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JULY 18-24, 2013 | COMPOSED AND IN FOCUS

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A hustler. A visionary. A witness. How Charles Libby captured Spokane PAGE 20

By Lisa Waananen

DEVELOPMENT

THEATER

PAGE 18

PAGE 27

Kendall Yards gets a new addition: The Inlander

The backstory behind the firing of the Civic’s director

ALT-COUNTRY

Son Volt dives headfirst into twang PAGE 43


2 INLANDER JULY 18, 2013


INSIDE JULY 18-24, 2013 | VOL. 20, NO. 40

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WHAT IS YOUR MOST TREASURED PHOTOGRAPH? TREVOR GEREN The one I have of my dad. I think we were doing a nativity scene. My dad’s just holding me. Me and him have had some rough spots. It’s just a reminder of how he’s been there for me from Day One.

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COMMENT | YOUTH

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Forgotten Generation America needs to bring back a broad-based investment in human capital, like we did with the G.I. Bill BY ROBERT HEROLD

I

recently enjoyed lunch in Seattle with a former student I hadn’t seen in several years. The first in her family to go to college, she was able to attend Gonzaga through scholarships. She took two classes from me and earned an A in both. She went from Gonzaga to the Peace Corps, served in a developing country during a time of unrest and strife, and developed an interest in refugee resettlement. Her tour completed, she headed east to do graduate work at a highly regarded private university. She graduated with distinction and landed a position in a not-forprofit doing work in her area of interest. Today, however, she struggles to pay more than $60,000 in student loans; at least she has managed to launch a career. The next generation, those graduating after the 2008 meltdown, face even more difficult challenges. These young people — call them the “Forgotten Generation” — completed college and entered the job market at the exact time the country began reeling from the excesses of what Andrew Bacevich terms our “culture of profligacy.” Today members of the Forgotten Generation, many even deeper in debt, face an unemployment rate in excess of 13 percent, much higher if you add those who aren’t on the unemployment rolls. Upwards of a third have moved back home.

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resident Obama has been of limited help. Thanks to him, young people may stay on their parent’s plan until age 26. And when the entire health care program kicks in, most will find other insurance. The President also worked to cut for-profit overhead on student loans. But aside from these laudable initiatives, he just doesn’t seem interested in addressing the deeper, more systemic problems. Republicans are much worse, wallowing around in a mythological universe where “it’s every man for himself and the devil take the hindmost.” They vote again and again to derail health care reform, they cut other benefits, and if they have their way, students will pay much higher loan interest rates. A difficult situation for millions will be made much worse. It wasn’t always this way, all this self-made nonsense. Let’s look back to 1944, to the passage of the G.I. Bill — tuition, stipends, money to begin businesses, a year’s worth of unemployment benefits, home loans and many other bits of largess. But, you say, these were our “heroes.” Many were, but of the 16 million Americans who saw military service during World War II, a significant percentage never went abroad. A much smaller fraction served near combat. A fraction of a fraction of a fraction did the heavy lifting on those Pacific islands, the North African desert, the hills in Italy, the beaches at Normandy and

the forests in Belgium and Germany. In the mid ’50s, the Bradley Commission, established by President Eisenhower and chaired by General Omar Bradley, concluded that military service should be about civic responsibility, not a way to get government benefits. Nonetheless, support for returning vets has continued. My younger brother, a Vietnamera veteran (luck of the draw), did his two years in Seoul, Korea, working as an MP breaking up bar fights. He returned home, and thanks to all his veteran’s benefits, paid his way through law school and bought his first house. Send comments to My student, by comparison, editor@inlander.com. faced more danger during her Peace Corps service, but received no tuition break nor VA loan. And my brother never faced a mountain of debt. Truth is, most of our “Greatest Generation” heroes never had to play Audie Murphy. They were required to serve six months (originally three) and be honorably discharged. Combat was never required. Richard Nixon spent most of his wartime duty in the Navy playing poker while at sea. (Apparently he was good at it, as he paid off his law school debts that way.)

LETTERS

W

hile we don’t begrudge these benefits, we have to consider the broader lessons that emerged from our dramatic postwar initiatives. With the country deeper in debt then than it is now, what began as an act of gratitude came to serve as a broad-based investment in human capital — an investment in the country’s future. Today we look back and view these veteran’s benefits as having made possible the creation of the post-World War II middle class, sustaining it right up through the 1970s. Government intervention, in this instance, was indeed the solution, not the problem. Today, instead of investing in human capital and the future, the Republican House holds us captive to bought-and-paid-for, ideologically driven inertia, with our own Congresswoman McMorris Rodgers at the forefront. Investment in human capital has come to be viewed as just an excuse to dole out money to the undeserving 47-percenters. Instead, they favor regressive policies that directly and indirectly promote a kind of indentured servitude. It’s hard to become a great generation when you’re exploited, stymied and forgotten. n


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

NO MSG!

The New Segregation BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

“L

et’s leave it to the states to decide.” You hear that a lot on those tough issues that America has become less and less able to grapple with back in D.C. And the states are deciding, on issues from gay marriage to abortion to legalizing marijuana to “stand-your-ground” laws like in Florida. What’s been so surprising is that from one state to the next you can have a set of laws that barely resemble each other. Different states are starting to seem more like entirely different countries. It’s a dynamic that’s been at work since the 1960s, but is accelerating today. More like-minded people cluster in states where they will feel at home, leading to more extreme political positions, leading to entirely different sets of laws. The Texas legislature, for example, just passed the most restrictive abortion laws in the nation, while Washington voters recently allowed for the legalization of marijuana for recreational use by adults. This new segregation was detailed in the 2008 book The Big Sort, which pointed out that American families moved 100 million times in the decade prior — generally to places where they’d find “their kind of people.” And there are winners and losers in all this sorting, as the 2010 Census confirms. Cities like Detroit and St. Louis are shrinking, while cities like Portland and Austin are booming. Bill Bishop, author of The Big Sort, echoes the concerns of the Founding Fathers when he writes, “Heterogeneous communities restrain group excesses; homogeneous communities march toward the extremes.” And as issues the federal government should take up are pushed to the states, new cultural tribes are staking out their territory across America. Likeminded citizens vote for more and more extreme representatives, Bishop argues, and they dream up more and more extreme legislation. The result is that states are winding up in completely different places — almost like living on different planets. So for all its faults, I was glad to see the Washington legislature create a kind of de facto power-sharing arrangement between the two parties; I don’t want to see us become a one-party state that gets caught up in doubling down on crazy. We should cherish our differences, not try to stamp them out. And we should listen to those who don’t agree with us — that’s just Democracy 101. Being open-minded allows Washington to project a welcoming face to the world, with growing, creative companies, beautiful environments and an accepting vibe to all people. That makes it the kind of state poised to be a winner as the big sort continues to shake out. And for me, it’s the kind of place that feels like home. 

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COMMENT | DIGEST ON OUR FACEBOOK

George Zimmerman was found not guilty in the Trayvon Martin trial. Are you satisfied with the verdict? LINDA MCHENRY: No, I’m not satisfied with the verdict and no, I do not respect our so-called justice system. JUSTIN TAYLOR: I am personally very happy with the verdict. I believe any jury in America would come to the same conclusion, not guilty. JACK OHMAN CARTOON

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Facing Up To Fire Suppressing forest fires can make them even worse BY ALLISON LINVILLE

T

he enormous column of black smoke towered before me. As the Hammer Fire closed in on the backcountry workstation that I call home in the summer, fear spread from my hard hat to the soles of my fire boots. I was on a trail crew-turned-fire crew that summer of 2011, suited up to help protect the historic Forest Service workstation in Montana’s Bob Marshall Wilderness. Working this close to flames and smoke was a brand-new experience. The fire was burning for “resource benefit,” and every nervous trail-crew worker supported that. We’ve seen the undeniable benefits of wildfire in the wilderness. But suddenly it was burning a little too close to our “home,” and we weren’t certain we could hold it back. When I read about 19 lives tragically lost while fighting a fire in Arizona or see photos of charred homes in Colorado, I can begin to understand the fear that courses through homeowners as the landscape changes in an instant. In a year of already record-breaking fires that are predicted to become yet more memorable, expensive and devastating, it’s hard to remember that these fires are raging because they were suppressed for the past 100 years. The benefits of fires are always a hard sell to people who have been hurt by them, and “let it burn” is a statement sure to stir up controversy. But that approach was born when foresters finally realized, at the end of the past century, that the 90-year-old 10 am policy — to have every fire under control by 10 am the day after it is reported — had created a gigantic tinderbox of fuels. When 36 percent of Yellowstone National

Park burned in 1988, much of the public feared the fires had “destroyed” the park. Wildland fire-use policies began to be quietly set aside due to public outcry. Today, though, it is apparent that the fires of ’88 actually rejuvenated the Yellowstone ecosystem and prevented even bigger fires. Nonetheless, the public remained fearful. Westerners still seemed to want every fire put out, as soon as possible. Since the Hammer Fire in 2011, I have watched terrifying fires that burned hundreds of acres in minutes. That is what fires do, I told myself, and it’s always a matter of when the trees will burn, not whether they will burn. While I have always supported letting wildland fires burn to help forests, now that I have stared fire in the face, a pump in my hand and my heart in my throat, I wonder if it is possible to convince Westerners that fire can be beneficial. If the public’s understanding and perception of fire changes, perhaps we can let a fire go as far as it can before reaching structures, allow it to burn the understory to clean out some fuels, and let it burn in the wilderness. And we can discourage people from building homes in the wrong places. Like it or not, fires are part of the life and death of forests; it’s our job to get used to it.  Allison Linville is a graduate student in creative writing at the University of Montana and spends summers working in the wilderness near Whitefish. A version of this column first appeared in High Country News (hcn.org).

WILL TOONE: What a joke. Disgraceful. TIM PLUMMER: So a trial by jury isn’t good enough? So you’d like to be judged by how someone “feels” about your case? RONNIE RAE: The charges were too high. The state got carried away with their charges and couldn’t prove their case. That is what happens when people get greedy and now a man guilty of something walks away. I am not a fan of how this case was handled at all. BRAD PRESTON: I need to check my calendar; I’m no longer sure whether we live in 2013 or 1913. JACK GRADY: Facts won out over corrupt politics. HARRIS MITHOUG: Should have gone for manslaughter, but the political/ societal pressure was too much and now he gets to walk scot-free and the parents get no justice. Just another case of the gun culture in America creating an impossible situation. ALAN GANGER: Not a satisfactory result, but the prosecution was always going to have a very difficult time proving their case, making the outcome fairly predictable. SCOTT MEREDITH: Yes, a jury of his peers analyzed the facts (and amazingly, were able to look past all the bullshit and excessive unfair treatment he suffered from the judge and the media) and provide a solid verdict. I call it karma coming back around from O.J. Simpson getting away with murder. CHAR DAUTERMAN: Not at all. Disgusting. 


