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, t s a p e h t y b d Inspire t n e s e r p e h t n i living p. 26

INSIDE

health

The Healing Power of Music P. 10

FOOD

Lettuce Wraps from Scratch P. 42

family

Anytime Can Be Storytime P. 46 SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER


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Inside

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ON THE COVER: Matt Vielle Photo/Hamilton Studio

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PG. 8

SEASON OF THE SQUASH • STRIPLAND LEVI HUTTON’S DREAM

Home

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THE MAGIC OF MUSIC • CHRONIC PAIN CARE GET SOME ZZZs • GARLICKY GOODNESS

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Avista is offering a rate discount program for electric and natural gas customers in Washington. To be eligible, customers must be senior citizens age 60+ or individuals living with a disability. The program is administered by SNAP for our customers residing in Spokane County. To find out if you’re income-eligible and learn more about the program, please contact SNAP at (509) 319-3020, email ratesdiscount@snapwa.org, or visit www.snapwa.org.

OCTOBER - NOVEMBER 2019

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FROM THE EDITOR SPOKANE • EASTERN WASHINGTON • NORTH IDAHO also at inlander.com/health&home

Stay Connected Email Health & Home Editor Anne McGregor at annem@inlander.com. The conversation continues on the Inlander Facebook page, and stay in touch with us at Inlander.com/Health&Home.

1227 W. Summit Parkway, Spokane, Wash. 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634

EDITOR Anne McGregor

annem@inlander.com

MANAGING EDITOR Jacob H. Fries ART DIRECTOR Ali Blackwood

Encouraging Notes BY ANNE McGREGOR

W

ant a fun way to live longer? Every couple of weeks, go to a concert. Or a dance. Or, really, anything where people experience music together. A 2018 Australian study of more than 1,000 respondents showed that attending any sort of music-focused event — from a dance to a concert of any size — increased life satisfaction, a result that could add up to nine years to life expectancy. The effect seems to be related to the communal experience, since listening to music alone didn’t have the same benefit. That doesn’t mean solitary musical experiences don’t confer their own benefits, however. Just 15 minutes of listening to music you like leads to increases in dopamine and serotonin levels, promoting feelings of happiness and excitement. Music during exercise helps improve performance and decrease the sense of exertion. You get the idea. Music offers measurable pleasures and health benefits, and listening to it is all gain, no pain. Go ahead, indulge. There’s another side to using music to benefit health, however. Music therapists are highly trained practitioners who use research-based insights about the brain’s response to music to address complex medical issues. I’ll bet you’ll know someone who could benefit from this side-effect-free treatment that Josh Kelety explores in “The Magic of Music” on page 10. Cheers!

EVENTS EDITOR Chey Scott CONTRIBUTORS Stacey Aggarwal, LeAnn Bjerken, Jonathan Hill, Jacob Jones, Josh Kelety, Young Kwak, Robert Maurer, Carson McGregor, Dan Nailen, Carrie Scozzaro, Matthew Singer, Matt Thompson, Matt Vielle, John R. White, Samantha Wohlfeil DESIGN & PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Wayne Hunt ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Kristi Gotzian MARKETING DIRECTOR Kristina Smith ADVERTISING SALES Autumn Adrian, Mary Bookey, Jeanne Inman, Rich McMahon, Claire Price, Carolyn Padgham-Walker, Wanda Tashoff, Emily Walden SALES AND MARKETING SUPPORT Camille Awbrey, Sydney Angove, Houston Tilley DESIGN AND PRODUCTION Derrick King, Tom Stover, Rachael Skipper

CONTRIBUTORS

DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Frank DeCaro BUSINESS MANAGER Dee Ann Cook CREDIT MANAGER Kristin Wagner PUBLISHER Ted S. McGregor Jr. GENERAL MANAGER Jeremy McGregor

CARSON McGREGOR graduated from Ferris High School in 2019 and is now a student at the University of Washington. As an Inlander intern last summer, he wrote event postings, reviewed game apps, and did on-the-street interviews. For this issue, he wrote about Space Ambassador Joe Bruce, and thoroughly enjoyed his visit to “Joe’s Museum.” Look for a slideshow of additional photos from the museum at inlander.com.

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JOSH KELETY covers criminal justice and Spokane County government for the Inlander. In his free time, he can usually be found at a coffee shop or at home with a book or the latest issue of The New Yorker. After reporting this story, he’s amazed at the variety of evidence-based applications of music therapy for neurological and behavioral health conditions. He hopes to see music therapy applied locally for marginalized populations, such as for homeless youth or inmates.

Health & Home is published every other month and is available free at more than 500 locations across the Inland Northwest. One copy free per reader. Subscriptions are available at $2.50 per issue: call x213. Reaching Us: Editorial: x261; Circulation: x226; Advertising: x215. COPYRIGHT All contents copyrighted © Inland Publications, Inc. 2019. Health & Home is locally owned and has been published since 2004.

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Season of the Squash BY CHEY SCOTT The Great Pumpkin Race

This annual event supporting Meals on Wheels Spokane celebrates the peak of the fall season in the Inland Northwest. Teams are invited to enter their decorated pumpkin creations for a special downhill race held during the event, which also features a vendor fair, live music and a 1K or 5K costumed walk/run through the scenic fall setting of Greenwood Memorial Terrace. Sat, Oct. 26 from 8 am-2 pm. $5-$25. All ages. Greenwood Memorial Terrace, 211 N. Government Way. mowspokane.org (232-0864) Lunch & Learn with WSU Spokane The Spokane Public Library, in partnership with Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine and De Leon Foods, presents this ongoing lecture series delivered by students of WSU’s Nutrition and Exercise Physiology Department. Topics cover all aspects of nutrition and exercise, and how they relate to your health and daily life. Lunches (first come, first served) are provided by De Leon Taco and Bar. Offered Oct. 24, Oct. 31, Nov. 7 and Nov. 21 from noon-1 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. spokanelibrary.org (444-5390) What Your Home Says About the World The MAC hosts sociologist and writer Michelle Janning, who shares how home spaces and objects tell the story of what’s happening in contemporary families. From stuffed animals to smartphones to love letters, the objects in our homes represent what’s going on in the stages of family life. Featuring real stories that bring her research to life, this talk highlights what we need to know about today’s changing family roles and relationships and how objects have their own cultural biographies. Sun, Oct. 12 at 2 pm. Free. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) Epicurean Delight This annual fundraiser is one of the region’s favorites, as it brings together 30 restaurants and 30 purveyors of wine, spirits, beer and cider to support the work of Vitalint (formerly the Inland Northwest Blood Center). Guests of the formal event enjoy unlimited gourmet food and drink, creatively prepared and artfully presented by local culinary teams. Participating restaurants and beverage purveyors also compete for top honors for their dishes or products, as voted on by guests and invited judges. Fri, Nov. 8 from 6-11:30 pm. $200/person; $425/two; group packages available. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. epicureandelight.org

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100 YEARS LATER

Levi Hutton’s Dream

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he Hutton Settlement is celebrating its centennial by showcasing its history, in dramatic fashion. Playwright and director Tim Rarick’s A PLACE TO CALL HOME chronicles Levi Hutton’s efforts to build a home for needy children in the Spokane Valley. Levi, who was raised in foster homes, and his wife May, became rich after striking silver in North Idaho, and after moving to Spokane from Levi’s savvy way with investments. The play, which opens with the reading of May Hutton’s eulogy and ends with the founding of the Settlement, is a testament to Levi’s decision after her death “to take a chance and make his dream a reality,” says Jessie Laughery, the Hutton Settlement’s director of community relations and communications. “It really captures the essence of what so many people may not understand about Hutton, the deeper meaning of it being more than a house or an orphanage, but a place to call home.” Produced entirely by volunteers, with help from production sponsor STCU, the “full-blown” play runs about two hours and features local actors, including four current residents of the Hutton Settlement. Thirty-two kids currently call the Settlement home, and an additional 15 are “transitional alumni” taking their first steps into adulthood through college or jobs, says Laughery. “That’s been a real intentional shift, knowing that family doesn’t end at 18, it doesn’t end at 24. We have tried to foster that forever family. If you ever called Hutton your home and you are in need of something, there are open doors here for you.” Something that would surely be a dream come true for Levi Hutton. — ANNE McGREGOR A Place to Call Home runs Oct. 25-Nov. 3: Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 pm; Sundays at 2 pm. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N Howard, Spokane. $25. spokanecivictheater.com

From rags to riches to giving back: Levi Hutton’s story comes to life at the Civic Theatre.

