June 16 edition

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SUPPORTING DRAGONBOAT BEAUFORT’S CANCER SURVIVOR MISSION POSTAL PATRON LOCAL

JUNE 16–22, 2022

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PRESORTED PERMIT NO. 97 BEAUFORT, SC 29902

COVERING BEAUFORT COUNTY

ELECTION 2022

LOWCOUNTRY LOWDOWN

LOLITA HUCKABY

Primaries over? Let’s move on to November elections Beaufort County Sheriff P.J. Tanner addresses supporters as they await primary election results at the Salty Dog restaurant in Bluffton on Tuesday, June 14. Unofficial results indicate that Tanner captured nearly 62% of the vote, defeating challenger Joey "JoJo" Woodward. Photo by Tony Kukulich.

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BEAUFORT arring some unexpected runoff races, Tuesday’s party primary voting should be over by now and we should know who’s facing who in the November elections. Early voting which began two weeks prior to Tuesday’s Election Day was slightly heavier – 6,262 compared to the 2020 primaries early ballots of 5,435 – and we can speculate that’s largely due to the sheriff’s race. The action there took place in the Republican races since no Democrats filed to run against the winner in November. As this column is being written, will Tanner get another term to expand his empire or will the challenger JoJo Woodward be calling the shots for the next four years? Same with the auditor race, where no Democrats filed to run. Will it be David Cadd or Willie Turral taking over the office that former auditor Jim Beckert might have left in a mess considering the County Council voted to sue him twice to force him to do his job. County Council District 4 race was also to be decided in Tuesday’s primary race. Incumbent Alice Howard, who has been the only female on the 11-member council since being elected in 2015, faced opposition from newcomer Josh Scallate. No Democrats filed for the seat, so Tuesday will tell. One thing’s for sure if Mike Covert of Bluffton, candidate for County Council District 6, didn’t win, there’s gonna be lawsuits. Turns out an incorrect ballot was distributed during early voting which didn’t include Covert or his Republican opponent. County elections officials said the error affected about 70 people and was caused by

SEE LOWDOWN PAGE A4

Tanner wins

Incumbent soundly defeats Woodward in race for sheriff, unofficially

By Tony Kukulich It was midnight when Beaufort County Sheriff P.J. Tanner told supporters gathered at the Salty Dog restaurant in Bluffton to watch election results come in that he was calling it a night. Though polls had closed five hours earlier, there were no official election results available indicating who had won the hard-fought race between the incumbent Tanner and challenger Joey “JoJo” Woodward. “It’s midnight,” Tanner said. “These folks, they need to go home. We had this place scheduled from 7 to 10. Here we are at midnight, so we’re going to go

ahead and move on out. I wish • Cadd defeats we had results. Turral in We don’t.” Republican primary for Unofficial reauditor. sults provided • Beaufort County by the Board votes delayed in of Voter Regbeing posted on istration and state site. Elections of • Unofficial vote totals for Beaufort CounCounty races. ty showed Tanner with more than 63% of the votes at the time he pulled the plug on his election-night event, but only 38 of the county’s INSIDE, PAGE A7

98 precincts had reported results at the time. “Things look good right now,” Tanner added. “I think the numbers are looking good. I feel good about the results so far. But I’m one of those guys, you all know me. I think everyone in here knows me real well. When it comes to the facts, I want facts. I don’t want fiction. That’s how I operate. That’s how I want us to go ahead and move forward.” When the board updated the unofficial results shortly before 1 a.m. Wednesday morning, Tanner’s

SEE WINNER PAGE A7

County steps back its threat to repeal impact fees

By Tony Kukulich This week’s Beaufort County Council meeting was notable for what was not on the agenda. The third and final reading of motion to repeal the county’s collection of impact fees was expected during the June 13 council meeting. A press release issued by the county Friday afternoon indicated that the matter would not appear on the agenda. For now, it’s

unclear if or when the motion will be considered. The move by the council may signal an easing of tensions between the county and municipalities. The county has been sparring with municipalities for much of the year over impact fees. In November 2020, the county engaged in a study to revise its impact fee policy. One year later the revised poli-

cy was distributed to the county's municipalities in the form of new intergovernmental agreements (IGA) that outlined the collection and distribution of the updated fee schedule. To date, those IGAs remain unsigned and frustration has built on both sides. Last week, Beaufort County Council Chairman Joe Passiment sent a letter to each of the municipalities offering to set up meetings

NEWS

EDUCATION

INSIDE

Beaufort investigation uncovers Texas murderer.

Raise Up program helps high school students plan for success.

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Lowcountry Life A2 News A2–6 Election A7 Business A8 Health A9–11 Education A12

Local Events Military Legal Notices Voices Faith Directory

to hammer out the concerns over the county’s proposed IGA. Chris Ophardt, Beaufort County public information officer, said those meetings will likely occur over the next two weeks. “The meeting aims to reach an agreement on the intergovernmental agreement by reviewing the terms proposed by each party

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SEE THREAT PAGE A6


ISLAND NEWS PUBLISHING, LLC

LOWCOUNTRY LIFE & NEWS

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David Lucas captured a photo of a hawk with its prey paying a visit Tuesday, May 31, to Beaufort’s Henry C. Chambers Waterfront Park. To submit a Lowcountry Life photo, you must be the photographer or have permission to submit the photo to be published in The Island News. Please submit high-resolution photos and include a description and/or names of the people in the picture and the name of the photographer. Email your photos to theislandnews@gmail.com.

VETERAN OF THE WEEK

JOHN CLARK

Beaufort’s John Clark, 79, joined the United States Marine Corps in Youngstown, Ohio in 1960. After Boot camp at Parris Island and Infantry training he trained in Aviation Supply and was assigned to MCAS Beaufort. During that tour, he deployed aboard USS Geiger (TAP-3) for Almeria, Spain and Operation STEEL PIKE 1. While there, his unit, working with Navy Sea-

John Clark

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Thanks for op-ed on Parris Island

I wish to extend my thanks and sincere appreciation to Col. Pugliese, USMC (ret) and Ms. Jennifer Tuckwiller, Chairman of the Board of the Beaufort Regional Chamber of Commerce, for the outstanding (op-ed) recently published in The Island News. The fact-filled column provided a great deal of information that has never before been available so concisely. So often all we read or hear about the future of MCRD Parris Island and MCAS Beaufort is gloom and doom. I am now aware of the study, planning, and expenses put forth to ensure these bases remain a vital part of our Country's national defense posture and a powerful and positive economic force on our community. As retired Marine I am well aware of how important history and tradition are to the Marine Corps. I commend the Colonel and Ms. Tuckwiller for making that point so well for your readers. – Lawrence V. Francese, MGySgt, USMC (ret), Beaufort

Manning’s column ‘disgusting’ I found Terry Manning’s June 9 political commentary extremely disingenuous and deceptive. On par I suppose for an ideology that calls good as evil and evil as good so long as it suits the political agenda. His characterization of Herschel Walker as not being enough of “a brother” because he didn’t view the Left’s hyped view of everything racist was a disgusting villainization of someone saying to the race baiters: “You’re wrong.” Add to this Mr. Manning’s deceptive and blatant misuse of the comment by Rep Louis Gohmert where he conveniently hid all context of the statement from the reader to try and assert that Rep Gohmert was decrying accountability. When in fact, Rep Gohmert’s complete statement was pointing out the blatant dou-

ble standard within the corrupt politically partisan DOJ that violates basic judicial integrity. In essence, that when a Democrat lies, cheats, and steals (as evidenced by e-mails, laptops, and their own spoken words) the DOJ turns a blind eye. But, when a Republican misstates their middle initial they are charged with lying to the FBI. And finally, Mr. Manning’s attempt at apologetics for the Liberal Democrat led destruction of America by calling them “misteps” in a learning curve was hilariously grotesque. Perhaps Mr. Manning isn’t living in the same America as the rest of us, but it is without a doubt that D.C. Democrats have deliberately and with forethought wrecked our Energy Security, stifled our Economy, flooded our Southern border with Foreign Nationals, and undermined our societal moral framework and national cohesion. Mr. Manning’s opinion piece was a great example of why readers need to observe and think for themselves. – Tom Johnson

AMIkids Beaufort grateful for local support Thank you to the Brays Island community and to all the AMIkids Beaufort supporters who made our 2022 Croquet Picnic a rousing success in May. This was the first time since 2019 that we held the event due to pandemic cancellations. With the help of many friends behind the scenes and with gracious hospitality of Brays Island to host us, we met our annual fundraising goal for the event and, to date, have netted $103,000. Many thanks, too, to Phil and Amelie Cromer who hosted our Captains’ Party at their beautiful Beaufort home. At the croquet event, we announced the start of a special capital campaign to raise $600,000 for a waterline to serve our campus with both drinking

PAL PETS OF THE WEEK Cat of the Week: Ribbit is ready to find a home where she can be the queen. She is still a kitten at heart and loves to play. She has the biggest eyes and the quirkiest personality. Ribbit would be happy to be the only cat in her home. Ribbit is a year old, spayed, up to date on vaccines, and microchipped.

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JUNE 16–22, 2022

bees, erected and operated a Short Airfield Tactical Support (STAP) runway. STEEL PIKE 1 was the largest peacetime amphibious landing exercise in history, involving 84 naval ships and 28,000 Marines of the 2nd Marine Division. It prepared the Navy and Marine Corps for similar operations in Vietnam. While stationed at MCAS Beaufort, he and his wife had two children at

Sports Editor

Justin Jarrett LowcoSports@ gmail.com

Naval Hospital Beaufort. He left active duty in 1964 and returned to Ohio and a 34-year career with U.S. Steel. He moved back to Beaufort in 1998 and has volunteered at the PI Museum. – Compiled by John Chubb, American Legion Post 9. For nominations, contact jechubb1@gmail.com.

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water and a fire hydrant. Details are on our website at www.amikidsbeaufort.org. We help young men separate a troubled past from a bright future and have been doing so since the mid-1980s in Beaufort County. AMIkids Beaufort’s campus in Dale provides not only education but numerous hands-on vocational opportunities, treatment and behavior modification. We have a nationally recognized welding program and recently earned our third YouthBuild federal grant to help our students learn construction skills while at AMIkids Beaufort. Thank you to everyone who helped make this event a success. – John C. Williams, Chairman, AMIkids Beaufort Board of Trustees

What’s different? We grow and change Mr. Dickson, you seem stuck in a time warp of your own historical biases, while the world around you necessarily evolves. As The Island News publisher so clearly stated in his (op-ed) that ran just above yours, it is time, again, to take weapons-of-war assault rifles out of the hands of civilians. And, I would echo the opinion of the majority of Americans, do something about the flood of guns in general. You are wrong about the NRA; they stopped advocating gun safety long ago to become a political entity unrepresentative of our need for gun safety. Yes, I too remember those good old days, but to make the Pledge we utter to the flag mean anything, we must act differently within today’s reality. —Tim Dodds, Lady’s Island

Mike McCombs needs to do better Editor, As a long time gun owner, I find it necessary to respond to the recent editorial regarding firearms. I have owned handguns

for over 40 years, I even own one of the dreaded AR’s. I originally owned a handgun because I often carried large amounts of cash working in Boston, I bought the AR in 2015 after a friend described the terrors of being in New Orleans after Katrina. No one has ever been injured by my guns, most people don’t even know I have them. I never let them off the leash, they don’t go roaming on their own. I own them for the same reason I have fire extinguishers, and a chainsaw. They are tools, no more. My chainsaw is far more dangerous than my guns. To suggest that we have a “sickness” because we legally own guns is absurd, and shows a naive perspective on the current situation in the world and the laws of this country. I haven’t mentioned the Constitution, because that’s not why I chose to protect my family and property. It is however the foundation document of our Republic and cannot be ignored. Serious people don’t dismiss those who disagree as being ‘sick’. Nobody is in any danger from my guns. You need to do better as Editor, even for a small town paper. – John Curley, Dataw Island

Thank you Mike McCombs Thank you for a very intelligent, articulate, and unfortunately necessary editorial on our nation’s firearms sickness. As you noted, a solid majority of Americans – including a majority of gun owners – favor enactment of a few simple, 2A-compliant regulations to curb gun violence. However, our NRA-corrupted politicians continue to twist themselves into pretzels blaming everything except the one element that makes us unique, our almost unfettered access to firearms including high-capacity rifles. We need to let them know doing nothing is not acceptable. If they fail to act we must show them the door.

Dog of the Week: Sergeant is a happy and healthy 6-month-old puppy. Sergeant has an abundance of energy and would love an active home. Sergeant enjoys walks, runs, playing with other dogs, and kids. Sergeant is neutered, up to date on vaccines, and microchipped.

– Peter Birschbach, Port Royal

If you are interested in adopting Ribbit, Sergeant or any of our other pets, call our adoption center at 843-645-1725 or email us at info@ palmettoanimalleague. org to set up an appointment.

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All content of The Island News, including articles, photos, editorial content, letters, art and advertisements, are copyrighted by The Island News and Island News Publishing, LLC, 2020, all rights reserved. The Island News encourages reader submissions via email to theislandnews@gmail.com. All content submitted is considered approved for publication by the owner unless otherwise stated. The Island News is designed to inform and entertain readers and all efforts for accuracy are made. Guest columns do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of The Island News, its publisher or editors. Content published from Care Magazine® is intended as a reference and options source only, not as a guide to self-treatment or substitute for profession medical advice. It is provided for educational purpose only. Readers assume full responsibility for how this information is used. The Island News reserves the right to refuse to sell advertising space, or to publish information, for any business or activity the newspaper deems inappropriate for the publication. Letters to the Editor should consist of fewer than 275 words and be emailed with a name and contact information to TheIslandNews@gmail.com.


NEWS

Undercover investigation targets online predators

By Tony Kukulich A week-long undercover investigation identified 14 individuals who were seeking to have sex with children. “In March of this year, the Beaufort Police Department hosted an Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) task force one-week operation where members of the task force communicated with adults and other folks online,” said Chief Dale McDorman of the City of Beaufort Police Department (BPD) during a June 10 press conference. “During this one-week operation we had three individuals travel to Beaufort to have sex with who they believed were 13 and 14 year olds. Shortly after the operation we did have a fourth traveler who came to Beaufort. These were people who came here to victimize the children who live in Beaufort and Beaufort County.” McDorman announced that 10 individuals had been arrested in connection with the operation and arrest warrants were outstanding for the remaining four suspects. Charges include criminal solicitation of a minor, disseminating obscene materials to persons under 18, second-degree exploitation of minors and attempted promoting prostitution of a minor. Three of the men arrested were from Beaufort County, while the remaining subjects were located in North Carolina, Georgia, Florida and other South Carolina locations. One of the suspects was on federal probation and on a sex offender registry for similar offenses. “I personally believe that there is a special place in hell for anybody that abuses children,” McDorman said. “If we can do anything that identifies

City of Beaufort Chief of Police Dale McDorman (left) and Beaufort County Sheriff P.J. Tanner (right) discuss an undercover investigation in Beaufort, South Carolina, Friday, June 10. The one-week, multi-agency operation resulted in the arrest of 10 individuals who established contacts with minor online for the purpose of having sex. Arrest warrants for four other individuals are still outstanding. Photos by Tony Kukulich. these folks and brings them to justice, we will do everything that we can to get to that end.” The operation, which was dubbed “Operation Rock the Boat,” was conducted by the BPD, the Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office, and the South Carolina Attorney General’s Internet Crimes Against Children task force. More broadly, the investigation involved the cooperation of a number of other local, state and federal agencies. “These cases are extremely difficult for law enforcement to work,” said Beaufort County Sheriff P.J. Tanner. “Law enforcement officers throughout South Carolina and throughout Beaufort County have families of their own (and) have children of their own. So when they’re investigating cases like this with pychosexual disorder individuals, it’s a difficult thing to do.” Sgt. Stephanie Karafa of the BPD has been a member of the ICAC task force since 2018. She presented the idea for the operation to McDorman.

“She had participated in other similar operations, and she presented the idea to us,” McDorman explained. “Maybe I was living under a rock. I thought that didn’t happen in Beaufort. I was a little surprised, but I was willing to find out and do what was necessary to do this.” In her role on the ICAC task force, Karafa can be assigned any one of a number of responsibilities including the investigation of cyber tips or working as a certified chatter. “That’s when I chat with these individuals who think that they’re ultimately talking with an underaged person,” she explained. Investigators built fake profiles on social media platforms and waited for the subjects to establish contact through those platforms. Once a crime is committed, the investigation begins to attempt to identify the perpetrator. According to Karafa, the investigations can be difficult. The conversations, she said, can be quite graph-

ic, especially considering that the subject believes they’re talking to a child. “For me, I get the satisfaction knowing it’s me, and they’re not talking to an actual child.” Karafa added. McDorman said that about 60 people from various agencies participated in the weeklong operation. With charges pending against 14 suspects, the effort to prepare for the prosecution of those cases means that much work remains. While this investigation didn’t start with a complaint from victims, Kevin Atkins, commander of the South Carolina ICAC task force for the attorney general’s office, said that the involvement of parents in the online lives of their children is the best way to keep their kids from becoming victims of online predators. “You lock your doors at night, but you hand your kids a phone,” Atkins said. “You open them to the world. You have to be a part of your chil-

dren’s life and what they’re doing online.” The following individuals have been arrested by the Beaufort Police Department as a result of Operation Rock the Boat: • Zachary Chappo, 36 of Bluffton, South Carolina – Criminal Solicitation and Attempted Disseminating Obscene Material to a person under 18 • Michael Ford, 51 of Bluffton, South Carolina – Attempted Criminal Sexual Conduct with a Minor and two counts of Criminal Solicitation • Michael Mahaney, 59 of Yemassee, South Carolina – Attempted Criminal Sexual Conduct with a Minor Second Degree and Criminal Solicitation • Justin Brumfield, 41 of Charleston, South Carolina – Nine counts of Criminal Solicitation and two counts of Attempted Disseminating Obscene Material to a person under 18

• Leroy Bolger, 73 of Callahan, Florida – Attempted Criminal Sexual Conduct with a Minor and Promoting Prostitution with a Minor • Woodrow Brown III, 35 of St. Stephen, South Carolina - Criminal Solicitation of a Minor • Drennen Rye, 45 of Savannah, Georgia – Two counts of Criminal Solicitation of a Minor, two counts of Attempted Disseminating Obscene Material to a person under 18 • Troy Curtis, 33 of Fountain Inn, South Carolina – Three counts of Criminal Solicitation of a Minor, three counts of Attempted Disseminating Obscene Material to a person under 18, Attempted Sexual Exploitation of a Minor • Matthew Eli Schmidt, 40 of Kannapolis, North Carolina – Criminal Solicitation of a Minor, Attempted Disseminating Obscene Material to a person under 18 • Christopher James Hendrix, 50 of Moncks Corner, South Carolina – Criminal Solicitation of a Minor

The four individuals who have not yet been arrested have not been identified by the BPD. The investigation related to this operation is ongoing. Tony Kukulich is a recent transplant to the Lowcountry. A native of Wilmington, Del., he comes to The Island News from the San Francisco Bay Area where he spent seven years as a reporter and photographer for several publications. He can be reached at tony. theislandnews@gmail.com.

Beaufort Memorial

D. Eli Penn, M.D. to Beaufort Memorial Lowcountry Medical Group Specialty Care

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n order to increase access to GI services for residents both North and South of the Broad, Beaufort Memorial has added board-certified, fellowship-trained gastroenterologist Dr. D. Eli Penn to its team at Beaufort Memorial Lowcountry Medical Group Specialty Care. Dedicated to preventing, diagnosing and treating disorders of the digestive organs, he sees patients at the practice’s Beaufort and Okatie locations. Dr. Penn brings wide-ranging experience to the practice, specializing not only in routine GI procedures such as endoscopy and colonoscopy, but also in advanced endoscopic therapies. He has published in multiple peer-reviewed journals and currently serves on the Professionalism Committee at the American College of Gastroenterology. The Kentucky native came to Beaufort Memorial from Macon, Ga., where he had practiced at the Medical Center of Central Georgia/Atrium Heath Navicent, and held a faculty appointment at Mercer University School of Medicine, continuing the academic research and work with trainees that have been a rewarding part of his career.

CALL 843-770-4588 TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT.

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University of Florida College of Medicine Dr. Penn joins board-certified nurse practitioner Kim Stockstill, certified physician assistants Kristen Johnson and Kim Thorpe, as well as boardcertified gastroenterologists John Crisologo, M.D., and Richard Stewart, D.O. at Beaufort Memorial Lowcountry Medical Group Specialty Care.

