. shift at a building, said he knows from his own experience that this is an idea that can work. “There’s an old lady, sometimes she comes down late at night, she just wants to talk,� Rosa said. “She knows I’m here, she has nobody

else, she trusts me. If something was wrong, I would know. I would never let anything happen to her.� Solomon said work-

ers should trust their gut feelings: “If you think something is going on, you’re probably right.� She urged the work-

FREE

VETERANS SPACE Available to Both Veteran & Spouse

Call NOW to Reserve Your Space

BUYING GOLD

803-773-6237

EVERGREEN & HILLSIDE

EVERYDAY Paying Top Dollar in Sumter

MEMORIAL PARKS

JEWELRY WHOLESALE

/(VJHOBSE%SJWFr4VNUFS 4$ -JNJUFE5JNF0GGFS $FSUBJO3FTUSJDUJPOT"QQMZ

&8FTNBSL#MWEt778-1031

QUICK REFUND TAX SERVICE

ers to be on the alert for signs of physical decline, mental confusion and depression, which can increase a tenant’s vulnerability.

Patient Education Series

EARLY FILING COUPON FOR NEW CLIENTS $

25.00 OFF Low Prep Fees Free E-Filing

294 N. Bultman Dr. Sumter, SC 803-775-7498rWalk-Ins Welcome

Lexington Medical Heart Center is pleased to present a FREE quarterly education series featuring medical topics that are important to your Sumter community.

When Seconds Count SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF A HEART ATTACK TUESDAY FEBRUARY 4TH @ 6:00 p.m.

AUTO PLUS PARTS SUPPLIER

Guaranteed Quality parts and value pricing

Hosted By:

COOK’S Auto Plus Auto Parts 'SJFSTPO3Et%BM[FMM 4$ Phone: 803-499-9086 Fax: 803-499-4388 Email: ccooks@ftc-i.net

A Lexington Medical Center Physician Network

540 Physicians Lane, Sumter SC William D. Brearley Jr., MD Lexington Cardiology

฀ ฀

฀

฀ ฀

฀

For directions and future topics visit SumterCardiology.com


A6

LOCAL / NATION

THE ITEM

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

STINNEY from Page A1 Sister Aime Ruffner remembers the family “heard there was a mob coming to take us out.” Because the family was run out of town before the trial, jurors never heard Ruffner’s testimony that George Stinney was with her when they encountered Binnicker and Thames as they searched for maypops near the Stinneys’ home, or that he remained with the family right up until the police took him away the next day. “Our parents were very strict,” she said. “We couldn’t go anywhere without their permission.” Both Ruffner and Charles Stinney testified that when a neighborhood group went out to search for the missing girls, it included both their father and George Stinney himself. Ruffner also said she was present the next day when her brother was arrested and hid inside the family chicken coop as strange men in “big black cars” approached the house and took Stinney away. She remembers her brother as a quiet, artistic boy who couldn’t have carried out the killings. “He carried around a pad my parents bought him, and whenever he saw an airplane fly over, he would try to draw it,” she said. Stinney attorney Steve McKenzie contrasted this testimony with the lack of a defense put forward by Stinney’s court-appointed attorney at trial, when no witnesses were called or arguments presented in Stinney’s favor. They also challenged the lack of surviving evidence or even notes from that short, two-hour proceeding in the Clarendon County Court-

house so long ago. But Third Circuit Solicitor Ernest “Chip” Finney III argued it’s exactly the length of time between the original case and today that makes it so hard to reevaluate. “That evidence has gone missing in the course of 70 years is not proof of a miscarriage of justice but the natural result of the passage of time,” he said. Finney argued the fact the Stinney family waited so long before making this motion should count against them. “Now, these witnesses can’t speak, and we can’t advance a new trial,” Finney said. In cross-examining Ruffner, the solicitor submitted an affidavit the sister wrote and signed in 2009 that failed to mention either the neighborhood search party or the chicken coop incident. Testifying for the state, former Alcolu resident Paul

Charles Stinney, above, brother of George Stinney, testifies in a videotaped deposition played Tuesday at a hearing to overturn his brother’s 70-year-old murder conviction. Now in his 80s, Stinney was unable to travel from his home in New York to testify. Judge Carmen Mullen, left, will be tasked with ruling on whether a motion challenging George Stinney’s murder conviction is strong enough to require a new trial in the controversial 70-yearold case. PHOTOS BY BRISTOW MARCHANT / THE ITEM

Fann recalled witnessing a large crowd outside the Stinney home the day the two girls’ bodies were found. “A man came out with an arm full of clothes and put them into a car,” Fann said he saw as a young boy. “Then they came out with the young man and put him into the car.” But the Stinney relatives

present Tuesday were determined to push forward with their case. After waiting so long to appear in court, they will have to wait at least another day to finish the hearing. “I’d like to see him found innocent,” Stinney sister Katherine Robinson said. “Whatever that takes.”

Proceedings before Fourteenth Judicial Circuit Judge Carmen Mullen — the Beaufort-based judge assigned to hear the case by the South Carolina Supreme Court — will continue today at the judicial center. Reach Bristow Marchant at (803) 774-1272.

2nd body recovered from Omaha plant that collapsed OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Authorities on Tuesday recovered the body of a second worker who was killed when an Omaha manufacturing plant collapsed, while federal investigators tried to pinpoint a cause of the industrial accident that killed two and injured 17. Interim Fire Chief Bernard Kanger said authorities retrieved the body from the International Nutrition building at 3:45 p.m. Authorities think no other people are in the building. Kanger said the two men killed were found on the second floor, but the bodies were not near each other. Thirty-eight people were in the animal feed and supplement plant on Monday when it collapsed. Authorities said they recovered the body of 53-year-old Keith Everett, of Omaha, on Monday night. The second worker killed was identified Tuesday evening as 47-yearold David Ball, of Omaha. Crews from Omaha and Lincoln had suspended their work Monday night because of shifting winds, cold temperatures and the dangerous rubble. They restarted Tuesday morning with a team of specially trained firefighters. The team also took a structural engineer to help make sure their efforts didn’t further destabilize the crumpled

structure, putting rescuers at risk. “After hours of hard work under extremely dangerous conditions, members of both teams were able to recover the (second) victim,” Kanger said. Meanwhile, authorities were still trying to determine a cause. Occupational Safety and Health Administration investigators were on the scene of the accident Tuesday morning as they took the lead in investigating the collapse, OSHA spokesman Scott Allen said. It was too early to know what might have caused part of the threelevel International Nutrition plant to collapse, Allen said. The plant makes nutritional products that are added to livestock and poultry feed. Some witnesses reported hearing an explosion before a fire that burned some workers and the partial collapse of the plant. “There are many questions yet to be answered about what caused this disaster, but I am confident that the answers provided by federal, state and local officials can offer lessons that will help avoid tragedies like this one in the future,” U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez said in a written statement. One company official

cast doubt on reports that an explosion caused the collapse and fire. Kim Nguyen, the international marketing manager for the company, said an investigator told company officials there was no explosion, “only a collapse of the building.” She said she could not recall the name of the investigator, and said the person did not know what caused the building to collapse. Nguyen urged people to wait for investigators to complete their study before drawing conclusions.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The International Nutrition plant is in wreckage in Omaha, Neb., where a fire and explosion took place on Monday. At least nine people have been hospitalized and others could be trapped at the animal feed processing plant.

SLAUGHTER SALE

50% - 75% OFF GOING ON NOW!

h t u e o r S y l p m i S Rotisserie & Grilln Bistro Southern Cooking with a Cajun Kick

DELICIOUS EVERYDAY MENU ITEMS FRIED PORK CHOP $7.99 ROTISSERIE CHICKEN OR TURKEY $8.99 GRILLED HAMBURGER STEAK $9.99 SHRIMP AND GRITS $9.99

...and more.

GRAB TABLE From $100 - $2499

MENSWEAR Corner of Wise and Alice Drive 803-905-4299 www.canthonysmenswear.com

Your Sumter Hometown Clothing Store!

GRILLED SALMON $9.99 SOUTHERN PIE (Shepard’s Pie) $9.99 SEAFOOD PLATTER $9.99 $"5&3*/(t(*'5$"3%4t5",&065

65 W. Wesmark Blvd (ACROSS FROM BILTON LINCOLN)

803-469-8502 Sun., Mon., Tues. 11:00am-2:30pm Wed. and Thur. Lunch 11:00am-2:30pm Fri. and Sat. 11:00am-9:00pm


OPINION WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

THE ITEM

A7

To submit a letter to the editor, e-mail letters@theitem.com COMMENTARY

|

It’s OK to feel sorry A

t one time in our the then commander of nation’s history, U.S. Pacific Command, blacks feeling “My fear is that the whole sorry for whites was verisland will become so boten. That was poroverly populated that it trayed in Harper Lee’s will tip over and capPulitzer Prize-winning size”? Adm. Willard renovel, “To Kill a Mockplied, with all sincerity, ingbird.” This is a novel “We don’t anticipate published in 1960 — and that.” I’d pay serious later made into a movie money to know what the — about Depression-era admiral and his white racial relations in the staff said about Johnson Deep South. The novel’s after they left the hearing character Tom Robinson, room. a black man, portrayed in Then there’s Rep. the movie by Brock PeSheila Jackson Lee, Dters, is on trial, falsely ac- Texas, who asked NASA cused of raping a white scientists whether they woman. The prosecuting could drive the Mars attorney, while grilling rover to where Neil ArmRobinson, asks him why strong placed the Amerihe spent so much can flag. Actually, time doing chores Armstrong plantfor the alleged ed the flag on the rape victim when moon in 1969. In he had so much 2010, Jackson Lee of his own work pointed out: to do. After per“Today we have sistent prosecutotwo Vietnams, Walter rial haranguing, side by side, North Robinson timidly WILLIAMS and South, exadmits that he felt changing and sorry for her. That reworking. We may not sponse elicits shock and agree with all that North dismay from the proseVietnam is doing, but cutor and the courtroom: they are living in peace.” How dare a black man The fact of business is feel sorry for a white that as a result of North woman?! Vietnam’s conquest, As a result of the today it’s only one naachievements of the civil tion, Vietnam. Another rights movement, which Jackson Lee geographical gave black Americans full observation was her refconstitutional guaranerence to “countries like tees, I am free to feel Europe.” But we sorry for guilty or timid shouldn’t be that critical white people. But there of her, because President may be less of a need be- Obama also has referred cause of white people’s to people from “countries response to former NBA like Europe.” Referring to player Dennis Rodman’s “countries like Europe” is bizarre interview from just as ill-informed as North Korea in which he saying countries like Africlaimed that North Koca or countries like South rea’s evil tyrant, Kim Jong America. Of course, they Un, is his best friend. are continents. Rodman has since apoloSome might recall the gized for some of his refield day the media and marks. But he’s been a bit social commentators had of catharsis. White liberwith Vice President Dan als, both in and out of the Quayle and his misspellmedia, made criticizing ing of potato, some of him nearly a national which was quite ruthless. pastime. Even Sen. John Esquire named Quayle McCain, who couldn’t among “The Dumbest summon up the courage Vice Presidential Picks of — nor would he allow his All Time.” That kind of presidential campaign field day wasn’t seen in staff — to speak ill of mainstream media in the Barack Obama’s minister, cases of Johnson, Jackson Jeremiah Wright, told Lee and Obama. To have CNN’s Piers Morgan in done so might have been reference to Rodman: “I deemed racist. think he’s an idiot. I think The bottom line is I’m he’s a person of not great glad the day has come intellect who doesn’t un- when I can freely feel derstand that he really sorry for whites, who does provide propaganda have to bite their tongue for this very brutal, ruthwhen it comes to critiless young man.” cism of blacks. The widespread and open criticism of RodWalter E. Williams is a man shows that there’s professor of economics at been considerable progGeorge Mason University. ress and that I don’t have To find out more about to feel as sorry for white Walter E. Williams and people. But what about read features by other the weak media response Creators Syndicate writto Rep. Henry C. Johners and cartoonists, visit son, D-Ga., who, during a the Creators Syndicate 2010 House Armed SerWeb page at www.crevices Committee hearing ators.com. concerning U.S. military buildup on Guam, told © 2014 CREATORS. Adm. Robert F. Willard, COM

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Can we find 15 honest people to serve on health care board? There have been numerous complaints on ObamaCare. First there were the websites. Then it was high deductible and co-pays. Praise has come from those who are now covered. Most of those issues will be surpassed by the ultimate board created by ObamaCare. The board is called the Independent Payment Advisory Board. There are 15 members appointed by the president and certified by the Senate. Members serve until January 2017. They cannot be removed unless they die or become negligent. This board is powerful. They are duty bound to cut costs. They can increase penalties for excess hospital admissions. They can set age limits on treatments such as heart by-pass or knee replacements. Their goal is less expense, not better care. Is it possible to find 15 honest people to

N.G. OSTEEN 1843-1936 The Watchman and Southron

H.G. OSTEEN 1870-1955 Founder, The Item

serve on IPAB? I doubt it. Just look around. People in high places want kickbacks. Virginia’s Republican Gov. McDonnell allowed a friend to market health products at the governor’s mansion. His fee was $30,000 for the daughter’s wedding, a $12,000 coat for the wife and $6,000 in jewelry. In South Carolina, a college board chairman wanted a new Porsche for a school land transaction (accused not convicted). A Columbia councilman wanted $5,000 for a land transaction (accused not convicted). Sen. Ben Nelson of Nebraska obtained $800 million in free Medicaid for his vote change on ObamaCare. This board will mostly be honest, but a few will seek a kickback, and remember their decision could deny you the treatment you need. You have already paid the premiums, and you deserve the care. PHIL BRANDT, M.D. Sumter

EDITORIAL ROUNDUP Recent editorials from South Carolina newspapers: Jan. 17 The State, Columbia, on state hack: The modern world and its computerized record keeping are quite convenient and quite problematic, too. We’d venture to say that most folks probably are not aware of how exposed they are to the tentacles of deceit and theft online. ... But that wasn’t what ran off with personal South Carolina files — again — late last year. It was an employee with a runof-the-mill flash drive taking his or her mouse and dragging and dropping more than 4,000 files on current and former employees of South Carolina’s unemployment agency before security software detected the unauthorized download. The downloaded data included names, addresses, birthdates, Social Security numbers and bank account information. It took four weeks for the state to let anybody know. Really? The massive hack of 2012, which exposed the accounts of 6.4 million South Carolina people or businesses to possible fraud, never seemed to receive the full attention of the government or the governor until too late. All it’s really seemed to lead to are millions of dollars in contracts to credit monitoring services that taxpayers are paying for to clean up the debacle. The unemployment agency hacker has been caught and fired, and the files have been retrieved. So unlike that first fiasco, at least the state knows who has been hacked and the

H.D. OSTEEN 1904-1987 The Item

|

information is in safe — we use that word extremely liberally — hands, although there are no guarantees the bank routing and Social Security numbers obtained haven’t already been compromised. We do not pretend to know what’s in the mind of a cyber thief. We don’t know the capabilities they have at their disposal. As more and more breaches such as the recent Target hack come to light, we as a society might have to resign to the fact that there is no such thing as hacker-proof protection online. But protection against a wayward flash drive? Grandma Pearl could probably figure that one out. It’s about time South Carolina did so, too. Online: http://www.scnow. com Jan. 18 The Herald, Rock Hill, on strengthening S.C. Freedom of Information Act: While ethics reform, government restructuring and now education are likely to consume much of state lawmakers’ attention during the new legislative session, they also need to find time to address a bill that strengthens the state’s Freedom of Information law. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Bill Taylor, R-Aiken, won approval in the House, 101-1, in 2012 but stalled in the Senate in the final days of the session. Taylor re-introduced the bill last year, and hopes were high that it would pass. But at a hearing on the bill in the House Judiciary Committee, Rep. Rick Quinn, RLexington, offered an amendment that would have removed

the section that exempted legislators from having to comply with the rules. That amounted to a “poison pill,” killing any chance it would pass. Fortunately, the bill still is active for this session, and we hope lawmakers will resurrect it. A strengthened FOI bill would not necessarily prevent all injustices. But it might help discourage governmental bodies from openly and brazenly ignoring the spirit of the law. Rep. Taylor’s bill would reduce the time officials would have to respond to an FOI request from 15 to 10 working days. It would hold fees for copying costs to the local prevailing rate. Governments have squelched FOI requests by charging exorbitant fees for copies of documents, sometimes thousands of dollars. Under the bill, documents must be turned over to those making the request within 30 days, although more time is allowed for documents over two years old. The law currently sets no time requirement for delivery of documents. The bill also sets up an appeals process for both citizens and public bodies through the Administrative Law Court. Currently, anyone who wants to challenge an FOI decision must hire an attorney and take the appeal to circuit court, which is costly and slow. These are relatively minor changes in the law but ones that would solve many of the access problems now facing those who make FOI requests. The need is there, and we hope lawmakers make time to address this crucial bill this year. Online: http://www.heraldonline.com

HUBERT D. OSTEEN JR. | EDITOR AND CHAIRMAN

Founded October 15, 1894 20 N. Magnolia St. Sumter, SC 29150

|

MARGARET W. OSTEEN 1908-1996 The Item

H. GRAHAM OSTEEN II Co-President

KYLE BROWN OSTEEN Co-President

JOHN DUVALL OSTEEN Vice President and Publisher

LARRY MILLER CEO


A8

DAILY PLANNER

THE ITEM

HOME SCHOOLING from Page A1 schooled her children in Hawaii, Texas, Virginia and Georgia, among other states. But each time they’ve moved, they immediately made connections and got involved in the community which helps with the transition from one city to another. “Every time we’ve moved, we dive into a community very quickly. We get to know people outside of the military,” she said. “My son participated in parks and recreation football. We have piano lessons with a local teacher. So there’s no shortage of socialization for them.” In Sumter, children who are home schooled get the opportunity to interact with others through programs with Parks and Recreation and the YMCA. Junko Allen, YMCA athletic director, said they have a number of programs including volleyball and soccer for kids from the area. In the future, Allen said she hopes to develop a physical education course for home school children in

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

QUIZ

Sumter. Prichard explained that she and her husband have no intentions of keeping their children out of public schools. Instead, they described their children’s education as being “tailored for each child.” Learning at home also creates a “positive peer atmosphere,” where children are encouraged to interact with other kids their age or older to give them confidence and knowledge when speaking with people of all ages. Most of all, it creates a sense of community despite living in multiple cities throughout their childhood. “The home school community is a community. It’s hard on military families and on kids when they have to move around. But our children can appreciate a wellrounded view of the world,” she said. “It allows our family to transition and deal with that a lot easier.” Reach Raytevia Evans at (803) 7741214.

795-4257

TODAY

TONIGHT

38°

THURSDAY 44°

FRIDAY

18°

18°

28°

Clear to partly cloudy and cold

Cold with sunshine and patchy clouds

Sunny and cold

Breezy with plenty of sunshine

Winds: NW 6-12 mph

Winds: SW 4-8 mph

Winds: WNW 7-14 mph

Winds: NNE 4-8 mph

Winds: SW 12-25 mph

Winds: W 10-20 mph

Chance of rain: 0%

Chance of rain: 5%

Chance of rain: 10%

Chance of rain: 5%

Chance of rain: 5%

Chance of rain: 15%

Sumter through 4 p.m. yesterday High ............................................... 62° Low ................................................ 37° Normal high ................................... 55° Normal low ..................................... 32° Record high ....................... 77° in 1954 Record low ........................... 2° in 1985

Greenville 35/21

Precipitation 24 hrs ending 4 p.m. yest. ........... Month to date .............................. Normal month to date ................. Year to date ................................. Normal year to date ....................

Lake Murray Marion Moultrie Wateree

Full 7 a.m. 24-hr pool yest. chg 360 356.72 +0.11 76.8 76.46 +0.01 75.5 74.82 +0.92 100 97.50 -0.82

River Black River Congaree River Lynches River Saluda River Up. Santee River Wateree River

Full pool 12 19 14 14 80 24

City Aiken Asheville Athens Augusta Beaufort Cape Hatteras Charleston Charlotte Clemson Columbia

Today Hi/Lo/W 40/23/s 28/16/pc 38/24/s 38/23/s 44/27/s 30/22/s 44/25/s 32/18/pc 38/24/s 38/23/s

7 a.m. yest. 9.25 3.80 11.71 7.69 80.25 7.10

Bishopville 37/21

0.00" 2.50" 2.72" 2.50" 2.72"

24-hr chg +0.11 -0.10 -0.94 -0.02 -0.43 -1.20

Thu. Hi/Lo/W 45/17/s 25/7/sf 39/16/s 47/19/s 51/24/s 41/23/pc 51/22/s 36/11/s 39/16/s 45/17/s

Columbia 38/23 Today: Partly sunny and colder. Thursday: Mostly sunny and cold.

New

Jan. 24 First

Jan. 30 Full

Feb. 6

Feb. 14

Myrtle Beach 36/25

Manning 39/22

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Aiken 40/23 Charleston 44/25

The following tide table lists times for Myrtle Beach.

High Ht. Wed. 12:23 a.m.....2.6 12:33 p.m.....2.7 Thu. 1:11 a.m.....2.7 1:23 p.m.....2.6

Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2014 Today Hi/Lo/W 34/20/s 25/13/s 32/19/s 31/17/s 36/21/s 50/25/s 33/18/pc 28/15/s 44/25/s 26/16/pc

Last

Florence 36/21

Sumter 38/22

Today: Mostly sunny and much colder. High 36 to 45. Thursday: Mostly sunny and cold. High 46 to 51.

City Darlington Elizabeth City Elizabethtown Fayetteville Florence Gainesville Gastonia Goldsboro Goose Creek Greensboro

Partly sunny and breezy

Sunrise today .......................... 7:24 a.m. Sunset tonight ......................... 5:42 p.m. Moonrise today ..................... 11:53 p.m. Moonset today ...................... 10:43 a.m.

Gaffney 32/20 Spartanburg 35/22

Temperature

Thu. Hi/Lo/W 42/16/s 36/14/pc 41/16/pc 38/15/pc 45/17/s 59/29/s 37/11/s 38/13/pc 50/22/s 31/11/pc

City Greenville Hickory Hilton Head Jacksonville, FL La Grange Macon Marietta Marion Mount Pleasant Myrtle Beach

Today Hi/Lo/W 35/21/pc 30/18/pc 44/32/s 49/26/s 40/25/s 42/23/s 36/23/s 30/17/pc 43/28/s 36/25/s

Thu. Hi/Lo/W 36/12/s 30/10/pc 50/26/s 58/30/s 39/17/s 45/19/s 33/13/s 28/10/pc 51/24/s 47/19/s

City Orangeburg Port Royal Raleigh Rock Hill Rockingham Savannah Spartanburg Summerville Wilmington Winston-Salem

Low Ht. 7:21 a.m.....0.3 7:36 p.m.....0.1 8:15 a.m.....0.3 8:26 p.m.....0.1

Today Hi/Lo/W 40/24/s 44/29/s 28/17/pc 34/18/pc 33/16/s 46/27/s 35/22/pc 44/29/s 33/20/s 28/17/pc

Thu. Hi/Lo/W 47/19/s 50/25/s 38/15/pc 38/12/s 41/11/pc 52/24/s 36/13/s 50/25/s 46/17/pc 30/11/pc

Shown are today’s noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

0s 10s

CRIME from Page A1

20s 30s 40s 50s

es, which are the number of calls made by officers and public, increased from 76,569 in 2012 to 83,827 in 2013 last year. More proactive measures by officers, including an increased number of property checks, are responsible for the increase, according to Roark. “Every time an officer does a property check on a piece of property or a business, it is a demonstration of proactive law enforcement,” Roark said. The area around Carolina Avenue is currently considered to be a hot spot for crime, as shown in the annual report. Roark said most of the crime in that area involves drugs and street crime that mostly involves juveniles but also said that he sees improvement in the crime around that area. “Sumter can have everything one could want to raise a family, but if you don’t have a safe place to live for current residents and potentially future residents and their families, the city won’t be very attractive,” Roark said. “We want the community to grow; we want the community to prosper. We are committed to improving the quality of life in the city of Sumter and maintain our proactive law-enforcement efforts.”

60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s Stationary front

Cold front Showers Rain T-storms Snow Flurries

Ice

Warm front

Today Thu. Today Thu. City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Albuquerque 54/31/pc 41/21/s Las Vegas 68/45/pc 62/42/s Anchorage 38/33/r 39/33/r Los Angeles 80/54/pc 75/52/s Atlanta 38/24/s 35/14/s Miami 64/46/s 70/55/s Baltimore 16/9/pc 22/9/sn Minneapolis 6/-14/c -2/-2/pc Boston 16/6/sn 20/3/c New Orleans 52/38/s 55/30/pc Charleston, WV 18/12/pc 18/7/pc New York 13/8/pc 21/6/sn Charlotte 32/18/pc 36/11/s Oklahoma City 48/17/s 26/11/s Chicago 14/1/sn 7/-4/pc Omaha 22/-6/pc 11/7/pc Cincinnati 20/3/sf 16/1/pc Philadelphia 14/6/pc 22/6/sn Dallas 60/32/s 35/19/c Phoenix 76/46/pc 73/49/s Denver 46/15/s 26/16/sn Pittsburgh 9/8/pc 16/-2/sn Des Moines 16/-6/pc 7/3/pc St. Louis 32/6/pc 14/6/s Detroit 13/6/sn 13/-2/sf Salt Lake City 40/24/c 37/18/pc Helena 36/20/sn 34/18/s San Francisco 65/44/pc 64/45/s Honolulu 79/62/sh 78/60/s Seattle 49/38/c 52/37/pc Indianapolis 20/0/sf 13/-3/pc Topeka 35/2/pc 16/6/pc Kansas City 31/1/pc 15/8/pc Washington, DC 17/12/pc 26/9/sn Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): ARIES (March 21-April the last word in astrology Don’t overdo it at home. 19): What you do to help Too much to eat or drink a cause will raise eugenia LAST will result in physical or questions. Take care of emotional problems. You personal responsibilities are better off going to a before offering your destination that makes you feel relaxed. services to outsiders. A relationship will take an emotional turn. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Get together with someone who brings out the best in you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Opportunities are New ideas will result in changes that will present, but you may misunderstand what’s encourage you to live better. Ease stress by expected of you. Learn all you can and addressing emotional issues. develop a plan that will enable you to handle whatever situation you face with SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Getting ease. together with a colleague you used to work with will spark ideas that can lead to new GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Ask questions and opportunities. Share your insight and take on new projects. What you offer will be experience and you will change the way greatly appreciated. A change will occur in people view you. the way you move forward with your plans if you lend someone a helping hand. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Expect to face some opposition along the way. It may CANCER (June 21-July 22): Emotional matters annoy you, but showing anger will not fix will lead to arguments if you aren’t careful what’s wrong. Back away until you have a about how you deal with others. Take a deep better idea on how you want to handle this breath and get involved in something you situation. enjoy doing. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Go over your LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Get moving. The more personal papers and look at your financial mobile you are, the happier you’ll be. Taking situation. An old idea used in an updated on domestic tasks will help improve your and diverse manner will help you bring in surroundings, comfort and attitude. A extra cash. partnership looks good. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Get out and VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Before making a mingle, offer assistance and go where the decision, listen to what’s being offered. An action is. There are deals to be formulated impulsive move will turn out to be costly. and money to be made. Don’t let a change Love is in the stars and romance will set the in partnerships slow you down. mood.