NOVEL APPROACH

Both Sides of the Road

A

uthor Joan Burbick’s new novel STRIPLAND is based on the real-life shooting of a Nez Perce man by an Idaho state trooper back in 2009, but if you’re expecting a straightforward, “true crime”-style narrative, you’ll be left wanting. Instead, Burbick delivers an incredibly creative, thought-provoking approach to her first work of fiction, and readers are rewarded for going along for the ride. Burbick’s writing skills are no surprise, given her 30-plus years teaching in the English department of Washington State University. She’s the author of some noteworthy nonfiction, and her research in interviewing people throughout the West for Rodeo Queens and the American Dream and Gun Show Nation: Gun Culture and American Democracy informed how she developed the characters in Stripland. She tells her story through the perspectives of four main characters — a homeless man, lawyer, photographer and “internet trickster” — each of whom has a different relationship to the killing. Some are struggling to understand what happened, others are trying to exploit the situation for their own gain, or to get revenge for the injustice they see. Their lives intertwine along the same patch of Lewiston, Idaho, asphalt running between a McDonald’s and a pawn shop, but I won’t spoil how they come together. Suffice to say, Burbick skillfully juggles the four characters’ narratives in a way that resets the reader’s expectations with the start of each section. And Stripland is good enough that you’ll enjoy following Burbick’s prose down each new path. — DAN NAILEN

OCTOBER - NOVEMBER 2019

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ALI BLACKWOOD ILLUSTRATION

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Using music therapy to stimulate the brain can help address conditions ranging from PTSD to Parkinson’s BY JOSH KELETY

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hile there’s little doubt virtually everyone finds enjoyment in some type of music, music therapists want you to know that their field is much more complex. Simply playing music for an audience is not music therapy. Music therapy isn’t about achieving musical goals, and the Music and Memory program, where custom playlists are curated for elderly people with Alzheimer’s and played for them on headset, is definitely not music therapy, they say. “Music therapy isn’t just listening to music. It’s not just someone playing a guitar by someone’s bedside where you’re passive — it’s engagement,” says Carla Carnegie, a certified music therapist and founder of Willow Song Music Therapy Services in Otis Orchards. “We’re not just flying by the seat of our pants and doing whatever. The things that we offer are because it’s been researched and there’s evidence there.” While the earliest references to the therapeutic value of music in the U.S. date back to the late 18th century, the development of music therapy as a serious clinical profession kicked off in the 1940s, when the first academic programs in the field were founded. The applications are highly varied. Songwriting can provide an outlet for expression for traumatized youth, singing can be used to help people with Parkinson’s improve their speech, and drumming can help veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder regulate their emotions. Individual therapy models are highly customized and evolving, and often take place in tandem with other therapies that patients are pursuing. “Music is a medium to help reach a therapeutic goal,” says Carlene Brown, director of the music therapy

program at Seattle Pacific University. “While it may look entertaining and be entertaining, we are always based on clinical goals.” But the goals are wide-ranging: “All the areas where you see nurses work, music therapists do work also,” Carnegie says.

TreatinG Movement

Parkinson’s disease affects motor skills, including walking and coordination. “Everything becomes small for a person with Parkinson’s. Everything becomes stiff in their gait and stride,” Carnegie says. “There’s not a fluidity to it, and it’s because of the progression of their disease.” Music therapy can address many of the issues facing people with Parkinson’s. It turns out that the parts of the brain that regulate movement are closely tied to those that perceive rhythm. Musical rhythm training can help improve walking abilities — including step length and speed — as well as limb coordination and balance, according to a 2015 article published in Frontiers in Neurology. Music and rhythm also increase production of dopamine, which tap into the brain’s reward system. “With rhythm, it fires those motor neurons and makes (the person’s) movement more fluid and opens up the possibility for them to have greater muscle movement and expansion,” Carnegie says. “It also makes the cells release dopamine. We all know that people with Parkinson’s have a shortage of dopamine, but it’s also that they’re not using the dopamine that they have efficiently either.” ...continued on next page

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with stroke recovery: You’re building new neuron connections but you’re also rebuilding the weak neuron connections that are there.”

Mental Health

Music and Play Therapist Kim McMillin leads a music therapy session for 14-year-old Evan Hannah, center, who is diagnosed with autism, and his mother Kerry at the Center for Music Therapy in Spokane. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“THE MAGIC OF MUSIC,” CONTINUED... Carnegie uses keyboards to work on fine motor skills, like improving finger strength, dexterity, and hand-eye coordination. Playing the drums can help with larger movements, to “motivate” her clients to “reach farther, reach out, and to stretch down,” for instance. Singing is also important. “For people with Parkinson’s, singing is really important because their voice gets so off,” she says. “Being able to keep their articulation and keep those muscles strong,

that’s what we’re trying to do: maintain the function that they have and improve it.” Strokes also inflict damage to the brain in various ways that can result in impaired speech and struggles with movement. A 2016 survey of studies published in Scientific Reports found that music-supported therapy is effective in improving “stroke-induced motor dysfunction.” “The brain can create new neurons connecting the two hemispheres of the brain,” Carnegie says. “That’s what’s happening

Music therapy may assist with healing from childhood trauma, help adolescents with behavioral health issues, and in particular, may be especially effective for people dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder. A 2012 study found that people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) who participated in music therapy saw greater improvements in their symptoms than those receiving cognitive behavioral therapy. In fact, the development of music therapy as a field was helped along by research endorsed by the U.S. Army and the Office of the Surgeon General following World War II, according to a 2014 report from the American Music Therapy Association. During the war, officials also orchestrated music-based interventions in an attempt to rehabilitate returning veterans. A 2017 U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs review of academic literature concluded that music therapy has potential as a useful tool to “reduce symptoms and improve functioning among individuals with trauma exposure and PTSD.” One of Carnegie’s clients, a veteran with PTSD, experienced significant progress through music therapy. They started out with drumming and rhythm, before shifting to guitar out of his desire to “connect with music again in a way that he hadn’t since high school,” she says. “He’s just come so much further in his own growth and healing and he’s really getting some chops now on this guitar, now he’s doing some song writing, so it’s

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a beautiful transformation for him,” she says. For kids dealing with childhood trauma or other stressors, music therapy can provide a vital outlet for emotions and self-expression. Carnegie recalls a former client who was 10 years old and exhibiting “really horrific behavior issues” at school, likely stemming from trauma. “I just said, at the piano, ‘play for me how your day has been’ and however he wanted to express that on the keyboard. Oh my gosh, when he was having a bad day, it was heavy handed, you could feel the anger,” she says. “It was really telling. He couldn’t tell me in his words how he was feeling but he could express it in improvisation on an instrument.” Aside from serving as an outlet, music therapy can also help regulate behavior and emotion for kids with severe behavioral issues. Elements of the therapy — especially in group settings with multiple clients — such as interaction, taking turns, or even merely “tolerating” the introduction of another instrument into the session can help kids learn to interact with other people and keep their feelings in check. Children and adolescents make up a sizeable share of music therapy clients. According to a recent workforce survey and analysis conducted by the American Music Therapy Association, approximately 22 percent of music therapists reported working with kids in behavioral health settings, such as community health centers, juvenile detention facilities, schools and inpatient and outpatient treatment centers. (Closer to home, Seattle Pacific University’s music therapy program runs a weekly drop-in

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At the Center for Music Therapy in Spokane, music therapist Kim McMillin works extensively with children who are on the autism spectrum. Using a variety of instruments, combined with singing and interaction, she aims to improve their social skills, as well as building on motor skills and self-confidence. She’s been working with one particular group of autistic kids and their parents — they are encouraged to participate in the sessions — for roughly three years. And while progress has been slow and incremental, it is significant. “It’s just a long road. And this is not the only therapy that they’re doing,” McMillin says at her studio at the Center for Music

Therapy. Debbie Thomas, a mother of one of the kids, says that she’s seen substantial changes in her daughter since she began music therapy three years ago: “Her confidence in socializing has improved,” she says. “It’s been fun to watch the confidence level build. She adds that the therapy has helped her daughter learn to “appropriately interact” with other people, such as understanding the back-and-forth nature of conversation. Rhythm in the music has also aided her in learning to slow down her speech. Overall, the progress has been “huge,” Thomas says.

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In 2015, the National Autism Center identified music therapy as an emerging intervention. McMillin is also teaching some of the kids to read music: “They love it because they love the structure, because it’s predictable,” she says. “They love predictable things.” In some cases, music therapy can help children on the autism spectrum who suffer from severe physical conditions. Carnegie is currently working with one boy who is “blind and was born with poor muscle tone” to improve his fingers’ dexterity and strength so he can use devices like a Braille reader in the future “I use the piano to help him move his fingers,” she says. “He needs to be able to manipulate devices that will help him.” It’s hard work; labor that music therapy professionals often see being misunderstood. McMillin says that some parents will come in saying that they just want their kids to be “exposed to music.” She shakes her head: “No. We’re working really hard at increasing the quality of life for your loved one.”

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Chronic Pain Care Can acupuncture help prevent opioid overuse and addiction? BY STACEY AGGARWAL

A

s the Inland Northwest unfortunately knows all too well, opioid addiction can wreak havoc not only on individuals and their health, but also on communities as a whole. One of the best ways to prevent opioid dependence is to reduce the usage of opioids to treat pain in the first place. That search for alternative treatments is leading to renewed interest in a very old method for relieving discomfort. Acupuncture offers a whole body approach to treat a wide variety of troubles — from insomnia, to digestive issues, to stress. And importantly, it may be especially effective for treating chronic pain. But acupuncture has not been widely covered by many insurance companies, especially for those on Medicare or Medicaid, creating a barrier for those who might benefit. The Community Health Plan of Washington (CHPW) hopes to change that and

recently unveiled newly expanded coverage for Washington residents on Medicare/ Medicaid that covers acupuncture to treat chronic pain and opioid addiction. CHPW Chief Medical Officer Dr. Paul Sherman hopes that this new expanded coverage will provide more options for people seeking relief. “We’re trying to build up our toolkit so patients can find the ‘tool’ that works best for them,” Sherman explains. “With this, we have the broadest coverage of any Medicaid plan in the state.” The CHPW insurance will cover up to six acupuncture visits for anyone, with no referral or diagnosis needed. Approval is required for more than six visits. With their expanded coverage, CHPW hopes to give patients alternative options to treat chronic pain and opioid addiction and to push other insurance providers in the


same direction. “There are two ways acupuncture can help reduce opioid dependence,” Sherman says. “First, it can help avoid the need for opioid treatment in the first place. Second, acupuncture treatment can also reduce opioid withdrawal symptoms.”

