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Serving New Hyde Park, North New Hyde Park, Herricks, Garden City Park, Manhasset Hills, North Hills, Floral Park

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Friday, May 19, 2017

Vol. 66, No. 20

N E W H Y D E PA R K

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GUIDE TO SUMMER FUN

SHI, SASSOUNI WIN MARTINS PROPOSES G.N. ED BOARD SEATS ETHICS REFORMS

PAGES 33-56

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Girl joins familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fight

PA J A M A R A M A

Zisselmans raise $ for cancer cure BY N O A H M A N S K A R For 12-year-old Remi Zisselman, ďŹ ghting cancer runs in the family. Since 2004, the year before her grandfather Isaac died from multiple myeloma, Remiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father, Marc Zisselman, of Manhasset Hills has raised more than $5 million to support research for a cure to the rare blood cancer. And in 2014, Remiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sister, Lexi, now 15, held a soccer tournament that raised $7,500 for the cause. Now Remi, a Herricks Middle School student, is using her love of running to plan her own fundraiser â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a June 17 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Charity Dashâ&#x20AC;? at Herricks High School to support the Mount Sinai Multiple Myeloma Program, run by the doctor who treated Isaac Zisselman. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tough work, and it takes a lot of time and eďŹ&#x20AC;ort to put it all together, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coming together slowly,â&#x20AC;? Remi said. Continued on Page 69

PHOTO COURTESY OF LITTLE SPROUTS PRESCHOOL

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Teddy Bear Pajama Dayâ&#x20AC;? at Little Sprouts Preschool in New Hyde Park had students come to school dressed in their PJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, holding their favorite stuffed animals, with themed stories, snacks and activities. See story on page 64.

Herricks budget, candidates get OK Gounaris, Zanetti elected to school board; $111M spending plan approved B Y N O A H M A N S K A R for the next school year. Trustee James Gounaris won Herricks school district vot- a third term unopposed with ers on Tuesday re-elected a 1,008 votes, and Henry Zanetti school board trustee, elected was elected with 981 votes to another for the ďŹ rst time and ap- replace Christine Turner, the proved a $111.2 million budget outgoing vice president, after 27 years on the board. And voters approved the 2017-18 budget 1,070-352. The budget will increase revenue from property taxes by 1.62 percent, the maximum allowed this year un-

der the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tax cap law. in the district.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go shoot for a lot Gounaris, of Manhasset Hills, and Zanetti, of Williston Park, will be sworn in for their SCHOOL ELECTION three-year terms in July as the district gears up for the start of COVERAGE $29.5 million worth of capital PAGES 28-30, 77, 88 projects this summer. Voters approved most of the spending for of diďŹ&#x20AC;erent expensive things and the work in December. Zanetti has said he wants to that sort of stuďŹ&#x20AC;,â&#x20AC;? Gounaris said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just wanted to hold the line help an already successful board and do what we need to do to ďŹ nd ways to make the district Continued on Page 20 preserve what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing here

For the latest news visit us at www.theislandnow.com D onâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget to follow us on Twitter @Theislandnow and Facebook at facebook.com/theislandnow


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The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

HC

Shi, Sassouni take Local bodybuilder G.N. ed board seats ‘on a roll’ at 73 1st Asian-American trustee elected in historic race Ciraulo eyes 5 competitions this year B Y N O A H M A N S K A R gust, entered his first bodybuild-

PHOTO BY JANELLE CLAUSEN

Jeffrey Shi (right) and Lawrence Gross speak about the responsibilities that come with being a Board of Education trustee. Shi is set to fill Gross’s seat in July. BY JA N E LL E CL AUSEN Jeffrey Shi and Rebecca Sassouni won seats on the Great Neck Public Schools’ Board of Education on Tuesday in a heated and sometimes polarizing race that drew more than 8,000 voters — more than twice as many as the last election. Shi defeated Nikolas Kron, 6,055 to 1,908, while Sassouni won 6,884 votes in an uncontested race after Ilya Aronovich dropped out. Sassouni and Shi benefitted from an energized community that delivered record turnout in favor of the public schools.

When a $85.9 million bond, meant to repair schools and upgrade facilities, was defeated in February by 113 votes, it shocked many parents into activism. They campaigned for weeks, handing out postcards at events, talking with friends and going door-to-door to ensure a “no” vote for a bond or budget could never happen again. Passions were further raised by concerns about whether Kron and Aronovich, who have children attending private religious schools, would support current school policies and be “pro-public education.” While the polls were set to close at 10 p.m. on Tuesday

night, a line with well over 100 people circled the E.M. Baker School. “It shows how important the vote is and that people can’t be complacent anymore,” said Matt Klein, 39, who has lived in Great Neck since he was eight years old. Shi and Sassouni also join the board at a time when many residents have pointed to a thread of distrust throughout the community. Both said that their priorities are to maintain the schools’ high rankings, be fiscally responsible and improve transparency and communication with Great Neck’s various Continued on Page 22

Peter Ciraulo is getting better with age. The 73-year-old bodybuilder from Herricks won first place in his division at the May 7 International Natural Bodybuilding Federation Northeast America Bodybuilding competition in Somerville, N.J., just two weeks after winning two first-place honors at a similar contest in Rochester. Now, Ciraulo is gearing up for another contest in early June, his third so far this year. He’s hoping to go to Italy for a fourth contest in July, he said, and will probably compete in as many as five events this year. That’s an unusually high number, as most bodybuilders only compete two to three times a year, said Karen Monetti, a bodybuilding promoter who organized this month’s New Jersey competition with her husband, Anthony. “I don’t know how much longer I’m going to be able to do this, but while I feel good, I just can’t help it,” Ciraulo said. “I’m on a roll. I just feel so good.” Ciraulo, who turns 74 in Au-

ing contest at 68. He started working out regularly in 2004, finding it therapeutic while caring for this mother and going through a divorce. Since his entry into natural bodybuilding, in which competitors don’t use steroids or hormones, Ciraulo has competed in about 18 contests and won 29 trophies, he said. In September, he won two first-place awards and one third-place honor at the World Natural Bodybuilding Federation’s Naturalmania contest in Manhattan. He’s often among only three or four men in his age group, but no matter what, being on stage and soaking up the applause “rejuvenates” him, he said. “It’s him, it’s who Peter is, and again, I think that passion that he has helps him out big time,” Monetti said. Ciraulo is now trying to get more men his age to get into bodybuilding at the New York Sports Club gym in Garden City Park, where he works out. Some are hesitant, he said, but he tells them it’s never too late to get started. Continued on Page 69

PHOTO COURTESY OF PETER CIRAULO

CORRECTION

Peter Ciraulo poses with Karen Monetti at the International The May 12 article “NHP-GCP to vote for 2 trustees, budget” misstated the name of the incoming Natural Bodybuilding Federation Northeast America competition in Somerville, N.J., on May 6. New Hyde Park-Garden City Park school district superintendent. It is Jennifer Morrison.

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EDITORIAL: Editorial Submissions: news@theislandnow.com / Sports Submission : sports@theislandnow.com Great Neck News: Janelle Clausen 516-307-1045 x203 • jclausen@theislandnow.com New Hyde Park Herald Courier: Noah Manskar 516-307-1045 x204 • nmanskar@theislandnow.com Manhasset Times: Max Zahn 516-307-1045 x215 • mzahn@theislandnow.com Roslyn Times: Max Zahn 516-307-1045 x215 • mzahn@theislandnow.com Williston Times: Noah Manskar 516-307-1045 x204 • nmanskar@theislandnow.com Port Washington Times: Stephen Romano 516-307-1045 x214 • sromano@theislandnow.com

NEW HYDE PARK HERALD COURIER (USPS#241-060) is published weekly by Blank Slate Media LLC, 105 Hillside Avenue, Williston Park, NY, 11596, (516) 307-1045. The entire contents of this publication are copyright 2017. All rights reserved. The newspaper will not be liable for errors appearing in any advertising beyond the cost of the space occupied by the error. Periodicals postage paid at Williston Park, NY, and other additional entry offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the New Hyde Park Herald Courier, C/O Blank Slate Media LLC, 105 Hillside Avenue, Williston, New York, 11596.


The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

HC

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Village helped Terry, records suggest Payments match description of municipality that feds say aided leader in concealing income BY N O A H MANSKAR The Village of Manorhaven appears to be one of the entities that federal prosecutors say helped Gerard Terry, the indicted North Shore political leader, shield his income from federal tax authorities, according to village records. The records suggest the village paid Terry, the former North Hempstead Democratic Committee chairman, 16 checks worth $76,733 for his work as village attorney in 2010, matching the dollar amount and number of checks that federal court filings say were paid by a “Municipality #2.” Municipality #2 did not file IRS Form 1099, a tax form showing income for independent contractors, for Terry for the 2010 tax year and “claimed he performed no work” that year, despite paying him and letting him continue to work for the village, according to a Jan. 31 letter from U.S. Attorney Artie McConnell to a judge.

Manorhaven Village Hall is seen on Manorhaven Boulevard in Port Washington. The letter also says Terry “explicitly instructed subordinate employees at Municipality #2” not to open mail from the IRS. In response to a Freedom of Information request, Manorhaven provided Forms 1099 only for the tax years 2009 and 2011. The records were sent to Blank Slate Media last Tues-

day. The form for 2010, along with those for 2008 and 2012, were absent, despite village records showing payments to Terry in those years. Government entities are subject to a fine — $260 per return as of January 2016 — for each Form 1099 they fail to file, according to the IRS website.

The fine is higher if “intentional disregard” for IRS law can be proven. Terry, 63, of East Hills, has pleaded not guilty in federal court to charges of tax evasion and the obstruction of the Internal Revenue Service for allegedly failing to file on-time income tax returns since 2000 and lying about his income on returns he

filed late. He worked for at least seven Nassau County municipalities, including Manorhaven, the Town of North Hempstead and the Village of Port Washington North. Manorhaven officials said Jonathan P. Fielding, the village clerk-treasurer at the time, would have been responsible for handling Terry’s checks and tax forms in 2010. Fielding also worked with Terry as the secretary to the Town of North Hempstead Board of Zoning Appeals, and helped create a limited liability company that Terry allegedly used to hide income from tax collectors. Municipality #2 is among three entities that allegedly played a role in concealing his income and otherwise evading tax collectors, according to McConnell’s letter. The other two are private companies, identified in the letter as “Law Firm #1” and “Company #1.” This apparent connection Continued on Page 25


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The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

HC

NHP bans landscaping on Sundays Village board votes to make work regulations match those for other contractors BY N O A H M A N S K A R Landscapers are now officially prohibited from working on Sundays and holidays in the Village of New Hyde Park. The village Board of Trustees voted 3-0 Tuesday to change the village code so that professional landscaping and gardening cannot be done on Sundays and federal holidays. Deputy Mayor Donna Squicciarino and Trustee Donald Barbieri were absent for the vote. Mayor Lawrence Montreuil said the measure is a piece of “housekeeping,” as a different section of the village code already bans many other kinds of contractors from working on Sundays and holidays. “It’s just really a clarification of the law,” Montreuil said after Tuesday’s Board of Trustees meeting. Before the amendment, the village code only allowed landscaping activity between 7 a.m. and 8 p.m. on any day of the week. The change was prompted by recent complaints of a landscaper working on Sundays and disturbing residents, Montreuil said. It has been “commonly understood” by companies that they should not work on Sunday in the village,

PHOTO FROM GOOGLE MAPS

New Hyde Park Village Hall is seen on Jericho Turnpike. he said. “It’s one day out of the week where most people are off from work and they can have peace and quiet without the lawn mowers and leaf blowers and all that making a racket,” Montreuil said.

Some nearby villages restrict land- similar rule allowing landscaping activity scaping activity to certain hours but do from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on any day. The Village of Williston Park allows not prohibit it on specific days. The neighboring Village of Floral Park landscaping between 7 a.m. and 8 p.m. prohibits landscaping before 8 a.m. and after 7 p.m. on any day. Mineola has a

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The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

HC

Winthrop and NYU Langone are joining together to make Long Island healthcare even stronger. When two great academic medical centers combine their talents and resources, local communities can access a larger, more versatile network of world-class physicians, leading-edge facilities and award-winning nurses and professionals. Patients can find precisely the right specialist, whatever their illness or condition. And two leaders in research and training can work together to find the cures and prepare the healers of tomorrow. To learn more about this exciting milestone in Long Island healthcare, call 1-866-WINTHROP or visit nyuwinthrop.org.

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Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

Martins touts ethics reform plan GOP candidate for county exec calls for independent enforcement of ethics laws BY ST E P H E N ROMANO Republican Nassau County Executive candidate Jack Martins rolled out his ethics reform plan on Tuesday, calling for a way to remove a corrupt county executive from office. “Ethics reforms are simple in my view: We need transparency, we need independent enforcement, we need accountability, but we also need disclosure,” Martins said at a news conference in front of the Theodore Roosevelt Executive and Legislative Building in Mineola. Martins said he held his news conference there because Roosevelt was “perhaps the greatest anti-corruption politician in the history of the country.” Martins, a former state senator who represented the 7th District, said it is important to restore public confidence in local governPHOTO BY STEPHEN ROMANO ment. “If we’re going to tackle the heavy lifting and the hard issues Jack Martins speaks at a news conference in Mineola on like the financial issues affecting Tuesday with a statue of Theodore Roosevelt behind him.

the county, the assessment issues affecting the county, the issues of public safety and gangs and heroin and the opioid epidemic and the water safety issues, we first and foremost have to deal with ethics reform,” Martins said. His plan includes seeking a provision in the county charter to allow removal of the county executive, independent enforcement of the county’s ethics laws and more examination of conflicts of interest. “As we begin a new chapter for Nassau County, enacting comprehensive ethics reform must be the first thing that we do,” Martins said. “Because reforming the way government functions affects everything that will occur after, enacting this reform package will be the first thing I do as county executive. Nassau County families have a right to honest government and we will ensure they have it.” Martins said his plan is not a Democratic or Republican way to restore public confidence, but rather “the right way.”

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Last week, Democratic candidate George Maragos unveiled his plan for anti-corruption reforms. He announced a package of proposed anti-corruption reforms, among them a reconstitution of the Nassau Board of Elections that the sitting county comptroller says would save $7 million annually. “The Martins plan falls well short of what is required to end corruption in Nassau County,” Maragos said. “We must ban all vendor political contributions, enact term limits and implement public campaign financing.” Democratic candidate Laura Curran, a county legislator from Baldwin, rolled out a reform package in January and has continued to put out different ethics reform proposals. Last week, she said she would keep her name off signs and promotional material in the county — a move she said current Republican County Executive Edward Mangano abused for political purposes. Continued on Page 66

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Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

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Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

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Maragos, Curran offer dueling reform plans BY N O A H M A N S K A R Democratic Nassau County executive candidates Laura Curran and George Maragos made campaign pledges last week to mitigate the inďŹ&#x201A;uence of politics on county government. Maragos last Wednesday announced a package of proposed anti-corruption reforms, among them a reconstitution of the Nassau Board of Elections that the sitting county comptroller says would save $7 million annually. And Curran, a county legislator from Baldwin, pledged to keep her name oďŹ&#x20AC; signs and other county promotional materials, something she says current Republican County Executive Edward Mangano has abused for political purposes. The proposals come as the candidates, competing in a Democratic primary with state Assemblyman Charles Lavine, look to reform Nassau following Manganoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s indictment last fall on federal corruption charges. Maragos is the ďŹ rst of the three candidates to propose the public funding of elections by consolidating the parallel, partisan Board of Elections operations into one â&#x20AC;&#x153;independentâ&#x20AC;? board. That would cut about $7 million in salaries,

which could be used to help candidates fund campaigns, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The band aids proposed by handpicked candidates to the insidious problem of corruption are a diversion to appease voters and will never end the pay-to-play corruption culture,â&#x20AC;? Maragos said in a statement. Maragosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; other four proposals mostly line up with what other Democrats have proposed, but in some cases go further. He would limit the county executive and legislators to eight years in oďŹ&#x192;ce, appoint an inspector general to oversee contracts, ban all political contributions by county vendors, and consolidate the jobs of the procurement compliance and purchasing directors into a single independent procurement directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oďŹ&#x192;ce. The state constitution requires that boards of elections be controlled by the two political parties garnering the most votes in the most recent general election. Maragosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; campaign says the election commissioners would still be political appointees, but the board would have one staďŹ&#x20AC; that would follow civil service hiring guidelines, as opposed to the current parallel staďŹ&#x20AC;s appointed by each party. Continued on Page 66

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The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

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11

Italian ice shop eyes F.P. location Matty’s Italian Ices & Gelato aims to open in Jericho Turnpike storefront BY G R AC E M CQ UA D E A new shop, Matty’s Italian Ices and Gelato, wants to open at 360 Jericho Turnpike in Floral Park, the former location of Village Valet Cleaners on the southeast corner of Linden Avenue. Zoning laws in the Village of Floral Park require that any retail store that prepares, stores or sells food must be issued a special use permit after a public hearing conducted by the Board of Trustees. “On behalf of the Village of Floral Park, we are very happy that you’re considering opening a business here,” village Mayor Dominick Longobardi said. Dennis Lawrence, vice president of Matty’s Italian Ices and Gelato Inc., and his architect, Robert Keyloun of Bobby K Architects in Bellerose Village, said the establishment will exclusively sell Italian ices and gelato. When asked after the meeting why he chose to call his shop Matty’s, Lawrence said that it is his 22-year-old son’s name. While his son will have no role in running the business, he thinks the name is “catchy,” he said. Keyloun said the 35-foot-by-18-foot space will seat up to six patrons, with the majority of the business focused on counter and standing service. He also said they hope to open soon now that the warm weather has arrived. Lawrence said he plans to have four to six employees during hours of operation, which will be Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Lawrence said the store will only have ice machines on the premises and that he doesn’t plan to use the basement for operations. When asked by the trustees if there are going to be any unique renovations in converting the space from a dry cleaners to an ice cream shop, the applicants said there will be no major overhauls and that all of the upgrades are cosmetic.

PHOTO BY GRACE MCQUADE

Dennis Lawrence, vice president of Matty’s Italian Ices and Gelato Inc., and his architect, Robert Keyloun, appear at Tuesday’s Village of Floral Park Board of Trustees meeting. When asked how deliveries will be handled, Lawrence said that they should be twice a week through a side door. Customers will only use the front entrance and make purchases inside the store as there will be no window service. As for garbage pickup and storage, Lawrence said they are “open-minded.” They plan to get rid of it on

their own on a daily basis to keep the store “clean and neat,” but they will also consider putting a trash container outside on Jericho Turnpike at Longobardi’s suggestion. Longobardi said the board would postpone a decision on the application until all parties hear from the Buildings Department.

Adelphi laxers enter to Trump speech BY ST E P H E N ROMANO The Adelphi men’s lacrosse team is trying to make lacrosse great again. The team uses music with a speech by President Donald Trump as its entrance song, a video posted on the Barstool Sports Instagram page shows. The video, which has been viewed more than one million times, shows the team running onto the field to the speech carrying an American flag. As the team lines up ready to

take the field, the speech begins playing. “In all of our cities and in all of our towns, I make this promise,” Trump says. “We will make America strong again. We will make America proud again. We will make America safe again. And we will make America great again. God bless you and goodnight. I love you.” The entrance music appears to receive mixed reviews with some fans cheering and others booing. It does not note at which game the video was filmed.

Danny McCabe, the director of athletics and campus recreation, said the music is selected by the team and has to be approved by the athletic department. “The men’s lacrosse team’s regular season pre-game warmup music is selected as a team and approved for us so long as they do not contain vulgarity or inappropriate subject matter,” McCabe said. “The songs they proposed and used this season meet those guidelines. As such, we are obliged to follow the policy.”

Gordon Purdie, the head coach, said the team has traditionally used “patriotic music” for its pregame warm up. “It was not intended to provoke or be taken as a political statement,” he said. “We’re sorry if anyone was offended.” The Division II school, which is the top seed in the NCAA Tournament, beat Pace University 10-9 on Saturday, but did not run out to the Trump speech because the NCAA does not allow teams to provide warm-up music. The Panthers finished the regular season 13-3, but lost to

Le Moyne College in the Northeast-10 Tournament championshipp ggame.

The Panthers will face Merrimack College on Saturday at Motamed Field on the Adelphi University campus in Garden City.

THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR READERS FOR THE BEST OF THE NORTH SHORE 2017 CONTEST NOMINATIONS! VOTING BEGINS MAY 26TH GET READY TO CAST YOUR VOTE! VOTING ENDS JULY 7, 2017.


12 The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

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SCHOOL NEWS

Herricks gives 3 from Herricks get awards spotlight to bass Three Herricks High School seniors that were recognized as National Merit finalists this past winter and semifinalists in the fall have been honored as winners of prestigious, highly sought-after scholarships. Natalie Tan, Nita Wong and Kelly Yu earned these awards based on their academic success, which included their SAT and PSAT results. Tan and Yu are recipients of National Merit Scholarship Corporation scholarships that are underwritten with the organization’s own funds, while Wong was presented with a National Merit Broadridge Scholarship, sponsored by Broadridge Financial Solutions, Inc. From approximately 1.6 million students who

entered the 62nd annual National Merit Scholarship Program by taking the PSAT, only about 15,000 were identified as finalists. From this pool, approximately 7,500 students across the nation were awarded scholarships. Tan is co-president of the Tri-M Music Honor Society and is also a Siemens Competition semifinalist as well as a National Honor Society member. Wong is involved in National Honor Society, plays the piano and teaches Chinese school. Yu serves as co-president of the Asian American Culture Club, participates in National Honor Society and performed in the All-National Symphony Orchestra as a violinist.

Student firm takes top honor Thanks to a grant from Herricks Community Fund, the second annual Herricks Bass Day was a success. Organized by Catherine Fish and Krista Weis, 41 string bass players between grades four and 12 were transported to Herricks High School for a fun day filled with guest artists and music. Professional bassists Max Schwartz, Man Wei Che and Grey Fulmer shared their expertise during workshop sessions, covering such diverse topics

such as beat boxing and repertoire. They also worked on the many technical aspects particular to bass playing. The highlight of the day was the culminating afternoon concert that featured 45 bass players onstage performing “Baby Elephant” en masse. Also in the spotlight were student performers Brandon Lau, Daniel Navy, Darren Yang and Jonathan Sanelli, as well as sixth-grade orchestra teacher Geoff Stone.

Herricks High School’s Virtual Enterprise business, DISCOVR LLC, attended the 2017 Youth Business Summit and Trade Show at Pier 92 in New York City on April 5. Alexander Kohan and Neel Shandal, two members of the all-star sales team, represented DISCOVR in the highly competitive Salesmanship Competition. They made their pitch to a panel of judges who tabulated their overall performance score based on their greeting, professionalism, product/service knowledge, persuasiveness and closing. Kohan and Shandal were both awarded the highest possible rating: Gold Status in the 2017 Youth Business Summit Salesmanship Competition.

Kids author visits Students chat with reptiles Center Street Through the use of technology, students at Searingtown Elementary School had the unique opportunity to see and learn about various reptiles. On April 21, first- and fourthgraders participated in Skype sessions with Erik Callender, known as “The Reptile Guy.” Callendar presented educational lessons and taught students about various reptiles in his current location of Borneo.

Students at the Herricks Public Schools’ Center Street School enjoyed an inspiring visit from award-winning children’s author and poet Darren Sardelli. The guest led two presentations; one for kingergarten through second grade and another for grades three to five. Sardelli discussed his passion for literature, shared stories of his role as a writer and encouraged students to pursue their interests. He also brought copies of

some of his books, “Galaxy Pizza and Meteor Pie (And Other School Poems That Are Out of This World),” “Mary Had a Little Jam: And Other Silly Rhymes,” “I Hope I Don’t Strike Out! And Other Funny Sports Poems,” “What I did on My Summer Vacation: Kids’ Favorite Funny Summer Vacation Poems,” “A Bad Case of the Giggles: Poems That Will Make You Laugh Out Loud,” and “One Minute Till Bedtime: 60 Second Poems to Send You Off to Sleep.”


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SCHOOL NEWS

NHP students see ancient sites in Italy Seniors and juniors in New Hyde Park Memorial High School’s Italian Club traveled to Italy in April. The students began their trip in Rome, at the Spanish Steps, and were soon immersed into the Italian culture by ordering lunch. They then strolled through Campo Marzio, shopped on Via Condotti and ventured to the Trevi Fountain to throw a coin in for good luck, one to return to Rome and a third to find love. The first night was completed after they went out to dinner and walked to the Colosseum. Their second day was spent in Vatican City, where they visited the Sistine Chapel and had an opportunity to view Michelangelo’s works of art, such as the “Creation of Adam.” The students walked around St. Peter’s Square as it was being prepared for Palm Sunday Mass. After their trip to Vatican City, they visited the Colosseum and saw where the gladiators fought and then walked across the street to see the Roman Forum. The next day they were off to Florence, stopping in the village of Assisi on the way. Students shopped in the small village and saw the Church of St. Marco. They also went to Michelangelo Square to see the view of Florence. On day four, the students explored Florence, visiting a jewelry and leather store, Ponte Vecchio and the Arno River. Later that day, they went to the Leaning Tower of

Pisa. The students concluded their sightseeing in Florence by going to the Galleria dell’Accademia to see the statue of David, as well as the unfinished sculptures of

Michelangelo’s “Prisoners.” On the fifth day, they went to the region of Liguria to take a boat trip to Cinque Terre, which was followed by a trip to the city of Genoa the next day. With their tour guide, the group visited “Porto Antico” and St. George’s Palace and later headed to Milan and saw the world famous “Teatro alla Scala” and the Cathedral of Milan. The students were able to walk around the “Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II.” The seventh day started by taking a boat ride around Sirmione and seeing Lake Garda. After Sirmione, the students went to Verona to the “Centro Storico.” Here they were also able to see the house of Romeo and Juliet’s balcony and touch the statue of Juliet for good luck. They ended the day in Venice and enjoyed walking around St. Mark’s Square in the evening. Their eighth day began with a gondola ride through the canals. They met two students who attended school in Venice who took them on a short tour around the city. After, the students went to a Murano glass making tutorial and a lace factory, which was in a chapel. They explored Venice for the remainder of the afternoon. Their final day in Italy was spent on Lido Beach in the morning, close to where they stayed and then they left Italy from the Venice airport.

Student success in essay contest Honor society adds members The annual World Languages National Honor Society induction dinner for Sewanhaka High School was held on April 20 at the Inn at New Hyde Park. Adviser Carmen Graci inducted 122 students into this prestigious honor society.

The event was attended by more than 200 guests, family members, teachers and administration of Sewanhaka. The 2017 seniors who were inducted were given a medal that they will wear at graduation to signify their membership in the honor society.

Making ‘medical marvels’ New Hyde Park Memorial High School sophomores from Angela Stone’s Science Research class took part in Northwell Health-Feinstein Institute for Medical Research’s 2017 Medical Marvels competition. The purpose of the program is to encourage Long Island students to examine possible careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. As part of this year’s topic, “Clean Water,” students had to envision themselves in the position of a school district superintendent who has learned that students and staff of one school

have become ill with similar symptoms after using the same water fountain. The group did background research including interviewing both Sewanhaka school district Superintendent Ralph Ferrie and New Hyde Park Memorial principal Richard Faccio. The team submitted a 14-

page comprehensive proposal entitled, “H2U” that addressed the current outbreak and offered strategies to prevent future water contamination issues. The plan had to include a technological component, a scientific research assessment and a public policy strategy. In addition, the team had to display their paper visually and make a video of an oral presentation. The team, made up by sophomores Aisha Abdelhamid, Jaime Jacob, Dylan Patel and Prachi Shah, received certificates and a $500 monetary award.

New Hyde Park Memorial High School students Aisha Abdelhamid, Nathan Edwards, Christina Jacob, Ramsha Shoaib, Melvin Thomas and Grant Wong were named winners in the Martin J. Kelly Writing Contest of the Irish Cultural Society. The students were part of a group of 610 poets who created

1,350 Gaelic quatrains in the competition. Sewanhaka High School students Noah Ahmed, Suhana Choudhury, Nicholas LaGrega, Ramsha Merchant, Young Park and Sonia Solomon were also among the winners. Their essays were selected from the more than 600 submissions received from 17 schools.


14 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

Opinion OUR VIEWS

Right choice at Clinton Martin

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he North Hempstead Town Board did the right thing last week in voting unanimously to approve a $19.4 million bid for the main work in a $23 million overhaul of the Clinton G. Martin pool in New Hyde Park. The renovation, expected to start in June and finish within a year, will resurface a 75,000-square-foot pool deck, expand the kiddie pool, renovate locker rooms, resurface the park’s tennis courts, overhaul the 55-year-old pool’s aging infrastructure, and add a water slide, spray features and shading structures. There is no question about the why of the project. The pool is an important part of the New Hyde Park community and the overhaul was needed and necessary. But the how — how the Town of North Hempstead evaluates the cost of the renovation — is another matter. After more than a year in intense discussions with Clinton G. Martin Park District residents, trustees approved a plan earlier this year based on an estimated cost of $14.1 million for the construction. The only problem is that when the only two bids were submitted, both were in excess of $19 million — $5 million more than expected. Including so-called “soft” costs, the number rose to $23 million. It doesn’t take a math whiz to see how far off that is. This difference did not sit well with park district mem-

bers, whose roughly 13,000 residents will cover the cost of the borrowing to pay for the project with increased property taxes. Some residents had expressed concerns during earlier discussions that the project’s cost would grow. Town officials assured them that it wouldn’t. Cue the apologies and, depending on how you view them, explanations or excuses. Town officials and Jason Pontieri of J.R. Holzmacher Engineering, the firm that made the cost estimates last year, expressed regret that the figures were so far off. Pontieri said the estimates were based on the most recent available construction data, but officials cannot see what specific costs were higher until they award a bid. Mitchell Pally, CEO of the Long Island Builders Institute, said cost estimates consider several factors that could have changed in the year since the first estimates were calculated. And Long Island’s construction industry is “substantially stronger than it’s ever been,” driving up competition and costs, Pally said. Still, an estimate of $14 million that ends up $5 million off — nearly 36 percent — is hard to fathom. Residents and town council members were then faced with a choice: accept a bigger property tax increase, or solicit more bids to possibly get a cheaper price. The pool construction was originally expected to increase

Editorial Cartoon

median property taxes of residents of the Clinton G. Martin Park District — which covers North New Hyde Park, the Village of New Hyde Park, Garden City Park, Herricks and Searingtown — from $40 to $100. The additional $5 million required for construction raised that cost to $140. Residents were divided but

both they and council members were apparently swayed by town Supervisor Judi Bosworth’s argument that there was no guarantee that new bids would be any less expensive and seeking them would delay the project for a second summer. “I just feel if we go any longer than the one season that

we’re proposed now, we’re going to miss out on memories and people will start looking elsewhere” said Rob Spina, a resident, who presented a petition with 212 signatures supporting the project. Give residents and council members credit. By our estimation, they made the right choice.

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Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

15

ALL THINGS POLITICAL

The outsourcing of good paying jobs

D

uring the 2016 Presidential Campaign, Donald Trump continually promised to put coal miners back to work and support the coal industry. This was welcome news to generations of coal miners who were struggling to find work, because roughly 200,000 coal mining jobs have been lost since peak employment in 1981. However, the Trump campaign shouldn’t have focused on the coal industry for getting Americans back to work, because coal is a filthy outdated source of energy. Instead, the focus should have been on the real problem, the outsourcing of American white collar and manufacturing jobs. Jobs are “outsourced” when U.S. based companies hire foreign workers instead of Americans. According to the most recent report from the Bureau of Economic Analysis, as of 2013, U.S. overseas affiliates employed 14 million people. In other words, instead of

corporations hiring American citizens to produce goods and services at home, they hire employees in other countries with a lower standard of living and poor labor protections. Corporate profits increase while good paying American jobs are lost. American technology companies who outsource white collar IT jobs pay salaries of $7,000 per year in China, and $8,400 in India, which is roughly one tenth the salary of those same jobs in the U.S. Likewise, most of the top accounting firms outsource managerial work because an office manager makes a mere $15,000-$20,000 in India, where the same job in the U.S. commands a salary of $150,000. Close to 90 percent of radiology services in hospitals are also outsourced to India, as doctors are paid at a fraction of their American counterparts to read American X-rays 6,000 miles away. These are all examples of good paying, white-collar jobs that are being outsourced for a

ADAM HABER All Things Political fraction of the cost, all in the name of efficiency. The middle class has also been hurt by outsourcing as 5,000,000 manufacturing jobs have been lost since 2000. Many blame cheap overseas labor for the loss of these American jobs because companies such as Walmart relentlessly push for lower prices and manufacture as cheaply as possible. Americans flock to Walmart to purchase cheap goods, which in turn causes more outsourcing of jobs.

Improvements in technology through use of robots and machines are also partly responsible for the loss of manufacturing jobs, as companies constantly strive for higher efficiency and productivity. Even President Trump outsources most of the manufacturing of Trump branded products. Trump shirts are made in China, Bangladesh, Honduras and Vietnam. Trump eyeglasses are also made in China, as are Trump hotel pens, shampoos, laundry bags and shower caps. All told Trump products are manufactured in at least 12 different countries, which made his vow not to eat Oreo cookies anymore when Nabisco moved American jobs to Mexico, disingenuous. Outsourcing jobs lowers barriers in American markets for competition from foreign made goods and services, and makes it difficult for companies who manufacture in America to compete globally. Sending jobs overseas hurts morale at American companies because employees feel expend-

able. Jobs lost to outsourcing rarely come back, making it harder for American workers to find meaningful, stable longterm employment. Ideas floated to stop outsourcing and protect American jobs include scrapping international trade pacts, stopping government contractors from hiring foreign workers, slowing visa entries of international workers, having caller ID from overseas call centers to raise American awareness of outsourcing, helping displaced American workers through job training and improving education of American citizens. Unfortunately, there are no easy answers or quick fixes. Outsourcing of good paying jobs creates an ever-increasing divide between the wealthy, and the middle class and poor. Without balance in the distribution of income there soon may not be enough of a middle class left with the ability to purchase the goods and services needed to drive the economy forward.

A LOOK ON THE LIGHTER SIDE

This laughter is no laughing matter

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t has come to this: two weeks ago, in Washington, D.C., a woman was convicted and sentenced to a year in jail… for laughing. Desiree Fairooz, a whitehaired lady of 61 years of age, was seated in a Senate hearing room in January, attending hearings on whether or not Sen. Jeff Sessions should be confirmed as President Trump’s Attorney General. “Sen. Richard Shelby (the other Senator from Alabama) was tasked with making compliments about Sen. Sessions,” Desiree told a reporter, “and one of them seemed ridiculous to me and I involuntarily laughed.” That prompted a Capitol Hill police officer to come over to her, tell her she was under arrest, and march her away. Desiree’s conviction is actually for what happened next: she protested rather loudly about being marched away, holding a sign. This, apparently, constitutes “disorderly conduct” and “parading on capitol grounds.” But none of it would have happened if she hadn’t been ar-

rested for laughing. For the record, the comment by Sen. Shelby that set Desiree off was that “(Sessions’) extensive record of treating all Americans equally under the law is clear and well-documented.” There is in fact a good deal of documentation of the exact opposite, but that’s not the point. The point is that the only thing Desiree did wrong was to have something land on her funny bone. She laughed, and it got her arrested, and all the rest followed. Now she may well have to spend a year in jail. There are some very thin skins in Washington, D.C., these days. Sen. Elizabeth Warren found this out while attempting to read her colleagues a letter, also about Mr. Sessions, from Martin Luther King, Jr.’s widow, Coretta. The thing is, that letter was already a part of the Congressional Record. But no matter. Sen. Mitch McConnell accused Ms. Warren of violating “Rule 19,” fa-

JUDY EPSTEIN A Look on the Lighter Side mously saying of Warren, “She was warned. She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted.” Oddly, other senators were allowed to read the very same letter the next day, with no repercussions. Perhaps it’s a coincidence that they were all men. Or perhaps there’s a pattern here. I am especially upset about the case of Desiree Fairooz. It’s partly because she’s my age, but mostly because, as she herself said, she couldn’t help it.

“I just couldn’t hold it,” she said. “It was spontaneous.” That could have been me. It could so easily have been me. I have been accused of laughing inappropriately all my life — I have a dangerously low threshold for ridiculosity —so I know that it’s something you really can’t help. Just ask Mrs. Herman, in 2nd grade, who put me out in the hall for using a line from a popular cartoon show about a mouse named Herman: “Hey, Herman — are you a man or a mouse?” I was asked to leave more than one friend’s Bat Mitzvah, because I couldn’t keep from giggling during somebody’s exceedingly dull speech (probably the rabbi’s). But at least I wasn’t arrested! What is this nation coming to, when a woman can be dragged out of a public place (a place that her tax dollars have paid for, most likely), for the mere crime of laughing? Men are fond of telling us women that we are too emotional. But we don’t go around

arresting people just for laughing at us. Alas, these days, apparently, speech — and laughter — are not free if they hurt the feelings of a man. Which doesn’t bode well for the human race. I don’t want to shock anyone, if this is coming to you as news, but — spoiler alert — women have been laughing at men since the dawn of time! And if we can’t do that, without being arrested, I really don’t see how our species is going to make it to another generation… because I don’t see men ceasing to make total laughing-stocks of themselves any time soon. I think that what the thinskinned men of Washington are really looking for is respect. But they should know this about respect: It can’t be demanded; it can only be earned. Nowadays, we have a President who has bragged, over an open microphone, about how he is able to just “grab women by the pussy.” So here’s one more thing to know about respect: It’s a two-way street.


16 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

OUT OF LEFT FIELD

Italian-Americans riding the sports elevator

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r. Tom Ferraro, the marvelous commentator for Blank Slate Media, last week highlighted that there are 319,602 Italian-Americans in Nassau County. In the 2000 Census, there were 408,572 in Suffolk. Our two suburban counties ranked among the highest population percentage of Italian-Americans in the U.S. (Suffolk was 2nd with 28.8), and Nassau was 7th (23.9). I grew up in an immigrant household and have been privileged to teach immigration history. I am keenly aware of the challenges for categorizing any ethnic group. The book I co-edited 30 years ago had the subtitle: “Salad Bowl or Melting Pot?” My North Shore co-author, Josef Sirefman, and I focused on the spectrum experienced by all immigrants: ethnicity (staying primarily in their own ghettoes); acculturation (blending American culture with their ethnic inheritance); and assimilation (becoming primarily “Americanized”). All those phases and phrases are complex; they call for elucidation. However, the trend from “salad bowl” to “melting pot” is

inexorable — the gauge is how many generations it takes for ethnic newcomers to fuse with other groups. For early Italian-Americans (of which I was one), there was a tendency to be “IN America, but not OF America.” My immigrant dad (from the beautiful Adriatic seacoast town of Casalbordino) almost never left our Little Italy ghetto. My mother’s illiterate parents (from bella Pescara) stayed even closer to home and to “la famiglia.” The immigrants in my 13-person household experienced a ghetto life that was later described by scholars as a “decompression chamber.” As in the case of deep sea divers, if you tried to adjust too quickly, you were likely to get a version of the cultural ““bends.” For those of us who grew up in those immigrant households of the 1930s and ‘40s, sports were seen as the quickest way out of the ghetto (not unlike blacks and other minorities). We saw that professional athletics valued youth and skill over ancestry, residence or education. The key was to get good enough at your sport to get a shot at the big time.

MICHAEL D’INNOCENZO Out of Left Field In our Italian-American ‘hood, like other ethnics of those decades, we were described as “sports crazy.’ Whatever the season, that was the sport we played. We had the audacity to envision being outstanding playing every sport (unlike today’s teens, who increasingly tend to focus only on a single sport, often with special coaching). In contrast, we advanced by playing games every day for many hours at a time. \ So fanatical were we, that during winters, we shoveled snow off an outdoor basketball court so we could play regardless of how cold the temperature was.

Sometimes, we resorted to the creative approach of “breaking into our school” (through a coal chute) so we could shoot hoops. Our approach to a fantasy of sports stardom was epitomized when we were in grammar school. I have never forgotten the exchange in the late 1940s between Dominick Yozzo and one of the Culetto twins. We all had trouble distinguishing the twins because one was called “Tony” and the other simply went through our ghetto life known as “The Twin.” Yozzo said to one of the twins: “How are you guys doin’ in school?” The Culetto who responded said: “I ain’t doin’ too good in school, but I’m doin’ ok down the street.” Some of us tried to bridge the ethnic “street corner society” with education skills. No one did that better than Frank Cosentino, son of immigrants, who was the best athlete in the history of our high school. He was also a superb student. He went on to graduate from Princeton where he was the starting tailback in the early ‘50s, and the number one golfer (losing only a single match during his college career).

Frank’s golf achievement is especially noteworthy. How in the world could the son of immigrants in an Italian ghetto become so proficient at golf? Long Island author Pietro DiDonato would understand. Frank excelled because of what DiDonato cited as Italian commitment to “Job.” For Frank, his paying job began at age 10 as a caddy; same for all of us at a beautiful private country club. We regularly joined Frank in playing 64 holes every Monday (which was caddy’s day). We began at 7 a.m. and finished when light faded at 8:45 p.m. (sometimes holding lighters over the cup to complete final puts). Like our “creative” approach using the school basketball court when the building was locked, we regularly “sneaked on to the back holes in late evening to play several holes, betting on each one of them). Our group, the sons of immigrants, regularly won the county golf championship. I played in the number two slot on my college team.

PULSE OF THE PENINSULA

2-state solution the only way, Barak argues

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hud Barak, the former Prime Minister of Israel, speaking at Temple Emanuel of Great Neck, May 11, argued forcefully for a two-state solution as the only way to preserve “The Zionist Project” — a nation that is both Jewish and democratic. While there are no options that do not bring risk, he asserted, the basis for his contention is that Israel is the strongest economy and has the strongest military “for 1,000 miles around” in the region. Israel would insist on drawing the border lines that protect its security. On the other hand, the existential threat, he argued, would be to abandon the two-state solution. And he insisted that Israel’s right wing government leaders need to wrest themselves from paralysis and politics and being held hostage to the messianic view of the settlers, and act, even unilaterally, to setting the stage. Barak laid out a cogent argument based on a lifetime at the center of Israel’s defense, politics and leadership, serving as Prime Minister, Chief of General Staff

of the Israeli Defense Forces and most recently as Minister of Defense, for moving forward with a two-state solution, and putting “a wedge” in the slippery slope toward a one-state solution. He said that the rise of ISIS and the globalized threat of terror from radical Islamic jihadists ironically creates an opportunity because it has elevated Israel’s position as an essential actor in a global conflict, while at the same time diminishing the Israel-Palestinian conflict as a regional one. He pointed to “an opportunity that happens once in generation and might disappear in a year or so, of a joint common interest that has developed between Israel and Sunni moderate leadership — Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Jordan and others. “The common interest is fighting together against Islamist radical terror; the second is to join hands and putting at bay Iranian nuclear intentions; third, to join hands in huge regional infrastructure projects – energy, water, transportation; and fourth, the Palestinian issue.” “We are never going to find ourselves in an ideal world,” he

KAREN RUBIN Pulse of the Peninsula said soberly. “The Mideast is never going to resemble Scandinavia.” But, “Israel, being the strongest player all around the area, can use this position of strength in a self-confident manner” to finally resolve the Palestinian issue. On the other hand, if there is only one state, Israel inevitably will become either non-Jewish or nondemocratic. That is because in an area the size of New Jersey live 8.5 million Israelis (including 1.5 million Arab Israelis) and 5 million Palestinians. If Israel remains democratic,

“overnight it would become a binational state and within few years a bi-national state with an Arab majority, almost surely civil war, and no future.” The other alternative in a onestate Israel is that it would no longer be a democracy, because Arabs would be barred from voting for Knesset. “Neither is the Zionist dream. It is the consequence of a painful but simple reality: we need a compelling imperative to find a way to disengage ourselves from Palestinians and create a line in Israel that would include settlement blocks and the Israeli’ suburbs of eastern Jerusalem. That would include 80% of the settlers. Beyond this line, should be a place for a viable Palestinian state. “I reemphasize: it’s not because of the need for justice for Palestinians, not because of the international community [and the spreading BDS — Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions movement, particularly on American college campuses]. It’s out of our compelling imperative to take care of our own security, future and identity.” There are risks and challenges,

“but that shouldn’t paralyze you from seeing difference between existential threat and the technical military risk we’ve lived with. In a way, what happens in the Mideast doesn’t increase the threat to Israel, but reduces it.” He only briefly addressed the problem on the Palestinian side, and did not address the intractable issue of dividing Jerusalem, saying, “No one can tell for sure whether Palestinians are ripe for painful decisions needed from both sides for a breakthrough in peace process.” But, he added, “even if there is no way to achieve a breakthrough these days, it doesn’t mean we should be paralyzed, that we should be blind to our interest in starting...” He said that “professionals” can find their way to a solution. “A group of the most senior leaders of ISF, Mossad, Israeli police, generals – have formed Commandos for Israel Security. They have proposed a practical plan for what should be done now to start disengagement, independently of Palestinians, with backing of Americans and Continued on Page 65


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FROM THE DESK OF ELAINE PHILLIPS

LIRR riders deserve better treatment

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IRR riders deserve a break. For weeks now, they have dealt with far too many delays, cancellations and service disruptions because of infrastructure failures at Penn Station. Two train derailments, signal breakdowns, electrical problems and a host of other issues all stemming from a crumbling transportation system are wreaking havoc on operations. Sadly, the only reliable thing commuters can expect from Penn Station right now is unreliability. The situation is so bad that it’s now officially a national joke, with Saturday Night Live’s Weekend Update joking this past week that a sewage leak at the station, which rained down wastewater from the ceilings was “an improvement.”

