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Vol. 1 INSPIRED

IN

Winter 2013

The Isis Nicole Magazine


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The Isis Nicole Magazine

Text and photography copyright Š 2013 by The Isis Nicole Magazine. www.theisisnicolemagazine.com

isisnicolemagazine.com

All rights reserved. No part of The Isis Nicole Magazine may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher.

Contributing Artists Alysha Laurene, Ayla Brass Montgomery, Brian Beckwith, Britney Tokyo, Helen Koh, Jacobo Ospina, Jorgeline Torres, Josh Kelly, Lane Stewart, Lili K, Logan Jean, Nate McGhee, Sam Gendel, Sasha Kremenetsky, Shannon Yazurlo.

Design by Helen Koh www.helennn.com For all contribution, distribution, and advertising inquiries please contact: theisisnicole@gmail.com Made in USA


Letter from the Editor It’s 7:50 a.m. I would like to be catching up on the sleep that September insisted I lose, but I can’t because the sunrise is splitting through my blinds. And then I realized, there is a time to rest, and a time to work. A season to be provoked, and a season to prosper. This winter issue is the result and reminder of perseverance and prosperity. To be #INSPIRED one must be provoked, then persevere and prosper. 

LA. NYC. TOKYO. PARIS. LONDON. ATL. MONTRIL. D.C. PITTSBURGH. SARASOTA. CINCINNATI. CHICAGO. BERLIN.  None of this would have been possible if we didn’t step up to the challenge.  I thank every artist who participated in this project, my mom who held the fort down- shipping all those disposable cameras across the world, and my dear friend Helen Koh, who jumped to my rescue when she saw me struggle. Stick with us. We’re onto something, and we can’t be stopped. 

— Isis Nicole

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Table of Contents

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True Grits — Girl Raised in the South 06 Handjobs 16 The Holy Nail 24 The Gentleman 32 Lili K 42 Harajuku Hollywood 52 Only on Camera 62 N

A Boy Made in Brooklyn 72 Filthy in Florida 80 Mad Jelly 88 Broads 92 Time for Some Action 96 A Boy and His Joy 102 PNG Princess 108 INTELLECT 05


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RumpTrue Grits — Girl Raised in the South

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shaker rumpshaker.tumblr.com

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By way of Atlanta, 26-year-old Alysha Laurene, known on the worldwide web as Rumpshaker, can easily be described as nail art’s aggregator and the misses of memorabilia, but she probably wouldn’t consider herself to be so. Totally expected from a coy cutie pie whose blogs have won the hearts of Tumblrites and Diplo.

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08 Who is Rumpshaker? Just a little creeper lurking my way through the expanse of the Internet and into the real world. Favorite place to escape? I enjoy escaping in the comfort of my double pillow top mattress. How do you set yourself apart from other bloggers? This sounds lame, but I don’t even feel like a blogger. I swear my only purpose online is to dump random images into one place for future reference. What keeps you inspired? The fact that Dolly Parton is alive and living in the same world as you and me!

I 2 truths and a lie? I have eleven fingers, I have a collection of dolls in my closet, and I hate onions. How do you spend your weekends? Totally cliche, but I love hitting up the movies. Especially by myself so it’s just a date with me and the movie screen. Best thrift store find? I’ve found so many articles of clothing that I thought would alter my life in some way, but the most practical and loved items are the cameras I’ve acquired for less than $15. Biggest misconception about the south? If there’s a misconception about something there has to be a little truth to it somehow, but I hold the South so near and dear to my heart. I can say that the term “Southern Hospitality” is accurate for the most part. Every time I leave the Mason Dixie Line, I’ve found people to be a little more guarded and way less friendly with complete strangers.


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Brass whoisBRASS.com

Handjobs

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As nail art continues to make its rounds on fingertips, 20-something-year-old director Ayla Brass Montgomery travels anywhere from NYC to Tokyo to film it. Nailgasm, an independent documentary about the conspicuous, “NAIL ART�, takes a closer look at its current craze supported by enthusiasts and the upcoming entrepreneurial designers involved. On a less polished debut, the California native lets us enter her dayin-the-life accompanied by palm trees, street art, and rapper friend, Anthony Speak Maidana.


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Manicures, not man massages you freaks!

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20 2 truths and a lie? I worked in a morgue when I was 16-years-old, I have 13 piercings, and I met the Spice Girls. Worst pickup line? “Aye, girl, take my number.” Claim to fame? Photographing Kendrick Lamar, Schoolboy Q, Wiz Khalifa, the Internet, and my film Nailgasm. What has been the biggest challenge you had to overcome in the wake of all your growth? Keeping my depression and anxiety in check. What have you discovered about yourself since releasing Nailgasm? That I’m tough as nails.