J

essica Sleight, licensed acupuncturist and East Asian medicine practitioner at Balance Point Acupuncture in the South Perry district also believes that increasing public access to acupuncture can provide an effective treatment option for those struggling with chronic pain. But what does a visit with an acupuncturist actually entail? Sleight says there are multiple features she will assess to help her reach a diagnosis. “There are 26 different main categories of how you can have a pulse diagnosis in acupuncture,” she says. In addition to the acupuncture “pulses,” there are several more considerations that can help your acupuncturist figure out how to treat your symptoms. Sleight points out, “What you tell me [during the appointment] will help me figure out what’s going on.” Even how you walk into the room can give the skillful eye an abundance of information. Questions about your sleep, bowel movements, diet and emotions are all fair game during an acupuncture appointment. “I’m working with the whole body as a structure. You come in with a symptom, but I want to understand you as a whole person,” she says, “Acupuncture looks at the whole picture to keep everything in balance so it functions properly.” This whole body diagnosis helps the acupuncturist decide where to target on the body. Put into a framework that people more familiar with Western medicine will understand, Sleight says acupuncture promotes healing through manipulation of what the Chinese refer to as “qi” or life force energy. “I’m putting a foreign object in your body and triggering your lymphatic system to push it out.” She continues, “By triggering your body to push out these foreign objects, your body will send fresh blood and lymph to heal the area.” Even though acupuncture needles are about the thickness of a human hair, a fear of needles is a barrier to many who might benefit. To assist those with needle-phobia, “[CHPW] also covers needleless acupuncture, which uses electrical stimulation to target the same areas as traditional acupuncture,” Sherman says.

Together, We’re Transforming Health Care Thanks to the generous support of our donors, Providence Health Care Foundation is funding technology, programs and research that saves lives and enriches our community. For more than 130 years, our region has relied on Providence not only for world-class medical care, but to answer the call for help from our less fortunate neighbors.

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DIABETES DISCOVERY

No More Need For Injections? I heard that there was a new drug for diabetes. What is it?

T

he FDA recently approved a novel medication for Type 2 diabetes that some consider to possibly be the one of the most significant advances in diabetes medications in several years. The

new medication is called Rybelsus, an oral version of the injectable drug semaglutide. Semaglutide and several other medications in this family (GLP-1 receptor agonists) are already available but must be

taken by injection because these molecules are very large and are not absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, until now. A new technology called SNAC enhances the gastrointestinal absorption of the active drug and allows it to be taken by mouth. Rybelsus has been shown to be safe and is very effective at lowering high blood sugar levels. It is also associated with significant weight loss and may soon be approved for that indication. Its primary side-effects are similar to other GLP-1 receptor agonists and include nausea, diarrhea, vomiting and reduced appetite. The nausea, diarrhea, and vomiting are typically self-limiting if they are experienced. The cost of this medication is probably going to be close to or less than its injectable competition, and it should be available by the end of the year. — JOHN R. WHITE John R. White is the chair of the Department of Pharmacotherapy at WSU-Spokane and the author of Medications for the Treatment of Diabetes, which the American Diabetes Association calls, “the most authoritative guide to diabetes therapeutics available.”

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PILLOW TALK

Getting Some ZZZs

E

venings, for many of us, are our favorite time of day. The work day responsibilities are over, and we can settle in to enjoy a big dinner, screen time or a book. The problem, however, is some of these admittedly fun activities can interfere with sleep. We may exercise and eat well, but ignoring sleep can undo many efforts to live a healthy and long life. Sleep affects every cell of the body and is crucial for our physical and mental health. During healthy sleep, the body is cleaning out toxins, repairing cells, storing or erasing memories and surveying the body for potential problems. It’s also important for our mental health: Poor sleep increases the risk for depression by 40 percent. So don’t let sleep troubles persist. Consulting a physician is important since some breathing disorders, such as sleep apnea, can be fatal if untreated. But for most of us, lifestyle changes are what’s needed to give our bodies a better chance to get the rest we need. Here are two things to try if sleep is a struggle: 1. A common pattern is to eat very little breakfast, a small lunch and then

a big dinner. This pattern often results in much daytime fatigue and feeling wide awake at bedtime. The body is getting its major fuel supply (food) at the exact wrong time of day. It’s hard on the heart to be working on digestion when it should be resting. Spacing out the day’s food with lunch being a bigger meal than dinner is ideal. It helps if the food choices are healthy. 2. The brain needs a “buffer zone” an hour or more before bedtime. This means no stimulating activity such as reading exciting stories, doing work or using computers, all of which can activate the brain. Give your body all the help you can to slow down before bedtime. Think of the calming rituals we use to prepare children for bed — a pleasant bedtime story and a kiss goodnight. This is a good ritual for the adult brain as well! —ROBERT MAURER Robert Maurer is a Spokane psychologist, founder of the Science of Excellence consulting firm, and the author of several books, including One Small Step Can Change Your Life and Mastering Fear.

OCTOBER- NOVEMBER 2019

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VAMPIRES BEWARE

Garlicky Goodness In addition to its distinct flavor, garlic can improve digestion, cardiovascular health, immunity, cognition and energy levels. This superfood may also reduce inflammation, balance cholesterol levels and even reduce the risk of cancer.

ATTRIBUTES

While there are numerous chemical components of garlic that have been studied, many of its beneficial effects can be attributed to a molecule called alliin. When garlic is crushed, chewed or chopped, it releases alliin and the enzyme alliinase, which together react to form the active metabolite of garlic, allicin. Allicin is a sulfur-containing compound that is broken down into fats and other sulfur-containing metabolites after ingestion. The sulfur is at least partially to blame for the unmistakable odor of garlic. In addition to allicin and its metabolites, fresh garlic also contains other beneficial vitamins and molecules, including vitamin C, nitrates, selenium, molybdenum and a variety of amino acids.

SUPER POWERS

In the body, the compounds in garlic affect cardiovascular health by stimulating blood vessel relaxation. Garlic is also considered a prebiotic, promoting digestive health by providing nutrients to the bacteria that inhabit the gut. The sulfur-containing metabolites in garlic influence a variety of other important signaling enzymes that are involved in inflammatory gene transcription, cancer signaling and even fat storage. In the lab and in mice, garlic can also detoxify from heavy metal exposure and can interact with iron to prevent excess absorption into the bloodstream. Supplementation with garlic also reduced overall cholesterol and improved LDL/HDL ratios in human studies.

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WEAKNESSES

Although garlic truly lives up to its “superfood” designation with all the bioactive compounds and metabolites, there are some downsides. Most importantly, too much garlic can be dangerous for those with low blood pressure. Garlic can also interact with enzymes that affect the metabolism of many medications.

HOW TO USE IT

Mangia! If you want to add beneficial garlic to your diet, be sure to physically disturb the cloves before consuming or cooking to promote the formation of allicin and be aware that not all forms of preparation are created equal. Microwaving garlic can degrade important compounds, while sautéing or roasting generally preserves them. If you just can’t stomach the strong flavor of garlic in your food, you can still get all the benefits through supplementation with garlic oil. Aged or boiled garlic also has many of the benefits of fresh garlic but without the strong odor. When supplementing with garlic, carefully monitor your dosage. For a 180-pound person, garlic can be toxic above 18 grams per day. — STACEY AGGARWAL

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Getting Soaked

Colorful bath bombs from BeYoutiful Bath Bombs and More YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

When it comes to self-care, consider a nice warm bath with luxurious additives BY LEANN BJERKEN

B

ath products are a bubbling business. And why not? There surely is no better way to nourish your psyche, while promoting glowing skin and relief from aches and pains. That’s led to innovation in the bath products business, with more traditional items such as salts, oils and bubbles being joined by ingredients like tea, milk and even flower petals. So how do you select a beneficial bath product? Consider the ingredients, say local makers. Bath salts, created from magnesium sulfate or sea salt, are commonly used for stress relief, detoxifying and soothing aches and pains. Many essential oils can, with proper dilution in a carrier oil, be added to a bath to improve skin clarity, reduce muscle aches and promote sleep. Adding certain flowers, herbs and even tea to bathwater may help soothe skin and promote relaxation.

“We’ve heard some wonderful feedback from folks who say that our products definitely make a difference in easing the pain of certain conditions,” says Annie Nunes, co-owner of the Lavender Lady, a local maker of lavender oils, soaps and bath salts. At BeYoutiful Bath Bombs and More, owner Jessica Veselka notes, “All of our company’s bath bombs have Epsom salts, which help the body reduce inflammation, stiffness and pain.” She says some customers’ favorite bath bombs contain other ingredients such as oats, cocoa butter and honey to soothe skin, lavender oil to support sleep or relaxation and eucalyptus oil to relieve congestion. Meanwhile, Lila McDermid, owner of the Caring Coconut specializes in milk baths, appealing because of milk’s ability to exfoliate and moisturize the skin.