PICK 3 TUESDAY: 6-7-0 AND 3-4-9 PICK 4 TUESDAY: 4-3-0-9 AND 5-7-9-5 PALMETTO CASH 5 TUESDAY: 6-7-10-21-31 POWERUP: 2 MEGAMILLIONS NUMBERS WERE NOT AVAILABLE AT PRESS TIME.

FOR SATURDAY: 13-14-19-37-38 POWERBALL: 25

pictures from the public

Reach Tyler Simpson at (803) 774-1295.

|

SUMTER CITY-COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION Today, 3 p.m., Planning Department, conference room, 12 W. Liberty St. SUMTER COUNTY DEVELOPMENT BOARD Thursday, 7:30 a.m., Greater Sumter Chamber of Commerce boardroom, 32 E. Calhoun St.

27°

Mostly sunny and much colder

-0s

PUBLIC AGENDA

SUNDAY

50°

22°

-10s

copper theft by 44.62 percent. “We should not measure our success by simply comparing numbers from year to year,” Police Chief Russell F. Roark said. “You’ve got to look at more than that, more than putting people in jail.” However, the report reveals an increase in sexual assault by 38.89 percent, which Roark said mostly involves individuals who feel the need to “flash” in certain areas across the city. Crosswell Drive and Miller Road also continue to be areas of concern with a concentrated number of violent and non-violent crimes. The Miller Road area especially has seen numerous issues concerning vandalism, which mostly involves juveniles during the summertime, according to Roark. To counter this, foot patrols and other specialized units have been dispersed to saturate those communities to deter crime. “I’ve had several people approach me on how much they enjoy seeing the squad cars come through their neighborhood and how they feel so much more alert,”said Sumter Mayor Joseph McElveen. “I think that’s a testament toward the improvements law enforcement has made in the city.” Also, calls for servic-

SATURDAY 49°

35°

Beverly Morris shares a photo she took last summer of the Methodist Oaks in Orangeburg.

Have you visited someplace interesting, exciting, beautiful or historical that you’ve taken some pictures of? Would you like to share those images with your fellow Item readers? E-mail your hi-resolution jpegs to sandrah@theitem.com, or mail to Sandra Holbert c/o The Item, P.O. Box 1677, Sumter, SC 29150. Include clearly printed or typed name of photographer and photo details. Include selfaddressed, stamped envelope for return of your photo. Amateur photographers only please.


SPORTS WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

THE ITEM To contact the Sports Department, call (803) 774-1241 or e-mail sports@theitem.com

Pitt tames Tigers 76-43

Tough one to swallow

BY WILL GRAVES The Associated Press

TSA sends Eagles to line, into 1st place in region BY MICHAEL CHRISTOPHER mchristopher@theitem.com DALZELL — Thomas Sumter Academy boys varsity head coach Morgan Watt could only watch as his team squandered a chance to pull into a tie for first place in SCISA Region II-2A on Tuesday. Palmetto Christian converted on 28 of 39 free throws and defeated the Generals 56-47 at Edens Gymnasium to improve to 4-0 in Region II. “We bailed them out,” Watt said. “The problem with Thomas Sumter boys is we don’t have anybody willing to take charges and that’s a big problem. When you play solid defense you cannot allow people to attack your basket, and we allow it. And somehow they think we’re going to win by allowing it and there’s no way to win when you do that.” Both teams saved their best play for the fourth quarter, but Palmetto Christian went on an 8-0 run with less than a minute to play to hold off the Generals. The Eagles just got three field goals in the final quarter and were 13 of 18 from the line. For Thomas Sumter, its main two scorers, Carlton Washington and William Dukes, each fouled out in the fourth. Washington finished with 12 points and 10 rebounds. Dukes added 10 points in the loss for TSA, which fell SEE TSA, PAGE B3

B1

KEITH GEDAMKE / SPECIAL TO THE ITEM

Thomas Sumter’s Drew Stengel (11) shoots over Palmetto Christian’s J.T. Waters (5) during the Generals’ 56-47 loss on Tuesday at Edens Gymnasium in Dalzell.

PITTSBURGH — Pittsburgh coach Jamie Dixon watched his team melt down in the final moments in a loss at No. 2 Syracuse over the weekend and wondered how the Panthers, who he insists are still finding themselves, would respond. “Is there going to be carryover? Are you going to be down?’’ Dixon asked. “I was concerned about that. But they looked more angry than disappointed.’’ Dominant too. Talib Zanna scored 22 points on near flawless shooting and ZANNA the 20thranked Panthers drilled Clemson 76-43 on Tuesday night. Zanna connected on 9 of 10 shots, most of them dunks or layups, as the Panthers (17-2, 5-1 ACC) bounced back from the potentially crushing loss to the Orange by overwhelming the Tigers. “We came out to prove something,’’ Dixon said. At both ends of the court. Pitt held Clemson to 32 percent shooting (16 of 50) and displayed remarkable willingness to share the ball on offense. The Panthers had 24 assists on 27 field goals. “I think from the start of the game we just tried to play our style of game, play as hard as we can, execute as best we could,’’ Pitt guard James Robinson said. “We’re a very unselfish team. When somebody gives up their shot to let SEE TIGERS, PAGE B3

Lady Generals hold off PC for top spot in Region II-2A BY MICHAEL CHRISTOPHER mchristopher@theitem.com DALZELL — Two years of hard work is beginning to take shape for the Thomas Sumter Academy girls basketball team, which is now off to a 4-0 start in SCISA Region II-2A. The Lady Generals held off a late rally by Palmetto Christian for a 48-45 victory on Tuesday at Edens gymnasium. “We are where we are now because of the hard work and dedication of those nine girls and I’m REED just so proud of them,” TSA head coach B.J. Reed said. TSA, which improved to 10-6 on the year, showed glimpses of a dominating team, but also showed room for improvement. It took a complete team effort to stave off a late come-

back by the Lady Eagles, who were down 42-28 at one point, but climbed back within one possession with 52.6 seconds to play thanks to an 11-0 run. PC senior Lizzie Wilson pitched in nine of her 11 points in the final quarter, including hitting two 3-point baskets. Junior Corey Caulder helped keep her team in the game, contributing 14 of her game-high 22 points in the second half as the Lady Eagles fell to 6-10 overall and 2-2 in region play. “We knew we had to stop her and I thought we did a good job stopping her the first three quarters of the game and I thought that stymied their offense,” Reed said of Caulder, who averages 20 points per contest. TSA led 34-24 heading into the final quarter of play and reached the 1-and-1 with 3:56 to play, but

KEITH GEDAMKE / SPECIAL TO THE ITEM

Thomas Sumter’s Julia Law, front, dribbles in front of Palmetto Christian’s Hannah McGrew SEE LADY GENERALS, PAGE B3 (11) during the Lady Generals’ 48-45 victory on Tuesday at Edens Gymnasium in Dalzell.

Goodell suggests getting rid of extra point kick BY BARRY WILNER The Associated Press Roger Goodell doesn’t want to stand pat with the PAT. He’s suggesting potential changes in the extra point that, well, might have some legs. The NFL commissioner says the extra point kick after touchdowns, which had a success rate of nearly 100 percent, is too automatic. Sure is.

And with few teams attempting 2-point conversion plays until desperation hits late in games, the old 1-pointer from 20 yards is the way coaches go. All that does is draw yawns. So Goodell wonders if the league can add excitement by making some major adjustments to the extra point, suggesting perhaps making a touchdown worth seven points instead

of six, with teams having the option to run a play for another point. But failing on that play would cost them a point. Gimmicky, for sure. But if Goodell likes the GOODELL idea ... A look at how changes to the extra point would affect football:

HOW AND WHO?

Passing any changes to the playing rules in the NFL is, unlike the extra point kick, no snap. The competition committee meets with the players’ union at the NFL combine in February, where any new proposals or ideas are discussed. It’s not unusual for the players to have input in potential adjustments, as they did recently on defenseless

player penalties. The powerful committee, chaired by Atlanta Falcons President Rich McKay, meets for about a week in early March and comes up with any proposals, whether from the teams or union or, yes, the big boss. At the league meetings later in March, the committee presents potential changes SEE PAT, PAGE B5


B2

SPORTS

THE ITEM

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

Don’t think, just shoot Dad’s advice leads to big night from Creighton’s Wragge BY ERIC OLSON The Associated Press OMAHA, Neb. — Creighton’s Ethan Wragge got some words of wisdom from his dad before he put on one of the great shooting exhibitions of the college basketball season. Two nights after he went 2 for 8 on 3-pointers in a loss at Providence, Wragge made seven straight in the first seven minutes of Monday’s game against fourthranked Villanova in Philadelphia. He finished with a school record-tying nine 3s and a career-high 27 points in the Bluejays’ 28-point victory. So, just what pregame advice did Brad Wragge impart to his son? “Don’t think,’’ Ethan said, quoting his father on Tuesday. Wragge, who always wears the same stoic expression on his bearded face, wasn’t joking. He became the best 3-point shooter in the nation by keeping things simple. He said he told himself Monday to not leave his shots short, like he did in the loss at Providence. Otherwise, he launched shots with his quick release and watched them drop though. No worries. “That’s when I’m at my best — right when I catch and shoot,’’ he said. “If I delay or think about it, that’s when the stuff you don’t want happens. When you get that rhythm, you get that feel, you’ve got to let it

SCOREBOARD

|

TV, RADIO TODAY 5 a.m. -- Professional Golf: European PGA Tour Qatar Masters First Round from Doha, Qatar (GOLF). 3 p.m. -- Professional Tennis: Australian Open Men’s and Women’s Quarterfinal Matches from Melbourne, Australia (ESPN2). 3 p.m. -- College Football: Senior Bowl Practice from Mobile, Ala. (NFL NETWORK). 6:05 p.m. -- Talk Show: Sports Talk (WDXY-FM 105.9, WDXY-AM 1240). 7 p.m. -- College Basketball: Virginia Commonwealth at Dayton (CBS SPORTS NETWORK). 7 p.m. -- College Basketball: Louisville at South Florida (ESPNU). 7 p.m. -- College Basketball: Wake Forest at Virginia Tech (FOX SPORTSOUTH). 7 p.m. -- NBA Basketball: Los Angeles Clippers at Charlotte (SPORTSOUTH). 7 p.m. -- College Basketball: Livingstone at Fayetteville State (WIS3 122). 7:30 p.m. -- College Basketball: Duke at Miami (ESPN2). 8 p.m. -- College Basketball: South Carolina at Georgia (WKTC 63, WPUB-FM 102.7, WDXY-FM 105.9, WNKT-FM 107.5, WDXY-AM 1240). 8 p.m. -- NBA Basketball: Oklahoma City at San Antonio (ESPN). 8 p.m. -- NHL Hockey: Chicago at Detroit (NBC SPORTS NETWORK). 8 p.m. -- NFL Football: Pro Bowl Draft (NFL NETWORK). 9 p.m. -- College Basketball: La Salle at St. Bonaventure (CBS SPORTS NETWORK). 9 p.m. -- College Basketball: Texas Christian at Oklahoma (ESPNU). 9:30 p.m. -- Professional Tennis: Australian Open Women’s Semifinal Matches from Melbourne, Australia (ESPN2). 10:30 p.m. -- NBA Basketball: Indiana at Phoenix (ESPN). 11 p.m. -- College Basketball: California at Southern California (ESPNU). 3:30 a.m. -- Professional Tennis: Australian Open Men’s Semifinal Matches from Melbourne, Australia (ESPN2).

PREP SCHEDULE THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Creighton’s Ethan Wragge (34) showed why he’s the best 3-point shooter in the nation by dropping nine of the Bluejays’ Big Eastrecord 21 in a 28-point thrashing of No. 4 Villanova on Monday in Philadelphia.

go.’’ Wragge’s 9-for-14 performance moved him to the top of the national 3-point accuracy chart. He’s making 50 percent (74-148), tied with Oklahoma State’s Phil Forte (53-106). Doug McDermott made five 3s and finished with 23 points against Villanova, which is a normal night at the arena for the twotime All-American. Jahenns Manigat added four 3s and a career-high 19 points. But Wragge was the star attraction as the Bluejays amassed a Big East-record

21 3-pointers. That was one more than the Creighton record, the most by a Division I team this season and the most against a Top 25 opponent since at least 1996-97, according to STATS. “I think people outside of our team who aren’t really familiar with what Ethan does, maybe they might get a giggle out of it and think it’s unbelievable, unreal,’’ Manigat said. “Whenever he gets on a hot streak like that, my goal is to set screens for him or pass him the ball and get out of his way and let him do what he does.’’

NBA ROUNDUP

|

Heat blow lead, rally past Celtics MIAMI — LeBron James scored 11 of his 29 points in the fourth quarter, Chris Bosh added 16 and the Miami Heat blew an 18-point lead before rallying to beat the Boston Celtics 93-86 on Tuesday night. Chris Andersen scored 13 points and made all five of his shots for Miami, which ended the game on a 9-0 run. Brandon Basson scored 15 points, Kris Humphries had 14 JAMES points and 13 rebounds, and Jeff Green had 12 points for the Celtics, who outrebounded Miami 46-33 but shot only 39 percent. Rajon Rondo, still coming around after returning from knee surgery, missed all eight of his shots, plus missed a pair of free throws with the Celtics down four with 44.4 seconds remaining. NETS MAGIC

101 90

NEW YORK — Andray Blatche came off the bench and had a team-high 18 points and reserve forward Mirza Teletovic added 14 points as the Brooklyn Nets continued their resurgence with an eighth win in nine games, beating the Orlando Magic 101-90 on a snowy Tuesday night. One night after routing the crosstown rival New York Knicks, the Nets kept up the surge. Their 8-1 start in January is a NBA best after a disappointing 10-21 start to

their second season in Brooklyn. Joe Johnson and Paul Pierce each had 13 points apiece for the Nets. Despite heavy snow that was expected to dump 8-14 inches on the city, there were barely any empty seats with 15,482 in attendance at Barclays Center. New York City native Kyle O’Quinn led Orlando with 15 points and eight rebounds off the bench. E’Twaun Moore had 13 points for the Magic, who lost for the 10th time in 11 games. BULLS TRADE G TEAGUE TO NETS FOR F SHENGELIA

CHICAGO — The Brooklyn Nets have acquired guard Marquis Teague from Chicago for Toko Shengelia. The Bulls announced the move Tuesday after reports surfaced over the weekend. The 6-foot-9 Shengelia has appeared in 17 games for the Nets this season, averaging 1.5 points in just over eight minutes. The native of Tbilisi, Georgia, has played in 36 NBA games over two years. Teague was drafted by the Bulls in the first round (29th overall) in the 2012 draft. In 68 regular-season games, he has averaged 2.1 points and 1.3 assists per game. Teague gives Brooklyn another option at point guard, where Deron Williams has been sitting out with ankle problems. From wire reports

TODAY Junior Varsity Basketball Carolina Forest at Sumter, 6 p.m. Darlington at Crestwood, 6 p.m. Marlboro County at Lakewood, 6 p.m. Manning at Hartsville, 6 p.m. Kingstree at Lee Central, 6 p.m. Ben Lippen at Wilson Hall, 5 p.m. B Team Basketball Crestwood at Westwood (Boys Only), 5:30 p.m. Robert E. Lee at Laurence Manning, 4 p.m. Thomas Sumter at Calhoun Academy, 6 p.m. Middle School Basketball Mayewood at Scott’s Branch, 5 p.m. THURSDAY Varsity Basketball St. Francis Xavier at Clarendon Hall (Boys Only), 7 p.m. Conway Christian at Sumter Christian, 4 p.m. Varsity and JV Basketball Thomas Sumter at Trinity-Byrnes, 4 p.m. Junior Varsity Basketball Hartsville at Crestwood, 6 p.m. Lakewood at Manning, 6 p.m. Lee Central at Lake City, 6 p.m. B Team Basketball Sumter at Marlboro County (Boys Only), 5:30 p.m. Wilson Hall at Orangeburg Prep, 5 p.m. Hammond at Laurence Manning, 4 p.m. Robert E. Lee at Clarendon Hall (Girls), 4 p.m. Robert E. Lee at Trinity-Byrnes (Boys), 5 p.m. St. Francis Xavier at Clarendon Hall (Boys Only), 6 p.m. Middle School Basketball Alice Drive at Sneed, 5 p.m. Bates at Furman, 5 p.m. Chestnut Oaks at Mayewood, 5 p.m. Hillcrest at Ebenezer, 5 p.m. St. Matthews at Manning, 6 p.m. Varsity Bowling Wilson Hall, Laurence Manning, Robert E. Lee in SCISA State Championship, TBA FRIDAY Varsity Basketball Crestwood at Hartsville, 6 p.m. Manning at Lakewood, 6 p.m. Lake City at Lee Central, 6 p.m. Scott’s Branch at East Clarendon, 6 p.m. Varsity and JV Basketball Wilson Hall at Florence Christian, 4 p.m. Orangeburg Prep at Laurence Manning, 4 p.m. Calhoun Academy at Thomas Sumter, 4 p.m. Dillon Christian at Robert E. Lee, 4 p.m. Clarendon Hall at Patrick Henry, 3 p.m. Sumter Christian at Maranatha Christian (No JV Girls), 4 p.m. B Team Basketball Wilson Hall at Ben Lippen, 4 p.m. Varsity Wrestling Sumter in Gamecock Duals, TBA SATURDAY Varsity Wrestling Sumter in Gamecock Duals, TBA B Team Basketball Thomas Sumter at Dorchester, 10 a.m.

NFL PLAYOFFS Pro Bowl Sunday At Honolulu TBD, 7:30 p.m. (NBC) Super Bowl XLVIII Sunday, Feb. 2 At East Rutherford, N.J. Denver vs. Seattle, 6:30 p.m. (FOX)

NBA STANDINGS By The Associated Press EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB Toronto 20 20 .500 – Brooklyn 17 22 .436 21/2 New York 15 26 .366 51/2 Boston 14 28 .333 7 Philadelphia 13 28 .317 71/2 Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 29 12 .707 – Atlanta 21 19 .525 71/2 Washington 20 20 .500 81/2 Charlotte 18 25 .419 12 Orlando 11 30 .268 18 Central Division W L Pct GB Indiana 33 7 .825 – Chicago 20 20 .500 13 Detroit 17 24 .415 161/2 Cleveland 15 26 .366 181/2 Milwaukee 7 33 .175 26 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 32 9 .780 –

Houston Dallas Memphis New Orleans

28 15 .651 25 18 .581 20 20 .500 16 24 .400 Northwest Division W L Pct Oklahoma City 31 10 .756 Portland 31 10 .756 Denver 20 20 .500 Minnesota 19 21 .475 Utah 14 28 .333 Pacific Division W L Pct L.A. Clippers 29 14 .674 Golden State 26 17 .605 Phoenix 23 17 .575 L.A. Lakers 16 26 .381 Sacramento 14 25 .359 Monday’s Games Dallas 102, Cleveland 97 L.A. Clippers 112, Detroit 103 Washington 107, Philadelphia 99 Charlotte 100, Toronto 95 Brooklyn 103, New York 80 New Orleans 95, Memphis 92 Atlanta 121, Miami 114 Chicago 102, L.A. Lakers 100, OT Houston 126, Portland 113 Indiana 102, Golden State 94 Tuesday’s Games Orlando at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Boston at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Portland at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Sacramento at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Minnesota at Utah, 9 p.m. Today’s Games Atlanta at Orlando, 7 p.m. Boston at Washington, 7 p.m. Chicago at Cleveland, 7 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Dallas at Toronto, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at New York, 7:30 p.m. Sacramento at Houston, 8 p.m. Detroit at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Oklahoma City at San Antonio, 8 p.m. Indiana at Phoenix, 10:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games L.A. Lakers at Miami, 8 p.m. Denver at Portland, 10:30 p.m.

5 8 111/2 151/2 GB – – 101/2 111/2 171/2 GB – 3 41/2 121/2 13

NHL STANDINGS By The Associated Press EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 49 31 15 3 65 141 109 Tampa Bay 50 29 16 5 63 146 123 Montreal 49 27 17 5 59 126 120 Toronto 51 26 20 5 57 145 154 Detroit 49 21 18 10 52 122 134 Ottawa 49 21 19 9 51 139 155 Florida 49 19 23 7 45 116 148 Buffalo 47 13 27 7 33 86 133 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 49 34 13 2 70 157 120 N.Y. Rangers 51 27 21 3 57 128 128 Philadelphia 50 25 19 6 56 137 144 Columbus 48 24 20 4 52 138 135 Washington 49 22 19 8 52 142 150 New Jersey 50 20 19 11 51 115 123 Carolina 48 20 19 9 49 117 137 N.Y. Islanders 51 20 24 7 47 142 166 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Chicago 51 32 8 11 75 184 139 St. Louis 48 33 10 5 71 170 108 Colorado 48 31 12 5 67 142 122 Minnesota 51 27 19 5 59 125 125 Nashville 51 22 22 7 51 125 152 Dallas 49 21 20 8 50 137 152 Winnipeg 50 22 23 5 49 141 150 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 51 37 9 5 79 175 126 San Jose 50 32 12 6 70 161 123 Los Angeles 50 29 15 6 64 128 103 Vancouver 50 25 16 9 59 127 127 Phoenix 49 23 17 9 55 141 149 Calgary 50 16 27 7 39 111 159 Edmonton 51 15 30 6 36 131 181 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Monday’s Games N.Y. Islanders 4, Philadelphia 3, SO Boston 3, Los Angeles 2 Florida 5, Pittsburgh 1 St. Louis 4, Detroit 1 Nashville 4, Dallas 1 Toronto 4, Phoenix 2 San Jose 3, Calgary 2 Tuesday’s Games Florida at Buffalo, 7 p.m. St. Louis at New Jersey, 7 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. Carolina at Philadelphia, ppd., snow Ottawa at Washington, 7 p.m. Los Angeles at Columbus, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Dallas, 8 p.m. Toronto at Colorado, 9 p.m. Vancouver at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m. Winnipeg at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Today’s Games Montreal at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m. Chicago at Detroit, 8 p.m. Phoenix at Calgary, 9:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Carolina at Buffalo, 7 p.m. St. Louis at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m. Philadelphia at Columbus, 7 p.m. Ottawa at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Pittsburgh at N.Y. Islanders, 7:30 p.m. Chicago at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Toronto at Dallas, 8 p.m. Nashville at Vancouver, 10 p.m. Los Angeles at Anaheim, 10 p.m. Winnipeg at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.

TENNIS Australian Open Results By The Associated Press Tuesday At Melbourne Park Melbourne, Australia Purse: $29.72 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men Quarterfinals Tomas Berdych (7), Czech Republic, def. David Ferrer (3), Spain, 6-1, 6-4, 2-6, 6-4. Stanislas Wawrinka (8), Switzerland, def. Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, 2-6, 6-4, 6-2, 3-6, 9-7. Women Quarterfinals Li Na (4), China, def. Flavia Pennetta (28), Italy, 6-2, 6-2. Eugenie Bouchard (30), Canada, def. Ana Ivanovic (14), Serbia, 5-7, 7-5, 6-2.

SPORTS ITEMS

|

Rice selects Brees, Quinn to Pro Bowl team HONOLULU — NFL great Jerry Rice is already bucking conventional fantasy football wisdom in a new Pro Bowl format inspired by the popular hobby. Rice picked New Orleans quarterback Drew Brees and St. Louis defensive end Robert Quinn to anchor his Pro Bowl team on Tuesday, opting for a passer over a runner. Rice made the selections in Hawaii after winning a coin toss against Hall of Fame cornerback Deion Sanders. Rice called tails. The decision prompted Sanders to select Kansas City running back Ja-

maal Charles and Houston defensive end J.J. Watt for Sunday’s game. The toss and selections started a new process for the NFL in selecting this year’s Pro Bowl teams. Rice and Sanders are serving as captains and general managers in charge of divvying up the NFL stars. AP SOURCE: PLAYERS WANTED A-ROD OUT OF UNION

NEW YORK — Several angry major league players wanted Alex Rodriguez kicked out of their union after he sued it last week, but staff lawyers told them expulsion was not allowed. The players spoke Jan. 13 during a

Major League Baseball Players Association conference call after Rodriguez sued the union and Major League Baseball to overturn an arbitrator’s decision suspending him for the 2014 season and postseason. Details were first reported Tuesday by Yahoo Sports and later confirmed to The Associated Press by a person familiar with the call. TEXAS (22) KANSAS ST.

67 64

AUSTIN, Texas — Jonathan Holmes made a catch-and-shoot 3 pointer at the buzzer to send Texas to a 67-64

victory over No. 22 Kansas State on Tuesday night. Javan Felix scored 23 points to lead Texas (15-4, 4-2) NO. 3 MICHIGAN ST. INDIANA

71 66

EAST LANSING, Mich. — Gary Harris scored 20 of his 24 points in the second half, helping No. 3 Michigan State beat Indiana 71-66 on Tuesday night to remain unbeaten in the Big Ten. The Spartans (18-1, 7-0) have won 11 straight games. From wire reports


SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

THE ITEM

Lady Gamecocks crush CFHS 61-37 MYRTLE BEACH — Sumter High School’s varsity girls basketball team remained undefeated in Region VI-4A with a 61-37 victory over Carolina Forest on Tuesday at the Carolina Forest gymnasium. Cy Cooper returned from an injury to lead the Lady Gamecocks in scoring with 13 points while pulling down eight rebounds and blocking three shots. Jessica Harris added 11 points while Kadejuha Kenned had 10. Anna McBride blocked nine shots and grabbed nine rebounds while scoring five points for SHS, which improved to 11-5 overall and 3-0 in region play.