300 Midtown Drive, Beaufort • 122 Okatie Center Blvd. N, Suite 300, Okatie

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JUNE 16–22, 2022

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NEWS

Beaufort investigation uncovers Texas murderer

By Tony Kukulich When Sgt. Josh Dowling of the Beaufort Police Department began investigating a complaint about harassing and threatening phone calls, there was no way he could have known where that investigation would lead or how far it would reach. There was also no way he could have known that his investigation would help solve two murders in Lubbock County, Texas that had long since gone cold. Dowling’s role in that wide-ranging investigation was recently featured in the inaugural episode of a new Investigation Discovery crime series called “Devil in the Web.” In May 2018, local real estate agent Katie Gambla started receiving very troubling calls from an unknown person. She filed a complaint at the time, but it wasn’t investigated because, according to Dowling, the calls stopped. The respite didn’t last. “Back in May of 2019, there had been a real estate agent here in Beaufort who was getting these very unusual phone calls, very explicit, very sexual in nature,” Dowling said. “It obviously made her quite apprehensive. She thought the

worst, obviously. She filed a report with the City of Beaufort. I was assigned the investigation in the matter.” Gambla was concerned that the caller resided in the area and was targeting her. As a real estate agent, she had a strong social media presence and frequently received calls from unknown numbers. While she occasionally dealt with an upset client, these calls were far from anything she had previously experienced. “The calls quickly changed into explicit sexual and physical threats of violence,” Gambla said in the Investigation Discovery episode. Calls to Gambla’s phone were coming from the same person, but the incoming phone number was constantly changing making attempts to block the calls ineffective. Dowling determined that the caller was using voice over IP (VOIP) technology to mask his identifying information. A search warrant for the VOIP provider didn’t reveal any information to identify the caller, but information did come to light. “There was an astronomical amount of calls that were outgoing,” Dowling said. “So I started Googling the phone numbers trying to figure out

who this person was and who these people were that he was calling. Every single outgoing call was to a female real estate agent throughout the country. I think there were calls to 20 states. It was literally back-toback (calls) all day.” Dowling called some of the numbers he had obtained through the search warrant, and each recipient told a story that was virtually identical to Gambla’s experience. “They were all quite terrified that the perpetrator was local to their area,” Dowling said. That kind of put our victim at ease here in Beaufort because she realized the suspect probably wasn’t here in Beaufort, but was randomly calling real estate agents.” The IP address used to access the VOIP system was tracked to a multifamily dwelling in Lubbock, Texas. A search warrant was issued for a single unit in that building, and the search was executed by the Lubbock police. They came up empty handed. “Lubbock police interviewed the suspect and they were pretty convinced it’s not this person,” Dowling said. “As a result our investigation comes to a conclusion because we just hit a complete dead end. We felt confident

ORDER OF THE PALMETTO

Former Port Royal Mayor Sam Murray, left, receives the Order of the Palmetto from S.C. Senator Gerald Malloy and S.C. Rep. Shannon Erickson on Saturday at the Port Royal Naval Heritage Park. The Order of the Palmetto is the state’s highest civilian honor given in recognition of a lifetime of extraordinary achievement. Murray was mayor of Port Royal for 41 years. At far right is current Port Royal Mayor Joe DiVito. Photo by Lolita Huckaby.

Lowdown from page A1

redistricting changes that moved the boundary lines for that District. Covert wants those voters to be identified and allowed to vote a correct ballot. Elections officials say that’s not possible. Lawyers for Covert and another GOP candidate, Shellie West Hodges, who is challenging incumbent Mark Lawson of Bluffton, filed a temporary restraining order for Tuesday’s balloting in their races only. But no action was taken on the request prior to opening the polls. Always interesting to see what the turnout will be and how many of the county’s 135,600 registered voters take seriously this freedom to elect our leaders. County taking another look at the sales tax proposal BEAUFORT – An issue that wasn’t on Tuesday’s ballot but definitely worth study is the proposed one cent sales tax which will be

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on the November ballot for “mobility” improvements. A 19-member citizens task force, lead by Dean Moss of Port Royal, spent several months drawing up a broadbased list of projects to be funded over a 10-year period. The County Council was scheduled Monday to give the second of three readings to the ordinance outlining the proposed sale tax referendum. But that reading was postponed after state Sen. Tom Davis urged the county officials to consider combining it with a provision that would raise even more dollars for land preservation. The task force recommendation included $60 million for greenways which would complement the county’s Rural and Critical Lands program. But Davis pointed to new legislation he spearheaded providing for a “Green Space” sales tax which could be used to buy development rights in projects already permitted, to reduce density. The Senator, whose district is now primarily south of the Broad River and parts of Jasper County, called the

current level of growth and development “staggering.” “There’s no way you’re gonna pave yourself out of this problem,” he told the council as he advocated for ways to reduce density. The citizens task force recommendations included a variety of transportation, or “mobility” projects including paving county-owned dirt roads in the northern part of the county, mass transportation improvements including ferries, and further work on the Lady’s Island business corridor. The list also includes a number of road projects, such as $75 million for improvements to U.S. 21 and S.C. 281 from Bell Bridge to Boundary Street and then additional improvements along Boundary Street to the Woods Memorial Bridge, to the tune of $75 million. Davis’ suggestion, which was echoed by the Coastal Conservation League, got the County Council members talking, throwing out various ideas on how to win public support. They then decided to delay second reading on

Sgt. Josh Dowling of the Beaufort Police Department appears in front the police department headquarters in Beaufort, South Carolina, Friday, June 10. Dowling's work on a harassment investigation led to the solving of two murders. Photo by Tony Kukulch. that the person was in that building, but we didn’t know which one.” Several months later, an investigator in Waco, Texas was assigned a complaint from a real estate agent who had received explicit and threatening calls. In this case, the caller also threatened the children of the victim with sexual violence. The Waco investigation identified the same unit in the same building in Lubbock that Dowling had found. That investigator contacted Lubbock police who relayed the

story about Dowling’s investigation. Thinking they would hit the same dead end, investigators made an important discovery. In the intervening months between the investigations, there was a complete turnover of occupants in that building with one exception. Investigators theorized that the one tenant who remained must be their suspect. That man was Andy Castillo. A search warrant was issued for Castillo’s apartment, and corroborating evidence implicating him in a nationwide

campaign of harassment and threats targeting real estate agents was recovered. Castillo’s DNA was collected, and Lubbock investigators made another discovery. Castillo’s DNA matched DNA recovered from the scene of murders. As reported by KLBK, Castillo was indicted in December 2020 for the murders of Cynthia Palacio in July 2003 and Linda Carbajal in April 2004. Both women were strangled to death. “That was obviously something that was quite unbelievable,” Dowling said. “It was something that started with harassing phone calls that materialized into something that significant.” Castillo never had to answer his charges. He died from complications due to COVID-19 in August 2021 while in police custody. Episode one of the Investigation Discovery series “Devil in the Web” can be found on Discovery Plus. Tony Kukulich is a recent transplant to the Lowcountry. A native of Wilmington, Del., he comes to The Island News from the San Francisco Bay Area where he spent seven years as a reporter and photographer for several publications. He can be reached at tony.theislandnews@gmail.com.

Black Moses Celebration

Ernie Laforest, left, of Beaufort, explains to prospective customers how his dehumidifiers, seen steaming in the foreground, work with a little water and a few drops of incense oil during Saturday’s Black Moses Celebration of Harriet Tubman’s exploits in freeing some 700 enslaved people during the Civil War. Heavy rain and lightning caused vendors to cover up their displays. Laforest was already in the hallway of the Black Chamber of Commerce and didn’t have to do a thing to keep from getting wet. Photo by Bob Sofaly. the ordinance. But it, like impact fee discussions, will be back. Teachers thank Council for support, but ask for more BEAUFORT – Monday night’s County Council meeting, in addition to including a work report from Sen. Tom Davis, took place before a standing-room only crowd … and it wasn’t neighbors upset about zoning changes. It was a room full of school teachers, and school administrators and school board members. It was kinda like the old days when school supporters stormed the council chambers to protest cuts being suggested by the county elected officials who have the final say-so on local taxes. This year, the crowd was there to politely thank the County Council for supporting the school district’s $298 million budget … but wished it could be more. Several speakers talked about the shortage of certified teachers and the impact on students. Currently the district has 109 certified posi-

tions vacant despite “aggressive” recruiting. Cost of living was the central factor given by the speakers. The district’s budget calls for a 3% cost-ofliving increase but various pay incentives which bring the average starting salary to $37,928, ranking Beaufort County district 53rd in the state education salary rankings. Some county council members responded so favorably they suggested the district finance people go back and figure out how much of a tax increase it would be to give teachers an even greater increase. Council hacks solicitor’s DUI court, blesses Spanish Moss Trail BEAUFORT – The body of 11, aka the County Council, wasn’t so generous to Solicitor Duffie Stone, who wasn’t present for budget discussions. The council majority voted to cut $187,000 out of the Solicitor’s budget for a pilot D.U.I. project aimed at reducing the number of those cases moving through

the courts. According to their calculations, the program wasn’t working and the numbers weren’t reducing significantly. The council suggested the Solicitor and the Sheriff get together and figure out an answer before their third and final votes on the budget in two weeks. The council did agree to shift $400,000 within the county’s $142 million spending plan for the Spanish Moss Trail crossing of Ribaut Road in Port Royal. The Friends of SMT have raised $700,000 through grants and donations for the crossing and now have permission of the S.C. Department of Transportation to cross that road. Defendants in those successful DUI cases might appreciate the expanded bike trail. Lolita Huckaby Watson is a community volunteer and former reporter/editorial assistant/columnist with The Beaufort Gazette, The Savannah Morning News, Bluffton Today, Beaufort Today and The Robesonian (Lumberton, N.C.). She can be reached at bftbay@gmail.com.


NEWS

VOTING MACHINES Vernon Kemp, IT Elections Systems Manager for Beaufort County Board of Voter Registration and Elections, runs simulation ballots while testing the ballot reader Friday morning. Kemp said this specific machine being testing is used for all “absentee by mail” ballots. Kemp said the big machine was working fine and the singlescan ballot reader for reading ballots that have been folded or otherwise damaged was also in perfect working order, just in time for S.C. primary elections for both Republican and Democratic parties Tuesday, June 14, throughout Beaufort County. Kemp said counting all the absentee ballots in Beaufort County was to begin at 9 a.m. Tuesday morning, June 14. Photo by Bob Sofaly.

Butterfly release by Habersham Gardeners helps support Ukraine

By Ron Callari On Saturday, June 11, members of Habersham’s Community Garden, in partnership with Taylor’s Landscape Supply and Nursery and support from the Habersham Land Company, held a Monarch and Zebra Longwing butterfly release fundraiser for Ostroh, Ukraine. As “sister cities,” Beaufort and Ostroh are waterfront destinations — on the Beaufort and Horyn rivers. Both towns have populations of around 15,000, and both communities swell to twice their size during their tourist seasons. Back in March, the City of Beaufort decided to raise funds for Ostroh. To date — according to Councilman Mitch Mitchell — more than $80,000 has been collected. City officials noted that this fundraising would help Ostroh’s refugees and displaced citizens. With a plan conceived by Beaufort Bookstore owner Bruce Page, the Habersham Community Gardeners headed up by Donna and Paul Brainard added to the

Habersham resident Peggy Largey enjoys her butterfly.

Beaufort City Councilman Mitch Mitchell and Habersham Gardener Donna Brainard speak at Habersham’s butterfly release on Saturday. Photos by Ron Callari. City’s coffers. With each $20 donation, 100 participants received a butterfly in a sealed packet to release. With sizable donations

from Taylor’s Landscape Supply and Nursery, Habersham Land Company and the Habersham Community, the gardeners raised $5,305.

Owner Jeff Taylor of Taylor's Landscape Supply & Nursery at Habersham’s butterfly release on Saturday.

Auditions set for Guys and Dolls June 19

From staff reports USC Beaufort Center for the Arts and the Beaufort Theatre Company have announced auditions for Guys and Dolls from 3 to 5 p.m., Sunday, June 19.

Call backs will be from 5:30 to 7 p.m., Tuesday, June 21. Auditioners should bring a non-returnable photo of themselves and potions of a showtune that best showcases their voice. Bring the mu-

sic track – a bluetooth speaker will be provided. Arrive 15 minutes early to complete paperwork and pick up sides to read for the audition. Wear comfortable clothing and shoes you can

dance in, no sandals. Not everyone who auditions will be cast. Cast size will be limited. All roles sing and dance. Ensemble cast, chorus and dance roles available. Ages

18 and older. Production dates will be 7:30 p.m., Sept. 24, 30 and Oct. 1; and 3 p.m., Sept, 25 and Oct. 2. For more information and questions, email Bonnie Hargrove at bhargrov@uscb.edu.

Seabrook man arrested for 2021 double murder From staff reports A man wanted for the 2021 murder of two women in Seabrook has been arrested by the U.S. Marshals Service in Queens, N.Y. Police sought 22-year-old Dionte Mitchell of Seabrook for the murders of Flora Mae Gantt and Shaina Mulligan. On Saturday, Dec. 4, 2021 at approximately 11:00 p.m, Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office responded to the report of shots fired on Detour Road in Seabrook. Deputies secured the scene and learned that two women were shot following a dispute at a party. Gantt, a 74-year-old Walterboro resident, was pronounced dead at the scene. Mulligan, a 30-year-old Beaufort resident, died en route to the hospital. The initial investigation identified Mitchell as one of the parties involved in the shooting. Mitchell met with investigators but was not immediately charged. Further investigation led to the issuance of warrants for the arrest of Mitchell on two counts of murder and one count of possession of a weapon during the commission of a violent crime. Believing that Mitchell left the state after the murders, Sheriff’s Office investigators enlisted the aid of the U.S. Marshals Service, leading to his arrest Wednesday morning, June 8. Mitchell is currently in custody and is expected to be extradited to Beaufort County to face charges related to the murders of Gantt and Mulligan.

JUNE 16–22, 2022

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NEWS

Arrest warrant issued for man considered armed and dangerous By Tony Kukulich A warrant for the arrest of 25-year-old Dakari Ayise has been issued on a charge of attempted murder stemming from a May 27, 2022 shootout on St. Helena Island. The shootout resulted in the death of 21-year-old Darius Ayise. He was the brother of Dakari Ayise. Dakari Ayise remains at large and is considered armed and dangerous. He is believed to frequent Lady’s

and St. Helena islands. The Beaufort County Sheriff’s Office advises that he not be apAyise proached. The Island News previously reported that three people – two men and a woman – were traveling in a vehicle near the 400 block of Seaside Road at approximately 5:30 p.m. on May 27 when a suspect fired

at the vehicle, striking the two male occupants. The Ayise brothers were reportedly the two male occupants of the vehicle. A Sheriff’s Office investigation found evidence at the scene indicating that gunfire was exchanged between the occupants of the vehicle and a man standing outside a residence on Seaside Road. Deputies recovered two handguns from inside the vehicle in which the trio was traveling.

Dedicating Pinckney Porter’s Chapel

Jennifer Pinckney, widow of the late state Sen. Clementa Pinckney, makes her remarks following the official ribbon cutting at Porter’s Chapel on Saturday at Port Royal Naval Heritage Park. The chapel was renamed in honor of Sen. Pinckney who was murdered in 2015 at Mother Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, where he was pastor. The renovated Porter's Chapel was moved to its current location in the Port Royal Naval Heritage Park with tours offered by the National Park Service. Mrs. Pinckney was on hand with their two daughters and the late Senator's father, along with a number of family members and congregants of the former church. Looking on are S.C. Senator Gerald Malloy, center, Port Royal Town Councilman Jerry Ashmore and Port Royal Mayor Joe DiVito. Photo by Lolita Huckaby.

Threat from page A1

and ensuring that they comply with state law,” Passiment wrote. City of Beaufort officials documented their concerns about the IGA as early as March 24, and according to Mayor Stephen Murray, the county has yet to respond. Passiment’s offer may be the path toward reaching agreement. “The City of Beaufort looks forward to meeting with the county in the coming weeks to hopefully renew the impact fee program,” Murray said. “Our council has approved the necessary intergovernmental agreement on first reading as a sign of good faith.” In March, a motion to repeal a school impact fee that was only collected south of the Broad River was expanded when District 7 Council member Logan Cunningham amended the motion to include the repeal of all impact fees collected by the county. The motion with Cunningham’s amendment was passed by the council.

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JUNE 16–22, 2022

During the April 25 council meeting, the council voted to delay the third and final reading of the motion until the June 13 meeting, ostensibly to give both sides time to settle their differences. As that deadline approached, it appeared that some progress toward resolution of the issues had been made. It was, however, clear that the June deadline was going to be insufficient to work through all of the concerns. “We have all put together revisions to the IGA that have been circulated, and the town gave first reading to an ordinance that would authorize me to negotiate on the town’s behalf,” Port Royal Town Manager Van Willis said. “We met the June 13 deadline in terms of getting a draft together and acting on it. However, we will not proceed with second reading until we reconcile the differences with the county on their draft IGAs versus ours. Additionally, the town and City (of Beaufort) hope to adopt IGAs that mirror one another.” As county officials threatened the repeal of impact

fees, there was little conversation about how that income would be replaced. Impact fees are generally paid by developers to offset the demand that development places on county and municipal resources. Fees are calculated to approximately offset the cost of providing those services to each new home, and they allow the government to assess those costs specifically on those benefiting from development. Without impact fees, the cost of expanding government services to accommodate development falls entirely on taxpayers. “We are working with the county on a follow-up meeting to resolve those differences,” Willis said. “I think we can come to a consensus on the IGAs with the county, even on library and recreation fees, which we did not have in place previously.” Tony Kukulich is a recent transplant to the Lowcountry. A native of Wilmington, Del., he comes to The Island News from the San Francisco Bay Area where he spent seven years as a reporter and photographer for several publications. He can be reached at tony.theislandnews@gmail.com.

The two shooting victims were driven to a nearby gas station where they were met by deputies and Beaufort County Emergency Medical Services paramedics. Both men were transported by ambulance to Beaufort Memorial Hospital, where Dakari Ayise was treated and released. Darius Ayise was transferred to Medical University of South Carolina for treatment of a more serious injury. He died on June 2 as a result of his

gunshot wound. According to the Sheriff’s Office, interviews with all parties involved in the incident confirmed that shots were exchanged over an ongoing but unspecified dispute. The identity of the man who fired the shots that killed Darius Ayise and injured Dakari Ayise has not been released. It is unknown at this time if he faces charges in the incident. Anyone who knows Dakari Ayise's whereabouts is urged

to contact the Sheriff's Office Emergency Dispatch at 9-11 or Crime Stoppers of the Lowcountry at 843-554-1111, if wishing to remain anonymous and for possible reward. Tony Kukulich is a recent transplant to the Lowcountry. A native of Wilmington, Del., he comes to The Island News from the San Francisco Bay Area where he spent seven years as a reporter and photographer for several publications. He can be reached at tony.theislandnews@gmail.com.

Hearts for Ukraine quilt raffle to benefit Ukraine

From staff reports The Sea Island Quilters, an organization of more than 70 local quilters, has designed and quilted a beautiful Hearts for Ukraine quilt that is being raffled off to support the City of Ostroh – Beaufort’s partner city in Ukraine. In March, Beaufort, through the efforts of Mayor Stephen Murray, begin a campaign to support Ostroh, a historic city in western Ukraine that is helping refugees from other parts of Ukraine. Ostroh is also supporting Ukraine’s army with needed supplies. Thus far, Beaufort has raised more than $100,000 through its Pride of Place fund – thanks to the generosity of donors from throughout the country, plus the Thibault Gallery, which sold blue and yellow pins in honor of Ukraine’s flag. The gallery donated all its proceeds – more than $40,000 so far – to Pride of Place for Ostroh. Many quilters participated in making the quilt, said Barbara Elder, a member of the quilt guild and one of

Bobbie Elder poses with a quilt to be auctioned off to raise money for Ostroh, Ukraine. Submitted photo. the organizers of the project. There are 56 pieced hearts on the front side of the quilt, all in shades of blue and yellow. The back is yellow with a star block surrounded by a sawtooth edge. The women began shortly after the Pride of Place campaign was announced in March. They completed the quilt a couple of weeks ago. The quilt is being displayed in the first floor foyer at City Hall, 1901 Boundary St. Tickets can be purchased at City Hall, in the Business Office on the first floor. Tickets are $1 each, or 6 for $5.

