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Friday, February 17, 2017

THE PULSE OF THE PENINSULA

Vol. 92, No. 7

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GUIDE TO SPECIAL OCCASIONS

NOREN WON’T RUN AGAIN

GOP TARGETS SUOZZI IN 2018

PAGES 35-38

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Ex town aide tied to alleged Terry front

EN GARDE!

Helped create corp. ID’d in indictment, denies role in alleged hiding of income BY N O A H M A N S K A R Jonathan P. Fielding, a Town of North Hempstead zoning oďŹƒcial until this week, helped Gerard Terry, an indicted Democratic political operative, create a company that Terry allegedly used as a front to hide income from the Internal Revenue Service, documents show. Fielding, who was secretary to the Board of Zoning Appeals, no longer worked for the town as of Tuesday, a town spokeswoman said. He indicated that he had been forced out. Fielding’s departure coincided with questions posed by Blank Slate Media to the town about his relationship to Terry’s company. It also comes two weeks after Terry, the former North Hempstead Democratic Committee chairman who worked as the zoning board’s attorney, was arrested on federal tax evasion charges for allegedly failing to pay nearly $1 million in income taxes.

Fielding in 2010 ďŹ led documents to incorporate a company, Neville Warwick LLC, that a federal indictment says Terry used to hide income from IRS tax collectors. State corporation records list Fielding as the recipient of correspondence for the company and list as its address a Mineola law ofďŹ ce where he has practiced. But Fielding’s role did not extend beyond preparing documents to organize the company, and he did not know for what purpose it would be used, he said in an interview. “I’ve never seen a bank statement or any other corporate minutes or anything else, or any other documents related to the LLC, since that organization seven years ago,â€? Fielding said. Terry and Fielding have a professional relationship that goes back to at least September 2008, when they served as Manorhaven’s Continued on Page 51

PHOTO COURTESY OF GREAT NECK PUBLIC SCHOOLS

The Great Neck South High School girls fencing team finished the season undefeated, going 14-0. See story on page 25

Great Neck residents vote down $85.9M school bond There were 1,677 no votes and 1,564 yes votes cast in a referendum. “While we have always Great Neck residents on Tuesday voted against a pro- maintained that this was the posed $85.9 million school community’s bond, it is clear that portions of the community bond.

BY ST E P H E N ROMANO

who were not in favor have spoken,� Board of Education President Barbara Berkowitz said. “Today’s bond proposition came at the conclusion of years of meetings and assessing the Continued on Page 52

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The Great Neck News, Friday, February 17, 2017

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Noren not running for Possible fee hike re-election as trustee for summer camp Berton Weston to run for vacant seat unopposed Linked to minimum wage increase BY S A M U E L GLASSER

Thomaston Village Hall BY ST E P H E N ROMANO Village of Thomaston Trustee Gary Noren will not run for re-election in the March elections, village officials said. Noren, vice president of sales for Outerstuff LCC, a sports apparel company, has served on the board for 16 years. He said in 2015 that he would not seek another term after the completion of the Long Island Rail Road’s project at the Colonial Road Bridge in Thomaston. Berton Weston has filed to run for Noren’s seat and will run unopposed. Mayor Steven Weinberg and Trustee Jill Monoson have also filed to run for re-election. Both are running unopposed. Elections will be held on Tuesday, March 21, from noon

to 9 p.m. at Village Hall at 100 E. Shore Road in Great Neck. Four board trustees in the Village of Saddle Rock have filed to run for re-election next month. Mayor Dan Levy, Deputy Mayor David Schwartz and Trustees Julia Gavriel and Mark Collins are all running unopposed. Elections will be held on March 21 from noon to 9 p.m. at Village Hall at 18 Masefield Way. Village of Russell Gardens Mayor Steven Kirschner and Trustees Martin Adickman and Jane Krakauer have all filed to run unopposed for re-election. Elections will be held on March 21 from noon to 9 p.m. at Village Hall at 6 Train Drive in Great Neck. Trustees Alina Hendler and Darren Kaplan have filed to run unopposed for re-election in the Village of Kensington.

Elections will be held on March 21 from noon to 9 p.m. at Village Hall at 2 Nassau Drive in Great Neck. Trustees Gerald Schneiderman and Lawrence Katz are running unopposed for re-election to two-year terms in the Village of Great Neck Plaza. Elections will be held on March 21 from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. at Village Hall at 2 Gussack Plaza in Great Neck. Village of Great Neck Estates Mayor William D. Warner and Trustees Jerffrey Farkas and Ira V. Ganzfried have all filed to run for re-election. They are running unopposed for two-year terms. Village Justice David I. Schaffer has filed to run unopposed for a four-year term. Elections will be held on March 21 from noon to 9 p.m. at Village Hall at 4 Gateway Drive in Great Neck.

Parents enrolling children in the Great Neck school district’s popular summer recreation program face a possible increase in fees this summer because of rising costs linked to increases in the minimum wage. David Zawatson, the district’s director of athletics, recreation and physical education, recommended that fees increase by 3 percent for next summer because the district was facing a “substantial increase in the minimum wage for student workers.” “We expect our expenses will be up by a substantial amount,” he told the Great Neck school board on Monday during his report on the summer and school year recreation programs. Zawatson said 883 children in kindergarten through eighth grade participated in the summer day camp’s 70th season in 2016. Full tuition for a six-week program ranged from $1,268 to $1,408. Zawatson said the state minimum wage increased on Jan. 1 to $10 per hour from $9, a hike that affects all student seasonal staff.

The summer camp program employed 92 student workers last year, most as counselors and lifeguards. Even with the proposed increase, the camp tuition is “extremely attractive” compared with other public and private day camps, Zawatson said. “We have demonstrated over time the ability to keep fees at a level people can afford,” he said, while making “an effort to work with families to reduce the cost of attendance for needy children.” Other recommendations for 2017 include a continuation of a discount for siblings, reduced rates for children enrolling for less than the full camp calendar, reduced fees for families demonstrating need and continued acceptance of nonresidents at full price, Zawatson said. During the school year, the recreation program offers activities after school, in the evenings and on weekends. An enrichment program was started this year providing before-school activities for grades three through five. Thirty-five subjects will be Continued on Page 65

PHOTO BY SAMUEL GLASSER

David Zawatson, the Great Neck school district’s director of athletics, recreation and physical education, reviews the summer recreation program with the school board on Monday.

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The Great Neck News, Friday, February 17, 2017

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Hope for Alzheimer’s in L. Success Neurological clinic offers trial of drug that could slow progression of prominent disease BY N O A H M A N S K A R There are few treatment options for the growing number of senior citizens with Alzheimer’s disease, but one Lake Success clinic is looking to help change that. Neurological Associates of Long Island is one of 90 sites across the country participating in the Alzheimer’s STEADFAST Study, a 23-month trial of a new drug called Azeliragon that could help slow the progression of Alzheimer’s. The practice, which treats thousands of Alzheimer’s patients from across Long Island, aims to have 20 participants enrolled in the national study of about 800 patients by the time enrollment closes early this year, said Dr. David Podwall, a physician at Neurological Associates. “By participating it allows them to be proactive in the management of their own problem, but it also allows them to help the larger community, because we desperately need new medications to help these people,” Podwall said. The study has been underway for about a year and is open to people who are at least 50 years old, have been diagnosed with mild Alzheimer’s disease and are already taking at least one existing Alzheimer’s medication, according to the STEADFAST Study website. Half the participants are given Azeliragon to take with their existing medications while the other half are given a placebo. No new Alzheimer’s treatments have been developed in the past decade, Podwall said, despite the fact that the memory-loss disease affects more than five million people in the U.S., according to the Alzheimer’s As-

Dr. David Podwal sociation, a national research and advocacy nonprofit. If approved by the Food and Drug Administration, Azeliragon could offer a new, more effective way of treating the disease, Podwall said. Alzheimer’s usually develops through inflammation

in the brain or the buildup of two proteins called A-beta and tau, Podwall said. Existing treatments target one of those three factors, but Azeliragon binds to receptors in the brain and blocks all three, Podwall said. Neurological Associates had to send Alzheimer’s patients to Manhattan for past drug trials, a heavy lift for them and their caretakers, Podwall said. But the STEADFAST study puts a new treatment right in their backyards, he said. “We are now offering, hopefully, tomorrow’s treatment today,” he said. Alzheimer’s disease has become “a huge burden to society” as the population of seniors grows, Podwall said, in terms of “both people and dollars.” Some 390,000 New York seniors at least 65 years old had the disease in 2016, and that number is on track to grow to 460,000 by 2025, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. It cost nearly $4.2 billion to care for those patients last year, the association estimates. And in 2015, more than one million caretakers provided more than $1 billion worth of unpaid care. State lawmakers in recent years have pushed to fund more Alzheimer’s research and aid caretakers. Gov. Andrew Cuomo introduced an initiative in 2015 to fund nonprofit groups that aid caregivers. Legislators also pushed that year for a public vote on a $1 billion bond to support Alzheimer’s research in the state, but the Legislature did not pass that measure. Anyone interested in participating in the STEADFAST drug trial can call Neurological Associates at 516466-4700, ext. 140, to see if they qualify.


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The Great Neck News, Friday, February 17, 2017

SEC investigating Hains Celestial, of L. Success

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WINTER IN G R E AT N E C K

BY M A X Z A H N Hain Celestial, a maker and seller of organic lifestyle and food products, revealed in a ďŹ ling last Friday that the Securities and Exchange Commission is investigating its accounting practices. The ďŹ ling of the Lake-Success-based company said that the SEC has put forth a “formal order of investigationâ€? and “issued a subpoena to [Hain Celestial] seeking relevant documents.â€? The ďŹ ling said the company “is in the process of responding to the SEC’s requests for information and intends to cooperate fully with the SEC.â€? The company voluntarily contacted the SEC in August to advise it of the company’s delay in the ďŹ ling of its periodic ďŹ nancial reports and the performance of an independent review conducted by an audit committee, the ďŹ ling said. On Nov. 16, the company informed the SEC of the completion of an audit conducted by that committee, which found no evidence of intentional wrongdoing in connection with the company’s

ďŹ nancial statements, the ďŹ ling said. Hain Celestial had been recognizing revenue when products were shipped to distributors rather than when the products were sold through its distributors to customers, Newsday reported. “In August we voluntarily, or self-reported, to the SEC delay in ďŹ ling of our ďŹ nancial results and have been responding to their requests for information,â€? Mary Celeste Anthes, Hain Celestial’s senior vice president of corporate relations, told Newsday on Friday. Anthes did not respond to a request for comment.

PHOTO BY PAULA GLASS, GREAT NECK RESIDENT

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The Great Neck News, Friday, February 17, 2017

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Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

GOP national group targets Suozzi BY N O A H M A N S K A R The National Republican Congressional Committee is hoping to make U.S. Rep. Tom Suozzi (D-Glen Cove) a one-term congressman. Suozziâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3rd Congressional District on the North Shore is among 36 Democratic House seats the GOP ďŹ nds vulnerable and plans to go after through the 2018 election, according to a list the NRCC released last Wednesday. Republicans considered the district stretching from northeast Queens to northwest SuďŹ&#x20AC;olk County ripe for the taking after former Rep. Steve Israel stepped down last year. But Suozzi, a former Nassau County executive, beat former GOP state Sen. Jack Martins by about 5.5 percentage points in Novemberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s election. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We owe the American people assurance that the agenda we were elected on â&#x20AC;&#x201D; healthcare reform, a stronger national defense, and more good-paying jobs â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is fulďŹ lled,â&#x20AC;? Rep. Steve Stivers (R-Ohio), the NRCC chairman, said in a statement. Suozzi and Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-Cold Spring) of the 18th Congressional District are the only New Yorkers on the list. The 3rd District has more registered Democrats than Republicans, but some

U.S. Rep. Tom Suozzi (D-Glen Cove) political analysts consider it a toss-up because of its high proportion of unafďŹ liated voters. Last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s race was especially competitive because it was for an open seat that Israel, previously a high-ranking House Democrat, had held for 16 years. Explaining in an email why the NRCC thinks Suozzi is vulnerable, a spokesman, Chris Pack, said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Suozzi is Suozzi,â&#x20AC;? pointing to a video of Suozzi

saying he raised property taxes and cut Nassauâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s workforce during his tenure as county executive from 2002 to 2009. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m conďŹ dent that voters are not happy with Tom Suozziâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s record,â&#x20AC;? Pack said in an interview. Calling him â&#x20AC;&#x153;Taxinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Tom,â&#x20AC;? the NRCC criticized Suozzi last year for hiking property taxes nearly 20 percent early in his ďŹ rst term, taking a $65,000 pay raise recommended by a bipartisan

commission and imposing a deeply unpopular home-heating tax that contributed to his 2009 loss to current County Executive Edward Mangano. Martinsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; court battle over whether he would face a primary election against a Republican challenger, Philip Pidot, prevented the NRCC from hammering that message as hard and from promoting Martins as the GOP candidate early in his campaign, an NRCC source said. Suozziâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tax hikes were eďŹ&#x20AC;orts to pull Nassau out of a ďŹ scal crisis; the county was on the brink of bankruptcy when he took oďŹ&#x192;ce. During the campaign, Suozzi touted the 13 bond upgrades Nassau received as proof of his success. Kim Devlin, a Suozzi political adviser, said the NRCCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s early political salvo is â&#x20AC;&#x153;why nothing ever gets doneâ&#x20AC;? in Congress. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tom is not worried about some list, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s too focused on working in a bipartisan way with other members to try and solve the problems facing our country and to serve the residents of his district,â&#x20AC;? Devlin said in a statement. Suozzi sent a fundraising pitch Thursday based on the NRCCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s announcement, asking supporters to donate to his re-election campaign to show they â&#x20AC;&#x153;like â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Suozzi being Suozzi.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?

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Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

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Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

County Dems call on sheriff to resign BY ST E P H E N R OM A N O Democrats in the Nassau County Legislature called for Sheriff Michael Sposato to resign on Monday, citing issues with the management of the county jail, including safety and security. “If you look at the aspects of what the sheriff is responsible for — making sure our facility is safe, secure and protects taxpayers — he has failed grossly,” Minority Leader Kevan Abrahams (DHempstead) said. The call for Sposato’s resignation comes after the Nassau County District Attorney’s Office said an investigation involving a nurse at the jail who was accused of smuggling contraband into the prison was mishandled. The nurse brought razors and drugs into the jail, reports show. Abrahams, speaking at a news conference, also referred to a state Commission of Corrections report, which “identified gross negligence on behalf of Armor Healthcare,” the healthcare provider for the county jail. State Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman settled a lawsuit last year against Florida-based Armor regarding health care negligence. “The sheriff on more than one occasion defended Armor even after the attorney general came out with their report, even after the state corrections

PHOTO BY STEPHEN ROMANO

Minority Leader Kevan Abrahams (D-Hempstead) led Democratic Nassau County legislators in calling for Sheriff Michael Sposato’s resignation. iff anymore,” Legislator Carrie Solages (D-Valley Stream) said. “In terms of cost to human life. In terms of cost to the taxpayer. With lawsuit after lawsuit, we cannot afford this man. I don’t know why our county executive appointed a cook as our sheriff. As a result, we’re paying the cost.” Democrats said they continued to ask for performance reports on Armor, but never received them.

came out with their report,” Abrahams said. “He continued to support Armor, which to us does not give us the vote of confidence as well as for the taxpayers to ensure that we will be able to have the jail run in a functional matter.” Sposato worked as a cook in the jail before rising to be named acting sheriff in 2007 by then County Executive Tom Suozzi. “We frankly cannot afford this sher-

Six inmates died at the county jail in 2016. Abrahams said some of the deaths were connected to Armor, “and at the same time we have not seen movement to bring in a quality medical-care provider.” The last of the six deaths occurred in September when an inmate, Michael Cullum, 62, died of heart failure. “With an election season gearing up and the need for campaign contributions on the horizon, today’s press conference is a cheap political stunt by Democrats to intimidate the Sheriff ’s Department into doling out overtime to the union — reversing the tens of millions in savings I achieved,” Sposato said. “I have never allowed inmates to run the asylum and it surely won’t start today.” Legislators said they fault County Executive Edward Mangano for not taking action, and said it was possible that his recent indictment is distracting him from properly running the jail. A spokesman for Mangano, Brian Nevin, said it was “an absolutely absurd statement made by politicians looking to grab cheap headlines.” “Since 2007, Michael Sposato has effectively led the Sheriff ’s Department by cutting millions in wasteful overtime and it’s no surprise a proven cost-cutter would be a target of attacks instigated by union bosses,” Mangano said.

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xplore the universe in a fascinating digital display inside the inflatable Starlab Planetarium in Castle Gould. Choose one of eight 30-minute sessions. March 4: 4 pm, 5 pm, 6 pm, 7 pm March 5: 10 am, 11 am, 12 pm, 1 pm

For more info and to register, visit: SandsPointPreserve.org

WINTER CHORAL CONCERT

Nassau home prices jump 7% in January BY ST E P H E N R OM A N O Home prices in Nassau County rose again last month — with the median price of sold properties jumping 7 percent from January 2016, according to Multiple Listing Services. Residential single/multifamily properties, condominiums and co-ops all rose, with a significant $62,500 gain for condos, from $500,000 to $562,500. While some real estate agents believed Nassau’s steady market would drop off after the presidential election, the county has seen three healthy months in November, December and January, with increases of 7 percent, 8 percent and 7 percent from the previous year. The median price for sold properties in the county increased to $475,000 from last January’s mark of $442,000. Residential single/multifamily properties rose from $454,411 to $480,000 and co-ops increased from $199,000 to $215,000.

After only seeing a slight increase in December, the number of sold properties in the county grew about 5 percent, increasing from 882 last year to 925. The sales of residential single/multifamily properties rose slightly, while condos and co-ops saw larger increases, jumping from 49 to 62 and 58 to 71, respectively. Following the upward trend of the median price for sold properties, the median price of pending sales rose, too, to a mark 8.1 percent higher than January 2016. With a jump from $430,000 to $465,000 for properties pending sale, the median price of residential single/ multi-family properties and condos rose slightly, while co-ops fell from $240,000 to $180,000. Although there was a price increase for pending sales, the number of properties pending sale fell 2.7 percent in January, from 776 to 755 — the second month in a row there has been a decrease.

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The Great Neck News, Friday, February 17, 2017

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COMMUNITY NEWS

Pet food drive in April Nassau County Legislator Ellen Birnbaum (D-Great Neck) is partnering with Long Island Cares, the Great Neck Park District, the Great Neck Social Center and the Herricks Community Center for a pet food drive from Feb. 10, 2017 to April 30, 2017 to help animals in need. “It is an honor to assist Long Island Cares in promoting their sixth annual Legislative Pet Food Drive,” Birnbaum said. “This drive is important because sometimes families are put in a position where they cannot afford to feed their pets and must give them away. I am asking those who can, to donate pet food to help those less fortunate families”.” The Great Neck Park District will have boxes to collect any donated items at Great Neck House located at 14 Arrandale Ave. in Great Neck as well as at Parkwood located at 65 Arrandale Ave. in Great Neck. Great Neck House is open Monday to Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Parkwood is open Monday to Sunday from 6:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. The Great Neck Social Center will have a box at their center located at 80 Grace Ave. in Great Neck. Their hours are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Friday. The Herricks Community Center, located at 999 Herricks Road in New Hyde Park, has a box in front of the main office. Their hours are 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday to Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday.

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Ellen Birnbaum Nassau County Legislator “Thank you to the Great Neck Park District, Great Neck Social Center and the Herricks Community Center for partnering with me so that together with the community, we can help Long Island Cares and those they serve,” Birnbaum said.

Cops ask public to help locate hit-and-run perp BY N O A H M A N S K A R Nassau County police are seeking the public’s help in finding the hit-and-run driver who killed a man in Thomaston four months ago. The culprit drove a gray or bluishgray Nissan Rogue made between 2009 and 2015 when he hit 43-year-old Oren Bennaeim while he was crossing Middle Neck Road near Barstow Road on the morning of Sept. 30, 2016, police said. Bennaeim died six days later at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset. The car, which was heading southbound when it hit Bennaeim, has major damage to its headlight and fender area on the passenger side, police said. Bennaeim’s wife, Jivanna Bennaeim, has said several cameras captured the car after it fled the scene, but none were able to read its license plate number. Jivanna Bennaeim is working to get

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a traffic light installed at the intersection where her husband, a former paratrooper in the Israeli army, was killed. Anyone with information about the crime should call the Crime Stoppers tip line at 1-800-244-8477, or Nassau County police Det. Gary Ferrucci at 516-5737788 or 573-7793.

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12 The Great Neck News, Friday, February 17, 2017

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Great Neck Community Calendar

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BOOSTS LOCAL RESTAURANTS In order to show community dedication and support, Leonard N. Katz, President of the Rotary Club of Great Neck, has instituted a new dynamic to his club. They have begun to have dinner events at local Great Neck restaurants on a monthly basis. The second Wednesday of each month will be given over to the club patronizing local establishments. As a further welcoming gesture, the club invites town residents and businesspeople to visit these restaurants with them to network and to participate in keeping Great Neck great and a wonderful place to live and work. They say, “come and discover how meaningful it is to give back to the community.” For more information, visit their Facebook page, Rotary Club of Great Neck or their website, www.rotaryclubofgreatneck. org. To join with them and be a dinner participant, just call 516-487-9392 or email them at rotaryclubofgreatneck@ aol.com. FREE EXERCISE CLASSES Ongoing Program - FREE Sil-

ver Sneakers Exercise Classes For All Levels: Balance, agility, strengthening, endurance and osteoporosis for eligible seniors. Monday through Saturday. Garden City, Roslyn and Great Neck. Call for more details, including seeing if you are eligible and class times, (516) 745-8050. WOMANSPACE A discussion group devoted to issues concerning women. Weekly meetings are held every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Great Neck Senior Center, at 80 Grace Ave, Great Neck. New members welcome. For more info call Joan Keppler at (516) 487-5844. Wednesday monthly lunch 1:00 P.M. February 22nd, 2017, sponsored by the St. Aloysius Sociables of Great Neck, at Louie’s Oyster Bar & Grille, 395 Main St., Port Washington. Cost: Price of your meal. Please call John Hyland ( 516) 482- 3795 for reservations. THE ROTARY CLUB OF GREAT NECK

Invites residents and business people to visit its meetings for social and business networking. In alignment with the club’s motto, “They Profit Most Who Serves Best,” all are welcome to discover how meaningful and satisfying it is to give back to the community while networking through the Rotary Club of Great Neck. On the second Wednesday of each month, dinner events are held to support local Great Neck restaurants, and on all other remaining Wednesdays in the month, the group gathers for breakfast at 8am in the boardroom of TD Bank at 2 Great Neck Rd. For more information, visit their website at www.rotaryclubofgreatneck.org or Facebook page at rotaryclubofgreatneck. To arrange for your visit as a guest or if interested in becoming one of their weekly speakers, please email rotaryclubofgreatneck@aol.com or call 516Continued on Page 46

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The Great Neck News, Friday, February 17, 2017

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13

Soldier’s memory lives on 10 years later sities and obtain quality jobs; and the Wounded Ranger Recovery Program, which gives financial and medical support to severely wounded soldiers. “When a young man gets wounded in theater, he is Last Thursday marked the 10-year anniversary of the death of Sgt. James J. Regan, a Manhasset native and spe- flown into Germany and gets treated there,” Regan said. cial operations soldier who was killed by an improvised “He is then airlifted to Walter Reed [National Military Medical Center] and we give a $3,500 grant to explosive device in northern Iraq. him and his family to take care of incidentals.” “We miss Jimmy a lot,” said Jim Regan, “ e’re with the “That’s what we do all the time. That’s his father. “It’s not easy, period.” Soon after his son’s death, Jim Regan soldier all through blocking and tackling for us. The government flies in two family members and we fly in the founded the Manhasset-based Army Ranger the recovery rest. Could be almost 10,” he added. “We’re with Lead the Way Fund, a nonprofit organization that provides services for soldiers and the phase. We will be the soldier all through the recovery phase. We will be with them and it will take a couple years families of soldiers who belong to the 75th Ranger Regiment, of which James Regan was with them and it for some of these guys to recover if they recover a part. will take a couple fully.” The Lead the Way Fund operates 90 perThe regiment conducts raids, personnel recovery, reconnaissance and other high-risk years for some cent of the services it funds, and partners with operations. of these guys to outside organizations for the other 10 percent, Regan said. “It has been about 15 years since 9/11,” recover if they Jimmy Regan was a student and athlete at Jim Regan said. “Only units like [the regiment] are really taking on the full burden of recover fully.” Chaminade High School. He was recruited for lacrosse by Duke University, where he helped defense now in the fight of the war on terJim Regan lead the team to two ACC championships. In rorism.” FATHER 2002, he graduated with a degree in economics “It’s a long time we’ve been in this fight,” Sergeant James J. Regan, a Manhasset native before he decided to join the Army. he said. “The pressure on these forces is ex“Knowing that Jimmy would be proud of how far we and special operations soldier who was killed by treme.” Regan said his organization spends over $1 million have come, and how many lives we have touched, gives us an improvised explosive device in Northern Iraq providing services for 4,000 soldiers and family members the comfort and the resolve to keep pushing forward with our mission,” Jim Regan said. “As long as our Rangers need ten years ago. each year. what takes place in American foreign policy. Such services include the Ranger Transition Program, us, we stand ready to support them.” “If conflict grows and issues happen, we will expand He said the future of the organization will depend on which helps special forces veterans get into top univerour budget into it,” he said.

BY M A X Z A H N

W

Baxter House should be torn down: report BY ST E P H E N R OM A N O The Village of Baxter Estates’ building inspector and an independent engineer have determined that the fire that ripped through the historic Baxter House last Sunday has left the house structurally unsound and recommended it be demolished, the village said in an e-mail to residents. “Based on my observations, along with my knowledge of the structure from the previous structural condition survey, it is my professional opinion that the building should be demolished down to the foundation,” said Dean Koutsoubis, a structural engineer from Koutsoubis Alonso Associates.

Koutsoubis and the village’s building inspector, Joseph Saladino, were forced to conduct their evaluation of the home last Wednesday from a distance because access to the home was blocked by a six-foot chain-link fence erected by the home’s owner, Sabrina Wu. Because the assessment was conducted outside the property’s fence, Koutsoubis said, it “is by no means comprehensive.” “However, based on my observations from the exterior, my knowledge of the building’s construction and my experience with similar situations, my opinions are made with a reasonable degree of engineering certainty,” Koutsoubis said. Village officials said the village has

not received an application from Wu to demolish the home, which is located at 15 Shore Road. But, they said her lawyer, A. Thomas Levin, sent a letter to the village expressing Wu’s intent to demolish the home. “Jurisdiction over requests for demolition of the structure remains in the village’s Landmarks Preservation Commission pursuant to the village’s Historic Preservation Law, unless there is danger that warrants emergency action by the village,” village Clerk Chrissy Kiernan said in an email. The home, which was built in the 1700s, was landmarked as a historic building in 2005. Kiernan said based on the building

inspector’s report and the engineering report, “we do not believe that such an emergency situation now exists.” The fire on Feb. 5, which burned for more than four hours before firefighters got it under control, caused significant damage to the north side of the house, the roof, interior and exterior. The cause of the fire could not be determined, according to the Nassau County Fire Marshal’s Office. Wu submitted an application to the Landmarks Preservation Commission last month to demolish and rebuild the house. The landmarks commission is scheduled to review the application on March 1 at the Port Washington Public Continued on Page 52


14 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

Opinion OUR VIEWS

Editorial Cartoon

‘It gets late early around here’

O

n Nov. 8, Tom Suozzi was elected Congressman for the 3rd District, defeating then Republican state Sen. Jack Martins. On Jan. 3, Suozzi was sworn in as a member of the 115th Congress. On Jan. 26, Suozzi held a fundraiser celebrating his election — and unofficially kicking off his 2018 re-election campaign. A ticket to attend cost a “suggested” $250. You could be a “chair” for a mere $5,400. Some might say Suozzi was realistic. Some might say he was being paranoid. But as they say, even paranoids have real enemies. On Feb. 7 — a little more than a month after Suozzi was sworn in — the National Republican Congressional Committee listed the Glen Cove Democrat as among 36 Democrats they plan to target in the 2018 election. As Yogi Berra said, “It gets late early around here.” And if anyone wants to know what’s wrong with Congress, Suozzi’s first days in office are a good place to start. Actually, you could even start before Suozzi’s election when his predecessor, Steve Israel, announced he would not seek re-election. Among his primary reasons? The constant need for members of Congress, even those in leadership positions such as Israel, to raise money to run for re-election. “I don’t think I can spend another day in another call room making another call beg-

ging for money,” Israel said in an interview with the New York Times. “I always knew the system was dysfunctional. Now it is beyond broken.” The money raised by members of Congress is most often provided by an army of lobbyists and special interests willing to assist members reach their fundraising goals. Not exactly conducive to good government. A quick look at our tax laws and gun laws will show you how well this system has worked so far. In the case of Israel and Suozzi at least they were concerned with running general election campaigns against a Republican. Thanks to gerrymandered Congressional districts approved by state legislatures — at the moment overwhelmingly controlled by Republicans — most members or Congress are more concerned with challenges within their own party. The fear of many Democrats being challenged to their left and Republicans to their right goes a long way in explaining how Congress got so polarized Congress. So what attracted the National Republican Congressional Committee to focus on Suozzi? Well, Suozzi did not have time to cast any votes or commit any ethical lapses that would engender the Republicans’ antipathy. Heck, Suozzi would be lucky to have learned his way to the bathroom. No. Republican spokesperson Chris Pack explained,

“Suozzi is Suozzi,” pointing to a video of Suozzi saying he raised property taxes and cut Nassau’s workforce during his tenure as county executive from 2002 to 2009. Never mind that Nassau County was on the brink of bankruptcy when Suozzi took office in 2002 after decades of Republican rule and that the county received 13 bond upgrades during his tenure. Apparently, the National Republican Congressional Committee expects all members of Congress to subscribe to the pledge demanded by tax activist Grover Norquist that they never raises taxes, no matter the circumstances.