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How do you set yourself apart from other filmmakers? I mainly deal with niche subcultures. What keeps you inspired? The awesome people who randomly hit me up and tell me how much they love something I made. What does it take to be successful in this world? Lots of fearlessness and hard work. What do you want to be remembered for this year and in the future? Giving a voice to those who often go ignored. Mainstream ignores a lot of people, that’s why I love exploring subcultures.

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Sasha K The Holy Nail theholynailblog.com


Nail art’s defender Sasha Kremenetsky has made an honest narrative out of her English literature background and obsession with beauty via the eye fuck oasis The Holy Nail, a multidimensional project that fosters a grassroots space for manicure maniacs alike. In anticipation of her new cuticle oils, the 26-year-old by way of Manhattan Beach takes us through her awkward dates and illusions about LA.

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28 Most known for? My nail blog and general sassy commentary. 2 truths and a lie? My grandfather was a famous hypnotist, I’m obsessed with eyebrows, and I’m allergic to strawberries. Celebrity Crush? Data from Star Trek: The Next Generation. Worst date ever? I can never truly diss a guy for trying to take me out on a date because it honestly never happens, but there was one time I went out with a guy and we had a nice dinner. About 45 minutes after the date ends, I’m pulling up to my house and he calls me and tells me his card got declined at the parking structure and he can’t get his car out. It was a totally understandable situation, but I lived crazy far away and it was the first or second date. I felt so awkward afterwards. Biggest misconception about LA? That people actually go to clubs. No one I know does that. What’s the coolest success of The Holy Nail? When I started The Holy Nail it was before nail art had hit its fever pitch. At that point I was just showing pictures to my friends. I was so happy to get the opportunity to get involved with Tipsy Zine, also seeing Madeline Poole’s shout out in The WAH Nails Book of Downtown Girls was pretty great too. She was and continues to be one of the major inspirations for The Holy Nail. Do you have any plans to expand your merch shop? My next endeavor is going to be cuticle oil. Not a lot of people know that I used to be really bad to my nails. My cuticles are always super dry from years of chronic over-nipping and biting, so I am always on the hunt for my next great cuticle

oil. When I did research, I’d see a lot of synthetics and it would bum me out. I’m planning on using a blend of highly moisturizing oils in conjunction with uplifting essential oils so that it’s nourishing for the body and mind. What is your art background? My first major in college was art and then I switched over to writing later on. I also worked in a gallery space during that time [where] I would run art show openings even though I would have to work until midnight on Saturdays. It was so worth it though. I’ve always made it a priority to have art be a part of my life in some way. My BA is in English literature, but even throughout my studies in college I focused on a lot of illustrated texts. I’m a very visual person, even in the way I write. What does your art represent? I’m a pretty anxious person, so both art and writing have given me a way to put some of those thoughts and feelings out there. I get very passionate about things. It’s the way I interact with the world. What I make represents neurosis and trying to be adorable 24/7. What keeps you inspired? Right now I’m looking into taking ceramics classes although I’m sure it’ll be hell on my nails. Being around creativity gives me strength. How do you set yourself apart? That’s never been hard for me. I’ve never really had to think about it. I’ve always been a weirdo. The hard part was being able to finally realize that was an asset. I still battle with it sometimes, but at the end of the day I’m grateful for it. What’s the best way to overcome a challenge? There’s nothing that works for everyone, but for me it’s about saying “no” to that part of yourself that’s preventing you from doing what you want. 

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Your winter goals consist of...? Baking cookies, sourcing my cuticle oil, traveling, and being extremely grateful for 2014. What do you want to be remembered for? I just want to be a voice in the discourse. Nail art is one of my passions. So is literary criticism. As long as there’s at least one person that’s into it, I’ll be happy.

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Gendel SAM

The Gentleman

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Filed under mystery by way of Ivanhoe, California, Sam Gendel, a 26-year-young poet, saxist, and current pianist for music duo inc., completes his first interview EVER over the phone, in this very special first issue.

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36 2 truths and a lie? I’ve solo sky dived, my greatest weakness is chocolate, and I hitchhiked by myself through Central Colombia. What’s the biggest misconception about California? That everyone is laid-back.

You told me that the sax is how you express yourself naturally, so how did you end up playing the keys for inc.? Those guys are my brothers first and foremost. We’re speaking the same language. We’re chanting the same mantra, that’s all. We’re saying the same thing over and over. They know how to deliver that to people and I’m honored that they would ask me to be a part of that.

What’s the biggest misconception about musicians? That they’re laid back! That they’re all lazy. People I know who aren’t musicians ask me if I sleep till noon everyday. You just caught me on a Sunday in America over here.