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RATING: Terrific Tub Time This product had a lovely scent, and the salt water was relaxing to soak sore muscles after a long day. While it doesn’t have the pizzazz of bubbly or colorful bath products, it is soothing. All of the company’s products are made from ingredients grown at the Lavender Lady’s owners Annie and Rick Nunes’ farm. FIND IT: The Victorian Boutique at Lavender Lady farm, 6178 Moriah Dr., Nine Mile Falls 720-4181. Free home and office delivery is available. Also at Siemers Farms in Green Bluff every weekend of October. Check Facebook for seasonal market dates and locations.

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Chamomile, Lavender, Coconut Milk and Oat Bath from Caring Coconut

RATING: Blissful Bath I was pleasantly surprised by this milk bath, which had a gentle exfoliating effect and clean coconut scent. However, I had to be careful not to let the oatmeal clog my drain post-bath! Owner Lila McDermid says some of the company’s products are designed specifically for use by new mothers, but most are enjoyed by anyone. McDermid says the company will be announcing new retail locations soon. FIND IT: Huckleberry’s and online at caringcoconut. com. Wildflower Bath Bomb and Blood Orange Scrub from Orange Thyme

RATING: Floral Fantasy The Wildflower bath bomb created a cloud of suds and petals, and its delightful fragrance easily enabled me to imagine lying in a field of flowers. The Blood Orange sugar scrub was a bit thicker than expected, but left my skin soft with a hint of orange peel scent post-bath. FIND IT: Boulevard Mercantile, Auntie’s Bookstore, Lucky Flowers in Kennewick.

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COEUR D ’ ALENE

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay.

Your Everyday Getaway Escape to Coeur d’Alene this week and find hundreds of things to do - and that’s on a Wednesday! See our online calendar and plan your fun day away today. coeurdalene.org

Find Fun this Fall

4 things to do this autumn in Coeur d’Alene

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t’s time to pull the boat out of the water and put away your paddle board. But cooler temperatures and shorter days don’t mean the fun has to come to an end in Coeur d’Alene. As the leaves begin to turn vibrant shades of gold and red and the sun sets lower, a new kind of beauty envelopes North Idaho. It also gives way to all kinds of new ways to play. Here are four ways to take advantage of all autumn has to offer in the Lake City.

1. SCREAM AT SCARYWOOD On Oct. 3, demented clowns, creatures from the crypts, spooky scarecrows, and other frightening figures take over Silverwood Theme Park, ready to make you scream with horror and delight. Are you brave enough to enter SCARYWOOD’S “scare zones?” Head to any of the park’s five “haunts,” special areas where warnings indicate the shock level from mild to maniacal. New this year, which is the 10th anniversary of Scarywood, is Dr. Delirium’s 3D Rockhouse. Get your 3D glasses and take a trip to crazyland as you navigate hidden scares and surreal illusions.

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Many of your favorite Silverwood rides are open too. The Log Flume has you hurtling in and out of tunnels and plunging over a steep drop, while the Timber Terror thrusts you more than 80 feet into the air, then wildly twists and turns, while you ride backwards. Scarywood is open Oct. 3-Nov. 2.

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2. SWING THE CLUBS ONE LAST TIME There’s no better way to enjoy vibrant fall colors than on the golf course. Even better, you can set your alarm a little

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later and soak in the midday sun as you take advantage of seasonal savings and specials. On Oct. 12, the Coeur d’Alene Resort Golf Course features its annual GOLFTOBERFEST, where you can taste the flavors of fall with seasonal microbrews and Bavarian-style bratwurst served throughout the course. The package also includes a special souvenir gift to commemorate the day. You’ll also find local beers and brats on the course at Circling Raven, during their OKTOBERFEST event on Oct. 5. Then celebrate another glorious golf season coming to a close at their End of Season Bash on Oct. 27 when you can take advantage of 15-percent-off green fees and huge discounts on apparel — not to mention the 19th hole specials. 3. REST AND RETREAT Before the rush of the holiday season, take some time to treat yourself to one of the Coeur d’Alene Resort’s LIVE WELL RETREATS. During the Mountains & Mimosa Retreat on Oct. 27-28, your journey starts with Kombucha check-in and includes a spa service of your choice, a sunrise mimosa and breakfast bar and an outdoor guided hike at Mineral Ridge, which offers unparalleled views of Lake Coeur d’Alene. The Yoga & Spa Retreat on Nov. 17-18 also includes luxurious overnight accommodations, plus a sunrise yoga class, a mindfulness workshop and the spa service of your choice. 4. GO HUNTING (FOR VINTAGE TREASURES) On Nov. 8-9 one of the top vintage markets in the country makes its way to the Kootenai County Fairgrounds. REBEL JUNK VINTAGE MARKET features a bevy vendors showcasing vintage, antique,


rustic and farmhouse decor from all over the country. Still can’t get enough? Then it’s time to explore Coeur d’Alene’s Midtown on Fourth Street, north of downtown. LOOKING GLASS ANTIQUES is a collection of vendors sharing their wares with a homey, welcoming vibe where looking is half the fun. Nearby is PARIS ANTIQUES, where you’re sure to find something new every day. Plan on spending at least half a day exploring the 15,000 square feet of fabulous finds at MIDTOWN MARKET HOME & VINTAGE.

C O E U R

D ’A L E N E

Upcoming Events

Fall Fest & Apple Palooza OCTOBER 26

Shop the Harvest Farmers Market downtown Coeur d’Alene and enjoy free hay rides, harvest produce, music, food and everyone’s favorite, Apple Palooza, an apple tasting event throughout the downtown. Pick up your maps and People’s Choice ballots at Fifth and Sherman. 10 am-3 pm.

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Every second Friday from April through December, stroll through beautiful downtown Coeur d’Alene and enjoy the many galleries representing locally and nationally acclaimed artists. Visit supporting galleries, shops, restaurants and businesses for this free, family friendly event. 5-8 pm; download a map at artsandculturecda.org/artwalk

Lighting Ceremony NOVEMBER 29

Welcome in the most wonderful time of the year in picturesque Coeur d’Alene! Experience the charming Lighting Ceremony Parade, then watch the flip is switched on one of the most magical lighting displays in the country!

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a house to 26

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Imported large-scale windows allow sweeping views of surrounding farmland at this Uptic Studio home. MATT VIELLE PHOTO/HAMILTON STUDIO

a The iconic farmhouse style endures even as it evolves in the Inland Northwest BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

s common as log cabins are to the region’s forested areas, farmhouses are ubiquitous throughout Washington’s Palouse and Idaho’s Panhandle, where older homes are often nestled into a windbreak of poplars and surrounded by agricultural accouterments. The style is not limited to farmers, however. Renewed and sustained interest in the versatile farmhouse style means elements of it are appearing in remodels and new homes as well. But what makes a farmhouse? Generally speaking, they were modest homes that were built onto as their occupants’ families

and farms grew. They are characteristically wrapped in white clapboard, often with black trim, and a peaked, shed-like roofline, with dormer windows and a wraparound porch. Farmhouses, says Uptic Studios’ principal and co-founder Matthew Collins, are all that and more. “A farmhouse is also a homestead, family compound, multigenerational hub and a functional environment to live/work/play.” Combined, that means an emphasis on form as well as function. ...continued on page 30 OCTOBER - NOVEMBER 2019

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Farmhouse Style: A Primer Marnie Hansen, an independent designer based in Spokane specializing in color, renovations and new construction interiors from start to finish, defines farmhouse style as a “beautiful mix of warm woods and metals, layering textures, whites, and neutrals to embody a laid-back, all-are-welcome kind of vibe.” The style is an acknowledgement to a particular lifestyle, she says. “It’s a nod to a slower time, a more relaxed style of living where people come first and real life is shared around the table. A well designed farmhouse has a cohesive mix of vintage and modern, keeping the overall feeling fresh yet unpretentious, and collected over time.” To put your own spin on it, advises Hansen, personalize your space. “Hang your story on your walls, infuse your family heirlooms into the design, and put your own personal spin on it to keep it feeling uniquely yours.” The result, she says, is “a warm, welcoming retreat at the end of a long day, to connect with your loved ones in a space that is best exemplifies the feeling of home.” — CARRIE SCOZZARO

Plank wood flooring adds a warm element to the white interior and black accents. MATT VIELLE PHOTO/HAMILTON STUDIO

“A HOUSE TO GROW IN,” CONTINUED...