Amtrak, Penn Station’s owner and operator, is currently developing a major infrastructure rehabilitation plan. That overhaul, while necessary, will likely result in several track closures and significantly impact service throughout the summer. Riders are rightfully concerned that this has the potential to result in an even bigger debacle than the one they have been dealing with. That cannot happen. Penn Station is one of the largest transit hubs in the Western Hemisphere, serving over 650,000 passengers a day. When hundreds of thousands of people don’t have a dependable way to get to work, it has an enormous impact on people, businesses and the region’s economy.

ELAINE PHILLIPS State Senator I have called for several different steps to be taken to help protect Long Island commuters. First, LIRR fares should be reduced during the construction. Riders pay for a certain level of service; if service is going to be

cut for an extended period, fares should be cut too. Amtrak is responsible for Penn Station. They need to do the right thing and fund a fare reduction. The MTA and Amtrak also need to work together to minimize the impact for riders. Shifting a portion of Amtrak’s service to Grand Central Station would free up more track space for the LIRR, the country’s largest commuter railroad and Penn Station’s biggest user. Increasing service from other LIRR hubs which connect with subway and bus lines will also help commuters get into Manhattan without having to go through Penn Station. Finally, riders must be kept informed about what is happening so that they can plan accord-

ingly. Having commuted on the LIRR for over 20 years, I know firsthand that every one of these delays has a ripple effect that impacts you and the people around you; the client who was kept waiting, the child whose game you had to miss, the babysitter who can’t leave until you get home. People need advance warning of service changes so that they can plan accordingly. They also need a way to provide feedback as to what needs improvement. You can read more about these proposals by visiting my website, phillips.nysenate.gov. Commuters should not have to continue suffering at Penn Station. You deserve better.

KREMER’S CORNER

Many elephants needed to tame Trump

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n the next few weeks, the famous Ringling Bros. circus will cease to exist, ending a history that dates back to 1884. The circus has provided fun and excitement to millions of youngsters, but it incurred the wrath of animal rights advocates and that was enough to put it out of business. The big question now is what will happen to all those elephants that have entertained in the center ring? Happily, many of them will be sent to animal sanctuaries and zoos. But others may be homeless and that is a dilemma that can be solved. There are a lot of places that the elephants can go, but Washington D.C. is probably the best place. No matter where you look whether it’s the Oval office, the Senate or the House, there is a need for more proverbial elephants in the room to act as a

reminder of unfinished business and the chaos that has made our nation’s capital a real animal house. Let’s start with the President’s office. There are probably a dozen or so that could occupy the space as a reminder of failed immigration policies, a lack of a real health care policy, a failure to propose a national infrastructure plan,potential conflicts of interest and a so-called tax revision proposal. Each and every one of those elephants in the room would serve as a stark reminder that President Trump still doesn’t have a clue about how to govern. Thanks to the firing of FBI Director James Comey, there is a need for another elephant to remind the President that aggravating the intelligence community is a proven way to get booted out of office. Over in the House of Representatives, a real health care

JERRY KREMER Kremer’s Corner plan, not the one they passed, requires at least one elephant. That same animal would be a stark reminder that the administration in power loses seats in the mid term elections unless it cleans up its act. With three factions in the Republican House, the future looks pretty bleak. The House could have gotten a new health-care bill passed

if an effort was made to woo some Democrats, but instead the leadership got into bed with the Freedom Caucus and all they got for the experience is screaming town hall meetings and other headaches. The elephant over in the Senate has to be the shadow of President Trump, creating daily chaos in the country. Just when things were settling down, the President gave new credibility to the claims about Russian interference in the recent election. By firing the FBI Director, with no notice to Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, the President has made each day just a little harder for the senators, who are trying to stay on good terms with the President. Can you imagine being a U.S. Senator and seeing the President welcoming Russia’s leaders to his office, at the same time that Mr. Trump is denying any cozy relationship with Rus-

sia? At least one elephant can be parked in Minority Leader Chuck Schumer’s office. That elephant symbolizes last year’s failed election, which cost the Democrats the White House and the chance to run the Senate. The Democrats need to regain the confidence of the millions of people who abandoned them in the 2016 election and voted for Trump over Hillary Clinton. The party needs a message that resonates with blue-collar voters and formally loyal voters, who abandoned them. There is an old adage that “an elephant never forgets.” However, in the case of our national government, the new crop of elephants in the room is a brutal reminder that our government is in a state of continuing chaos and the business of the people remains untouched and unfinished.

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18 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

READERS WRITE

The importance of donating blood

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would like to impress on the many the importance of donating blood. I was at the Immaculate Conception in Douglaston on May 2, where many groups were being honored for running blood drives. Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio and the New York Blood Center gave praise for Brooklyn and Queens for the 2016 Blood Campaign which accounted for 8,000 donations.

Bishop DiMarzio said,” The donation of blood is a sign of social-consciousness because unless people are willing to donate blood, the health of our communities will not be very well.” I wholeheartedly agree with the Bishop. I’m grand knight of St. Anastasia Knights of Columbus council #5911 and as Chairman with my co-chairman Giuseppe Petruso and fellow members Jo-

seph Stock and Martin Aversa, and with the help of Boy Scout Troop #153 we run two blood drives a year at St. Anastasia parish in Douglaston. Now here is my question, would like to save three lives ? Giving one pint of blood does just that. Our blood drive is on June 4 at St. Anastasia parish in Douglaston located 45-14 245th Street on Sunday at 8:45-2:45 Let me also point out that the need for blood

is constant. Did you know that our local hospitals need more than 2.000 pints a day. You never know when someone you know needs blood or even yourself. So, if you can please give the gift of life, you will be glad that you did. Frederick R. Bedell Jr. Mineola

Trump’s ignorance, broken promises

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n the campaign trail, Donald J. Trump proposed policies, if elected, he would re-work American foreign policies to put America’s interest first beginning with walling our southern border at Mexico’s expense. The Mexican president had a belly laugh and declared zero financial responsibility for the project. So, Mr. Trump promptly reversed the $25 billion cost to the American government; i.e. American taxpayers and in upside down talk declared Mexico will pay up in the future. Trump continues to insist on building the best wall on our 2,000 mile long southern border even though some border land is privately owned; parts run through river water and swampy terrain; ecologists have predicted extinction for animals that won’t be able to migrate across the border to mate and feed according to their biological imperatives. Best of all, the undocumented and the drug dealers will by-pass this great wall and accomplish entry by alternative air and sea routes; so this exquisite building project can serve as a decorative border marker rather than a deterrent to desperados. While campaigning, Mr. Trump promised to re-negotiate NAFTA, our trade agreement with Mexico and Canada, but reversed course in office when he learned of the damage to American interests associated with un-doing NAFTA. He subsequently learned that the Mexican government partners with U.S. border patrols in trying to prevent unsanctioned border crossings and also co-operates with U.S. counter-terrorism agencies. He now understands that the Mexican government has been our good friend

and trading partner. So, the NAFTA project was sent to the back burner and there it remains indefinitely. In the name of America first, Mr. Trump told South Korea to pay the $1 billion cost for our installment of the THAAD missile defense system aimed to deter military action from North Korea. The South Koreans hit the streets en masse to demand of American to stick to its contracted agreement to pay for the system. So, Mr. Trump reversed positions and accepted the $1 billion cost for the THAAD missile installation on South Korean soil. Next move for Mr. Trump was to invite North Korean President Kim to a tete à tete to discuss America’s disapproval of North Korean militarism. Mr. Trump announced his belief that he would be “honored” to meet Mr. Kim in person. Kim declined to reply to Mr. Trump’s warm invitation to a pow-wow. Mr. Trump moved on to President Duterte of the Philippines. He extended his warm invitation to this self-confessed murderer and chief of a murderous campaign of terror with 7,000 and counting Filippinos killed under Duterte’s extra-judicial assassination policy. Mr. Duterte announced he would not waste his time meeting with Mr. Trump. On the campaign trail, Mr. Trump promised to undo the Iran deal of lifting sanctions in return for Iran halting nuclear weapons development under strict international inspections. In office, Mr. Trump discovered that Iran is at war with ISIS as is the United States, so the Iran deal stays in force in order not to antagonize an ally in fight-

ing ISIS. In the America first platform, Mr. Trump denounced China as a currency manipulator and of harming the U.S. economy. He also promised to use his powerful negotiating prowess to strong-arm China into pressuring North Korea to cease and desist nuclear testing and to mitigate its hostility to South Korea. In this negative mind-set on China, Mr. Trump acknowledged the President of Taiwan in a direct telephone call, apparently undoing America’s 70 year oneChina policy. Chinese President Shih met Trump at Mar-el Lago headquarters and explained Chinese fiscal policy; China’s commitment to re-uniting Taiwan to the mainland and revealing China’s minimal influence on North Korean policy. Trump then announced that he has a wonderful opinion of President Shih; China is not a currency manipulator; China is unable to apply meaningful pressure on North Korean policies and yes, there is just one China: Taiwan is a renegade state that, like Hong Kong, will eventually re-unite with the mainland. We all know of Trump’s effusive praise of Russian President Putin that has soured after Mr. Trump discovered Russia’s adversarial behavior in East Ukraine, Crimea, Syria. He just didn’t know about Russian geopolitics until recent days. We also remember how Trump declared NATO obsolete pre-election and how he reversed course and announced our strong involvement in the NATO alliance including the continuation of financial participation at current levels despite his earlier complaint that NATO countries were bilking us and making us pay for

their share in the organization. What about the federal court’s reversal of Trump’s executive order to ban travelers from seven Muslim majority nations on suspicion of hostile intentions towards the United States. Not one of the citizens from the banned countries has committed an act of terror on U.S. soil; in contrast, the Muslim countries whose citizens have committed atrocities such as 9/11 and the 1993 attack on the World Trade Tower were not banned. Saudi Arabian, Kuwaiti, Egyptian citizens were responsible for terror in the U.S., but Mr. Trump apparently was not aware of their national origins, so their home countries were not included in the ban. In any case, a federal judge ruled the ban unconstitutional, so the ban went away. Other issues of concern: the promise to improve American health care system when the American Medical Association denounced his replacement plan as disastrous for at least 30 percent of the country. Trump’s reputed involvement and putative indebtedness to Russian oligarchs as financial partners in Trump’s enterprises has yet to be clarified to American citizens. Just now, we hear that FBI Director Comey got fired as he was in the process of unlayering Trump’s highly questionable connection to Russian money. What about Trump’s tax returns? What is hiding in the figures? What grade are we giving on Trump’s 100th day in office? Will the grade go up or down on his 200th day? Diane Nahas Great Neck

Phillips shows she cares for seniors

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s a senior who attended one of Sen. Elaine Phillips’ senior scam prevention programs, I wanted to thank her for providing this important service. The program was very informative and featured professionals from the New York State Division of Consumer Protec-

tion and LiveOn NY who offered helpful tips on identifying and avoiding common scams. They patiently answered questions for nearly two hours and listened to real life stories and experiences from many in the group who were targets of scams themselves.

And we received additional information to take home and review,as well as helpful contact numbers for follow-up questions and to report additional concerns. Sen. Phillips even posted a video of the presentation on her website, so that seniors who couldn’t attend could still get

the information. It’s nice to see an elected official going so far to help address an issue that is a real concern for us. Thank you Sen. Phillips for caring about seniors! Peter Gong New Hyde Park


The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

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READERS WRITE

Serve community I dropped out to unify on library board G.N. district: candidate

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am a member of the Nominating Committee of the Great Neck Library. There will be two openings for members of the Board of Trustees, as well as two for the Nominating Committee itself. I urge you to apply if you are ready to give something back to the community. Apply if you use the Main Library or any of its branches at Station, Lakeville, or Parkville. Apply if you take pleasure in seeing pre school children less than three feet tall enjoying computers, or students doing research, writing papers, or studying together. Apply if you enjoy the movies, lectures, meetings and performances at the library.

Apply if you enjoy the beauty of the new building at Main and the panoramic vista of its lake and lawns. Apply also if you don’t like the way the library is run and wish to change things. It’s easy to apply. If chosen as a candidate by the Nominating Committee, you will not have to seek signatures on a nominating petition as would otherwise be required to seek elective office. Simply send a letter with your resume by June 1 to: Chairman, Nominating Committee Great Neck Library 159 Bayview Ave. Great Neck, NY 11023 Howard M. Esterces Great Neck

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ince I announced my withdrawal as a candidate for the Great Neck School District Board of Education at the Meet the Candidates Night on Tuesday, May 9, 2017 at the Great Neck House, there has been speculation as to what motivated my decision. I would like to clear up any misconceptions. When I made the decision to run for the Board of Education, it was because I felt that I could provide sound counsel and make positive contributions to Great Neck’s public school system. We all agree that a first-class public school district is good for our community, good for our property values, and vital if we are to develop our children into responsible, civic-minded leaders of tomorrow. These are the same goals that led me to serve on the Board of Directors of the Silverstein Hebrew Academy (SHA). I believe absolutely that providing a well-rounded, high quality education should be and is the mission of our public school system, of SHA and the other private, non-public schools in Great Neck. As the campaign progressed, it became clear to me that there were misconceptions and misunderstandings as to my motives for running for the Board of Education; enough so that my candidacy

was becoming a distraction to the important issues all of the candidates, including myself, wanted to focus on. My goal was to be a unifying force for the community, not an impediment. I also realized that if I were fortunate enough to be elected to the Great Neck School District Board of Education, it would be an all-encompassing and time consuming commitment, and I would not be able to provide a 100 percent commitment to the Board of Education and at the same time honor my deep commitment to the Silverstein Hebrew Academy. For these reasons, and these reasons alone, I made the difficult decision to withdraw my candidacy. At the time that this statement will be published, the vote will have taken place and the Great Neck School District will have two new board members. I congratulate both and look forward to working with the school district for the benefit of all members of the Great Neck community. Ilya Aronovich Great Neck

Top cop out of hospital after procedure BY N O A H M A N S K A R Nassau County’s acting police commissioner was recovering at home Friday after being treated for heart problems, the Police Department said. Acting Commissioner Thomas Krumpter was released from St. Francis Hospital in Flower Hill on Friday afternoon after undergoing a stent procedure to open up his arteries on Thursday, Deputy Commissioner Patrick Ryder said in a statement. He went to the hospital on the advice of his doctor after feeling some discomfort Thursday, Ryder said. Officer James McDermott, president of the Nassau Police Benevolent Association, the county’s largest police union, said he heard from police officials that Krumpter has had as many as five stents put in his heart. “[T]he commissioner has been released and he is home resting comfortably,” Det. Lt. Richard LeBrun, the department’s top spokesman, said in an email. Krumpter, 50, has served as Nassau’s top cop since 2014, when County Executive Edward Mangano appointed him to the post.

This year is his 25th as a Nassau police officer. Krumpter had not been feeling well throughout this week, McDermott said — he skipped a memorial for a police officer upstate on Wednesday. He also did not participate in Wednesday’s Unity Tour, a bike ride to Washington, D.C., after riding last year, McDermott said. McDermott said he did not know of any existing health problems Krumpter had. Krumpter told Newsday last year that he had lost 70 pounds by exercising and cutting down on junk food. Krumpter has led the Nassau Police Department into a period of historically low crime rates — major crimes fell 8.7 percent countywide in 2016 compared with the prior year. He has also bolstered community policing programs while maintaining precinct mergers, including the controversial consolidation of the 3rd and 6th Precincts on the North Shore. After more than three years in the Police Department’s top job, Krumpter has yet to be officially confirmed as the permanent police commissioner by the Nassau County Legislature.

Acting Police Commissioner Thomas Krumpter is seen in Great Neck in 2014.


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Herricks budget, trustees make grade Continued from Page 1 more efficient and play an active role in resolving issues in the formula for distributing state education aid. Zanetti attended nearly every school board meeting before his election. He said he is looking forward to getting comfortable on the other side of the table. “I’ll have to be a little more careful about what I say, because sometimes in the audience you can crack a joke or two,” Zanetti said Wednesday. Maintaining all programs while abiding by the state tax cap will be one of the

district’s ongoing challenges in the coming years, Zanetti said. The district will also be renegotiating contracts with its labor unions in the next three years, which Gounaris has said will be another significant challenge. The board will name a new vice president in July following Turner’s departure at the end of June. Gounaris, who served as school board president from 2013 to 2015, said he would be happy to serve in that role if the board asks him to. “We are five equals and it’s not always about a label or a title,” he said.

HERRICKS James Gounaris — 1,008 votes Henry Zanetti — 981 votes BUDGET 1,070 yes, 352 no

“It’s really about the work the five of us equally share and do.” Zanetti said he will most likely “just

rather get my feet wet” when he takes office, but would consider the vice president’s post.

Mineola candidates, budget get OK MINEOLA Margaret Ballantye-Mannion — 769 votes Patrick Talty — 755 votes BUDGET 796 yes, 233 no CAPITAL RESERVE 756 yes, 252 no

Margaret Ballantyne-Mannion (left) BY N O A H M A N S K A R Mineola school district voters approved $98.6 million in spending, elected a new school board trustee and re-elected the board’s vice president on Tuesday. The district’s $94.4 million 201718 budget passed by a margin of 796 votes to 233, and a proposition to spend $4.2 million from a capital reserve fund passed 756-252. Vice President Margaret BallantyneMannion won a second three-year term unopposed with 769 votes, and Patrick Talty won his first term unopposed with 755 votes. Talty, a Brookhaven National Laboratory engineer, will replace Trustee Nicole Matzer, who is stepping down after four

Patrick Talty years on the board, the third change in membership in three years. Talty said one of his primary goals is to increase parent involvement in the district. He pointed to the “anemic” voter turnout on Tuesday as evidence of room for improvement, though he said that’s not exclusive to Mineola. “Children know when their parents are involved, and I think it makes them sit up a little bit straighter in school,” Talty said Wednesday. The budget contains a 0.89 percent increase in property tax revenue, the maximum allowed this year under the state’s tax cap law. The capital reserve money will pay for a second gymnasium at Mineola High School and an expansion at the Meadow Drive School.

The projects are among millions of dollars worth of work the district has taken up in recent years. Voters also approved $7 million in capital reserve spending in 2015, but some large projects at the Hampton Street School have been delayed by the state Education Department’s backlogged review process. Talty has said he hopes to continue the district’s recent emphasis on giving students “modern” learning environments. “Big strides have been made over the past couple years, and the community, again, those that voted, voted overwhelmingly in support of continuing that,” Talty said. While she thinks the entire district budget is important for students, Bal-

lantyne-Mannion, a Spanish professor at York College in Jamaica, Queens, said she is “most excited” about the capital projects. “[W]e are creating the learning spaces that will allow our programs to flourish and our students to thrive,” she said in an email. Among the district’s biggest challenges in the next three years are the unpredictability of pension costs for teachers and possible changes to federal health care policy, Ballantyne-Mannion said. “But we plan very carefully and these do not worry us — we have a history of taking our responsibility to our taxpayers very seriously and spending wisely so we can do what we need to do and for what we want to give our students,” Ballantyne-Mannion said in her email. Talty said it will be “an honor” to serve on the board with Ballantyne-Mannion, whom he called “a very strong voice on behalf of the children of the district.” Ballantyne-Mannion said she looks forward to serving with Talty, who she thinks will be “a great colleague.”

Visit us online www.theislandnow.com for more local news


The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

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3 budgets, 2 trustees pass in NHP-GCP BY N O A H M A N S K A R New Hyde Park-Garden City Park school district voters approved more than $237 million in spending and re-elected two school board officials on Tuesday. The district’s $38.2 million budget passed by a margin of 678 votes to 310, and a proposition to spend about $3 million in reserves on building projects passed 696-285. School board Vice President Tara Notine won a second full three-year term unopposed with 717 votes, and Trustee James Reddan won his first full term unopposed with 704 votes. The Sewanhaka Central High School District $193 million budget was approved by New Hyde Park-Garden City Park voters 648-321. Sewanhaka’s four component districts passed the budget by a total vote of 3,507 to 1,295. The Hillside Public Library’s $3.06 million budget also passed 750-231. Library board Trustee Peter Pinto was reelected unopposed with 446 votes, and Rita Kostakos was elected to the board unopposed with 313 votes. “It’s a very exciting time to be in the New Hyde Park-Garden City Park school district,” Reddan, who also serves on the Sewanhaka school board, said Wednesday. The budget includes a 2.08 percent increase in property tax revenue, the maximum increase allowed this year un-

NHP-GCP Tara Notine — 717 votes James Reddan — 704 votes

New Hyde Park-Garden City Park school board Vice President Tara Notine (left) and Trustee James Reddan were re-elected on Tuesday. der the state’s tax cap law. The reserve money will fund repairs at all four of the district’s schools, including fixes to walls, floors and sidewalks. Notine was first elected to fill the seat vacated by then-Trustee Alan Cooper in 2013 and won her first full term in 2014. Reddan was appointed to the board in October 2014, replacing Trustee Patricia Rudd, who was elected to the board again last year. Notine, a 19-year district resident who works in the cosmetics industry, said she and the board have accomplished her goals of shrinking class sizes and communicating more with the community. The board also hired new principals for all four of the district’s elementary schools last year, another achievement that Notine said she is proud of.

She and Reddan will join the board in overseeing the transition between retiring Superintendent Robert Katulak and Jennifer Morrison, who will replace him in July. “I believe she will be a perfect fit for our district and will continue to make our district the best it can be,” Notine said in an email. Reddan, a lifelong Garden City Park resident and Town of Hempstead engineer, said he also wants to help smooth the transition into high school for the district’s sixth-graders. He has proposed more widely distributing iPads to fifth- and sixth-grade classrooms to prepare students to use them daily in Sewanhaka schools. “Being on the Sewanhaka board and wanting this transition to be as smooth as

BUDGETS New Hyde Park-Garden City Park 678 yes, 310 no Capital reserve spending 696 yes, 285 no Sewanhaka school district 648 yes, 321 no Hillside Public Library 750 yes, 231 no HILLSIDE LIBRARY BOARD Peter Pinto — 446 votes Rita Kostakos — 313 votes possible helps, because it helps facilitate that,” Reddan said. Abiding by the state tax cap law while continuing to expand the district’s educational offerings will be the board’s “biggest challenge” in the coming years, Notine said. “However, we have been able to achieve this so far and I am confident we will continue to be able to do so in the future,” she said in her email.

G.N. bond package passes on 2nd try BY JA N E LL E C L AUS E N Great Neck residents approved a $223.3 million school budget and a $68.3 million bond on Tuesday, as a surge of voters came out to strongly back the public schools. Voters approved the 2017-18 budget 6,772 to 1,607 and the revised bond 6,299 to 1,925 in what many described as a stunning turnout for public school advocates and strong rebuttal to those who rejected a $85.9 million bond in February. There were 1,677 no votes and 1,564 yes votes cast in that referendum. In this election, “yes” votes increased by 4,735, while “no” votes increased only 248. “This was an eye-opener, for sure,” said Debbie Volk, a parent, referring to the rejected bond. Counting absentee ballots, 8,379 qualified Great Neck Public School residents voted. A few people also tried to get on line around 10 p.m. For comparison, the budget votes from 2012 to 2016 only totaled 7,205 votes put together. At least 30 parents waited well into the night to hear the official election results. They jotted down results machine by machine as John T. Powell, assistant superintendent for business, got results over the phone in the Phipps administration build-

PHOTO BY JANELLE CLAUSEN

Teresa Prendergast, superintendent of Great Neck Public Schools, steps into the room of parents eagerly awaiting official election results. ing. The results were not officially announced until after 1 a.m. Wednesday, due to procedures to be followed, unprecedented turnout, new voting machines and the number of absentee ballots. But this spoke to the election’s high stakes, as well as the passion of many activists who pushed to get Great Neck to vote. “We got almost 80 percent on the bond, 80 percent of the budget,” Don Ashkenase, a longtime trustee on the Board of Education, said to a group of parents and teachers eagerly awaiting official results in the Phipps building well past midnight. “It

was an overwhelmingly successful evening and we owe it all to you.” Board of Education trustees described the results as a validation of the public school system, but also acknowledged a need to reach out to other members in the community better. “While there were some intense differences of opinion about the bond and the annual budget being voted upon, the fact so many of you became involved is a very good thing, as you expressed your opinions and exercised your right to vote, which are fundamental rights and privileges in America,” said Barbara Berkowitz, president of the Board of Education. Jeffrey Shi and Rebecca Sassouni, often billed together on fliers as “team-pro public school,” were also elected as trustees. The $223.3 budget maintains elementary and secondary school programs, low class sizes, training and professional development, and early drop-off programs. It also covers contractual salary increases, hikes in insurance premiums and other expenditures. Property taxes also went up 1.26 percent, just shy of $2.5 million, which is equal to the state-mandated tax cap. Other revenue came from appropriated reserves, state aid and program revenue. The budget

is 1.9 percent higher than the 2016-2017 budget, which was $219.147 million. The $68.3 million bond will help pay for critical projects and building enhancements across Great Neck’s public schools. About $9.5 million is being drawn from the district’s reserve funds. The total cost of renovations is about $77.847 million. Among the critical projects, school officials said, are roof replacements, masonry reconstruction, and window and door replacements, which have a short life span. The cost of these repairs will be $51.7 million. Another $26.1 million goes towards educational and building enhancements like science labs, auditorium renovations, library centers, a new parking lot and various other upgrades. Jessica Vega, public relations coordinator for the school district, said in an earlier interview that the final bids might come in for less than what is being estimated. “It will not be more than what’s estimated,” Vega said. The bond is worth about $17.56 million less than the $85.9 bond rejected in February. It scrapped building construction, reduced the scope of alterations at the E.M. Baker Schools and cut additions and alterations to the Clover Avenue School.


22 The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

HC

Sassouni, Shi win G.N. board seats

SCHOOL BUDGET 2017–2018 (Proposition 1) PASSED Yes – 6,772 No – 1,607

REVISED BOND REFERENDUM 2017 (Proposition 2) PASSED Yes — 6,299 No — 1,925

LIBRARY BUDGET (Proposition 3) PASSED Yes —5,894 No — 2,363

Continued from Page 2 groups. Pursuant to that goal, Shi proposed forming an infrastructure commission “willing to ask tough questions.” “We’re going to have an infrastructure committee to have the best minds in our community who are the developers, who are the engineers and architects to probably review the budget items, bond items, item by item, to find out where money could be saved,” Shi said, “or just that maybe there is no money to be saved and we’re actually on the right track.” “So that’s one of the key things, because there is a mistrust developed over the time,” Shi added. Shi, a technology consultant who first moved to Great Neck in 2013 for its public schools, is the first Asian-American to join the Board of Education. But Shi said he aims to represent the entire community’s interests. “I’m for all people,” Shi said. “I’m for Jewish people, I’m for Chinese people, I’m for Asian people, because this public school is for all people, so I could care less [that I’m the first Asian-American on the board] because I’m just a working parent at the end of the day and just want to make sure my kid and all the kids in my community receive the right amount

of education and prepare them to be very successful.” More than a third of students in the Great Neck Public Schools are of Asian descent. Shi brings with him over 20 years of experience in the financial, health-care and technology industries. He works for New York City, managing information technology infrastructure and analyzing data. Sassouni serves as one of three parent members on the Board of the Education’s Citizens’ Advisory Committee, an officer of the United Parent Teacher Council and as the Chairperson of the UPTC Legislative Committee. Sassouni also served on a selection committee, two nominating committees, co-chaired the JFK High School Shared Decision Making Committee and a PTO board member at JFK, North Middle and North High Schools. Outside of the schools, Sassouni is an officer of the Sephardic Heritage Alliance Inc. and has been an officer and board member of Temple Israel of Great Neck for more than a decade. She also served as a board member of the Schechter Schools of Long Island. Sassouni is an attorney specializing in special education school cases. She belongs to the Nassau County Bar Associa-

PHOTOS BY KAREN RUBIN

Lines at the polls stretched outside Great Neck polling places even after polls were scheduled to close at 10 p.m.

SEAT OF LAWRENCE GROSS NIKOLAS KRON 1,908 votes — JEFFREY SHI WINNER -- 6,055 votes

SEAT OF SUSAN HEALY REBECCA SASSOUNI WINNER — 6,884 votes tion’s Education Law Committee. “My duty as a member of your Board of Education will be to be a careful steward, to bear the awesome fiduciary responsibility to ensure that we continue to observe best practices for cost efficiencies and curricular and programmatic innovation which will befit our continued AAA bond rating and our unparalleled reputation for education here in Great Neck,” Sassouni said at a recent public forum. Nikolas Kron said that despite a defeat, he intends to stay involved, much like he did after his loss to Donna Peirez in a special election in December. In that time Kron went to board meetings, emailed trustees and let them know what he was hearing on the ground. “I will offer my expertise and advice to the board to the degree that they wish to hear what I have to say, and to the degree that I can be helpful,” Kron said.

Visit us online www.theislandnow.com


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

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24 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017


The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

HC

25

2 N. Hills trustees seek re-election Elliott Arnold, Phyllis Lentini unopposed in bids for 4th full terms on village board BY N O A H MANSKAR Village of North Hills voters will cast ballots June 20 to likely re-elect two longtime trustees in the village election. Trustees Elliott Arnold and Phyllis Lentini were the only people to file petitions declaring candidacy for their seats by Tuesday’s deadline, Marianne Loboccaro, the village administrator, said. Lentini first took her seat on the board in 2003, and Arnold took his seat the following year. If re-elected, they will each serve a four-year term. Lentini, 68, is the widow of former village Mayor John Lentini, who died in 2002 and for whom the Village Hall is named. She was appointed to complete a two-year term on the board in 2003. Lentini retired in 2007 from the real estate company she and John Lentini ran together, she said. She has also

Village of North Hills trustees Elliott Arnold (far right) and Phyllis Lentini (second from right) are running unopposed for re-election next month. been active as a parishioner at St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Church in Manhasset. Arnold, 66, a life and health insurance broker, was appointed to a vacant trustee seat in

2003. Both he and Lentini were re-elected in unopposed races in 2005, 2009 and 2013. Arnold has also served with the Nassau County Village Officials Association and

in community committees in the Acorn Ponds neighborhood where he lives. Lentini said she wants to be particularly involved in the development of a residential

subdivision on the former site of the historic Inisfada Retreat House, which borders the subdivision where she lives. “We have reviewed very carefully all those big projects, and between all of us together, we made sure that the projects that went through went through the right way,” Lentini said. Both trustees have overseen the implementation of a shuttle service between the Village Hall and the Manhasset Long Island Rail Road station. In their time the board has approved other major development projects including the Ritz-Carlton Residences and a new headquarters for Dealertrack Technologies. Arnold could not be reached for comment on Wednesday. Polls for the June 20 village election will be open from noon to 9 p.m. at the Village Hall, located at 1 Shelter Rock Road in North Hills.

Village helped Terry, records suggest Payments match description of municipality that feds say aided leader in concealing income Continued from Page 3 with Manorhaven sheds more light on the help Terry allegedly received in hiding his tax debt exceeding $1 million, which he accumulated despite making more than $200,000 a year as a municipal attorney. John Marzulli, a spokesman for the U.S. attorney’s office for New York’s Eastern District, said he could not confirm or deny whether Manorhaven is Municipality #2. Donald Badaczewski, the village justice court clerk, said Terry’s Form 1099 for 2010 could have been destroyed in a fire at a Brooklyn warehouse where the village stored records or otherwise lost by a previous administration. “The village feels strongly that they did send a 1099 and that it was lost in the fire in Brooklyn,” village Mayor Jim Avena said. Trustee Rita DiLucia, who was on the village Board of Trustees in 2010, said she had no knowledge of whether the village issued Terry a 1099 or not that year, intentionally or otherwise. Fielding could not be

reached for comment. But Avena described him as “one of the finest, most honest men I’ve ever met” and said he would never intentionally withhold a Form 1099. Avena denied that the village was complicit in Terry’s alleged tax evasion. He highly doubts that Manorhaven officials were those whom Terry told not to open IRS mail, he said, as Terry was not in the village office on a daily basis. “Based upon the circumstance and the people involved, I would absolutely find it extraordinary that I was wrong on this one,” Avena said. Terry declined to comment for this story, as did his attorney, Stephen P. Scaring. Terry has also pleaded not guilty to eight charges of tax fraud brought in New York State courts. He is next due in federal court on June 16 and in state court on June 23. McConnell’s Jan. 31 letter asked U.S. District Court Judge Joanna Seybert to detain Terry until his trial. Seybert denied the request. Terry was released on bail and first confined to his home, but was later allowed to leave.

Gerard Terry A listing of Manorhaven’s payments to Terry shows 15 checks with dates in 2010 totaling $73,533. But a 16th check for $3,200, dated Jan. 1, 2011, brings the total amount to $76,733. Badaczewski said it is possible that the Jan. 1, 2011, check was actually paid in late 2010. The 25 other payments to Terry in 2011 total $80,000, matching the amount on his Form 1099 for that year. Terry allegedly cashed the checks at the bank where they were drawn to prevent the IRS from garnishing his wages, according to McConnell’s letter. Sharon Natalie Abramski,

the current village clerk, said she had no knowledge of whether Manorhaven was Municipality #2 as described in McConnell’s letter. Asked whether she thought it was possible, Abramski said, “I would not speculate. That would be silly for me to do. I don’t know how they did things. … I’ve only been the clerk since last July, so I’ve kind of revamped things.” Records that other municipalities for which Terry worked provided in response to Freedom of Information requests do not match the description of Municipality #2. The Village of Port Washington North paid Terry $14,643.75 in 2011 and 2012, according to Forms 1099 and village financial records. The Long Beach Housing Authority only employed him as a consultant in 2015, paying him $12,000. Terry was on the Nassau County payroll as an employee for the Nassau Board of Elections, and the county did not issue him any Forms 1099, Sergio A. Blanco, a deputy county comptroller, said in an email. Blank Slate Media’s requests

to the Freeport Community Development Agency, the Roosevelt Public Library and the Town of North Hempstead are still pending. Terry also did work for the North Hempstead Housing Authority, federal prosecutors said in a January news release. But Sean T. Rainey, the authority’s executive director, said the authority never employed Terry. Terry has blamed his tax debt on “Type-A workaholic compulsion with self-denial and truly catastrophic health issues.” Scaring told Seybert in a February letter that the allegations against him have left his family with little income. Terry is also under investigation for his role in bid-rigging and procurement fraud schemes in Nassau County, according to McConnell’s Jan. 31 letter. He has not been charged with any crimes related to that investigation. Manorhaven received two separate federal subpoenas in 2007 and 2016 seeking records related to Terry. The village received a separate subpoena in 2015 for records relating to contracts with eight village vendors.


26 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

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BLANK SLATE MEDIA MAY 19, 2017

A showcase of Holocaust survival BY JA N E LL E C L AUS E N

I

nside the Kupferberg Holocaust Center, a long corridor of documents, maps and photos details the life of Benzion Persecki – later known as Ben Peres. At the center of it is a rare artifact: a jacket kept from his time in the Dachau concentration camp in Germany. It is an especially rare find. While many Holocaust survivors might have chosen to discard or burn any memories of the tragedy, the garment remained in his closet his entire life – and 37 years after, when it was discovered in an estate sale by antique clothing collector Jillian Eisman in 2015. Eisman, whose grandfather was drafted into the Soviet Army in World War II and whose brother died in the Sept. 11 terror attacks, immediately recognized it as an object of pain, suffering and resilience. “I think others will feel very strongly when they see the jacket and they see the rust-colored stains and the dirt and the documents that go along with it, and that this was somebody’s life,” Eisman said in an interview at the Kupferberg Holocaust Center, which is on the campus of Queensborough Community College in Bayside. “This is a lot of lives, and we can change things.” Peres’ family never knew of the jacket’s existence. But when family members were contacted, they responded by helping develop the exhibit and donating boxes of documents. “They were surprised that their father had kept it because he never seemed to be someone lost in the past or guided by his past,” said Dan Leshem, the co-curator of the Jacket from Dachau exhibit. “He seemed very loving and warmhearted and gregarious rather than traumatized and backwards-looking.” The documents, photos and undeveloped film chroni-

cled Peres’ battle for reparations from the German government in the wake of the Holocaust, his time in a displaced persons camp, and how he survived the Holocaust. But it also showcases a kind, resilient man searching for identity, justice and home. They are also complemented by historical context, detailing Jewish culture in pre-war Lithuania, widespread discrimination and violence within Nazi Europe, life in the ghettos and just how many people died in the Holocaust. Lithuania, where Peres grew up, saw 85 percent of its Jewish population murdered. In a video, Sam Widsawsky serves as a proxy for Peres in explaining life in the Dachau and Kaufering labor camps. There they worked grueling hours creating rockets and munitions, while enduring malnutrition, beatings and frequent death marches. “His story is definitely one a sort of a miracle. He continued to fight and fight and he didn’t let that stop him,” said Abigail Jalle, an intern who helped assemble the exhibit. Even his mother proved to be a fighter, she added. One piece of the exhibit that stands out particularly to Leshem is a letter Peres’ mother wrote to a lawyer in seeking reparations for her oldest son, Levi-Ichak, 15 years after his death in July 11, 1941. Her writing begins neat

and tight. But by the second paragraph, it morphs into a chaotic cursive that goes off the lines. “What you see in this document, which is really remarkable because normally we think of video being able to do this but not two-dimensional documents, is that you see the passage of time and you see an emotional transformation that takes place inside of her,” Lesham explained. The exhibit aims to end more positively. A video of Peres’ wedding shows beaming guests, mostly Holocaust survivors. “I think for students, it’s very important to end on this note of thinking of victims of these atrocities not only as victims, but as people who were resilient and were able to continue living and to overcome,” Leshem said. Just beyond this video, multicolored notes from students drape a lobby wall. While most answers are in English, others are in a few different languages. Leshem speculated that the people either wanted their communication with Peres to be secret, or that there were feelings only their main language could convey. “It’s amazing to see how much the students have grown attached to him,” Jalle said, noting that she herself saw him as a friend. In conjunction with the exhibit is a fully immersive online one, set to debut within the next few weeks and offering many ways to navigate. In this way, it will remain even after the exhibit departs at summer’s end. The website hopes to cater to multiple learning styles, so that any type of professor can use it. It also aims to stir a global conversation, with questions from the exhibit being connected to Facebook. “It is by far the most ambitious exhibit the center has ever tried,” Leshem said. The Jacket from Dachau exhibit is located at the Queensborough Community College at 222-05 56th Ave, Bayside, NY 11364.


28 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

LEO’S

Now Serving Breakfast Daily

The top seven events

1

Author Event: “The Gifted Storyteller”

Friday, May 19 at 7 p.m. What if a genie popped out of a bottle and gave you the power to create the life you want? This is the intriguing premise of Gregg Korrol’s book, which he will discuss, with a focus on helping people see the empowering meaning in their lives. Where: Turn of the Corkscrew Books and Wine 110 N. Park Ave., Rockville Centre Info: (516) 764-6000 or turnofthecorkscrew.com

8:00-11:30AM

2

”The Godfather” in Concert Friday, May 19 at 7:30 p.m.

Thursday is Mexican Night at Leo’s Margaritas Mohitos Fish Tacos Fajitas Tacos

Friday Only 25% Off Entire

Saturday Only 25% Off Entire

Lunch or Dinner Check

Lunch or Dinner Check

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 5/25/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 5/25/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Sunday Only 30% Off Entire Dinner Check Cash Only • Alcohol not included • Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 5/25/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined 9/any other offer

Monday Only 30% Off Entire

Tuesday Only 30% Off Entire

Lunch or Dinner Check

Lunch or Dinner Check

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 5/25/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 5/25/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Wednesday Only 25% Off Entire

Thursday Only 25% Off Entire

Lunch or Dinner Check

Lunch or Dinner Check

The Godfather Live brings Francis Ford Coppola’s masterpiece to life with music performed by the Long Island Concert Orchestra while the film is simultaneously shown on the big screen. The audience will be enthralled until the final notes of the haunting song, “Speak Softly, Love,” are played. Single ticket prices for the concert are $55, $65, $75, and $85 (includes a $3 facility fee). $200 VIP tickets include a cocktail party that begins at 5:45 p.m. Where: Tilles Center for the Performing Arts, 720 Northern Blvd., Brookville Info and Tickets: (516) 299-2752 or tillescenter.org

3

Mike DelGuidice & Big Shot — Celebrating the Music of Billy Joel

Friday, May 19 at 8 p.m.



Mike DelGuidice, one of Long Island’s most celebrated performers who has played to sold-out audiences for more than 20 years, heads up his Big Shot Billy Joel Tribute Band once again, showcasing the Piano Man’s greatest hits. Where: The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington Info & Tickets: (631) 673-7300 • paramountny.com

4

Ladies of Laughter: Funny and Fabulous

Saturday, May 20 at 8 p.m.

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Cash Only • Alcohol not included

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 5/25/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 5/25/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

190 Seventh St., Garden City 742-0574 • www.leosgardencity.com

The Ladies of Laughter competition has discovered some of the funniest women in comedy today, with past participants including Amy Schumer and Tammy Pescatelli. Kelly MacFarland and Robin Fox will headline this year’s show, with a lineup of other talented female comedians. All seats $25, friends $20. Where: Landmark on Main Street, Jeanne Rimsky Theater 232 Main Street, Port Washington Info & Tickets: (516) 767-1384; Box Office: (516) 767-6444 landmarkonmainstreet.org


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

for the coming week

5

Great Neck Street Fair 2017

SUSHI

29

REPUBLIC

Sunday, May 21, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

The 28th annual Great Neck street fair will feature more than 100 artisans and vendors, as well as all of the shoppers who flock to this one-day event every year. The fair will take place rain or shine. Where: 607 Middle Neck Road at Fairview Ave., Great Neck Info: (516) 442-6000 • nassaucountycraftshows.com

6

The Stephen C. Widom Cultural Arts at Emanuel Presents... Journalists Peter Beinart & Bret Stephens in Conversation

Sunday, May 21 at 3 p.m. Head on over to this discussion featuring two of today’s leading journalists — Beinart, a regular contributor to The Atlantic and CNN, and Pulitzer Prize-winning Stephens, now an op-ed columnist for The New York Times — as they engage in a conversation about current events that will be moderated by Lane Filler of Newsday. Where: Temple Emanuel, 150 Hicks Lane, Great Neck Info: (516) 482-5701 or emanuelgn.org

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7

Barry Manilow in Concert

Thursday, May 25 at 7:30 p.m. The music veteran known for his string of ‘70s pop-rock classics — from “Mandy” and “I Write the Songs,” to “Looks Like We Made It” and “Weekend in New England” — will perform his greatest hits, along with songs from his new album, This Is My Town: Songs of New York. Where: NYCB Live, Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum Info: (516) 231-4848 nycblive.com Tickets: (800) 745-3000

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fax: 516-747-1677 • OPEN 7 DAYS

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www.sushirepublicny.com Gift Certificates Available


30 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

THE TOP EVENTS FOR KIDS FOR THE COMING WEEK

J

ourney to Oz

Amazing

3 Story High Slide!!!

raffles!

SATURDAY, JUNE 10, 2017

Photo Booth!

Gaga Pit!

1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Friday, May 19 and Saturday, May 20 at multiple times

Inspired by L. Frank Baum’s original stories, this clever adaptation puts the audience front and center. Audience members are invited to go to Oz with Dorothy and become part of the cast in this interactive production, singing, dancing and acting alongside professional actors. Children will learn the art of storytelling while creating, analyzing and participating in the performance. For children ages 5 and up.

Where: Long Island Children’s Museum, 11 Davis Ave., Garden City Info: 516-224-5800 or licm.org

RAIN OR SHINE McKenna Elementary School 210 Spruce Street, Massapequa Park, NY 11762

Caricature Artist!

Giant Obstacle Course!!

CHILDREN $15.00 ADULTS NO FEE FREE T-SHIRT (while supplies last) MUSIC • CARNIVAL GAMES • 3 STORY HIGH SLIDE • CARICATURE ARTIST • PHOTO BOOTH GAGA PIT • GIANT OBSTACLE COURSE • RAFFLES • ARTS AND CRAFTS • FACE PAINTING TIE-DYEING • FOOD AND BEVERAGES FOR PURCHASE AND MUCH MORE... Your time and support will make a difference. All proceeds will go directly to the Long Island Tourette Association.

For More Information Go To: www.longislandtourette.org

S

LIME — Students of Long Island Maker Expo

Saturday, May 20, 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. SLIME is an interactive day of making for family and educators from all across Long Island. Hands-on learning activities from recyclables to robotics promote critical thinking and problem-solving skills necessary for children to participate in the global community. There will be more than 100 activities, demonstrations, presentations and speakers. SLIME Expo tickets are $5 in advance and $7 at the door (if available).

Where: Cradle of Aviation Museum, Charles Lindbergh Blvd., Garden City | Info: 516-572-4111 or cradleofaviation.org

L

EVENT SPONSOR

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Saturday, May 20 at 11 a.m.

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New York Times bestselling author, Food Network star, and The Pioneer Woman herself, Ree Drummond brings us the first title in a brand-new picture book series with stories inspired by life on the ranch entitled “Little Ree.” Activities for children will follow the story time.

Where: Barnes and Noble, 91 Old Country Road, Carle Place Info: 516-741-9850 or barnesandnoble.com

D

ucks and Donuts Story Time and Craft

Join Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone, NY Islanders legend Bob Nystrom, and President/CEO at Zorn’s of Bethpage Merrill Zorn, and more, and be one of the brave individuals to go Over the Edge for a great cause! Funds raised will directly support EAC Network’s programs that help at-risk children, struggling families and seniors, and people suffering ng from addiction or mental health issues across Long Island. d.

Sunday, May 21 at 11:30 a.m. Author Robert DeNicola will read and sign copies of his new book, a tale of independence about a busy duck whose pluck winds up changing the lives of all the ducks in the pond. He will then teach children how to illustrate.