As far as what we do specifically with our instrument, and playing music, that’s just a role that I can fill. “Give Sam a keyboard and we’ll do whatever it takes to get this message out,” and so I said I’m up for it. Give me the keys, and let’s take this show on the road. It’s a privilege to make music with them and to share this experience.

I’m sorry. I totally forgot it’s Father’s Day. No, it’s perfect. I gave him a call this morning, so yeah, I took care of that. Sunday’s my favorite day of the week. It’s when I’m most buoyant.

My thing with the saxophone, that’s just like breathing. I’m convinced I did that in a previous life or something because I always knew I was going to play it, and it always made sense to me. I can’t even think of my life without it, prior. It seems like I have always played it, even though I didn’t.

Sunday is not my favorite. This should all be in the interview by the way. I think it should be no filter. Everything! Even when I say like and um. I gotta keep it clean! I have full faith in you Isis! What’s the story behind Sam? [Laughs.] I gotta sum it up. It’s a mystery, even to Sam I think. The story of Sam is this kid running through the orchids who one day picked up a horn and never looked back. That’s about it right there. That’s the truth really. Where is your favorite place to escape? I don’t escape, that’s the thing. I like to confront. That’s where I confront life. People may misinterrupt things I do as an escape- going off to the desert, or wrapping my head up in a bunch of words and music, but that’s confrontation in my eyes. And people can say what they’d like, but I know that’s what that is.

When did you start? I was 11-years-old. That’s a long time! [Laughs.] It is a long time. I’ve been playing it longer than I haven’t. I guess it makes sense why I would feel that way. In the end, it’s just a tool and a way I express. I feel close to it. I hope to do something with it. It’s hard right now because there isn’t a context for it in the culture. You’re either a comedy act on YouTube playing the thing in some jokey way, or you’re a part of the other thing, which is this insular world of modern Jazz which doesn’t relate to the culture in any way. It just feeds off of its own ego. I’m not really keen on being a part of either of those, so I’m trying to walk more of a middle road and cut through the middle of that thing and figure out a way to express in a way free from all

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that. That’s what I’m working on. One day, I’ll get there.

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How do you express yourself in other ways? I write poetry. I have to do that. I don’t know what I would do if I didn’t do that. I would probably be mouthing off in all the wrong places and getting myself into trouble, so I filter it into that. Poetry, that’s just music still. It’s all rhythm, melody, harmony and vibrations. It’s natural. What do you mean by getting yourself into trouble? I speak my mind. I’m not politically correct. But the art is what allows us to express those things in a way that’s digestible. So without that I would just be another crazy guy on the corner with a megaphone, and that has its place too. I’m just more interested in the refined approach. What do you want to be remember for? The same thing that I always wish. That I’m remembered as a good son, a good brother, a good friend, and a good lover. I didn’t intend for that to rhyme.

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I “I live in a dream for a moment,” croons singer-songwriter Lili K, the lovechild of Andre 3000 and Lena Horne, who will at times, pretend that her voice is a sylphlike trumpet. Her vocals are the first thing heard on Chance The Rapper’s Acid Rap “Good Ass Intro”, and even more recently, she has made her debut on MTV Jams for her feature on the Innanetape mixtape by Vic Mensa.  “I knew [music] would always be a focal point in my life but once people started to react to my voice, that’s when I realized that I could actually make a living out of it,” says the Lili K who started recording when she was 15-years-old. The Milwaukee born, Chicago based songbird makes the jittery vibes of 20th century Jazz digestible for new millennials using a spirited concoction of Hip-Hop & Soul. lilikmusic.com


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46 Most known for? Doin the sangin’. Unknown for? Being a detective. A pretend detective. 2 truths and a lie? The “heel toe” is my favorite dance, I’m a black belt in Tae-kwon-do, and I love the snow. First crush? This boy Terrell I was in first grade with. We used to always race, and he let me win sometimes ‘cause he liked me too. Then I moved and never saw him again. What if he’s my long lost love? What’s the one thing you would never do? Intentionally hurt those that I love. I put a special few higher than my own life. What’s the secret to becoming Twitter official? No idea. I was at SXSW hanging out with my friends in Mayer Hawthorne’s band, and I got an email saying I was verified. [Laughs.] It was a pretty good day. Pros and cons of social networking? You can connect with so many people and make those connections personal. [However] social networking takes us away from real life sometimes. It takes away. Favorite place to escape?  The studio. Recording is a peaceful solitude and I feel so much better after I record. What is your art background? I went to an arts middle school and an arts high school. I’m trained in Jazz, classical, and opera voice, as well as music theory.