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COMMENT | SATIRE

Cook, Clean, Cheerlead BY ANDY BOROWITZ

R

epublican lawmakers in the Texas State Senate are proposing a precedent-setting new bill that would make it illegal for women to live in the state. Senator Harland Dorrinson, one of the many pro-life lawmakers backing the woman ban, crafted his bill after witnessing Senator Wendy Davis filibuster an anti-abortion bill last month. “That was our moment to say, ‘Enough is enough,’ ” he said. “This comes down to a choice between life and women, and we choose life.” Senator Dorrinson said his bill would call for a 20-foot womanproof fence to be constructed along the borders of the state. “Women are great at talking, but not at climbing,” he observed. But another GOP state senator, Cal Jamson, believes that the total ban on women goes “too far” and is proposing a less draconian bill that

would allow some women to remain in the state as guest workers. “Texas needs women to cook, clean and cheerlead,” he said. “If they show that they can do those things and stay out of politics, there could be a pathway to citizenship.” Elsewhere, a growing chorus of lawmakers in Florida is arguing for a measure that would eliminate laws altogether. “Florida is rife with laws that say ‘Do this, don’t do that,’ ” said Gov. Rick Scott, a supporter of the measure. “Speaking as a Floridian, I have found it exhausting pretending to obey them.” n For more fake news from Andy Borowitz, visit borowitzreport.com.

COMMENT | CONGRESS

Dems Getting Cozy BY JIM HIGHTOWER

“I

t’s appalling,” said Rep. Jim Himes. He was talking about the money that special interests stuff in the pockets of our lawmakers. “It’s disgusting… and it opens the possibility of conflicts of interest and corruption,” he added. So naturally, he promptly joined the disgusting system that has turned our Capitol into a wide-open bazaar for buying and selling legislative favors. “It’s unfortunately the world we live in,” the Connecticut Democrat shrugged. Even though Himes is only in his third term, he’s become an aggressive trader in this bazaar, heading up fund-raising for his fellow Democrats in the House. Why him? One, as a member of the committee that oversees Wall Street, he can attract campaign cash like honey attracts flies, especially when big banks are lobbying furiously to get exemptions from legislation that restricts some of their destructive profiteering. Two, Himes has proven to be a trusted ally of the wheeler-dealer bankers, supporting their de-reg bills. And three, he is one of them, having become a millionaire as a Goldman

Sachs banker. Republicans are totally in Wall Street’s pocket, but Democrats are sinking into it, too. With the admirable exception of Rep. Maxine Waters and a handful of other Dems who stood with consumers, most Democrats on the committee joined every Republican member in May to do the bank lobby’s bidding. Six days later, Himes’ fund-raising operation arranged for the seven freshmen Democrats on the committee, each of whom had stood with the bankers, to trek up to the heights of Wall Street for a personal bonding session with the CEOs of Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan Chase. Thus are forged the ties that bind. Hey, Democrats — don’t just deplore this corrupt system, stand with us to overthrow it. To learn how, go to publiccampaign.org. n For more from America’s populist, check out jimhightower.com.

JULY 18, 2013 INLANDER 11


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12 INLANDER JULY 18, 2013


Michael Devenere, 54, says his unit in the Danmor Apartments may be small, but “this is home.”

HOUSING

Uneasy Living Low-income and month-to-month tenants often face challenges with securing stable housing BY JACOB JONES

A

n unexpected and unexplained letter threatened to uproot Michael Devenere’s entire life. After nearly four years of living in the Danmor Apartments in downtown Spokane, he came home last week to find a “Notice to Terminate Tenancy.” “If you do not surrender possession of these premises on or before the date set forth,” the letter states, “judicial proceedings will be instituted for your eviction.” Devenere, 54, felt betrayed. He takes good care of his

unit and keeps to himself. He often pays his rent three months in advance. The letter, delivered July 8, gave him just 22 days to move out. All 14 of his neighbors received the same notice, their letters littering the front entryway. With many on Social Security, veterans benefits or other fixed incomes, Devenere says they have few options for affordable housing in downtown. “To get kicked out without any explanation,” he says,

JACOB JONES PHOTO

at a loss. “This is my home.” A couple days later, the Danmor building owners reversed their decision and rescinded the eviction orders. But Devenere says the incident highlights the insecurity of local low-income housing and the limited protections for tenants living on month-to-month rental agreements. “Most of us have been here for a long time,” he says, “because we have nowhere else to go.”

T

he Danmor Apartments on Third Avenue has stood for 106 years. New blue paint covers the hallways, but behind several doors sit damaged and neglected units. Of the 36 total units, many have become uninhabitable. Residents and building managers acknowledge problems with gang activity, drugs or vandalism over the years. But many respectful tenants also call the building home. Bob Peeler, with SNAP Homeless Services, says lowincome buildings provide important transitional housing and affordable living space for people on fixed benefits or pensions. ...continued on next page

JULY 18, 2013 INLANDER 13


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NEWS | HOUSING “UNEASY LIVING,” CONTINUED... “We need those types of buildings,” he says floors. Water runs steadily from a broken kitchen of the Danmor Apartments. faucet. With a touch of disgust, he argues he People seeking low-income housing have a shouldn’t be punished for problems with other variety of local options, Peeler says, but demand tenants. remains high. Spokane’s downtown area con“It’s not our fault,” he says. tinues to cope with the 2007 closure of the Otis McKinsley, 70, lives on Social Security. Hotel, which displaced more than 100 residents. He says he has resided at the Danmor Apart“Since we lost the Otis, we’ve never really ments for eight years. In that time, his rent has rebounded,” he says. increased from $175 to $300 a month. Spokane tends to lose one large housing The sudden eviction notice left him angry building each year, Peeler says. Owners close up and unsettled. He had just paid July rent. He says some. A few units get condemned over building he has no family in the area to help with packing code issues. Fires destroy other facilities. or moving expenses. How could he be expected Right now, SNAP continues to find and move into a new place in less to look for new homes for two than three weeks? of seven families displaced from “They should have told us before,” he Send comments to the Sinto Apartments in June due says. editor@inlander.com. to the fire at Geno’s restaurant. While state law requires landlords to Peeler says a four-family building give 30 days notice before changing the in West Central is also expected to terms of a rental agreement, they may give close after being “red-tagged” over code violajust 20 days notice before evicting month-totions. month tenants. With the federal sequester and local budget Peeler says SNAP and other housing advocuts, Peeler says low-income housing will have cates pushed last year to introduce legislation to compete with other priorities in the coming to increase the eviction notice to 30 days. They years. Closing the Danmor Apartments would also called for residents of four years or more to have further stretched local housing. receive at least 60 days notice. “I’m glad that the owners changed their He says the Washington Landlord Associaminds,” he says. tion “crushed” those efforts before they ever made it to the floor. alking the halls of the Danmor, David An outraged McKinsley says he and his McKinsley peeks into vacant units neighbors deserve better. with tattered walls and trash-strewn “It isn’t right,” he says.

LETTERS

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anmor co-owner Michelle Morin calls the eviction notices an unfortunate miscommunication between owners after frustrations with problem tenants and management changes. Two other out-of-town owners previously supervised the building, but started seeing increased tenant issues when they lost their on-site building manager. The co-owners hired Windermere Property Management to take over the building in April. Morin says Windermere was a “poor fit,” and continued problems left the other co-owners feeling like they had to close the building.

“Since we lost the Otis, we’ve never really rebounded.” Morin says her family opposed closing the Danmor and decided to take over the management themselves. They started reaching out to tenants Saturday to cancel the evictions. “We’re currently putting a plan in place to get a new [on-site] manager,” she says. Morin says she is aware of some units that need significant work. Her family plans to make repairs and complete other remodeling, but they can work around the current tenants. Devenere says he feels some relief, but remains uneasy in the wake of so many mixed messages. “I think they owe everybody an apology,” he says. He can’t help thinking of what he might face if another eviction notice comes down. He doesn’t want to leave his home. For now, he’s still skeptical of any promises: “I’ll believe it when I see it in writing.” n

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NEWS | DIGEST

NEED TO KNOW

PHOTO EYE SOUL-POWERED

The Big News of the Past Week

1.

George Zimmerman, a Hispanic neighborhood watch volunteer in Florida, had admitted shooting and killing unarmed black teen Trayvon Martin, but claimed it was self-defense. Last Saturday night, a jury found him not guilty of murder, sparking protests across the country.

2.

A fire tore across four soon-to-open buildings near Washington State University last Sunday, forcing many students to rapidly change their housing plans.

3.

The Spokane City Council passed a temporary law Monday setting zoning and licensing rules for marijuana. A license comes with a $250 fee and must be at least 1,000 feet from schools, playgrounds and daycares. The rules will be reassessed in 90 days.

4.

In a blow to east downtown, two bars, The Blue Spark and Ugly Betties Public House, have closed. Blue Spark owners blame the empty Ridpath Hotel and street loiterers. Ugly Betties was bought out and will reopen as a different business.

NICHOLAS GRAUERT PHOTO

From left to right, Gary Edighoffer, Brian Ploeger and Dave Stultz of Soul Proprietor play during the KYRS Music Fest at Glover Field in Peaceful Valley. The nine-piece horn band plays classic funk and R&B, including favorites from acts like Tower of Power and Aretha Franklin.

DIGITS

0

$

Amount, out of a $5.6 million request, that Innovate Washington received in state funding this year. Combining Sirti and the Washington Technology Center to create Innovate Washington was supposed to give the agency more lobbying punch, but ultimately, it was in vain.

16 INLANDER JULY 18, 2013

49 percent

Amount of Elway poll responders who said Gov. Jay Inslee was doing a “poor” or “only fair” job. Only 40 percent called his performance “good” or “excellent.”

5.

Friday morning, longtime Civic Theatre Executive Artistic Director Yvonne Johnson was fired. As of press time, the exact reason for her firing were still shrouded in mystery, but the board planned to meet Wednesday. (See p. 27.)

ON INLANDER.com What’s Creating Buzz

HISTORY: So you’ve rocked out at KYRS’ solar-powered indie music fest. Now learn more about that awesome location. From Native Americans to Green Day, read the history of Glover Field on our blog.


NEWS | BRIEFS

Singing the Blues More challenges to two citizen initiatives in Spokane; plus, Democrats do outreach in Idaho DEMOCRACY DRAMA

The drama over two local CITIZEN INITIATIVES set to appear on the November ballot continues. After a coalition of business interests and conservative council members filed a suit last month claiming the initiatives are outside the scope of the city’s power, a group behind one of the initiatives has filed a countersuit. Envision Spokane, which is for the third time pursuing a Community Bill of Rights, argues the coalition can’t prove that simply allowing the initiative to appear on the ballot will cause harm and that the suit is instead meant to limit citizens’ right to petition the government. Spokane Moves to Amend the Constitution, which is pushing a separate initiative limiting corporate campaign contributions and lobbying at the city level, has filed a motion for the court to dismiss all claims related to its initiative. A hearing for the initial suit against the initiatives is set for July 26. Meanwhile, Spokane City Council President Ben Stuckart and Mayor David Condon have announced support for an ordinance that would require future initiatives to undergo a review by the city’s hearing examiner before signature gathering begins. The ordinance, on which the council will vote July 29, wouldn’t prevent initiatives deemed illegal from making it to the ballot, but it would give the city more grounds to challenge them, Stuckart says. Envision Spokane and others have been outspoken about potential ramifications of the ordinance, denying city claims that the hearing examiner could provide an impartial review. “It’s about making a declaration about what’s being proposed before it has the chance to be vetted by the people,” says Envision

Spokane campaign manager Kai Huschke. “That’s counterintuitive to what the citizen initiative process is supposed to be about.” — HEIDI GROOVER