Where: Dolphin Bookshop, 299 Main Street, Port Washington Info: 516-767-2650 or thedolphinbookshop.com

Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone

Bob Nystrom, NY Islanders legend Merrill Zorn, President/CEO, Zorn’s of Bethpage

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M

HA Equine Festival

Sunday, May 21, 12-4 p.m. The Muttontown Horsemen’s Association’s Annual Equine Festival will feature something for the whole family — polo by the Meadowbrook Polo Club and horsemanship demos, as well as Uncle Carmine’s traveling zoo, pony rides, face-painting, games and treats that will all delight children of all ages. Where: Mutton-

town Preserve, Route 106, Muttontown | Info: 516-822-8245 or muttontownhorsemen.com


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32 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

THE CULINARY ARCHITECT

Planning an at-home wedding, part II Now that you have chosen the wedding basics, you need to take care of the following: WEDDING ESSENTIALS Invitations * Calligraphy Ceremony Flowers Photographer * Videographer Party Favors Reception * Food * Beverages Rentals Labor Music Seating Valet Parking Wedding cake INVITATIONS come in many shapes and sizes, from the most simple imprinted invitation to an engraved glass delivered by a chauffeured limousine. It all depends on your taste, style and budget. Remember to order the invitations early as most companies require at least six weeks to print or engrave custom invitations. Most invitations are sent eight weeks prior to the wedding. Over order no matter how many invitations you plan to use, since you will always need more. Unless your handwriting is spectacular, consider hiring a calligrapher.

EVITES: Although in “force” the flowers. this 21st century people The flowers you send Evites, they are NOT choose all depend on appropriate for a wedyour style and budget. ding. Fred Falconer of CALLIGRAPHY, Falconer’s Florist of Port handwritten with ink and Washington highly reca nib, is an elegant touch ommends selecting flowto any invitation. ers that will complement Most calligraphers the atmosphere you are charge by the line and trying to create. will address the inner Whether the wedand outer envelopes, as ding is very formal or well as the seating cards comfortably casual, the ALEXANDRA TROY for the reception. type of flowers and the The Culinary Architect Many stationers offer style of the bouquets and computerized calligraphy arrangements should at a substantial savings. help to set the mood. Peel and stick labels are NOT acceptWhen ordering bouquets, Falconer also able. suggests to be sure they complement the WEDDING CEREMONY: Decide where style of dress as well as the wearer, to create it will take place and engage the proper of- a total picture of beauty. ficiant, be it a priest, minister, rabbi, justice PHOTOGRAPHER: Often people feel of the peace or captain of the ship. that guests phones and digital cameras can A dear friend or relative can be or- capture their special day. dained online or at the appropriate City However, a professional is needed. Hall for the day. Ronald J. Krowne of Ronald J. Krowne (Check with local municipalities for the Photography tells clients to chose a fullrules and regulations.) time, full-service photographer to be asFLOWERS are perhaps the most im- sured of reliability, “hopefully one who parportant decorative element to the wedding. ticipates in professional organizations and If you are getting married in the middle studies the latest in the industry and carries of winter, you can have summer flowers if liability insurance,” he says. “It is important you give your florist six months notice to to MEET the photographer, see their work

and feel comfortable with them. Having a professionally made album will bring you the greatest joy as the years pass.” VIDEOGRAPHER: Hiring a videographer is optional. If you would like to capture your special day on tape, it is often best to ask your photographer who they recommend as you want the two services to compliment each other not compete. PARTY FAVORS: Optional, they should reflect the couples style and budget. Searching the web can give you lot’s of ideas. At Culinary Architect Catering, we often suggest that people use small frames as seating cards and the frame becomes the gift. RECEPTIONS can range from a breakfast to a midnight soiree. The time of day will dictate what type of reception you have. Discuss your favorite foods with your caterer. Choose a menu that can satisfy “all the guests at the same time.” If you have many vegetarian guests, offer a selection of vegetables but do not forget that other people may prefer poultry, fish or meat. Every dish will not appeal to everyone, but if you have a selection, there will be enough to satisfy everyone. Continued on Page 77

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guide to

concerts & orchestras Saturday, May 20, 8:00 p.m. Ladies of Laughter All seats $35

1Main Street, Northport Free lisoundfestival.com

Sunday, June 4, 7:00 p.m. Mavis Staples Tickets $59 - $79

NORTH HEMPSTEAD SUMMER OF FUN SUMMER CONCERT SERIES www.northhempsteadny.gov/ summer 516-869-6311

Friday, June 16, 8:00 p.m. Louie Anderson Tickets $32 - $42 Tuesday, June 20, 7:30 p.m. Aimee Mann, The Mental Illness Tour Tickets $49 - $69 BABYLON CHORALE www.babylonchorale.org P.O. Box 492, Babylon 516-799-4974 Summertime Concert (Babylon Chorale) Saturday, June 10, 8:00 p.m. Our Lady of Grace Church, West Babylon, NY $20 General Admission $15 Seniors/Students Summertime Concert – Abridged (Babylon Chorale) Sunday, June 11, 3:00 p.m. Bay Shore Festival, Main Street Gazebo, Bay Shore, NY No Admission FLUSHING TOWN HALL www.flushingtownhall.org 137-35 Northern Blvd Flushing 718-463-7700 Check website for pricing and ticket availability LGBTQ Voices @ Diversity Plaza in Jackson Heights Saturday, June 3, 5:00 p.m. Open Mic: Fathers Thursday, June 1, 6:00 p.m. Queens Jazz Orchestra Forever Sonny: A Tribute to Sonny Rollins Friday, June 9, 8:00 p.m. Pan Asian Repertory Theatre: Lost in Shanghai Sunday, June 18 We’re All the Same Inside: Doll Making Workshop & Brunch Sunday, June 11, 12:30 p.m. Taking it to the Streets: 1950s NY through the Lens of Flushing Sunday, June 25 through Sunday, August 6 (check website for times)

GREAT SOUTH BAY MUSIC FESTIVAL add ticket prices www.greatsouthbaymusicalfestival.com 99 Smith Street, Shorefront Park, Patchogue July 13 - 16 Check website for details LANDMARK ON MAIN STREET www.landmarkonmainstreet. org 232 Main Street, Suite 1, Port Washington 516-767-1384 Afternoon T.E.A. continues throughout the summer with free movies and live entertainment designed for the 55+ crowd. Free, no tickets required. Wednesday, May 24, 2:00 p.m. Lois Morton 20th Century Girl Wednesday, June 21, 2:00 p.m. Warren Schein, Broadway Melodies Wednesday, June 28, 2:00 p.m. Magic & Comedy with Pat Darienzo Wednesday, July 12, 2:00 p.m. Vintage Bliss: Music of Motown Wednesday, July 26, 2:00 p.m. David Glukh Duo – Russian Music Wednesday, August 9, 2:00 p.m. Film: Clara Bow in It (1927) Wednesday, August 30, 2:00 p.m. Film: Buster Keaton in the Cameraman (1928) Other Events:

Saturday, July 22, 8:00 p.m. An Evening with Graham Nash Tickets $59 - $395 Friday, August 4, 8:00 p.m. Tommy Emmanuel Tickets $40 - $65 LONG BEACH SUMMER CONCERTS www.longbeachny.gov Check website for Summer daily concert information LONG ISLAND SOUND AND ART FESTIVAL Rich Rivkin Presents: www.limusicfestivals.com 631-261-2941

Saturday, May 27 Memorial Day Commemoration and Fireworks Extravaganza Ceremony begins at 6 p.m., fireworks at darkness North Hempstead Beach Park Parking fee $10 Featuring music by Desert Highway, an Eagles Tribute Band. Sponsored by NEFCU. Media sponsor, Kiss Products, Inc. Saturday, August 19 BeachFeast 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. North Hempstead Beach Park Parking fee: $10 cash / $7 Debit or credit card

NORTH HEMPSTEAD Sunday, May 21, 12:00 p.m. – BEACH PARK 6:30 p.m. Performances will begin at Spring Fest Dave Diamond Band, Djembe 1 p.m. (unless otherwise noted) Movement, SuperJam Northport Village Park, 1 Main Parking Fees Apply. Saturday, July 1 at 6:30 p.m. Street, Northport Kamellot Free limusicfestivals.com/springfest popular classic rock and dance music cover band Sunday, June 11, 12:00 p.m. – Sunday, July 9 (rain date: 8:00 p.m. Sunday, August 13) Woodstock Revival Alive & Kickin’ Wonderous Stories, Half Step, Variety band Milagro, Four Way Street, Sunday, July 16 (rain date: Jellyband Saturday, July 22) Old Bethpage Village Restora- Ring Of Fire tion A tribute to Johnny Cash 1303 Round Swamp Rd, Old Sunday, July 23 (rain date: Bethpage Saturday, July 29) Tickets at WoodstockRevival. 45RPM net Long Island’s leading cover band known as the purveyors Saturday, August 2, 12:00 of musical fun p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Sunday, July 30 (rain date: Sunday, August 13) LI Sound and The Capris Art Festival Ying Yang, Glass Bottom Soul, Oldies band, known for their Ken Talve Trio, hit “There’s a Moon Out Djembe Movement Tonight” fame Northport Village Park Sunday, August 6 (rain date:

Saturday, August 12) Gold Coast Orchestra Hot variety band Sunday, August 27 at 8 p.m. Sepideh Persian Pop star TUESDAY NIGHT AT CLARK BOTANIC GARDEN 193 I U Willets Road Albertson FREE concerts begin at 7:00 p.m. Please bring a chair and a snack. Tuesday, July 11 (rain date: Thursday, July 13) PLAZA THEATRICAL PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS: “MADAGASCAR” Tuesday, July 18 (rain date: Thursday, July 20) David Sear Followed By Tom Chapin Folk night Tuesday, July 25 (rain date: Thursday, July 27) New York Brass Choir with the Brass Blast followed by the movie DIRTY DANCING Tuesday, August 1 (rain date Thursday, August 3) Arts In The Garden: Dance Visions plus an art display Tuesday, August 8 (rain date: Thursday, August 10) North Shore Pops: Playing popular themes from movies and classics

MANORHAVEN BEACH PARK Manorhaven Blvd., Manorhaven. Free of charge, please bring a chair and a picnic. Saturday, July 15 (call 311 for rain date) 7:30 p.m. Broken Road A tribute to the Rascal Flatts Saturday, August 5 (rain date: Sunday, August 6) 7:00 p.m. Plaza Theater Productions Presents, Hairspray The Musical MARTIN “BUNKY” REID PARK Broadway & Union Ave., Westbury 7:30 p.m. Free of charge, please bring a chair. Rain location: “Yes We Can” Community Center Friday, July 7 Wayne Holmes Tribute to Ray Charles MICHAEL J. TULLY PARK STADIUM 1801 Evergreen Ave., New Hyde Park Friday, August 4, 7:00 p.m. Live & Let Die: A Tribute To Paul McCartney Followed By The Streetfighter Band: A Tribute To The Rolling Stones

YOUNG PEOPLE AND THE ARTS SERIES MARY JANE Tuesday mornings at 10:30 DAVIES GREEN a.m.; various parks, call Plandome Road (across from 869-6311 for details and rain 220 Plandome Road) information Monday Nights at 7:30 pm. Concerts on the Green. Free Tuesday, July 11 Manorhaven Beach Park of charge, please bring a Magic Of Amore chair. Monday, July 17 (rain location: Tuesday, July 18 (rain date: Friday, July 21) Manhasset Public Library) Clark Botanic Garden Penny Lane Red Pants Band A tribute to the Beatles Tuesday, July 25 Monday, July 24 (rain Charles Fuschillo Park location: Manhasset Public Indoor Library) Improv 4 Kids Jammin’ With You Tuesday, August 1 Family night, music for kids Clinton G. Martin Park and their families Indoor Monday, July 31 The Bierokos Randi And The Rainbows (Rain Location: Manhasset CINEMA ON Public Library) Oldies night, featuring their hit THE BAY Sunset Park, Port Wash“Denise, Denise” ington Monday, August 7 (rain Saturday, June 17, 8:30 p.m. location: Manhasset Public Star Wars: The Force Library) Awakens New Vintage Swing Band Followed By Conga A Tribute Saturday, July 8, 8:30 p.m. To The Miami Sound Machine

Continued on Page 40


News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017 â&#x20AC;¢ Guide to Summer Fun

37


38 Guide to Summer Fun • News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

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News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017 • Guide to Summer Fun

39

Harbor Links Golf Course

Harbor Links offers an exclusive atmosphere, situated on Long Island's prestigious North Shore. Our Grand Ballroom offers breathtaking panoramic vistas while the warmth and richness of our interior creates the perfect setting for your affair.

Jeanine Phelan
 Office: 516-767-4810
 Email: jphelan@palmergolf.com Banquet Sales Manager One West Fairway Drive
 Port Washington, N.Y. 11050
 www.harborlinks.com

• Wedding receptions • Bar/Bat Mitzvahs • Bridal/Baby Showers • Rehearsal Dinners • Engagement parties • Birthday parties • Corporate Meet and Greet • Fundraisers • Golf Outings- James Viras (jviras@palmergolf.com )



40 Guide to Summer Fun • News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

concerts & orchestras Continued from Page 36

Pitch Perfect 2 Saturday, July 22, 8:30 p.m. Back to the Future Saturday, August 5, 8:00 p.m. Finding Dory NORTH SHORE POPS ORCHESTRA www.northshorepops.org PO Box 920, Huntington (516) 574-3059 Saturday, May 27, 8:00 p.m. The Atria on Roslyn Harbor Thursday, June 15, 7:30 p.m. Dominican Village, Amityville - 7:30pm Friday, June 30, 8:00 p.m. Sousa Band Shell, Pt Washington - 8:00pm Sunday, July 2, 8:30 p.m. Heckscher Park, Huntington - 8:30pm Wednesday, July 5, 7:00 p.m. Chelsea Mansion, Muttontown Thursday, July 6, 7:30 p.m. Westhampton Beach Village Green, WHB Thursday, July 27, 7:30 p.m. (Rain date Thursday Aug 3) Westbury Village Piazza, Westbury - 7:30pm Tuesday, August 8 Tuesday, 7:00 p.m. (Rain date Thursday, August 10) Clark Botanic Garden, Albertson - 7:00pm NYCB THEATRE AT WESTBURY Venue.thetheatreatwestbury. com 960 Brush Hollow Road, Westbury 516-247-5200 Check website for ticket availability and pricing Sunday, May 21, 6:00 p.m. Dick Fox’s Spring Doo Wop Extravaganza Friday, June 2, 8:00 p.m. Stephanie Mills & The Whispers Saturday, June 3, 8:00 p.m. Johnny Mathis Friday, June 16, 8:00 pm. Happy Together Tour Saturday, June 17, 3:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. Bill O’Reilly, Dennis Miller and Jesse Watters: The Spin Stops Here! Wednesday, June 21, 8:00 p.m. Huey Lewis and the News Thursday, June 22, 8:00 p.m. A Night at the Disco with the Village People, The Trammps

featuring Earl Young & Rolls Royce Friday, June 30, 8:00 p.m. Southside Johnny & The Asbury Dukes and The Weight Band Saturday, July 22, 8:00 p.m. Vic Dibietto Saturday, August 12, 8:00 p.m. ABBA: The Concert Saturday, August 19, 8:00 p.m. Air Supply Sunday, August 20, 8:00 p.m. Bill Maher Friday, August 25, 8:00 p.m. The Elvin Tribute Artist Spectacular Saturday, August 26, 8:00 p.m. Stephen Stills and Judy Collins NIKON THEATRE AT JONES BEACH www.theatrewantagh.com 1000 Ocean Parkway, Wantagh 516-221-1000 Check website for ticket and pricing availability Saturday, June 3, 12:55 p.m. 2017 Country Megaticket Tickets (Includes All Performances at Nikon at Jones Beach Theater) Saturday, June 3, 7:00 p.m. KTUphoria Sunday, June 4, 7:00 p.m. Jason Aldean with Chris Young Tuesday, June 6, 7:30 p.m. Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds Monday, June 12, 12:55 p.m. Ticket To Rock (Includes 6/13, 7/19, 9/16 Performances at Northwell Health at Jones Beach Theater) Tuesday, June 13, 6:30 p.m. Deftones with Rise Against Wednesday, June 14, 7:00 p.m. Train with OAR and Natasha Bedingfield Thursday, June 15, 7:00 p.m. Florida Georgia Line with Nelly Friday, June 16, 5:00 p.m. BLI Summer Jam feat. Flo Rida, Jason Derulo, and Martin Garrix Saturday, June 17, 7:30 p.m. Steve Miller Band with Peter Frampton Friday, June 23, 7:00 p.m. Dierks Bentley with Cole Swindell Saturday, June 24, 7:00 p.m.

Third Eye Blind Sunday, June 25, 8:00 p.m. Rammstein Saturday, July 1, 6:00 p.m. Nickelback with Daughtry Friday, July 7, 7:30 p.m. James Taylor with Bonnie Raitt Saturday, July 8, 11:00 a.m. Vans Warped Tour Wednesday, July 12, 8:00 p.m. Moody Blues Friday, July 14, 7:00 p.m. Lady Antebellum with Kelsea Ballerini Tuesday, July 18, 7:00 p.m. Rod Stewart and Cyndi Lauper Wednesdsay, July 19, 6:45 p.m. Incubus with Jimmy Eat World Thursday, July 20, 7:00 p.m. Foreigner with Cheap Trick and Jason Bonhams Led Zeppelin Experience Friday, July 21, 8:00 p.m. Chris Stapleton Saturday, July 22, 7:00 p.m. Muse with 30 Seconds to Mars Sunday, July 23, 8:00 p.m. Boston with Joan Jett and The Blackhearts Thursday, July 27, 7:00 p.m. Brantley Gilbert Friday, July 28, 7:30 p.m. Chicago and the Doobie Brothers Saturday, July 20, 7:00 p.m. OneRepublic with Fitz and the Tantrums Tuesday, August 1, 7:00 p.m. Kings of Leon Thursday, August 3, 7:00 p.m. Brad Paisley Sunday, August 13, 8:00 p.m. Goo Goo Dolls with Phillip Phillips Tuesday, August 15, 8:00 p.m. Jimmy Buffett Wednesday, August 16, 7:00 p.m. Styx with REO Speedwagon Wednesday, August 23, 7:00 p.m. John Mayer Friday, August 25, 7:00 p.m. Lynyrd Skynyrd and Hank Williams Jr Saturday, August 26, 6:30 p.m. Deep Purple and Alice Cooper Sunday, August 27, 7:00 p.m. Luke Bryan with Brett Eldredge Thursday, August 31, 6:45 p.m. Matchbox Twenty and Counting Crows

NYCB/NASSAU VETERANS MEMORIAL COLISEUM www.nycblive.com 1255 Hempstead Turnpike, Uniondale Saturday, May 20, 11:00 a.m, 3:00 p.m., 7:00 p.m. Ringling Bros. B&B Circus Sunday, May 21, 11:00 a.m., 3:00 p.m., 7:00 p.m. Ringling Bros. B&B Circus Thursday, May 25, 7:00 p.m. Barry Manilow Saturday, June 3, 7:30 p.m. The Weekend Saturday, June 10, 8:00 p.m. Maxwell Saturday, June 24, 7:30 p.m. Mariachi Sol De Mexico Friday, July 7, 7:30 p.m. New Kids on the Block with Paula Abdul and Boyz II Men Saturday, July 22, Time TBA UFC – Ultimate Fighting Championship Saturday, August 5, 8:00 p.m. J. Cole Wednesday, August 30, 7:30 p.m. Cirque du Soleil OVO Thursday, August 31, 7:30 p.m. Cirque du Soleil TOWN OF OYSTER BAY MUSIC UNDER THE STARS www.oysterbaytown.com PLANTING FIELDS AT THE ARBORETUM www.plantingfields.org P.O. Box 58, Oyster Bay, NY 516-922-9200 Saturday, May 27 (Memorial Day Weekend) Concert in the Park – Red,White & Blues By Jerome Smith And City Sounds Entertainment 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. at Coe Hall FREE / No Parking Fee / No reservations required / Restrooms at Main Greenhouse Bring a chair, blanket, and an outdoor picnic to enjoy great upbeat music and the beauty at Planting Fields and exterior of Coe Hall. Coe Hall is closed during the concert. Restrooms are available at the Main Greenhouse. COFFEED INC, park caterer, will be selling snacks, sandwiches, desserts and drinks. Saturday, June 3

Concert in the Park – Southern Voice Band 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. at Coe Hall FREE / No Parking Fee / No reservations required / Restrooms at Main Greenhouse Bring a chair, blanket, and an outdoor picnic to enjoy great music and the beauty at Planting Fields and exterior of Coe Hall. Coe Hall is closed during the concert. Southern Voice Band is a popular CT based Modern Country band. They play a wide variety of country covers by artists like Tim McGraw, Jason Aldean, Carrie Underwood, Miranda Lambert, Blake Shelton and many more. Featuring talented male and female vocalists backed-up by a rockin’ rhythm section, Southern Voice always delivers a highly entertaining show! Restrooms are available at the Main Greenhouse. COFFEED INC, park caterer, will be selling snacks, sandwiches, desserts and drinks. Sunday, June 4 David Houston Performs – The Sporting Life (An Exhibition Program) 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. at Coe Hall $5 admission fee, members and children under 12 are free Written and Directed by David Houston A Reading In The Style Of Radio Drama Monday, June 5 Planting Fields Foundation’s Golf Classic Mill River Club, Upper Brookville Join us for our 3rd annual Golf Classic at the Mill River Club! We begin at 10:00 a.m. with registration and breakfast, followed by a shotgun start at 12:00pm. Lunch will be served on the course, followed by cocktails, dinner buffet and raffle auction at 5:30 p.m. Friday, June 9 The Bailsmen Music In The Garden – Summer Concert Series Presented By Planting Fields Foundation The unique Friday night series features concerts one Friday each month. Shows start at 7:00 p.m. and include

one complimentary glass of wine or beer. There will be additional beverages, hors d’oeuvres, and desserts available for purchase, catered by COFFEED INC. Enjoy jazz, blues and swing, music under the stars in the historic cloister garden of this Gold Coast mansion, Coe Hall, at Planting Fields Arboretum. All concerts are rain or shine and will take place indoors if there is inclement weather. Saturday, June 10 Plein Air Through the Seasons - The Rose Garden 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. /FREE with $8 Parking Fee Meet at the end of the West Parking lot by the Welcome Pavillion. Annie Shaver-Crandell is a visual artist based in Manhattan whose fondness for fresh air and magnificent colors has brought her repeatedly to Planting Fields to paint out of doors. As an art historian in her previous profession, she offers both historical and contemporary approaches to the depiction of landscape and floral themes. Suggested list of materials: Some form of drop cloth, any oil, acrylic, oil or dry pastels. Bring a bag lunch or purchase snacks at COFFEED’s garden café inside the hay barn. Friday, June 16 Twilight Tour 7:00 p.m. / Meet at Coe Hall $20 Non Members / FREE for members Meet at Coe Hall and enjoy wine and cheese before venturing out for a twilight tour of the grounds. The twilight tour will be led by Vincent A. Simeone, Director, Planting Fields Arboretum State Historic Park, and Henry B. Joyce, Executive Director, Planting Fields Foundation. Saturday, June 17 (Father’s Day Weekend) Jonathan Kruk’s Storytelling – The Sporting Life & Tales (An Exhibition Program) Children’s Exhibtion Program 12:00PM & 2:00PM at Coe Hall $5 admission fee, members and children under 12 are free Jonathan Kruk will enchant children of all ages with stories and tales! No reser-


News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017 • Guide to Summer Fun

concerts & orchestras vations necessary, just come to Coe Hall for one of his performances and enjoy! Sunday, June 18 (Father’s Day) David Houston Performs – The Sporting Life (An Exhibition Program) 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. at Coe Hall $5 admission fee, members and children under 12 are free Written and Directed by David Houston Style Of Radio Drama Saturday, June 18 (Father’s Day Weekend) Concert In The Park – The Hambones 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. at Coe Hall FREE / No Parking Fee / No reservations required / Restrooms at Main Greenhouse Bring a chair, blanket, and an outdoor picnic to enjoy great, upbeat music and the beauty at Planting Fields and exterior of Coe Hall! . The Hambones play a merry mix of pop,

blues, country & rockabilly from the Classic American Songbook. Dancing encouraged!!! Restrooms are available at the Main Greenhouse. Coe Hall is closed during the concert. COFFEED INC, park caterer, will be selling snacks, sandwiches, desserts and drinks. Saturday, June 24 Family Fun Night – Strummin’ & Drummin’ 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. at Coe Hall FREE / No Parking Fee / No reservations required / Restrooms at Main Greenhouse Bring a chair, blanket, and an outdoor picnic to enjoy great music and the beauty at Planting Fields and exterior of Coe Hall! Come out and enjoy this fun and interactive night! Coe Hall is closed during the concert. Restrooms are available at the Main Greenhouse. COFFEED INC, park caterer, will be selling snacks, sandwiches, desserts and drinks.

Friday, June 30 Summer Theater in the Park – Madagascar 6:00pm / FREE admission / No Parking Fee / No Reservations Required Rain or Shine at the Hay Barn/Visitor’s Center at Planting Fields. COFFEED INC, park caterer, will be selling snacks, sandwiches, desserts and drinks. Saturday, July 1 Concert In The Park – Fivestone Band 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. at Coe Hall FREE / No Parking Fee / No reservations required / Restrooms at Main Greenhouse Bring a chair, blanket, and an outdoor picnic to enjoy music and the beauty at Planting Fields and exterior of Coe Hall! FiveStone is a high energy club and party band playing the Best of Classic, Pop, Top 40, Dance & Party Rock. Coe Hall is closed during the concert. COFFEED INC, park caterer, will be selling snacks, sandwiches, desserts and drinks.

Friday, July 7th, 2017 – Matt Marshak Music In The Garden – Summer Concert Series Presented By Planting Fields Foundation $30 Non-Member / $20 Members 7:00 p.m. at Coe Hall New York Guitarist Matt Marshak brings a unique, one of a kind, handcrafted style of guitar playing. A truly eclectic blend of jazz, urban groove, pop, funk, r&b, world beat, and much more. His style and sound have led him across the globe performing at some of the worlds biggest jazz festivals. The Dubai International Jazz Festival, Panama City’s Seabreeze Jazz Festival, The Berk’s Jazz Festival, Mallorca Spain’s Jazz Festival, Portugal’s Algarve Smooth Jazz Festival, Slovakia’s Bratislava Jazz Days, Wisconsin’s Jazz on the Vine, and many, many more. He has performed on the same festival bills with legends such as Santana, Larry Carlton, George Benson, David Sanborn, Fourplay, and many more. He has also headlined and performed with artists

such as Alex Bugnon, Nick Colionne, and Four 80 East. Shows start at 7:00pm and include one complimentary glass of wine or beer. There will be additional beverages, hors d’oeuvres, and desserts available for purchase, catered by COFFEED INC. Sunday, July 9 David Houston Performs – The Sporting Life (An Exhibition Program) 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. at Coe Hall $5 admission fee, members and children under 12 are free Written and Directed by David Houston A Reading In The Style Of Radio Drama Friday, July 14th, 2017 Summer Theater in the Park – HAIRSPRAY 6:00pm / FREE admission / No Parking Fee / No Reservations Required Rain or Shine at the Hay Barn/Visitor’s Center at Planting Fields. COFFEED INC, park caterer, will be selling snacks, sandwiches, desserts and drinks.

41

Saturday, July Concert In The Park – The Rick Laban Trio 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. at Coe Hall FREE / No Parking Fee / No reservations required / Restrooms at Main Greenhouse Bring a chair, blanket, and an outdoor picnic to enjoy music and the beauty at Planting Fields and exterior of Coe Hall! Coe Hall is closed during the concert. COFFEED INC, park caterer, will be selling snacks, sandwiches, desserts and drinks. Saturday, July 15 Jonathan Kruk’s Storytelling – The Sporting Life & Tales (An Exhibition Program) Children’s Exhibtion Program 12:00 p.m. & 2:00 p.m. at Coe Hall $5 admission fee, members and children under 12 are free Jonathan Kruk will enchant children of all ages with stories and tales! No reservations, just come to Coe Hall for one of his performances and enjoy! Continued on Page 42

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42 Guide to Summer Fun • News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

concerts & orchestras Continued from Page 41

Sunday, July 16 Summer Garden Festival 12:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. , rain or shine $20 per vehicle This garden summer festival features live musical performances by the WMD’s and the Hambones, kids crafts, dance groups and more! FREE self-guided visits of Coe Hall. The festival is a collaborative effort between Planting Fields Foundation and the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. $20 per car load; once inside the park all activities are FREE! Friday, July 28 French Cookin’ Music In The Garden – Summer Concert Series Presented By Planting Fields Foundation $30 Non-Member / $20 Members 7:00 p.m. at Coe Hall French Cookin’ is a New York-based Blues band. They play a wide variety of styles, all firmly rooted in the blues. Ranging from the Delta to Chicago, back down to Texas and Louisiana “second line”, adding their own unique touch to present a new look at this vital American art form. We also play an extensive selection of original titles, presenting the Blues in a more contemporary vein while preserving the essence that is the core of the music. Shows start at 7:00pm and include one complimentary glass of wine or beer. There will be additional beverages, hors d’oeuvres, and desserts available for purchase, catered by COFFEED INC. Friday, August 4 9th Annual Champagne Party! Motown & Masquerade Garden Soiree 7:00 p.m. -10:30 p.m. at Coe Hall $75.00 Members/Firefighters/Military/Police/EMS $100.00 Non-Member Celebrate summer in the grandeur of the gardens at Coe Hall. Enjoy plentiful hors

d’oeuvres, savory desserts, champagne, wine, sangria and craft beer. Dance under the stars all evening to the energetic and fun Motown music provided by JEROME SMITH & CITY SOUNDS ENTERTAINMENT. Choose a mask and wear it well, so your true identity, no one can tell! Join us to celebrate and bring an air of mystery to this fun masquerade garden soiree! OLD WESTBURY GARDENS www.oldwestburygardens. org 71 Old Westbury Road, Westbury 516-333-0048 SENIOR POPS www.seniorpops.org P.O. Box 1473, Melville 516-414-1831 Sunday, June 4, 2:00 p.m. (tentative) Levittown Hall THE PARAMOUNT www.paramoutny.com 370 New York Avenue, Huntington 631-673-7300 Check website for calendar of events PIANOFEST IN THE HAMPTONS www.pianofest.com 110A Pantigo Road, East Hampton Check website for pricing and directions Monday, June 26, 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Concert Season Opener Levitas Center for the Arts Wednesday, June 28, 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Concert – Brookhaven National Laboratory Wednesday, June 28, 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Concert – East Hampton: St. Luke’s Episcopal Church Monday, July 3, 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Concert – Avram Theatre Monday, July 01, 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Concert – Avram Theatre Wednesday, July 12, 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Concert – East Hampton: St. Luke’s Episcopal Church Monday, July 17, 5:30 p.m. –

7:00 p.m. Concert – Avram Theatre Monday, July 24, 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Concert – Avram Theatre Wednesday, July 26, 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Concert - East Hampton – St. Luke’s Episcopal Church Monday, July 31, 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Concert – Avram Theatre Wednesday, August 2, 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Concert – Brookhaven National Laboratory Monday, August 7, 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Concert- Avram Theatre Wednesday, August 9, 6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. Concert – East Hampton: St. Luke’s Episcopal Church Monday, August 14, 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Concert – Avram Theatre

Wednesday, July 12 East Village Green, Levittown ‘What hurts the most” would be not seeing the talented Broken Road, a Rascal Flatts Tribute at East Village Green, Levittown.

TILLES CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS Tillescenter.org 720 Northern Boulevard, Brookville Box Office 516-299-3100 Thursday, June 1, 7:30 p.m. The Illusionists Sunday, July 30, 7:00 p.m. Australian Pink Floyd Show Sunday, August 13, 7:00 p.m. Sarah Chang Saturday, August 19, 8:00 p.m. Al Stewart Friday, August 25, 8:00 p.m. Squirrel Nut Zippers

Thursday, July 20 Seamans Neck Park, Seaford The music of Stevie Wonder will fill Seamans Neck Park, Seaford as Sir Duke performs a Stevie Wonder Tribute.

TOWN OF HEMPSTEAD www.toh.li All concerts begin at 8:00 p.m., unless otherwise noted. Saturday, July 8 Special Time: 7:30 p.m. Town Park, Point Lookout Raindate - Sunday, July 9 The Annual Independence Day Salute starring Jerrod Niemann with Bay Fireworks and a “Salute to Veterans”. Independence Celebration Sponsors: Swingbellys and Mercy Medical Center Raindate: Completely Unchained, a Van Halen Tribute Tuesday, July 11 Special Time: 7:30 p.m. Newbridge Road Park, Bellmore Plaza Productions performs Hairspray at Newbridge Road Park, Bellmore.

Thursday, July 13 Echo Park, West Hempstead “How wonderful life is” when Captain Fantastic plays the timeless music of Elton John at Echo Park, West Hempstead. Friday, July 14 Uniondale Park, Uniondale Pep & the Soul Explosion performs at Uniondale Park, Uniondale Wednesday, July 19 Oceanside Park, Oceanside The Capris will play Oceanside Park, Oceanside

Friday, July 21 Rath Park, Franklin Square “Are you lonesome tonight?” Head down to Rath Park, Franklin Square for a rockin’ Elvis Tribute by Elvis Time with Steve Mitchell. Thursday, July 26 Merrick Road Park, Merrick No need to “cruise the Miracle Mile” … the music of Billy Joel will be performed right here in the Town of Hempstead as Songs in the Attic performs a Billy Joel Tribute at Merrick Road Park, Merrick. Thursday, July 27 Shell Creek Park, Island Park Four Way Street will perform a Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young Tribute at Shell Creek Park, Island Park.

as FM performs a Steely Dan Tribute. Thursday, August 3 Rock Hall Museum, Lawrence Take “Penny Lane” then “Abbey Road” to Rock Hall Museum, Lawrence for a Beatles Tribute by Beyond Fab. Friday, August 4 Forest City Park, Wantagh “You can go your own way,” but make sure you end up at Forest City Park, Wantagh to check out The Fleetwood Mac Tribute Experience with Fleetwood Macked. Saturday, August 5 Special Time 7:30 p.m. Baldwin Park, Baldwin Reflections performs a Tribute to the Ladies of Motown at Baldwin Park, Baldwin Harbor. Wednesday, August 9 Averill Blvd Park, Elmont Kick back and enjoy the hits of the 60s, 70s and 80s as All Souled Out performs at Averill Boulevard Park, Elmont. Thursday, August 10 Coes Neck Park, Baldwin Tuesday Afternoon remembers “Nights in White Satin” during a Moody Blues Tribute at Coes Neck Park, Baldwin. Friday, August 11 East Village Green, Levittown Any Way You Want It, you’ll remember the hits of a classic Rock ‘n’ Roll group during A Journey Tribute at East Village Green, Levittown. Wednesday, August 16 Echo Park, West Hempstead “Come sail away” with Rockin’ the Paradise, a Styx Tribute band, at Echo Park, West Hempstead. Thursday, August 17

Merrick Road Park, Merrick One performs a Three Dog Night Tribute at Merrick Road Park, Merrick. Friday, August 18 Hewlett Point Park, East Rockaway You’ll want to be a part of it … part of the audience for the Smooth Sounds of Johnny Avino as they perform A Night of Frank Sinatra & Friends at Hewlett Point Park, East Rockaway. Wednesday, August 23 Rock Hall Museum, Lawrence Take a journey back in time at Rock Hall Museum, Lawrence as The Klemzer Connection takes you on a musical journey from Klemzer to Rock. Thursday, August 24 Seamans Neck Park, Seaford Enjoy a summer evening by checking out the great music of Wonderous Stories at Seamans Neck Park, Seaford. Friday, August 25 Newbridge Road Park, Bellmore “Why don’t you come to your senses...” and head down to Newbridge Road Park, Bellmore, where Desert Highway will play the very best of The Eagles. VANDERBILT MUSEUM www.vanderbiltmuseum.org 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport 631-854-5579 Friday, August 4, 6:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. Alex Torres and His Latin Orchestra Tickets: $25 in advance and for Museum members; $30.00 at the door. Latin dance lessons ($5 per person) will be offered from 6:00 to 7:00.

Friday, July 28 Hewlett Point Park, East Rockaway An Irish night with EMISH at Hewlett Point Park, East Rockaway Wednesday, August 2 Speno Park, East Meadow “Rikki Don’t Lose That Number” or the directions to Speno Park, East Meadow

The Vanderbilt Mansion at The Vanderbilt Museum


News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017 • Guide to Summer Fun

43

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44 Guide to Summer Fun • News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

theatre ARENA PLAYERS www.arenaplayers.org 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport 516-293-0674 BALLET LONG ISLAND www.balletlongisland.com 1863 Pond Avenue, Ronkonkoma 631-737-1964 ADELPHI UNIVERSITY PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Aupac.adelphi.edu 1 South Ave, Garden City 516-877-4000 BROADHOLLOW THEATRE COMPANY AT ELMONT/BAYWAY ARTS CENTER AT ELMONT 700 Hempstead Turnpike, Elmont 631-581-2700 www.broadhollow.org Performance Dates: Wednesday, July 12 at 2:00p.m.; Friday, July 14 at 8:00p.m.; Saturday, July 8, 15, 22 at 8:00p.m. and Sunday, July 9, 16, 23 at 2:30p.m. Young Frankenstein Performance Dates: Wednesday, August 9 at 2:00p.m.; Friday, August 11 at 8:00p.m.; Saturday, August 5, 12, 19 at 8:00p.m. and Sunday, August 6, 13, 20 at 2:30p.m. Ragtime CULTURAL ARTS PLAYHOUSE www.culturalartsplayhouse. com 625 Old Country Road, Plainview 516-694-3330 Sunday, May 20 through Sunday, June 11 Into the Woods Friday, June 23 through Sunday, July 23

West Side Story Friday, July 28 through Sunday, August 20 Check website for show times, pricing and ticket availability GOLD COAST INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL www.goldcoastfilmfestival. org 113 Middle Neck Road, Great Neck 516-829-2570 Thursday, June 1, 7:00 p.m. Sgt. Pepper’s 50th Anniversary Celebration Thursday, June 29, 7:30 p.m. Deconstructing the Beatles: Rubber Soul JOHN DREW THEATER, GUILD HALL www.guildhall.org 158 Main Street, East Hampton (631) 324-4050 Check website for ticket availability and pricing Wednesday May 31 - Sunday June 18 Guild Hall and Urban Stages present ANGRY YOUNG MAN Friday, June 23, 8:00 p.m. Screening Of Larsenworld: Longhouse In East Hampton Saturday, June 26, 6:00 p.m. Musicians from the New York Philharmonic with guests soloist Susanna Phillips Sunday, June 25, 6:00 p.m. Guest Rental: Hamptons International Film Festival presents The Cove Thursday, June 29, 8:00 p.m. National Theatre Live: Obsession Friday, June 30, 8:00 p.m. Guild Hall and Taylor Barton present GE Smith presents Portraits with Sarah Jarosz and Paula Cole Sunday, July 2, 6:00 p.m. The Pianist of Willesden Lane Wednesday, July 5, 6:00 p.m. Mama Lee Rose with OCDC

Thursday, July 6 – Wednesday, August 16 Guest Rental: Jewish Film Festival Saturday, July 8, 7:00 p.m. The Hamptons International Film Festival presents SummerDocs Hosted by Alec Baldwin Wednesday, July 12 – Sunday, July 23 Love, Loss, and What I Wore Thursday, July 27 Screening of Barney’s Wall Friday, July 28, 8:00 p.m. Staged Reading: Assisted Loving By Bob Morris Starring Richard Kind And Tovah Feldshuh Saturday, July 29, 7:00 p.m. The Hamptons International Film Festival presents SummerDocs Hosted by Alec Baldwin Monday, July 31, 8:00 p.m. Mandy Gonzalez Tuesday, August 1, 8:00 p.m. Guest Rental: Moscow Meets Manhattan - Dueling Pianos Plus! Starring Brian Gurl and Katherine Alexandra Friday, August 4, 8:00 p.m. Guild Hall and Taylor Barton present GE Smith presents PORTRAITS with the Bacon Brothers Saturday, August 5, 8:00 p.m. Sweet Honey In The Rock® Sunday, August 6 – Sunday, August 27 Strring the Pot: Conversations with Culinary Celebritites: Jacques Pepin, Andrew Zimmern, Michael Symon, & Daniel Humm Sunday, August 6, 8:00 p.m. My Sinatra starring Cary Hoffman Tuesday, August 8, 7:00 p.m. Hamptons Institute Sunday, August 13, 8:00 p.m. Ethel Monday, August 14, 7:00 p.m. Hamptons Institute Thursday, August 17, 8:00 p.m. The 35th Anniversary Asbury Short Film Concert Friday, August 18, 8:00 p.m. New York City Ballet: On and Off Stage

Sgt. Pepper’s 50th Anniversary Celebration will take place at the Gold Coast Arts Center on June 1

Saturday, August 19, 8:00 p.m. Mavis Staples Sunday, August 20, 8:00 p.m. Staged Reading: Only A Kingdom A new musical by Judith Shubow Steir Monday, August 21, 7:00 p.m. Hamptons Institute Friday, August 25, 7:00 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Celebrity Autobiography Friday, August 25 Saturday, August 26, 7:00 p.m. The Hamptons International Film Festival presents SummerDocs Hosted by Alec Baldwin Sunday, August 27, 8:00 p.m. Staged Reading: Sweet Birds by Eugene Pack Tuesday, August 29, 8:00 p.m. The Gong Show Off Broadway JOHN W. ENGEMAN THEATRE AT NORTHPORT www.johnwengemantheater. com 631-261-2900 250 Main Street, Northport 631-261-2900 Check website for showtimes, pricing and ticket availability Thursday, July 6 – Sunday, August 27 Grease LANDMARK ON MAIN STREET www.landmarkonmainstreet. org 232 Main Street, Suite 1, Port Washington 516-767-1384 Afternoon T.E.A. continues throughout the summer with free movies and live entertainment designed for the 55+ crowd. Free, no tickets required. Wednesday, May 24, 2:00 p.m. Lois Morton 20th Century Girl Wednesday, June 21, 2:00 p.m. Warren Schein, Broadway Melodies Wednesday, June 28, 2:00 p.m. Magic & Comedy with Pat Darienzo Wednesday, July 12, 2:00 p.m. Vintage Bliss: Music of Motown Wednesday, July 26, 2:00 p.m. David Glukh Duo – Russian Music

Wednesday, August 9, 2:00 p.m. Film: Clara Bow in It (1927) Wednesday, August 30, 2:00 p.m. Film: Buster Keaton in the Cameraman (1928) Other Events: Saturday, May 20, 8:00 p.m. Ladies of Laughter All seats $35 Sunday, June 4, 7:00 p.m. Mavis Staples Tickets $59 - $79 Friday, June 16, 8:00 p.m. Louie Anderson Tickets $32 - $42 Tuesday, June 20, 7:30 p.m. Aimee Mann, The Mental Illness Tour Tickets $49 - $69 Saturday, July 22, 8:00 p.m. An Evening with Graham Nash Tickets $59 - $395 Friday, August 4, 8:00 p.m. Tommy Emmanuel Tickets $40 - $65 PLAZA THEATRICAL PRODUCTIONS 34 Forest Avenue, Lynbrook 516-599-6870 www.plazatheatrical.com Sunday, August 20, 2:00pm My Fair Lady at The Showplace at Bellmore Movies 222 Pettit Ave, Bellmore Wednesday, June 7, 16 My Fair Lady at The Westbury Manor Lunch and a show. 1100 Jericho Turnpike, Westbury, NY Lunch at 12:00pm/Show at 1:15pm Friday, June 16, 7:00 p.m. Saturday, June 17, 2017 at 11:30am & 2:00pm Saturday, July 1, 2017 at 11:30am & 2:00pm Cinderella at The Long Island Childrens Museum 11 Davis Ave, Garden City, NY Sunday, July 9, 2017 at 2:00pm Sunday, July 23, 2017 at 2:00pm Hairspray at The Showplace at Bellmore Movies 222 Pettit Ave, Bellmore

SHINING STUDIOS www.shiningstudios.org 631-334-9611 Saturday, June 3rd at 2:00pm at Castle Gould’s “Club G” at the Sands Point Preserve Sunday, June 4th at 2:00pm at Castle Gould’s “Club G” at the Sands Point Preserve Grease Thursday, June 8th at 7:30pm at the United Methodist Church of Port Washington Friday, June 9th at 8:00pm at the United Methodist Church of Port Washington Saturday, June 10th at 2:00pm at the United Methodist Church of Port Washington Alice in Wonderland SMITHTOWN CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS www.smithtownpac.org 2 E. Main Street, Smithtown 631-724-3700 Check website for show times, pricing and ticket availability Now through Saturday, June 17 High School Musical Now through Saturday, June 17 The Wonderettes Saturday, July 8 through Sunday, August 20 The New Mel Brooks Musical Young Frankenstein TILLES CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS Tillescenter.org 720 Northern Boulevard, Brookville, Box Office 516-299-3100 Thursday, June 1, 7:30 p.m. The Illusionists Sunday, July 30, 7:00 p.m. Austalian Pink Floyd Show Sunday, August 13, 7:00 p.m. Sarah Chang Saturday, August 19, 8:00 p.m. Al Stewart Friday, August 25, 8:00 p.m. Squirrel Nut Zippers VANDERBILT MUSEUM www.vanderbiltmuseum.org 180 Little Neck Road, Centerport 631-854-5579 Friday, August 4, 6:00 pm 10:00 pm Alex Torres and His Latin Orchestra


News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017 • Guide to Summer Fun

45

ADVERTORIAL

Long Island High School for the Arts now offering two Summer Academies The Nassau BOCES Long Island High School for the Arts (LIHSA) invites students with a passion in the arts to learn from masters in a variety of disciplines. This summer, LIHSA has two Summer Arts Academies, providing young artists with even more hands-on learning experiences under the guidance of professional artists who will help them to develop their skills. Summer Arts Academy Beginner- through advanced-level classes and workshops are conducted in a custom-designed, air-conditioned arts complex that boasts professional dance studios, state-of-the-art digital media and music/audio production labs, art studios, practice rooms and a fullyequipped professional theatre. Daily courses are available in dance, music (instrumental, voice and digital), theatre (drama and musical theatre), film and visual arts. Students learn under recognized artists and experts in their chosen field, perform with ensembles, enjoy performances from guest artists, and take cultural field trips to museums and Broadway shows. The academy concludes with performances by all

students in each arts discipline. This four-week academy runs July 5August 2, from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m., at the Long Island High School for the Arts in Syosset. Candidates for the academy must be entering grades 6-12 in the fall of 2017 and must have a recommendation from their home school districts. Students are placed in classes based on age and level of achievement. Interested students should ask their guidance counselors or principals for an application, call LIHSA at 516-622-5678, or apply online at www.nassauboces.org/saa by clicking on Quick Links, Summer Arts Academy, Application. Summer Music Intensive Academy (SMIA) This summer experience is being offered for the first time to serious high school musicians from across Long Island. Each student will receive

specific, individualized instruction and mentoring from at least two master musicians in LIHSA’s cutting-edge facilities. SMIA students will develop their skills while gaining invaluable experience. Students can choose from any one of three advanced-level learning experiences: In the String Quartet and Ensemble Intensive, students will hone and perfect their skills under the guidance of master musicians, working toward performance in an ensemble classical setting. Students taking Advanced Jazz Study for Vocal and Jazz Ensemble will explore various jazz formats and expand their repertoire while improving their performance skills. For Introduction to Composition, students will use their own, original compositions as a foundation for learning vital composing techniques, then arrange and record their compositions using professional

software. This comprehensive, five-day academy runs August 21-25, from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m., at the Long Island High School for the Arts in Syosset. Candidates for the academy must be currently attending high school and are required to audition. Call LIHSA at 516-622-5678 for more information. About Nassau BOCES A vital regional resource, Nassau BOCES offers state-of-the-art programs for learners of all ages and abilities as well as cost-effective services for school districts and municipalities. We empower students to achieve their maximum potential in alternative, artistic, outdoor, special education, virtual, and career and technical environments. We offer adult education and a variety of programs that are vital to improving the Long Island regional economy. In addition, our technology services form the backbone of many school districts’ infrastructure. As the county’s educational leader in implementing the state’s reform efforts, we are helping to shape the future of education.

