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Friday, December 2, 2016 Vol. 91, No. 49

THE PULSE OF THE PENINSULA

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HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL PREVIEW

REC CENTER TALKS HIT SNAG

NIFA REJECTS COUNTY BUDGET

PAGES 29-36, 53-60

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BAKING FOR A CAUSE

How politicians give millions to local projects State legislators in majority have power to hand out grants BY N O A H MANSKAR

Teenagers from Lake Success Chabad made various Thanksgiving foods and treats for the needy. See story on page 68.

A new scoreboard for Williston Park’s Little League baseball ďŹ eld. Resurfaced tennis courts in New Hyde Park. A power generator for a theater in East Hills. Performances for children at Landmark on Main Street in Port Washington. These projects and initiatives, along with 102 others on the North Shore, have received money from state grant programs through members of the Assembly and Senate. The lawmakers often promote them with news releases and appear at ribbon-cuttings when they’re complete — sometimes as they run campaigns for re-election or for another oďŹƒce. Those lawmakers have discretion over who receives hun-

dreds of millions of dollars in grants each year through three programs: the State and Municipal Facilities Program, the Community Projects Fund and supplemental grants to school districts and libraries known as “bullet aid,â€? according to state legislators, their aides and publicly available documents. More than $1.5 billion has been appropriated for the State and Municipal Facilities Program alone since its inception. North Shore municipalities and nonproďŹ t groups have been designated to receive at least 109 grants worth nearly $6.9 million since 2014, according to lists published by the Senate and Assembly. Ranging in size from $5,000 to $350,000, they are meant to pay for projects from afterschool programs to road repairs

and major construction work at public parks. Local oďŹƒcials have praised lawmakers for obtaining the grants, saying they provide funding for needed projects for which small municipalities could not otherwise pay. “Communities rightfully expect their legislators to ďŹ ght for them and bring home as much state aid as possible, because every additional dollar in aid from Albany is one that doesn’t have to be raised locally,â€? Chris Schneider, a spokesman for state Sen. Jack Martins (R-Old Westbury), wrote in an email. But government watchdogs say the grants come from opaque piles of money that are subject to political forces and that lack clear criteria for who can and should receive them. Continued on Page 74

Voters to pick 1 of 7 for G.N. school board Great Neck Board of Education. Nine candidates initially Voters will go to the polls stepped forward to run for the Tuesday to decide which of seven chance to serve the remainder candidates will replace former of Bloom’s term until 2019, but Trustee Monique Bloom on the two, Mariana Ristea and Michael

BY J OE N I K I C

Darvish, withdrew their candidacies on Nov. 10 and Nov. 29, respectively. The seven candidates for the seat include Donald Panetta, Josh Ratner, Nikolas Kron, Nicholas Toumbekis, Lori Beth Schwartz, Donna Peirez and Grant Toch. Bloom resigned in September because of her corporate travel commitments. School district oďŹƒcials

said since Darvish withdrew after the Nov. 28 deadline to ďŹ le nominating petitions, the district did not need to further extend the deadline. His name will still be on the ballot, however, as ballots have already gone to print. Panetta, a 30-year New Hyde Park resident, said he is running because he loves being involved in the community and saw an opportunity with the open seat. He said that although he

does not have education experience, his wife and son are both teachers in New York City and he often speaks with them about the problems they are facing as teachers and problems with the education system. “I can bring fresh ideas. As a total outsider, if somebody were to say ‘hey, let’s do something,’ my ďŹ rst impulse is ‘let’s look into it,’â€? he said. “Whereas someone Continued on Page 69

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The Great Neck News, Friday, December 2, 2016

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Park district talks for rec Park election to see center purchase stalled incumbent challenged Board seeking ‘option’ to recoup money: commissioner

Cilluffo, Leiberman to face off Dec. 13

BY J OE N I K I C

BY J OE N I K I C

Negotiations to purchase the Kings Point Tennis Center on Steamboat Road and convert it into an indoor recreational facility have stalled, Great Neck Park District officials said Monday. At a Nov. 2 meeting, officials said the park district was in talks with the owner of the approximately 13,855-square-foot property for a “purchase option contract,” meaning the park district would have the sole right to purchase the property if it makes a down payment. “Unfortunately at this point, we’ve not come to terms on the option itself,” park district Commissioner Robert Lincoln said. “Those terms are important because we need to have confidence that we have a reasonable opportunity to get back our investment in the option if we decide not to exercise it.” Lincoln said the district would need to pay $200,000 if it signs an option agreement and then make another $200,000 payment 90 days later to give it a one-year period to complete the purchase. “The board is carefully considering ways to recoup the investment of the option itself in the event they weren’t to go forward,” said Chris Prior, counsel to the Board of Commissioners. “There are issues that have cropped up in that discussion.” Park district Superintendent Jason Marra said at the Nov. 2 meeting that the proposed purchase of the property and renovations of the building would cost $5 million to $7 million. The facility could be used to promote health and wellness for residents of all ages, he said. Although negotiations are currently on hold, Lincoln said, it gives the park district extra

An incumbent commissioner, Frank Cilluffo, is running against a Great Neck resident, Neil Leiberman, in this month’s election for the Great Neck Park District board. Leiberman, a former New York City guidance counselor and physical education teacher, said he is making his fourth attempt to be elected to the board because he is “passionate” about the park district. Cilluffo said the district has undertaken capital improvements, added services and promoted conservation efforts during his tenure. Leiberman said: “I want to preserve what we have, which is precious and irreplaceable. Our parks contribute to our health, well-being, quality of life and spirit of our community.” He said for more than two decades he has been actively involved in the park district by attending meetings and serving on various advisory committees, and it is the only elected office he has sought because he is “so committed to keeping our parks and park programs the best they can be and being the strongest representative for constituents to insure fiscal responsibility.” He said the No. 1 challenge facing the park district is how to best manage its finances. “The biggest challenge is to maximize what we do with limited tax dollars, constantly find-

ing that crucial balance between user fees and nontax revenues in a way that preserves our most important mission of making available facilities and programs to the community and responding to changing needs of a changing community,” Leiberman said. He added that another challenge was to expand parking on the peninsula with the Long Island Rail Road’s East Side Access Project, which will bring the LIRR straight into Grand Central Station. Park district officials have said the project would increase ridership by 20 percent at the Great Neck train station upon its completion. If elected, Leiberman said, he would work to continue improving programs offered to the Great Neck community, which would include more wellness and fitness programs like “sunrise yoga” at Steppingstone Park and tai-chi on the Village Green. He also said that if elected, he wants to work “more collaboratively” with the school district, Great Neck Library and Gold Coast Arts Center by offering programs like art shows and “giving young performers and creators more opportunities to showcase their work” at park district facilities. Leiberman said he was in favor of the park district pursuing the purchase of the Kings Point Tennis Center and turning it into an indoor recreational facility. Cilluffo is seeking his second Continued on Page 70

Frank Cilluffo

Neil Leiberman

Great Neck Park District officials at Monday’s meeting time to assess the needs of the community and explore alternatives. “We are not in a position to enter into an option relevant to that particular property. It doesn’t mean the deal is dead. It doesn’t mean it can’t happen,” he said. “However, until all the details are worked out, it would be totally inappropriate, not necessarily illegal, but certainly inappropriate to enter into something that could put taxpayer money at risk.” “With these talks being stalled, it might be a good thing because it gives us the time to figure out what everybody really wants,” Lincoln added. Marra said the park district would issue a 20-year bond, at a 2.2 percent interest rate, to pay for the project. He estimated that the increase in taxes for park district residents would be $26 to $36 per household. Resident Sam Yellis said he was in favor of an indoor recreational center, but didn’t feel that the location of the Kings Point Tennis Center was appropriate. He said park district officials should “not feel guilty” about increasing taxes to con-

struct a new facility elsewhere. Other residents at the meeting expressed interest in the district opening an indoor pool for the community. Lincoln said that in terms of the tennis facility, if the district were to renovate it into an indoor pool, it could not offer any other types of activities. Initial ideas called for the tennis center to be used as a multipurpose facility for residents of all ages. Marra said he and the board has discussed sending a “community needs assessment” to the community, which would partly address the potential purchase of an indoor recreational facility. He said that the survey, which would be mailed to all residents, would be essential not just to planning for a recreational facility, but for planning the next five to 10 years at the park district. Lincoln said that if negotiations resume to purchase the Kings Point Tennis Center, the board would hold another public meeting to update the community on what has been going on and offer the opportunity for more resident input.

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The Great Neck News, Friday, December 2, 2016

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Orthodontist and candy: a new purpose BY J OE N I K I C Dr. David Sherman, a Great Neck orthodontist, said his two sons have an abundance of leftover candy every year after their Halloween escapades and he wanted to find an option other than throwing it away. “They sort it, they eat some the first night, some the second night, then they forget about it,” Sherman said. “That got me thinking of if there was a better way of disposing all of this candy.” After a quick Google search, he said, he found Operation Gratitude, a nonprofit group that sends care packages to soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines deployed overseas, to their children left behind, and to new recruits, veterans, first responders, wounded veterans and their caregivers. Sherman, a 1996 graduate of Great Neck North High School, said he thought it would be a good idea to collect candy from patients at his offices to donate to Operation Gratitude. He works half of the week at the practice of his father, Peter Sherman, in Great Neck and the other half of the week at his own office in Manhattan. He said 1,100 pounds of candy were collected, enough to fill 35 large shipping boxes. Although his patients brought in a large amount of leftover candy for the initiative, Sherman said about two-thirds of

Dr. David Sherman with boxes of donated candy it came from residents in the surrounding community. He said Operation Gratitude listed the locations of his offices on its website for those looking for a place to drop off excess candy, which boosted donations. One local school brought in 170 pounds of candy, Sherman said, while a Girl Scout troop from Floral Park brought 175 pounds of candy. “We were not expecting that sort of response,” he said. Another reason the initiative was so successful was a segment on “Jimmy Kim-

mel Live!” showing the reactions of children after their parents told them they had given away the rest of their candy, Sherman said. The segment promoted Operation Gratitude. He said that because of the high cost of shipping all of the candy to Operation Gratitude in California, he decided to also donate to the Ronald McDonald Houses in New Hyde Park and Manhattan. Onethird of the donations went to Operation Gratitude, one-third went to one Ronald McDonald House and the rest went to the other.

Sherman said the candy donations are a “win-win” because from a professional standpoint, it takes some of the candy “out of kids’ mouths,” and it gives it to those who didn’t have the same opportunity to collect candy. Although in moderation candy can be fine, “the excesses that these kids go to in collection of candy can sometimes be overwhelming,” he said. “I think for us it’s nice to be able to parlay that into an opportunity to give these types of candies or treats to people who ordinarily wouldn’t be able to trick-or-treat.” Sherman said the positive response from people of all ages and backgrounds and the abundance of donations showed that people can come together and join to support charitable efforts despite factors that draw people away from each other. “Especially in these, what seem to be, very divisive times, it’s nice to see that people, no matter where they come from, patients and nonpatients, that they’re willing to put all that stuff aside and support a worthy cause,” he said. “If we can facilitate those types of stories and relationships, then certainly we feel good about that.” Given the high number of donations, Sherman said he would consider doing the initiative again next year. “Some days felt like more of a candy store than a dental office, but at end of the day when you look back at it, it’s something we were thrilled about doing and thrilled with the response,” he said.


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The Great Neck News, Friday, December 2, 2016

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Doc returns to ventriloquist beginnings BY J OE N I K I C For Dr. Robert Baker, it all started with a sock puppet he made when he was 8 years old. After a more than 30-year career as a gastroenterologist practicing in Great Neck, Baker will step away from medicine at the end of the year and focus on performing ventriloquism. “I did not want to be 75 years old and say ‘gee, I wonder if I could have done this,” he said. “The performer has always been very much a part of me.” “It’s now time to take something that’s been on the back burner for 30 plus years and move it to the front burner,” Baker added. Although he will no longer practice medicine, he said he will give talks to doctors about how to improve the patient experience. Baker said his interest in ventriloquism was sparked when he was 8 years old, “driving my mother crazy,” when she sat him down in front of a television program featuring ventriloquist Terry Bennett. He was immediately infatuated, he said, ran to an encyclopedia, looked up ventriloquism

Dr. Robert Baker and made his first sock puppet. Baker said that after twisting his parents’ arms, they bought him a Darren O’Day ventriloquist doll, which was made famous by ventriloquist Jimmy Nelson, who is known best for starring in commercials for Nestlé chocolate. When he was 17, he said he had a professional ventriloquist

figure personally made for him. “That character is still with me and I open every show with him,” Baker said. During high school, he started doing magic tricks and began performing at children’s birthday parties to work on his craft and make some money. Baker, who is a Manhasset resident, said that when he went

to college, he was faced with the challenge of appealing to an adult audience. He said he found that college audiences appreciated magic, just in a different way than children. “I was doing the same tricks for them as for the kids, but I changed the routine,” Baker said. “The basic magic was still the same.” He said he was able to pay a “significant part” of his medical school fees by performing stage hypnosis and mind-reading acts at Catskill resorts. “Those were really rewarding. It’s just a huge amount of fun,” Baker said. “Hypnosis shows are fun because they rely on the audience members. People like seeing their friends doing funny things.” He said when he went into practice in 1982, he put magic on hold and limited performing to holiday office parties, in private with friends and the occasional charity event. “When I went into practice, a magician friend of mine, who was a prominent New York attorney, told me I couldn’t perform professionally anymore,” Baker said. “He said ‘what are people going to say? You’re a doctor in

the community going to show up doing magic?’” In 2008, he found his way back into performing magic and ventriloquism on stage. Baker said he a took a course in stand-up comedy at Governor’s Comedy Club and was later invited by the executive director of Carolines on Broadway to perform ventriloquism at the venue. He said he started doing his own shows at restaurants in Great Neck and Manhasset before the businesses eventually closed. Baker said he has been performing at various venues, but one favorite is local firehouses. “Firehouse audiences are great because they’re there for two purposes: to drink and to laugh,” he said. “They’re so much fun.” Baker said there were “few feelings” that can describe what it is like for him to perform and receive a positive reaction from an audience. “The character I’m working with delivers a line, then there’s this pause of a few milliseconds and you can almost see it going through people’s heads as they’re processing the joke, then you’re hit what can only be described as Continued on Page 75


The Great Neck News, Friday, December 2, 2016

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News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

NIFA rejects Nassau County budget Oversight board instructs Legislature to fill $36 million budget gap, response due Monday BY ST E P H E N ROMANO The Nassau County Interim Finance Authority rejected the county’s proposed $2.9 billion budget for 2017 on Tuesday night and instructed the county Legislature to fill a budget gap of $36 million, which developed when legislators reduced a proposed $105 traffic ticket fee. NIFA, the county’s financial control board, voted unanimously to reject the unbalanced budget, which was approved by the Legislature on Oct. 31. Lawmakers have until Monday to amend the budget. “We all agree the county’s fiscal situation is severe and needs to be addressed,” Adam Barsky, the NIFA chairman, said. The $105 traffic ticket surcharge was proposed by Nassau County Executive Edward Mangano, and was to be applied to all parking and traffic violations. The fee was proposed to raise $66 million to fund the hiring of 150 police officers and 81 civilian

Theodore Roosevelt Executive and Legislative building police employees, but the Legislature voted earlier this month to cut the fee to $55 for traffic tickets and eliminate it for parking violations. The fee reduction caused the $36 million budget gap. Republican legislators proposed filling the hole with a partial amnesty program, which would require businesses that have violated a 2013 county law

requiring them to report income and expenses to pay 75 percent of their fines. However, the proposal was rejected by NIFA, because the law is currently being challenged in court. “The amnesty program is subject to legal challenge and we don’t believe that those legal challenges will be fully resolved in time for the county to realize any revenues from that program,”

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Barsky said. This is the second consecutive year that NIFA has rejected the county’s budget. A resolution voted on by NIFA indicated that the adjusted budget must include $75 million in tax refund payments already approved and action to fill the $36 million gap. Howard Weitzman was the only NIFA member to vote against the resolution, which passed 5-1, saying “more cuts are necessary to plug the gaps in the budget and meet the NIFA mandated budget goals.” Chris Wright, who was not present, issued a statement agreeing, backed Weitzman and said $80 million in spending should be cut. One NIFA member, Paul Annunziato, disagreed with other members of the board, saying the county’s financial situation isn’t as serious as others said. “I strongly disagree on many of the assertions that are being made,” Annunziato said. “It is important to note the progress the

county has made,” referring to the county’s progress in reducing the budget risk. On Monday, the Legislature will vote on a plan to raise $15 million by increasing a fee to verify tax maps on real estate transactions. That fee was raised $150 in the 2016 budget, according to the budget. The rejection of the budget comes amid a not-guilty plea by Mangano on federal corruption charges. On Tuesday, Republican legislators filed a bill to increase the tax map verification fee to $355 to raise $15 million, and they could resolve the remaining $21 million gap by cutting funding for youth programs and bus services, county officials said. Nassau County Comptroller George Maragos issued a news release on Tuesday saying his office projects a deficit of $121.1 million “on a Generally Accepted Accounting Principles basis, down from a $134.1 million deficit before the amendments.”

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Phillips slams MTA for proposed fare hikes State Sen.-elect calls for Governor Cuomo to add funding to state budget to avert plan BY J OE N I K I C State Sen.-elect Elaine Phillips called on Gov. Andrew Cuomo last week to add funding to next year’s state budget to avert proposed plans by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to increase Long Island Rail Road fares. On Nov. 16, the MTA announced proposals to increase fares for both public transportation and tolls, which includes a $15 maximum increase for monthly LIRR tickets and a $6.75 maximum increase for weekly tickets. “We depend on the MTA to provide commuters a safe, convenient and affordable way to get to and from work but, sadly, it’s failing as delays mount due to overdue maintenance and fares increase to the point where riding the train is becoming unaffordable,” Phillips said. She said that residents in the 7th Senate District, which she was elected to represent

last month, pay as much as $3,444 per year to commute by train into the city. Phillips added that it does not include the additional cost of using subways and buses for LIRR riders to arrive at their final destination. The MTA is also proposing an increase of MetroCard fares to $3 from $2.75 for a single ride. MTA officials said that the proposed increases are the lowest since 2009. “The MTA continues to keep its promise to make sure that fare and toll increases, while necessary to keep our system running, remain as low and possible and that they are done in as equitable a way as possible,” MTA Chairman and CEO Thomas F. Prendergast said in a statement. “Fare and toll revenue cover just 51 percent of the operating budget, which is why this modest increase is needed to ensure that subway, rail, bus and paratransit services continue to operate safely and reliably and to fuel

State Sen.-elect Elaine Phillips the region’s economic and financial growth.” Charts outlining the proposed prices for LIRR tickets by station are available at www. mta.info. Citing a study conducted by state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli, Phillips said recent fare increases have equaled three times the amount of inflation. She was also critical of the LIRR’s 9.8-mile proposal to add

a third track from Floral Park to Hicksville, saying it should focus on making traveling more affordable for riders rather than expensive projects. “Instead of raising fares and promoting expensive mega projects that will cost billions of taxpayer and railroad customers’ money, like the ‘third track,’ the state needs to step up and provide funding to treat Long Island commuters more fairly, support the railroad’s core mission, promote safety and ensure affordability,” Phillips said. “Right now, the MTA is making plans to spend billions of dollars to install new tracks, but without first taking steps to improve safety and keep fares down.” “It’s time for the MTA to get its priorities straight and ensure that commuters are getting the service they pay for without asking them to dig even deeper,” she added. The MTA will hold eight public hearings throughout MTA’s service territory to get

comment from members of the public on the proposed fare hikes. For residents on Long Island, the public hearing will take place at the Hilton Long Island/Huntington, located at 598 Broad Hollow Road in Melville, at 5 p.m. The registration period to speak at the meeting or to have comment placed into the official record is from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Members of the public can register in advance to speak at a meeting by calling 646-2526777 between the hours of 6 a.m. and 10 p.m. Additionally, those interested can submit comments via email by going to www.mta.info or by mailing a letter to MTA Government Affairs, 20th Floor, 2 Broadway, New York, NY 10004. Reach reporter Joe Nikic by e-mail at jnikic@theislandnow. com, by phone at 516.307.1045 x203. Also follow us on Twitter @joenikic and Facebook at facebook.com/theislandnow.


News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

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10 News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

You’re Invited! Our 2nd LSLF

VIRTUAL BENEFIT CONTEST Honoring our Latest Real Live Discovery Grant Recipients! Prabodhika Mallikaratchy, PhD CUNY-Lehman College, Bronx, NY Design and Development o DNA Aptamer Based Immunotherapeutic In memory of Muriel Fusfeld. Grant made possible by Caryl Rubenfeld and the Muriel Fusfeld Foundation.

Katrien Van Roosbroeck PhD University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston TX. Role of MicroRNA’s in Aggressive Transformation of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia to Richter Syndrome.

Akihide Yoshimi, MD, PhD Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. Understanding the Collaborating Events Essential for IDH-Mutant Leukemogenesis. Grant is partially funded by Caryl Rubenfeld and The Muriel Fusfeld Foundation.

Florencia Leticia Palacios, PhD Feinstein Institute at Northwell Health, Manhasset, NY. Characterization of the Biological Function of Musashi2 RNA Binding Protein in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. Grant made possible by Walter Kissinger in memory of Ambassador Felix Schnyder.

Yusuke Tarumoto, PhD Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, NY. Identification of Genetic Dependencies and Therapeutic Targets in AML. Grant made possible by Walter Kissinger in memory of Ambassador Felix Schnyder.

2017 Grand Rounds Lecturer and Fully Endowed LSLF Research Fellow at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center to be determined

Gently close your eyes… Let your mind wander… Hear the music your mind brings forth… At our Virtual Benefit Concert! No need to dress up, hire a sitter, take the bus, train or park your car, or even leave your home! Just choose your perfect moment Let your imagination flow As you listen to your favorite entertainer perform At your favorite venue, in your choice of seating With your favorite guests.

To show your support, kindly send your contribution to: Lauri Strauss Leukemia Foundation 382 Main Street, #106, Port Washington, NY 11050 516-767-1418 office 516-767-1419 fax lslf@lslf.com www.lslf.org

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The Great Neck News, Friday, December 2, 2016

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12 The Great Neck News, Friday, December 2, 2016

ELECT DONNA PEIREZ TO THE GREAT NECK BOARD OF EDUCATION For almost 50 years Donna Peirez has devoted herself—as a parent, volunteer, and teacher— to the best possible education for our children.

FOR DONNA, THE ONLY CONSTITUENCY THAT MATTERS IS THE CHILDREN.