NEW BLUE

Democrats in Idaho hoping to break the state’s Republican stronghold have formed NEW CAUCUSES representing the interests of the Church of Latter-day Saints, Latinos, LGBT people and business professionals. As chair of the Idaho LDS Democratic caucus, Jordan Morales, a 25-year-old Boise State student, says it’s lonely being a blue Mormon in a red state — “You hide in the closet,” he says — and is hoping to reach out to others like him. “A lot of [church] members feel like you can’t be a good Mormon and be a Democrat, and that’s just not the case,” Morales says. “One of the principle tenets of our faith is being our brother’s keeper.” Last week, the Idaho Democratic Party started a nine-stop road tour to introduce voters across the state to the new caucuses. Sally Boynton Brown, executive director of the Idaho Democratic Party, says party members are taking advantage of the summer months as “Democrats tend to do better in Idaho” in off-year elections. “Idaho is really at a crossroads right now,” Boynton Brown says. “I think with the Republican Party’s extreme ideology and policies … people are looking around for something different.” — DEANNA PAN

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NEWS | DEVELOPMENT

The Inlander’s new address: 1227 W. Summit Parkway. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

From the Ground Up The Inlander relocates to Kendall Yards — which is buzzing with new construction BY MEGAN PETERSEN

K

endall Yards has welcomed its first office to the neighborhood: The Inlander. The paper’s traffic — along with visitors to Central Food, Spa Paradiso and the nearly 100 residences already in the development — has the area buzzing. And there’s plenty more to come. In the next three months, developer Greenstone plans to build three restaurants, a residential-retail mixed-use building, 80 residential units

18 INLANDER JULY 18, 2013

and a major road extension. They’re already working on 105 townhouses, apartments and single-family homes and the connecting stretch of the Centennial Trail — a $9 million project that will eventually include amenities like river lookouts, plazas and public art. The trail will run adjacent to the 2.5-acre Olmsted Park, which is currently in the design phase and might include picnic shelters, splash pads, walking paths, public art, a swimming pool


Planned in the near future: three new restaurants. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO and a playground, depending on resident preference. “Kendall Yards has a lot of things lined up right now,” Central Food owner David Blaine says. “It has quite a bit of momentum.” With the main arterial connection to Monroe Street expected to be finished by the fall, Kendall Yards will slowly but surely start looking less like a construction site and more like an urban neighborhood. And Greenstone wants to keep that neighborhood local. “[Supporting local business] is really important to us,” Greenstone CEO Jim Frank says. “We want to give opportunities to local people.” The three new restaurants are going to be owned and operated by local chefs. The retail units probably will be service retail shops — like bike repair or pet care — and small medical or dental care offices with local operators. Greenstone hopes to make a neighFor the next six Wednesdays, you can catch borhood out of the some of the best local bands with one of professionals. the greatest views in town as the backdrop. “We want to build a Kendall Yards is holding a concert series commercial community to serve the growing neighborhood and with a sense of conthe Spokane community. July 17 marks the nectedness,” Frank says. kickoff with Folk Inception. Terrible Buttons “We want businesses to will shred on July 24. All shows start at 6:30 know each other and to pm and will be at “The Nest” — the new support each other.” park right next to Central Food at Cedar and Although GreenSummit Parkway. stone is putting on a summer concert series and holding resident meetings to encourage neighborliness, the residents of the 100 occupied homes are already well on their way to creating a tight-knit community. Chuck Contardo’s neighbors go on group dog walks, host progressive dinners and have made a habit of regular patio visits, which he likens to barhopping. Some neighbors even vacation together. “These were people who didn’t know each other two years ago,” says a Contardo, a two-year Kendall Yards resident, “and now they’re really just great friends.” For its part, The Inlander was excited by the prospect of helping Spokane grow, Inlander publisher Ted McGregor says. “We want Spokane to be more in the league of up-and-coming cities,” McGregor says. “[Kendall Yards] shows that Spokane is not just holding its own, but is building more. … Spokane’s doing great, and we want to be a part of it.” 

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IT’S

C H A R L E S A . L I B BY T H AT W H AT E A R LY S P O K A N E L O O K E D

BE C AU S E OF

W E K N OW

LI K E

Through His Eyes By Li s a Wa a n a ne n

harles A. Libby hauled his camera down C the steep stairs on the north side of the river and stood on a wooden platform at the base of

the lower falls. The young man turned his lens south toward the steel lattice of the Monroe Street Bridge and the silhouette of the downtown skyline, but his eye was on the water. What did Libby see in the falls? Did he see the graceful dancing of the spray, the sun off the water, the water tossed into droplets of light before crashing on the wet, black rocks below? Did he see it in black and white, as it would emerge later from the darkroom chemicals? Was he thinking of people who might want to purchase such an image, or was he just thinking of shadow and light? He took a frame, and another. He took a whole series, each one a slightly different moment isolated from the roar of the ever-crashing falls.

A camera and other equipment Libby used are now kept at the MAC. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Imagine Spokane as it was a century ago: A bustling city rebuilt after the devastating 1889 fire, flush with insurance money and mining fortunes, the downtown streets busy with streetcars and automobiles beneath

a tangle of wires. If you can picture those streets, or elegant social gatherings at the Davenport Hotel, or the Grand Coulee Dam under construction, you most likely have seen Libby’s work. Our memories are made of Libby’s photographs. Many other photographers made their homes in Spokane in the early days and the decades that followed, but no other photographer took so many photos over so many years. By the time he retired in 1962, Libby had witnessed and recorded more than six decades of construction sites, businesses, social gatherings and special occasions. He photographed four Presidents and every landmark of the region, and left more than 200,000 negatives. Local historians have described his photographs and meticulous ledger books as a “monumental collection” and an “invaluable historical resource.” ...continued on next page

JULY 18, 2013 INLANDER 21


COVER

STORY

|

LOCAL

HISTORY

The Libbys’ state-of-the-art studio built in 1949.

Charles Libby Jr. at Felts Field.

Libby with a window display of group photos.

“THROUGH HIS EYES,” CONTINUED...

A portrait of Libby from a promotional book published in 1901. NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS & CULTURE/ EASTERN WASHINGTON STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY PHOTOS

Libby left a vast and valuable record of Spokane’s growth — but very little of himself. Libby arrived in Spokane in 1898 at age 19. His family — mother, older brother and two sisters — moved from Olympia after the death of his father, a mining engineer who had come out to the West Coast from Maine. Unlike Olympia, Spokane was booming. The population had doubled in the 10 years since the fire. Libby helped his older sister, Addie, in the photography studio she opened in downtown Spokane. By 1902 the pair split off to operate their own studios. The reason isn’t clear — it may have been a business choice, or more likely a difference of vision. Photography was not uncommon at that time — Spokane had eight

photographers listed in the 1900 city directory — but most photographers stayed in the studio and specialized in portraits. Most who traveled specialized in landscapes and stereoscopes. The equipment was bulky and heavy; controlling the light was essential. Libby took portraits throughout his career, but made a name for his studio by taking his camera out of it. His sister’s advertisement in 1903 said: “Visit the Libby Art Studio for Artistic Photographs.” Libby called himself a “commercial fotografer,” and he would come to you. He married Gretchen Schlussler in 1905. Their only child, Charles A. Libby Jr., was born two years later. On Sundays the Libbys would pack a picnic and take a ride on the streetcar, and if a building under construction or

grand new home caught Libby’s eye, he would stop to photograph it, just in case someone might want a print.

Libby was a hustler. He must have been tireless. Decades later, his son recalled reluctantly working weekends as a boy out at Liberty Lake and Coeur d’Alene, where companies and clubs would hold huge picnics. The Libbys would take a group photo, drive back to the studio in Spokane to develop a proof, then rush back to the gathering hoping to catch everyone before they left. The proofs would be passed around, and anyone who wanted a copy would write a name and address on the back. In those days the Libbys used Ko-

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Libby smiles as his granddaugther is photographed.

President Roosevelt photographed by Charles Libby Jr. at the Grand Coulee Dam; a 1903 advertisement

dak’s Cirkut panoramic camera, and they’d get the whole party to pause from their picnic and line up in long rows for a photo. Every group had a joker, the younger Libby later recalled, who would stand at one end as the camera started and then run around back so he’d show up on both ends of the photo. Many times a photo was ruined with blurry faces as everyone else turned to look at what was going on behind them. Libby was an innovator; both he and his son were fascinated by technology and machines. It was a time when, if a family bought a new car or a company bought a new fleet, the Libbys would get a call to come photograph the proud occasion. The Libbys showed up for the wrecks, too — they took thousands of photos of derailed trains and crashed cars for insurance companies. Around the same time the Libbys

July 26

photographed the National Air Races at Felts Field in 1927, the younger Libby took photography to the sky with some of the region’s first aerial shots. He would go up with pilots he knew at Felts Field and step out onto the wing with an arm wrapped around a strut and both hands on the camera. A local company made a special harness that tied him to the plane in case he lost his balance.

Beginning in 1933, the Libbys were hired to photograph the full construction of the Grand Coulee Dam. From the excavation to many years afterward, the Libbys took their equipment to the site and the surrounding hills to photograph the piles of earth and gravel, the concrete and steel, the ...continued on next page

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COVER

STORY

|

LOCAL

HISTORY

The lower falls and the Monroe Street Bridge, around 1906.

NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS & CULTURE/EASTERN WASHINGTON STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY PHOTOS

Train tracks to the east of Spokane.

“THROUGH HIS EYES,” CONTINUED... heavy trucks and cranes reshaping the landscape. In 1934, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt came to visit the dam, and was driven to a promontory on the east side of the Columbia River to view the site before addressing the crowd. Unlike the Associated Press photographers swarming for the president’s visit, the younger Libby knew his way around and waited patiently beside a rock. As the car rolled by, he snapped an up-close photograph of FDR’s face — shadowed by the wide brim of his hat — that became one of his most widely seen. For the younger Libby, photography was always a business. It was a profession, often technologically interesting, but he claimed no love of photography as an art. “Maybe this sounds kind of cold-hearted,” he said in an interview after he’d retired, “but to me it was a dollars-and-cents proposition. That’s all.” His fondest words, though, were for the days spent in the sun at the Grand

Woods near Post Falls

24 INLANDER JULY 18, 2013

A view of Spokane from the South Hill. Coulee Dam site. “I remember all day long down at the dam taking pictures of the excavation and driving the steel and the pouring of the concrete,” he said. “I think that’s when I enjoyed photography the most.”