239 Cold Spring Rd., Syosset • 516-622-5678 www.nassauboces.org/lihsa

CAMPAIGN FOR THE

JULY 5 - AUG 2 GRADES 6-12 The Long Island High School for the Arts (LIHSA) Summer Arts Academy offers young artists a hands-on learning experience from professional artists in a customdesigned, air-conditioned arts complex. 9 am to 3 pm

LIHSA Summer Music Intensive Academy

AUG 21-25 GRADES 9-12 By Audition Only

REGISTER NOW at www.nassauboces.org For more info about the summer or school year programs, call

516.622.5678 239 Cold Spring Rd, Syosset


46 Guide to Summer Fun • News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

museums AFRICAN AMERICAN MUSEUM & CENTER FOR EDUCATION AND APPLIED ARTS www.theaamuseum.org 110 North Franklin Street, Hempstead 516-572-0730 Tuesday through Friday 12:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Saturday: 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Monday by Appointment $3 AMERICAN MERCHANT MARINE MUSEUM museum@usmma.edu www.300 Steamboat Road, Kings Point 516-726-6047 Museum temporarily open by appointment only

Combo includes the museum and a single Planetarium or Dome Theater show. *Children ages 2-12, Senior Citizens 62+, Military Personnel, Volunteer Firemen & Non-Ambulatory Visitors Other Options Junior Jet Club $2.50 Nunley’s Carousel $2 Check website for calendar of events GARDEN CITY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM www.gardencityhistoricalsociety.org 11th Street, Garden City 516-746-8900 Thursdays 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

GARVIES POINT MUSEUM AND PRESERVE www.garviespointmuseum. com CENTER FOR 50 Barry Drive, Glen Cove SCIENCE 516-571-8010 TEACHING AND Adults: $4.00; Children 5-12 LEARNING years: $2.00 www.cstl.org Days and Hours of Operation: 1 Tanglewood Road, Rockville Tuesday to Saturday, 10:00 Centre a.m. – 4:00 p.m. 516-764-0045 School groups by appointment Exhibits open daily 10:00 a.m. Tues-Fri – 4:00 p.m. Closed Sundays and Mondays Amazing Animals Exhibit Open and Holidays daily 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Check website for calendar $6 of events Group Rate: $5 (12 person minimum) HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL & CRADLE OF TOLERANCE AVIATION CENTER OF MUSEUM NASSAU COUNTY www.cradleofaviation.org www.hmtcli.org 1 Davis Avenue, Garden City 100 Crescent Beach Road, 516-572-4111 Glen Cove Tuesday through Sunday 9:30 516- 571-8040 a.m. – 5 p.m. Monday - Friday Open Tuesday-Sunday, 9:30- 10:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 5:00 Saturdays, Sundays and Open Mondays that fall on Holidays Holidays and School Breaks 12:00 p.m – 4:00 p.m. Admission Rates: Suggested Fees: Museum Adults: $10 Adult $15 Seniors: $5 Child/Senior* $13 Students: $4 Museum includes aviation Events: museum galleries and Junior May 21 Jet Club Reception And Unveiling Of Planetarium & Dome Theater “Tears Of The Holocaust,” A Shows: Sculpture By Michael Izrael Adult $9 Galmer Child/Senior* $8 June 8 Museum and Show Combo Choice and Responsibility DurAdult $20 ing the Holocaust Child/Senior* $18 $15

HUNTINGTON ARTS COUNCIL www.huntingtonarts.org 213 Main Street, Huntington 631-271-8423 Call or check website for all program details ISLIP ART MUSEUM www.islipartmuseum.org 50 Irish Lane, East Islip 631-224-5402 Open Thursday and Friday 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 12:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. LONG ISLAND CHILDREN’S MUSEUM www.licm.com 11 Davis Avenue, Garden City 516-224-5800 Open Tuesday through Sunday 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Members: Free General Admission: $13 Visitors over 65: $12 Children under 1: Free’ Check website for daily calendar of events

www.ncfiremuseum.org One Davis Avenue, Garden City Proudly protected by the Uniondale Fire Department 516-572-4177 Open daily Tuesday through Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Open Mondays that fall on holidays and school breaks. From July until the end of August, the Museum is open 7 days a week Adult: $5 Child: $4 Special Discount*: $4 *Senior Citizens 62+, Volunteer Firemen & Non-Ambulatory Visitors

NASSAU COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART www.nassaumeseum.org One Roslyn Drive, Roslyn Harbor 516-484-9338 Tuesday - Sunday, 11:00 a.m. - 4:45 p.m. Museum Store Tuesday - Sunday, 11 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Docent-Led Exhibition Tours LONG ISLAND SCIENCE CENTER Tuesday - Sunday at 2:00 p.m. www.lisciencecenter.org Docent-Led Mansion Tours 11 West Main Street, Riverhead Saturdays at 1:00 p.m. 631-208-8000 Docent-Led Family Tours Saturdays 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 Sundays at 1:00 p.m. p.m. Family Art Activities Sundays at 1:30 p.m. MARITIME Closed July 10-21 (reopening EXPLORIUM July 22) www.maritimeexplorium.org Port Jeff Harbor Admission Fees: 101 East Broadway, Port Adults $12.00 Jefferson Seniors (62+) $8.00 631-331-3277 Students $4.00 Open Year Round Children (4-12) $4.00 July through August: Museum Members Free Wednesdays – Sundays 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. $5 per person; members and Events: children under 1 are Free. March 26-July 9. 2017 Family Sundays at the MUSEUM OF Museum AMERICAN Sundays, 1-4 p.m. ARMOR Family Tour at 1 p.m., Art www.museumofamericanar- Activities at 1:30 p.m. mor.com 1303 Round Swamp Road, Old Sunday, May 21 at 3 p.m. Bethpage Halston’s Inner Circle: 516-454-8265 A Conversation with Guest Wednesday through Sunday Curator Lesley Frowick 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Sunday 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Lesley Frowick and Friends NASSAU COUNTY FIREFIGHTERS MUSEUM AND EDUCATION CENTER

Saturday, June 10 at 7 p.m. 2017 Museum Ball Night at Studio 54 Honoring Frank and & Rita Castagna

Summer Art Lab 2017 Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Session 1: July 24-August 4 Session 2: August 7-18 NASSAU COUNTY POLICE MUSEUM www.policeny.com 1490 Franklin Ave Mineola 516-573-7620 Call daily for hours NORTH SHORE HISTORICAL MUSEUM www.northshorehistoricalmuseum.org 140 Glen Street, Glen Cove 516-801-1101 Wednesdays: 2:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Saturdays: 11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Members: Free Non-Members Adults $5 (ages 18 and over) Non-Members Seniors $4 (ages 65 and over) Non-Members Teens $4 (ages 13 to 17) Children Free (ages 12 and under) OYSTER BAY RAILROAD MUSEUM www.obrm.org Audrey Avenue, Oyster Bay 516-558-7036 Open seasonally on Saturdays and Sundays from 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. RAILROAD MUSEUM OF LONG ISLAND www.rmli.org 4th Street at the Tracks: Greenport 631-477-0439 Griffing Avenue at the Tracks: Riverhead 631-727-7920 Riverhead is Open on Saturdays Only 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Greenport will Reopen Memorial Day Weekend Adults (13+): $10 Children (5-12): $5 Children under 5: Free SCIENCE MUSEUM OF LONG ISLAND www.smli.org 1526 N. Plandome Road, Plandome 516-627-9400 Call or check website for calendar of events and pricing

TACKAPAUSHA MUSEUM AND PRESERVE www.friendsoftackapausha. org Washington Avenue between Merrick Road and Sunrise Highway, Seaford 516 571-7443 Thursday to Sunday from 11:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. Museum Admission: $2, children ages 5 - 12; $3, adults and teenagers; those under 5 years of age are admitted free when accompanied by a parent. THE AMERICAN AIRPOWER MUSEUM AT REPUBLIC www.americanairpowermuseum.com 1230 New Highway, Farmingdale (631) 293-6398 Thursday through Sunday 10:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Adults: $10 Senior Citizens (65+) and Veterans with proper ID: $8 Children (4-12) $5 Children under 4: Free Check website for Flight Experience Information May 26-28 Legends of Airpower Weekend at Republic Airport 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. THE AMERICAN GUITAR MUSEUM www.americanguitarmuseum. com 1810 New Hyde Park Road, New Hyde Park 516-488-5000 Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday: 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Thursday: 10:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. Saturday: 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Free admission WANTAGH RAILROAD MUSEUM www.wantagh.li/museum 1700 Wantagh Ave, Wantagh (516) 826-8767 Sundays 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. from mid April through mid November.


News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017 • Guide to Summer Fun

museums mansion tours PLANTING FIELDS, COE HALL www.plantingfields.org 1395 Planting Fields Road, Oyster Bay 516-922-9200 PARK HOURS: 9:00 am - 5:00 pm daily $8 per car until Nov, 18th Coe Hall hours: Self-Guided Visits to Coe Hall 11:30 am - 3:30 pm 3/27 – 10/2 daily October Weekends only $5 Non-Members Members & Children under 12 are free MILL NECK MANOR HOUSE www.millneckmanorhouse. org 40 Frost Mill Road, Mill Neck (516) 628-4243 NYIT DE SEVERSKY MANSION www.nyit.edu/deseversky Northern Boulevard,

Old Westbury 516-686-7675 Call for tour information and rates OHEKA CASTLE www.oheka.com 135 West Gate Drive Huntington 631-659-1400 Tour begins at 11:00 a.m. daily by reservation only Adults - $25 Seniors - $20 (Ages 55+) Hotel Guests - $15 Students - $15 (ID Required) Children - $5 (Ages 12 & Under) OLD BETHPAGE VILLAGE RESTORATION www.obvrnassau.com 1303 Round Swamp Road Old Bethpage, NY 11804 516-572-8401 Wednesday – Sunday : 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Last Admission 3:00 p.m. Adults: $12.00 Children 5-12 years: $8 Children 4 and under: Free Seniors, Volunteer Firefigther

& Persons with Disabilities: $8 Active Military: Free Check website for event information OLD WESTBURY GARDENS www.oldwestburygardens. org 71 Old Westbury Road, Old Westbury 516-333-0048 Westbury House and Gardens are open every weekend from April 1st, and every day except Tuesdays from April 10th to October 31st, from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. with the last vehicle being allowed onto the property at 4:00 p.m. Check website for calendar of events THE SANDS POINT CONSERVANCY www.sandspointpreserveconservancy.org 127 Middle Neck Road, Sands Point 516-571-7901 Saturday, May 27 (Memorial Day Weekend) through Monday, September 4 (Labor Day Weekend)

Long Island Speech

& Myofunctional Therapy (631) 689-6858 • (516) 597-4344 www.LiSpeechandMyo.com www.LiSpeechandMyo.com

Licensed Speech Pathologists & Myofunctional Therapists Specializing in the Treatment and Correction of: culties • Fluency • • Voice Disorders • Motor Planning Disorders • Deviate Swallowing • Tongue Thrust • • Feeding & Swallowing Problems / Aversions • Thumb Sucking • • Articulation Disorders • Oral Facial Muscle Weakness •

Specialized Therapy Approaches Including PROMPT Therapy • Individual FEEDING Therapy Augmentative Communication Evaluations & Therapy

olk LAKE SUCCESS, WANTAGH, JERICHO, COMMACK, STONY BROOK, FARMINGVILLE, EAST YAPHANK Participating with most major health insurances

Hours: 8:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Admission to the Preserve is $10 per car or free for members of the Sands Point Preserve Conservancy. Walk-in admission is $4 per person. Additional fees apply for mansion tours, programs, and events. SUFFOLK COUNTY VANDERBILT MUSEUM www.vanderbiltmuseum.org 180 Little Neck Road Centerport 631-854-5579 Tuesdays, Saturdays and Sundays: 12:00 p.m. -4:00 p.m. Closed: Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday (planetarium open Friday & Saturday nights) Summer (June 26 –September 3, 2017) Tuesdays – Saturdays: 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. (planetarium open Friday & Saturday nights) Sundays: 12:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Closed: Mondays Closed Tuesday, July 4 General Admission (Daytime):

Required to enter grounds Adult: $7 Child (Under 12): $3 Senior/Student (Student ID or age 62+): $6 Planetarium Show, add $6 per person (Save $1 off the price of a second planetarium show) Mansion Tour, add $6 per person (not recommended for children age 8 and under) Planetarium — Evening: Adult: $10 Senior/Student (Student ID or age 62+): $9 Children 12 and under: $8 Save $2 per ticket off the price of a second evening

47

planetarium show Spring (April 11- June 25, 2017) THEODORE ROOSEVELT MANSION TOUR www.nps.gov 20 Sagamore Hill Road, Oyster Bay 516-922-4788 SANDSWILLETS HOUSE www.cowneck.org 336 Port Washington Blvd., Port Washington 516-365-9074

Oheka Castle


48 Guide to Summer Fun • News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

entertainment ANIMAL FARM PETTING ZOO AND FAMILY PARK www.afpz.org 296 Wading River Road, Manorville 631-878-1785 Monday - Friday 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Adults: $14.50 Children (2-16): $12.50 (Children under 2 - free) Seniors ( 65+): $12.50 Rates are subject to change

ADVENTURELAND AMUSEMENT PARK www.adventureland.us 2245 Broad Hollow Rd, Farmingdale 631-694-6868 May 20, 21, 27, 28 Open 11:30 a.m. May 26, 29 Open 11:00 p.m. June 1,2,7,8,9,14,15,16 Open 10:00 a.m. June 3,4,10,11,17,18,24,25 Park Open 11:30 a.m. July and August

Weekdays: Open at 11:00 a.m. Weekends: Open at 11:30 a.m. Check website for daily park closing times and pricing information

ACTIVE KIDZ LONG ISLAND activekidzlongisland.com 200 Robbins Lane, Jericho 516-621-6600 Open daily, call for schedule Adventure Maze: $13 Ninja Obstacle Course: $10 Cannonball Blast: $7 Aeroball: $7 Frenzy: $ Laser Tag 1 Game: $9 Laser Tag 2 Games: $16 Laser Tag 3 Games: $21 Adventure Package (Maze/ Ninja Course/ 1 Aeroball): $25 Extreme Package (Maze/1 Aeroball/1 Rock Climb): $26 Blast Pass (2 hours unlimited attractions): $35

Ages 7-9: $42 Last Call (Ages 7 and up:) $39 Spring Schedule (April 7 – June 11) Open for General Admission on Fridays 3:00 p.m. -10:00 p.m. Saturdays 9:00 a.m. -10:00 p.m., and Sundays 9:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. and select Holidays 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Group visits are available Monday – Sunday by appointment, plus select holidays. Summer Schedule (June 12 – Sept 4) Open 7 days a week Monday-Friday 10:00 a.m. -10:00 p.m. Saturday & Sunday 9:00 a.m. -10:00 p.m.

BAYVILLE ADVENTURE PARK

www.bayvilleadventurepark. com 8 Bayville Avenue, Bayville 516-624-7433 ADVENTURE PARK Check website for hours VIP Pay One Price/1 day AT LONG ISLAND unlimited ticket: $31.75 www.longislandadventurepark.org VIP Pay One Price/2 day 75 Colonial Springs Road, unlimited ticket: $39.50 Wheatley Heights 2 Day Unlimited Ticket for all (631) 983-3844 attractions: $19.95/day Ages 12+: $56 Check website for all other Ages 10-11: $49 pricing

BOOMERS FAMILY FUN CENTER

CHUCK E. CHEESE

www.boomerslongisland.com 655 Long Island Avenue, Medford (631) 475-1771 Check website for daily schedule and admission fees

BOUNCE TRAMPOLINE SPORTS www.bounceonit.com 310 Michael Drive, Syosset 516-762-1300 Open Bounce Prices: 30 Minutes: $15 60 Minutes: $20 90 Minutes: $25 120 Minutes: $30 Additional 30 Minutes: $5 Additional 10 Minutes: $10 Mandatory Bounce Socks: $3 Galactic Jump N Glow (must be 48” or taller to participate) Every Friday & Saturday 8pm-10pm 30 Minutes: $17 60 Minutes: $22 90 Minutes: $27 120 Minutes: $32 Additional 30 Minutes: $8 Additional 60 Minutes: $12 Mandatory Bounce Socks: $3 Check website for hours and availability

www.chuckecheese.com Delco Plaza 11-15 Hanover Place, Hicksville 516-433-3343 Sunday through Thursday 11:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. Friday 11:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.

COLD SPRING HARBOR FISH HATCHERY & AQUARIUM www.cshfha.org 1660 Route 25A, Cold Spring Harbor 516-692-6768 June, July, August hours: Saturdays and Sundays, 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.; Daily 10:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Members: Free Children: Ages 3-12: $4/2 & Under: Free Adults: $6 65 and over: $4

COUSINS PAINTBALL www.cousinspaintball.com 149 Edwards Avenue, Calverton 631-698-6230 Open every Saturday and Sunday from 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Call for pricing and special offers

COUNTRY FAIR ENTERTAINMENT PARK www.countryfairpark.com 3351 Route 112, Medford 631-732-0579 Mini Golf Adults (13+): $10 Mini Golf Children 12 & Under: $8 Mini Golf Seniors: $8 Mini Golf Children 4 & Under: Free Go-Kart Pricing: $7.50 per ride Laser Tag: 1 game $6 per person; 4 games $20 (minimum 2 players per game) Batting Cages: $2 per round – 15 pitches ¼ Hour Cage Rental: $15 ½ Hour Cage Rental: $25 1 Hour Cage Rental: $45 Arcade Games $.50 each Driving Range: $8 Small Bucket (approx. 40 balls) Driving Range: $18 Large Bucket (approx. 120 balls) $2.50 Club Rental (May bring own clubs) 1 game = $6.00 PER PERSON

DAVE AND BUSTERS www.daveandbusters.com Mall at The Source 1504 Old Country Road, Westbury 516-542-8501 Sunday through Thursday 11:30 a.m. -Midnight Friday and Saturday 11:30 a.m.-2:00 a.m.

Cherry Lane Gymnastics / New Hyde Park



516-775-2828

now registering for summer Our professional staff will safely teach your kids gymnastics while building strength, flexibility, coordination and confidence. All while having fun and making new friends.

BEGINNERS WELCOME! Classes for Kids – 12 months to 17 years

FLU SHOTS AVAILABLE NOW!

GIVE YOUR CHILD A GREAT SUMMER! Programs still available

• Pediatric & Adult Care • Sprains & Minor Fractures • Stitches • Vaccinations Available (Incl. Pneumonia) • Work/Sport Injuries • Onsite X-Rays, EKG’s and Labs • Business Accounts Welcome • We see worker's comp patients, no fault patients • Seasonal Allergies and Asthma

Most Insurance Accepted Now Scheduling Immigration Physicals 516

LuHiSummerCamps.org 516-626-1100

No Appointment Needed

SERVING THE COMMUNITY FOR OVER 10 YEARS

352-STAT(7828) www.statmd.net

Our staff speaks: Spanish, Russian, 2090 JERICHO TPKE, NEW HYDE PARK, NY 11040 Chinese, Urdu & (between Denton Ave. & New Hyde Park Rd., Punjabi cross street is Denton Ave.) OPEN 7 DAYS: Mon.-Fri. 9am-9pm, Sat.-Sun. 9am-5pm • All Holidays 10am to 3pm


News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017 • Guide to Summer Fun

entertainment FUN STATION USA Funstationusa.com 40 Rocklyn Avenue, Lynbrook 516-599-7757 Open daily 11:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. Unlimited Ride Bracelet (All Day Pass) Monday thru Friday $12.95 — Includes: Helicopter-Carousel-Turtles-Maze (must have socks) $15.95 — Includes: Bumper Cars-Helicopter-CarouselTurtles-Maze (must have socks) Saturday and Sunday $14.95 — Includes: Helicopter-Carousel-Turtles-Maze (must have socks) $17.95 — Includes: Bumper Cars-Helicopter-CarouselTurtles-Maze (must have socks) Price per Ride per Person Helicopter — $2 Turtle Train — $2 Carousel — $2 Bumper Cars — $3 (44 inch height requirement) Laser Tag — $5 (48 inch height requirement) Roller Coaster Simulator — $5 (48 inch height requirement) Flight Simulator — $6 (48 inch height requirement)

Maze — $4.00 (must have socks) Unlimited use for the Maze only

LAZERLAND OF LI www.lazerlandofli.com 54A Motor Parkway, Commack 631-543-8300 Monday: Closed Tuesday - Thursday: 4:00pm-9pm Friday: 4:00pm-11:30pm Saturday: 11:00 am to 11:30 pm Sunday: 11:00 am to 7:00 pm

LONG ISLAND AQUARIUM www.longislandaquarium. com 431 E Main St, Riverhead (631) 208-9200 Open daily 10:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Aquarium Tickets (Includes Butterflies, Bugs & Birds admission) Children (3-12) $22 Adults (13-61) $29 Seniors (62+) $25 Children 2 & Under FREE Butterflies, Bugs & Birds Exhibit Only Children (3-12) $8.00 Children (3-12) $6.00

(Aquarium Only Members) Adults (13-61) $10.00 Adults (13-61) $8.00 (Aquarium Only Members) Seniors (62+) $8.00 Seniors (62+) $6.00 (Aquarium Only Members) Children 2 & Under FREE Add-On Fun $6.00 (Includes $5 Arcade Card, Unlimited Rides on Simulator Ride and Discovery Tower*) (*Weather permitting) AQUATIC ADVENTURES Aquarium admission is NOT included and is required for the following adventures: Behind-the-Scenes Tour $5 (Members: $4) Insect Interaction $10 (Members: $9) Penguin Encounter $50 (Members: $45) Shark Keeper $50 (Members: $45) Sea Lion or Penguin Selfie 1 – 5×7 or 4 wallet size: $16 1 – 8×10:$19 E-mail/Reprint Add-On (Must purchase photo to add) $5 Shark Dive $165 (Members: $160) Trainer Program (Aquarium admission IS included with this adventure) $155 (Members: $140) (Saturdays Only April – September)

LONG ISLAND PUPPET THEATRE www.lipuppet.com 10 Heitz Place, Hicksville 516-932-5469 Check website for showtimes and pricing

LONG ISLAND LASER BOUNCE www.lilaserbounce.com 2710 Hempstead Turnpike, Levittown 516-342-1330 Check website for all attraction information and pricing

LONG ISLAND GAME FARM www.longislandgamefarm. com Chapman Blvd., Manorville 631-878-6644 Monday to Friday: 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday: 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Q-ZAR www.qzarny.com 151 Voice Road, Carle Place 516-877-7200 Monday through Thursday: 10:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. Friday and Saturday: 10:00 a.m. to Midnight Sunday: 10:00 a.m.- 9:00 p.m. General Admission $7/game Exclusive Game $11/game

Discount: $35/6 games Discount: $65/12 games Check website for daily special pricing

RIVERHEAD RACEWAY www.riverheadraceway.com 1797 Old Country Road, Riverhead 631-842-7223 General Admission: Opens 12:00 p.m. Pit Window: 9:30 a.m. Pits: 10:00 a.m. National Anthem: 12:30 p.m. approx General Admission: Adults $25 Children 6-12 $10 Kids Under 6 FREE Car Registration Per Class: $45 General Pits: $35 Check website for calendar of events

SPLISH SPLASH www.splishsplash.com 2549 Splish Splash Drive, Calverton 631-727-3600 May 27,28,29 10am-5pm June 3,4,10,11,16,17,18,19,20,21,11 10am-5pm June 23 10-am-6pm June 24-30

49

10am-7pm July open daily 10am-7pm August 1-13 10am-7pm August 14-20 10am-6:30 p.m. August 2131 10am-6pm Check website for pass pricing

SLOTS A LOT RACEWAY www.slotsalotraceway.com 1100 Hempstead Turnpike, Franklin Square 516-253-5379 Monday and Tuesday Closed Wednesday through Friday: 3:30 p.m. -8:00: p.m. Saturday and Sunday: 12:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Pricing: Car and Controller Rental $6/ unlimited time Red and Yellow Tracks $7/15 minutes $10/30 minutes $16/1 hour $50/all day (subject to availability) Blue King Track $10/15 minutes $14/30 minutes $21/1 hour $70/all day (subject to availability) Drag Strip Racing $20/one racer per hour $30/two racers per hour Continued on Page 50


50 Guide to Summer Fun • News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

entertainment Continued from Page 49

STRIKE FORCE SPORTS www.strikeforcesports.net 450 B Commack Road, Deer Park, NY 11729 631-242-1197 Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays:M Please Call for private parties or events Thursdays: 6:00 p.m. -10:00 p.m: $25 Fridays: 5:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m.: $35 Saturdays: 12:00 p.m. -4:00 p.m.: $25 5:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. $25 10:00 p.m.-1:00 a.m.(16+ only): $20 Sundays: 12:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.: $35 All prices reflect online reservation. Prices at the door are $5 higher than displayed ticket cost. Check website for session pricing

SAFARI ADVENTURE

630 Old Country Road, Garden City (516) 741-4008

Resident: $6 Non Resident: $7 Guest: $9 Skate Rental: $4 Locker Rental: $.50 or $.75

ICELAND AMC LOEWS RACEWAY 1025 Corporate Drive, Westbury (516) 745-6937

UNITED ARTISTS THEATRE AT WESTBURY 12 7000 Brush Hollow Road, Westbury (844) 462-7342

BOW TIE MANHASSET CINEMAS 430 Plandome Road, Manhasset (516) 365-9188

BOW TIE PORT WASHINGTON CINEMAS 116 Main Street, Port Washington (516) 883-6464

www.icelandlongisland.com 3345 Hillside Avenue, New Hyde Park 516-746-1100 Fridays: 3:30 p.m.-5:30p.m. (All Ages Session) Admission: $9.00 Ages 9 & Under: $7.00 Skate Rental: $5.00 Teen Night (Ages 11+): 8:30 p.m.-10:30p.m. Admission: $10.00 Skate Rental $5.00 Saturdays (All Ages Session) 1:15p.m.-3:15p.m. Admission $9.00 Ages 9 & Under $7.00 Skate Rental $5.00 Sundays: (Children’s Session) 11:15 a.m.-12:45p.m. Admission $9.00 Ages 10 & Under $7.00 Skate Rental $5.00 1:00 p.m.-3:00p.m. All Ages Session Admission $9.00 Ages 9 & Under $7.00 Skate Rental $5.00

www.thesafariadventure.com 1074 Pulaski Street, Riverhead 631-727-4386 Open Daily 10:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Open Play Pricing: 3+ Years: $14.95 Under 3: $9.95 Infants/Crawlers/Adults: Free, $9.95 + tax w/o older children

SOUNDVIEW CINEMAS, INC.

20 Tower Place, Roslyn (516) 621-8488

LONG BEACH ICE ARENA

TIKI ACTION PARK

PORT WASHINGTON CINEMA

www.longbeachny.gov 150 West Bay Drive, Long Beach 516-705-7385

www.tikiactionpark.com 1878 Middle Country Road, Centereach 631-471-1267 Monday 3:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Tuesday 3:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Wednesday 3:00 p.m.- 9:30 p.m. Thursday 3:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. Friday 3:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m. Saturday 11:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m. Sunday 11:00 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. Park hours may vary on holidays See website for all attractions and pricing

TURF ISLAND www.turfisland.com 3573 Maple Court, Oceanside 516-543-4345 Check website for hours and programs

movie theatres HERRICKS THEATRE

7 Soundview Market Place, Port Washington (516) 944-3900

BOW TIE ROSLYN THEATER

116 Main Street, Port Washington

skating CANTIAGUE PARK ICE RINK www.nassaucountyny.gov 480 West John Street, Hicksville 516-571-7056 Skate Rental $6 Skate Sharpening $8 Public Session Admission (subject to change) Resident Adult $8 Non Resident Adult $22 Resident Child $6 Non Resident Child $15 Resident Senior, volunteer firefighter, volunteer ambulance corps, police auxiliary units, persons with disabilities and veterans $4

3324 Hillside Ave, New Hyde Park (516) 747-1789

FREEPORT RECREATIONAL CENTER

AMC LOEWS ROOSEVELT FIELD

www.freeportny.gov 130 E. Merrick Road, Freeport 516-377-2200

ICEWORKS 175 Underhill Blvd, Syosset 516-496-2277 Call for Summer clinic information

PORT WASHINGTON SKATING CENTER www.pwskating.com 70 Seaview Avenue, Port Washington 516-484-6800 Summer General Skating July through August Saturdays: 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Sundays: 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Weekday General Skating resumes September 6 Admission (all ages): $8 Skate Rental: $4

SUPERIOR ICE RINK www.superioricerink.com 270 Indian Head Rd, Kings Park (631) 269-3900 Wednesday 12:30 p.m. - 2:30 p. m**. and 4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Friday Night with DJ 8:30 p.m. - 10:30 p.m. Saturday 12:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. Sunday 12:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. ** No Session during July and August Adult: $9 Children: $7 Friday Night: $11

Friday Night Rental: $4 Seniors and Under 3: $5 Skate Rental: $4

¼ Hour Cage Rental: $15 ½ Hour Cage Rental: $25 1 Hour Cage Rental: $45

THE RINX AT HIDDEN POND

FROZEN ROPES

www.therinx.com 660 Terry Road, Hauppauge 631-232-3222 Check website for open skate and pricing

TOWN OF OYSTER BAY SKATING RINK www.oysterbaytown.com 1001 Stewart Ave, Bethpage, NY 11714 516-433-7465 Check website for seasonal hours Under 2 years old – Free 2-4 Years – $3.00 (resident); $4.00 (non-resident) 5-17 Years – $5.00 (resident); $8.00 (non-resident) 18 years and over – $6.00 (resident); $10.00 (nonresident) Senior Citizens (60 and over) – $4.00 (resident); $5.00 (non-resident) Veterans, Volunteer Firefighters & Aux. Police – $4.00 (resident); $5.00 (non-resident) Skate Rental: $4.00 per session Skate Rental Discount Book of 10: $35.00

NORTHWELL HEALTH ICE CENTER www.islanders.nhl.com 200 Merrick Ave East Meadow 516-441-0070 Check website for Open Session Schedules $11 Adults (13+ years old) $9 Children (6-12 years old) $5 Seniors/Military $5 Skate Rental Free (Under 5 years old)

baseball BASEBALL PLUS www.baseballplusny.com 400 Duffy Avenue Hicksville 516-827-5009 Monday through Friday 2:00 p.m.-10:00 a.m. Saturday and Sunday 9:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.

BATTER UP BATTING RANGE www.batterupli.com 130 Hicksville Road, Bethpage 516-731-2020 Monday through Friday: 9:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday: 9:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m.

COUNTRY FAIR ENTERTAINMENT PARK www.countryfairpark.com 3351 Route 112, Medford 631-732-0579 Batting Cages: $2 per round – 15 pitches

www.frozenropes.com 575 Underhill Blvd, Syosset 516-364-7473 30 Minute Non-Member Rate: $25 30 Minute Member Rate: 22.50 60 Minute Non-Member Rate: $50 60 Minute Member Rate: $45 (May/June/July) 3 months of unlimited half-hour rentals $389 2 months of unlimited half-hour rentals $275 1 month of unlimited half-hour rentals $150 *Maximum of 4 players per cage *$5.00 each additional player *Must reserve in advance *Subject to availability

Leisure Pass weekday: $9 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass Weekend and holiday: $18 Non-Leisure Pass & NonResidents weekday: $28 Non-Leisure Pass and NonResident weekend and holiday: $34 Motor Cart Rentals Residents w/Leisure Pass weekday and weekend and holiday: $22 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass weekday: $15 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass weekend and holiday: $22 Non-Leisure Pass & NonResidents weekday: $26 Non-Leisure Pass & NonResident weekend and holiday: $26 Caddy Cart Rentals $4 for 9 Holes $6 for 18 Holes

MATT GUILIANO’S PLAY LIKE A PRO

BETHPAGE STATE PARK GOLF

www.playlikeaprobaseball.com 1745 Expressway Drive North, Hauppauge 631-342-9033 Monday through Friday: 2:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Saturday: 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Sunday 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Batting Cage Pricing: Tokens: $3/each (1 per round) Token Card (50 tokens): $75 Token Card (25 tokens): $50 ½ Hour: $50 1 Hour: $85 Peak ½ Hour Rental: $70 Peak 1 Hour Rental: $120 Check website for all other rental information

STATION SPORTS www.stationsports.com 25 Depot Road, Huntington Station 631-673-1830 Summer Hours: Open Daily 11:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. Batting Cages (Baseball/ Softball): 12 Pitches: $2.00 = 1 Token 72 Pitches: $10.00 = 5 Tokens + 1 FREE Token 156 Pitches: $20.00 = 10 Tokens + 3 FREE Tokens Wiffle Ball: 12 Pitches: $2.00 = 1 Token Target Paintball: 50 shots: $6

golf BAY PARK GOLF COURSE www.nassaucountyny.gov First Avenue, East Rockaway 516-571-7242 Sunday-Tuesday 7:15 am Wednesday 9:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday 7:15 am Call for tee times Residents w/Leisure Pass: $17 Residents w/Leisure Pass weekend and holiday: $20 Residents w/Discounted

99 Quaker Meetinghouse Road, Farmingdale 516-249-0700 Call for fees Black Course: Weather Permitting, Open April 14th November 19th Red Course: Weather Permitting, Open March 31st - November 26th Green Course: Weather Permitting, Open March 18 November 26th. Blue Course & Yellow Course: Weather Permitting, Open Year Round The Blue and/or Yellow Courses will be available for 9 hole play for the first 90 minutes of each day. Additionally, 9 holes are available Friday through Monday beginning @ 1 pm and Tuesday through Thursday beginning @ 10 am on either the Blue or Yellow courses. All courses Discount for Senior Citizens & Juniors: Monday - Friday. No Holidays. Club Rentals Through Pro Shop $40 ($20 deposit) Driving Range $8 per small bucket of balls approx. 60 $10 per large bucket of balls approx 75 Electric Cart 18 Holes: $37 9 Holes: $25 Twilight: $29 Green Fees Green, Blue, & Yellow Courses Weekdays (18 Holes): $38 Weekdays (9 Holes and Twilight): $23 Weekends (18 Holes): $43 Weekends (9 Holes and Twi-


News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017 • Guide to Summer Fun light): $26 Senior Citizens and Juniors (Weekdays 18 Holes): $25 Senior Citizens and Juniors (Weekdays 9 Holes): $15 Senior Citizens and Juniors (Weekday Twilight): $15 Outing Fees for Green, Blue, & Yellow Courses: (additional fees may apply) Weekdays: $55 Sat. - Sun. & Holidays: $65 Green Fees (non-NYS resident) Red Course Weekdays (18 Holes): $86 Weekdays (Twilight): $52 Weekends (18 Holes): $96 Weekends (Twilight): $58 Green Fees (non-NYS resident) Black Course Weekdays (18 Holes): $130 Weekdays (Twilight): $78 Weekends (18 Holes): $150 Weekends (Twilight): $90 Green Fees (Residents) Red Course Weekdays (18 Holes): $43 Weekdays (Twilight): $26 Weekends (18 Holes): $48 Weekends (Twilight): $29 Senior Citizens and Juniors (Weekdays): $28 Senior Citizens and Juniors (Twilight): $17 Outing Fees (additional fees

may apply) Weekdays: $65 Sat.-Sun. & Holidays: $75

Leisure Pass weekday: $9 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass Weekend and holiday: $18

Green Fees (Residents) Black Course Weekdays (18 Holes): $65 Weekdays (Twilight): $39 Weekends (18 Holes): $75 Weekends (Twilight): $45 Senior Citizens and Juniors (Weekdays): $42 Seniors Citizens and Juniors (Twilight): $25 No Show Fee $15 per player Pull Carts $5.00 + $5 deposit (tax included) and driver license. Sold at the Driving Range. Reservation Fee $5 per player Cancellation Fee $5 per player

Non-Leisure Pass & NonResidents weekday: $28 Non-Leisure Pass and NonResident weekend and holiday: $34 Motor Cart Rentals Residents w/Leisure Pass weekday and weekend and holiday: $22 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass weekday: $15 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass weekend and holiday: $22 Non-Leisure Pass & NonResidents weekday: $26 Non-Leisure Pass & NonResident weekend and holiday: $26 Caddy Cart Rentals

weekend: $17 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass weekday: $9 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass Weekend: $17 Non-Leisure Pass & NonResidents weekday: $28 Non-Leisure Pass and NonResident weekend: $34 Motor Cart Rentals Residents w/Leisure Pass weekday and weekend: $20 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass weekday: $10 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass weekend: $20 Non-Leisure Pass & NonResidents weekday: $24 Non-Leisure Pass & NonResident weekend: $24

$4 for 9-holes

CANTIAGUE PARK GOLF COURSE www.nassaucountyny.gov 480 West John Street, Hicksville 516-571-7061 Tuesday 9:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Wednesday – Monday 7:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m. Check website for fees Residents w/Leisure Pass: $17 Residents w/Leisure Pass weekend and holiday: $20 Residents w/Discounted

Caddy Cart Rentals $6 for 18-holes $4 for 9-holes

CHRISTOPHER MORLEY PARK GOLF COURSE www.nassaucountyny.gov Searingtown Road, Roslyn 516-571-8120 Monday 9:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Tuesday – Sunday 7:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Residents w/Leisure Pass: $17 Residents w/Leisure Pass

$6 for 18-holes

EISENHOWER PARK GOLF COURSE www.nassaucountyny.gov Hempstead Turnpike, East Meadow 516-572-0200 Red Course: Tuesday-Sunday

6:30 am. – 6:00 p.m. Closed Monday White and Blue Course: Sunday –Saturday 6:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Red Course Residents w/Leisure Pass weekday: $42 Residents w/Leisure Pass weekend and holiday: $48 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass weekday: $26 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass weekend and holiday: $48 Non Leisure Pass and Non Resident weekday: $65 Non Leisure Pass and Non Resident weekend and holiday: $70 White and Blue Courses Residents w/Leisure Pass weekday: $37 Residents w/Leisure Pass weekend and holiday: $42 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass weekday: $22 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass weekend and holiday: $42 Non Leisure Pass and Non Resident weekday: $50 Non Leisure Pass and Non Resident weekend and holiday: $57 White and Blue Course Twilight and 9-Holes Residents w/Leisure Pass weekday: $22 Residents w/Leisure Pass

weekend and holiday: $22 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass weekday: $15 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass weekend and holiday: $22 Non Leisure Pass and Non Resident weekday: $35 Non Leisure Pass and Non Resident weekend and holiday: $42 Weekday Motor Cart Rentals: Residents w/Leisure Pass 18 Hole: $38 Residents w/Leisure Pass 9 Hole: $22 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass 18 Hole: $29 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass 9 Hole: $15 Non Leisure Pass and Non Resident 18 Hole: $44 Non Leisure Pass and Non Resident 9 Hole: $28 Weekend and Holiday Motor Cart Rentals: Residents w/Leisure Pass 18 Hole: $38 Residents w/Leisure Pass 9 Hole: $22 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass 18 Hole: $38 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass 9 Hole: $22 Non Leisure Pass and Non Resident 18 Hole: $44 Non Leisure Pass and Non Resident 9 Hole: $22 Continued on Page 52

GRAND OPENING!

It’s Party Time at Cafe Aurelia

# BIRTHDAY PARTIES # FOOD ART COOKING WORKSHOP # ICE PLAY # TEA ROOM

16 Main Street Port Washington, NY 516-660-7190 Open 2:30-10 pm www.@aureliasteaparty

51

Reserve Your Party!


52 Guide to Summer Fun • News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

entertainment Continued from Page 51

Junior Rates – Leisure Pass Required Up to age 18 Monday-Thursday, after 1:00 p.m. 18 Holes: $17 9 Holes: $14

GLEN COVE GOLF COURSE www.glencovegolfclub.com Lattingtown Road, Glen Cove 516-676-0550 Open to public after 3:00 p.m.

HARBOR LINKS GOLF COURSE www.harborlinks.com 1 Fairway Drive, Port Washington 516-767-4816 Check website for fees and hours

LIDO GOLF CLUB www.lidogolf.com 255 Lido Blvd., Lido Beach 516-889-8181 Check website for fees and hours

MERRICK ROAD PARK GOLF CLUB www.toh.li Clubhouse Road, Merrick 516-868-4650 Check website for fees and hours

NORTH WOODMERE PARK GOLF COURSE www.nassaucountyny.gov Branch Boulevard, North Woodmere 516-571-7814 First tee off and token for the range is 6:30 a.m. On Thursday, both the course and range open at 10:00 a.m. Last tee off, walking or with a motor cart, is 6:30 p.m. Last token sold for the range is at 7:30 p.m. Gate to the driving range is locked at 7:55 p.m. Residents w/Leisure Pass: $17 Residents w/Leisure Pass weekend and holiday: $20 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass weekday: $9 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass Weekend and holiday: $18 Non-Leisure Pass & NonResidents weekday: $28 Non-Leisure Pass and NonResident weekend and holiday: $34 Motor Cart Rentals Residents w/Leisure Pass weekday and weekend: $22 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass weekday: $15 Residents w/Discounted Leisure Pass weekend and holiday: $22 Non-Leisure Pass & Non-

Residents weekday: $26 Non-Leisure Pass & NonResident weekend and holiday: $26 Caddy Cart Rentals $4 for 9-holes $6 for 18-holes

OYSTER BAY GOLF www.oysterbaytown.com One Southwoods Road, Woodbury 516-677-5980 The register will open at 6:30 a.m. First Tee time will be 7:24 a.m. Driving Range: 9:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Resident Member: Weekday: Day: $30.00 Evening: $15.00 Weekend/Holidays: Day: $35.00; Evening: $18.00 Non-Resident Member Weekday: Day: $50.00 Evening: $30.00 Weekend/Holidays: Day: $65.00; Evening: $40.00 Resident Member Senior, Volunteer Firefighters, Veterans and Aux. Police Weekday: Day: $23.00 Evening – $12.00 Weekend/Holidays: Day: $35.00; Evening: $18.00 Non-Resident Senior Member Weekday: Day: $40.00; Evening: $25.00 Weekend/Holidays: Day: $65.00; Evening: $40.00 Resident Non-Member Weekday: Day: $40.00 Evening: $20.00 Weekend/Holidays: Day: $45.00; Evening: $23.00 Non-Resident Weekday: Day: $75.00; Evening: $40.00 Weekend/Holidays: Day: $85.00; Evening – $50.00 Resident Non-Member Senior, Volunteer Firefighters, Veteran and Aux. Police Weekday: Day: $30.00 Evening: $15.00 Weekend/Holidays: Day – $44.00; Evening: $22.00 Non-Resident Senior Weekday: Day: $50.00 Evening: $30.00 Weekend/Holidays: Day: $80.00; Evening: $45.00 Resident Junior (under 21 years of age) Weekday: Day: $30.00 Evening: $15.00 Weekend/Holidays: Day: $35.00; Evening – $18.00 Juniors under age 15 must be accompanied by an adult. No one under age 10 is permitted to play. Non-Resident Junior Weekday: Day: $45.00; Evening: $25.00 Weekend/Holidays: Day: $60.00; Evening: $30.00 Student Team/Camp (after 2pm) – $18.00 Guest of Resident (Weekdays Only) Day: $50.00; Evening:

$25.00 Golf Carts Member $30.00 Non-Member: $40.00

SPRING ROCK GOLF CENTER www.springrockgolf.com 377 Denton Avenue, New Hyde Park 516-739-0167 Golf Range Open Daily 6:00 a.m. – Midnight Last pin ticket sold at 11:00 p.m.

mini golf BAYVILLE ADVENTURE PARK – PIRATE ADVENTURE www.bayvilleadventurepark. com 8 Bayville Avenue, Bayville 516-624-7433 Player: $10.75 Viewer: $5

BETHPAGE MINIATURE GOLF www.batterupli.com 130 Hicksville Road, Bethpage 516-731-2020 “Open Weather Permitting” Monday through Friday: 9:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday: 9:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. $7.50 per person

CANTIAGUE PARK MINIATURE GOLF www.nassaucountyny.gov West John Street, Hicksville 516-571-7082 Children 13 years and younger: $5 Children 13 years and older: $8 Seniors/Volunteer firefighters/ volunteer ambulance corps/ Members of police auxiliary/ persons with disabilities and veterans $5 Non-Resident: $11

COUNTRY FAIR ENTERTAINMENT PARK www.countryfairpark.com 3351 Route 112, Medford 631-732-0579 Driving Range Pricing: $8 Small Bucket (40 balls) $18 Large Bucket (120 balls) $7.50 club rental fee Mini Golf Pricing: Adults (13+): $10 Children 12 & Under: $8 Seniors: $8 Children 4 & Under: Free

CROW’S NEST MINI GOLF www.crowsnestcove.com 741 S Ocean Avenue, Freeport 516-223-0497 Adults: $9.50 Children: $8.50 Hours June - August Sunday to Thursday 11:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. Friday and Saturday 11:00 a.m. – 11:00 p.m.