GIRLS AREA ROUNDUP CRESTWOOD DARLINGTON

64 40

DARLINGTON — Crestwood High School improved to 4-0 in Region VI-3A with a 64-40 victory over Darlington on Tuesday at the Darlington gymnasium. Cawasha Ceasar led the Lady Knights, 15-3 overall, with 17 points. Ladazha Cole added 13 while Whitney Wilson and Shaquanda Miller-McCray both had 11. LAKEWOOD MARLBORO COUNTY

60 49

BENNETTSVILLE — Sonora Dengokl scored 21 points to lead Lakewood High School to a 60-49 vic-

|

tory over Marlboro County on Tuesday at the Marlboro County gymnasium. Shanekia Jackson added a double-double for the Lady Gators, who improved to 11-5 overall and 3-1 in Region VI-3A. She scored 10 points and grabbed 10 rebounds. MANNING HARTSVILLE

63 60

MANNING — Makeba Harvin scored 18 points and grabbed 23 rebounds to lead Manning High School to a 63-60 victory over Hartsville on Tuesday at Thames Arena. Ambria Brunson added 10 points for the Lady Monarchs, who improved

to 12-5 overall and 2-2 in Region VI-3A. Mahogany Green and Lanisha Brown both had eight points and Kareena Hilton grabbed 11 rebounds.

MANNING Harvin 18, Brunson 10, Brown 8, Green 8, Goldsmith 6, Hilton 5, Canty 4, Manning 4. HARTSVILLE Johnson 16, Rogers 15, Dawson 9, Williams 7, Godfrey 4, Brockington 4, Cornell 2, McDaniel 1, Brewer.

JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL THOMAS SUMTER 34 PALMETTO CHRISTIAN 16

DALZELL — Thomas Sumter Academy improved to 6-5 on the season with a 34-16 victory over Palmetto Christian on Tuesday at Edens Gymnasium. Josie Reed led TSA with 13 points. Kylie Kistler had seven points and six rebounds.

BOYS AREA ROUNDUP

|

Gators grab 40-31 Region VI-3A victory BENNETTSVILLE — Lakewood High School’s varsity boys basketball team improved to 3-1 in Region VI-3A with a 40-31 victory over Marlboro County on Tuesday at the Marlboro County gymnasium. Jarvis Johnson led the Gators, who improved to 11-8 on the season, with 16 points. Robert Grant added eight. SUMTER CAROLINA FOREST

72 66

MYRTLE BEACH — Erick White scored 28 points to lead Sumter High School to a 72-66 victory over Carolina Forest on Tuesday at the Carolina Forest gymnasium. The Gamecocks improved to 11-5

overall and 2-1 in Region VI-4A. They handed Carolina Forest its first region loss, dropping it to 2-1 as well. Micah McBride and Quentin Kershaw both had 11 points for SHS. Juwan Butler-steven led Carolina Forest with 24 while Ryan Yurachek had 16.

SUMTER Richardson 2, Butler 8, McBride 11, Rembert 6, Ta’Bon 2, White 28, Kershaw 11, Moore 4. CAROLINA FOREST Jones 8, Johnson 2, Helgerson 4, Moss 2, Yurachek 16, Butlersteven 24.

DARLINGTON CRESTWOOD

74 64

DARLINGTON — Crestwood High School fell to 1-3 in Region VI-3A with a 74-64 loss to Darlington on Tuesday

at the Darlington gymnasium. Tyrell Allen led the Knights with 20 points. Darnell Robateau added eight. ST. FRANCIS XAVIER PATRICK HENRY

52 39

St. Francis Xavier High School improved to 2-2 in SCISA Region I-1A with a 52-39 victory over Patrick Henry on Tuesday at Birnie Hope Center. Leighton Savage led the Padres, 3-6 overall, with 16 points. Jay McFadden and Dalton Foreman both had 10. Joseph Wilson paced Patrick Henry with 20 and Alex Jones had 11.

B3

LADY GENERALS from Page B1 Palmetto Christian would not go away. Wilson connected on her first 3-pointer which made it a 42-28 deficit then her second trey made it a 10-point game, trailing 43-34. PC freshman Parker Emerson’s trey, the third 3-pointer of the quarter gave the Eagles new life as they trailed 43-38. Hannah Jenkins and Taylor Knudson led TSA with 11 points each. Mary Kathryn Ross added eight. Reed thought the entire team contributed to the victory as eight of the nine players got into the scoring column. “It was a great team effort offensively, and we were able to do what we needed to do defensively because we had such great, tough defense on their guards, who are phenomenal guards,” Reed said.

TSA from Page B1 to 8-8 overall and 2-2 in region play. “We’re not a great shooting team so we want to execute and get the best shot,” Watt said. “Tonight we didn’t make a lot of them. Carlton (Washington) had a pretty good game, but defensively he didn’t. He allowed himself to get into foul trouble by doing things that’s not real smart.” The Eagles, who improved to 7-6 overall, were led by J.T. Waters’ 13 points. Chris DeMarco added 10. Joesph Siegwald and Will Tuchfarber each contributed nine points. There is still a lot of basketball to be played and Watt said his team just missed its opportunities. He also said he was pleased with its effort.

TIGERS from Page B1 somebody else make a play, it usually comes back around.’’ It came around often on a night the Panthers posted their fourth-highest margin of victory in conference play in school history. Lamar Patterson scored 13 points and grabbed six rebounds to become the 19th Pitt player to top 1,000 points and 500 rebounds and often served as the catalyst during a first half in which the Panthers raced to quick lead and never let the Tigers (13-5, 4-2) in it. “They make plays out of nowhere every once in awhile,’’ Clemson coach Brad Brownell said. “The defense isn’t as bad as it looks, they’re just so good passing the ball. It’s demoralizing to play defense for 30 seconds and give up a layup.’’ K.J. McDaniels battled early foul trouble and finished with 11 points for the Tigers but Clemson appeared overmatched from the opening tip. Pitt needed less than 10 minutes to build a double-digit lead and cruised while handing the Tigers their worst loss of the season. Clemson came in one of the bigger surprises in the new-look ACC. Wins over Duke, Virginia Tech and Wake Forest had the Tigers off to their best conference start since 1997. The game against the Panthers marked the beginning of a difficult stretch in which Clemson plays five of six on the road, including visits to North Carolina and Syracuse. As promising as things have looked at times, Brownell admitted there’s still plenty of work to be done. “All of a sudden you get slapped in the face a little bit and it’s real,’’ he said. “There’s nowhere to hide.’’ There certainly wasn’t on a night the Panthers provided the Tigers with a glimpse of what life at the top of the ACC looks like. Pitt used a quick 11-0 burst to take control, their fluid offense working just fine even without sophomore forward Durand Johnson, who is sidelined for the rest of the season after tearing the ACL in his right knee on Jan. 11. The student section wore white headbands — Johnson’s signature look — in tribute while his teammates did a pretty solid impression of Johnson’s streaky 3-point shooting. Clemson came in ranked third in the country in 3-point defense but could do little more than watch as the Panthers hit 4 of 7 3-pointers during a near flawless opening 20 minutes. Pitt made 12 baskets during the first half, and recorded assists on all 12. There was no such efficiency for the Tigers. Clemson had as many turnovers (8) as baskets during arguably their worst 20-minute stretch of the season. The result was a 37-20 Pitt lead, the Tigers’ biggest halftime deficit this season. “Our guys played like a young team that got a little nervous,’’ Brownell said.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pittsburgh’s Derrick Randall (11) gets a rebound over Clemson’s Sidy Djitte (50) during the Panthers’ 76-43 victory on Tuesday in Pittsburgh.

It didn’t get any better. Patterson opened the second half with a 3-point heave that splashed through the net as the shot clock expired to give Pitt a 20point lead. At one point Clemson guard Austin Ajukwa received a technical foul with 8 minutes left for hanging on the rim after a breakaway dunk that made it

61-33. Brownell screamed “We’re down by 40’’ at Ajukwa as the Panthers went to the free throw line. Robinson made the ensuing free throws to push the lead back to 30 as the “We Want Duke’’ chants started. The Panthers host the 18th-ranked Blue Devils next Monday.

One man's trash is another man's treasure. Find your treasure in The Item's classifieds. www.theitem.com


B4

FOOTBALL

THE ITEM

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

PAT from Page B1 for discussion by all 32 owners, who can either vote on them or table them. McKay said Tuesday: “We do anticipate the topic being discussed.’’ KICKING AROUND?

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Seattle wide receivers Doug Baldwin (89) and Golden Tate (81) are part of an unheralded group that has been catching passes for the Seahawks all season. They despise being cast as Seattle’s weak link, but are happy to use those slights as motivation.

Seattle slight used as motivation Seahawks WRs look to prove doubters wrong BY TIM BOOTH The Associated Press RENTON, Wash. — Somewhere along the way, “pedestrian’’ became a favored word for the Seattle Seahawks’ receivers. Doug Baldwin, Jermaine Kearse and Golden Tate each used the word in some fashion after the Seahawks beat San Francisco to win the NFC championship Sunday. It was their way of responding to critics who have panned Se-

attle’s receiving corps as one of the weak points in the Seahawks roster. “It irritates the hell out of me when we’ve got guys who constantly want to talk about our receiving corps,’’ Baldwin said after the 23-17 win over the 49ers. “Talking about we’re average. We’re pedestrian. We’re going to walk our ... to the Super Bowl. Pedestrians.’’ Seattle’s receiving crew was supposed to have more experience and be considered a strength before the season began. That’s when the Seahawks were expected to have Percy Harvin and Sidney Rice as their starters, with Baldwin, Tate and Kearse filling secondary roles as extra

receivers catching passes from Russell Wilson. But then Harvin missed 15 of 16 regular-season games following hip surgery in August and Rice was lost for the year after Week 8 with a knee injury. It’s left an unheralded, underappreciated group as Seattle’s pass catching options. And while they despise being cast as a weak link, they also are more than happy to use those slights as motivation. Perhaps no player feeds off the negativity more than Baldwin. Before the NFC title game, the undrafted free agent out of Stanford talked about carrying a “boulder’’ around on his shoulder, not a chip. Then

he made sure to note that pundits on Sunday morning were again pointing to Seattle’s receivers as the reason Wilson and the pass game had been struggling. “They were talking about Russell Wilson was struggling and the reason he was struggling was his receiving corps was appetizers,’’ Baldwin said. “I’ll take that. I’ll be an appetizer. But that’s a good ... appetizer if you ask me.’’ Baldwin responded with one of the best games in his career on Sunday. He finished with six catches for 106 yards — the second-most in his three seasons — including a 51-yard reception in the first half that helped loosen the 49ers defense.

From travails to triumph, LB Trevathan leads Broncos BY ARNIE STAPLETON The Associated Press ENGLEWOOD, Colo. — As promised, Danny Trevathan has snuffed the showboat in him after his humiliating gaffe in the NFL opener. He morphed into a standout linebacker in his second season and led the Broncos in tackles after his inauspicious debut in Denver’s rout of the Ravens in September. Trevathan blamed excitement over his first career start for his premature celebration of a sure pick-6 of Joe Flacco when he flipped the football aside just before crossing the goal line. That decision left teammate Wesley Woodyard with an ankle injury and made Brandon Stokley the new Don Beebe. On the other hand, if Trevathan doesn’t pull a Leon Lett, maybe Peyton Manning takes the rest of the night off and doesn’t get a chance to make history with his seventh touchdown throw later on in Denver’s 49-27 win. Trevathan’s miscalculation was reminiscent of Lett’s gaffe in the Super Bowl in 1993 when Dallas’ defensive lineman

MOBILE, Ala. — Alabama coach Nick Saban was asked about everything but the players he came to see in his annual visit to the Senior Bowl practice That’s because the Crimson Tide’s already eventful offseason has seen five players leave early for the NFL, including a surprise de-

YEA AND NAY

Coaches will hate any changes, particularly ones that would mean more decisions for them to make. They so rarely go for the 2-pointers until the fourth quarter, and are reluctant to do so then because, well, there’s nothing automatic about those attempts. Indeed, less than half (33 of 69) worked in 2013. Short-yardage backs such as All-Pro fullback Mike Tolbert of Carolina shouldn’t mind the elimination of PAT kicks. Nor should running quarterbacks such as Russell Wilson, Colin Kaepernick and Cam Newton, whose improvisational skills would be a huge advantage. Kickers? They probably will shrug and practice their field goals — which is what they normally do regarding extra points anyway. WHO STAYS, AND WHY

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Denver linebacker Danny Trevathan (59) had his season begin in embarrassing fashion with a fumble at the goal line, but Trevathan promised to learn from his mistake and move on. He’s done just that, leading the Broncos in tackles and helping the defense withstand the loss of five starters to injuries to surge into Super Bowl XLVIII.

was returning a fumble for a score in the Cowboys’ 52-17 win over Buffalo. Beebe chased down a hotdogging Lett and knocked the ball loose just before he crossed the goal line. “I promised myself I would never put my team in a place like that again,’’ Trevathan said this week. “I’ll make up for it. I’ll do whatever I’ve got to do. I promised those who were laughing at me, I’m going to make them suffer. I’m going to be here

and grind it out, I’m going to pick it off next time, do whatever I’ve got to do to go ahead and get that off my back.’’ Redemption came one month later in Dallas when Trevathan deked Tony Romo into throwing an interception at the Dallas 24 in the waning moments of a shootout, and it came just four days after he was carted off the practice field with a knee injury that at first had him fearing his playing days were over.

Saban blitzed with ’Bama questions at Senior Bowl BY JOHN ZENOR The Assocaited Press

The idea of toying with the extra point is not entirely new. John Mara, owner of the New York Giants and among the most influential members of the competition committee, says “it came up for brief discussion in past meetings, but no action was taken.’’ It took the NFL years to come around on the 2-point conversion, which can be a pass or run play from the 2-yard line — and under Goodell’s apparent preference, could be worth one point if the kick is eliminated. The 2-pointer existed in the old AFL from 1960-69, and college football has had it since 1958. But it was defeated several times in NFL owners’ votes before it passed in 1994 as part of a package of changes to help the offenses.

parture by injured safety Vinnie Sunseri, a freshman’s arrest, the splashy hire of offensive coordinator Lane Kiffin and two transfers. Plus, the Tide’s two biggest stars — quarterback AJ McCarron and linebacker C.J. Mosley — declined invitations to the Senior Bowl, which will be played Saturday. Freshman cornerback Tony Brown, a Jan-

uary enrollee, was arrested Saturday night and charged with resisting arrest and failure to obey. Saban did not disclose what his punishment would be SABAN but made it clear the incident doesn’t affect Brown’s status with the program. Saban said he has spoken with Brown.

“Look, some people are in the wrong place at the wrong time,’’ he told reporters. “Some people don’t make good decisions about what they do, what they say. Tony Brown’s a fine young man, we’re glad to have him in the program. We’ll certainly try to use this as a learning experience for him. “The punishment he receives will be so that he learns not to do

something like this in a disrespectful way to somebody in a position of authority who is there to protect us all, which is our police. We’re going to get him to learn from this.’’ Alabama had an uncharacteristic ending to the season, dropping two straight games as the program’s bid for a third consecutive national title crashed to a halt. Tide receiver Kevin

Rosters would get slight revamping, with teams likely keeping at least one power back active every week and having two on the roster. Often, those guys also play on special teams, so their presence wouldn’t throw a lineup out of whack. PRACTICE WON’T MAKE PERFECT

Teams would work even more on their short-yardage packages, beginning in training camp. They would use their PAT offenses in other situations on the field in games, too. While going for a fourth-and-2 near midfield is less rare than it once was, it might become all the more common when coaches know the more times they attempt such plays, the more seasoned their players will be when trying for the extra points. WILL IT HAPPEN?

It’s impossible to gauge the owners’ thinking, and a three-quarters majority is needed to pass any rules changes. Goodell doesn’t get a vote. Then again, it sounds like he already has cast his.


RECRUITING

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

THE ITEM

B5

N.C. Shrine Bowl wide receiver commits to Clemson Jan. 31st. Penn State is now talking to Prince since James Franklin took over as head coach and is trying to get him in for a visit as well. DB DJ Smith of Marietta, Ga., who is a USC commitment, made his official visit over the weekend and he confirmed he is still committed to USC, but will take his official visit to Tennessee this coming weekend. Smith made his commitment to USC on television last week. “I feel like it was just the best fit,” Smith said after making his announcement. “Location-wise, it is very close to home, like two to three hours. Coach (Grady) Brown has been like a second daddy. He’s been there for me. He’s been truthful. I feel like he’s been straightforward with me from the get-go. And I just feel like it’s my best chance for early playing time. So I feel like it’s my best decision.” Last season, Smith was in on 77 tackles with two interceptions. “He’s a very good cover corner,” said his head coach, Rocky Hidalgo. “He’s physical enough to play safety. I think he’s got a chance to be an exceptional player.” Defensive end Taylor Stallworth of Mobile, Ala., committed to USC after visiting last June and that commitment remains in place, but Mississippi State remains a threat to the Gamecocks. Stallworth made his official visit to USC over the weekend and will go to Mississippi State this weekend. “Mississippi State is coming on hard,” Stallworth said. “My commitment is still strong and I don’t think it will turn, but I’m still keeping my eyes open.” Stallworth had 60 tackles and six quarterback sacks this season. He played in the Alabama-Mississippi All Star Game and recorded eight tackles, two tackles for loss and a sack. Shrine Bowl WR Hunter Renfrow of Socastee High in Myrtle Beach made his official visit to Appalachian State over the weekend. He is deciding between an offer from the Mountaineers and a walkon opportunity at Clemson. He will visit Clemson this weekend. “I enjoyed the visit,” Renfrow said. “The coaches were what I liked most about it. They were real down to earth. The facilities are nice. It snowed the whole time we were up there.” Renfrow said he remains torn between his two options and will wait until after his Clemson visit before making a final decision, which will come a few days after that visit. App State recruiter Justin Stepp is scheduled to visit Renfrow after his Clemson visit. “They are still pretty even,” said Renfrow, who was a QB in high school, but is being recruited as a slot receiver. LB Jalen Williams of Blythewood High remains committed to Clemson even though his offer right now is of the grayshirt variety. Williams said the coaches have told him they should know in about a month if he will come in with the ‘14 class this summer or have to wait until August. Either way, Williams said he is a lock with Clemson and is not dealing with any other programs. He will take his official visit to Clemson next weekend. Williams played in the Touchstone Energy North-South Game and the Offense-Defense All American Game. This season he had 100 tackles and six sacks. Shrine Bowl DL Arthur

Williams of Fayetteville, N.C., spoke with USC recruiter Joe Robinson on Sunday and Robinson was to meet with Williams at his home on Monday. Williams is an FSU commitment, but is still interested in the Gamecocks. Williams did not take an official visit this weekend, but is scheduled to visit FSU this weekend and USC on Jan. 31. FSU head coach Jimbo Fisher was scheduled to make his in-home visit on Tuesday. Williams said he’s still “pretty firm” with his commitment to FSU, but he’s giving USC a chance. His final decision is down to the Seminoles and Gamecocks. Running back Derrell Scott of Havelock, N.C., made his final official visit over the weekend to Florida and now will take a week to have final in-home visits and make his decision before announcing on Jan. 27 at his school. Scott is also considering USC and Tennessee. USC recruiter Deke Adams and Tennessee recruiter Robert Gillespie visited with Scott last Thursday. USC head coach Steve Spurrier will visit Thursday after Phil Tennessee KORNBLUT head coach Butch Jones visits him today. For much of Scott’s recruiting the feeling was that USC was the team to beat, but his assistant coach, Caleb King, disagrees with that assessment. “I don’t ever think there was a slam dunk,” King said. “I think there was perception out there he was going to follow Pharoh (Cooper). They are very good friends. Of course, he’s also very good friends with Kendal Vickers, who is probably going to be a starting defensive end at Tennessee next year.” King said Scott will keep his decision to himself until he announces on Jan. 27. Tennessee has been reported as his leader. RB Alvin Kamara has been given a release from Alabama and is looking at Clemson, FSU, Oklahoma State and UCLA at this point. Kamara is from Norcross, Ga., and was offered by Clemson in high school. He was redshirted this season and was suspended for the Sugar Bowl. USC and Clemson recruiters were among the coaches to visit with DE Andrew Williams of McDonough, Ga., last Thursday. USC’s Robinson was in during the day and Clemson’s Marion Hobby attended Williams’ high school banquet that night. Ole Miss recruiter Chris Kiffin also visited Williams last Thursday. Williams made his official visit to Auburn over the weekend and was very impressed with the Tigers. He’s going to Ole Miss this weekend and Clemson on Jan. 31. Right now USC is on the outside looking in on official visits. WR Kameron Uter of Atlanta made an official visit to Wake Forest over the weekend. The former Vanderbilt commit is still scheduled to visit Vandy this weekend. He’s talked with Clemson about baseball and USC contacted him after his decommitment, but has not followed up. WR Isaiah Ford of Jacksonville, Fla., made an official visit to Miami over the weekend. Miami is making a strong push now and has told him he can play football and basketball. USC and Virginia Tech are also working Ford, who is a former Louisville commitment. Ford is also still recruiting corner

T

he Clemson football program picked up one commitment from its two targets visiting over the weekend, and South Carolina appears to have improved its positioning with defensive back Wesley Green of Lithonia, Ga., and defensive lineman Dexter Wideman of Saluda High School, both of whom made official visits over the weekend, Shrine Bowl wide receiver Trevion Thompson (6-feet3-inches, 185 pounds) of Durham, N.C., committed to Clemson on Sunday after completing his official visit with the Tigers. He had also been considering Ohio State, North Carolina State, West Virginia and North Carolina. This season, Thompson caught 57 passes for 987 yards and 14 touchdowns. “He has that ability to get open,” said Thompson’s head coach, Anthony King. “He’s hard to cover despite not having blazing speed. But he knows how to get open and attacks the ball when he gets open.” Thompson is Clemson’s 19th commitment for the 2014 class, including linebacker Jalen Williams, who currently has a grayshirt offer. He’s the fourth WR in the class. Defensive lineman Cory Thomas of McCalla, Ala., was the other non-Clemson commitment to visit the Upstate over the weekend. Thomas has been committed to Tennessee, but he said on Twitter following his visit that he had a great visit and is trying to figure out a decision. Green is now favoring USC over Georgia coming off the visit. Green had been considering Mississippi as a third option, but has dropped the Rebels. He will take his official visit to Georgia on Jan. 31 and will announce a final choice on National Signing Day on Feb. 5. Wideman is still committed to Florida State. “Nothing has changed yet. I’m going to wait until after my visit (to FSU) on the 31st,” Wideman said. As for the strength of his commitment to FSU, Wideman said, “It’s still the same. The visit did move me some in (USC’s) direction, but I don’t want to say. I’m just waiting until after the visit on the 31st.” DB Chris Lammons of Plantation, Fla., made his official visit to USC over the weekend and, as expected, he did not make a commitment. Lammons has also visited Wisconsin and is going to decide between the Gamecocks and Badgers. Wisconsin recruiters were in to see him earlier this week and USC is to be down this coming week. Lammons will wait until Signing Day for his announcement. “He’s very high on South Carolina,” said Lammons’ head coach, Steve Davis. “He’s developing a real good relationship with (assistant) Coach (Grady) Brown. There’s playing time there and the type of scheme they run in the secondary, he likes that. South Carolina has a really good chance.” As does Wisconsin at this point. “He has a former teammate there in Sojourn Shelton, and he can get on the field there real early,” Davis said. “He’ll have a better gauge when he gets back (from USC).” Offensive lineman Damian Prince of Forestville, Md., was also at USC over the weekend. That was his third official visit. He’s also been to FSU and Maryland. He is scheduled to visit Florida on

considering the Cardinals. DB Derrick Tindal of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., committed to Indiana, but plans to take the rest of his official visits. The CB was scheduled to visit Syracuse last weekend. He has USC this weekend and NCSU on Jan. 31. He also has offers from Cincinnati, Marshall, Pittsburgh, Georgia Tech, Wisconsin and Akron. He will announce a final decision on National Signing Day. This season, Tindal had 52 tackles and three INTs. Athlete Dre Massey of Mauldin High was offered by East Carolina on Saturday while on his official visit with the Pirates. Massey did not commit. He plans to visit Oregon State this weekend before making a decision. Gaffney High ATH Hyleck Foster also visited ECU over the weekend. Foster currently is committed to Marshall. Some other notable instate prospects taking visits over the weekend include DL Poona Ford of Hilton Head High to Texas, DB Cory Seargant of Northwestern High in Rock Hill to ECU, and DL Zeek Rodney of South Pointe High in Rock Hill to Syracuse. From Gray College in West Columbia: WR Walter Vance and WR Jamil Hornsby have committed to Limestone; punter Taylor Wilson has an offer from Chowan and is also considering walking on at USC; RB Kevin Miller is getting a run from Charlotte, Gardner-Webb and Newberry; DB Eric Baker has an offer from Glenville State, W. Va.; and WR Deion Kelsey and WR J.R. Leach are looking at Payne College. Gray College has signed WR Shaikee Brooks of Irmo High and Louisburg Junior College in North Carolina. The War Eagles also are recruiting Lexington High QB Will Hunter and Gilbert High QB Mitch Spires. Both played in the North-South Game. Goose Creek HighWR Jordan Barnes has an offer from Tusculum and is hearing from The Citadel and Presbyterian. Gators sophomore DE Javon Kinlaw has an offer from USC. LB Michael Roach (6-4, 210) of Kenosha, Wis., has committed to Wofford, according to the Kenosha News. He also had an offer from North Dakota, while Wisconsin and Northern Illinois talked to him about walking on. This season, Roach had 13.5 sacks and 16 TFLs. RB Andre Stoddard of St. Joseph’s in Greenville (5-10 220) also committed to Wofford. This season Stoddard rushed for 1,918 yards and 28 TDs. As a junior, he rushed for 2,775 yards and 40 TDs. Juniors: DB Terry Godwin of Hogansville, Ga., who holds an offer from Clemson, announced a commitment to Georgia. Godwin visited Clemson last season for the FSU game and has been in regular contact with Tiger secondary coach Mike Reed. He’s UGA’s third commitment for 2015. DB Rico McGraw of Nashville, Tenn., also committed to UGA. Clemson and USC were among his other offers. Clemson head coach Dabo Swinney and defensive coordinator Brent Venables visited Bamberg-Ehrhardt High on Friday and offered ‘15 prospect DE LaSamuel Davis and ‘17 prospect ATH Savalas Cann. Davis also has offers from Florida, NCSU, UNC, Oregon, Kansas State, WF, GT, Southern California and UCLA. Cann also has offers from USC, Florida and UNC. OL Jake Fruhmorgen of

Tampa, Fla., will attend Clemson’s junior day on Feb. 1. Clemson and USC have both offered. Michigan offered him last week. OL Brian Chaffin of Charlotte was visited by Clemson last week. He plans to attend a junior day at Clemson next month. He did pick up an offer from UNC. They join NCSU, WF, Northwestern, Mississippi State and Charlotte as offers. USC also has shown some interest. QB Marquane Goodman of West Florence High has USC and NCSU as his top choices. His sole offer is from App State with interest coming from USC, NCSU, Arkansas and Tennessee. Clemson and NCSU are two visits Goodman has made,. QB Lorenzo Nunez of Kennesaw, Ga., recently added Texas A&M to his offer sheet, bringing his total to six. The QB continues to show strong interest in Clemson. Clemson Tennessee, Charlotte, Kentucky and Ohio State are his other offers with interest from FSU, Florida, Notre Dame and Miami. RB Nyheim Hines of Garner, N.C., had perhaps the best offensive season of any non-QB in the Carolinas in ‘13. Hines rushed for 3,147 yards and 50 TDs. He averaged 10.5 yards per carry. He also had 600 yards receiving with eight TDs, passed for two TDs and had a pair of TDs on kickoff returns. All of that will make him one of the hottest prospects around for the ‘14 season, and right now Clemson and USC figure to be in the hunt. Hines said he’s in regular contact with the recruiters from both schools. Hines plans to visit USC, Clemson, Ohio State, Duke, Tennessee and FSU. He’s also in regular contact with Duke, FSU, Nebraska and WF. Tennessee and VT are his most recent offers. Hines said he doesn’t have any clear favorites right now. ATH RayRay McCloud of Tampa has been offered as an RB by Clemson and USC. McCloud has not visited USC, but has been to Clemson twice. He said he is interested in both programs. Auburn, UGA, Tennessee and Vandy are the other schools he has visited. He plans to visit Florida, South Florida and Southern Cal this spring. He does not have any favorites, but said USC, Clemson, Ole Miss, Kentucky and Florida are showing the most interest. All have offered. His other offers include UCLA, Ohio State, Louisville and Wisconsin. RB Traveon Samuel of Phenix City, Ala., has Clemson in his top five. He named FSU, Auburn, Alabama, Ohio State and Clemson in that order. Florida offered last week and could become a factor as well. He plans to visit there for a junior day. He also plans to visit Clemson. His offers include Clemson, Auburn, FSU, Florida, Ohio State, California, Tennessee, Duke, UNC, NCSU, USF and Southern Mississippi. Last season, Samuel rushed for over 1,700 yards and 21 TDs. DB Mark Fields Jr. of Cornelius, Ga., has a list of Clemson, USC, UGA, Tennessee, NCSU, Louisiana State, Ole Miss, UCLA and Florida. OL Shaq Crouch (6-5, 333) of Johnsonville High is hearing from several schools, but has yet to receive his first offer. Of those showing interest, Crouch named USC as his favorite. Crouch is also hearing from Clemson, UNC, NCSU, FSU, Tennessee and Alabama. He has visited USC and Clemson.