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This year you’ve made features on Acid Rap by Chance The Rapper and Innanetape by Vic Mensa. How did you end up working together? Chance called me one night really last minute to come sing on “Hey Ma” for his first project 10Day. We stayed in touch and he asked me to do some work on Acid Rap songs “Good Ass Intro” and “Pusha Man” as well. I met Vic through working with Chance, and we had talked about working together for awhile. He contacted me when he had the perfect song, and it happened to by “Hollywood LA” for Innanetape. Would you ever make a rap mixtape?! The genre can be called Drazz, defined by the combination of jazz singing and rapping like Drake.  Nah! Maybe I’ll do some fast singing... but I’m a singer.

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What has been the most humbling experience in your career? I was at Raheem Devaughn’s Chicago show. I was hanging out with him and the band backstage, and before his set, his manager out of nowhere calls me up to sing. The audience didn’t want to see anyone but Raheem and actually boo’d before they even knew it was me coming on stage. I picked the absolute wrong song to sing and they weren’t feeling me, and that was the first time that had ever happened to me. It was extremely humbling and reminded me that I have so much growth to do. Who’s your right-hand producer?  That Rabbit Peter Cottontale. Which of your own songs makes you cry? “Highlight the Moon” and “Never Ever” because of the situation I wrote them about.

What are the biggest challenges to overcome in Chicago? For me, it’s getting taken seriously as a soul artist. Chicago is a Hip-Hop city right now. It’s really easy to get looked over if you’re not a rapper. Which artists would be a dream come true to work with? Stevie Wonder, Robert Glasper, D’Angelo, Musiq Soulchild, Andre 3000 and so many more. How do you set yourself apart? I don’t try to chase a trend or be something I’m not. I’m just myself, which isn’t quite the norm. What is your definition of success? Being happy and living off of doing what I love. My goal is to live a comfortable life and travel the world because of my music. What advice do you have for upcoming artists? Make the music you want to make. Don’t chase a wave. Meet people and build relationships with them. Stay humble. Be kind, and work your ass off.  What keeps you inspired? I just love to sing. I get no greater joy. I’m constantly singing, and people telling me that it brings them that same joy it brings me is amazing. I’ve had fans tell me my music has gotten them through a break-up or a bad day, and that’s awesome.  What’s the latest project we can anticipate this coming season? I’m working on my first full length album. I’m not sure when it will be done, and I don’t have a name for it yet, but I can tell you it’s the music I’ve been wanting to make, and it’s going to be my best project yet.

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Harajuku Hollywood


07 Britney Tokyo, by way of Japan, can easily be described as one of the most creative-kawaii babes to watch rising from LA. Admired for her picture perfect manicures and service with Vanity Projects pop-up salon at MoMA PS1, the effulgent bicoastal 23-year-old nail artist presents her work and play. Boyfriend and Barbies included.

britneytokyo.com

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54 Favorite place to shop? Clumsy Cat, Joyrich, and Wild Style. What is your art background? My grandfather was a painter and I think it’s inside of my DNA somehow. I grew up painting nails, and I was always interested in nail art. How did you end up being part of Vanity Projects? Rita Pinto, the curator of Vanity Projects, reached out to me through Brass, the documentarian behind Nailgasm. We were both featured [in the film] and she invited me to come to MoMA PS1 to do nails during her residency pop-up. Since then, we have been working together both commercially and at her upscale salon where people will watch video art while getting their nails done.

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What is your most popular design? I love Barbie, My Little Pony, and hand painted designs mixing materials. Nail stickers and gems are also a big part of my signature style. What inspires you as a woman? I think fashion is what empowers me the most. What does it take to be successful in this world? Being positive, having good energy, and being honest and reliable makes you a successful person. Good karma goes a long way! What do you want to be remembered for this year? For being a bad ass nail artist and a crazy Japanese girl with an insane fashion sense.


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Only on Camera

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Tucked away somewhere in Chicago, 21 year-old director of photography Brian Beckwith, by way of Poughkeepsie, New York, creates cinematic depictions of rappers and their vixens.

*See: Beckwith’s most popular soft-core soaked music video for “Go To The Mo” by singer/songwriter, Jeremih.

When Beckwith is not working in the presence of beautiful models or around the routines of boastful entertainers, you can probably catch him biking, skating, or CTA-ing throughout the city. That is at least until he makes his permanent move to LA.

brian-beckwith.com

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How do you make the most of Chicago? By riding every CTA line, looking at the environment as if I don’t live here. What’s overrated about the city? Its Deep Dish What’s overrated about LA? The thought that they have everything there. Mountains, beaches, downtown. They’re all far away from each other. What’s underrated about being an artist? The “starving artist” phrase but if you’re passionate and good at what you do, you can make a living off of it.