EISENHOWER PARK MINI GOLF www.nassaucountyny.gov 516-571-7082 Children 13 years and younger: $5 Children 13 years and older: $8 Seniors/Volunteer firefighters/ volunteer ambulance corps/ Members of police auxiliary/ persons with disabilities and veterans $5

FIVE TOWNS MINI GOLF 5townsminigolfbatting.com 570 Rockaway Turnpike, Lawrence 516-239-1743 Check website for monthly summer hours

HARBOR LINKS MINI GOLF www.harborlinks.com 1 Fairway Drive, Port Washington 516-767-4816 May 26 – September 3 7:00 a.m. – Dark $8 per person, includes rental and ball

JONES BEACH STATE PARK www.parks.ny.gov 1 Ocean Parkway, Wantagh $5 Playing Fee

MONSTER MINI GOLF www.monsterminigolf.com 410 Commack Road Deer Park, NY 11729 631-940-8900 Monday-Thursday: 2:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Friday: 2:00 p.m. -10:00 p.m. Saturday: 12:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. Sunday: 12:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Adults $9.99 Children $8.99

516-571-7460 Children 13 years and younger: $5 Children 13 years and older: $8 Seniors/Volunteer firefighters/ volunteer ambulance corps/ Members of police auxiliary/ persons with disabilities and veterans $5

GREENLAWN EQUESTRIAN CENTER

SPRING ROCK GOLF CENTER

www.islandhillsstable.com 26 Rocky Point Road, Middle Island 631-924-4046

www.springrockgolf.com 377 Denton Avenue, New Hyde Park 516-739-0167 Sunday – Thursday 10:30 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. (Last admissions at 8:30 p.m.) Friday and Saturday: 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 a.m. (Last admissions at 10:30 p.m.) Monday – Thursday Adult Romeo Course: $8 Monday – Thursday Adult Juliet Course: $7 Monday – Thursday Child (under 12) and Senior (over 65) Romeo Course: $7 Monday – Thursday Child (under 12) and Senior (over 65) Juliet Course: $6 Monday – Thursday Replay Adult Romeo Course: $5 Monday – Thursday Adult Replay Juliet Course: $4 Friday-Sunday and Holiday Adult Romeo Course: $9 Friday-Sunday and Holiday Adult Juliet Course: $8 Friday-Sunday and Holiday Child (under 12) and Senior (over 65) Romeo Course: $8 Friday-Sunday and Holiday Child (under 12) and Senior (over 65) Juliet Course: $7 Friday-Sunday and Holiday Replay Romeo Course: $5 Friday-Sunday and Holiday Replay Juliet Course: $4

horseback riding

SKYDRIVE GOLF CENTER

BABYLON RIDING CENTER

www.skydrivegolf.com 1024 Broadhollow Road Farmingdale, NY 11735 631-694-4666 Open 7 days a week, 7:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. Children 12 & under Senior Citizens Adults $6.00 $6.00 $7.00

www.babylonridingcenter.com 1500 Peconic Avenue, West Babylon 631-587-7778

STATION SPORTS www.stationsports.com 25 Depot Road Huntington Station, NY 11746 631-673-1830 Monday – Friday 3:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 11:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. 18 Holes – $8.00 Children Under 10 – $6.00

WANTAGH PARK MINI GOLF www.nassaucountyny.gov 1 King Road, Wantagh

BETHPAGE EQUESTRIAN CENTER www.bethpageequestriancenter.com 499 Winding Road, Old Bethpage 516-845-1000

COUNTRY FARMS EQUESTRIAN CENTER

www.greenlawnequestrian. com 29 Wood Ave, Greenlawn (631) 456-1700

ISLAND HILLS STABLE

NATIVITY RIDING ACADEMY www.nativity-riding-academy. com 11 Ruth Lane, Ridge 631-504-0085

THE NEW YORK EQUESTRIAN CENTER www.mynyec.com 633 Eagle Avenue, West Hempstead 516-486-9673

PARKVIEW RIDING CENTER www.parkviewridingcenter.com 989 Connetquot Avenue, Central Islip 631-581-9477

SWEET HILLS RIDING CENTER www.sweethills.com Sweet Hollow Road, Melville 631-351-9168

bike trails Atlantic Beach Boardwalk Hither Hills State Park, Montauk Bethpage Sate Park Bikeway Belmont Lake State Park Path Caumsett State Park Shared-Use Path Cedar Creek Park Path Cold Spring Harbor Connetquot Shared-Use Path, Oakdale Eisenhower Park Glen Cove Esplanade Greenbelt Trail, Holbrook Heckscher State Park, East Islip Hempstead Lake State Park

www.country-farms.com 200 Bellport Ave., Medford 631-345-9585

Hither Hills State Park

DEEP HOLLOW RANCH

Kings Park Bike Trail

www.deephollowranch.com 10 Old Montauk Highway, Montauk 631-668-2744

Jones Beach State Park Boardwalk Long Beach Boardwalk Long Island Greenbelt Trail Long Island Seashore Trail


News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017 • Guide to Summer Fun

Massapequa Preserve Mitchell Field SharedUse Path Nassau Expressway Shared-Use Path, Lawrence Nassau-Suffolk Greenbelt Trail Paumanok Path Riverwalk, Riverhead Setauket-Port Jefferson Greenway State University of New York at Stony Brook - Paul Simons Memorial Bike Path Sunken Meadow State Park Boardwalk Valley Stream State Park Walt Whitman Trail Trail View State Park Woodbury Wantagh County Park Wantagh State Parkway Shared-Use Path “Ellen Ferrant Memorial Bikeway” West Meadow Beach Shared-Use Path Long Island Mountain Biking Trails

www.climbonline.org Bethpage State Park Calverton Mountain Bike Trail* Cathedral Pines Eastport* Edgewood Preserve* Glacier Ridge

parks Aerodome Park West Shore Road, Port Washington Alvan Petrus Park 1390 Port Washington Blvd., Port Washington Allenwood Park Allenwood Road, Great Neck 516-487-4360 Bay Park Marjorie Lane, East Rockaway 516-571-7245 Baxter Pond Park Shore Road 516-572-0200

Floral Park Memorial at Cannon Park Hillside Avenue, Floral Park

Plandome Pond Park Northern Bourndale Road & Brookwold Drive, Manhasset

Gateway Park Prospect Avenue and Brush Hollow Road, Westbury 516-869-6311

Richard Provost Park Nassau Blvd and Meadowfarm Road, New Hyde Park

Gerry Pond Park Main Street and Paper Mill Road, Roslyn

Ravine Park Ravine Road, Great Neck

Hempstead Pool Listings

Grant Park Hewlett, 516-571-7821 Harbor Hills Park Shore Cliff Place, Great Neck Heckscher State Park 631-581-2100

Blumenfeld Family Park Main Street, Port Washington

John D. Caemmerer Park Wentworth Ave and William Street, Albertson

Broadway Park Broadway at Old Courthouse Road, Garden City Park 516-739-6738

Jonathan L. Iepi Firefighters’ Park Grace Avenue, Great Neck 516-829-2691

Cantiague Park 480 West John Street, Hicksville 516-571-7056

Kings Point Park 74 Redbrook Road, Kings Point 516-482-9257

Captree State Park West Islip 631-669-0440

Lakeville Park Pembroke Avenue, Great Neck 516-482-9502

Caumsett State Park 631-423-1770

Manhasset Valley Park Northern Boulevard, Manhasset 516-572-0290

Cedarmere Park 225 Bryant Avenue, Roslyn Harbor 516-571-8130

Manor Park Cumberland Avenue, Great Neck 516-482-9264

Charles Fuschillo Park Carle Road at Broadmoor Lane, Carle Place 516-338-2789

Manorhaven Beach Park 158 Manorhaven Boulevard, Port Washington 516-767-4618

Christopher Morley Park Searingtown Road, Roslyn 516-571-8113

Martin “Bunky” Reid Park Broadway & Urban Ave., Westbury 516-338-2787

Otis Pike* Rocky Point* Stillwell Woods Preserve Trailview State Park Mountain biking is not permitted at Rocky Point, Otis Pike Preserve and Eastport from November 1 thru January 31 or as posted. NYSDEC Permit Required at Parks for hiking and mountain biking as noted by *

bike groups Concerned Long Island Mountain Bicyclists www.climbonline.org

Huntington Bike Club www.huntingtonbikeclub.com

Clinton G. Martin Park 1601 Marcus Avenue, New Hyde Park 516-869-6311 Creek Park (Daniel J Berg Memorial) Great Neck Road, Great Neck Cutter Mill Park Great Neck Road, Great Neck 516-829-5428 Donald Street Park Donald Street, Roslyn The Park at East Hills 516-621-5600

Long Island Bicycle Club www.libike.org

Massapequa Park Bicycle Club www.massparkbikeclub.org

Suffolk Bike Riders Association www.sbraweb.org

Eisenhower Park Hempstead Turnpike, East Meadow 516-572-0348 Eugene Nickerson Beach Park Lido Beach 516-571-7700

pools

Mary Jane Davies Green Plandome Road, Manhasset

Robert Moses Park 631-669-0470 Roslyn Road Park Sagamore Avenue, Roslyn 516-627-0590 Sandminer’s Monument West Shore Road, Port Washington Searingtown Pond Park Dogwood and Searingtown Road, Searingtown Shepherd Lane Park Shepherd Lane, Roslyn Heights Steppingstone Park 38 Steppingstone Lane, Great Neck 516-487-9228 Sunken Meadow Park Kings Park 631-269-4333 Sunset Park and John Phillip Sousa Bandshell Lower Main Street, Port Washington 516-883-6566 Thomaston Park Susquehanna Avenue, Great Neck Udalls Pond Park Beach Road & West Shore Road, Great Neck Upland Park Bates Road and Soundview Drive, Great Neck

Merriman Park Pine Street, Port Washington

Village Green & Rose Garden Middle Neck Road, Great Neck 516-482-0181

Memorial (Athletic) Field Fairview Avenue, Great Neck 516-773-3420

Wantagh Park Merrick Road, Wantagh 516-571-7460

Mill Pond Park Shore Road and Harbor Road, Port Washington

Whitney Pond Park Northern Boulevard & Community Drive, Manhasset 516-869-6311

Michael J. Tully Park 1801 Evergreen Avenue, New Hyde Park 516-869-6311 North Hempstead Beach Park 175 West Shore Road, Port Washington Pine Street Park Pine Street, Port Washington

Wilson Park 211 Westbury Avenue, Mineola 516-746-9374 Wooleys Lane Park Wooleys Lane and Oxford Blvd, Great Neck Wyngate Park Wyngate and Shoreward Drive, Great Neck

ANCHOR Answering the Needs of Citizens with Handicaps through Organized Recreation Lido Beach Town Park 630 Lido Blvd., Lido Beach (516) 431-6946 www.campanchor.org North Hempstead Town Pools Outdoor Pools ww.toh.li Pricing for Averill Boulevard Park, Echo Park, Forest City Community Park, Newbridge Road, Oceanside Park, Veterans Memorial Park: District Resident Family Seasonal: $250 District Resident Individual Seasonal: $133 District Resident Individual Daily: $8 Child 5-9 Years Old Daily: $4 District Resident Senior Citizen, Veteran, Handicapped, Volunteer Seasonal: (volunteer firefighter, volunteer ambulance member, or auxiliary police office): $66.50 District Resident Senior Citizen, Veteran, Handicapped, Volunteer Daily: (volunteer firefighter, volunteer ambulance member, or auxiliary police office): $4 Non-District Resident Family Seasonal: $293.30 Non-District Resident Individual Seasonal: $160.50 Non-District Resident Individual Daily: $9 Non-District Child 5-9 Years Old Daily: $4.50 District Resident Senior Citizen, Veteran, Handicapped, Volunteer Seasonal: (volunteer firefighter, volunteer ambulance member, or auxiliary police office): $80.25 District Resident Senior Citizen, Veteran, Handicapped, Volunteer Daily: (volunteer firefighter, volunteer ambulance member, or auxiliary police office): $13 Non-District rates do not apply to Forest Community Pool. Pricing for Hewlett Point Park District Resident Family Seasonal: $226.50 District Resident Individual Seasonal: $121 District Resident Individual Daily: $5.50 Child 5-9 Years Old Daily: $2.75 District Resident Senior Citizen, Veteran, Handicapped, Volunteer Seasonal: (volunteer firefighter, volunteer ambulance member, or auxiliary police office): $60.50 District Resident Senior Citizen, Veteran, Handicapped, Volunteer Daily: (volunteer firefighter, volunteer ambulance member, or auxiliary police office): $2.75 Non-District Resident Family

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Seasonal: $266 Non-District Resident Individual Seasonal: $145 Non-District Resident Individual Daily: $6.50 Non-District Child 5-9 Years Old Daily: $3.25 District Resident Senior Citizen, Veteran, Handicapped, Volunteer Seasonal: (volunteer firefighter, volunteer ambulance member, or auxiliary police office): $72.50 District Resident Senior Citizen, Veteran, Handicapped, Volunteer Daily: (volunteer firefighter, volunteer ambulance member, or auxiliary police office): $3.25 Hewlett Point passes are NOT interchangeable with other pools. Pricing for Harold Walker Memorial Park District Resident Family Seasonal: $121 District Resident Individual Seasonal: 60.50 District Resident Individual Daily: $3.50 Non-District Resident Family Seasonal: $142 Non-District Resident Individual Seasonal: $73 Non-District Resident Individual Daily: $5 15 Coupons: $25 Daily Pricing for Franklin Square Special Park District/Rath Park Pool District Resident Family Seasonal: $160 District Resident Individual Seasonal: $80 District Resident Individual Daily: $7 District Resident Senior Citizen, Veteran, Handicapped, Volunteer Seasonal: (volunteer firefighter, volunteer ambulance member, or auxiliary police office): $40 District Resident Senior Citizen, Veteran, Handicapped, Volunteer Daily: (volunteer firefighter, volunteer ambulance member, or auxiliary police office): $3.50 Guest with District Resident: $8 Daily Averill Boulevard Park Pool ww.toh.li 145 Averill Blvd., Elmont Open daily 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Echo Park Pool Complex www.toh.li 399 Nassau Blvd., West Hempstead 516-483-7400 Open Daily 10:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. Forest Community Park Pool www.toh.li 3099 Morgan Drive, Wantagh 516-783-2516 Open Daily 11:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.


54 Guide to Summer Fun • News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

entertainment Harold Walker Memorial Park Pool www.toh.li Woodfield Road, Lakeville 516-766-2277 Open Daily 11:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Hewlett Point Park Pool www.toh.li 130 Hewlett Point Avenue 516-599-4064 Open Daily 11:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Newbridge Park Road Pool www.toh.li Newbridge Road, Bellmore 516-783-3518 Open Daily 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Oceanside Park Pool www.toh.li 3800 Mahlon Brower Drive, Oceanside 516-763-0709 Open Daily 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Rath Park Pool www.toh.li 849 Fenworth Blvd, Franklin Square 516-488-1843 Open Daily 11:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Roosevelt Avenue Pool www.toh.li 14 Hart Avenue, Roosevelt 516-623-7414 Open Daily 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Veterans Memorial Park Pool www.toh.li Prospect Park, East Meadow 516-296-7780 Open Daily 10:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. North Hempstead Town Pools www.northhempsteadny.gov Aquatic Activity Center at Michael J. Tully Park www.northhempsteadny.gov 1801 Evergreen Avenue, New Hyde Park 516-869-6311 Michael J. Tully Park Aquatic Activity Center, 1801 Evergreen Ave., New Hyde Park. Open all year. Hours Mon., Wed., Fri, 8 a.m.-8:30 p.m. Tues. &Thurs. 6 a.m.- 8:30pm Sat.-Sun. 8 am- 5:30 pm; water slide hours Mon.-Fri., 3:30-6 p.m. Sat.-Sun. and holidays., noon5:30 p.m. Fee(for residents only) $11 ages 18-59, $8 13-17, $7 3-12, $6 seniors, veterans, volunteers, $14 guests. Manorhaven Beach Park Pool www.northhempsteadny.gov 158 Manorhaven Blvd., Port Washington Outdoor pool with water slide.

Hours June 17-Aug. 13 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Aug. 14-Sept 4, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Fee: Residents $11 adults, $8 teens, $7 children, $6 seniors, $14 guests. Clinton G Martin Park Pool www.northhempsteadny.gov 1650 Marcus Avenue, New Hyde Park 516-869-3111 Closed for renovations Martin Bunky Reid Park Pool www.northhempsteadny.gov Broadway at Urban Avenue, Westbury 516-869-6311 Martin “Bunky” Reid Park, Broadway and Urban Avenue, Westbury. Outdoor pool, open June 24-Sept. 4. Hours 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Residents only; no fees. Whitney Pond Park Pool www.northhempsteadny.gov Northern Boulevard and Community Drive Manhasset 516-869-6311 Whitney Pond Park, Northern Boulevard and Community Drive, Manhasset, 516-8696311. Outdoor pool. Open June 17-Aug. 18. Hours 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Fee $8, $6 teens, $5 children, $4 seniors, handicapped, volunteer fire fighters. Membership and nonresident fees available. Nassau County Pools Cantiague Park Pool www.nassaucountyny.gov 480 W John Street, Hicksville, NY 516-822-7266 Open Daily 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Fees (daily): resident adult with Leisure Pass, $8; resident child with Leisure Pass (4-17 years of age), $6; resident senior, disabled, vol. firefighter, ambulance corps auxiliary police, veterans with Leisure Pass $4; non-resident adult, $25, non-resident child, $20. Family ($250), individual ($100) and senior ($55) memberships are also available. A Leisure Pass is required for residents to receive the resident rate. Christopher Morley Park Pool www.nassaucountyny.gov Searingtown Road, North Hills, NY 516-571-8113 Open Daily 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Fees (daily): Resident adult, $6; resident child (4-17 years of age), $4; senior, disabled, vol. firefighter, ambulance corps, auxiliary police, veterans, $4; non-resident adult, $16, nonresident child, $11. A Leisure Pass is required for residents to receive the resident rate.

Jones Beach State Park Pool www. nysparks.com 1 Ocean Parkway, Wantagh 516- 785-1600 Park hours and facility operations are subject to change. Patrons are encouraged to contact the park directly to confirm operating hours before traveling Nassau County Aquatic Center www.nassaucountyny.gov Eisenhower Park, Merrick Avenue 516-572-0501 Member Hours: Monday-Friday: 6:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. Saturday: 6:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Sunday: 9:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Non-Member Hours: Monday – Friday: 9:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday: 9:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Adult (age 18 and over) Nassau County Resident /Leisure Pass $6 Adult (age 18 and over) Nassau County Resident w/out Leisure Pass and Non-Resident Rate: $20 Children (age 4-17) Nassau County Resident /Leisure Pass $5 Children (age 4-17) Nassau County Resident w/out Leisure Pass and Non-Resident Rate: $13 Children ages 3 and under Nassau County Resident /Leisure Pass Free with paying adult Children ages 3 and under Nassau County Resident w/out Leisure Pass and Non-Resident Rate:N/A Person with Disability, Senior Citizen (age 60 and over), Veteran, Volunteer Ambulance Corps, Volunteer Firefighter, Auxiliary Police Nassau Resident with a Leisure Pass: $4* *N/A for Nassau County Resident without a Leisure Pass and Non Resident Nickerson Beach Park Pool www.nassaucountyny.gov Lido Beach, Lido Beach 516-571-7700 Open Memorial Day through Labor Day Daily: $12 for Leisure Pass holders and $35 for nonLeisure Pass holders. Season sticker: Leisure Pass holders, $100; seniors, disabled, volunteer firefighters, auxiliary police &amp; veterans, $50 (Leisure Pass required); nonLeisure Pass holders, $250. North Woodmere Park Pool www.nassaucountyny.gov Hungry Harbor Road, North Woodmere 516-571-7801 Monday – Friday: 11:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday and Holidays: 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Fees (daily): resident adult, $9;

resident child (4-17 years of age), $6; resident senior, disabled, vol. firefighter, ambulance corps auxiliary police, veterans, $5; non-resident adult, $25, non-resident child guest, $20. Family ($265), individual ($110) and senior ($60) memberships are also available. A Leisure Pass is required for residents to receive the resident rate. Wantagh Park Pool www.nassaucountyny.gov Merrick Road, Wantagh, NY 516-571-7460 Open Daily 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Fees (daily): resident adult, $9; resident child (4-17 years of age), $5; resident senior, disabled, vol. firefighter, ambulance corps auxiliary police, veterans, $4; non-resident adult, $30, non-resident senior & child, $30. A Leisure Pass is required for residents to receive the resident rate. Seasonal passes are also available for residents with Leisure Passes, with rates as follows: families ($265); individuals ($110); and seniors ($60). Oyster Bay Town Pools (Bethpage Community Pool, Marjorie R. Post Community Park Pool, Plainview-Old Bethpage Community Park Pool, Syosset-Woodbury Community Park Pool) Pools are open from June 24, 2017 through Labor Day, September 4, 2017. Call the pool where you would like to register with any questions or for further information. Bethpage Community Park – 733-8404 1001 Stewart Avenue, Bethpage (at the intersection of Cherry and Stewart Avenues) Marjorie R. Post Community Park – 797-7990 Merrick and Unqua Roads (entrance on Unqua) Plainview-Old Bethpage Community Park – 733-8400 Washington Avenue, Plainview Syosset-Woodbury Community Park – 677-5990 7800 Jericho Tpke, Woodbury (just east of Rt. 135) Registration For Season Memberships: Starts Saturday, May 27, 2017 Sundays, Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Holidays from Noon to 6pm Tuesdays and Thursdays from Noon to 7pm Starting June 24, 2017, registration will take place during normal hours of operation. Pool Membership Registration takes place at the Town of Oyster Bay Community Park Pools. (Note: Pool memberships are NOT available at Town Hall or by mail.) Residents must register at the pool they would like to join.

Remember… Memberships are only good for the pool at which you register. Town of Oyster Bay Community Park Pool Memberships are for Town of Oyster Bay Residents only (and guests of members). 2017 Hours Of Operation June 24, 2017 through September 4, 2017 from 11am to 7pm. *After Labor Day, pools close for the season. 2017 Seasonal Pool Membership Information Town of Oyster Bay “Park District” Residents Individual $100.00* Family $200.00* Senior citizen (individual) $50.00* Senior citizen married couple $85.00* Disabled Persons Permanent Disability/Social Security (Individual): $50.00* *plus Photo I.D. processing fee (per person) $5.00 Town of Oyster Bay “Non-Park District” Residents Individual $125.00* Family $235.00* Senior citizen (individual) $60.00* Senior citizen (married couple) $100.00* Disabled Persons Permanent Disability/Social Security (Individual): $60.00* *plus Photo I.D. processing fee (per person) $5.00 NOTE: For above items, a family is defined as a married couple, parents or legal guardians of children living at the same address. You must be 16 years of age or older to join as an individual member. Community Park Pools Guest Policy A Community Park Pool Member may bring a guest who must pay the appropriate daily fee based on his/her age (child, adult or senior). The pool member must be present in order for his/her guest to enter. Nanny Membership Nanny (Individual) $125.00 Nanny Membership is for non-residents who provide day care for child members of the family pass holder in family’s home or nanny’s home. To obtain a Nanny Membership, individual must provide a written statement from an adult member of a family pass holder stating that he/she provides day care for child members of the family pass holder in his/her home or nanny’s home. Daily Admission For TOB Residents who are NOT pool members (must show proof of TOB residency) Child (3 to 15 years old): $5.00 Adult (16 & older): $7.00 Senior citizen (60 & older): $4.00 Disabled Persons Permanent Disability/Social Security (Individual): $4.00 (with S.S. Medicare I.D. Card)

beaches Town of Oyster Bay Beach Information www.oysterbaytown.com Tobay Beach, Massapequa John J. Burns Park, Massapequa Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park, Oyster Bay Tobay, Philip B. Healey at Florence Avenue, Theodore Roosevelt and Centre Island Beaches will open for the season Weekends Only on Saturday, May 27, 2017. Beach Stickers will also be available at Tappen Beach daily from 8am to 4pm. Beach Facilities, Hours and Fees Beekman Beach, Oyster Bay (Passive Park) West End Avenue, Oyster Bay Centre Island Beaches, Bayville – 516-624-6123 Off Bayville-Centre Island Road, Bayville Town of Oyster Bay residents and non-residents. Bathing in Oyster Bay Harbor and Long Island Sound, picnic area on bay side. Outdoor showers available. From May 27th through June 18th, lifeguards are on duty from 9am to 5pm weekends and holidays only. Then from June 24th through Sept. 4th, lifeguards are on duty from 9am to 5pm daily. Parking fees and residency requirements apply starting at 8am weekends and holidays from May 27th to June 18th, then daily from June 24th to Sept. 4th. Town of Oyster Bay RESIDENTS pay $60 for the season or $20 daily. NON-RESIDENT DAILY fees are $50 Monday through Friday and $60 Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays. (see fee information below for more details) Charles E. Ransom Beach, Bayville – 516-624-6160 Off Bayville Avenue, Bayville Town of Oyster Bay residents and non-residents. Long Island Sound overlook, playground. No lifeguards and no swimming. Parking fees and residency requirements apply starting at 8am. Town of Oyster Bay residents pay $60 for the season or $20 daily. Nonresident daily fees are $50 Mondays through Fridays and $60 Saturdays, Sundays and Holidays. (see fee information below for more details) Harry Tappen Beach, Glenwood Landing – 516-674-7100 Shore Road, Glenwood Landing Town of Oyster Bay residents


News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017 • Guide to Summer Fun and non-residents. Bathing in Hempstead Harbor, restaurant, picnic area, sunfish/ sailfish/kayak racks, boat launching ramp, 267-slip marina, playground, swimming pool and half-court basketball. From June 24th through September 4th, lifeguards are on duty from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Residents are $20 (daily); $60 (seasonal). Non-residents are $40 (daily); $120 (seasonal). Parking fees and residency requirements apply starting at 8 a.m. daily during the Beach Season. (see fee information below for more details) Philip B. Healey Beach at Florence Avenue, Massapequa – 516-797-7994 Town Of Oyster Bay Residents Only Bathing in South Oyster Bay, playground, picnic area. Lifeguards 9am to 5pm weekends and holidays from May 27th through June 18th, then daily from June 24th through September 4th. Bathing in South Oyster Bay, picnic area, playground, spray park. Parking fees and residency requirements apply starting at 8am weekends and holidays from May 27th to June 18th, then daily from June 24th to September 4th. $60 for the season or $20 daily. (see fee information below for more details) Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Park and Beach, Oyster Bay – 516-624-6202 Larrabee Avenue, Oyster Bay Town Of Oyster Bay Residents Only Bathing in Oyster Bay Harbor; pavilion; refreshment stand; 2 covered picnic areas; tennis, handball and basketball courts; softball fields; children play areas; picnic area; launching ramps; 97-slip marina; Dingy racks; scenic walking paths throughout the facility, kayak racks, gazebo. From May 27th through June 18th, lifeguards are on duty from 9am to 5pm weekends and holidays, then daily from June 24th through Labor Day, September 4th. Parking fees and residency requirements apply starting at 8am weekends and holidays from May 27th through June 18th, then daily from June 24th through Sept. 4th. Residents are $60 for the season or $20 daily. (see fee information below for more details) Stehli Beach, Bayville/ Lattingtown – 516-624-6125 Town Of Oyster Bay Residents Only Bathing in Long Island Sound. Lifeguards on duty from 9am

to 5pm daily from June 24th through September 4th. Parking fees and residency requirements apply starting at 8am daily from June 24th through September 4th. Residents are $60 for the season or $20 daily. (see fee information below for more details) Tobay Beach, Massapequa – 516-679-3900 Ocean Parkway, Massapequa For Town of Oyster Bay residents, with non-residents permitted Monday through Friday (excluding holidays). Surf bathing in Atlantic Ocean, calm water bathing in South Oyster Bay, refreshment stands, restaurants, surfboarding and soft boarding area, 9/11 Memorial, an over 150-slip transient boat basin in bay area, children’s play area, picnic area, Spray Park, Miniature Golf Course. Lifeguards on duty from May 27th through June 18th from 9am to 6pm weekends and holidays only and then from June 24th through September 4th from 9am to 5pm Mondays through Fridays and from 9am to 6pm weekends and holidays. Parking fees and residency requirements apply 8am to 6pm weekends and holidays only from May 27th through June 18th; then from 8am to 6pm seven days a week from June 24th through September 4th. Parking fees: TOB Residents $20 daily, $60 season; Nonresidents permitted Mondays through Fridays only (except holidays): $50 daily. (see fee information below for more details) 2017 Beach Fees Town Of Oyster Bay Resident Parking Fees for ALL TOB Beach Facilities: Daily Admission (for vehicles without seasonal sticker): $20.00 per day Seasonal Stickers – cars and motorcycles: $60.00 Senior Citizen Sticker: No fee (must have Town of Oyster Bay Senior ID card, which can be obtained at Town Clerk’s office) Disabled Persons Permanent Disability/Social Security Act: No fee (must have Town of Oyster Bay ID card, which can be obtained at Town Clerk’s office) Non-Resident Weekday Daily Parking Fees for Tobay, Centre Island and Ransom ONLY: MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY (except holidays) Cars and Motorcycles – $50.00 per day Non-Resident Weekend and Holiday Daily Parking Fees for Centre Island and Ransom ONLY: SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS: Cars And Motorcycles – $60.00 Per Day (Please note: Tobay Beach is for “Residents Only” on week-

ends and holidays) Non-Resident Parking Fees For Tappen Beach: Daily Admission (for vehicles without Non-Resident ‘Tappen’ seasonal stickers): $40.00 per day Non-Resident TAPPEN SEASONAL STICKERS (valid at Tappen ONLY): Cars and Motorcycles – $120.00 Check website for parking pass information Town of Hempstead Beaches www. toh.li Beaches open May 27 through September 4 Ocean Beaches Open Saturday, May 27, 2017 to Labor Day, Monday, September 4, 2017 Parking Fees Collected Monday - Friday: 7 AM to 5 PM Weekends & Holidays: 7 AM to 5 PM Lifeguards On Duty Weekends & Holidays Only: May 27 to June 18 - 10 AM to 6 PM Seven Days A Week: June 19 to September 4 - 10 AM to 6 PM Special Park District Beaches Open Saturday, June 17 to Labor Day, Monday, September 4, 2017 Ocean lifeguard coverage is limited to weekends only through Sunday, June 18. Full ocean beach coverage begins Monday, June 19. The daily resident beach parking fee is $10 per car and $25 for non-residents ($20 for non-residents at Lido Beach Town Park). Non-resident “walk-in” rates apply at Sands, Lido and Lido West beaches. Lido Beach Town Park 630 Lido Blvd, Lido Beach 516-431-6650 Lido West Town Park 200 Lido Blvd, Lido Beach 516-432-0940 Town Park at Point Lookout Lido Blvd., Point Lookout 516-431-3900 Town Park at Sands 710 Lido Blvd, Lido Beach 516-431-6910 Hewlett Point Park 130 Hewlett Point Ave, Bay Park 516-599-4064 Town of North Hempstead Beaches www.northhempsteadny.gov Check website or call facility for fees, parking, residency information North Hempstead Beach Park 516-869-6311

Manorhaven Beach Park 516-869-6311 State Beaches www.nys.gov Check website or call facility for fees, parking, residency information Gov. Alfred E. Smith/Sunken Meadow State Park 631-269-4333 Heckscher State Park 631-581-2100 Jones Beach State Park 516-785-1600 Orient Beach State Park 631-323-2440 Robert Moses State Park 631-669-0470

camping Battle Row Camp Ground www.nassaucountyny.gov Claremont Road, Old Bethpage 516-572-8690 Blydenburgh County Park www.suffolkcountyny.gov Veteran’s Memorial Highway, Smithtown 631-854-3712 Catherdral Pines County Park www.suffolkcountyny.gov Yaphank-Middle Island Rd. South of Rt. 25, Middle Island 631-852-5502 Cliff and Ed’s Campgrounds www.cliffandeds.com 395 Schoolhouse Road, Cutchogue 631-298-4091 Eastern Long Island Kampgrounds www.easternlikampground.net 690 Queen Street, Greenport 631-477-0022 Eugene Nickerson Beach and Campgrounds www.nassaucountygov.ny Lido Blvd., Lido Beach 516-571-7700 Smith Point County Park Campgrounds www.suffolkcountyny.gov Fire Island, Shirley 631- 852-1313 South Haven County Park www.suffolkcountyny.gov Watch Hill Fire Island www.watchhillfi.com 631-597-3109 Wildwood State Park www.nyparks.com 790 Hulse Landing Road, Wading River 631- 929-4314

water activities American Sportfishing Charters www.asfcharters.com 10 Matinecock Avenue, Port Washington 516-883-8411 Angler Fleet www.theanglernow.com Inspiration Wharf, 405 Main Street, Port Washington 718-659-8181 Atlantic Outfitters www.atlanticoutfitters.us 405 Main Street #2, Port Washington 516-767-2215 Bob’s Canoe Rentals, Inc. www.canoerentalslongisland. com 631-269-9761 Brewer Capri Marina www.byy.com 15 Orchard Beach Blvd, Port Washington (516) 883-7800 Empire Kayaks www.empirekayaks.com 4 Empire Blvd., Island Park (516) 889-8300 Freedom Boat Club www.freedomboatclub.com (516) 699-8420 10 Matinecock Avenue, Port Washington Friends of Port Rowing www.portrowing.com North Hempstead Beach Park 141 West Shore Road, Port Washington 516-744-0221 Inspiration Wharf www.inspirationwharf.com 405 Main Street, Port Washington 516-883-0765 Lady Liberty Cruises www.ladylibertycruises.com Town Dock, 347 Main Street, Port Washington 516-922-9214 Long Island Boat Rentals www.liboatrental.com Inspiration Wharf, 403 Main Street, Port Washington 516-761-0840 Manhasset Bay Marina www.manhassetbaymarina. com 10 Matinecock Ave, Port Washington 516-883-8411 Nissequogue River Canoe and Kayak Rentals www.canoerentals.com 631-979-8244 Oyster Bay Marine Center www.obmc.com 5 Bay Avenue, Oyster Bay 516-624-2400

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Port Sailing School www.portsailing.com 403 Main Street, Port Washington 516-767-7245 Port Yacht Charters www.portyachtcharters.com 9 Belleview Avenue, Port Washington 516-883-0998 Saf-T-swim www.saf-t-swim.com Check website for locations Smarter Charter www.smartercharter.com 1 Pleasant Avenue, Port Washington 516-944-6002 The Water Front Center www.thewaterfrontcenter.org 1 West End Avenue, Oyster Bay 516-922-7245 Tom’s Point Marina 1 Sagamore Hill Drive, Port Washington 516-883-6630

bowling alleys AMF Babylon Lanes www.amf.com 430 Sunrise Highway, Babylon (631) 661-6600 Check website for pricing; hours subject to change Monday 9:00 a.m. - Midnight Tuesday 4:00 p.m. - Midnight Wednesday 9:00 a.m. Midnight Thursday 4:00 p.m. - Midnight Friday10:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m. Saturday 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m. Sunday 11:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m. AMF East Meadow Lanes www.amf.com 1840 Front Street, East Meadow (516) 794-1111 Check website for pricing; hours subject to change Monday Noon – 11:00 p.m. Tuesday 11:00 a.m. - Midnight Wednesday 4:00 p.m. Midnight Thursday 11:00am - Midnight Friday 4:00 p.m. - 1:00 a.m. Saturday 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m. Sunday 11:00 a.m. – 11:00pm AMF Garden City Lanes www.amf.com 987 Streetewart Avenue, Garden City (516) 222-0808 Check website for pricing; hours subject to change Monday Noon - Midnight Tuesday Noon - Midnight Wednesday Noon - Midnight Thursday Noon - 12:00 a.m. Friday 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m. Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 2:00 a.m. Sunday 10:00 a.m. – 12:00


56 Guide to Summer Fun • News Times Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

entertainment a.m. AMF Plainview Lanes www.amf.com 500 Old Bethpage Road, Plainview (516) 433-9595 Check website for pricing; hours subject to change Monday Noon – 11:00 p.m. Tuesday 4:00 p.m. - Midnight Wednesday 4:00 p.m. - Midnight Thursday 4:00 p.m. - Midnight Friday Noon - 1:00 a.m. Saturday 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m. Sunday 11:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. AMF Sheridan Lanes www.amf.com 199 E Jericho Turnpike, Mineola (516) 741-3444 Check website for pricing; hours subject to change Monday 9:00 a.m. - Midnight Tuesday 3:00 p.m. - Midnight Wednesday Noon - Midnight Thursday 3:00 p.m. - Midnight Friday 11:00 a.m. - 2:00 a.m. Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 2:00 a.m. Sunday 10:00 a.m. - Midnight AMF Syosset Lanes www.amf.com 111 Eileen Way, Syosset, NY 516-921-7575 Check website for pricing; hours subject to change Monday 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m. Tuesday 4:00 p.m. - Midnight Wednesday 4:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m. Thursday 4:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m. Friday 10:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m. Saturday 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m. Sunday 11:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m. Bowlero www.bolero.com 2183 Jericho Turnpike Commack, NY (631) 499-7722 Check website for pricing; hours subject to change Monday 3:00PM - 1:00AM Tuesday 3:00PM - 12:00AM Wednesday 3:00PM - 12:00AM Thursday 3:00PM - 12:00AM Friday 12:00PM - 1:00AM Saturday 11:00AM - 2:00AM Sunday 11:00AM - 12:00AM Farmingdale Lanes www.farmingdale lanes.com 999 Conklin Street, Farmingdale 516-249-4300 Check website for pricing; hours subject to change Monday 9:00 a.m. - 12 midnight Tuesday 9am - 12 midnight Wednesday 9am - 12 midnight Thursday 9am - 12 midnight Friday 9am - 1 am Saturday 9am - 1 am Sunday 9am - 12 midnight Herrill Lanes www.herrillanes.com 465 Herricks Road, New Hyde Park 516-741-8022 Monday to Friday - 9am-1am Saturday - 9am-2am

Sundays - 8:30am-midnight Massapequa Bowl & Lounge www.massapequabowl.com 4235 Merrick Road, Massapequa 516-541-8000 Check website for pricing Sunday through Thursday 9:00 a.m.- 12:00 a.m. Friday and Saturday 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 a.m. Strike 10 Lanes Deer Park www.strike10lanesdeerpark. com 849 Long Island Avenue, Deer Park 631-667-7750 Check website for pricing Sunday 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 a.m. Monday 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 a.m. Tuesday 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 a.m. Wednesday 11:00 p.m. – 12:00 a.m. Thursday 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 a.m. Friday 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 a.m. Saturday 9:00 p.m. – 2:00 a.m.

botantical gardens Clark Botanic Garden www.clarkbotanicgarden.org 193 I U Willets Road, Albertson 516-484-2208 Open Daily 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Old Westbury Gardens www.oldwestburygardens.org 71 Old Westbury Road, Westbury 516-333-0048 Westbury House and Gardens are open every weekend from April 1, and every day except Tuesdays, from April 10th to October 31st, from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m.(the House will open at 11:00 a.m. and close at 4:30 p.m.), with the last vehicle being allowed onto the property at 4:00 p.m. The John P. Humes Japanese Stroll Garden www.gardenconservancy.org 347 Oyster Bay Road, Locust Valley 516-676-4486 Peconic Land Trust www.peconiclandtrust.org 296 Hampton Road, South Hampton 631-283-3195

arboretums Bailey Arboretum www.baileyarboretum.com 194 Bayville Road, Locust Valley 515-801-1458 Open Daily No Admission Fees, No Parking Fees Spring/Summer Hours: 8:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Bayard Cutting Arboretum www.bayardarboretum.com 440 Montauk Highway, Great

WT

River Summer Hours April 1 – October 31 Tuesday – Sunday 10:00 am – 5:00 pm Park hours and facility operations are subject to change.

and Holidays Hoffman Nature Preserve and Wildlife Center www.hoffmancenter.org 6000 Northern Boulevard, Muttontown 516-922-3290

Planting Fields Arboretum State Historic Park www.plantingfields.org 1395 Planting Fields Road, Oyster Bay, NY 516-922-9200 Park Hours: 9:00 am - 5:00 pm daily $8 per car until Nov, 18th Coe Hall Hours: Self-Guided Visits to Coe Hall 11:30 am - 3:30 pm 3/27 – 10/2 daily October Weekends only $5 Non-Members Members & Children under 12 are free

Long Island Heritage Trails www.longislandheritagetrail. com

Hofstra Aboretum www.hofstra.edu 129 Hofstra University, Hempstead 516-463-6623 LIU Post Community Arborteum www.liu.edu 720 Northern Boulevard, Brookville

nature preserves Longhouse Reserve www.longhouse.org 133 Hands Creek Road East Hampton, NY 11937 (631) 329-3568 Sweet Briar Nature Preserve www.sweetbriarnc.org 62 Eckernkamp Drive, Smithtown Preserve: Open 8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. everyday Vivarium: Open 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. daily (In Season) Caleb Smith State Park 581 West Jericho Turnpike, Smithtown (631) 265-1054 Charles T. Church Nature Preserve Frost Mill Road, Mill Neck 516-671-0283 Fox Hollow Preserve www.northshorelandalliance. org White Oak Tree Road, Laurel Hollow 516-626-0908 Open sunrise-sunset Garvies Point Museum and Preserve www.garviespointmuseum.com 50 Barry Road, Glen Cove 516-571-8010 Adults: $4.00; Children 5-12 years: $2.00 Days and Hours of Operation: Tuesday to Saturday, 10am-4pm School groups by appointment Tues-Fri Closed Sundays and Mondays

Louis C. Clark Sanctuary 8 Valentine’s Lane, Old Brookville 516-626-0908 Muttontown Preserve 25A west of Jericho-Oyster Bay Road, Muttontown Lane, East Norwich 516-571-8500 Sands Point Preserve www.andspointconservancy. org 27 Middle Neck Road, Sands Point 516-571-7901 Summer: Saturday, May 27, 2017 (Memorial Day Weekend) through Monday, September 4, 2017 (Labor Day Weekend) Hours: 8:00 AM to 7:00 PM Admission to the Preserve is $10 per car or free for members of the Sands Point Preserve Conservancy. Walk-in admission is $4 per person. Additional fees apply for mansion tours, programs, and events. Theodore Roosevelt Sanctuary and Audobon Center 134 Cove Road, Oyster Bay Cove 516-922-3200

vineyards Anthony Nappa Wines www.anthonynappawines.com 2885 Peconic Lane, Mattituck 774-641-7488 Hours: Year round 4 days a week, Friday to Monday from 12:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m July 4th through Labor Day: Thursday to Monday from 12:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.Baiting Hollow Farm Vineyard www.baitinghollowfarmvineyard.com 2114 Sound Ave, Calverton (631) 369-0100 Monday: 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM Tuesday: Closed Wednesday, Thursday, Friday: 12:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Saturday: 11:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Sunday: 12:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Bedell Cellars www.bedellcellars.com 36225 Main Road, Cutchogue 631-734-7537 Sunday - Thursday 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Friday and Saturday 11:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Bridge Lane Wine

www.bridgelanewines.com 35 Cox Neck Road, Mattituck Wednesday through Monday: 12:00 p.m. -7:00 p.m. Closed Tuesday Channing Daughters www.channingdaughters.com 1927 Scuttlehole Road, Bridgehampton 631-537-7224 Open daily 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Clovis Point Vineyard and Winery www.clovispointwines.com 1935 Main Road, Jamesport 631-722-4222 Monday to Friday: 12pm - 5pm Saturday: 11am - 7pm Sunday: 11am - 6pm Corey Creek 45470 Ny-25, Southold 631-765-4168 Sunday – Thursday, 12:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Friday – Saturday, 12:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. Diliberto Winery www.dilibertowinery.com 250 Manor Lane, Jamesport 631-722-3416 Saturday 11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Sunday 11:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Kontokosta Winery www.kontokostawinery.com 825 North Road, Greenport 631-477-6977 Sunday, Monday & Thursday 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Friday & Saturday 111:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m Closed Tuesday & Wednesday Lieb Cellars www.liebcellars.com 13050 Oregon Road, Cutchogue 631-734-1100 Open Daily 12:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Martha Clara Vineyards www.marthaclaravineyards. com 6025 Sound Avenue, Riverhead 631-298-0075 Monday – Friday, 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Saturday, 11:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Sunday, 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

5120 Sound Avenue, Riverhead 631-722-9463 Sunday - Friday: 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Saturday: 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Pulgliese Vineyards www.pulgliesevineyards.com 34515 Main Road, Cutchogue 631-734-4057 Monday - Friday: 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Saturday: 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Sunday: 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Sannino Bella Vita Vineyard www.sanninovineyard.com 1375 Peconic Lane, Peconic 631-734-8282 Open Daily 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Sherwood House Vineyard www.sherwoodhousevineyard. com 1291 Main Road, Jamesport 631-779-2817 Sunday– Thursday: 11:00a.m. -6:00 a.m. Friday 11:00 a.m. -8:00 p.m. Saturday 11:00 a.m. -7:00 p.m. Shinn Estate Vineyards www.shinnestatevineyards.com 2000 Oregon Road, Mattituck 631-804-0367 Monday through Thursday 10:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Friday 10:30 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Saturday 10:30 a.m.– 8:00 p.m. Sunday 10:30 a.m.– 5:00 p.m. Sparkling Pointe www.sparklingpointe.com 39750 County Road 48, Southold 631-765-0200 Monday – Thursday, 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Friday – Sunday, 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Suhru Wines www.suhruwines.com 2885 Peconic Lane, Peconic 631-603-8127 Friday through Monday: 12:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. May, June Thursday through Monday: 12:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. July and August

Mattabella Vineyards www.mattabellavineyards.com 46005 Main Road, Southold 631-655-9554 April & May / ThursdayMonday 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m June - October / MondaySunday 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Mccall Wines www.mccallwines.com 22600 Main Road, Cutchogue 631-734-5764 Friday through Sunday: 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. Palmer Vineyards www.palmervineyards.com

All information, dates and fees listed in this guide are subject to change.