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Licensed Real Estate Salesperson C: 917.974.4500 | mindy.greenberg@elliman.com | GreatNeckForSale.com Top Producer 2015, Units Douglas Elliman (Great Neck) TV Interior Design Celebrity Visit us at elliman.com/long-island KNOWN GLOBALLY. LOVED LOCALLY. 110 WALT WHITMAN ROAD, HUNTINGTON STATION, NY, 11746. 631.549.7401 | © 2016 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS ARE DEEMED RELIABLE, BUT SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. PHOTOS SHOWN MAY HAVE BEEN MANIPULATED. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Minimalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; environmental impact: 3rd track study BY J OE N I K I C The Long Island Rail Roadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposal to construct a 9.8-mile third track between Floral Park and Hicksville will take three to four years to complete at a cost of about $2 billion, according to a draft environmental impact report released Monday. The environmental report for the LIRRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Main Line expansion states that the project would have a â&#x20AC;&#x153;minimalâ&#x20AC;? adverse impact and addresses quality of life concerns for those in the surrounding communities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Expanding the Main Line is crucial to the future of Long Island and its residents,â&#x20AC;? Gov. Andrew Cuomo said in a statement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;By increasing capacity on one of the LIRRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s busiest corridors and eliminating all street-level grade crossings, this project will result in less traďŹ&#x192;c, less congestion and a transportation network that meets the needs of current and future generations of Long Islanders.â&#x20AC;? The project, which Cuomo proposed in January 2016, was initially expected to cost $1 billion, and later on $1.5 billion. A more precise time period for completion will be determined after a â&#x20AC;&#x153;competitively bid contractâ&#x20AC;? is awarded to a contractor, according to the study, but work at any speciďŹ c location will not take longer than two years. The project calls for 2,257 additional parking spaces in New Hyde Park, Mineola, Westbury and Hicksville. In New Hyde Park, the MTA will add 95 parking spaces, while 1,133 parking spaces would be added to two parking garages on Second Street and Mineola Boulevard that currently oďŹ&#x20AC;er 115 spaces and 120 spaces, respectively. The New Hyde Park, Merillon Avenue, Mineola, Carle Place and Westbury LIRR stations will also see improvements, which include platforms to accommodate 12-car trains, pedestrian overpasses and underpasses to connect eastbound and westbound platforms, heated platforms and ADA-compliant ramps. According to the study, noise pollution would be mitigated by â&#x20AC;&#x153;sound alienation wallsâ&#x20AC;? and the elimination of seven streetlevel railroad crossings, ďŹ ve of which are in New Hyde Park and Mineola. Businesses would not be aďŹ&#x20AC;ected by the

project, and it is estimated to generate approximately $3.18 billion for Nassau County and approximately $3.33 billion for the New York State economy overall, according to the study. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Governor Cuomo challenged us to undertake a project to transform the LIRR experience for both passengers and local communities, and to do so with an unprecedented level of community consultation and outreach â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exactly what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing now,â&#x20AC;? MTA Chairman Thomas Prendergast said in a statement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have gone to extraordinary lengths to listen to what the public wants out of this project. We will continue to study the impacts of this proposal and take input from all stakeholders, including our neighbors along the tracks and Main Line customers from across Long Island and New York City.â&#x20AC;? Although the LIRR will continue its outreach eďŹ&#x20AC;orts through public meetings, community consulting, keeping elected oďŹ&#x192;cials and stakeholders updated on new information and public comments, some local elected oďŹ&#x192;cials said they took issue with the time period they were given to respond to the study. The deadline for comment is Jan. 31. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The consultants for the LIRR had six months to prepare the document but we, the public, are now given only six weeks to review the material and provide comment,â&#x20AC;? said Robert Lofaro, mayor of the Village of New Hyde, who has been critical of the plan since it was proposed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once again, the governor, the MTA and the LIRR are trying to limit the voices of the people who will be most aďŹ&#x20AC;ected by this project.â&#x20AC;? Mayor Thomas Tweedy of the Village of Floral Park said he was concerned with the speed at which the project was progressing and the limited time given to the public to examine the 21-chapter study. Tweedy said he felt the cost and time period for construction given was not realistic or reliable given the MTAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;track recordâ&#x20AC;? with projects such as East Side Access, which is extending LIRR service to Grand Central Terminal, taking longer and costing more than originally anticipated. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It just seems from the standpoint of manpower and the ability to work, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an awContinued on Page 75

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Doc gets $1.8M research grant BY M A X Z A H N Back pain is the most common cause of disability in the United States, according to the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research in Manhasset. Nadeen Chahine, a Ph.D. scientist with the organization, took a step last month toward addressing the ailmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impact when she received a ďŹ ve-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to explore inďŹ&#x201A;am-

Nadeen Chahine, a research scientist at the Feinstein Institute who was recently awarded a $1.8 million grant.

mationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role in degenerative disc diseases of the spine, the institute said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spine- and disc-related pain aďŹ&#x20AC;ect people from young adulthood onward, in the prime of their life when theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re most busy in careers and having families. So it causes a tremendous economic burden as well as a health care burden,â&#x20AC;? Chahine said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My area of interest is to try to understand what causes the discs and soft Continued on Page 69

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14 News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

Opinion OUR VIEWS

Editorial Cartoon

Responding to hate speech

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he swastika drawn on the wall in a boys bathroom at Paul D. Schreiber High School in Port Washington two weeks ago appeared to be written in pencil and covered less than a third of a tile. After the swastika was reported by a student, the school immediately closed the bathroom and cleaned the wall. Kathleen Mooney, the Port Washington school district superintendent, then responded forcefully, saying, “This type of behavior is completely unacceptable, does not represent who we are as a school district or a community, and will not be tolerated.” Mooney also praised the student who reported the incident and announced an investigation to determine who drew the swastika In short, the school district’s was proactive and forceful. But though the drawing of swastika may be as the school district called it — an “isolated incident” — more needs to be done. Especially at a time when hate speech and symbols of hate have become far too common and far too accepted. And especially in response to a symbol under which six million Jews died and a world war was fought that claimed the lives of 60 million people, including 400,000 American service members. Just a day after the swastika was found in Port Washington, the National Policy Institute — a think tank that is part of the

so-called “alt-right” movement, which includes neo-Nazis, white supremacists and antiSemites — held a gathering at the federally owned Ronald Reagan Building in Washington, D.C. A video of the meeting, which came in the wake of Donald Trump’s surprising election victory, showed the leader of the institute shouting “Hail Trump, hail our people, hail victory!” as some of the people in attendance gave the Nazi salute. This did not take place in a vacuum. Incidents of hate speech directed at Mexicans, Muslims, blacks and Jews rose dramatically after Trump’s election. All of which should come as no surprise. During his campaign, Trump called undocumented Mexican immigrants “rapists,” said a judge should be disqualified from hearing a case about Trump University because of his Mexican descent, proposed to ban all Muslims from entering the country, mocked a disabled reporter, singled out violence in black communities, criticized women on the basis of their looks and ran advertising linking Jews to global financiers hostile to America. And after he was elected, Trump appointed Steve Bannon, the former head of a website linked to the “alt-right,” as his chief White House strategist. The website’s headlines have included “Birth Control Makes Women Unattractive and Crazy” and "Bill Kristol: Republican Spoiler, Renegade Jew.”

BLANK SLATE MEDIA LLC 105 Hillside Avenue, Williston Park, NY 11596 Phone: 516-307-1045 Fax: 516-307-1046 E-mail: hblank@theislandnow.com EDITOR AND PUBLISHER Steven Blank

Trump and his campaign have maintained he was merely advocating an “America First” policy that sought to secure the country’s borders and protect the country against violent extremists, that he had no antipathy to any particular group and he wouldn’t be constrained by “political correctness." The reaction of extremist groups to Trump’s statements seems to say otherwise. The Trump transition team initially issued a tepid response to the National Policy Institute meeting — at a time Trump was on Twitter blasting the cast of “Hamilton” for its call to Vice President-elect Mike Pence to respect the country’s diversity and “uphold our American values and to work on behalf of all

of us.” "President-elect Trump has continued to denounce racism of any kind and he was elected because he will be the leader for every American,” Trump-Pence transition spokesman Bryan Lanza said in a statement. Trump issued a stronger condemnation a few days later at an interview at The New York Times. “I disavow and condemn them,” Trump said. After a campaign hailed by white nationalists with little or no discouragement by Trump, his disavowal is a good starting point if he wants to be the leader for every American. We hope he goes further, but to say we have our doubts is more than an understatement.

OFFICE MANAGER Holly Blank REPORTERS Joe Nikic, Noah Manskar, Stephen Romano, Max Zahn

Even if he is sincere, it will take more than Trump alone to undo the divisiveness of the campaign. The Holocaust Memorial Museum’s response to the meeting of the National Policy Institute instructs us both in how unspeakable acts begin and how to prevent them from happening again. “The Holocaust did not begin with killings: it began with words,” the museum said. “The museum calls on all American citizens, our religious and civic leaders and the leadership of all branches of the government to confront racist thinking and divisive hateful speech.” We hope this is a lesson learned well beyond a high school in Port Washington.

EDITORIAL DESIGNERS Lorens Morris, Yvonne Farley CLASSIFIED Linda Matinale

COLUMNIST Karen Rubin ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Stacy Shaughenessy, Melissa Spitalnick, Lee Reynolds ART DIRECTOR Jewell Davis PRODUCTION MANAGER Rosemarie Palacios

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Williston Times • Great Neck News Herald Courier • Roslyn Times Manhasset Times • Port Washington Times


News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

15

OUT OF LEFT FIELD

Women interrupted, but not for long

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embers of the Electoral College meet in their respective states on Dec. 19. Despite three different approaches to block Donald Trump, it is not likely that Hillary Clinton will take the Presidential Oath on Jan. 20. Still, her campaign — flawed as it was, and grossly distorted by the rise of “fake news” — represents another step forward in the advancement of female leaders for the United States. Clinton received 2 million more popular votes than Trump — the most ever by a “losing” candidate. Al Gore won the popular vote in 2000 by more than 600,000. Our national citizens have signaled they are now ready for a woman chief executive and commander-in-chief — it would behoove Mr. Trump to keep that in mind. Do you remember the Virginia Slims ads, ironically introduced in 1968? “You’ve come a long way, baby!” What a sexist way to sell cigarettes by trying to dramatize progress women had made to that time.

Protest and reform are at the heart of American democracy, and they have been producing more gender equity and inclusion. The progress has been uneven, but Helen Fisher emphasizes that the 21st century will be led by “the first sex” — her response to Simone DeBeauvoir’s 1952 depiction of women as “the second sex”. Along the way, Pat Schroeder, longest serving female member of Congress, until her record was recently eclipsed by Barbara Mikulski, offered an incisive perspective in her appropriately entitled book of 1998: “Twenty Years of Housework and the Place is Still a Mess.” Schroeder was the first woman elected to Congress from Colorado in 1972. At the time only 14 females served in the House of Representatives. After the 2016 election there will be a record-tying 104 women in the 115th United States Congress — 83 of them in the House, nearly a 600 percent increase since Schroeder’s election. In a year when most pundits and citizens expected a woman to be elected President, feminists

MICHAEL D’INNOCENZO Out of Left Field might have hoped for even larger gains. However, an examination of women in the House and Senate illustrates demographic and Democratic trends that will shape future elections. Just as Republican candidates have lost the popular vote in six of the last seven presidential elections, too often overlooked for significance, so too, the party differences for women in Congress are another danger sign for Republicans. Here are some of the trends worth noting — all of then augur well for Democrats in terms of national demographics.

Six new women of color have been elected to the House, contributing to a new historic high of 34 — 31 Democrats, three Republicans. In that record group, AfricanAmerican women number 17 Democrats, and only one Republican. Of the nine Hispanics in 2017, seven are Democrats, and only two Republicans — just imagine what can happen in 2018 elections if Donald Trump holds to his “deportation squads” that will surely disrupt Latino families, friends and communities. There will be seven Democratic Asian-Pacific-Islander women in the 2017 House — there are zero Republicans from that group. In recent elections, “AsianAmericans” have sometimes given even higher support for Democrats than latinos. Only two female House incumbents failed in reelection bids — both losers were Republicans. In competition for eight open seats, Democrats won six. In 2017 the House will have 62 Democratic women, and only

21 Republicans. When we turn to the Senate, demographic trends even more dramatically bolster Democrats. Of 21 Women in the 2017 Senate, 16 will be Democrats. Especially noteworthy, with three new Democratic senators of color, they will quadruple the number of women of color serving simultaneously. Indeed, besides these four in 2017, only one other woman of color has ever been elected to the Senate in all of American history. Consider two other factors here regarding key roles by women when the new government meets in 2017. Joining the GOP House group will be Liz Cheney. She replaces the former Wyoming representative — one of only three women who wanted to be addressed as “congressman”. More important, Cheney is likely to take Cynthia Lummis’ spot on the so-called “house freedom caucus” as the only female among 40 extreme conservatives that Long Island Republican Congressman Peter King has called “the crazies.” Continued on Page 16

A LOOK ON THE LIGHTER SIDE

It starts with an ‘m’ and ends with a ‘y’

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octor,” I said, “I keep forgetting things.” “Like what?” “Ummmmm.....” What, indeed? There were dozens of examples, but suddenly I couldn’t recall a single one. “Like all the examples I was going to tell you,” I lamely finished. “You’re probably just under a lot of stress,” he said. Yes, I wanted to shout — the stress of knowing that my mind is disintegrating, piece by itty-bitty piece. “Why didn’t you save yourself the co-pay and just talk to me?” said a friend later, over coffee. “I could have told you what stress you’re under. It starts with an M.” “Memory loss?” “Here’s another clue: You could call it estrogen withdrawal.” “Oh. Well, at least it isn’t Alzheimer’s...but does that mean you’ve been forgetting things, too?” “Let’s just say that I don’t enjoy watching Jeopardy as much as I used to.” I used to enjoy Jeopardy, my-

self. In fact, when I was in high school, I was on our team for “It’s Academic,” a local television station’s quiz show where area high schools competed every week. I used to know all sorts of trivia, from the countries and capitals of Africa — my favorite was Ouagadougou, in Upper Volta, now Burkina Faso — to which musical featured the song “Baubles, Bangles and Beads” — Kismet — to who ran against Harry S. Truman in his second campaign for President — trick question, he only ran once. Plus, for extra credit, there should not be a period after that “S” in Truman’s name, as he always insisted it didn’t stand for anything. Nowadays, I’m lucky if I remember my own middle name. Too often, I find myself staring into the refrigerator, not seeing whatever I was looking for because I can’t remember what it was — only to close the refrigerator and go back to the living room, sit down again, and remember: “oh yes, a cup of coffee!” Repeat that process a dozen times a day, and then wonder

JUDY EPSTEIN A Look on the Lighter Side where the time has gone — and before you start, I can tell you, don’t go looking for that in the refrigerator! Another thing I can never remember is where I left my glasses. Every night and every morning, my children had to help in the search, because I refused to wear the librarian-strings people gave me. “As lost as mommy’s glasses,” my 11-year-old once contributed as an example of “simile” in English class. Worst of all for a compulsive

talker and writer, I have begun to find myself at a loss for words. “I know it begins with a K,” I said, when one child asked me for a synonym for “curdle.” Six days later, I was driving the other child somewhere when it finally came to me: “Coagulate!” At least it sounds like a “K.” I wonder if we could design a new game show for me — say, “Menopausal Pursuit,” or “Menopause Jeopardy!” Categories could be: Names, Places, Facts and Faces — all followed by the phrase “That I Used to Know.” For example, when you run into someone who “looks familiar,” do you spontaneously remember having met them before? Ten points! Do you remember where? Fifty points! Never mind their name. They probably don’t remember yours either. When your answer to a question is “I don’t remember the word, but I know it starts with an ‘S’,” you get 50 points if there turns out to actually be an “S” anywhere in the word. When a child picks up a

knick-knack in your house, 20 points if you can remember where, or why, you got it, before it hits the ground. For example: “honey, please put that down; it’s the incredibly expensive teacup Daddy and I bought on our honeymoon in Paris.” “But you told us you and Daddy never went to Paris!” “Okay, so we bought it at the airport, later, to pretend we’d gone to Paris. Now, put it down!” Instead of a bird descending when you say the secret word, you will be randomly overcome with sudden hot flashes. And, in the Double or Nothing Final Round, no one needs to bother with the actual answer. “Who is buried in Grant’s Tomb?” Instead, full credit will be awarded to every contestant who leaps up, after the answer is revealed, and shouts out “I knew that!” The prize will be a pad of paper and a pencil, for writing down whatever it is you were looking for in the refrigerator. Just don’t put down “my mind.” That’s gone forever.


16 News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

PROFESSOR’S PERSPECTIVE

Lesson for media-academia complex

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s the clock approached midnight on Election Day, our collective bubble began bursting and my iPhone began blowing up. Colleagues from my two professions, journalism and academia, and I were shell-shocked the presidential election didn’t go as expected. “This is so f---ed up!” texted a journalist. “Oh my God!” pinged a professor. “We will be the ones ostracized if he wins.” When Donald Trump’s win was official, another academic acquaintance observed: “It’s an indictment on all of us.” Indeed, it was an epic failure for the media-academia complex. And not just because nearly every poll showing Trump had little-to-no chance of winning was a collaborative effort between media outlets and universities. Journalists are supposed to inform the public about what’s happening in society. Professors are expected to educate students about the real world. But, this election, both were out of touch with reality. While some correctly predicted the outcome, most of us perished the thought. Our hubris may have even suppressed Hillary Clinton’s turnout and mobilized angry

Trump supporters. We need to reckon with our flaws, or risk becoming completely irrelevant in the political process. Here are some ways we can improve: First, we must stop being insufferable know-it-alls. As scribes and scholars, we have expertise in a particular beat or field, but that doesn’t make us qualified to determine which candidate is best to lead 320 million Americans, each of whom has many and varied needs. Nor is it our job. Yet, law professor Stanley Fish acknowledged in a New York Times op-ed, it’s “so commonplace for professors to regularly equate the possession of an advanced degree with virtue.” Likewise — “journalists, at our worst, see ourselves as a priestly caste,” CBS political editor Will Rahn confessed in a column. “We believe we not only have access to the indisputable facts, but also a greater truth.” Trump showed us we’re not as smart as we think. It’s time for some humility. As Socrates, a great teacher with a knack for a good sound bite, said: “the only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.” But that’s difficult to realize when living in a bubble. The election exposed how

MARK GRABOWSKI Professor’s Perspective isolated and insulated we are from the typical Trump voter: a Republican who lacks a college degree and who lives in Middle America, according to exit polls. By contrast, journalists and professors are highly educated and tend to be liberal, studies show. Universities are concentrated on the east and west coasts. Meanwhile, “journalism jobs are leaving the middle of the country and heading for the coasts” due to the Internet, Harvard’s Nieman Journalism Lab found. We care about different things, too. While the media-academia complex fixated on social justice, exit polls showed the most important issue for Trump voters was the economy.

But, as professor Liz Swan decried in Psychology Today, we made “ignorant presumptions about how others are feeling or thinking without even having a conversation with them.” Although prejudice may be unavoidable, as professors and journalists we’re professionally obligated to try to be fair. However, shortly before the school year started, a Gettysburg College political science professor declared in a Philadelphia Inquirer op-ed that a Trump presidency was “unteachable” and it would be “a disservice to students to attempt to provide balance.” The next day, The New York Times published a cover story calling on reporters to “throw out the textbook American journalism has been using” even though “it may not always seem fair to Mr. Trump.” Many other journalists and professors adopted this approach, creating an echo chamber and hurting their professions’ integrity. Critical thinking, the American Philosophical Association stresses, requires being objective and fair-minded in evaluation. “Ethical journalism,” the Society of Professional Journalists asserts, “should be accurate and fair.” Small wonder that studies show critical thinking among

college students and public trust in the media are at all-time lows. If we want others to support our calls for social justice, we must first be fair ourselves. Thankfully, some leading media and academic institutions have started addressing these problems. Even before the primary elections began, the University of Chicago released a powerful statement committing the school to freedom of expression, including “ideas and opinions — individuals — find unwelcome, disagreeable, or even deeply offensive.” Immediately after the election, The New York Times’ publisher and top editor promised to “rededicate” themselves to reporting “honestly” and “impartially.” Others in the media and academia should follow suit. But, a few weeks after the election, it’s clear from perusing social media that many scholars and scribes still haven’t learned much from November’s surprise. And it doesn’t take a college degree to know what happens when you don’t learn from history. Mark Grabowski Journalism professor at Adelphi University and former political journalist

Women interrupted Castro’s death offers hope Continued from Page 15 This is the group that drove John Boehner to resign as GOP Speaker. Historian Jon Meacham has described the former President George H.W. Bush and others as furious with Liz and her mother Lynn for pushing Dick Cheney to more extreme positions in the Bush 43 presidency. Liz and her mom have been described as team “iron ass.” The Washington Post notes: “The Cheney women adopted the moniker with pride.”

As an early supporter of Trump and a far-right conservative, Liz is likely to cause huge mischief as a new member of the House — a reason Sen. Rand Paul endorsed her Wyoming GOP opponent. A second consideration is the fantasy of many Democrats that Michele Obama will seek office. If Trump and Cheney “go low,” Ms. Obama, as the person with the highest approval rating in the United States, could be best equipped to channel Eleanor Roosevelt “to go high.”

Fidel Castro has died at age 90 and now maybe there is hope for the people of Cuba. Here was a tyrant that was most nefarious by his actions and had impoverished his nation and his own people. His brutal regime executed thousands of innocent people. As reported, Fidel Castro admitted holding 15,000 political prisoners. It was also reported that over 582 people were shot by firing squad in a two year period. And during the 1960s the United States and the Soviet Union were on the verge of nu-

LETTERS POLICY Letters should be typed or neatly handwritten, and those longer than 300 words may be edited for brevity and clarity. All letters must include the writer’s name and phone number for verification. Anonymously sent letters will not be printed. Letters must be received by Monday noon to appear in the next week’s paper. All letters become the property of Blank Slate Media LLC and may be republished in any format. Letters can be e-mailed to news@theislandnow.com or mailed to Blank Slate Media, 105 Hillside Ave., Williston Park, NY 11596.

clear war over missiles in Cuba. Now on a personal note my mother became good friends with a woman on 213th street in Queens Village in the 1950s. She had escape from Cuba with her three sons and one daughter after her husband was killed by Castro’s rebels. She and her sons worked hard and was able to buy a house in Queens Village. I remember she would take care of me while my mother had to do errands. Her name was Marie and I found her to be a most kind woman who worked hard for her family and believed in the American dream and hated what Castro did to Cuba. I also remember she even gave my mother a set of maracas for a present because my mother likeLatin Americanmusic. Marie also try to teach me how to play the piano which was in her living room. After my mother died she

told my father if there was anything she could do to help. A number of years later she sold the house in Queens Village and invested in a apartment building — I think somewhere in Queens. As I think back Marie was truly an example of the Cuba immigrants that have come to the America. I still don’t understand how Fidel Castro was able to stay in power all these decades. I therefore pray for the Cuba people that they can be afforded more freedom, economic security and religious freedom. Although, Raul Castro is still in power and can prevent that from happening. But that regime may also pass away. So in closing let me say:” Viva, Cuba and its’ people for its’ a new day.” Frederick R. Bedell Jr. Mineola


News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

17

READERS WRITE

Trump’s election sets America back

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onald Trump is no Adolf Hitler. Certainly there are similarities — they were obsessed with controlling their public image. They took great joy in affixing their name to public places. They enjoyed finding dirt that could be used for blackmail to manipulate, or threaten, people into compliance. They employed counterfeiting to achieve their goals. In Hitler’s case, it was the creation of counterfeit histories — the ‘stab in the back’ myth, the ‘Jewish cabal’ myth — in addition to the counterfeit signs and facilities meant to fool people into believing that the gas chamber was a communal shower. This list can go on. Trump employed the art of counterfeiting by creating a ‘university’ where he pretended to offer useful advice for a large sum of money. He created a ‘foundation’ that could accept donations. He lent his name to construction projects, giving them the veneer of respectability, when often they were scams. This list can go on.

Still, Trump is no Hitler. Hitler could act as his own lawyer in a court of law, as he did after his failed 1923 coup. Hitler possessed a core ideology, however reprehensible. Hitler could express himself using more than 140 characters. Trump, thankfully, possesses none of these qualities. For Trump to be Hitler, he would need to have characteristics that go beyond bombast, narcissism, and the ability to work a crowd into a frenzy. He’d need the craftiness of a Steve Bannon, the cynicism of a Paul Ryan, and the diabolical cunning of a Newt Gingrich. Yet even this would not be sufficient to create a Hitler — a human being capable of orchestrating the inhuman on a massive scale. However, let’s not break open the champagne to celebrate Trump’s shortcomings. Trump has resuscitated the horrors of American history. If Reagan made us believe that greed is good, and Bush made us believe that torture is good, Trump has made a fright-

eningly large segment of the populace believe that hatred is good. He did not do this all alone. He had many enablers in the media, in the halls of Congress, and in the upper reaches of business. The three decades long I.V. drip of hate that has come out of the mouths of Limbaugh, Hannity, O’Reilly, Coulter, and others, combined with nearly two decades of digitally distributed hate, combined with faux histories — counterfeit histories — put forth by O’Reilly, Pat Buchanan, Jonah Goldberg, and others, has prepared the hearts and minds of millions to embrace hatred, to cherish it as an unalloyed good. On Jan. 20, 2017, when we put a madman at the helm of the most powerful nation on earth, we should not think that America will suddenly have transit camps, work camps, or killing centers. We will not have Nuremberg Laws —however there may be faint echoes of these things. Our patriotic storm troops may be pulling people out of their homes, tossing them into detention centers, and sending them back home where, in some cases, death awaits.

Our version of the Nuremberg Laws may be in the guise of exclusionary quotas, reverse discrimination lawsuits. Will our home-grown neo-Nazis claim that they are being unfairly excluded from the halls of academia by the culture of political correctness? And an even newer Jim Crow that goes beyond the nationwide carceral state and which becomes international in scope. We may be marching towards an America that we have yet to fully imagine, an America where every crackpot Republican idea will be given serious consideration, and stands a serious chance of being implemented. Trump may not be Hitler, but the psychological damage approaches the scale of a Hitler. Everything that we have cherished, that we have considered inalienable, that we have taken as the bedrock of America’s greatness, has been broken. On Jan. 20, 2017, this can only get worse. Jeff Siegel Port Washington

Turkey Trot rules are for the birds

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fter moving to Port Washington four years ago, the annual Turkey Trot has become a tradition in our family and one we look forward to every year. This year, as in the past, my kids looked me up to tell me I had placed second in my age group. However, on further research, we realized I had actually placed fifth, according to my “GunTime,” and only placed second, according to my “NetTime.” It didn’t make sense to me so I did a little research into the scoring system, since participants were not informed about how their times would be recognized in any of the entrant information or details about the race. Runners in a chip-timed race, which are used by most road races these days, usually have two sets of times, which are called GunTime and NetTime. In many running events, organizations give each

registrant a “chip time” with a radio frequency identification chip adhered to the back of their bib number, a starting line mat and a finish line mat. Each finisher receives a NetTime that “starts” when you cross the starting mats, “StartTime,” and “finishes” when you cross the finish mats, FinishTime. When you cross the starting line, the mats activate the chip and read its unique code from antennas embedded within the mats. The time of day is recorded and paired with your chip code and stored in a special computer box called a decoder that is attached to the mats. The same exact thing happens at the finish line as the exact global positioning system time of day is recorded when you cross the line. Each finisher also gets a GunTime. This time starts when the starting device, gun, air

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determination that each child receive the best education possible. She recognizes that “one size fits all” doesn’t apply to our students. We need a candidate that can oversee a quality education within the constraints of difficult economic times. Donna Peirez is that candidate. Shelly Stern Great Neck

Faith Paris Port Washington

America is mad as hell

Peirez for ed board onna Peirez brings a unique perspective to the role of a member of the Board of Education. As a long-time resident of Great Neck, she is mindful of the rising cost of education. She is intimately aware of the limits that the tax cap puts on running the school district. Having worked beside Donna for many years, I observed that she has an incredible understanding of what the children in our community need and a

horn, voice command, is implemented to begin the race, regardless how long it takes the participant to get to the actual starting line. I learned that the Port Washington Community Chest determines its Turkey Trot winners by GunTime. You have to physically cross the Finish line before someone else in order to be recognized as the winner, even if you have run a full minute faster than them. This was not publicized anywhere but now I know for next year. Though you have to wonder why they have a chip system if they don’t use it in any official capacity. And to all those looking to place first, second or third — make sure you get to the front of the race.