It should be noted that in the eight years since Suozzi left, Republican County Executive Ed Mangano and the Republicancontrolled county Legislature haven’t cut the property taxes Suozzi raised — and have still struggled to balance the county budget. Martins made the same case about Suozzi raising taxes as county executive during his unsuccessful race for Congress against Suozzi in the general election. But apparently the national party believes Martins spent too much time fighting to prevent a primary race against lightly regarded challenger Phillip Pidot and too little attacking Suozzi.

They also note the small edge enjoyed by Democrats in the 3rd District and the large number of independents who could help swing the district to a Republican. Now despite the election of Donald Trump as president, and all that has followed, the National Republican Congressional Committee believes Suozzi’s tax hikes as county executive could be the basis for victory in 2018. We endorsed Suozzi in his bid against Martins, but like any reasonable person believe it is way too early to make a judgment about his performance If only that was how modern Congressional elections worked.

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Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

15

ON THE RIGHT

Time for Ed Mangano to pack it in

E

ight years ago I co-chaired the Conservatives for Mangano Committee. I agreed to join the committee — which was responsible for providing Mangano’s razor thin margin of victory — for several reasons. First, I was outraged that the Nassau Conservative Party chairman, Roger Bogsted, put personal gain above party principles by working as a commissioner for Democrat Suozzi, and nominating a shill candidate for county executive — who also worked in the Suozzi administration — to draw votes away from Mangano. Then, after meeting Mangano, although I realized he was not close to being a public policy expert, I concluded he was a decent guy, and would listen to sound advice to fix Nassau’s fiscal mess. In retrospect, endorsing Ed Mangano was the worst decision I made in my 45 years as a Conservative activist. (To make amends, I declined to vote last November for Mangano’s latest political hero, Donald Trump.) Mangano began his adminis-

tration on a wrong footing by appointing scores of political hacks to key positions and by refusing to listen to sage advice from key members of the state oversight board, the Nassau Interim Finance Authority. After I was appointed to serve on the NIFA board in 2010, my worse fears were confirmed. Mangano was wholly ignorant of the fundamentals of municipal finance and unwilling to learn. To this day, he wrongly believes that operating budgets can be balanced with borrowed dollars and that unexpended loan balances can be treated as surplus funds to dispense as he pleases. There’s more: Mangano failed to fulfill his promise to fix the county’s property tax assessment system. His self-proclaimed reform merely forced homeowners to challenge their assessments. “The effect” Newsday observed, “has been a huge shift in the tax burden from wealthy residents who know to appeal, because it never cost them anything,

GEORGE J. MARLIN On The Right to less savvy, poorer ones.” Despite boasts that he had eliminated Nassau’s annual residential home tax refund liability, it was announced in August 2016 that $39.1 million was still owed to homeowners. Mangano was unaware his program did not end refunds on small condominium complexes and expensive mansions.

Those owners can still challenge assessments in New York’s Supreme Court. Since Mangano’s indictment by the U.S. attorney in a bribery probe on October 20, 2016, matters have gotten only worse. The county’s operating budget is hemorrhaging red ink. Mangano’s bus service privatization deal, as predicted by NIFA members, is a disaster and straphangers are facing service cuts. Police overtime is out of control, hitting $69.9 million in 2016. The vendor Mangano hired to provide medical services to Nassau’s jail has been riddled with scandals. New York’s Commission of Corrections declared the company was “grossly incompetent” and blamed it for the deaths of several inmates. In January it was revealed that state property tax abatements for seniors had expired because Mangano had failed to procure a home-rule message to extend it. And on Feb. 6, District Attorney Madeline Singas announced that the County Executive’s Office botched an investigative into ac-

cusations that a nurse employed at the jail had smuggled in contraband. Meanwhile, the indicted Mangano acts as though everything is coming up roses. Last week, after learning his trial date is set for Jan. 15, 2018 and that the government will turn over to his lawyers 20,000 pages of documents, Mangano told reporters on the steps of the Federal Court House the pending case has “really not been a distraction” and he can effectively govern. While the facts detailed in this essay contradict that claim, I’m certain Mangano actually believes it. That’s because governing for him means attending ribbon cutting ceremonies and releasing self–congratulatory press releases. Ed Mangano is not only incompetent, he is a public embarrassment who will be spending more time with his criminal defense lawyers than governing in the coming months. If he has any remaining sense of public decency, he will pack his bags and vacate County Hall now.

THE NEW SUBURBANIST

Where to go to find real facts W here do we most often find real truth, real facts in a new era of Internet hoaxes, fake news stories and new political administrations that tout their own “alternative facts”? Many citizens appear confused and worried. News stories from the BBC and the New York Times and Money magazine are reporting (with proof) that dystopian novels such as “1984” by George Orwell and “Brave New World” by Aldous Huxley are seeing a noticeable boost in sales. After Meryl Streep’s antiTrump and pro-journalism speech at the Golden Globe awards in January, donations picked up to the Committee to Protect Journalists. Subscriptions to the New York Times and other newspapers have picked up dramatically since Donald Trump was elected president according to the Columbia Journalism Review and other sources. Meanwhile, I’ve been hearing from several well-educated friends, who are wondering if their own reading habits are leading them toward facts or fiction. “Hey man. Got a question for you on this ‘fake news’ thing,” wrote one friend from my high school years. “What’s your advice and do

you have an opinion on where to find some form of truth in our media today?” One key question for any publication is this: If a reporter gets facts in a story wrong, will the news outlet investigate a complaint and publish a correction? Does the publication have its own code of ethics? Or does it subscribe to and endorse the Society of Professional Journalist’s code of ethics? And if a reporter or editor seriously violates ethical codes – such as being a blatant or serial plagiarizer, fabulist or exaggerator – will they be fired at a given news outlet? While some may criticize mainstream media outlets for a variety of sins, top outlets such as the Washington Post, the New York Times, NBC News and the New Republic have fired journalists for such ethics violations. That is remarkable in a world where some celebrities, politicians and other realms of media (other than news… such as Hollywood films “based on a true story”) can spread falsehood with impunity. Another friend writes, “Trump’s attacks on the free media has me spooked and I want to support the media somehow. At the same time, I am aware of my liberal bias and would welcome a

PAUL GLADER The New Suburbanist different point of view as long as it isn’t ‘alternative facts.’ Any suggestions for good publications to subscribe to? I already have subscriptions to the [Washington] Post, [New York] Times and [Wall Street] Journal.” I am heartened by questions like these. A major shift in political and cultural life in our country means it is a good time for people to improve their own reading and learning habits. The Poynter Institute – an enlightened non-profit in St. Petersburg, Fla., that has an ownership role in the Tampa Bay Times and provides research, training and educational resources on journalism – provides many

excellent online modules to help citizens improve their news media literacy. In the post-post truth age (that is, an age where one has to work hard to be media literate and find the truthful sources of information), citizens should support local and regional publications that hew to ethical journalism standards and cover local government entities. In my corner of Long Island, that means I read (and sometimes write for) the Great Neck News and the chain of local newspapers to which it belongs. This year, I also have subscribed to Newsday, which is the largest paper that covers Long Island. I would urge citizens to subscribe to their local newspapers as well. This action helps these organizations employ journalists who attend city hall meetings, school board meetings and police precincts to report on how your tax-dollars are being spent, how your constitutional rights are being safeguarded, and to serve as watch dogs on how well your elected officials are serving you. Realizing that millions more people are scratching their heads, wondering what to read and where to spend their subscription dollars, here are my top 10 large

journalistic brands where I believe you can most often find real, reported facts: 1. The New York Times This is the most influential newspaper in the U.S. in my view. Its editorial page and some of its news coverage take a left-leaning, progressive view of the world. But the NYT also hews to ethical standards of reporting and the classic elements of journalism in America. That’s what helps the New York Times remain, arguably, the agenda-setting news organization in America. It is a leader in business, politics and culture coverage. * 2. The Wall Street Journal The largest circulation newspaper in the U.S., the Wall Street Journal made its bones as a business newspaper and pioneered new types of feature writing in American journalism (for example, its quirky middle-column feature called the “Ahed” and longer form, in-depth reports called “leders”). As the company was purchased by Australian media mogul Rupert Murdoch in 2007, the WSJ pivoted to cover more general news in addition to business news. The WSJ is still brand X among Continued on Page 47


16 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

A LOOK ON THE LIGHTER SIDE

A life-saving concept: ‘The have-to rules’

I

n the new and much-acclaimed film “La La Land,” the two young people at its center have a critical disagreement soon after they meet. He (played by Ryan Gosling) is a dedicated jazz musician and fan of the entire genre; she (played by Emma Stone) says, “You should know, I don’t like jazz.” I wanted to leap up, right then, and offer them a little advice. “What you two need are ‘The Have-To Rules,’ ” I wanted to say. “Why, what are those?” Emma might have replied. “It’s very simple. You just set a few basic ground-rules for each other — things the other person has to do, or has to like, if you’re to stay together. We call them ‘The Have-To Rules.’ ” “You should listen to her,” says my husband. Ryan Gosling leans away from Emma, whom he was embracing, to tell my husband, “You’re just saying that because you have to.” “Exactly!” He is beaming.

“I think you’ve got it! Let’s say, for example, that one of you makes a first, experimental meal for the other — maybe you’ve added some new ingredients to her family’s recipe for scrambled eggs. She takes a bite.” “And,” I add, “let’s also say that the new ingredients aren’t mushrooms, or ham, or anything sensible, but peanut butter and jelly!” “Wait a minute,” says Emma. “Wouldn’t that stick horribly to the pan? Or burn, even?” “Yes, yes, it would,” I tell her. “It’s a crazy idea, and one that you’ll want to bring up for as long as you own that pan. But instead — what do you say?” “I would say, ‘This is interesting,’” she answers. “But everyone knows that that’s a synonym for ‘bad’,” Ryan Gosling points out. “Quite right. And that’s where ‘The Have-To Rules’ come in. You say that you love it, because you have to!” “I do?” “You do.” I was firm with

JUDY EPSTEIN A Look on the Lighter Side her. “Now, back to music. My husband and I had this very discussion, early on. He was a big jazz fan — still is, for all I know. And I couldn’t abide it!” “That’s not what you told me!” He looked hurt. “You just said, you couldn’t understand it.” “Yes, wasn’t I clever? What I meant was, I couldn’t understand why you like it, because there’s never a tune! Or if there is, the musicians forget about it as soon as possible — leave it

for dead — with such distracting solos, that I can’t even recognize the tune if they do come back to it. But for us to stay together, I knew I ‘had to’ like it. So I do.” “And so,” asks Emma, “does he ‘have-to-like’ something for you, in return?” “Country music!” We said together. “It’s just so ‘twangy,’” said my husband. “I couldn’t stand it.” “So we made the rule,” I explained. “He has to like country music — well, bluegrass at least — and I have to like jazz, at least from before Miles Davis. It works well enough.” “Does it work for other things, too?” Ryan wanted to know. “Of course! Like the shawl I made, to wear to his cousin’s wedding. We both knew the pattern was crooked and the hem was a mess, but he said he liked it.” “At least, she warned me,” my husband remarked. “She said ‘You have to like this. I in-

voke The Have-To Rules.’ ” “And in return, I assured him he’d picked the right shirt and his tie was perfect. It’s not like either of us had a choice!” “And it’s pretty great for watching TV. I’ve told Judy she has to like the re-runs of “Psych” I’ve been saving; and she uses the rule for a lot of her PBS murder mystery shows. ‘You have to like this,’ she says. I never tell her that I actually do.” “You do?” I turn to him, surprised. “Well, yes, some of them. I like Inspector Lewis, and the scenery for Father Brown; they remind me of our honeymoon in England. So I’ve come to like them.” He turned back to Ryan and Emma. “But I wouldn’t get any Have-To points if Judy knew that! So I pretend that the only reason I watch her shows is because I have to. And you,” he said, turning back to me, “you need to pretend that you don’t know that!” “All right,” I say demurely. “If I have to.”

PULSE OF THE PENINSULA

Many cheers, but 1 jeer for Cuomo There is much to cheer in Gov. Cuomo’s State of the State address, one of which he delivered at SUNY Farmingdale on Long Island. His agenda for infrastructure, mass transportation improvements, water quality, affirming women’s reproductive rights, support for immigrants and refugees, free tuition at public colleges for those who qualify, and how he couples the need for aggressive climate action with vigorous sustainable economic development, giving his blessing leading to LIPA’s landmark decision for a 90 megawatt offshore windfarm to supply the East End, the first utility-scale project in America and making Long Island a leader in a new American industry, put Cuomo in line another New York governor, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, which FDR brought to the White House as the New Deal (and it is clear Cuomo is jockeying for an eventual run for president). The one jeer? His renewed assault on local control, which he casts as the culprit for unceasingly high property taxes, which is a notreally-veiled attack on public education.

Each year, Cuomo has used a different mechanism to make the property tax cap — which limits the amount a municipality can raise through property taxes to 2 percent or the CPI, whichever is less — an offer that can’t be refused. This year, Cuomo has unveiled a “groundbreaking” proposal which mandates the county executive “to develop localized plans that find real, recurring property tax savings by coordinating and eliminating duplicative services and proposing coordinated services to enhance purchasing power, such as jointly purchasing and coordinating use of expensive transportation or emergency equipment. Taxpayers will then vote on these cost-saving plans in a referendum in the November 2017 general election.” If the referendum fails, well then, the plan would need to be reworked and resubmitted in November 2018. (Notably, New York City is exempted.) But the argument begins with a flawed argument that we spend 2.5 times on property taxes than state income taxes. Doesn’t that spending dif-

KAREN RUBIN Pulse of the Peninsula ferential reflect how much we pay for the services we actually receive locally? Plowing snow. Repairing roads. Treating sewage. Picking up garbage. Delivering water. Maintaining police, fire and emergency services. Keeping street lights on. And yes, public education. Though people like to charge that Long Island pays the highest property taxes in the country, that isn’t true. Nor do New Yorkers pay the highest taxes in the nation, When all taxes are tallied — real estate, income, sales taxes and fees, New York comes in sixth

(behind Illinois, Nebraska, Wisconsin, Connecticut and Rhode Island). Nor are the taxes out of line to the incomes earned and home values. But most importantly, for the quality of municipal services including public schools, we want in our community. Question for Cuomo: before you forcibly consolidate local governments, how much money would be saved by the exercise and how would consolidation actually work? North Hempstead already promotes intermunicipal cooperation; the school districts already participate in joint purchasing and shared services (BOCES) wherever practicable. Indeed, Great Neck public schools now earn a tidy sum in revenue from other districts for tuition paid into programs such as SEAL (rather than paying out $1 million in tuition). If there is waste and duplication, voters can show their ire at the ballot box or make their better-government suggestions known at public meetings. But the real target of Cuomo’s assault on local governments and property taxes is

public education, since 60-65 percent of the property tax bill goes to fund schools. Indeed, Long Islanders wouldn’t pay so much in property taxes if we weren’t so shortchanged in state aid for our public schools — though Long Island has 17 percent of New York’s student population, we only receive 12 percent of state aid. It is a lot more obvious when you compare the percentage of school budgets funded by state aid: New York City, where property taxes are low and just about everybody gets some sort of tax holiday, gets 50% of its school budget paid by the state; in comparison less than 5 percent of Great Neck’s school budget comes from the state. Also, new enterprises, like Avalon Bay residential development, are getting a PILOT by Nassau County’s IDA, reducing the taxes they contribute to the school district as well as Village of Great Neck; the difference is made up by homeowners. Gov. Cuomo has made property taxes, and particularly school taxes, the enemy, falsely claiming that the taxes inhibit growth. Continued on Page 18


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READERS WRITE

Don’t sully arguments with invectives

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am writing this letter to express my sense of outrage at the rhetoric used by Joan Swirsky in her article “Obama Attacks Israel in the U.N. Vote” published in the Great Neck News of Jan. 13, 2017. The fact that the Obama administration did not veto the U.N. resolution 2334 will remain an ugly blot on former President Obama’s foreign policy. This resolution should have been vetoed, not because it criticized Israel for illegal settlements, but for it’s repeated language calling for Israel to retreat back to the 1967 borders and have Jerusalem exist as a divided city. Resolution 2334, as it was written, was insidious and inimical to the goal of a peaceful solution for Israel and its neighbors. Like millions of other Jews, here, abroad, and certainly in Is-

rael, I would hope that some type of peaceful solution would be forthcoming; even though that peace may be tenuous at best. Of course, there are different opinions as to how to achieve the goal of a peaceful solution for Israel and its Arab neighbors. \ Joan Swirsky would have you believe that we and a multitude of prominent American and Israeli citizens are all “Jew haters”, “ anti-Semites”, and “destroyers of Israel,” ad nauseam, because we believe that illegal settlements are not in Israel’s long-term interests. It should be noted, that many of these illegal settlements are started by and populated with religious extremists who have little or no regard for international or Israeli laws. They rely on a spurious interpretation of ancient biblical literature for their raison d’etre.

Unfortunately, the power of these religious extremists increase daily; and not just in Israel. Joan Swirsky castigates, in a most contemptuous manner, many of our most highly respected American citizens. Their crime, according to Swirsky, is that they had the temerity and audacity to bring to Israel’s attention, on many occasions, that the continuation of illegal settlements would not increase Israel’s security and would be an impediment to any peace efforts. It should be noted, that previous administrations, both Democratic and Republican, have criticized Israel for illegal settlements. We all know that the Palestinians and other Arab countries must be prepared to make serious concessions before any

meaningful peace can be realized between Israel and the Palestinians; especially when it comes to a two state solution. Perhaps Joan Swirsky would enlighten us as to what she envisions for the State of Israel; keeping in mind that Israel must exist in an area comprised by tens of millions of Arabs. Should Israel maintain the status quo for the long-term future? Even the hard right Prime Minister Netanyahu and various members of his cabinet admit that this solution would be untenable and unsustainable for the future of Israel. Perhaps Swirsky would like to see an apartheid type of government, such as South Africa had not so many years ago. This type of society would have the rest of the civilized world look upon Israel as a pari-

ah among nations and a constant object of international derision. Joan Swirsky refers to Donald Trump as the “true American hero.” What has Donald Trump ever done to be placed in this exalted category? What an insult this is to the truly great American heroes and patriots, past and present, who have served this country and our society with valor and distinction. I believe that President Trump, who is a master of hyperbole, gross distortion of the facts, outright mendacity, and calumnious diatribes against anyone who might disagree with him-yes!! Even Donald Trump might hesitate to use the type of invectives that flow so readily from the pen of Joan Swirsky. Sanford J. Kowan Great Neck

Restore the Gimbel’s passageway

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et us all rejoice in celebrating the 104th Anniversary of Grand Central Terminal, which first opened on Feb. 2, 1913. Contrast this with the late, great Penn Station Terminal, which was destroyed in the name of progress in 1962. Fast forward, 55 years later. Penn Station is still a shell of its former glory. There is no natural lighting, decent food court, gourmet food shops, upscale stores or quality restaurants. Most Long Island Rail Road and New Jersey Transit commuters rush in and out each day. Grand Central Terminal has high ceilings, natural light, a food court, gourmet food shops, upscale stores and great restaurants such as the Oyster Bar. Not only do Metro North commuters have a real terminal, but they are joined on a daily basis by thousands of people who work nearby and patronize the great food court, quality restaurants and stores. LIRR commuters just have a station. Few people who work nearby Penn Station stops by during the day to patronize any of its commercial establishments. LIRR riders will be lucky if the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s Eastside Access project provides a direct connection to Grand Central Terminal via the 63rd Street tunnel and reaches

beneficial use by December 2023. We can then join our Metro North comrades in utilizing this great institution to and from work. Perhaps it might be useful in 2017 to look for other low cost, easy-to-implement alternatives in the short run. Consider transit riders disappointment that a proposal submitted by one of New York City’s developers, Vornado Realty Trust, to pay for construction to reopen the old Hilton Corridor, also known as the Gimbel’s passageway was never completed. They had offered to do this in exchange for a city zoning variance to construct a high rise office building at 7th Avenue and 32nd Street. While the zoning variance was approved, Vornado Realty Trust never moved forward with construction of a high rise office building. This was due to a weak market for potential renters. Until the 1970s, both Long Island Rail Road and New Jersey Transit riders exiting east at Penn Station had a direct underground passageway known as the Hilton Corridor. It was also known as the Gimbel’s passageway. Gimbels was Macy’s chief competitor at Herald Square. They closed in 1986. This passageway still stands dormant. It is a forgotten underground

link between Penn Station and Herald Square. It was once a 800-foot pedestrian concourse providing an indoor connection to the 34th Street Herald Square IND and BMT subway, along with PATH station complex. Further, there was an adjoining nearby underground passageway starting at 34th street which ran along 6th Avenue, going as far north as 42nd Street. Many avoided the rain and snow by using this indoor path. Both passageways were closed many decades ago by New York City Transit and the LIRR, due to security issues. If reopened today, Amtrak riders along with New Jersey Transit and LIRR commuters would have easy underground connections to the Broadway N, R, Q & W and 6th Avenue B,D, F & M subway lines along with PATH, rather than walking outside on the street exposed to both inclement weather and heavy vehicular traffic. By using either the subway or walking, riders would have

direct access to both midtown and East Side Manhattan along either the Broadway, 6th Avenue, 42nd, 53rd, 59th or 63rd Street corridors, served by numerous subway lines and stations. Why wait for the LIRR to provide access to Manhattan midtown eastside via Grand Central Terminal? The most recent recovery schedule for the MTA’s Eastside Access project calls for revenue service opening to the public starting in December 2023. How disappointing that the old Hilton corridor, which previously provided transit options for thousands of rush hour commuters remains unused after so many decades. The Vernando Trust developers proposal to reopen and widen it from some points where it narrows to nine feet was $50 million. Converting the total length to 15 feet wide could cost up to another $100 million. This seems like a reasonable investment of $150 million out of a $27 billion 2015-2019 Capital

program plan for a significant transportation improvement that could benefit thousands of transportation riders. There is still time for the MTA to consider amending the 20152019 Capital Plan and add funding for this project. If Gov. Andrew Cuomo can find $2 billion in new money for LIRR Main Line Third Track, why can’t he find $150 million for reopening this passageway? Construction could be completed within a year or two versus seven to eight more years for LIRR East Side Access to Grand Central Terminal. Diogenes is searching for the first public official or MTA Board member to speak out in favor of this project. Larry Penner Great Neck (Larry Penner is a transportation historians and advocate who previously worked 31 years for the US Department of Transportation Federal Transit Administration Region 2 NY Office.)

LETTERS POLICY Letters should be typed or neatly handwritten, and those longer than 300 words may be edited for brevity and clarity. All letters must include the writer’s name and phone number for verification. Anonymously sent letters will not be printed. Letters must be received by Monday noon to appear in the next week’s paper. All letters become the property of Blank Slate Media LLC and may be republished in any format. Letters can be e-mailed to news@theislandnow.com or mailed to Blank Slate Media, 105 Hillside Ave., Williston Park, NY 11596.


18 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

READERS WRITE

Better off without TPP trade deal

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have been planning to say for some time that I voted for Hillary Clinton. It surely was not without reservation but Trump is definitely an embarrassment. My thoughts were that she could save The Supreme Court from becoming an enemy of We The People. The Clintons have a tremendous amount of baggage and she (I kind of hoped) might be impeached. Next subject —The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement: Briefly looking around I noted that I have items made in or just from Italy, China, Vietnam, USA, Honduras, Mexico, England, France, Canada, Bermuda, Japan, Hong Kong, India, Germany, Spain, Brazil, Greece and Morocco. Perhaps items from other countries too. All due to the natural course of things. Some of these items I have had many years. Also, in Central and South America there are those who harvest a nominal twenty pounds of the best Arabica coffee beans ‘just for me.’

It would be a nice vacation some time to go say hello and thank you to them. It is obvious that we don’t need a TPP with all of the secrecy and dangers. There have been the recent articles about globalization. Looking at it with the ‘bigger picture’, they are about nothing. The United States today is the melting pot where it is said that in time there will no more be races: only the Human Race. I myself am of four ‘bloods’ I know of. My children would therefore have seven and two of my grandchildren have eight. It is said that there are 160 languages spoken in Queens County, NYC. There have to be many interracial offspring. This is too much to go into detail at this time. Our Creator has brought into existence numerous life waves such as those who are now angels, We who are now human and those who are animals: all This over vast eons. Biologists can confirm that the anthropoids are part of our life wave. They are

the stragglers. The monkeys are probably too far behind to ever catch up. They will probably die out and be cast out into chaos. Also, those who are too crystallized into race will eventually meet the same fate. That which does not progress degenerates. There are many now who already don’t identify with any particular race. They are very open to all of humanity. Another subject: There is talk these days of reverse commute. Maybe they should get out of reverse and get into drive. One weekday morning during rush hour I noted the time trains went west and east. Westbound trains (to the city) averaged one train every 4.72 minutes and East bound every 8.5 minutes. During the evening rush it was 6.32 minutes per train east and 11.5 minutes west. I measured the evening over a longer

time before and after it was really busy. This does not count the few Oyster Bay Line trains. The trains are often enough that wait time is negligible. Transit records were quoted that about 11 percent of total riders go east in the morning and west in the evening. From this they, the ‘reverse commuters’ deduce that they are those who commute to LI to work. They don’t realize that those are people who work night jobs going home when the majority are going to work and vice versa. I imagine that the trains going east in the morning and West in the evening are quite empty. Naturally, more trains go West in the morning and are stored close to Penn Station for the evening rush and away from Penn Station for the morning rush. Have a nice day. Charles Samek Mineola

Reclaim N.Y. is alt-right tool Staying young

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n Jan. 23, Reclaim New York gave a presentation at the Port Washington Public Library. Reclaim’s goals seem noble. They claim to promote government transparency so citizens can monitor spending. Reclaim does this by filing Freedom of Information Law (“FOIL”) requests with towns, school boards and public libraries demanding spending information in specific formats. If the response is late or wrongly formatted, Reclaim sues — costing governments thousands in legal fees and hundreds of per-

sonnel hours. In truth, Reclaim is a cover for the “alt-right” movement’s war on government. And despite their apparent devotion to transparency, when asked to disclose who their own sponsors were, they refused. We know, however, that Reclaim’s sponsors include billionaire Trump supporter Rebekah Mercer and Trump White House advisor Steve Bannon, who use Reclaim as a tool for advancing their antigovernment agenda. Well-attended, the meeting elicited curiosity. Some were interested in Re-

claim’s message. Many were concerned that Reclaim’s tactics waste our precious tax dollars. Port Washington has excellent schools and libraries. We do not need outside organizations interfering with our already financially transparent institutions. Reclaim and the “alt-right” do not share Port Washington’s values. I promise to be vigilant against the threat Reclaim poses to Port and urge my neighbors to do the same. Laurie Radler Port Washington

at heart in snow

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he snow storm of February 2017 has brought much trouble for many of us. Schools kids are happy to be off and those who have to go to work are sad and experience difficulty in getting in. I was lucky and had the day off. My wife and myself are in our sixties and young at heart.

While moving the snow off of our little walkway and stoop we did something silly. We made snow angels. I guess it pays to stay young at heart. So my advise to all if you can during our next snow storm,” Smile and be happy!” Frederick R. Bedell Jr. Mineola

Many cheers, 1 We can prevail over Trump jeer for Cuomo O Continued from Page 16 But the services that are funded through property taxes contribute to economic growth and activity (an educated workforce, lighted roadways) as well as quality of life. “Economic theory expects people to consider taxes when deciding where to live, but most studies show taxes only tangentially influence these decisions,”

explained Stephanie Hunter McMahon, professor of law at the University of Cincinnati College of Law, in a WalletHub report. “Taxes are, therefore, more influential for what they do or do not provide rather than therateitself...these taxes are really payments for the goods and services state and local governments provide to the taxpayer and other members of the community.”