An Ultra-Modern Farmhouse Rising out of 30 acres of farmed alfalfa on the Palouse, Sarah and Nick’s home is a reflection of their active lifestyle — she is a long-distance runner, he cycles — and a blend between her desire for coziness and his for modernity. They also wanted to be close to town, yet allow ample room for their children and dogs to run free. With a recommendation from their real

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estate agent, Suzy Dix, the couple worked with Uptic Studios, a Spokane-based firm whose most visible projects include Iron Goat Brewing and Maryhill Winery. Their approach to home design was unique, Sarah says. “We started by evaluating our existing home and eliminated spaces we weren’t using and enlarged spaces we wanted to

use more and in different ways. We worked back and forth on floorplan designs for quite a while and once the floorplan was dialed in, Matthew unveiled his vision for the exterior. We were blown away.” According to Collins, “The concept of the home developed on the idea of breaking the different functions of living into separate spaces, allowing the in-between zones to serve for entry, circulation and moments of transition.” The home (featured on the cover of this magazine) has steep, peaked roof lines, making it appear as though it were three connected buildings. The central structure is mostly glass, while the buildings flanking either side resemble aged cedar, helping make the house look like it has been on the land for many years, says Sarah. “Visitors to the house expect a very


The sleek and spacious kitchen serves as the home’s hub. MATT VIELLE PHOTOS/HAMILTON STUDIO

choppy interior,” says Sarah, “but in reality it is very open and flowing,” with the kitchen as the hub. It features a sleek kitchen island where everyone gathers, an L-shaped countertop, high ceilings and plenty of room for a sturdy wooden dining table, bench and chairs. The kitchen, like much of the house, includes one of Sarah’s favorite features: huge windows, which bring the outside in. “It is bright and sunny all day long,” Sarah says. “At night it feels like you could reach out and touch the moon.” The backside view of the house reveals a full-length patio — a spin on the conventional farmhouse porch — while an inside/outside fireplace functions as a both a visual focal point and entertaining area. While Nick had a big role in the overall design,

Sarah took on décor and interior design, incorporating wide plank wood floors throughout, for example. “The majority of the house is black and

“At night it feels like you could reach out and touch the moon.” white with raw wood accents, and a pop of color here and there to soften the starkness of the black and white,” she says. “The family celebrates a modern lifestyle, but are still deeply connected to the region and the surrounding Palouse,” Collins says. ...continued on next page

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An open layout offers room for large, multigenerational gatherings at the Rogers’ newly built farm-style home. (ABOVE) EUGENE MICHEL PHOTO (RIGHT) JESSAMYNE CAMPBELL PHOTOS

“A HOUSE TO GROW IN,” CONTINUED...

Contemporary Take on a Classic Style Longtime Colbert residents, Debbie and Todd Rogers didn’t start out wanting a farmhouse, says Debbie, who considers herself a city girl. Rather, they wanted a place

guest bedroom and bath, a great room, kitchen, pantry and laundry/mud room on the main level. The daylight basement adds three more bedrooms, two bathrooms and a bonus room. “This layout suits our needs perfectly,” Debbie says. “And Cameron (Rippy) had the great idea of using the area above one of the garages for a ‘man loft’ for my husband, in lieu of a shop. He loves it!” In addition to abundant windows, white shiplap siding, and black accents outside, the interior features barn-style lights, ceiling beams, bridge faucets over the apron sinks in the kitchen, and a bathroom with subway tile and black grout. To Debbie, however, farmhouse style is less about a look and more about a feeling. “I love home,” she says, “the thoughts, the feelings that are invoked with just the mention of the word.” For her, farmhouse style is inclusive. “All are welcome, anytime. Young, old, quiet, loud, funny, serious — everyone belongs here in my home that is made up of new and modern as well as antique and vintage,” she

“Young, old, quiet, loud, funny, serious — everyone belongs here in my home.” large enough for their family of 15, including seven grandchildren, yet also befitting times when it was just the two of them. Located on 20 wooded acres, Debbie also knew she wanted to bring the outdoors in: “lots of natural wood, big windows letting in lots of daylight, and pops of color and greenery giving life.” But as they worked with Rippy Construction, a modern farmhouse was what they ended up with. The two-level home includes a master bedroom and bath,

...continued on next page 34

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(Above) In a mostly white house, Hale Navy paint from Benjamin Moore provides a dramatic backdrop for the rawhide to couches, creating a “modern farmhouse vibe.” (Right) For decor, Alisa Lewis opts for an eclectic mix of salvaged and contemporary items. KATYA HIGGINS PHOTOS

“A HOUSE TO GROW IN,” CONTINUED... says. “It’s the diversity, the unexpected, the juxtapositions that I love — always paired with the homey and the comfortable — and I feel like the farmhouse style suits this perfectly.” Some of that juxtaposition of design includes more industrial or contemporary elements, which gives the place a refined, rather than rustic, look, says Jill Rippy, the office manager and executive coordinator for Rippy Construction (formerly Rippy Homes), which she and husband Cameron Rippy founded in 2010. “The grand scale and scissor trusses of the back porch also pull more to contemporary than classic farmhouse. The sleek, simple and industrial style handrail definitely has a contemporary feel. The finish selections chosen by the homeowner make this house feel like home for them,” she says.

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Resurrecting a North Idaho Farmstead

A few years ago, Alisa Lewis and her husband Kyle, who has worked for nearly 20 years in construction, were flipping houses in the Spokane Valley when they discovered what would be one of their most significant projects: their future home, which now serves as a model for their custom construction company. “We specialize in farmhouse style new builds, custom stick-framed shops with living quarters or ‘barndominiums,’ and small commercial updates and new builds like coffee stands, office buildings, medical offices and retail spaces,” Alisa says. At the time, Alisa was working as a home care nurse with patients in the Dalton Gardens area of North Idaho when a small, dilapidated 1950s-era house caught her eye. It was on the corner of an acre that looked to be a turn-of-the-century farmstead,

judging by the classic red barn nearby on the property and Dalton Gardens’ history of small-scale farming. It was for sale by owner but the phone number was disconnected, so Alisa persisted until she was able to speak to someone about the 800-squarefoot-house, which was actually rebuilt from a 1900s farmhouse on the same foundation, she later discovered. Within a few days, they purchased the fixer-upper and squeezed into a single bedroom with their two young children. They slowly transformed rooms and added others, including a three-car garage with a second story bonus room, which they tied it into the remodeled original home, for an additional 1,000 square feet. A new roof, siding, windows, walkways, doors and the quintessential farm...continued on page 36


New

Rooftop Terraces

Enjoy sweeping panoramic views of our spectacular 60,000 sq. ft. central garden and beyond, with the option of a rooftop terrace on all 2-story Bella Terra townhomes. The rooftop terraces can extend to include adding a partial 3rd floor as well. The 3-story Emerson model now offers the option of a small private terrace on the 3rd floor. All Emerson townhomes will continue to include the spacious 2nd floor deck.

What Makes Farmhouse Style So Popular? Jill Rippy wonders if it isn’t a desire for a slower-paced lifestyle. “We are all so busy with the things we need to get done for work, home and kids that the thought and feel, (even if it is on a subconscious level) of coming home to a place that represents a time and era where people had time to rock in rocking chairs on their front porches and watch the grass grow or the sun set, a place that feels like a refuge from the world, a time when life was just a little simpler, is of course very appealing.” Besides, she adds, farmhouse style construction is easy on the eyes and simply beautiful. — CARRIE SCOZZARO

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Rebuilding on a century-old farm foundation created a modern but rustic home, featuring views of the old barn. KATYA HIGGINS PHOTOS

“A HOUSE TO GROW IN,” CONTINUED... house porch helped make the stunning transformation complete. They’ve since added an orchard and garden, with plans

style, and we kept it that way,” Lewis says. “We chose one white for the whole house, same window pattern, one black for the doors, and kept the roof line cohesive with farmhouse dormers.” The minimal color scheme outside continues inside the house, where Lewis’s design talents really shine. Furnishings, fixtures and accents are mostly black, white, neutral or wood, and the décor is an eclectic mix of salvaged items, contemporary shabby chic, and industrial elements like the kitchen island and stools. EVERY FREEAY FREE D RSDAYcom“I used to own a vintage rental S U R H U T H THURS ERY RY T

“We love the clean simple farmhouse style, and we kept it that way...” for chickens and goats. The kids play in the old red barn — they call it the clubhouse — which they’ve heard used to be home to the prior owner’s donkeys. “We love the clean simple farmhouse

Your Home, Your Happiness

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pany that served the Northwest with farm tables and vintage pieces for weddings and events,” says Lewis, who kept her favorite pieces from the Farm Chicks Vintage & Handmade Fair, which she used to host. Their kitchen table, for example, is from a Spokane Valley architect, while the arched window frame nearby is from a Palouse church. “Our upstairs loft definitely has a more modern farmhouse vibe with a cowhide rug, the industrial metal staircase and our rawhide leather couches.” The “Hale Navy” wall (from Benjamin Moore) and family pictures make this a treasured spot for the Lewis family, who recently welcomed another baby.