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

For more information, please contact: Eliana Vollmer, Special Events Coordinator (516) 775-5683 x129 evollmer@ rmhlongisland.org

Event Chair: Katie Hunt Rotolo Visit us online! www.rmhlongisland.org

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58 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Arts & Entertainment Calendar NYCB LIVE/NASSAU VETERANS MEMORIAL COLISEUM 1255 Hempstead Turnpike, Uniondale (516) 794-9300 • http://www.nassaucoliseum. com Through May 21 at various times Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Presents Out of This World Thursday, May 25 at 7:30 p.m. Barry Manilow Saturday, June 3 at 7:30 p.m. The Weeknd NORTHWELL HEALTH AT JONES BEACH THEATER 695 Bay Parkway, Wantaugh (516) 221-1000 • www.livenation.com Saturday, June 3 at 7 p.m. KTUphoria 2017 with Backstreet Boys, Fifth Harmony, Nicky Jam, Jason Derulo, Shaggy, Daya, Craig David, Starley and Miley Cyrus Sunday, June 4 at 7:30 p.m. Jason Aldean: They Don’t Know You Tour GOLD COAST ARTS CENTER 113 Middle Neck Road, Great Neck (516) 829-2570 • goldcoastarts.org Thursday, June 1 at 7 p.m. 50th Anniversary Celebration of “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band”: Film and live concert fundraising event. Through June 11 Festival of the Arts: A celebration of the accomplishments of its students in Dance, Art, Ceramics, Music, and Drama programs. Through Friday, September 15 Creative Crossroads: The art of Adam Handler and Luis Zimad Lamboy come together in this two-person exhibition of color and shape. LANDMARK ON MAIN STREET 232 Main Street, Suite 1 Port Washington (516) 767-1384 ext. 101 www.landmarkonmainstreet.org Saturday, May 20 at 8 p.m. Ladies of Laughter Wednesday, May 24 at 2 p.m. Lois Morton: 20th Century Girl PLANTING FIELDS ARBORETUM Coe Hall Historic House Museum 1395 Planting Fields Road, Oyster Bay (516) 922-9200 • http://www.plantingfields. org Saturday, May 20, 2-2:45 p.m. Jonathan Kruk’s Storytelling — The Sporting Life and Tales (An Exhibition Program for Children) $5 admission fee, members and children under 12 are free Sunday, May 21, 3-5 p.m. Peony Walking Tour: Meet at Coe Hall. Tickets are required. For more information, contact Jennifer Lavella at (516) 922-8678 or email jlavella@plantingfields.org THE PARAMOUNT 370 New York Ave., Huntington (631) 673-7300 ext. 303 www.paramountny.com Friday, May 19 at 8 p.m. The Paramount Tribute Series Presents:

Mike DelGuidice & Big Shot — Celebrating the Music of Billy Joel Saturday, May 20 at 8 p.m. Streetlight Manifesto: The “Somewhere in the Between Tour” 2017 Friday, May 26 at 8 p.m. The Paramount Tribute Series Presents “Friday Night Fever” Featuring The N.Y. Bee Gees Saturday, May 27 at 8 p.m. An Evening with Little Feat & The Midnight Ramble Horns LONG ISLAND CHILDREN’S MUSEUM 11 Davis Avenue, Garden City 516-224-5800 • www.licm.org Friday, May 19, 11:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Kids in the Kitchen Ages 3-5. Fee $5 with museum admission ($4 LICM members). Friday, May 19, 2:30-4 p.m. Cute as a Button Flowers Ages 3 and up. Free with museum admission. Through Sunday, May 21 “Journey to Oz” All ages. Fee $9 with museum admission ($7 LICM members). MADISON THEATRE AT MOLLOY COLLEGE 1000 Hempstead Avenue, Rockville Centre 516-323-4444 • www.madisontheatreny.org Friday, May 19 at 7 p.m. “A Gospel Extravaganza” Through Saturday, May 20, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. (MTh), 12-8 p.m. (F) The Frank & Gertrude Kaiser Art Gallery at Molloy Presents... Senior BFA/BS Exhibit In the Kaiser Gallery, 2nd Floor, Public Square HUNTINGTON ARTS COUNCIL 213 Main Street, Huntington Saturday, May 13, 2-6 p.m. Huntington Village Art Walk Ongoing through Saturday, May 20 Juried Art Exhibition: “Into the Deep” NASSAU COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART 1 Museum Dr., Roslyn (516) 484-9338 www.nassaumuseum.org Ongoing through Sunday, July 9 Halston Style: The first comprehensive retrospective of the works of the American fashion designer Halston. Sponsored by “H Halston exclusively at Lord & Taylor,” the exhibition occupies the entire museum. Ongoing Sculpture Park Walking Trails Gardens Events FILM “ “Halston on Film” through July 9 Ongoing through Sunday, July 9 Halston on Film: The exhibition Halston Style includes films and videos related to Halston’s contributions to the world of fashion; films are screened at various times. For The Family Family Sundays at the Museum, 1-4 p.m. Family Tour at 1 p.m. Art Activities at 1:30 p.m. Sunday, May 21 at 3 p.m. Halston’s Inner Circle: A Conversation with Guest Curator Lesley Frowick Tuesdays, May 23 and June 27 at 1 p.m.


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

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A&E Calendar cont’d Sketching in the Galleries with Glenna Kubit Thursday, June 15 at 1 p.m. Brown Bag Lectures with Riva Ettus STEPHEN C. WIDOM CULTURAL ARTS AT EMANUEL Temple Emanuel of Great Neck 150 Hicks Lane, Great Neck Sunday, May 21 at 3 p.m. Journalists Peter Beinart & Bret Stephens in Dialogue, moderated by Lane Filler of Newsday Tickets are $20 or two for $35. THE DOLPHIN BOOKSHOP & CAFE 299 Main St., Port Washington (516) 767-2650 • www.thedolphinbookshop. com Fridays at 11 a.m. Music & More: Marilyn & her guitar For children ages 2-4 Fridays, 7-9 p.m. Cafe Music at The Dolphin Free admission Sunday, May 21 at 11:30 a.m. Story Time and Craft: Ducks and Donuts: A Tale of Self-Reliance by Robert DeNicola Thursdays through June 8, 6:30-8 p.m. Sketchbook Club for Adults To register, call 516-767-2650 Wednesdays through June 21 and Fridays through June 23, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Sketchbook Club for Tweens (ages 9-12) BOOK REVUE 313 New York Avenue Huntington Tuesday, May 23 at 7 p.m. “The Rising” by Stephanie Doyle-Cocchi Saturday, June 3 at 7 p.m. “Trophy Son” by Douglas Brunt THE ART GUILD 200 Port Washington Blvd., Manhasset www.TheArtGuild.org Second Thursdays: June 8 and July 13 Sip & Sketch: Live model, no instruction, short and long poses. Bring a snack and/or beverage. Call or email to RSVP. Beginners, 1-4 p.m.; Intermediates, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. TILLES CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS | LIU POST 720 Northern Boulevard, Brookville (516) 2993100 • http://tillescenter.org Friday, May 19, 7:30 p.m. “The Godfather” In Concert Thursday, June 1 at 7:30 p.m. The Illusionists: Live from Broadway

THE SPACE AT WESTBURY 250 Post Ave., Westbury (516)283-5566 • www.thespaceatwestbury. com Thursday, May 18 at 8 p.m. David Crosby Saturday, June 10 at 8 p.m. The Fab Faux with The Hogshead Horns & The Creme Tangerine Strings Performing the “Hey Jude” Album in its Entirety and a set of Favorites SANDS POINT PRESERVE CONSERVANCY 127 Middle Neck Road, Sands Point info@sandspointpreserve.org • 516.571.7901 Saturday, June 3, 10-11 a.m. Sports Scientist: For children 4-10 Sunday, June 11, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Gems, Minerals and Fossils

THE WHALING MUSEUM & EDUCATION CENTER 279 Main Street, Cold Spring Harbor (631) 367-3418 • http://www.cshwhalingmuseum.org Saturday, May 20, 12:30-2:30 p.m. The Art of Surf Bathing: Great-Grandma’s Bathing Suit: Presentation and Walking Tour $12 per person. Limited seating. RSVP: 631-367-3418 ROCK HALL MUSEUM 199 Broadway, Lawrence (516)239-1157 • www.friendsofrockhall. org

Sunday, May 21, 12-4 p.m. Colonial Day: Rock Hall Celebrates 250 Years of Histiry: Step back in time and visit Colonial America. Free and open to the public. For more information, call 516-239-1157. BJ SPOKE GALLERY 229 Main Street, Huntington (631) 549-5106• www.bjspokegallery.com Through Sunday, May 28 New Exhibits on Display: The abstract works of gallery president, Kevin Larkin, and gallery director Lorraine Carol

CLARK BOTANIC GARDEN 193 I. U. Willets Road, Albertson (516) 484-2208 • http://clarkbotanic.org/ Monday, May 22 at 12 p.m. Bridge and Card Party Fundraiser $25 per person HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL AND TOLERANCE CENTER OF NASSAU COUNTY Welwyn Preserve, 100 Crescent Beach Road, Glen Cove (516) 571-8040 • http://www.hmtcli.org Sunday, May 21 at 2 p.m. Reception and Unveiling of “Tears of the Holocaust,” a sculpture by Michael Izrael Galmer COLD SPRING HARBOR FISH HATCHERY & AQUARIUM 1660 Rte. 25A, Cold Spring Harbor (516) 692-6768 • http://www.cshfishhatchery. org Wednesdays and Thursdays, 10-11 a.m. Pollywog Adventures for Pre-Schoolers: Kids of all ages learn about the natural world. Saturday, June 3, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Reptile & Amphibian Appreciation Day Adults: $6; Kids, ages 3-12: $4; Seniors 65 and up and children under 3: Free NYCB THEATRE AT WESTBURY: THE NORTHWELL HEALTH CONCERT SERIES 960 Brush Hollow Road, Westbury (516) 247-5205 • http://www.thetheatreatwestbury.com Sunday, May 21, 6 p.m. Dick Fox’s Spring Doo Wop Extravaganza Friday, June 2 at 8 p.m. Stephanie Mills & The Whispers Saturday, June 3 at 8 p.m. Johnny Mathis

Real Estate Tip From a Professional:

LISTING YOUR PROPERTY

If you are considering putting your home on the market, summer may be the perfect time. The frenzy of the spring buying season has ended, meaning there are fewer houses listed and competing for buyers’ attention. Tax refunds have been sent out, so potential buyers who have been saving for a down payment may now have the funds they need. Additionally, families hoping to get settled into a new home before the school year begins are abundant.

CHRIS PAPPAS, Licensed Associate Real Estate Broker

Visit us at elliman.com/long-island

Commercial & Residential Expert Leading Edge Award Winner 2014, 2015*, President’s Circle 2016* C: 516.659.6508 | chris.pappas@elliman.com www.ckpappas.com | www.facebook.com/ckpdere * At Douglas Elliman Real Estate 110 WALT WHITMAN ROAD, HUNTINGTON STATION, NY 11746. 631.549.7401 | © 2017 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


60 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

Community Calendar SHELTER ROCK JEWISH CENTER Men’s Club bagel breakfast with novelist Alexander Rosenstein, author of “DoubleEdged Sword” Sunday, May 21 at 9:30 a.m. following at 9 a.m. morning service 272 Shelter Rock Road, Roslyn For more information, call 516-741-4305 JUBILEE YEAR CELEBRATION AT TEMPLE ISAIAH “You Light Up My Life” Presented by Neil Yerman: Temple Isaiah’s 50th Anniversary Celebration Sunday, May 21 at 2 p.m. Temple Isaiah, One Chelsea Place off Cuttermill Road, Great Neck There is a suggested donation of $18. For more information, call 516-487-5373 NASSAU COUNTY BAR ASSOCIATION Free Public Clinic: “Detecting, Preventing and Remedying Elder Abuse” Monday, May 22 at 3-6 p.m. Both to take place at the Bar Association, 15th Street at the corner of West Street in Mineola For more information and to register call 516-747-4070 TOWN OF NORTH HEMPSTEAD’S SPRING DEPARTMENT EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM What to Know Before Buying or Selling a Home Seminars Tuesday, May 23 at 7 p.m. Hillside Public Library, 155 Lakeville Rd., New Hyde Park For more information, call 311 or 516-869-6311 or go to www.northhempsteadny.gov SPRING YOUTH SOCCER CLINICS At Michael J. Tully Park 1801 Evergreen Ave, New Hyde Park Tuesdays, from 5-6 p.m., on May 23, 30 and June 6, 13 or Fridays, from 5-6 p.m., on May 19, 26 and June 3 and 10 (rain dates: June 20 and 30) For more information, contact Jordan Speregen at 516-719-0800 or via email: jordan@ andgosports.com UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CONGREGATION AT SHELTER ROCK 48 Shelter Rock Road, Manhasset (516) 627-6560 Friday, May 19 at 7:30 p.m. Concert to Aid Refugee Families: Renowned Syrian singer, GAIDA will perform. Event will raise funds for Catholic Charities and Church World Services Tickets: $25 at the door; $20 online; $10 children under 18 For more information, call 516-627-6560 or go to www.uucsr.org/GAIDA Wednesday, May 24, 1-3 p.m. Join Selfhelp’s Free Virtual Senior Center — Art Gallery Connect with new friends online; email and Skype with friends and family. Participate in live, interactive discussions on art, history, news, exercise, music museum tours and well-being. Play games and explore what the Internet has to offer. Friday, June 2 at 7 p.m. SJC MH Film: “Buried Above Ground” — Social Hall A screening and Skyped discussion with director Ben Salkow. The film explores post-traumatic stress

disorder as seen through the eyes of three characters. WALT WHITMAN BIRTHPLACE HISTORIC SITE 246 Old Walt Whitman Road Huntington Station (631)351-3244 Saturday, May 20, 5-9 p.m. A Call for the Arts: Syosset High School Art Show at the Walt Whitman Birthplace The evening will include performances by students in orchestra and band, as well as spoken word pieces. Admission is $10 for those 12 and up, children under 12 are free. All proceeds go to Action Against Hunger and WWBA. NORTH SHORE LAND ALLIANCE, INC.’S INTRO TO JOURNALING FOR ADULTS: EXPLORING THE NATURAL WORLD THROUGH ART Saturday, May 20, 1:30-3 p.m. At Wawapek Preserve, Cold Spring Harbor $10 per person. RSVP by calling 516-9221028 GAALS (GIRLS ATHLETICS AND LIFE SKILLS) MOTHER-DAUGHTER DAY OUT: Celebrating Girls (Ages 5-14) & Their Moms At Community Synagogue 155 Middle Neck Rd., Port Washington Sunday, May 21, Doors Open at 8:45 a.m., Meditation at 9 a.m., Sessions from 10 a.m.-12:45 p.m.; Optional Lunch from 1- 2 p.m.; Lounge Open from 8:45 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Prices: Mother + Daughter, $125; Add-on Lunch for Mother + Daughter, $60; Add-on Event for Additional Girl, $35; Add-on Lunch for Additional Girl, $25 Fore more information, go to www.gaalsusa. com LONG ISLAND BAROQUE ENSEMBLE At Christ Church 61 East Main Street Oyster Bay 212-222-5795 Sunday, May 21, 3 p.m. The Ensemble will perform “Fortepianp.” $30 general admission; $20 for those in their 20; $15 students TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM 401 Roslyn Road Roslyn Heights, NY 11577 516-621-2288 Sunday, May 21, 5-9:30 p.m. Dancing with the Temple Beth Sholom Stars Tuesday, May 30 at 7:30 p.m. Tikkun Leyl Shavuot: Our Living Torah, An Evening of Jewish Learning GIRLS ATHLETICS AND LIFE SKILLS MOTHER-DAUGHTER DAY OUT At the Community Synogogue of Port Washington 160 Middle Neck Rd., Sands Point Sunday, May 21 Celebrating girls and their moms, this is a one-of-a-kind shared experience where mothers and daughters join together for hands-on activities. Choose from amongst yoga & mindfulness, cooking, art and other sessions that interest and inspire you. For more information, go to www.GAALSusa. com.

NEW HYDE PARK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND THE PINK TIE FOUNDATION BENEFIT At the Crest Hollow Country Club 8325 Jericho Tpke., Woodbury Monday, May 22 Event will support the Don Monti Foundation for Cancer Research For more information, go to www.PinkTie.org ADELPHI NY STATEWIDE BREAST CANCER HOTLINE & SUPPORT PROGRAM Alumni House, 1 South Ave., Garden City Monday, May 22, 6-8 p.m. Using Mindfulness and Meditation to Cope with Breast Cancer presented by Jacob Cooper, CH, LMSW, RMT For more information on both seminars, call 800-877-8077 Tuesdays from 6-7:30 p.m. Young Women’s Support Group, Under 40 For more information, contact Erin Nau at 516-877-4314 PROJECT INDEPENDENCE SUPPORT & SOCIAL GROUP TRIVIA CHALLENGE Call 311 or (516) 869-6311 for more information. Last Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. Havana Central Restaurant Roosevelt Field, Garden City. For more info, call (516) 676- 1976. SID JACOBSON JCC 300 Forest Drive, East Hills, 11548 www.sjjcc.org/jll. Fridays Shababa Fridays, 9:45-10:45 a.m. General Exercise Group for All cancer Survivors, 12:30-1:15 p.m. Discussion Group for All Cancer Survivors, 1:15-2 p.m. Sundays Gentle Yoga for All Cancer Survivors, 9:3010:30 a.m. Mondays News Behind the News, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Eat, Chat, Move!, 12:15-1:45 p.m. Tuesdays Mah Jongg Clinic, 10 a.m.- 12 p.m. Tuesday Lectures, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Swim Program for Strength & Wellness, 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Knitzvah: Knitting for a Cause, 7-8:30 p.m. Wednesdays Knitzvah: Knitting for a Cause, 12-2 p.m. Taste of Torah, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Thursdays Games Day, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Meditation, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Thursday, May 18, 3-5 p.m. Shababa Cooks: Shavuot Edition in Partnership with 92YShababa Network Children ages 1-5 and their families. $25 per family/$15 member families At Bernice Jacobson Day School and Camp Sunday, May 21, 10-11:30 a.m. Planting Day at Camp Jacobson At Bernice Jacobson Day School and Camp 340 Wheatley Rd., Old Westbury Tuesday, May 23, 10:30 a.m. Great Stories: Shavuot Edition For children ages 1-7 years and their families At Barnes & Noble, 1542 Northern Blvd., Manhasset ST. ALOYSIUS SOCIABLES OF GREAT NECK At Limani’s Restaurant, 1043 Northern Blvd., Roslyn

Wednesday, May 24 at 1 p.m. Cost: Price of your meal For more information, call John Hyland at 516-482-3795 TRIVIA CHALENGE At Gino’s Pizzeria & Restaurant 1113 Jericho Tpke., New Hyde Park Wednesday, May 24 at 6 p.m. Match wits with great minds. You may win a prize. For more information, call 516-676-1976. PORT WASHINGTON SENIOR CENTER 80 Manorhaven Blvd., Port Washington Caregiver Support Group The first and third Tuesday of every month from 2-3 p.m. Info.: 311 or 516-869-6311 WINTHROP-UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 200 Old Country Road, Suite 250 Mineola, NY 11501 * Winthrop-University Hospital’s Department of Neuroscience Free Support Group/Huntington’s Disease Meetings held the second Monday of the month Winthrop’s Research & Academic Center 101 Mineola Blvd., Room G-013 * Winthrop-University Hospital’s Head and Neck Cancer Care Support Group Third Monday of the month, from 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. 1300 Franklin Avenue, Suite ML5, Garden City * Winthrop-University Hospital’s Inspiring Women Series: Bladder Problems — What Women Need to Know Wednesday, May 24 at 7 p.m. Winthrop’s Research & Academic Center 101 Mineola Blvd., Room G-013 NEW HYDE PARK MEMORIAL DAY PARADE Join the Greater NHP Chamber of Commerce as they march to honor those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedoms. 175 West Shore Rd., Port Washington Saturday, May 27 at 9-11 a.m. arrival to line up) Parade begins at Lakeville Road/Jericho Tpke. (in the municipal parking lot) NORTH HEMPSTEAD 2017 MEMORIAL DAY FIREWORKS EXTRAVANGANZA At North Hempstead Beach Park 175 West Shore Rd., Port Washington Saturday, May 27 at 6 p.m. Event is free, but vehicles will be charged a $10 parking fee. For more information, go to www.northhempsteadny.gov or call 311 or 516-869-6311. SINGLES ASSOCIATION OF LONG ISLAND At Herrill Lanes 465 Herricks Rd., New Hyde Park Last Saturdays of the month, May 27-December 20, 7-9 p.m., except in July, August and October. For ages 25 plus. Social gathering afterwards at the Omega Diner, 1809 Lakeville Rd. in New Hyde Park MANHASSET MEMORIAL DAY PARADE Manhasset American Legion Hall on Plandome Road Monday, May 29, beginning at 10 a.m. Memorial Service at 11 a.m. in the Manhasset High School Auditorium FLORAL PARK MEMORIAL DAY PARADE The American Legion Post on Elizabeth Street and Memorial Park Monday, May 29, beginning at 10 a.m. Kick-off at 10 a.m., parade begins at 11 a.m.


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62 The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

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Hillside Library You may register for programs at hillsidelibrary.info/events. You need to have your library barcode number for registration. The library subscribes to several museum passes for the enjoyment and entertainment of our patrons, holders of Hillside Library cards in good standing. The library collects used cell phones (with their chargers) for charity. Also, the library collects reading glasses. The Donation Boxes are on the First Floor. We thank you.

MOVIE: “LA LA LAND” (PG-13) Friday, May 19 at 6:15 p.m. Starring Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling. WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE BUYING OR SELLING A HOME Tuesday, May 23 at 7 p.m. Hosted by the North Hempstead Building Dept. CARDS, COLORING, GAMES & COFFEE Wednesday, May 24 at 1 p.m. De-stress and take part in one or more of these activities. PLANT, GROW, EAT Thursday, May 25 at 7 p.m. Recycle flower pots and extra

PROGRAMS

plants at the meeting. MOVIE: “PASSENGERS” (PG13) Friday, May 26 at 1:30 p.m. Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Chris Pratt and Michael Sheen.

fun and a craft. Must be preregistered. JUMP FOR JOY Wednesday, May 24 at 11 a.m. Ages 18 mos. to 4 years. Music, parachute and dancing. Must be pre-registered.

CHILDREN: PLAY HOORAY Friday, May 19 at 1:30 p.m. Ages 18 mos. and up. Songs, music and movement. Must be preregistered. SNUGGLE TALES STORY TIME Monday, May 22 at 1:15 p.m. Ages 12-36 months with caretaker. Stories, songs, movement

TALES FOR TYKES Thursday, May 25 at 1:15 p.m. Ages 3-4 years. Story time fun. Must be pre-registered. HILLSIDE MOVIE: “RATCHET & CLANK” Thursday, May 25 at 4 p.m. All ages. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Shelter Rock Library ART EXHIBIT: THE ARTWORK OF ALFONSO GALLO The exhibit will run through the months of May and June. ART LECTURES: Maurice Utrillo and His Cityscapes Friday, May 19 at 11 a.m. Maurice Utrillo was born in the Montmarte quarter of Paris to artist/model Suzanne Valadon. Utrillo had no formal training, he studied directly under his mother’s tutelage. His first subjects were domestic scenes reflecting his own home, however, he began

to concentrate on Paris city views. His cityscapes soon became famous with its characteristic boldness of color and meticulous draftsmanship. By the time of his death, he had become an international figure in the art world . EMPIRE SAFETY COURSE Saturday, May 20, 9:30 a.m.3:30 p.m. For Drivers of all ages. Fees: Ages 60+, $33. All others, $38 LOVE IS A MANY SPLENDID THING: Love as Portrayed by Major Artists

Monday, May 22 at 1:30 p.m. By artists revealing their intimate feelings through their creations we see many facets of love: excitement, mother and child, joy, jealousy, betrayal and more. Some works of Schiele, Mapplethorpe, Barbara Hepworth, Picasso, Rembrandt, Michelangelo, Georgia O’Keefe, Matisse, Chagall and Frida Kahlo will be presented in this visual lecture. AARP SMART DRIVING COURSE Tuesday, May 23 and Wednesday, May 24, 6-9 p.m.

Please print the registration form below or pick up a registration form at the Reference Desk. CREATIVE NEEDLES AND THE ART OF COLORING Fridays, May 26 and June 2 at 12:30 p.m. Bring your projects and supplies to cross-stitch, knit, crochet, needlepoint, or embroider in the company of other needlecraft lovers. Registration is required. For additional information about events, please call 516227-7055.

Great Neck Library THURSDAY FILM ENCORE AT THE STATION BRANCH The Thursday film at the Station Branch will be an encore of the film shown on Wednesday at Main. The Station Branch, is located at 26 Great Neck Rd. (2nd level), Gardens at Great Neck Plaza. Refer to the Library Newsletter, film brochure or website for further information on the films scheduled. Doors open at 1:30 p.m. Arrive early as seating is limited. Priority seating is given to Great Neck School District residents. Please bring your Library card, driver’s license or other ID showing your Great Neck School District address. STICKS IN THE STACKS KNITTING AND CROCHET CLASS AT LAKEVILLE Come and learn the basics, or perhaps just brush up on what you already know at this new, ongoing knitting

and crocheting class. At the Lakeville Branch, 475 Great Neck Road. All skill levels are welcome. Supplies will be provided, or bring your own from home. Registration is ongoing. Call 466-8055, ext. 231/232 for info.

from 6:30-8:30 p.m. If you love to knit or crochet, join the circle every other Thursday night. If you are just starting out and would like the help of others, or are advanced and like working with company, join the group.

COLORING FOR RELAXATION Monday afternoons from 2-4 p.m. At the Parkville Branch, 10 Campbell Street (off Lakeville Rd.) in New Hyde Park.

PARKVILLE BOOK GROUP: “THE HEART GOES LAST” BY MARGARET ATWOODThursday, May 25 at 1:30 p.m. At the Parkville Branch, 10 Campbell St. in New Hyde Park.

LAKEVILLE LITERARY CLUB: “DARING: MY PASSAGES” BY GAIL SHEEHY Wedneday, May 24 at 7 p.m. At the Lakeville Branch, 475 Great Neck Road. Call 516466-8055 x231/232 for more info.

PROJECT INDEPENDENCE SOCIAL DISCUSSION AND MEN’S GROUP AT PARKVILLE Thursday, May 25 at 11:30 a.m. (social group) and Friday, May 26 at 10:30 a.m. (men’s group) at the Parkville Branch, 10 Campbell St. in New Hyde Park.

KNITTING AND CROCHETING AT PARKVILLE Every other Thursday night

Great Neck Library Closing/

Cancellation Information Online Library patrons connected to the Internet are asked to check the website: www. cancellations.com for Library weather related closings/program cancellations. In order to access this service, Library District residents can log on to cancellations.com, type in their zip code or Great Neck Library and obtain information on program cancellations or Library closings. In addition, at no charge, residents can request automatic e-mails from cancellations.com when the Library has posted any information. This is a great way for Library District residents who are connected online to be advised of weather related changes in Library hours or programs.

Floral Park Library MOVIE MATINEE: “HACKSAW RIDGE” Friday, May 19 at 1 p.m. This film is the true story of Desmond Doss who, in Okinawa during the bloodiest battle of WWII, saved 75 men without firing a gun. As an army medic, he was the only soldier in WWII to fight on the front lines without a weapon. Stars Academy Award nominated actor Andrew Garfield. Rated R. 139 mins. MADE WITH LOVE — EVENING Monday, May 22, 7 p.m. Whether you’re a beginner, an expert, or somewhere in between, Made with Love knitting and crocheting group welcomes all to their weekly evening group. SIGN LANGUAGE FOR KIDS Tuesday, May 23, 5-6 p.m. Kids in Grades 3 through 6 are invited to learn the basics of this beautiful language -- and have a lot of fun at the same time. MEDITATION: THE WOW FACTOR WITH DR. MATTHEW RAIDER Tuesday, May 23 at 7 p.m. Based on his own experience as a gerontologist, and someone who’s been meditating for many years, Dr. Matthew Raider will talk about what keeps you young - even as your body ages. He’ll also explore the eternal nature of consciousness, and explain how you can experience it for yourself. MADE WITH LOVE — DAYTIME Wednesday, May 24, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Whether you’re a beginner, an expert, or somewhere in between, Made with Love knitting and crocheting group welcomes all to their weekly evening group. HEALTH BINGO WITH EMBLEM HEALTH Wednesday, May 24, 1:30-3 p.m. Join in and play bingo while listening to a talk on Medicare facilitated by a Medicare expert. Come to play and learn! SENATOR PHILLIPS & ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA PRESENT: MEMORY SCREENING PROGRAM Thursday, May 25, 1-4 p.m. Senator Phillips and AFA will be sponsoring free memory screenings at our library. Screenings will consist of a series of questions to gauge memory, language and thinking skills. The memory screening takes approximately 10 minutes and is confidential. Results are not a diagnosis, but a memory screening can suggest if someone should see a physician for a full evaluation. The program is FREE and open to all residents of Senator Phillips’ Senate district, however, appointments are required and will be scheduled on a first come, first served basis. Residents wishing to get a free memory screening on May 25, can schedule an appointment by calling Senator Phillips’ office at 516-746-5924.


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

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64 The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

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SCHOOL NEWS

Mentoring unites schools, biz leaders

Sewanhaka Central High School District’s Academy of Finance hosted its fifth annual Advisory Board Mentoring Day for the academy’s class of 2018. Since 1988, New Hyde Park Memorial has been the home of this successful district program. The program gives high school students an opportunity to learn about and prepare for financial services and businessrelated careers. It is one of several model programs established to promote educational excellence by the National Academy Foundation. The academy is a partnership that links the resources of education, business and the community, bridging the gap between the classroom and the workplace. It helps students develop career skills, evaluate their own potential for success and estab-

lish personal goals. It provides an enriched, elective four-year comprehensive academic program for high school freshmen, sophomores, juniors and seniors. Working with each individual Academy of Finance program is an advisory board, comprised of prominent local business leaders from the community. These members provide support and advice to guide the administration of the program. Present at the meeting representing New Hyde Park Memorial was Principal Richard Faccio, district Business Coordinator Christine Licastri and Debra Stein-Silberlust, the district’s business education and technology chairperson. At the meeting, the following community leaders became mentors to the Academy of Finance students: Richard DeMar-

tino, of the Greater New Hyde Park Chamber of Commerce; Cheryl Fajardo of NexisCard; John Paccione, retired J.P. Morgan Chase and advisory board chairperson; Timothy McCue, Valley National Bank; Mary Durkin, Vaughn College of Aeronautics; Samantha Grenier, Northwell Health; Christopher Vulpis, Rosenblatt, Levittan, Vulpis et. al.; Joshua Printz, HSBC Bank; Carmine Biscardi, State Farm Insurance-Peter Mathison Agency; and attorney Christopher

based learning experiences. This requirement of the program typically takes place the summer between the student’s junior and senior year and requires that each student participate in 60 hours of work experience. Anyone interested in learning more about offering a workbased learning experience to one of New Hyde Park’s Academy of Finance students should email Teetz at cteetz@sewanhaka.k12.ny.us.

COMMUNITY NEWS

F.P. student in state sci. competition

Floral Park Memorial High School eighth-grader Hammad Izhar has advanced to the New York State Science Congress competition. Izhar is one of only 13 students from Long Island who is proceeding to this level. Participating students represent the top projects nominated by the Science Teachers Association of New York State through affiliated regional science fairs. Students will present their projects to judges in a poster format.

Gomoka, Academy of Finance alumnus (class of ’95); and visitors Phil Heckler from Hicksville school board and Ron Shapiro, owner and operator of Crown Trophy. “On behalf of the Academy of Finance, we are grateful to all who participated for their time and their expertise – thank you,” the Academy of Finance program manager, Christine Teetz, said. The Academy of Finance juniors are preparing to participate in their summer work-

Sprouts kids celebrate

Pair wins honors for writing Sewanhaka High School seniors Alyssa Molai and Kristen Wiederhold were awarded third place in Floral Park Women’s Club writing contest. Both are students of English teacher Matt Curiale.

Some special annual events have taken place in recent days for the toddler, nursery and pre-kindergarten classes at Little Sprouts Preschool in New Hyde Park. Families also took part in some of the festivities. “Teddy Bear Pajama Day” had the students come to school dressed in their PJ’s, holding their favorite stuffed animals, with themed stories, snacks and activities. “Sports Shirt Day” celebrated the start of the spring sports season, with children donning the jerseys of their favorite teams. A visit from a local vet showed the

children how to properly approach and pet a friendly pooch. And “Dads and Donuts Day” invited special male guests to partner with the students to create a fun craft project and enjoy a sweet treat. Little Sprouts Preschool provides early childhood education for children ages 2 to 5 and is a ministry of Christ Lutheran Church. The school is currently registering for the 2017-18 school year and also has a seven-week summer recreation program. For more information or to take a tour, please call 516-746-4889 or visit www.christchurchnhp.org.


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

65

READERS WRITE

Cross Harbor freight tunnel lacks funding

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ov. Cuomo’s announcement that the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey will spend up to $70 million for advancing an environmental study, as well as design and engineering for the Cross Harbor freight tunnel still leaves a $9.93 billion shortfall to complete this project. Last year, Manhattan-Brooklyn Congress member Jerald Nadler claimed that there is real progress for his favorite Cross Harbor freight tunnel project. This doesn’t add up if you look at past history. This project has been championed by Congress member Nadler as his number one transportation priority for almost 30 years. After all that time, it has yet to progress beyond the federal NEPA environmental review process. In theory, it might move thousands of trucks on a daily basis off the roads and on to railroad tracks for significant portions of the journey between New Jersey and Long Island. It reminds me of the long forgotten proposed tunnel between 69th Street in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn and St. George, Staten Island. The concept was to extend subway service from Brooklyn to Staten Island.

Ground was broken with entrances at both ends in the 1920s, but the project quickly ran out of money and was abandoned to history. When living on Shore Road in Bay Ridge, friends and I would look to no avail in attempting to find the abandon site filled in decades earlier. Flash-forward 90 years later and we have the proposed “Cross Harbor” rail freight tunnel project. Construction of any new freight, public transportation tunnel or bridge project can take years, if not decades, by the time all feasibility studies, environmental reviews, planning, design, engineering, real estate acquisition, permits, procurements, construction, budgeting, identifying and securing funding is completed. This is before the project reaches beneficial use. Construction for the Second Ave. subway began in the 1960s. (Bond money intended for this project in the 1950’s was spent elsewhere.) The first segment of three stations between 63rd and 96th strees on the upper east side of Manhattan was finally opened to the public on Jan. 1 of this year at a cost of $4.5 billion. Construction for the origi-

nal tunnel to support bringing the Long Island Rail Road from Queens into Grand Central Terminal began in the 1960s. The latest completion date is now December 2023 with a cost of $10.8 billion. No one can identify all the sources for the estimated $24 billion to build a new tunnel for New Jersey Transit and Amtrak known as the “Gateway project” to gain additional access to Penn Station from New Jersey. Ditto for paying back the $3 billion federal loan which covered a majority of the estimated $4 billion for replacing the Tappan Zee Bridge in Westchester. Any guess who will find $10 billion or more needed for construction of a new Cross Harbor Freight Tunnel? Neither the Port Authority of NY and NJ, Congressmember Nadler or Gov. Cuomo have yet to identify and secure the billions need to fund final design and engineering, let alone construction. The PANYNJ also needs to find $1.8 billion for PATH extension from Newark to Newark Airport, $7 billion toward the $10 billion total cost for a new Port Authority Bus Terminal in midtown Manhattan, along with billions more for other transportation investments.

There is also a potential serious conflict with the proposed $1 to $2 billion Triboro X (a new subway connecting the Bronx with Queens and Brooklyn). The route would run parallel from Cross Harbor freight tunnel, Bay Ridge terminus on to Queens. This would result in serious operational conflicts between freight and subway trains. The proposed Cross Harbor freight tunnel may be just another in the continuing series of feasibility studies and environmental reviews sponsored by various governmental agencies and public officials over decades. They generate some money for consultants along with free publicity for elected officials who promise a bright future but all to often move on to another public office before delivering. Taxpayers are frequently left holding an empty bag with unfilled promises. Some NYC residents who oppose the project based on concerns about significant future increases in the number, length and frequency of freight trains need not worry. At the end of the day, just like the long abandoned Brooklyn to Staten Island subway project — don’t count on seeing any shovel in the ground any time soon.

It is wishful thinking that Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey can count on billions in future federal funding to make up the difference. Don’t be surprised if waiting another 30 years until future Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey 10-year (2027-2036, 20372046 and 2047-2056) capital plans are approved before a complete $10 billion or more funding package is in place. This is necessary to support awarding construction contracts. Residents who oppose the Metropolitan Transportation Long Island Rail Road proposed Main Line third track project based on concerns about significant future increases in the number, length and frequency of freight trains need not worry. You may never see completion of any Cross Harbor freight tunnel in their lifetime. Larry Penner Great Neck (Larry Penner is a transportation historian and advocate who previously worked 31 years for the U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Transit Administration Region 2 NY Office).

Residents question Baxter House decision

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oncerned citizens living in the Village of Baxter Estates and in the town of Port Washington are asking why the Village of Baxter Estates Board has decided to ask the owner of the Baxter House to submit an application for demolition of the centuries old and landmarked namesake of the village. A number of issues make this request on the part of the Village trustees a troubling one: 1. The Village Code does not allow the building inspector to bypass the Landmark Preservation Commission and order demolition. 2. The Landmark Preservation Commission just two days earlier issued a written resolution finding that the owner violated the His-

toric Preservation Law by allowing the house to fall into its current state of decay. After spending in excess of $100,000 in legal fees to defend the house, and after finally obtaining a directive from the Landmark Commission with the power to initiate remedial measures, the village decided to demolish it. Citizens question this logic. (Specifically: At the March 2 Board meeting, the village indicated that the building inspector would be acting to enforce Local Law 1 of 2016 the following week. While the Inspector did not issue any violations, he did write to Landmark Preservation Commission asking for confirmation of his belief that the state of the house

violated the provisions of Local Law 1. The commission ultimately met on April 24 and confirmed the Inspector’s findings, and on Tuesday, May 9 met again to issue a written resolution.) 3. The village is ordering the owner to demolish a home that the Village claims suffered from neglect at the hands of said owner, thus rewarding her for disregarding the rules that set out by the Board that the rest of Village of Baxter Estates residents live by (and trust the board to help enforce). 4. The village asks for demolition of the house with no plan on what replaces it and no guarantee that about what is built there.

The board has received no assurance that what is built will be consistent with the historic site and the Village of Baxter Estates community. Expecting the current owner to comply with community expectations is not realistic. Concerned citizens understand that the Village of Baxter Estates board is in a difficult position. To be sure, pieces of the roof appear to be loose and may have ended up on neighbors’ properties. No one wants to see the charred remains of the house for much longer. But no one wants to see the house demolished without being certain that all options have been exhausted and without any assur-

ances of what will go there in its place. Citizens ask the Village of Baxter Estates Board to reconsider the demolition directive — in part because the order is not a lawful one (see: Ch. 80, §80-3 and §80-7), but also because less destructive means to alleviate any dangerous conditions are preferable. Once the house is gone, this historic structure is lost forever. The gateway to the village of Baxter Estates, its namesake, and the very nature of the village is at risk. Michael Scotto Save the Baxter House Community Group Village of Baxter Estates

2-state solution only way for Israel, Barak says Continued from Page 16 others in the world community. It contains all the elements — political, practical, and security — written by best experts of Israel.” “They will tell you that Is-

rael is better protected and safer if we delineate this line, if we have to struggle against terror that takes place from outside, beyond the line, and the real enemy of 80 percent of settlers ...the real enemy are the ele-

ments of the government that keep poking the eye of the Palestinian government by continuing settlement operations.” He concluded, “We need leadership sober, open eyed, self confident of the strength of

Israel and ready to act, holding in their hand an inner compass, not a weather vane. The most immediate and urgent mission is to put a wedge on that slippery slope toward one nation, one state for two peoples. The effect

that extremists on both sides — our right wing and Hamas — both dream and act to have one state is what makes the onestate agenda the real existential threat to the Zionist project and Israel.”


66 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

Martins presents county Games on holidays ethics reform package READERS WRITE

show disrespect

But the local sport teams violate this trust and steer our sport minded children away from this trust and schedule games on Memorial Day and Mother’s Day, instead of teaching our children to be trustworthy citizens they teach to be just like them. A child’s game is more important than being a loyal useful trustworthy citizen.

Has anyone noticed over the past 30 or 40 years that the people who make the after school sports schedule always have games on Memorial Day and Mother’s Day? The government gives a day off (in this area 5:27 a.m. to noon) to honor our war dead. The government knows, if not for these 1 million war dead, there would be no U.S.A. It is an unwritten contract between U.S. government and we citizens.

Clara Rucker Floral Park

LIRR failing to meet North Shore needs

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attended the Nassau County Village Official Association meeting on May 9 in Westbury where they invited Long Island Rail Road President Patrick Nowakowski to speak. He gave us an overview on the infrastructure plan of the LIRR for the next few years. He explained the four East River tunnels are the bottleneck where the LIRR is using the maximum (60%) allocated. The ridership has been increased from 83 million a few years ago to 89 million this year but the tunnels prevent the LIRR from adding more trains to any line (including the Port Washington line). I complained to him that passengers in Great Neck have a hard time finding a place to stand in the morning rush hour express train. In fact, while most Long Island school districts experienced gradual decrease in enrollment over the last few years, there are three school districts have increases in enrollment: Port Washington, Manhasset and Great Neck.

They are all along the Port Washington line and it implies more parents need to travel to work. However, Nowakowski is unwilling to take trains away from other lines to the overcrowded line because he will face stiff opposition from residents in other lines. I asked if the LIRR can use the double deckers in the Port Washington line and his answer is that the existing double deckers are fueled by diesel which they are going to phase out. The situation cannot be improved until 2022 (current target) when the Grand Central project is completed. The impression I had coming out of the meeting is that the LIRR lacks the courage to make a tough decision and they have little imagination on how to solve a problem. What happened in the last few weeks with the train delays and other issues are just a reflection of how they think and how they react. To-on Pang Great Neck

Continued from Page 6 Philip Shulman, Curran’s communications director, said, “How can we trust Jack Martins to fix the mess in Nassau County when in Albany he stifled ethics reforms from becoming law, even after Dean Skelos was indicted on federal corruption charges?” Skelos, a Republican who was the state Senate majority leader, was convicted in a federal corruption case. Assemblyman Charles Lavine, who is also a Democratic candidate for county executive, introduced legislation that would prohibit political candidates from using campaign funds for criminal defense in federal indictment cases. Mangano, a Republican who was indicted on federal corruption charges, has not yet said if

he will seek a third term. A spokesman for Lavine did not immediately respond to a request for comment. In his plan, Martins said he will seek to amend the county charter so the county executive can be removed by “vote of a bipartisan special legislative committee, and by super majority vote of the county Legislature.” Amending the charter would require action by the county Legislature. “It makes no sense that there’s a legislative process for removing the president of the United States but not the county executive in Nassau County,” Martins said. After Mangano was indicted, Martins, along with other Republican politicians, called for the two-term county executive to resign.

Maragos, Curran offer dueling ethics reform plans Continued from Page 8 Philip Shulman, Curran’s campaign spokesman, said Maragos, a former Republican, is late to the game. “Where were George Maragos’s anti-corruption proposals when he ran for office twice as Ed Mangano’s running mate?” Shulman said in an email. Curran on Friday said she would remove her name from all signs and other promotional materials if elected and deny county legislators’ requests to do the same. Mangano has wasted taxpayer money putting his name on everything from signs to golf pencils for no purpose other than political self-promotion, she said.