For the late st news, visit us at w w w.theislan dn ow.com

ver the Feb. 12 weekend, the White House sent Stephen Miller, one of the president’s senior advisors, out to the Sunday news programs on ABC,CBS, NBC and Fox news to defend the very sloppy and questionable travel ban. Of course, the White House was immediately challenged in the courts, but true to the president’s reactions to criticism, he attacked the legitimacy of the findings of various judges. In this instance he started with such a phrase as “these socalled judges”. When questioned about our historical principle of judicial independence, going back to the Federalist papers, Miller stated that the president should

not be questioned on matters of national security. He rashly asserted that the President is 100 percent correct. It was an ignorant pronouncement, an assertion that the President has unquestioned authority, injecting the hint that we are headed by a dictator. Of course, in his dreams, so often expressed, he carelessly asserts that he can fix everything. There are scientific terms for such a delusion. Beyond that, there is strong evidence that Mike Flynn, before actually being appointed an advisor to the President, had discussed sanctions with Vladimir Putin, and had later lied to Vice President Pence, who repeated the lie

to the nation. And to add to the messy policy pronouncements, Trump, who had talked of removing the nuclear umbrella over South Korea, had to pull back in light of North Korean missile tests. These are just the latest missteps and the effects on our credibility, added to the unintended consequences of plans to make America great without any regard for the reality that the rest of the world is affected by what we announce or attempt. Lest I sound too pessimistic, let me repeat, resoundingly, that we can prevail. Esther Confino New Hyde Park


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READERS WRITE

Battle for sensible gun controls not over

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od, Guns and Guts Made [the] U.S. GREAT.... Pistolero magazine Between 1963 and 1973, while the war in Vietnam was taking 46,121 lives, guns here in America killed 84,644 civilians. Jervis Anderson, “Guns in American Life” Why are guns the only unregulated consumer products in America? We regulate toy guns and teddy bears, but we do not regulate a product that kills 4,600 children in a year. Marian Wright Edelman (1999) In June of 2012, Colby Weathers walked into the Odessa Gun and Pawn shop in Missouri and purchased a 45 caliber Hi -Point pistol. She went home, loaded two bullets into the magazine, and shot her father, Tex Delano. She then texted her mother, “Dad is dead.” An open and shut case of premeditated murder. However, there’s more to the

story. Colby Weathers was a paranoid schizophrenic . In 2007, she complained that she was hearing voices and that a chip had been implanted in her brain. She had been hospitalized several times and the Social Security Administration determined she was unfit to work. In May of 2012, the Odessa shop had sold Colby a gun which her parents took away before she could harm herself or others. Two days before the murder occurred she went back to the gun shop. Janet Delana, her mother, called and spoke with Derrick Dady, the store manager. She informed him that her daughter was mentally ill and had attempted suicide. Lest there be a problem of identification, Janet Delana gave the proprietor Colby’s name, date of birth and Social Security number. In spite of this knowledge, Dady put profit before compassion and made the sale. The case was resolved out of court with a $2.2 million settlement. Odessa Gun and Pawn was

found guilty of negligence and Colby is serving time in prison. But this case has important national implications. Gun dealers have an obligation to use good judgment, carry out federally mandated background checks and not sell to every person who enters the store. There is precedent for this expectation. Cashiers in supermarkets cannot sell tobacco to underage purchasers and bartenders cannot serve liquor to inebriated customers. Derrick Dady is what is known as a “bad apple” dealer. This is defined as one who ignores the law and may engage in “straw purchases”...when one person buys a weapon for another while lying about who really owns the gun. Dan Gross of the Brady Campaign points out that “A small and dangerous group of firearms vendors are responsible for the toll of gun violence across the United States.” What does the future portend? Throughout his campaign for the presidency, Donald Trump made no secret of where he stood

on this issue. He vowed that he would “totally” protect the Second Amendment, streamline background checks, abolish gun-free zones at schools, and implement a national right to carry in all 50 states. Talk about loving your guns! Five days after his election, Trump formed a 64 member Second Amendment coalition. Members came from the National Rifle Association, pro-gun members of the House, and representatives of the firearms industry. This is similar to asking the fox to guard the hen-house. On Feb. 1, 2017, Trump invited a group of distinguished Americans to the White House to garner support for his Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch. Seated right next to the president was Wayne LaPierre of the NRA. This reminded me of inviting your “crazy uncle” to Thanksgiving dinner, but it could simply have been a thank you for the NRA endorsement. Just when you think it is safe to go back in the water, you discover that according to the Brady

Center “The Senate is poised to vote on a bill that would make it easier for people with dangerous mental illnesses to obtain guns.” As Lenin said “one step forward, two steps back.” The problem we face is our national delusion about the Second Amendment Contrary to popular belief, It is not what keeps America safe. We, as a people, have had a love affair with guns from colonial times through the days of the “Wild West,” and up to the present. But there is a price to pay for this romance. Unlike other “civilized” nations we have had four presidents (Lincoln, Garfield, McKinley and Kennedy) assassinated and two others (Teddy Roosevelt and Ronald Reagan who were shot but survived. The battle for sensible gun control will go on as it has for the past decades. On a lighter note, President Trump informed the NRA he was reversing his position on the Second Amendment since he did not believe it was right to “arm bears.” Dr. Hal Sobel Great Neck

A blind eye toward Cuban oppression

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read with great interest Jerry Kremer’s essay on his trip to Cuba entitled “Cuba seen through a different lens.” A more appropriate title should have been “Cuba seen through a delusional lens.” It’s distressing that the Port Times gave Mr. Kremer a platform to offer a completely biased account on one of the world’s most repressive regimes. Mr. Kremer wrote a 500-word plus postcard for Castro’s Cuba but was only able to dedicate 26 words to the political repression that has occurred in Cuba since the revolution. His mention of political prisoners was also done in the condescending manner of equating the treatment of political dissent in Cuba with a number of European countries. Who knew that when it comes to political freedom that Cuba is the Sweden of the Caribbean? Before anyone books a trip to Cuba based on Mr. Kremer’s fantasy land description of the country, I would suggest reading the Human Rights Watch Report on Cuba for 2015. Despite President Obama’s ill-advised restoration of diplomatic relations in December 2014, 6,200 Cuban citizens were detained from January to October 2015 for political activities. According to the Cuban Commission for Human Rights and National Reconciliation, detainees are often beaten, threatened and held incommunicado. No one knows how many prisoners are rotting in Castro’s gulag because Amnesty In-

ternational hasn’t been allowed in the country since 1990. The Ladies in White is a group founded by wives, mothers and daughters of political prisoners. According to Human Rights Watch, they are routinely harassed, beaten and detained before and after they attend Sunday mass. On Aug. 9, 2015, a few days before John Kerry was due to visit the country, 90 political activists were arrested including 50 Ladies in White after Sunday mass in Havana. During the visit of Pope Francis in September 2015, police arrested 150 dissents who were scheduled to see the Holy Father. Miriam Leiva, one of the founders of the Ladies in White was scheduled to meet the Pope but missed meetings on September 19th and 20th as she was detained by the Cuban police. Mr. Kremer tells us about the lack of heavy police presence anywhere. Maybe he should have put down his pina colada and found one of The Ladies in White and asked them if there is a police presence in Havana. Or maybe Mr. Kremer can ask Lazaro Yuri Roca, an independent blogger who has covered the Ladies in White about police activity. He may find that Mr. Valle Roca is reluctant to discuss the matter as on June 7, 2015 he was detained by the Cuban police, driven 30 miles outside of Havana and with a gun to his head warned to stay away from the Ladies in White demonstrations. The above episode is not surprising as the

Cuban media is owned by the state and the independent press in considered illegal. According to Freedom House, independent journalists are routinely harassed by the secret police and it remains illegal to distribute independent media. Mr. Kremer writes about the crumbling buildings and lack of capital investment in Cuba. The Castro sympathizers on the left often blame the U.S. embargo for the failing Cuban economy. But there is no embargo on Cuba from Europe and Asia. Foreign businesses and governments have avoided investing in Cuba due to the widespread corruption and control of all key economic assets by the Castro brothers and the military. When Castro came to power in 1959, GDP per capita was $2,067 per year. By 1999, 40 years later, it was only $2,307 per year. The average Cuban state worker makes $20 per month. Cuba went from being one of the wealthy nations in the Caribbean and South America to one of the poorest. The people of Cuba have been impoverished while the Castro brothers and the military have become rich. As if the damage inflicted on their own people wasn’t enough, Cuba exported their corrupt socialism to Venezuela where recent reports detail massive food shortages and people eating pets for survival. Mr. Kremer tells us about the light security at the airport in Havana and lack of soldiers

with heavy weapons. I would agree with him that one benefit of a trip to Cuba is the remote chance of being involved in a terrorist attack. The main reason that Cuba is not a target for terrorist organizations is that the country was on the State Department list of state sponsors of terrorism from 1982 through 2015. ISIS doesn’t usually like to attack other members of the club. Thanks to President Obama, Americans are now free to travel to Cuba and enjoy the beautiful beaches. But I hope that prospective travelers think about the fact that their presence is not helping the Cuban people but extending the life of a brutal and corrupt regime. Vladimir Lenin supposedly said that communism would prevail across the globe because the West was full of “useful idiots” that whether they realized it or not would help advance his cause. Fortunately, Lenin was wrong about the result of the global struggle between communism and capitalism but he was right about “useful idiots.” The people of Cuba still live under repressive communism and their prison state is supported by “useful idiots” such as President Obama with his restoration of diplomatic relations and Mr. Kremer with his love letter from Havana. John Stacconi Sands Point Letters Continued on Page 47


20 The Great Neck News, Friday, February 17, 2017

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Finding solace through painting BY M A X Z A H N Myra Fox cannot speak or walk. Terminal brain cancer, diagnosed in December 2015, has rendered the former Roslyn resident unable to lift a paintbrush she used with dexterity for decades. Nevertheless, Fox has vowed to hold and attend an exhibition of her life’s paintings that will take place at the Roslyn Village Gallery in March. “It will be very emotional,” said Stewart Fox, her husband. “She’ll be ecstatic looking at giant 60-foot walls with her work on it.” Myra Fox, a resident of Roslyn from 2001 to 2015, began painting oil and water color works 30 years ago. “Local artists know her,” said Marsha Tarlow, the owner of the Roslyn Village Gallery. “Everyone who has painted with her has said wonderful things about her.” While living in Roslyn, Myra Fox took painting lessons with Steve Lampasona at the Nassau County Museum of Art, and she worked as a framer at the Ro-

bley Gallery on Old Northern Boulevard. Her interest in art took her abroad as well. “She enjoyed traveling and painting,” Stewart Fox said. “She would travel with an art teacher and groups and go to Italy for a week, or Prague. They’d paint all day and in the evening they’d discuss each other’s paintings.” Over the years Myra Fox composed scores of works, occasionally participating in exhibitions that showed four or five of them, Stewart Fox said. “She has sold but not on a regular basis,” Tarlow said. A year and a half ago, Myra and Stewart Fox moved upstate to Saugerties. Just a few months later, Stewart Fox, a physician, took her to the hospital for a CAT scan hours after she had difficulty completing her sentences. Doctors discovered a malignant tumor on Myra Fox’s brain. After an initial surgery, she underwent chemotherapy. “Initially she was doing art,” Stewart Fox said. “But not for very long because she slowly was developing weakness in her arms and legs from radiation

A painting by longtime Roslyn resident Myra Fox, who will hold an exhibition of her work at Roslyn Village Gallery in March. and chemotherapy.” Though debilitated, she had full functioning of her body until last September, when a bloodrelated medical emergency, akin to a stroke, left her paralyzed on the right side of her body and

unable to speak. Stewart Fox said she can understand speech but has difficulty expressing a response. “It must be very frustrating for her,” he said. “We deal with it each day. She seems to be in pretty good spirits about the whole thing, considering what’s going on. If you tell a joke, she laughs it. If something angers her, she grimaces.” A month ago, Tarlow, who herself suffers from multiple sclerosis, heard about Myra Fox’s illness and decided to hold an exhibition of her work. “I felt what a horrible story and a terrible thing,” Tarlow said. “I thought, ‘Why don’t we ask her if she would like to have a show?’” Days later, Stewart Fox did just that. “She was bright eyed about it and she smiled,” he said. “She liked the idea.” They determined the show would be a fundraiser for the Brain Tumor Center at Columbia University Medical Center, which provided care for Myra Fox. A week later, Tarlow visited Stewart and Myra Fox in Saugerties to solidify the plans.

“I wanted to see her work firsthand,” Tarlow said. “It’s a tremendous body of work. It was very heart warming to meet her, and I left with a lot of sadness for her situation. I felt the gift is in the giving. She’s able to give back with this show by raising money for research.” The month-long exhibition will be the first held at the Roslyn Village Gallery’s new, larger space on Old Northern Boulevard. A reception to celebrate the opening will take place on March 12 “from noon to whenever,” Tarlow said. Fifty or sixty of Myra Fox’s paintings will hang on the gallery walls. “The legacy here is that artists know her and knew her over the years,” Stewart Fox said. “Now they get to see work. I’m hoping a lot of them will buy a painting and have her work.” “I told her, ‘In the future wouldn’t it be nice to know 50 people out there who still have a Myra on their wall and remember you by every day they look up and see your paintings? Otherwise, what’s going to happen? I’m going to have 80 paintings in my house. I don’t need any of them to remember you.’”

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The Great Neck News, Friday, February 17, 2017

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Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a JUNGLE in here!

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COMMUNITY NEWS

ADL speech in Great Neck on Saturday Having returned last week from his visit with Pope Francis in the Vatican to reaffirm Jewish-Catholic Relations and denounce anti-Semitism, Jonathan Greenblatt, the CEO and national director of the Anti-Defamation League, will speak at Temple Beth-El of Great Neck during and following Saturday Shabbat services on the topic of snti-Semitism in America. There is no charge for this event. A complimentary brunch will be served following service. RSVPs for the brunch are requested. All are welcome. Temple Beth-El of Great Neck is located at 5 Old Mill Road in Great Neck. For more information, please contact the Temple Beth-El office at 516-4870900 or visit www.tbegreatneck.org Greenblatt, the CEO and sixth national director of the ADL, is an accomplished entrepreneur and innovative leader with deep experience in the private, public and non-profit sectors. As chief executive of ADL, Greenblatt leads all aspects of one of the most respected civil rights organizations in the

country. After his first year at the helm of ADL he was recognized in the NonProfitTimes 2016 “Power & Influence Top 50” list. Prior to heading ADL, Greenblatt served in the White House as special assistant to President Obama and director of the Office of Social Innovation and Civic Participation. There, he led the administration’s efforts to use innovation to accelerate economic recovery and boost job creation. Greenblatt came to that role after a long career as a serial social entrepreneur and corporate executive, starting and scaling businesses focused on creating economic value and social good. He co-founded Ethos Brands, the business that launched Ethos Water, the premium bottled water that helps children around the world access clean water. Ethos Water pioneered the idea of linking cause to consumption and was acquired by Starbucks Coffee Company in 2005. Following the acquisition, Greenblatt

was named vice president of global consumer products at Starbucks and joined the board of the Starbucks Foundation. Greenblatt also founded All for Good (AFG), the open data platform designed to enable more people to serve. Launched with support from Google, AFG was one of the largest databases of volunteer opportunities on the internet. AFG was acquired by Points of Light in 2011. Prior to AFG, Jonathan served as CEO of GOOD Worldwide, a diversified media company whose products include the award-winning GOOD Magazine and the popular website GOOD.is. Earlier in his career, he worked as an executive at Realtor.com (now Move Networks), joining the company as a product manager and eventually heading up its consumer products unit. Move Networks was acquired by News Corporation in 2014. From 2006 to 2011, Jonathan taught social entrepreneurship at the Anderson School of Management at UCLA. In 2015, he served as a senior fellow at the

Wharton School of Management. Greenblatt graduated cum laude with a bachelor of arts degree from Tufts University and earned his MBA from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. Greenblatt has served on numerous startup and non-profit boards, including the African Leadership Foundation, Kevita, KaBOOM! and Water.org. He is a member of the 2006 class of Henry Crown Fellows at the Aspen Institute and is a Next Generation Fellow of the American Assembly. Greenblatt’s ADL roots run deep. As an undergraduate at Tufts, he interned in ADL’s New England regional office in Boston, and he is a graduate of ADL’s Salvin Leadership Program. Greenblatt is married to Marjan Keypour Greenblatt, an Iranian-American who came to the U.S. as a political refugee. Marjan Keypour Greenblatt worked as an associate director in ADL’s Pacific Southwest regional office in Los Angeles for nearly eight years.

Club celebrates Temple to host security talk eatery program The Rotary Club of Great Neck celebrated the first anniversary of its program of supporting local restaurants last week. The capstone of this program was a special dinner at Shiraz Restaurant, a kosher Persian restaurant located at 770 Middle Neck Road. This anniversary meal was overseen by the operating partner of Shiraz, Mordechi Hayam. He told the group that all his food was prepared from scratch and that they even ground their own tahini and humus appetizers. Among the previous restaurants visited by the club were; Sushi Fusion, Wild Ginger, Cho-Sen Village, Bareburger, Great Neck Diner, Colbeh Mediterranean Grill, Mumbai Grill (Shalom Mumbai), Il Bacco Ristorante Italiano and Bevanda Restaurant. The Rotary Club of Great Neck would like to continue visiting local restaurants on the

second Wednesday evening of each month and asks restaurant owners to contact the club if they have an area that can accommodate their group for a dinner event. On all other remaining Wednesdays in the month, the club gathers for breakfast at 8 a.m. in the boardroom of TD bank at 2 Great Neck Road. In alignment with their Club motto being, “They Profit Most Who Serves Best,” visit and discover for yourself how meaningful and satisfying it is to give back to your community while networking through the Rotary Club of Great Neck. To arrange for your visit as a guest, or if interested in becoming one of their weekly speakers, email them at rotaryclubofgreatneck@aol.com or call (516) 487-9392. For more information about the club, visit its website at www.Rotaryclubofgreatneck.org and their Facebook page at RotaryClubofGreatNeck.

For the latest in community news visit us 24 hours a day 7 days a week at www.theislandnow.com

On Friday, March 3, 2017 at 7:30 p.m., Karen J. Greenberg, expert on national security, terrorism and civil liberties and the director of the Center on National Security, will be the guest in the pulpit at Temple Emanuel of Great Neck. She will offer the talk, “Rogue Justice: The Making of the Security State—An Update.” Greenberg is the author of “The Least Worst Place: Guantanamo’s First 100 Days,” published by Oxford University Press in 2009. The book was selected as one of the best books of 2009 by

The Washington Post and Slate. com. Her newest book, “Rogue Justice: The Making of the Security State,” published by Crown in 2016, explores the War on Terror’s impact on justice and law in America.

A permanent member of the Council on Foreign Relations, Greenberg holds a Ph.D. from Yale University and a bachelor of arts degree from Cornell University. Greenberg’s talk is preceded by a brief service. Following her talk, there will be a Q&A, refreshments and a book signing. All members of the community are invited to attend. Admission is free. Temple Emanuel of Great Neck is located at 150 Hicks Lane, in Great Neck. For further information, please call 516482-5701.

Lunar New Year at church

Town of North Hempstead Supervisor Judi Bosworth and Council Member Anna Kaplan attended the Lunar New Year Celebration at the All Saints Episcopal Church in Great Neck on January 28. Bosworth and Kaplan presented a proclamation of recog-

nition to mark the holiday. The event, which was hosted by the Korean Culture Exposure Center, the Great Neck KoreanAmerican Civic Association, and

the Great Neck Korean Parents Association, celebrated Seollal, the Korean New Year and Daeboreum, the first full moon of the New Year.


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COMMUNITY NEWS

Buckley students take on coding challenge On most Tuesdays, Buckley Country Day School’s fifth and sixth graders — along with the rest of the students — are dressed in school uniform. However, Feb. 7 was not just another Tuesday — it was the Day of Code! For that special event, the library was transformed into a mini Silicon Valley and the fifth and sixth graders were dressed in more casual, “Steve Jobs” style of attire. The result — a great day dedicated to computer programming, during which the students were fearless in making things with code. “It was hard to believe that 70-plus

students were in the library,” said Patricia Russac, Buckley’s library director, who organized the Day of Code. “It was quiet with concentration and the students were totally focused on coding. It was awesome.” The day was broken into three major sessions: Silicon Valley, Genius Hour, and Made With Code. “Watching students become more confident with each challenge was inspiring to see as a teacher,” said Buckley library assistant Stephanie Temple. “We read so much about too few girls in computer coding, well, that’s not the case at Buckley.”

For Silicon Valley, students started their coding journey with the website “Pencil Code” to learn the fundamentals of programming, how to measure distances and angles, and ways to construct arcs and circles to program their own initials. When they moved on to Genius Hour, they used the augmented reality feature in Vidcode to program a Pokemon Game, and jumped right in to figure out how to code a Snapchat filter. Finally, the day rounded out with Made With Code, an intense session of HTML and CSS. For this, Buckley’s young program-

mers used real coding languages to take their skills to a higher level. “It was amazing to see students learning how to code using their ingenuity and passion with technology,” said Buckley IT manager Sam Oppedisano. “They began to realize they could create content, and not just consume it.” Overall, it was a day — not just of code — but of real world learning, something that cannot be underestimated in today’s high-tech world. “We truly believe that knowing the language of computer coding can open up a host of opportunities well beyond the classroom,” Russac said.

Day of Code at Buckley Country Day School.

Social justice Legal workshops for seniors award offered The Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County annually honors middle school, high school and college students on Long Island who confront intolerance, prejudice or other forms of social injustice. High school and middle school recipients of the Friedlander Upstander Award receive a $2,500 scholarship, and recipients of the Daniel Gillman Goodfellows Award for college students receive a $1,000 award. The awards will be presented at HMTC’s Annual Tolerance Benefit on May 1. The Friedlander Upstander Award, presented by HMTC and the Claire Friedlander Family Foundation, in conjunction with the Nassau and Suffolk County Police Departments, will be awarded to Nassau and Suffolk County middle school and high school students who have acted as “upstanders” against bullying or intolerance in any of its forms. The student’s action as an upstander could be one of interven-

tion or prevention, big or small. Applications for the Friedlander Upstander Award are due by March 1. The Daniel Gillman Goodfellows Award, presented by HMTC and the Gillman family, will be presented to a Long Island college or university student who has demonstrated a commitment to helping others and who has who has intervened against (or prevented) an act of intolerance or acted in the service of helping others in need. The award memorializes and honors Daniel Gillman, a kind and generous young man who dedicated himself to aiding young people and adults. His altruism was a reflection of the selflessness of the Belgian rescuers who saved the life of his grandmother during the Holocaust. Applications for the Gillman Award are due by April 7. For more information and applications, please visit hmtcli.org or call 516-571-8040.

The Nassau County Bar Association provides free monthly legal consultation clinics for Nassau County residents 65 and older. Seniors have the opportunity to meet oneon-one with an attorney who volunteers to provide a half-hour private consultation on any topic of concern. The next senior citizen free legal consultation clinic will be held on Thursday, Feb. 16 from 9:30 to 11 a.m. at the NCBA located at 15th and West streets in Mineola. This popular free program regularly fills up quickly. Registration is required by calling 516-747-4070. Founded in 1899, the Nassau County Bar Association is the leader in providing legal information and community service on Long Island.

NCBA consists of private and public attorneys, judges, legal educators and law students who demonstrate their commitment to the community by offering a variety of services for the public, including lawyer referral services, mortgage foreclosure, Sandy recovery and senior citizen legal clinics; judicial screening and public education programs. The Nassau Academy of Law provides the largest program of continuing education for the legal community. We Care, part of NCBA’s charitable arm, assists children, the elderly and others in need, through countless projects and donations. For more information, call 516-747-4070 (language translation available), email info@ nassaubar.org, or visit nassaubar.org.

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COMMUNITY NEWS

Historical society presentation G.N. law firm to Two of Great Neck’s most noted philanthropists will be the focus of the next presentation by the Great Neck Historical Society next Wednesday, Feb. 22, when the group continues its series on famous local residents. The program, free and open to the public, will look as the lives of Louise Udall Skidmore Eldridge, the first female mayor in New York State and a founder of the Great Neck Library and Great Neck Park District, and William Slocum Barstow, an Louise Udall Skidmore Eldridge inventor and the first mayor of Kings Point. Historical Society President Alice Kasten and board member Mary Dehn will give an in-depth look at the two philanthropists and answer audience questions at the program, which begins at 7:30 p.m. at Great Neck House, located at 14 Arrandale Ave. Eldridge was born in 1860 and lived in Saddle Rock which her husband, Roswell, incorporated as a village in 1911. He became the first mayor William Slocum Barstow of the village and, following She was also an active his death, his wife, Louise, sucmember of the Nassau County ceeded him. She was the last private in- Horticultural Society and won dividual to own the Saddle Rock many awards for her roses and Grist Mill, which had been in other hothouse flowers. Barstow entered the field the Udall family for many years.

of electrical engineering when it was brand new, and began by working as an apprentice for Thomas Edison. He went on to patent a host of inventions, all dealing with electricity. He served as president of 30 electric light, power and gas companies. His home is now the museum of the Merchant Marine Academy. He and his wife, Francoise Melanie Duclos, donated generously to numerous charities. In Great Neck they funded the Women’s Club and Girl Scout House, and paid for the lowering of the railroad tracks in Great Neck Plaza. Further information about the program is available by visiting the Historical Society website, www.GreatNeckHistorical. com or calling 288-6124. The following Historical Society program, on Feb. 26, will discuss efforts to preserve the Stepping Stones Lighthouse and the Saddle Rock Grist Mill. On March 23, Robert Sturm, an expert on the history of the Long Island Railroad, will discuss how the railroad, originally a private business, developed and later collapsed.

SCHOOL NEWS

H.S. music program honored North High School has been recognized as having a high school music program of excellence by the Long Island Music Hall of Fame. The school was selected based on the merits of the application submitted by Joseph Rutkowski, North High instrumental music teacher. North High is one of seven schools that will receive this award of excellence at the Long Island Music Hall of Fame recognition ceremony in April. The other music department teachers at North

High are: Neil Saggerson, fine and performing arts department head, and Janine Robinson, vocal music. Earlier this year, Rutkowski was recognized by the Long Island Music Hall of Fame when he received their Music Educator of Note Award. The Long Island Music Hall of Fame is “dedicated to the idea that our musical heritage is an important resource to be celebrated and preserved for future generations.”

host workshops Wisselman & Associates, a matrimonial and family law firm in Great Neck, will be conducting a series of four legal miniworkshops for social workers and mental health professionals this winter and spring. Each workshop is an opportunity for professionals to learn how to effectively assist patients experiencing marital and family problems and who may be involved with legal issues and dealing with the court system. Moreover, they provide insight into cases which require court testimony. The four legal mini workshops will be held in Wisselman & Associates’ Great Neck office, located at 1010 Northern Blvd., Suite 300 in Great Neck. Each workshop qualifies for 1.5 continuing education credits, and one may attend as many or as few workshops as desired. The fee to attend each workshop is $20. One must register before the event, and admittance is on a first come, first served basis. All attendees will receive a certificate of completion upon finishing. The entire course will instruct about various legal concerns related to divorce and family law, including: divorce and separation, child custody and visitation, parental alienation, helping patients through court proceedings, disclosure of subpoenaed records, testifying in court, forensic testing and attorney for the child

matters. The first workshop will be held on Feb. 10 from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., addressing how to solve custody issues and parenting time problems. Discussion will include topics about the impact of acrimony on proceedings, custody, parenting, and communication. The second workshop will be held on March 22 from 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. and will cover the entire divorce process from preseparation to post-divorce. The court’s process and the therapist’s and attorney’s role will also be reviewed. The third workshop will be held on April 21 from 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., teaching about the attorney for the child’s role and other concerns related to the best interests of the child. The last workshop will take place on May 17 from noon to 1:30 p.m., addressing how to prepare court testimony as a therapist. To register for one or more of the workshops, please call 516773-8300, or email sharyn@alwjaw.com. Please specify the date(s) of the desired workshop. Wisselman & Associates, SW/ CPE is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers.

Skating teams win first place English language classes

For adults who want to learn English or improve their Englishlanguage skills, or who want to earn a high school equivalency diploma, the Great Neck Public Schools Adult Learning Center offers a variety of classes during the day and evening designed to meet their needs. A range of English-language classes are offered, from beginning literacy to advanced ESNL (English to speakers of other languages). In preparation for the TASC (Test Assessing Secondary Completion) examination, formerly known as the GED, classes are available to improve math, reading, science, social studies and

writing skills. Once enrolled, students may also take elective classes such as conversational English, “Crossroads Café” and citizenship, to name a few, at no additional charge. Registration for classes must be done in person at the Adult Learning Center at 105 Clover Drive. Please allow two hours to complete the registration process. Register on Wednesday, March 1 or Thursday, March 2, from 9 a.m. to noon, or from 6 to 9 p.m.; or on Saturday, March 4, from 9 a.m. to noon. Preference will be given to Great Neck residents and previ-

ous Adult Learning Center students. The annual, non-refundable processing fee for Adult Learning Center classes is $50 for those who live or work in Great Neck (proof of residency or employment is required), and $100 for non-residents. Payment, at time of registration, can be made in cash, or by credit card, check or money order payable to Great Neck Public Schools. For more information, please refer to the Community Education catalog, phone the Adult Learning Center at 516-441-4950, or visit http://alc.greatneck.k12.ny.us.

The Great Neck Park District’s synchronized skating teams, the Ice Gems and the Icicles, both competed at the 2017 Empire State Winter Games in Lake Placid on February 2 through 5. Both teams won first place in their divisions for their performances. This is the first time since competing in the Empire Winter Games, that either team has won gold.


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C OSMCM HU ON O ILT Y N ENWE SW S

Lunar New Year Fencing team finishes perfect video produced Saddle Rock School parents have produced a short video featuring highlights from the recent performances by students from Great Neck North High School, North Middle School, South High School and South Middle School, held at Saddle Rock, in celebration of the Lunar New Year. See such traditional dances as: jasmine flower, parasol, Ko-

rean techno, ribbon, fan, and lion, as well as Chinese yo-yo and martial arts demonstrations. The secondary students performed during two student assemblies. Go to https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=G39gizz7ruk to view the video of the student performers.

Student invited to sing in choir Clara Goldman, a fifthgrader at E.M. Baker School, has been invited to sing in the Children’s Choir at the 2017 Organization of American Kodály Educator’s (OAKE) National Conference Choirs Concert. The concert will take place in March in Philadelphia. Clara was selected for the Children’s Choir by the National Choir Committee following an audition process. She was nominated for the choir by her Baker vocal music teacher, Cynthia Gorney, who is a professional member of OAKE. The Children’s Choir is one of four choirs that will perform at the national concert. It will be conducted by Fred Meads, director of vocal studies at the American Boychoir School. The annual concert features student singers in grades four through 12 from around the country. It is the culmination of the OAKE National Conference.

The Great Neck South High School girls fencing team had an undefeated season, finishing with a record of 14-0; named girls large school champions; overall season champions; and Nassau County champions. They captured the Nassau County championship when they defeated the North High girls fencing team in the finals, 14–7. They were led by captain Macy Meng and Ariel Kang. The South High boys fencing team took third place at the county championships. They were led by Edmond Wu, who captured the gold medal in saber. Steven Grams won gold in épée; Wentao (Jeffery) Li took the bronze medal in foil; and captain Matthew Ko took fourth place in épée. At the recent Nassau County Individual Fencing Tournament, the South High girls team was led by the reigning, and now defending, épée champion, Captain Macy Meng. In foil, Ariel Kang secured

the bronze medal, and in saber, Muen (Mary) Ye and Michelle Song took fifth and sixth places, respectively. Additionally, South High coach Catherine Sagevick was named 2017 Nassau County Girls Coach of the Year. Joshua Baravarian is the South High boys coach. The North High girls fencing team was named small school champions. They took second place at the Nassau County championships. The North High boys fencing team took fourth place at the

county championships. Shannon Sarker took first place in saber. The North High coaches are Michael Calderaro and Tyler Healy.