Either cash or checks are accepted. Checks should be made out to Beaufort Pride of Place – Ukraine Fund. The office is open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. Hearts for Ukraine will be displayed at City Hall for two weeks, then at the Beaufort Digital Corridor, 500 Carteret St., where tickets will also be sold. The drawing will be held of July 24. For information about the Sea Island Quilters, email the group at seaislandquilters@gmail.com or go to their website: https://www. seaislandquilters.com.

Practice makes perfect

A Department of Transportation worker loads traffic cones back into his truck during the statewide hurricane evacuation exercise Thursday morning on U.S. 21 near Marine Corps Air Station Beaufort. DOT trucks were dotted every 10th of a mile along major thoroughfares from Beaufort all the way to Columbia during the exercise. Photo by Bob Sofaly.

County offering self-defense courses

From staff reports The Beaufort County Detention Center is sponsoring a free Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) course for all interested female residents of Beaufort County beginning Monday, June 20. This basic self-defense course will be taught by a certified RAD Systems instructor and includes lectures, discussions, and self-defense techniques suitable for women of all ages and abilities. Classes will be held at the Burton Wells Recreation Center, 1 Middleton Recreation Drive, Beaufort. Participants must commit to attending all classes:

Monday June 20, 6-8 p.m. Lecture. Participants will be introduced to a RAD Certified Instructor and will be educated on awareness and prevention techniques. Regular clothes are acceptable for this initial class. Wednesday June 22, 6-8 p.m. Defense techniques. Participants are asked to attend in comfortable gym type apparel and tennis shoes. Monday June 27, 6-8 p.m. Defense techniques. Participants are asked to attend in comfortable

gym type apparel and tennis shoes. • Wednesday June 29, 6-8 p.m. Defense techniques. Participants are asked to attend in comfortable gym type apparel and tennis shoes. • Thursday June 30, 6-7 p.m. Defense techniques. Participants are asked to attend in comfortable gym type apparel and tennis shoes. Space is limited to 12 participants and sign up is mandatory to participate. For more information or to register, please contact Christi Owens by Friday June 17, at cowens@ bcgov.net or 843-255-5194.


ELECTION 2022

Women make County Council gains as vote totals delayed on primary night By Mike McCombs This primary election has been a difficult one for the Beaufort County Board of Voter Registration and Elections. An incorrect ballot was initially distributed in County Council District 6, leaving off Republicans Mike Covert and Tab Tabernik after the boundary lines were moved during redistricting. Then Tuesday night, because of the resolution of that error, county results could not be uploaded to the S.C. Election Commission’s Election Night Results site until all precincts had reported in Beaufort County. “The resolution of the redistricting error was to deploy a corrected election database to the six affected precincts,” the office said in a news release Tuesday night. “Once all precincts have reported, the results from the six affected precincts can be merged with the unaffected precincts for state reporting.” The results were released just twice during the evening via printed reports and emails with the unofficial final tally coming right at midnight. Women on the rise Two-term incumbent Alice Howard held off first-time challenger Josh Scallate by just over 140 votes in the Re-

publican primary for Beaufort County County Council District 4. Howard had been the Alice only woman Howard on the 11-person Council. Now she has company. In District 6, Tab Tabernik held off former Councilman Mike Covert by a healthy margin. In District 8, Paula Brown did much the same thing to John Zmarzly. Both were Republican primaries. In District 9, Mark Lawson held off challenger Shellie West Hodges, firming up the number of women on Council at three but there’s still a chance of a fourth. In County Council District 2, Republican challenger and attorney David Bartholomew surprised and edged out incumbent Paul Sommerville, a 16-year vetDavid eran on CounBartholomew cil. Next up, Bartholomew will face Democrat Marilyn Harris in the November General Election. Rodman routed Just more than two years af-

ter stepping down as Beaufort County Council Chair, lightning-rod councilman Stu Rodman finds himself on the way out altogether. Rodman was routed by challenger Tommy Reitz in their County Council District 11 race, 1,785 votes, to just 900 votes for Rodman.

Race set for House District 121 The General Election race is set for S.C. House District seat. On the Democratic side, Michael Rivers Sr., continues is quest for his fourth term in the S.C. House, handling challenger Marvin Lamar Bowens relatively easily. As for the Republicans, Eric Erickson did much the same as Rivers, dispatching Timothy Swain relatively easily. Eric Rivers and Erickson Erickson will face off in November’s General election. In the race for Governor There were no real surprises in the Gubernatorial campaigns Tuesday night. On the Republican side, incumbent Henry McMaster defeated primary challenger Harrison Musselwhite of Greenville handily.

Cadd captures auditor role By Tony Kukulich David Cadd, the former Beaufort County deputy auditor, won the race for auditor in a landslide victory over opponent Willie Turral in Tuesday’s Republican primary. With no Democratic party candidate, Cadd’s primary victory means that he will, in all likelihood, run unopposed in the November general election. The unofficial results provided by the Board of Voter Registration and Elections of Beaufort County show that 20,801 votes were cast in the auditor’s race. Cadd received 13,966 (67%), while Turral picked up 6,835 (33%). “I would like to thank God, my family, friends, and supporters in this election,” wrote Cadd in a social media post Wednesday morning. “I especially would like to thank my fabulous team that worked tirelessly. I believe Beaufort County voted for experience and strong leadership to prevent any outside manipulation of the auditor’s office. I look forward to serving all the citizens of Beaufort County.” Both Cadd and Turral were running for office for the first

Winner from page A1

lead over Woodward remained. Tanner had 15,015 votes compared to Woodward’s 9,208 with 96 of 98 precincts reporting. Tanner and Woodward were the only two candidates for sheriff. As such, the winner of the primary will not face an opponent in the November general election. For all intents and purposes, the race was decided in Tuesday’s primary. Tanner first won election for sheriff of Beaufort County in 1998. Assuming that the official vote count remains inline with the unofficial results, Tuesday’s victory hands Tanner his seventh consecutive four-year term as sheriff. Woodward served in the

time. Cadd is a 30-year veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. Turral is an educator and commuDavid nity activist. Cadd “We ran a very clean campaign,” Turral said in a video that was posted on his Facebook page Wednesday morning. “We ran as hard as we could. We did not get the results that we wanted, but we’ve got to trust God and trust the process. We are alive and well and in a position to continually move Beaufort. Now those who are in office, our job is to hold them accountable.” The incumbent, Jim Beckert, was elected in 2014 and 2018. He opted not to run for reelection. His tenure in the office has been marked by controversy and turmoil. Beckert has been sued by Beaufort County Treasurer Maria Walls and former Beaufort County Financial Officer Alicia Holland on charges related to harassment. He has also been sued twice by the county in an effort to compel him to perform the duties of the position. Cadd, who worked for five

Sheriff’s Office under Tanner and was most recently an investigator for the 14 Circuit Solicitor’s Office. This is the second time he has faced off against Tanner. Woodward was defeated in the 2018 race for sheriff. In that contest, he captured 45% with a particularly strong showing in the Bluffton precincts. During the election campaign, Woodward criticized Tanner on issues including the high number of open positions in the Sheriff’s Office; the agency’s high turnover rate and poor morale; and a lack of transparency. Tanner countered that law enforcement agencies across the state and the country are struggling with staffing issues, and said that the application pool has started to grow again, a fact he attributed to a salary adjustment that Tanner implemented earlier this year.

years under Beckert, said he was fired after he filed a whistleblower complaint stating that Beckert created a hostile work environment and undermined Cadd’s ability to do his job as deputy auditor. Cadd did not seek endorsement of his candidacy or accept campaign donations, stating, “I am here for all the people of Beaufort County and not just a selected few.” Early in the campaign, Turral received support from the Beaufort County Republican Party and endorsements from Sheriff P.J. Tanner and S.C. Sen. Tom Davis among others. However, a video surfaced of Turral reportedly recorded in 2020 in which he made comments critical of police and disparaged former President Trump. Much of Turral’s support vanished in the wake of that video. Beaufort County will certify the unofficial results from the June 14, 2022 statewide primaries on Thursday, June 16, 2022. The canvass hearing will be held at 10 a.m. in the Board of Voter Registration and Elections of Beaufort County’s main office, 15 John Galt Road, Beaufort, S.C. 29902. “The criticisms through a campaign, it’s unfounded,” Tanner said. “Misinformation, I find, is the most egregious part. Don’t mislead the people that we work for, the people that pay the taxes and expect us to do the job that we do. Of course, you expect a negative campaign for those that are running against somebody that’s in office, that’s an incumbent. You’ve got to try to attack them at some level. But where’s the fairness in the factual data that’s supported? Those are the things that are irritating.” Woodward’s campaign had problems in the late stages of the race. Woodward’s campaign manager, John Acker, admitted to manipulating the Facebook account of South Carolina State Representative Bill Herbkersman (R, 118), a Tanner supporter. Acker reportedly used Herbkersman’s

As for the Democrats, while there were five candidates, it was a race between former Joe RepreCunningham U.S. sentative Joe Cunningham and State Senator Mia McLeod, with Cunningham coming out on top with 55.6 percent of the vote. Cunningham’s staff began campaigning immediately, sending out campaign emails and asking for donations. Meanwhile, the S.C. GOP sent out an email with a quote from party chairman Drew McKissick alluding that Cunningham would not be much of a challenge for McMaster. Holding the 1st If the Republicans hold on to South Carolina’s 1st Congressional District, it will be incumbent Nancy Macy in the seat. Nancy Mace held Mace of a primary challenge from 2018 GOP nominee Katie Arrington. In Beaufort County, Mace won with 52.75% of the vote, similar to her 53.29% mark district-wide.

Secretary of Agriculture Longtime incumbent Hugh Weathers held off two challengers with 59.97% of the vote and will go on to face David Edmund (Green) and Chris Nelums (United Citizens) in November’s general election.

He’s back Incumbent Alan Wilson held off a primary challenge from “S.C.-first candidate” Lauren Martel with 66.37 percent of the vote. With no Democratic challenger in the general election, Wilson will go on to his fourth term in office. Shooting for 6 Incumbent Mark Hammond will get a chance to “keep South Carolina business friendly” in the November General Election after dismissing a primary challenge from Keith Blandford in the Secretary of State race. First elected in 2002, Hammond is running for his sixth term as Secretary of State. He will face Democrat Rosemounda Peggy Butler in November. Three for two spots The Democratic primary to determine an opponent for Tim Scott in the race for U.S. Senate will result in a runoff.

In an amazingly close race, the vote was almost evenly split between the three candidates. Catherine Fleming Bruce (34.37%) and Krsytle Matthews (33.22%) will move on to a runoff two weeks from Tuesday’s primary (June 28), while Angela Geter (32.42%) appears to have gotten the short end of the stick. Teacher, teacher In the Democratic race for Superintendent of Education, though Beaufort County’s votes have not yet been added to the state totals on SCVotes.org, it appears Lisa Ellis’ almost-2,000-vote win in Beaufort County may have helped her avoid a runoff. Unofficially, it looks like Ellis brought home 50.12% of the vote, while Gary Burgess had 31.21% in the three-way race. On the Republican side, Kathy Maness and Ellen Weaver weren’t so lucky, and they’ll be moving on to a likely June 28 runoff. Maness looks to have around 30% of the vote, while fundraising juggernaut Weaver, who still lacks her required Master’s degree, is near 24%. Mike McCombs is the Editor of The Island News and can be reached at TheIslandNews@gmail.com.

Primary Results Tuesday, June 14

(Note: Vote totals are unofficial. Votes will be certified Thursday, June 16.) Beaufort County Sheriff – Republican Candidate Votes Pct. P.J. Tanner 15,015 61.99 JoJo Woodward 9,208 38.01

County Council District 8 – Republican Candidate Votes Pct. Paula Brown 1,115 55.12 John Zmarly 908 44.88

Beaufort County Auditor – Republican Candidate Votes Pct. David Cadd 13,966 67.14 Willie Turral 6,835 32.86

County Council District 9 – Republican Candidate Votes Pct. Mark Lawson 956 66.95 Shellie West Hodges 472 33.05

County Council District 2 – Republican Candidate Votes Pct. David Batholomew 1,404 51.24 Paul Sommerville 1,336 48.76 County Council District 4 – Republican Candidate Votes Pct. Alice Howard 1,174 53.27 Josh Scallate 1,030 46.73 County Council District 6 – Republican Candidate Votes Pct. Tab Tabernik 1,435 55.97 Michael Covert 1,129 44.03

County Council District 11 – Republican Candidate Votes Pct. Tommy Reitz 1,785 66.48 Stu Rodman 900 33.52 SC House of Representatives District 121 – Democratic Candidate Votes Pct. Michael Rivers Sr. 1,410 86.66 Marvin Lamar Bowens 217 13.34 SC House of Representatives District 121 – Republican Candidate Votes Pct. Eric Erickson 1,065 71.72 Timothy Swain 420 28.28

Source: Beaufort County Board of Voter Registration and Elections account to like posts on Woodward’s Facebook page, and he deleted Herbkersman’s video in which he endorsed Tanner. Acker was also involved in Herbkersman’s campaign. Tanner pounced on the opportunity and criticized Woodward, first for failing to acknowledge the actions of his campaign manager, and then for allowing Acker to remain on the campaign. Woodward struck back in a social media post. “Making this race a personal attack on a campaign worker is classless and only proves that the betterment of Beaufort County is not a concern to my opponent,” wrote Woodard. Woodward was also called out in the June 8 episode of the popular “Murdaugh Murders Podcast.” He was criticized for collecting evidence from the scene of the

murders of Maggie and Paul Murdaugh in June 2021 when he was an investigator for the 14th Circuit Solicitor’s Office, Alex Murdaugh was a prosecutor for the same office, which host Mandy Matney said represented a clear conflict of interest. “I point out JoJo Woodward because his involvement in the case concerns me personally as someone who lives in Beaufort County,” Matney said. “I keep hearing JoJo Woodard supporters saying things like, ‘He was just doing his job. He was just following Duffie’s orders.’ That is the problem. A sheriff is supposed to be a leader and a person of impeccable integrity. … As a former deputy, JoJo Woodward should have known that he should not have been on that scene, and he should have walked away.” Beaufort County’s results in

the race will become official once certified on Thursday. “I’m very proud of our campaign,” Tanner concluded. “I’m very proud of the message that we sent to the residents of this county for their consideration, for their vote. I respect all of the votes, if it was for me or not for me. At the end of the day, I respect their opinion and the position they took. I don’t know that I can say it any clearer. Thank you for those that voted for me. Thank you for those that voted against me. I’m going to earn your vote. I’m going to earn your support.” Tony Kukulich is a recent transplant to the Lowcountry. A native of Wilmington, Del., he comes to The Island News from the San Francisco Bay Area where he spent seven years as a reporter and photographer for several publications. He can be reached at tony.theislandnews@gmail.com. JUNE 16–22, 2022

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BUSINESS

Consider a simple investment strategy to help reduce guesswork • •

Provided by Wells Fargo For most investors, the key to success is simple: Buy low and sell high. But how often have you seen this scenario played out? (You may have done it yourself.) • When the market is up, an investor feels good and buys stocks. • When the market is down, that same investor gets scared and sells. Although reacting like this may feel instinctively right at the time, buying high and selling low is unlikely to result in a profit. Why do investors do this? The reason may have a lot to do with us making investment choices the same way we do many important decisions: using both our heads and our hearts (i.e., logic and emotion). When there’s market volatility—including both market highs and market lows—our emotions tend to take over and we may make illogical choices going against our best interests. Rather than falling victim to the potential perils of emotional investing, you may want to be completely logical: get into the market when it’s down and out when it’s up. This is known as “market timing.” While this approach sounds rational, the problem

By Caroline Holden Father’s Day is a time to recognize, appreciate, and celebrate the fathers and father figures who lift us up and shape our lives for the better. In a sense, fatherhood is a duty that is entrusted to every male. No one exemplifies this duty as well as South Carolina native Ken Willis. Whether to his own children, his grandchildren, his employees, or the community at large, Ken understands what it means to be a helpful hand and guiding force to all those around him. Ken, better known as “Biggie” to his grandchildren, has never shied away from the responsibilities he carries as a father and grandfather. He actively celebrates the role he is able to play in his family’s life and enjoys every minute shared with them. Married at the age of 38 to the love of his life, Jeanie, the couple has two lovely sons and three beautiful grandchildren. As an alumni of the University of South Carolina, there is nothing Ken enjoys more than sharing his enthusiasm for the Gamecocks with

is it’s extremely difficult, even for experienced investors, to do consistently. There’s an old saying: “No one rings a bell” when the market reaches the top of a peak or the bottom of a trough. Translated, that means anyone attempting to time the market finds it difficult to know exactly when to make their move. For example, if you think the market has reached a peak and get out and then share prices keep rising, you’ll miss out on the additional profits you could have made by waiting. And after you get out, how do you know when to get back in? If you act too quickly, you’ll forego better bargains as prices continue to fall. If you wait too long, you may sacrifice the chance to fully benefit from a market rally.

Give dollar cost averaging a look

To avoid the potential problems of emotional investing and market timing, consider a strategy called “dollar cost averaging.” Dollar cost averaging is the practice of putting a set amount into a particular investment on a regular basis (weekly, monthly, quarterly, etc.) no matter what’s going on in the market. For example, you could invest $500

Additional shares when prices are low Fewer shares when prices increase

As shown in the table below, if the price is $24 per share, you’d buy 20.83 shares (keep in mind mutual funds let you purchase fractional shares). If it rises to $30, you would buy only 16.67 shares.

Using dollar cost averaging in a fluctuating market Month January February March April May June July August September October November December

This example is hypothetical and for illustrative purposes only.