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Kumiko Love shares intimate details of her own financial life and tips on how to budget with thousands of followers. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Big Payoff After successfully tackling thousands of dollars of debt, The Budget Mom helps other women see it’s possible for them, too BY CHEY SCOTT

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umiko Love has accomplished what may seem to many as an impossible feat: Paying off more than $77,000 in debt in less than a year. Now, she’s saving up to buy her first home in cash within two years, and revealing how she does it all with millions of followers on social media through her brand The Budget Mom. From her modest Spokane Valley apartment, Love, a 33-yearold accredited financial counselor, shares her personally tested budgeting tips and a deep look into her own finances to help and inspire other women just like her — working women, mothers and others of any age or stage of life — that almost any financial goal is possible. “The first [Budget Mom] article was in 2016 after I had just started my accredited financial counseling designation and started learning all this amazing info,” she recalls. “I was like, ‘Oh my gosh, I wish I could have known this three year ago.’ It would have saved me so many tears and frustration, so I thought it was my duty to share it with the world and help single moms like me, and save

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[them] stress and time.” Things have since taken off for Love and her brand. She’s recently appeared on Good Morning America, Today and Inside Edition, and stories about the Budget Mom have been published by dozens of national and regional news outlets. Love’s newly released Budget by Paycheck Workbook, a financial tracker she designed, has already presold thousands of copies, though it doesn’t ship until mid-October. She’s also in contract negotiations with a major publishing house to take on the Budget Mom workbook line, and has fans flying in from all over the world to attend a conference she’s hosting in Spokane Valley this October. Love credits the Budget Mom’s success to her steadfast, tightknit community of followers, which currently includes more than 285,000 on Instagram and 585,000 Budget Mom email subscribers. “Once I started sharing my real numbers and real story, and started searching for a tribe — people like me, single moms who know how hard and lonely it is and [who’ve felt] defeated and overwhelmed and stressed — they were searching for me, and that


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is why my community is so strong and growing so fast,” she says. Love posts daily videos on Instagram and YouTube that include budgeting tutorials, savings challenges, her own daily spending and answers to followers’ concerns. She also personally responds to each message or email sent to the Budget Mom’s online platforms. “Seeing someone do this in their real, everyday life motivates and inspires hope in so many people,” she notes.

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esides the personal fulfillment she gets from being a helpful and trusted resource to other women, Love, most of all, does this for her seven-year-old son, James. “I had my son in 2012. That was my turning point, my ‘aha’ moment: I can’t just want to figure this out, I have to figure this out,” Love recalls. “I’d tried every [budgeting] method out there — monthly, percentage, calendar, envelope budgeting — and every month I failed and was short and I couldn’t figure out where it was going. So I took everything I felt I succeeded at and extracted it and rolled it up in a step-bystep method that we know as budget by paycheck.” Love’s budget-by-paycheck system combines three budgeting methods: calendar, paycheck and cash envelopes. She designed her own worksheets to track income, spending, budgets and debt, along with other savings goals. These materials are part of the newest Budget by Paycheck Workbook ($50 at thebudgetmom.com), with some forms free online and through a subscriber newsletter. “My biggest thing is to make sure the people who desperately need it have it without having to pay for it,” she notes. Before anyone can dive right in to her tried-and-tested method, however, Love says it’s critical to know how much you’re currently spending in various categories like food, entertainment, clothing and household expenses. “I tell my readers you should not even think about putting any numbers on a piece of paper for your budget until you know where your dollars are going,” she says. “Tip number two is, take a step back and ask why you want to change your financial life,” she continues. “You find out what is your purpose and motivation, and you hang on to that and hang on to that hard. It should be something that makes you emotional.” Although Love notably paid off $77,000

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“BIG PAYOFF,” CONTINUED... worth of debt in just eight months, her personal financial journey began long before that, and before her son was born, back in 2011. After graduating from Eastern Washington University with a degree in finance, Love was initially able to tackle thousands of dollars of credit card debt incurred during college, along with medical debt from a severe motorcycle accident. As time went on, however, more debt — mainly on credit cards and from a new car purchase — piled on during some rough periods, and her total amount owed had again increased. So in June 2018, Love announced on the Budget Mom’s Instagram account her big plan to pay off that looming number so as to hold herself more accountable. It also helped that, at the time, the Budget Mom was growing as a business, and Love was thus able to use extra profits to put toward

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her debts. “I hit one goal and moved on to the next, I was always one step ahead of myself,” she recalls. “I didn’t have time to say ‘I have this money, where can I spend it.’ It was already spent in my plan.” Even considering her unique situation, Love believes it’s possible for anyone, as long as they’re motivated and committed, to accomplish similar goals. “What I say is that if you do the steps and work the plan, anyone can do it,” she says. “How fast you do it is the question, not if you can do it. I wanted it bad, and to this day I’m so passionate about it and that is the level you have to get to.” An Evening with the Budget Mom • Wed, Oct. 23 from 5-8:30 pm • $25; $75 VIP • CenterPlace Regional Event Center • 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr., Spokane Valley • thebudgetmom.com


RULY DEEN PHOTO

Ancient Arts Spokane-based Ruly Deen’s jewelry creations combine the artist’s love of nature, history and metalworking STORY AND PHOTOS BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

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he allure of metal goes beyond its shiny surface. It can be melted and poured into molds, pounded into thin sheets, and transformed into chains as thick as your wrist or as delicate as a strand of hair. Once freed from its earthly confines, metal becomes a seemingly magical ingredient, which appears in virtually every culture dating back centuries. Artist Ruly Deen is particularly enamored of silver. “Silver can be matte white or shiny, reflective bright, or it can be oxidized to a rich, deep

black,” Deen says. “It can be cast, which is my primary method, or it can be fabricated, which is a set of techniques I have been employing in my most recent work,” she says. In her new Raw Earth series, Deen forms the setting around stones such as pietersite, which has a characteristically stormy-looking surface, and larimar, a light blue stone reminiscent of water. The result is jewelry and other works that harken to an older time. History and nature are two favorite inspirations, Deen says.

“I am also very drawn to symbol systems, especially those of ancient cultures, as diverse as Nordic runes to Greek alchemy,” says Deen, who took her first metalsmithing class at age 12. By 16, she was earning money and en route to a bachelor in fine arts in metalsmithing from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. “I find meaning in the marks humans make and share with one another and the way their interpretations change based on the culture where they are used. I collect the stories that are told to explain their shapes, and bring their emotional importance into my own interpretations.” She calls this her “symbolic landscape” style. Deen founded Silver Element Jewelry in 2011, yet she’s been working and exhibiting in the community for much longer. Fans of the defunct Inland Craft Warnings, an annual juried show and sale that ran from 1983 to 2012, may remember her elaborately defined designs. Others may remember her former gallery space above Auntie’s called Argentum Aurum. She travels to select Northwest shows, including ArtFest and Art on the Green, as well Terrain’s Winter BRRRZAAR. Prior to the Northwest, Deen worked as head model maker for a large design supplier in Florida and on Philadelphia’s renowned Jeweler’s Row. “I was lucky enough to be in several shops that had European masters as part of the team, and I picked up techniques from them that I still use each time I sit at the bench,” says Deen, who works out of her home studio in rural Eastern Washington. The bench is the jeweler’s workspace. Deen has several: one for detail work neatly lined with small containers and tools and lit with two portable, adjustable lamps, as well as a bench for soldering with a small flame torch. Elsewhere are setups for polishing stones, grinding, and casting. A separate part of the shop houses her woodworking area — Deen designs and fabricates her own jewelry stands — and a photography area she uses to document her designs. Deen also maintains a showroom in Kendall Yards, where she meets clients and does special exhibitions around major holidays. “One of the benefits of being a local artist is the opportunity to meet people who would like to incorporate their own love of nature with my ‘symbolic landscape’ style for a meaningful piece [of] wearable art,” Deen says. “Sometimes it is a ring, but I have also created pendants or bracelets, and even, a bronze walkway plaque.”

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Chef Sil Hernandez enjoys the opportunity to incorporate flavors from his Oaxacan heritage to create new combinations at Spokane’s Scratch restaurant. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Scratching the Surface At Scratch, chef Sil Hernandez looks forward to making his mark BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

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unning gives him a way to process all the creative ideas he has, while krav maga, a European form of martial arts, helps him focus, says chef Silviano “Sil” Hernandez. Both are essential to what he does at Spokane’s Scratch restaurant, especially since he is now in charge of all things culinary at the popular downtown eatery. Earlier this year, Hernandez, as well as longtime Scratch employee Mari Bork and

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her husband, Brad Bork, took over Scratch from former owner, Connie Naccarato, who started it in 2007. “It’s a true partnership,” says Bork, who has worked with Hernandez for around 12 years. “He’s creative, fun to work with,” she says, and he’s humble. “It feels like a family,” says Bork. Hernandez came to Scratch after eight years working for Naccarato when she ran Mamma Mia restaurant with her parents in North Spokane. The family style restaurant appealed to Hernandez, who got his start cooking in family style restaurants — mostly Italian — while living in Chicago. Although he was studying to become a physical therapist, he discovered that cooking was his true passion and trained the old-fashioned way: on the job. One thing he learned quickly: Family recipes are sacred and not to be tinkered with. That, he says, doesn’t apply at Scratch, which regularly does special dishes and does a seasonal menu change twice yearly, giving Hernandez ample opportunity to flex his wings. Another lesson learned: Take one significant ingredient and use it multiple ways. A whole duck, for example, can be broken ...continued on page 44


LOCAL OPTION

Homegrown Seltzers

W

hile hard seltzers first hit the market several years ago, it’s truly hard to deny that within the last year spiked seltzers have begun (white) clawing their way up the popularity ladder, with more varieties popping up in stores all the time. Now there’s a local, Spokane-brewed option, with NO-LI BREWHOUSE proudly taking the mantle as the first hard seltzer maker in the region. After seeing the rising popularity of the bubbly beverages, which are lower in calories and carbs, the folks at No-Li decided to give it a go, explains Bill Powers, No-Li’s marketing director. “[Last winter] we started investigating how hard it would be and did some test batches, and those went really well,” Powers says. “We were like, ‘Yeah, we’re onto something here.’ People know some of the more popular brands like White Claw and Truly, and we thought why not have a local company make it for the people of Washington state, Spokane and the Northwest?” So far they’ve got two flavors, Day Fade Huckleberry and Day Fade Rainier Cherry. The 12-ounce cans come in at 2 carbs, 100 calories and 5 percent alcohol, and in Powers’ experience at beer festivals, they’re appealing to people across the board. — SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL Day Fade hard seltzers can be found at independent local grocers such as Rosauers, Yoke’s and Super One, along with, of course, at No-Li’s pub at 1003 E. Trent.