“It’s clear that Ed Mangano is using Nassau residents’ tax dollars for his own personal political branding,” Curran said, standing in front of a sign bearing Mangano’s name at Grant Park in Hewlett. Officials at every level of government brand public resources with their names, a practice that has detractors and supporters. Though there would be a cost to scrubbing Mangano’s name from signs, Curran said leaving them blank would still save the county money. Brian Nevin, a Mangano spokesman, noted that Curran’s name is on county signs, including one on the new 1st Police Precinct

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“More than six months ago, I called for a change in county leadership to restore the public’s trust in county government. A recall provision gives Nassau’s residents the tools they need to keep government in check between elections when circumstances arise,” Martins said. The plan would also require both the Nassau County commissioner of investigations and the county’s procurement director to be confirmed by a majority of the county Legislature. Martins’ plan also included a revamped ethics board, making it bipartisan, with members serving five-year staggered terms after being appointed by the county executive and confirmed by the county Legislature. “We must have a zero-tolerance policy when it comes to public corruption,” Martins said.

PHOTO BY NOAH MANSKAR

Laura Curran speaks at a news conference at Grant Park in Hewlett last Thursday.

in Baldwin. Mangano has only followed longstanding practices in putting his name on signs at county parks, Nevin said. “If Laura Curran wants to get elected, she better come up with a real plan that saves more than the cost of paint and stickers,” Nevin said in an email. E. O’Brien Murray, a spokesman for Jack Martins, the GOP choice to replace Mangano, said Curran’s pledge only continues her “hypocrisy tour.” “Maybe she should have taken down the signs with her name on them before she claims she is against them,” Murray said in an email. Murray also rejected Maragos’ proposals, saying he “wants to make already over taxed Nassau County residents responsible” for funding political materials. Maragos said there are more pressing issues than signs to be addressed. “It’s astounding to consider that during a time when Nassau County taxpayers face record levels of corruption, failing public transportation and high property taxes, the most substantive thing Laura Curran can talk about is signage,” he said in a statement. A Lavine spokesman declined to comment for this story.


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Business&RealEstate How much to give kids for a home? Well, my kids have been out for many years, my daughter, Kim with two kids (No. 1 salesperson at LinkedIn) and my son, Matt a Leadership in Environmental Engineering & Design)-certified project manager with GreyStone Construction International in New York City, finally getting married on June 3! Luckily one already has a home and my son, had already accumulated one cond-op (hybrid condo & co-op, very rare!) in the lower East Side and another condo in Brooklyn that he purchased in September 2016, where he currently resides. I happen to be a fortunate parent that I have extremely successful kids that were able to purchase their own homes with their own earnings (with absolutely no assistance from dad). They worked smart, diligently and hard over the years, to save that most crucial and critical down payment. My daughter, while single, never rented, but went right into the purchase mode when she was 28. My son and his BFF, frat brother from the University of Maryland, lived the lives of Ri-

ley; bachelors for several years in several five-six story walk-up flats and the final penthouse pad with doorman and all the amenities that two single guys could ever want! Fast forward, his frat bro, got engaged and married and moved out. Realizing that rent was a dead-end street, he finally realized and listened to his dad and became his own landlord and purchased his first apt, a cond-op in the Lower Eastside and (gaining the tax benefits, price appreciation, increasing his wealth, when renting was decreasing his future wealth and finally, gaining the security of not having to worry that the landlord wouldn’t renew his lease). Then again, like his sister, he scrimped and saved to come up with that ever important down payment; but only 10 percent as opposed to the normal 20 percent out of pocket; due to the fact that the apartment was a cond-op and their offering plan and amendments allowed a flexible 90 percent financing. However, it was still all about strict and dedicated squirreling away of a sufficient portion of his

PHILIP A. RAICES Real Estate Watch salary. Sacrificing whatever was necessary and not wasting money on nonsense, immediate gratifications and “temporary satisfaction for the moments.” Even my son drove an 11year old hand me down 1968 Oldsmobile Cutlass with over 150,000 miles. Some of his friends, I am sure snickered at him, wondering, how come your dad doesn’t buy you a car, can’t afford it? Well, when he graduated college, a few years down the line, he bought himself a used BMW, so at that point, they all stopped

laughing; I guess they got it and there was a lesson learned. My dad didn’t give me a graduation present either, so back in 1973, I ordered a brand new 1973 SD455 Trans Am, only $4,700 at that time; flying to Detroit, to Jim Causley Pontiac on Mack Avenue, picked it up and drove it all the way home through Canada; one of my top 10 moments of sheer fun and enjoyment. So, I thought it would be an excellent learning experience for him to do the same, although in today’s dollars, he spent much more than I did; but did it with his own money! So now you are saying, I want to help my kids or maybe do it the way I did it? It’s your choice; however, prices have escalated quite a bit from when my children initially bought and they also weren’t burdened with all their student loans, since we split them 50/50, again, to learn the responsibility of paying. However, my daughter’s loans from Emory University, were quite a bit more than my son’s at the University of Maryland, so I chipped in a bit more.

Unfortunately, the burden of today’s student loans and their financial responsibility to repay, are one of the main debilitating factors that are keeping many, many millennials and other graduates, from purchasing, especially, if they went to an Ivy League or high cost college or university. This is a difficult situation and a major burden experienced by so many graduates, that should be addressed by our politicians, to help minimize and possibly alleviate their financial burden. Some way a solution should be created, maybe based on reasonable repayment schedules with lower interest rates, based on a formula based on a percentage of their salaries and wages. Stay tuned and come back to my column for Part 2. Phil Racies is the owner of Turn Key Real Estate at 7 Bond St. in Great Neck. He can be reached by email: Phil@TurnkeyRealEstate. Com or by cell (516) 647-4289 to answer any of your questions. To search for any type of properties or to see what your home is worth or homes that have sold in your area, go to WWW.Li-RealEstate.Com.


68 The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

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Recent Real Estate Sales in New Hyde Park New Hyde Park Real Estate Market Conditions MEDIAN SALES PRICE $590,000 Demographics near New Hyde Park, NY Population Population Density Median Age People per Household Median Household Income Average Income per Capita

City 9,811 11,367 41.2 3.2 99,469 35,118

County 1,361,350 4,744 41.3 3 98,401 42,949

1636 Falmouth Avenue, New Hyde Park Sold Price: $575,000 Date: 03/24/2017 4 beds, 2 Full baths Style: Cape # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 60x100 Schools: New Hyde Park-Garden City Park Total Taxes: $14,334 MLS# 2910099

21 Willow Road, New Hyde Park Sold Price: $680,000 Date: 03/16/2017 4 beds, 1 Full baths Style: Cape # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 60x100 Schools: New Hyde Park-Garden City Park Total Taxes: $6,465 MLS# 2894973

645 5th Avenue, New Hyde Park Sold Price: $710,000 Date: 04/13/2017 4 beds, 2 Full/1 Half baths Style: Colonial # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 60x100 Total Taxes: $12,295 MLS# 2914283

100 Terrace Blvd, New Hyde Park Sold Price: $560,000 Date: 03/03/2017 4 beds, 2 Full baths Style: Cape # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 40x100 Schools: New Hyde Park-Garden City Park Total Taxes: $7,622 MLS# 2894222

Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s note: Homes shown here were recently sold in New Hyde Park by a variety of real estate agencies. The information about the homes and the photos were obtained through the Multiple Listing Services of Long Island. The homes are presented based solely on the fact that they were recently sold in New Hyde Park and are believed by Blank Slate Media to be of interest to our readers.

Whether youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for a new home or want to sell your current residence, call me.

MIMI VALENTE HERMINIA VALENTE, Lic. R. E. Salesperson C: 516.652.9514 | O: 516.281.3814 herminia.valente@elliman.com elliman.com/hvalente © 2017 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.

    


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COMMUNITY NEWS

Girl, 12, joins family’s Two new members fight against cancer added to council Continued from Page 1 The event is a service project in advance of Remi’s bat mitzvah, the Jewish ritual of womanhood, in September, Marc Zisselman said. That was also the impetus for Lexi’s fundraiser, he said. Participants in the dash will pay $20 to run two 100-yard races, split into different age groups. The winner and runnerup in each race will each get raffle tickets drawn from separate boxes for a chance to win a door prize, while the other runners get their tickets put in a third box. Remi has accompanied her father on meetings with sponsors and helped with other work to support the event, including “guerrilla marketing,” Marc said. So far they’ve gotten two corporate sponsors and commitments for donated door prizes, including an Apple iPad, a custom soccer jersey and a pizza party for 20 people. Remi runs track for Catholic Youth Organization and USA Track & Field teams. She said she wanted to use her love of running in honor of her grandfather, who died the week she was born, after seeing her sister and father work for the cause. “To honor that by giving back a little bit, let alone in memory of their grandfather, is pretty special,” Marc Zisselman said.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARC ZISSELMAN

Remi Zisselman, 12, poses with her father, Marc Zisselman. The goal is to raise awareness about multiple myeloma and to get people involved in supporting research to help fewer people die from it, Remi said. Multiple myeloma is a cancer formed from malignant plasma cells that can harm the bones and kidneys and cause infections. It’s a rare disease — the chances of getting it are 1 in 143, and about 30,300 cases are expected to be diagnosed this year, according to the American Cancer Society. The Charity Dash will support the Mount Sinai Multiple Myeloma Program, a nonprofit organization run by Dr. Sundar Jagannath, an expert on the disease who treated Isaac Zisselman, Marc Zisselman said.

Mount Sinai opened a research facility in Huntington recently, supported by Zisselman’s fundraising efforts, he said. Lexi Zisselman has helped her father with his annual fundraising event each year, and Marc said he hopes Remi will, too. He hopes to eventually hand the annual event over to the two of them, he said. “It’s definitely going to be more than a onetime involvement,” Marc Zisselman said. Remi’s Charity Dash will run from 4 to 6 p.m. on Saturday, June 17, on the Herricks High School track. Anyone interested in participating or who has any questions should contact Marc Zisselman at mzisselman@yahoo.com.

Herricks bodybuilder ‘on a roll’ at age 73 Continued from Page 2 “It’s like getting behind the wheel of a car — once you start driving, it becomes easy,” he said. Ciraulo keeps a busy schedule, he said — he regularly trains five or six days a week, but goes to the gym every day when a competition is near. He also volunteers once a week at St. Francis Hospital in Flower Hill. His training regimen and strict diet

make it hard for him to travel and see his grandchildren, which he said is one of the biggest drawbacks of his new career. But bodybuilding is keeping him healthy at a time in his life when his friends are bogged down with the ailments of old age, he said. “I’d rather spend time at the gym than spend time at the doctor’s office,” Ciraulo said.

The Long Island Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependency, Long Island’s premier provider of substance abuse services and prevention programs, adds two new members to the Board of Directors, Michael Martino and Jeanne Poscillico Leonard. Executive Director Steve Chassman said, “LICADD welcomes Michael Martino and Jeanne Poscillico Leonard to our Board of Directors. Each brings a level of expertise and passion that will help to further our mission of offering support to individuals and families struggling with the challenge of addiction.” Martino is the Community Relations Manager for SUEZ, a world-wide environmental organization that operates and manages Nassau County’s wastewater system. He offers a wealth of knowledge and experience from a career spent working in media and public relations. While serving as managing editor of the Long Island Press, he became aware of the opiate scourge that had taken over Long Island. He was part of a team that exposed the issue in a series of award-winning articles. While working on these stories Michael met family after family who told their heartbreaking stories of addiction and loss. He is looking forward to sharing his time and talent as a member of the LICADD Board of Directors, as he says, “While my work in the press helped bring some attention to the challenges of a drug epidemic, it is clear that almost ten years later the crisis is still going strong and the need for services is more vital than ever. I look forward to serving on the LICADD Board of Directors, working alongside staff and volunteers to offer support and options to individuals who struggle with addiction.” Poscillico Leonard is a Gold Circle of Excellence real estate broker with Daniel Gale Sotheby’s International Realty. She has lived and worked in Cold Spring Harbor and Huntington since 1968, raising five children and operating two local businesses, including a real estate investment company. To the LICADD Board of Directors, she brings 30 years of experience in real estate sales and investment and a desire to lend her support to LICADD, especially during the current drug epidemic on Long Island.

About her appoinment, Leonard says, “I have always been an active member of my community – volunteering and contributing for issues near and dear to my heart. As I gained a better understanding of how“T the drug crisis is affecting our neighbor-s hoods today, I decided to volunteer mys time working with LICADD. I look forward to helping further the LICADD mission ofs support, education prevention and advo-a cacy for individuals and families struggling with addiction.” For 61 years, The Long Island Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependency has been Long Island’s premier, non-profit agency providing life-saving alcohol and drug prevention and intervention services to at-risk children, individuals, and families across the region. For more information about LICADD’s services, go to www.licadd.org or find them on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

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70 The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

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S. High senior gets computer science honors BY JA N E LL E CL AUSEN Olivia Lundelius, a senior at Great Neck South High School, helped pioneer classes in Java, Python and Android app making at the Great Neck Library. Her work won her the Nassau County B.E.S.T. (or Bringing Excellence Service by Teens) award, which is given out by the Nassau County Library Association. Adam Hinz, the coordinator for youth services at the Great Neck Library, said that it did not have too many technology programs. In fact, he said, he went to her about starting the classes to help keep the library relevant. “The current director of Levels approached me and asked if I was interested in teaching a course while I was at a Python course that was organized through Levels. I thought he was crazy at first, but I thought, eh, OK, why not,” Lundelius recalled. At the time, Lundelius was a junior in high school, but she had frequently attended Levels, a supervised teen center of the Great Neck Library, since eighth or ninth grade. “On Levels, we have a lot of arts based programs. We didn’t have a ton of technology, even though that was her main interest,” Hinz said. Hinz said Lundelius was as reliable as any library professional would be.

PHOTO COURTESY OF GREAT NECK LIBRARY

Olivia Lundelius (center) is the Nassau County recipient of the B.E.S.T. Award. Lundelius would arrive early, often email ahead, check which operating systems students had so she could accommodate them and make in-depth lesson plans, he said. Hinz also recalled when Levels was temporarily based in Saddle Rock Elementary School as renovations unfolded at the main library. He said there was no wireless

signal, so she downloaded Java onto flash drives in advance. “She was incredibly self-reliant and I knew this was something I was not going to have to worry about,” Hinz said. “She was sort of bullet-proof all the way along.” But, she said, computer science is not her only love. Lundelius recalled days where her

grandfather, a paleontologist, took her to the Vertebrae Paleontology Laboratory in Austin, Texas. There she helped separate microfossils from concentrate, which she described as an exhausting process. “Before it can be analyzed, the microfossils need to be separated and that’s a long and boring task,” Lundelius said. “So hopefully I can help create some kind of machine that will sort it automatically, so that they don’t have to waste so much time sorting it.” Both her interest in paleontology and computer science played a part developing a project that earned national accolades in competitions like the WAC Lighting Fair and Regeneron Science Talent Search. Her device sources RGB color levels and data to effectively separate the microfossil from granite, allowing for easier and quicker analysis. “I always knew I wanted to go into some kind of science because my family is very much interested in the natural sciences and nature and paleontology,” Lundelius said. After graduation, Lundelius will go to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, a private research university, to study computer science. From there, she hopes to secure her graduate degrees and get into research. “Computer science as a field itself is really, really cool,” Lundelius said, “but I’m very interested in how it can be used in other places.”

COMMUNITY NEWS

‘We Persist’ forum held April 29

Reach Out America held its women’s forum entitled “We Persist” on April 29. From 10 a.m. till 4 p.m., guests attended four one-hour panel discussions on women and elections, women and health care, women and peace, and women and religion that were moderated by committee chairs Sandie Salat, Shirley Romaine and Sybil Bank. After former state Assemblywoman Michelle Schimel started the proceedings with a lively inside look at what it means to be a female legislator in Albany, ROA vice president Patty Katz led the first discussion, about the challenges women face in getting elected. Her panelists were Liz Abzug and Marie Wilson, known and respected feminist activists. The second session, with New York Times staff writer Roni Rabin and singlepayer advocate Margaret Flowers, dealt

with the health care obstacle course women must navigate. Next, Cora Weiss, a venerable peace spokesperson and Nobel Prize nominee, discussed the historical and current involvement of women in the search for diplomatic solutions to international conflicts. And finally, LIU philosophy professor Shaireen Rasheed and Unitarian Universalist pastor Natalie Fenimore talked about how women should think about faith in an age of both newfound inclusion and traditional practice. Lunch and a musical interlude rounded out the day. The weather was flawless, so participants took advantage of the beauty of the venue, the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Shelter Rock’s Veatch House, and its surrounding grounds. From September to June, on the second Wednesday of the month, in the So-

cial Hall at UUCSR, the general membership meets to discuss committee agenda items and hear an invited speaker address issues of timely urgency. This year Reach Out America has added an evening documentary film series and the aforementioned forum to the programming it has offered members and interested non-members. Next season it plans to expand its

nighttime events, its committees and its membership. There will be new outreach to immigrants, people of color and the LGBTQ community in the hopes of truly reaching out to include the diverse population of our dynamic, ever-changing region. For more information go to www. reachout-america.com or ReachOut America on Facebook.


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Ages 5-12 (13 & Up Welcome) Three Rooms A Fun And Great Learning Experience Please Call (516 ) 616-1601 Registration Ongoing (Limited Availability) BROADWAY BOUND’S SUMMER DANCE CLASS SCHEDULE A UNIQUE PAY AS YOU GO PROGRAM

Tuesdays And Wednesdays During July And August TUESDAYS: JULY 18,25, AUGUST 1,8,15, 22 3:00 Acro (Ages 3-6) 4:00 Ballet & Jazz (Ages 3-6) 4:00 Acro (Ages 7 & Up) 5:00 Hip Hop (Ages 5-8) 6:00 Hip Hop (Ages 12 & Up) 6:00 Hip Hop (Ages 9-11) 7:00-8:30 Ballet/Lyrical (Ages 8 & Up) 8:30 Jazz (Ages 8-12) WEDNESDAYS: JULY 19, JULY 26, AUGUST 2, 9, 16, 23 3:30 Ballet & Jazz (Ages 4-8)

MUSICAL THEATRE For The Past Three Years Our Musical Theatre Department Has Won “The Best Performing Arts Studio” Award For Broadway Bound. During Our Regular Season September Through June We Offer Two Classes On Fridays Consisting Of Singing, Acting And Dancing. ** NEW THIS YEAR WE ARE OFFERING SUMMER INTENSIVES ** PLEASE CALL 516-616-1601 FOR DATES AND TIME

BROADWAY BOUND’S REGISTRATION FOR FALL CLASSES Three Large Dance Rooms All Air-conditioned With Bathrooms, Cubbys And Floating Floors REGISTRATION DATES Monday June 19th Through Friday June 23rd 10am – 2pm August 24, 25, 26 11am – 3pm August 31 And September 1, 2 10am – 5pm September 7,8,9 10am – 5pm Registration Also Takes Place On Tuesdays And Wednesdays During July And August Starting July 18 Through August 23rd 3:30 pm – 8 pm WE OPEN FOR CLASSES MONDAY SEPTEMBER 11, 2017

Please call to make an appointment for our prestigious competition classes

66 New Hyde Park Rd, Garden City (516) 616-1601


72 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

PROFESSIONAL GUIDE ▼

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Psychotherapist

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LYNNE: 6 2 5 - 3 3 1 4


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

PROFESSIONAL GUIDE MATH TUTOR â&#x2013;ź Scholarship Students Wanted!

73

OUR TOWN

Suburbia needs a new vision

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There is a new movement emerging in America called Reimagining Suburbia. This movement may have been started with James Kunstlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Geography of Nowhereâ&#x20AC;? written in 1993. Kunstler described the housing boom during the post-World War II era which created cheap housing on the plains of Long Island for the returning GIs. The concept of ďŹ&#x201A;ight from the inner city was reasonable but he was one of the ďŹ rst to describe how impoverished suburbia had become. Without planning for art institutions or town squares and with the domination of car culture, strip malls and monotonous cookie cutter Levitt homes, suburbia had become a cultural wasteland. Our wish for a walkable town where one would regularly run into neighbors for a friendly chat or a bit of gossip had been replaced by an angry drive to a mall where one would shop among strangers. However the wish for a pleasant neighborhood life remains as strong as ever. Witness the ďŹ lm â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Book of Henryâ&#x20AC;? starring Naomi Watts, which will be released in June. The ďŹ lm crew did lots of the shooting here at Hildebrandtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on Hillside Avenue in Williston Park to capture a home town feeling. Build a Better Burb is a website which talks about the natural desire to have a walkable town. It describes how many Americans are turning their backs on car culture and prefer a walkable town where they can shop, work and live. There are now things called â&#x20AC;&#x153;pocket neighborhoodsâ&#x20AC;? which are planned groupings of smaller residences built around a courtyard or common garden to promote a closer sense of community and neighborliness. Every Long Island town has its own architectural board, beautiďŹ cation committee and urban planning commission. Years ago I interviewed the head of urban planning in Carmel by the Sea in California. Carmel is an awe-inspiring jewel of a town on the Monterey Peninsula in California that has been the home of many artists including Doris Day, Clint Eastwood, Ansel Adams, Jack London, Sinclair Lewis and Robert Lewis Stevenson. The town planner of Carmel told me that these artists were attracted to the natural beauty of the town but conversely lent their aesthetic senses to furthering its beauty. And now Carmelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quaint shops and quiet peaceful charm attract over 1,500,000 visitors a year. To ďŹ nd out more about who is looking over the aesthetic look of

DR. TOM FERRARO Our Town Williston Park I called upon former Mayor Doreen Ehrbar, who has been in charge of the townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beautiďŹ cation committee since 1996. When we spoke she told me that her crew in coordination with the village workers meets every other week to arrange plantings on the Hillside Avenue median, to plant trees and bushes in the parks and to establish â&#x20AC;&#x153;buckets of beautyâ&#x20AC;? in front of each store. She told me that Williston Park has a small town feel. I must say that when I interview local professionals or storekeepers they always say they were attracted to Williston Park because of the decency of the people and feeling of safety of the town. A townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s identity and brand is established by the appearance of the store fronts and the look of the homes. Anyone who takes the time to walk through the back streets of Williston Park will observe large homes with small sized yards that are immaculately tended. Years ago I asked an urban planner to walk down Hillside Avenue with me and gave me her impressions of Williston Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main street. She told me that it lacked a clear identity. Some storefronts had wood like Peter Andrews, some had brick fronts and some looked old fashioned with old fashioned colors like Hildebrandtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

The police station had modern architecture right next to a brick Tudor home which was next to the old Collins farmhouse converted into a restaurant. So I asked Doreen Ehrbar about the issue of identity and she mentioned that just last week she was discussing this issue. She had said that perhaps the stores needed the same color and type of awnings to establish identity but the opposing view was that the town displayed a feel of individualism or variety which served it well. She then brought up the question of grants which would be needed in order to fund these changes. I thought about the amount of wealth in Carmel which allowed the town to control all aspects of building. Ehrbar told me she found inspiration from the Town of East Hampton. One of the marvels of travel is that it opens your eyes to what is possible. I just returned from a vacation in Capri. The entire island is a remarkable thing of beauty with its gardens, villas and streets. The town was built using the unlimited wealth of the Roman Empire 2,000 years ago. And there are no cars on the island so everyone strolls along its streets at ease and in peace. The moral of this story of Williston Park is simple. It is possible to create a more beautiful town. All you need are three things. You need able leadership, which we already have. You then need an artistic vision but ďŹ nally you need money as well. In the Village Green newsletter there is a form which you can ďŹ ll out and make a contribution. In grad school I was a grant writer for aesthetic education in SuďŹ&#x20AC;olk County. I think I could be talked into writing a grant that could also help us to infuse our town with beautiďŹ cation money as well.

Here is main street in Capri, the perfect example of a walkable town.


74 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

BUYER’S GUIDE ▼ AWNINGS

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ANTIQUES

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COMPUTER REPAIRS

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DETTAGLIO DETAILING “We clean and pamper your car” • We specialize in Imports: Mercedes-Benz, BMW, Audi, Jaguar & Maserati • SUV’s, Vans & Pick-Ups also detailed at a higher price • We provide Mobile service

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- 631-612-7152

Owner/Operator Check us out on Facebook

CARPENTRY

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New Doors New Windows New Moldings Free Estimates

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Servicing Long Island Since 1961


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

BUYER’S GUIDE ▼ HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

RAFTER ONE CARPENTRY

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Mindful in both work and pricing !

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Pool Coping / Pool Patio Driveways / Sidewalks / Brickwork Belgium Block / Retaining Walls / Patios / Steps Pavers / Nicolock / Cambridge Stucco / Cultured Stone / Stone Veneer

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STRONG ARM CONTRACTING, INC. MASONRY

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76 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

BUYER’S GUIDE ▼ MOVING

MOVING

N.Y.D.O.T.#10405

PLUMBING

Serving the community for over 40 yrs

ADVERTISE HERE 516.307.1045

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MOVERS

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• Residential • Commercial • Piano & Organ Experts • Boxes Available

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Licensed & Insured Licensed #T-11154 175 Maple Ave. Westbury, NY 11590

114 Jericho Tpke. Mineola, NY 11501

PAINTING

24HR EMERGENCY SERVICE

PAINTING & WALLPAPER est. 1978

Interior and Exterior • Plaster/Spackle Light Carpentry • Decorative Moldings Power Washing

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and CARPENTRY Interior B. Moore Paints Dustless Vac System Renovations

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• Patios • House Exteriors • Fences • Gutters • Walkways • AND MORE! by Michael College Student Garden City HS Grad

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BUYER’S GUIDE ▼ TREE SERVICE

26

WINDOW REPAIRS

Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

77

Planning at-home wedding Continued from Page 32 BEVERAGES: Are you going to have a champagne reception or offer a full bar? Many caterers suggest that the client purchase the liquor for savings and liquor liability (check to see if you need a rider on your insurance policy for the event). Other caterers prefer to supply the alcohol. Be sure to include liquor, mixers and ice in your budget. RENTALS today offer a large range of table appointments. From the most simple glass plate to Royal Doulton china, from stainless steel to silver, from glass to crystal, anything and everything is available to adorn your reception table and make all the appointments appear as if they belong to the household. Your wedding coordinator or caterer can show you what is available or you can find your own rentals on line under “party rental” and investigate all your options. LABOR: Most caterers charge a labor cost for the people who set up and serve you during the reception.

Be sure to ask when the caterer quotes prices if service is included. Also ask if there is a mandatory gratuity and what it is. Ask to see photographs of the staff. Are they well groomed, uniformed and neat? MUSIC, good or bad, can make or break the party. (I was a guest at a tent wedding where it poured rain, the food was abominable, but the music was great — everyone had a terrific time.) Music for the ceremony can range from organ to cello to harp to trios to whatever — it all depends on your style and taste. Music for the reception tends to be more au courant — from bands and DJs to couples making their own playlist. Either go and hear the groups play or search the web for sample music. No matter what, be sure the music will be enjoyed by everyone. SEATING: If you are having a sit-down (or even a buffet) meal,

be sure that everyone has a seat. Assigned seating often makes your guests more comfortable and at ease because people know where to put themselves. VALET: If parking is a problem, consider hiring a valet company. Be sure the company is properly insured and drivers presentable. WEDDING CAKE: Although most caterers can supply some type of wedding cake, there are people who specialize solely in baking wedding cakes. Costs generally range from $5 to $25 per guest per slice. (If you want to have a first anniversary party, be sure to have the baker prepare an extra top layer.) Alexandra Troy is owner of Culinary Architect Catering, a 35-year-old, Greenvale-based company, specializing in weddings, private, corporate and promotional parties. Please share your At Home Wedding photographs at party@ culinaryarchitect.com.

631-385-7975

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ALL BRANDS W W W. S K YC L E A RW I N D OW. CO M Call Mr. Fagan • 32 Years Experience Lic. # H080600000 Nassau

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PLACE YOUR AD WITH US To advertise, call 516.307.1045 or fax 516.307.1046 PHOTOS BY BETSY BECKER


78 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

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COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS ▼ EMPLOYMENT, MARKETPLACE To Place Your Ad Call

HELP WANTED

EMPLOYMENT

HELP WANTED

Phone:

ADMINISTRATIVE ASS’T

516.307.1045

PART TIME-MANHASSET MEDICAL BILLING OFFICE Flexible schedule, (prefer mornings $15 per Hr. Min. 2O hrs. BASIC DATA ENTRY. KNOWLEDGE EXCEL. HANDLE PHONE. Please call: 516-365-4O4O Resume:Dimatus@aol.com

Fax: 516.307.1046

e-mail: hblank@theislandnow.com

In Person: 105 Hillside Avenue Williston Park, NY 11596

We’re Open: Mon–Thurs: 9am-5:30pm Fri: 9am-6pm

Deadlines Tuesday 11:00am: Classified Advertising Tuesday 1:00pm: Legal Notices/ Name Changes Friday 5:00pm Buyers’s Guide Error Responsibility All ads placed by telephone are read back for verification of copy context. In the event of an error of Blank Slate Media LLC we are not responsible for the first incorrect insertion. We assume no responsiblity for an error in and beyond the cost of the ad. Cancellation Policy Ads must be cancelled the Monday before the first Thursday publication. All cancellations must be received in writing by fax at: 516.307.1046 Any verbal cancellations must be approved by a supervisor. There are no refunds on cancelled advertising. An advertising credit only will be issued.

• Great Neck News • Williston Times • New Hyde Park Herald Courier • Manhasset Times • Roslyn Times • Port Washington Times • Garden City News • Bethpage Newsgram • Jericho Syosset News Journal • Mid Island Times • Syosset Advance

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT to vice President, 5 days, must be experienced in Quickbooks and Word. Knowledge of AR/AP a must. Email resume to submitresumes3@ gmail.com

The North Shore Hebrew Academy seeks an experienced

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT With: Excellent Communication, Organization and Time Management Skills The candidate must demonstrate high level skills in: • Microsoft Office and Typing • Data Entry • Project Management Hours are: Mon-Thurs: 8:00am-4:15pm • Friday: 8:00am-1:15pm • Benefits Available Interested candidates should submit resumes to: Elana Helfgott, Early Childhood Director

ehelfgott@nsha.org

ARE YOU TIRED OF THAT SAME OLD JOB? WE HAVE OPENINGS FOR SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS Don’t miss an opportunity for a great job where you can serve your community and make good money doing it. We provide the training you need to obtain your commercial drivers license. WE OFFER: - Flexible hours - 401k plans with Matching funds - Health Insurance - Life Insurance - Emergency Family leave - Safety & attendance bonus twice a year WAIT THERE’S MORE: RETIREEES WELCOME! EASY TO DRIVE VANS FREE CDL TRAINING For qualified candidates. We will train you for the road test. Call today to begin training!

NEW STARTING SALARIES BIG BUS

$19.93/HR BENEFIT RATE $21.93/HR* NON-BENEEFIT RATE *Available after 90 days of employment

VAN

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AND... - Positions available for mechanics and bus attendants - Become a NYS Certified school bus driver!

EDUCATIONAL BUS TRANSPORTATION 516.454.2300 CALL TODAY

EOE

POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR NASSAU AND SUFFOLK

to advertise call: 516.307.1045

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

SITUATION WANTED

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT: Part time or full time to assist VP of Strocchia Iron Works, a steel and architectural metal contractor. Responsible for AP/AR, phones, mail, bank recon, download docs from email, some Quickbooks, Notary Public. Contact ralph@strocchia.com with resume.

PART TIME SALES ASSOCIATE: St. Stephen’s Consignment Shop, Port Washington. Please help us further our mission “Good Deals and Good Works” in the community. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday 1-4 p.m. during the school year. Assist with sales and social media posts. Hourly wage, no benefits. Please email shop@ststephenspw.org

CHILDCARE AVAILABLE JuneAugust, Garden City resident, college senior, nursing major. CPR certified. Own transportation. Reliable, fun, athletic, loves children of all ages. References available. Call /text 516-670-2798

AFLAC Choose Your Flight Path As an Aflac associate, you can enjoy unlimited growth potential, flexible hours and achieve success on your own terms. Take advantage of the freedom to balance your work and personal life and set your own goals for success. Be a career agent or advance into management, the choice is yours. FORTUNE MAGAZINE10 Best Companies to Work For in the U.S. List18th Consecutive Year. Contact Bill Whicher Director of District Sales Garden City Office 516-574-1064 GERMAN TEACHER P/T: The Waldorf School of Garden City seeks a P/T German Teacher beginning in September 2017. Please send resume to: RRR@waldorfgarden.org To learn more about the Waldorf School of Garden City visit our website: www.waldorfgarden.org P/T ADMIN ASSISTANT Garden City CPA firm looking for a P/T Admin Assistant. Responsibilities are billing, A/R & Practice Mgmt. Software. Very professional environment. Must have recent CPA firm experience with Office Tools Billing & Mgmt. Will need to be a self starter, very detailed oriented & organized person. Schedule can be flexible. Send resume: abasile@basilecpa.com

SHARE YOUR NOVENAS CALL NOW 516.307.1045

SUMMER HELP WANTED: Garden City family with 2 daughters, ages 9 and 11, looking for summer help Monday thru Friday from 8am to 2pm for child care and driving to local activities. Will provide car. Call Louisa 516-241-5368

SITUATION WANTED AIDE/CARE GIVER: CARING, EFFICIENT, RELIABLE Available Mon-Fri live in to care for your sick or elderly loved one. Cooking, light housework, personal grooming, administer medications . 14 years experience. Just ended 7 years with previous patient. References available.Please Call 516-448-0502 CARE GIVER: NEED A COMPANION or nursing assistant for your loved ones at home or in a health care facility? Call 516-410-9943 for a NY State certified nursing assistant with excellent references! CERTIFIED HHA, PCA seeks weekend position, live in or live out. 17 years experience with Parkinsons, Alzheimers, dementia, cancer patients. References available upon request. Call Doreen 516-302-7564 CERTIFIED NURSE’S AIDE 15+ yrs experience, honest & reliable seeking home care position. Available full-time, part-time, weekends & overnight. Licensed driver with own car. Contact Barbara 516-734-1165

CHILDCARE/ELDER CARE / HOUSEKEEPING Available 5-6 days a week, live in. Experienced in Childcare & Elder Care. Light cleaning, cooking, laundry. References available. 30 yrs experience. Please call Phyllis 917-412-3418 ELDER CARE:Mature woman available to take care of elderly person. Live in or out. 3 or 4 days. Light cleaning, cooking, laundry. Local excellent references. Please call Luisa 516-485-9215 or 516-451-1781. Leave message. HOME HEALTH AIDE/ ELDER CARE Home health aide with over 15 years experience !! Excellent references. Cooking, cleaning, showers, all aspects of daily care. Live in. Available Immediately !! Call Sharon 347-739-7717 HOMECARE ATTENDANT European lady, experienced, looking for part time job. 4-5 hours /day (morning). Excellent references. Own transportation. Call Jeanette (516)741-6347 HOUSE CLEANING: Excellent service, with great references, reliable, own transportation, English speaking. Call Selma at 516-690-3550 HOUSE CLEANING: Experienced cleaning service available. Pleasant, responsible. Provides own quality clean products. Own transportation. Local references. Spanish/English speaking. Free estimates. Approximate cost: Small home $79, Mid size $99, Large $118. Please call Diana 516-859-7084

DIRECT SUPPORT STAFF Find Your Career at Lexington Today! If you are looking for a meaningful career in human services that offers a nurturing workplace and a chance to interact with extraordinary people, consider a Direct Support Staff position with Lexington. Paid training, work flexible morning, evening or overnight shifts in Albany and Fulton Counties. Provide assistance such as meal preparation, medication administration, personal care and active participation in the community. Our employees enjoy outstanding benefits and excellent work environment. Apply online at www.lexingtoncenter.org For more information contact: Lexington ~ Human Resources Department 127 East State Street, Gloversville, NY 12078 (518) 773-7931 ~ hr@lexcenter.org Pre-employment drug testing, criminal background check and valid NYS driver’ s license required. EOE


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

79

▼ MARKETPLACE, REAL ESTATE, SERVICE DIRECTORY SITUATION WANTED MOTHER’S DAY!! GIVE THE GIFT OF CLEANINGI am available for regular and deep cleaning of your home. In addition to cleaning, I also organize homes, offices, garages. English speaking, honest, reliable. Excellent references. Own transportation. Animal friendly. Free estimates. Call 516-225-8544

ANNOUNCEMENTS

MEETINGS Come and join us for an informative video & meet great people. Third Wednesday of the month. 7pm. Park City Diner, 101 Herricks Road, Garden City Park, NY 11040. The John Birch Society. JBS.org

NOVENAS/PRAYERS PRAYER TO THE BLESSED VIRGIN (Never known to fail). Oh Most Beautiful Flower of Mount Carmel, fruitful vine of Splendor of Heaven, Blessed Mother of the Son of God, Immaculate Virgin assist me in this necessity. Oh Star of the Sea help me and show herein you are my Mother. Oh Mary Mother of God, Queen of Heaven and Earth I beseech thee from the bottom of my heart to succor me this necessity (make request). There are none that can withstand your power. Oh show me herein you are my Mother. Oh Mary conceived without sin pray for us who have recourse to Thee (three times). Oh Holy Mary I place this cause in your hands (three times). Thank you for your mercy to me and mine. Amen. This prayer must be said for three days and after three days your request will be granted. The prayer must be published. Grateful thanks. (L.B.) PRAYER TO THE HOLY SPIRIT Holy Spirit thou who made me see everything and showed me the way to reach my ideals. Thou who gave me the divine gift to forgive and forget the wrong that is done to me, and thou who art in all instances of my life with me. I thank thee for everything and confirm once more that I never want to be separated from you no matter how great material desire may be, I want to be with thee and my loved ones in Your perpetual glory. Thank You for your love towards me and my loved ones. Pray this prayer for 3 consecutive days. After 3rd day your wish will be granted no matter how difficult it may be. Promise to publish this dialogue as soon as your favor has been granted. (L.B.)

MARKETPLACE GARAGE SALE GARDEN CITY Saturday, May 20th 9am to 2pm 98 Huntington Road GARAGE/ MOVING SALE! GARDEN CITY Saturday, May 20 9am to 1pm 32 Nassau Blvd Antique Morris recliner chair, Henkel Harris armoire media ready for 36” TV with drawers, LL Bean Shaker desks, Ethan Allen end tables and glass top coffee table, lamps, tv stands, Aubusson rug. INVITED SALES BY TRACY JORDAN Consignment Shoppe and Auction House Open 7 Days a Week Consignments by Appointment Monthly Live & Online Auctions Tag Sale, Appraisals and Estate Sale Services Complete House Cleanouts Moving Services Home Staging Services 839 Stewart Avenue Garden City, NY 11530 516-279-6378 www.invitedsales.com

WANTED TO BUY

ABE BUYS OLD STUFF Danish, Modern, Lucite, Lamps, Tables, Paintings, & Chandeliers

917-817-3928 LOOKING TO BUY! Oriental items, clothing, art, old & modern furniture, estates, jewelry, silver, glassware, dishes, old photos, coins & stamps, flatware. Call George 718-3861104 or 917-775-3048 OLD TOOLS, toys, trains, coins, antiques, sterling, costume jewelry, clocks, watches. Pleasant and courteous treatment. In business over 54 years. Immediate payment. Immediate removal. 347-256-7981 TOP CASH PAID: JEWELRY, Furniture, Art, etc. Please call 718598-3045 or 516-270-2128. www. iBuyAntiquesNYC.com

TAG SALE

MARKETPLACE

*BROWSE *SHOP *CONSIGN A.T. STEWART EXCHANGE CONSIGNMENT SHOP China, Silver, Crystal, Jewelry, Artwork, Furniture, Antiques, Collectibles Tues-Fri 10-4 Sat 12-4 Every Tuesday: 10% Senior Citizen Discount. All proceeds benefit The Garden City Historical Society 109 Eleventh Street Garden City 11530 516-7468900 email: store@atstewartexchange.org www.gardencityhistoricalsociety. org

GARAGE SALE GARDEN CITYSaturday, May 20th 9am-4pm 52 St. James St. South Furniture, antiques, paintings, area rugs, baby items, clothing and more! No early birds please.

AVITAL GALLERY: Paintings, Royal Copenhagen, Rosenthal and more. Hours Wednesday, Thursday, Saturday, Sunday 12-5 or by appointment. 770 Middle Neck Road, Great Neck, NY 11024. 516-528-9765/516-304-5640 Free parking in back.

TAG SALE

AUTO SERVICES

EAST WILLISTON VILLAGE WIDE TAG SALE: Saturday, May 20th from 9-2p.m., drizzle or shine. If it pours, rain date Sunday, May 21st. go to www.eastwilliston.org to double check. Over 70 homes participating. Something for everyone! Map available day of sale from 9am sharp at 460 Sagamore Ave. zip code 11596

DETTAGLIO DETAILING: Anthony Masia, Owner/Operator. Dependable, professional detailer, SUVs, vans, pick-ups also detailed at a higher price. We specialize in imports/Mercedes-Benz, BMW, Audi, Jaguar & Maserati. $10 off complete detail. Spring Wash & Wax Special $95/cars only. Coupons not to be combined. 631-612-7152. Check us out on Facebook.

GARDEN CITY Saturday, May 20, 9am-3pm 6 Cedar Place Items priced to sell. Something for everyone!! NEW HYDE PARK: Saturday, May 20th, rain date Sunday, May 21st from 8:30-4. 125 Wilton Street. Vacuum, bedding, clothing, Mother of Bride dresses, audio CDs, books, jewelry and much more. WILLISTON PARK: “Bargains and Blessings” Thrift Shop at RESURRECTION CHURCH, 147 Campbell Avenue @Center Street. OPEN Thursdays 9:30am-1pm and Saturdays 10am-2pm. 516-746-2257. EASTER ITEMS, jewelry, clothing, household items, etc. DONATIONS accepted Monday-Thursday 9am1pm.

YARD SALE WILLISTON PARK: Saturday, May 20th from 10am-5pm. Raindate Sunday, May 21st. 103 Collins Avenue. Estate items, costume jewelry, furniture, books, kitchen wares and much more.

PETS

PET SERVICES A GARDEN CITY ANIMAL LOVER doesn’t want to leave your precious pooch or fantastic feline alone all day. I’m reliable, dependable and will walk and feed your pet while you work or travel. Please call Cheryl at 516-505-9717 DO YOU HATE KENNELS? OR STRANGERS IN YOUR HOUSE? HOME AWAY FROM HOME will care for your dog in my Garden City home while you are away. Dog walking also available. Pet CPR & first Aid Certified. Numerous referrals and references. Limited availability. Book early! Annmarie 516-775-4256 MYA’S K9 CAMP Full Service Pet Care Professional Dog Training Grooming Boarding Walking GC Resident 516-382-5553

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTO FOR SALE 2002 4 RUNNER: Green, all wheel drive, full off road vehicle, tow hitch, good condition, original owner. 85,000 miles. $7,200 negotiable. 516-395-8947

REAL ESTATE FOR RENT

APARTMENT FOR RENT GARDEN CITY BORDER APARTMENT: Spacious, bright 2 bedroom with dining area, gated parking, laundry, A/C, hardwood floors. NO BROKER FEE, near LIRR. $1,685 + electric. ALSO 1 bedroom with balcony $1,535.00 + electric. Both available approximately June 1. www.gcbapts. com or 516-742-1101 GARDEN CITY May special3 rooms, 1 BR, EIK, parking, elevator. $1975 Beautiful view new kit. One BR updated tile bath, wood floors. $2300 Enormous four rooms, 2 BR, new kit., walk in shower, elevator, doorman. $3500 Garden City Properties 516)746-1563 / (516)313-8504

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

CONDO/CO-OP FOR SALE GARDEN CITY DOUBLEDAY CONDO FSBO 3 Bedrooms, 2.5 Bathrooms, 2,200 sf. 2015 new luxury construction. Open floorplan. 2 deeded garage, 24/7 conciergesecurity, gym, pool, lounge. Zillow listing : https://goo.gl/ybe836 Email: doubledaycondo@gmail.com

HOMES FOR SALE GARDEN CITY FOR SALE BY OWNER: Mott Colonial. 4 Bedrooms, including 2 possible Master Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, Eat In Kitchen, Dining Room, 18x20 Family Room, 60x125 property. Principals Only.Call 631-427-3031

OUT OF TOWN REAL ESTATE MOUNTAIN CREEK: Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 bath condo in Mountain Creek resort. A 4 season destination resort just 50 miles form NYC. Ski, bike, golf, hike, waterpark, pool, hot tub, spa and lake. $215,000 fully furnished. Contact me at 5red@optonline.net

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

SERVICES CONDO/CO-OP FOR RENT GARDEN CITY WYNDHAM WEST Luxury Condo. 24hr concierge/valet; health club, exercise classes (included), heated pool, entertainment room, 1 BR, 1 1/2 Baths, CAC, Spacious LR, Eff Kitchen, Patio. $3,600/ month C Quill, Broker 516-732-6049

OFFICE SPACE WILLISTON PARK 1300sf. office space avail on Hillside Ave. Prof building, parking lot, close to RR & parkways. Full commission paid. Call Tony 516-248-4080.

VACATION RENTAL HAMPTON BAYS SUMMER RENTAL 1 block from Meschutt Beach. Close to all. 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath. Immaculate. June $6,000. July $8,500. References/Security required. Call/ Text 516-724-5034

VACATION RENTALS SARATOGA RACE TRACK 6 WEEKS AT COZY COTTAGES

2 BR, 1 BTH $6,900 2 BR, 1 BTH $6,750 3 BR, 1 BTH $1,950 Per Week. Straight run to track / 5mi (9P to Union Ave)

518-664-5421 WOODLOCH LAKEHOUSE Sleeps 10. 3 Bedrooms, 2.5 Baths, Full Kitchen, Washer, Dryer, Lake, Pool, Boats, Use of Resort Facilities. Available week of 6/25-7/2 Asking $5,500 Call 516-483-0061

TO PLACE A PROPERTY LISTING CALL NOW!