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What’s your background as an artist? I started making videos when I was [around] 13 years old with a Tony Hawk Helmet Cam. I went from making stupid videos with my friends to parody music videos, skate videos, youth media shows, then studying at Columbia College Chicago. Pros of digital culture? Having access to the Internet, higher production value of videos with a lower budget, free music, and social network creepin’. Cons? Everyone and their extended family is a photographer, videographer, director, music producer, artist, writer, editor, graphic designer, and a DJ!

R What is your definition of success? Making a decent living doing something you enjoy, while getting major recognition and respect for the most part. Craziest thing you’ve captured? Naked females! Not like that though. What keeps you inspired? New music, photos on Tumblr, traveling in general, and meeting and reading about successful people who do what I want to do.

A What do you want to be remembered for in the future? My cinematography, making awesome music videos, and treating everyone like a human being.

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Logan Jean

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A Boy Made in Brooklyn

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Made of gift and grind, say hello to Brooklyn native, Logan Christopher Jean, the 24-year-old editor of Jungle Gym Magazine (an online media platform shared with his homies Alonzo Balias & Ruben Dario), and manager of up-and-coming producer, $1 Bin. rawdizzy.tumblr.com

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76 2 truths and a lie? I won two bronze medals running track, I played basketball in middle school, and I could’ve played for the Pistons. Biggest misconception about New Yorkers? The biggest misconception about us is that we’re all assholes, which is true in some cases, not all. I love New York. Craziest hookup? I went on a date with a girl and we stopped in Au Bon Pain. Inside I saw this girl I had an E-Crush on. It was like one of those love at first sight cheesy moments. She was so beautiful. When my date who was kinda hot, but not as hot as my E-Crush, went to the bathroom, I just had to make my move before she came out. Long story short, when you see something you want go for it. Best way to get a girl? The best way is to make her laugh. Who doesn’t like to laugh? How do you set yourself apart from other tastemakers? By not paying attention to other tastemakers. I just try to focus on being the best “me” I can be. Aside from writing, what else do you do? I help manage a young producer/DJ out of Harlem by the name of $1 Bin (Dollar Bin). When it comes to production and composing there’s nothing he can’t do. He’s like Michael Jordan with an MPC. www.soundcloud.com/dollarbin

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What keeps you inspired? Great people like my Dad. He’s 51-yearsold but still gets up earlier than me, takes care of a foster child, works seven days a week, maintains good health, a good relationship with his family, he a supporter, provider, and a contractor that can build and fix anything. There’s not a person in my neighborhood who doesn’t know my dad or can say anything bad about him. He’s great! What do you want to be remembered for? This year I wanna be remembered for pumping out hits with $1 Bin. I also wanna be remembered for helping uplift music culture and my community.

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Ospina Jacobo

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Flithy in Florida

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Photographer Jacobo Ospina, an underage fowl-mouthed-curly-haired-creeper by way of Florida, says he’s known for taking shitty pictures of his shitty friends doing shitty things. Based on his photo diary, lets totally disagree.

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What’s the best way to capture a photo? Shit faced with your friends while they’re doing embarrassing shit. What are you looking to bring out when taking a picture? Depends on what I’m shooting. Sometimes I want good vibes, sometimes I want bad vibes. How do you set yourself apart? By being a self-absorbed hipster prick. Pros and cons of digital culture? Pro, being able to watch porn on my phone no matter where I am. 2 truths and a lie? Connor McElwain gets bitches, I have a green birthmark on my shoulder, and I have high standards.

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What are some signs that a guy’s about to get the panties? When she bails out on her friends to watch Pulp Fiction with you on your couch.

Con: sometimes girls look fuck-able on Instagram, but in person they’re not. What keeps you inspired? The people I love and the people I hate. What do you want to be remembered for? Being a whiny bitch.

Signs that he’s not? When she tells you that you that you’re her best friend. Favorite place to escape? Imaginationland/P(a)yne Skatepark. What is your art background? My uncle was a photographer and I did some tight ass finger paintings in preschool. When did you start photography? Around a year ago. Who are some people you’ve shot? I’ve shot for Set and Smvsh Apparel. I’m shooting for Observed Lords pretty soon. The people I shoot the most are my little brother Connor and my friend Nena.

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Kelly Mad Jelly

Josh

Just six months after the debut of Josh Kelly’s “The Wake Up Call”, a documentary applauding the notability of four men from his second home in Cincinnati (Floyd Johnson—Ohio Against The World, DJ Clockwork—Most Dope, Matt Tomamichel—Corporate, & music producer, Air Kalo) the 22-year-old director, and Windy City native, has made plans to return with a short film this winter.