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’m mad as hell, and I’m not going to take it anymore,” — that’s the real message from the election. It’s been clear for years that the United States Congress and the Washington establishment doesn’t do anything. Well they talk a lot and pose for pictures and solicit campaign contributions — so they can get re-elected and talk to each other some more. Our system of government is broken. The lobbyists have taken over. Money talks and it doesn’t say: “let’s help the little guy — the average Joe.”

Money says: “let’s help ourselves — the little guy be damned.” Corruption is the norm. Lying is expected. Honesty is in short supply. Unbiased news reporting is a myth. It’s been said that people get the kind of government they deserve. So what does that say about America? “We have met the enemy, and it is us.” Dave Golbert Great Neck

Visit us Online at www.theislandnow.com


18 News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

READERS WRITE

Paper’s columnists, Dems out of touch

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was a bit tired when I read the Nov. 18 edition, so I went back and re-read it. It was so partisan — I couldn’t decide whether to laugh or get angry. I have come to respect the columns of Jerry Kremer, and as usual, he did not disappoint. “Election is over, time to move on,” is sage and correct — a wise man. That is what we do here in America. All the crybabies and sore losers need to go to their safe spaces, and have some milk and cookies, and enjoy their Play Dough. As a retired United States Navy Officer, who has lived in 23 states, and been to 49 of the 50, missing North Dakota, I am always somewhere between amused and annoyed when the very liberal people of the North Shore of Nassau County think

that they are wiser and more sage than the rest of the United States, and just can’t imagine why others don’t see the sagacity of their positions. This election has proven just that — that many people in the United States who are good citizens and love their country don’t agree with a lot of people around here, and for good reasons. I have read the columns of Judy Epstein, and I find her amusing and refreshing most of the time, but not this time. I have traded shots recently with several women who wanted to see a woman in the White House, regardless of who she was or what she stood for. Hillary Clinton was a terrible candidate, and most people with any sense of right and wrong knew that. A sage lady I work with likened her candidacy to a “coro-

nation.“ Fortunately, enough of us weren’t buying. Those pundits who attempt to blame it on “sexism” or “white-lash “ are stupefyingly clueless. This had nothing to do with racism or sexism. If Condoleeza Rice ran for President, I would have voted for her-because she would have been a good President. Voting for Hillary because she is a woman is like buying a car because you like the color, and ignoring everything else that you want in a car. The time is not far off when we will have a woman President, but Hillary was totally unsuited and unsuitable. Rebuffed on her health care plan as First Lady — you can have two for the price of one — a nothing United States senator from New York, others would

Right choice for MLW/FD

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y name is Steven Flynn, and my wife Cindy and I are lifetime residents of Manhasset. My daughter Michelle just graduated with the class of 2016 from Manhasset High School, and my son Aiden is attending kindergarten at Shelter Rock. I am writing to inform you that on Tuesday, Dec. 13, I will be running for the position of Manhasset-Lakeville Water/Fire Commissioner. My last 18 years of working with a water distribution system has given me extensive knowledge on the everyday operations of how water systems operate. Additionally, I am a New York State certified water operator for the past 16 years. I have proudly served my community for 27 years as a volunteer firefighter, and I understand what is needed to provide the best fire/emergency medical services to the district. In my years of

service as a volunteer firefighter, I have held the position of 2nd Lieutenant, 1st Lieutenant, and Captain from 2000 to 2006. I hope that the qualifications I have mentioned above will allow you to give me a chance to serve as your next commissioner. My extensive water and fire experience, coupled with my leadership positions, gives me the experience and insight into what our district needs. Please vote on Tuesday, Dec. 13 from 12 p.m. to 9 p.m. at firehouses no. 1, 3, 4, and 5. I appreciate your support, and I’d like to wish you and your family a very happy, healthy and safe holiday season. Remember — your vote counts.

call her a carpet-bagger, and a less than successful Secretary of State. And her treatment of those around her when not on camera? Thanks, but no thanks. I am not a huge Trump fan, though I voted for him. America is a center/slightly right country. Barack Obama took us way too far to the left. There had to be a swing back to center. How far — we’ll have to wait and see, however Obama knows that his leftist “vision” for America, financed by George Soros, will be rolled back. To read the column by Michael D’Innocenzo, a retired History professor, discussing abandoning the Electoral College in favor of the popular vote, makes me want to tell him it’s time for him to retire. As a history major myself, I was always taught to be very

sidering fracking in New York State Patty Katz joined state Assemblywoman Michelle Schimel and myself on a trip to Dimock, Pa., to witness first hand the effects of hydrofracking on water contamination. Patty has been a member of The Town of North Hempstead Ecological Commission for the past six years as well as the Environmental Legacy Fund working on initiatives to protect the environment and open space. Not to mention her visits with me to a recycling facility in Brookhaven, chairing the Envi-

William C. Kempner Lt. United States Navy Retired Roslyn Heights

Celebrating Christmas in Port

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n celebration of the upcoming Christmas season, the Port Washington Knights of Columbus Council No.1227, Columbiettes and the John Michael Marino Lodge No.1389 Order Sons of Italy in America join together to celebrate the Annual Lighting of the Nativity. The event takes place on Tuesday, Dec. 6 at 7 p.m. at the fire medics building located at Steven and Cindy Flynn 423 Port Washington Blvd. The lighting will include the Manhasset blessing of the Nativity followed by singing of traditional Christmas carols. The Knights of Columbus and Columbiettes are hosting refreshments and homemade soup at the council’s building at 155

Right pick for sewer district It is with great pleasure and passion for the environment as well as the Great Neck community that I urge you to go out and vote for Patty Katz on Dec. 13 for commissioner of the Great Neck Water Pollution Control District. As the former Chief Sustainability Officer of The Town of North Hempstead and a 30 year Great Neck former resident I can think of no one in the community who has worked harder to preserve and protect water quality. When Gov. Cuomo was con-

careful of revisionists, and revisionism, as truth is usually the first casualty. The Electoral College is a pillar of our republic. Otherwise, the people in New York and California and Chicago can vote and the rest of the nation doesn’t matter. I’m sure his opinion would be different were the shoe on the other foot. Benjamin Franklin said it: “We‘ve given you a republic if you can keep it.” Most Americans are desperately in need of a civics course, or in Prof D’Innocenzo‘s case — due for a refresher. The system of “checks and balances” worked as designed. The Republic will survive.

ronmental Committee for Reach out America and raising money to build a well in Kenya providing access to clean, safe water to the local water crisis. All as a dedicated volunteer. onna Peirez is the most The Great Neck Water Polqualified candidate for lution Control District is fortuthe seat on the Great nate to have the opportunity Neck Board of Educato have Patty Katz available to tion. serve as commissioner. We have known her for 40 I ask you to please go out years. and vote for her on Tuesday, During that time she has Dec. 13. been a parent, PTA leader, community activist, and educator. Fran Reid She is committed to mainNorthport taining educational excellence

Manorhaven Blvd.. Everyone in the community is welcome to attend. This promises to be a wonderful start to the Christmas holiday season. The event is sponsored by two outstanding Port Washington organizations. Everyone is welcome so please join us as we celebrate the birth of Christ. Anthony Carpinelli Grand Knight Rita DiLucia Presisdent, Columbiettes Marianne Bortone Prince President, Sons of Italy Lodge

Peirez the right pick

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and, as a retiree, she is keenly aware of the fiscal realities facing the schools. Great Neck would be very fortunate to elect such a knowledgeable, intelligent, fair minded and dedicated individual to serve on the school board. Barbara and Stephen Singer Great Neck


News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

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22 News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

OUR TOWN

NHP fights battle against citification It’s about time I wrote about New Hyde Park, that little hamlet just west of Williston Park. I had always thought that New Hyde Park was the area between Hillside Avenue and Jericho Turnpike and between Herricks Road and Denton Avenue. How wrong I was. Actually what I thought of as New Hyde Park is made up of Herricks, North New Hyde Park, Garden City Park, Manhasset Hills and New Hyde Park proper. I like to describe a town’s character by pointing to its most magical spot. Paris has the Eiffel Tower and London has Westminster Abbey. Closer to home, Williston Park has Hildebrandt’s, Manhasset has the Miracle Mile and Port Washington has Louie’s Oyster Bar and Grille. So what’s the architectural center point that best symbolizes New Hyde Park? Given the fact that New Hyde Park is actually four towns in one, this is sure to be a challenge. Once again my plan is to plot a minor excursion into this western hinterland and keep my eyes open. I begin at the intersection of Herricks and Hillside and head south. I give a tearful goodbye to Williston Park and immediately

to my right is Herrill Lanes. I work with professional bowlers so I’ve been there before. I’ve always liked the sound that bowling balls make when they hit the pins. And who doesn’t like those comfy bowling shoes — a real throw-back to the fifties. However, I don’t like the smell of bowling alleys — too dusty, I think. I keep heading south and notice Dominck’s Italian Deli on the right. It is recessed away from the road with a large parking garage on the right and a big home on the left making it a perfect little piazza. I have thought maybe one thousand times that if they would develop the outside into a patio setting I would come there once a week. I keep heading south until I get to Jericho Turnpike and head west. I pass Jonathan’s — I once had brunch there; fond memories. To my left is Uncle Bacala’s — nice Italian seafood. I keep going west past the Denton House and suddenly develop a feeling that I’m closer to New York City than I want to be. The feeling is subtle and comes from a combination of too many speeding cars, streets

DR. TOM FERRARO Our Town that are too cramped and too many traffic lights. Undaunted, I keep going past New Hyde Park Road, and get to Lakeville Road — where I make a right and head north. Back in 1683 New Hyde Park was an 800-acre parcel of land given to Thomas Dongan who was fourth royal governor of New York. He called the land “Dongan’s Farm,” and built a mansion on Lakeville Road. By 1691 he fled back to Ireland and the land was eventually purchased by George Clarke in 1691 who named the land Hyde Park after his wife’s maiden name. When I get to Union Turnpike I make a right and head back east. I travel to Marcus, keep going east until I get to Hillside Avenue and see Spring Rock Golf

Center on my right. Many Korean-Americans over there hitting many golf balls. I am tempted to stop by and hit a few myself but resist the urge given my limited time frame. Like most Americans these days, I am too busy to waste my time on trivial things like fun and games. I keep going east and now am in familiar territory. I spy Iceland Rink on my left and think fondly of the big poster I have of myself hanging over the ice and worry whether my phone number is large enough. I then pass by Sushi Republic, the wonderful Japanese restaurant where I have lunch maybe twice a week. Soon enough I am back in my office in Williston Park and wondering about how best to characterize New Hyde Park. The answer is easy — the best way to describe New Hyde Park is to speak nostalgically of Lakeside Avenue when it had Thomas Dongan’s mansion which was surrounded by open farmland and grazing cattle. Those days are long gone and what is of great concern is the slow, steady inevitability of Nassau County turning into Queens County. This is unsettling. I always thought of myself

A McDonalds in the historical landmark Denton House circa 1795 on Jericho Turnpike, New Hyde Park.

as a suburban guy, not a city guy but clearly the city is coming our way. It has crawled its way past Lakeville Road and is steadily encroaching upon Williston Park. I feel like handing out brooms to all the people in New Hyde Park and ask them to stamp out any evidence of Queens County by sweeping toward the west.. Somehow I do not think this will work. I would even be willing to commission a 25-foot tall bronze sculpture of a broom by Claes Oldenburg and place it somewhere on Lakeville Road as a symbol of the resistance to the slow approach of Queens into Nassau County. New Hyde Park is the border land between Queens County and Nassau County and for that reason it needs all our love — good will and blessings we can muster. There will be no Trumpian wall built between Queens and Nassau. There will be no 25-foot bronze broom to symbolize the protection of suburbia. Welcome to the 21st century. Progress and growth and change will not be stopped — so Nassau County, get ready to be citified.


BLANK SLATE MEDIA December 2, 2016

Ballet to present ‘The Nutcracker’

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glevsky Ballet recently announced its annual production of “The Nutcracker” on Saturday, Dec. 18 at 6 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 19 at 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. at the Tilles Center for the Performing Arts. The by the The performance performan nce will feature new neew choreography chor executive artistic Brandon Curry, and star company’s ex xecutive artisti ic director, Mauricee Brando “Sugar Nicholas Rose as the Alison Stroming Strom ming as the “S Sugar Plum Fairy” aand nd Nic “Cavalier,” according release “Cav valier,” accordi ing to a press releas se from Eglevsky Ballet. Stroming Both Strom ming and Rose are principal princip artists with the Theatre New Dance Theatr re of Harlem, and N ew York actor Chris Comportray godfather “Drosselmeyer.” fort will por rtray Clara’s godfath her “Dro “Eglevsky for its ap“Eglevs sky Ballet has longg been known k proach Curry said. “I wantproac ch to this treasured sstory,” tory,” C deeper ed tto o delve a little dee eper into the characters of ‘Clara’ ‘Clar ra’ and ‘Drossel- meyer’ and also increase participation the pa articipation of our incredibly academy students talented aca with our professional dancers.” dan ncers.” has welcomed back Additionally, Curry h Eglevsky to tthe he stage several E glevsky Ballet alumni to participate in the ballet’s party scene aas the parents and guests of th the ctional family who are he Stahlbaums, the fictiona the party’s hosts. One ooff these alumni is JJamie Stanton, who as a amie S child young chi ild and teenager appeared iin many of the Eglevsky Ballet ballet. Baallet productions off this bal This year, Stanton returns retturns to play the role of Clara’s mother “Mrs. Stahl Stahlbaum.” lbaum.” “After Eglevsky School of Ballet “A After studying at thee Eglevsk from the age of 8 and pe performing erformin roles many children’s joining the Eglevsky Ballet dren n’s roles and then jo oining th Company professional dancer when I was Com mpany as a profess sional d 18, 18 8, I am thrilled to be be returning return to the stage,” Stanton said. Lutin Tanner, lighting d designer for Garth Fagan Dance, Bad d Boys oof Ballet, and nudance companies, will parmerous other da ance com ticipate in the p production roductio as well. The Eglevsky Eglevvsky Ballet Bal has presented “The Nutcrac Nutcracker” cker” as a holiday gift for children of aall ll ages since 1960.


24 News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

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Daughtry Acoustic Trio Saturday, Dec. 3 at 7 p.m.

Since forming, Daughtry has released four studio albums (Daughtry, Leave This Town, Break The Spell and Baptized), scored four No. 1 hits, garnered four Grammy nominations, won four American Music Awards, won three People’s Choice Awards, sold over 8.2 million albums and 16 million singles worldwide and sold out concerts around the globe. Where: 370 New York Avenue, Huntington Info: (631) 673-7300 • paramountny.com

2

SCW Cultural Arts presents An Afternoon of Comedy with Robert Klein

Sunday, Dec. 11 at 3 p.m. The fifth season of Stephen C. Widom Cultural Arts at Emanuel continues with comedy giant Robert Klein and special guest Nicolas King singing The American Songbook. Following the show, there will be refreshments. Where: 150 Hicks Lane, Great Neck Info: (516) 482-5701 • emanuelgn.org

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Jingle Bell Bottom Ball Sunday, Dec. 3 at 8 p.m.

Brian Rosenberg, Goodrich & Licata Entertainment Presents: 3rd Annual Jingle Bell Bottom Ball: Starring: Harold Melvin’s Blue Notes, The Trammps, France Joli, Bonnie Pointer, Odyssey, Melba Moore, Carl Carlton, Lime and Machine & Disco Unlimited. Where: 960 Brush Hollow Rd. Westbury Info: (516) 334-0800 • venue.thetheatreatwestbury.com


News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

for the coming week V H Q

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Alive! ‘75, Schism and Live After Death

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Saturday, Dec. 10 at 8 p.m. Come see the famous Kiss cover band Alive ‘75, Tool cover band Schism, and Iron Maiden cover band Live After Death. Where: 250 Post Ave., Westbury • Info: (516) 283-5566 • thespaceatwestbuy.com

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Jon Bellion & Nick Tangorra: Presented by BLI’s “Home for the Holidays Concert” A Benefit for Cohen Children’s Medical Center

Thursday, Dec. 8 at 8 p.m. Come see Jon Bellion and Nick Tangorra play live and help a worthy cause for Cohen Children’s Medical Center. Where: 370 New York Avenue, Huntington Info: (631) 673-7300 • paramountny.com

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Glorious Dead Presents: Flatbush Zombies “3001: The Tour”

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Sunday, Dec. 4 at 8 p.m. Flatbush Zombies (stylized as Flatbush ZOMBiES) is an American hip hop group from the Flatbush section of Brooklyn, New York City, formed in 2010. Where: 370 New York Ave., Huntington Info: (631) 673-7300 • paramountny.com

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Adelphi Jazz Ensemble Friday, Dec. 9 at 7:30 p.m.

The Adelphi Jazz Ensemble covers the spectrum from traditional to cutting-edge jazz. The ensemble often features original student compositions in addition to pieces by some of the greatest names in jazz. Where: Adelphi University Performing Arts Center Westermann Stage, Concert Hall, 1 South Ave., Garden City Info: (516) 877-4000 • aupac.adelphi.edu

2016

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26 News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016 Family Owned & Operated Since 1992

THE TOP EVENTS FOR KIDS FOR THE COMING WEEK

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0th Annual Holiday Express Weekend

Saturday, Dec. 10 and 11 from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. Featuring free rides on the holiday express trackless train, complimentary cookies, candy canes and hot cider. Also raffle prizes, and on the 10th, the annual community Holiday Market and Tree Lighting from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., and a visit from Santa on Sunday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Where: The Oyster Bay Railroad Museum, 102 Audrey Avenue, Oyster BayInfo: (516) www.obrm.org

Open 7 Days

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Tuesday, Dec. 6 from 7 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

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Come celebrate the lighting of the village tree with friends and family.

Where: Village Green - Next to Village Hall at 2 Prospect St, East Williston Info: (516) 746-0782 eastwilliston.org

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inter Wonders Sunday, Dec. 4 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Come make a hanging mobile of a cozy winter scene to take home. Use colorful shapes, streamers, and strings to assemble your mobile. You’ll find yourself admiring it whenever you find yourself indoors this season. Ages three and up. Free with museum admission.

Where: 11 Davis Avenue, Garden City - Info: (516) 224-5800 licm.org

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parkling Snowflakes

Tuesday, Dec. 6 to Friday, Dec. 9 from 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m.

If you loved Dena in Chardonnnay Go you will love her in One Funny Mother!

Come and create your own colorful, sparkling snowflake using markers and gems to brighten up winter windows at home. Ages three and up. Free with museum admission.

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For the latest in community news visit us 24 hours a day 7 days a week at www.theislandnow.com


News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

Arts & Entertainment Calendar LANDMARK ON MAIN STREET 232 Main Street, Suite 1 Port Washington (516) 767-1384 ext. 101 www.landmarkonmainstreet.org Friday, Dec. 2 at 8 p.m. JOHN PIZZARELLI QUARTET: Holiday Hits & More Sunday, Dec. 18 at 7 p.m. CHERISH THE LADIES: A Celtic Christmas GARVIES POINT MUSEUM 50 Barry Dr. in Glen Cove (516) 571-8010/11 • www.garviespointmuseum.com THE 50+ COMEDY TOUR 2016 SCHEDULE Saturday, Dec. 31 at 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. at Theatre Three in Port Jefferson Paul Anthony Rich Walker Keith Anthony Saturday, Dec. 31 at 8 p.m. at The Madison Theatre in Rockville Centre Eric Haft Tina Giorgi Rob Falcone Saturday, Dec. 31 at 8 p.m. at Cultural Arts Playhouse in Syosset Peter Bales Steve Lazarus Carie Karavis NYCB THEATRE AT WESTBURY 960 Brush Hollow Road, Westbury (516) 247-5200 venue.thetheatreatwestbury.com Saturday, Dec. 3 at 8 p.m. Jingle Bell Bottom Ball Sunday, Dec. 4 at 12:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. Max & Ruby Saturday, Dec. 10 at 7 p.m. Doo Wop Extravaganza Sunday, Dec. 11 at 8 p.m. Kenny G. - Live In Concert Saturday, Dec. 17 at 8 p.m. Paul Anka Sunday, Dec. 18 at 3 p.m. A Charlie Brown Christmas Live Friday, Dec. 23 at 8 p.m. Kenny Rogers: The Gambler’s Last Deal Christmas & Hits THE SPACE AT WESTBURY 250 Post Ave., Westbury (516) 283.5566 www.thespaceatwestbury.com Friday, Dec. 2 at 8 p.m. America Saturday, Dec. 10 at 8 p.m. Alive! ’75, Schism and Live After Death Friday, Dec. 16 at 8 p.m. KTFO and ACC Presents: Worlds Collide Thursday, Dec. 29 at 8 p.m. Gogol Bordello THE PARAMOUNT 370 New York Ave., Huntington (631) 673-7300 ext. 303 www.paramountny.com Friday, Dec. 2 at 8 p.m. Friday Night Fever - Featuring The New York Bee Gees with Special Appearance by Raniere Martin: A Tribute to Donna Summer & Special Guest - 45 RPM

Saturday, Dec. 3 at 8 p.m. Daughtry Acoustic Trio Sunday, Dec. 4 at 8 p.m. Glorious Dead Presents: Flatbush Zombies “3001: The Tour” Thursday, Dec. 8 at 8 p.m. BLI’s ”Home for the Holidays Concert” Featuring Long Island¹s own: Jon Bellion & Nick Tangorra - A Benefit for Cohen Children¹s Medical Center Tuesday, Dec. 13 at 8 p.m. Gavin DeGraw ADELPHI UNIVERSITY PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Westermann Stage, 1 South Avenue, Garden City (516) 877-4000 aupac.adelphi.edu Wednesday, Nov. 30 to Sunday, Dec. 4 Fall Dance Adelphi: Aszure Barton Sunday, Dec. 16 at 8 p.m. The Celtic Tenors TILLES CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS | LIU POST 720 Northern Boulevard, Brookville (516) 299-3100 • http://tillescenter.org Friday, Dec. 2 at 7:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Rebecca Luker: A Love Story Sunday, Dec. 4 at 3 p.m. McGill/McHale Trio Thursday, Dec. 8 at 8 p.m. LIU Post Wind Bands Friday, Dec. 9 at 8 p.m. The Mavericks: Sleigh Bells Ring Out! Saturday, Dec. 10 at 8 p.m. China Philharmonic Orchestra Sunday, Dec. 11 at 2 p.m. A Christmas Carol Monday, Dec. 12 at 10:30 a.m. A Christmas Carol - School Time Performance Tuesday, Dec. 13 at 7:30 p.m. Neil deGrasse Tyson: An Astrophysicist Saturday, Dec. 17 at 6 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 18 at 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. The Nutcracker performed by Eglevsky Ballet LONG ISLAND CHILDREN’S MUSEUM 11 Davis Avenue, Garden City 516-224-5800 • www.licm.org Friday, Dec. 2 from 11:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Kids in the Kitchen Saturday, Dec. 3 and Sunday, Dec. 4 from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Messy Afternoons Sunday, Dec. 4 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Winter Wonders Tuesday, Dec. 6 through Friday, Dec. 9 from 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Sparkling Snowflakes Tuesday, Dec. 6 and Thursday, Dec. 8 from 11:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. stART (Story + Art) Friday, Dec. 9 from 11:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Kids in the Kitchen Saturday, Dec. 10 and Sunday, Dec. 11 at 1 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 2 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. Artful Luminaries Saturday, Dec. 10 and Sunday, Dec. 11 from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Messy Afternoons Continued on Page 62

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28 News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

THE CULINARY ARCHITECT

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Electricâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roast beef for the holidays To me and my family, nothing says it is holiday time more than gathering around a beautifully set table and eating roast beef. The holidays are the perfect time to make a standing rib roast. It is one of those meals that is regal and delicious. However, it is not that easy to prepare, as it takes up most of the oven and you have to pull out this heavy piece of meat several times. I set out to â&#x20AC;&#x153;free up my ovenâ&#x20AC;? and make it easier to prepare this delicious meat. Enter The Electric Roaster â&#x20AC;&#x201D; by making the roast beef in an electric roaster, this diďŹ&#x192;cult meal becomes easy. Add vegetables midway and you have your vegetable side dish, pass around stewed tomatoes and make individual Yorkshire puddings while the roast rests and you have a feast that will make any holiday dinner festive. MENU Serves 6-8 Standing Rib Roast Mixed Vegetables Yorkshire Pudding

Mixed Vegetables Cooked Under A Roast Beef

Stewed Tomatoes (See Island Now October 6, 2016) Standing Rib Roast 1 6-7 lb. standing rib roast 1/8 cup Maggi Seasoning 1/8 cup Worcestershire Sauce Olive oil Freshly ground pepper 1. Twenty-four to forty-eight (24-48) hours ahead of time, combine the Maggi Seasoning and the Worcestershire Sauce in a large non-reactive bowl or very large Ziploc bag. 2. Generously, pepper roast and place in bowl or ziploc to marinate. Refrigerate. Rotate every now and then. (I rotate my mine every time I open the refrigerator door). 3. One half hour (1/2) before roasting, turn electric roaster on highest heat. 4. One half hour (1/2) later, brush electric roaster with oil. Dry oďŹ&#x20AC; roast and put in roaster, fat side down. Sear for 15 minutes. Turn

ALEXANDRA TROY The Culinary Architect over. Ten minutes later, turn again. Ten minutes later, turn on last side. 5. Turn down roaster to 325 degrees. Cook 15 minutes more. Add vegetables at this point, so roast and veggies will be done simultaneously. 6. After roast has cook 1 1/2 hours, double check its temperature. It should be 120 degrees for a perfectly cooked center. Remove the roast from roaster. Set aside on a wooden carving board. Cover with foil and let rest 1/2 hour. 7. Carve and serve.