In a fluctuating market, dollar cost averaging will result in an average cost per share that’s less each month. In a fluctuating ed by the number of purchas- ing’s challenges is you have than the average market price per share. The average market price per share in the table (the sum market, this practice lets you es [12]) is $26.42. However, to stick with the strategy even of the market prices [$317] divided by the number of purchases [12]) is $26.42. However, the the average price per share when the market declines, purchase: average price per share (the total invested [$6,000] divided by the number of shares purchased • Additional shares when (the total invested [$6,000] and that can be difficult [228.81]) is only $26.22. divided by the number of (see our previous discussion prices are low purchased [228.81]) is about investing). •While Fewer shares when pricyou’re mulling dollar costshares averaging’s potential merits, consider this:emotional You may well be only $26.22. However, during times es increase using the strategy already. If you participate in an employer-sponsored retirement plan, such as alike While you’re mulling dol- these, dollar cost averaging As shown in the table 401(k) or 403(b), and contribute the same amount each payday, you’re using dollar cost above, if the price is $24 per lar cost averaging’s potential can be most useful by letaveraging. share, you’d buy 20.83 shares merits, consider this: You may ting you purchase shares at (keep in mind mutual funds well be using the strategy al- lower prices. Because dollar cost averlet you purchase fractional ready. If you participate in an shares). If it rises to $30, you employer-sponsored retire- aging can be simultaneously ment plan, such as a 401(k) more difficult and advantawould buy only 16.67 shares. In a fluctuating market, or 403(b), and contribute the geous when the going gets dollar cost averaging will re- same amount each payday, toughest, consider turning to sult in an average cost per you’re using dollar cost aver- a professional financial advisor for help. He or she should share that’s less than the av- aging. offer a voice a reason during erage market price per share. these periods as you grapple The average market price per Get help for when with whether to adhere to share in the table (the sum of the going gets tough One of dollar cost averag- the strategy. the market prices [$317] divid-

It’s a day to celebrate all the Kens

his family. Together, the Willis family delights in bonding over the highs and lows of footKen ball season. Willis In his free time, Ken loves to explore the beauty of the Lowcountry with his three grandchildren, and occasionally treating them with a visit to the local toy store. To no one’s surprise, Ken considers being a loving father and grandfather the greatest achievement of his life. When it comes to business, you will rarely meet someone as accomplished and humble as Ken. After graduating from the University of South Carolina, he went on to serve as a Project Manager for Leonard, Call, Taylor & Associates of Myrtle Beach from 1979 to 1985, topping annual sales of more than $25 million. In 1990, Ken relocated to Fripp Island, where he served as the Co-Founder and President of The Fripp Company, Inc. Under his direction, the company has been widely

Ken provided me with the opportunity and guidance to make one of the most important decisions in my life. I am proud to say that 30 years later I can call my mentor, not only a friend but a business partner” – Todd McDaniel, Bay Street Realty Group Partner and Owner credited for putting Fripp Island on the map, having grown revenues to more than $100 million annually. In his next role as Managing Director of the Grand Harbor Group, LLC, he oversaw the development of all Grand Harbor amenity-based real estate communities with combined sales exceeding $85 million. Currently, Ken serves as CFO and Broker-InCharge of Berkshire Hathaway’s Bay Street Realty. Those having had the pleasure to work with Ken

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Investing $500 per month over one year Price per share Shares purchased $24 20.83 $25 20.00 $28 17.86 $30 16.67 $27 18.52 $22 22.73 $24 20.83 $27 18.52 $26 19.23 $29 17.24 $28 17.86 $27 18.52

know that while he has been extremely successful throughout his career, he takes the greatest pride in seeing his agents and team thrive. Whether inside or out of the office, Ken remains a father figure to everyone around him. His ability to mentor young agents and help them reach their full potential is unparalleled. Ken is constantly pushing new agents to further their careers, even if that means handing over a large listing or bringing them onto

a client account. His belief in his team’s abilities and unfaltering support has led many agents to credit Ken with why they have not left their current role and never plan to. “Everyday Ken leads by example. He has taught me invaluable lessons about life, real estate, and leadership,” Marketing Director and Realtor, Meg Wynne said. “Ken has taken me under his wing from day one, as he does all of his agents, and for that and so much more I am forever indebted to him.” In addition to his dedication toward his family and employees, Ken is often viewed as a father figure to the Beaufort community at large. Ken sees giving back to his community and creating opportunities for growth as another one of greatest honors. Through the development of Fripp Island, Ken has not only invested in the community but also created a place for people to call home. Over the years, he has not only dedicated countless hours to helping the community, but also to helping those

Like any investment strategy, dollar cost averaging doesn’t guarantee a profit or protect against loss in a declining market. Because dollar cost averaging requires continuous investment regardless of fluctuating prices, you should consider your financial and emotional ability to continue the program through both rising and declining markets. This article was written by Wells Fargo Advisors and provided courtesy of Katie C. Phifer, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™, RICP® and First Vice President-Investment Officer in Beaufort, SC at 843-982-1506. Investment and Insurance Products are: • Not Insured by the FDIC or Any Federal Government Agency • Not a Deposit or Other Obligation of, or Guaranteed by, the Bank or Any Bank Affiliate • Subject to Investment Risks, Including Possible Loss of the Principal Amount Invested Wells Fargo Advisors is a trade name used by Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC, Member SIPC, a registered broker-dealer and non-bank affiliate of Wells Fargo & Company. ©2021 Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC. All rights reserved.

from the community who are in need. Just ask Todd McDaniel. As a young local bartender, Todd was eager to support himself after graduating college. True to his nature, Ken was more than happy to step in and help Todd launch a successful career in sales. Ken’s propensity for giving back only continues to grow. “Nearly 30 years ago Ken offered me a job in sales. Ken provided me with the opportunity and guidance to make one of the most important decisions in my life. I am proud to say that 30 years later I can call my mentor, not only a friend but a business partner,” Bay Street Realty Group Partner and Owner Todd McDaniel said. As Father’s Day approaches, it is once again time to give thanks to all the father figures who have guided, mentored, counseled, cared for and supported us through life’s ups and downs. Whether that be lessons born from experience or sacrifices made from love, it is a day to celebrate all the Kens in our lives and the wisdom they impart.


HEALTH

Advance Directives: Taking control of health care choices

From staff reports Every time you go to the doctor, there is a check box that asks if you have an advance directive. You may look at it and wonder what that is, but don’t want to ask. It’s probably just another form in the pile that you have to fill out. And it isn’t that important, right? Actually, advance directives are very important if you want your wishes to be known and respected. “An advance directive is a written document that tells your doctors and fami-

ly about your decisions and wishes for care and comfort should you become terminally ill or have a serious illness and can’t speak for yourself,” said Anne Caywood, a Bluffton-based attorney and executive director of Lowcountry Legal Volunteers. Completing one is simple. You can download the documents from any number of websites (visit BeaufortMemorial.org/PowerOfAttorney for a copy) or ask your health care provider for help. In addition to answering a

few questions and signing it, you will need a couple of witnesses and maybe a notary. A lawyer is not required. You can be specific about your wishes, or you can simply name someone (a proxy or power of attorney) to make decisions for you if you are unable to do so for yourself. “Executing a formal Health Care Power of Attorney will ensure that whoever you trust will legally be able to make those decisions on your behalf,” said Caywood. Once you’ve completed your form and gained agree-

ment from the person you identified to make decisions on your behalf, have a conversation with your family so they are aware of your wishes. Give copies of the paperwork to your doctors, your health care facility and the person you have chosen as your health care power of attorney. Keep the original in a safe but easily accessible place. Locally, Beaufort Memorial is also able to keep the documents on file in case you are hospitalized. To take advantage of this free ser-

vice, bring your completed forms, insurance card and a photo ID to the admitting department. For more information, contact the Care Coordination Department at 843-522-5052. It’s also important that you keep these documents up to date. “This is a document that you need to periodically review,” said Caywood. “As we age, our goals change and so may our decisions about health care.” It is important to review your decisions as often as

once a year, but it is imperative you review them in case of divorce, diagnosis of a serious illness, decline in your health, or the death of your chosen agent/power of attorney. Be sure to keep track of who has copies, so that you can update them with any changes. “Prepare in advance, educate your family about your wishes and document them,” says Caywood. “This will empower your chosen representatives to act confidently on your behalf if they should ever need to.”

Need help preparing your advance directive?

From staff reports Beaufort Memorial Hospital (BMH) and Lowcountry Legal Volunteers have partnered to help area residents complete a health care power of attorney at no cost. The two local not-for-prof-

its have scheduled a series of clinics at which those who qualify can meet with an LLV staff attorney or a volunteer attorney from the community to develop the documents. Residents leave the meeting with finalized documents in

hand, as well as a legal will. “It’s also important to have a will so that your decisions will be honored as to how your real and personal property will be distributed to family and loved ones,” said Caywood. “If you don't have a

will at the time of your death, the law of the state where you live will decide everything for you.” Interested? The first step is to contact the Lowcountry Legal Volunteer office at 843815-1570 or by email at info@

lclv.org. “A member of the staff will assist you in determining if you meet the qualifications for free legal assistance,” she said. “Qualifications are based primarily on income.” If you qualify, the office will

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A9


HEALTH & WELLNESS Options & References for a Healthier Life

Medical myths: Vegetarian and vegan diets

By Tim Newman Until fairly recently, vegetarianism was generally considered a fringe lifestyle choice in the United States, and veganism even more so. Anything on the fringes of society tends to inadvertently encourage myths and misconceptions. Also, deciding to avoid animal products sparks rage in some people. This anger manifests for a range of reasons. Suffice it to say that if a sizable group of the population is against something, conditions are ripe for myths and half-truths. Overall, vegetarianism and veganism are misunderstood. Here are some of the most common myths.

some women, might increase the risk of breast cancer, particularly for those with a family history. Overall, as the American Cancer Society explains: “The evidence does not point to any dangers from eating soy in people, and the health benefits appear to outweigh any potential risk. In fact, there is growing evidence that eating traditional soy foods […] may lower the risk of breast cancer, especially among Asian women.”

8. Pregnant people need meat and dairy

1. Plant-based diets are always healthful

In recent decades, an increasing number of studies have demonstrated links between red meat consumption and poorer health outcomes. For instance, processed and red meat intake is associated with colon cancer, obesity, heart disease, and diabetes. This might suggest that a diet without meat is better for the body. But, just as not all meat is red, not all vegetarian or vegan diets are healthful. To use an extreme example, if an individual only ate potato chips, they would be vegan, but certainly not brimming with vitality, energy, and health. As with any other diet, it depends entirely on what an individual consumes. Additionally, lean white meat and fish are not associated with the same health issues as processed and red meats. And certain meat substitute products can be high in salt. In 2018, Action on Salt, a “group concerned with salt and its effects on health,” carried out a survey of meat substitutes. They investigated products from several major retailers in the United Kingdom. When they looked at burgers, they found that the average salt content of beef burgers was 0.75 grams (g), compared with 0.89 g for vegetarian burgers, including bean burgers. According to their findings, a veggie burger has “more salt than a large portion of McDonald’s fries.”

2. Vegetarianism guarantees weight loss

Sadly, no. Not all vegetarian and vegan diets are equally healthful. It is incredibly easy to consume thousands of calories each day without any of them being associated with animals. The key to weight loss is a healthful diet and regular exercise, and neither requires the avoidance of animal products. It is still worth noting, though, the evidence that following a plant-based diet is associated with weight loss. For instance, a review published in Translational Psychiatry explains: “We found robust evidence for short- to moderate-term beneficial effects of plant-based diets versus conventional diets […] on weight status, energy metabolism, and systemic inflammation.” This finding held true for healthy participants, people with obesity, and individuals with type 2 diabetes. To give another example, another review, published in BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care, looked at the impact of plant-based diets on people with diabetes. Among other benefits, the authors found that these diets were associ-

ated with a “significant improvement” in weight.

3. Vegetarians and vegans cannot get enough protein

This is perhaps the most common of all the myths that we cover today. But it is still a myth. In the world of food, protein abounds. For people who eat them, dairy products and eggs are high in protein. Vegans also have an array of options, including seitan, tofu, lentils, chickpeas, many types of beans, spelt, spirulina, quinoa, oats, wild rice, seeds, and nuts. Even some vegetables contain protein, including spinach, asparagus, broccoli, artichokes, potatoes, peas, brussels sprouts, and sweet potatoes.

In fact, calcium is important for a number of bodily functions, including maintaining blood pressure, muscle contraction, transmitting signals along nerves, and blood clotting. Vegans, therefore, need to ensure that they take in enough calcium from plantbased sources. As with protein, there are plenty of places to pick up calcium, including soy-based foods, beans, lentils, peas, spinach, turnips, figs, flax, chia, sesame seeds, seaweed, and some nuts—almonds, in particular.

6. You cannot get B12 from a vegetarian diet

This myth follows on from the protein myth above. In short, the most important nutrient for building muscle is protein, which can easily be found in abundance beyond the animal kingdom.

This is a myth. While vegans often take B12 supplements to ensure that they have adequate levels, vegetarians have a wealth of other options. Vegetarians can derive B12 from eggs and milk products, including cheese. Meanwhile, a range of vegan-friendly foods are fortified with B12, including some cereals, tofu, nondairy milks, and spreads.

5. Dairy is essential for strong bones

7. Soy increases the risk of breast cancer

4. You can’t build muscle without meat

Dairy is not essential for strong bones, but calcium is.

As it stands, there is no convincing evidence that eating

soy-based foods increases the risk of breast cancer in humans. This misunderstanding might stem from earlier studies in rodents. Scientists showed that when these animals received large amounts of soy compounds called isoflavones, they were more likely to develop breast cancer. However, humans process soy differently from rodents. A study published in February 2020 searched for associations between soy, dairy intake, and breast cancer risk. The scientists had followed 52,795 cancer-free women in the U.S. for an average of 7.9 years. They found no clear association between soy intake and breast cancer, but they did identify a link between dairy milk and breast cancer. However, the full picture is, perhaps, slightly more complex. Some women use soybased supplements as a natural alternative to hormone therapy during menopause. One large study investigated whether these supplements might be associated with breast cancer risk. The researchers found “no association between past use of soy supplements and breast cancer.” But they also found that taking soy supplements, for

During pregnancy, it is important to take in all the nutrients that a growing baby needs. But, as we have seen along the way, plant-based foods can provide the vast majority of them. Someone who is vegetarian, or vegan may need to do a little extra planning to be sure that have enough nutrients, especially at the beginning of pregnancy. As we mentioned above, it is important to ensure an adequate intake of vitamin B12, through supplements or fortified foods, and this is especially true during pregnancy and breastfeeding. The American Dietetic Association recommend vitamin B12 supplementation throughout pregnancy and breastfeeding for people with vegan or vegetarian diets. As the authors of a review of research about plantbased diets during pregnancy explain, “The available evidence shows that wellplanned vegetarian and vegan diets may be considered safe during pregnancy and lactation, but they require a strong awareness for a balanced intake of key nutrients.” For people considering plant-based diets, Medical News Today have published useful guides to vegetarian and vegan eating. For anyone with a preexisting condition, it might also be worth discussing the change with a doctor. This article was fact checked by Harriet Pike, Ph.D. Source: https://www.medicalnewstoday. com/articles/medical-mythsvegetarian-and-vegan-diets#8

How to tell if you are burned out (and what to do about it) By Katie Sandler Many people suffer from burnout in their careers and life in general but may not realize it. Going through the motions, dreading the fact that it's time to go to work, and feeling mentally exhausted are draining, but they can take a toll on one's attitude, work performance, and quality of life. Knowing the signs of burnout and what to do about it can make a difference. “We live in a time when all we do is rush from one point to the next, constantly being busy with work, tasks, and life chores,” explains Katie Sandler, personal development and career coach. “Before long, this can lead to people

feeling emotionally depleted.” Recognizing the signs and taking action can help people overcome them and feel great. It can also help ensure that it doesn't happen again. According to the National Institutes of Health, burnout is a term that was coined in the 1970s by an American psychologist. The term is widely used today to describe the condition where people experience various symptoms, including mental exhaustion, feeling unmotivated, detached and helpless, feeling like a failure, having an increasingly pessimistic outlook, and not feeling satisfied with life. People who experience burnout often feel like they

have a lot of bad days, that the things they do don't matter, and that they are not appreciated. These feelings all lead to a decrease in life satisfaction, and until it's addressed, things will stay the same or even continue to decline. Here are some things that can be done to address burnout: • Take a serious look at your job. Burnout is often caused because people are not satisfied with their job. When this happens, it is time to determine what can be changed. Perhaps it is time to switch jobs or make a plan to move into a new career field. • Cut back on the number of

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JUNE 16–22, 2022

hours worked that may be contributing to the problem. Some people put too many hours in at the office, and others still take their work home once they leave it. Set boundaries so that there are hours when work is not a part of your life and schedule. • Work on improving your attitude by practicing gratitude, meditation, exercising regularly, and engaging in activities that bring you joy. Your work-life balance must be balanced in order to help create happiness. • Pay close attention to those you surround yourself with to limit the time spent with people who are overly negative or drain you emotionally. This goes for people at work and in your personal life. • Take some time off. Taking a sabbatical or planning a

vacation doesn't have to be fancy. It just needs to be something that will allow you to relax, unwind, and re-charge. Relaxation time needs to be a part of your weekly schedule, too. • Get help if you feel that you cannot overcome it. Work with an impact coach, career coach, or counselor to get the help you need

to help move things in the right direction. Katie Sandler is an impact coach who provides health and wealth coaching and personal and professional development. www.katiesandler.com. Source: National Institutes of Health. Depression: What is burnout? June 2020. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ books/NBK279286/


HEALTH & WELLNESS Options & References for a Healthier Life

Don’t let COVID-19 spoil your summer How to celebrate Juneteenth and other events safely during this summer

By Paula Penebaker Navigating the new normal, especially when it comes to summer celebrations, can be tricky with COVID-19 still circulating and infections on the rise in some communities. Even after two years, attending summer events like family cookouts, visiting amusement parks and enjoying music and cultural festivals, still comes with challenges thanks to what seems like a never-ending pandemic. With Juneteenth just days away, many people are looking forward to celebrating this important holiday to commemorate the emancipation of enslaved African Americans in this country. However, when looking at how COVID-19 has disproportionately impacted the Black community, celebrating safely must remain a top priority in order to remain COVID-free. As more cities lift mask mandates, the undeniably low vaccination rates in the Black community means it’s important to proceed with caution for Juneteenth celebrations,

By Cynthia Weiss and Jason Howland Hurricane season is underway, and above-normal activity is predicted this year. As COVID-19 is still a concern, there may be added stress when it comes to ensuring safety from severe weather and the spread of infection. Being properly prepared with medical supplies, and food and water, can help ensure personal safety and well-being. “Past experiences show it can take one storm to have an impact, so it is important to make a plan for you and your family in advance of any severe weather event,” says Dr. Brittany Beel, a Mayo Clinic emergency medicine physician. Location safety: “It is important to have a safe place to ride out a storm. You will also want to think about loved ones, such as elderly relatives and pets who might require special assistance,” says Dr. Beel. In advance of a storm, she also recommends unplugging electronics that could become potential shock or fire hazards, especially if there is a risk of flooding. Also, think about the heat. "No electricity

as well as other popular summer gatherings. Recently, public health officials in different areas across the nation have expressed concern about the rise in the number of Covid cases. “There have been a lot of mixed messages and misinformation shared over the last two years that have caused

many to tune out,” said Dr. Kendell Jasper, Ph.D., a licensed psychologist. “Stick with the medical professionals.” The Mayo Clinic continues to track COVID-19 cases and is forecasting potential hot spots within states by counties therein. The Center for Disease Control (CDC)

to any celebrations and before attending large events where the virus can be spread easily. 4. Mask up. With many mask mandates relaxed, there’s absolutely nothing wrong with erring on the side of caution, and choosing to wear a mask, even if you are outdoors. 5. Go the distance. When gathering with groups of people, be mindful to protect your personal space and social distance as much as possible. 6. Keep it clean. Sanitizing and hand washing are key ways to kill the virus. So, don't forget to sanitize surfaces and handwash often. 7. Shake less hands. Elbow bump or air hug instead of shaking hands and hugging. So, when it comes to COVID-19, it’s better to be safe than sorry. These useful tips can help ensure everyone has a happy, safe and healthy Juneteenth Day this year.

Health tips for severe weather planning means no air conditioning, so that could lead to heat stroke and heat exhaustion. I always recommend battery-powered fans to keep cool." Fire and gas safety: “Generators are popular items in areas where power outages are common. When operated safely, in a controlled environment, they are valuable,” says Dr. Michael P. Boniface, Mayo Clinic emergency medicine physician but reminds that they are a potential hazard for carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas produced from the combustion of any material, including wood, charcoal, and gasoline. Risks for exposure increase during severe weather, says Dr. Boniface. Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include a vague array of common ailments, including headache, nausea, fatigue, and confusion. “In the U.S., carbon monoxide is still a prevalent disease with the majority of exposure happening from portable generators,” he says. “But charcoal grills, propane grills and combustible furnaces also pose a risk.” Dr. Boniface advises that grills and generators should

only be used outdoors, in a well-ventilated area, and never on a covered patio or porch, or in a garage. He recommends checking the batteries in carbon monoxide detectors prior to a storm, and, if anyone exhibits signs of concern, seek medical attention immediately. When the winds and rains of a hurricane finally end, a new danger emerges: "… injuries related to storm cleanup and exploration after the storm," says Dr. Boniface. He says chainsaw wounds are among the injuries that spike after a storm. Skin lacerations and punctures are also common during cleanup, as are injuries caused by falls. Dr. Boniface says you can protect yourself during storm

careTALK©

Texting your doctor while you travel

What’s the easiest, lightest, most important item you forget to (pack) and bring with you when traveling? Popular travel app options range from GPS features, mapping, virtual photos, translators, gas finders, etc. Yet, most travelers forget to prepare for a medical emergency. Ask your doctor or medical practice if they offer an online patient portal service,

provides vaccination rates by state. Currently there are four out of 50 states with large Black populations that have alarmingly low vaccination numbers including: • Alabama: 48.0% of residents have received 1st dose • South Carolina: 40% are fully vaccinated

• Louisiana: 32% are fully vaccinated • Georgia: 54% of residents have received 1st dose As cases are on the rise in many regions of the country, the risk of gathering in large groups and contracting COVID-19 also increases. That’s why it’s extremely important to approach Juneteenth celebrations, and other summer festivities, with an abundance of caution. Here are a few easy tips to help keep everyone safe this Juneteenth Day: 1. Less is more. Don't try to attend each and every event you’re invited to. Pick wisely. 2. Don't wait to vaccinate. Consider getting a first dose, second dose or booster shot before heading out to Juneteenth Day festivities. Visit vaccines.gov to find vaccines in your area. 3. Know before you go. Athome COVID-19 testing kits make it easy as ever for people to know their status before heading

or research for a free HIPAA Certified app that is a “Portable Health Record (PHR)”. Designed for mobile access for travelers, it should also offer patients access to their recorded conversations and secure texts with their doctors. A PHR allows you to travel with your health records stored securely on your phone simply by uploading all medical information and

records. Examples of Portable Health Record (PHR) apps: • FollowMyHealth®; Allscripts Healthcare Solutions Inc • Aetna Health; Aetna Inc Sources: https://www.ncbi. nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/ PMC344574/; https://www. ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4832132/;

Everywhere That People Care The trusted Care magazine is now back in print as a regular contributor to The Island News, with Karen Mozzo as editor. Together we’ll deliver information, references, and options for a healthier life.

recovery by dressing appropriately. "This includes long-sleeve shirts, thick leather work gloves if you’re going to be working and picking up and cleaning debris," he explains. Dr. Boniface says to protect your feet with rugged closedtoe shoes. Wear a mask in areas where dust or mold may be present, and spray on insect repellent "...because you are going to be exposed to a lot of mosquitoes and other insects that are going to be equally displaced by the storm," says Dr. Boniface. Food and water safety: “While it's important to stay hydrated with water, drinking only water isn't enough. You also need drinks with electrolytes in them to make sure

your body is replenished with the tools it needs to keep functioning. Electrolytes help your body use water effectively,” Dr. Beel says. Also, she says that while you might be tempted to stock up on certain food prior to a storm, you should limit the amount of food that requires refrigeration. "This will be the first food to spoil if the power goes out. You don't want food poisoning during a severe weather event." She notes that you should check expiration dates on canned foods and rotate out items, as needed. First-aid and medications: Review health care necessities in advance of a severe weather event, reminds Dr. Beel. "Create a list of all medications, including over-the-counter items, with the names, doses and conditions you are taking the medicine for. And you will want to ensure you have extra doses on hand—ideally seven to 10 days' worth." Dr. Beel also says to think about any medical devices. "You will want to have a supply of batteries and backup power for equipment such as oxygen, glucose meters or other devices."