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2 truths and a lie? I am 6 foot, my middle name is Delaney, and my dad invented Glad sandwich bags. Biggest turn off? Chapped lips and ugly teeth. Biggest turn on?  Confidence. Biggest misconception about Cincinnati? That there is no culture here. That we are all broke. That there is nothing to do. That everyone hates on one others goals, and the biggest, that there is no opportunity here.

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What is your art background? I started producing music at 14-years-old. I used to make soul beats using Limewire. Around the same age I started experimenting with a digital camera. I would do photo slideshow videos of different skaters. After that I took a jewelry making class in high school and that was super cool. I learned how to wield and manipulate metal and wood. Looking back, I wish I would have tried harder at that. I could have made so much more dope shit. When I started community college that same half ass attitude continued and I wasn’t passionate about it. Once I got my first DSLR in 2009 that’s when things really started to shape. I ended up leaving school in 2011 to pursue freelance directing in Atlanta, but it didn’t work out. When I came back to Cincinnati, I knew I had to go even harder. I finished school, scored a video job and spent nine months on my documentary The Wake Up Call all at the same time.

What challenges did you face when filming your documentary? Well the person who was supposed to help me with the whole thing bailed on me. I was in school trying to finish strong and graduate while shooting at the same time. Secondly, just working around other peoples schedules. There were days I was drive around to meet people and they would be busy or I would have to text people a million times to get things accomplished. The biggest challenge was getting a venue and my vision out correctly with basically no budget, but that’s were God came in. How do you set yourself apart? By continuing to focus on myself. Making choices based on what I think is a good idea, rather than a trend at the time.Don’t get me wrong I study my competition, but I try to be innovative. What are you looking to bring out when taking a picture? Depends on what I’m shooting. Sometimes I want good vibes, sometimes I want bad vibes. Pros and cons of digital culture? Pros being that technology makes things easier and faster. Cons. People have become addicted to technology, like a drug. What keeps you inspired? The people I love and the people I hate. What do you want to be remembered for this year? Helping the culture grow in Cincinnati and being known for constantly working. @K0SH_

My documentary premiered at at a local theater here and I had about 250 people come out. I was so happy when people came up to me and said they were inspired. That was my goal. I gave it as a present to the city.

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Broads Shannon

Move over bitches. This year’s forecast is looking cheeky with a high chance of Broads, a women’s streetwear line run and made by no holds barred 21-yearold Right Coast native, Shannon Yazurlo. Don’t believe it? Just watch!

Top 3 designers? James Jebbia, Marc Jacobs and Rene Lacoste. Worst pickup line? All of them.

TheBroadsLife.com

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N Least favorite trend? All of them! I’m not one to follow the trends. I will say that I’m not really feeling the “seapunk” look or the current all over digital printing craze. Basically anything that looks like your trying too hard. The best statement is no statement! What is your art background? D-I-Y till I die! What does Broads represent? The revival of the All American Girl, next door. When did you know you were meant to be a designer? Honestly, I think everyone around me in my family knew way before me. My first memory would have to be something that happened in pre-school. We were informed that we would be finger painting and to wear old clothes. Apparently

I scoffed at the teacher and responded with, “I don’t own any old clothes.” So there you have it! What inspires you as a woman? Lipstick, expensive champagne, and super adorable cocktail dresses! What does it take to be successful in this world? Tenacity. What do you want to be remembered for? This is tricky! I guess for the releases that I’ve done and the ones I have coming up. Overall I’d like to say for creating an exclusive one of a kind timeless brand without any sort of funding or proper education. Like Walt Disney once said, “If you can dream it, you can do it!” I think that is the kind of mentality I have when it comes to making my dreams a reality.

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Stewart Lane


Time for Some Action We love a great discovery. Behold the world of Lane Stewart. Plucked from his native New Mexico, the LA-based director is on the rise, and he’s taking his art friends with him. Whether shooting with rapper, Glasspopcorn, singer-songwriter, Natalia Kills, or tropic-bass duo, B.C. Kingdom, Stewart’s discipled nature compels him to multitask music videos, photography, and his latest feat, movies.

lane-stewart.com

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98 Unknown for? Screenwriting. I’m planning on making a few movies soon. I am also sometimes a photographer and designer. Movies take a long time to make and sometimes I need a quicker creative payoff. Favorite place to escape?  Outside of LA, I like to go to Texas. My family has a little house in the woods where I can really disappear. My first instinct was to say a movie theater, but I think the real answer is the Internet. I can go anywhere on the Internet. When did you start directing? I used to make movies on this Gameboy camera I had as a kid. I spent a lot of time indoors. I never had the resources to really capture what I had in my head though. Who are some of the artists you have filmed? I feel lucky that I have been able to meet and work with a lot of talented people. I have an ongoing creative collaboration with, B.C., who are some of my best friends. I also recently directed a video for my friend ,Glasspopcorn, which I’m really proud of. I love doing music videos, but I’m exploring other formats soon.