Charles Libby Sr. died in 1966 at age 86, four years after he retired. In 1969 his son sold the business to Keith Henry, who had previously worked for

the company, and it was Henry who recognized the value and immensity of the studio’s collection. It wasn’t a collection he could maintain himself, and he made arrangements with the Eastern Washington State Historical Society to sell a portion of the negatives and donate the rest in 1987. By the time a portion of the collection was preserved and discussed in 1979, it was necessary for historians to point out that the Libby photographs do not show a complete record of Spokane’s past. Libby and his son took very few photos of Spokane’s black and


Asian communities; they did not photograph of his clients’ wishes. It’s clear in the casual crime or poverty. pride of men standing beside trucks with their While photographers working for the Farm hands in pockets and hat brims obscuring their Security Administration captured migrant eyes; in the light falling through the trees onto families and Dust Bowl landscapes during the children dressed in white at Natatorium Park; Great Depression, Libby photographed ladies in the symmetry of pyramids of canned goods in furs crowded around the window displays at and polished floors, the repetition of shining Sears, Roebuck and Company. While war phofactory assembly lines, the dark curve of rails tographers wired home images of fallen G.I.s in bending to meet the horizon — he was biased World War II, Libby photographed department toward beauty in lines and light, and presented stores and soda fountains. While his subjects the way they imagined early documentary photographers themselves. captured the tenement slums and Libby was an optimist. He sold the Send comments to child workers at the turn of the cenidea that special occasions require evieditor@inlander.com. dence, and he predicted our nostalgia. tury, Libby photographed the falls. “They didn’t go out and take Over the years, Libby appears in pictures of slums unless someone some of his own photos as a shadow hired them to take pictures of slums, and no in the lower corner of the frame. It’s not clear one did,” the Washington State Historical whether this was simply accidental, unavoidSociety’s curator of special collections, Edward able given the position of the sun, or if it was Nolan, said at the time of an exhibit in 1991. something more intentional. Did he want us There’s a modern impulse to apologize, to to take notice? Was he deliberately leaving justify — to clear Libby of culpability by vacatevidence of himself? ing his intent. It was all a matter of business: A newspaper article printed in 1949 when He aimed his lens in the direction that money the company opened a new state-of-the-art asked him to. studio on Lincoln Street between Second and What happened to Third described Libby the young man who as a “clear-eyed, robuststood beside the crashlooking man.” He was ing falls, watching the 70 years old, and he’d spray and the light? been photographing Maybe that was idle Spokane for more than practice; maybe he half a century. He and no longer had time, his son had decided with a family to care to build after their for and a business to longtime studio in the run. He stopped riding Exchange Building was the streetcar looking torn down. for grand houses; “The wrecking he bought a car and crews have had to rushed to keep up with chase me out of most of requests. Through his the offices I ever had,” decades of ledgers, Libby said. we know who Libby None of the buildworked for on which ings where he worked A man in Hangman Creek near Spokane, days, when he had his still stand. Not the first around the turn of the century. cameras cleaned and one, on the second what price he paid for his darkroom chemicals. floor of a narrow building on Post Street, nor The photos of Libby himself show a man the second, in the old Granite Building that at ease, with a broad smile and dark-rimmed stood where the Paulsen Building is now. The glasses. Even in portraits he carries a look of studio on Lincoln that was new in 1949 was eager momentum, like he is used to being on torn down less than three decades later. Libby the move. As a young man he jokes around in admired progress, and he also understood the the studio; as a grandfather, he sits to the side inevitability of loss. of a sofa and makes faces at the baby to get her It’s not clear what Libby wanted us to see to smile. in the shadows of himself, but they look now His work was driven by money, surely, like blind spots, negative space — reminders of but Libby was not merely a businessman or a how much we might never have seen if Libby technician. He was not an impassive recorder had not taken the photo. n

LETTERS

How we reported this story Research for this story comes from contemporary newspaper accounts, materials from the Northwest Room at the Spokane Public Library and, most of all, the Libby Studio Photograph Collection and other resources at the Joel E. Ferris Research Library and Archives at the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture. Curator of Special Collections Rose Krause and archives assistant Jane Davey generously shared their knowledge and time. Details are drawn from interviews by John Ross of Eastern Washington University, James B. Hunt of Whitworth University and the research of former MAC curator of history Larry Schoonover.

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Yvonne A. K. Johnson was fired last week after more than eight years at the helm of the Spokane Civic Theatre.

THEATER

Unkindest Cut

Spokane Civic Theatre’s recently fired executive artistic director may have saved the theater — but she made a lot of enemies along the way BY DANIEL WALTERS

T

he voice mail firing Yvonne A. K. Johnson, executive artistic director of the Spokane Civic Theatre, came Friday morning. “I’m calling to inform you that your position as an employee at Spokane Civic Theatre has terminated, effective today,” said Civic board president Larry Wooley, slowly reading from a script, informing Johnson she had from between noon to 2 pm to be escorted by a board member to pick up her personal belongings from the theater. “… if you are found on the premises at any other time, the Spokane Police Department will be contacted to effect your removal,” he continues. Johnson says she felt shocked and betrayed. “Everyone’s upset. Everyone’s confused. No one saw this coming,” she says. “I don’t even know why I was terminated.”

But others saw it coming. Johnson has enemies. In fact, she just lost a lawsuit in which she was trying to sue one of them for defamation. For those who love her, she’s a “blunt” and “demanding” director who rescued the Civic from financial disaster. But to many of her critics, she’s a bully whose uncompromising direction created a toxic atmosphere and cost the theater some of its greatest talent.

A PLAYHOUSE DIVIDED

At her South Hill home two days after her firing, wearing a pink Grease T-shirt, Johnson is talking about her job in the present tense. She doesn’t believe she was legally terminated. In fact, she’s certain the votes actually came down in her favor.

Johnson knew the board had been in upheaval. Wooley only became president of the board a few weeks ago, right about when two board members who had supported Johnson stepped down. Two other board members say attempts had been made to strip them of their voting ability. Johnson says she and Wooley had been having communication problems, and on July 9, despite an exemplary performance review, the board decided to find a mediator to help resolve a few issues. But a few days later, Wooley demanded the board vote on Johnson’s termination via email. While Wooley has shied away from commenting, Johnson’s supporters on the board have been vocal. “I’m embarrassed and humiliated to be a part of it,” says Deena Caruso, whose young daughter Sophia was mentored by Johnson and now performs in New York City. Regardless, the Civic is moving on. Instead of Johnson, the Civic announced Monday that this fall’s production of Les Misérables will be directed by Broadway veteran Douglas Webster. When Johnson first took charge of the Civic Theatre in January 2005, she was taking the helm of a sinking ship. Taxes hadn’t been paid, finances were a mess, the building desperately needed repairs, and the executive director had recently been fired. “The theater was over $200,000 in debt,” Civic board ...continued on next page

JULY 18, 2013 INLANDER 27


Scenic Excursion

Train Rides “Down River Days Festival”

July 27 & 28

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Saturday: 1 pm & 3 pm Sunday: 11 am & 1 pm

Affair on Main Street Festival leaves from Metaline Falls Park Aug 31 & Sept 1 JULY 27 & 28 AUG 31 & SEPT 1 OCTOBER 5 & 6

Train leaves from Ione Station

OCTOBER 12 & 13 OCTOBER 19 & 20 OCTOBER 26 & 27

Twenty-mile roundtrip rides between Ione and Metaline Falls, crossing the Pend Oreille River

Autumn Color Rides leave from Ione Station every weekend in October

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CULTURE | THEATER “UNKINDEST CUT,” CONTINUED... member Michael Muzatko says. “She was given an ultimatum to turn around the theater within one year, or they would close it. It would be a parking lot.” And she did it. She overhauled the budget, the marketing strategy and the fundraising philosophy. She started the Spokane Civic Theatre Academy, a theater camp that today attracts 700 registrations a year. There was no question about who was in charge. Thanks to raises over the past eight years, she says she earns a salary of approximately $90,000. Every document had to be approved by her. The play reading committee was eliminated, and she took control of the show selection herself, focusing specifically on what would draw a crowd. “I make over 100 decisions a day for the Civic,” Johnson says. “I couldn’t run everything by everybody. I didn’t have time.” Measured by the numbers — filled seats, ticket sales and balance sheets — Johnson’s tenure has been a smash hit. Muzatko says she has the rare gift of being extraordinarily talented in both the artistic and business aspects of her job. It’s easy to find a host of testimonials from people who find her positive, inspiring and brilliant. Yet it’s equally easy to find a list of detractors — former staffers, actors, directors and board members who say Johnson’s intractable style has driven them away from the Civic. They allege mind games, inflexibility and favoritism. Johnson brushes aside the criticism as jealousy, bitterness over casting decisions, even sexism. “There are not a lot of female artistic directors in the entire country,” Johnson says. “If I was a man, I don’t think this would be happening right now.” Her detractors include many prominent community members.  George Green, once Johnson’s defender, says he abruptly resigned as development director of the Civic in 2010 because he was sick of unwarranted reprimands. “I was made to feel small,” Green says. “By the time I’d left I felt deflated.”  Until her final performance in 2009, Abbey Crawford had performed at the Civic for 20 years. “There’s no reason to do something you love in the face of somebody who doesn’t love you,” Crawford says. Johnson would scream and yell at actors, Crawford says.  Johnson has clashed with her board before. In 2007, the board asked Johnson to report finances in terms of show-to-show, instead of just month-to-month, says Ben Stuckart, city council president and former Civic board vice-chair. “She flat-out refused,” Stuckart says, “and said either [board chair Ron Rector should] resign or she would be leaving.” Rector resigned. In the span of two weeks, Stuckart, Rector, and at least six other board members resigned. Johnson says recent events feel like a rerun. “I feel like it’s a power and control issue,” she says.

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But none of Johnson’s many critics compare to Jim Ryan. In 2010, Ryan moved from Pittsburgh to become the Civic’s music director. He didn’t last

long. It all came down to a Craigslist post. Ryan and his wife had posted anonymously to the Casual Encounters page, seeking sex with a likeminded couple. Instead, a stranger used the post to forward pieces of their email correspondence — and nude photographs — to the Civic, threatening to go to the media. Johnson told Ryan he could either resign or be fired. Ryan chose the latter. The decision opened a fissure in the theater community. Many signed a petition expressing “disdain, disappointment and disgust” with his termination. Some Civic veterans said his termination made them feel unsafe over their personal life: “When is it going to be me next?” Tom Heppler, a gay 56-year-old actor, remembers asking Johnson during one rehearsal. “I got very emotional about it.” Ryan had to fight to get unemployment benefits. He unsuccessfully petitioned the Washington State Human Rights Commission, and attempted to sue the Civic for breach of contract. Nearly three years later, Ryan sounds more amused than bitter. “One of the big errors that Yvonne Johnson made in firing me: She brought somebody across the country with nothing better to do than fight what she had done to him,” Ryan says. Even while working at other local theaters, Ryan played the unrestful spirit, haunting Johnson. Today, SpokaneCivicTheatre.com leads to the Spokane Civic Theatre website. But SpokaneCivicTheatre.org calls up a blog titled “Civic Doody” run by Ryan. There, Ryan has posted more than 50,000 words over the course of two years and nearly all of it, in exhaustive detail, savages Johnson and the Civic board. Johnson, he writes, is a “reviled” “narcissistic maniac” with a “black heart.” The Civic unsuccessfully petitioned the National Arbitration Forum to force Ryan to hand over his SpokaneCivicTheatre domain names, and Johnson filed a defamation lawsuit against Ryan. She says Wooley encouraged her to file it. But defamation is notoriously difficult to prove, especially against a “public figure” like Johnson. Johnson not only lost, she — or the Civic, or its insurance company — is on the hook to pay Ryan a $10,000 penalty, plus his legal expenses. It’s difficult to measure how much Ryan’s activism is responsible for Johnson’s termination, but Ryan is celebrating. “I am happy that she will not hurt anybody any more,” Ryan says. On a summer evening this past Friday, Ryan gathered with a group of actors on the front porch of a South Hill home. Many of the 30 or so attendees — at one time ardent supporters of the Civic — lamented what it had become. “It’s nice to know that I can maybe go home again,” Jone Campbell Bryan, a former Civic staff member, said to ex-Civic actress Jackie Davis. But Johnson wants to go home again as well. She wants to be rehired. Then, she says, healing the community may require professional arbitration. Amid all the backstage backbiting surrounding the Civic, she maintains no one has ever confronted her. “No one,” Johnson says, “has come in to say, ‘Here are some issues we have been having.’” 