Preschoolers learn about trees OAKE is a professional music education association inspired by the vision of Zoltán Kodály, a Hungarian virtuoso pianist, conductor and composer. Its mission is “to support music education of the highest quality, promote universal literacy and lifelong music making, and preserve the musical heritage of the people of the United States of America through education, artistic performance, advocacy and research.”

Winter music night on March 3 Great Neck South High School will host its winter music night on Friday, March 3, at 7:30 p.m., in the school’s music room (309) at 341 Lakeville Road. This informal evening will feature student instrumentalists and vocalists performing all forms of music, including original compositions, rock, pop, opera, jazz, hip-hop, Broadway and classical. There will be a $5 per person admission charge that includes refreshments. For more information, please contact Michael Schwartz, performing arts department head and instrumental teacher, at 516441-4851, or at mschwartz@greatneck.k12.ny.us.

The Silverstein Hebrew Academy preschool engaged in a deep exploration of trees that lead into Tu B’Shevat – the Jewish holiday celebrating the New Year for trees. Students immersed themselves in learning all about the structure of a tree, collected and sorted different parts of trees, observed and recorded the changing seasons, made a neighborhood tree guide, squeezed olives to make oil, and discussed the products made from trees. Students ages two to four learned that trees are not only beautiful parts of nature but that they also provide nutrition to both people and animals. Since it is still winter in New York, the Silverstein Hebrew Academy took the students on a digital adventure to Israel via Skype. While in Israel, students went on a guided tour of an Israeli neighborhood where they could study the different kinds of trees and learn more about the direct benefits that each tree provides. The students saw pome-

granates and olives growing on the trees and grapes hanging from vines. From a very early age, Silverstein Hebrew Academy offers students a comprehensive curriculum that is rich in Jewish studies, social sciences, arts, STEAM programs and more. The mission is to give students the resources to think critically, problem solve and excel in and out of the classroom, while

preparing for success in today’s ever-expanding world.

C L A R I F I C AT I O N An article in the Feb. 10 edition about the Landing Cove Condominium Community in Glen Cove omitted information on the real estate agency handling its sales. The real estate agency is Douglas Elliman and it can be reached at 516-627-2800.


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COMMUNITY NEWS

County aids pet food drive Building), East Meadow Nassau County Executive * Traffic Parking Violations, 16 Edward Mangano announced toCooper Street, Hempstead day that County offices will par* 40 Main Street, Hempstead ticipate in Long Island Cares’ 6th (In Front of Suite C Office) Annual Legislative Pet Food Drive * One West Street, Mineola Challenge. (Main Lobby) The drive will take place dur* NCPD, 2nd Floor Training ing the month of February and Wing, 1490 Franklin Ave., Mineola focus on collecting for the family * County Executive Building members most vulnerable to hun(Main Lobby), 1550 Franklin Ave., ger: residents’ pets. Mineola LI Cares formed Baxter’s Pet * 240 Old Country Road, MinPantry in 2009, and has since disEdward Mangano eola (Main Lobby) tributed over one million pounds * Nassau District Attorney’s Ofof pet food to pets all over Long Is- Nassau County Executive fice (Main Lobby) 262 Old Country land, including: dogs, cats, ferrets, rabbits, caged pets, fish, reptiles and all others Road, Mineola * Health Department, 200 County Seat Drive, considered family members. “For many of us our pets are family,” said Man- Mineola * Probation, 400 County Seat Drive, Mineola gano. “These pet food items will help feed animals in need, which in turn keeps pets with their loved (Directors Office –Main Entrance) * DSS, 60 Charles Lindbergh Blvd., Uniondale ones and out of shelters. I thank those who generously donated and participated in the County’s (Outside Cafeteria) * DPW, 1194 Prospect Avenue, Westbury (2nd 2016 Barkfest Pet Food Drive and ask residents to consider donating to this much needed and worth- Floor Reception) Anyone interested in donating pet or regular while cause.” Drop off boxes will be located in the following food items, please feel free to contact the Freeport Long Island Cares facility at 516-442-5221 or visit County locations for the month of February: * Corrections/Sheriff Department (Main Lob- at 84 Pine Street in Freeport during operating hours. by), 100 Carman Ave., East Meadow * Eisenhower Park (Lobby of Administration

Town adds personal touch Town of North Hempstead constituents wanting to get updates on service requests or answers to their questions now have a personalized customer service advocate at Town Hall. Town Supervisor Judi Bosworth says the resident advocate is an expansion of the town’s successful applicant advocate service, which helps navigate residents through the building permit process. The new resident advocate will still have a role helping residents with building department matters, but will now also expand its role to include resident’s concerns with the Highway and Code Enforcement departments. The Town’s 311 call center continues to be the first line of customer service for residents, where callers can report issues, make service requests, or voice their concerns about any issue.

The role of the resident advocate will be to provide personalized one-on-one service to residents, to follow up on their service requests, and to assure that these requests are dealt with in a timely manner. “Customer service is a number one concern here in North Hempstead,” Bosworth said. “Our new resident advocate will be the eyes and ears for my office to assure that all service requests are dealt with efficiently and in a timely fashion. We live in a world filled with computerized customer service and we all know how frustrating that can be. The resident advocate will provide personalized service and make sure no case falls through the cracks.” Lauren Summa, the town’s current applicant advocate, will fill the role of resident advocate. For more information or to make an appointment with the resident advocate, please contact 311 or call 516-869-6311.

Buckley team headed to LEGO finals

The Buckley Cyber Bulldogs are comprised of students from grades five through eight. The Buckley Cyber Bulldogs Robotics team is on the move — straight to the SBPLI first LEGO League championship round. After competing at the Long Island FLL Robotics

Qualifying Tournament, which was held at Mineola High School, the Cyber Bulldogs advanced to the championship round. “I am so proud of this group of students,” said Linda Bernard, Buckley Country Day School’s head of Upper School. “They have done an amazing job of coming together as a team, and it was great that they were able to showcase all of their hard work at the tournament.” The LEGO competition was made up of two parts: a set of challenges that the robotics team must complete using the LEGO robot that it constructed, as well as a special project associated with this year’s FLL theme, “Animal Allies.” Buckey’s team — which is comprised of students from grades five through eight — performed well in both areas of the league tournament. Their overall score qualified the Cyber Bulldogs to compete in March at Longwood High School. The winning team from the next event will be the Long Island representative at the World Championship

Festival later this year. For the challenge part of the event — which takes place on a large table — Buckley’s robot accomplished a series of tasks set out by the judges. For the Animal Allies portion of the event, students were asked to “think of people and animals as allies in the quest to make life better for everyone. Sometimes people help animals and sometimes animals help people.” The Project’s mission was to make “interactions with animals better.” The Cyber Bulldogs stepped up in this area of the competition, coming up with a concept for a drone-like robot, which can warn elephants in Africa when poachers are in their vicinity. The drones would emit a low-frequency sound that is heard by the elephants, causing them to run away from that area. Congratulations to all of the members of the Buckley Robotics team and good luck in the next round!

Town to provide payment records online The Town of North Hempstead recently added a feature from technology provider OpenGov to the NorthHempsteadNY.gov website that will provide a comprehensive report of all payments made by the town, by year and vendor. This additional feature, called OpenGov Open Checkbook, will continue to strengthen North Hempstead’s commitment to openness and transparency in government, according to a town press release. The town launched its modernized

website in 2015, which included its first interactive aggregate financial and budget reports powered by OpenGov. With OpenGov, the public can easily analyze, share and compare detailed town budget data in a user-friendly format. The addition of the OpenGov Open Checkbook to the town’s website makes it even simpler for residents to see checkbook-level spending data, and to follow how each and every one of their tax dollars is spent by their local government.

Checkbook data for the years of 2014, 2015 and 2016, up to January 6, 2017, will be available. “Previously this kind of information was only available by requesting it under the Freedom of Information Act, but will now be easily available and searchable to anyone through the town’s website,” North Hempstead Town Supervisor Judi Bosworth said. “The Town of North Hempstead has an obligation to its residents to show them how their tax dollars are being spent, and now through Open-

Gov the town is an open book.” “North Hempstead is a great example of how a town that is committed to open the books to the public can do so efficiently and effectively when they apply the right technologies,” said OpenGov CEO and Co-Founder Zac Bookman. “OpenGov is committed to powering more effective and accountable government, and we will continue to develop software and services that deliver on that mission for towns like North Hempstead.”


BLANK SLATE MEDIA February 17, 2017

Exploring nature through photos Here is Docent Maxine Hersh, doing a nice job of describing one of the great photos of our time “Migrant Mother, Nipomo California, 1936” BY TOM F E R R A R O

I

saw the advertisement about the Ansel Adams show at the Nassau County Museum of Art. Ansel Adams is the guy who took all those black and white photos of Yosemite Park. I had been at Yosemite a few years ago so I thought it might be nice to have my memories refreshed. When I travel places I do the sightseeing and take the requisite photos but when I get home I’m always left with the feeling that I missed out on something. Maybe by seeing the Yosemite Park photos taken by an expert I would finally appreciate the place. When I got to the museum I was stunned to experience what was the probably the best photo exhibit I will ever see. Not only were the classics by Ansel Adams on display (“Vernal Fall, Yosemite Valley,” 1920, “Still Life, San Francisco,” 1932 and “Silverton, Colorado,” 1951) but the museum was filled with another show entitled Light Works, 100 years of photos which had some of most famous photographs ever taken. At first glance all the photos were fairly innocuous looking. Just row after row of black and white’s and kind of smallish. What’s the big deal? Well thank the Lord for Docent Maxine Hersh whose tour started at 2 p.m. Somehow she managed to open my little brain up and let in some light. She got the group to slow down and actually told us what to look for in these photos. There was the photo by Eadweard Muybridge father of the moving pictures

with a donkey and a man. Here was the Alfred Stieglitz famous 1907 “The Steerage.” At first this photo looked like yet another dark and dreary black and white of some people on a big ship. But she began to point out the geometry of the composition with the gang plank, the smokestack, the ladder leading upward and the man with the circular straw hat. Suddenly its magic began to emerge. And as I proceeded to look at more photos I saw how classic photos always contain geometry. Ansel Adams Silverton, Colorado with its varying tones of black, gray and white was all about triangles. All those steeples and roof tops forming triangles in the foreground and the big gray mountain in the background as one giant triangle. We went on to look at the familiar American classic by Dorothea Lange entitled “Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California” 1936. This photo is also about geometry with the mother at its center a stunning vision of triangularity and strength framed by her two exhausted children who lean against her with their backs to us. And then we got to “Behind the Gare St. Lazare, Paris” 1932, the photo by Henri Cartier-Bresson, which was the Time Magazines selection as Photo of the Century. This photo was another example of geometry with the use of a wrought iron fence and a ladder as well as the image of a man leaping over a shallow body of water with his shadow right below him as his foot is about to hit the water. The comedy of a man about to fall into water juxtaposed with the view of tombstones in the background makes this photo not only an example of Bresson’s ‘

decisive moment’ but also gives the photo gravitas and depth of meaning. As I looked at the photo more carefully I began to understand why this was the best photo of the century. I thought about the show the next day and I realized that I had never understood the importance of geometry in photos and how our life is filled with geometric structure as well. At its most basic we have the geometry of day and night, the geometry of work versus play, the geometry of hard days framed by restful nights, of busy weekdays surrounded by slower weekends and the geometry of life itself framed by birth and death. As the Cartier-Bresson photo reveals, to make a truly great photo you need more than just geometry. What made Behind the Gare St. Lizard, Paris the photo of the century was the way Cartier-Bresson quietly told us about life. We are here only for an instant and very soon indeed we will all be sinking back into the ever after. But before we sink underneath the water it is best to pause for a moment and look around to see what there is to see. To appreciate life in all its glory and its pain. This is what all the mystics tell us. This is what Buddha told us and what Christ told us. And all of our best writers told us the same thing. Thornton Wilder’s Our Town, Samuel Becket’s Waiting for Godot, E.B.White’s Ring of Time, say it loud and clear. Pause for a moment, look around you, take a deep breath and try to enjoy the ride. So thank you Henri Cartier-Bresson, Docent Maxine Hersh and Nassau County

PHOTO COURTESY OF: WWW.NASSAUMUSEUM.ORG

Ansel Adams, Vernal Fall, Yosemite Valley, California, 1920, gelatin silver print. Collection of the Kalamazoo Institute of Arts; Gift of Wm. John Upjohn. © The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust. Museum of Art for letting me pause for a brief moment like that funny little leaping man in the photo. They say a picture is worth a thousand words. Well Cartier- Bresson’s photo only took me 877 words to describe. Not bad. I only wish this essay was could have been equal to his photo.


28 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

LEO’S

The top seven events

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18th • 9:30PM

LIVE MUSIC FEATURING

“HIS BOY ELROY”

1

Sands Point Preserve Conservancy Presents: Rainforest Escape

Now Serving Breakfast Daily 8:00-11:30AM

Saturday, Feb. 18, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Discover the extraordinary biodiversity of our planet’s rainforests with Ranger Eric Powers as he shares fascinating stories about his travels through the tropical world. He’ll bring his collection of jungle artifacts, including skulls, fabrics made from bark, and children’s toys from indigenous cultures—and a few of his wonderful live pets. Members: $10 per car; Non-Members $20 per car. Where: Hempstead House, 127 Middle Neck Road, Sands Point For ticket info: (516) 304-5076 • sandspointpreserveconservancy.org

Thursday is Mexican Night at Leo’s 2 Margaritas Mohitos Fish Tacos Fajitas Tacos

The B-Street Band: The Original Springsteen Tribute Band

Saturday, Feb. 18, doors open at 7 p.m./show starts at 8 p.m.

Rock the night away with The B-Street Band, the first band in the world to do a unique tribute to a live performer, featuring the original E Street Band drummer, Vini ’Mad Dog’ Lopez. Fans of The Boss will enjoy the ultimate Springsteen experience. The event will also include “Any Way You Want It: The Journey Tribute.” Where: The Space at Westbury, 250 Post Ave., Westbury Info: (516) 283-5566 • thespaceatwestbury.com

Friday Only 25% Off Entire

Saturday Only 25% Off Entire

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Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 2/23/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 2/23/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

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Monday Only 30% Off Entire

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Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 2/23/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

Wednesday Only 25% Off Entire

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Lobster Dishes & 14 oz. Black Angus Steak not included. Not available at the bar • Coupon Must Be Presented At Time of Ordering • Expires 2/23/17 • Dine In Only Good for parties of 8 or less • May only be used on day specified. Not to be combined w/any other offer

190 Seventh St., Garden City 742-0574 • www.leosgardencity.com

3

February Funny Fest Saturday, Feb. 18, 8-10 p.m.

February Funny Fest returns once again for another outrageous night of live, stand-up comedy. The annual event is a winter comedy carnival of laughter and fun. Each year features a full line-up of top comedians, plus surprise guest comics, too. The event will be led by Paul Anthony, host of the LI Comedy Festival. Where: Theatre Three, 412 Main Street, Port Jefferson Info: (631)928-9100 • theatrethree.com

4

Camillia House Festival Sunday, Feb. 19, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

Come and enjoy the annual Camellia House Festival featuring live music, walking tours of the Camellia House, a Mad Hatter’s Tea Party, and storyteller and activities for children. Coe Hall is open for self-guided visits. For more information, contact the theatre for ticket info. Snow date: Sunday, Feb. 26. Where: Planting Fields Arboretum, 1395 Planting Fields Road, Oyster Bay Info: (516)922-8678 • plantingfields.org


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

for the coming week

5

Kings and Queens of Soul: Rock Legends Live!

Tuesday, Feb. 21 at 7:30 p.m. Join an evening of classic soul music. Let the rhythm engage and rediscover the range of styles and sounds from a variety of television and concert clips from around the world. The event features the truly gifted singers and musicians that gave us soul music, rhythms and lyrics that spoke to us all and inspired many performers ever since the first song was dubbed “soul.” Among the performers and groups that will be highlighted are Stevie Wonder, The Four Tops, The Three Degrees, Ray Charles, Jackie Wilson, Chi-Lites, and more. Members $11 | Public $16. Where: Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Avenue, Huntington Info: (631)423-7611 • cinemaartscentre.org

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David Duchovny in Concert Thursday, Feb. 23, doors open at 7 p.m./show starts at 8 p.m.

David Duchovny and his band will be performing songs from his 2015 debut, “Hell or Highwater,” along with some brand new tracks. Known primarily for his television and film work, most notably his portrayal of FBI Agent Fox Mulder on the iconic Fox science fiction television series “The X-Files,” actor, writer, and director Duchovny didn’t even pick up a guitar until his early fifties, but by 2015, the 54-year-old had amassed enough material to put out an album of original music. The two-time Golden Globe winner cites artists like Leonard Cohen, Bob Dylan, Wilco, R.E.M., and the Flaming Lips as inspirations, and his debut studio long player offers up an evocative blend of country, folk, and brooding alternative rock. Where: The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington Info: (631)673-7300 • paramountny.com

7

Poetry in Motion: Group Show Ongoing through Sunday, Feb. 26

The Poetry in Motion exhibit will feature works by b.j. spoke artist members. Each artist will select or write a poem that resonates with their work or create a new work of art inspired by a favorite poem. Where: b.j. spoke gallery, 299 Main Street, Huntington Info: (516) 922-8678 • bjspokegallery.org

29

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30 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

Custom Event Catering

THE TOP EVENTS FOR KIDS FOR THE COMING WEEK

All you need to do is shower and show up to your special event. We will create and design a menu tailored to make your next event unforgettable!

By Alexandra Troy

Montauk to Manhattan.

H

istory of Dolls of Color: Celebrating Black History Month Sunday, Feb. 19 at 1 and 3 p.m. Go on a journey through time as you view April Marius’s collection of rare African American dolls. Marius will share folklore and facts behind her treasured collection. Let these dolls inspire you as you create your own piece of black history in the museum’s Dolls of Color program. Ages 5 and up. Free with museum admission.

Where: Long Island Children’s Museum 11 Davis Avenue, Garden City Info: 516-224-5800 or licm.org • Weddings • Corporate Events • Special Celebrations • Promotional Occasions

Blank Slate Media’s

Best of the North Shore Blank Slate Media BSMBestoftheNorthShore.com

28 Chestnut Street, Greenvale, NY 11548 | 516-484-7431

P

resident’s Day Story Time

Monday, Feb. 20, 12-1 p.m. Kids four and older can join this special lunchtime story time. For $3.95 you get a choice of a hot dog or grilled cheese sandwich and a beverage. You will be entertained by Story Time with Peggy and a game of President’s Day trivia. Must be registered for this event.

Where: Turn of the Corkscrew Books and Wine, 110 N. Park Avenue, Rockville Centre Info: 516-764-6000 or turnofthecorkscrew.com

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F

amily Art Making: February ThreeDay Break for Art

NEW YORK’S CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED HIT MUSICAL

Tuesday, Feb. 21, Wednesday, Feb. 22 and Thursday, Feb. 23, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. each day

RECOGNIZED BY THE DRAMA DESK, OUTER CRITICS CIRCLE, ASTAIRE AWARDS & OFF BROADWAY ALLIANCE

Families can enjoy the school break together with three days of art making and gallery tours inspired by the powerful images of the museum’s current photography exhibitions. A different project will be offered every day. For children of all ages and their families. Museum admission plus $10 per family materials fee.

Where: Nassau County Museum of Art, One Museum Drive, Roslyn Harbor Info: 516-484-9337, nassaumuseum.com

M

ake a Dreamcatcher followed by a Victorian Tea Party

Musical Hollywood’s About

Wednesday, Feb. 22, 1-2:30 p.m. dreamcatcher event; 2:30-4 p.m. tea party

Tough Guy in Tap Shoes

BUT JOY “ NOTHING AND PLENTY OF IT!

- Rex Reed, NY Observer

“AN AMAZING MUSICAL! “

Photo: Carol Rosegg

The

- Steve Schonberg, WNBC-TV

NEW THURSDAY MATINEES 2PM Telecharge.com 212-239-6200 - Groups: 212-757-9117 Westside Theatre 407 W 43rd St - CagneyTheMusical.com

Dreamcatchers were originally made by the children of Native American tribes, such as the Cherokee. To Native Americans, dreams were messages sent by sacred spirits. Learn the legend of how dreamcatchers worked and create your very own. Then join the tea party. This fun and informative program includes role-playing while teaching social skills, self-esteem and confidence. Children learn dining manners, such as how to properly hold and cut with a knife and fork. Apple juice will be substituted for the hot tea. Participants also practice table setting and introductions. All make their own name tag and place card. Bring a friend, or your favorite doll, or come join new friends at the party! Dress up if you wish! Program includes a guided tour of the Walt Whitman Birthplace. Ages 9 and up. $12 per child. $20 per child for both programs.

Where: Walt Whitman Birthplace Association 246 Old Walt Whitman Road, Huntington Station Info: 631-427-5240, waltwhitman.org


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

31

THE CULINARY ARCHITECT

Delicious popcorn recipes and the Oscars Popcorn and movies go together like Boogie and Bacall. Why not whip up a few batches of popcorn and open up a bottle of bubbly and watch the 89th Oscars on Sunday, Feb. 26. If you are really lazy, you can make your popcorn in the microwave. Personally, I prefer to make my popcorn from scratch…it tastes so much better and it is really easy to do. If you prefer to be healthier, just air pop your popcorn and save three quarters of the calories. No matter how you make your popcorn, sitting back and munching on it while watching the Oscars will make your evening more delicious no matter what the entertainment. MENU (Yields about 16 Cups) Basic Popcorn Recipe Popcorn with Old Bay Seasoning Peanut Butter Popcorn Rocky Road Popcorn Kir Royale

Basic Popcorn Recipe 1/4 cup vegetable or canola oil 1 cup popcorn (I use Bob’s Blue Mill, which comes in a plastic bag and is sold in The Bob’s Blue Mill section of most supermarkets) 1. In a large covered pot, heat oil. Add two kernels. If they pop, you are ready to go. 2. Add popcorn kernels and cover pot. Cook while shaking pot. When popping ends, you are done. Then proceed with any or all of the following recipes. NOTE: If you like bacon flavor, substitute 1/2 cup of bacon grease for oil If you like duck flavor, substitute 1/2 cup of duck fat for oil. If you like truffle flavor, add 1/8 cup of truffle butter (available in Gourmet Grocery stores) to the oil. Popcorn with Old Bay Seasoning 4 tblsp. sweet butter 2 tblsp. Old Bay Seasoning

1. In a saucepan, warm honey and sugar until sugar is dissolved. 2. Stir in remaining ingredients and whisk until smooth. 3. Pour over popcorn, add peanuts. 4. Spread on baking sheets and let cool.

ALEXANDRA TROY The Culinary Architect 3 cups Oyster Crackers (optional) 1. Melt butter and stir in Old Bay Seasoning. Drizzle over popcorn. Toss with Oyster Crackers if you desire. Peanut Butter Popcorn 1 cup honey 3/4 cup sugar 1 cup peanut butter 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1 tsp. salt 2 cups peanuts

Rocky Road Popcorn 5 tblsp. sweet butter 2 tsps. vanilla 2 tsps. Kosher salt 2 cups mini marshmellows Semi-sweet chocolate chips Roasted almonds 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 2. Melt butter and add vanilla and salt. 3. Drizzle over popcorn and toss with 2 cups of mini marshmellows, chocolate chips, to taste (I use a whole bag of Nestles) and almonds to taste (I use a whole

can of Blue Diamond). 4. Spread on baking sheet(s) and bake for 2 minutes. 5. Cool slightly and serve. Kir Royale (Makes about 16 servings) 2 bottles champagne, chilled 1 bottle creme de cassis, chilled 12 champagne flutes 1. Place a 1/2 shot of creme de cassis in a champagne flute. Top with champagne and serve. Sante! Alexandra Troy is owner of Culinary Architect Catering, a 32 year-old Greenvale-based company, specializing in private, corporate and promotional parties. She lives in Manhasset with her husband and son. For the latest news, visit us at www.theislandnow.com

Check us out on facebook at facebook.com/theislandnow and twitter: @theislandnow


32 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

Holocaust center to Queens to host film screen Anne Frank film festival in March The Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance Center of Nassau County’s Reel Upstanders Film Series will present a screening of “No Asylum: The Untold Chapter of Anne Frank’s Story” on Sunday, March 12 at 12:30 p.m. The film is about the stunning discovery of lost letters by Anne Frank’s father, Otto, which reveal an unknown chapter of their family’s life. There will be a discussion following the film with Joan Adler, author of “For the Sake of the Children: The Letters Between Otto Frank and Nathan Straus, Jr.” The Holocaust Memorial and Tolerance

Center is located at 100 Crescent Beach Road in Glen Cove. There is a requested donation of $10. Reel Upstanders was established in honor of David Taub (1932-2010), a Holocaust Survivor and respected friend of HMTC. For more than 20 years, HMTC has been fulfilling its mission to teach the history of the Holocaust and its lessons through education and community outreach. For more information, call (516) 5718040, visit www.hmtcli.org or go to Facebook.com/HMTCNY and Twitter.com/HolocaustTolCtr.

Adelphi to present Best of Broadway Adelphi’s popular Best of Broadway series is back, once again featuring Adelphi’s talented students as they celebrate the music of Broadway. Best of Broadway: One Enchanted Evening will be performed on Saturday, February 25 at 8:00 p.m. and Sunday, Feb. 26 at 4 p.m. on the Westermann Stage, Concert Hall, at the Adelphi University Performing Arts Center, 1 South Ave, Garden City. Taking inspiration from a wide variety of shows, the latest Best of Broadway performances feature some of the most moving lyrics from the genius that was Oscar Hammerstein from shows such as “South Pacific,” “Show Boat,” “Carousel” and many more.

Co-directors Erin Quill (Original Broadway Company of “Avenue Q”) and Jad Bernardo (musical director) return to lead a cast of talented performers in this beloved event. The Poole Family Broadway Series at AUPAC is sponsored by Mary Jane and Thomas Poole. Tickets are currently on sale and are priced at $25, with discounts available to seniors, students and alumni. Information is available at the Lucia and Steven N. Fischer Box Office at 516.877.4000 or boxoffice@adelphi.edu. Regular box office hours are Tuesday through Friday from 1:00-6:00 p.m. The box office is also open two hours before most scheduled performances.

The seventh annual Queens World Film Festival has their 2017 line up of events all set, featuring 135 films from 25 nations, and is scheduled for March 14 through 19. Each year, the festival pays tribute to an outstanding filmmaker for his or her body of work. This year’s “Spirit of Queens” award goes to independent film director Julie Dash and her 1991 masterpiece, “Daughters of the Dust,” which will be showcased at the Museum of the Moving Image on Wednesday night, March 15 from 7 to 10 p.m. The screening will be followed by a conversation with Dash. The incredible Illusions by Dash will also be screened within another block of films screened at MoMI on Friday, March 18. The Queens World Film Festival engages audiences with targeted outreach to the diverse communities that comprise the borough. “This year’s 135 films come from 25 nations whose diasporas are represented in Queens, the ‘World’s Borough’. These films examine love, loss, immigration, mental health and some take on these themes in progressive ground breaking style. These films promise to move and entertain our audiences.” QWFF Artistic Director Don Cato said. The festival sponsors include Kaufman Astoria Studios, Investors Bank, MYNYCB, Council Member Daniel Dromm and Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer, The Queens Post and the TimesLedger Highlights and statistics for the 2017 Queens World Film Festival include: March 14: Opening Night at MoMI kicks off at 7 p.m. with a VIP reception featuring the 2017 filmmakers, 2017 Honoree Dash and other special guests. The program starts at 8 p.m. when Dash will receive the 2017 Spirit of Queens Award for her outstanding contribution to cinema — indie or otherwise. Her work is majestic and intimate, assertive and nuanced. The night will also feature NYC’s elected officials, QWFF sponsors and partners, and five short films that will give the audience a glimpse of what is to come during Festival Week 2017. March 18: At 5:30 p.m., the MoMI Redstone Theatre will show “Adam Green’s Aladdin,” featuring Macaulay Culkin of “Home Alone,” leading an enthusiastic cast through the wildest adaptation of this classic that you will ever see. The film also stars Alia Shawkat (“State of Grace,” “Arrested Development,” “Search Party”). March 16: At 8 p.m., the MoMI Redstone Theatre will have the world premiere of “Searching for Fortune,”

starring John Heard (“The Sopranos,” “Big,” “The Milagro Beanfield War,” “Awakenings,” “Home Alone,” “Radio Flyer,” “The Pelican Brief,” “White Chicks,” “Miami Vice”). A family drama about a woman who tracks down her recently deceased husband’s brother and reveals a 25-year-old family secret. March 18: At 8 p.m., the MoMI Redstone Theatre will screen the North American premiere of “Scumbag” (the world premiere was at the prestigious International Film Festival at Rotterdam), “The Wolf of Wallstreet” meets “Kids” starring every punk legend since the 1970s, starring Princess Frank, Debra Haden, Nick Zedd, Michael Alig, Neon Music, Goddess Bunny, Keith Morris, Angelo Moore, Monique Parent, Jael De Pardo, Don Bolles, Kid Congo Powers, Scott E. Myers, Ron Jeremy, Cindy Lucas, Penny Arcade, Nina Hartley, Brian Soigne and Deluxe Wilso. March 18: At 2:45 p.m., the MoMI Bartos Theatre will Show “After School” by the rising star Alec Tibaldi, an alumni of QWFF, who’s 2016 film “Ride or Die” won the QWFF 2016 Best Ensemble Award. “After School” is another sterling example of great directing, acting and production and stars Ruby Modine (“Shameless”) and the young and extremely promising Piper De Palma, whose father is film director Brian De Palma. And there are 130 more incredible, intriguing and challenging works, including four about the undocumented immigrant experience and four more featuring challenging mental health conditions. There will be six beautiful LGBT films, an animation about brotherly love that will break your heart, thrillers, chillers and all-out high camp. The world’s borough is well represented, with 23 films from Queens, 16 from Manhattan, 17 from Brooklyn and one from the Bronx. There will be 12 films from Germany, seven from Spain, four from Iran and eight films are by Asian filmmakers from all over NYC. They will also have 50 films by women and three films that were collaborative efforts from educational institutions. In addition to producing the annual Queens World Film Festival, the organization programs films year-round at a variety of borough venues through its “Encore” and “Old Spice” screening series, and through its “Young Filmmakers” training program. The Queens World Film Festival is a program of the Queens World Film Initiative Inc., a non-profit 501(c) 3 organization.