5 - 7 carrots, washed, peeled and cut into chunks 4 - 6 celery stalks, washed, peeled and cut into chunks 2 onions, peeled, stem removed and cut into chunks 1/4 cup olive oil Salt and Pepper tot taste 1. One to twelve (1 - 12) hours before cooking, place all the ingredients in a Ziploc bag. Toss to combine, seal bag and let marinate in refrigerator. 2. After roast has cooked for 1 hour, add vegetables. Roast vegetables until roast is done. If vegetables need more time, continue roasting while meat rests. 3. Scoop vegetables into a serving dish and serve along side carved meat.

(Make this while the roast is resting) 3 large eggs 3/4 cup heavy cream 3/4 cup ďŹ&#x201A;our 3/4 tsp. sea salt 1/4 cup non-fat or olive oil or a combo of both 1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. 2. Oil 6-8 large cupcake tins. 3. In a bowl, whisk 3 eggs until well beaten. Add cream, ďŹ&#x201A;our and salt. Mix until combined. 4. Pour mixture into muďŹ&#x192;n tins. Bake until puďŹ&#x20AC;y and golden brownâ&#x20AC;Śapproximately 12-17 minutes.

Yorkshire Pudding, My Way (Makes 6-8, depending on how high you ďŹ ll muďŹ&#x192;n tins and the size of the muďŹ&#x192;n tin)

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Parties, Dining & Gift Guide

A Blank Slate Media / Litmor Publications Special Section â&#x20AC;¢ December 2, 2016


38 HOLIDAY PARTIES, DINING & GIFT GUIDE • News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

Tips for less stressful holiday travel R

oadways, railways and skies tend to get busy come the holiday season, when millions of people across the globe travel to visit family and friends. Wherever travelers are headed, be it across the country or across the world, they should realize that many other people are traveling as well. That can lead to traffic, long lines and other side effects associated with large crowds. But before travelers let the idea of challenging travel conditions deter them, they can consider certain ways to make the process of getting from point A to point B a bit more manageable.

Travel by car Those traveling by automobile will have a few extra steps to take to ensure their trips go off with minimal disturbances. One of the more important steps is to ensure the vehicle is properly maintained prior to departing. Have the car checked by a

mechanic and take care of any service appointments, such as oil changes or tire rotations.

Traveling by plane

Map out the route in advance and have an alternative plan if the route chosen proves to be too congested. One idea is to choose a scenic drive that may be a little longer but has less traffic. In addition, account for rest stops or points of interest that can break up the trip. Apps such as GasBuddy can help drivers find the cheapest gas or the cleanest bathrooms along their routes.

One of the key things air travelers can do to make holiday traveling easier is to avoid peak travel dates. Whenever possible, avoid traveling the day right before the holiday, which tends be the busiest and most expensive. Remember, weekends tend to be more harried and expensive as well, particularly when the holidays fall in close proximity to a weekend.

Bring along plenty of snacks so you can eat healthy and aren’t forced to rely on foods you otherwise would not eat. This is particularly helpful with keeping kids satiated. Plan for a few treats along the way so that everyone traveling has an end goal, such as an ice cream or a souvenir.

Weather is a gamble in many regions of the world during the holiday season. Develop a contingency plan just in case foul weather delays or cancels flights. It’s much less stressful to put plan B into motion than it can be to rush around trying to make new, last-minute plans.

Always shop around for the best rates, but also the best atmosphere. It may be wiser to fly out of a smaller airport where crowds will be thinner and delays less frequent, or you may prefer a larger airport that’s closer to home and offers more amenities. Another way to avoid delays is to pack minimally. Ship gifts and even travel essentials ahead to your destination, and only bring carry-on bags aboard the plane. This helps travelers sail through security checks and avoid the crowds at the luggage carousels. Holiday travel requires planning, patience and having alternative plans in place so that everyone can make it home for the holidays.

Grand Opening Special 254 East Jericho Tpke. Mineola, NY 718-628-0300 Full line of Men’s and Women's Unique Hats, Scarves, Ear Muffs, Back Packs. Etc.

Something For Everyone!

Stop In Today! Our Store is overflowing with beautiful gift ideas.

HOURS: Mon thru Sun 10am to 7pm. Closed Tuesday


News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016 â&#x20AC;¢ HOLIDAY PARTIES, DINING & GIFT GUIDE

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40 HOLIDAY PARTIES, DINING & GIFT GUIDE • News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

How to handle holiday hosting

FULL INTERIOR DESIGN SERVICES FEATURING THE FINEST IN HOME FURNISHINGS

way to encourage participation. When everyone brings something along and helps, it frees up time to spend together rather than worrying about what needs cooking in the kitchen or whether a last-minute trip to the store is in order.

Downsize Festive feelings may inspire you to expand your guest list. Social people understandably want to invite all of their circles of friends, but an overwhelming guest list can make hosting more difficult. If you have trouble paring down the guest list, consider hosting separate parties, designating one for family and another for friends. You can even downsize your offerings to lessen some your load. Rather than spending days in the kitchen making unique apps, stock up on chips, snacks and premade appetizers so you have enough food. If you want to make one or two appetizers from scratch, stick to a handful of tried-and-true recipes and convenience items so you’re not worrying about kitchen-testing new things.

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1046 Franklin Avenue Garden City 516.742.8280 www.barbatsulyfurs.com

oliday revelers tend to be busy with social engagements — from corporate parties to cocktails with close friends — between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day. Chances are, many people will be attending a party and/or hosting their own this holiday season. While attending a party requires little of celebrants other than a willingness to have a good time, hosting a holiday get-together can be hard work. But hosts can heed a few time-tested strategies to ensure they and their guests make the most of their time together this holiday season.

Hire professionals If you’re simply too busy to handle hosting but still want to invite loved ones, hire some professional help. Hire wait staff to tend to guests during the party, and book a cleaning service to clean your home in the days before the party. Don’t hesitate to have the party catered if you prefer your gathering not be potluck. Holiday hosting can be a big time commitment, but there are ways to make hosting easier regardless of how busy you are.

Forget perfection Television, movies and advertisements paint an unrealistic picture of what the holidays should be. Don’t get down if a holiday party that would make Norman Rockwell proud is beyond your capabilities. Rather than trying to plan a picture-perfect holiday party, channel your energy into what you do best. Cook up a holiday feast if you love being in the kitchen, or decorate till you drop if you love to deck the halls. The point of the party is to gather with family and friends, so no need to worry about throwing a perfect party.

Enlist helpers Ask others to contribute to the party so all of the work is not on your shoulders. A potluck party is a great

Hiring a bartender or wait staff for a holiday party frees up more time to socialize with your friends and family members.


News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016 • HOLIDAY PARTIES, DINING & GIFT GUIDE

Just a sampling of our vendors: Lalique Christofle Bernadaud Baccarat Michael Aram Vera Wang L’Objet Juliska Annie Glass Kate Spade Nambe Nest Swarovski

Come see our line of well dressed beds, linens and towels Sferra • Matouk • Frette • Ralph Lauren • Kumi Kookoon • Design Guild of London Bridal Registry • Corporate Gifts

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Imperial China USA

impchina

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41


42 HOLIDAY PARTIES, DINING & GIFT GUIDE â&#x20AC;˘ News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

PersonaltrainingStudio 10th ANNUAL HOLIDAY EXPRESS WEEKEND December 10th & 11th, Noon-4PM FEATURING # Free rides on the Holiday Express Trackless Train # Complimentary cookies, candy canes, hot cider # Fabulous raffle prizes # Operating O gauge holiday themed train layout # Saturday, the 10th, features the annual community Holiday Market and Tree Lighting from 3-6 PM # A visit from Santa on Sunday, the 11th, from 1-3 PM

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PersonaltrainingStudio 1325 Franklin Avenue-Suite LLGC, Garden City 516.739.3534 personaltrainingstudio.com


News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016 â&#x20AC;¢ HOLIDAY PARTIES, DINING & GIFT GUIDE

OPEN FOR LUNCH THURSDAY & FRIDAY

43


44 HOLIDAY PARTIES, DINING & GIFT GUIDE • News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

Smart ways to finance holiday purchases

Restore • Revitalize • Unwind Superb Spa Services for Couples BFFs | Mother and Daughter | You! Therapeutic Massages Faci als Body Treatments

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C

onsumerism reaches a fevered pitch during the last quarter of the year, when the holidays fuel increased spending on everything from dining and entertainment to gadgets to toys. It can be easy to get swept along during the season of spending and fail to pay attention to budgets when the urge to splurge on loved ones sets in. However, failure to take inventory of where money is going can leave individuals facing some unwanted financial repercussions come the new year. Spending beyond their means is something many holiday shoppers fall victim to. Perhaps they didn’t accurately budget for the year, or surprise purchases crop up, pulling resources away from holiday allowances. That’s when credit cards can become so attractive, and potentially dangerous. A 2014 survey from Accenture, a leading global professional services company, found that most people make a budget for holiday gift buying, but nearly half exceed their budgets anyway. Buying with credit cards makes overspending easy. Consumers who want to avoid holiday debt can take a proactive approach and explore some other financing options this holiday season.

Layaway Various retailers have reinstituted layaway policies to make it easier for shoppers to buy holiday gifts. With layaway, instead of paying for an item all at once and leaving with it the same day, shoppers pay a percentage of the cost of the item. In the meantime, it is held in layaway. Once an item has been paid for in full, the merchandise is free to leave the store. Spacing out payments can help shoppers avoid

overspending, and many stores do not charge interest fees on layaway purchases.

Holiday clubs Financial institutions may offer savings clubs that can help people save for holiday spending over several months. The “club” is simply a special short-term savings account set up to encourage holiday saving. Many such accounts can be opened with a nominal deposit. At the end of the term, the money can be withdrawn and used for holiday purchases. Shoppers likely won’t miss the small amount of money being set aside each paycheck, but are surprised to see just how quickly savings can add up. While some banks still offer Christmas club accounts, which reached the height of their popularity in the 1970s, today they are most commonly offered by credit unions. According to the Credit Union National Association, or CUNA, nearly 72 percent of credit unions run Christmas clubs, and consumer interest in these clubs is holding steady.

Credit card perks Smarter credit card usage during the year can be handy come the holidays. Choose cards that will yield cash back or other perks, such as discounts at certain retailers. Also, be sure to pay the balances off in full when the bills arrive, so as not to rack up high interest charges throughout the year. Use the cash-back rewards you accumulate during the year as a holiday spending allowance. Holiday shoppers can implement a few saving and spending strategies to avoid going into debt this holiday season.


News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016 • HOLIDAY PARTIES, DINING & GIFT GUIDE

Give the perfect gift for any occasion. Gift Cards now available to all Maspeth Federal Savings customers.

· No processing fee · Various design choices · Choose your dollar amount from $10-$1000

maspethfederal.com

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46 HOLIDAY PARTIES, DINING & GIFT GUIDE • News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

GIFT GIVING WITHOUT THE GUESSING! RIBBON GIFT CARD ENSEMBLE Great for your Employees, Customers, Teachers, Friends and Family. Everyone on your Shopping List! Spend Less Time Shopping and More Time Together! We Make It Easy! • 17 gift collections packed with products you know and love! • 180 day Satisfaction Guarantee on Gift Cards and Gift Items! • Just choose the collection that fits your recipient best and they redeem it online or call our 800 number in the convenience of their home.

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Solomons Jewelers Cordially Invites You to the

FREIDA ROTHMAN TRUNK SHOW Thursday, December 8th 12noon - 7:00pm Albertson location

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516.681.6111


News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016 â&#x20AC;¢ HOLIDAY PARTIES, DINING & GIFT GUIDE

Celebrate THE HOLIDAYS AT

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48 HOLIDAY PARTIES, DINING & GIFT GUIDE • News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

’Tis the season for beauty.

Pink Pearl Pendant with Pavé Diamonds in 14K Rose Gold from $899 Chain included Available in various 14K Gold and Pearl combinations

Roosevelt Field Upper Level between Macy’s and Nordstrom, 516-248-7200 NaHoku.com

How to ship smart

T

he holiday season can be hectic, and thanks to that sometimes frenetic pace, it can be easy to put things on the back burner. While it’s OK to put off some things until the holiday season has come and gone, shipping gifts to loved ones does not fall into that category. Shipping can be expensive, especially for last-minute shoppers who want to ensure their gifts arrive in time for the holidays. But the following are a handful of ways to ship smart and save both time and money. Ship directly to the recipient. Lastminute shoppers who are buying online can save money by shipping gifts directly to the recipient. While shipping directly to the recipient may seem less personal than sending a gift you wrapped yourself, many online retailers allow shoppers to send gift-wrapped items directly to another person. Just be sure to have the recipient’s correct address when choosing this option. Ship early. Waiting to ship all gifts at the same time may be more convenient, but it can prove more costly as well. If you typically finish your holiday shopping just a few days before Christmas, then waiting to ship

everything will cost more money than shipping gifts as you buy them. The longer you wait to ship gifts, the more you can expect to pay if you expect those gifts to arrive on time. Shipping gifts as you buy them, especially if you get much of your shopping done early, can save you short-term or overnight shipping fees, which can be significant. Comparison shop. Much like you can save money by comparison shopping for holiday gifts, you can save by comparing shipping costs as well. Pack-and-ship companies compete for consumers’ business during the height of the holiday shipping season, so compare the costs between the various pack-and-ship companies, including the postal service, to see which offers the best deal. Insure the items you ship. The holiday season is the busiest time of year for the pack-and-ship industry. While the industry is often remarkably effective at delivering gifts intact and on time, items are sometimes lost or damaged. By insuring your packages, you’re ensuring you won’t be out of luck should your package be lost, damaged or stolen before it reaches its destination.


News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016 â&#x20AC;¢ HOLIDAY PARTIES, DINING & GIFT GUIDE

49

7KH6ZDQ&OXE

HOLIDAY PARTY...

 

4$70hours Per Person (Monday-Thursday)

all inclusive No service Charge

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3$&.$*(,1&/8'(6

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OPEN BAR

THROUGHOUT ENTIRE AFFAIR 3/$7('',11(5,1&/8'(6 $SSHWL]HU6DODG&KRLFH2I(QWUHHV ,FH&UHDP%DUZLWK$VVRUWHG7RSSLQJV &RIIHH7HD'HFDI

*OHQZRRG5RDG5RVO\Q1<  3K  _ZZZVZDQFOXEFRP


50 HOLIDAY PARTIES, DINING & GIFT GUIDE • News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

How to find great gifts for the family handyman

F

or those people who don’t know a box cutter from a box saw, shopping for men and women who like to get their hands dirty

around the house can be a difficult task. Home improvement projects are complex undertakings that often involve the use of complex tools, and novices may be lost in the proverbial woods as they look for gifts for their loved ones who can’t wait to swing hammers around the house. Though there’s always an element of risk when shopping for gifts for loved ones, the following hints might help shoppers with no knowledge of home improvement projects find gifts that will please their favorite handyman. Take inventory of his or her existing tools. When shopping for the DIY enthusiast in your family, try to take inventory of his or her tool chest before beginning your search. Make note of any tools that look new, checking those off your shopping list, and any that look like they need replacing. Use your phone to photograph any unfamiliar tools that you might want to replace so you know what to look for when visiting the hardware store.

Think of what your relative likes to do most. The family handyman may have a particular area of home improvement expertise or something he or she is especially passionate about. Does your loved one prefer to work in the garden? Is he into woodworking and making decorative items for the house? Think of what he or she likes to do most and then look for something that will make that hobby more enjoyable. While multipurpose tools might make for welcome gifts, something more specific to his or her particular passion may make an even better gift. Think outside the (tool)box. While new tools might make a handyman’s day, they are not the only items that make great DIY gifts. Consider enrolling your loved one in an advanced class so he or she can learn more about a favorite hobby. Or gift a magazine subscription so he or she can stay abreast of the latest DIY trends and topics. Such gifts are great options for shoppers hesitant

Happy Hour Everyday 4-7pm

(516) 294-6565 980 Franklin Avenue Garden City www.grimaldisgardencity.com

at the Bar Only

with side of sauce

Unlimited Pizza with Toppings

$24.00 Add a Pasta Course

$26.00 PER PERSON Add a Chicken / Eggplant Entreé

$32.00 PER PERSON Open Bar (3) Hours vs. Bar Tab

Add $20.00 PER PERSON CAKES MAY BE PROVIDED AT AN ADDITIONAL COST YOU MAY BRING YOUR OWN

All Gratuity on Party Packages Must Be Paid in Cash

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PARTY PACKAGE Includes Coffee • Tea • Soda Mixed Green Salad/Caesar Salad Antipasto/Tomato & Mozzarella Assorted Pinwheels One Large Calzone per Table

to purchase potentially costly tools that may or may not be hits with their relatives. Speak with a professional. If you can’t access your loved one’s workshop or simply don’t know what he or she might want, ask a local contractor for gift recommendations. For example, a carpenter might know just what will elicit a smile from woodworking enthusiasts, while landscapers might be able to suggest items for gardening or lawn care enthusiasts. Advancements are always being made in the home improvement industry, and those people who make their living in that industry might be great resources as you try to find the go-to gift for your loved one. Finding a gift for the family handyman might be difficult for shoppers with no DIY experience of their own. But a little forethought and perhaps some professional assistance can be just what shoppers need to find gifts their loved ones will cherish for years to come.

at the Bar Only (Toppings not included)

CATERING MENU 18” SALAD SELECTIONS

APPETIZER SELECTIONS ANTIPASTO

$70

Homemade mozzarella, oven roasted sweet red peppers, genoa salami, sicilian olives

ASSORTED BAKED PINWHEELS

$60

Variety of spinach, pepperoni, buffalo chicken and sausage and bacon rolls, served with a side of sauce

BRUSCHETTA

$60

Seasoned chopped tomatoes, topped with a parmesan dusting served on crustini bread

TOMATO MOZZARELLA

$70

Large slices of tomato and fresh mozzarella with a basil pesto drizzle over a bed of greens

VEGETABLE PLATTER

$55

Assorted vegetables served with a blue cheese dip

18” DESSERT PLATTER Combination of Jr. Cheese Cake, Cannoli, Chocolate Decadence and Rice Pudding $60 Grimaldi’s Cannoli Platters (15 cannolis) $45

House $70 Caesar $60 Chopped $70 Portobello $70 Mediterranean $70 Add Fresh Mozzarella $10 Add Grilled Chicken $12 Add Salami $10

Holiday Gift Certificates Available

ENTREÉ SELECTIONS Chicken Parmigiana Chicken & Vegetables Chicken Marsala Sausage & Peppers Eggplant Parmigiana Eggplant Rollatini Penne Primavera Penne Ala Vodka Penne Bolognese Linguini white or red Clam Sauce

Half $50 $50 $55 $45 $40 $45 $40 $40 $45 $45

Full $80 $80 $90 $75 $70 $80 $65 $55 $75 $75

VISA, MASTERCARD, AMERICAN EXPRESS CARD ACCEPTED

BOOK YOUR HOLIDAY CATERING ORDERS SOON!


News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016 â&#x20AC;¢ HOLIDAY PARTIES, DINING & GIFT GUIDE

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52 HOLIDAY PARTIES, DINING & GIFT GUIDE • News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

HOLIDAY AT AMERICANA SHOP LONGER WITH OUR EXTENDED HOLIDAY HOURS Thursday, December 1 through Friday, December 23 Monday - Saturday 10am to 8pm • Sunday 11am to 6pm To 7pm on Sunday, December 18

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Select stores open January 1 • Noon to 5pm

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©2016 CASTAGNA REALTY CO., INC.

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Northern Boulevard at Searingtown Road

americanamanhasset.com

800.818.6767


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News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

Gorka to perform at folk music concert Singer-songwriter John Gorka will perform at the Folk Music Society of Huntington’s First Saturday Concerts series on Saturday, Dec. 3 at 8:30 p.m. at the Congregational Church of Huntington. Now in its 48th year, the Folk Music Society of Huntington presents two monthly concert series, a monthly folk jam, and an annual folk festival in conjunction with the Huntington Arts Council, according to a press release from the Folk Music Society of Huntington. Since emerging three decades ago as a winner of the Kerrville New Folk Competition in the Texas Hill country, Gorka has been writing personal songs with a touch of humor. Born in New Jersey and now a Minnesota resident, Gorka is a baritone singer, and has recorded and released 13 albums. The concert will be preceded by an open mic at 7:30 p.m., and the church is located at 30 Washington Drive, off Route 25A in Centerport.

Tickets are priced at $30, and $25 for FMSH members. For more information, and to inquire about tickets in advance, call (631) 4252925.

61

All Jewish 11th & 12th Graders From The Great Neck Area!

Leading on Campus Tuesday, December 13 • 6:30-8:30 pm Hosted by the Lake Success Jewish Center 354 Lakeville Rd., Great Neck, NY Join us for an important conversation to help prepare you with the skills and the knowledge you will need to face anti-Israel sentiments and programs on college campuses. Goals of the Program: • To encourage Jewish/pro-Israel leadership and activism on campus • To reduce student fears and anxiety about anti-Israel/anti-Semitic activity on campus • To encourage integration without assimilation • To expose you to anti-Israel situations, movements, and terminology you might face • To offer strategic ways for reacting to potential uncomfortable situations • To share with you the Jewish and pro-Israel organizations that can offer support • To provide you with a better understanding of what “pro-Israel” means

Pizza and light snacks will be served! Please RSVP! Email by Thursday, December 8 to Rabbi Michael Klayman - mklayman@lakesuccessjc.org Sponsored by:

Joel Grey tribute at Temple Emanuel “Shades of Grey,” a musical tribute to Joel Grey will be performed at Temple Emanuel of Great Neck on Tuesday, Dec. 6. The musical is conceived, directed and performed by Bob Spiotto, according to a press release from Temple Emanuel of Great Neck. Grey has been a performer for over 60 years whose acts include on Broadway as Master of Ceremonies in “Cabaret,” as well as “George M,” “The Grand Tour,” “Chicago,” “The Wizard of Oz,” “Wicked” and “Anything Goes.” Spiotto has worked as a director, producer, manager, arts administrator, consultant, as well as an actor, choreographer and teacher in the New York, Long Island and Washington, D.C., metropolitan areas and abroad. Spiotto last served as executive/artis-

tic director for the Suffolk Theater, prior to which he worked at Hofstra University for 23 years, most notably as the executive producer/artistic director for Hofstra Entertainment and Artistic Director of Community Arts Programs for the Hofstra University Cultural Center. In 2011, Spiotto performed in “Harry and Eddie: The Birth of Israel,” which ran at the Actor’s Temple Theatre in New York City. Spiotto holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in theater performance from Hofstra University and a Master of Fine Arts degree in directing from The Catholic University of America. The suggested donation is $5. Call (516) 482.5701 for further information. Temple Emanuel of Great Neck is located at 150 Hicks Lane, Great Neck.

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62 News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

A&E Calendar cont’d Continued from Page 27 St. Francis Prep’s Music Department Annual Christmas Concerts 6100 Francis Lewis Boulevard Fresh Meadows (718) 423-8810 Ext. 255 Friday, Dec. 9 and Saturday, Dec. 10 Lord and Taylor Hosts Breakfast With Santa 1200 Franklin Avenue, Garden City (516) 742-7000 Saturday, Dec. 3 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 10 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. SENIOR POPS ORCHESTRA PRESENTS HOLIDAY CONCERT Brookside School 1260 Meadowbrook Road, North Merrick (516) 414-1831 Sunday, Dec. 18 at 2 p.m. SCW Cultural Arts presents An Afternoon of Comedy with Robert Klein and special guest Nicolas King singing The American Songbook Temple Emanuel of Great Neck 150 Hicks Lane, Great Neck Sunday, Dec. 11 at 3 p.m. Grand Opening of Nassau County Christmas Village and Winter Wonderland at Milburn Lake Behind the Coral House at 70 Milburn Avenue in Baldwin Thursday, Dec. 8 at 5:30 p.m. Festivities continue: Saturday, Dec. 10 from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 11 from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 17 from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 18 from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. GOVERNORS’ COMEDY CLUB 90 Division Ave. Levittown (516) 731-3358 • http://tickets.govs.com/ index.cfm Friday, Dec. 2 at 8 p.m. Tim Krompier Saturday, Dec. 3 at 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Bob Nelson BROKERAGE COMEDY CLUB 2797 Merrick Road, Bellmore (516) 781-LAFF (5233) GovernorsFeedback@gmail.com Friday, Dec. 2 at 8 p.m. and Saturday, Dec. 3 at 7:30 p.m. and 10 p.m. Kurt Metzger ZEBRA- A Hammerheads Reunion Mulcahy’s Pub and Concert Hall 3232 Railroad Avenue, Wantagh Saturday, Jan. 14 HARP CONCERT — Performed by members of the Long Island Chapter of the American Harp Society Plainview-Old Bethpage Library 999 Old Country Road Plainview Sunday, Dec. 11 at 3 p.m. Northport Chorale’s Holiday Concert, with selections performed with the Northport Community Band Laurel Hill Road, Northport www.northportchorale.org Contact Debi at (631) 223-3789 Friday, Dec. 9 at 8 p.m.