LOL - Read Bizarro, Mother Goose, Zits and more on The Item's comics page.


B6

OBITUARIES

THE ITEM

ABRAHAM THOMY Abraham “Abe” Thomy, 90, of Sumter, died Monday, Jan. 20, 2014, at his residence. Mr. Thomy was born May 6, 1923, in Mullins, to the late Najib and Careemy Jacob Thomy. Abe was a member of the Church of the Holy Cross in Stateburg. He lived in THOMY Lake City from 1923 to 1959 before moving to Sumter in 1960. Abe was the owner of Thomy Studios. Mr. Thomy began his photography career at age 16. He served as a photo reconnaissance technician in World War II. Following the war, he studied in Philadelphia. Later, he returned home to Lake City, where he began his photography career. Mr. Thomy was nationally recognized for his photographs of literary and society figures, political leaders, television film stars and other international personalities. He was a founding member of the S.C. Photography Association; a founding member of the Sumter Area Toastmasters Club 4848; and received a commendation from the General Assembly of the state of South Carolina for 50 years of portraiture in 1996. Mr. Thomy was a graduate of the Art Institute of Philadelphia and the Antonelli’s School of Photography in Philadelphia. He was preceded in death by his parents; two sisters, Alice Mary Thomy and Evelyn Thomy Johnston; and a

brother, Joseph James Thomy. Abe is survived by his wife, Marjorie Twilley Thomy of Sumter; three sons, David Abraham (JoAnn) Thomy of Jacksonville, Fla., Richard Jacob (Brenda) Thomy of Ocean Isle Beach, N.C., and Timothy Warren (Jennifer) McDonald of Columbia; one daughter, Karen Thomy Pressley of Beaufort; five grandchildren, Julia Kristin Pressley, Hayes and Davis Hilton, Andrew David and Charles David Thomy; one brother, George Albert Thomy of Lake City; a mother-in-law, Majorie J. Robinson; one brother-in-law, Robert Johnston of Lake City; two nephews, Dr. James (Billie) Thomy and Gregory George (Reveley) Thomy, both of Lake City; two nieces, Gwen Thomy (Anthony) Daniel and Lisa Johnston Wilson, both of Charleston; and a special friend, Kathleen Kreklau of Sumter. Visitation for family and friends will be held from 10 to 11 a.m. today at the chapel at the Church of the Holy Cross in Stateburg. The funeral mass will follow at 11 a.m. at the Church of the Holy Cross. The family will receive friends in the Parish Hall after the service. Burial will follow at 3 p.m. at the Lake City Cemetery. An online condolence page is available at www.brockingtonfh. com.

RICHARD E. LAWRENCE Richard Edwin “Dick” Lawrence, 80, husband of Willie Swin-

AUSTRALIAN OPEN

dle Lawrence, died Monday, Jan. 20, 2014, at his home. Born in Worcester, Mass., he was a son of the late Chester F. and Genevieve Whitesell Lawrence. He was a U.S. Army veteran of the Korean War and retired as a supervisor at HealdCincinnati Milacron in Worcester. Survivors include his wife of Sumter; four children, Richard Lawrence, Robert Lawrence, Randall Lawrence and Pamela Puchala, all of Massachusetts; 10 grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by a daughter, Valerie Lawrence Ledger. Services will be held at a later date. Memorials may be made to the American Cancer Society, 950 48th Ave. North, Suite 101, Myrtle Beach, SC 29577. Elmore-Cannon-Stephens Funeral Home and Crematorium of Sumter is in charge of the arrangements.

ROBERT HAMMOND MAYESVILLE — Graveside services for Robert “Bobby” Holland Hammond, 79, of Mayesville, will be held at 11 a.m. today in Beulah Methodist Church Cemetery, 820 Beulah Church Road, Camden. The Rev. Brian Peake, minister of Mayesville Presbyterian Church, will officiate. Memorials may be made in his memory to Mayesville Presbyterian Church, P.O. Box 141, Mayesville, SC 29104 or Beulah United Methodist Church, 1410 Black River Road,

Camden, SC 29020. Robert Holland “Bobby” Hammond passed away on Sunday, Jan. 19, 2014, at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. He was born Nov. 21, 1934, in Camden, a son of the late Jessie Holland Hammond Jr. and Sarah Moseley Hammond. He graduated from Frontbonne College in St. Louis, Mo., with a bachelor of arts degree and was a 1969 graduate of Embry Riddle in Daytona Beach, Fla. He served 12 years active duty in Army Airborne as a staff sergeant and eight years in the Naval Reserves. During this time, he served on MH-60K Special Operations; Operation Desert Storm with Special Operation Aircraft and the P-3 Orion; NIGHT STALKERS 160 Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne); and many other special projects. He was a certified flight instructor and an airline transport pilot. Bobby is survived by his wife, Jane Curry Hammond; and his brother, Charles T. Hammond and his wife, Jennie. He was a loving father to his children, Michael Hammond and wife, Terri, Mark Hammond and wife, Kim, and Michelle Hammond-Beville and husband, Bryan; and stepchildren, Jennifer Cable and William Blackwell and wife, Sabrina. Bobby was a proud grandfather to 13 and great-grandfather to six. He was predeceased by his sister, Sara R. Hammond.

|

Djokovic’s winning streak ends BY DENNIS PASSA The Associated Press MELBOURNE, Australia — Novak Djokovic continued an upsetting trend at the Australian Open. The three-time defending champion joined Serena Williams and Maria Sharapova as unexpected early departures from the season’s first major with a quarterfinal loss Tuesday night to Stanislas Wawrinka. Djokovic came into the match with 28 consecutive wins since losing last year’s U.S Open final to Rafael Nadal, and 25 in a row at Melbourne Park since 2010. But the figure that really mattered was 14 — the number of consecutive matches in which Djokovic had beaten Wawrinka back to 2007, including two five-set wins the last time they met in Grand Slam matches last year at the Australian and U.S Opens. Djokovic held off Wawrinka 12-10 in the fifth set in a 5-hour, 2-minute fourth-rounder here last year — the longest Grand Slam match of the season. All those streaks ended in a 2-6, 6-4, 6-2, 3-6, 9-7 win Tuesday by Wawrinka, Roger Federer’s sometimes Swiss doubles partner and who is into the semifinals of a Grand Slam for the first time. “Fourteen is enough,’’ Wawrinka said. “After losing two times against him in Grand Slam in five sets, I’m really happy to take that one.’’ Federer, who will play Wimbledon champion Andy Murray in a quarterfinal on Wednesday, tweeted: “So deserving for Stan the man ...’’ The match, which included a fiveminute rain delay with Wawrinka serving at 5-5 in the deciding set, lasted exactly four hours and featured long rallies that tested the resolve, patience and shot-making ability of both players. At the end, it was a mis-hit from Wawrinka on a service return that set up match

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Novak Djokovic slams his racquet after losing a point during his Australian Open quarterfinal loss to Stanislas Wawrinka on Tuesday in Melbourne, Australia. Wawrinka defeated Djokovic 2-6, 6-4, 6-2, 3-6 9-7 to snap his 28match winning streak.

point. Djokovic chased it to the net but his cross-court drop shot was too wide. He then missed a volley on match point. “Didn’t want to let him win that one,’’ Warwinka said. “Got a little bit lucky in the last one. He missed easy shots. But in general in the fifth set I think I went for it.’’ Djokovic was quick to praise Wawrinka, heading to his media interview obligations just minutes after the match ended. “He took his opportunities. He deserved his big win today,’’ Djokovic said. “There’s nothing I can say. I gave it my best, I gave it my all. It wasn’t to be this time. He showed his mental strength and he deserved to win.’’ After reaching the semifinals at backto-back majors for the first time, the 28-year-old Wawrinka will be playing for a place in his first Grand Slam final — in 36 attempts dating back to 2005 — when he meets No. 7-seeded Tomas Berdych, who beat third-ranked David Ferrer 6-1, 6-4, 2-6, 6-4.

Kornegay Funeral Home, Camden Chapel, is in charge of the arrangements. Online condolences may be sent to the Hammond family by visiting www.kornegayfuneral. com.

MILDRED MOORE-HELTON Mildred Moore-Helton, widow of Neal Helton Sr., died Jan. 16, 2014, in Sumter. Born in Virginia, she was a daughter of the late Willis Moore and Betty A. Floyd. She was a member of Jehovah Missionary Baptist Church. Surviving are two sisters, Linda Danzey of Atlanta and Sheila Poole of Irvington, N.J.; three brothers, Robert (Deborah) Poole Sr. of Tampa, Fla., and Eugene (Loretta) Floyd and Elton Floyd, both of Irvington; her beloved children, Tamiko R. Moore of Baltimore, Md., Neal (Renee) Helton Jr. of Pikesville, Md., Jeffery L. Helton of Balitimore, and Ruby V. Helton and Nichole B. Helton, both of Sumter. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday at Jehovah Missonary Baptist Church, 803 S. Harvin St., with Pastor Marion H. Newton officiating. Internment will follow in Evergreen Memorial Park cemetery. Mrs. Helton will be placed in the church for public viewing from 10 a.m. until the hour of service. The family will receive friends from 6 to 8 p.m. today at Palmer Memorial Chapel. The public may also view Mrs. Helton from 3 to 8 p.m. today.

Please visit the Palmer Memorial Chapel website at www.palmermemorialchapel.com to send tributes.

THEOLANDER M. TAYLOR Theolander Montague Taylor, 85, died Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014, at Sumter Health and Rehabilitation Center. Born in Sumter County, he was a son of the late James E. Sr. and Ophelia Prince Taylor. Funeral arrangements are incomplete and will be announced by Palmer Memorial Chapel Inc. of Sumter. EDWARD HILTON MANNING — Edward “Bugle” Hilton, 73, husband of Effie Rogers Hilton, died Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014, at Clarendon Memorial Hospital, Manning. He was born Dec. 28, 1940, in Manning, a son of the late Davis Hilton and Nora Hilton McKinney. The family is receiving friends at the residence, 908 Branchview Drive, Manning. These services have been entrusted to Samuels Funeral Home of Manning. ANN LUCAS Ann Lucas, wife of W.D. Lucas, died Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014, at her home. Services will be announced by Elmore Hill McCreight Funeral Home & Crematory, 221 Broad St., Sumter, (803) 775-9386.

AREA SCOREBOARD

|

BASEBALL SPRING REGISTRATION

SOCCER YOUTH SPRING SIGNUP

The Sumter County Recreation Department will be taking registration for its spring baseball leagues beginning on Jan. 27. Registration for children ages 4-12 will run through Feb. 13. The last day to register for the 13-14 year-old league is March 21. A player’s age will be based on the age as of April 30, 2014. The cost to register will be $35 for 4-6, $40 for 7-8, $45 for 9-10, $45 for 11-12 traditional, $50 for 11-12 O’Zone and $50 for 13-14. A birth certificate is required if one is not on file at the recreation department. A mandatory coaches meeting will be held on Thursday, Feb. 13, at 6 p.m. at the recreation department at 155 Haynsworth Street for anyone interested in coaching. For more information call the recreation department at (803) 436-2248 or visit the website at www.sumtercountysc.org.

The Sumter County Recreation Department is taking registration for its spring youth soccer leagues through Jan. 23. There will be leagues for children ages 9 and under, 12 and under and 17 and under based on their ages of Sept. 1, 2014. The registration fee is $40 for the 9 and under league and $45 for the 12 and under and 17 and under leagues. There will be no late registration. A coaches meeting will be held on Tuesday, Jan. 14, at the recreation department located at 155 Haynsworth Street for anyone interested in coach. For more information, call the recreation department at (803) 436-2248 or go to www.sumtercountysc.org.

SOFTBALL SPRING REGISTRATION

The Sumter County Recreation Department will be taking registration for its spring girls softball leagues beginning on Jan. 27. Registration for children ages 5-12 will run through Feb. 13. The last day to register for the 13-18 year-olds is March 28. A player’s age will be based on her age as of Dec. 31, 2013. The cost to register will be $35 for 5-6, $40 for 7-8 and $45 for 9-18. A birth certificate is required if one is not on file at the recreation department. A mandatory coaches meeting will be held on Thursday, Feb. 13, at 6 p.m. at the recreation department at 155 Haynsworth Street for anyone interested in coaching. For more information call the recreation department at (803) 436-2248 or visit the website at www.sumtercountysc.org.

MEN’S OPEN SIGNUP

The Sumter County Recreation Department will be taking registration for a men’s open adult soccer league from Jan. 13 through Jan. 24. The entry fee is $375 per team and space is limited. Games will be played on the weekends. A team meeting will be held on Tuesday, Jan. 28 at 6 p.m. at the recreation department located at 155 Haynsworth Street. For more information, call the recreation department at (803) 436-2248 or go to www.sumtercountysc.org. CO-ED LEAGUE SIGNUP

The Sumter County Recreation Department will be taking registration for a co-ed adult soccer league from Jan. 13 through Jan. 24. The entry fee is $375 per team and space is limited. Games will be played on the weekends. A team meeting will be held on Tuesday, Jan. 28 at 7 p.m. at the recreation department located at 155 Haynsworth Street. For more information, call the recreation department at (803) 436-2248 or go to www.sumtercountysc.org.


PANORAMA WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

THE ITEM

C1

Contact Ivy Moore at (803) 774-1221 or e-mail ivym@theitem.com

PHOTO PROVIDED

This aerial photograph of McElveen Manor shows how large it has become over the past 15 years.

Senior living facility changes hands

McElveens retire from elderly care BY IVY MOORE ivym@theitem.com

I

t’s been 47 years since Pat and Gobe McElveen opened a small day care in their home. The day care grew into a complex of several buildings, McElveen Daycare and Preschool on McCray’s Mill Road. “I was in the (U.S.) Postal Service for 31 years,” Gobe said, “and I was Camden postmaster for the last 14 years of that. Pat was doing child care, and I was working with the post office. I worked on the books for the day care after I got home every night.” Although they admitted the work was hard, both McElveens said it was “a labor of love” for them. Years later, they took on an even bigger workload. Thirty-three years after opening the day care, the McElveens decided to get into senior care, opening McElveen Manor, an assisted living facility next door to the day care. A few years ago, they opened a state-of-theart Alzheimer’s care facility on the property. After 15 years, they have decided to retire, but not before finding a buyer they felt would continue their senior care philosophy. Over the years the McElveens were joined in operating McElveen Manor by several family members, including their daughter, Michele McElveen Flagler, a registered nurse who is also administrator. She is still serving in that capacity as her parents are retiring and the facility changes hands. Flagler also plans to retire from McElveen Manor once she is sure the transition to new owner Meridian Senior Living is ac-

MCELVEEN MANOR Assisted retired living, assisted Alzheimer’s care 2065 McCray’s Mill Road Sumter, SC 29154 www.mcelveenmanor.com (803) 778-9690

complished. “The main motivation of building this was that my mother had Alzheimer’s, and my father had to go every day to the nursing home to sit with her to make sure she was rolled over (in her bed) and properly fed,” Gobe McElveen said. “He did that twice a day. Seeing this and watching her suffer the way she did, what we wanted to do was build an assisted living and Alzheimer’s facility, family owned, so that we could see that we were family invested and see that the proper care was given to all of our residents.” Pat added, “Our passion and our joy has always been in serving others, especially seniors.” “It was after (his mother) passed away that Daddy realized there’s got to be something better,” Flagler said. “That’s when assisted living facilities were really first coming about. He wanted to make sure that residents and family members got the care they deserved. Like Daddy says, the buck really stopped with him. He could make sure that everyone took excellent care of the residents.” That philosophy and practice was what motivated Kenneth and Doris Gardner and their family to choose McElveen Manor in May of 2013. Kenneth Gardner, who turns 93 on Sunday, and Gobe have been friends for years and are both members of the local Elks Lodge, Gard-

ner said. Mrs. Gardner is 87. They celebrated their 68th wedding anniversary on Jan. 12. “I used to visit my brotherin-law here a couple of times a week,” Kenneth Gardner said, “just visiting and socializing with people, so I was very familiar with the place. My children like it, too.” The Gardners’ daughter, Carol Reynolds, agreed. “My dad always said that was where he would like to live when the time came to move from their home,” she said. “He frequently visited my uncle years ago when he was there and there was a home-like feel that my father liked.” “The staff at McElveen Manor has shown compassion to our unique situation,” she continued. “They allowed my parents to share a room for a while, which greatly helped their transition from living at home. After a few months, they saw the need for more assistance, and (my mother) made the gradual move to the memory unit where she is currently receiving the care she needs. The administrators and staff have been observant and always call when situations arise. Our family is very pleased with the care our parents are receiving at McElveen Manor.” Meridian Senior Living president Charles E. Trefzger said the care and reputation of McElveen Manor were what interested the company in purchasing it from the McElveens. He noted that the facility is “considered by many one of the finest senior living residences in the state.” He said the company is “delighted” that the McElveens selected the com-

IVY MOORE/THE ITEM

Pat McElveen, standing, and Gobe McElveen, seated at right, visit with Mary White, a resident at McElveen Manor, which the McElveens have sold after operating the assisted living facility for 15 years.

pany “to continue their tradition of service at McElveen Manor.” The McElveens said they feel Meridian is a company that will stay committed to excellence by sharing the family’s mission of providing quality, family-friendly care to the residents. “We are extremely pleased to have Meridian take over the management and operations of McElveen Manor,” Gobe McElveen said. “We looked long and hard to find a company that shares our commitment to senior housing and our dedication to the residents of McElveen Manor.” A few months before the official change of hands, Meridian representatives met with McElveen Manor staff, residents and families to assure them that the care and atmosphere they were accustomed to would continue under the new management. Trefzger noted, “At Meridian, we share the core values of excellence and the commitment to excellence to enriching the lives of the valued residents and families at McElveen Manor that have made the McElveens successful.” Since the changeover in

December, Gardner said, he hasn’t noticed any difference in care or atmosphere. “The meals are good, they take good care of my wife, and it feels just the same,” he said. “I’m very satisfied.” Reynolds said the family does have some concerns, although they’ve found their parents’ care very good so far. “We hope the quality of care doesn’t change, the rates don’t increase, and that the family atmosphere that we have come to appreciate continues,” she said, echoing the feelings of her adult siblings. McElveen Manor offers assisted retired living and assisted Alzheimer’s care. For more information about McElveen Manor, visit its website www. mcelveenmanor.com. Meridian Senior Living is a management company based in Hickory, N.C. It specializes in assisted living and memory care services throughout the U.S. McElveen Manor is its only facility in S.C. The stated mission of Meridian is to “enrich the lives of their residents, families and employees through extraordinary experiences — because everyone deserves a great life.” Its website is www.meridiansenior.com.

Deadline for SCBook Festival author submissions approaching Author selection for the SCBook Festival ends March 1. Authors who COLUMBIA — The are selected to partici2014 SCBook Festival is pate are considered for coming to the Columbia Metropolitan Convention readings, panels, book Center in Columbia on signings and other events scheduled over the weekMay 16, and time is running out for authors to sub- end of May 16 through mit their works for consid- 18. eration for inclusion in the The SCBook Festival uses the following critethree-day event. In 2012, more than ria for evaluating author submissions: 6,000 people attended • Completed 2014 Authe festival, which is considered the state’s prethor Submission Form. Download the form mier literary event, and even more are expected (PDF) at www.scbookfesto be in audiences this tival.org. • A hard copy (or an spring. FROM STAFF REPORTS

Advance Reader’s Copy) of the author’s book with a brief synopsis and press kit must be submitted by the publisher. • Authors selected will be deemed to be of wide interest to the general public, and those with new books will be given preference. • The selection committee chooses as diverse a group as possible regarding subject of publication, targeted age level (adult, teen, juvenile), ethnic origin of author and popularity of the book (best sell-

er vs. academia). • Festival programming includes, but is not limited to, the following sub-categories: Southern story, mystery, thriller, historical fiction, biographies, cooking, literary, regional, romance, humanities, children’s, young adult, and graphic novels. • Self-published authors and other authors not selected as part of the presentation panels are encouraged to participate in the festival as exhibitors. See the Exhibitor Page on the website.

• Work will be reviewed by the Author Selection Committee, which selects from more than 1,000 titles submitted each year. • Due to the high volume of submissions, the SCBook Festival will respond only to submissions that have been selected and accepted as a part of the presentation programming. At this point, few selections have been made, so patience is advised. • Books and materials submitted become property of the South Carolina

Book Festival and will not be returned. The submission of materials does not guarantee selection. Notification may be received anywhere before March 1. Find more information and forms for the submission process at www.scbookfestival.org. Submit selections to: SCBook Festival Author Submission 2711 Middleburg Drive, Suite 203 Columbia, SC 29204 Fax: (803) 771-2487 Email: submissions@ schumanities.org


C2

FOOD

THE ITEM

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

Go for the food: NJ options for Super Bowl foodies BY DAVID PORTER Associated Press Writer EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — Buffalo wings and chicken fingers, take a breather. Crab dip and curly fries, sit this one out. For Super Bowl foodies, New Jersey offers a mash-up of delicacies representing just about every culture on the planet. Those fortunate enough to have tickets to the game at MetLife Stadium will be able to gorge on American, Mexican, Asian and Italian specialties, done with a local flair, in the “Home Food Advantage” food court. Club seat ticketholders will get an even more varied menu including sushi, sliced beef tenderloin and garlic shrimp with peppercorn demi-glace, blue crabcake with pickled baby bok choy and lemon aioli, to name a few of a host of offerings. The food court dishes have local roots, such as Nonna Fusco’s homemade meatballs, inspired by stadium chef Eric Borgia’s grandmother (based on some diligent first-person research, they are the real deal). For everyone else, a 20-minute drive in any direction from the stadium will land you in the middle of any of a number of ethnic enclaves brimming with culinary treats. And you won’t even have to pay a bridge or tunnel toll. Borgia, who worked as executive chef for baseball’s San Diego Padres before coming to work for Delaware North Companies when the stadium opened in 2010, wanted to create a local-themed food court that brought to mind a New York/New Jersey street fair, minus the funnel cakes and $1.99 three-packs of tube socks. Ideas came during several days of food touring around the area, Borgia said. “We drove around to food trucks and little holes-in-thewall where people eat lunch,” he said. “We wanted to do street food, but we wanted to make sure it was authentic.” Located on the ground floor of the stadium, it is a street you’ll wish you lived on. It’s comfort food gone rogue, starting with a stand where you can

PHOTOS BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ABOVE: This undated image provided by New York Jets shows a rice ball. Nonna Fusco’s homemade dishes are served at MetLife Stadium among an array of food options that will be available to Super Bowl fans when the big game is played there Feb. 2.

score a linebacker-sized grilled cheese sandwich featuring two varieties of New York State cheddar pinned between thick slices of Texas toast. Add a slab of bacon on a stick dipped in jalapeno-infused maple syrup and make sure your cardiologist is on speed dial. Next door, Lucky’s serves Asian dishes, including noodle soup and porkand-chicken steamed buns with pickled slaw and Sriracha aioli. For meat lovers, there’s Liberty Sausage and its “kitchen sink” sandwich, combining grilled chicken sausage and hot dog with potatoes, peppers and sauce, or a pork sausage sandwich with fresh spinach and roasted garlic. Nonna’s, in addition to its heavenly meatballs, serves pasta and

LEFT: A display of sushi was for sale at MetLife Stadium during the first half of the NFL football game between the Seattle Seahawks and the New York Giants. Club seat ticketholders will get a more varied menu including sushi, sliced beef tenderloin and garlic shrimp with peppercorn demi-glace, blue crabcake with pickled baby bok choi and lemon aioli. IF YOU GO... METLIFE STADIUM: E. Rutherford, N.J. Food court map, www.metlifestadium.com/docs/default-source/stadium-map/metlife-stadium-fan-map.pdf?sfvrsn=6 . MITSUWA MARKETPLACE: Edgewater, N.J.; www.mitsuwa.com/tenpo/newj/eindex.html IRONBOUND DISTRICT: Newark, N.J.; www.goironbound.com/portal/

antipasti and is adding a roast pork and broccoli raab sandwich for the Super Bowl. Tacos Raqueros’ burritos and tacos should provide enough heat to take your mind off the fact that it is February and you are outside. Trying to sum up the multitude of food options in the surrounding area is like trying to analyze “Hamlet” in a tweet, but here goes: The best Cuban sandwiches can be found on almost any corner in Union City, outside the Lincoln Tunnel and overlooking the Hudson River. A

few miles north along the river is Mitsuwa Marketplace in Edgewater, billed as the largest Japanese supermarket in the country. Head back up and over the hill and you’re in Palisades Park, where Korean food reigns. Nothing warms better than curry, and Jersey City’s Newark Avenue, in the Journal Square area, is chock-full of Indian restaurants. In downtown Jersey City, don’t miss Taqueria, one of the area’s best taco joints, as long as you don’t mind the uber-hipster vibe. Newark, which will host

Super Bowl media day on Jan. 28, is home to the Ironbound neighborhood, known for its Portuguese and Spanish flavors and dishes of paella big enough to feed a 53-man roster. Newark also has Hobby’s deli, and Calandra’s Italian family bakery, both of which have attained well-deserved legendary status. Equally revered is Fiore’s in Hoboken, where the fresh “mutz” (mozzarella) melts in your mouth and the friendly servers make what some consider the perfect sandwich. For cheaper eats and an authentic New Jersey experience, Libby’s Lunch (Paterson) and Rutt’s Hut (Clifton) are masters of that humble American staple, the hot dog.