Guide to

SENIOR LIVING

A Blank Slate Media/Litmor Publications Special Section â&#x20AC;¢ February 17, 2017


34 SENIOR LIVING • Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017 ADVERTORIAL

Grace Plaza Nursing & Rehabilitation Center Offers Alzheimer Caregivers Support Group Great Neck, NY 11021 - In collaboration with the Alzheimer’s Disease Resource Center (ADRC), Grace Plaza is proud to begin offering an Alzheimer Caregivers Support Group. These meetings, which are open to the community, consist of families, caregivers, friends and other interested individuals meeting to share feelings, experiences and information. It will offer an opportunity to give and receive mutual support and exchange coping skills with one another in matters of relating to people with dementia and their care. Education, support, common experiences and friendship give people the strength to cope with the tragedy of Alzheimer’s disease. People learn from each other and most importantly

they learn they are not alone. The meetings, will be held on the third Thursday of every month at 2:00pm at Grace Plaza, located at 15 St. Paul’s Place, Great Neck. So whether this disease directly affects your family or you know of someone in this situation, this group is here to help.. Grace Plaza Nursing & Rehabilitation Center was established in 1972 as a 214-bed short & long term skilled nursing & rehabilitation center located in Great Neck, Long Island, New York. Grace Plaza offers expertise care in the field of sub-acute rehabilitation, including geriatric care, rehabilitative care, respiratory therapy and medically complex care.

For more information about the services Grace Plaza offers, please call (516) 466-3001 or visit us on the web at www.graceplaza.com.

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carries visual information to the brain. As the optic nerve fibers are damaged, the amount and quality of information sent to the brain decreases and a loss of vision occurs. Will I go blind from glaucoma? If diagnosed at an early stage, glaucoma can often be controlled with little or no further vision loss. If left untreated, first peripheral vision and then central vision will be affected, and blindness may result. How Is glaucoma detected? A comprehensive optometric examination will include tests for glaucoma. A simple, painless procedure called tonometry measures the internal pressure of your eye. Health of the optic nerve and your field of vision will be checked. How is glaucoma treated? Glaucoma is usually effectively treated with prescription eye drops and medicines that must be taken regularly. Some cases require laser therapy or surgery. Will my vision be restored after treatment? No. But early detection and treatment can control glaucoma and reduce the chances of vision loss.

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Guide to Special Occasions

a blank slate media/litmor publications special section â&#x20AC;¢ february 17, 2017


36 Guide to Special Occasions • Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

Choosing the right restaurant for your party they would if they were to have a party at home. Such a reality makes a dinner party at a local restaurant a lot less stressful for the hosts. There are a number of things to emphasize when looking for the right restaurant to host the next dinner party.

Getting together with family and friends for a good meal is a great opportunity to reconnect and share a few laughs. Though such gatherings have traditionally taken place at private homes, today’s busy adults are increasingly turning to restaurants to host their mini reunions. Restaurants don’t require hosts and guests to wash any dishes, and hosts won’t have to find time to clean their homes top to bottom like

PROXIMITY Whether entertaining family and friends or a business dinner, the restaurant where you will be gathering should be easily accessible to all people who plan to attend. A centrally located restaurant that’s only a short drive for guests and hosts alike is ideal, as it cuts back on the time people will spend driving to and from the restaurant. Try to accommodate those guests who don’t drive by choosing a restaurant that’s accessible via public transportation. PRICE Perhaps the only downside to hosting a dinner party at a restaurant is that such gatherings tend to be more expensive than parties at private residences. Hosts should first determine who will be paying the bill. If everyone has agreed to pay their own portion of the bill, this gives you a little more flexibility

when choosing a restaurant. If you, as the host, intend to pick up the tab for everyone, then you might want to find a nice restaurant with reasonably priced entrées. A five-star restaurant might break the bank, but you might be able to find a three- or four-star restaurant that’s still elegant and more affordable. If each guest intends to pay for his or her own meal, discuss with guests how much they would like to spend before making a reservation. Once you have an idea of what everyone is willing to spend, you can start to narrow down your options. MENU The menu is an important thing for hosts to consider when choosing a restaurant for their next dinner party. Many men and women adhere to certain diets or lifestyles that restrict what they can and cannot eat, and you will want to find a restaurant that can cater to as many of your guests’ needs as possible. Discuss any dietary restrictions with your guests before you begin the process of finding a restaurant. If the responses are slow to come in, you can still go ahead with your search, but look for restaurants that offer vegetarian and gluten-free fare.

When examining the menu, take into consideration any offerings for kids if any guests are planning to bring their children along. Kids tend to prefer chicken fingers and fries over filet mignon and baked potatoes, so the restaurant should have some menu items for young children if kids will be joining in the festivities. ACCESSIBILITY When looking for a restaurant, try to find one that’s easily accessible for any older guests who might not get around as easily as they used to or any guests who might have a disability that requires handicap accessible seating and restrooms. Many restaurants can fill both of these needs, but it’s still up to hosts to ask in advance so all guests have a comfortable evening. The parking lot should not be too far away, but if it is, ask the restaurant manager if valet service is available for those guests who might prefer it. A dinner party at a restaurant with family, friends or even professional colleagues often makes for an enjoyable evening for guests and hosts alike. But hosts must consider several factors before ultimately choosing where they and their guests will dine.

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Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017 â&#x20AC;¢ Guide to Special Occasions

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38 Guide to Special Occasions â&#x20AC;¢ Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017 â&#x20AC;˘ SENIOR LIVING

Yearly eye exams can reveal more than just vision trouble

More evidence points to the importance of routine eye exams, not only to pinpoint potential conditions of the eye, but also to serve as windows to diseases that aďŹ&#x20AC;ect the entire body. Now more than ever it is essential to make and keep annual eye exams, as they can help to reveal the ďŹ rst signs of serious ailments. Doctors from around the world say dozens of diseases â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from certain cancers to arthritis to high blood pressure â&#x20AC;&#x201D; can show symptoms in the eye. Under the watchful and knowing gaze of an eyecare professional, individuals can get early diagnosis and begin treatment promptly.

According to Dr. Roy Chuck, chair of the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and MonteďŹ ore Medical Center, there are many systemic diseases that can be seen in the eye. In addition to the conditions mentioned, jaundice can indicate liver disease while retinal detachment and bleeding in new blood vessels may indicate hypertension. By looking at the color of the cornea, some doctors can tell if a patient has elevated levels of cholesterol. Many people have had their eye doctors be the ďŹ rst healthcare professional to detect the presence of their diabetes. If an ophthalmologist suspects an underlying medical condition, he or she will likely refer men and women to their primary care doctors for a more thorough examination. Going to the eye doctor can do more than ensure your vision is sharp. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a life-saving decision for many people who have major health conditions diagnosed through the eyes.

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40 SENIOR LIVING • Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017 ADVERTORIAL

Rebounding from a late start to retirement savings

ible? Downsize cable packages or skip that costly cup of coffee on the way to work. Perhaps it’s time to look for a smaller, less expensive home or a compact car instead of an SUV. Any money saved now will benefit you when the time comes time to bid farewell to the workforce.

S

ome people do not have the ability to begin saving for retirement early on. Others may have brushed retirement savings aside for so long that they are now worried that it’s too late to begin socking away money for retirement. While it’s best to start saving for retirement as early as possible, the good news is that it’s never too late to start planning for retirement. If your 40th birthday has long passed and you’re finally thinking ahead to retirement, consider these catch-up strategies. • Research tax-advantageous retirement savings plans. A financial planner can point you in the right direction, or consult with your employer about employee programs. Deposit money into a 401(k) or 403(b) plan or another retirement vehicle. Jump on any opportunities when your employer matches invested funds. Investigate an IRA and find out if there are any government incentives. Depending on your age, you may be able to deposit more money into such accounts than other investors. • Cut back on expenses. Cutting back on unnecessary expenses is a great way to save more money for retirement. Figure out where you can save some money you can then allocate to retirement savings. Maybe you can reduce insurance coverage on an older car or raise your deduct-

• Delay your retirement. Many people who retire find themselves bored and looking for ways to fill their time, and as a result more and more people are delaying their retirement, which also gives them more time to save for that day when they do call it quits. If you want to work less, discuss and negotiate a phased retirement with your bosses that allows you to stick with your employer but gradually work fewer hours until you retire completely. You may be able to work part-time for several years and retire when you’re most comfortable. • Consider more aggressive funds. Even if you are 50 you still have a few decades before retirement, which leaves lots of time to grow your retirement savings. But you may want to consider more aggressive funds that can help you catch up more quickly than less aggressive investments. Just know that aggressive funds may also leave you susceptible to substantial losses. • Don’t amass debt. If you’re saving for retirement but only paying minimum balances on your credit cards, then you’re not really saving. Pay down credit card debt before you begin to set aside money for retirement. Delaying retirement planning may mean you have to work a little harder to build up a solid reserve. But by following some financial tips and persevering, you can still enjoy retirement with security.


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

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Shakespeare’s stage Northwell gains Jones recreated at Hofstra Beach sponsorship America is about to see the debut of its most authentic recreation of Shakespeare’s Globe stage — not on Broadway, Los Angeles or La Jolla, but at Hofstra University this March where construction is currently underway at the John Cranford Adams Playhouse on a historic Hofstra Globe Stage. The Hofstra Globe Stage will be a working laboratory for students, faculty and guest artists. Hofstra Drama Professor David Henderson, the director of this project, is the only college professor and set designer to have spent considerable time abroad in consultation with the archivists and design staff of Shakespeare’s Globe in London. Hamlet is the headline event of Hofstra’s 68th Shakespeare Festival, one of the longest running Shakespeare festivals in the United States. Other spring performances will also make use of the unique Globe setting. Tickets are on sale now for these, and the Hofstra community may receive up to two free tickets to each production upon presentation of a valid HofstraCard. Visit the Playhouse Box Office from Monday to Friday, 11 a.m.-3:45 p.m., or call 516-463-6644. Tickets are also available for purchase online at hofstratickets.com. Following are upcoming scheduled events: 68th Annual Hofstra Shakespeare Festival March 2-12 Hamlet by William Shakespeare Directed by Christopher Dippel As relevant today as it was over 400 years ago, Hamlet is a revenge tragedy like no other. When Hamlet learns the truth about his father’s “foul and most unnatural” death, he reflects on his life — past, present and future; mortal and immortal — and provokes us to do the same. Location: Toni and Martin Sosnoff Theater, John Cranford Adams Playhouse Show times: Thursday, March, 2 at 7 p.m.; Friday, March 3 and 10 at 8 p.m.; Saturday, March 4 and 11 at 8 p.m.; Sunday, March 5 and 12 at 2 p.m.

Tickets: $12; $10 senior citizen (over 65) or matriculated non-Hofstra student with ID. Two free tickets with current faculty/ staff/student HofstraCard. There will be an opening night reception with food, drink and reminiscences from alumni of the Hofstra Shakespeare Festival at the Schaeffer Black Box Theater on Thursday, March 2, at 6 p.m., as well as a post-show talkback with cast and crew. Tickets to the reception are $25. March 9 and 11 This Bud of Love – A One Hour Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare Adapted by Maureen McFeely Directed by Jean Dobie Giebel This timeless story of star-crossed lovers, whose tragic end reconciles an age-old feud, is an excellent introduction to Shakespeare, suitable for young audiences. Location: Toni and Martin Sosnoff Theater, John Cranford Adams Playhouse Show times: Thursday, March 9 at 8 p.m., and Saturday, March 11 at 2 p.m. — special performance with The Collegium Musicum, a Hofstra music ensemble devoted to the performance of little-known music of the past, customarily called “Early Music.” Tickets: $6. Two free tickets with current faculty/staff/student HofstraCard. March 31-April 9 The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) by The Reduced Shakespeare Company Directed by Kara-Lynn Vaeni Three actors perform all 37 plays in 97 minutes. Fast, funny and physical, this is a show made for people who love — and hate — the plays of William Shakespeare. Location: Toni and Martin Sosnoff Theater, John Cranford Adams Playhouse Show times: Friday, March 31 and April 7 at 8 p.m.; Saturday, April 1 and 8 at 8 p.m.; Sunday, April 2 and 9 at 2 p.m.; and Thursday, April 6 at 8 p.m. Tickets: $12; $10 senior citizen (over 65) or matriculated non-Hofstra student with ID. Two free tickets with current faculty/ staff/student HofstraCard.

Northwell Health is the new, exclusive title sponsor of Jones Beach Theater, signing a multi-year agreement with Live Nation, which operates the 14,000-seat amphitheater for the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. The historic, 65-year-old venue will now be known exclusively as Northwell Health at Jones Beach Theater. Northwell Health, which is also the official health care partner of Jones Beach Theater, will have signage, posters, graphics and banners displayed prominently throughout the venue, parking area and on the theater’s existing directional signage. Northwell will also offer health screenings, wellness tips and other promotions at the concerts that encourage healthy living. “Jones Beach Theater is a Long Island landmark and an iconic entertainment venue that has been offering music lovers a premier New York experience for generations, while Northwell Health is a highly respected, clinical, academic and research institution with deep roots across Long Island,” said Ramon Soto, senior vice president and chief marketing and communications officer at Northwell Health, New York State’s largest private employer with a workforce of more than 62,000. “This partnership provides us with a unique opportunity to not only showcase the Northwell brand, but also celebrate the intersection of life and health at a destination that draws hundreds of thousands of concert-goers annually, furthering our mission of improving the health of the communities we serve

across Long Island and the entire New York area.” “We are thrilled that Northwell Health has chosen the legendary Jones Beach Theater as a platform to heighten their visibility and connect with thousands of concertgoers,” said Andy Peikon, senior vice president of venue sales at Live Nation, the world’s leading entertainment and ticketing company. “Live Nation has a great lineup of artists scheduled to perform at the venue for 2017 and we look forward to working closely with Northwell Health for years to come.” Along with the official renaming of the venue, Live Nation will soon announce the complete 2017 summer music line up for Northwell Health at Jones Beach Theater. Numerous concerts are currently on sale, including: Dave Matthews, Train, Florida Georgia Line, Third Eye Blind, Lady Antebellum, Rod Stewart and Cyndi Lauper, Foreigner and Cheap Trick, Chicago and the Doobie Brothers, and Brad Paisley. Originally known as Jones Beach Marine Theater, the amphitheater was designed to specifications provided by Robert Moses. From its opening in 1952 until 1981, the theater primarily hosted musical productions. The primary focus of the venue then changed to concerts. During the 1990s, the theater underwent two expansions that increased seating from 8,200 to 11,200 and then to its current capacity of 14,000. For ticket information, please visit the Live Nation website.

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42 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Arts & Entertainment Calendar GOLD COAST ARTS CENTER 113 Middle Neck Road, Great Neck (516) 829-2570 • goldcoastarts.org Wednesday, Feb. 22 at 7:30 p.m. A Man Called Ove—Gold Coast Film Series Saturday, Feb. 25 at 8 p.m. Adam Ippolito & Friends—A Benefit Concert & CD Release Party Tuesday, March 7 at 7:30 p.m. The Man Who Saved the World—Elliman Film Series Thursday, March 9 at 7 p.m. “Come From Away” on Broadway Through March 12 Lost & Found: The Art of Assembling LANDMARK ON MAIN STREET 232 Main Street, Suite 1 Port Washington (516) 767-1384 ext. 101 www.landmarkonmainstreet.org Wednesday, Feb. 22 at 2 p.m. Vintage Bliss: The Great American Songbook Friday, Feb. 24 at 8 p.m. Marcia Ball & the Subdues “Boogie on the Bayou: A Mardi Gras Celebration Saturday, Feb. 25 at 8 p.m. Improvised Shakespeare Saturday, March 4 at 8 p.m. Celebrity Autobiography Live! Friday, March 10 at 8 p.m. Broadway on main Street: Alice Ripley Friday, March 17 at 8 p.m. Sarah Jarosz Performs Saturday, April 8 at 8 p.m. TV Medium Kim Russo PLANTING FIELDS ARBORETUM Coe Hall Historic House Museum 1395 Planting Fields Road, Oyster Bay (516) 922-9200 • http://www.plantingfields. org Wednesday, Feb. 17 at 7 p.m. The Master Keys Thursday, March 24 at 7 p.m. Hot Club of Flatbush THE PARAMOUNT 370 New York Ave., Huntington (631) 673-7300 ext. 303 www.paramountny.com Friday, Feb. 17 at 8 p.m. The Paramount Comedy Series Presents: Pablo Francisco Saturday, Feb. 18 at 8 p.m. St. Pauli Presents: Less Than Jake & Pepper with Special Guests--The Attack & The Bunny Gang Thursday, Feb. 23 at 8 p.m. David Duchovny Friday, Feb. 24 at 8 p.m. The Paramount Party Series Presents: Unforgettable Fire & 42: A Tribute to U2 & Coldplay Saturday, Feb. 25 at 8 p.m. Aaron Tveit LONG ISLAND CHILDREN’S MUSEUM 11 Davis Avenue, Garden City 516-224-5800 • www.licm.org Tuesday, Feb. 14 through Friday, Feb. 17 from 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. Happy Hearts Wreaths

Ages 3 and up. Free with museum admission. Saturday, Feb. 18 from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Green Tea Series--Wild About Conversation Ages 4 and up. Free with museum admission Sunday, Feb. 19 from 1-3 p.m. History of Dolls of Color--Celebrating Black History Month Ages 5 and up. Free with museum admission MADISON THEATRE AT MALLOY COLLEGE 1000 Hempstead Avenue, Rockville Centre Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Friday, 12- 8 p.m. through April 12 The Frank & Gertrude Kaiser Art Gallery at Malloy Presents... World War I: Image, Money and Propaganda—The Central Powers Saturday, Feb. 25, 8 p.m. The Madison Theatre at Malloy College Presents... Grammy Award Winning Singer and Songwriter Jimmy Webb in Concert with the South Shore Symphony Sunday, Feb. 26, 3 p.m. The Institute for Interfaith Dialogue presents... The Essence of Greek Orthodox. In Kellenberg Hall, Room 006 Tickets/Info.: 516-323-4444 or www.madisontheatreny.org HUNTINGTON ARTS COUNCIL 213 Main Street, Huntington February 2-25 The Human Condition exhibit NASSAU COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART 1 Museum Dr., Roslyn (516) 484-9338 www.nassaumuseum.org Through March 5 Ansel Adams: Sight and Feeling Through March 5 Light Works: 100 Years of Photos Through March 5 New Photos: Long Island Collects March 25-July 9 Halston Style: The first comprehensive retrospective of the works of the American fashion designer Halston. Sponsored by “H Halston exclusively at Lord & Taylor,” the exhibition occupies the entire museum. Ongoing Sculpture Park Walking Trails Gardens Events FILM SCREENING Through March 5 Stryker’s America: Photographing the Great Depression FILM SCREENING Through March 5 Cartier-Bresson’s Century FILM March 25-Nov. 9 Halston Tribute: Lincoln Center For The Family Sundays, 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Family Tour at 1 p.m. Art Activities at 1:30 p.m. March 6 and 26 Neiman Marcus Family Sundays at the Museum 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

A&E Calendar cont’d Super Family Sunday Merrymaking in a Gold Coast Mansion 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 21 Wednesday, Feb. 22 Thursday, Feb. 23 Family Art Making Days February Three-Day Break for Art New Program Tuesdays, 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Sketching in the Galleries Exhibition Lecture THE DOLPHIN BOOK SHOP & CAFE 299 Main St., Port Washington (516) 767-2650 • www.thedolphinbookshop. com Sunday, February 19, 11:30 a.m. Storytime: The Green Umbrella by Jackie Azua Kramer The ART Guild 200 Port Washington Blvd., Manhasset www.TheArtGuild.org Exhibit Through Feb. 26 Photography Exhibit: “From My Perspective” Second Thursdays: March 9 Sip & Sketch: Live model, no instruction, short and long poses. Bring a snack and/or beverage. Call or email to RSVP. Beginners, 1-4 p.m.; Intermediates, 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. For children: Saturdays until March 4 Children’s Art Studio (ages 8-12), 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Art Explorations (ages 5-7), 12 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. Wednesdays until March 1 Children’s Art Studio (ages 8-12), 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Thursdays until March 30 Advanced Art Instruction for High School Students (ages 15-18), 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. BJ SPOKE GALLERY 229 Main Street, Huntington

(631) 549-5106• www.bjspokegallery.com Through Feb. 26 Poetry in Motion Exhibit SANDS POINT PRESERVE 127 Middle Neck Road, Sands Point info@sandspointpreserve.org • 516.571.7901 Saturday, Feb. 18, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Rainforest Escape Saturday, March 4, 4-7:30 p.m. and Sunday, March 5, 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Celestial Weekend Sunday, March 5, 2-4 p.m. Winter Choral Concert Sunday, March 19, 10-10:45 a.m. Spring Family Yoga

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Community Calendar KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS HALL 186 Jericho Turnpike, Mineola Friday, Feb. 17. Doors open at 6 p.m.; first bout at 7:30 p.m. Golden Globes Boxing. Tickets $30 each. No tickets will be sold at the door. Call or email Mike (516)639-8606; mmurtha@ newyork811inc.com Saturday, Feb. 25 from 6 to 10 p.m. Special Olympics Sports Night Dinner Dance Fundraiser Wear your favorite sports jersey. DJ and dancing. Beer, wine, soda, dessert and coffee will be complimentary. Cash bar for mixed

drinks. Contact Steve Driscoll: 800-997-1237 Sunday, March 5 from 2 to 5 p.m. St. Patrick’s Day After Parade Party. Live music by Billy and Jacinla. Irish food and drinks at reasonable prices. Free admission. Saturday, May 6 from 4 to 8 p.m. $ 15 per person includes hot and cold buffet, cookies and coffee. Cash bar racing games 50/50 raffle. Downstairs in Members Lounge. Contact: Tom Kelly, 516-414-2229 or tomkelly11501@gmail.com Continued on Page 44

THE NASSAU POPS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA GALA BENEFIT CONCERT FOR CEREBRAL PALSY OF NASSAU The Tilles Center for the Performing Arts LIU, 720 Northern Blvd., Brookville Saturday, March 18, 8 p.m. The Nassau Pops, under the direction of Maestro Louis Panacciulli, presents an upcoming performance for the Cerebral Palsy of Nassau. This concert features Linda Eder, who has appeared as Lucy in the Broadway musical “Jekyll & Hyde” and for sold-out crowds across the country and Europe. Reserved seating: call Tilles Center Box Office, 516-299-3100 CLARK BOTANIC GARDEN 193 I. U. Willets Road, Albertson (516) 484-2208 • http://clarkbotanic.org/ Thursday, March 2, 1 p.m. Let’s Chat About Our Gardens $10 members; $12 non-members Sunday, March 5, 1 p.m. New York, New York: The World in a City “Fireside Chat” with Pat Sommerstad $10 members; $12 non-members To register for either event, contact Maria Morgan, 516-484-8603.

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44 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

Annual kids fair at Hilton in Huntington TThe seventh annual All Kids Fair will take place on Sunday, April 30 at a new, larger venue, the Hilton Long Island in Huntington (also known as the Huntington Hilton), in order to accommodate more attendees due to the tremendous turnout in recent years. The fair features educational activities for kids and their families. A new addition is 14-year-old singer Chloe Wheeler, who appeared on the Spanish version of “The Voice Kids” in 2016. The bilingual teenager will also be performing. Eleven-year-old chef Sophie Bravo and 13-year-old chef Ally Kustera of Food Network’s “Chopped Junior” will also be present at the event doing cooking demos. The 2017 All Kids Fair will bring back many of last year’s favorite features, such as free face painting and chocolate samples, and will add many new ones for the entertainment of its visitors. New options, at no extra charge, include a bounce house, petting zoo, and an 8 1/2 foot snake to touch. Admission is $5 per person and free for children of ages 2 and younger. Ever year, the All Kids Fair offers exciting educational and health activities to interest kids and their families. The fair offers choices for toddlers through high school, including kids who have special needs or are gifted. Over 80 exhibitor spaces and many classes provide valuable information. Exhibitors will cover schools, camps, after school activities, birthday party

ideas, college planning, and travel. Some of the many classes children can share with their parents and grandparents are gymnastics, art and music. L. Rodrigues of Lindenhurst, who attended the event last year, enthusiastically shared, “We love the All Kids Fair! My son and I enjoy sharing the day with each other, experiencing the fun activities, events and giveaways local “kidawesome” businesses provide.” Attendees who like to “pay forward” to charitable groups are encouraged to bring non-perishable food and money for donation to The INN (Interfaith Nutrition Network). Those who do will receive raffle tickets to win a variety of donated prizes. Sponsors to date are: Long Island Parent Magazine, Your Local Kids Source, Super Smiles Pediatric and Family Dentistry, Macaroni Kid, and Long Island Media Inc. The All Kids Fair is an annual event organized by Specialty Connections. This event showcases services such as schools, after school activities, places for kids to play, photography, day cares, kid-friendly products such as furniture and books, and health/wellness products and services. For more information about all the events that Specialty Connections produces, including events at area malls, visit www.SpecialtyConnections.com. For information about All Kids Fair classes, a current list of exhibitors, and available ways to participate, visit www. AllKidsFair.com or contact Barbara Kaplan at 516-621-1446.

Community Calendar cont’d Continued from Page 43 COPAY 21 North Station Plaza, Great Neck Friday, Feb. 17 at 10 a.m. Child Abuse Prevention “YES WE CAN” COMMUNITY CENTER 141 Garden Street, Westbury Health and Wellness Series Feb. 17, 24 and 27 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Info.: 311 or 516-869-6311 WALT WHITMAN BIRTHPLACE HISTORIC SITE 246 Old Walt Whitman Road Huntington Station Wednesday, Feb. 22 at 1 p.m. Make a Dreamer Catcher: Dreamcatchers were originally made by the children of Native American tribes, such as the Cherokee. To Native Americans, dreams were messages sent by sacred spirits. Learn the legend how dreamcatchers caught all of your bad dreams. Create your very own to hang in a special place. Victorian Tea Party: This fun and informative program includes role-playing while teaching social skills, self-esteem and confidence. Children will learn dining manners and practice table setting and introductions. Apple juice will be substituted for the hot tea. $12 per child/event; $20 for both programs. For more information go to www.waltwhitman.org Thursday, March 2 at 6 p.m. Walt Whitman presents “Walking with Whitman with Martin Espada” The series continues to bring the most intriguing figures in contemporary literature on the national scene. Hosted by George Wallace, the evening will begin with an open mic for the community at 6 p.m. A musical prelude will be followed by a reading from featyred poet Martin Espada, ending with a Q&A and booksigning. Admission is $10, $5 for members. Info./Ticket info: 631-427-5240 or www. waltwhitman.org Sunday, March 5 at 1 p.m. Irish Dancers. Children of all ages will enjoy a performance of Irish dancing by teachers and students from the Mulvihill-Lynch Studio of Irish Dance, known internationally as champions on the competitive circuit. After the show, participants can get their faces painted by Miss Carin or take a guided tour of the Walt Whitman Birthplaces. $9 per child, chaperones free For more info., go to www.waltwhitman.org BEST COMICS 1300 Jericho Tpke., New Hyde Park Wednesday, Feb. 22 from 1 to 4 p.m. Best Comics Presents: Jim Shooter (Legion of Super Heroes, Secret Wars, Solar Man of the Atom) & J.C. Vaughn (Zombie-Proof, Vampire, PA) signing their new book, Bedtime Stories for Impressionable Children Info.: 516-328-1900 or www.bestcomics.com ZUCKER HILLSIDE HOSPITAL Sloman Auditorium 266th Street & 76th Avenue Glen Oaks National Alliance for Mental Illness free presentation: “Improving Mental Health: Four Secrets in Plain Sight” Wednesday, Feb. 22 at 7:30 p.m.