OLD WESTBURY GARDENS 71 Old Westbury Rd, Westbury 516-333-0048 • www.oldwestburygardens. org Wednesdays and Sundays at 10:30 a.m. Tai Chi Thursdays and Saturdays at 11:15 a.m. Yoga NASSAU COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART 1 Museum Dr., Roslyn (516) 484-9338 www.nassaumuseum.org Nov. 19 to March 5, 2017 Ansel Adams: Sight and Feeling Nov. 19 to March 5, 2017 Light Works: 100 Years of Photos Nov. 19 to March 5, 2017 New Photos: Long Island Collects Ongoing Sculpture Park Walking Trails Gardens Events FILM SCREENING Nov. 19 to March 5, 2017 Stryker’s America: Photographing the Great Depression FILM SCREENING Nov. 19 to March 5, 2017 Cartier-Bresson’s Century For The Family Sundays, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Family Tour at 1 p.m. Art Activities at 1:30 p.m. Jan. 8, 22, 29 Feb. 5, 12, 19, 26 Neiman Marcus Family Sundays at the Museum Sunday, January 15, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Super Family Sunday Merrymaking in a Gold Coast Mansion 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21 Wednesday, Feb. 22 Thursday, Feb. 23 Family Art Making Days February Three-Day Break for Art New Program Tuesdays, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Jan. 17, Feb. 14 Sketching in the Galleries Exhibition Lecture Thursdays. 1-2 p.m. January 5, February 2 Brown Bag Lectures: Riva Ettus THE WHALING MUSEUM AND EDUCATION CENTER 301 Main Street Cold Spring Harbor, New York, 11724 www.cshwhalingmuseum.org Sunday, Dec. 4 at 1 p.m. Holidays in the Harbor: Sea Glass Ornaments Sunday, Dec. 4 at 2:30 p.m. Holidays in the Harbor: Menorah Workshop Sunday, Dec. 11 at 2:30 p.m. Holidays in the Harbor: Gingerships! THE DOLPHIN BOOK SHOP & CAFE 299 Main St., Port Washington (516) 767-2650 • www.thedolphinbookshop. com Fridays at 11 a.m. Music in the Cafe Sunday, Dec. 11 at 10:30 a.m. Hanukkah Celebration


News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

Community Calendar ETHICAL HUMANIST SOCIETY OF LONG ISLAND Free Monday Talks at the Ethical Humanist Society of Long Island 38 Old Country Road At the western end of Old Country Road Paths To Humanism Monday, Dec. 5 WEDNESDAY MONTHLY LUNCHEON (Holiday Lunch) Dec. 28 at 1 p.m. At the Milleridge Inn, 585 North Broadway, Jericho Call John Hyland at (516) 482-3795 for reservations WALT WHITMAN BIRTHPLACE ASSOCIATION 246 Old Walt Whitman Road Huntington Station Yuletide Family Day Sunday, Dec. 4 at 1 p.m. WINTHROP-UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 200 Old Country Road, Suite 250 Mineola, NY 11501 Winthrop-University Hospital’s Department of Neuroscience Offering Free Support Groups Brain Tumor Support Group for Patients: First Monday of the Month 10:30 am to 11:30 am on Dec. 5 Winthrop Wellness Pavilion, 1300 Franklin Ave., Suite ML-5, Garden City 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Dec. 19 Dystonia Support Group for Patients – Fourth Monday of the Month Winthrop Wellness Pavilion, 1300 Franklin Ave., Suite ML-5 Garden City 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Dec. 14 Epilepsy Patient Support Group – Third Wednesday of the month Winthrop Research & Academic Center, 101 Mineola Blvd. Room G-020 Mineola 10 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. on Dec. 12 Huntington’s Disease – 2nd Monday of the month Winthrop’s Research & Academic Center, 101 Mineola Blvd., Room G-013 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Dec. 8 Relapsing & Remitting Multiple Sclerosis and Newly Diagnosed MS Winthrop Wellness Pavilion, 1300 Franklin Avenue, Suite ML-5, Garden City Head and Neck Cancer Patient Support Group

Offered by Winthrop-University Hospital’s Center for Cancer Care 1300 Franklin Avenue, Suite ML5 Garden City Third Monday of the month, from 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. “Improve Your Well-Being” Tai Chi & A Mindfulness Approach to Stress Management Wednesday, Dec. 14 at 1:15 p.m. The Samuel Field Y Two Weekday Programs For Preschool Children With Developmental Disabilities Contact Amanda at (718) 423-6111 ext. 242 or e-mail asmith@sfy.org 58-20 Little Neck Parkway. Little Neck On Wednesdays from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Carle Place End of the Year Christmas Dinner Social Saturday, Dec. 17 at 6 p.m. Domenico’s Restaurant Levittown Shopping Center 3270A Hempstead Turnpike Levittown TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM 401 Roslyn Road Roslyn Heights, NY 11577 516-621-2288 Saturday, Dec. at 7:30 p.m.

Club TBS Sunday, Dec. 4 at 8:30 a.m. Blood Drive Wednesday, Dec. 7 at 10:30 a.m. Current Events/Discussion Group Friday, Dec. 9 at 7:30 p.m. Friday Night Live Tuesday, Dec. 13 at 7 p.m. IDF Musical Ensemble Wednesday, Dec. 14 at 11:30 a.m. Senior Luncheon Thursday, Dec. 15 at 7:30 p.m. Sisterhood Author Talk

15th Annual Long Island Smart Growth Summit Crest Hollow Country Club 8325 Jericho Turnpike, Woodbury Contact (631) 261-0242 or info@visionlongisland.org for more info Friday, Dec. 2 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Non-Profit Symposium Theodore Roosevelt Executive and Legislative Building 1550 Old Country Road, Mineola (516) 571-0896 Tuesday, Dec. 6 at 10 a.m. TEMPLE JUDEA OF MANHASSET 333 Searingtown Rd. Manhasset (516) 6218049 temple-judea.com Three Days of Duplicate Bridge The game schedules are: Mondays and Tuesdays at 12 p.m. and Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions Old Westbury Hebrew Congregation 21 Old Westbury Road SINGLES ASSOCIATION OF L.I. For further information on any or all these events, call 516-465-3953 or email singlesassofli@optimum.net. Sunday, Dec. 4 at 4 p.m. Apple Bee’s Restaurant 1300 Corporate Drive (off Merchants Concourse) Westbury Saturday, Dec. 10 at 6 p.m. Ben’s Carle Place Restaurant 59 Old Country Road

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64 News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

Auditions set to begin Adelphi chorale, vocal for ‘The Music Man’ ensembles to perform The Community Synagogue Theater Company recently announced auditions for its next musical, “The Music Man,” where performances will be at the Jeanne Rimsky Theater at Landmark On Main at 232 Main St. in Port Washington on Thursday, April 27, Saturday, April 29, and Sunday, April 30 Auditions will be held on Sunday, Dec. 4 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and Monday, Dec. 5 from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. A double matinee performance will be on April 30. “The Music Man” is an Americana musical featuring songs such as “Seventy Six Trombones,” “Goodnight My Someone” and “Till There Was You,” according to a press release from the Community Synagogue Theater Company. The Community Synagogue Theater Company is welcoming Matt DeLuca into the role of Director. “I am happy to join this creative team and theatre company because it is evident upon meeting the people involved how much they love the idea of creating live theatre together,” DeLuca said. “With such palpable enthusiasm, creativity and excitement, the show can’t help but be a hit.”

Musical director Michael Janover will work with the cast and conduct the orchestra, Aislinn Oliveri will join as the choreographer, and Lydia Gladstone will serve as costume designer. Returning as technical director is Brian Wedeking, as well as and artistic director Nick Gardella. Lori Zlotoff will also return as executive producer. “ We have chosen a timeless musical that has a part for everyone,” Zlotoff said. “I am so excited to showcase our talent on stage this year with such a wonderful show.” All adults are welcome to audition, and children aged eight and older are invited as well. Tweens, teens and young adults are also encouraged to come out for both chorus and featured roles. Callbacks will be on Thursday, Dec. 8. All auditions will be held at the Community Synagogue Theater Company at 160 Middle Neck Road in Port Washington. Appointments are not necessary. For more information, call (516) 883-3144, Ext. 359.

The Adelphi University Performing Arts Center recently announced that the department of music will perform the Adelphi Chorale and Adelphi Vocal Ensemble: Holiday Celebration on the Westermann Stage of the Concert Hall on Sunday, Dec. 11 at 4 p.m. Under the direction of Karen Faust Baer, the Adelphi choral ensembles will celebrate the wonder, hope and peace of the season, according to a press release from Adelphi University. “One of the highlights of our concert will be the performance of ‘Peace of Wild Things’, a work composed by Jake Runes-

tad, who recently gave a workshop at Adelphi,” Karen Faust Baer, choral ensemble director and adjunct professor, said. The program will feature works by Mendelssohn, Handel, Copland, Elgar, and a work by award winning composer Jake Ruhenstad. The concert hall is located at 1 South Avenue in Garden City. Tickets are currently on sale and are priced at $20, with discounts available to seniors, students and alumni. For more information, call (516) 877-4000 or e-mail boxoffice@adelphi. edu.

Singer-songwriters to play ‘Hard Luck Cafe’ Jon Bellion concert to benefit Cohen center The Paramount in Huntington will host Jon Bellion’s “Home for the Holidays” concert on Thursday, Dec. 8 at 8 p.m., which will also benefit Cohen Children’s Medical Center, a member of Northwell Health. Strictly a producer at age 14, Bellion, a resident of Lake Grove and graduate of Sachem North High School, developed a unique sound and style, according to a press release from The Paramount. Set to open for Twenty One Pilots on their 2017 tour, Bellion will perform live on stage for one night only at The Paramount for his first hometown headline

concert. Also performing at the event, special guest Nick Tangorra will perform as well. With over 27 million streams, Tangorra has performed at The Paramount as a special guest three times, opening for Meghan Trainor, Bridget Mendler & Fifth Harmony in recent years. This will be Tangorra’s first direct support slot at The Paramount. A portion of the proceeds for this event will go to benefit the Cohen Children’s Medical Center. For tickets and more information visit paramountny.com, or call (800) 745-3000.

Singer-songwriters Steven Pelland and Aly Tadros will be featured artists during the monthly “Hard Luck Café” series at the Cinema Arts Centre and Folk Music Society of Huntington on Thursday, Dec. 15 at 8:30 p.m. The concert will be in the Cinema’s Sky Room, and will be preceded by an open mic at 7:30 p.m. Aly Tadros, from

Laredo, Texas, now calls Brooklyn home, according to a press release from the Cinema Arts Centre and Folk Music Society of Huntington. Her music combines folk, pop, Mexican and Middle Eastern influences. “It’s not your mama’s folk music,” Tadros said. “Take the cool tone of Norah Jones, the guttural

growl of Fiona Apple, and the unorthodox guitar work of Ani DiFranco — and you’ve got this half-Egyptian/half Texan songwriter.” Steven Pelland, a native of Fall River, Massachusetts, began his musical career at the early age of seven, learning accordion and organ. His father, a professional guitarist and vocalist, inspired him to study electric bass and voice during his teens. At age 19, Steven graduated from the Modern School of Music and began freelancing as a bassist on Boston’s jazz scene. Tickets are $15, and $10 for Cinema Arts Centre members. Tickets will be available at the door as well. For more information, call (631) 425-2925.


News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

65

County museum opens 3 photo exhibits North Shore residents, along with artists, art collectors and gallery owners recently gathered at the Nassau County Museum of Art for its members and press preview of three exhibitions of photography. This marked the first time in recent history that the museum has devoted all of its galleries to the art of photography, ac-

cording to a press release from the Nassau County Museum of Art. Guests at this invitation-only reception were the first to see these exhibitions, which explore photography from its nearly earliest days through to the work of some of the most prominent contemporary photographers. Two of the exhibitions, “Ansel Adams:

Sight and Feeling and Light Works: 100 Years of Photography” were organized by Michigan’s Kalamazoo Institute for the Arts. The third exhibition, “New Photos: Long Island Collects,” features more recent works of photography from the second half of the 20th century down to the present day — all on loan from Long Island collectors.

The exhibits opened to the public on Nov. 19 and remain on view through March 5. For information, visit nassaumuseum. org or call (516) 484-9337. The museum is located at 1 Museum Drive, Roslyn Harbor off of Northern Boulevard/25A, and is open Tuesday to Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4:45 p.m.

Steve Blank, publisher of Blank Slate Media, with NYS Assemblyman Charles D. Lavine.

Museum trustee Dr. Harvey Manes with Girls in Windows, a 1960 a Ormand Gigli work he loaned to the exhibition.

Artist Ellen Kahn is shown with the four works in New Photos created by her and her sister, Lynda Kahn.

Museum trustee Deborah A. Cannon is shown with a work by William Wegman, famed for his photographs of dogs.

Dr. Stephen J. and Sharon Cuchel. Sharon Cuchel is a museum trustee.


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READERS WRITE

Grant Toch for G.N. school board

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y name is Grant Toch and I am running to succeed Monique Bloom as a trustee for the Great Neck School District Board of Education. As a trustee, I promise to advocate tirelessly to maximize the resources provided to our school district’s students and teachers while promoting financial stability and transparency. This promise I make is supported by an eight year record of working on your behalf with the Board of Education and teachers to solve some of the most pressing financial issues facing the school district. The special election for the board of education trustee provides me an opportunity to ask for your vote so I may continue to advocate on your behalf in a more far reaching and influential role. By way of background, my wife, Nicole, and our three daughters have lived in Great Neck for almost 11 years. Our daughters, ages six, eight, and 12 all attend the Great Neck Pubic Schools. My daughters’ public school background and that of my own allow me to appreciate the critical role it plays within our community, the value it provides currently to our students and the need to continuously enhance its offerings and stature.

My community involvement involves both our school district and youth sports. I have been a substantial contributor to the United Parent-Teacher Council for eight years, first as a Member, 2009 to 2012, and then as chairman of its budget committee from 2012 to present. In addition, I have been on the UPTC Executive Board, both as treasurer and recording secretary, for the last four years. I have also recently been appointed to the BoE’s newly created Financial Advisory Committee. As both member and chairman of the UPTC budget committee, I have represented your voice advocating on behalf of the school district’s students and parents so that maximum resources are brought to bear, enabling every child to have an opportunity to achieve their maximum potential, while safeguarding the financial stability of the district and its employees. My impact can be seen today as the bond offering currently proposed originated with the budget committee back in 2009. This has not been an easy task, particularly against the backdrop of the property tax cap legislation. Starting from 2009 and using our proprietary financial model, we demonstrated to the district that the budget

trajectory was unsustainable long term, short of large tax or other revenues increases, or significant increases in class size, and this was before taking into account the significant underinvestment made by the district in its own physical plant. We recommended the district undergo a comprehensive strategic review performed by an independent third party in preparation for a bond offering, the proceeds of which were to be invested in a manner consistent with the strategic review, allowing Great Neck to build the school district of the future, while simultaneously funding the bond without a tax increase and placing the School District budget on a sustainable long term trajectory. As the bond offering is coming closer to reality, albeit absent the comprehensive strategic review, I have spent considerable time educating parents and teachers about the bond offering and its impact on our district. In addition to assessing the bond offering proposed by the board of education and its potential impact on taxpayers, the district and its taxpayers face other financial issues which must be balanced against the need for it to preserve and enhance substantive offerings and protect employees. I have spent considerable time work-

Peirez right for school board

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y name is Charlotte and my daughter was fortunate enough to be part of the last first-grade class that Mrs. Peirez taught at Lakeville Elementary. My first impression of Mrs. Peirez was that she is like a grandmother — warm, wise, and knows just what to do with a child — and I was right. Her experiences throughout the years gave her an ability to know just how to help a child in the classroom and help them grow both academically and as a whole person. Being a first-time parent in the school district, or in the American elementary school system for that matter, means I am not sure of what is to happen in the classroom. After meeting and speaking with Mrs. Peirez my husband and I were immediately put at ease

I

Grant Toch Great Neck

Peirez a ‘pillar of the community’

knowing that our daughter was in good hands, and that we had a teacher that will find the best way to help her grow. I think she will be an excellent choice for the Board of Education. In my humble opinion, having someone who e have had the good has been in the classroom for 29 years gives her fortune and privilege an unique vantage point to understand how of over 40 years of things really are in the classroom. friendship with Donna Our children need someone at the Board of Education that have experience with the day-in Peirez and her husband Bill. She has been a pillar of the and day-out of the school administration and firsthand experience with educating our children to community in so many ways and has demonstrated total dedicamake the best possible decisions for our kids. tion to the education of the chilCharlotte Chiu dren of Great Neck. Great Neck As a PTA President, committee chair and president of the United Parent Teacher Council and chair of shared decision making, she volunteered countless hours over many years to making our schools the best they can be. derful teacher, but she is also as she will not only be a great Then she spent 28 years dedicated to the community fit for the board but also keep as a classroom teacher at the and keeping it great. things going and make great Lakeville Elementary School Donna not only has the in- strides to the changes that our and earned a reputation for besight to what is happening in community has faced in the last ing one of the most beloved and the Great Neck community, but few years and had to endure. desired teachers in the entire she also knows what is changschool system. ing and what is needed to keep Mary Lau But it is equally important to this community great. New Hyde Park note that Donna and Bill Peirez I totally support Donna

Vote Peirez in school election have known Donna Peirez for a few years. I met Donna when I was the treasure of United Parent-Teacher Council. Donna and I would attend every meeting and that is where I got to know her both personally and professionally. First of all, Donna is a won-

ing with the board of education and administrators addressing issues such as: 1. the ongoing annual structural deficit position the School District annually must close prior to the completion of its budgeting process; 2. the low inflation environment that results in the largest expenditures growing at rates in excess of the budget itself; 3. the increasing likelihood that uncontrollable expenditures will increase significantly placing substantial pressure on our budget and our taxpayers; 4. additional capital expenditures required but likely unaddressed by the proposed bond offering. I ask for your vote to become a trustee on the school board because I am the only candidate with a demonstrated record of working with the district’s board of education, teachers, parents and students to find solutions to these pressing challenges while promoting financial stability, preserving and enhancing district substantive offerings and protecting employees. With young children in the school district, I am committed to this community and these causes for a long time to come.

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are residents and taxpayers in Great Neck, just like the rest of us, and share our concerns about school spending and taxes. Donna understands what is needed to provide the most effective education possible and where the possible waste and inefficiencies lie. And, as she has proven time and time again, Donna knows how to bring contentious parties together so that we can all work together for the only constituency that matters to her: the children. It is not often that the community is presented with a candidate for the Board of Education with the experience, credentials and dedication of Donna Peirez and we urge you to vote for her on Dec. 6. Trudy and Steven Markowitz Great Neck


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READERS WRITE

O’Brien ‘clear choice’ for M-LFD commish

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here is a clear choice for Manhasset-Lakeville water/fire commissioner on Tuesday, Dec. 13. Donald O’Brien has served as a commissioner for six years and has done what he committed to in his original campaign. He has brought his career background in finance to the board, serving as its treasurer for four years and its chairman for two years. During his two terms, he has implemented major changes in budgeting that have resulted in financing capital expenditures through the annual budgets. There has been no new water district bond financing during the past six years and existing bond debt has

been paid down by $10.6 million or 50 percent. All budgets have been under the tax cap. O’Brien has established a close working relationship with the fire chiefs. He has a working knowledge of the issues related to fire protection, rescue, and the ambulance unit. He refinanced the fire district bonds to reduce interest expense. The fire department will be debt-free in 2017. His contract negotiating skills for district contracts and his private sector management expertise, which includes working closely with attorneys on legal issues and accountants and auditors on the financial state-

ments, are major assets for the districts. His private sector real estate property management experience has been beneficial in matters relating to the operation and maintenance of the properties owned and operated by the water and fire districts. We need to elect O’Brien for another term so he can continue to deliver for the residents of the district. Let’s get out and vote to re-elect Commissioner Donald O’Brien on Tuesday, Dec. 13 at the Bayview Avenue Firehouse. Elizabeth A. Parrella Manhasset

Vote Cilluffo in Cilluffo deserves re-election park election I

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he election for a new park commissioner is on Dec. 13. I think Frank Cilluffo has done a really good job working with the other [Great Neck] Park District commissioners. Our parks had the same three people in office for quite a while, and even though they did a good job it was time to bring in someone who had some new ideas. Commissioner Cilluffo seems to have amazing energy

and uses it to good effect trying to make sure the details of the park district work as well as the district’s big plans. He has worked hard at the job and has proved him self as someone willing to work full time for our parks. Frank has only been in office for two years and deserves his first full three-year term.

t has been almost two years since Frank Cilluffo was elected to complete Ruth Tamarin’s term as a commissioner of the Great Neck Park District. On Tuesday, Dec. 13, he is running in a contested election for a full three-year term. I am glad the election is contested, because it gives the electorate a reason to cast a vote for Frank in recognition of his performance over the past two years. When first elected, while Frank was a visible and active presence in the district’s facilities, he was circumspect at board meetings as he learned the various details of a commissioner’s responsi-

bilities, and how the administration operates. He soon found his voice, and gained his stride working well with the other two commissioners. He took an active part in the search for the new superintendent and assistant superintendent. I am supporting Mr. Cilluffo because I think he has proven over the past two years that he will continue to be an excellent park commissioner — if elected to a full term. Please vote on Dec. 13. Marty Markson Great Neck

Leiberman can improve G.N.

Amanda Stein Great Neck

I Leiberman best for parks N Support Peirez for schools have known Neil Leiberman Neil has the maturity and a conflict wisely and find a way to for many years. He is devot- sense of fair play, he will reach improve employee morale. ed to our town. out to all of us for feedback at I firmly believe you couldn’t Neil has what it takes to all park facilities and will take find a person more suited for make Great Neck even greater the time needed to look into the job at hand. than it is now. your opinions. Making it fun for all ages — His background as a physiJoan Hutchinson Great Neck o one is more passionate about Great Neck parks than my creating more winter events and cal education teacher and a summer fun. counselor enables him to handle dad, Neil Leiberman. Being one of Great Neck’s park commissioners has been a dream of his for as long as I can remember. Not a day goes by that he doesn’t make use of our beautiful parks or come up with ideas to improve them. My dad isn’t your typical politician, and therefore wouldn’t be your typical park commissioner. As long-term residents in Great Neck, we fully munity leader, PTA president and know she will He would lead by example and do right by the parks and his support Donna Peirez for the seat on the school do the best for our Great Neck community. board. There could not be a better candidate for constituents. She has been a dedicated, enthusiastic and school board in Great Neck then Donna Peirez. Eric Leiberman brilliant member of the community for over 40 Lainie and Larry Charmatz Great Neck years. We have known her as a terrific parent, comGreat Neck

Peirez committed to district

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have known Donna Peirez since I moved here 43 years ago and can vouch for her commitment to the children of Great Neck. She was an active member of the PTSAs when her children were school age, often as president culminating in a term as President of the United Parent Teacher Council. During those years she

chaired many important districtwide committees including budget, safety and transportation, and legislative. There is no one whom I would endorse for the school board of Great Neck more wholeheartedly than Donna Peirez. Candy Gould Great Neck

Woman injured in car crash BY J OE N I K I C A 43-year-old woman was left seriously injured after three vehicles collided on the Long Island Expressway in Lake Success late Thursday evening, Nassau County police said. Police said a 2003 Acura SUV was traveling westbound on the LIE when it came to a

stop and was rear ended by a 2001 Acura about 11:49 p.m. The 2001 Acura, police said, was then rear ended by a 2010 Toyota. Police said the female passenger in the Toyota was not wearing a seat belt and was thrust forward and left unconscious. She was transported to a

nearby hospital for treatment and was listed in critical condition, police said. There were no other reported injuries. Police said there was “no apparent” criminality. All three vehicles were impounded at the scene for brake and safety inspections, police said.


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COMMUNITY NEWS

Doc to talk on Teens make food for needy Holocaust trauma Can Holocaust trauma be inherited? Temple Isaiah will explore this thought-provoking new theory in a lecture presentation on Monday, Dec. 5 at 7:30 p.m. Psychologists have long known Linda Burghardt, Ph.D. that the profound a member of Temlegacy of loss and ple Isaiah of Great suffering experi- Neck and Scholarenced by Holocaust in-Residence at the survivors deeply af- Holocaust Memofects their children. rial & Tolerance Now biologists Center, will present are saying that ge- a talk on these new netics can play an scientific discovereven larger role in ies entitled, “Can transmitting this Holocaust Trauma trauma to the next Be Inherited? The generation. Complex Genetic L i n d a Legacy of the SecBurghardt, Ph.D., ond Generation.”

Burghardt will describe the science behind these claims and explain how this genetic legacy can have far-reaching consequences for the children of survivors -- and their own offspring. The lecture will be presented on Dec. 5 at 7:30 p.m. at Temple Isaiah, located at 1 Chelsea Place, off Cutter Mill Road. There is a $10 donation requested, and coffee and cake will be served. For further information, call the Temple office at 516-4875373.

In the spirit of the Thanksgiving holiday, teens from Great Neck came together at Lake Success Chabad. Numerous thanksgiving foods and treats were made by teens of the JLE Teen Club and distributed by Chaim’s Kitchen, a soup kitchen run by Lake Success Chabad, to people in need. The teens of Lake Success

Chabad meet each month to participate in an activity where they give back to the community, and welcome all teens to join in giving back. For more information on how to participate in upcoming community service events please visit www.myJLE.com or call Rabbi Dovid or Chumy Ezagui at 516487-3343.

Race for water, fire commish BY M A X Z A H N

Temple ensemble to hold concert The Temple Israel of Great Neck Women’s ensemble, Na’aleh, will hold its next concert, which is open to the public, on Sunday, Dec. 11. The performance, titled “Jewish Music to Warm Your Soul on a Winter Sunday”, will take place starting at 3 p.m. at Temple Israel of Great Neck, located at 108 Old Mill Road. All of the pieces to be performed are in English, Hebrew and Yiddish, and will consist

of prayers, psalms, poems and more. The Na’aleh Women’s Ensemble is conducted and accompanied on flute by Shira Fishkin and accompanied on piano by Guy Brewer. Admission to the concert is $18 per person. For more information, please contact Renee Fleischer at 516-466-8428, Ellen Rosen at 516-482-7480 or email naalehchorus@aol.com.