trated because I’m trying to manifest it. When it’s over and I have a break, I like to be happy doing nothing. Happiness is success. Is it ever hard to live in the moment as you’re capturing it? That’s a really tough question. Maybe I don’t understand what living in the moment means. I feel like when it comes to my work, no matter what, I am always capturing to preserve a moment. I will always have access to that moment, and that’s very comforting to me. What keeps you inspired? Any idea that passes through my mind I try to write down. Even if it’s something I could never actually do. I think the more respect you show to every idea, the easier they come. Having really supportive and creative friends helps. They push me to do the best I can. There’s a comfortable pressure there that I like. We like to impress each other. I get a lot of ideas walking, driving, and in the shower.

How do you set yourself apart? I’ve thought about that before, but I’ve realized that I can’t. There’s no way to control it. The only way to really set myself apart is to stay true to what I like and what I want to do.

Who are some of your favorite directors? I want to shoutout some very underrated people: Nicolas Roeg, Lynne Ramsay, Rainer Werner Fassbinder and Sophie Muller to name a few. When it comes to inspiration, I try to be more inspired by people in different areas though. Michael Jackson, Janet Jackson, Carine Roitfeld, Barack Obama, Malcolm McLaren, Stephen Sprouse, Ruff Ryders, Marina Abramovic, and Richard Branson.

What is your definition of success? My definition of success is just being happy. I’m doing what I love and that’s what makes me happy. I mean, when I’m starting a project I’m obviously frus-

What do you want to be remembered for? I just want to create memorable images and hopefully some of that will make a difference in somebody’s life.

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Mcghee N

A Boy and His Joy

nate

Pittsburgh native Nate Mcghee has got a promising leap-first-look-later way of doing things, like when he moved to Chicago four years ago to quickly earn his place as guitarist for R&B band Harmonious Dynasty.

Today, the upcoming 23-year-old beat maker and audio engineer is fully focused on the production of his first hybrid collaborative album scheduled to debut next year. natemcghee.com

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104 2 truths and a lie? I’ve milked a cow by hand, I was once lost in the middle of Europe alone with no money, map, phone or means of transportation, and I was arrested for riding my bike on the sidewalk over the age of 13 in Chicago. Best way to a girl’s heart? Slang her that Good D [Laughs.] Sike naw! Starbucks, cheesecake and flowers maybe? Not particularly all in that order, but if I were to roll up on a girl in the street with flowers and offer to take her to go get some Starbucks or cheesecake, she’d be with it. Top 3 MC’s? I’ll have to go with Big L at number one for that list, Eminem at number two and the boy Biggie at number three. Now, if you ask me my top three rappers, thats a completely different lineup. What some people sadly fail to realize is that there’s a vast difference between an MC and a rapper. Biggest misconception(s) about  musicians? The money and the groupies. Unless you’re like unreal blazing whatever instrument you play, heavily connected, or on tour with a major label artist, sometimes it’s really hard to get good paying gigs until you build up your network and net worth. With that being said, a lot of extremely talented musicians that I know still sometimes end up struggling financially and living gig to gig. On top of that, people don’t like to respect what you do as not only your craft and art form, but most importantly an avenue to gain revenue and provide for yourself. I’ve heard every excuse in the book about why they may not have your money in full once you get finished with a gig. Now the groupies… I will say that it’s a lot easier to notice the difference in thirst level when you jump off stage at a big name venue versus your local hole in the wall bar on the corner. [Well] with

the exception of this one time my band and I rocked Al’s Bar in Lexington, Kentucky. That joint was off the chain! I get down with the Lex. They showed unreal love, but that’s another story for another interview. Biggest misconception(s) about white guys? That we don’t have rhythm or soul. That we can’t run fast or jump high. That we are always warm and can withstand the harsh winter days by wearing our open toe thong sandals and gym shorts all year round. The one that kills me the most is that when white people get caught in the rain, we smell like wet dogs. Biggest misconception(s) about Pittsburgh? It might be all the hype with the recent success of Wiz Khalifa and Mac Miller to make the city sound poppin’, [but] there’s not much of an arts scene. If you’re able to make it out of the Burgh, you start to realize that there more to life than Allegheny County. I love my city. It’s filled with a bunch of hard ass working Steelers fans who drink a lot of beer, and I wouldn’t change being born and raised there for anything, but there’s hardly anything to do for entertainment.