Sharing and caring support group meets at 6 p.m. Dr. Lloyd Sederer will be talking about his new book in which he shares lessons learned after more than 40 years of helping people with mental illness and addictions. Info.: 516-326-0797 or www.namign.org NORTH HEMPSTEAD PROJECT INDEPENDENCE Wednesday, Feb. 22 at 6:45 p.m. Tax Grievance Seminar Shelter Rock Library, 165 Searingtown Road, Albertson Thursday, Feb. 23 from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Color for the Health of It! Roslyn Community Center, 53 Orchard Street, Roslyn Heights ROSLYN COMMUNITY CENTER 53 Orchard St., Roslyn Heights Color for the Health of It! Thursday, Feb. 23 from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Info.: 311 or 516-869-6311 PREMIER SOCIAL ADULT DAY SERVICES HEALTH FAIR 115 Fulton Avenue, Hempstead Saturday, Feb. 25 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Please join us to learn about health programs and resources in your community that can help improve your health and quality of life. Free admission, screenings and lunch. Design your own jewelry. Play table games. Get skincare and makeup tips. Win raffle prices. Receive freebies and giveaways. Info.: 516-280-8111 THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF MANHASSET Recital in the Music Hall, 1845 Northern Blvd., Manhasset Sunday, Feb. 26 at 3 p.m. Laura Bontrager, cellist, aand Bernadette Hole, pianist, will present a recital featuring the works from the baroque, classical and 20th century periods. The program will consist of selections by Frescobaldi, Beethoven, Bach, Debussy and Vierne. Admission is free. Building and facillties are handicapped accessible. Call 516-627-4911 for more information. BOOK REVUE 313 New York Avenue Huntington Wednesday, March 1 at 1 p.m. I Love My Brother by Miriam Gardner-Engel Monday, March 13 at 7 p.m. The Adventures of Lola Larissa Lily by Lauren Coffey Free writers’ workshop co-hosted by the Long Island Writer Guild HARBOR CHILD CARE PRESENTS CASINO NIGHT At VFW Hall, 155 Searingtown Road, Albertson Friday, March 10, 7-11 p.m. This is the 2017 spring fundraiser. $95 per person. Includes open bar, hors d’oeuvres, buffet & $500 in gaming chips. Register online at www.harborchildcare.org/ events or call 516-248-9855 ETHICAL HUMANIST SOCIETY OF LONG ISLAND 38 Old Country Road, Garden City Wednesday, March 22 at 7:30 p.m. Free College Planning & Admissions Workshop Open to students and parents alike, this fo-


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

Community Calendar cont’d rum will explore topics, such as choosing a college that’s the “best” fit for you, the intricacies and nuances of the college application and admissions process, creating a compelling college essay, and paying for that college degree. Register at www.tfaforms.com/319156 or www.collegeconnect.info PROJECT INDEPENDENCE SUPPORT & SOCIAL GROUP TRIVIA CHALLENGE Call 311 or (516) 869-6311 for more information. Last Wednesday of every month at 7 p.m. Havana Central Restaurant Roosevelt Field, Garden City. For more info, call (516) 676- 1976. SID JACOBSON JCC 300 Forest Drive East Hills, 11548 www.sjjcc.org/jll. Fridays Shababa Fridays, 9:45-10:45 a.m. Challah in the Hallway, 12-2:45 p.m. General Exercise Group for All cancer Survivors, 12:30-1:15 p.m. Discussion Group for All Cancer Survivors, 1:15-2 p.m. Sundays Gentle Yoga for All Cancer Survivors, 9:3010:30 a.m. Mondays News Behind the News, 10:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Eat, Chat, Move!, 12:15-1:45 p.m. Tuesdays Mah Jongg Clinic, 10 a.m.- 12 p.m. Tuesday Lectures, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Swim Program for Strength & Wellness, 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Knitzvah: Knitting for a Cause, 7-8:30 p.m. Wednesdays Knitzvah: Knitting for a Cause, 12-2 p.m. Beginner Canasta, 9:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Games Day, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Meditation, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Beginner Canasta, 1-3 p.m. THE ADELPHI NY STATEWIDE BREAST CANCER HOTLINE & SUPPORT PROGRAM At the Adelphi School of Social Work 1 South Ave., Garden City

Support for Caregivers of People with Breast Cancer Mondays, 6-7:30 p.m. Young Women’s Support Group, Under 40 Tuesdays, 6-7:30 p.m. All groups are facilitated by a social worker. Info.: 516-877-4314 or the Breast Cancer Hotline, 800-877-8077 PORT WASHINGTON SENIOR CENTER 80 Manorhaven Blvd., Port Washington Caregiver Support Group The first and third Tuesday of every month from 2-3 p.m. Info.: 311 or 516-869-6311 CLINTON G. MARTIN PARK 1601 Marcus Ave., New Hyde Park Blankets of Love Tuesdays, Feb. 21 & 28 from 1 to 2 p.m. The group provides an opportunity for seniors in the Town of North Hempstead community to come together and work in a collaborative manner on a meaningful and rewarding project. Each blanket created is donated to a worthy cause. Info.: 311 or 516-869-6311 World in Motion Tuesday, Feb. 28 from 2:15-3:15 p.m. Join a lively discussion on current world issues. Open to all Town of North Hempstead residents 60 and over. Info.: 311 or 516-869-6311 WINTHROP-UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 200 Old Country Road, Suite 250 Mineola, NY 11501 Winthrop-University Hospital’s Department of Neuroscience Offering Free Support Groups Huntington’s Disease – 2nd Monday of the month Winthrop’s Research & Academic Center, 101 Mineola Blvd., Room G-013 Head and Neck Cancer Patient Support Group Offered by Winthrop-University Hospital’s Center for Cancer Care 1300 Franklin Avenue, Suite ML5 Garden City Third Monday of the month, from 12 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

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Webb to sing with S. Shore Symphony The South Shore Symphony Orchestra, under the Music Direction and Baton of Scott Jackson Wiley will be performing at Madison Theatre in Rockville Centre on Saturday Feb. 25 at 8 p.m. The orchestra will feature Grammy Award-Winning Songwriter Jimmy Webb Premiere for Piano & Orchestra with Jimmy Webb, the only songwriter with hits in pop, country, disco and rap, now adds a classical nocturne to his catalog. The South Shore Symphony and pianist Jeffrey Biegel, announce the New York premiere of Jimmy Webb’s “Nocturne for Piano and Orchestra” (Nocturne for “Lefty”). Known for legendary hits including ‘Wichita Lineman,’ and ‘MacArthur Park,’ the Grammy-award winning songwriter and member of the Songwriters Hall of Fame teamed up with pianist Jeffrey Biegel and The South Shore Symphony for this unique project, funded by the Rockville Centre Guild for the Arts. Following the premiere, Webb will join the South Shore Symphony to perform his hits, including ‘By the Time I Get to Phoenix,’ ‘Up, Up and Away,’ and others. “Nocturne for Piano and Orchestra” (Nocturne for “Lefty”), composed by Webb (for pianist Jeffrey Biegel), was orchestrated by Webb together with Grammy-winner Jeff Tyzik. Webb dedicated the work to his wife and partner Laura Savini. Webb said: ‘This music originated in discussions I had with my wife about famous nocturnes such as “Moonlight Sonata” and others. The piece depicts different aspects of nightfall; the mathematical exactitude of life in the city, the splendor of night skies and full moons partially obscured by cloud, the gentle rise and fall of human conversation in social gatherings and the dizzying whirl of waltzing on a seaside esplanade. It is essentially an opportunity for the listener to contemplate their own experiences during the hours of darkness. It includes a personal tribute to the music of Miles Davis, and the smoky

dives and small clubs where I performed in my early years: the kingdom of the lonely and disillusioned. “Lefty” is my wife, Laura Savini, of PBS fame, a raving beauty who is also a southpaw. The notes have been inspired by her joy and devotion to art.’ Orchestrator Jeffrey Tyzik noted: ‘It was a great pleasure to collaborate with Jimmy Webb on his new multi-faceted composition “Nocturne for Piano and Orchestra” (Nocturne for “Lefty”). I have been a great admirer of Jimmy’s huge body of work since the 1960s and I was honored to be a part of orchestrating his beautiful music for symphony orchestra. Jimmy writes from the heart and continues to be an inspiration for all songwriters.’ Pianist and collaborator Jeffrey Biegel added: ‘The sonic landscape of Jimmy’s piece is instantly ear-catching and beautifully laid out for the piano. One reason I approached Jimmy is because he is a songwriter and his sense of melody and harmony suit the genre for piano and orchestra. He treats the piano in a unique style which immediately grabbed my attention the moment I received the piano part.’ Webb’s compositions have always been highly influenced by classical music and structure. He is a student of classical music and was deeply inspired by the opportunity to create this piece.

Molloy to host 3rd annual literary fest Word Up: Long Island LitFest, the region’s first literary festival now in its third year, will take place at the Madison Theatre at Molloy College in Rockville Centre on Sunday, March 26 from 1 to 6 p.m. General admission is $40 and includes two introductory workshops on essay writing and storytelling. Both workshops begin at noon, just before the full day of author readings, talks and booksignings, which start at 1 p.m. This year’s stellar roster of authors includes: Dave Barry, Pulitzer-Prize winning humor writer whose columns and essays

have appeared in hundreds of newspapers over the past 35 years. He’s also written a number of New York Times bestsellers. His latest, “For this We Left Egypt,” a parody of the Passover Haggadah, is coauthored with Alan Zweibel and Adam Mansbach, an original Saturday Night Live writer who has won multiple Emmy and Writers Guild of America awards for his work in television, which includes “It’s Garry Shandling’s Show,” “The Late Show With David Letterman,” and “Curb Your Enthusiasm.” Mansbach has also won a Tony Award and the Thurber Prize. Gail Sheehy is the author of seven-

teen books, including the internationally acclaimed best-seller Passages, named one of the ten most influential books of our times by the Library of Congress. She will be in conversation with Cathi Hanauer, editor of the New York Times bestselling essay collection The Bitch in the House: 26 Women Tell the Truth about Sex, Solitude, Work, Motherhood and Marriage and the recent The Bitch Is Back: Older, Wiser, and (Getting) Happier. Friars Club historian and LitFest emcee Barry Dougherty, author of several comedy books, will interview Kelly Carlin, writer, actress, producer, monologist, and Internet radio host, and author of

A Carlin Home Companion: Growing Up with George. Steven Gaines, co-founder and a past vice-chairman of the Hamptons International Film Festival and author of numerous books, including Philistines at the Hedgerow and his memoir, One of These Things First. Caroline Leavitt is the author of the novel Cruel Beautiful World, the New York Times bestselling Is This Tomorrow, Pictures of You, and many other works. Bill Scheft is an Emmy-nominated and longtime staff writer for David Letterman and the author of five humor novels, including his latest, Shrink Thyself.


46 The Great Neck News, Friday, February 17, 2017

Great Neck Park District

Great Neck House is located at 65 Arrandale Ave. in Great Neck 516-487-7665 Holiday Skate and Tennis Camps Keep the kids busy during school break at the Parkwood Sports Complex! We offer skating, tennis and other activities at the skate or tennis camps. The programs run from Monday, February 20 through Friday, February 24. For more information on skate camp, call (516) 487-2975, Ext. 114 or tennis, (516) 829-9050.

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Hockey Clinics at Rink During the February school break we are offering hockey clinics daily, 9:1510:15 a.m., Monday, Feb. 20 through Friday, Feb. 24 for children ages 5 and up. Full equipment is required to participate. There is a special public skate schedule for the break which you can

find on-line at www.greatneckparks.org. Check our website for more information or call (516) 487-2975, Ext. 128. Sunday @ 2 at Great Neck House Our Sunday performance series now begins at 2 p.m. Mambo Loco will perform

on Sunday, February 5, 2 p.m. at Great Neck House. Since 2005, Mambo Loco has become synonymous with classic Afro-Cuban/ Puerto Rican music. During the past several years Larry, Bill, Wayne and Alfredo have been bringing the best of “old school” Latin music to the Long Island area. A park card is required for admission to Great Neck House.

Nature Program: Site Saving in Great Neck Sunday, February 26 at 2 p.m., The Great Neck Historical Society will discuss their work to preserve and restore Saddle Rock Grist Mill. and the Stepping Stone Lighthouse. To register call (516) 482-0355. No children, under age 16, are permitted to attend.

Weekend Movie “Ghostbusters” (2016) will be shown on Friday, February 24 at 8 p.m.; Saturday, February 25 at 5 & 8 p.m. and Sunday, February 26 at 7:30 p.m.

Great Neck House Class Registration The next session of Great Neck House classes begin on Monday, February 27. Registration is on a firstcome, first-served basis

Great Neck Library Author Talk: Author Yamin Levy Sunday, Feb. 19 at 2 p.m. Meet Rabbi Yamin Levy when he talks about his ambitious debut novel, Sababa.. In the Main Building, 159 Bayview Avenue. Weekly English Language Conversation Classes for Beginners and Second Level These classes will now be held on a weekly basis, every Tuesday at the Station Branch, 26 Great Neck Road (2nd level), Gardens at Great Neck Plaza, above Best Market. The Beginner’s class is held from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. and stresses basic grammar and spoken language. Second Level is held from 2 to 3 p.m. and is for people who have some fluency in English. All are welcome to sit in on the Beginner’s class. Beginners are encouraged to stay for second class. For further

information, please call the Reference Dept. at 516-466-8055 x218. Chess Club at Main Wednesdays from 12:30-4:30 p.m. Enjoy a game of chess at the newly renovated Main Library in the small Multipurpose Room at the Main Building, 159 Bayview Avenue. Wednesday Film Matinee at Main Wednesday afternoon films are back at the Main Library. Refer to the Library newsletter, film brochure or website for further information on the films scheduled. YA February Vacation Programs: Book Swap and Book Share for Teens and Parents and Coloring for Teens and Parents Wednesday, Feb. 22 from 6:30-7:15 p.m. Start your spring cleanup early by bring-

ing your gently used books and trade them for books that are “new” to you. In the large multipurpose room of the Main Library, 159 Bayview Avenue. Project Independence Social Discussion and Men’s Group at Parkville Thursday, Feb. 16 at 11:30 a.m. Join a Project Independence Social Discussion Group at the Parkville Branch, 10 Campbell Street (off Lakeville Road) in New Hyde Park. Each weekly meeting is 60 minutes. SAT Prep Course Registration Wednesdays, March 1, 8, 15, 22 and 29 and April 5, 6:30-8:30 p.m. The course is taught by NYS certified math and verbal skills experts. There is a $25 fee per student (fee includes textbook). Advanced registration is required by calling the Main

Building, 159 Bayview Avenue, at 516-4668055 x218. Great Neck Library Closing/Cancellation Information Online Library patrons connected to the Internet are asked to check the website: www.cancellations. com for Library weather related closings/program cancellations. In order to access this service, Library District residents can log on to cancellations.com, type in their zip code or Great Neck Library and obtain information on program cancellations or Library closings. In addition, at no charge, residents can request automatic emails from cancellations. com when the Library has posted any information. This is a great way for Library District residents who are connected online to be advised of weather related changes in Library hours or programs.

Great Neck Social Center Veterans Social Club The Veterans Social Club is first and foremost Social! Every second Friday of the month, Veterans, their spouses, and guests meet to enjoy a program that is entertaining or informative. The next meeting will be on Feb. 10 at 2 p.m. World in Depth Lots to talk about for the savvy seniors who have better ideas

about how to run the world. Every Thursday at 2:00pm there is a session. No charge, just come and put in your own opinion! Combatting the Winter “Blahs” Start off teh day right by coming into Room 4 on any Monday or Friday to grab a cup of tea and a little snack as you chate with other “noshers.” Listen to Doctor Herb as he plays the piano with classics, show tunes, and

popular tunes of teh day! What is Elder Law? Need to know about Elder Law? Elie Schulman, Esq. will fill you in on primary concerns facing senios on Thursday, Feb. 16 at 10 a.m. Lunch and Learn with Janet Just imagine a light picnic lunch as you munch and listen to one of Janet De Winter’s crisp and

during regular registration department hours at Great Neck House. Non-resident registration fees apply. Come to Great Neck House, 14 Arrandale Avenue or call (516) 482-0355 for a detailed list of adult and children’s classes available. Winter Swim Program Winter Swim programs for children, ages 3 and up, continue at the Great Neck North Middle School every Saturday afternoon between 12 and 4 p.m. It is never too late to register. There is an extra fee for non-residents. Call (516) 487-2975, Ext. 118 for more information.

Great Neck Community Calendar Continued from Page 12 487-9392. TUESDAYS WITH REAP (Retired, Energetic, and Active People) at the REAP ADULT EDUCATION CENTER 20 Cumberland Ave., Great Neck. The Economics and Writers’ Clubs meet the second Tusday of the Month. VACATIONARTS AT THE GOLD COAST ARTS CENTER The Gold Coast Arts Center continues to bring fun and creative activities to children through the VacationArts program. It’s the perfect choice for no school days. VacationArts allows you to choose your own dates and schedule your Pre-K through 7th Graders for a fun, exciting and active day. Your children will experience sessions in Art, Music, Ceramics, Chess, and Acting, taught by experienced teachers and artists. Days off from school are filled with creative activities which will keep your child engaged and happy. Construct a sculpture; learn a hip-hop routine; strategize chess moves with a grand master; make a unique edible art project; and more. Activities vary daily. Creative expression is considered one of the building blocks of early development, so why not keep your child engaged. Further VacationArts™ Programs: Winter Recess: Feb. 21, 22, 23, 24 2017 Spring Recess: April 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 17, 18 2017 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. A NUT-FREE Snack and Lunch is Included in Tuition. Kosher Meals Available Upon Re-

quest. Transportation Not Provided. GREAT NECK PUBLIC SCHOOLS Wednedsay, March 1, Thursday, March 2, and Saturday, March 4 from 9am-12pm and 6-9 pm Adult Learning Center ESOL & TASC Registration, 105 Clover Drive, 516-441-4950 Friday, March 3 at 7:30 p.m. Music Night at Great Neck South High School, 341 Lakeville Rd. Info: 516-441-4873 Tuesday, March 7 at 7:30 p.m. Music Fundraiser at South High School, 341 Lakeville Rd., 516441-4851 Thursday, March 9 at 7:30 p.m. BOE Public Action Meeting at South Middle School, 349 Lakeville Rd., 516-441-4001 Wednesday, March 22 at 7:30 p.m. North Middle School Presents “Seussical.” 77 Polo Rd. Info: 516441-4551 NATIONAL SECURITY EXPERT On Friday, March 3, 2017 at 7:30 p.m., Karen J. Greenberg, expert on national security, terrorism and civil liberties and director of the Center on National Security, will be the guest in the pulpit at Temple Emanuel of Great Neck. She will offer the talk, “Rogue Justice: The Making of the Security State—An Update.” Greenberg’s talk is preceded by a brief service. Following her talk, there will be a Q&A, refreshments and a book signing. All members of the community are invited to attend. Admission is free. Temple Emanuel of Great Neck is located at 150 Hicks Lane in Great Neck. For further information, please call 516-482-5701.


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

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READERS WRITE

Where to go to find real facts Continued from Page 15 daily business publications in the world. Its editorial page is a bastion of American free-market conservatism, using the motto, “free markets, free people.” With former Republican speechwriters and strategists such as Karl Rove, Peggy Noonan and Bill McGurn writing columns, the WSJ editorial page is often a mustread for Republicans in Washington. And left-leaning readers should not dismiss the WSJ edit page just because they may disagree with its positions. It has won several Pulitzer Prizes for editorials and columns that feature a clear thesis, backed up by thorough fact-based reporting and bold arguments. * 3. The Washington Post The newspaper that brought down President Richard Nixon with its reporting on the Watergate scandal in the early 1970s maintains its intellectually robust tradition under the new ownership of Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos. The Post has, for decades, been part of the big three national papers — a peer of the NYT and WSJ — in terms of winning Pulitzer Prizes, hiring the best and brightest reporters and producing big scoops. Of the big three, the Post is arguably the most forwardthinking right now in trying new digital strategies that have boosted readership. And with Bezos’ back-

ing, the Post is on a hiring binge for talented reporters while the NYT and WSJ have been pruning their reporting staffs in recent months. Most people think the Post editorial page leans left but is often regarded as more center left than the NYT. * 4. BBC The BBC is the global standard bearer for excellence in broadcast radio and TV journalism. If only U.S. cable news outlets could follow BBC‘s recipe. And while PBS produces some great entertainment, documentary and news programs, its news programs have often seemed to lack the creative energy of the BBC. While NPR produces some fantastic journalism, a bulk of its news coverage seem to come from re-reporting news from the New York Times and the Associated Press. And the American public perceives NPR to be more left-leaning than the BBC. 5. The Economist Another British export, the Economist magazine is staffed with excellent economists and journalists who produce a tightlyedited, factually rigorous account of what’s happening in the world each week. One oddity is that the Economist doesn’t publish bylines of their writers so you never know who exactly wrote a given piece. 6. The New Yorker This American treasure publishes sophisticated narrative nonfiction pieces from top writers and

reporters each week in a print magazine and, increasingly, on other platforms. The New Yorker is smartly expanding its audience on the web, offering to the masses content that used to be open only to its print subscribers. The magazine itself runs a piece of fiction each week (identifies it as such). The long-form non-fiction reports on politics, culture, business and other topics often take months to report, write and fact check. The result is deep reporting and analysis each week that is hard to find elsewhere. And the narrative structures and techniques the writers use make for enjoyable reading. Similar to the Times, the New Yorker presents a progressive view of the world. Conservative readers should recognize that but not let it detract from them enjoying some of the best reporting and writing happening in the world. * 7. Wire Services: The Associated Press, Reuters, Bloomberg News You can’t exactly “subscribe” to these wire services. But you can trust reports from these organizations to be factual. They provide a backbone of news and information flows about politics and the economy. And their member organizations that surface their reports benefit from this reporting. You can follow these organizations on social media and can also follow certain reporters for these organizations who report on topics of

interest to you. These wire services also do have web sites and mobile apps you can use to stay abreast the news. * 8. Foreign Affairs This bi-monthly magazine is published by the Council on Foreign Relations. It’s a serious magazine for people who want intelligence on global affairs. The magazine and its many digital platforms benefits from submissions, dialogue, differing views and analysis from the many top minds on international relations. 9. The Atlantic This is another national treasure, a monthly magazine that presents a view of the nation and world from Washington D.C. It is informed by many top journalists who write long-form features and also write some analysis. The Atlantic web site sometimes hews to clickable headlines. But the magazine and its parent company also subscribe to American journalism principles of fact-based reporting. 10. Politico Founded by reporters who left the Washington Post in 2006, Politico has built itself into a crucial player in politics reporting in the U.S. (and with expansions to Europe). It does publish some products in print, but Politico is easily accessible on the Internet and mobile devices. Keep an eye on Axios, a news startup launched this year by two founders of Politico. * Disclosures: Earlier in my

career, I interned at the Associated Press and the Washington Post. I worked as a staff writer at the Wall Street Journal between 20012011. I have also published freelance articles in the Post, the New York Times and the New Yorker (website) as well as some of the publications listed in the runner up lists. Notables: - National Public Radio & Public Broadcasting Service - TIME magazine -The Christian Science Monitor - The Los Angeles Times (and many other regional, metropolitan daily newspapers) - USA Today - CNN - NBC News - CBS News - ABC News Business News Sources: - FORBES magazine - Bloomberg BusinessWeek magazine - Fortune magazine - The Financial Times newspaper Sources of reporting and opinion from the right of the political spectrum: - National Review - The Weekly Standard Sources of reporting and opinion from the left of the political spectrum: - The New Republic - The Nation

Trump leads attack on democracy

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n the past few months, much has been written and spoken about the importance of our democratic institutions in safeguarding our country from precipitous actions on the part of the new administration in Washington. Yet, in the little more than three weeks since the inauguration, these institutions have come under relentless attack, leaving many to ask whether they are strong enough to preserve our democracy. First, came the attack on the media, which was labeled the “opposition party” and disparaged for exposing the many lies, falsehoods, bogus claims, baseless assertions and delusions promoted by the White House as “competing truths,” as though two mutually exclusive facts can exist at the same time. This attack is ongoing. Next came the attack on the

Department of Justice, with the firing of a career Department of Justice lawyer, the acting attorney general, because she refused to defend an executive order limiting travel and immigration which she did not believe was lawful. The attorney general represents the country (not the White House) and has the duty to uphold the rule of law. So far, that Department of Justice lawyer’s belief has been validated by the courts. Now we have the “demoralizing” and “disheartening” spectacle of the occupant of the Oval Office calling the federal judge who blocked his travel and immigration ban a “so-called judge” whose “ridiculous” ruling would be overturned on appeal (it wasn’t) and lashing out at the appellate judges who were considering the appeal, calling the judicial proceedings “disgraceful”

and the courts as “political.” “Demoralizing” and “disheartening” are not my words, but those of Judge Neil M. Gorsuch, Donald Trump’s nominee to fill the vacancy on the Supreme Court. Judge Gorsuch’s comments were confirmed by aides. All this before the federal Court of Appeals unanimously affirmed the lower court ruling and suggested that the ban did not advance our national security and that the administration had pointed to “no evidence” that anyone from the seven predominantly Muslim countries covered by the executive order had committed any terrorist acts in the United States. The Court of Appeals ruling rejected the administration’s claim that the courts are powerless to review a president’s national security determinations. In the words of the appellate

court, “It is beyond question that the federal judiciary retains the authority to adjudicate constitutional challenges to executive action.” But still the attack on the judiciary persists. “See you in court,” Donald Trump tweeted after being turned back by two federal courts. Like the anecdotal client whose lawyer tells him that “justice has prevailed,” Donald Trump keeps shouting “appeal.” “Our legal system is broken,” reads still another tweet, though our judiciary has thus far withstood Donald Trump’s efforts to break the system. Article III of our Constitution provides for the rule of law by establishing a judiciary independent of the executive and legislative branches, one of the checks and balances against unbridled actions by the other branches in contravention of the Constitu-

tion. Checks and balances means that sometimes the executive branch will be told “no.” Donald Trump isn’t accustomed to hearing the word “no.” But, to preserve the rule of law, it is incumbent upon the courts to say “no” to Donald Trump whenever he oversteps constitutional limitations. The rule of law is what differentiates our country from totalitarian regimes. Without it we are just another banana republic. My sixth grade granddaughter explained the differences between democracies, autocracies and oligarchies as we watched the inauguration back on January 20. Sadly, what the man who was inaugurated that day needs is some middle school social studies lessons. Jay N. Feldman Port Washington


48 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

READERS WRITE

Baxter House owner fails historic building

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s we all know the Baxter House was the subject of a mysterious ďŹ re a little over a week ago. Very little in the way of public response has been made by the village oďŹ&#x192;cials of Baxter Estates except for a brief statement of loss on the village webpage. Yesterday my friend was visiting the Baxter Estates Village Hall, when the current owner of the Baxter House property arrived with an armful of donuts and other pastries. The current owner of the Baxter House said that she wanted to thank the oďŹ&#x192;cials of the Village of Baxter Estates

for being good to her. The mayor, trustees and the Landmarks Commission of Baxter Estates have indeed been good to her. The current owner let the historic Baxter House fall into disrepair without paying one cent to the village in ďŹ nes, although orders to remedy were repeatedly issued. If the house had been kept properly, would there have been a ďŹ re? We are awaiting the ďŹ re marshalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s report. For those that think the current owner was blindsided by the landmarking of the Baxter House a year after she bought it, I understand the landmarking process started three years before the current

we all have a say in that. Please attend. Why do I care? I love the Baxter House because I grew up in the west where there are no buildings going back to the American Revolution. The Baxter House property is a sentinel reminding us of our American history because Israel Baxter fought for our country under Captain John Sands of Sands Point and General George Washington. The house, like so many others on Long Island, housed Hessian soldiers ďŹ ghting for England. It is irreplaceable.

owner bought the Baxter House. I understand she was told of the possibility of the house being landmarked. Even if she is not a professional in real estate, she needed to do her due diligence before buying the property. There will be a meeting of the Landmarks Commission on March 1 at 7:30 at the Port Washington Public Library to consider whether to totally demolish the Baxter House. The current owner would like to do that to build a new home. Many people think that the Baxter House despite the ďŹ re can be repaired and rebuilt. As a landmarked building,

Gloria Marmor Port Washington

House puts Baxter Estates at â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;crossroadsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

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he Village of Baxter Estates is at a crossroads. Its landmarked namesake is in shambles and the mayor and the trustee say they are powerless to aďŹ&#x20AC;ect an outcome other than demolition. Indeed, they seem to welcome demolition after many years of failing to protect the house. There are two stories here, one is a tale of good intentions and a hope that an absentee owner will do the right thing despite a history of doing exactly the opposite. The other story, in my view just as tragic, a municipal government that asks that its laws being complied with rather than

demand it. A government should not have to â&#x20AC;&#x153;persuade, cajole, or convinceâ&#x20AC;? anyone to comply with the law. As Teddy Roosevelt put it â&#x20AC;&#x153;no man is above the law and no man is below it: nor do we ask any manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s permission when we ask him to obey it.â&#x20AC;? Some have expressed sympathy for the owner because she bought the house not knowing it could be landmarked. There is much disinformation regarding the landmarking process. Many do not appear to recognize that the House was landmarked in 2005 after the owner was aďŹ&#x20AC;orded extensive due pro-

Despite numerous violations of village law the village has no record of the owner paying a penny in ďŹ nes. Each member of the Village Board took an oath to enforce the laws of the Village, but with regard to the Baxter House that enforcement has been entirely wanting. Please join us on Wednesday, March 1, at 7:30 p.m. at the Port Washington Public Library for the Baxter Estates Landmark Commission meeting. Come to speak for the house and speak for the rule of law.

cess and that in landmarking the property, the village noted that the owner was aware that the house was over 300 years prior to the sale and that there was a historic preservation law on the books. The village landmarked the Baxter House in 2005 and the owner never sought to challenge that determination in court. Rather, from records obtained from the village, it appears that the owner not only failed to maintain the home in violation of village laws, but also illegally turned the house â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a single family â&#x20AC;&#x201D; into a multiple occupancy. She was ďŹ rst cited for this in 2012 and the later in 2014.