Lastly, keep a list of health care professionals, phone numbers and medications in your emergency kit, as well as any important papers, such as health records, health care directives and living wills.

Learn more

Additional hurricane preparation lists, and other tips are available here: • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. • Department of Homeland Security. • Federal Emergency Management Association. In addition, Mayo Clinic has more information on hurricane health and safety preparedness and storm cleanup tips: • "3-day plan to eat from a can." • "Safety tips during a storm." • "Mayo Clinic Minute: Stay safe after storm cleanup." • "Mayo Clinic Minute: Staying hydrated during hurricane recovery." https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic. org/discussion/tips-for-severeweather-planning/ https://newsnetwork.mayoclinic. org/discussion/mayo-clinic-minutestay-safe-after-storm-cleanup/

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Mon - Fri, 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. Saturday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sunday, 1 - 5 p.m. JUNE 16–22, 2022

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EDUCATION

Raise Up program helps high school students plan for success

By Tony Kukulich This year’s graduating class from Battery Creek High School included the first seniors in Beaufort County to complete the Raise Up program. Raise Up is a mentoring and scholarship program designed to help high school students with the skills and materials necessary to gain acceptance into a post-secondary school. The program was founded by Roger and Teresa Jones in 2009. Roger Jones and his daughter Allyson Thornton developed the curriculum, and Thornton serves as the executive director of Raise Up. Before coming to Battery Creek, the program existed exclusively at North Charleston High School. “It’s a three-year curriculum,” Thornton said. “Students start the fall of their sophomore year and it runs through their graduation from high school. The goal is to get them prepared for whatever the path they choose after high school. If it’s the military, two-year or four-year college, our goal is to help them be successful obtaining and planning the path.” Open only to male students, the process for acceptance into the program starts with interviews and an application completed in the student’s freshman year. Once a student is accepted into Raise Up, he will receive instruction on a variety of topics necessary for success ranging from social skills to financial literacy. The focus is, howev-

Battery Creek High School students who graduated from the Raise Up program gather for a celebration on the waterfront in downtown Beaufort on Thursday, June 9. Raise Up is a program designed to equip high school students with the skills and materials to maintain a 3.0 or higher grade point average and gain acceptance into a post-secondary school. Pictured are (front row) Jose Lopez, Andrew Villatoro, Allyson Thornton, Jeremiah Dilbert, Alex Barradas Perez, (back row) Dreshaun Brown, Ivan Huerta, Sebastian Sanchez, Jessie Rodriguez, Jean Rebecca and Tyrell Grier. Photo by Tony Kukulich. er, clearly on academics and preparation for the SAT and ACT tests. “We meet with our students every week at school for 45 minutes to an hour,” Thornton explained. “We always have a specific topic that we’re going to cover. We also have them give us their grades. Every week they’re accountable to bring us their grades.” The weekly check-in allows students to identify problems early and take any necessary corrective steps to resolve

those issues. Thornton said this has the added benefit of getting students comfortable working with teachers and other authority figures. From their sophomore year into the spring of their junior year, students spend one Saturday a month preparing specifically for the SAT and ACT tests, though this isn’t a typical test preparation course. These sessions focus on teaching the material covered by the test. “Our scores have jumped 200 to 400 points since we

started doing that,” Thornton said. “We didn’t initially do that. We started with a sixweek SAT course that taught how to take the test. We discovered that the students knew how to take the test, but they didn’t know the material. They were so far behind.” The first Battery Creek class got its start in 2019 with 10 students. Nine of those students were able to complete the program. Thornton added that 100% of the students who complete the program graduate high school.

Support from the Battery Creek administration was important in the success of the program, Thornton said. She commended Chad Cox and Denise Lessard, the former and current principal, respectively, as well as guidance counselor Kirsten Nash for their commitment to the success of Raise Up. Other contributors to the program include The Pat Conroy Literary Center. “It thrilled the board of The Pat Conroy Literary Center and Pat Conroy’s family and

his widow, Cassandra King Conroy, a former teacher, that we were able to offer Allyson meeting space for the young men of Raise Up at the Center’s new home on Bladen Street when they needed it,” said Marly Rusoff, a board member at the center. “Last fall they met in our Education Room to work on their senior essays. Pat Conroy would have been elated to meet these young men and to read what they wrote in their personal essays.” As the students prepare for graduation, the Raise Up staff helps them find schools that match their future plans, apply for financial aid and awards scholarships. “This program has been very beneficial in helping me define my future,” said Raise Up graduate Ivan Huerta, who will attend Clemson University in the fall with plans to become a chiropractor. “Financially for me, Raise Up has had a big impact. It’s helped expand my perspective of what I want to do in my life.” The 2022 Raise Up graduates from Battery Creek High School included: Dreshaun Brown, Jeremiah Dilbert, Tyrell Grier, Ivan Huerta, Jose Lopez, Alex Barradas Perez, Jessie Rodriguez, Sebastian Sanchez and Andrew Villatoro. Tony Kukulich is a recent transplant to the Lowcountry. A native of Wilmington, Del., he comes to The Island News from the San Francisco Bay Area where he spent seven years as a reporter and photographer for several publications. He can be reached at tony. theislandnews@gmail.com.

2 local students graduate from Governor’s School

From staff reports Two students from northern Beaufort County were among the 97 graduates in the S.C. Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities’ Class of 2022. The school held its 2022 commencement ceremony on May 27 at Furman University’s

McAlister Auditorium. Scarlet Mercier, a Drama student from Beaufort, previ-

ously attended Holy Trinity Classical Christian School. Mercier served as Secretary of the National Honors Society and as Student President of the Library Club. After graduation, Mercier will attend the College of William and Mary. Jamari Young, a Drama student from Port Royal, previ-

ously attended Beaufort High School. After graduation, Young will attend New York University. The Governor’s School’s residential high school program provides pre-professional training in the arts as well as a nationally recognized academic education. Artistically

talented students from across the state are selected through an application and audition process and attend during their sophomore, junior and senior years depending on their selected art area. Upon successful completion, graduates receive a South Carolina high school

diploma and a Scholar Diploma. As a public school, tuition is free. Students only pay for meal plan and housing costs. Financial assistance is available through the Governor’s School Foundation. Applications for the 2023-2024 school year will open in the fall at SCGSAH.org.

Storybuilders Project leads to publication for Lady’s Island students

From staff reports The creative writing efforts of nine Lady’s Island Elementary School (LIES) students will be featured in an upcoming national publication, the 2022 Young American Poetry Digest. Their writings center around the South Carolina state motto “While I Breathe, I Hope.” These student works are the result of a creative writing project called “Storybuilders,” led by retired teacher Carol Dawson and the Pat Conroy Literary Center. Selected students in 1st, 3rd and 5th grades

worked with volunteers, including authors, poets, and educators, to create poems, short stories, and one-act plays throughout the 12-week program. At the conclusion, the children’s work was published internally with a bound anthology of their work. The students also held a presentation of selected readings and book signing for their peers, family, and dignitaries from the Pat Conroy Center. “This project allowed our students a deep immersive experience with the arts,” LIES Principal Davina Coleman

said in a news release. “The skills are so transferable to everyday life. We’re building great writers and hopefully we’ll inspire some of these students to choose writing, journalism, or screenwriting as a future career.” The student poetry that emerged from the Storybuilders project was then submitted to the Young American Poetry Digest competition. Nine students had their work chosen for publication – Lucas Cardenas, Trey Dasher, Ashton Hinson, Owen Huang, Ja’Mya Rivers, Daniel Russell, Kamad

Seabrooks-Gilbert, Gaberiel Singleton, and Christian Williams. Poems were selected for inclusion based on creativity, age appropriateness, sensory/ figurative language, structure, and poetic techniques. LIES is the district’s original arts-infused school of choice. The school’s arts-infused programming and the work of the Pat Conroy Literary Center are made possible in part through grants from the South Carolina Arts Commission which receives funding from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Nine Lady’s Island Elementary School students from the Storybuilders project had their poems chosen for publication in the Young American Poetry Digest competition. Photo courtesy of the Beaufort County School District.

EDUCATION BRIEFS

2 from Beaufort earn degrees from Wofford

Wofford College awarded 374 Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts degrees to 357 graduates, including two from Beaufort, during the college's 168th Commencement Exercises on Sunday, May 22. Carolina Garren Hughes of Beaufort was one of 93 students who earned two degrees. Hughes received a Bachelor of Arts in International Affairs and a Bachelor of Arts in Humanities. Kathleen Hampton Simkins of Beaufort received a Bachelor of Arts in Humanities. Wofford College, established in 1854, is a four-year, residential liberal arts college located in Spartanburg.

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JUNE 16–22, 2022

It offers 27 major fields of study to a student body of 1,775 undergraduates.

Beaufort’s Anglesey earns degree from Alabama

Tiffany Anglesey of Beaufort received a Bachelor of Science in Human Environmental Sciences when the University of Alabama awarded 5,907 degrees during its spring commencement ceremonies May 6-8, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. UA offers its students a premier educational, cultural and social experience with more than 200 undergraduate, graduate and professional programs. The University of Ala-

bama, part of The University of Alabama System, is the state's flagship university.

Beaufort’s Hurley graduates from Centenary

Centenary University awarded degrees to 465 graduates, including one from Beaufort, at its 147th commencement, which was held as three separate in-person ceremonies on the University’s Hackettstown, N.J., campus. Beaufort’s Ashlee Hurley graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Equine Studies focusing on Equine Business Management. Founded in 1867 by the Newark

Conference of the United Methodist Church, Centenary University’s academic program integrates a solid liberal arts foundation with a strong career orientation.

of at least 3.65. Troy University is a public, historic, international university located in Troy, Ala., with 22,500 students and 154,000 alumni.

Beaufort’s Muradeli named to Troy Provost's List

Beaufort’s Willingham makes Lander’s Spring 2022 Dean’s List

Mariam Muradeli of Beaufort has been named to the Provost's List at Troy University for the Spring Semester/Term 4 of the 2021/2022 academic year. The Provost's List honors full-time undergraduate students who are registered for at least 12 semester hours and who have a grade point average

Beaufort’s McCayla Willingham was named to Lander University’s Dean’s List for the second semester of the 2021-22 academic year. To qualify for the Dean’s List at the Greenwood school, a student must earn a GPA of at least 3.5 over the course of the semester. Students are listed by their hometowns below.


WHAT’S HAPPENING St. Helena Library Activities

THIS WEEK’S MOVIES AT HWY 21 DRIVE-IN

4:30 to 5:30 p.m., Mondays, Lego Club, all ages welcome; 2 to 4 p.m., Thursdays, S.C. Works Job Coaching, free help with job searches, interviews; 1 to 2 p.m., Saturdays, Chess Club, ages 5 and older. 6355 Jonathan Francis Senior Road, St. Helena Island, 843255-6540.

The movies scheduled for this week (Friday, June 17 through Wednesday, June 22 – Closed Monday) at the Highway 21 Drive-In are Lightyear (PG, 8:45 p.m.) and Dr. Strange Multiverse of Madness (R, 10:40 p.m.) on Screen 1; Jurassic World Dominion (PG-13, 8:45 p.m.) and Top Gun Maverick (PG-13, 11:05 p.m.) on Screen 2; and Top Gun Maverick (PG-13, 8:45 p.m.) and Jurassic World Dominion (PG-13, 10:25 p.m.) on the new Screen 3.

Beaufort County Library Ongoing Programs

Online ticketing is available at hwy21drivein.com on the Now Playing page. Patrons are asked to arrive early on Friday and Saturday nights. Gates open at 6:30 p.m.

These are the ongoing programs available at the Beaufort Branch Library Downtown: 2:30 p.m., 1st Tuesday each month, Knitting/ Crochet Class; all day during business hours, 1st Thursday each month, Chess Club; 2:30 p.m., last Tuesday each month, Book to Movie Club; daily during library hours, Escape Quest Games.

“Our family at the Hwy. 21 drive in feel a responsibility to our community,” a statement from Highway 21 Drive-In management reads. “We are concerned about many things in these trying times and in making the right decisions. We are concerned with our employees, our patrons, our business, our community’s businesses, and the health and well-being of all.” A reminder: no outside food or beverages can be brought into the drive-in.

Bluffton Night Bazaar — a Lowcountry Made Market

Upcoming movies include Elvis (June 24) and Minions: The Rise of Gru (July 1).

5 to 8 p.m., first Thursday of each month, Burnt Church Distillery, 120 Bluffton Road. A highly curated selection of accessories, clothing, home goods, custom gifts and more by local artists and makers.

– Staff reports

A War on Two Fronts: African Americans Fight for Victory at Home and Abroad

Rooted Beaufort Yoga classes

Through Saturday, Aug. 13, Morris Center for Lowcountry Heritage, 10782 S. Jacob Smart Blvd., Ridgeland. A traveling exhibit adapted from an original exhibition and book developed by the Athenaeum Press at the Horry County Museum. The exhibition and book explore how African Americans in the 92nd and 93rd Army infantry divisions fought for racial equality during wartime, and then went on to be active participants in the Civil Rights Movement. It traces the little-known stories of soldiers on the front lines, and how segregation affected their training, service and recognition. The exhibition draws from the work of Maggi Morehouse, Burroughs Distinguished Professor of Southern History and Culture at Coastal Carolina University and a daughter of a commanding officer in the 92nd infantry division. To learn more about “A War on Two Fronts” and other Athenaeum Press projects, visit www.ccu.press or www. warontwofronts.com. Morris Center is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. For more information, visit www.morrisheritagecenter.org or call 843-284-9227.

5:30 to 6:45 p.m., Thursdays, Cypress Wetlands, Port Royal; 9 to 10:15 a.m., Whitehall Park or Pigeon Point Park. Rooted Beaufort is a collective of local Yoga teachers who host outdoor yoga classes and donation-based events with proceeds being donated locally on a rotating basis.

The Historic Port Royal Museum

10 a.m. to 3 p.m. or upon request, Thursdays through Sundays, The Historic Port Royal Museum, 1634 Paris Ave. The museum features the turn-of-the-century businesses and industries of Port Royal: Shrimping, crabbing, oystering, the railroad, the school and the mercantile. Great gifts featuring local artists are available. For more information. visit www.portroyalhistory.org, email historicportroyalfoundation@gmail.com or call 843-524-4333.

Tour Historic Fort Fremont

10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, Fort Fremont History Center, Fort Fremont Preserve, 1124 Land’s End Road, St. Helena Island. Docent-led tours are at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. every Saturday. Travel back in time to the 1800s and the Spanish American War. Visitors to Fort Fremont can learn about the fort’s history by reading interpretive panels, taking a self-guided tour with a smart phone, visiting the history center exhibit hall, or attending a docentled tour of the property. The Preserve is open to the public Monday through Sunday from dawn to dusk. For more information, visit www.fortfremont.org or contact Passive Parks manager Stephanie Nagid at snagid@ bcgov.net.

Lowcountry Made Markets

9 a.m. to 1 p.m., first and third Saturday of each month through December, Buckwalter Place Park, next to Kroger off Buckwalter Place Blvd., Bluffton. Each market includes local vendors, live music, food and drink. The events are free. Participating vendors include: Gullah Express LLC (food truck), Declan’s Delights, Pick N Paint Pottery, Preservation Tree Art, 7th & Palm, Kara Artman Art, Southern Botanica, Hedone (bath & body), Blue Door Boutique, The Herb Room Organic Apothecary, Juke Joint Sweets, BPC Custom Furniture, Back to Eden Self Care Products, LLC, Shutterbug Custom Designs LLC, Pet Wants Hilton Head, Grind Coffee Roasters, LLC, Fabula Collective, The Artsy Girl, KODA Glass Designs, Lowcountry Livin’, Legacy Art Gallery, Cottonwood Soap Company, Marsh View Candles and Crafted With A Purpose.

Port Royal Farmers Market

9 a.m. to noon, Saturdays, year round, Naval Heritage Park, 1615 Ribaut Road, Port Royal. Rain or shine. You will find fresh, local, seasonal produce, shrimp, oysters, poultry, beef, pork, eggs, bread and cheese, as well as plants, ferns, camellias, azaleas, citrus trees and beautiful, fresh cut flower bouquets. There are prepared food vendors serving barbecue, dumplings, she crab soup, crab cakes, paella, coffee, baked goods, bagels and breakfast sandwiches. No pets allowed. For more information, visit http:// www.portroyalfarmersmarket.com/, visit @ portroyalfarmersmarket on Facebook or call 843-295-0058.

Lowcountry Made Markets in Port Royal

9 a.m. to 1 p.m., second Saturday of the month through November, Live Oaks Park, 904 14th Street, Port Royal. These markets showcase only local artists, artisans and small businesses. The open-air markets are held “farmer’s market” style with new vendors each month. Each market will also include live music, food and drink, and is free to attend. Vendors include Amidst the Alders, Preservation Tree Art, True South, Pet Wants, Meg’s Sweet Treats, Sativa Health Products, Back to Eden Self Care (Tea),

Graceful Stitches, Cottonwood Soap Company (Bath & Body), Sweet Carolina’s Clothing Boutique, B&E Rustic Designs, Blue Door Boutique, Clayed by Reena LLC, Kara Artman Art, The Herb Room Organic Apothecary, Bliss Bites Cookies, Kilted Bee Mead (Soap), HandMade Beaufort, Lovin' My Skin, LLC, Purely, Inc. and KODA Glass, Lovely Olive Designs, Gone Gullah, Tout Sweet Macarons, Moonlight Crow Creations, Fabula Collective, Finch Sign & Design Metalworks LLC and Honey Bunny Boutique.

“Pull Yourself Up” Group Exercise Class for women

9:30 a.m., select Saturdays, Wardle Family YMCA, 1801 Richmond Ave., Port Royal. This multi-generational women’s group training is a 5-week program taught by Kelly Blackston. It is designed for females who wish to be stronger especially using back muscle shoulders and arms plus build camaraderie and make new friends. Free for ages 13-19; $10 per class for YMCA members; $20 per class for adult non-member. Questions should be directed to Denice Davis, YMCA Healthy Living Program Director at 843-521-1904 or beaufort-jasperymca.org.

Sea Island Quilt Guild

6:30 p.m., Thursday, June 16, Carteret Street United Methodist Church, 408 Carteret Street, Beaufort. We are also selling tickets for our Raffle Quilt "Hearts of Ukraine" The money made on this project will be given to the City of Beaufort to be added to their Sister City fund. You may contact Sam Cowan 843-271-123 for tickets. We look forward to seeing you there. All are welcome.

Beaufort Indivisible’s June meeting set

11:30 a.m., Saturday, June 18, St. Helena Branch Library, 6355 Jonathan Francis Senior Road. Featured speakers will be Marilyn Harris and York Glover Sr. Harris is a 2022 Democratic candidate for Beaufort County Council District 2 (MCAS/Beaufort/Lady’s Island/Fripp Island). Glover represents District 3 (Beaufort/Lady’s Island/St. Helena Island/Parris Island) on the Beaufort County Council. His term expires in 2024. The event is free and open to the public.