A fowl take on fresh spring rolls and peanut sauce BY J.M. HIRSCH AP Food Editor Do we never see fresh spring rolls stuffed with chicken? We see shrimp and vegetarian and even crab. But never chicken. And that’s a shame, because the ingredients in a fresh spring roll — usually a blend of vegetables and noodles, often some avocado, maybe some mint, all wrapped in tender rice paper — aren’t all that far removed from the usual chicken salad ingredients. And then there is the dipping sauce. There are plenty of variations, but spicy peanut sauce is among the most common. And chicken certainly gets along well with peanut sauce. So I decided to take spring rolls in a fowl direction. When paired with crunchy jicama, carrots and cucumber, the chicken shines as a spring roll filling. Add fresh mint and a deliciously sweet-and-sour spicy peanut sauce, and you have the makings of a fine Asian-inspired meal. When soaking the rice wrappers, do them one at a time. And don’t soak them longer than suggested or they will fall apart. The rice noodles and wrappers can be found in the Asian or international aisle of most grocers. This recipe is an excellent way to use up leftover roasted or grilled chicken. And if you have no leftovers or are short on time, just grab a rotisserie chicken.

CHICKEN AND JICAMA SPRING ROLLS WITH PEANUT SAUCE Start to finish: 30 minutes Makes 12 rolls For the dipping sauce: 1/4 cup smooth natural peanut butter 1/4 cup apricot jam 2 tablespoons soy sauce 2 tablespoons rice or cider vinegar Hot sauce, to taste

For the spring rolls: 2 ounces dried bean or rice thread noodles 1/2 English cucumber, peeled and halved lengthwise 4-ounces peeled jicama root 12 large rice-paper wrappers (8-inch round or

larger) 1/2 cup shredded carrots 2 avocados, pitted and thinly sliced 1 pound cooked boneless, skinless chicken breast meat, pulled or cut into strips 12 large fresh mint leaves

To make the dipping sauce, in a medium bowl stir together the peanut butter, jam, soy sauce and vinegar. Season with hot sauce, then set aside. Place the noodles in a bowl and cover with hot water. Soak for 5 minutes, or until softened. Drain well in a mesh strainer and set aside. Use a spoon to scrape out and discard the seeds from the cucumber halves. Cut each piece into thin strips. Set aside. Cut the jicama into thin slices, then cut each slice into thin matchsticks. Fill a large bowl (at least several inches larger than the rice wrappers) with warm water. Soak 1 wrapper in the water until just barely softened, about 10 seconds. Carefully remove the rice wrapper from the water and lay flat on the counter. Place a small bundle of noodles along one edge of the wrapper. Top the noodles with a bit each of cucumber, jicama, carrots, avocado and chicken, then top with a mint leaf. Roll the wrapper, starting with the filling side, folding the ends over the fillings as you roll to form a tight cylinder. Repeat with the remaining wrappers and fillings. Serve with the dipping sauce. Nutrition information per roll with peanut sauce: 200 calories; 80 calories from fat (40 percent of total calories); 8 g fat (1.5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 20 mg cholesterol; 20 g carbohydrate; 4 g fiber; 5 g sugar; 13 g protein; 310 mg sodium.


FOOD

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

THE ITEM

C3

Rethinking a fatty dip to have a healthier side BY SARA MOULTON Associated Press Writer Is there a chip dip in the world that isn’t wonderful? No matter what the flavor, at heart most are tubs of sour cream or melted cheese. Few foods are more satisfying. Of course, most dips also are notoriously heavy with fat and calories. Indeed, that’s why we love them. Still, I figured there must be ways to lighten them up while retaining their luxurious texture. I started by bulking up on the vegetables — in this case, artichokes and spinach. Artichokes happen to contain many nutrients and a ton of fiber. I chose canned artichokes rather than frozen because the canned are packed in citric acid, which gives them a lemony kick. But if you prefer frozen, you’ll need 2 cups thawed. But why frozen spinach instead of fresh? Because you’d need to cook down a bathtub full of fresh spinach — or pretty darn near it — to end up with the equivalent of a cupful of frozen spinach. No one wants to do all that work before even starting to mix the dip. Also, a cup of frozen spinach boasts more than four times the nutrients of a cup of fresh spinach. It’s kind of hard to beat. And all I had to do was defrost it and squeeze it out. Easy. Now, how to conjure up that rich, cheesy texture without employing a boatload of cheese? I started with Neufchatel, a French cream cheese that has one-third less fat than the full-fat version, but more flavor than the no-fat version. Then I added some lowfat sour cream for tang and a tiny bit of low-fat mayonnaise for the oil. You’re welcome to substitute extra-virgin olive oil, if you’d like. Finally, there’s some Parmigiano-Reggiano, which bristles with so much flavor and salt that just a little bit of it — an ounce in this case — will do the trick. The full-fat version of this dip usually includes mozzarella, but I didn’t miss it, so I didn’t use it. All these veggies and cheese cried out for some heat. I ended up using red pepper flakes and Peppadews. Peppadews are pickled red peppers from South Africa, hot and sweet and about the size of cherry tomatoes. If you don’t find them in the market, you can swap in pickled cherry peppers or even roasted red peppers. As an added bonus, any of these red peppers will brighten up the dip’s complexion. The finishing touches? Caramelized onions and garlic. Please take the time to cook the onions slowly, which brings out their natural sugar. It adds a nice depth of flavor to the mix. Serve this dip with a healthy cracker (just read the label) or make your own pita crisps. To do so, just separate some two-layered pita bread pockets into single layers, spray them lightly with oil, cut them into triangles, and bake them at 400 F for 10 to 12 minutes, or until crisp. Then go ahead and indulge yourself.

HOT AND SPICY ARTICHOKE SPINACH DIP Start to finish: 55 minutes (35 active) Makes about 4 cups 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 1/2 cups finely chopped yellow onion 1 tablespoon minced garlic 13.75-ounce can artichoke hearts, drained 10-ounce box frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry 4 ounces Neufchatel (low-fat cream cheese) 1/2 cup low-fat sour cream 2 tablespoons low-fat mayonnaise 1 ounce freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano (about 3/4 cup grated using a wand-style grater) 1/2 cup medium chopped mild Peppadew peppers (about 2 ounces), or medium chopped roasted red peppers 1/2 to 1 teaspoon red pepper flakes, or to taste Kosher salt Crackers or low-fat pita crisps, to serve Heat the oven to 375 F. Coat an 8-inch square baking pan with cooking spray. In a medium skillet over medium-low, heat the oil. Add the onion and saute, covered, stirring occasionally, for 8 minutes. Uncover the pan and continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until the onions are golden brown, about another 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Remove the pan from the heat and set aside. In a food processor, pulse the artichokes until they are medium chopped, then transfer them to the skillet. In the food processor combine the spinach,

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Hot and Spicy Artichoke Spinach Dip cream cheese, sour cream, mayonnaise and half of the Parmigiano-Reggiano, then process until mixed. Add the mixture to the skillet, along with the peppers and pepper flakes. Stir well, then season with salt.

Transfer the mixture to the prepared pan, sprinkle the remaining cheese over the top and bake on the oven’s middle shelf for 15 to 20 minutes, or until it is bubbling at the edges. Serve immediately with crackers or low fat pita crisps.

Nutrition information per 1/2 cup: 150 calories; 80 calories from fat (53 percent of total calories); 9 g fat (4 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 20 mg cholesterol; 13 g carbohydrate; 4 g fiber; 2 g sugar; 7 g protein; 540 mg sodium.

Chill out while you find the two identical snowmen.

Š 2014 by Vicki Whiting, Editor Jeff Schinkel, Graphics Vol. 30, No. 6

Good question, Paula! Cold fronts and warm fronts are something meteorologists – scientists who study the weather – watch to make predictions about the weather.

I’m puzzled, Dr. Cicle. What are cold fronts and warm fronts?

Here’s how meteorologists show a cold front on a map.

This is how they show a warm front.

Standards Link: Visual discrimination.

Find the words in the puzzle,

Oh no! A cold wind blew my display about weather fronts all apart! Luckily, I numbered each sentence. Do the math problem on each piece. Then use the answers to put the sentences in order from the smallest number to the largest.

Standards Link: Earth Science: Students understand how to read a weather map.

WEATHER then in this week’s Kid Scoop  stories and activities. SYMBOLS E R U T S I O M S P  S  O S D C F R E R STORMS T L A L M O R F S E ! WARM O M O R L E O G  D WATCH R C A B H D  W E I MOISTURE M W T T M O T A D C CHILL S P A M L Y S T  T COLD  E M W O  S C O  MASS LAST W T S A L L I H C S  Standards Link: Letter sequencing. Recognizing identical PREDICT words. Skim and scan reading. Recall spelling patterns.

The cold front looks like icicles on a string!

Weather Watchers Standards Link: Number Sense: Students compute sums and differences, order numbers from least to greatest.

Look through the newspaper for three people and/or companies who need to watch the weather to make decisions. For example, outdoor games can be canceled if the weather is bad. Tell how the weather can affect each of the weather watchers you selected.

Standards Link: Earth Science: Students know the effects of changes in the weather.

Look at the two weather puzzles. Which town is most likely to have stormy weather? Use the cold front and warm front symbols to help you predict. Standards Link: Earth Science: Students understand that weather can be observed and predicted; different conditions affect different results.

Carolina Children’s Dentistry

‡6PDOO&RPPHUFLDO 5HVLGHQWLDO3OXPELQJ,QVWDOODWLRQV ‡*HQHUDO5HSDLUV‡-HW&OHDQLQJ‡&DPHUD,QVSHFWLRQRI'UDLQ3LSHV

#1 IN THE #2 BUSINESS! Columbia, SC (803) 736-6000

Sumter, SC (803) 775-4793

Specializing In Infants, Children, and Adolescents

438 N. Main Street, Sumter 800-849-8884 / 803-773-6689 24/7 EMERGENCY SERVICES

4 Locations To Serve You Better

Deadline: February 16 Published: Week of Mar. 16

Buying used Mobile Homes, Lots, Acreage, or Houses In Need of Repair Call 803-773-8022 anytime

“Proud Supporters Of Literacy In Our Community�

Quality Manufactured and Modular Homes at great prices Financing Available 2735 Broad Street - Sumter, SC

803-469-3222

www.claytonhomesofsumter.com

This page is brought to you by these community minded businesses.

Call 1-800-293-4709 to sponsor this Exciting Page!

This page is brought to you by these community minded businesses.

Call 1-800-293-4709 to sponsor this Exciting Page!

1283 Broad Street Sumter, SC 29150

803-905-5500

Sumter Laundry & Cleaners

1091 Broad St., Sumter 938-9767

Please include your school and grade.

VESTCO PROPERTIES

(803) 773-3328

4.BJO4Ut4VNUFS )PVST.'".1.t4BU".1. XXXTVNUFSDVUSBUFESVHTDPN

Imagine you were a snake. What would you eat? How would you move? Where would you live? Write a paragraph about your life as a snake.

740 Bultman Drive, Sumter, SC 29150

“Investing In Our Futures by “Promoting Literacy For Our Kids�

'SFF*O5PXO%FMJWFSZ 4JODF

Standards Link: Number Sense: Students know rules of divisibility.

Send your story to:

Sumter Family Dental Center

piggly wiggly

Sumter Cut Rate Drugs 803-773-8432

Search through the newspaper for the following numbers: = 6.$'34 divisible by 2 = 6.$'34 divisible by 3 = 6.$'34 divisible by 5

FREE Home Pick-up & Delivery

GEICO Field Representative

775-3962

Telephone: 803.938.8200

Roger Armield 639 BULTMAN DRIVE

Buy a Happy Meal or a Ea_`lqCa\kE]YdYf\ GET A

FREE COOKIE


C6

THE ITEM

COMICS

BIZARRO

SOUP TO NUTZ

DOG EAT DOUG

GARFIELD

ZITS

BEETLE BAILEY

BLONDIE

ANDY CAPP

DILBERT

BORN LOSER

MOTHER GOOSE

Jeff MacNelly’s SHOE

THE DAILY CROSSWORD PUZZLE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

Man who doesn’t want marriage keeps attracting women who do

D

dear abby

EAR ABBY — I ly agrees. But somehow am a 53-yearI have broken five good old male who is hearts, whose only fit, healthy and has a transgression was fallgood job. I also have ing in love with me. two failed marriages NOBODY’S RETIREbehind me, which have MENT HUSBAND cost me dearly, both emotionally and finanDEAR N.R.H. — I cially. I have no admire your selfintention of image. You must making that misbe doing sometake again! I thing right to have been on my have the ladies own for five lining up the way years, and in they are. Howevthat time I have er, you may not Abigail had five relabe as effective a VAN BUREN tionships -- alcommunicator ways with as you think you women my age are if five differ(give or take a few ent women failed to get years). the message you said My problem is that you convey. I have sevwomen my age seem to eral thoughts about have only one agenda: your predicament: marriage. One very nice If your only fear of lady finally clarified her marriage is that you feelings by saying that would again be cleaned at this time in her life, out financially, a strong she didn’t have time for prenuptial agreement “just dating” because in could help you avoid a few years she’d be 60. any problem if a third I understand her dimarriage didn’t work. lemma, but I’m not inHowever, if variety is terested in younger what you prefer, then women. I try hard to you should restate your make it clear at the bemessage every few ginning of any relation- months as these relaship that marriage is tionships blossom. (Or out of the question, and you could move to a I don’t proceed with monastery and stop the relationship unless dangling yourself in the the lady wholehearted- dating pool.)

SUDOKU


TELEVISION

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

AROUND TOWN

TW FT

|

The Big Bang Theory North Pole. (HD) Family Feud

8:30

9 PM 9:30 LOCAL CHANNELS

The Big Bang Theory (HD) Family Feud

10 PM

10:30

Law & Order: Special Victims Unit: (:01) Chicago P.D.: Chin Check The Jersey Breakdown Raped runaway. team discovers a large ammo cache. (N) (HD) (N) (HD) Criminal Minds: The Road Home CSI: Crime Scene Investigation: Vigilante killer in Cleaveland. (N) (HD) Boston Brakes Finlay investigates fiery car crash. (N) (HD) Modern Family: Super Fun Night Nashville: Just for What I Am Scarlett’s career is taking off. (N) Three Dinners (N) Kimmie and James. (N) (HD) (HD) (HD) NOVA: Killer Typhoon The storm & its Chasing Shackleton Crew begins aftermath are examined. (N) (HD) trek through the mountains. (N) (HD)

11 PM WIS News 10 at 11:00pm News and weather. News 19 @ 11pm The news of the day. ABC Columbia News at 11 (HD) Tavis Smiley (HD)

11:30

12 AM

(:35) The Tonight Show with Jay Leno Scheduled: actor Charlie Sheen. (N) (HD) (:35) Late Show with David Letterman Popular celebrities are interviewed. (HD) (:35) Jimmy Kimmel Live Scheduled: actress Christina Ricci. (N) (HD)

BBC World News International news. American Idol: Auditions #3 Singers take their turns on stage as the third WACH FOX News at 10 Local news Two and a Half Two and a Half set of auditions kicks off, each hoping to impress the judges with their vocal report and weather forecast. Men Tyrannic girl- Men Alan as talents. (N) (HD) friend. (HD) Charlie. (HD) College Basketball: South Carolina Gamecocks at Georgia Bulldogs from Law & Order: Criminal Intent: Un- Law & Order: Criminal Intent: GemStegeman Coliseum z{| daunted Mettle Young architect is ini A plastic surgeon is murdered. (HD) murdered. (HD)

Charlie Rose (N) (HD) The Middle: The Scratch Social worker. (HD) The Arsenio Hall Show (HD)

CABLE CHANNELS

The Sumter County Teachers Association-Retired will meet at noon today at the North HOPE Center, 904 N. Main St. Call Brenda Bethune at (804) 4696588.

The Sumter Chapter of the National Federation of the Blind will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 11, at the ShilohRandolph Manor, 125 W. Bartlette St. The 2014 king or queen will be crowned. Charles E. Black, president of the National Federation of the Blind, Kershaw County Area Chapter, will speak. The spotlight will shine on Alexus Blanding and the associate member is Laura Colclough. Transportation provided within the coverage area. Contact Debra Canty at (803) 775-5792 or DebraCanC2@frontier.com. Call the 24hour message line at (206) 376-5992 for information about tickets for the April 19 barbecue.

8 PM

C7

Duck Dynasty: Till Duck Do Us Part Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty Duck Dynasty (N) Wahlburgers: Who’s Your Favorite? Don’t Trust Irate (:01) Duck DySurprise wedding. (HD) (HD) (HD) (HD) (HD) (HD) Second location. (N) (HD) wife. (HD) nasty (HD) (5:30) Die Hard 2 (‘90, Action) Bruce The Rock (‘96, Action) aaa Sean Connery. A biochemist and a former inmate at Alcatraz prison have to rescue Die Hard (‘88, Action) aaac Bruce Willis. A cop Willis. Airport terrorists. (HD) a group of people who were taken hostage by a madman as they toured the old facility. (HD) fights terrorists in a high-rise. (HD) Ultimate Treehouses (HD) Beaver Beaver Treehouse Masters (HD) Treehouse Masters (HD) Beaver Beaver Treehouse The Game: The Game (HD) Being Mary Jane: The Huxtables Jason’s Lyric (‘94, Drama) aa Allen Payne. A young man from the Fifth Ward of Houston Husbands New Wendy Williams Trashbox (HD) Have fallen deals with his traumatic childhood. residence. Show (N) The Real Housewives of Atlanta: The Real Housewives of Beverly Top Chef: Po’ Boy Smackdown New Top Chef: Leaving New Orleans Last What Happens Top Chef: Leaving New Orleans Last Sour Grapes, Sour Peaches Hills: Tough Break Orleans staple, the po’boy. challenge in Louisiana. (N) (N) challenge in Louisiana. The Kudlow Report To Be Announced To Be Announced To Be Announced Mad Money Investing advice. Greed Erin Burnett OutFront (N) Anderson Cooper 360° (N) (HD) Piers Morgan LIVE (N) (HD) Anderson Cooper 360° Later Erin Burnett OutFront P. Morgan The Colbert Re- Daily Show (HD) South Park (HD) South Park (HD) South Park (HD) South Park (HD) Workaholics (N) Broad City (N) Daily Show (N) The Colbert Re- (:01) @midnight port (HD) (HD) (HD) port (N) (HD) (N) (HD) Good Luck Char- Austin & Ally Liv and Maddie Lemonade Mouth (‘11, Musical) aac Bridgit Mendler. Five high school A.N.T. Farm (HD) Blog: Avery’s First Jessie: 101 Lizards Wizards of lie (HD) (HD) (HD) students meet in detention and decide to form a band together. Breakup (HD) Waverly (HD) Klondike: Part Two Trouble plagues the city and miners. Klondike: Part Three Bill seeks revenge on the killer. (N) (:12) Klondike: Part Three Bill’s revenge. (6:00) SportsCenter (HD) NBA Basketball: Oklahoma City Thunder at San Antonio Spurs z{| (HD) NBA Basketball: Indiana Pacers at Phoenix Suns z{| (HD) Colin’s (HD) College Basketball: Duke Blue Devils at Miami Hurricanes (HD) 2014 Australian Open Tennis: from Melbourne Park in Melbourne, Australia z{| (HD) Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey Melissa & Joey Baby Daddy (N) John Tucker Must Die (‘06, Comedy) aac Jesse Metcalfe. Three The 700 Club Baby Daddy (HD) (HD) (HD) (N) (HD) (HD) ex-girlfriends of a high school jock train a girl to steal his heart. Restaurant: Impossible (HD) Restaurant: Impossible (HD) Restaurant: Impossible (HD) Restaurant: Impossible (HD) Diners (HD) Diners (HD) Restaurant On the Record with Greta (N) The O’Reilly Factor (N) (HD) The Kelly File News updates. Hannity Conservative news. (HD) The O’Reilly Factor (HD) The Kelly File College Basketball: Wake Forest vs Virginia Tech z{| Golden Boy Live: from Indio, Calif. no} (HD) The New College Football (HD) Basketball Home: Super Home: Bachelor The Good Wife: Killer Song Murderer The Good Wife: Wrongful Termina- Frasier Niles has a Frasier: Rooms Frasier Live life Frasier: We Two Gold Girl Final Bowl Fever of the Year gets sued. (HD) tion Class action suit. (HD) toothache. with a View again. Kings goodbyes Property Brothers (HD) Property Brothers (HD) Buying and Selling (N) (HD) Hunters (N) Hunters (HD) Property Brothers (HD) Buying (HD) American Pickers (HD) American Pickers (HD) American Pickers (N) (HD) American Pickers (HD) (:02) Appalachian Outlaws (HD) American (HD) Law & Order: Criminal Intent: My WWE Main Event (N) Burn Notice: Seek and Destroy Mi- Burn Notice: Bad Breaks Old neme- Burn Notice: Truth and Reconcilia- Burn Notice (HD) Good Name (HD) chael helps an art dealer. (HD) sis. (HD) tion Corrupt official. (HD) Wife Swap: Kraut; Hardin Luxury and Wife Swap: Sundstrom; Tower Drag Wife Swap: Lawrence; Caddel Con- Wife Swap: Alcorn; Booker Boxer (:01) Wife Swap: Kinsman; Thomp- (:02) Swap: son Lobsterwoman. Sundstrom; Tower servative mom, atheist mom. swaps with competitive eater. country. racing family Sam & Cat Witch Way (N) Full Hse Full Hse Full Hse Full Hse Full Hse Full Hse Friends (:36) Friends (:12) Friends Cops (HD) Cops (HD) Cops (HD) Cops (HD) Cops (HD) Cops (HD) Cops (HD) Cops (HD) Jail (HD) Jail (HD) Jail (HD) Ghost Hunters: Orphans of Gettys- Opposite Ghost Hunters: Shock Island Penn- Ghost Hunters: Hyde and Seek Hyde Ghost Hunters: Orphans of Gettys- Opposite Worlds: Live: Fight (N) burg Gettysburg, Penn. (HD) Worlds burg (N) (HD) sylvania Asylum. (HD) Hall. (HD) Seinfeld (HD) Family Guy Vision The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang The Big Bang Men at Work (N) The Big Bang Conan Scheduled: Matt LeBlanc. (N) Men at Work: quest. Theory (HD) Theory (HD) Theory (HD) Theory (HD) (HD) Theory (HD) (HD) Post-Posal (HD) The Wrong Man (‘56, Thriller) Henry Bright Eyes (‘34, Family) aaa Shirley Temple. Paddy O’Day (‘35, Comedy) ac Jane Withers. Pack Up Your Troubles (‘32, Comedy) aac Stan Fonda. An innocent man. Adults battle for custody of an orphan. A fugitive immigrant joins a show. Laurel. Soldiers look for orphan’s grandparents. My 600-lb Life (HD) My 600-lb Life (HD) Sex Sent Me to the ER (HD) My Strange My Strange Sex Sent Me to the ER (HD) My Strange Castle: 3XK Tracking down Triple Castle: A Deadly Affair Beckett has Castle: He’s Dead, She’s Dead Fa- Castle: Under the Gun Castle fixates Hawaii Five-0: Kanalua McGarrett’s Hawaii Five-0 Killer. (HD) an unexpected suspect. (HD) mous psychic is murdered. (HD) on coded document. (HD) help. (HD) (HD) S. Beach S. Beach S. Beach S. Beach S. Beach S. Beach S. Beach (N) Repo (N) (:01) Repo (:31) Repo (:02) S. Beach Gilligan (HD) Gilligan (HD) Gilligan (HD) Gilligan (HD) Raymond (HD) Raymond (HD) The Exes (N) Kirstie (N) (HD) The Exes (HD) Kirstie (HD) Queens (HD) NCIS: Prime Suspect Gibbs’ barber Modern Family Modern Family psych (N) (:01) Modern (:31) Modern White Collar: Shot Through the (:02) psych asks for his help. (HD) (HD) (HD) Family (HD) Family (HD) Heart Assassin manhunt. (HD) Law & Order: Humiliation (HD) Notting Hill (‘99, Romance) aac Julia Roberts. Movie star falls for book store owner. Notting Hill (‘99, Romance) aac Julia Roberts. Funniest Home Videos (HD) Rules (HD) Rules (HD) Rules (HD) Rules (HD) WGN News at Nine (HD) How I Met Rules (HD) Rules (HD)

The American Red Cross, Sandhills Chapter, 1155 N. Guignard Drive, Suite 2, will offer the following classes: 9 a.m. Saturday, Feb. 8, Client Case Work; and 6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 24, New Volunteer Orientation and Disaster Services Overview. Call (803)-7752363 for additional information and to register.

Sumter Benedict Alumni Club will meet at 6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 3, at the North HOPE Center. Call Shirley Blassingame at (803) 5064019.

7:30

WIS News 10 at Entertainment Revolution: Captain Trips Gene de7:00pm Local Tonight (N) (HD) cides to help out Willoughby. (N) news update. (HD) News 19 @ 7pm Inside Edition (N) The Crazy Ones: Mom First date. Breakfast Burrito (HD) Evening news up- (HD) date. Club (HD) Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) The Middle: The Suburgatory: (N) (HD) (HD) Carpool (N) (HD) Victor Ha Foster child. (N) (HD) State of the State 2014 Gov. Nikki Nature: Meet the Coywolf A new hybrid carnivore is examined. (N) (HD) Haley’s State of the State. (N)

The Shepherd’s Center, 24 Council St., will offer free public information sessions 11-11:50 a.m. each Thursday through March 13 as follows: Jan. 23, outof-wedlock pregnancy social/economic impact on the community; Jan. 30, forms and frequency of elder abuse; Feb. 6, federal Medicaid recoupment; Feb. 13, get active/be healthy; Feb. 20, investing in uncertain times; Feb. 27, emergency preparedness; March 6, spring gardening tips; and March 13, you are what you eat.