CULTURE | DIGEST

OUTING ILLER CREEK Day: Thursday, July 4 Time: 4:30-6:30 pm Location: Iller Creek Unit of the Dishman Hills Conservation Area, 9001 E. Holman Rd., Spokane Valley Temperature: 83 degrees Elevation gain: 1,200 feet Visibility: clear Hiking Distance: 5 miles Terrain: Easy to moderate; some steep trail segments during ascent

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s it winds through part of the 1,233-acre Dishman Hills Conservation Area in south Spokane County, the Iller Creek trail offers some incredibly diverse hiking settings, from a cool forest stream valley, lush with vegetation, to rocky granite monoliths offering spectacular views of the rolling Palouse hills. The increasingly popular hiking trails, managed as part of the county parks system, are tucked away near a quiet residential area of Spokane Valley but are easily accessible from DishmanMica Road and I-90. Though the hike up the hill is fairly steep in some areas, the longer 5-mile loop that follows

the Iller Creek bed on the way up is worth the climb for stunning views of the Palouse you’ll find upon making it to the top. Wildlife and native plant life abound along the trail. This time of year, the wildflowers are abundant and diverse, from deep blue cornflowers and vivid red Indian paintbrush blossoms to purple lupine. Birds and insects are continually visible and audible during this hike, but other wildlife — like moose and black bears — are often spotted in the area, too. — CHEY SCOTT Visit DishmanHills.org for more information.

TO THE FORMER SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE

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Friday, July 26 8pm | $17-$37

For Your Consideration BY HEIDI GROOVER

Thursday, August 8 | 7:30pm Price: $37 - $47 MUSIC VIDEO | What starts looking like some sort of a house party where the band is singing to people sitting on the floor, the new official video for PHOENIX’S “TRYING TO BE COOL” quickly turns into something mesmerizing. With a meta, behind-the-scenes-y feel, the camera follows the group of French rockers as they roam around a warehouse space playing their guitars in hip outfits while playing chess and lighting a giant cannon. All the while, screens in the background count down to the next video cut. You’ll want to watch it again and again, and the song is catchy enough to allow it.

JOURNALISM | Small-scale sports bets, charity poker tournaments — it’s the incredibly low stakes of the stories that will grip you and the police tactics that will leave you wondering, “WTF?” Up on Salon.com this month, “WHY DID YOU SHOOT ME? I WAS READING A BOOK” is an excerpt from reporter Radley Balko’s book, Rise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America’s Police Forces. The piece explains the mind-bending trend of state and local police using SWAT raids against people targeted for things like gambling and underage drinking.

TO DO | There are some things that remind you Spokane doesn’t suck. Spending a THURSDAY ON PERRY ST. is one of those things. The farmers market in the lot between Casper Fry and The Shop features 20 local vendors with everything from produce to honey to artisan spices and freshly baked bread. There’s live music in one corner, and the Veraci Pizza truck baking hot, melty, wood-fired deliciousness in another. Inside The Shop (and on their excellent patio) all the beers on tap, including microbrews, are just $2 on Thursdays. Two. Dollars. You might want to stay all night.

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CULTURE | ART

Meet the Vendors

AT SPOKANE PUBLIC MARKET

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Alan Chatham with one of his interactive pieces, an example of projects that will result from the upcoming Art Up Weekend. STEPHEN SCHLANGE PHOTO

This weekend, creativity turns collaborative in Spokane BY MIKE BOOKEY

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July 26

lan Chatham — or just Chatham as most know him — can do a lot of things. He can make an actual guitar work as a Guitar Hero controller. He can explain complex economic theories. He can instruct a computer to interact with humans. He can’t, however, make a pretty painting. “Making stuff happen is easy for me, but I can’t make beautiful things,” says Chatham, a lean 28-year-old who on this particular morning, like many others, has his laptop and sketch pad sprawled across a table at Boots Bakery, the Main Avenue café that doubles as a de facto hub for Spokane’s creative class. Chatham wants to collaborate with artists, hoping to bring together the city’s different creative camps, combining artists and thinkers with people who have the specific technical skills to get ideas or projects off the ground. That’s the plan for this weekend’s first-ever Art Up Weekend. A variation of Startup Weekend, an entrepreneurial conference in which teams pitch business ideas and work to create a business plan, Art Up Weekend’s ostensible objective during its 21-hour time frame is to have groups of artists and “makers” — people who, as that buzzword suggests, make things in the physical realm — come together to create interactive pieces to be displayed at this fall’s Terrain art event. But organizers say there’s another, perhaps more lofty goal. “We want to get different people from different walks of life in the same room and see what happens,” says Luke Baumgarten, a local advertising copywriter, former Inlander staff writer and co-founder of Terrain, which is also one of the organizers, along with participants from Startup Weekend, Chatham and others. He says the two-day event, held at the new Merlyn’s comic book store space, will allow local creative types to break up into teams. By Saturday evening, the hope is for those teams to have produced a proposal, or working prototype for a Terrain exhibit. But along the way, Baumgarten

says they want to help different camps of artists or programmers or designers get to know each other. “A lot of groups in Spokane tend to selfsegregate. Just getting people in the room is half the battle,” says Baumgarten. On one side, Chatham, explains, you have visual artists: painters, sculptors, illustrators, animators. On the other, there are computer programmers, designers and other skilled technicians. If you put these two groups and their tools together, the thought goes, they should be able to execute something amazing. Chatham is a native Spokanite who joined the Army out of high school in 2003 and eventually landed at Pomona University in Southern California, where he earned a degree in economics. It was his minor in computer science, however, that led him to his current pursuit, a Master’s degree in human-computer interaction from Carnegie Mellon University. In January, though, he decided to take some time off. He came back to Spokane, unsure of what he’d find. Soon, he dove into the city’s art scene, eventually opening his own “laboratory” on Main Avenue where he debuted his first piece, a collaborative exhibit he created with Vanessa Halls called “001: Not Drunk Enough to Dance.” Essentially, the artwork is a drawing that mimics the movements of the viewer. Even the most uptight onlooker will at least wave their arms or do some reluctant public dancing. This is the sort of interactive art this weekend of thinking and doing aims to come up with. Spokane, Chatham says, already loves interactive art, even if they might not know it. “In Spokane, what’s the favorite piece of public art? It’s the garbage goat, because that’s interactive,” says Chatham. n Art Up Weekend • Fri, July 19 at 9 pm through Sat, July 20 at 7 pm • Merlyn’s • 17 W. Main Ave. • Free, but registration required at artupspokane.eventbrite.com


Geographical Gastronomy A local chef proves that Peruvian cuisine is more than quinoa BY ANNEMARIE C. FROHNHOEFER

S

Sara Balcazar-Greene works the wok in the kitchen located inside The Purple Turtle, the marketing firm she operates with her husband.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

ara Balcazar-Greene jerks the wok’s long handle toward her sternum, allowing cubes of steak, red pepper strips, tomatoes and spices to spin through the air before they land back in the wok with a sizzle. She says this is stir-fry, but there doesn’t seem to be much stirring involved. Instead, there’s chopping and flipping. When plated, inch-thick rectangles of seared beef, surrounded by generous slices of sweet red pepper and tomatoes, sit in a deeply flavorful brown sauce imbued with the mellow heat of a Peruvian pepper. This traditional Peruvian dish, loma saltado, isn’t complete without rice and a side of French fries. The ingredients are familiar, as are the cooking techniques, but the outcome is a different, and delicious, interpretation of our hemisphere’s meat and potatoes. Balcazar-Greene, born and raised in Peru, and her husband Brad, born and raised in Spokane, opened their marketing and consulting firm, The Purple Turtle, in 2005. Since that time Sarah has been perfecting her cooking skills. Though not a professional chef, she finds cooking to be a relaxing and entertaining way of sharing her Peruvian heritage with others. The couple frequently holds Peruvianinspired culinary events at their downtown professional space — a large white room complete with a stainless steel kitchen area on one end and a baby grand piano on the other. While many Americans are now familiar with Peruvian quinoa and know the health benefits of the ancient grain, ...continued on next page

JULY 18, 2013 INLANDER 31


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FOOD | COOKING “GEOGRAPHICAL GASTRONOMY,” CONTINUED... we may not fully appreciate the celebratory, sensory nature of other Peruvian dishes. Balcazar-Greene wants to change that. Last year she started a blog (peruvianchick.com) that features Peruvian and Peruvian-influenced dishes. “We have influences from so many different cultures … we have the coast and we have the Andes and we have the jungle. There are so many different flavor profiles because there are so many different regions,” she says. “On the coast there is fresh seafood and ceviche. In the Andes we have a lot of grains like quinoa and many species of potato, then in the jungle we have a lot of fruits and vegetables and cacao.” Peruvian cuisine’s fusion of different cultures and environments is perhaps best exemplified in loma saltado, the culture’s signature dish. The potatoes, indigenous to the region, are deep-fried in the European style, while the rice is steamed in the traditional manner and accompanies an Asian-influenced stir-fry. If loma saltado exemplifies Peruvian cuisine’s ability to fuse different flavors, then ceviche, a chilled seafood dish, shows us the country’s culinary sensuality. Balcazar explains that Peruvian cuisine appeals to as many senses as possible — not just taste alone. Visually, the ceviche is stunning. White fish is cooked in a barely green citrus sauce made of fresh Key lime juice and ginger. Slices of orange sweet potato accompany the pristine fish. Both are topped with kernels of dried yellow corn and fresh parsley. The taste is as refreshing as the color scheme. Citrus adds bite to the mild fish and the potato adds some sweetness. Together they create a light dish that is texturally appealing — firm fish, fine-grained

“We have influences from so many different cultures. … We have the coast... the Andes ... and we have the jungle.”

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potato and crunchy corn. But ceviche is only an appetizer. More flavors, colors and textures await. If the sensation you are going for is warm comfort, then Peruvian entrees like aji de gallina will fulfill that need. Tender, shredded chicken is smothered in a rich Parmesan cheese sauce and topped with slices of hard-boiled egg. If such a creamy dish sounds sleep-inducing, be aware of the underlying ingredient — aji, a yellow Peruvian pepper. It starts out mild, with a texture that is almost as heavy and full as a tomato. But then the aji, as BalcazarGreene says, “kicks you in the back.” You might want to follow that up with chicha, a purple corn drink. Unsweetened, it tastes like a dry wine, but with some cane sugar, cinnamon and cloves, the fragrant drink is unlike any juice you’ve ever tried. The corn provides a nutty flavor and the finish is smooth. Finely diced apple floats atop the drink’s surface. One look at your glass and you will understand when Balcazar-Greene explains that in Peru, every meal is a celebration. Well, maybe not every meal. As a child, Balcazar-Greene did not like quinoa — she thought it was gummy and tasteless. But as her tastes matured, she began to appreciate, even enjoy, the traditional grains of the Andes. She was not alone. Since the mid-’90s, European-trained Peruvian chefs like Gastón Acurio returned home and reinvented their native cuisine, infusing it with indigenous, local products combined in new, flavorful ways. Now quinoa is found in everything from curries and stews to pancakes. Balcazar uses some of Acurio’s practices in her own kitchen, adding them to tricks she learned from her mother — like pulling the pits out of Key limes to make them less bitter. As for the wok technique? That was self-taught. “It was trial and error,” she explains. “I lost plenty of food to the floor.” Through her blog, Balcazar plays the role of ambassador, introducing Inland Northwesterners to the cuisine of her youth, reinterpreted through adult eyes and experience. In a few weeks she intends to expand her ambassadorial role by offering cooking classes to those interested in creating their own Peruvian dishes. n


FOOD | MOBILE

ATTENTION

New Box on the Block

CLASS OF 2014

A gourmet food truck from the Seattle area is hoping to gain new fans in Spokane

COLLEGE APPLICATION WORKSHOP 4 SESSIONS AVAILABLE Aug 19-22 | 9a-12p or 1p-4p Aug 26-29 | 9a-12p or 1p-4p