THE INLANDER’S WEEKLY EMAIL FOR FOOD LOVERS Subscribe at Inlander.com/newsletter OCTOBER - NOVEMBER 2019

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“SCRATCHING THE SURFACE,” CONTINUED... down in-house for entrees, using smaller pieces for their popular lettuce wraps, while the rest is used for a nutritious and flavorful broth. Although Hernandez likes to smoke the duck for an extra level of flavor when serving it at Scratch, the recipe he shares involves a simple sauté, which helps maintain the meat’s inherent tenderness. Lettuce wraps, he says, are versatile, fast and easy, something he has served his kids. “It’s just like eating a taco,” says Hernandez, who originally hails from Oaxaca, Mexico. Hernandez intends to slowly incorporate more Oaxacan dishes, such as one his mother made involving zucchini flowers and epazote, a pungent herb often used in parts of both Mexico and Central America. Although he struck out finding a reliable source for the flowers — pulling the buds diminishes the plant yield — his description of the dish intrigued one Green Bluff grower who asked for the recipe. Also on his list are peppers, which offer flavors ranging from sweet to hot to smoky,

as well as salsas, pork and moles, which he describes as a staple of Oaxacan cooking. Hernandez credits his mother with his love of cooking, something he’s able to do for her when he visits her in Mexico. She’s visited Spokane once since he’s lived here, says Hernandez, who made her a simple spaghetti and meatballs dish at her request, with one small alteration: red pepper flakes. “You know us Mexicans,” he says, “we like heat. “The more I know, the more interesting it gets,” says Hernandez.

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|YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

TRY IT YOURSELF

Lettuce Wraps with Duck Filling Lettuce wraps are a fast, healthful dish that can be adapted for almost any dietary need or taste profile. Switch up the vegetables or swap out the duck for another animal protein, and use any lettuce-like greens you prefer. Here, the Five Spice powder, an Asian spice blend typically including fennel, cinnamon, pepper, star anise and cloves, adds a hint of smoky sweetness. •• 1 tablespoon duck fat or vegetable oil •• 2 6-ounce duck breasts, sliced (Scratch uses Maple Farms brand) •• 2 teaspoons Five Spice powder •• 1/2 cup mushrooms, chopped •• 1 red bell pepper, seeded and diced •• 1 yellow onion, diced •• 1 teaspoon ginger, minced •• 1 teaspoon garlic minced •• 1 bunch fresh cilantro, chopped •• Whole butter lettuce leaves.

Sauce

•• 1 cup sweet chili sauce •• 1/4 cup soy sauce •• 1 teaspoon sesame oil •• 1/2 lemon juiced and zest of 1 lemon •• Garnish (optional): consider pickled cabbage, rice noodles, candied walnuts, sesame seeds or julienne-sliced scallions

1. Heat oil in frying pan over medium heat. 2. Saute ingredients for filling excluding lettuce until onions soften. 3. Add sauce and heat through. 4. Remove from heat and assemble, filling lettuce wraps and adding garnishes as desired. — Shared by Sil Hernandez of Scratch restaurant

The National Museum of American Illustration, Newport, RI and the American Illustrators Gallery, NYC.© 2019

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Norman Rockwell, The Doughboy and His Admirers, 1919, Oil on canvas. © NMAI

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Story Time Reading with kids may be just about the best thing you can do BY JACOB JONES JONATHAN HILL ILLUSTRATION

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pokane children’s poet Kenn Nesbitt says he learned to love literature and reading aloud out past the AM waves on long car rides. Driving into the mountains on childhood road trips, the radio signal would slip into static and the family Cadillac would come alive with verse. “We didn’t have an eight-track player or a cassette player in the car,” he says, “so basically my parents would tell stories and sing songs and recite poems to keep my brothers and I from fighting, more or less.” Instead of thumbing at Game Boys, they would listen as their father recalled “Casey at the Bat” or “The Raven” from memory. Nesbitt says he came to know many of them by heart as the words and rhythms spun in his mind long after the trip. It sparked a lifelong passion. Nesbitt, who served as Children’s Poet Laureate from 2013 to 2015, says reading aloud with his parents solidified family connections, sparked lasting memories and introduced him to a wonderful world of words. “I just loved it,” he says. “I’m not a zealot on ‘you have to read poetry to your kids,’ but I am a zealot on ‘you have to read to your kids.’”

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“STORY TIME,” CONTINUED...

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n a world of endless distractions and overpacked schedules, reading aloud with children can get squeezed out, but reams of research confirm the many benefits. It helps cement parent-child bonds. It boosts speech development and vocabulary. It corresponds with advanced reading skills and academic performance — across

I just can’t think of a better thing to do with your kids. — Poet Kenn Nesbitt

broad social or class disparities. “Reading regularly with young children stimulates optimal patterns of brain development and strengthens parent-child relationships at a critical time in child development,” reads a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics, “which, in turn, builds language, literacy, and social-emotional skills that last a lifetime.” Classic guides like Jim Trelease’s “The ReadAloud Handbook” also emphasize its role in fueling personal curiosity, enhancing focus and fostering empathy.

And it’s usually pretty fun. Read-aloud evangelists agree it’s never too early, or late, to start. So how can we try to read more with our kids? Gwendolyn Haley, a library services manager with the Spokane County Library District, says families can make reading aloud a part of their daily routine. Take stock of when you might have unhurried time in the day — at breakfast, after school, during bedtime — and have some favorite books ready to go. Almost all libraries offer age-appropriate reading lists. Haley and others suggest picking books you like to read to start, then give kids more control over what you read together as they develop their own tastes. “Book choice is so important,” she says. “If you hate it, they will know.”

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eading aloud with children helps introduce advanced ideas or emotions. Children can often hear and understand concepts at levels above what they could comprehend while reading independently. Haley says those organic conversations during reading have huge developmental benefits. “Those discussions we have around our

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reading are just so important,” she says. It’s a great opportunity for our children to have conversations about what the characters in the book are doing and experiencing and how do we think they’re feeling about that and what would we do in the same situation.” Research shows the literal number of books in a home can correspond with reading comprehension. Make books easy to find around the house. Make frequent trips to the library for new material and give kids ownership over a few of their own cherished books.

make it memorable.” Haley says her family uses a smart speaker to listen to books together and that they also appreciate having access to e-books for making text size larger or tracking down hard-to-find books. Spokane area libraries also have new digital resources for joining online book clubs or getting recommendations through NoveList, which Haley called a sort of Pandora for books that offers titles based

on previous favorites. As children get older, experts note it can be harder to find ways to connect. Shared stories create literary touchstones for family values, traditions or inside jokes that last a lifetime. “You’re sharing an experience with them,” Nesbitt says, “and you’re learning something about their world as well… I just can’t think of a better thing to do with your kids.”

Additional Reading: The Read-Aloud Family, by Spokane writer and Read-Aloud Revival podcaster Sarah Mackenzie How to Raise a Reader, by New York Times Book Review editors Pamela Paul and Maria Russo The Read-Aloud Handbook, by Jim Trelease poetry4kids.com, by Kenn Nesbitt

Haley encourages parents to give kids permission to dislike some books and move on to something that resonates or holds their attention better. “Books aren’t broccoli,” she says, “you don’t have to clean your plate.” Experts suggest rekindling or doubling down on your own reading. Parental modeling, reading newspapers or books on your own also plays a large role in showing kids that you value reading and that it is something grown-ups enjoy. Haley says parents can make “invisible” reading on phones or tablets more recognizable by talking to kids about what they’re reading.

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hile some may see technology as undermining traditional reading, both Nesbitt and Haley praised audio books and e-books to providing additional means for connecting kids to literature. Reading together has extra benefits, but audio books can still bring families together to listen to stories. Nesbitt has written 23 books and has audio versions of many of them. The sounds of the words are part of what makes poetry special. “Poetry is somewhat magical for kids,” he says. “It’s rhythmical. It’s got rhymes. It’s got a lot of poetic devices, assonance and alliteration and things like that that

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“GOOD EGGS,” CONTINUED... sons: one, more dietary cholesterol leads to less production of cholesterol by the liver; two, for most who eat eggs, the “good” cholesterol (HDL) goes up more than the “bad” cholesterol (LDL); and three, for those who do get a bump up in LDL, the rise tends to be in the form of the less-dense, better type of LDLs. I think of it as less gooey, and less likely to plug things up. For those without Type 2 diabetes, recent studies suggest that eating up to three eggs a day, is safe. One of my favorite things about this nearly perfect food is that it can it be prepared in all different tasty types of ways. They can be scrambled, fried, frenched, folded, hard-boiled, soft-boiled, baked and whipped. While any egg is a rich source of protein and energy-dense fat, the best eggs come from happy hens allowed some room to roam and hunt for worms, grubs and such and who are fed fruits and vegetables in addition to the typical whole-grain fare. The orange, rather than yellow, yolk is a characteristic of eggs from pastured hens and is a result of this nutrient-rich diet. If hens are fed flax seeds as part of their diet, their eggs may even be a rich source of Omega-3 fatty acids, a poly-unsaturated fat that offers health benefits to most — lowering triglycerides which in turn reduce the risk of future cardiovascular disease. Eggs are also high on the satiety index, and low on the glycemic index. In other words, they are a satisfying and filling food to eat for breakfast, helping to keep the hunger inducing hormone ghrelin in check — less ghrelin equals less growlin.’ Full disclosure: I am pretty sure I am addicted to eggs. I have a very close correspondence with my supplier, and I think it is telling that I am unwilling to share my supplier with others, for fear of jeopardizing my supply. But, for those willing to work a little, I will give a hint: I get my supply from the only good watchmaker left in town. I think it is quite appropriate that I obtain this oviparous treasure from a jewelry store.