Michael Scotto Baxter Estates

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Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

49

Business&RealEstate Seller, make believe you are buyer You are getting ready to put your home on the market and especially now when there is less competition during the winter months, compared to the spring when many more will consider listing their homes. Now, make believe you are the buyer. I want you to walk through your home and critique it. Be as critical as possible, since you need to understand that today, it probably will be the largest outlay of dollars you, as the potential purchaser, will ever make. Not all buyers will always be straight forward to let their agent or seller know how they really feel about the properties that they visit; they may not want to insult them. The truth is, they just pass on those houses and go on to view the next one. Buyers will always base their decisions on the location and school district as a first pre-requisite as to the towns they will want to live. Next will be the styles that are available and what they may like. But most important, if they are looking for an excellent to mint condition home, they want the kitchens and bathrooms to be in perfect condition or some, who are experienced, will take a fixerupper and renovate and update to their specific needs and wants. While walking through your home how would you rate yours? This is not to say that you have to renovate; because you will not always get all the money back when selling. You have to compare selling prices of homes that are updated to those that are somewhat similar to yours and then decide what will be a proper asking price. Your realtor can surely assist you with this task. You know what you originally paid for your place and then determine the asking price and how fast you want to sell. Obviously, updating and renovating will assist you in selling much faster, but at what price are you willing to

go. Always have a budget in mind when planning to update and don’t go overboard. Next, looking around your interior, does it show as sunny and bright most of the day (eastern to western exposure). Are your windows clean, bushes trimmed below the windows. Does the interior need a touch up or a full paint job? How are your floors and/ or carpeting? Worn or clean and shimmering? How updated are your utilities, eg. electric, gas, plumbing. I always advise my sellers to hire a professional licensed home inspector, so you will know in advance what issues you might have and take the opportunity to address and rectify them. This would be extremely helpful when your home is over 30 years old and as things wear and break, you will then know what to do. You do not want any surprises when the purchasers inspector finds items that you could have taken care of, if you only knew beforehand. Then at that moment, the

PHILIP A. RAICES Real Estate Watch purchaser decides they want to renegotiate the agreed upon price and ask for a credit, that might be larger than the cost to fix those issues or they might just walk away. Again, it is a seller’s market environment, but that doesn’t mean buyers will purchase your home at your price, no matter what issues are discovered. As is said, “ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” So again, you have to have the mind set of a buyer and see your home through the purchaser’s eyes and be picky,

as most of them will be when viewing your place. A big problem today that I have observed, is the clutter that is in and outside of many houses. Too much stuff, will in many instances, cloud the vision of buyers to really see the true value of your property. Give yourself plenty of time to remove those things that you will absolutely not consider taking with you when you move. This is the most difficult process for a lot of owners, because it takes a huge amount of effort and discipline to begin. Start with a little bit each day and make it a regimen, so it becomes part of your daily job and you will be surprised how smoothly it will go if you discipline yourself to just start. The finish line will be that much more closer than you would imagine. Also, during the winter, make sure your walkways are clear and you have ice melt, in the event of snow. You do not want anyone

slipping and hurting themselves on your watch. Keep things simple and make yourself a checklist. For “Our Seller’s Guide for “Things to Consider When Selling Your Home,”just email me with your name, email and cell number. Phil Raices is the owner/ Broker of Turn Key Real Estate at 7 Bond St. in Great Neck. He has earned designations as a Graduate Realtor Institute and Certified International Property Specialist. He can be reached by email: Phil@TurnkeyRealEstate.Com or by cell (516) 647-4289 to answer any of your questions or article suggestions. To search for any type of properties or to see what your home is worth or homes that have sold in your area, go to WWW.Li-RealEstate.Com or if you desire a free, no strings attached customized Comparative Market Analysis for your home in today’s market and learn of its value, just call me for an appointment.


50 The Great Neck News, Friday, February 17, 2017

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Recent Real Estate Sales in Great Neck Great Neck Real Estate Market Conditions MEDIAN SALES PRICE $789,000 Demographics near Great Neck, NY Population Population Density Median Age People per Household Median Household Income Average Income per Capita

City 9,972 7,503 41.4 2.9 86,722 39,686

County 1,338,712 4,702 41.2 3 97,049 42,286

9 Wyngate Place, Great Neck Sold Price: $1,268,000 Date: 01/19/2017 4 beds, 2 Full/1 Half baths # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 60x103 Schools: Great Neck Total Taxes: $18,573 MLS# 2887407

4 Saint George Road, Great Neck Sold Price: $1,018,000 Date: 01/24/2017 4 beds, 3 Full/1 Half baths Style: Colonial # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 75x100 Schools: Great Neck Total Taxes: $14,234 MLS# 2884253

31 Old Field Lane, Great Neck Sold Price:$1,380,000 Date: 01/20/2017 4 beds, 4 Full/1 Half baths Style: Colonial # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 121x136 Schools: Great Neck Total Taxes: $21,588 MLS# 2892913

66 Beverly Road, Great Neck Sold Price: $1,030,000 Date: 01/20/2017 4 beds, 3 Full baths Style: Split # of Families: 1 Lot Size: 100x100 Schools: Great Neck Total Taxes: $27,945 MLS# 2876360

Editor’s note: Homes shown here were recently sold in Great Neck by a variety of real estate agencies. The information about the homes and the photos were obtained through the Multiple Listing Services of Long Island. The homes are presented based solely on the fact that they were recently sold in Great Neck and are believed by Blank Slate Media to be of interest to our readers.

GLOBAL CONNECTIONS. LOCAL AGENTS Your buyers could be down the street or on the other side of the world, but our local agents have the tools to find them either way… reach matters. Great Neck Office | 11 Bond Street | 516.466.2100 Visit us at elliman.com/long-island 110 WALT WHITMAN ROAD, HUNTINGTON STATION, NY, 11746. 631.549.7401 © 2017 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


The Great Neck News, Friday, February 17, 2017

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Ex town aide tied to alleged Terry front Continued from Page 1 village attorney and deputy village attorney, respectively. Fielding took the town zoning board job four days after he was officially replaced as the clerk-treasurer in the Village of Manorhaven in July 2012. Terry’s tenure as the village attorney also ended that month. Manorhaven has received two subpoenas from the Nassau County District Attorney’s Office relating to Terry — one in 2016 and another in 2007 — and a separate federal subpoena from 2015 investigating contracts with eight village vendors, according to documents obtained by Blank Slate Media. Fielding ended his work as the village’s clerk and treasurer at a time when, former village officials said, scores of village records were found destroyed or missing at the start of thenMayor Giovana Giunta’s new administration. Fielding denied that any records were destroyed or removed. He was hired as the town zoning board secretary on July 30, 2012, and was most recently paid a town salary of $105,137, Carole Trottere, a town spokeswoman, said in an email. He worked with Terry until the town ceased its working relationship with Terry last year after revelations about his tax debt. Fielding’s duties included researching zoning appeals applications, meeting with applicants, writing meeting minutes and preparing board decisions, he said. Fielding said he had “no intention” of leaving his job at the town. His wife and four children depended on the income and health insurance it provided, he said. “It’s a great blow to me and my family to lose my livelihood,” Fielding said. Trottere would not say whether Fielding was fired or left voluntarily, or whether his connection to Terry played a role in his departure. “We do not comment on personnel issues,” Trottere said in a statement. Fielding’s departure came the same day that Stephen Scaring, Terry’s Garden City-based attorney, asked U.S. District Court Judge Joanna Seybert to change Terry’s bail conditions so that he is no longer confined to his Roslyn Heights home. Home detention is having an “adverse impact ... on Mr. Terry’s law practice, and his ability to earn a living,” Scaring

wrote in a court filing Tuesday. Scaring did not respond to a request for comment for this story. Terry pleaded not guilty Jan. 31 to federal charges of tax evasion and obstruction of the IRS for failing to file on-time income tax returns since 2000 and lying about his income on returns he filed late, despite making at least $200,000 annually, mostly from taxpayer-funded jobs with Nassau County municipalities. Terry has also pleaded not guilty to eight charges of tax fraud brought in New York State courts. He is also under federal investigation for his role in “kickback, bid rigging and other procurement fraud schemes in Nassau County,” according to a Jan. 31 court filing. Terry allegedly deposited income into a corporate checking account for Neville Warwick LLC to avoid the IRS taking payments from his personal bank account toward his tax debt, which totals about $1.4 million, according to federal court filings. Fielding has not been subpoenaed or interviewed by state or federal investigators, he said. Nellin McIntosh, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York, declined to comment on the ongoing federal investigation of Terry. Neville Warwick was incorporated on July 30, 2010, about three weeks after Fielding was reappointed to a two-year term as Manorhaven village clerk on July 8, according to village meeting minutes. Terry served alongside him as village attorney until July 2012, when Giunta, then the newly elected mayor, took office and replaced them. Fielding’s working relationship with Terry only extended to meetings where Terry would address legal questions relevant to the village or the town zoning board, he said. “I didn’t see him day to day in either capacity because that’s not the nature of the position that he held,” Fielding said. Giunta and other Manorhaven officials offered to keep Fielding on as village clerk for three months after the new administration took office, said Lucretia Steele, a village trustee at the time. But he declined the offer and later took the job as the town’s zoning board secretary, Steele said. “He said, ‘No, I can’t stay, I have my reasons,’” Steele said. Giunta declined to com-

Gerard Terry ment for this story. But Fielding, in the interview, said Giunta and other new officials planned to replace him all along. He left in early July, he said, but the Board of Trustees did not appoint a new clerk until July 26. Before he left, he detailed all issues facing the village in a memorandum and attached all relevant documents, he said. “I did everything that I could for them at the time in the amount of time that I had left,” Fielding said. Nassau County District Attorney Madeline Singas subpoenaed Manorhaven in February 2016 for information about Terry’s jobs with the village; his pay; all of his personnel files; and all financial disclosures he had filed since 2000, according to a copy of the subpoena. The subpoena came two days after Singas said she would investigate Terry following a Jan. 30 Newsday report that revealed he had a tax debt of more than $1 million despite holding six government jobs paying him more than $200,000 in 2015. But it was not the first subpoena Manorhaven had received bearing Terry’s name. An August 2007 subpoena from then-Nassau District Attorney Kathleen Rice contained similar language, demanding “any and all documents” in Terry’s personnel file, as well as all payroll records and financial disclosure forms related to Terry. Brendan Brosh, a spokesman for Singas’ office, declined to comment on the focus of the 2007 investigation and what it concluded. “Because a criminal case is pending against Mr. Terry, I cannot address your question about any other investigation(s) which may have involved this defendant,” Brosh said in a statement. A spokesman for Rice, now a Democratic U.S. congresswoman, also declined to comment. The U.S. Attorney’s Office separately subpoenaed

Manorhaven in January 2015 seeking records related to village contracts with eight people and companies that had been in effect at any point since January 2010, according to a copy of the subpoena. The listed contractors were Peter Dejana; Dejana Industries, Dejana’s national municipal services company; Aero Snow Removal, a Dejana Industries subsidiary; Anthony Soldano; Port Auto Body Inc.; Louis Tobar; Stephen Blasucci; and his company Port Plumbing and Heating. McIntosh, the spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney’s office, declined to comment on the subpoena and whether it was related to the investigation of Terry. Village officials turned over thousands of pages of documents relating to seven of the eight contractors in response to the subpoena, according to a source with direct knowledge of the subpoena who requested anonymity to discuss it. No records related to Aero Snow Removal could be located, but village officials found “compromised and removed computers, missing minutes and shredded village records” when Giunta’s administration took over in July 2012, then-village Clerk Leslie Gross wrote in a February 2015 letter responding to the subpoena. Steele, the former village trustee under Giunta, said she saw shredded documents “all over the place” when she and others entered the village office on the first day of the new administration. They also determined whole boxes of records were missing, Steele said. But a police report was never filed and no internal investigation was conducted to determine who was responsible, Steele said. Fielding called the allegations “entirely inaccurate and a fabrication,” and said he had no knowledge of any officials destroying records Current village Mayor Jim Avena, who was a trustee before Giunta’s administration took over, rejected the accusation and said he was unaware of such a thing ever happening. “It was never brought to my attention about records being destroyed,” Avena said in an interview. Avena said he was never questioned in relation to the federal subpoena, and that he is unaware of any other village officials being questioned. In the time period covered

by the subpoena, Dejana Industries had a garbage-removal contract with Manorhaven that officials have said cost the village nearly $100,000 in extra expenses. Manorhaven-based Dejana Industries won the one-year contract in 2009 at a cost of $563,000, some $94,000 more than the village’s previous contract with Westbury-based Meadow Carting, James Toner, the former village attorney, said in March 2016. Village bid documents required that the contractor be located within a four-mile radius of the village, making Dejana the only qualified bidder, according to village records. Such provisions in that and other contracts have cost the village about $1 million, Toner said last year. Dejana Industries did not respond to a request for comment, nor did Blasucci, who owns Port Plumbing and Heating. A publicly listed number for Soldano was disconnected. Someone who answered the phone at Port Auto Body hung up on a reporter’s call. No contact information for Tobar was publicly available. Terry has blamed his tax debt on “Type-A workaholic compulsion with self-denial and truly catastrophic health issues.” He and his wife, Concetta Terry, have had “virtually no current income” since Concetta Terry lost her job last summer as a deputy clerk in North Hempstead, Scaring, Terry’s attorney, wrote in Tuesday’s court filing. Allowing Terry to leave his home while his case proceeds would allow him to continue his law practice with a focus on private clients, given that he has lost all his government clients, Scaring wrote. “[W]hile the government is eager to bandy about the notion that Mr. Terry has a secret cache of wealth, prosecutors offer no evidence to support this claim,” Scaring wrote. A public statement by Assistant U.S. Attorney Artie McConnell on Jan. 31 about Terry’s alleged relationship to other corruption investigations was also supported by little evidence and was irrelevant to the crimes with which Terry has been charged, Scaring argued. There is no indication that Terry has tried to interfere with ongoing criminal investigations, and he is highly unlikely to flee while facing these charges, Scaring wrote. Stephen Romano contributed reporting.


52 The Great Neck News, Friday, February 17, 2017

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House should be torn down: report Continued from Page 13 Library. Before Thursday’s snowstorm, residents said they were concerned that the snow would cause more structural damage to the house and wanted Wu or an outside contractor to install plywood over the roof the house. Saladino said if the snow was to cause portions of the house to collapse, the debris would likely fall within the interior of the house and within the fence. Koutsoubis said plywood should not be installed on the roof because multiple rafters are missing and it would be difficult to attach the wood. “Rather than stabilize the structure, the added weight of the plywood and any subsequent snow, will actually reduce stability and increase the likelihood of roof collapse,” Koutsoubis said. “And third, even if the building could be protected to prevent further damage or deterioration, my recommendation would still be to demolish the structure.” The snowstorm did not cause more damage to the house, residents said. Although residents asked about the possibility of the house’s chimneys falling due to strong winds, Kout-

soubis said, they would most likely fall inward “because it is the inward chimney support that is most compromised.” If a chimney fell outward, it would fall within the fenced-off area, Koutsoubis said. Long before the fire, residents and village officials pushed to preserve the house, condemning Wu for allowing it to deteriorate. Chris Bain, president of the Cow Neck Peninsula Historical Society, said “it was allowed to decline with no one living there.” “The owner didn’t take care of it,” he said. Wu purchased the house in 2003 for $990,000 and the village landmarked the property in 2005 — a decision appealed by Wu. The village issued Wu three Order to Remedy violations — the last of them coming recently for blue tarps that covered the home’s windows and fell into neighbors’ yards. Residents from Baxter Estates, Port Washington and all over Long Island have shown support for the home, repeatedly contacting the village, posting to a Facebook group “Save the Baxter House,” which has over 650

PHOTO FROM SAVE THE BAXTER HOUSE VIA FACEBOOK

The Baxter House, a historic 18th-century home in Baxter Estates, was heavily damaged in a fire early Sunday morning. members and signing a petition to save the home. Koutsoubis said there are health and safety reasons for demolishing the home, too, noting the possibility of animals and trespassers entering.

Residents vote down $85.9M bond Continued from Page 1 needs of our school district.” The proposed bond was to be part of a $95.41 million total the school was set to spend on capital needs and educational enhancements in the district. The remaining $9.51 million would have been taken from reserves. There are over 6,500 students in the district. The school district estimated that if the bond had passed, a home valued at $500,000 would see a tax increase of $157.50 per year, a home valued at $750,000 would see a tax increase of $236.25 per year and a home valued at $1 million would see a tax increase of $315 per year. School district officials and architects from Patchogue-based BBS Architecture introduced proposed plans in October for each of the district’s 18 school buildings targeted at addressing critical needs. The projects would have cost an estimated $51.7 million. In November, school district officials presented plans for how $43.71 million would be spend on educational and school building improvements. “More upsetting than this loss is the fact that this bond has polarized our community, Berkowitz said. “Therefore, before we can contemplate our next step, we will need to determine how best to repair this fracture.” Roger Smith, BBS’ principal archi-

The Great Neck Board of Education tect, had said roof construction was one of the “larger pieces” of the bond, as many of the district’s roofs were damaged or have moss growing due to water infiltration. Smith said the roof work was expected to last the district between 25 to 30 years. The funds would also have been used to fix windows and doors, which, Smith said, are “truly past their life expectancy.” Of the $43.71 million in educational enhancements proposed in the rejected bond, many of the “areas of focus” that were detailed by Fred Seeba and Joe Rettig, architects from BBS, in November were related to renovated science labs and library and media centers, auditorium renovations, bathroom renovations

and improved air conditioning and infrastructure in the district’s schools. The bond would have allowed the district to create a $6.58 million early childhood center, where children across the district would have been offered a pre-kindergarten education, at the district’s Adult Learning Center on Clover Drive. The early childhood center would have been more convenient for students living in the southern half of the district. Superintendent of Schools Teresa Prendergast said leading up to the vote that the early childhood center would have also helped alleviate overcrowding at E.M. Baker Elementary School. Leading up to the vote, the school board pushed the importance of the

Great Neck Social Center Continued from Page 46 lively reviews of a fascinating novel. Do call (516)487-0025 to reserve a space for her delightful review. And you do not have to read the book to enjoy Janet’s review.

World in Depth Goes Deeper Lively active seniors meet every Thursday at 2 p.m. to share opinions under the moderation of a quartet of savvy men and women. People like Janet de Winter, Martha Cohen, Martin Boomsa and an occasional Special

Guest take the discussion to a higher level than most of what you watch on TV. No charge to come and put in your own opinion. The Great Neck Senior Citizens Center is located at 80 Grace Ave. in Great Neck.

bond, urging residents to vote in favor. The school board made an effort to reach Great Neck residents through mailings, presentations at school board meetings and presentations at different organizations, including the Great Neck Village Officials Association, Great Neck Chinese Association, Great Neck Chamber of Commerce. Donald Ashkenase, who is serving his 12th term on the school board, called the bond issue one of the most important undertakings the board has considered during his 35-year tenure. “Our disappointment is obvious, but we will continue to do all in our power to address the needs of our children, our schools and our community,” Berkowitz said.

y they READ WEEKLY OPINIONS have FROM YOUR NEIGHBORS to say SIMPLY VISIT US ONLINE

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Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY

SCHOOL & CAMP DIRECTORY

Sport Psychology Dr. Tom Ferraro

has specialized in sport psychology for 20 years and works in the fields of golf, tennis, soccer, baseball, football, wrestling, lacrosse, figure skating, gymnastics, softball, fencing and more. He has helped professional teams, Olympians and elite young athletes learn how to manage the intense pressure of competitive sports. He appears on both TV and radio and has sport psychology columns in 5 different newspapers and has been featured in The New York Times, Wall street Journal and the London Times. Golf Digest includes him in their list of top mental game gurus in America. For a consultation see below: Williston Park Professional Center 2 Hillside Ave, Suite E. Williston Park NY 11596

Our 68th Summer!!

(building parallel to E. Williston railroad station)

drtomferraro.com drtferraro@aol.com

(516) 248-7189

Cozzi Pro Shop Open In Lobby TEEN NIGHT FRIDAYS 8:30-10:30

Celebrate Natâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; l Skate Day!

2/18 - 11:30-2:45 Lots of Giveaways!

OPEN YEAR ROUND

We are holding a fundraiser for the Scott Hamilton CARES Foundation. Please join us 2/18/17, 11:30-2:45.

# Learn to Skate Program # Tots -Adults # Group Lessons

# # # #

Private Lessons Birthday Parties Public Sessions Hockey Programs

Registration is Ongoing For Hockey & Skill Development Clinics

$

10 OFF

BIRTHDAY PARTY PACKAGE One Coupon Per Party. Not to be combined w/any other offer.

3345 HILLSIDE AVE. NEW HYDE PARK, NY Just West of Herricks Road

Gift Certificates Available

516-746-1100 www.icelandlongisland.com

53


54 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

PROFESSIONAL GUIDE ▼

FAMILY THERAPIST ▼

HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT ▼

Family Care Connections,® LLC Dr. Ann Marie D’Angelo, PMHCNS-BC Doctor of Nursing Practice Advanced Practice Nurse Care Manager Assistance with Aging at Home / Care Coordination Nursing Home & Assisted Living Placement PRI / Screens / Mini Mental Status Exams 901 Stewart Ave., Suite 230, Garden City, NY 11530

(516) 248-9323

WWW.DRANNMARIEDANGELO.COM INDIVIDUAL, MARRIAGE & FAMILY THERAPY ▼

Joan D. Atwood, Ph.D. New York Marriage and Family Therapists An experienced therapist makes all the difference Individual, Couple, and Family Therapy and Anger Management

516 764 2526 jatwood@optonline.net • http://www.NYMFT.Com 542 Lakeview Avenue Rockville Centre, NY

19 West 34th St. New York, NY

101 Hillside Avenue Williston Park, NY

PSYCHOTHERAPY ▼

LAW ▼

Elder Law Wills & Trusts Medical Planning Estate Planning Probate & Estate Administration / Litigation 901 Stewart Avenue, Suite 230 Garden City, NY 11530

(516) 222-1122

WWW.DANGELOLAWASSOCIATES.COM REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONAL ▼

Efrat Fridman,

TAX & ACCOUNTING ▼

Marion Cohen

LCSW

Real Estate Salesperson, CBR

Individual, couple and family therapy

"Your agent, your neighbor"

PSYCHOTHERAPY

effiefrid@gmail.com Woodbury By Appointment

To advertise, call 516.307.1045 or fax 516.307.1046

D’Angelo Law Associates, PC Frank G. D’Angelo, Esq.

Individual, Couple & Family Counseling Women’s Groups

SLafazan@Hotmail.com 516-375-3897

PLACE YOUR AD WITH US!

PIANO LESSONS ▼

PSYCHOTHERAPY ▼

Sandra Lafazan, LCSW Psychotherapist

ADVERTISE WITH US ▼

516-224-7670 2 Pinetree Lane Old Westbury NY 11568

718-887-4400 225 W. 35th St. New York, NY 10001

TAX PREPARER ▼

350 Main St., Port Washington, NY 11050 cell: 917.434.2941 o: 516.883.2900 ext. 312 Email: marioncohen@danielgale.com Web: marioncohen.danielgale.com Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity

TUTOR ▼

MATH • SAT • ACT

TAX PREPARATION IRS & NYS REGISTERED TAX PREPARER Individual & Small Business Returns

We Make House Calls! • 25+ years experience • Available all year • Appointments 7 days

New client 10% discount

Maria Passariello 516-984-3328 • mptax1040@gmail.com

TUTORING ▼

CHEMISTRY TUTOR ▼

call

Jonathan, Ivy League Ph.D.

(516)

669-0587

itutorchem@gmail.com I also tutor:

AP • SAT II Regents

biology, gy physics, p y earth & envi. sci.

NorthShoreAcademics.weebly.com

TI-84 TI-89

# Algebra # Core Curriculum NYS Licensed # Geometry Grades 7-12 # Algebra 2 + Trig # Pre-Calc # AP Calculus

NORM: 625-3314

ENGLISH • ACT • SAT ing ritical Read C # 25+ Years # Writing Experience # Grammar # Essays

LYNNE: 6 2 5 - 3 3 1 4


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

PROFESSIONAL GUIDE TUTORING â&#x2013;¼

English Tutor Diane Gottlieb

M.Ed., M.S.W.

SAT/ACT, College Essays AP, Regents, ELA Test Prep Reading Comprehension and Writing Proficiency

Phone: 917-599-8007 E-mail: dianegot@gmail.com LongIslandEnglishTutor.com Providing one-on-one professional support to build confidence, knowledge, and skills in every student

TUTORING ALL SUBJECTS â&#x2013;¼

3RUW7XWRULQJ $FDGHPLF6XFFHVV $FDGHPLF6XFFHVV  

 7(6735(3 6$7,6$7,, $&7 $3 66$7 &+6(( ,6((

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&RPPRQ&RUH0DWK (QJOLVK 5HJHQWV$3DQG+RQRUV3K\VLFV0DWK+LVWRU\(DUWK6FLHQFH%LRORJ\DQG&KHPLVWU\ 6SDQLVK )UHQFK &ROOHJH0DWK 6FLHQFHV 5HDGLQJ6WXG\6NLOOVDQG7HVW7DNLQJ6WUDWHJLHV 2UJDQL]DWLRQDO6NLOOV1RWH7DNLQJ &ROOHJH&RXQVHOLQJ5HVXPH (VVD\V

 3RUW:DVKLQJWRQ%OYG3RUW:DVKLQJWRQ1< LQIR#SRUWWXWRULQJFRP

SPANISH TUTOR â&#x2013;¼

SPANISH TUTOR SPANISH GRAMMAR/LITERATURE FLACS A - FLACS B/ Intensive Review of prior exams. This includes: Speaking, Listening Comprehension, Reading and Writing

William Cullen, M.A., SPANISH, S.D.A. Chaminade HS / Fairfield University Alumnus

516-509-8174 / wdctutor06@aol.com References furnished on request

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS â&#x2013;¼

College Arts Admissions

College Counseling in the Visual and Performing Arts Dance â&#x20AC;¢ Musical Theatre & Drama â&#x20AC;¢ Film â&#x20AC;¢ Instrumental & Vocal Music â&#x20AC;¢ Audio Recording & Production â&#x20AC;¢ Theatre Technology & Production â&#x20AC;¢ Visual & Graphic Arts

Community Meetings Village of East Williston Grievance Night

Village of Manorhaven Board of Zoning and Appeals Meeting

Village of Old Westbury Board of Trustees Meeting

Tuesday, February 21 @ 7:00 p.m. Village Hall 2 Prospect Street, East Williston 516-746-0782

Tuesday, February 21 @ 7:00 p.m. Village Hall 33 Manorhaven Boulevard Port Washington

Tuesday, February 21 @ 7:00 p.m. Village Hall 1 Store Hill Road, Old Westbury 516-626-0800

516-883-7000 Village of Floral Park Tax Grievance Night

Mineola Memorial Library Board of Trustees Meeting

Village of Plandome Manor Board of Trustees Meeting

Tuesday, February 21 @ 7:00 p.m. Village Hall 1 Floral Boulevard, Floral Park 516-326-6300

Monday, February 20 @ 7:30 p.m. 195 Marcellus Road, Mineola 516-746-8488

Tuesday, February 21 @ 7:00 p.m. Village Hall 55 Manhasset Avenue, Manhasset 516-627-3701

Village of Floral Park Architectural Review Board Meeting

Village of Mineola Assessment Review

Village of Roslyn Board of Trustees Meeting

Wednesday, February 22 @ 7:30 p.m. Pool and Recreation Building 123 Stewart Street, Floral Park 516-326-6300

Tuesday, February 21 @ 4:00 p.m. Village Hall, 155 Washington Avenue, Mineola 516-746-0750

Tuesday, February 21 @ 8:00 p.m. Village Hall 1200 Old Northern Boulevard Roslyn 516-621-1961

Village of Great Neck Board of Trustees Meeting

Village of Mineola Board of Zoning and Appeals Meeting

Tuesday, February 21 @ 8:00 p.m. Village Hall 61 Baker Hill Road, Great Neck 516-482-0019

Thursday, February 23 @ 7:30 p.m. Village Hall 155 Washington Avenue, Mineola 516-746-0750

Village of Great Neck Grievance Day â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Board of Assessment Review

Village of New Hyde Park Board of Trustees Meeting

Tuesday, February 21 @ 4:00 p.m. Village Hall 61 Baker Hill Road, Great Neck 516-482-0019

Tuesday, February 21 @ 8:00 p.m. Village Hall, 1420 Jericho Turnpike, New Hyde Park 516-354-0022

Village of Great Neck Estates Assessment Grievance

Village of New Hyde Park Tax Grievance Day

Tuesday, February 21 @ 5:00 p.m. Village Hall, Atwater Plaza/4 Gateway Drive Great Neck

Tuesday, February 21; call for appointment Village Hall 1420 Jericho Turnpike, New Hyde Park 516-354-0022

516-482-8283 Great Neck Water Pollution Control District Board of Commissioners Meeting

Village of North Hills Board of Zoning and Appeals Meeting

Thursday, February 23 @ 8:30 a.m. District Oï¬&#x192;ce 236 E Shore Road, Great Neck 516-482-0238

Tuesday, February 21 @ 7:30 p.m. Village Hall 1 Shelter Rock Road, North Hills 516-627-3451

Village of Roslyn Estates Tax Grievance Day

Tuesday, February 21 @ 12:00 p.m. Village Hall 25 The Tulips, Roslyn Estates 516-621-3541 Village of Roslyn Estates Architectural Review Board Meeting

Wednesday, February 22 @ 7:45 p.m. Village Hall 25 The Tulips, Roslyn Estates 516-621-3541 Village of Williston Park Board of Trustees Work Session and Public Meeting

Tuesday, February 21 @ 6:30 p.m. /8:00 p.m. Village Hall 494 Willis Avenue, Williston Park 516-746-2193 Meetings are held at the respective Village Halls except where noted. All meetings, dates and times are subject to change.