Broadway Bound Summer Camp

9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Monday through Friday, June 20 through July 1, USC Beaufort Center For The Arts. Campers will engage in all aspects of musical theatre, while gaining self-confidence and the ability to express themselves as they learn basic acting skills, vocal instruction and choreography. The highlight of the camp will be the children’s creation of their own show. Tuition is $275. Register and pay at https://www. uscbcenterforthearts.com/summer-camp.

Indoor Gardening: Fruits and Veggies Class

4:30 p.m., Tuesday, June 21, Lobeco Library, 1862 Trask Parkway. Class presented by Horticulture Agent and Master Gardener Laura Lee Rose of the Beaufort County Clemson Extension. Call 843-255-6479 or stop by to register.

Camp Caroline

9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Wednesday, June 22 and Thursday, June 23, John Paul II Catholic School, 4211 Okatie Highway. Staffed by FRIENDS of Caroline and trained student bereavement grief support facilitators, Camp Caroline is a bereavement camp for students in 1st through 12th grades. Designed to provide a safe, compassionate environment where students who have lost a loved one can learn to acknowledge and express their

feelings of grief, they learn how to share their grief experience with each other, recognize the support systems around them, and positively cope with their grief emotions. The camp concludes with family members joining the students to celebrate the lives of the loved ones lost. Visit https://www.fochospice. org/Services#CAMPCAROLINE for more information and to apply for Camp Caroline. Please call 843-525-6257 with any questions.

Friends of Port Royal Cypress Wetlands guided tours

6 p.m., Friday, June 24, Sunset Tour; 9 a.m., Friday, July 22; 6 p.m. Friday, Aug. 26, Sunset Tour. The Friends of Port Royal Cypress Wetlands (501c3) offers free guided tours with Master Naturalist Jill Moore, from Moore2Life, as guide. Watch our baby egrets in their nests and learn about the other wildlife, birds, and plants that inhabit this special place. Tours are approximately 90 minutes and limited to 12 participants. To sign up for a tour please email Kat Bray at info@foprcw.org. For more information, visit www.foprcw.org.

Firecracker 5K

8 a.m., Monday July 4, downtown Beaufort. Hosted by HELP of Beaufort and Lowcountry Habitat For Humanity, the race starts at Freedom Mall, crosses the Woods Memorial Bridge and runs to Meridian Road before turning back. Pre-Raceday registration, $35. Virtual 5K registration, $25. Raceday registration, $45. For more information or to register, go to http://runsignup.com/race/ SC/Beaufort.

Maye River Quilters

10 a.m., Saturday, July 9, Church of the Palms, 1419 Okatie Highway. The wearing of masks is encouraged. For more meeting dates and times, and for membership forms to join the group, call 843-530-1244. To attend the meeting as a guest, send an RSVP email to mayeriverquilters@gmail.com.

Junior Building Detectives – Solving the Mysteries of Built Histories

9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., July 11 through July 15, historic John Mark Verdier House. Hosted by the Historic Beaufort Foundation, this summer children’s camp for kids, ages 8 to 12, will enable participants to “solve the mysteries of built history” by learning about local architecture. The camp will teach the basics of historic architecture and preservation. Campers will learn how buildings change over time, the meaning of architectural features, and the relevance of historic buildings to our community through hands-on activities, walks, arts and crafts, experiments and more. Campers will create a building and present the design to the class and parents/guardians. Cost is $100 for HBF members and $125 for non members. Register by calling 843-3793331 or visiting http://historicbeaufort.org. Registration paperwork must be submitted at least two weeks before the start of the program to ensure a child’s spot.

Creative Arts Camp

10 a.m. to 1 p.m., July 11 to July 16, USC Beaufort’s Center For the Arts. Cost is $130. Camp is for ages 7 to 11. Subjects include Drawing and Clay, Mixed Media and Trash to Treasures – Focusing on Recycled Art. To register or for more information, go to www. USCBCenterForTheArts.com.

Musical Theatre Audition Skills Camp

10 a.m. to 1 p.m., July 11 to July 16, USC Beaufort’s Center For the Arts. Cost is $130. Camp is for ages 7 to 11. Class showcase at noon on July 15. Subjects include Monologue and Vocal Performance.

Sunday Worship Pre-Recorded — YouTube Indoor — Sanctuary 8:30 and 10:30 am

Jesus Christ is Lord!

81 Lady’s Island Drive 843.525.0696 www.seaislandpresbyterian.org

Steve Keeler, Senior Pastor Richard Norris, Lay Pastor

A Congregation of the Presbyterian Church (USA)

Mass Schedule Weekends

SAINT

PETER’S CATHOLIC CHURCH

70 Lady’s Island Drive Beaufort, SC 29907 www.stpetersbeaufort.org

843-522-9555

SATURDAY 5:00 pm 7:00 pm (Spanish)

SUNDAY 9:00 am 11:00 am 4:00 pm -

Daily Masses Main Church 8:30 am

Mon Tues Thurs Fri

Holy Cross Mission

Historic Church 12:00 pm - Wed 9:00 am - 1st Sat of Month JUNE 16–22, 2022

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LOCAL MILITARY

BEST WARRIOR From left to right, Bob Louden, Association of the United States Army representative; Staff Sgt. Lucas Lock, a corrections/ detention specialist assigned to 8th Theater Sustainment Command and a native of Beaufort; Sgt. Casey Naumann, military police assigned to 8th Theater Sustainment Command; and retired Col. Ben Lukefahr, AUSA pacific region president, pose for a photo June 5 at The Hanger, Wheeler Army Airfield, Hawaii during a meet and greet for the 2022 U.S. Army Pacific Best Warrior Competition. The USARPAC BWC 2022 is an annual week-long competition consisting of competitors from multiple USARPAC units across the Indo-Pacific. The noncommissioned officers and junior enlisted Soldiers are evaluated in several categories such as general military knowledge, basic Soldier skills, and physical fitness. Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Monik Phan, U.S. Army.

About VA Mental Health Services

O

n Jan. 12, 2022, The Island News was kind enough to publish my first article about VA Mental Health Services. That article advised military members, veterans, and their families and caregivers to read the information at the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs VA Mental Health Services website https://bit.ly/3tjai3J. That first article, which can be read online at https:// bit.ly/39lqf1O, provided my personal story about the successful PTSD treatment the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center gave me. It also told readers how a veteran in crisis or concerned about another veteran can connect with a qualified Veteran Crisis Responder or get help? The answer is repeated here:

Question 1 How to get immediate Mental health care anytime day or night? • Call the VA’s Veterans Crisis Line at 800-2738255 (24/7). • Text the VA’s Veterans Crisis line at 838255. • If you have hearing loss, call 800-799-4899. • Go to your nearest VA medical center. It does not matter what your discharge status is or if you are enrolled in VA health care. • Call the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center’s main number at 843-5775011 or the Mental Health Clinic at 843-789-7311. • Call 911. • Go to the nearest emergency room. You may ask why am I writing more about VA Mental Health Services? The answer to that is simple, I am writing more about this subject for the following five reasons: 1. Veterans with mental health challenges, who are fortunate enough to obtain VA Mental Health Services, will most likely have a much better chance of a successful marriage and career, longer and happier life, and learn that mental health problems like depression, anxiety, and

EDITOR’S NOTE

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This is the second in a series of four articles.

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LARRY DANDRIDGE

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PTSD can be treated successfully treated and controlled. Mental health is a lifeand-death situation. Veterans with mental health challenges, who are fortunate enough to obtain VA Mental Health Services, will most likely have a much better chance of avoiding illegal substance abuse, avoiding alcoholism, avoiding abusing their families (parents, spouses, children, and pets), avoiding homelessness, avoiding running afoul with our legal system, and avoiding becoming suicidal. Sexual assault, death of loved ones, the repeated threat of death or serious injury, fratricide, Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBIs), divorce, chronic pain, serious accidents, the repeated subjection to loud noise (gunfire, artillery, bombs, missiles, etc.), what a service member does in war, the politics around the war, and other traumatic events take a heavy toll on military members, veterans, and their families – and the readiness of our military. Last month (May) was National Mental Health Awareness Month. In May many Americans learned that in the U.S. general population there is a national mental health crisis caused by a severe shortage of behavioral healthtrained providers. Over one-third of Americans live in designated Mental Health Professional Shortage Areas, areas that have fewer

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mental health providers than the minimum their population would need. The historical challenges in recruiting and retaining these and other essential health workers have been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Read online more about the National Mental Health challenges and initiatives in the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Fact Sheet dated May 3, 2022, at https://bit. ly/3zB8mXb. Veterans are fortunate that the VA has the staffing of highly qualified mental health professionals and facilities to serve every needy veteran. The VA is currently and successfully providing mental health care to one of this author’s best friends and fellow Vietnam War buddies and one of my closest family members who served during the wars in South West Asia.

The next three articles on VA mental health services will provide answers to the following 30 questions and more: 1. How to get immediate Mental health care anytime day or night? 2. How to get VA Mental health care online? 3. How to speak to a fellow veteran who has been through mental health problems and VA Mental health care? 4. Are such mental health conditions as PTSD, sexual trauma, depression, grief, anxiety, and other mental health problems treated by the VA? 5. Will using mental health services at VA put my career at risk? 6. What kind of mental health services does the VA provide?

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Does the VA offer mental health help for family, friends, and caregivers of veterans? What are the mental health resources outside of the VA for vets and service members? How do I get a copy of the VA’s new Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Handbook? How do I get a copy of the Federal Benefits for Vets, Dependents, & Survivors Booklet? How do I get a copy of the VA’s National Resource Directory? What free smartphone applications can I use to help manage my physical and mental health and help me deal with stress, quit smoking, and more? What is the VA telehealth program? I'm in the National Guard or Reserves. Am I eligible to use VA mental health services? How long will it take for me to start getting help once I contact VA? What mental health problems does VA treat? What kinds of mental health services does VA provide? Does VA offer mental health resources for family, friends, and caregivers of Veterans? How do I find my closest VA health facility? How can I search online and find local VA Resources? What are the signs of a health crisis? Can I get connected with mental health care – no matter what my discharge status, service history, or eligibility for VA health care? Is it true that more than half of the 22 veterans who commit suicide each day have never sought VA mental health care? Are too many mentally ill persons getting through recruiting and enlistment screening?

25. Is combat trauma the only kind of trauma treated by the VA? 26. What are the warning signs of a mental health crisis? 27. Where can a veteran read about PTSD and VA PTSD treatment? 28. Is it true that Vietnam Veterans have the highest lifetime prevalence of PTSD, followed by Operation Iraqi Freedom and the Gulf War? 29. Is it true that among Veterans who use VA health care, about 23 out of 100 women (or 23%) reported sexual assault when in the military and 55 out of 100 women (or 55%) and 38 out of 100 men (or 38%) have experienced sexual harassment when in the military? 30. Is the military doing enough to screen recruits for mental illness to ensure that they are healthy enough to train and serve and are they healthy enough that the high stress of military life will not worsen their mental health to the point they go AWOL, desert, or commit some crime?

Question 2 Where can I read online about the VA’s world-class mental health care? Veterans and military members, and their families, caregivers, and survivors should go to the VA’s Health Benefits Page (Mental Health Care) page at https://bit. ly/2IuOFTz and read the information therein. The VA provides specialty inpatient and outpatient mental health services at its medical centers and community-based outpatient clinics (in addition, readjustment counseling services may be available for you and members of your family at Vet Centers across the nation). The VA’s goal is to support recovery and enable veterans who experience mental health problems to live meaningful lives in their communities and achieve their full potential.

The VA provides cost-free military sexual trauma counseling and referral, including appropriate care and services. Mental health services are available in specialty clinics, primary care clinics, nursing homes, and residential care facilities. Specialized programs, such as mental health intensive case management, day centers, work programs, and psychosocial rehabilitation are provided for those with serious mental health problems. Question 3 What VA mental health services and programs does the VA provide to veterans? The list of services and programs that Mental Health supports include: Inpatient Care, Residential Care, Outpatient Mental Health Care, Homeless Programs, Programs for Incarcerated Veterans, Specialized PTSD Services, Military Sexual Trauma, Psychosocial Rehabilitation & Recovery Services, Substance Use Disorders, Suicide Prevention Programs, Geriatrics, Violence Prevention, Evidence-Based Psychotherapy Programs, and Mental Health Disaster Response/ Post Deployment Activities. Next week’s article will answer more questions about VA mental health services and programs. It will also encourage military members, veterans, their families, and caregivers to take full advantage of their VA (and DOD) mental health benefits. Please share this information with military members, veterans, and their families and survivors. You can read copies of Larry Dandridge’s past articles at www.yourislandnews.com. Larry Dandridge is a Vietnam War wounded warrior, disabled veteran, exEnlisted Infantryman, ex-Warrant Officer Pilot, and retired Lt. Colonel. He is a past Veterans Service Officer, a Patient Adviser at the RHJ VA Hospital, the Fisher House Charleston Good Will Ambassador, and the VP for Veteran Affairs for the local Army Association Chapter. Larry is the author of the award-winning book Blades of Thunder and a contributing free-lance writer with the Island News. Contact him at LDandridge@earthlink.net or 843-276-7164.

Parris Island Marine Corps Graduates To Receive a Copy of with a List of Graduates, visit www.yourislandnews.com A14

JUNE 16–22, 2022


LEGAL NOTICES The sale of the Property is to satisfy the default in payment by the Obligor/Owner of the obligations secured by the MORTGAGE as recorded in Book 3941 at Pages 1994, records of Beaufort County, SC. The amounts secured by the MORTGAGE, are

Land For Sale The City of Beaufort will be selling property located at 1505 North Street, Beaufort, SC 29902 Parcel ID: R120 004 000 0659 0000 Property type: Currently vacant land, paved parking lot. The subject property frontage of about 61 feet on North Street, and about 42.5 feet on King Street. The property contains an estimated land area of about 12,782 sq. ft. or 0.29 acre. Minimum acceptable bid is $750,000.00 Bids must be submitted in writing to: City Manager's Office Land Sale 1911 Boundary Street Beaufort, SC 29902 Bidding will close at 4:00 pm June 30,2022 Successful highest bidder will be required to post a ten (10%) deposit within fifteen (15) days of the award by City Council. Any questions, please call 843-525-7070.

TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to S.C. Code Ann. § 27-32-300, et. seq., NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN of the intent of the undersigned Trustee to sell the below described Property at Public Auction on the 7/7/2022, beginning at 9:30 A.M.. The Public Auction shall occur at the Office of Bolchoz Law Firm, 6 Buckingham Plantation Rd, Ste B, Bluffton, SC 29910.

Amount currently in default (including interest) $67,431.85 Trustee’s Fee $ 350.00 Costs $ 874.63 Total Amount Due $ 68,656.48 With a per diem of $ 21.00 Together with any and all additional principal, interest, costs coming due and payable hereafter. The successful bidder, other than the Creditor, shall be required to pay in cash or certified funds at the time of the bid. If the Creditor is the successful bidder at the sale, it shall receive a credit against its bid for the Total Amount Due. The successful bidder shall also be required to pay for Deed Preparation, Documentary Stamps, or transfer fee, and Recording Costs. This sale is subject to all taxes, liens, easements, encumbrances, assessments, and/or senior mortgage liens of record and the undersigned Trustee gives no opinion thereto. An Obligor has the right to cure the default, and a Junior Lienholder has the right to redeem its interest up to the date of that the Trustee issues the Certificate of Sale pursuant to S.C. Code Ann. § 27-32-345. King Cunningham, LLC, Trustee and Attorney for HHI Development, LLC, by Jeffrey W. King, SC Bar # 15840; or W. Joseph Cunningham, SC Bar # 72655 P.O. Box 4896, North Myrtle Beach, SC 29597 (843)-249-0777 TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to S.C. Code Ann. § 27-32-300, et. seq., NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN of the intent of the undersigned Trustee to sell the below described Property at Public Auction on the 7/7/2022, beginning at 9:30 A.M.. The Public Auction shall occur at the Office of Bolchoz Law Firm, 6 Buckingham Plantation Rd, Ste B, Bluffton, SC 29910.

Property Description: A fee simple undivided 0.0147723220820258 % ownership interest in the Project as tenants(s) in common with the holders of other undivided interests in and to the timeshare property known as MBV VACATION SUITES, as established by that certain Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions and Vacation Ownership Instrument for MBV Vacation Suites, recorded at Book 3406, Pages 1312-1365, et seq., of the records of the R.O.D. Office for Beaufort County, South Carolina, as amended or supplemented (the “Declaration”), having Interval Control Number U2507-W40B. Name/Notice Address of Obligor; Record Owner, if different from the Obligor; and any Junior Lienholders is as follows: ANNE F. ISAACS & RONALD J. ISAACS, PO BOX 1221, LAKE GROVE, NY 117550521. Junior Lienholder: , .

Property Description: A fee simple undivided 0.0147723220820258 % ownership interest in the Project as tenants(s) in common with the holders of other undivided interests in and to the timeshare property known as MBV VACATION SUITES, as established by that certain Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions and Vacation Ownership Instrument for MBV Vacation Suites, recorded at Book 3406, Pages 1312-1365, et seq., of the records of the R.O.D. Office for Beaufort County, South Carolina, as amended or supplemented (the “Declaration”), having Interval Control Number U1202-W35B. Name/Notice Address of Obligor; Record Owner, if different from the Obligor; and any Junior Lienholders is as follows: NANCY D. RICHER , 3817 23RD AVE SW, NAPLES, FL 34117. Junior Lienholder: , .

The sale of the Property is to satisfy the default in payment by the Obligor/Owner of the obligations secured by the MORTGAGE as recorded in Book 3723 at Pages 1831, records of Beaufort County, SC.

The sale of the Property is to satisfy the default in payment by the Obligor/Owner of the obligations secured by the MORTGAGE as recorded in Book 3544 at Pages 2168, records of Beaufort County, SC.

The amounts secured by the MORTGAGE, are

The amounts secured by the MORTGAGE, are

Amount currently in default (including interest) $27,558.60 Trustee’s Fee $ 350.00 Costs $ 878.73 Total Amount Due $ 28,787.33 With a per diem of $ 12.31

Amount currently in default (including interest) $32,693.73 Trustee’s Fee $ 350.00 Costs $ 876.27 Total Amount Due $ 33,920.00 With a per diem of $ 14.34

Together with any and all additional principal, interest, costs coming due and payable hereafter.

Together with any and all additional principal, interest, costs coming due and payable hereafter.

The successful bidder, other than the Creditor, shall be required to pay in cash or certified funds at the time of the bid. If the Creditor is the successful bidder at the sale, it shall receive a credit against its bid for the Total Amount Due. The successful bidder shall also be required to pay for Deed Preparation, Documentary Stamps, or transfer fee, and Recording Costs. This sale is subject to all taxes, liens, easements, encumbrances, assessments, and/or senior mortgage liens of record and the undersigned Trustee gives no opinion thereto.

The successful bidder, other than the Creditor, shall be required to pay in cash or certified funds at the time of the bid. If the Creditor is the successful bidder at the sale, it shall receive a credit against its bid for the Total Amount Due. The successful bidder shall also be required to pay for Deed Preparation, Documentary Stamps, or transfer fee, and Recording Costs. This sale is subject to all taxes, liens, easements, encumbrances, assessments, and/or senior mortgage liens of record and the undersigned Trustee gives no opinion thereto.

An Obligor has the right to cure the default, and a Junior Lienholder has the right to redeem its interest up to the date of that the Trustee issues the Certificate of Sale pursuant to S.C. Code Ann. § 27-32-345.

An Obligor has the right to cure the default, and a Junior Lienholder has the right to redeem its interest up to the date of that the Trustee issues the Certificate of Sale pursuant to S.C. Code Ann. § 27-32-345.

King Cunningham, LLC, Trustee and Attorney for HHI Development, LLC, by Jeffrey W. King, SC Bar # 15840; or W. Joseph Cunningham, SC Bar # 72655 P.O. Box 4896, North Myrtle Beach, SC 29597 (843)-249-0777

King Cunningham, LLC, Trustee and Attorney for HHI Development, LLC, by Jeffrey W. King, SC Bar # 15840; or W. Joseph Cunningham, SC Bar # 72655 P.O. Box 4896, North Myrtle Beach, SC 29597 (843)-249-0777

TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE

TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE

Pursuant to S.C. Code Ann. § 27-32-300, et. seq., NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN of the intent of the undersigned Trustee to sell the below described Property at Public Auction on the 7/7/2022, beginning at 9:30 A.M..