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ver in the Seattle area, The Bistro Box had regular customers who would line up for the coconut chicken, Wagyu beef sliders, hand-cut french fries and fresh salads and sandwiches. Dozens of fans cried out with the announcement in June that the food truck was leaving the area, but their loss may be Spokane’s gain. The food truck pulled into town recently with hopes of winning over a new set of fans on this side of the state. The Bistro Box may be the new food truck on the block, but its owners clearly already know a thing or two about Spokane — the truck made its local debut on Hoopfest weekend when the streets were filled with hungry crowds, serving sandwiches on fresh Petit Chat focaccia. “It was a good starting point,” says Barb Pagarigan, who owns the business with her husband Floyd. She’s from Spokane originally, and they moved back to be closer to family. They’re adjusting the menu for the east side of the state, and looking forward to filling Spokane’s growing appetite for fresh and creative fare. Pagarigan recommends the coconut chicken, served served as dippers with a sweet-chili orange sauce or as sliders with coleslaw. The menu also features a variety of specialty beef sliders, such as the crowd favorite OMG Slider — beef topped with crunchy peanut butter, pepper jelly, bacon and cheddar. Operating a restaurant that’s already mobile makes it easier to

Must pre register mcmeekancc.com/workshops Call for more info 795.1629

NICK GRAUERT PHOTO

relocate, of course, but in many ways The Bistro Box is starting from scratch. They’re working on arranging a daily schedule of different locations, including a spot downtown and one on the South Hill. In the meantime, the calendar is filling up with local events like the recent Ford Food Truck Challenge and the weekly EmersonGarfield Farmers Market beginning this Friday.  The Bistro Box • bistrobox.net • Locations and events listed at facebook.com/bistrobox

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FOOD | UPDATE

WING YOUR #1 TINATION

DES

31

WITH MOUTH G WATERIN ! S R O V A FL

More than 30 years after its founding, Azar’s continues to provide authentic Middle Eastern cusine.

NICK GRAUERT PHOTO

AZAR’S RESTAURANT

2501 N. Monroe St. 326-7171

T

here is a lot of history within the walls of this small but mighty Greek and Middle Eastern restaurant. Founded in 1980 by her parents, Azar’s tradition and fine cuisine lives on through Katy Azar. Azar’s features many of the same menu items it has offered Spokane for more than 30 years. Its lunch buffet is all-you-can-eat for just $10.95. Longstanding favorites like the Gyro sandwich, the combo dinner and the Spana-

34 INLANDER JULY 18, 2013

kopita Dinner, which the menu describes as “layered filo dough filled with spinach and feta cheese, baked and served with gyro meat” are still on the board. And as Azar will remind you: “Don’t forget the baklava.” The hookah bar is no longer in operation due to changes in Washington state law, but the restaurant still proudly serves imported Greek beer and wine. — JEFF RUTHERFORD


FOOD | SAMPLER

ITALIAN LUIGI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT 245 W. Main Ave. | 624-5226 The sauces, dressings and minestrone here are made from scratch daily, with traditional Italian favorites like fettuccine Alfredo and heart-healthy primavera filling the menu. Sure, Luigi’s is a classic Italian eatery, but it’s also known to think outside of the box, especially with its salmon lasagna. The meatball sandwich with salad makes a great lunch or even a dinner. In the bar, you’ll feel like you’ve been transported to the era when Frank Sinatra and Marilyn Monroe defined the word “class.” MAMMA MIA’S 420 W. Francis Ave. | 467-7786 It’s all home-style southern Italian at this north-side dining room, with sauces, pastas and breads made from old-time family recipes. The menu has plenty of munchable appetizers to keep families happy, alongside traditional pastas, pizzas and meat entrées (we love the garlic chicken). Mix and match any of their pastas and sauces for a new combination each time. They offer a few cheap, hearty lunch options, too: Italian sub sandwiches, pizzas and calzones. ITALIAN KITCHEN 113 N. Bernard St. | 363-1210 Terra-cotta floor tiles, etched glass, heavy draperies, dark wood and kitschy Italiana set the mood for traditional Italian-American favorites. For lunch, the meatball sandwich is delightful. For dinner, check out the restaurant’s two tasty kinds of gnocchi, incredible lasagna and delicious ravioli, plus steaks, chicken and seafood. If you’re feeling adventurous, try building your own pasta. Desserts are few but mighty, including burnt creme and classic tiramisu. And don’t forget the dark, high-ceilinged, old-wood bar next door.

ARLO’S RISTORANTE 330 N. 1st Ave. | Sandpoint 208-255-4186 Sandpoint, Idaho, seems like the last place you’d find world-class Italian cuisine. But thanks to the people at Arlo’s, that’s not the case. Next time you’re heading out to our neighboring state, you need to taste this eatery’s food and find out why so many locals love it. The restaurant has recently added a gluten-free menu, while maintaining its favorites such as flatbread pizzas and a mussel dish. FERRARO’S FAMILY ITALIAN 11204 E. Sprague Ave. | 928-2303 Authentic Italian family recipes from owner and chef Pat Ferraro, who originally hails from Casole Bruzio, Italy, make dinner at Ferraro’s like a quick gastronomical trip to Europe. Mildly spicy broth chock-full of peas, celery, tomato, green beans, kidney beans and tiny pasta team up to make Ferraro’s delicious minestrone, and the signature dish, spicy Chicken al Diavolo with peppers and spices, will make your mouth water and your tongue tingle. TITO’S ITALIAN GRILL AND WINE SHOP 210 E. Sherman Ave. | Coeur d’Alene 208-667-2782 Tito Macaroni’s is all grown up. Dropping the “Macaroni” from its name, it has become Tito’s Italian Grill and Wine Shop. Gone are the white, butcher-paper table coverings, crayons and the self-serve bottle of wine reminiscent of Tomato Street. Now, Tito’s is creating a fine dining experience with a casual atmosphere. In their place are real tablecloths, candles and a wine shop with 125 labels. The new everyday menu features plenty of small plates, salads, brick-oven pizzas and a smattering of entrees that allow for varied appetites. 

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JULY 18, 2013 INLANDER 35


Things are getting weird around here.

Bump in the Night

instead from restless, constantly moving cameras as well as loud noises; quick, horrific visuals; and suggestions of rancid smells that, one of the Warrens explains, could be a sign of demonic activity. Lorraine Warren (Vera Farmiga) is a clairvoyant. Ed Warren (Patrick Wilson) is a paranormal investigator with some religious training. Their teamwork brings them onto the lecture circuit and into homes where, as in this one, “a dark entity has latched on to the family, and the house needs an exorcism.” The Perron story, we’re told, took place in Rhode Island in 1971. Roger Perron (Ron Livingston) was at wit’s end in trying to protect his family, but it was his wife Carolyn (Lili Taylor) who finally reached out to the Plenty of time is spent in this house, where things Warrens — who did this kind of work often — and usually keep going badly for these nice people, and those same found rational explanations for their cases. things make for very scary viewing. There’s an interestNot this time. They realize it as soon as they walk in ing juncture in the film where due to some the door. We realize it as soon as they perfectly placed shockeroos, set and lit in start giving each other silent, knowTHE CONJURING just the right places and ways, characters ing looks. Wan fills the film with neat Rated R on the screen and people in the audience moments: Little Cindy is sleepwalking Directed by James Wan are screaming at the same time, at the same (again), and the scene is accompanied Starring Patrick Wilson, Vera volume. by the great Santo & Johnny song “Sleep Farmiga, Ron Livingston, Lili Taylor But in a terrific example of a script Walk.” Young April chats on and on maintaining a certain balance, the film is just with her new friend Rory, but there’s as much about a different family: the Warnobody in the room with her. Carolyn, rens, a pair of demonologists called in by the frightened playing a game with her kids, approaches a closet blindPerrons to help them deal with whatever supernatural folded (not a good idea). business is going on. Near the end, a lot of truly frightening things are Directed by James Wan, who has scared the bejeebers going on all over the place, culminating in one hell of an out of us before with the gory Saw and the suspenseintense exorcism. This is great fun to watch with an audiful Insidious, this film goes a different route in delivering ence that enjoys this kind of thing. But anyone doing so the shivers. It’s practically bloodless, and gets its scares will also probably stay out of dark rooms for a while. 

The Conjuring busts open the horror film formula BY ED SYMKUS

A

longstanding tradition in horror movies is to use things that go bump in the night to get the audience jumping. There’s plenty of that going on in this frightening based-on-fact item. But The Conjuring takes an extra few steps. Things here also go bump in the daytime, and indoors and outdoors. This is demons, ghosts and witches territory. It follows the Perron family — mom, dad, five daughters, dog — who move to an isolated old house (one which, in the finest of red flag warnings, Daisy the dog won’t enter), are tickled when they discover a boarded-up cellar, then start witnessing and hearing the oddest of experiences. There are distant (and close-up) knocking sounds; every clock in the place stops at the same time every night; mom starts finding mysterious bruises on her body; one of the girls, almost asleep, tells her sister over in the next bed to “stop grabbing my foot!” even though her sister and that bed are nowhere near her, even though we see her get grabbed by “something.”

36 INLANDER JULY 18, 2013


FILM | SHORTS

SOCIAL SECURITY OR SSI?

OPENING FILMS THE CONJURING

Yes, folks, there’s such thing as a really scary (and gripping) horror movie that isn’t punctuated by gore. Director James Wan (Saw) fills his based-on-fact haunted house tale with nervous cameras, dark rooms, loud noises and the stories of two families — one lives in that house, the other is trying to help them. This is really unnerving stuff, and a ball to watch in a big dark room with a bunch of strangers, most screaming as one. (ES) Rated R

GIRL MOST LIKELY

Kristin Wiig’s post-SNL career now finds her in this quirky comedy in which she stars as Imogene, a down-and-out playwright whose mental breakdown lands her back at home. As she assimilates back into the real world, she has to dodge the insanity of her mother (Annette Bening), who is in love with an alleged CIA agent (Matt Dillon) and try to get her life back on track. (MB) Rated R

KON-TIKI

The charming and adventure-filled Oscar-winning documentary of the same name, from 1950, gets a dramatic treatment that keeps the original’s mood and aura intact, but throws in a few fictional inventions. Still, the story of Thor Heyerdahl and a handful of sailors who recreate a centuries-old raft voyage, with only winds and currents guiding them, makes for a nice bit of comfort viewing. Plus, there’s subtle, perfectly done CGI work on some of the sea life they encounter. (ES) Rated PG-13

ONLY GOD FORGIVES

When Ryan Reynolds isn’t a heartthrob, he’s a bad-ass keen on hunting people down. In Only God Forgives, his charac-

Girl Most Likely

ter, Julian Thompson, boxing club owner and part-time drug smuggler, reluctantly seeks justice for the brutal murder of his prostitute-killing brother. Set in Bangkok, the story soon lands Thompson fighting the “Angel of Death,” who also just so happens to be a member of the police squad. Death and crime keeps viewers on their toes as they question who to root for. (KS) Rated R.

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At 58, Bruce Willis is still atop most Hollywood call sheets for the big-budget cop movie. In this one, he’s supported by three Academy Award winners: Catherine Zeta-Jones, Anthony Hopkins and Helen Mirren. Reuniting his old team, Willis plays a retired CIA agent on a mission to track down a nuclear device. Giving the movie extra flavor is the eccentric John Malkovich. (JR) Rated PG-13

R.I.P.D.