RESUME â&#x20AC;¢ ESSAYS â&#x20AC;¢ REPERTOIRE LISTS

Michele Zimmerman 516-353-6255 CollegeArtsAdmissions@gmail.com www.CollegeArtsAdmissions.com

PLACE YOUR AD â&#x2013;¼

ADVERTISE WITH US! To place your ad, call 516.307.1045 or fax 516.307.1046

55

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AT FACEBOOK.COM/ THEISLANDNOW AND LIKE US ON TWITTER: @THEISLANDNOW


56 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

BUYER’S GUIDE ▼ ANTIQUES

CLEANING

$$ Top Cash Paid $$

STRONG ARM CLEANING

HIGH END ANTIQUES HIGH CASH PAiD Oil Paintings, Mid-Century Accessories 1950s/60s, Porcelain, Costume Jewelry, Sterling Silver, Gold, Furniture, Objects of Art, etc. • 1 Pc.or entire estates • Premium prices paid for Tiffany, Damaged Meissen Porcelain, Bronzes, Quality Pieces Marble, etc. also

wanted

CALL JOSEPH OR

RUTH

718-598-3045 or 516-270-2128 Family Business for over 40 years

AntiqueAssets.com Buying and Selling over 40 Years / Member New England Appraisers Association

CLEANING

Residential and Commercial Cleaning Specialist • Post construction clean ups • Stripping, waxing floors • Move Ins and Move Outs

ADVERTISE HERE 516.307.1045

Free estimates / Bonded Insured

516-538-1125 www.strongarmcleaningny.com CARPENTRY

ADVERTISE HERE 516.307.1045

SWEENEY CUSTOM CARPENTRY and PAINTING Renovations Custom Closets Sheetrock Repairs Interior/Exterior

New Doors New Windows New Moldings Free Estimates

ADVERTISE HERE 516.307.1045

516-884-4016 Lic# H0454870000

GENERAL CONSTRUCTION

ADVERTISE HERE 516.307.1045

CONSTRUCTION Licensed & Bonded

DEVELOPMENT AND GENERAL CONSTRUCTION

ADVERTISE HERE 516.307.1045 HOME IMPROVEMENT PORT HOME

IMPROVEMENT & PAINTING

Remodeling • Renovation • Additions New Construction 917-642-2390 • www.vintagehomesny.com danny@vintagehomes.com Nassau County Lic. #H18H1330000

• Bathrooms • Decks • Siding • Tile • Sheetrock • Windows • Gutters

• Kitchens • Extensions • Basement • Closets • Moldings • Doors • Carpentry

10% Discount

on Interior Painting, All Carpentry Lic. #H0450780000

516-305-3153

CONSTRUCTION

PLACE YOUR AD WITH US

HOME IMPROVEMENT

ACPM CONSTRUCTION CORP

ADVERTISE WITH US!

LAMPS FIXED $ 65

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

ALL TYPES OF MASONRY Concrete • Bluestone • Pavers • Cultured Stones Blacktop • Patios • Stoops Free Estimates • References Family Owned and Operated • 35 years in business LICENSED & INSURED OFFICE 516-328-9089

LIC#1829730220 FAX 516-775-9036

To place your ad, call 516.307.1045 or fax 516.307.1046

In Home Service Handy Howard 646-996-7628


BUYER’S GUIDE ▼ HOME IMPROVEMENT

Elegant Touch Remodeling “Quality Construction with a Personal Touch” Deal direct with owner - Serving li over 25 years

• • • •

All Types of Home Improvements Free Estimates • Free design service extensions • Kitchens dormers • bathrooms decks • siding Licence #H18H2680000

Sage Oil

ADVERTISE HERE 516.307.1045

Save 5¢ per gallon by visiting mysageoil.com and entering promo code SAGE5 at checkout.

516-485-3900

PLACE YOUR AD

HOME/OFFICE ORGANIZER

ADVERTISE WITH US!

Overwhelmed by inefficient use of living space? Drowning in an ocean of paperwork?

To place your ad, call 516.307.1045 or fax 516.307.1046

57

HOME HEATING OIL

234099-1

631.281.7033

Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

ADVERTISE HERE 516.307.1045 ADVERTISE HERE 516.307.1045

We Create Order Out Of Chaos.

ADVERTISE HERE 516.307.1045

JUNK REMOVAL

COMPLETE JUNK REMOVAL/DEMOLITION For a Free Consultation call Lisa Marx and Randi Yerman

917.751.0395

ADVERTISE HERE 516.307.1045

www.neatfreaks1976.com Instagram: organizethisnthat

LANDSCAPING

MOVING

• We haul anything & everything • Entire contents of home and/or office • We clean it up and take it away

Long Island and New York State Specialists

Residential - Commercial Bonded Insured / Free Estimates

• Residential • Commercial • Piano & Organ Experts • Boxes Available

STRONG ARM CONTRACTING, INC.

516-538-1125 PLACE YOUR AD WITH US

ADVERTISE WITH US! To place your ad, call 516.307.1045 or fax 516.307.1046

N.Y.D.O.T.#10405

MOVING & STORAGE INC.

FREE ESTIMATES www.ajmoving.com

516-741-2657

114 Jericho Tpke. Mineola, NY 11501

MOVING Serving the community for over 40 yrs

BRIAN CLINTON

MOVERS One Piece to a Household/ Household Rearranging FREE ESTIMATES

333-5894 Owner Supervised

Licensed & Insured Licensed #T-11154 175 Maple Ave. Westbury, NY 11590


58 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

BUYER’S GUIDE ▼

PAINTING

PAINTING, POWERWASHING

SWEENEY PAINTING and CARPENTRY Interior B. Moore Paints Dustless Vac System Renovations

Exterior Power Washing Rotted Wood Fixed Staining

516-884-4016 Lic# H0454870000 TREE SERVICE

OLD VILLAGE TREE SERVICE

PAINTING & WALLPAPER est. 1978

Interior and Exterior • Plaster/Spackle Light Carpentry • Decorative Moldings Power Washing www.MpaintingCo.com 516-385-3132 516-328-7499 New Hyde Park, NY 11040 Licensed & Insured

classicrenovator.com

BBB & Angies List (A+) Rating

ADVERTISE HERE

Crown Moldings, Wainscot/Recessed Panels, Coffered Ceilings Suffolk Lic# 43882-H

516.307.1045

516.921.0494 classicrenovator.com TREE SERVICE

RESD/COMM CLEANING

STRONG ARM CLEANING

Residential and Commercial Cleaning Specialist • Post construction clean ups • Stripping, waxing floors • Move ins and move outs

Licensed & Insured

FREE ESTIMATES Member L.I. Arborist Assoc.

516-466-9220

Free estimates / Bonded Insured

516-538-1125 www.strongarmcleaningny.com

ROOFING

ADVERTISE WITH US

To advertise, call 516.307.1045 or fax 516.307.1046

ADVERTISE HERE 516.307.1045

Owner Operated Since 1989

PLACE YOUR AD WITH US

516.307.1045

PAINTING & HOME IMPROVMENTS

Nassau Lic#H38110500000

24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

ADVERTISE HERE

26

WINDOW REPAIRS

631-385-7975

WINDOW REPAIRS & RESTORATIONS

Outdated Hardware • Skylights •Andersen Sashes • New Storm Windows • Wood Windows • Chain/Rope Repairs • Falling Windows • Fogged Panes • Mechanical Repairs • Wood Repairs

ALL BRANDS W W W. S K YC L E A RW I N D OW. CO M Call Mr. Fagan • 32 Years Experience Lic. # H080600000 Nassau

ADVERTISE WITH US

PLACE YOUR AD WITH US To advertise, call 516.307.1045 or fax 516.307.1046


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

nassau

59

COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS WEMPLOYMENT, MARKETPLACE

To Place Your Ad Call Phone: 516.307.1045

Fax: 516.307.1046

e-mail: hblank@theislandnow.com

In Person: 105 Hillside Avenue Williston Park, NY 11598

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Open: Monâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Thurs: 9am-5:30pm

Deadlines Tuesday 11:00am: Classified Advertising Tuesday 1:00pm: Legal Notices/ Name Changes Friday 5:00pm Buyersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guide Error Responsibility All ads placed by telephone are read back for verification of copy context. In the event of an error of Blank Slate Media LLC we are not responsible for the first incorrect insertion. We assume no responsiblity for an error in and beyond the cost of the ad. Cancellation Policy Ads must be cancelled the Monday before the first Thursday publication. All cancellations must be received in writing by fax at: 516.307.1046 Any verbal cancellations must be approved by a supervisor. There are no refunds on cancelled advertising. An advertising credit only will be issued.

â&#x20AC;¢ Great Neck News â&#x20AC;¢ Williston Times â&#x20AC;¢ New Hyde Park Herald Courier â&#x20AC;¢ Manhasset Times â&#x20AC;¢ Roslyn Times â&#x20AC;¢ Port Washington Times â&#x20AC;¢ Garden City News â&#x20AC;¢ Bethpage Newsgram â&#x20AC;¢ Jericho Syosset News Journal â&#x20AC;¢ Mid Island Times â&#x20AC;¢ Syosset Advance

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60 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

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AUTOS WANTED

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AUTO BUYERS We Visit You. Top $$ Paid or donate/tax ded. CALL 516-VAN-CARS LUKE 516-297-2277

ALL CARS We pay over scrap prices on most cars. Any year, Any cond. Serving Nass & Suff CASH PAID 7 Day Pick-Up

631-697-8345

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ADVERTISE HERE, CALL: 516.307.1045

LOTS FOR SALE

Advertising Sales Executive Blank Slate Media Blank Slate Media, a fast-growing chain of 6 award-winning weekly newspapers and website, is looking for an energetic, service-oriented professional with good communications skills to sell display, web and email advertising. Earn up to $60,000 in the first-year representing the 6 Blank Slate Media publications and website as well the 5 publications and 1 website owned by Blank Slateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sales partner, Litmor Publications. We are looking for an enthusiastic and service-oriented sales professional with good communication skills. Requirements: Minimum of 2 years outside sales experience. Newspaper sales experience a plus. Must have your own car. â&#x20AC;˘ Exclusive, protected territory â&#x20AC;˘ Opportunity to sell both print and online programs â&#x20AC;˘ A collegial, supportive sales team â&#x20AC;˘ Award-winning editorial coverage. â&#x20AC;˘ A separate newspaper for each community allowing advertisers to target their markets. And you to provide the most cost-effective way to advertise. â&#x20AC;˘ Represent media that produce superior response for clients. Compensation â&#x20AC;˘ Salary plus commission â&#x20AC;˘ Health insurance â&#x20AC;˘ Paid holidays â&#x20AC;˘ Sick days & holidays

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To apply, e-mail your resume and cover letter to sblank@theislandnow.com or call Steve at 516.307-1045 x201 for more information.

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Freelance Reporter Wanted

Who insures you doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter. Until it does.

Blank Slate Media, the publisher of 6 award-winning newspapers and website, is seeking one or more people to assist our reporting staff in covering local government meetings and community events. Good writing skills and a car a must. Newspaper experience preferred. Excellent opportunity to learn by working with editors with many years of weekly and daily newspaper experience.

To apply, e-mail cover letter, resume, and clips to: nmanskar@theislandnow.com

hiram cohen & son, inc. Insurance Since 1919

105 Hillside Avenue, Williston Park, NY

516.307.1045

Bill Spitalnick 486 Willis Avenue, Williston Park, NY 11596 516.535.3561 â&#x20AC;˘ Fax: 516.742.7209 A 2013 Chubb Personal Cornerstone Elite Agency

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Financial Strength and Exceptional Claim Service Property | Liability | Executive Protection | Workers Compensation | Marine | Surety Homeowners | Auto | Yacht | Jewelry | Antiques | Accident & Health Chubb Group of Insurance Companies (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chubbâ&#x20AC;?) is the marketing name used to refer to the insurance subsidiaries of The Chubb Corporation. For a list of these subsidiaries, please visit our website at www.chubb.com. Actual coverage is subject to the language of the policies as issued. Chubb, Box 1615, Warren, NJ 07061-1615. Š2013 Chubb & Son, a division of Federal Insurance Company.

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The Great Neck News, Friday, February 17, 2017

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Recreation WE HAVE A NEW LOOK program faces NEW, IMPROVED READY TO VIEW fee hike in G.N. AND www.Theislandnow.com Continued from Page 2 oďŹ&#x20AC;ered for the spring, including algebra, chess, debate, math strategies and soccer. The programs are popular, Zawatson said, with 365 students signing up for the fall trimester and 250 for the winter. Zawatson said information for the spring program will be available after the February break and that second-graders will be able to participate. The school board did not comment on Zawatsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recommendations. In other action, the board adopted a revised comprehensive attendance policy that has been updated to reďŹ&#x201A;ect federal standards, adds language regarding absences of homeless students and gives parents access to their childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attendance records through the online parent portal. The board also had a ďŹ rst reading on new policies to codify district practices on managing and minimizing the amount of cash held at each school and the management of the petty cash funds for each building. Readings at three meetings are required before a policy can be adopted. Superintendent Teresa Prendergast also said that Great Neck South High School took ďŹ rst place in the Brookhaven National Laboratory/Long Island Regional High School Science Bowl held at the Brookhaven lab on Jan. 28. The team consisted of ďŹ ve students, Melody Yang, Elissa He, Ajay Dheeraj, Allan Lee and Adrian Chen. The coach is biology teacher Jim Truglio. Great Neck competed against 18 other teams from across Long Island in one of the regional competitions of the 27th annual U.S. Department of Energy National Science Bowl. The team will go to the national ďŹ nals in Washington, D.C., from April 27 to May 1. The teams face oďŹ&#x20AC; in a fast-paced question-and-answer format covering science disciplines including biology, chemistry, Earth science, physics, energy and math.

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66 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

Sports Spartans defeat Sewanhaka Indians BY G R E G ORY GIACONELLI The Elmont Spartans defeated the Sewanhaka Indians 54-43 on Wednesday afternoon, led by K.C. Ndefo’s 18 points and Victor Olawoye’s 13 points.

Elmont Sewanhaka

54 43

Jayden Boyd and Giovany Brice led Sewanhaka with 16 and 13 points respectively. Sewanhaka head coach Jay Allen said he gives credit to a well-coached Elmont team, led by Ndefo, who won the State Championship last season. “Those guys are a well-oiled machine,” Allen said. “They just did a better job of playing their style by getting out on the break and generating opportunities. K.C. Ndefo was the difference in this game.” In the first quarter, Elmont outscored Sewanhaka 15-10 as Ndefo paced the attack with eight points. He went 2-4 on the line and hit three field goals. Brice led Sewanhaka with six points in the opening quarter as he scored three times from inside the paint. Elmont outplayed Sewanhaka 13-8 in the second quarter and took a ten point lead into halftime. Ndefo added five more points in the second quarter to lead Elmont with 13 points in the first half. Ismael Astasie finished the first half with six points, including four in the second quarter for Elmont. Kamaal Chin led Sewanhaka with four points in the second quarter, hitting a pair of free throws and a basket. Brice, Chin and Boyd provided Sewanhaka’s offense by combining for 16 points in the first half. Elmont had the edge in the third quarter 11-7 and had a 3925 lead heading into the final quarter.

Sewanhaka guard Rahim Akinwunmi (no. 1) and forward Giovany Brice (no. 13) Olawoye led Elmont with six points in the third quarter including a pair of baskets and two shots on the line. Rahim Akinwunmi led Sewanhaka with three points by going 3-4 on the line in the third quarter. In the final quarter, Sewanhaka outscored Elmont 18-15 but Elmont went on to win 54-43. Olawoye led Elmont with seven points in the fourth quarter, in which he went 2-2 on the line and added a basket and a three pointer. Olawoye finished the game with 13 points, all coming in the second half. Ndefo added five points in the second half for Elmont and totaled 18 for the match. Boyd led Sewanhaka with nine points in the fourth quarter. He went 3-4 on the line and added three shots from the interior, finishing the game with a team leading 16 points. Brice compiled five points in the fourth quarter for Sewanhaka and collected seven points in the second half. He completed the contest with 13 points. Boyd said they couldn’t execute as an early deficit proved to be too much, resulting in their first home loss of the season. “We came out flat in the first half,” Boyd said. “We tried to pick it up in the second half but we just couldn’t pull through. It’s a tough loss but we’ll bounce back.”

Weekly Boys Basketball Scores Tuesday, Feb. 7 Carle Place defeated Wheatley 60-46. Christopher Ruscillo led Carle Place with 19 points and 11 rebounds. Christopher Sheremetta recorded 11 points while Benjamin Armstrong chipped in with 10 points for Carle Place. Brian Doria and Michael Tragale led Wheatley with 12 and 11 points respectively. MacArthur defeated Manhasset 61-46. Angelo Andino led MacArthur with 18 points. Kyle Acquavella posted 17 points while Mike Manfredo compiled 12 points for MacArthur. Danny Hedberg led Manhasset with 19 points. Great Neck South defeated Mepham 65-53. Sheldon Henry led Great Neck South with 17 points, seven rebounds and four assists. Liam Blicher recorded 13 points and eight rebounds while David Sabzehroo collected 12 points for Great Neck South. Chaminade defeated St. Mary’s 66-25. Kyle Murphy led Chaminade with 11 points and 11 rebounds while Brendan McGuire added 11 points as well. Justin Brown and Mike McLoughlin led St. Mary’s as they combined for 10 points.

Wednesday, Feb. 8 Floral Park defeated Valley Stream North 81-59. Brian Fox led Floral Park with 29 points. Frank Phelan posted 23 points and 11 assists while T.J. Cluess compiled 15 points and 10 rebounds for Floral Park. Hewlett defeated New Hyde Park 66-42. Zach Bromfeld led Hewlett with 21 points and 10 rebounds. Gianluca Preziosi recorded 21 points and five assists while Alyjah Hill totaled 15 points, 10 rebounds, and five assists for Hewlett. Nick Anthony led New Hyde Park with nine points. Bellmore JFK defeated Great Neck North 54-46. After Great Neck North cut the lead to four with 45 seconds left, Kobe Chukwuka, who had four points and seven rebounds, hit two free throws with 30 seconds left, and Marco Travaglione, who led Bellmore JFK with 18 points and 11 rebounds, added a pair of foul shots with nine seconds left. Steven Carlson added 14 points while Matt Muscarella chipped in with 10 points and five assists for Bellmore. Julien Hakimian led Great Neck North with 20 points while Joe Gohari recorded 12 points.

Sewanhaka guard Jayden Boyd (no. 11)

Friday, Feb. 10 Manhasset defeated Herricks 77-49. Danny Hedberg led Manhasset with 21 points and nine rebounds. Jordan Idaspe led Herricks with 24 points. Malverne defeated Wheatley 63-57. Josh Rivers led Malverne with 18 points and seven assists. Makhia Effs, who recorded 14 points, made two free throws with 14 seconds left to put Malverne up by four points. Michael Tragale led Wheatley with 18 points. Sewanhaka defeated Great Neck North 62-45. Rahim Akinwunmi led Sewanhaka with 14 points and 13 rebounds while Jayden Boyd posted 12 points and seven assists. Juilian Hakimian and Daniel Sharifian combined for 15 points to lead Great Neck North. Saturday, Feb. 11 Floral Park defeated Bethpage 77-44. Frank Phelan led Floral Park with 17 points while Mike Incantalupo and T.J. Cluess each recorded 10 points. Island Trees defeated Mineola 53-41. Kevin Dixon led Island Trees with 17 points and 18 rebounds. John McMahon led Mineola with 18 points. Roslyn defeated Division 75-52. Jonah Tenner led Roslyn with 14 points and 12 rebounds while Ben Perez posted 16 points. Chaminade defeated Kellenberg 61-39. Kyle Murphy led Chaminade with 14 points while Michael O’Connell recorded 10 points and five assists. Port Washington defeated Valley Stream Central 63-51. Xavier Merriweather led Port Washington with 24 points. Tyler Stevenson-Moore and Jake Block scored 17 and 11 points respectively for Port Washington. Calhoun defeated Great Neck South 65-37. Patrick Gardner led Calhoun with 17 points. Liam Blicher led Great Neck South with nine points. Manhasset defeated Long Beach 77-31. Eddie DeMatteis led Manhasset with 16 points.


The Great Neck News, Friday, February 17, 2017

GN

67

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68 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

G.N. South fencers lose in L.I. finals BY G R E G ORY GIACONELLI The Great Neck South girls fencing team’s dream season came to an end as they lost to Ward Melville in the Long Island Championship on Feb. 7. Head coach Catherine Sagevick said although they didn’t win a Long Island Championship, the girls were happy to hoist a Nassau County crown, which they earned against rivals Great Neck North on Feb. 4. She added that they are already looking to build off of this year’s success. “The loss did not dampen anyone spirits,” Sagevick said. “The girls have already told me that their goal is to be back here next year. They have already begun preparing.” Sagevick said after graduating two senior captains from last year’s team, they were unsure of what this season may bring but their mission was to become Long Island Champions. According to Sagevick, their success this year has been due to a hardworking, determined and extremely motivated group of young ladies that finished the season undefeated at 15-0. Sagevick said four fencers who were instrumental in their run this season are Macy Meng, Hannah Gal, Angie Lei and Ariel Kang. Meng, the team captain, was vital in keeping the team on track by allowing them to stay motivated and dedicated to their goal. “She encourages her fellow team-

Head Coach Catherine Sagevick and the Great Neck South Varsity Girls Fencing Team mates to always strive for their best,” Sagevick said. “She spent countless hours working with them on techniques to improve their fencing skills and build confidence in themselves.” Gal and Lei are four-year veterans whose developments led to forming a solid squad in epee, according to Sagevick. Sagevick said Kang has consistently

demonstrated her ability to quickly assess and respond to her opponent’s moves. She also achieved a third place finish in this year’s Individual Championship, according to Sagevick. Sagevick said a big factor behind their success was that every girl, whether a starter or substitute, worked together to achieve their common goal. In the end, it resulted in a perfect

regular season, a league title, a division crown and a county championship. “As much as fencing is an individual sport, when the girls support each other and work together to improve not only themselves but their teammates, the team as a whole benefits,” Sagevick said. “This year, the girls truly worked in concert as a team. I am so very proud of them all.”

LIU Post women edge Mercy College BY S H E L BY TOW N S E N D The LIU Post women’s basketball team came back from a 14-point deficit to come away with a 74-68 win over Mercy College during a home thriller Feb. 8. The Pioneers were able to snap a three game losing streak with five girls

tallying point totals in the double digits. Sophomore guard Shannon Doyle led the team in total points and assists, with 15 and 7, respectively. Junior guard Kristen Olsen and freshman forward Mikaiya Patterson both scored an impressive 14 points for the Pioneers, and senior guard Kylie Garret and sophomore forward Sasha Patterson each

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had 10 points. It was a battle for the lead early in the game, with the two teams tied at 18 at the end of the first quarter. Mercy dominated the majority of the 2nd quarter, pulling away to a 14-point lead with only 1:40 left to play in the first half. The Pioneers were able to battle back with an 8-0 run over Mercy, and

went into halftime down by six points. Coach Deirdre Moore said she told the girls during halftime to “try to keep the energy and the effort high, try to get easy shots, close shots, and we have to get stops on defense.” That high energy was visible as both teams were in another tug-of-war for the lead during the third quarter. The game entered the final quarter tied at 53. The Pioneers continued to battle during the fourth quarter and took their largest lead of eight points with 4:26 to play. They never relinquished their lead and came away with a 74-68 win over Mercy College. The Pioneers are now 10-13 overall and 6-7 in the East Coast Conference. The team has only have five more games left in the regular season, all East Coast Conference match-ups, before it competes in the first round of the conference championship on March 1. This article was originally published in the Pioneer, the award-winning student newspaper of LIU Post, www. liupostpioneer.com, and is republished here by Blank Slate Media with the permission of the Pioneer.


Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

69

LIU Post men crush Mercy College BY T H OM A S A S B AT Y On Wednesday, Feb. 8, the LIU Post men’s basketball team beat the Mercy Mavericks, 8155, at the Pratt Recreation Center in Brookville.

LIU Post Mercy

81 55

The Pioneers were hot from behind the arc all night, hitting 15 three-pointers. It was only the third game this season at which the Pioneers had 15 or more threes. LIU got off to a hot start, opening the game with a 13-3 run in the first 3:38. Senior forward Greg Dotson, junior guard Kyle McLeggan and freshman guard Jared Rivers all hit baskets in the early run. The men shot a crazy 59.3 field goal percentage in the first half, with 66.7 percent from downtown. The green and gold took a 45-21 lead into half. The Pioneers, who never trailed, went on a 22-7 run for eight minutes starting at the four-minute mark of the game. Dotson recorded his team best eighth double-double of the year, having 18 points and 15 rebounds. Dotson shot a perfect 4 for 4 from the free throw line and 6 for 11 from the field. Aary Bibens also sunk 18 points, along with five rebounds

and three assists. Mcleggan earned 11 points and two rebounds, and Mosley collected 12 points, four assists and two rebounds. Head LIU Post men’s basketball coach Erik Smiles was pleased with his team’s performance. “We performed well, we executed and made shots. Anytime you make shots, you are going to look better than how you played overall, but we guarded in the first half and made shots throughout the game.” Smiles and the Pioneers will head to Rochester on Saturday, Feb. 11 to play Roberts Wesleyan College, an ECC rival that they defeated earlier in the season, 84-64. “Roberts is a good team with good size and length on the perimeter,” Smiles said. “We have to do a good job of guarding their guys and taking away their shooters.” The Pioneers currently sit 7th in the ECC polls, with a 6-7 conference record. The team has five games left on the schedule, all against ECC opponents. “We are going to have to do what we did tonight,” in order to make the playoffs, Smiles said. He stressed that his team would have “to have guard, execute, rebound the ball, stay together, and be positive.”

PHOTOS BY ADELA RAMOS

This article was originally published in the Pioneer, the award-winning student newspaper of LIU Post, www.liupostpioneer.com, and is republished here by Blank Slate Media with the permission of the Pioneer.

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70 Blank Slate Media Newspapers, Friday, February 17, 2017

Post kickline team in search of coach BY S H E L BY TOWNSEND The LIU Post kickline squad has been around since 2010, but until recently, it was just considered a club on campus. Last year, it became an official spirit team, along with the dance team and cheerleading squad, but the newcomers are facing some challenges as they try to expand their team. The squad does not currently have an official coach. Katelin Townsend, who is also the head cheerleading coach and a success coach, is voluntarily serving as a temporary advisor, and is looking for volunteers to fill the coaching position. The team’s two captains, Fallon Boyle and Erica Bergen, are in charge of running the team. “We choreograph our own dances and organize everything we do,” said Boyle, a senior public relations major. “Our biggest challenge is definitely not having a coach, as it is hard to run every aspect of the team while being a full time student,” Bergen, a junior arts management major, said. Kickline, cheer, and dance are all three separate spirit

PHOTOS BY SHELBY TOWNSEND

teams; the spirit teams became an official part of LIU Post athletics in 2014. According to Boyle, kickline is different because they incorporate three different aspects in their performances: dance, pom, which is similar to some cheerleading routines, and kickline. “Kickline is definitely unique,” Boyle said. “We always have one long kickline that is visually pleasing to watch. Think

of the Rockettes. That’s exactly what we do.” The team performs during football halftime shows and basketball games as well as some campus events like Midnight Madness and Relay for Life. The kickline team held official tryouts on Jan. 22 and is still looking to expand. They currently have six active members, but are looking to build a team of 12 members. Along with practicing new rou-

tines, the girls have been working to build campus awareness of the team and have created accounts on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter @liupostkickline. Boyle said that being a part of the team has been a great experience because not only has she met new friends, but it is great to be a part of a spirit team and cheer on other Pioneer athletes. “I’ve been dancing since I was little so to be able to con-

tinue in college is an amazing experience,” Boyle said. According to Bergen, they plan on holding another tryout session at the end of the semester or over the summer to build their fall team. This article was originally published in the Pioneer, the award-winning student newspaper of LIU Post, www.liupostpioneer.com, and is republished here by Blank Slate Media with the permission of the Pioneer.

Post Rugby team seeks NCAA status BY Q U E D US BABALOLA The LIU Post women’s rugby team has made it clear that it is a force on campus not to be ignored. On Feb. 18, 2016, Bryan Collins, the university’s director of athletics and recreation, announced that the school

would be adding women’s rugby to its list of sport clubs in the 2016-2017 academic year. Fast forward to January 2017, and the women are in the process of becoming an official NCAA team. The team now has 18 players, three managers and one coach. A majority of the games so far have

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been on other campuses, including Manhattanville College and Bard College. As a result, support from the Post campus at those away games has been scarce, but when the match has been brought back home, many have been cheering this team on. Support for the rugby team has grown as it has become more successful. William Monroe, an LIU Post senior finance major, was surprised the team was even still around. “I have seen teams and clubs come and go left and right, so it’s surprising but amusing to hear that they are still around, and even about to become an official team; they should pat themselves on the back,” Monroe said. Many LIU Post students are still unaware that the rugby team has been formed. The school’s official social media accounts don’t include posts pertaining to the team. And because many of the team’s first games have been away, Post students have not travelled to watch the matches. Taylor Hill, a junior broadcasting major who is the team’s captain, feels as if the lack of promotion hasn’t benefitted the team in any way.

“It’s frustrating because we should have more promotion regardless [of whether] we are a varsity team or not,” Hill said.” “We’re also in transition into becoming part of the NCAA, so I feel as though we should be promoted more. Many people don’t know that we’re still on campus and we’re always looking for members.” While they are looking for more teammates, Shakira Clarke, a sophomore public relations major, is pleased with her team the way it is. “I honestly love my teammates. I’ve met some of my closest friends through rugby,” Clarke said. “Our bonds are unbreakable. I think the coach brought the best group of girls together and created a beautiful little family.” With their first pre-season game coming in March, the team is practicing every day to get ready for the season. No pads, No helmets, Just a ball. This article was originally published in the Pioneer, the award-winning student newspaper of LIU Post, www. liupostpioneer.com, and is republished here by Blank Slate Media with the permission of the Pioneer.


The Williston Times, Friday, February 17, 2017

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72 The Great Neck News, Friday, February 17, 2017

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