Pursuant to S.C. Code Ann. § 27-32-300, et. seq., NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN of the intent of the undersigned Trustee to sell the below described Property at Public Auction on the 7/7/2022, beginning at 9:30 A.M..

The Public Auction shall occur at the Office of Bolchoz Law Firm, 6 Buckingham Plantation Rd, Ste B, Bluffton, SC 29910.

The Public Auction shall occur at the Office of Bolchoz Law Firm, 6 Buckingham Plantation Rd, Ste B, Bluffton, SC 29910.

Property Description: A fee simple undivided 0.0147723220820258 % ownership interest in the Project as tenants(s) in common with the holders of other undivided interests in and to the timeshare property known as MBV VACATION SUITES, as established by that certain Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions and Vacation Ownership Instrument for MBV Vacation Suites, recorded at Book 3406, Pages 1312-1365, et seq., of the records of the R.O.D. Office for Beaufort County, South Carolina, as amended or supplemented (the “Declaration”), having Interval Control Number U2506-W29B. Name/Notice Address of Obligor; Record Owner, if different from the Obligor; and any Junior Lienholders is as follows: NORA JEAN MATTHEWS , GENERAL DELIVERY, PORTLAND, OR 97208-999. Junior Lienholder: , .

Property Description: A fee simple undivided 0.0073861610410129 % ownership interest in the Project as tenants(s) in common with the holders of other undivided interests in and to the timeshare property known as MBV VACATION SUITES, as established by that certain Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions and Vacation Ownership Instrument for MBV Vacation Suites, recorded at Book 3406, Pages 1312-1365, et seq., of the records of the R.O.D. Office for Beaufort County, South Carolina, as amended or supplemented (the “Declaration”), having Interval Control Number U1502-W49O. Name/Notice Address of Obligor; Record Owner, if different from the Obligor; and any Junior Lienholders is as follows: DARRYL CHEEK & GLENDA ROBERTS CHEEK, 13709 HICKORY CREEK DR., HASLET, TX 76052-2435. Junior Lienholder: , .

The sale of the Property is to satisfy the default in payment by the Obligor/Owner of the obligations secured by the MORTGAGE as recorded in Book 3632 at Pages 389, records of Beaufort County, SC. The amounts secured by the MORTGAGE, are Amount currently in default (including interest) $8,837.65 Trustee’s Fee $ 350.00 Costs $ 426.91 Total Amount Due $ 9,614.56 With a per diem of $ 3.63 Together with any and all additional principal, interest, costs coming due and payable hereafter. The successful bidder, other than the Creditor, shall be required to pay in cash or certified funds at the time of the bid. If the Creditor is the successful bidder at the sale, it shall receive a credit against its bid for the Total Amount Due. The successful bidder shall also be required to pay for Deed Preparation, Documentary Stamps, or transfer fee, and Recording Costs. This sale is subject to all taxes, liens, easements, encumbrances, assessments, and/or senior mortgage liens of record and the undersigned Trustee gives no opinion thereto. An Obligor has the right to cure the default, and a Junior Lienholder has the right to redeem its interest up to the date of that the Trustee issues the Certificate of Sale pursuant to S.C. Code Ann. § 27-32-345. King Cunningham, LLC, Trustee and Attorney for HHI Development, LLC, by Jeffrey W. King, SC Bar # 15840; or W. Joseph Cunningham, SC Bar # 72655 P.O. Box 4896, North Myrtle Beach, SC 29597 (843)-249-0777 TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to S.C. Code Ann. § 27-32-300, et. seq., NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN of the intent of the undersigned Trustee to sell the below described Property at Public Auction on the 7/7/2022, beginning at 9:30 A.M.. The Public Auction shall occur at the Office of Bolchoz Law Firm, 6 Buckingham Plantation Rd, Ste B, Bluffton, SC 29910. Property Description: A fee simple undivided 0.0147723220820258 % ownership interest in the Project as tenants(s) in common with the holders of other undivided interests in and to the timeshare property known as MBV VACATION SUITES, as established by that certain Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions and Vacation Ownership Instrument for MBV Vacation Suites, recorded at Book 3406, Pages 1312-1365, et seq., of the records of the R.O.D. Office for Beaufort County, South Carolina, as amended or supplemented (the “Declaration”), having Interval Control Number U2403-W1B. Name/Notice Address of Obligor; Record Owner, if different from the Obligor; and any Junior Lienholders is as follows: WALTER JUNIOR UNDERWOOD & LA SHAUNDA L. UNDERWOOD, 1393 LEICSTER CT, HAMPTON, GA 30228-3333. Junior Lienholder: , . The sale of the Property is to satisfy the default in payment by the Obligor/Owner of the obligations secured by the MORTGAGE as recorded in Book 3963 at Pages 331, records of Beaufort County, SC. The amounts secured by the MORTGAGE, are Amount currently in default (including interest) $22,479.33 Trustee’s Fee $ 350.00 Costs $ 426.91 Total Amount Due $ 23,256.24 With a per diem of $ 9.96 Together with any and all additional principal, interest, costs coming due and payable hereafter. The successful bidder, other than the Creditor, shall be required to pay in cash or certified funds at the time of the bid. If the Creditor is the successful bidder at the sale, it shall receive a credit against its bid for the Total Amount Due. The successful bidder shall also be required to pay for Deed Preparation, Documentary Stamps, or transfer fee, and Recording Costs. This sale is subject to all taxes, liens, easements, encumbrances, assessments, and/or senior mortgage liens of record and the undersigned Trustee gives no opinion thereto. An Obligor has the right to cure the default, and a Junior Lienholder has the right to redeem its interest up to the date of that the Trustee issues the Certificate of Sale pursuant to S.C. Code Ann. § 27-32-345. King Cunningham, LLC, Trustee and Attorney for HHI Development, LLC, by Jeffrey W. King, SC Bar # 15840; or W. Joseph Cunningham, SC Bar # 72655 P.O. Box 4896, North Myrtle Beach, SC 29597 (843)-249-0777 TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to S.C. Code Ann. § 27-32-300, et. seq., NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN of the intent of the undersigned Trustee to sell the below described Property at Public Auction on the 7/7/2022, beginning at 9:30 A.M.. The Public Auction shall occur at the Office of Bolchoz Law Firm, 6 Buckingham Plantation Rd, Ste B, Bluffton, SC 29910.

payment by the Obligor/Owner of the obligations secured by the MORTGAGE as recorded in Book 3802 at Pages 124, records of Beaufort County, SC. The amounts secured by the MORTGAGE, are Amount currently in default (including interest) $31,639.20 Trustee’s Fee $ 350.00 Costs $ 426.91 Total Amount Due $ 32,416.11 With a per diem of $ 11.32 Together with any and all additional principal, interest, costs coming due and payable hereafter. The successful bidder, other than the Creditor, shall be required to pay in cash or certified funds at the time of the bid. If the Creditor is the successful bidder at the sale, it shall receive a credit against its bid for the Total Amount Due. The successful bidder shall also be required to pay for Deed Preparation, Documentary Stamps, or transfer fee, and Recording Costs. This sale is subject to all taxes, liens, easements, encumbrances, assessments, and/or senior mortgage liens of record and the undersigned Trustee gives no opinion thereto. An Obligor has the right to cure the default, and a Junior Lienholder has the right to redeem its interest up to the date of that the Trustee issues the Certificate of Sale pursuant to S.C. Code Ann. § 27-32-345. King Cunningham, LLC, Trustee and Attorney for HHI Development, LLC, by Jeffrey W. King, SC Bar # 15840; or W. Joseph Cunningham, SC Bar # 72655 P.O. Box 4896, North Myrtle Beach, SC 29597 (843)-249-0777 NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND INTENT TO SELL Name and Address of Owner(s): VRTS, LLC AND SUZANNE PALMIERI, Manager 633 S CAMPBELL AVE SPRINGFIELD MO 65806 (Obligors) Contract Number: 11060542; the following described property: Together with a remainder over in fee simple absolute as tenants in common with the other owners of all the unit weeks in the hereafter described Condominium Unit in that percentage interest determined and established by the aforesaid Declaration of Interval Ownership, Rights, Restrictions, Affirmative Obligations, Conditions, Etc. for the following described real estate located in the County of Beaufort, State of South Carolina as follows: UNIT WEEK 51 in UNIT NO 3852, in Monarch at Sea Pines, Horizontal Property Regime XXV, Phase XX, according to the Master Deed of American Resort Properties, Inc., dated May 18, 1982, as recorded in the Beaufort County Records in Deed Book 347 at Page 346, et seq. and as amended by Annexation Declaration of Phase XX, recorded in the Beaufort County, Records in Deed Book 361 at Page 1, and all applicable amendments thereto. Lien Book and Page 150/36 144/2014 ; Total Amount Presently Delinquent: $6625.67. You are currently in default under certain provisions of the Master Deed Establishing Monarch at Sea Pines, Horizontal Property Regime, Beaufort County, South Carolina by MARRIOTT OWNERSHIP RESORTS INC. recorded in the Registrar of Deeds, Beaufort County, South Carolina in Deed Book 347 at Page 346, et seq. and as amended, and lienholder has chosen to proceed with a non-judicial foreclosure procedure in accordance with Article 3 of Chapter 32 of Title 27 of the Code of Laws of South Carolina. If you fail to cure the default or take other appropriate action with regard to this matter within thirty calendar days after the date of this notice, you will risk losing your interest in this timeshare estate through a nonjudicial foreclosure procedure. However, under the nonjudicial procedure, you will not be subject to a deficiency judgment or personal liability for the lien being foreclosed even if the sale of your timeshare estate resulting from the nonjudicial foreclosure is insufficient to satisfy the amount of the lien being foreclosed. You may object to the sale of your timeshare estate through the nonjudicial foreclosure procedure and require foreclosure of your timeshare interest to proceed through the judicial process. An objection must be made in writing and received by the trustee before the end of the thirty-day time period. You must state the reason for your objection and include your address on the written objection. In a judicial foreclosure proceeding that results from your objection, you may be subject to a deficiency judgment and personal liability for the lien being foreclosed if the sale of your timeshare estate resulting from the judicial foreclosure is insufficient to satisfy the amount of the lien being foreclosed. Furthermore, you also may be subject to a personal money judgment for the costs and attorney’s fees incurred by the lien holder in the judicial foreclosure proceeding if the court finds that there is a complete absence of a justifiable issue of either law or fact raised by your objections or defenses. You have the right to cure your default at any time before the sale of your timeshare estate by payment of all past due loan payments or assessments, accrued interest, late fees, taxes, and all fees and costs incurred by the lien holder and trustee, including attorney’s fees and costs, in connection with the default.

Property Description: A fee simple undivided 0.0073861610410129 % ownership interest in the Project as tenants(s) in common with the holders of other undivided interests in and to the timeshare property known as MBV VACATION SUITES, as established by that certain Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions and Vacation Ownership Instrument for MBV Vacation Suites, recorded at Book 3406, Pages 1312-1365, et seq., of the records of the R.O.D. Office for Beaufort County, South Carolina, as amended or supplemented (the “Declaration”), having Interval Control Number U1404-W28O. Name/Notice Address of Obligor; Record Owner, if different from the Obligor; and any Junior Lienholders is as follows: CATHERINE ADELE JONES & SHERI LYNN MOORE, 144 THOMAS BLVD, HAMILTON, OH 45013. Junior Lienholder: , .

Any response or inquiry should be made in writing to Daniel C. Zickefoose, who is serving as trustee in this matter, at the following address:

The sale of the Property is to satisfy the default in

An undivided one fifty-first (1/51) fractional inter-

See Into The Future . . . . . . read

Eck, Collins & Richardson, P.L. 4000 Faber Place Drive, Suite 300 North Charleston, SC 29405 NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND INTENT TO SELL Name and Address of Owner(s): AJA M. STALLWORTH 5109 CORNERS DRIVE WEST BLOOMFIELD MI 48322 THOMAS FONTAINE STALLWORTH IV 5109 CORNERS DRIVE WEST BLOOMFIELD MI 48322 Contract Number: 100218610 the following described property:

est in Unit No. 8212 respectively, Grande Ocean Resort Horizontal Property Regime, lying situate and being on Hilton Head Island, Beaufort County, South Carolina, and being more particularly shown and described by reference to the Master Deed, establishing the said Horizontal Property Regime, being dated May 25, 1993, and recorded in the Office of the Register of Mesne Conveyances for Beaufort County, South Carolina, on June 3, 1993 in Deed Book 626 at Page 2446; as amended by the First, Second, Third, Fourth and Fifth Amendments to Master Deed recorded in said Office, on July 2, 1993 in Deed Book 635 at Page 39; on August 26, 1993 in Deed Book 647 at Page 651; on May 23, 1994 in Deed Book 706 at Page 639; on December 14, 1995 in Deed Book 822 at Page 1007, and on January 21, 1997 in Deed Book 916 at Page 603, respectively, as may be further amended from time to time, and by reference to that certain plat entitled “As­ Built Survey of Grande Ocean Resort Horizontal Property Regime” said plat prepared by Terry G. Hatchell, S.C.R.L.S. #11059 of Surveying Consultants, said plat being dated May 27, 1993, and recorded in the Office of the Register of Mesne Conveyances for Beaufort County, South Carolina, in Plat Book 46 at Page 102, said plat bearing last revision date January 7, 1997 and recorded in said Office in Plat Book 59 at Page 58, ae may be further revised from time to time. AND ALSO, all of the rights, privileges, easements, and common areas appertaining to the above-described property as set forth in the Master Deed and By-Laws of Grande Ocean Resort Horizontal Property Regime. AND ALSO, all right, title, interest and privileges extending to Timesharing Interest Numbers(s) 8212-G-40; in each of the respective aforedescribed Units, as contained in that certain Time Sharing Declaration dated May 25, 1993, recorded in the office of the Register of Mesne Conveyances for Beaufort County, South Carolina, on June 3, 1993, in Deed Book 626 at Page 2533, and amended by that certain Supplement to Time Sharing Declaration, dated December 12, 1995 and recorded in said Office on December 14, 1995 in Deed Book 822 at Page 1035, as may be further revised from time to time. Pursuant to South Carolina Code of Laws Section 27-32-225, please be on notice that: Owner(s) are currently in default under the terms of the mortgage dated September 30, 2014, recorded in the public records (Register of Deeds) of Colleton County, South Carolina in Mortgage Book/Page 3351/2627. The unpaid balance due as of November 01, 2020 is $ 7,160.99 which accrues interest at $ 1.92 per day. If you fail to cure the default or take other appropriate action with regard to this matter within thirty calendar days after the date of this notice, you will risk losing your interest in this timeshare estate through a nonjudicial foreclosure procedure. However, under the nonjudicial procedure, you will not be subject to a deficiency judgment or personal liability for the lien being foreclosed even if the sale of your timeshare estate resulting from the nonjudicial foreclosure is insufficient to satisfy the amount of the lien being foreclosed. You may object to the sale of your timeshare estate through the nonjudicial foreclosure procedure and require foreclosure of your timeshare interest to proceed through the judicial process. An objection must be made in writing and received by the trustee before the end of the thirty-day time period. You must state the reason for your objection and include your address on the written objection. In a judicial foreclosure proceeding that results from your objection, you may be subject to a deficiency judgment and personal liability for the lien being foreclosed if the sale of your timeshare estate resulting from the judicial foreclosure is insufficient to satisfy the amount of the lien being foreclosed. Furthermore, you also may be subject to a personal money judgment for the costs and attorney’s fees incurred by the lien holder in the judicial foreclosure proceeding if the court finds that there is a complete absence of a justifiable issue of either law or fact raised by your objections or defenses. You have the right to cure your default at any time before the sale of your timeshare estate by payment of all past due loan payments or assessments, accrued interest, late fees, taxes, and all fees and costs incurred by the lien holder and trustee, including attorney’s fees and costs, in connection with the default. Any response or inquiry should be made in writing to Daniel C. Zickefoose, who is serving as trustee in this matter, at the following address:

Eck, Collins & Richardson, P.L. 4000 Faber Place Drive, Suite 300 North Charleston, SC 29405 NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND INTENT TO SELL Name and Address of Owner(s): BRANDON RIVERS| 276 AINA PUA PL KAPA'A HI 96746 Contract Number: BB*9316/36 the following described property: An undivided one fifty-first (1/51) fractional interest in Unit No. 9316 respectively, Barony Beach Club Horizontal Property Regime, lying situate and being on Hilton Head Island, Beaufort County, South Carolina, and being more particularly shown and described by reference to the Master Deed, establishing the said Horizontal Property Regime, being dated March 8, 1999, and recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Beaufort County, South Carolina, on March 11, 1999 in Deed Book 1146 at page 526; as amended from time to time, and by reference to that certain plat entitled "As-Built Survey of Barony Beach Club Horizontal Property Regime" said plat prepared by Terry G. Hatchell, S.C.R.L.S. #11059, said plat being dated March 3, 1999, and recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Beaufort County, South Carolina, in Plat Book 69 at Page 65, as may be further revised from time to time. AND ALSO, all of the rights, privileges, easements, and common areas appertaining to the above-described property as set forth in the Master Deed and By-Laws of Barony Beach Club Horizontal Property Regime. AND ALSO, all rights, title, interest and privileges extending to Time-Sharing Interest Number(s) 9316-G-36; in each of the respective aforedescribed Units, as contained in that certain Time Sharing Declaration, dated March 8, 1999, recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Beaufort County, South Carolina, on March 11, 1999 in Deed Book 1146 at Page 526, as amended from time to time. Pursuant to South Carolina Code of Laws Section 27-32-225, please be on notice that: Owner(s) are currently in default under the terms of the mortgage dated April 09, 2019, recorded in the public records (Register of Deeds) of Colleton County, South Carolina in Mortgage Book/Page 3752/564. The unpaid balance due as of April 09, 2021 is $ 9,185.12 which accrues interest at $ 2.32 per day. If you fail to cure the default or take other appropriate action with regard to this matter within thirty calendar days after the date of this notice, you will risk losing your interest in this timeshare estate through a nonjudicial foreclosure procedure. However, under the nonjudicial procedure, you will not be subject to a deficiency judgment or personal liability for the lien being foreclosed even if the sale of your timeshare estate resulting from the nonjudicial foreclosure is insufficient to satisfy the amount of the lien being foreclosed. You may object to the sale of your timeshare estate through the nonjudicial foreclosure procedure and require foreclosure of your timeshare interest to proceed through the judicial process. An objection must be made in writing and received by the trustee before the end of the thirty-day time period. You must state the reason for your objection and include your address on the written objection. In a judicial foreclosure proceeding that results from your objection, you may be subject to a deficiency judgment and personal liability for the lien being foreclosed if the sale of your timeshare estate resulting from the judicial foreclosure is insufficient to satisfy the amount of the lien being foreclosed. Furthermore, you also may be subject to a personal money judgment for the costs and attorney’s fees incurred by the lien holder in the judicial foreclosure proceeding if the court finds that there is a complete absence of a justifiable issue of either law or fact raised by your objections or defenses. You have the right to cure your default at any time before the sale of your timeshare estate by payment of all past due loan payments or assessments, accrued interest, late fees, taxes, and all fees and costs incurred by the lien holder and trustee, including attorney’s fees and costs, in connection with the default. Any response or inquiry should be made in writing to Daniel C. Zickefoose, who is serving as trustee in this matter, at the following address: Eck, Collins & Richardson, P.L. 4000 Faber Place Drive, Suite 300 North Charleston, SC 29405

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Newspaper Network JUNE 16–22, 2022

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VOICES Editor’s Note: The opinions of our columnists in the Voices section are not necessarily the opinions of The Island News.

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Signed, a Christian who doesn’t want organized prayer in school

nytime violence touches a school, well intentioned people post the same ill-conceived takes on social media: “When I was in school we carried gun racks in our pickups, and we never had people go shooting up the place.” “When I was in school we prayed and said the Pledge of Allegiance, and we didn’t have these kinds of things happening.” “They took God out of the classroom, and look what happened.” It drives me nuts! Not because I resent their desire to make schools a safe place for young people to learn and grow, but because they conveniently ignore so much else that might explain why we are having increased violence in general, not just around schools, and how mandated school prayer could cause more harm than good.