Hillcrest High School Class of 1974 will hold a reunion meeting at 4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 25, at the American Legion Post 202 building, 310 Palmetto St. Call E.B. Brooks at (803) 481-5148 or (803) 316-7652 or Kevin Vannoy at (803) 9683238.

7 PM

THE ITEM

Web series turned cable comedy ‘Broad City’ debuts BY KEVIN MCDONOUGH What if “Girls” tried to be funny? Really funny? “Broad City” (10:30 p.m., Comedy Central, TV-14), the web series turned cable comedy starring creators Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer, covers a lot of the same ground as the overpraised HBO show. Essentially, Jacobson and Glazer absurdly lampoon themselves, playing desperately underemployed 20-somethings who try to maintain a pathetic approximation of a “hip” lifestyle, while contending with low and/or nonpaying jobs and hideously inconsiderate roommates and their insignificant others. There’s a lot of sublimated anger here. Rage, even. Many of the sketches involve the women’s demeaning jobs set against the backdrop of forced corporate cheer and phony, quasiBuddhist affirmations. Like the web version, “Broad City” proceeds with brief two- or threeminute sketches. This is unlike its companion series “Workaholics,” which presents a cartoonish look at “work” in traditional 22-minute episodes. “Workaholics” enters its fourth season tonight (10 p.m., Comedy Central, TV-14). So who will like “Broad City”? Take some of the deranged quality

of Kristen Schaal’s character on “Flight of the Conchords” and add some of Sarah Silverman’s brazen audacity, and you’re getting close. It also hits at some of the finely observed bohemian silliness of “Portlandia.” And speaking of that IFC series (returning for a fourth season on Feb. 27), look for Fred Armisen in a bizarre cameo on tonight’s series debut. • There’s something natural about comedians Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer moving up the media food chain from the Internet to cable. What doesn’t make sense to me is something called “Wahlburgers” (10:30 p.m., A&E, TVPG), a reality series following the antics of the famous Wahlberg acting family as sibling Paul opens a hamburger franchise. You would think Mark, a busy Hollywood star and producer of HBO’s “Boardwalk Empire” (among other things), and Donnie, a star of “Blue Bloods” on CBS and producer of “Boston’s Finest” on TNT, would have better things to do. Seriously, how much screen time do they need? To be generous, you could say they are doing this for their beloved mother, Alma, and their unsung brother. But that doesn’t excuse the contrived and boring Go Online for Your

eEdition subscription

Take It On the Run. Get the news anytime, anywhere with an eEdition subscription and even get read-out-loud capabilities!

The Item eEdition

www.theitem.com

nature of this series. Paul tells us that each and every burger he sells honors the memory of their father. Sorry, but that’s a bit much.

Tonight’s Other Highlights • Gene has plans for Willoughby on “Revolution” (8 p.m., NBC, TV14). • Arrow enlists Laurel on “Arrow” (8 p.m., CW, TV-14). • “Nature” (8 p.m., PBS, TV-PG, check local listings) presents “Meet the Coywolf,” an increasingly familiar creature in some suburbs and even cities. • A runaway receives rough treatment on “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” (9 p.m., NBC, TV-14). • Phil and Claire want to talk to Haley about her future on “Modern Family” (9 p.m., ABC, TV-PG). • A car crash investigation yields a familiar face on “CSI” (10 p.m., CBS, TV-14). • Halstead’s old associates put him on edge on “Chicago P.D.” (10 p.m., NBC, TV-14). • Scarlett’s star rises as Juliette’s fades on “Nash-

ville” (10 p.m., ABC, TVPG). • Si irks the family by documenting his day with a digital camera on “Duck Dynasty” (10 p.m., A&E, TV-PG). • As Fiona continues to fail, the surviving girls show remarkable new powers on “American Horror Story: Coven” (10 p.m., FX, TV-MA).

Cult Choice A sniper (Kiefer Sutherland) threatens to kill a publicist (Colin Farrell) if he ends a call in the 2002 thriller “Phone Booth” (7:35 p.m., Starz).

Series Notes Procrastination on “The Crazy Ones” (8 p.m., CBS, r, TV-14) * Carpooling woes on “The Middle” (8 p.m., ABC, TV-PG) * A sobering thought on “Mom” (8 p.m., CBS, r, TV-14) * Empty nesters on “Suburgatory” (8:30 p.m., ABC, TV-14) * A vigilante haunts Cleveland on “Criminal Minds” (9 p.m., CBS, TV-14) * Stephen puts the Ultra team to the test on “The Tomorrow People” (9 p.m., CW, TV-PG) * The old gang resents Kimmie’s

new romance on “Super Fun Night” (9:30 p.m., ABC, TV-PG).

Late Night Hari Sreenivasan is booked on “The Daily Show With Jon Stewart” (11 p.m., Comedy Central) * Matt LeBlanc, the cast of “Impractical Jokers” and Trombone Shorty are on “Conan” (11 p.m., TBS) * Gabourey Sidibe, Kerri Kenney-Silver, Natasha Leggero and Bobby Lee are booked on “Chelsea Lately” (11 p.m., E!) * Charles Duhigg is on “The Colbert Report” (11:30 p.m., Comedy Central) * Jay Leno welcomes Charlie Sheen, Joy Behar and Neon Trees on “The Tonight Show” (11:35 p.m., NBC) * Christina Ricci, Jake Johnson and Danny Brown appear on “Jimmy Kimmel Live” (11:35 p.m., ABC) * Kevin Nealon and Lupita Nyong’o visit “Late Night With Jimmy Fallon” (12:35 a.m., NBC) * Craig Ferguson hosts Michelle Monaghan and Michael Irvin on “The Late Late Show” (12:35 a.m., CBS). Copyright 2014, United Feature Syndicate


C8

FOOD WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

THE ITEM Contact Rhonda Barrick at 803-774-1264 or e-mail rhondab@theitem.com

Tex-Mex meets

classic comfort for

Super Bowl grub

CHILI COR

PHOTOS BY THE

BY ALISON LADMAN Associated Press Writer

ASSOCIATED PR

NBREAD

PIE

ESS

CHILI CORNBREAD PIE

M

ost classic Super Bowl party grub generally can be classified one of two ways — spicy Tex-Mex or basic comfort. And since there’s already a lot of crossover between those categories, we decided to embrace them and create a Super Bowl party dish that combines the best qualities of both. We drew our inspiration from shepherd’s pie and a Tex-Mex taco. The result is a casserole that starts with a layer of chili, then adds a layer of cornbread. After it has baked, the casserole gets finished with all the standard Super Bowl ingredients — guacamole, sour cream, shredded cheese and olives. You could even add some refried beans or shredded lettuce and pico de gallo.

Start to finish: 50 minutes (20 minutes active) Servings: 10 For the chili: 1 teaspoon smoked paprika 3 scallions, sliced 1 1/2 pounds lean ground beef Salt and ground black pepper 1 cup frozen corn kernels, thawed (op1 large yellow onion, diced For the cornbread: tional) 3 cloves garlic, minced 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1/4 cup sliced pickled jalapenos, lightly 16-ounce jar salsa 1 cup corn meal chopped 1 chipotle pepper, minced (from a can of 3 tablespoons sugar For serving: chipotles in adobo) 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 cup guacamole 2 tablespoons adobo sauce (from a can of 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 cup sour cream chipotles in adobo) 1 1/4 cups milk 1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese 1 tablespoon chili powder 1 egg 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted Heat the oven to 400 degrees. Coat a deep 9-by-9-inch pan with cooking spray. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, cook the beef until browned, about 8 minutes. Add the onion, garlic, salsa, chipotle, adobo, chili powder, cumin and paprika. Bring to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, then spoon the chili into the bottom of the prepared pan. Set aside. To make the cornbread topping, in a large bowl stir together

Nutrition information per serving: 400 calories; 170 calories from fat (43 percent of total calories); 19 g fat (10 g saturated; 0.5 g trans fats); 95 mg cholesterol; 37 g carbohydrate; 4 g fiber; 7 g sugar; 23 g protein; 850 mg sodium.

A fresh take on the traditional seven-layer dip

SEVEN-LAYER POTATO SKINS Start to finish: 45 minutes (15 minutes active) Servings: 16

BY ALISON LADMAN Associated Press Writer Everybody seems enraptured by seven-layer dip. And not that it’s bad, but it’s been done. And done again. And again. So for this year’s Super Bowl party, why not freshen it up a bit? Take the same concept of shoveling piles of delicious toppings into your mouth, but instead of chips use a slab of roasted potato. To create our seven-layer potato skins, we started with some of the traditional toppings for potato skins — bacon, scallions and cheese. From there, we added crumbled sausage (more pig!), a garlicky sour cream and caramelized onions. OK, so they’re more like over-stuffed, almost twice-baked potatoes. But with party food this delicious, who cares?

A seriously intense meatball BY ELIZABETH KARMEL Associated Press Writer

S

the flour, corn meal, sugar, baking powder and salt. In a small bowl, whisk together the milk and the egg. Add the melted butter, whisking as you add it. Gently stir the liquid mixture into the dry mixture. Fold in the scallions, corn (if using) and jalapenos. Spoon the cornbread mixture over the chili and bake for 25 to 30 minutes. Spoon into bowls and garnish with guacamole, sour cream and shredded cheese.

upposedly, we all have our dirty little food secrets, those crazy things we’re embarrassed to admit we love. But the truth is, I don’t consider any of my loves to be secrets. If I love something, I am proud to eat it, no matter how trashy or elegant it is. If I was ashamed to eat it, I wouldn’t eat it! Which is why in this day of aspirational organic, local, vegan, sustainable, nose-to-tail eating, I think a little honesty about what tastes good and satisfies the soul is important. And that’s why I’m sharing my No. 1 pick for great Super Bowl party food, a trashy, delicious little recipe for sausage meatballs I got from my Aunt Mert. I made them twice this Thanksgiving for a tony northern crowd, and I served

8 medium potatoes 1/2 cup sour cream 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 large yellow onions, diced 8 slices cooked bacon, crumbled Salt and ground black pepper 1 cup shredded cheddar cheese 8 ounces loose sausage meat, cooked 2 scallions, sliced and crumbled Heat the oven to 400 degrees. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil, then coat with cooking spray. Poke the potatoes all over with a fork. Microwave on high until tender, 10 to 12 minutes depending on the wattage of your microwave. Allow to cool until easily handled. Meanwhile, in a medium skillet over medium, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil. Add the onions and cook until softened and browned, 15 to 18 minutes. When the potatoes are cool enough to handle, cut them in half. Scoop out and reserve the insides, leaving a 1/4-inch-thick wall of potato flesh on the skin. Arrange the halves skin sides down on the prepared baking sheet. Brush the potatoes with the remaining tablespoon of oil. Sprinkle lightly with salt and black pepper, then bake for 15 to 20 minutes, or until crisped and browned. Meanwhile, in a medium bowl stir together the reserved potato flesh and the sausage. Season with salt and pepper, if needed. In a small bowl, stir together the sour cream and garlic. Set aside. Once the potato skins have baked, start layering them. Spoon a bit of the caramelized onions into the bottom of each shell. Top with the sausage-potato mixture. This should mostly fill the shell. Sprinkle crumbled bacon over the potatoes, followed by cheese. Bake for another 10 minutes. Top with a dollop of the garlic sour cream and sprinkle with the scallions. Serve immediately. Nutrition information per serving: 160 calories; 70 calories from fat (44 percent of total calories); 8 g fat (2.5 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 20 mg cholesterol; 16 g carbohydrate; 1 g fiber; 2 g sugar; 7 g protein; 210 mg sodium.

SPICY SAUSAGE MEATBALLS You can prep this recipe in advance. Follow through the step of forming the meat mixture into balls, then arrange them on a baking sheet and freeze. Once frozen, store in plastic bags. Cook frozen meatballs as directed, but increase oven time to 35 minutes. Start to finish: 40 minutes (15 minutes active) Makes 36 meatballs 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon melted butter 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder or granulated garlic

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1 pound grated sharp cheddar cheese 1 pound loose spicy sausage meat 2 eggs Heat the oven to 350 degrees.

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt, butter, garlic and cayenne. Set aside. In a second large bowl, use your hands to mix together the cheese, sausage and eggs until well combined. Add the flour mixture and mix for several minutes to ensure all ingredients are evenly distributed. Pinch off about 1/4 cup of the mixture and roll into 1 1/2-inch meatballs. Arrange the meatballs on a rimmed baking sheet. Bake for 25 minutes. Serve hot. Nutrition information per meatball: 110 calories; 60 calories from fat (55 percent of total calories); 7 g fat (3 g saturated; 0 g trans fats); 35 mg cholesterol; 6 g carbohydrate; 0 g fiber; 0 g sugar; 6 g protein; 220 mg sodium.

them right alongside smoked salmon and caviar. The sausage balls were scarfed up while the more sophisticated offerings were ignored. They are spicy, savory, salty and full of protein, so they are the perfect pairing for the beer that typically flows on Super Bowl Sunday! The simplest southern sausage meatball recipe is three ingredients — bulk hot breakfast sausage, cheddar cheese and Bisquick. They are so simple that even someone who can’t boil water can make them! All you need is a bowl and a fork (or clean hands) to mix

everything together and a baking sheet to cook them on. If you don’t like spicy foods, you can leave out the cayenne, but I think it helps balance the richness of the meatballs. I also use the sharpest cheddar that I can buy and prefer to grate the cheese myself because it seems to melt better. If you prefer Italian flavors, you can adapt the recipe and use bulk hot Italian sausage and substitute 1/2 cup of grated Parmesan or Romano cheese for 1/4 pound of the cheddar.


CLASSIFIEDS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

THE ITEM

D1

DELINQUENT TAX SALE Under and by virtue of Tax Executions issued by the Treasurer of Sumter County of taxes past due and unpaid, proper levy has been made on the real estate hereinafter described as designated in the office of the County Auditor. I will sell the same at public auction to the highest bidder in the Court Room #1 at 141 North Main Street, in the City and County of Sumter, State of South Carolina at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, February 12, 2014. Procedures for Tax Sale are found in Title 12 Chapter 51 of the Code of Laws of South Carolina, as amended.

The successful purchaser (or assignee) is also responsible for the cost of the mortgage/title search. TERMS: CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK OR MONEY ORDER * ALL BIDDERS MAY PRE-REGISTER IN SUMTER COUNTY TREASURER’S OFFICE FROM NOW THRU FEBRUARY 10, 2014. THERE IS A $10.00 NON-REFUNDABLE REGISTRATION FEE. NO REGISTRATION ON DAY OF SALE.

REDEMPTION period for property sold is TWELVE months from the date of the sale. The successful purchaser (or assignee) is responsible for the cost of tax title/or bill(s) of sale plus any documentary stamps necessary to be affixed and recording fees if property is not redeemed.

CAROLINA B. RICHARDSON COUNTY TREASURER/TAX COLLECTOR

REC #

TAXPAYER

DIST. DESCRIPTION

LOT/BLD/ACERAGE

REC #

TAXPAYER

DIST. DESCRIPTION

860415-12-3 848622-12-3 847864-12-3 860437-12-3 879173-12-3 885769-12-3 831326-12-3 864853-12-3 834898-12-3 852444-12-3 883007-12-3 877906-12-3 834706-12-3 875446-12-3 872206-12-3 828533-12-3 865546-12-3 846181-12-3 840925-12-3 813743-12-3 841338-12-3 841339-12-3 841340-12-3 841341-12-3 825155-12-3 859859-12-3 856369-12-3 856370-12-3 849444-12-3 887720-12-3 857414-12-3 898181-12-5 825444-12-3 833679-12-3 842817-12-3 857433-12-3 830969-12-3 871977-12-3 861411-12-3 813520-12-3 873796-12-3 875965-12-3 825199-12-3 835616-12-3 880785-12-3 862416-12-3 890357-12-3 849133-12-3 849134-12-3 820375-12-3 835687-12-3 875962-12-3 871322-12-3 844282-12-3 859395-12-3 886714-12-3 884224-12-3 846099-12-3 815026-12-3 815027-12-3 815269-12-3 840771-12-3 878393-12-3 817113-12-3 817058-12-3 843656-12-3 825394-12-3 846532-12-3 873338-12-3 813460-12-3 816797-12-3 834687-12-3 880930-12-3 825387-12-3 877851-12-3 870566-12-3 851114-12-3 826751-12-3 888133-12-3 848925-12-3 883606-12-3 868618-12-3 868619-12-3 817163-12-3 877588-12-3 885541-12-3 885542-12-3 997697-12-5 867384-12-3 842649-12-3 887327-12-3 879935-12-3 871576-12-3 841909-12-3 858451-12-3 846251-12-3 874778-12-3 845673-12-3 866269-12-3 873253-12-3 865531-12-3 848493-12-3 887077-12-3 885929-12-3 819180-12-3 857592-12-3 819152-12-3 819153-12-3 819155-12-3 859391-12-3 845752-12-3 819364-12-3 888952-12-3 879395-12-3 848590-12-3 848591-12-3 848592-12-3 846563-12-3 848593-12-3 872316-12-3

ABRAM AARON ADAMS GARLAND J ADAMS JULIE HARRIET R & REMBER ALBERT CARRIE ALEXANDER ABENA & MONTGOMERY P ALLAN IDA MAY & BURGESS LOUELL ALLEN HORACE JR ALSTON ALINE HEIRS OF ALSTON BERNARD CRAIG & STEPHAN ALSTON GENERAL JR ALSTON JOHN ARDIS DELILAH ARDIS RUSSELL MARK & SUSAN ARDIS TOMMIE & MCQUILLEN PEARL ARTIS EARLINE C*& BOYD GEORGIA ATKINSON AMELIA J ATKINSON FANNIE HEIRS OF ATM INVESTMENT HOLDINGS LLC AVIN J ROLAND LE HEIRS OF AYERS FREDDIE BAKER WILLIE RAY & SHAUN E BAKER WILLIE RAY & SHAUN E BAKER WILLIE RAY & SHAUN E BAKER WILLIE RAY & SHAUN E BALLARD WALTER ET AL TR BALLS MILDRED BALLARD BALLS SAMUEL L JR BALLS SAMUEL L JR BANK FIRST CITIZENS & TRUST CO BANK OF AMERICA NATIONAL TRS & BARKLEY RICKY D BARWICK THOMAS W & MARGIE W BAXTER ROOSEVELT BENBOW TERRY BENENHALEY BOBBY DERALD BENENHALEY JULIA HEIRS OF BENENHALEY SANDRA L BENNETT JENE M & NICHELLE M BETHEA LETTIE JANE TR FOR WELL BETHEA TOMMY L & SANDRA BETHUNE MAGGIE PEARSON LE ETAL BLAIR ANNETTE N ETAL BLAIR JAMES H BLANDING ELIJAH & HERBERT BLANDING WILLIAM LUTHER ETAL BLIGEN CORINE I BOOKER TONEY D BOSTICK KEJUAN D BOSTICK KEJUAN D BOSTON ZOE BOWDEN WILLIAM L & RAY RONALD BOWMAN TIMOTHY JACOB BOYER WILLIAM O BRACEY SOPHIA A BRACY FREDIE BRADFORD WILLIE HEIRS OF BRADING ALICE M BRADING GENE BOYLE ETAL BRADLEY FRANCIS D & DAVIS BRADLEY FRANCIS D & DAVIS BRADLEY JAMES T BRADLEY LAKESHIA BRADLEY PAUL EUGENE ETAL BRADLEY WILLARD BRADLEY WILLARD J JR BRADO JAMES & MARCI BROCK JAMES A BROOKS ARNOLD E SR BROOKS TODD BROWN BETTY BROWN BETTY L CUMMINGS BROWN CHARLES W JR & ROXANNE BROWN DAISY G ESTATE OF BROWN EUGENE BROWN HARRY L BROWN JOEY R & SHARON M BROWN JOYCE BROWN KATIE BROWN LATOYA LAVON BROWN LOUISE LE ETAL BROWN MARCUS ESTATE BULTMAN WILLIAM F III ETAL BULTMAN WILLIAM F III ETAL BURCH LIZZIE BURGESS KAREN E BURGESS MOLLIE HEIRS OF BURGESS MOLLIE HEIRS OF BURGESS SUMPTER A JR ETAL BURNS PANSY BURNS RICHARD H & HICE JUDY B BUTLER RICHARD JR TR & HEIRS C T STRATEGIES LLC TRUSTEE CABBAGESTALK BLONDIE M CAIN SHIRLEY CAMPBELL FRANCIS CAMPBELL FRANCIS & RUTH D CAMPBELL LEE ROY JR CAMPBELL LEROY & FRANCIS CAMPBELL RUTH D CANTEY GILBERT EST ETAL CAROLINA GOLDEN PRODUCTS CO A CAROLINA INVESTMENT CORP CARTER JAMES CARTER MAGGIE KELLY HEIRS OF CEASAR MACK CHARLES FRANCIS HEIRS OF CHATMAN JOSEPH LOVETTI ETAL CHATMAN JOSEPH LOVETTI ETAL CHATMAN JOSEPH LOVETTI ETAL CHEEKS ARTHUR CHINA MELVIN CHINA VALERIE CHURCH EBENEZER AME OF MAYESV CHURCH MIRACLE DELIVERANCE TEM CLARK SHERIKA CLARK SHERIKA CLARK SHERIKA CLARK SHERIKA CLARK SHERIKA CLAVEN RUEBIN AKA REUBEN

02 1990001013 02 1350003057 02 2360001005 02 1990002034 17 2290601015 17 2271001011 02 1341001007 02 0740003016 02 0880001026 02 1850001028 17 2291103009 17 2270403022 02 2111101007 17 2481602007 17 2480903068 02 2211402006 02 0760002010 02 2520305007 02 1660001002 01 2681202008 02 3720003003 02 3720003004 02 3720003005 02 3720003006 01 2510101018 02 1800003034 02 2870002020 02 2870002030 02 1590501004 17 2051302038 02 2130002065 17 2490104058 01 2510805039 02 3080102003 02 1320102013 02 1350002052 02 1000004022 17 2270502014 02 2250002017 01 2510602044 17 2501601024 17 2270304024 01 2510701026 02 1320101017 17 2281004050 02 2990401007 02 1170001038 02 1430003013 02 1430003083 01 2700002057 02 1330202013 17 2281406014 17 2271206045 02 1000004007 02 1570003083 17 2290703058 17 2290801011 02 2310001013 17 2270902012 01 2270902020 01 2700001031 02 1300002115 17 2291301044 01 2510905037 01 2510905036 02 1430003091 01 2510804007 02 0760002043 17 2290605020 01 2500602003 01 2500602004 02 2100002055 17 2281411007 01 2510803015 17 2500907030 17 2490806010 02 3420001037 01 2500402014 17 2271305052 02 2730004039 17 2501501039 17 2281301030 02 2451501003 01 2501503046 17 2480903051 17 2270305004 17 2270305005 17 2501602032 02 2360004005 02 2251301019 17 2490806023 17 2290201031 17 2501104006 02 0931101006 02 1380101018 02 1380101017 17 2261201006 02 1500001010 02 1380003043 17 2500908054 02 2250002041 02 0870002032 17 229080305400001 17 2271303006 01 2700002036 02 1150001013 01 2510804016 01 2510804017 01 2510804022 02 1570003072 02 1360002069 01 2681202048 18 3050003010 17 2271302007 02 0880002106 02 0910001012 02 1341602011 02 1410001028 02 1440003008 17 2501602039

6.11 ACR .72 ACR 1.85 ACR 2 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 2.87 ACR 1.11 ACR 4.69 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1.35 ACR 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 2.00 ACR 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 2.00 ACR 1.96 ACR 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT .66 ACR 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2.18 ACR 1.48 ACR 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 3 BLD 3.04 ACR 4.60 ACR 1.48 ACR 4 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1.50 ACR 1 LOT 1 LOT 1.00 ACR 1 LOT 2.51 ACR 8.00 ACR 1.00 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1.62 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1.13 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 3 BLD 1 LOT 11.64 ACR 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1.63 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 5.17 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 6.00 ACR 2 BLD 1 LOT 1.60 ACR 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 BLD 1 LOT 1.00 ACR 6.91 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1.00 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 24.27 ACR 1 LOT 1.56 ACR 1.00 ACR 1 LOT 1.50 ACR 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT

827288-12-3 841216-12-3 828447-12-3 880723-12-3 997832-12-5 855603-12-3 885927-12-3 848238-12-3 886394-12-3 997845-12-5 862194-12-3 837080-12-3 848158-12-3 850420-12-3 844602-12-3 855358-12-3 864934-12-3 889644-12-3 794398-11-5 888985-12-3 842444-12-3 837667-12-3 877516-12-3 888110-12-3 888111-12-3 816989-12-3 865278-12-3 869464-12-3 833627-12-3 852793-12-3 886439-12-3 842281-12-3 855064-12-3 866267-12-3 865009-12-3 861347-12-3 861348-12-3 929131-12-5 873587-12-3 879912-12-3 834189-12-3 864780-12-3 864977-12-3 886973-12-3 885594-12-3 879103-12-3 885598-12-3 885600-12-3 876138-12-3 863106-12-3 845292-12-3 845293-12-3 845294-12-3 862082-12-3 848250-12-3 840260-12-3 870096-12-3 816432-12-3 881696-12-3 881785-12-3 889048-12-3 822878-12-3 825421-12-3 883187-12-3 898164-12-5 873478-12-3 878821-12-3 872514-12-3 822843-12-3 824636-12-3 817184-12-3 886785-12-3 849767-12-3 822503-12-3 863020-12-3 863021-12-3 848874-12-3 813657-12-3 868384-12-3 816926-12-3 885509-12-3 858655-12-3 835735-12-3 848583-12-3 872156-12-3 879155-12-3 851498-12-3 857800-12-3 886423-12-3 841241-12-3 862081-12-3 888774-12-3 815481-12-3 815483-12-3 815484-12-3 815488-12-3 873418-12-3 869297-12-3 836746-12-3 839705-12-3 828350-12-3 831327-12-3 842474-12-3 875681-12-3 881697-12-3 827223-12-3 825223-12-3 879072-12-3 842897-12-3 869497-12-3 846269-12-3 883664-12-3 826594-12-3 826596-12-3 820851-12-3 820300-12-3 831392-12-3 840411-12-3 867936-12-3 820351-12-3