Jeff Bridges plays a defender of justice kind of like he did in the Coen brother’s True Grit in 2010. There’s one major difference in this one: He’s dead. Bridges and Ryan Reynolds play deceased cops that fight colossal bad guys on Earth. It’s part buddy-cop movie, part monster movie, and part action movie with a dash of Kevin Bacon. (JR) PG-13

TURBO

Ryan Reynolds is the star of this latest film from DreamWorks Animation. Yes, that means you don’t get to look at him. It’s a cartoon snail version of Reynolds that wants nothing more than to go fast and win the Indy 500. The voices of Paul Giamatti, Bill Hader, and trademark delivery from the voice of Samuel L. Jackson accompany Reynolds in this family flick. (JR) PG

NOW PLAYING AUGUSTINE

This French film features seasoned actor Vincent Lindon and European pop star Soko. Based on a true story, it offers a look at the relationship between revolutionary French neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot and his frail teenage patient, Augustine. An Official Selection at the Cannes Film Festival, this stirring film explores ideas of controversial medicine, forbidden love, power and politics. At Magic Lantern (JR) Not Rated

BEFORE MIDNIGHT

In 1995, Before Sunrise introduced us to the pair as dreamy twenty-somethings whose chance meeting on a train led to a single wildly romantic night in Vienna; in 2004, Before Sunset found them reuniting in Paris as slightly more hardened adults, in a way that completely reframed

the events that occurred nine years earlier. Now, the third installment in Richard Linklater’s story features our couple (Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy) now very much together raising twin daughters as they vacation in Greece. (SR) Rated R

DESPICABLE ME 2

Gru is back with his minions and adopted daughters in the animated sequel, picking up as the Anti-Villain League cracks down on high-tech super-criminals. The agency calls on (or rather, kidnaps) Gru for his ex-villain expertise, but will he be able to juggle the mission on top of his paternal duties? Get ready to giggle for returning voice actors Steve Carell, Kristin Wigg, Miranda Cosgrove and the adorably clumsy minions. (PG) ...continued on next page

JULY 18, 2013 INLANDER 37


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FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING THE HEAT

Ready for another buddy cop film? Well, this time around we’ve got a bit of a twist as a tightly wound FBI agent played by Sandra Bullock goes on the hunt for a badass drug dealer. But the catch is that she has to team up with goofball Boston police officer, played with, we’ll assume, ample fart jokes by Melissa McCarthy in order to catch this evil doer. Hijinks ensue as this unlikely pair hits the mean streets. (MB) Rated R

GROWN UPS 2

Those guys from the glory days of ’90s comedy are back for another round. Happy Madison Productions brings you another Adam Sandler installment with the same pee jokes, physical humor and goofiness that have become his trademark. You get to watch him hang out with David Spade, Kevin James and the always-enjoyable Chris Rock. There are plenty of SNL cameos throughout. Also, Shaq makes an appearance. (JR) Rated PG-13

THE LONE RANGER

Johnny Depp dons another wig as Tonto, the Native American sidekick to the notso-lonesome Lone Ranger, John Reid (Armie Hammer). Tonto lays down the wisdom in fluent broken English to transform a man of law into a masked hero. Loaded with Pirates of the Caribbean special effects and quippy humor, Depp and Hammer gallop horseback through the dust in an adventure against the Western bad guys. (BN) PG-13

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The reboot of the reboot of the Superman story is brimming with both fight and flight scenes, lots of self-doubt, a bit of humor, the problems of actually being a stranger in a strange land, and a moving, heartfelt look at father-son relationships. Henry Cavill is slightly earnest in the lead, Amy Adams gives Lois Lane the right amount of feisty toughness, Russell Crowe shows the stoic side of Jor-El, Kevin Costner is a wise and kindly Jonathan Kent, and Michael Shannon manages to mix malevolence with pride as General Zod. Visual effects are excessive, but writer David S. Goyer and director Zack Snyder make everything balance out just right. (ES) Rated PG-13

MONSTERS UNIVERSITY

The gang from Monsters Inc. is back, and this time they’re back in school. We see Mike trying to get back into the Monsters University scaring department — after failing out — by winning a university-wide “Scare Games.” Here Monsters University takes advantage of a familiar collegemovie trope: an outcasts vs. elites competition straight out of Revenge of the Nerds. (SR) Rated PG

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38 INLANDER JULY 18, 2013

It seems that Joss Whedon (the man behind Avengers, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and generally known as the king of all nerds everywhere) can do whatever the hell he wants after raking in so much superhero cash last summer. Take on Shakespeare? Why not? He wrote and directed this modern telling of the classic tale, most of which he filmed at his own house — because he can do things like that. (MB) Rated PG-13.

MUD

Two teenagers stumble across a ruggedly handsome fugitive (Matthew McConaughey)  hiding in the  Deep South  from bounty hunters and the law. The boys decide to take matters into their own hands, making a pact to keep the dashing criminal hidden from hungry killers and help reunite him with his long lost love. It’s nice to see McConaughey continue his habit of appearing in movies that aren’t, by and large, romantic comedies. Let’s hope he keeps it up. (SM) Rated PG-13

PACIFIC RIM

Guillermo del Toro (Hellboy) pays homage to the Japanese monsters movies of his youth with this big, loud, exciting tale of gigantic creatures rising from the ocean’s depths, and being met by man-made, equally gigantic robots that attempt to beat the tar out of the invaders. The film pauses briefly to share personal, usually tragic, stories of the folks in charge of fighting back, but the insane action is never far away, and it keeps on getting crazier. One great idea was to fill the film with B actors instead of stars. The only really recognizable face is that of del Toro regular Ron Perlman, who plays a darkly comic, 24-carat-gold-shoe-wearing war profiteer. (ES) Rated PG-13

THE SAPPHIRES

A musical comedy-drama, The Sapphires follows four women as they are discovered by a talent scout (played by the hilarious Chris O’Dowd from The IT Crowd) and travel to Vietnam in 1968 to sing for the troops. The soul group battles racism and cat fights, leading to tension in the group and numerous hardships that threatens their success. (KS) Rated PG-31

STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS

Director J.J. Abrams has done what every Star Trek fan has been hoping for. He’s upped the ante on everything in the sequel to his 2009 reboot of the franchise. And he’s done so with an eye cocked in the direction of diehard fans, to whom he sends little shout-outs of old Trek references. He also spins a whopping good, action- and effects-filled tale of intrigue and

attitudes (and relationships and photon torpedoes and even a cameo by a Tribble). (ES) Rated PG-13

STORIES WE TELL

In genre-defying documentary style, Sarah Polley digs into the layers of her family’s memories to find, of course, the truth. But each version of the past and confessions of her mother’s affair combine into a playful, colorful tale that’ll hit you in the feels. Supported by an unusual but genuine cast who mainly play themselves, Polley learns how memories of the past can reverberate into the present. (BN) PG-13

THIS IS THE END

Who would’ve thought that a party at James Franco’s house could lead to catastrophe? Playing themselves, the all-star cast includes Seth Rogen, Danny McBride and Jonah Hill, among others, all of whom are trapped in Franco’s house as the Apocalypse unfolds. As supplies dwindle, they must take on the outside world, dodging sinkholes and blue lights that snatch people away. (AC) Rated R

WHITE HOUSE DOWN

Didn’t we just see this movie, like when it was called Olympus Has Fallen? Yes, but this time it’s angry (or maybe frustrated) Americans instead of North Koreans who launch an assault on 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. Jamie Foxx is the president; Channing Tatum is the square-jawed Everyman who steps up to protect him; James Woods, Maggie Gyllenhaal, and lots of other strong actors struggle with a cliché-ridden script as various good and bad guys. One good thing: We learn that the presidential limo is called Ground Force One. (ES) Rated PG-13

WORLD WAR Z

Former UN worker Gerry Lane (Brad Pitt) and his family are stuck in an apocalyptic traffic jam as Philadelphia falls to fastmoving, rabid zombies. Then, Gerry is tasked by the government to travel around the world looking for the source of this global pandemic, all the while trying to get back to his family. (MJ) Rated PG-13 

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Before Midnight

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Kontiki

68

This is the End

68

Monsters University

64

Man of Steel

60

World War Z

56

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Kon-Tiki takes some dramatic license with a famed 1947 voyage

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BY ED SYMKUS

I

saw the 1950 Oscar-winning documentary Kon-Tiki in elementary school. I can’t recall the details of the film, but do remember some high adventure and a sense of charm. The Kon-Tiki was a large raft made of balsa, fir, and bamboo, lashed together by hemp rope, with a small cabin to protect its crew from the elements. That crew — four Norwegians, one Swede and a Spanish-speaking parrot — was captained by Norwegian anthropologist Thor Heyerdahl, who set out to prove that the people of Polynesia came to the islands, on balsa rafts, from South America, not, as most theories suggested, from Asia. Over a period of 101 days in 1947, they floated, pushed only by winds and currents, from Peru to Polynesia. With just the addition of modern-day provisions, cameras and film, and a transmitting-receiving radio, they successfully recreated such a voyage. Heyerdahl was right. Two Norwegian directors now have made a dramatic film, based on the documentary and Heyerdahl’s book about the voyage, with a few changes in the name of dramatic license. The adventure and charm remain intact. So we get to see actors’ skin become sun- and weather-beaten, and their stubbly faces slowly get

covered by not-very-attractive beards. We meet up with the same creatures the real sailors met: flying fish, a majestic whale shark (perfectly done via CGI). The only flaws appear when the story veers into dramatic territory that doesn’t need to be here. There’s a side story about Heyerdahl’s wife getting upset over him going on the voyage, played out in long-distance phone calls. One of the sailors, Herman Watzinger, makes a couple of instinctual errors that cause tension on the raft, but were invented by KON-TIKI the screenwriter. The Rated PG-13 pacing is also a bit too Directed by Joachim Ronning slow. and Espen Sandberg Kon-Tiki was filmed At the Magic Lantern in two languages at once: one take in Norwegian, followed by one in English. The Norwegian version was the result of funding from the Norwegian Film Institute, and a native-language version was one of their requirements. There’s an English version because Heyerdahl, who died in 2002 at 87, made a deal many years ago with producer Jeremy Thomas that the movie would be made in English. The version at the Magic Lantern, of course, is in English. 