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CANNABIDIOL-BASED (CBD) PRODUCTS in this advertising section come in two varieties. There are CBD products made from hemp (aka CBD Hemp Oil) that are federally legal for sale in all 50 states. There are also CBD products made from cannabis that are only legal to purchase where allowed under specific state laws, as in Washington’s retail cannabis shops allowed under RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 505t2. (For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at liq.wa.gov.) Neither CBD product contains the psychoactive properties of cannabis flowers and extracts.

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CBD FAQs BY MATTHEW SINGER

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avigating the world of CBD is tricky — mostly because there’s not even a map yet. Science has known about cannabidiol since the 1940s, but in the era of reefer madness, scientific studies were rare. It’s only been in the past few years that research into CBD has really ramped up, but even now, studies remain hamstrung by its murky legal status. The 2018 Farm Bill legalized the production of hemp — cannabis bred for fiber production rather than the resin that gets you blitzed — and included highly specific provisions to allow the manufacture and sale of hemp-derived CBD products. But in the eyes of the federal government, CBD, like cannabis itself, remains classified as a Schedule I drug. But clearly, none of this has stopped CBD from growing into a billion-dollar business. So in an attempt to get answers to some

really basic questions, we reached out to two experts: Anna Symonds, director of East Fork Cultivars’ CBD Certified program in Oregon, and Zoe Sigman, program director for the California-based nonprofit Project CBD. What do we actually know about CBD’s medical benefits? By the standards of Western medicine, the answer is “very little.” As with the cannabis plant itself, years of prohibition have stalled research into CBD’s therapeutic properties. But of course, lack of research does not prove a negative. “What I don’t like about the way this is talked about sometimes, especially by people who are dismissive or anti-cannabis or CBD, is that they’ll say something like, ‘There’s no evidence to show,’ but what they’re really saying is, ‘Studies haven’t been done yet,’” Symonds says. But progress is being made. Last year, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Epidiolex, a seizure medication containing cannabidiol as a primary ingredient, and the resulting clinical trials showed CBD as an

SPOKANE - 1325 N DIVISION - SUITE 103

effective treatment for two rare forms of epilepsy. What’s the difference between the CBD products I get from a licensed retail shop and those at a normal health food store? In the most basic terms, the stuff you’ll find in a dispensary is going to be a full-spectrum product — that is, it contains a broad range of the plant’s other natural cannabinoids, including THC and many of the terpenes. Outside a licensed weed store, CBD is derived from hemp and contains, by law, less than 0.3 percent THC by volume. But the source material isn’t the only difference. If you’re getting CBD from a dispensary, it will have been tested for potency and purity, as required by the state. But beyond the FDA prohibiting companies from advertising unverified health claims about their products, the hemp-derived CBD market is basically unregulated. I’ve tried CBD before and didn’t feel anything. Does that mean the stuff I got was bunk? Could be. But when it comes to experiencing tangible effects from CBD, there are many variables. According to Symonds, the human endocannabinoid system — the biological network of neurotransmitters that allow us to experience the effects of cannabis — is as individual as a fingerprint. While there is a belief that you can “train” your body to become more sensitive to CBD, by taking increasing amounts over a period of time, Symonds says there’s not much science yet to fully support that claim. And then there’s the matter of sheer dosage. “Anecdotally, it seems like people need to consume… like 10-30 milligrams to feel anything at all,” Sigman says. “And it’s subtle, right? It’s not intoxicating, so you’re not going to feel high. If you take a lot of it, like a lot a lot, you can feel kind of loose, like you’re getting out of a hot tub.” What it ultimately comes down to, says Sigman, is the reason you’re taking CBD in the first place. Are you just trying to unwind after a long day? Then you’re less likely to feel something than someone taking it specifically to ease pain or combat feelings of anxiousness. OCTOBER - NOVEMBER 2019

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Joe Bruce’s home “space museum” includes a photo signed by the late local astronaut Michael Anderson and a lithium hydride canister with Buzz Aldrin’s signature, as well as three space suits. YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

The Space “ W Ambassador Sharing his passion for planets, stars and huge, powerful rockets is what fuels Joe Bruce’s mission to educate BY CARSON McGREGOR

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Health& Home

e’re on this shoreline called Earth, looking out into space, wondering what’s beyond the moon? What’s beyond Mars? What’s beyond that next star? And we’re going to explore. That’s part of who and what we are,” Joe Bruce says. Bruce has built a life as an artist, explorer, collector and most importantly a teacher, and he loves everything related to the study of space. In fact, there’s a giant toy rocket in Bruce’s yard. It serves as a gateway to the astonishing collection of space memorabilia in his basement. The collection has pieces from every era of space exploration — it includes a wide variety of parts from rockets, elements from command and control, and even three complete spacesuits. “Joe’s Museum” as his wife Kathy calls it, also showcases Joe’s own flight and space related artwork. There’s a scale model Bruce built of


a SpaceX Rocket, and a corresponding photo of Bruce standing beneath the real one. Astronaut gloves hang from the ceiling near a light fixture featuring planets aligned around the sun. Though “Joe’s Museum” looks like a professional facility, it’s a museum on the move. Bruce regularly takes parts of his collection out into the community. Each piece of memorabilia also comes with a story. Take the prized lithium hydroxide canister with Buzz Aldrin’s signature on it. When Bruce got a chance to meet Aldrin in Seattle, he handed the astronaut the canister to sign. “He said, ‘What’s this? A battery?’” laughs Bruce. “So, I had to go through and explain to Buzz Aldrin what he was using,” Bruce remembers. The canister was key to the astronauts’ survival as it was used to suck up the carbon dioxide the astronauts breathed out. Through decades of presentations in libraries, senior care facilities and classrooms

with students of all ages, Bruce has shared his passion for space. It all started 29 years ago when Bruce’s son told his teacher about the collection his dad happened to have stored in the basement. Bruce has been returning to Moran Prairie Elementary ever since. “There’s not anyone really like Joe,” says Moran Prairie kindergarten teacher Debby Smith. “He’s exciting for the kids, he’s hands on… Joe doesn’t just stay in my room for 30 to 40 minutes. These kids are sitting and engaging with Joe up to two hours.” Bruce is modest about his school visits. “It doesn’t take much especially with little kids — you’ve got dinosaurs, and you’ve got space.” Bruce’s presentations include showing and explaining the parts of his collection — the two pieces of Mars and the spacesuits are always popular. And he reads new books, explains how space food works and leads in games that painlessly teach lessons about science-y topics like friction. If the room is full of older kids or adults, who might not be automatically interested in space, his program typically focuses on the history of space flight. In addition to giving space talks showcasing his collection, Bruce also enjoys sharing his love of astronomy through informal evening programs to “tour the sky” with one of his many telescopes. Smith recalls a “Star Party” at Moran Prairie Elementary. “We had probably 150 people there,” to look at the moon and several different planets. “Parents and kids really enjoyed that,” she says. In fact, it’s the kids that motivate Bruce to offer up his knowledge. Since 2003, Bruce has worked as the director of Children’s Ministries at Hamblen Park Presbyterian Church in Spokane, but he also carries the title of NASA/Jet Propulsion Labs Solar System Ambassador, a volunteer position. “My hope is that with these kids … something is sparked there. An interest. Or something’s ignited. And one of these kids might go on and have an interest and go on and be the next Neil Armstrong, the next Sally Ride, the next Mae Jemison. Or who knows? Maybe even a future president.”

NNUAL QUILT SHOW 4 1s t A

OCTOBER 18, 19 & 20 FRI & SAT 10AM-6PM | SUN 10AM-4PM

SPOKANE COUNTY FAIR & EXPO CENTER • 500+ Quilts hung and fully lit • WSQ Raffle Quilt • Master Quilter demonstrations • WSQ Boutique and quilted items for sale • Cherrywood Fabrics (Prince) Exhibit • 50+ Merchant/Vendor Mall

FREE PARKING wsqspokane.org

To schedule a Space Talk with Joe Bruce, search NASA Solar System Ambassadors and click on the directory. OCTOBER - NOVEMBER 2019

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Profile for The Inlander

Inlander Health & Home 10/07/2019  

Inlander Health & Home 10/07/2019