Students hit book bazaar

The Great Neck Park District Book Bazaar held at Great Neck House began on October 24 and will draw to a close on December 11.

Pictured with organizer Rebecca Rosenblatt Gilliar are the Village School students and their faculty: Stephen Goldberg,

Sam Yellis, Jeff Bernstein, Lauren Sullivan, Cindy Pavlic, Lisa DiRosa, Megan Wilvert and Ronni Graf.

Donald T. O’Brien pointed to his experience helping manage the budget of the Manhasset-Lakeville Fire and Water District. Steve Flynn cited his background as a public works superintendent. The two are competing in an election on Dec. 13 to fill a three-year term on the district’s commission. The three commissioners oversee an $18.6 million budget and ensure that residents receive clean, reliable water as well as prompt fire safety services. The Manhasset-Lakeville Fire and Water District takes in all of Manhasset except for Plandome, half of Great Neck, and some of northern New Hyde Park. Though the commission oversees both the fire and water districts, which cover the same geographic area, the two are technically independent of each other. They serve approximately 45,000 people, who use 7.4 million gallons of water a day, according to the water district’s website. The position of commissioner is part-time and pays $100 for each of two weekly meetings for a total of approximately $800 per month. O’Brien, an incumbent who has served two three-year terms, emphasized his 34 years working in real estate finance before taking the position and how it helped him manage the district budget. “We haven’t borrowed any money since I’ve been on the board,” he said. “We paid down $10.6 million of the water district debt, which amounts to 50 percent of the total. And the fire district will be debt free in March.” He pointed to the new Munsey Park water tower, which he said will go on line by the end of the year, as an achievement that came together through the careful apportioning of funds and the consistent application of oversight for the duration of the two-year project. The tower is behind schedule, since its initial deadline for completion was November. O’Brien attributed the delay to the “impact of weather” and said he considered the timeline “pretty accurate forecasting for such a large project.” Initially, when the water tower was proposed, village officials and residents raised concerns about the aesthetics of having another tower, while also

questioning the safety of having such a large tank in the middle of a residential area. In an interview, Flynn described himself as superintendent of the Department for Public Works in the Village of Plandome. The village website lists him as the Highway and Water Department foreman. Elizabeth Kaye, the clerk-treasurer for the village, said the two titles are used interchangeably by village officials. Flynn overseas two full-time employees and an occasional part-time employee, Kaye said. Flynn said his job affords him “extensive knowledge of the water distribution systems.” “I understand costs and options with water systems, and I have worked within budgets to get the right systems at the right price,” he added. He also pointed to his 27 years as a volunteer firefighter in Manhasset, which included positions of second lieutenant, first lieutenant and captain. “I bring the right blend of fire and water background coupled with the love I have for this town as a 46-year resident,” he said. For his part, O’Brien said he has lived in Manhasset “since grammar school.” Flynn acknowledged that O’Brien has “served this community well over the last six years.” “This is an election where the voters have two viable candidates,” he added. O’Brien did not share such an opinion of Flynn. He said Flynn “has a limited understanding because he has only been to two meetings and there is a lot going on.” The water district holds one meeting per week, as does the fire district. Flynn did not respond to a request for comment about the number of meetings he has attended. Flynn said he would “serve Manhasset with utmost respect for our community, and with the pride and tradition that my family has instilled in me.” O’Brien summed up his candidacy by saying, “There are a lot of financial and management duties for the commissioner. That’s what I brought to the job and I want to continue to do that.” Voting will take place on Dec. 13 from noon to 9 p.m. at firehouses 1, 3, 4 and 5.


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Voters to pick 1 of 7 for G.N. school board Continued from Page 1 who may have more time on the board, their first impression might be ‘no, we can’t.’” Panetta is a member of the Lakeville Civic Association, an assistant Scoutmaster in Troop 10 of Great Neck, treasurer of the Brotherhood of Temple Tikvah of New Hyde Park, a member of the Clinton G. Martin Pool Advisory Committee and a member of the Great Neck Library Nominating Committee. He is also a member of the Great Neck Memorial Day Parade committee, and an Eagle Scout adviser in the Shelter Rock District Boy Scouts of America. Ratner is a lifelong Great Neck resident who attended Saddle Rock Elementary School, Great Neck South Middle School and Great Neck South High School. He graduated from the University of Maryland at College Park with a degree in government and politics. He also minored in leadership studies. As well as serving in the college’s student government and its executive committee, Ratner said, he served as a student representative to the College Park City Council. He said the board would benefit from having

a member who is “recently connected” to the issues facing students. “Although I’m young, you have to remember I’m one part of the collective board,” said Ratner, who is 23 years old. “There is 102 years of experience that I will work with and will make sure we do the best for our community moving forward. “However, I’m the voice that this community needs to bring to that board to round it out and make sure our students’ perspectives and their futures and the needs of their futures are discussed,” Ratner added. Toch moved to Great Neck with his wife in 2006. They have three daughters who attend schools in the district in first, third and seventh grade. He said that it “doesn’t matter” how many candidates are vying for the seat, as he is a “unique” candidate because of his work in the community and in the school district. Toch said that as well as serving as a parent coordinator for Great Neck travel soccer teams, on which all three of his daughters play, he has worked with the Great Neck United ParentTeacher Council, or UPTC, since 2009. In 2009, he joined the budget committee and in 2012 began chairing the

Nikolas Kron

Lori Beth Schwartz

committee, he said. Toch said he became a member of the UPTC executive board in 2012, first serving as a treasurer and now serving as a recording secretary. He said that his experiences for 14 years as an analyst at various hedge funds, and the fact he specializes in the financial services sector and in government bonds, are relevant to the district’s endeavors. “I am talking about an issue that goes across the different ethnicities in our community in a way that is not opportunistic, it is sincere and demonstrated over a long period of time,” Toch said. “My candidacy is about the promotion of financial stability, providing transparency and ensuring that our students and our teachers are provided the opportunity to achieve their maximum potential.” Peirez, a 28-year firstgrade teacher at Lakeville Elementary School who retired in June, said what makes her different from the other candidates is her knowledge of what goes on inside the classroom.

Donald Panetta

Donna Peirez

“I think the main thing ... is my experience from working in the classroom with the children,” she said. “That one extra piece is my knowledge of the intricate workings of the district.” Before teaching in the district, Peirez said, she was very involved in the district by serving on the Parent Teacher Associations of the former Kensington-Johnson Elementary School, E.M. Baker Elementary School, North Middle School and North High School. She said that she is a “consensus builder” and that one of her biggest achievements was when Kensington-Johnson closed around 1980 and she helped facilitate the move of students to E.M. Baker. Peirez, who also taught at the Great Neck Community School, a cooperative nursery school, for 11 years, said her expertise on what works best in the classroom would be an asset to the board. “I feel that I can bring a current knowledge of curriculum that is success-

Josh Ratner

Grant Toch

ful and some that is not,” she said. “Everybody has great ideas about what they want in the budget, but what really affects the teaching in the district, the students, facilities, technology? What are we bringing that’s meaningful and what isn’t?” Peirez said that in addition to maintaining the district’s high academic standards, she wanted to see increased efforts in developing students’ social skills and understanding of other cultures. Kron, who was born and raised in Dublin, Ireland, and moved to Great Neck with his wife in 1999, worked as a strategy consultant for Ernst & Young and Cap Gemini S.A., advising health-care, pharmaceutical, energy and consumer clients on how to best take advantage of new technologies. He decided to run for the Great Neck Board of Education, he said, because he felt it was time to “bring new blood to the board.” Kron said he wanted to bring his business and entrepreneurial experience to the board.

Nicholas Toumbekis

“I have a strong experience in understanding new technologies and techniques from the business world and academic research world and wanted to share that with the board,” he said. “It is already an amazing school district but it needs the newest ideas to continue to grow into the 21st century needs of our children.” Kron said that higher education is one way for students to progress after high school, but it is not the only path. He added that getting students prepared for the next level of their lives is important and that he would work to make them aware of all the options available. “What I want people to do is to think carefully about the election, about the right mix of skills and experience on the board,” Kron said. “I think that I fit nicely in the middle of the right age demographic with a vested interest because of my children in the school system and a strong understanding of how the real world works Continued on Page 70

SCHOOL NEWS

Researcher gets $1.8M grant Improv group to perform Continued from Page 13 tissues of the spine, which give it flexibility, to degenerate over time,” she added. The study will examine a molecule called the high mobility group box one, HMGB1, a protein expressed by dying or stressed cells, the institute said. The question the study seeks to answer is whether the release of the protein in such cells is a cause of the degeneration in spinal discs and soft tissue. “Are the molecules a leading cause of degeneration or a bystander? It’s hard to know,” she said. Chahine will examine how the HMGB1 molecule functions in samples of degenerating tissue and will inject the molecules into healthy tissue samples to observe their effect. If Chahine finds that the molecule causes disc and soft tissue degeneration, then it could lead to a new treatment, she said. She cautioned that, in a best-case scenario, such a drug development process would take about 10 years to complete “efficacy and safety testing.”

According to Chahine, a new treatment is necessary because “there is little information physicians can offer patients as far as therapy” for soft tissue and disc degeneration. “If it doesn’t resolve at home with care like Advil then patients tend to see a specialist who might use epidural steroid injections to relieve the pain,” she said. “The outcomes of these injections are highly varied and unpredictable. Some respond favorably and some don’t, without clear indication of what factors matter most in helping people respond well.” She added, “What we’re trying to do in this study is come up with alternative therapies for people.” Chahine said she has family members who suffer from back pain. “I’ve been fortunate that I haven’t suffered from it myself,” she said. “At some point I may have to manage my own. I don’t think anyone is immune.”

Theatre South’s Improv Troupe will perform on Friday, Dec. 9 at 7:30 p.m. at Great Neck South High School, located at 341 Lakeville Road. During the performance, students improvise and create characters and scenes based on ideas from the audience. The public is encouraged to attend Improv to enjoy a spontaneous production by a talented cast. For tickets, please contact Thomas Marr, drama teacher/ director, Theatre South, at 516441-4873. Improv troupe, seated, front, from left: Jack Doremus (Troup captain) and Nathan Vallejo (Troup captain). Standing, middle, from left: Sophie Williams, Haylie Lempert, Brian

PHOTO BY JEFF BARLOWE

Volk, Lucas Cowen, Daniella Brancato, and Maggie Roach. Rear, from left: Benjamin Weber and Julian Malater (seated on shoulders).


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Incumbent challenged

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Continued from Page 2 term on the Board of Commissioners after first winning election in December 2014, defeating three opponents to serve out the remainding two years of former park district Commissioner Ruth Tamarin’s three-year term. He said he was running again to “build our community and enrich the lives of all our residents through leisure activities, parks and conservation initiatives.” Cilluffo is a retired New York City police officer and a police academy graduate with a degree in information technology. He currently coaches in the Great Neck Hockey program and PAL soccer program. “Over the past year, I have been part of many capital improvement projects such as the Memorial ballfield and playground renovation, the paving of commuter parking lots where we added a total of 21 additional parking spaces, and we are in the final stages of construction of our new administration building at 5 Beach Road,” Cilluffo said. “In addition to our recent capital improvements, I was most enthusiastic about our ‘extended Summer’ at the Parkwood Pool Complex. For the first time, after many years of requests from residents we kept the pool facility open for an additional two weeks after Labor Day at no additional cost to our patrons.” He also said he was proud of the conservation efforts he has been a part of at the park district, which include the organic turf management program, leaf mulching and the planting of 100 trees throughout the park district for its 100year anniversary. Cilluffo serves on the park district’s Parkwood Rink Advisory Committee, as well as on the Board of Safe Sports. If elected, he said, he will continue to work with the two other commissioners,

Robert Lincoln and Daniel Nachmanoff, and the superintendent, Jason Marra, to “improve our communication with our community through technology.” “We will introduce online program registration, a new website, social media and community surveys to improve our recreation services in early 2017,” Cilluffo said. “The focus will be on building our community and we will use technology to interact with our patrons and provide the highest level of customer service.” He said voters should vote for him because of his “proven track record” of commitment to improving operations at the park district. “I will continue to be, as I have been over the past two years, responsive to our district residents in order to meet the needs of our community,” Cilluffo said. “During my two-year tenure as commissioner we have not raised park district taxes while making numerous improvements.” “We will continue to do more with less and find creative ways to generate revenue through new recreation programming,” he added. “It has been a pleasure serving this community and I will be dedicated to all Great Neck Park District residents for the next three years and beyond.” The park district election will take place on Dec. 13 and polls will be open between 1 p.m. and 9 p.m. The polling sites are Great Neck House, located at 14 Arrandale Ave., Great Neck Social Center, located at 80 Grace Ave. and the Manhasset-Lakeville Firehouse located at 97 Jayson Ave. The Great Neck Park District includes all Great Neck villages and unincorporated areas with the exception of Great Neck Estates, Harbor Hills, Lake Success, Saddle Rock and University Gardens.

Voters to pick 1 of 7 Continued from Page 69 and keeping abreast with the latest technologies and techniques.” Schwartz, a former United ParentTeacher Council president, said that it was important to have a member on the board with children in the district. Starting with volunteering at the Great Neck Community School, she said, she went on to serve on various boards and committees for the schools her children attended: Saddle Rock Elementary School, John F. Kennedy Elementary School, Great Neck North Middle School and Great Neck North High School. Schwartz said she was elected to be a delegate to the UPTC and served as co-chair of the Health Education Committee. From 2012 to 2014, she served as UPTC president and served for a year on the board after her presidency as a member-at-large. Schwartz currently serves as chair of the Total Community Involvement Com-

mittee and PTO co-president at North Middle School. She said that her “motivating factor” to get involved in the school system was for more parental input and that one of her goals is to get more involvement from parents in the district. Schwartz said that through her community involvement, she has been able to meet people of different cultures and ethnicities and worked to “build bridges” connecting different groups. “I think I have a depth and breadth of understanding of the programs that the schools offer and the understanding of love for your teachers, love for your schools, wanting to support them in the deepest of ways,” she said. “And also trying to look to the future to make sure you protect that for the future.” Efforts to reach Toumbekis for comment were unavailing. The election will take place on Tuesday from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. at the E.M. Baker School and Great Neck South High School.


News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

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72 News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

Business&RealEstate In the middle of a perfect storm? The election for now is over, but interest rates dipped before the election, due to uncertainty and many put their dollars in the safe bond market, causing rates to go down. Now, rates have gone up a bit, with that normal fear of an increased economy and the flight to stocks as you can see that they are at an all time high of 19,000 plus. Many people for now are feeling much better, and some are not. The big question is whether or not the election and/or the Electoral College votes were fixed (as Trump previously was saying, if he lost, “the system was fixed.”); even though Hillary Clinton was ahead by 2 millionplus popular votes. Will the Electoral College for the last 100-plus years be changed or doomed in the near future? Stick around and we shall see. How will real estate be affected over the next four years? My thoughts are that if things continue to bode well — huge demand, 15-year low in inventory, 40-year low in interest rates and more and more millennials entering the market to

purchase — I do not see an end in sight; especially since builders throughout the country are still way behind in catching up to the current and future demand, because they literally stopped construction over the last three to five years and only the last year and half have come back to play “catch up baseball.” Based on the demand it will take possibly 10-plus years to build the necessary housing to satisfy the current demand. Inventory based on Multiple Listing Service of Long Island statistics for October 2015 was 25,623 properties down to 21,721 units at the end of October 2016, a reduction of 15.2 percent (only 6.7 months of inventory!) (down 32.5 percent since 2014) The impact has been to increase sale prices by 8.8 percent during the same period. The pressure on prices goes up as inventory decreases, basic supply and demand economics. We are still at an historic low for interest rates as was mentioned earlier. However, as the rates have now increased a bit since the election, due to money moving out of the Mortgage Bond Mar-

PHILIP A. RAICES Real Estate Watch ket and back to the stock market, rates had to increase to attract more investors who demanded more value. Return on investment, therefore equaling higher rates. This might be eliminating some who were border line purchasers due to the increased monthly cost of their mortgage, (principle, interest and taxes, insurance: P.I.T.I.). Moreover, as interest rates further increase, psychology sets in with those who become afraid or those who wait and figure prices will come down, as demand cools off. Waiting will usually cost

more because of the cost of money. It is far smarter to buy the interest rates than to wait for the drop in prices, because the monthly cost of one’s mortgage would still be less than sitting on the sidelines for a lower price point, over the long run. Unless rates go up to 7-9 percent (6 percent has been the average normal interest rate in the past), ownership will still be, for the very foreseeable future more advantageous and cost effective and less expensive than renting. Remember being your own landlord allows you to receive all the tax deductions, appreciation and security of growing roots within your community and raising a family without the fear of increased rents (fixed rate mortgage), the landlord not renewing your lease (you have the comfort of not being told that you have to move, eliminating the uncertainty factor). The increased equity for an owner over the years, is the single best leverage for increasing a family’s long term wealth and generally where most have their equity and wealth in homeownership. I can see that our economy is surely not overheating, by any

stretch of the imagination and the profitability of companies has been more in the mass layoffs and getting more work accomplished with less people. My wife got laid off in July, after 28 years with her company, because they wanted to save money, and most likely getting the current crew to do her graphic arts and production responsibilities, that she had been in charge of. (Any company need a fantastic graphic artist?) Although the initial shock was sudden and by surprise, her severance package was much more than most receive and her pension that she took with her was okay. But this has happened to millions over the last eight years, however, unemployment has been coming down to less than 5 percent. This has mainly been due to service sector jobs, which do not pay a sufficient wage to make it very feasible for those to gain the “American Dream of Ownership.” Even locally I have experienced a multitude of people and families, who have to take on two or three jobs to live on Long Island. I know and have the simple solution, as I have mentioned in an article I wrote five years ago in a blog on the internet. Begin rebuilding our infrastructure of roads, bridges, tunnels and high speed passenger and commercial rail in the north, south, central U.S. And west. These types of highly skilled positions, paying $50-100-plus per hour, will allow those to save and eventually purchase their home. This will obviously increase demand further, but continue to allow the construction industry to do well far into the future. I hope Mr. Trump will accomplish this one task in the next four years, more high paying jobs! Currently, the average price of a home in the U.S. as per Realtor.Com and The National Association of Realtors has gone above $250,000 (obviously not related to our local values, by any stretch of the imagination). I guess for me, without my wife’s income, I will have to find more sellers to sell their homes, condos, coops and commercial properties for and purchasers to do transactions with.


The Great Neck News, Friday, December 2, 2016

GN

Recent Real Estate Sales in Great Neck Great Neck Real Estate Market Conditions Median sales price $792,000 Demographics near Great Neck, NY Population Population Density Median Age People per Household Median Household Income Average Income per Capita

City 9,972 7,503 41.4 2.9 86,722 39,686

County 1,338,712 4,702 41.2 3 97,049 42,286

73

31 Upland Road, Great Neck Sold Price: $910,000 Date:10/14/2016 3 beds, 2 Full/1 Half baths Style: Exp Cape # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 60x105 Schools: Great Neck Total Taxes: $12,011 MLS# 2848914

21 Clark Drive, Great Neck Sold Price: $880,000 Date: 10/24/2016 4 beds, 2 Full/1 Half baths Style: Cape # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 80x100 Schools: Great Neck Total Taxes: $9,398 MLS# 2835244

118 Station Road, Great Neck Sold Price: $999,000 Date: 10/05/2016 4 beds, 3 Full baths Style: Contemporary # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 80x183 Schools: Great Neck Total Taxes: $14,200 MLS# 2852147

144 Arrandale Avenue, Great Neck Sold Price: $1,375,000 Date: 10/24/2016 4 beds, 3 Full baths Style: Ranch # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 132x432 Schools: Great Neck Total Taxes: $23,700 MLS# 2836154

Editor’s note: Homes shown here were recently sold in Great Neck by a variety of real estate agencies. The information about the homes and the photos were obtained through the Multiple Listing Services of Long Island. The homes are presented based solely on the fact that they were recently sold in Great Neck and are believed by Blank Slate Media to be of interest to our readers.

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74 The Great Neck News, Friday, December 2, 2016

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How state legislators in the majority Continued from Page 1 That means they pose a financial risk to the state, according to state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli. “At the end of the day we shouldn’t be doing any of them,” said E.J. McMahon, executive director of the Empire Center for Public Policy, a conservative think tank. “This is not core state priorities. This is political pork.” North Shore legislators and their aides said the majority leader of each chamber — Democrat Carl Heastie in the Assembly and Republican John Flanagan in the Senate — primarily decide who gets grant money to award and how much. Documents indicate a major partisan imbalance. Republican senators and Democrats who vote and caucus with them awarded nearly $84.5 million worth of State and Municipal Facilities Program, or SAM, grants between early 2014 and October 2015, according to a list the Senate published last year. Democrats who are not part of the breakaway Independent Democratic Conference — aside from Simcha Felder of Brooklyn, who votes with Republicans — got none to award, according to the list. Assembly Democrats gave more than $104.2 million in SAM grants in 2015, according to a list the Assembly published last year. Republicans got a total of $3.6 million. State Assemblyman Fred Thiele, an Independent, awarded more than $1.3 million. North Shore Democratic Assembly members Charles Lavine, Michelle Schimel and Michaelle Solages awarded 39 community project grants worth $225,000 this year, according to an Assembly list published in October. State Assemblyman Ed Ra, along with the rest of his Republican colleagues, got no money to award this year, according to the list. “I think this plays into all of the concerns that it would talk about with ethics in the Legislature and everything,” Ra said in an interview. “Having the resources, the control, that much at the top is just another thing that the top leadership has to hang over the heads of the rank and file.” The Senate and Assembly publish some lists of awarded grants on their websites, but spokespeople for both chambers did not respond to emails seeking detailed information about how money is allocated among legislators and the processes for determining who receives grants. The process for receiving grants is straightforward, according to interviews with state and village officials — municipalities or community organizations send lawmakers a letter saying what they want to do and how much money they need to do it, and the legislator decides who gets funding. That concerns DiNapoli and officials in his office. In a May comptroller’s report titled “Unfinished Business: Fiscal Reform in New York State,” DiNapoli proposes more strictly regulating lump-sum budget appropriations like those used to fund the grant programs. “Details on expenditures – purposes, recipients and other key factors – remain largely outside the State accounting sys-

ies money on top of their annual state aid packages. The Assembly approved $14 million and the Senate approved $15 million in such grants in 2015. Lawmakers negotiate the lists of recipients in budget deals each year, Ra and Butler said. Fifteen bullet aid grants totaling $355,000 went to North Shore schools, libraries and other publicly funded organizations last year.

tem,” DiNapoli’s report says, specifically referring to the State and Municipal Facilities Program. “... As a result, it is difficult for the public to be assured that the funds are being put to good use in a cost-efficient and effective manner.” Where oversight is arguably lacking before grants are awarded, it is very much present afterward, state and local officials said. It takes an average of a year for grant money to be disbursed once allocated as the applications are reviewed by state agencies and the Legislature, said Tara Butler, Lavine’s chief of staff. Municipalities receive capital grant money as a reimbursement after performing the designated work. “Whether it’s $500,000 or $5,000, it takes a really long time,” Butler said. Their partisan aspects may not be pretty, but ultimately the grant programs help North Shore communities and are run in the best way possible, Lavine said. “If we view this process cynically, which is easy to do, it’s simple to do, then we play a role in undermining democracy, because majority rule is what counts in our families, it counts in our communities, and it has to count in our government,” he said. “There’s no other way to do it.” A spokesman for the GOP Senate majority did not respond to requests for comment. Schimel referred two requests for information about grants to the Assembly press office, which did not respond to repeated requests for information over several weeks. A representative for Solages did not respond to a request to schedule an interview with her staff member who handles grants. The office did send a list of grants Solages awarded in the last fiscal year. Northwell ventriloquist at LandmarkThe State and Municipal Facilities Program is the largest initiative through which North Shore communities receive state grants. The state has allocated $385 million to the program each year for four years. Municipalities and other publicly financed bodies can request funding for brick-andmortar building projects, certain vehicles or economic development projects, according to state budget documents. Most grants are administered through the state Dormitory Authority, which borrows the money to fund the program. From February 2014 to late 2015, North Shore municipalities were nominated for 55 SAM grants worth a total of

$6.3 million, according to lists published in 2015. The Dormitory Authority reviewed 10 of them as of Oct. 20. Thirty-nine came from Martins; two from ex-Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos (awarded to Nassau County), a Republican convicted last year on corruption charges; three from Schimel; five from Lavine (D-Glen Cove); and one from Ra (RFranklin Square). The grants have funded large capital projects, such as the $250,000 renovation of the Village of Williston Park’s firehouse and road repaving in the Village of Thomaston, as well as purchases of new vehicles. Fifteen were designated for improvements at local parks. New money has not been appropriated since 2010 for the Community Projects Fund, which provides smaller grants known as “member items” to municipalities and non-profits. But some money is reappropriated and distributed to legislators each year. Three North Shore Assembly members — Lavine, Schimel and Solages, all Democrats — awarded 39 grants worth $225,000 this year using money appropriated between 2001 and 2005, according to an Assembly list published in September. They went mostly to nonprofit groups, including the Great Neck Breast Cancer Coalition and Roslyn-based North Shore Child and Family Guidance Center, to support social programs and other services. The amount of money allocated to that program has decreased tremendously since scandals involving the misuse of member item grants, state lawmakers said. Under the old system, member items could be awarded to almost any organization for almost any purpose with little oversight. That led to several scandals in the Legislature. In perhaps the most prominent, former Senate Majority Leader Pedro Espada, a Democrat, was convicted on corruption charges in 2012 for funneling member item money to nonprofit groups he controlled. In the 2009-10 fiscal year, Senate Democrats, who then controlled the chamber, awarded more than 2,700 grants totaling more than $64.1 million. Senate Republicans awarded fewer than 1,000 grants totaling more than $8.2 million. More recent information on Senate member item grants, which are now controlled by Republicans, could not be found on the Senate website. Dozens of so-called “bullet aid” grants also give school districts and local librar-