CLEA CHARLIE CLEA IDA L* & MARTIN BETTY C & COLCLOUGH DELORES D COLCLOUGH DELORES DENISE COLCLOUGH JOHNIE MAE COLEMAN FRED J ESTATE COLIER LUCINDA HEIRS OF CONTEE GREGORY CONYERS BEULAH HEIRS& ROSA LEE CONYERS JACKLYN COUSAR BETTY ET AL COUSAR DAVID E & TINA M COVENANT REALTY LLC COX PAMELA COX PAMELA FLO CR CAPITAL GROUP LLC CROOM MELVIN LEROY CROWN LAND CORP CRUZ SANTAGO & OSORIO JOSE R DANIELS MAGGIE M DAVIS ESTATE LLC DAVIS JAMES O JR & ROSS DAVIS JEFFREY DAVIS LIBSON HEIRS OF DAVIS LIBSON HEIRS OF DAVIS LILLIE B DAVIS THOMAS DAVIS THOMAS DAWSON JUDGE DEAS WHIT SR & RUTH D DELAY MARY N DENNIS FRANK DENNIS MARTHA ESTATE DENNIS ORVIN LEE SR & IVORY L DENNIS TOM REALTY INC DENNIS WILLIAM C JR & SUSAN L DENNIS WILLIAM C JR & SUSAN L DICKEY LEVERNE ETAL DICKS BERNICE H DICKS BERNICE H LE DINKINS CLEMENTINA DINKINS EARNESTINE DELORIS DINKINS EDGAR HEIRS OF DINKINS STEPHEN L DIXON ELIZABETH B DIXON ELIZABETH B DIXON ELIZABETH B DIXON ELIZABETH B DIXON ELIZABETH B DOBSON DONNIE LEE DOZIER REGGIE H & BAXTER TERES DOZIER REGGIE H & BAXTER TERES DOZIER REGGIE H & BAXTER TERES DUBOSE GERRY B & HODGE GEORGE DUFFY KENNETH F ETAL DUKE STACEY & KIRKWOOD THELMA DUKES WILLIE MAE DUNCAN CRAIG L DUPONT DOROTHY ESTATE DURANT MARTINEZ DWYER KENNETH DYSON BILL DYSON BILL EADY DONALD & RONALD ECKENRODE GLORIA EDWARDS VIVIAN & HAIRSTON ROSE ELKIN STEVEN EMERY ROSEMELL ETAL ENGLISH H L ENGLISH HARRY ENGLISH HARRY L EVANS LUE ELLA FARQUHARSON J FISHER GENEVA C FLEMING WINFRED FLEMING WINFRED FLOYD ARTHUR HEIRS OF FLOYD JUNE & STEVENS BRITTANY FORD ELIZABETH FORD JOHN H JR FORD THOMAS FRANKLIN BURNELL & ANNIE LEE FULWOOD BURNIE SR HEIRS OF GAMBLE DEREK GAMBLE DONNA L ETAL GARY MAGGIE GASKINS JOYCE ANN GATHERS FLORA* & BEN HEIRS OF GAY ELOISE GEDDINGS EDMOND D & HEIDI J GEDDINGS EDWARD W GETER LINDA MCBRIDE GILLUS VERA ETAL GILLUS VERA ETAL GILLUS VERA ETAL GILLUS VERA ETAL GIVENS GLADYS B GIVENS THOMAS GLASSER C C GLISSON ANTONYA M GLOVER ALVIN GLOVER BELLE GLOVER CORETTA GLOVER KENNETH O & REGINALD S GLOVER THERESA A ESTATE GOINES LOREE S HEIRS OF GOODMAN LOUISE HEIRS OF GOODWIN KEONDRA S ETAL GRANT DENNIE L GRANT HENRIETTA GRANT LIONEL & JESSIE & LETITI GREEN CLARENCE GREEN CLARENCE GREEN CLARENCE GREEN DELORES W* ETAL GREEN EMANUEL (ESTATE) GREEN GARRY J GREEN GARRY JANNELL GREEN HERBERT & SONS GREENE ROBERTA

02 0890002032 02 0890002013 02 2520005067 17 2500903049 02 2520005068 02 1000007003 17 2271302029 02 3300002023 17 2281403024 17 2281504031 02 2670002017 02 2451401005 02 1560703004 02 2960003011 02 2221602005 02 2370002019 02 0760003012 27 1690102012 17 2481601008 18 3098201002 02 1380003049 02 2000801022 17 2291201036 17 2271207003 17 2271207011 01 2510201021 02 0920002019 17 2281304005 02 1490001017 02 0780002044 17 2281409005 02 1901003006 02 0840001074 02 1380002033 02 0840001035 02 2241102010 02 2241102011 02 3600001021 17 2290902057 17 2290703024 02 0890004012 02 0880002053 02 0788101005 17 2291405040 17 2270504005 17 2271203035 17 2281201027 17 2291302009 17 2490704006 02 3671102003 17 2290605011 02 2990002003 02 2990002038 02 2580001013 02 1500002086 02 2650001034 17 2281406032 02 1811002010 17 2270501054 17 2271208004 18 3080907011 02 0760002011 01 2500403001 17 2271302027 02 1280902020 17 2270401039 17 2480904042 17 2270202007 01 2681202026 01 2510501006 01 2301202008 17 2291001018 02 0990002011 01 2460002029 02 3650001021 02 3650002027 02 0880002134 01 2510904010 02 2241103011 01 2681201001 17 2270302029 02 1440002003 02 2100001005 02 1300001016 17 2291102020 17 2271101058 02 1640001022 02 1310002014 17 2281405035 02 2120401031 02 2580001004 18 3098108004 02 0990602009 17 2271205013 17 2290605036 17 2480802050 17 2301401001 17 2301401018 02 1811502016 02 2240501016 02 1921601022 02 1980001071 02 2661601021 17 2281411009 17 2260503033 02 2200002012 01 2510202030 17 2291303011 02 0910003023 17 2271104054 02 0880002023 17 2291202014 17 2291203041 01 2670202003 01 2480002018 01 2681201006 27 1680701018 02 1170001012 02 339000200600001 02 2990003017

LOT/BLD/ACERAGE 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 2.14 ACR 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 4.08 ACR 2.30 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1.63 ACR 1 LOT .88 ACR 5.00 ACR 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1.02 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 10.29 ACR 2.33 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 3.00 ACR 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 2.07 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 3 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 4.18 ACR 2.00 ACR .85 ACR 1 LOT 2.71 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 3 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1.38 ACR 2 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 3 BLD 1 LOT 1.04 ACR 1.00 ACR 2.12 ACR 3 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 12.96 ACR 1 LOT 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 5.02 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1.00 ACR 6.00 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1.25 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 2.40 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 13.22 ACR 1 LOT 3.00 ACR 1 LOT 1 LOT 4.00 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 2 BLD 1.00 ACR


D2

CLASSIFIEDS

THE ITEM

REC #

TAXPAYER

DIST. DESCRIPTION

883103-12-3 869597-12-3 896153-12-3 869100-12-3 819333-12-3 866419-12-3 872259-12-3 888286-12-3 862709-12-3 873868-12-3 888485-12-3 881967-12-3 887330-12-3 836065-12-3 818695-12-3 873520-12-3 873521-12-3 873522-12-3 861862-12-3 861863-12-3 861865-12-3 861866-12-3 861867-12-3 817439-12-3 817440-12-3 877416-12-3 813744-12-3 827359-12-3 874824-12-3 841149-12-3 816729-12-3 843186-12-3 886687-12-3 849547-12-3 849548-12-3 849549-12-3 833287-12-3 847125-12-3 868620-12-3 865114-12-3 839247-12-3 867564-12-3 870074-12-3 833751-12-3 833752-12-3 833753-12-3 833754-12-3 833755-12-3 828192-12-3 853095-12-3 865935-12-3 838214-12-3 883170-12-3 831960-12-3 887071-12-3 889232-12-3 862775-12-3 862776-12-3 862777-12-3 874041-12-3 849360-12-3 879731-12-3 883487-12-3 871117-12-3 889222-12-3 819032-12-3 840924-12-3 870614-12-3 866384-12-3 885947-12-3 870280-12-3 822423-12-3 898180-12-5 855193-12-3 855194-12-3 879880-12-3 889605-12-3 885655-12-3 856715-12-3 856716-12-3 868579-12-3 929089-12-5 874952-12-3 857916-12-3 857917-12-3 850012-12-3 858480-12-3 871040-12-3 889683-12-3 855077-12-3 014483-12-5 849140-12-3 825016-12-3 888722-12-3 887462-12-3 843162-12-3 843163-12-3 876139-12-3 858314-12-3 885487-12-3 869281-12-3 869282-12-3 878295-12-3 875126-12-3 875127-12-3 834838-12-3 848145-12-3 888951-12-3 846249-12-3 870484-12-3 870007-12-3 874738-12-3 853134-12-3 876726-12-3 832624-12-3 837976-12-3 823580-12-3 861936-12-3 998309-12-5 820908-12-3 882949-12-3 016383-12-5 885396-12-3 839706-12-3 831872-12-3 831873-12-3 831874-12-3 837392-12-3 862976-12-3 843857-12-3 856241-12-3 883843-12-3 855176-12-3 883138-12-3 855187-12-3 827329-12-3 831824-12-3 817519-12-3 886354-12-3 887387-12-3 829181-12-3 885318-12-3 869374-12-3 006187-12-5 816820-12-3 861681-12-3

GREGG TRACE C GREGG WILLIAM JR GTE SOUTH INCORPORATED H R SNETHEN HOME IMPROVEMENT HAIRSTON PAULA ETAL HALL EARLY MAE & DIGGS JAMES H HAMIN DARNASIA BY CONSERVATOR HAMMOND MARY P & MACK ADA P ET HAMPTON MORDECAI HEIRS OF HAMPTON TRACEY & STEPHANIE HANNIBAL HALLIE JR & STEVENS E HARBOUR PORTOFOLIO VII LP HARRINGTON DARLENE BRUNSON HARRIS AVA KERSHAW HARRIS ENTERPRISE HARRIS GLORIA HARRIS GLORIA HARRIS GLORIA HARRIS JAMES V HARRIS JAMES V HARRIS JAMES V HARRIS JAMES V HARRIS JAMES V HARRIS JAMES V HARRIS JAMES V HARRIS JAMES V DBA HARRIS ENTE HARRIS SHEILA R HARVIN ERNEST HASKELL A CARTER & APRIL HASKINS JAMES CLAYTON HATCHELL BOBBY B HAYES ANGELA HAYNESWORTH JANIE HEIRS OF & HAYWARD JOHN L HAYWARD JOHN L HAYWARD JOHN L HELTON JACQUELINE & JAMES OTIS HENSON BERTHA P HERRINGTON JOHNNY L HEIRS OF HIGGINS PAULINE HODGE JOHNNIE SR HODGE JOHNNY ALLEN SR HODGE VERONICA SCOTT HOLMES ESTELLE F & KEITH HOLMES ESTELLE F & KEITH HOLMES ESTELLE F & KEITH HOLMES ESTELLE F & KEITH HOLMES ESTELLE F & KEITH HOLMES JOSEPH*&SMITH SARA ETAL HOOPS LLC HOOVER JUDY H HEIRS OF HOPKINS ANTHONY & LORETTA HOPKINS EARTHA ETAL HORTON SARA E & LOUIE HUDSON MCWILLIE L HEIRS OF ISAAC JANIE LOU J & WILLIE ISAAC JEFFERSON T ISAAC JEFFERSON T ISAAC JEFFERSON T ISAAC TRACEY IVEY NICOLE LYNN JACKSON JOSHUA JACKSON LORETTA JAMES CARL A & SHERMAN RANDOLP JAMES FRANCES H ET AL C/O JAMES QUEEN E JB PROPERTIES OF SC LLC JEFFERSON ALAN D JENKINS GERTRUDE JENKINS LAWRENCE HEIRS OF JETER SADIE C JOHNSON ANNIE BELL M HEIRS OF JOHNSON JAMES JOHNSON JOHNATHAN M JOHNSON JOHNATHAN M JOHNSON POPE B JOHNSON PRESTON JONES ADA & WILLIE HEIRS OF JONES EARL M & DEBORAH A JONES EARL M & DEBORAH A JONES MARY T ESTATE JONES MARY TINDALL ESTATE KEITH GERTRUDE FOLSOM MARSHALL KEITH WILHELMENIA R KEITH WILHELMENIA R KENDALL CHARLES A JR KENDRICK SALLIE HEIRS OF KHAN MOHAMMED H & TILAT H KIRVEN ROBERT F KOLB WARREN ESTATE (HAZEL)* LAKEWOOD GOLF LLC LAWSON WILLIE SR* & ANGELA M LEMON NORNESS LESANE ALEX & HOLLAND PATRICIA LESANE CARLISLE & NEDDIE LEVERNE TURKESSA & DEBARGE KE LEVERNE TURKESSA & DEBARGE KE LEVINER CONSTRUCTION & LEWIS GERALDINE LEWIS MALACHI HEIRS OF LEWIS MARY LEWIS MARY LEWIS MARY A LEWIS SENIOR III & ANNIE MARIE LEWIS SENIOR III & ANNIE MARIE LINTON SANDY LITTLE KAYLA M LIVINGSTON GLENN LOGAN ANGELA M LOWERY NETTIE MABIN ABRAHAM R & ELLA M MAJOR CAROLYN MAPLE GEORGE ETAL MARION FRANCES MARTIN CHARLES BRADLEY & KASSA MATTHEWS NELLIE MAYHEW EDWIN E MAZURSKY & EVANS ATTORNEYS ETC MCCAIN MARGUERITE R MCCANTS JOYCELYNN TRUSTEE MCCLAIN EDNA ESTATE MCCLEARY EDITH R ESTATE MCCONICO SARAH G HEIRS OF & MCCORMICK PAULA MCCRACKEN WILLIAM DAVID III MCCRACKEN WILLIAM DAVID III MCCRACKEN WILLIAM DAVID III MCCRACKEN WILLIAM DAVID III MCCRAY LEROY MCCRAY THOMAS EDWARD MCDANIEL GENEVA ESTATE MCDANIELS GENEVA MCDONALD MICHELLE R & MOSES TE MCDONALD RUBY J TRUSTEE ETAL MCELVEEN MARY & SUSAN R MCELVEEN SARAH MCFADDEN BEN MCGILL ERNEST STEVE MCGORTY JEWEL CANARELLA MCKALSEN RADDIN D MCKENNA JOHN R MCKENZIE LEROY MCKENZIE LEROY E MCKENZIE TONY M MCKINNEY DANIEL L MCLEOD EPHRAIM HEIRS OF

17 2291104026 17 2301401015 17 2500204077 I 02 2221602002 01 2060003006 02 1500901008 17 2040201013 17 2290605008 02 3300002006 17 2501101057 17 2500908052 17 2291104001 17 2490806030 02 0330001008 17 2500905002 17 2271207027 17 2500905006 17 2500905016 17 2271207025 17 2271303061 17 2500905004 17 2500905017 17 2500906015 01 2500908066 17 2500908068 17 2260402020 01 2681203005 02 1370001032 17 2280201013 02 1630001086 17 2290502070 02 1170002040 17 2290702020 02 2870003040 02 2870003041 02 2870003042 02 2730004007 02 1960002037 02 2320004020 02 0880001006 02 2560001005 02 2560001004 17 2301302048 17 2290102011 17 2290201052 17 2290201054 17 2290201057 17 2290702002 02 1310004001 02 1551001015 02 0991402012 02 1000003007 17 2281504026 02 1300902001 17 2480003010 18 3080905017 02 3350002020 02 3350002021 02 3350002022 17 2480902004 02 1380003047 17 2290702015 17 2270503025 17 2500904025 18 3080802013 01 2510502057 02 2440001300 17 2291105026 02 1470002045 17 2271305025 17 2271208012 01 2510804035 17 2480902016 27 1681002007 02 2511201007 17 2281504003 27 1681002037 17 2270503041 02 1551401019 02 1551401020 02 2080701020 02 2080701019 17 2290701015 02 1330001012 02 1331001002 02 0880001021 02 1390001025 17 2280802012 27 1680003001 02 1800003024 02 2230001086 02 1400002064 01 2481402012 18 3098106005 17 2500904026 02 1760001003 02 1760001012 17 2020101039 02 1360002003 17 2270203006 17 2501105003 17 2501105007 17 2290602037 17 2500908016 17 2500908019 02 1880001067 02 1970002050 18 3098105017 02 0991202016 17 2290502058 17 2270201030 17 2271306028 02 1561402002 17 2309202035 02 1270002006 02 0820001040 02 1511202004 02 2511301010 17 2270303018 01 2510804087 17 2500908045 02 1590001018 17 2260502044 02 1390901001 02 1590001025 02 1590001027 02 1590001028 02 1590001061 02 3510002003 02 1430003077 02 2520304001 17 2270304012 02 3080101003 17 2281301032 02 2110003017 02 1570002009 02 1180001005 01 2510902065 17 2481601022 17 2500703009 02 0991105002 17 2260402018 17 2271208058 02 3600001015 01 2460202010 02 2370004003

LOT/BLD/ACERAGE 2 BLD 1 LOT 1.21 ACR 1 LOT 1.03 ACR 1.00 ACR 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 28.00 ACR 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 2 LOT 5.00 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2.83 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 2.00 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 8.83 ACR 1 LOT 5.65 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 12.87 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 2.07 ACR 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 7.86 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 22.45 ACR 11.11 ACR 11.11 ACR 2 BLD 1 LOT 2.26 ACR 2 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1.97 ACR 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 3.50 ACR 2.50 ACR 1.00 ACR 19.36 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 2.00 ACR 154.64 ACR 2.08 ACR 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 5.04 ACR 13.86 ACR 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1.11 ACR 1.70 ACR 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 3.77 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1.74 ACR 7.35 ACR 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1.00 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 53.39 ACR 1.14 ACR 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 3.15 ACR 3.00 ACR .92 ACR 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 6.21 ACR 1.00 ACR

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

REC #

TAXPAYER

DIST. DESCRIPTION

875798-12-3 848804-12-3 828884-12-3 877281-12-3 845297-12-3 849001-12-3 879099-12-3 874545-12-3 891015-12-3 834080-12-3 877211-12-3 876136-12-3 869047-12-3 869763-12-3 844185-12-3 875048-12-3 891295-12-3 879969-12-3 879970-12-3 855638-12-3 828570-12-3 879287-12-3 842324-12-3 883087-12-3 833391-12-3 862322-12-3 818552-12-3 995910-12-5 006017-12-5 860327-12-3 872813-12-3 859854-12-3 818783-12-3 855223-12-3 857305-12-3 836144-12-3 834877-12-3 826746-12-3 822603-12-3 822604-12-3 867648-12-3 851272-12-3 817036-12-3 883132-12-3 834713-12-3 881638-12-3 000024-12-5 882975-12-3 861834-12-3 861835-12-3 861836-12-3 861837-12-3 826661-12-3 851719-12-3 888590-12-3 885388-12-3 888334-12-3 851713-12-3 830431-12-3 026752-12-5 812570-12-3 863031-12-3 871133-12-3 998328-12-5 856240-12-3 845630-12-3 845770-12-3 838969-12-3 834936-12-3 860217-12-3 833408-12-3 816722-12-3 873094-12-3 852664-12-3 816507-12-3 858586-12-3 835211-12-3 883032-12-3 844477-12-3 909807-12-5 888037-12-3 846140-12-3 867013-12-3 869269-12-3 885820-12-3 882935-12-3 882937-12-3 885877-12-3 885878-12-3 833294-12-3 909682-12-5 874029-12-3 837751-12-3 857912-12-3 857913-12-3 857910-12-3 857911-12-3 883019-12-3 833436-12-3 833437-12-3 872527-12-3 834763-12-3 827842-12-3 887548-12-3 995796-12-5 874264-12-3 844652-12-3 843711-12-3 837011-12-3 871258-12-3 813722-12-3 828597-12-3 840706-12-3 815330-12-3 815154-12-3 026537-12-5 842769-12-3 830321-12-3 826237-12-3 879521-12-3 819109-12-3 830175-12-3 834082-12-3 876606-12-3 870212-12-3 880441-12-3 874014-12-3 878513-12-3 998718-12-5 870144-12-3 880081-12-3 847914-12-3 876362-12-3 886955-12-3 886956-12-3 881749-12-3 819588-12-3 866080-12-3 814087-12-3 842701-12-3 848886-12-3 849536-12-3 888352-12-3 857454-12-3 873821-12-3 873835-12-3

MCLEOD ERVIN L MCLEOD JEFFREY D MCLEOD JOSEPH I AND MENDENHALL MCPHERSON LAWRENCE C & MARIE M MIDSTATE ENTERPRISES A PART ET MILLER KNAJA R MILLETTE MICHAEL J MIMS TROY GRIFFITH MIRACLE SQUARE INC MITCHUM CECIL JR MOISE ROBERT M TRUSTEE MOLE ROBERT MONTGOMERY PATAR MOORE PEGGIE M MOSES NATHALEE L MOSES ZELDA A ETAL MT PISGAH APTS INC MULDROW TOMMY L MULDROW TOMMY L MURRAY RACHEL LEE MYERS IRENE L NEAL VERNON CYLE NELSON DARYL NELSON DERRICK L NELSON FRIZEAL NELSON PETER & LUCILLE B NETTLES MARJORIE B TRUST NEW PRIVATE RESTAURANT PROPERT NICHOLS LAVONNE B ETAL NICKENS JOHN HENRY OBRIEN NANCY OLIVER MINNIE OSBORNE GREGORY OSBORNE STEVEN OSTEEN DAVID A OWENS RICHARD F & RANINA OWENS YOLANDA PAGE HENRY W PAGE HENRY W PAGE HENRY W PERRY LONNIE JR PERRY STACEY & BRIDGET & PETTIGREW ROBERT PHILLIPS DAVID PINEVIEW GOLF LLC PLAYER RIC ETAL PLEASANT ANTHONY JR PORCHER LATOYA PORCHER MICHAEL PORCHER MICHAEL PORCHER MICHAEL PORCHER MICHAEL PORTER GEORGE HEIRS OF PORTER SHANDEL R & BRITTANY S POSTELL JIMMIE LEE HEIRS OF POSTELL JIMMY LEE POTTS MARY CHARLES PREMIER PROEPRTIES LLC %HENRY PREUSSER TAMMY T PRICE SAUL E* & JOSEPHINE H PRIMES LARRY PRINCE ATLEE JR PRINCE LYNDELL & MICHELLE PRINGLE EDWARD PRINGLE GENEVA ESTATE PRINGLE RODRICK PRIVATEER CONSTRUCTION & DEV PUGH JASON & HAM WANDA RABON CHARLIE H JR RABON WILLIE M RAGIN THOMAS HEIRS OF RAGIN THOMAS N LE ET AL RAMSEY BRENDA RAMSEY TERRILL & YULANDA RAMSEY WANDA RANSOM JOHN SR RAY GARY A & PATRICIA RAY HERBERT JR RAY RONALD M & BOWDEN WILLIAM REAMES FRANCINE REESE DOROTHY B REGNIER JAMES S & KIMBERLY P RICH SOPHIA HEIRS OF%JERALD RICHARDSON ALMENIA B RICHARDSON ALPHONZA RICHARDSON LEON N ESTATE & ALM RICHARDSON LEON N ESTATE & ALM RICHARDSON WILLIE JR ETAL RICHARDSON WILLIE JR ETAL RILEY KENNETH & GLORIA L RILEY MELVIN & TAMIKA D RIVERS CLARENCE ET AL RIVERS ROSA MARIE ROACH BAUREGARD ROACH BAUREGARD ROACH MARION C A ROACH MARION C A ROBERSON WILLIE & FELDER MARVI ROBERTS PHILLIP L & ANNE K M ROBERTS PHILLIP L & ANNE K M ROBINSON CHRISTOPHER ROBINSON COREY ROBINSON DOROTHY ROBINSON NELL LUNETTE ET AL ROBINSON TOMMIE MAE MCCOY ROCK PROPERTIES OF SUMTER LLC RODRIGUEZ PEDRO & COOK MELISSA ROSE MARBETH L ROSE RUSSELL & DARIN ETAL RUTHERFORD RAYMOND SANDERS JAKE SANDERS JOHN EARL SAPP MARS SARVIS RONZ L SCARBOROUGH WILLIAM JR SCHMIDT PAUL G SCOTT BERNARD SCOTT JEAN S & WILLIE J SCOTT JULIUS C & BONNY P SCOTT MARGIE C SCOTT TROY KEVIN SHANNON DEDEE J SHARPER SAMMIE SHARPER TIFFANY SHANTA SHAW PEARL HEIRS OF SHAW THELMA SIMMONS JAMES W SIMMONS JAMES WAYNE SIMMONS KEVIN B LE SIMMONS LAWRENCE W SIMMONS REBECCA SIMON LAKESHA P & ALESHIA S SINGLETARY DERRICK SINGLETARY DERRICK E SINGLETARY DERRICK E SINGLETON JENNIFER ETAL SINGLETON MAMMIE SINGLETON MARY FRANCES & ROBER SINGLETON WILLIE HEIRS OF & SKINNER JOYCE ETAL SKULLY CHRISTOPHER & SUSAN SLATER NATALIA SMITH RANDOLPH & BERNICE J SNETHEN HECTOR R SOLOMON ONEAL A/K/A ONEIL SOUTH SUMTER NEW DIRECTION

17 2491503001 02 2120003015 02 237000400300001 17 1871302008 02 1550201006 02 0760001028 17 2270901012 17 2050501037 17 2291303043 02 2110002073 17 2491001009 17 2290602027 02 1970001103 17 2270501001 17 2290703035 17 2490806028 17 2291203040 17 2500903032 17 2501601028 02 1560902003 02 1380003044 17 2270305042 02 1501001007 17 2271303009 02 2870002009 02 2870002033 02 2540001032 17 2030702005 02 2080907005 02 1960001012 17 2050503016 02 1800003019 01 2071002022 02 1480002019 02 2011401009 02 1280902007 02 2010003067 01 2510801001 01 2510801002 01 2510801003 02 2640007018 02 3670702005 17 2270403033 17 2271105012 02 3390902002 17 2270202027 17 2271303031 17 2480702006 02 1590301022 17 2291402015 02 2430001016 17 2480801026 01 2301201014 02 1970001148 17 2260502024 17 2260502025 17 2291302022 02 1310001013 02 1890001041 17 2271304011 01 2481402011 02 3650002002 17 2491503029 01 2700002048 02 2520304009 02 1790502013 02 2200002008 02 2511203013 02 3130001032 02 1890201005 02 2081002010 01 2261001012 17 2270802064 02 1551601032 01 2080303007 02 1410002009 02 1360004036 17 2501503030 02 1330202006 17 2290902033 17 2270501025 02 0780002009 02 2080701017 17 2271207018 17 2271201007 17 2260404006 17 2260404007 17 2271207004 17 2271207039 02 2211401038 01 2510302022 17 2500901023 02 1340801017 02 1330001010 02 1331001004 02 1330001009 02 1331001005 17 2270506007 02 0921201002 02 0921201003 17 1861102002 02 1681601003 02 2880001038 17 2501601053 01 2510204003 17 2490803014 02 2420002001 02 3670702006 02 3670702002 17 2500803001 01 1831201009 02 1410002028 02 1100001003 01 2480002015 01 2700002025 17 1851402003 02 1350005008 02 2511301028 01 1820003015 17 2490806065 01 2470501019 02 2640001008 02 1000008008 17 2271305056 17 2271307012 17 2290301037 17 2490803053 17 2490801010 17 2270504016 17 2510106012 17 2270503028 02 3140001022 17 2481401024 17 2291102023 17 2291403006 17 2500803022 01 2680904029 02 1310004007 01 2681202049 02 0890003009 02 0940701006 02 2730004062 17 2291503034 02 2231401013 17 2500903022 17 2501501011

LOT/BLD/ACERAGE 1 BLD 2 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 BLD 1 LOT 1.01 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 3.42 ACR 15.40 ACR 2 BLD 1 LOT 2.00 ACR 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 14 BLD 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 5.25 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 2.00 ACR 1.83 ACR 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 3 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1.00 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1.96 ACR 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 2.00 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 5.72 ACR 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 5.00 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 4.50 ACR 2 BLD 1 LOT 1.00 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 2.00 ACR 2 BLD 1 LOT 5.40 ACR 1 LOT 1 LOT 1.06 ACR 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1.10 ACR 2.31 ACR 1 LOT 6 BLD 2 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 3.69 ACR 2.30 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 4.00 ACR 2.00 ACR 4.00 ACR 2.00 ACR 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 18.64 ACR 2 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1.90 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1.98 ACR 1 LOT 19.49 ACR 1.70 ACR 3.00 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 3 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 2 LOT 4 BLD 2 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1.20 ACR 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 6.00 ACR 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT


CLASSIFIEDS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

LEGAL BUSINESS NOTICES ANNOUNCEMENTS SERVICES Abandon Vehicle / Boat

Business Services

Card of Thanks

Abandoned Vehicle Notice:

774-1234

Ricky's Tree Service Tree removal, stump grinding, Lic & ins, free quote, 803-435-2223 or cell 803-460-8747.