516.307.1045

HOME IMPROVEMENTS AMBIANCE PROFESSIONAL SERVICES *Handyman & Remodeling *Kitchen Installations *Furniture Assembly *Finish Carpentry *Minor Electrical & Plumbing 23 year GC Resident Lic & Ins H18E2170000 Call BOB 516-7412154 GUTTERS, WINDOWS, CARPET CLEANING! GENERAL HOME REPAIRS & MAINTENANCE: “Handyman Services” Plumbing, electrical is my specialty. Most gutters $30-$40. Powerwashing & painting available. Clean ups in/out. Lawn mowing. All odd jobs.... you name it. I will do it. All work guaranteed!!! Fully insured. Free estimate. Senior discount. Call 516-534-9518 LAMPS FIXED $65 In home service. Handy Howard. 646-996-7628 MASONRY All types of stonework Pavers, Retaining Walls, Belgium Block Patios, Foundations, Seal coating, Concrete and Asphalt driveways, Sidewalks, Steps. Free Estimates Fully Licensed & Insured Boceski Masonry Louie 516-8504886 RAFTER ONE CARPENTRY: Kitchens & Baths, Windows & Doors, Wainscoting & Molding, all general home repairs. References. License #H010478/Insured. Bill Ryan 516-491-6222 SKY CLEAR WINDOW and Restorations Inc. Window Restorations, Outdated Hardware, skylights, Andersen Sashes, new storm windows, wood windows, chain/rope repairs, falling windows, fogged panes, mechanical repairs, wood repairs, restorations, all brands. Call Mr. Fagan, 32 years experience. 631-385-7975 www.skyclearwindow.com

TO PLACE A NOVENA LISTING CALL NOW! 516.307.1045

PAINTING & PAPERHANGING

CESAR'S PAINTING Interior/Exterior Renovations Wallpaper Removal, Skim Coating, Painting, 0LASTERINGs3ENIOR$ISCOUNT

516-943-3755 INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING Plastering, Taping, Sheetrock Skim Cutting, Old Wood Refinish Staining, Wallpaper Removal & Hanging, Paint Removal Power Washing, Wood Replacement JOHN MIGLIACCIO Licensed & Insured #80422100000bCall John anytime: 516-901-9398 (Cell) 516-483-3669 (Office) JV PAINT HANDYMAN SERVICESInterior-Exterior Specialist Painting, Wallpapering, Plastering, Spackling, Staining, Power Washing. Nassau Lic#H3814310000 fully Insured Call John 516-741-5378

PARTY HELP LADIES & GENTLEMEN RELAX & ENJOY Your Next Party! Catering and Experienced Professional Services for Assisting with Preparation, Serving and Clean Up Before, During and After Your Party Bartenders Available. Call Kate at 516-2481545

TUTORING CHEMISTRY TUTOR: Call Jonathan, Ivy League Ph.D. AP, SAT II, Regents. I also tutor Biology, Physics, Earth & Environmental Science.itutorchem@gmail.com or 516-669-0587 ELEMENTARY TUTOR: Elementary teacher dual certified in general and special education (Birth-6th grade) available to work with your student to support, enhance and reinforce important skills in Math & Literacy. Call Jeanine 516-225-1044 ENGLISH TUTOR: Diane Gottlieb M.Ed., M.S.W. SAT/ACT, College Essays, AP, Regents, ELA Test Prep, Reading comprehension and writing proficiency. 917-599-8007 or email: dianegot@gmail.com LongIslandEnglishTutor.com Providing one-on-one professional support to build confidence, knowledge and skills in every student. IVY LEAGUE GRAD TUTOR: 8+ years experience. Specialities include Physics, Chemistry, Math (all levels), SAT, SAT II. Rate $100/hr. Sessions held in Library. Skype tutoring available. Call 718-415-8118 MATH, SAT, ACT TUTOR: Algebra, Geometry, Algebra 2 plus Trig, PreCalc, AP Calculus. Norm 625-3314 ENGLISH, ACT, SAT TUTOR: 25+ year experience Critical Reading, Writing, Grammar, Essays. Lynne 625-3314 ONE ON ONE TUTORING I am a special ed/literary specialist with over 5 years of experience. MA COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY TEACHERS COLLEGE. Please contact me at 516-633-7442 and view my webpage at www.nickyreadingspecialist.com SCHOLARSHIP STUDENTS WANTED! Leona Handelman, Half Hollow Hills Math Teacher. Empowering students K-12. Common Core and enrichment, PSAT, SAT, ACT, Regents/test prep, professional licensing exams. Free evaluation and personalized tutoring programs. 516-652-9851 or 516-627-0024

PLACE YOUR AD CALL 516.307.1045


80 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

â&#x2013;¼ SERVICE DIRECTORY INSTRUCTION

CLEANING

SERVICES

BASEBALL INSTRUCTION Top rated on Long Island New York State Certified Go to: coachup.com/coaches/johns-22 for reviews and info.

SPRING INTO ACTION LET US CLEAN YOUR HOUSE WINDOWS GARDEN CITY WINDOW CLEANING Home Window Cleaning Service by Owner Free Estimates Inside & Out Fully Insured 25 Years Experience 631-220-1851 516-764-5686

COLLEGE ARTS ADMISSIONS: College Counseling in the Visual and Performing Arts. Dance, Musical Theatre & Drama. Film, Instrumental & Vocal Music. Audio Recording & Production. Theatre Technology & Production. Visual & Graphic Arts. Resume, Essays, Repertoire Lists. Michele Zimmerman. 516-353-6255 CollegeArtsAdmissions@gmail.com www.CollegeArtsAdmissions.com

VINYASA and GENTLE YOGA

Classes in Mineola Studio.

â&#x20AC;¢ $110 - 10 classes â&#x20AC;¢ $15 - walk-in rate Call or Text Carol 516-662-7391 or email YogawithCarol@outlook.com PIANO LESSONS By Ira Baslow. Experience the joy of playing the piano. Private lessons in your home, free no-obligation piano lesson, all levels, all styles, all ages. Beginners a specialty. 516-312-1054 www.iwantmypianolessons.com

CLEANING HOUSE CLEANING 20% OFF your 3rd cleaning. Experienced cleaning service available. Honest, reliable and pet friendly. Available Monday thru Saturday. Own transportation. English speaking. Free estimates. Please call Elly 516-451-3642

CLEANING MARIAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CLEANING Experienced house cleaner. Good references. Responsible and hard working. Flexible days. Call Maria 516-859-5355 or 631-495-2444 MARIAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CLEANING SERVICE Our excellent cleaning team will get your home or office spotless! Available Monday thru Friday 7am to 6pm Supplies provided if neede Own transportatio Excellent references provide CALL 516-849-2026

SHARE YOUR NOVENAS CALL NOW 516.307.1045

STRONG ARM CLEANING: Residential and commercial cleaning specialist, post construction clean ups, shipping and waxing floors, move ins and move outs. Free estimates. Bonded and insured. 516538-1125 www.strongarmcleaningny.com TWO LADIES EVONNE & ROSA HOUSEKEEPING & BABYSITTING SERVICE Housekeeping for apartments, homes, condos. Also clean offices. Babysitting services available weekends morning or evening. Responsible & Reliable! Evonne 516-7323803 Rosa 516-499-1390

SERVICES

COMPLETE JUNK REMOVAL/DEMOLITION SERVICE: Strong Arm Contracting Inc. We haul anything and everything. Entire contents of home or office. We clean it up and take it away. Residential/Commercial. Bonded/Insured. Free estimates. 516-538-1125 DECLUTTER & ORGANIZE your home/office. We do it all. Create a life you love to look at. Free Consultation. Neat Freaks Lisa Marx and Randi Yerman 917-751-0395 www.neatfreaks1976.com instagram: organizethisnthat

1-866-We Junk It: All phases of rubbish removal & demolition. Residential, commercial, construction sites, kitchens, bathrooms, cleanups, attics, basements, floods, fires. All size dumpsters. Same day service. Fully insured. Bob Cat Service. www.1866wejunkit.com 516-541-1557

FC Finishing Touch Masonry: pool coping, pool patio, driveways, sidewalks, brickwork, Belgium block, retaining walls, patios, steps, pavers, Nicolock, Cambridge, stucco, cultured stone, stone veneer. Facebook FC Finishing Touch. web: fcfinishingtouch.com Nassau H0432180000. 516-635-4315

A & J MOVING & STORAGE: Established 1971. Long Island and New York State specialists. Residential, Commercial, Piano & Organ experts. Boxes available. Free estimates. www.ajmoving.com 516741-2657 114 Jericho Tpk, Mineola NYDOT# 10405

OLD VILLAGE TREE SERVICE: Owner operated since 1989. 24 hour emergency service. Licensed /insured. Free estimates, member LI Arborist Assoc. Please call 516466-9220

PROMOTE YOUR PET SERVICES HERE: CALL

516.307.1045

PSYCHOTHERAPY: Efrat Fridman, LCSW. Individual, couple and family therapy. effiefrid@gmail.com 2 Pinetree Lane, Old Westbury, NY 11568. 516-224-7670 or 225 West 35th Street, NY 10001 718-8874400

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www.theislandnow.com

www.gcnews.com

1 0 5 H i l l s i d e Av e n u e , S u i t e I , W i l l i s t o n P a r k , N Y 1 1 5 9 6 â&#x20AC;¢ O f f i c e : 5 1 6 . 3 0 7.1 0 4 5 â&#x20AC;¢ F a x : 5 1 6 . 3 0 7.1 0 4 6

Advertising Sales Executive Blank Slate Media Blank Slate Media, a fast-growing chain of 6 award-winning weekly newspapers and website, is looking for an energetic, service-oriented professional with good communications skills to sell display, web and email advertising. Earn up to $60,000 in the first-year representing the 6 Blank Slate Media publications and website as well the 5 publications and 1 website owned by Blank Slateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sales partner, Litmor Publications. We are looking for an enthusiastic and service-oriented sales professional with good communication skills. Requirements: Minimum of 2 years outside sales experience. Newspaper sales experience a plus. Must have your own car. â&#x20AC;¢ Exclusive, protected territory â&#x20AC;¢ Opportunity to sell both print and online programs â&#x20AC;¢ A collegial, supportive sales team â&#x20AC;¢ Award-winning editorial coverage. â&#x20AC;¢ A separate newspaper for each community allowing advertisers to target their markets. And you to provide the most cost-effective way to advertise. â&#x20AC;¢ Represent media that produce superior response for clients. Compensation â&#x20AC;¢ Salary plus commission â&#x20AC;¢ Health insurance â&#x20AC;¢ Paid holidays â&#x20AC;¢ Sick days & holidays

To apply, e-mail your resume and cover letter to sblank@theislandnow.com or call Steve at 516.307-1045 x201 for more information.


The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

HC

▼ LEGALS

HC

Legal Notice NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF NASSAU BANK OF AMERICA NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR MORGAN STANLEY LOAN TRUST 2006-3AR, Plaintiff AGAINST JESSICA ARMAS, et al., Defendant(s) Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated February 28, 2017 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Calendar Control Part (CCP) Courtroom of the Supreme Court, 100 Supreme Court Drive, Mineola, NY 11501, on June 20, 2017 at 11:30AM, premises known as 40 ALLEN STREET, NEW HYDE PARK, NY 11040. All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in New Hyde Park, Town of Hempstead, and County of Nassau and State of New York, SECTION 9, BLOCK 77, LOT 40. Approximate amount of judgment $764,617.28 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment for Index# 8724/09. Malachy P. Lyons Jr., Esq., Referee Gross Polowy, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff 1775 Wehrle Drive, Suite 100 Williamsville, NY 14221 NHP #145723 4x 05/19, 05/26, 06/02, 06/09 /2017 #145723

SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF NASSAU DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY AS TRUSTEE FOR INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-AR15, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2006-AR15, Plaintiff against RAYMOND LOUGHLIN A/K/A RAYMOND A. LOUGHLIN; CHRISTINA LOUGHLIN, et al Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered on February 1, 2017. I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction in the Calendar Control Part (CCP) Courtroom of the Supreme Court, 100 Supreme Court Drive, Mineola, N.Y. on the 13th day of June, 2017 at 11:30 a.m. premises described as follows: All that certain plot, piece or parcel of land. With the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate lying and being in the Incorporated Village of New Hyde Park, County of Nassau and State of New York. Said premises known as 1604 Gilford Avenue, New Hyde Park, N.Y. 11040. (Section: 8, Block: 160, Lot: 3 & 4). Approximate amount of lien $ 762,575.44 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed judgment and terms of sale. Index No. 002700-15. Bruce R. Bekritsky, Esq., Referee. McCabe, Weisberg & Conway, P.C. Attorney(s) for Plaintiff 145 Huguenot Street Suite 210 New Rochelle, New York 10801 (914) 636-8900 NHP #145777 4x 05/12, 05/19, 05/26, 06/02 /2017 #145777

SUPREME COURT— COUNTY OF NASSAU EMIGRANT BANK (FORMERLY KNOWN AS EMIGRANT SAVINGS BANK AND NEW YORK PRIVATE BANK & TRUST, Plaintiff -againstWILLIAM E. EWASHKOW, et al Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered herein on April 24, 2017, I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at (CCP) Calendar Control Part Court Room of the Nassau Supreme Court, 100 Supreme Court Dr., Mineola, NY on June 20, 2017 at 11:30 a.m. All that certain plot, piece or parcel of land, situate, lying and being in the Incorporated Village of Garden City, Town of Hempstead, County of Nassau and State of New York, known and designated as Section 34 Block 170 and Lots 49, 50 and 51. Said premises known as 125 MEADOW STREET, GARDEN CITY, NY Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment and Terms of Sale. We are a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Index Number 004439/2016. EDGAR ROYCE, ESQ., Referee STAGG, TERENZI, CONFUSIONE & WABNIK, LLP Attorney(s) for Plaintiff 401 Franklin Avenue, Suite 300, Garden City, NY 11530 NHP #145908 4x 05/19, 05/26, 06/02, 06/09 /2017

New Hyde Park Community Calendar LIKE TO SING? The New Hyde Park Senior Chorus welcomes new members. The chorus meets Mondays 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. at The Clinton G. Martin Park, Marcus Avenue and New Hyde Park Road. To join, call 516-775-8118. COMMUNITY VOLUNTEERS FOR EDUCATION We are currently looking for community volunteers/ retirees for one or two hours a week in the New Hyde Park-Garden City Park School District. You will be assisting students under the supervision of a classroom teacher. There is no prior experience necessary to participate in the program. Volunteers do a variety of activities with children such as reading to students or helping with classroom projects. If you would like more information on this program, please call Eileen Bileski at 516-4342306. FREE EXERCISE CLASSES

#145908

PUBLIC NOTICE INC. VILLAGE OF NEW HYDE PARK, N.Y. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that at a public hearing was held by and before the Board of Trustees of the Inc. Village of New Hyde Park, New York, on Tuesday, May 16, 2017, at 7:30 PM prevailing time, at the Village Hall, 1420 Jericho Turnpike, New Hyde Park, New York, and the following local law was adopted: LOCAL LAW AMENDING SECTION 111-7 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE OF THE INCORPORATED VILLAGE OF NEW HYDE PARK, ENTITLED “GENERAL REGULATIONS AND RESTRICTIONS”, SUBSECTION (A), TO PROHIBIT LANDSCAPING, GARDENING OR GROUNDS KEEPING SERVICE ON SUNDAYS AND HOLIDAYS PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that this local shall take effect immediately after its filing in the office of the Secretary of State and the publication of a public notice containing and abstract hereof, in accordance with the provisions of applicable state statue and local law. Dated: May 17, 2017 By Order of the Board of Trustees Inc. Village of New Hyde Park, N. Y. Cathryn Hillmann, Village Clerk-Treasurer NHP #145913 1x 05/19/2017 # 145913

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SENIOR CHORUS New Hyde Park: Entertainers Senior Chorus welcomes new members. The group meets 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. Mondays at Clinton G. Martin Park, Marcus Avenue and New Hyde Park Road. Contact 516-7758118 for more information. Ongoing: Community Volunteers with Music background needed. Ongoing Program - FREE Silver Sneakers Exercise Classes For All Levels: Balance, agility, strengthening, endurance and osteoporosis for eligible seniors. Monday through Saturday. Garden City, Roslyn and Great Neck. Call for more details, including seeing if you are eligible and class times, (516) 745-8050. AARP Floral Park Chapter 5224 TUESDAY NIGHT BINGO Veterans of Foreign Wars Post #5253 will host bingo on Tuesday nights from 7 to 11 p.m. The top prize is $1,500 with additional cash prizes totaling $1,700. Admission is $4 at the post, which is located at 155 Searingtown Road in Albertson.

AMERICAN THEATER DANCE WORKSHOP Adult beginner ballet classes on Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Adult Ballet classes Monday through Friday from 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. are at the American Theater Dance Workshop, 999 Herricks Road, NHP. 516-248-6420. ADVICE FOR BREAST CANCER PATIENTS “SATURDAYS with Sabaa”: Breast cancer and lymphedema education and tips from the Adelphi NY Statewide Breast Cancer Hotline & Support Program. Physical therapist Sabaa Mundia, a blogger for the Facebook site of the Adelphi NY Statewide Breast Cancer Hotline & Support Program, is offering useful tips on the site every Saturday. To access the

information, visit #saturdayswithsabaa and https://www. facebook.com/adelphibreastcancerhotline. To reach the hotline call 800-877-8077. Ten upcoming AARP defensive driving courses at Clinton G. Martin Park in New Hyde Park for 2017 The classes, open to drivers age 50 and older, will be held on April 8, May 13, June 3, June 17, Sept. 9, Oct. 14, Nov. 11 and Dec. 9. To register for an AARP defensive driving class, please make your check payable to AARP. The cost is $20 for members and $25 for non-members. All participants must be 50 and older. Please be sure that your check contains your name, address, phone number and the date of the class you wish to attend. Seating for each class is limited. PLEASE mail all checks to: Defensive Driving Coordinator, Department of Community Services, 1601 Marcus Ave., New Hyde Park. Once checks are received, a seat will be reserved in your name and a letter confirming your registration will be mailed to your address.

COMMUNITY NEWS

Mental health walk raises $209K A walk for mental health by the National Alliance on Mental Illness at Jones Beach on May 6 raised $209,000.00 with fundraising efforts continuing through July 7. “Mental illness affects 1 in 5, making NAMIWalks a community event. I want to thank Michael Dwyer, Associate Executive Director of Zucker Hillside Hospital who spoke of their commitment to serving our population and their long-term relationship with us and state Senator John E. Brooks, 8th Senatorial District, Ranking Minority Member of the Senate Committee on Mental Health who clearly understands the need to improve access to mental health and substance abuse services. We can’t do it alone!” said Janet Susin, NAMI Queens/Nassau president. Janet Reilly, NAMI Queens/Nassau 2nd vice president and team cap-

Ann Allen Cetrino Family and Friends Team; #2 Port Voices Team tain of Ann Allen Cetrino Family and Friends, the Premier Sponsor, motivated the crowd. “We have made great progress in ending stigma and spreading awareness of the struggle, needs, and rights of our loved ones and families,” she said. “

Legislators and our communities are listening and responding. Magnify our voices, become advocates and influencers … there’s more to do!” Team Port Voices, Port Washington middle and high school students, have raised $6,504.72. Their

message states, “We are trying to stop the stigma that prevents young people from getting help from biological brain disorders. We are the voice of the many people who have these disorders through no fault of their own”.


82 The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

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COMMUNITY NEWS

Girl Scouts to sing for seniors Phillips holds Girl Scout Troops 1040, 1172 and 1620 will be performing songs and dances at the Bristal assisted living facility at 99 South Service Road in North Hills on Friday, May 26 from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. The performance will include a special tribute to veterans. For additional information, contact Girl Scout Troop leader Sarai Korpacz, at (917) 2021646.

scam seminar

State Sen. Elaine Phillips (R-Manhasset) recently sponsored a senior scam prevention program in New Hyde Park to help local seniors protect themselves from scams, fraud and identity theft. The program was held at the Hillside Library. About 50 local seniors took part in the program, which featured presentations from the New York State Department of State’s Division of Consumer Protection and LiveOn NY. Seniors learned about many of the scams which target the elderly, along with important steps they can take to avoid becoming a victim. Seniors who could not attend the program but would like information about consumer protection safety tips can call Phillips’ office at 516-746-5924 or visit Phillips’ website, phillips.nysenate.gov, and click on the “Senior Scam Prevention” link on the home page.

Town honors students for T-shirt entries

Town of North Hempstead Supervisor Judi Bosworth and the Town Board announced the winner of the Town’s Annual Earth Day T-Shirt contest. The winners were honored before a Town Board meeting on April 25. For the past 13 years the Town of North Hempstead has organized the t-shirt design contest in honor of

Earth Day. This year, nine school districts from the town participated in this contest and over 450 students submitted entries with the theme “Clean Water Starts With You.” This year’s winning design was created by Manhasset High School Freshman Hailey Morris and 4,000 tshirts have been created with her artwork.

These shirts will be distributed throughout the Town at schools and at upcoming community clean-ups that are being organized by town council members. twenty-three students were recognized with honorable mention for their designs. Six students from New Hyde Park were recognized as honorable mentions.

THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR READERS FOR THE BEST OF THE NORTH SHORE 2017 CONTEST NOMINATIONS! VOTING BEGINS MAY 26TH GET READY TO CAST YOUR VOTE! VOTING ENDS JULY 7, 2017.


The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

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COMMUNITY NEWS

Ex Floral Park mayor feted at dinner On Tuesday, May 9, Floral Park residents and officials honored Thomas Tweedy for his 16 years of service to the residents of Floral Park as an elected official. Tweedy is a lifelong resident of the village. He is a graduate of Our Lady of Victory School, Xavier High School and Boston College. He and his wife MaryAnn have resided in the West End for more than 35 years. Tweedy is a principal of Edwin S. Tweedy, Inc. a general construction-construction management corporation. Tweedy’s service to his fellow residents was evident before being on the Board of Trustees and will continue on. He is a 35-year member and past president of the West End Civic Association, member of Knights of Columbus, lector at Our Lady of Victory, past president of the Lexington School of the Deaf PTSA, past chairman of the Citizens Party and for 12 years as a member of IAABO Board 41, the interscholastic basketball referee association.

Prior to his appointment by Mayor Ann Corbett as trustee in 2001, Tweedy was very active in the community having served the village as a member of the Architectural Review Board and the Recreation Committee. He also served as director, officer, and coach of the Floral

Park Little League and the Floral Park Indians. Tweedy’s commitment to Floral Park and goal while serving as trustee and subsequently as mayor was always to maintain, improve and expand the rich quality

of life that the residents of Floral Park have enjoyed for more than 100 years. For an in depth “Look Back” interview with Tweedy covering his term see the Floral Park Mayor’s Report on Four Village Studio’s website at www.4VS.org.

Trautwig to give keynote at Adelphi Adelphi University will hold its 121st Commencement on Sunday, May 21 at 10:00 a.m. at the Northwell Health at Jones Beach Theater, 1000 Ocean Parkway in Wantagh. Al Trautwig, a 1978 graduate of Adelphi and a member of Adelphi’s Athletics Hall of Fame, will serve as the commencement speaker and be recognized with an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree. During the program, Board Chair Ronald Lee ’67 and President Christine Riordan will oversee the proceedings to bestow the honorary degree and confirm nearly 2,200 graduates at the associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s levels. A Doctoral Hooding Ceremony will be held for candidates earning the highest degree, on Friday, May 19 at 4:30 p.m. in the Concert Hall of Adelphi’s Performing Arts Center, 1

South Ave. in Garden City. As a student at Adelphi University, Trautwig majored in business but had a strong interest in sports. He had been a stick boy for the New York Islanders and a ball boy for the New York Nets when both teams played at Nassau Coliseum, not far from Garden City South, his Long Island home. Today, Trautwig serves as both the pre- and postgame host

for the New York Knicks and the New York Rangers on the MSG Network. He also serves as a host of MSG’s weekly comprehensive hockey show, “Hockey Night Live,” and is the host of the original series MSG Vault, where he recounts memorable moments at Madison Square Garden. In February 2014, Trautwig reported on cross-country skiing and Nordic combined skiing as part of NBC’s coverage of the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. In 2012, he covered gymnastics on NBC’s Summer Olympics telecasts from London. Since 1984, Trautwig has announced 16 Olympic Games for NBC, ABC and CBS. Throughout his career in broadcasting, Trautwig has been nominated for, and won, numerous prestigious awards. Among his honors are four

national Emmy awards, 28 New York Emmys and a New York State Sportscaster of the Year award. He credits the experiences he had working at WBAU, Adelphi’s student-run radio station, with helping him to land his first job out of college. In the summer of 1978, he convinced the New York Apollo soccer team to let him broadcast the play-by-play of every game on WBAU. After graduating, Trautwig began his broadcasting career calling New York Apollo Soccer for WMCA radio. Over the next two years, he worked at SportsPhone, called soccer games for Cosmos radio and New York Arrows Indoor Soccer for WPIX and SportsChannel, and worked on ESPN college soccer telecasts. He went to USA Network, where he worked on more than

D’Urso visits Clark Botanic Garden State Assemblyman Tony D’Urso and his wife Maria visited the Clark Botanic Garden’s second annual Springfest, where they enjoyed listening to live music, bought from local vendors, watched a model train exhibit and strolled to see the striking tulips and other wonderful and colorful flowers.

500 sports telecasts, including play-by-play for the North American Soccer League, NCAA College Basketball, the NHL, gymnastics, tennis and golf. Following four years at USA, Trautwig moved to ABC, where he hosted Wide World of Sports. A member of Adelphi’s Athletics Hall of Fame, Trautwig returned to his alma mater in November 2013 to speak with Adelphi students studying sport management, and again in 2014 to address Adelphi’s firstyear students at their matriculation ceremony. Trautwig and his wife, Cathleen (Catallo) Trautwig ’79, met as students at Adelphi. They have a son, Alex. For more information and the full day’s program, contact Adelphi’s commencement office at 516-877-4695 or visit commencement.adelphi.edu.

For the latest in community news visit us 24 hours a day7 days a week at www.theislandnow.com


84 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

Sports Chaminade Flyers edge Holy Trinity BY G R E G ORY GIACONELLI The Chaminade Flyers defeated the Holy Trinity Titans 5-4 in baseball on Friday afternoon, led by Mark Ferraro.

Chaminade Holy Trinity

5 4

Ferraro went 3 for 3 with two singles, a double and three runs batted in. Michael Ragno and Vincent Sarnelli each went 1 for 3 with a run batted in while reliever Steve Hansen Jr. earned the save for Chaminade. Chaminade starting pitcher Liam Dvorak allowed no runs, two hits, five walks and struck out seven through five innings. Nicholas McTighe led Holy Trinity by going 1 for 2 with a two run triple while Max Morrill went 1 for 3 with a run batted in and a run scored. Holy Trinity starting pitcher Michael Zawol allowed three runs, eight hits, two walks and fanned four through five plus innings. Chaminade head coach Michael Pienkos said it was a satisfying victory to close out the regular season, as well as a sneak preview of their first round playoff matchup against Holy Trinity. “This is the one-run league,” Pienkos said. “To have a 5-0 lead going into the last inning, I knew they were going to come back. That’s typical of the league.” In the bottom of the first inning, Chaminade had an early opportunity to take the lead with runners on first and third with one out. Zawol worked his way out of a jam by getting Shane Sullivan to pop out and struck out Joseph Salamone to end the inning. Chaminade threatened again in the bottom of the second inning with one out and runners in scoring position. Zawol struck out Sarnelli and got Matthew Corinaldesi to ground out to end the threat. In the top of the third inning,

PHOTO BY GREGORY GIACONELLI

Chaminade senior starting pitcher Liam Dvorak (no. 10) Holy Trinity had a chance to take the lead with the bases loaded and one out. Dvorak pitched his way out of a jam with a pop out and struck out Michael Cartusciello to keep the game scoreless. After allowing a leadoff walk and a pass ball in the top of the fourth inning, Dvorak retired the next three batters. In the bottom of the fourth inning, Chaminade had their turn to strike first with two on and one out. Zawol struck out Ragno and got Sarnelli to fly out to center fielder Jashiah Greene to end the inning. In the top of the fifth inning, Holy Trinity had two on and two outs but Dvorak got Cartusciello to fly out to Salamone in right field. Chaminade finally broke through in the bottom of the sixth inning with five runs. Ferraro broke a scoreless tie with a bases clearing double to center field to give Chaminade a 3-0 lead. During the at bat, Ferraro said he was looking for a good pitch to hit against Zawol, whom they chased after the double, to take the lead. “I knew he wasn’t throwing his curveball for a strike,” Ferraro said. “I was just looking for a fastball. He gave me one with two strikes and I put one away.” Chaminade added two more runs on a triple by Ragno and an RBI groundout by Sarnelli to take a 5-0 lead. Holy Trinity rallied for four

runs in the top of the seventh inning to make it a one-run game. A two-run triple by McTighe and a RBI double by Morrill got Holy Trinity within two, which knocked out Chaminade reliever Jack Prochner. Paul Ariola came in for Chaminade and allowed a run to score on a wild pitch to cut the lead to one. After Ariola issued a walk, Pienkos turned to Hansen to hold the lead. Hansen retired all three batters he faced as Chaminade held on to win 5-4. Baseball Scores Monday, May 8 Long Beach defeated Herricks 9-5. Long Beach pitcher Kevin Dunn threw six innings and allowed four hits and no earned runs while striking out eight. Dunn went 2-for-3 while Marquis Stephens went 3-for-4 with two RBIs, two runs scored and a stolen base for Long Beach. Eric DelValle led Herricks with a home run. Farmingdale defeated Port Washington 10-9. Jacob Taormina led Farmingdale with a twoout, walk-off single in the bottom of the seventh inning to score Robby Manetta. Anthony Burriesci tied the game at nine on a two-run single with no outs in the seventh. Jackson Trenaman’s grand slam in the top of the fifth inning gave Port Washington a 9-5 lead. Robby Keane went 2-for-3 and cut the deficit to two with a two-run home run in the bottom of the fifth inning for

Farmingdale. Michael Manetta pitched a scoreless seventh to earn the win. Oyster Bay defeated Wheatley 11-5. Joe Daniello led Oyster Bay by going 2-for-4 with four RBIs and a run scored while Kevin Duke went 3-for-3 with a triple, two RBIs and a run scored. Tuesday, May 9 Farmingdale defeated Port Washington 7-3. Farmingdale pitcher Justin Rosner allowed one hit and two unearned runs through five innings while Anthony Burriesci went 4-for-5. Michael Dortz had an RBI single that scored Angus McCloskey to give Farmingdale a 4-3 lead and Robbie Manetta followed up with a three-run home run to blow the game open. Port Washington pitcher Mitchell Levine allowed six hits through five innings. Great Neck North defeated West Hempstead 9-1. Great Neck North pitcher Joey Jacobs struck out 14 and threw his first varsity no-hitter while Oliver Besman went 3-for-4 with three RBIs. Herricks defeated Long Beach 9-1. Herricks pitcher Eric DelValle tossed a complete game and allowed three hits and one run. Jonathan Vargas and Bryan Wu both went 2-for-3 with two RBIs for Herricks. Holy Trinity defeated Chaminade 4-1. Holy Trinity pitcher Max Morrill threw a complete game and allowed one run on seven hits and four walks, while striking out two. Nicholas McTighe went 1-for-2 with a run scored and a double for Holy Trinity’s second run in the bottom of the fourth inning. Joey Zawol’s RBI double in the fourth inning gave Holy Trinity a 3-1 lead. Manhasset defeated Jericho 4-2. Teddy Urban had a sacrifice fly to drive in Bryan Hanlon, who pinch-ran after Freddy Giovanelli’s double in the bottom of the sixth inning, to give seventeenth seeded Manhasset a 3-2 lead over sixteenth seed Jericho in the Nassau Class A out-bracket playoff game. Winning pitcher Jamie Weiss had an RBI single to drive in Jay Schlaefer to tie the game at two in the top of the fifth inning for Manhasset. Sch-

laefer went 2-for-3 with a walk and three runs scored while Robert Giovanelli went 3-for-4 with two RBIs, and pitched the final two innings for the save. Oyster Bay defeated Wheatley 8-1. Charlie Collette led Oyster Bay by going 3-for-4 while James Losee went 2-for-3 with two RBIs. Floral Park defeated Roslyn 6-2. Pitcher Chris Stefl struck out eight and allowed four hits and one earned run in a complete game to lead 18th seeded Floral Park over fifthteenth seed Roslyn in the Nassau Class A out-bracket playoff game. Mike Baldini and Jack Dixon each drove in two runs as part of a five-run top of the fifth inning to give Floral Park a 6-1 lead. Justin Rahaman went 2-for-4 with a triple and two runs scored for Floral Park. St. Dominic’s defeated St. Mary’s 16-0. Frankie DiMartino led St. Dominic’s by going 3-for-4 with four RBIs and two doubles. Wednesday, May 10 Herricks tied with Long Beach 7-7. Farmingdale defeated Port Washington 8-7. Phil Krpata led Farmingdale with a single that knocked in Mike Manetta, who led the bottom of the seventh inning with a triple. Manetta went 3-for-4, while Anthony Burriesci also went 3-for-4 and now has 30 hits on the season. Burriesci pitched one inning of relief for the win for Farmingdale. Jackson Trenaman’s home run made it 3-0 in the top of the third inning for Port Washington. Farmingdale rallied with a seven-run fifth inning highlighted by a three-run home run by Angus McCloskey that gave them a 7-3 lead. Holy Trinity defeated Chaminade 4-2. Jahsiah Greene led Holy Trinity by going 3-for-3, including a solo home run. Matt Aufiero led Chaminade with a home run. Thursday, May 11 Roosevelt defeated Great Neck North 7-3. Roosevelt pitcher Jason Rodriguez tossed 6 2/3 innings and struck out nine while allowing five hits. Rodriguez went 3-for-4 with two RBIs while Andres Adames went 2-for-4 with two RBIs for Roosevelt.


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

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86 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, May 19, 2017

Port Washington crushes Uniondale The Port Washington Vikings defeated the Uniondale Knights 19-6 in lacrosse on Thursday afternoon, led by Harry Basham’s four goals.

Port Washington 19 Uniondale 6 Brian Crawley recorded a hat trick and three assists while Robbie Connors added a hat trick and an assist for Port Washington. Jose Romero led Uniondale with a hat trick while Cesar Lanezo had a goal and three assists and goalkeeper Marcel Quinlan stopped 11 shots on goal. After winning the season finale on their home turf, Port Washington head coach Isaac Neal said the team is prepared for the playoffs. “It’s always nice to end the regular season with a win,” Neal said. “Any conference game in Conference A is a big one. Either way, we’re still looking forward to the playoffs, which is the next step for us.” In the first quarter, Port Washington outscored Uniondale 5-4 and outshot them 178. Crawley led Port Washington with two goals and an assist while Rhys Jackson scored twice. Lanezo led Uniondale with a goal and two assists while David Victome scored twice. With 9:05 remaining in the first quarter, Port Washington struck first with two goals in a 50-second span by Jackson and Crawley respectively.

PHOTOS BY GREGORY GIACONELLI

Port Washington junior attacker Harry Basham (no. 26) Uniondale answered at 8:17 on a goal by Romero, which was assisted by Lanezo. Connors gave Port Washington a 3-1 lead with 7:58 left in the first quarter. Uniondale evened up the game at three with a pair of goals by Victome. Port Washington took back the lead with Crawley’s second goal of the game but Lanezo tied it up again for Uniondale. With 36.5 seconds remaining in the first quarter, Jackson netted his second goal of the game and Port Washington took a 5-4 lead. In the second quarter, Port Washington outscored Uniondale 6-0 and had the advantage in shots 16-3. Basham and Connors paced Port Washington’s offense with two goals each. James Dalimonte and Drew Turner also scored for Port Washington in the second quarter.

In the third quarter, Port Washington outscored Uniondale 7-0 and had a 13-1 edge in shots on goals. Basham and John Athanasian provided Port Washington’s attack with two goals each while Crawley had a goal and an assist. Basham said Port Washington’s uptempo style of play dictated the pace of the game. He added that the team will look to use that to their advantage in the postseason. “We love playing quick,” Basham said. “When you have opportunities, it’s great. We’re gonna try to control our offense so we can be productive as we can be.” In the fourth quarter, Uniondale outscored Port Washington 2-1 and outshot them 5-1. Romero scored both goals for Uniondale while Jordan Schaffer netted the lone goal for Port Washington, who went on to win 19-6.

Boys Lacrosse Scores Monday, May 8 Elmont defeated Great Neck South 16-2. Erick Edouard led Elmont with five goals. Josh Cherubin added four goals while Christian Gibson recorded a hat trick and four assists for Elmont. Wheatley/Carle Place defeated Friends Academy 7-6. Luke Caliendo led Wheatley/ Carle Place with two goals and an assist while Dylan Vincenti scored twice. Caliendo scored the game winning goal in the fourth quarter. Wheatley/Carle Place goalkeeper John Deridder, who stopped 10 shots, scored with 6:10 left after running the length of the field. Floral Park defeated Mineola 14-4. Mitchell Kozak led Floral Park with a hat trick and an assist while Brenden Fogarty added two goals and two assists. John McMahon led Mineola with two goals. Sewanhaka defeated Roosevelt 9-8. Stephane Eugene led Sewanhaka with four goals while Baris Akkaya recorded a hat trick and two assists. Stephane Eugene’s fourth goal came on Yvans Oscars’s fifth assist to break a 8-8 tie in overtime. Liam Hilt, who scored twice, tied the game at 8 with 1:30 left in the fourth quarter. Tuesday, May 9 Roosevelt defeated Great Neck South 18-4. Danielo Parkinson led Roosevelt with five goals and an assist. Tyon Grimes added four goals and an assist while Keyvon Hall had two goals and four assists for Roosevelt. Bellmore JFK defeated Herricks 9-8. Eric Brach, who scored twice, led Bellmore

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Port Washington senior midfielder Robbie Connors (no. 27)

JFK with the game winning goal unassisted in the third overtime with 1:30 remaining. Ryder Lampert, who had two goals and an assist, tied the game at 8 with three minutes remaining in regulation. Bellmore JFK trailed 6-1 at halftime and 8-2 with eight minutes remaining in the third quarter. JT Intravaia added two goals and two assists for Bellmore JFK while Jason Zheng led Herricks with a hat trick. Goalkeeper Matt Lafaro made 13 saves for Bellmore JFK while Anthony Picano stopped 15 shots for Herricks. Manhasset defeated New Hyde Park 16-0. John Psyllos led Manhasset with four goals and two assists. Goalkeeper Nick Arman led New Hyde Park with 10 saves. Roslyn defeated Elmont 17-4. Ethan Gatto led Roslyn with four goals and three assists. Jake Steffen recorded a hat trick and four assists while Zach Simon had a hat trick and an assist for Roslyn. Chaminade defeated St. John’s the Baptist 13-4. Will Kusnierek led Chaminade with two goals and an assist. Wheatley/Carle Place defeated Malverne/East Rockaway 8-5. Mike Vella led Wheatley/Carle Place with two goals. MacArthur defeated Sewanhaka 14-6. Kennedy Catholic defeated St. Mary’s 16-1. Jericho defeated Great Neck North 14-1. Wednesday, May 10 Floral Park defeated Oyster Bay 10-6. Brenden Fogarty led Floral Park with a hat trick and two assists while goalkeeper James O’Grady recorded eight saves. Wheatley/Carle Place defeated Plainedge 10-8. Dylan Vincenti, Mike Vella, Liam Coffey, and Chris Ruscillo each scored twice to lead Wheatley/Carle Place while Max Gerow collected eight ground balls. Wheatley/Carle Place clinched a share of the Nassau CD II regular season title with Friends Academy. Herricks defeated Great Neck North 16-3. Danny Woska led Herricks with four goals and seven assists. Jason Zheng added four goals and an assist while Marc Licul had three assists for Herricks. Chaminade defeated St. Dominic 18-7. Six different players scored twice for Chaminade while goalkeeper Brendan Krebs recorded seven saves.


The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

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NHP Gladiators edge Wheatley The New Hyde Park Lady Gladiators defeated the Wheatley Lady Wildcats 14-11 in lacrosse on Tuesday afternoon, led by Krysta Sollecito’s five points.

New Hyde Park 14 Wheatley 11 Sollecito recorded four goals and an assist while Mackenzie Griffin added two goals and two assists. Joanna Mauceri netted a hat trick for New Hyde Park while goalkeeper Michelle Agernza stopped 13 shots on goal. Allison Lamonica lead Wheatley with four goals and an assist while Sami Rothstein scored twice and had two assists. Jolie Katz recorded a hat trick for Wheatley while goalkeeper Yvonne Kalpakis stopped 11 shots. New Hyde Park head coach Dom Gagnon said this game was a battle the whole way as both teams fought for first place in Nassau Conference V. “We struggled in the first half but we made some adjustments offensively in the second half,” Gagnon said. “Defensively, we were always trying to pressure the ball and force them to make mistakes. This was a big win for our team and the girls worked real hard to earn it.” Wheatley head coach Terry Grace said they anticipated that this game would go down to the wire. “We knew it would be this kind of game right till the end,” Grace said. “We just thought we’d be pulling ahead instead of them. We got exactly what we expected.” In the first half, each team

PHOTO BY GREGORY GIACONELLI

New Hyde Park midfielder Joanna Mauceri (no. 7) and Wheatley midfielder Sami Rothstein (no. 24) scored eight goals but Wheatley had the advantage in shots on goal 17-11. Sollecito led New Hyde Park with a hat trick while Lamonica had a hat trick for Wheatley. Jules Wesler gave New Hyde Park a 1-0 lead 40 seconds into the game. Sollecito scored with 22:09 remaining in the first half to make it a two goal game. Lamonica got Wheatley on the board but New Hyde Park took back the two goal lead as Mauceri found the back of the net. Wheatley answered back with four consecutive goals to take a 5-3 lead. The sequence started with a free position goal by Rothstein, which allowed Wheatley to take the lead for the first time in the game. Sollecito and Griffin evened up the game with 10:31 remaining in the first half, which prompted Grace to call a timeout. Both sides scored three goals each and the game was tied at

eight going in halftime. In the second half, New Hyde Park outscored Wheatley 6-3 and outshot them 13-8. Joanna Mauceri led New Hyde Park with two goals in the second half. After Griffin scored off the faceoff, Mauceri followed up with her second goal of the game to give New Hyde Park a quick 10-8 lead. With 17:33 left to play, Domenique Dunne got Wheatley back within a goal as they trailed 10-9. New Hyde Park countered with four goals and led 14-9 with 2:55 remaining in the game. Wheatley got within three, on goals scored by Katz and Lamonica respectively with 43 seconds left. New Hyde held on the rest of the way and won 14-11, as they remain undefeated. Girls Lacrosse Scores Monday, May 8 Valley Stream District defeated Great Neck South 8-5. Au-

drey D’Aulisa led Valley Stream District with four goals and two assists. Jordana Ovadia led Great Neck South with a hat trick while goalkeeper Rebecca Bressler made 12 saves. Wantagh defeated Manhasset 11-10. Alexandra Murphy led Wantagh with four goals while Megan Gordon had a hat trick and two assists. Taylor Carson, who recorded two goals, scored with 19 seconds left to break a 10-10 tie. Madison Rielly led Manhasset with four goals while Madison Miller netted a hat trick. Tuesday, May 9 Sewanhaka defeated West Hempstead 12-10. Sandy Padilla-Ortega led Sewanhaka with five goals and three assists while Kylie Woo scored five goals. Great Neck South defeated Roosevelt 16-10. Jordana Ovadia led Great Neck South with four goals and an assist. Danielle Delponte and Hannah Lee each had a hat trick for Great Neck South while goalkeeper Rebecca Bressler recorded eight saves.

Mineola defeats Manhasset The Mineola fifth-grade Police Activity League lacrosse team made up of players from Mineola, Carle Place, Williston Park and Albertson is starting to come together through much hard work over the past three months. After being down 3-1 at halftime, Mineola regrouped with the guidance of Coach Vella, a Mineola alumnus. “We need to stop going for the stick on defense and need to running with our guy and drive him into the alley when he is approaching the goal, if he shoots lift his stick,” Vella said. In the second half Mineola’s defense was led by Alex Baker, and Gavin Fitzpatrick who slowed down the Manhasset offense to only 3 goals in the second half. The midfield turned in on in the second half with Jack McCormack scoring two goals and winning seven faceoffs. Jake Grimm scored a team high of four goals to help Mineola take the lead. Joe O’Connell had three assists, and Blake Lyons and Troy Madden both played strong defensive midfield. The attack men were led by Nick Pascarella with one goal while Stephen Anderson, Scott Postupka, Thomas Kowalczyk and Jack Romano all moved the ball around the offensive side of the field. Goalie James Demakopoulos was on fire all game and made 13 saves to help out his team with 20 seconds left to play in the game Manhasset took one last rip to the lower right hand corner of the net where it was saved by Demakapolous, who was the game MVP.

KIMBERLY PITCHAYAN Your Personal Connection to Real Estate KIMBERLY PITCHAYAN, Licensed Real Estate Salesperson C: 917.294.7469 | O: 516.281.3847 kimberly.pitchayan@elliman.com elliman.com/kpitchayan 192 Hillside Ave, Williston Park © 2017 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.

87


88 The Herald Courier, Friday, May 19, 2017

HC

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