A POLITICAL ‘HONEY POT’ The Senate and Assembly majority leaders determine who gets grant money and how much — and members of the controlling party get more to dole out than the minority. Once lawmakers get the money, they ask municipalities and community groups to send written requests for grants, legislators and their aides said. They then review them and decide which projects to fund. Spokespeople for both chambers did not respond to emails asking how grant funds are distributed among legislators. Ra said Assembly Republicans received SAM grant money for the first time last year, the first under Democratic Speaker Carl Heastie. Heastie’s predecessor, Manhattan Democrat Sheldon Silver, was convicted on corruption charges last year. Ra was given one $100,000 capital grant to award and received $25,000 in community projects money last year, he said. By contrast, Lavine got $157,500 for the last fiscal year, according to a list Butler provided. Ra has not received any bullet aid grants since taking office in 2010, he said. Asked how they are distributed, he said, “I couldn’t even guess.” “It shouldn’t be, ‘we’re pulling out however many billion dollars for this program and you’re really going to have to peek around to find out where it’s going,’” Ra said. “It shouldn’t be that way.” The Village of New Hyde Park has a “wish list” of projects it takes to Martins each year that it would otherwise have to fund by raising taxes or borrowing, village Trustee Donna Squicciarino and Mayor Robert Lofaro said. The village got $200,000 in SAM grant funds to renovate basketball and tennis courts and make other fixes at its Memorial Park in 2015. But McMahon, head of the Empire Center, said grant programs, especially SAM, are a “honey pot” of political pork-barrel spending that lacks transparency and uses tax dollars from across the state to fund projects that have only local impacts. “Why in the world is it at any time a priority for the state to put a scoreboard in the village of blank’s Little League field, or to build somebody’s firehouse?” he said. “There’s a lot of these projects in here. Build your own firehouse.” The lack of clear criteria and oversight for the programs puts them at greater risk for waste, fraud and abuse, officials in DiNapoli’s office said. The lump sums that fund them should therefore be allocated in a “competitive Continued on Page 75


The Great Neck News, Friday, December 2, 2016

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hand out millions for local projects Continued from Page 74 process with clear, measurable, public and objective criteria defined in statute or by regulation,” DiNapoli’s report on fiscal reform says. OVERSIGHT AFTER THE FACT Grants to municipalities and nonprofit groups go through a lengthy vetting processes after the grants are awarded that often take at least a year. Grant nominations get reviewed by the relevant state agency, then must be reviewed and approved by the Legislature before the agency disburses them, said Butler, Lavine’s chief of staff. Each grant program has specific eligibility requirements and clear oversight “to ensure that recipients use the funds solely and entirely for their approved purpose,” unlike previous member item grants that could be awarded for basically any purpose, said Schneider, the Martins spokesman. Before municipalities get SAM grant payments, they must submit an application for reimbursement after completing the project that includes an itemized breakdown of costs, checks paid to vendors, bid

the lengthy review was at times frustrating, but he thinks oversight is important to ensuring grant programs are not abused or awarded to politically connected groups. “Whichever way the discretionary monies work and so on, my concern is that the end result is benefiting somebody, truly,” Lofaro said. “And we feel the money we had received, people in the state, people in the village should feel that we’ve done the right thing with the money that was discretionary that was awarded to us.” Lavine said an independent body reviewing grant applications would be ideal, but a stricter process could thrust funding PHOTOS FROM THE VILLAGE OF NEW HYDE PARK for important but sometimes controversial organizations, such as Planned Parenthood, Two state grants totaling $200,000 helped pay for renovations at the Village into the political fray. The current processes give lawmakers of New Hyde Park’s Memorial Park. fl exibility while effectively safeguarding materials and other supporting documents. large file folders. For grants administered by the DormiIt did not receive the second $150,000 grant money from misuse, he said. “The bottom line is I am almost positive tory Authority, local officials must sign a grant until May 31 of this year, more than grant disbursement agreement outlining two years after Martins awarded the first — I think I am positive — that with rare the terms of the grant and the conditions $50,000 grant, and about a year after the exception, if I can even think of one, every dollar that I have been able to play a part under which it can be revoked. project was finished. New Hyde Park’s materials related to its The village paid $61,000 out of its cof- in distributing to these not-for-profits has been well used,” Lavine said. two grants for the $211,000 park renova- fers for the project. tion contain hundreds of pages filling two Robert Lofaro, the village mayor, said

Doctor ‘Minimal’ environmental impact: study returns to beginnings Continued from Page 4 a wall of laughter,” he said. “You can feel it hit you right in the chest. It’s an amazing feeling.” Over the years, Baker said, patients have asked him where they can see him perform, so he will perform on Dec. 9 at 8 p.m. at the Landmark on Main Street in Port Washington “as a way of saying goodbye.” “It gives me a chance to thank all of my patients, including people who have been with me for 34 years,” he said. Tickets cost $35 and all proceeds from the show will be donated toward colon cancer research at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research. They can be purchased at the door or at moonlightingdoc.show. Those interested must be at least 18 years old to attend. “Do you know how much cooler that is? I get to have fun, make people laugh and do some good at the same time,” Baker said. He said he was ambivalent about leaving medicine but was excited to move on to the next chapter of his life. “Being a doctor is not just what I do, it’s who I am. It has occupied almost all of my adult life,” Baker said. “I’m going to miss my patients. I feel like I’m leaving my friends.”

Continued from Page 13 ful lot of work to get done in four years,” he said. “Rather than race through it, let’s make sure we have good planning.” According to Cuomo’s office, the governor directed construction for the project to use the “design-build” contracting technique, which gives oversight to private construction firms. The method, his office said, “puts the responsibility to both design and build a project on a single firm, capitalizing on private sector construction expertise and innovation and incentivizing a firm’s success at reducing construction length, cost and impacts.” Tweedy admitted that the third track “might be beneficial” but since the LIRR has other projects it is working on, another one would “exacerbate the problem.” He said if things don’t go according to plan, Floral Park will have to deal with the consequences. “We’re not afraid of progress but unexamined progress is a recipe for disaster,” Tweedy said. “If they have a three-year mistake in Floral Park, what does that do to our business community? It just completely changes the business community, which is the backbone of your community.” He said the project provides no benefits to Floral Park, and when he spoke with MTA officials he was told there was “no hope” for improvements in the village. “Floral Park is bearing all of the burden, but getting none of the benefit,” Tweedy said. “Many elements of this project like sound attenuation walls, station improvements and construction planning are the direct result of extensive input from local officials and community members along the project corridor,” said Shams Tarek, a project spokesman. “Mayor Tweedy has made

it clear that he opposes the project and the resulting benefits in any form and doesn’t want to influence the design. In fact in this very newspaper he said, ‘it’s their plan to design, it’s their plan to disclose, not mine to develop.’” “Fortunately, we have heard from the people of Floral Park directly and as a result, this project will include numerous benefits including sound attenuation walls for Floral Park residents and ways to minimize impacts around schools,” Tarek added. “As promised, this project requires no residential property taking, and any Floral Park resident who uses the LIRR will benefit from more reliable service. We will continue to work with the public to make this the best project it can be.” Both Lofaro and Tweedy said there should be oversight of the project by either an independent or federal entity. “It should also be noted again that the entity that has ultimate oversight and approval of the [Draft Environmental Impact Statement] is the LIRR,” Lofaro said. “How’s that for controlling your own destiny?” There are both federal and state requirements regarding construction safety and regulations, and the state Department of Transportation will be overseeing the elimination of the grade crossings. Efforts to reach the Village of Mineola mayor, Scott Strauss, for comment were unavailing. While some remained critical of the project, others expressed support after the environmental study. The Right Track for Long Island Coalition, a group of 172 corporations, labor unions, nonprofit groups and individuals supporting the project, commended Cuomo and the MTA for their efforts. “After reviewing the DEIS, it is clear that the transformative impact of this project will

extend from every Long Island home to every business,” said Dave Kapell, executive director of Right Track for Long Island Coalition. “Thanks to the unprecedented outreach efforts of the MTA and the Governor’s office, as well as the foresight and vision of some of our local elected officials, we have seen this project turn into a true win for all Long Islanders.” Although the project will avoid taking any residential property, the MTA will need to acquire four full commercial properties and 10 partial commercial or industrial properties, according to the study. In total, 2,130 jobs will be created as a result of the project, the study said, 1,297 of which are full-time equivalent construction jobs, as well as 762 off-site Nassau County jobs, 24 off-site Suffolk County jobs and 33 New York State jobs. There will be six meetings for public comment from Jan. 17 to 19. Two will take place on Jan. 17 at the Yes We Can Community Center in Westbury. The first meeting runs from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and the second begins at 6 p.m. and ends at 9 p.m. On Jan. 18, there will be two meetings at the David S. Mack Student Center at Hofstra University. The first meeting begins at 11 a.m. and ends at 2 p.m. and the second goes from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. The final two meetings will take place at The Inn at New Hyde Park on Jericho Turnpike. The first meeting goes from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and the second begins at 6 p.m. and ends at 9 p.m. Comments can also be submitted online, by mail or in person before the draft environmental report’s Jan. 31 deadline. Officials said comments would be taken into consideration for the final environmental report.


76 News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

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News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

PROFESSIONAL GUIDE ▼ COLLEGE APPLICATIONS CONSULTANTS ▼

HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT ▼

FAMILY THERAPIST ▼

Family Care Connections,® LLC Dr. Ann Marie D’Angelo, PMHCNS-BC Doctor of Nursing Practice

Dedicated professionals help your students maximize their chances for college admissions success

THE PERFECT APPLICATION

Advanced Practice Nurse Care Manager Assistance with Aging at Home / Care Coordination Nursing Home & Assisted Living Placement PRI / Screens / Mini Mental Status Exams 901 Stewart Ave., Suite 230, Garden City, NY 11530

College Application Consultants TODD LEWIS, PRESIDENT

SHARON JANOVIC, DIRECTOR

(516) 248-9323

1 LINDEN PLACE, SUITE 410, GREAT NECK, NY 11021

perfectcollegeapplication@gmail.com 516-441-2468 tel

INDIVIDUAL, MARRIAGE & FAMILY THERAPY ▼

Joan D. Atwood, Ph.D. New York Marriage and Family Therapists An experienced therapist makes all the difference Individual, Couple, and Family Therapy and Anger Management

516 764 2526 jatwood@optonline.net • http://www.NYMFT.Com 542 Lakeview Avenue Rockville Centre, NY

19 West 34th St. New York, NY

101 Hillside Avenue Williston Park, NY

PLACE YOUR AD ▼

WWW.DRANNMARIEDANGELO.COM LAW ▼

PIANO LESSONS ▼

D’Angelo Law Associates, PC Frank G. D’Angelo, Esq. Elder Law Wills & Trusts Medical Planning Estate Planning Probate & Estate Administration / Litigation 901 Stewart Avenue, Suite 230 Garden City, NY 11530

(516) 222-1122

WWW.DANGELOLAWASSOCIATES.COM PSYCHOTHERAPY ▼

Advertising on this page is only open to N.Y.S. licensed professionals. Call 516-307-1045 and let us begin listing you in our Professional Guide and Professional Services pages. SPANISH TUTOR ▼

PSYCHOTHERAPY ▼

Sandra Lafazan, LCSW Psychotherapist Individual, Couple & Family Counseling Women’s Groups

SLafazan@Hotmail.com 516-375-3897

Woodbury By Appointment

THERAPIST ▼

GET MORE OUT OF THERAPY Cutting edge energy psychology eliminates the self sabotage, negative emotions, limiting beliefs, and other interference patterns that block you from reaching your goals.

Tracey Cardello, LCSW P.C. 400 Jericho Turnpike #107 Jericho, NY 11753 www.tlcwellnessstudio.com Office: 516-933-4000

tracey@traceycardello.com Cell: 516-996-2145

call

Exam Preparation

516-509-8174 / wdctutor06@aol.com References furnished on request

PSYCHOTHERAPY

516-224-7670 2 Pinetree Lane Old Westbury NY 11568

718-887-4400 225 W. 35th St. New York, NY 10001

TLC COUNSELING AND WELLNESS STUDIO

FLACS A - FLACS B

Chaminade HS / Fairfield University Alumnus

LCSW

Individual, couple and family therapy

ADVERTISE HERE ▼

SPANISH TUTOR SPANISH GRAMMAR/LITERATURE William Cullen, M.A., SPANISH, S.D.A.

Efrat Fridman,

effiefrid@gmail.com

CHEMISTRY TUTOR ▼

Trimester Exams/Comps

77

Jonathan, Ivy League Ph.D.

(516)

669-0587

itutorchem@gmail.com I also tutor:

AP • SAT II Regents

biology, gy physics, p y earth & envi. sci.

NorthShoreAcademics.weebly.com

Advertising on this page is only open to N.Y.S. licensed professionals. Call 516-307-1045 and let us begin listing you in our Professional Guide and Professional Services pages.


78 News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

PROFESSIONAL GUIDE â&#x2013;¼

COLLEGE ESSAYS â&#x2013;¼

COLLEGE ESSAYS Make your application stand above the rest.

TUTORING â&#x2013;¼ Personalized Tutoring Programs

Leona Handelman NYS Certified MATH TUTOR K-12 516-652-9851 516-627-0024 AMC/TASC/PSAT/NMSQT SAT & ACT â&#x20AC;¢ REGENTS/TEST PREP PROFESSIONAL LICENSING EXAMS

Call Jonathan, (516) 669-0587 or ixessays@gmail.com, an Ivy League PhD with proven Ivy League results. NorthShoreAcademics.weebly.com

TUTORING ALL SUBJECTS â&#x2013;¼

3RUW7XWRULQJ $FDGHPLF6XFFHVV $FDGHPLF6XFFHVV  

 7(6735(3 6$7,6$7,, $&7 $3 66$7 &+6(( ,6((

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&RPPRQ&RUH0DWK (QJOLVK 5HJHQWV$3DQG+RQRUV3K\VLFV0DWK+LVWRU\(DUWK6FLHQFH%LRORJ\DQG&KHPLVWU\ 6SDQLVK )UHQFK &ROOHJH0DWK 6FLHQFHV 5HDGLQJ6WXG\6NLOOVDQG7HVW7DNLQJ6WUDWHJLHV 2UJDQL]DWLRQDO6NLOOV1RWH7DNLQJ &ROOHJH&RXQVHOLQJ5HVXPH (VVD\V

 3RUW:DVKLQJWRQ%OYG3RUW:DVKLQJWRQ1< LQIR#SRUWWXWRULQJFRP

TUTORING â&#x2013;¼

Free Evaluation and Scholarships Available

Community Meetings Village of East Hills Architectural Review Board Meeting

Monday, December 5 @ 8:00 p.m. Village Hall, 209 Harbor Hill Road, East Hills 516-621-5600 East Williston Library Board of Trustees Meeting

Wednesday, December 7 @ 7:30 p.m. 2 Prospect Street, East Williston 516-741-1213 East Williston School District Board of Education Work Session

TUTORING â&#x2013;¼

English Tutor Diane Gottlieb

Wednesday, December 7 @ 7:30 p.m. Wheatley School, 11 Bacon Road, Old Westbury 516333-7804 M.Ed., M.S.W.

SAT/ACT, College Essays AP, Regents, ELA Test Prep Reading Comprehension and Writing Proficiency

Phone: 917-599-8007 E-mail: dianegot@gmail.com LongIslandEnglishTutor.com Providing one-on-one professional support to build confidence, knowledge, and skills in every student

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS â&#x2013;¼

College Arts Admissions

College Counseling in the Visual and Performing Arts Dance â&#x20AC;¢ Musical Theatre & Drama â&#x20AC;¢ Film â&#x20AC;¢ Instrumental & Vocal Music â&#x20AC;¢ Audio Recording & Production â&#x20AC;¢ Theatre Technology & Production â&#x20AC;¢ Visual & Graphic Arts

Village of Flower Hill Board of Trustees Meeting

Monday, December 5 @ 7:30 p.m. Village Hall, 1 Bonnie Heights Road, Manhasset 516-627-5000 Village of Great Neck Board of Trustees Meeting

Tuesday, December 6 @ 7:30 p.m. Village Hall, 61 Baker Hill Road, Great Neck 516-482-0019 Village of Great Neck Plaza Board of Trustees Meeting

Wednesday, December 7 @ 8:00 p.m. Village Hall, 2 Gussack Plaza, Great Neck 516-482-4500 Village of Floral Park Board of Trustees Meeting

Tuesday, December 6 @ 8:00 p.m. Village Hall, 1 Floral Boulevard, Floral Park 516-326-6300

RESUME â&#x20AC;¢ ESSAYS â&#x20AC;¢ REPERTOIRE LISTS

Michele Zimmerman 516-353-6255 CollegeArtsAdmissions@gmail.com www.CollegeArtsAdmissions.com

TUTOR â&#x2013;¼

MATH â&#x20AC;¢ SAT â&#x20AC;¢ ACT

TI-84 TI-89

# Algebra # Core Curriculum NYS Licensed # Geometry Grades 7-12 # Algebra 2 + Trig # Pre-Calc # AP Calculus

NORM: 625-3314

ENGLISH â&#x20AC;¢ ACT â&#x20AC;¢ SAT ing ritical Read C # 25+ Years # Writing Experience # Grammar # Essays

LYNNE: 6 2 5 - 3 3 1 4

PLACE YOUR AD â&#x2013;¼

Advertising on this page is only open to N.Y.S. licensed professionals. Call 516-307-1045 and let us begin listing you in our Professional Guide and Professional Services pages.

Great Neck Water Pollution Control District Board of Commissioners Meeting

Thursday, December 8 @ 8:30 a.m. District Oï¬&#x192;ce, 236 E Shore Rd, Great Neck (516) 482-0238 Herricks School District Board of Education Meeting

Thursday, December 8 @ 7:30 p.m. Herricks Community Center 999 Herricks Road, New Hyde Park 516-305-8900 Hillside Public Library Board of Trustees Meeting

Thursday, December 8 @ 7:30 p.m. 155 Lakeville Road, New Hyde Park 516-355-7850 Village of Kensington Architectural Review Board Meeting

Wednesday, December 7 @ 8:00 p.m. Village Hall, 2 Nassau Drive, Great Neck 516-482-4409 Village of Kings Point Board of Trustees Meeting

Thursday, December 8 @ 8:15 p.m. Village Hall, 32 Steppingstone Lane, Kings Point 516-504-1000 Manhasset School District Board of Education Meeting

Wednesday, December 7 @ 8:00 p.m. Shelter Rock Elementary School 27A Shelter Rock Road, Manhasset 516-267-7700

Continued on Page 84


News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

BUYER’S GUIDE ▼ ANTIQUES

CLEANING

CLEANING

$$ Top Cash Paid $$

STRONG ARM CLEANING

CLEANING HOMEOFFICE

HIGH END ANTIQUES HIGH CASH PAiD Oil Paintings, Mid-Century Accessories 1950s/60s, Porcelain, Costume Jewelry, Sterling Silver, Gold, Furniture, Objects of Art, etc. • 1 Pc.or entire estates • Premium prices paid for Tiffany, Damaged Meissen Porcelain, Bronzes, Quality Pieces Marble, etc. also

wanted

CALL JOSEPH OR

RUTH

718-598-3045 or 516-270-2128 Family Business for over 40 years

AntiqueAssets.com Buying and Selling over 40 Years / Member New England Appraisers Association

CLEANING

Residential and Commercial Cleaning Specialist • Post construction clean ups • Stripping, waxing floors • Move Ins and Move Outs

Free estimates / Bonded Insured

516-538-1125

79

WEEKLY - MONTHLY Since 1979 Insured / Bonded Trusted and Reliable

CALL OLYMPIA CLEANING

www.strongarmcleaningny.com

516-883-0359

CARPENTRY

PLACE YOUR AD

SWEENEY CUSTOM CARPENTRY

ADVERTISE WITH US!

and PAINTING Renovations Custom Closets Sheetrock Repairs Interior/Exterior

New Doors New Windows New Moldings Free Estimates

To place your ad, call 516.307.1045 or fax 516.307.1046

516-884-4016 Lic# H0454870000

GENERAL CONSTRUCTION

HOME IMPROVEMENT

DEVLIN BUILDERS Since 1979

CONSTRUCTION Licensed & Bonded

DEVELOPMENT AND GENERAL CONSTRUCTION

We do all types of improvements including HANDYMAN REPAIRS No job too small

Bob Devlin @

516-365-6685 Insured, License # H18C730000

HOME IMPROVEMENT PORT HOME

IMPROVEMENT & PAINTING

Remodeling • Renovation • Additions New Construction 917-642-2390 • www.vintagehomesny.com danny@vintagehomes.com

516-305-3153

GENERAL CONTRACTING

ACPM CONSTRUCTION CORP

Clearview General Contracting, Inc.

Free Estimates • References Family Owned and Operated • 35 years in business LICENSED & INSURED OFFICE 516-328-9089

LIC#1829730220 FAX 516-775-9036

FREE ESTIMATES CALL RENATO

HOME IMPROVEMENT

516-767-2000

# Shingle, Slate, Flat Roofing and Repairs # Vinyl Siding, Trim, Gutters & Leaders # Windows # Kitchen, Bath & Interior Remodeling Residential/ Commercial

10% Discount

Lic. #H0450780000

CONSTRUCTION

ALL TYPES OF MASONRY Concrete • Bluestone • Pavers • Cultured Stones Blacktop • Patios • Stoops

• Kitchens • Extensions • Basement • Closets • Moldings • Doors • Carpentry

on Interior Painting, All Carpentry

Nassau County Lic. #H18H1330000

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

• Bathrooms • Decks • Siding • Tile • Sheetrock • Windows • Gutters

Free estimates

171 Main Street, Port Washington, NY 11050 • Nassau Lic. H187230000

LAMPS FIXED $ 65 In Home Service Handy Howard 646-996-7628


80 News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

BUYER’S GUIDE ▼ HOME IMPROVEMENT

Elegant Touch Remodeling “Quality Construction with a Personal Touch” Deal direct with owner - Serving li over 25 years

• • • •

All Types of Home Improvements Free Estimates • Free design service extensions • Kitchens dormers • bathrooms decks • siding

HOME HEATING OIL

Sage Oil

ADVERTISE HERE

516 485-3900

516.307.1045

631.281.7033

Quality Oil at a Great Price Since 1960

Licence #H18H2680000

No Fee For Visa/MC/Discovery or Debit Cards

HOME CARE/HOUSEKEEPING SERVICES

JUNK REMOVAL

Home Care & Housekeeping Services We provide these services: # Live in or live out maids # Companions # Home Care # Housekeeping

ADVERTISE HERE 516.307.1045

COMPLETE JUNK REMOVAL/DEMOLITION

ADVERTISE HERE

Haya’s & Rona Agency Haya Rona

Office: 516-482-4400 Cell: 516-298-9445

516.307.1045

Office: 516-441-5555 Cell: 516-316-0111

25 Great Neck Rd, Suite #3, Great Neck NY 11021

HOME/OFFICE ORGANIZER

• We haul anything & everything • Entire contents of home and/or office • We clean it up and take it away Residential - Commercial Bonded Insured / Free Estimates

STRONG ARM CONTRACTING, INC. Declutter & Organize • All aspects of your home/office organized – whether you are moving into a new space or moving out – we assist and organize it all. • Dealing with an “Estate” – we sort, donate and toss. • Photographs and memorabilia beautifully arranged and organized. Lisa Smerling Marx

516-319-2762

Randi Yerman

917-751-0395

neatfreaks1976@outlook.com Follow on Instagram @organizethisnthat

JUNK REMOVAL

ALL PHASES OF RUBBISH REMOVAL & DEMOLITION Residential • Commercial Construction Sites

516-541-1557

LAWN SPRINKLERS

• • • • •

Fall Drain Outs Backflow Device Tests Free Estimates Installation Service/Repairs

516-538-1125

Joe Barbato (516) 775-1199

LANDSCAPING

MOVING N.Y.D.O.T.#10405

MOVING & STORAGE INC.