PETS & ANIMALS

Home Improvements H.L. Boone, Contractor additions, painting, roofing, gutters, sheetrock, blown ceilings, decks. 773-9904

WINTER-SPECIAL - 20% Awnings, Patio Covers, Screen Rooms Ventu-Lite Inc 773-9545

ne STOP SHOPPING You can ind everything you need for the new house or the new spouse in one convenient placeOUR CLASSIFIEDS! Sporting Goods • Electronics Appliances • Furniture • Cameras Jewelry • Dishes • Books PLUS A WHOLE LOT MORE!

Tree Service

Electrical work. New & Repair Call 803-499-4127

The following vehicle was abandoned at Dr. J. Auto Hobby, 4490 Patriot Parkway, Sumter, SC 29154. Described as a 2003 Cadillac E s c a l a t e , V I N # 1GYEK63N93R145162. Total Due for storage is $7451.75 as of January 17, 2014. Owner is asked to call 803-494-6205. If not claimed in 30 days. it will be turned over to the Magistrate's Office for public sale.

THE ITEM

Roofing James Albert I would like to thank family, friends and Co-workers for the beautiful cards, flowers, food, and monetary gifts. I know that James would have loved them. We appreciate your thoughtfulness during this difficult time. ********** Words cannot express how much I would like to thank two Guardian Angels for helping me take care of my husband James Albert doing his time of sickness and that is my mother Hattie M. Brown and sister Juanita Rouse. You were there for me whenever I needed you. Thank you, Thank you. ********** I would like to give a special thanks to Lee County Dialysis, Transport Care and Gold Cross transportation for taking such good care of my husband. Thank You Mrs. Patricia (Brown) Albert

All Types of Roofing & Repairs All work guaranteed. 30 yrs exp. SC lic. Virgil Bickley 803-316-4734.

Livestock Wrangler All Stock, $9.00 Cattle & Horse feed. Safe Choice Senior $20.00, Protein Tubs and Mineral for Cows. 803-435-2797

Pets

STATE TREE SERVICE Worker's Comp & General liability insurance. Top quality service, lowest prices. 803-494-5175 or 803-491-5154 www.statetree.net A Notch Above Tree Care Full quality service low rates, lic./ins., free est BBB accredited 983-9721 The Tree Doctor Any size tree removal & stump grinding. Trimming & clearing. No job too big or small. Call 775-8560 or 468-1946. We accept credit cards and offer senior discounts

Garage, Yard & Estate Sales Sumter County Civic Center Indoor Garage Sale. 700 W. Liberty St. Saturday, February 1, 2014 8 am - 1 pm. Free admission. For booth space call 436-2271 Starting Jan 6, 2014 @ 9:00am Sumter County Flea Mkt Hwy 378 E. 803-495-2281 500 tables. Sat. $8 free return Sun.

Softball Equipment- Pitching machine, Backstop, Balls, Bats ETC. Call for details 803-968-2459

MERCHANDISE

Split Oak Firewood, $60/dump, $70/stacked. Darrell Newman 803-316-0128. Tree Service also available.

Sumter County Civic Center Indoor Garage Sale. 700 W. Liberty St. Saturday, February 1, 2014. 8AM - 1PM. Free admission. LARGE GARAGE SALE 1st & 3rd Weekend Tables $1 & Up FLEA MARKET BY SHAW AFB

Open every weekend. 905-4242

Help Wanted Full-Time Drivers needed Local runs, home nightly. Must have CDL with tanker and hazmat endorsements, Clean 10 yr MVR, 2 yrs driving experience and be 25 yrs of age. Call 803-473-6553. STC Now Hiring Diesel Mechanic

Firewood for Sale Will Deliver. Call 803 651-8672

Garage, Yard & Estate Sales

EMPLOYMENT

For Sale or Trade

Dog Feed 50lbs, River Run 30/20 $26.25, 24/20 $23.75, 27/15 $22.50. Call 803-435-2797

Tree Service

D3

Premium Firewood (Oak/Hickory) $70/del. Tree Serv. & Lawn Care avail. Chris 803-464-8743

Martin's Used Appliance Washers, Dryers, Refrigerators, Stoves. Guaranteed. 803-464-5439 or 469-7311

Qualified candidates must have:

•Valid driver license •High School Diploma or GED •Three years or more of diesel mechanical experience •Must provide tools / picture at interview STC offers competitive salary and benefits EOE and Drug Free Workplace Contact - Pat Joyner 803-775-1002 x107 Inside Floor Sales - Must have some knowledge of hardware. Apply at Wally's Hardware from 9am-3pm 1291 Broad St.

Help Wanted Part-Time

King Size Mattress/ Box spring. In very good condition. $500 OBO. Call 803-968-2845 Expert Tech, New & used heat pumps & A/C. Will install/repair, warranty; Compressor & labor $600. Call 803-968-9549 or 843-992-2364

$$$ AVON $$$ FREE TRAINING! 803-422-5555 Wanted Church Musician pianist or keyboardist. call 843-647-9103

Looking to ind...

A NEW BEST FRIEND?

Classiieds

YOUR SOURCE FOR A

QUICK SALE! 20 N. Magnolia St. • Sumter, SC 29150

803-774-1234

The family of the late Mrs. Viola Choice Furman appreciates your kindness and your prayers. Continue to pray our strength in the Lord. Thank you and may God bless and keep you. Her Children, Grandchildren & Family

CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT Call, email or fax us today!

classiied@theitem.com • (803) 775-1024 FAX

(803) 774-1234

REC #

TAXPAYER

DIST. DESCRIPTION

873836-12-3 837876-12-3 818229-12-3 825410-12-3 840275-12-3 818971-12-3 865813-12-3 865814-12-3 865816-12-3 836098-12-3 851244-12-3 833439-12-3 833441-12-3 833442-12-3 869203-12-3 869204-12-3 888393-12-3 888394-12-3 888395-12-3 871562-12-3 845167-12-3 845169-12-3 845170-12-3 845171-12-3 845178-12-3 845180-12-3 845181-12-3 865125-12-3 815992-12-3 837170-12-3 828488-12-3 015391-12-5 880821-12-3 869208-12-3 864885-12-3 817277-12-3 817278-12-3 888302-12-3 869296-12-3 873080-12-3 833112-12-3 880461-12-3 831605-12-3 881032-12-3 887501-12-3 860762-12-3 842581-12-3 888935-12-3 880078-12-3 000164-12-5 831540-12-3 888323-12-3 888324-12-3 831541-12-3 831542-12-3 869803-12-3 828807-12-3 828808-12-3 874403-12-3 874405-12-3 014953-12-5 006219-12-5 840354-12-3 006168-12-5 869356-12-3 869357-12-3 869358-12-3 880775-12-3 826015-12-3 826016-12-3 848801-12-3

SOUTH SUMTER NEW DIRECTION SOWERS GEORGE J & LILA M SOWERS TRACY SPANN CASSIE SPEARS TONY LYNN & STACEY SPENCER MARTHA ANN PAT STEADMAN ROBIN ETAL STEADMAN ROBIN ETAL STEADMAN STACEY ETAL STEWART QUENTIN M STREATH JOSEPH M STREETS JOANNE STREETS JOANNE STREETS JOANNE STUKES JULIA BURGESS STUKES JULIA BURGESS STUKES MARSHALL STUKES MARSHALL & JULIA STUKES MARSHALL & JULIA SULLIVAN STAYCE S SUMTER LIFESTYLE COMMUNITIES L SUMTER LIFESTYLE COMMUNITIES L SUMTER LIFESTYLE COMMUNITIES L SUMTER LIFESTYLE COMMUNITIES L SUMTER LIFESTYLE COMMUNITIES L SUMTER LIFESTYLE COMMUNITIES L SUMTER LIFESTYLE COMMUNITIES L SUMTER TRUST C FOR SANDERS TALBERT GWENDOLYN & CARTER GLO TAYLOR AMELIA TAYLOR BERLIE SPANN ETAL TAYLOR CHARLIE & SAMMIE* TAYLOR JEAN HEIRS OF TAYLOR PHYLLIS SIMON & JANIE TAYLOR SAMMIE TEMPLE MIRACLE DELIVERANCE TEMPLE MIRACLE DELIVERANCE TENTION MYRTLE ANN AS TRS THOMAS IDA E THOMAS REGINALD V THOMAS ROBERT A THOMPSON WILLIE & MACK DAVID R TINDAL BETTIE L TINDAL CLEVELAND E ESTATE TINDAL LEROY & MARY A TINDAL ROSA LE HEIRS OF TODD SYLVIA PINCKNEY TONEY DOROTHY TORCHIA RUTH WILLIAMS TRUE DIVINE CHRISTIAN MINISTRI TRUE TEST TRUE TEST TRUE TEST TRUE TEST TRUE TEST TRUESDALE PAMELA TUDOR ELIZABETH HAMPTON TUDOR ELIZABETH HAMPTON TURNER JACQUELINE TURNER JACQUELINE ULRICH TRACY ELIZABETH VALLIER EMERY A & BARBARA L VAUGHAN SHELBY MITCHUM VAUGHN ERNEST LEE VAUGHN GREGORY VAUGHN GREGORY VAUGHN GREGORY VAUGHN GREGORY VELASCO CECILIA A VELASCO CECILIA A VINING LYNDA ELLIOTT

17 2501501042 02 1560703018 01 2500604004 01 2510804056 02 2081002001 01 2501201043 02 0920002033 02 0920002043 02 0920002042 02 2870003031 02 1791202006 02 1300002060 02 1300002061 02 1300002062 17 2480803004 17 2480803013 17 2480803003 17 2480803008 17 2480803009 17 2271307025 02 3390801001 02 3390802001 02 3390802002 02 3390802003 02 3390901003 02 3390902003 02 3390902004 02 0880002022 01 2510704004 02 1341501026 02 3650002007 02 0770002013 17 2271203021 17 2290904042 02 0750002005 01 2501601054 01 2501601057 17 2290902062 17 2490205036 17 2301401017 02 2210001033 17 2501602047 17 2271104039 17 2271208020 17 2500908053 02 2080701015 02 1310003089 18 3051205009 17 2050302014 01 2300502040 02 0330001011 17 2270303030 17 2270404047 17 2270501077 17 2271205015 17 2481501021 02 3240002011 02 3240002012 17 2271305020 17 2271305034 02 1860207005 02 1460002004 02 2011401024 17 2271105028 17 2260401011 17 2270502025 17 2270502026 17 2270505005 02 1520002075 02 1520002083 02 1170002008

LOT/BLD/ACERAGE 3.04 ACR 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1.00 ACR 1 LOT 2.28 ACR 1 LOT 2.33 ACR 1.94 ACR 1.94 ACR 1.94 ACR .50 ACR .50 ACR 3.50 ACR .50 ACR .60 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1.90 ACR 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 9.09 ACR 5.00 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 6.65 ACR 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1.25 ACR 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 4.00 ACR 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 3 BLD 1 LOT 1.00 ACR 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 29.38 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 4.00 ACR

REC #

TAXPAYER

DIST. DESCRIPTION

835529-12-3 862934-12-3 823317-12-3 823318-12-3 823319-12-3 910115-12-5 873710-12-3 822188-12-3 870320-12-3 891355-12-3 872399-12-3 826855-12-3 886653-12-3 886788-12-3 867678-12-3 874260-12-3 888678-12-3 873855-12-3 876401-12-3 834436-12-3 886471-12-3 879037-12-3 833918-12-3 857267-12-3 857268-12-3 856854-12-3 877447-12-3 844361-12-3 881648-12-3 875461-12-3 886911-12-3 881612-12-3 846187-12-3 846188-12-3 879087-12-3 826035-12-3 826576-12-3 872873-12-3 824798-12-3 869906-12-3 869907-12-3 870528-12-3 885823-12-3 885256-12-3 888769-12-3 889115-12-3 831870-12-3 888305-12-3 884211-12-3 888682-12-3 876633-12-3 820139-12-3 818468-12-3 868874-12-3 887536-12-3 869549-12-3 835297-12-3 885521-12-3 851674-12-3 825247-12-3 862153-12-3 840135-12-3 877860-12-3 828464-12-3 868444-12-3 878890-12-3 837584-12-3 871788-12-3 814636-12-3 885498-12-3 830663-12-3

VMS INC A SC CORP WADE ANNIE R WADFORD BARBARA G WADFORD BARBARA G WADFORD BARBARA G WADFORD DAVID MICHAEL WASHINGTON LUCILLE S WASHINGTON OCALA ESTATE WASHINGTON PEGGY WASHINGTON PLACE INC A/K/A WASHINGTON RICHARD WASHINGTON WILLIE WATKINS JANNIE LOU P WATKINS JOSEPH P HEIRS OF WEATHERLY CARL & PATRICIA ANN WEBSTER RONALD WEBSTER RONALD L & BRIDGET B WEBSTER RONALD SR & BRIDGETTE WEEKS ELIZABETH N WEST LARRY D & FOE IVORY M WHEELER VIRGINIA H WHITE CHERYL SIMMONS ETAL WHITE ELLIS WHITE ELLIS WHITE ELLIS WHITE ELLIS ETAL WHITE JOHNNIE MAE ETAL WHITE ROBELL* ETAL WHITE SYLVESTER JR ESTATE WILK GREGORY A WILKINS MAGGIE L WILLIAMS ANTHONY L WILLIAMS DIRRECK WILLIAMS DIRRECK WILLIAMS DIRRECK A WILLIAMS ELIJAH HEIRS OF WILLIAMS PAUL HEIRS OF WILLIAMS ROSALIND & PRINCE WILLIAMS T &FULLARD A&THOMPSON WILLIS BERTHENIA WILLIS BERTHENIA WILLIS BERTHENIA R WILLIS BERTHENIA RICHARDSON WILLIS MIRIAM S WILSON ETHEL M ETAL WILSON GEORGE & DOLLY WILSON HALLIE B JR & THOMASINA WILSON HARRY HEIRS OF WILSON HERBERT WILSON HERMAN B WILSON JEANETTE ETAL WILSON JOYE WILSON KATHERINE J ETAL WILSON LOUISE G WILSON ROBERT WILSON WILLIE T WINDLEY SHERALD LEROY WINN J CALDWELL HEIRS OF WITHERSPOON CLIFTON WOODS PEARL WOODS SAMS J JR HEIRS OF WORRELL KYLE WRIGHT ALLIE MAE & HEREMINEO S WRIGHT CARL WRIGHT JOHN W WRIGHT STEPHANIE WRIGHT TONYA M WRIGHTEN THERESA P LE YOUNG ALICE YOUNG JOANNA M YOUNG JOSEPH HEIRS OF

02 0870101003 02 3500001001 01 1841301001 17 2051302035 17 2051302036 01 1841301006 17 2271203006 01 2510805029 17 2290603009 7172281302006 17 2500908031 01 251080502900001 17 2290605009 17 2291002008 02 2660003018 17 2270401075 17 2500907029 17 2270401073 17 2271205003 02 3660003018 17 2281503014 17 2501101006 02 3660002027 02 3660003010 02 3660003015 02 3660003011 17 2480802029 02 3660003005 17 2480802028 17 1850001100 17 2291204041 17 2270305034 02 0910002024 17 2260501029 17 2501501035 01 2501503047 01 2261202012 17 2290502020 01 2300502004 17 2271207012 17 2271207014 17 2271206047 17 2271201018 17 2290903019 18 3098105018 18 3080804015 02 1860102006 17 2291001015 17 2271203023 18 3080903018 17 2270603027 01 2510202022 01 2500302022 02 2200002063 17 2501503054 17 2500402005 02 1390001137 17 2270303027 02 1310002016 01 2510203048 02 2650003021 02 1560203013 17 2281504012 02 0730003010 02 0730003006 17 2501103004 02 1340404009 17 2281504042 01 2510102060 17 2270302012 02 2460201004

LOT/BLD/ACERAGE 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 5 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT .76 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1.10 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 5 BLD 1 LOT 1.00 ACR 13.57 ACR 2.44 ACR 3 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2.48 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 2.80 ACR 2 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 2.67 ACR 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 9.30 ACR 1 LOT 6.35 ACR 1 LOT 1 LOT 4 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 LOT 1 BLD 1 LOT 2.00 ACR


D4

CLASSIFIEDS

THE ITEM

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 2014

MAYO’S SUIT CITY

569&%04"7"*-"#-& GPSSFOUBMPSQVSDIBTF

Winter Clearance Sale */130(3&44/08

If your suits aren’t becoming to you, It’s a good time to be coming to Mayo’s!

8FTNBSL1MB[Btt.PO4BUtXXX.BZPT%JTDPVOU4VJUTDPN Driver Trainees Needed Now! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $800+ per week! No experience needed! CDL -Trained and Job-Ready in 15 days! 1-888-263-7364

Large 3BR $400 Dep/Rent Large 4 BR $525 Dep/Rent Large 1 BR Apt $300 Dep/Rent 468-1900 Available Feb. 1st. 1001 Arnaud St. 2 br, 2 ba, townhouse. Stove, refrig, $750 mo. + dep. 773-5436

Work Wanted

In Town Manning 3BR 2BA Brick house $800 Mo/Dep Call 803-473-7577

I am a certified personal care taker looking for private employment with disabled or elderly. Call 803-847-4065 for more info.

3BR 1BA newly renovated, C/H/A, stove & refrig. Near Lakewood High School $595 Mo+Dep 469-8328 / 983-9711

RENTALS Rental to Share Settled Roommate needed. Nice neighborhood. Will have own room & access to the whole house. No kids, no pets & no partying. $300 month. 436-9926.

2BR Home on Patricia Dr. Completely remodeled. Den, DR, C/H/A $375/mo. + $375/dep. 3BR/2BA MH with Den, LR, DR, W/D hook up, C/H/A with large fenced backyard. Located in Country Springs on 15S. $550/mo + $550/dep. Call 803-316-7958 or 803-773-1838 Mon-Fri between 9-5pm. Section 8 welcome.

217 W. Hampton, 604 sq ft. office space. $525 /mo. Lg. office, sm office/breakroom. Contact C21 Hawkins & Kolb for more info. 803-773-1477. 50 Wesmark Ct. 1,177 sq ft. $1000/mo. + $100 CAM. Reception area, 3 office space, breakroom, 1/2 ba, file/storage room. 773-1477

Commercial Rentals

2003 Scout 235 Sportfish with 225 HP Yamaha. $32,000. Call 803-491-7300.

Building for rent, 4miles out of Manning. Might could be used as a church. Call 803-473-3301

2007 Triton TR-21X HP Bassmaster Classic Edit. with 250 Mercury XS Call for details 803 968-2459

Guignard Storage: 57 Neal St. Personal storage units. No deposits. Call 803-491-4914

TRANSPORTATION

862 E Liberty St Storage/Retail/ Office 1550 Sq Ft. $250 Mo. Agent Owned Call 803-236-2425

FOR RENT: Nice 2BR, 2BA in Tudor Place. $775/mo + dep. Call 775-1580 for details.

REAL ESTATE

Mobile Home Rentals

Unfurnished Apartments HOLLY COURT APARTMENTS located in Manning, currently have spacious two bedroom apartments for rent. Fully carpeted with central air and heat, water and sewer included. Please call to inquire about our Move in Special. Ph:( 803) 435-8786 Senior Living Apartments for those 62+ (Rent based on income) Shiloh-Randolph Manor 125 W. Bartlette. 775-0575 Studio/1 Bedroom apartments available EHO

Scenic Lake 2Br, 1Ba. No pets. Call between 9am - 5pm ONLY! (803) 499-1500. Clean 2br 1ba pvt lot no pets nonsmoker Hwy15S part furn $400 Mo. $400 Sec. 481-2868 lv msg. 2, 3 & 4/BR's Trailers for rent, Cherryvale & Dogwood Area $250 & up. (803) 651-9926 American MHP, 2 & 3/BRs, lot rentals, water/sewer/garbage pkup inc'd. Sec. 8 ok. 803-494-4300.

2 & 3BR 2BA Starting $375-$500 Month. Nice quiet park convenient Shaw/Sumter Call 499-9501 or 494-5643 No Calls after 8pm 3BBR/2BA Doublewide (Wedgefield). $600. Call 803-983-8084

1st Month Special 2BR/2BA Apt. Call 803-236-5953

STATEBURG COURTYARD

Unfurnished Homes

2 & 3 BRs 803-494-4015

3Br 1BA For Rent or Rent to own Alderman Camp Rd $600/mo + Dep. Call 803-473-3301 ALCOLU: 4BR/2BA in the country for rent. $700/mo + $700/dep. 803-473-3301 2Br home Carolina Ave. & 2Br Apt Miller Rd. $395 mo. First mo. rent free! 774-8512 / 983-5691

Manufactured Housing LOW CREDIT SCORE? Been turned down for bad credit? Come try us, we do our own financing. We have 2-3-4-5 bedroom homes on our lot. Layaway program available. For more information, call 843-389-4215. 2007 Singlewide. Owner financing with $5,000 down. Call 803-236-5953

Land & Lots for Sale LAND FOR SALE: 3.25 acres (Airport Rd). Asking $8,000. Call 803-406-3596. 5775 Cane Savannah Rd. (Wedgefield). 1+ acre land for sale. Perfect for a new home or future investment. Close to Shaw AFB. 803-983-2261

Commercial Industrial

2BR 2BA MH c/h/a, appliances, .5 acre lot, 5 mins. from Shaw, $450 mo+Dep Call 803-983-7317

Resort Rentals Vacation Rentals Santee, Garden City Beach Michelle Hodge, 803-491-4914

Church Facility located at 16 Kendrick Street. Move in Ready. 10,195 sq ft on 2.35 acres with 1,040 sq ft picnic shelter. Chapel, Fellowship Hall, Sunday School Rooms, Office Complex and Full Working Kitchen. Contact Talmadge Tobias at Re/Max Summit 803-491-4573.

DRIVERS WANTED “NO GIMMICKS�

PLRQDOOPLOHV‡/D\RYHU3D\‡/RDGLQJXQORDGLQJIURPstKU *XDUDQWHHG0LQLPXP3D\‡$FKLHYDEOH*RDOVIRU/XFUDWLYH,QFHQWLYHV - CDL (Class A) w/ hazmat & tanker - At least 2 yrs. exp. - Clean MVR - Excellent pay ($.45 per running mile - includes $.06 per diem non-taxable expense) - Paid Vacation - Paid Holidays - Paid Sick Days - BC/BS Health Ins. - Dental Insurance - Life Insurance - Short Term Disability - 401(k) w/co. Match

CONTACT Pat Joyner at 803-775-1002 Ext. 107 OR visit our website to download a job application and fax to (954) 653-1195 www.sumtertransport.com 170 S. Lafayette Drive Sumter, SC 29150 EOE

CAROLINA PINES REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER is accepting applications for the following positions:

t%JSFDUPSPG3FTPVSDF.BOBOHFNFOU'5 t3/&3$BTF.BOBHFS'5 t3/8PNFOBOE$IJMESFO4FSWJDFT  -% 0# 1FETBOE/VSTFSZ 13/ t3/*$6'513/ t3/.FE4VSH'513/ t3/&NFSHFODZ4FSWJDFT'513/ t-1/.FE4VSH'513/

Autos For Sale R & R Motors 803-494-2886 2007 Town & Country, 2004 Dodge Ram ext. cab SLT 4x4, 2008 Ford Explorer XLT, 2006 Pontiac G6 GT, 2005 Toyota Camry LE A Guaranteed Credit Approval AUTO LOANS We will arrange financing even if you have been turned down before. Loans available for no credit, bad credit, 1st Time Buyers & Bankruptcy buyers. No co-signers needed. Call Mr. Ashley Brown at 803-926-3235

1993 Oldsmobile Achieva, Like new 105K Mi $2,800 Call 803-469-3014

BOAT FOR SALE 1995 16 ft. High Tide Excellent condition 2008 Yamaha 50/Very low hours Brand new EZ Loader trailer

Miscellaneous S.C. Construction Serv., We specialize in Energy Systems, also offer Painting, Dry Wall, Floor Encapsulations, and mobile home repairs. Call 803-847-7824 for more details. C&C Recycling Parts & Wrecker Service Top price paid for junk cars! We buy scrap metal, alum cans, batteries, copper. 773-7702

$6800 Call 803-468-2244 www.rebelmouse.com/16hightide

I Found it in the

CLASSIFIEDS JOBS HOMES APARTMENTS CARS BOATS MOTORCYCLES BIKES FURNITURE PETS GARAGE SALES & MORE GET THE CLASSIFIEDS DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR. 803-774-1258

*Night shift openings with competitive shift differentials 8FPGGFSDPNQFUJUJWFCFOFĂĽUTBOETBMBSZ:PVNBZHP POMJOFwww.cprmc.comGPSPOMJOFBQQMJDBUJPOT 8F%SVH5FTU &0&tThis Hospital is partially owned by physicians.

20 N. Magnolia Street • Sumter, SC www.theitem.com


January 22, 2014