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with pencils, imitating hi-hats and snare drums, depending on how you beat the pencil. Freestyles and desk beats came before any assignments given by teachers in class. When did you start producing? Well when I was 15-years-old I copped an MPC 1000 and started making music, but I would say that I’ve only been producing on a more serious note for like three years. My music represents the different phases and events in my life that made me feel some type of way. It’s me expressing my emotions. How do you set yourself apart from different artists? I try to stay in my own lane and develop my own sound.

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Favorite place to escape? If I’m in Chicago, I like going down by the lake to reflect. If I’m in the Burgh, then it would be my grandmothers house. Unfortunately she fell victim to cancer and recently passed away, but that has been my number one escape spot ever since I could remember. I spent all my time with her when I was a little kid. We would go to McDonald’s and fire down on the hot cake breakfast meal, and load up on napkins and the little takeout ketchup and jelly packets to take back to the crib so we didn’t have to worry about buying any of that stuff when crunch time came. My other get away spot is up on Mt. Washington. If you’re ever in the Burgh you gotta ride up to Mt. Washington and chill on the look out deck. You’re literally above the entire city.

What are you up to when your not making music? I like to ride my bike, hang out and enjoy the presence of my friends, family and peers, live moment by moment and see what adventures it takes me on. What keeps you inspired? Mostly the fear of failure, also the success of my friends and peers involved in the same things as myself. When I see someone that I came up with killing the game, it makes me put myself in check and step it up a notch.

What’s some shit you would never do? Drink water from out the toilet.

How do you make the most out of Chicago? I try to take it for what it’s worth. It’s a huge city with tons of stuff going on so I try to discover as much cool stuff to do while I have the chance.

What is your art background? Fifth period drawing class in 12th grade, and the graffiti that I was arrested for doing when I was in 7th grade. [Laughs.] It was on a huge wall of a recreational center pavilion the day before someone was supposed to have their wedding reception there. [Also] making beats

What do you want to be remembered for this year? I’m currently in the process of producing my own album. I want my shit to be timeless and to carry on when I’m 50-years-old. I also want to be remembered for having a positive attitude and being an influence to others.

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Niiina msnina-art.tumblr.com

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PNG Princess

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By way of Montril, 22-year-old Msniiia, known IRL as Jorgelina Andrea, calls creativity her religion. Her practice of choice? Software-sass: a decorative digital reassembling of western icons in true generation-wifi fashion.

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110 3 things we didn’t know? I was born in Argentina, I love cats, and I am a little bit shy. Favorite place to escape?  On the Internet. Celebrity crush? One of the most influential artists, Andy Warhol. What’s the best thing about living in Spain? The food and the weather. When did you start to make digital art? I started a little over a year ago making gifs on Tumblr, but I’ve always liked art even when I didn’t know what it meant. Being able to express my ideas and emotions is my disciplined vent. I make

collages, illustrations, and gifs. I am also starting to do videos and photography, which I am currently studying. In most of my collages I use famous characters like Marilyn Monroe, Bettie Page, Jayne Mansfield, Kate Moss, Amy Winehouse, and Tupac Shakur. How did you and trill lolita Itzel Xoco start to collaborate? I met her online and I invited her to come to Spain. I learned a lot from her. She is very creative and a great artist. What does your art represent? It represents everything that has influenced me and my experiments and efforts to try something new. Have you been to the USA? I’ve never been yet, but I would like to someday!

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I don’t send fortune ass cookie texts. 02) nipples are the new black. 03) he will swear he doesn’t eat pussy. he lied. 04) cheap chicwatch a foreign flick, have some foreign dinner, make some foreign friends, listen to some foreign music, learn some foreign lyrics. 05) don’t confuse likes for love. 

INTELLECT

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four years of fucking constitutes a relationship- or some confusing version of it. 07) all dick ain’t good dick! 08) home is where the heart is, so keep it drama free. 09) talk is still cheap, so make sure you know your worth. 10) embrace all hours of beauty sleep. 06)

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Lili K | Ayla Brass Montgomery | Rumpshaker | Britney Tokyo | Sam Gendel | The Holy Nail | Brian Beckwith Special thanks to Mom, Helen Koh, Man, Hydea, Duke, Avia Paul, Heliz Mazouri, Alysha Laurene, Kim Bui, Rhonda Willingham, Cameron Derby, Sasha Krementsky, Leslie Fuentes, Hey Nice Nails, Logan Jean, Natalie Nezeruk, This Is Venice, Bianca Polnett, Sam Gendel, inc., Lili K, Ayla Montgomery, Broads, Josh Kelly, Lane Stewart, Britney Tokyo, Nate Mcghee, Jacobo, Joregeline Torres, Brian Beckwith, messkid, Darnell Williams, Fundamental, Albert, Krishtine de Leon, and Lushy Lurkdat, for making the INspired issue possible!


The Isis Nicole Magazine #1