Long Island and New York State Specialists

• Residential • Commercial • Piano & Organ Experts • Boxes Available FREE ESTIMATES www.ajmoving.com

516-741-2657

114 Jericho Tpke. Mineola, NY 11501

MOVING Serving the community for over 40 yrs

BRIAN CLINTON

MOVERS

Kitchens • Bathrooms Clean-Ups • Attics Basements Flood/Fire

One Piece to a Household/ Household Rearranging FREE ESTIMATES

ALL SIZE DUMPSTERS Bob Cat Service Some Day Service,

Owner Supervised

Fully Insured

www.1866WEJUNKIT.com

333-5894 Licensed & Insured Licensed #T-11154


News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

BUYERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S GUIDE â&#x2013;ź MASONRY

PAINTING

Pool Patios/ Driveways / Sidewalks Brickwork/ Belgium Block/ Retaining Walls Patios / Steps / Pavers / Nicolock / Cambridge Stucco / Cultured Stone / Stone Veneer

Finishing Touch Masonry

PAINTING & WALLPAPER Interior and Exterior â&#x20AC;˘ Plaster/Spackle Light Carpentry â&#x20AC;˘ Decorative Moldings Power Washing

Nassau #H0432180000

PAINTING, POWERWASHING

PAINTING & HOME IMPROVMENTS

FCFinishing Touch â&#x20AC;˘ Web â&#x20AC;&#x201C; fcfinishingtouch.com

SWEENEY PAINTING and CARPENTRY

CLASSIC PAINTING & HOME IMPROVEMENTS INC. Residential and Commercial Since 1995

Exterior Power Washing Rotted Wood Fixed Staining

516-884-4016

516.921.0494

Licensed & Insured Servicing Nassau, Suffolk & Queens

Lic# H0454870000

Our Services: * Residential Painting * Interior Painting * Exterior Painting * Wall paper * Finish Carpentry * Home Improvements * Commercial Painting * Skim coat & Plastering * Drywall / Sheet Rock * Hardwood Flooring       * Power Washing * Condo / Coop Painting * Apartment Painting

TREE SERVICE

PRESSURE WASHING

ADVERTISE HERE 516.307.1045

ADVERTISE HERE 516.307.1045 RESD/COMM CLEANING

Residential and Commercial Cleaning Specialist â&#x20AC;˘ Post construction clean ups â&#x20AC;˘ Stripping, waxing floors â&#x20AC;˘ Move ins and move outs

PRESSURE WASHING

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I will call you back & always follow up with youâ&#x20AC;?

516.307.1045

STRONG ARM CLEANING

ISLAND WIDE â&#x20AC;˘ House Washing â&#x20AC;˘ Decks â&#x20AC;˘ Fences â&#x20AC;˘ Patios â&#x20AC;˘ Driveways â&#x20AC;˘ Sidewalks

ADVERTISE HERE

est. 1978

www.MpaintingCo.com 516-385-3132 516-328-7499 New Hyde Park, NY 11040 Licensed & Insured

516-635-4315

Interior B. Moore Paints Dustless Vac System Renovations

81

Lic/Ins Owner Operated

409-9510

516

Free estimates / Bonded Insured

516-538-1125

www.islandwidepressurewashing.com

www.strongarmcleaningny.com

ROOFING

TREE SERVICE

OLD VILLAGE TREE SERVICE 24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE Owner Operated Since 1989 Licensed & Insured

FREE ESTIMATES Member L.I. Arborist Assoc.

516-466-9220

26

WINDOW REPAIRS

631-385-7975

WINDOW REPAIRS & RESTORATIONS

Outdated Hardware â&#x20AC;˘ Skylights â&#x20AC;˘Andersen Sashes â&#x20AC;˘ New Storm Windows â&#x20AC;˘ Wood Windows â&#x20AC;˘ Chain/Rope Repairs â&#x20AC;˘ Falling Windows â&#x20AC;˘ Fogged Panes â&#x20AC;˘ Mechanical Repairs â&#x20AC;˘ Wood Repairs

ALL BRANDS W W W. S K YC L E A RW I N D OW. CO M Call Mr. Fagan â&#x20AC;˘ 32 Years Experience Lic. # H080600000 Nassau

ADVERTISE WITH US

PLACE YOUR AD WITH US To advertise, call 516.307.1045 or fax 516.307.1046


82 News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

nassau

COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS WEMPLOYMENT, MARKETPLACE

To Place Your Ad Call Phone: 516.307.1045

Fax: 516.307.1046

e-mail: hblank@theislandnow.com

In Person: 105 Hillside Avenue Williston Park, NY 11598

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Open: Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Thurs: 9am-5:30pm

(03/2<0(17

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Deadlines Tuesday 11:00am: Classified Advertising Tuesday 1:00pm: Legal Notices/ Name Changes Friday 5:00pm Buyersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide Error Responsibility All ads placed by telephone are read back for verification of copy context. In the event of an error of Blank Slate Media LLC we are not responsible for the first incorrect insertion. We assume no responsiblity for an error in and beyond the cost of the ad. Cancellation Policy Ads must be cancelled the Monday before the first Thursday publication. All cancellations must be received in writing by fax at: 516.307.1046 Any verbal cancellations must be approved by a supervisor. There are no refunds on cancelled advertising. An advertising credit only will be issued.

â&#x20AC;¢ Great Neck News â&#x20AC;¢ Williston Times â&#x20AC;¢ New Hyde Park Herald Courier â&#x20AC;¢ Manhasset Times â&#x20AC;¢ Roslyn Times â&#x20AC;¢ Port Washington Times â&#x20AC;¢ Garden City News â&#x20AC;¢ Bethpage Newsgram â&#x20AC;¢ Jericho Syosset News Journal â&#x20AC;¢ Mid Island Times â&#x20AC;¢ Syosset Advance

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ADOPTION $'237 &DULQJ PDUULHG FRXSOH ORRNLQJ WR DGRSW 6WDEOH HPSOR\ PHQW DQG D ORYLQJ KDSS\ KRPH DZDLWV \RXU FKLOG 3OHDVH FDOO %ODLU DQG-RKQDW $'237,21 813/$11(' 35(* 1$1&<" 1HHG KHOS" )5(( DV VLVWDQFH &DULQJ VWDII FRXQVHOLQJ DQGILQDQFLDOKHOS<RXFKRRVHWKH ORYLQJ SUHDSSURYHG DGRSWLYH SDU HQWV -R\  ZZZ)RU HYHU)DPLOLHV7KURXJK$GRSWLRQRUJ +DEOD(VSDQRO TO ADVERTISE HERE

CALL NOW 516.307.1045 HELP WANTED

WA N T E D DRIVERS & ESCORTS Full Time Receptionist Mineola Home Improvement Company

(NYC) Pre-K Work Hiring Licensed Commerical Drivers

â&#x20AC;¢ Answer phones, greet customers in showroom and assist in customer service â&#x20AC;¢ Data entry in QuickBooks â&#x20AC;¢ Scanning, Copying, Emailing, Faxing, Filing â&#x20AC;¢ General administrative tasks to assist office staff

Class B/PS or C/PS

Candidates should be proficient in Microsoft Office and QuickBooks (will train). Experience of Home Improvement Industry is helpful. MUST BE Personable, Upbeat and Patient with Customers, Fluent in English with excellent verbal and written communication skills.

â&#x20AC;¢ Hours: Mon - Fri 10am - 6pm. â&#x20AC;¢ Salary â&#x20AC;&#x201C; To Be Determined

Email resume to: info@wendelhome.com Fax to: 516-742-0223

Full Time 5 days/week Year Round Steady Work Holiday & Sick Pay $600 to Start Sign On Bonus

Call Us Now! 245-37 60th Ave, Douglaston, NY 11362 Queens Location

718-225-9351


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News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

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516.307.1045

ADVERTISE HERE CALL NOW 516.307.1045

Community Meetings Continued from Page 84 Village of Manorhaven Planning Board Meeting

Tuesday, December 6 @ 7:00 p.m. Village Hall, 33 Manorhaven Boulevard, Port Washington 516-883-7000 Village of Mineola Board of Trustees Meeting

Wednesday, December 7 @ 6:30 p.m. Village Hall, 155 Washington Avenue, Mineola 516-746-0750 Village of New Hyde Park Board of Trustees Meeting

Tuesday, December 6 @ 8:00 p.m. Village Hall, 1420 Jericho Turnpike, New Hyde Park 516-354-0022 Village of North Hills Architectural Review Board Meeting

Tuesday, December 6 @ 7:30 p.m. Village Hall, 1 Shelter Rock Road, North Hills 516-627-3451 Village of Old Westbury Planning Board Meeting

Freelance Reporter Wanted Blank Slate Media, the publisher of 6 award-winning newspapers and website, is seeking one or more people to assist our reporting staff in covering local government meetings and community events. Good writing skills and a car a must. Newspaper experience preferred.

Monday, December 5 @ 8:00 p.m. Village Hall, 1 Store Hill Road, Old Westbury 516-626-0800 Village of Plandome Board of Trustees Work Session

Monday, December 5 @ 7:00 p.m. Village Hall, 65 South Drive, Plandome 516-627-1748 Village of Plandome Heights Board of Trustees Meeting

Excellent opportunity to learn by working with editors with many years of weekly and daily newspaper experience.

To apply, e-mail cover letter, resume, and clips to: nmanskar@theislandnow.com

Monday, December 5 @ 7:30 p.m. Village Hall, 37 Orchard Street, Manhasset 516-627-1136 Port Washington School District Board of Education Meeting

Tuesday, December 6 @ 8:00 p.m. Schreiber High School 101 Campus Drive, Port Washington (516) 767-5805

105 Hillside Avenue, Williston Park, NY

516.307.1045

Wednesday, December 7 @ 7:30 p.m. Village Hall 3 Pleasant Avenue, Port Washington 516-883-5900

Advertising Sales Executive Blank Slate Media Blank Slate Media, a fast-growing chain of 6 award-winning weekly newspapers and website, is looking for an energetic, service-oriented professional with good communications skills to sell display, web and email advertising. Earn up to $60,000 in the first-year representing the 6 Blank Slate Media publications and website as well the 5 publications and 1 website owned by Blank Slateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sales partner, Litmor Publications. We are looking for an enthusiastic and service-oriented sales professional with good communication skills. Requirements: Minimum of 2 years outside sales experience. Newspaper sales experience a plus. Must have your own car. â&#x20AC;˘ Exclusive, protected territory â&#x20AC;˘ Opportunity to sell both print and online programs â&#x20AC;˘ A collegial, supportive sales team â&#x20AC;˘ Award-winning editorial coverage. â&#x20AC;˘ A separate newspaper for each community allowing advertisers to target their markets. And you to provide the most cost-effective way to advertise. â&#x20AC;˘ Represent media that produce superior response for clients. Compensation â&#x20AC;˘ Salary plus commission â&#x20AC;˘ Health insurance â&#x20AC;˘ Paid holidays â&#x20AC;˘ Sick days & holidays

Village of Port Washington North Board of Trustees Meeting

To apply, e-mail your resume and cover letter to sblank@theislandnow.com or call Steve at 516.307-1045 x201 for more information.

Village of Roslyn Board of Zoning and Appeals Meeting

Monday, December 5 @ 8:00 p.m. Village Hall, 1200 Old Northern Boulevard, Roslyn 516-621-1961 Village of Roslyn Estates Planning Board Meeting

Wednesday, December 7 @ 7:30 p.m. Village Hall, 25 The Tulips, Roslyn Estates 516-621-3541 Village of Roslyn Harbor Board of Trustees Meeting

Thursday, December 8 @ 7:00 p.m. Village Hall, 500 Motts Cove Road South, Roslyn Harbor 516-621-0368 Village of Saddle Rock Board of Trustees Meeting

Wednesday, December 7 @ 7:30 p.m. Village Hall, 18 MaseďŹ eld Way, Saddle Rock 516-482-9400 Meetings are held at the respective Village Halls except where noted. All meetings, dates and times are subject to change.


The Great Neck News, Friday, December 2, 2016

GN

Election questions demand audit This was clear in WisLet’s be clear: Hillary consin and North Carolina. Clinton won the popular But there is evidence also vote by more than 2.5 milthat in some key districts, lion votes (the largest numthe electronic voting maber for anyone who didn’t chines may have been actually win the presidenhacked in order to give the cy) and pretty much by the win to Trump, which demargin that was forecast. mands proper audit and reShe wasn’t a “bad” cancount to assure Americans didate. It wasn’t that she the rightful outcome of the didn’t talk enough about election. an economic policy that KAREN RUBIN Add to this the reports would lift up everyone, or that Russia hacked some that she didn’t have enough Pulse of the Peninsula state elections rolls, interpolicies. It wasn’t that she fered with the election by didn’t offer the so-called white working class a vision of a better hacking into Democratic National Committee and by paying trolls to disseminate future. false news (viewed 15 million times). The election was stolen. Is it so implausible that a few – not an Yet, she lost every “toss-up” battleground state by the narrowest of margins, entire state - but enough precincts which only 1-2 percent, resulting in Trump win- rely on electronic voting without a paper ning the Electoral College votes (theoreti- trail could be hacked? “Americans should demand this simcally; there is still hope the voters will do the right thing and cast their ballot for the ple step to ensure that the machinery of democracy worked. winner of the popular vote). DFA members have spent years workDoes anyone doubt that if the situation reversed and Trump won the popular ing to ensure our elections are fair, accesvote by millions but failed by thousands sible, and verifiable,” Jim Dean, chair of to win the Electoral Vote that Trump Democracy for America, wrote in an email. would have fought the result up to the This shouldn’t even be controversial. There should be routine audit after Supreme Court (a la Bush v. Gore), and his minions would have taken to the every election to assure that the electronic tallies conform with paper ballots, and full streets with guns? Even now, he is fomenting the lie that recounts where less than 2 percent margin separates the winners. Most urgently, three million votes were cast illegally. given the fact that we have now seen cyThis is who claims the presidency? But in a brilliant manipulation, ber warfare with penetration of even the Trump railed about how the election most secure government sites including would be stolen (from him), forcing Dem- the National Security Agency, electronicocrats — and particularly Hillary Clinton only voting systems should be replaced — to assert that American elections have with systems that generate a paper trail. integrity, and that any challenge would The Department of Justice was mum undermine the essence of a democratic when I asked whether or how many comrepublic, a peaceful transition of power, plaints have been filed — whether voters found they were purged from the rolls in order to prevent any contest. They were played, as is apparent with when they arrived to vote, or whether Trump replaying Clinton’s own state- long lines or inaccessible polling places ments (omitting the fact that it was Green kept them from casting their ballot. “The Justice Department does not Party candidate Jill Stein, not Clinton, who is demanding recounts in Wisconsin, tally the number of callers to determine whether federal action is warranted. InMichigan and Pennsylvania). This isn’t up to Hillary Clinton or any- vestigatory decisions are based solely on one. The voters need to know if the votes the facts and evidence as they relate to the federal statutes the department enwere accurately counted. Meanwhile, Trump is now trumpet- forces.” But with Republicans now content ing — without any proof — that 3 million votes were cast illegally (the only person they have found the means to control I have heard who was caught casting two power without needing to secure a maballots was a Des Moines woman who jority of voters — not for the House, the Senate or now the White House — necesvoted twice for Trump). And if he believes that, he more than sary election reforms will never happen. And Trump is already signaling furanyone, should be demanding recounts. It is apparent that the shortfall in ther attacks on voting rights, under the Electoral Votes was chiefly the result of guise of promulgating the lie of rampant voter suppression, with states unleashed “voter fraud.” That’s why this audit is so imporby the weakening of the Voting Rights Act, and voter repression tactics in key tant now. And why the Electoral College sections of swing states designed (suc- should make the moral choice and cast cessfully) to shift 1-2 percent of the votes. their votes for Clinton.

W W W .T H E I S L A N D N O W . C O M

▼ LEGALS

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Legal Notice LEGAL NOTICE GREAT NECK UNION FREE SCHOOL DISTRICT NASSAU COUNTY, NEW YORK There will be a public hearing on Monday, December 12, 2016 at 8:30 p.m. in the Multi Purpose Room of the Saddle Rock Elementary School, located at 10 Hawthorne Lane, Great Neck, New York, 11023. At this hearing the Great Neck Board of Education will hear comments from the public concerning the proposed resolution to authorize an exemption from school property taxes for Cold War veterans, pursuant to Section 458-b of the Real Property Tax Law. GNN #144636 1x 12/02 /2016 #144636

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a public hearing will be held at the Office of the Great Neck Water Pollution Control District, 236 East Shore Road, Great Neck, New York 11023 on December 15, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. for the purpose of consideration of adopting a resolution rescinding and replacing the complete ordinances of the Great Neck Water Pollution Control District. A copy of the revised Ordinance, as proposed, is available for inspection during business hours and is posted on the District’s Website. BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS GREAT NECK WATER POLLUTION CONTROL DISTRICT Carman, Callahan & Ingham, LLP Counsel GNN #144643 1x 12/02 /2016 #144643

Notice of Formation of 5 SUNKEN ORCHARD LANE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/17/2016. Office location: Nassau County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 121 Myers Ave Hicksville NY 11801 Purpose: any lawful purpose. GN #144581 6x 11/11, 11/18, 11/25, 12/02, 12/09, 12/16 /2016 #144581

NOTICE OF SPECIAL DISTRICT MEETING OF THE GREAT NECK UNION FREE SCHOOL DISTRICT TOWN OF NORTH HEMPSTEAD COUNTY OF NASSAU, NEW YORK NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a special district meeting of the qualified voters of the Great Neck Union Free School District Nassau County, New York will be held on December 6, 2016 in the two election districts: ELECTION DISTRICT NO. 1—All that section of the School District lying north of the Long Island Railroad, at the Great Neck E.M. Baker School, 69 Baker Hill Road, Great Neck, New York; ELECTION DISTRICT NO. 2 —All that section of the School District lying south of the Long Island Railroad, at the Great Neck South Senior High School, 341 Lakeville Road, Great Neck, New York, for the following purpose: A)To elect a member of the Board of Education to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Monique Bloom, pursuant to Education Law Section 2112. Said term for the newly elected Board member shall commence immediately upon the qualification of the person so elected and will

expire on June 30, 2019. NOTICE IS ALSO GIVEN that the special district meeting to elect a member of the Board of Education shall be conducted by voting on voting machines on December 6, 2016 commencing at 7:00 a.m. and ending 10:00 p.m., DST. AND NOTICE IS ALSO GIVEN that nominations for member of the Board of Education shall be made by petition signed by at least 25 qualified voters of the District and filed in the office of the District Clerk between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. not later than the 30th day preceding the special district meeting at which the vacancy shall be voted upon, this year, November 7, 2016. Such petition shall state the name and residence of each signer and shall state the name and residence of the candidate, and must describe the specific vacancy for which the candidate is nominated, including the length of the term of office and the name of the last incumbent. The candidate receiving the greatest number of votes for each specific vacancy shall be considered elected to office. However, a nomination may be rejected by the Board of Education if the candidate is ineligible for the office or declares his or her unwillingness to serve. AND NOTICE IS ALSO GIVEN that registration is permitted in the office of the District Clerk, Phipps Administration Building, 345 Lakeville Road, during the hours 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p. m., Monday through Friday, up to and including December 1, 2016. A register will be prepared and will be filed in the office of the District Clerk, 345 Lakeville Road, Great Neck, New York, and such register will be open for inspection by any qualified voter between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p m. (DST) on each of the five (5) days prior to the day set for the special district meeting, except Sunday, and between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon (DST) on Saturday, and at each polling place on election day. AND NOTICE IS ALSO GIVEN that a person shall be entitled to vote at the special district meeting who is a citizen of the United States, eighteen years of age, a resident of the School District for a period of thirty days next preceding the district meeting or election at which he/she offers to vote and registered to vote for said district meeting or election. A person shall be registered to vote if he or she shall have permanently registered with the Nassau County Board of Elections or with the School District’s Board of Registration. Only persons who shall be registered shall be entitled to vote. Said register shall include (1) all qualified voters of the District who shall present themselves personally for registration, and (2) all voters previously registered for any annual or special district election and who shall have voted at any annual or special district election held or conducted at any time within the four calendar years (2012-2015) prior to preparation of said register. AND NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Board of Registration will meet during the hours of voting at the special district meeting on December 6, 2016 at the polling places in each of the election districts to prepare a register for District meetings and elections to be held subsequent to December 6, 2016. PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that the Board shall convene a special meeting thereof within twenty-four hours after the filing with the

District Clerk of a written report of the results of the ballot for the purpose of examining and tabulating said reports of the result of the ballot and declaring the result of the ballot; that the Board hereby designates itself to be a set of poll clerks to cast and canvas ballots pursuant to Education Law ß2019-a.2.b at said special meeting of the Board. PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that applications for absentee ballots for the special district meeting may be applied for at the office of the District Clerk. A list of all persons to whom absentee ballots shall have been issued will be available in the office of the District Clerk on each of the five days prior to the day of the special district meeting except Sundays. No voter’s absentee ballot shall be canvassed unless it shall have been received in the office of the District Clerk not later than 5:00 p.m. on the day of said special district meeting. Dated: September 19, 2016 Great Neck, New York BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION GREAT NECK UNION FREE SCHOOL DISTRICT MICHELE DOMANICK, DISTRICT CLERK GNN 144443 4x 10/21, 114, 11/18, 12/2/ 2016 #144443

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a public hearing will be held as to the following matter: Agency: Board of Trustees Village of Thomaston Date: December 19, 2016 Time: 7:30 p.m. Place: Village Hall, 100 East Shore Road, Thomaston, New York Subject: Application of Tower Ford, Inc. as lessee, and Spartan Petroleum Corp. as owner, pursuant to Village Code §203-70.2 for an incentive use permit to use the premises located at 655 Northern Blvd., Thomaston, New York for the retail sale of automobiles. Premises are located in the OB zoning district and are designated as Section 2, Block 140, Lot 795 on the Nassau County Land and Tax Map. At the said time and place, all interested persons may be heard with respect to the foregoing matter. The Board of Trustees, as Lead Agency pursuant to the State Environmental Quality Review Act, has determined that the proposed action is an Unlisted Action, and that the proposed action would not have a significant adverse environmental impact (Negative Declaration). Any person having a disability which would inhibit attendance at or participation in the hearing should notify the Village Clerk at least three business days prior to the hearing, so that reasonable efforts may be made to facilitate such attendance and participation. All relevant documents may be inspected at the office of the Village Clerk, 100 East Shore Road, Thomaston, New York, during regular business hours. Dated: November 22, 2016 BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES GNN #144703 1x 12/02/2016 #144703

THIS COULD BE YOUR AD HERE CALL NOW 516.307.1045


86 News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

Sports LIU Post falls in 1st round of tourney BY M I C H A E L OTERO Coming off of a thrilling 48-41 victory against WinstonSalem State University in the first round of the NCAA Division II Tournament, the LIU Post football team faced their toughest test this season and suffered a 40-21 loss at the hands of Shepherd University on Saturday, Nov. 26, at Bethpage Federal Credit Union Stadium in Brookville. The Pioneers’ loss is the team’s first of the season, rounding out a historic campaign with a 12-1 record. The 12 wins are a program record, as are the two playoff games.

With the win, the Rams from Shepherd University move on to face California University of Pennsylvania in the quarterfinals. In the game, the Pioneers were dealt a blow early when the Rams marched down the field on their opening possession and scored a touchdown. Their drive went for six plays and 63 yards and finished with a 31-yard scamper by freshman halfback Brandon Hlavach. On their ensuing drive, the Pioneers attempted to answer that score with one of their own, but a costly turnover in the redzone kept the Pioneers off the scoreboard. After the defense forced a punt, the Pioneer offense made

Shepherd Univ. 40 LIU Post 21 sure to get in the end zone, with a one-yard run by red-shirt sophomore running back Malik Pierre to even the score at seven apiece. The score stood at 7-7 until the end of the first quarter, but the Rams unleashed a 19-point unanswered outburst to take a commanding 26-7 lead into halftime. Senior quarterback Jeff Ziemba tossed all three touchdowns, two to senior 6”4’ pass

catcher Billy Brown and one to senior receiver CJ Davis — the last score coming just 23 seconds before halftime. The Pioneers fought valiantly until the end, cutting the deficit to 12 twice during the second half, but the Ram offense was in rhythm and could not be stopped. They scored in response to Pioneer touchdowns twice and capped off the win with Brown’s third receiving touchdown of the day with 4:27 left in the game. Senior LIU Post quarterback Jeff Kidd went 25-for-43 through the air for 288 yards and a touchdown and was also sacked four times. His counterpart, Ziemba, threw for 375 yards and four scores.

The Pioneer running game, which played a huge part in their win against Winston-Salem, was held to under 100 yards, but scored two touchdowns. In the receiving department, Brown stole the show for the Rams, totaling 11 catches for 189 yards and three touchdowns. Kidd’s favorite target, redshirt senior wide out Shane Hubbard, finished with 10 catches and 155 yards. Defensively, senior linebacker Nate Feliz had a game-high 10 tackles and a sack. Red-shirt junior defensive lineman Anthony DeNunzio had nine tackles to go along with a sack and pass break up, while freshman defensive back Joshua Flowers made nine tackles and two pass break ups.

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News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

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Herricks athletes excel in the fall Girls swim team wins conference title, 4 football players win post-season awards The Herricks Public Schools’ Athletics Department ended its fall season with a number of victories and outstanding displays of sportsmanship. The girls swim and football teams earned spotlight for both individual and team victories. The girls swim team was crowned Conference IV Champions after completing an undefeated season with a record of 8-0. The team competed in three relays at the Nassau County Girls Swimming Championships, and Katherine Hong additionally competed in the 100 Backstroke. Head Coach Sara Bove expressed pride in the team members for their hard work and dedication. The football team enjoyed a banner season with a total of four wins, the most it has had since 1995 — and finished with a 4-4

record — just one spot below the playoffs cut. The preseason ninth seed is the highest seed since 1996, and the wins were against the seventh, eighth, no. 12 and no. 14 seeds. Football players also secured four post-season awards. Michael Saleme earned All-County status, Michael Scaldaferri was named All-County Honorable Mention, Michael Chase received recognition as a National Football Foundation Scholar Athlete and Nicholas Gounaris was presented with the Long Island Association of Football Officials’ Unsung Hero Award. “The athletes and coaches worked diligently during their off-season, which in turn produced positive results,” Director of Athletics, Physical Education and Health Education Jim Petricca said.

PHOTO COURTESY OF HERRICKS PUBLIC SCHOOLS

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88 News Times Newspapers, Friday, December 2, 2016

happy From your neighbors at Douglas Elliman Real Estate The best part of this season is the opportunity to say thank you for your business throughout the year. We are grateful to the communities we know, love, and live in, for entrusting us with your real estate needs locally and globally. We wish you a joyous and happy holiday season.

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