Since 1962 there has been established prohibition against school-sponsored prayer or any other practice that elevates one religion above another. Unless you graduated before that year, you went to school when organized prayer in public education was illegal, whether or not your local school or district complied. I graduated in 1985, and every Friday before football games, players were taken out to dinner where we were fed sirloin tips, a baked potato, green beans or salad, dessert — and a motivational word and prayer from a local pastor. Every prayer included

His reply? “This is a free country …. You can do what you want.” Sometimes, no players joined Kennedy, other times there were quite a few, and he began to deliver “motivational” messages to the players who gathered to pray with him. He even began joining pregame prayer sessions initiated by the student-athletes. This went on for seven years, until an official from another school commented favorably on Kennedy’s actions to Bremerton High School’s principal. A different administrator at the school admonished Kennedy, who then went to Facebook and posted, “I think I just might have been fired for praying.” Kennedy hadn’t actually been terminated, but his post sparked support from thousands of people across the country who flooded the district with calls, letters and emails of support. The dis-

trict gave Kennedy guidance on modifying his actions to protect himself and the district from legal action, but he defied them and was terminated. “This is a free country …. You can do what you want.” Except you can’t, and everyone seems to know that except people like Kennedy who paint themselves as victims of religious oppression. This siege mentality, that Christianity is under attack, that they (usually white people) are having something taken from them, is easy bait to be used by a Republican Party trying to galvanize itself against demographic change. Change begets fear, fear begets rage, and rage begets … more rage. And so you have Baptist preachers like Greg Locke, who tells his congregation, “You cannot be a Christian and vote Democrat in this nation. … They are God-denying demons that butcher

babies and hate this nation.” Gee, why wouldn’t I want a mandate for that to be broadcast over school public address systems every morning? Locke is an extremist, but his mentality is one that is moving from the fringe to the center of conservative ideology. These people who say, “Put prayer back in schools,” care less about being Christlike than they do getting their way and keeping the nation looking and sounding like they think it did when they were in school. You want prayer in school? Teach your children how to pray. A silent prayer from the heart or an intimate prayer with a friend will travel farther than vain repetitions made to signal dominance over others. Terry E. Manning lives and works in Savannah, Ga. He is a Clemson graduate and worked for 20 years as a journalist. He can be reached at teemanning@gmail.com.

I’m unhappy in this new, remote world

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t is Saturday, and I’m in North Adams, Mass. It’s maybe 65 degrees here in the Berkshires and the temperature will likely climb into the low 80s later today. It is, however, not my purpose to boast about the fact that I’m wearing a gray woolen sweater and heavy-duty hiking socks. At the moment my wife and I are located in a textile mill, situated on the Hoosic River, the Eclipse Mill having ceded its lint, non-stop noise and dawn-to-dusk labor to China, Vietnam and Bangladesh. Manufacturing is largely gone from Western Massachusetts although nearby towns do make wax-coated cheddar cheese and some continue to distill-down sap and bottle that distillation as maple syrup. Many towns have small, liberal arts colleges (Amherst, Smith and Williams) who do manufacture young, ambitious graduates who move to Boston but will reliably write endowment checks for the rest of their lives. The nature of work has changed in Western Massachusetts in the last 100

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JUNE 16–22, 2022

SCOTT GRABER

years, and it appears there is another change playing itself out places like New York City and Atlanta. It seems that stacking large numbers of young graduates in a tall, vertical box — those glass boxes shaping the skyline of lower Manhattan and Boston — is under re-evaluation. It is said that places like Nashville, Austin and Portland are booming as graduates decide they can do their work remotely — that they can do their thinking without riding a commuter train for an hour each morning. I believe the exchange of ideas, and the refining of those ideas, is a collective, corporate experience that is essential in the American marketplace. I think collaboration is connected to productivity; that productivity is the not-so-secret sauce

that powers our economy. Collaboration took a big hit with the COVID Pandemic. The first line of defense was get their young graduates out of the building, off of the New Haven railroad and comfortably isolated on a beige, Ikea-bought couch. The next thing was to eliminate in-person meetings and in-person travel to those meetings. In my own profession, the law, trials (both jury and non-jury) were canceled; and motion hearings, depositions and mediations went to a remote place called Zoom. No. I didn’t like those remotely-held motion hearings from the start. I didn’t like them because there were usually technical problems where the sound or the video would suddenly fail. The judge, sometimes sitting at a kitchen table in his home, would stop the proceedings and try to patch-in the audio by way of a cellphone. These jury-rigged efforts sometime succeeded, but there was a kind of insecurity lingering throughout the hearing. Depositions — sworn interviews with po-

I believe the exchange of ideas, and the refining of those ideas, is a collective, corporate experience that is essential in the American marketplace. I think collaboration is connected to productivity; that productivity is the not-so-secret sauce that powers our economy.” tential witnesses were also subject to electronic failure. These days you may have four different lawyers in four different cities across the country. The problem here is the fact that during a long deposition, one or more of these attorneys can shut off his video (presumably still listening to the proceedings) all the while doing something else. Since the advent of cellphones doing something else during a deposition — texting another attorney about a different case —

usually takes place regardless. In years gone by it was not uncommon to see every attorney around the table, excepting the attorney doing the interrogation, busily checking their e-mail or ordering espresso machines from Prime. This sort of thing can also happen in mediations — mediations being the last attempt to settle a case before a trial is put on the trial docket. At a mediation all participants are expected to make a good faith attempt to find a number — a dollar

figure — that will end the case. In order for a mediation to succeed both the Plaintiff and the Defendant must feel vulnerable. They must believe a jury is unpredictable and can bring back a verdict that is unacceptably high, or no money at all. Unpredictability and the continuation of trial-day, confrontational angst are the Mother’s Milk of mediation. If the mediation is remote, the various lawyers (and their clients) remain secure in their tastefully-decorated offices, surrounded by their children’s art, distanced from the ring where uncertainty is made manifest. Although it’s hard to go “dark” during a mediation, the mediator’s compelling, lets-make-a-dealand-go-home argument is diluted. Dulled. Easy to ignore. Yes, I understand that the world is changing; and I’m a self-confessed Luddite, completely adrift and unhappy in this strange, now remote world. Scott Graber is a lawyer, novelist, veteran columnist and longtime resident of Port Royal. He can be reached at cscottgraber@gmail.com.

Choose common sense, stop the madness

hen I picked up the most recent copy of the Island News, which, by the way, I find the be the best informed local paper available, I turned right away to the Voices section. Knowing that the past week had been rife with news and opinions regarding the horrific massacre in Uvalde, Texas, I was anxious to see the local take on what has become a uniquely American problem. Two of the three editorial pieces dealt with this tragedy, fair enough coverage. Mike McCombs’ contribution was much more extensive, and it is one with which I absolutely agree. When reading that of Cherimie Crane Weatherford, however, I found myself asking, “When is she going to address gun regulation?” And I was really pulled up short by her suggestion of the implementation of a mental health

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TERRY MANNING

a plea for a sincere effort and for safety for the players. We still lost games. Players still suffered injuries. I welcomed those prayers, and it never occurred to me that a teammate might take offense. But what if one had? Or what would have happened if one of the coaches had started putting their private practice of faith above the law? The latter is what happened in Kennedy v. Bremerton School District, a case before the Supreme Court. Joseph Kennedy is a former Marine and football coach at a school in Bremerton, Wash. He also considers himself, according to court documents, a devout Catholic. Starting in 2008, as players and coaches shook hands after games, Kennedy would walk to the 50-yard line, kneel and pray. He was alone at the beginning but in time players from his team and even opposing teams asked to join him.

CAROL LUCAS

class in every school. Before I address either of those issues, let me say that most of what Ms. Weatherford said seemed to be heartfelt, and I applaud that. However, the suggestion of a mental health class as part of school curriculum is perplexing; furthermore I believe the failure to address the issue of guns is a glaring omission. In the interest of transparency, the apparent word of the day, I must tell you that I am a retired high school English teacher with 32 years of experience. Having retired in

1997 from a suburban school district in Pittsburgh, Pa., I am anguished every time one of these school shootings occur. My thought is always, “There but for the grace of God go I.” And when I see politicians recommending the arming of teachers, my anguish turns to rage, yes, rage! I envision myself in the middle of discussing Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales when a kid – make no mistake, chances are great he will be younger than 20 years old – walks in with his assault rifle (please take note of the name assault, no question about why he is here). I must now pull out MY assault rifle, blow him away in front of my class, and then hope to return to The Miller’s Tale after a few moments of clean-up. Flippant? Ludicrous? Perhaps, but so is the suggestion

of arming teachers. And after Tulsa, Okla., are you also going to arm doctors as well as their receptionists? And by all means, you as a patient, want to be very sure that you carry your gun to an office visit, so that if you are in a position to help people escape by holding a door, you are also in a position to shoot the intruder. Is this what we have become, a return to the wild, wild West? The answer, people, is guns. GUNS! And the easy acquisition of assault rifles is for one purpose and one alone … to kill people. I’m so disgusted that what I perceive as reasonable changes in gun laws are a no go for Republican Senators. Someone please take the time to explain to me why ASSAULT rifles cannot be banned. I saw somewhere a suggestion that with every purchase of such, the buyer must

enter the armed services for proper training. I can hear the wails and cries, even as I type. And why not raise the age to 21? Why not an extended background check with a longer waiting period? You don’t want the government digging into your background? Newsflash! Technology has already rendered that null and void. Look at Canada’s laws and their statistics for mass shootings and weep. As for mental health issues, I haven’t encountered anyone who doubts the legitimacy of better mental health care. However, regarding Ms. Weatherford’s suggestion of integrating said class into the curriculum, I must ask if she thinks that in a classroom of 25 to 30 kids, this will be effective. Will you encourage in this class the idea of a child’s going to

someone in authority and saying, “I think Johnny has a mental health problem?” Imagine the chaos that could produce, not only among the kids, but also with the parents. And at what grade level do you propose introducing this kind of class? Any educator will tell you what a delicate proposition this is. I agree that mental health is part of the solution. However, let’s not make it the ONLY solution to a multi-faceted problem. In conclusion, I’m not proposing taking away guns. Sadly I believe that train left the station years ago. But please let’s implement a common-sense approach and stop the madness. The police forces want it; most Americans want it; legitimate gun owners should get behind it. Carol Lucas is a retired high school teacher and a Lady’s Island resident.


FAITH LIVING ON PURPOSE

Photo by Serhii Volyk.

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Learning how to adjust our sails

ur mind is a garden our thoughts are seeds, we can plant flowers or we can plant weeds.” This old saying means we choose what we think about and are responsible for the thoughts we allow to grow. We cannot direct the wind, but we can adjust our sails. We decide each moment what we will say, how we act, and who we will serve. God is waiting for us to become the person Jesus died for us to be. Courage does not always roar. Sometimes faith is the quiet voice at the end of the day that says, “I will try it again tomorrow.” Never give up, ask God to help you and He will. The Bible says in Psalm 118, verse 5, “I called upon the Lord in my distress: the

BILLY HOLLAND

Lord answered me, and set me in a large place. The Lord is on my side, I will not fear, what can man do to me?” Feed your faith and your fears will starve to death. Proverbs Ch. 3 and verses 5-8 declare, “Trust in the Lord with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding. In all thy ways acknowledge Him and He shall direct thy paths. Be not wise in thine own eyes; fear the LORD and depart from evil. It shall be health to thy

navel, and strength, nourishment, and refreshment to thy bones.” We know that God is the highest authority and has complete power and control over all things. We are celebrating how our creator is bringing victory over an enemy that is trying to do us harm. We confess God’s Word that is the true reality of His perfect will. We believe and receive His never-failing truth into our lives and come into agreement with Isaiah 54:17, “No weapon formed against thee shall prosper; and every tongue that shall rise against thee in judgment thou shalt condemn. This is the heritage of the servants of the Lord, and their righteousness is of me, saith the Lord.”

We are filled with joy because God loves us and sent His Son Jesus to save us and we know in our hearts that He desires to intervene and always has our best interest in mind. God is the creator of all things and spoke the universe into existence. He said let there be light and there was light and it was good, and this same spiritual principle is active and alive within us. He wants us to know and agree with His will and to speak His Word in faith as He has promised that He will manifest His plans through us for His glory. God’s Words are light and life and His people are commanded to choose life! In Isaiah 57:19 the Lord says, “I create the fruit of the lips; Peace, peace to him who is

far away, and to him that is near and I will heal him.” We repent of our sins and ask God to help us become victorious. Psalm 66:18, “If I regard iniquity in my heart God will not hear me.” Psalm 51:10-12, “Create in me a clean heart O God, and renew a right spirit within me. Cast me not away from thy presence, and take not thy Holy Spirit from me. Restore unto me the joy of thy salvation, and uphold me with thy free Spirit.” “In my distress, I called upon the Lord and cried unto my God: He heard my voice out of His temple, and my cry came before Him, even into His ears,” Psalm 18:6. Be encouraged to know He is listening to you right now. “Father, I come to you today with a broken and

contrite heart. I am weak but we know that you are strong. Fear and doubt are at my door like ravening wolves. I look across the world and see evil and darkness everywhere. My heart is heavy as I see more people turning against you and your truth. I humbly ask that you fill my mind and soul today with your peace that passes all understanding. Please encourage my heart and allow me to see the victory as when Elisha’s servant’s eyes were opened. Help me to stay focused on who you are and to dwell in the secret place of the Most High. My hope, my trust, and my life is in you and nothing else. All glory to you forever, amen.” Read more about the Christian life at billyhollandministries.com.

Preparing the Way

The Adventure Begins The Big Picture of the Bible

The knight bravely storms the enemy castle. Out of love for his kidnapped bride, he overcomes every foe. No one can stop his determined climb up the tower stairs. Vanquishing his final enemy, he bursts into the room where his beloved has been kept prisoner. “I am here,” he exclaims, “I have come for you!” He sets her free and, at long last, the two embrace with great joy. Does God have such a love for us? In our previous faith messages, we examined some of the reasons for faith in God. One can come to important insights by reflecting on the physical universe and on our experience of human nature. But these insights can only scratch the surface of the mysteries of God. If we are to know him in a deeper way, God has to choose to reveal himself to us. He has to come into the castle, so to speak, and make himself known. God has indeed made himself known to us! He did not simply set the universe in motion and leave us on our own without another thought. Rather, since our first days on earth, he has interacted with the human race and revealed himself to be a faithful, loving Father. As God revealed himself to his people over the centuries, he inspired many individuals to write down the stories of his words and deeds.

To understand the Bible, we need to see the big picture. At its heart, the Bible is the adventure of God gradually forming a family of faith, the Israelites. With great patience, he helped them to love and trust him, calling them to be the light by which all the other nations would come to know him. If we can understand the broad outlines of this family history, then the other pieces of the Bible begin to fall into place. The Psalms, for example, are the family songs of the Israelite people, while Proverbs is a collection of their wise sayings. God comes to save us! In this message series, we will share the big picture from Genesis to Jesus. We will see that God created humanity to enjoy perfect union with him, and that we lost this union due to sin. We will watch as God begins his family of faith with the “yes” of one faithful man, Abraham, and follow this family as it grows into the nation of Israel. We will see how God prepares the way for a gift of himself beyond our imagining, a mighty warrior coming to save his beloved.

This is the amazing story recounted in the Bible. In its pages, we find the greatest adventure ever told: how God patiently prepared the way for the most amazing rescue mission of all time. This adventure is recounted by many authors and through various types of literature, such as histories, poems, and letters. For this reason, the Bible is not like a typical novel, but more like a library of small books collected under one cover.

Preparing the Way Message 1 of 8

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47. *Just out of the water 48. Parallel grooves 50. Arrival times 52. *Wave rider 56. Nitrogen, in the olden days 57. In ____ of 58. Hipbones 59. Parcel of land 60. Et alibi 61. Auctioneer's exclamation 62. A.C.T. section 63. Tie the knot 64. *Casual beach tops DOWN 1. British Broadcasting Corporation, colloquially 2. Shells in a magazine 3. Capital of Peru 4. Fungus damage (2 words) 5. *Same as sandbar 6. Catch for a ratchet's notch, pl. 7. Criticism 8. *Water at its highest (2 words) 9. The largest continent 10. Retired electric Chevy 11. Compass dir. 13. Hindu Festival of Lights 14. Dyed fabric

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19. Type of TV show 22. Eating contest staple 23. *Decapod on a beach 24. *Propelled like a paddle board 25. Plural of sputum 26. Type of bin in a grocery store 27. Bundle of axons 28. Slipperier 31. *Building material found at the beach 32. Jack Ryan's and Jason Bourne's org. 34. Barrels of beer 36. *Hasselhoff's beach TV show 38. Improvise 40. Exercise group 41. Upbraiding 44. Annoy 46. Lao Tzu follower 48. Hotel room option 49. Metallica's "Don't ____ On Me" 50. Poet Pound 51. To perfection (3 words) 52. A bunch 53. *End-of-day summertime soother 54. Rub the wrong way 55. Pops 56. Cash dispenser

LAST WEEK'S CROSSWORD & SUDOKU SOLUTIONS

JUNE 16–22, 2022

A19


820 Bay Street

Beaufort, SC 29902

843.521.4200

$599,000

$179,000

BROAD RIVER BLUFF | MLS 176144 VILLAGE CREEK | MLS 176338 5BDRM | 3.5B | 3052sqft Bryan Gates 843.812.6494

$369,000

1acre Homesite | Community Deep Water Dock Donna Duncan 843.597.3464

$3,750,000

FRIPP ISLAND | MLS 172191 .06acre | Oceanfront Homesite Pat Dudley 843.986.3470

$1,050,000

CITY WALK | MLS 176050 3BDRM | 2.5B | Marshfront Amy McNeal 843.521.7932

$185,000

SEABROOK | MLS 175490 7acre | Marsh View | No HOA Dawn Yerace 843.441.6518

ST. HELENA ISLAND | MLS 175916 9.23acres | Private Deepwater Dock Edward Dukes 843.812.5000

$219,000

LOST ISLAND | MLS 174952 .32acre Homesite | Tidal Creek Lloyd Williams 1.843.754.4735

$369,000

MOSSY OAKS | MLS 176346 3BDRM | 2B | 1716sqft David Polk 843.321.0477

$79,000

$1,850,000 – $1,950,000

GIBBS ISLAND | MLS 161569

LUXURY NEW CONSTRUCTION

$829,000

$135,000

.39acre Homesite | Marshfront Julia O’Hara 1.201.456.8620

FRIPP ISLAND | MLS 176110 4BDRM | 4B | 2212sqft Amy McNeal 843.521.7932 Pat Dudley 843.986.3470

MLS 174089 | 3BDRM | 2.5+B Elevator | Secured Parking Edward Dukes 843.812.5000

$90,000

SEABROOK | MLS 176266

.76acre Homesite | Waterfront Community Heidi Smith 1.850.803.1216

$99,000

POLAWANA | MLS 174717 8.21acres | Community Dock Wayne Webb 843.812.5203

$188,900

WALLING GROVE | MLS 170981 1.25acre Homesite | Private Dock Sara Miller 1.540.209.5434

$2,600,000

ST. HELENA ISLAND | MLS 174484 ST. HELENA ISLAND | MLS 175156 1.7acre Homesite | Convenient to Beach Lloyd Williams 1.843.754.4735

223.85acres, approx. | 2900ft Marshfront Scott Sanders 843.263.1284

$1,249,000

$279,000

$125,000

$35,000

FRIPP ISLAND | MLS 175855

COMMERCIAL OPPORTUNITY

BATTERY POINT | MLS 167765

DATAW ISLAND | MLS 176128

$2,725,000

$950,000

$219,000

$49,500

GIBBS ISLAND | MLS 175586

FRIPP ISLAND | MLS 173423

POLK VILLAGE | MLS 176081

4BDRM | 3B | 2638sqft Amy McNeal 843.521.7932

5BDRM | 6.5+B | Inground Pool | Private Dock Julia O’Hara 1.201.456.8620

MLS 174906 | 1700sqft | 3/4 mile from I95 Wayne Webb 843.812.5203

.46acre Homesite | Oceanfront Trudy Arthur 843.812.0967 Nancy Butler 843.384.5445

.18acre Homesite | Corner Lot Colleen Baisley 843.252.1066

3BDRM | 1B | 1229sqft Edward Dukes 843.812.5000

.18acre Homesite | Golf Views Trudy Arthur 843.812.0967 Nancy Butler 843.384.5445

ISLANDS OF BEAUFORT

MLS 174569 | .33acre Homesite | Marsh View Dawn Yerace 843.441.6518

If you are thinking about selling, now is the time to consider your options! Call us today to learn what your home could sell for in today’s market.

www.LowcountryRealEstate.com