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Local band Space Movies seek new levels of noise-induced transcendence every time they play BY JORDAN SATTERFIELD

Space Movies at the 2013 Volume music festival. JENNIFER DEBARROS PHOTO

here is a theory that sound at extremely high volumes can have hallucinatory effects on the brain. It happened to me. Just once, but it was a memorable enough experience to incite vivid flashbacks every time I even think the name of the band responsible: Space Movies. Multi-instrumentalist Alex Moe and drummer Aaron Hansen, the two freaks behind Space Movies, sat down with me last week to discuss their upcoming show this Saturday at their most frequent stage, Mootsy’s. We met there, and sat talking on the top floor. It became clear that this was the quietest these two had ever been together at Mootsy’s. On stage, Moe and Hansen almost seem possessed, as though some unseen life form is pulling the strings and turning up the instruments. Moe, hunched over a keyboard with a bass guitar on his shoulder, convulses furiously with every groove that slides out of his amplifiers. Directly in front of him, Hansen is a blur of percussive energy, though we can occasionally catch a glimpse of his gas-mask-covered face through the mess of limbs. But once they put down their instruments, the duo is surprisingly mild-mannered, and they have a very lucid understanding of the music that they make. Though it may be loud and largely improvisational, it is also direct, intentional and completely original. “People would probably guess this, but Lightning Bolt is definitely our biggest influence,” says Moe of the Rhode Island noise duo. There is an obvious connection — Space Movies’ heavy, shifting and unpredictable arrangements typically feature a bass-anddrums lineup similar to Lightning Bolt. But a better understanding of how their music feels came via my stepfather, who saw them with me earlier this year. “It sounds like a Pink Floyd breakdown,” my stepdad leaned over mid-performance and screamed into my ear, “like something from A Saucerful of Secrets or Meddle.” At the time I think I yelled back, “No it doesn’t!” But since hearing his explanation, it’s become more and more clear that he is completely right. There are almost frightening amounts of excitement and chemistry between these two, and once they’ve switched on, it seems to pour out of them like they’ve been doing it for centuries. Which is intriguing, given that the band started with, ahem, modest ambitions. “We used to just smoke a lot of weed and look up random YouTube videos,” remembers Hansen. He goes on to explain the origins of the band’s name, which has something to do with a YouTube video in which a crackhead explains his apparent successes in Hollywood making “space movies.” Explanation aside, the name Space ...continued on next page

JULY 18, 2013 INLANDER 41


MUSIC | NOISE “NO STOPPING,” CONTINUED... Movies works well, invoking the dark, terrifying and unexplored realms where Moe and Hansen seem to tread. “Everything’s pretty loosely written,” says Moe, a self-proclaimed jazz obsessive. Whether it was intentional or not, he has brought the often nervous, free-form structures of his beloved jazz records into the noise world with his instrumentalism. The approach is crucial to their sound, and also a easier way for Space Movies to operate. “We have a lot of wiggle room,” Hansen chimes in, “because we don’t really like writing music.” This is proving difficult for a band that’s starting to take recording more seriously. Moe and Hansen have plans for putting together enough material for an LP later this year or early next, most likely with the help of a Kickstarter campaign. “Writing is tough,” continues Hansen, “because a lot of the time we’ll play and I’ll say, ‘I’m not totally sure how I played that, but this kinda sounds like it.’ ” But this further examination of what they are capable of as a duo is bringing them closer artistically and helping to actualize their full musical potential. Back in the day, they say they were happy to get high and record a cassette tape’s worth of abstract hip-hop beats. Now they bring a catharsis that you can almost touch as it seeps out of their pores. “Space Movies is just me and Aaron,” says Moe, “and it always has been and it always will be.” Then Moe says something that specifically relates to Space Movies’ philosophy concerning live music, but seems to reach beyond that, into a more broad explanation of how the band operates in general: “No stopping.” n Space Movies with The Kitchen and Mirror Mirror • Sat, July 20, at 10 pm • Mootsy’s • 406 W. Sprague Ave. • $5 • 21+ • 8381570

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MUSIC | ALT-COUNTRY

Son Volt’s latest album, Honky Tonk, features plenty of fiddles and steel guitar.

Back to their Roots Son Volt have always had a little country in them, but their new album dives headfirst into twang BY GAWAIN FADELEY

T

wenty years after the release of Uncle Tupelo’s final album, Jay Farrar and Jeff Tweedy still cast a twin shadow over American music. Their songwriting partnership has influenced an entire generation of punks who weren’t afraid of a touch of twang or fiddle. Think of them as the Lennon and McCartney of alt-country. Or maybe the Jagger and Richards. Tweedy continues his rise as the leader of prolific dad-rock luminaries Wilco. You may have heard of them. Son Volt, with Farrar at the helm, has maintained a stream of solid albums, beginning with 1995’s Trace. Their latest release, Honky Tonk, finds the band in a more traditional mood, reaching back to the spilled-beer/sawdust-floor vibe of classic Bakersfield country a la Buck Owens or Merle Haggard. There are fiddles and pedal steel aplenty, the latter serving as a particular inspiration, as Farrar told No Depression early this year: “I’ve been playing the pedal steel for about two years… there’s such an inherent energy to those late 1950s and early 1960s recordings, and the pedal steel playing was the common thread with the Bakersfield contingent.” Honky Tonk feels like a bit of a departure for the band, which after three well-received releases in the mid-to-late ’90s, took an extended hiatus until 2005’s Okemah and the Melody of Riot — a fiery

quasi-protest album released amid the tumult of our most recent adventure in Iraq. Named after Woody Guthrie’s Oklahoma hometown, the record aimed to prove once again the power of song in speaking truth to power. Son Volt followed up with the harder-edged The Search in 2007 and American Central Dust in 2009. The latter was a considerably mellower affair that saw the band moving towards a more traditional sound, a trend that continues on Honky Tonk. “There’s always been a duality to Son Volt in that there’s acoustic songs and electric songs, but this time the focus was the fiddle and pedal steel guitar aesthetic,” Farrar told No Depression. “I wanted to acknowledge an homage to honky-tonk music, yet not feel limited by the parameters.” Honky Tonk manages to do exactly that, embracing more traditional instrumentation while remaining quintessentially Son Volt. Spokanites have been lucky to have had a solid run of Americana and Roots artists coming through so far this summer; this will be a must-see show from a truly seminal band whose influence can be traced across a wide swath of American music. n Son Volt with Colonel Ford • Tue, July 23, at 8 pm • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague Ave. • $15 • All-ages • ticketweb.com • 244-3279

TIEMPO LIBRE • DELHI 2 DUBLIN • PAUL PERESS TRIO STRETCH ORCHESTRA • SHAKURA S’AIDA • BRANDI DISTERHEFT CLINTON SWANSON BLUES BAND • MELODY DIACHUN QUARTET SULTANS OF STRING • APPROACHING NORMAL • SELKIRK TRIO MOONGLOW • JAN VAN GOLD BAND

JULY 18, 2013 INLANDER 43


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ROCK MCDOUGALL

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 7/18

ARBOR CREST WINERY (927-9463), Spokane Brass Quintet BABY BAR, Babs Johnson Gang, Normal Babies, Catholic Guilt CARR’S CORNER, Endever, Crytikal Mass, Cold Blooded, Autolycus COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, PJ Destiny J CDA PARK (SPOKANE), Chutzpah CURLEY’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE DALEY’S, The Usual Suspects THE DISTRICT BAR, Gator Loops J THE HOP!, Vante Hendrix, Embodied Organics, Cisco, Indica, Wyatt Haste JOHN’S ALLEY, Left Hand Smoke J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow NYNE, Pamela Benton J PHAT HOUSE, Tone Collaborative J RIVERSTONE PARK, 6 Foot Swing THE ROCK BAR, Armed & Dangerous TEMPLIN’S (208-773-1611), Sammy Eubanks THE VIKING, AG/CP

Friday, 7/19

BIG SKY’S (489-2073), The Coleman Underground BIGFOOT, Cliff Park BOLO’S (891-8995), Protocol BOOMERS (368-9847), Gumball Alley BROOKLYN DELI & LOUNGE (8354177), Starlite Motel CARLIN BAY RESORT (208-6677314), Whack A Mole J CARR’S CORNER, Ian Miles, Liz Rognes, Strange Mana THE CELLAR, Max Daniels Trio J THE CENTER, Rock or Roll, Evan Egerer, Awaken the Sleeping, Undercard CLOVER (487-2937), Karrie O’Neill CDA CASINO, Phoenix, Ron Greene COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR (208263-6971), Devon Wade

44 INLANDER JULY 18, 2013

S

ee that rock tag up there next to McDougall’s name? It’s not quite appropriate. But neither is country, or Americana, or any other confined genre tag. We chose rock because you can dance to McDougall, but that’s where the similarities end. McDougall is a one-man band, but he sounds like an eight-piece. He stomps a bass drum as he picks away at a banjo or a guitar. On “Ready, Begin,” he sings of warm summer days, blackberry-stained fingertips and a sweaty backyard dance party. When McDougall plays instrumental songs, they’re transfixing. It’s American nostalgia music for a new generation. — LEAH SOTTILE McDougall with The Holy Broke and Tom V • Thu, July 25, at 10 pm • Mootsy’s • 406 W. Sprague Ave. • $5 • 21+ • 8381570

ROCK JOHN MAYER

CONKLING MARINA (208-686-1151), Stagecoast West THE COUNTRY CLUB (208-6762582), The Ryan Larsen Band CURLEY’S, Sucker Punch THE DISTRICT BAR, Gator Loops FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kozmik Dreamzz J FORZA COFFEE CO. (535-7179, The Causeway J THE HOP!, Scum, Dirty Savage, Neck Cutta, Versatial, Element X, Legally Insane IRON HORSE, The Hitmen JONES RADIATOR, Bob Rice KNITTING FACTORY, Sammy Eubanks, Soul Proprietor J LAGUNA CAFÉ, String Theory LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Evan Michael MAX AT MIRABEAU (922-6252), Plastic Saints J MEZZO PAZZO, Nick Grow J THE PHAT HOUSE, Left Over Soul RED LION AT THE PARK (326-8000), Chris Rieser and Jay Rawley

J RED ROOM LOUNGE , B Side Players, Son Dulce, Milonga THE ROADHOUSE, Jackson Michaelson SPLASH, Steve Denny, Karma’s Circle SULLIVAN SCOREBOARD (891-0880), Triple Shot J THE NEST AT KENDALL YARDS, Mike Ross TWELVE STRING BREWING (9908622), Maxie Ray Mills J THE VIKING, The Lion Oh My, Summer in Siberia, Facedown ZOLA, Raggs and Bush Doktor

Saturday, 7/20

BABY BAR, Moose Portrait BARBARY COAST (489-4084), The Usual Suspects BIGFOOT, Cliff Park BIRDY’S (863-9572), Maxie Ray Mills BOLO’S (891-8995), Protocol BOOMERS (368-9847), Gumball Alley CARLIN BAY RESORT (208-6677314), Whack A Mole

I

t would be easy to completely disregard John Mayer, which I probably will directly after writing this. However, before you do that, consider that while John Mayer makes eye-rolling, shmaltzy romance ballads, he’s not a bad musician. In fact, he’s something of a guitar virtuoso: he’s been called one of the “New Guitar Gods” by Rolling Stone and has collaborated with Buddy Guy, B.B. King and Eric Clapton. He even was an opening act for the Rolling Stones. In the music department the guy is no slouch. Dislike him for his gag-inducing, frathouse-pantydropper love songs. But the guy definitely knows how to play. — LEAH SOTTILE John Mayer with Phillip Phillips • Sat, July 20, at 7:30 pm • Gorge Amphitheatre • Quincy, Wash. • $20-$95 • All-ages • livenation.com THE CELLAR, Max Daniels Trio J THE CENTER, Suburban Legends, The Resignators, The Back Ups J CHAPS (624-4182), Just Plain Darin with Tyler Coulston CLOVER (487-2937), Evan Denlinger CLUB RIO (208-437-4814), Last Chance Band CDA CASINO, Phoenix, Ron Greene CONKLING MARINA (208-686-1151), Stagecoast West THE COUNTRY CLUB (208-6762582), The Ryan Larsen Band CURLEY’S, DBC Band, Sucker Punch THE DISTRICT BAR, Mark Shurtz FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kozmik Dreamzz GATEWAY CAFÉ (208-686-1314), Al Rowe, Doc Williams, Gordy Ryan J THE GORGE, John Mayer, Phillip Phillips (see story above) J THE HOP!, Darto, Mojave Wizard, Lust for Glory, Wicked Obsession IRON HORSE, The Hitmen JOHN’S ALLEY, Scott Pemberton

J KNITTING FACTORY, Mid Summer Madness feat. Jay 5, True Justice, On One, Over Time, Dirty Savage, Whurlwind Entertainment, Imperfect Cody, Cordell Drake & Mista Snipe, Enfeeble Ataxia LA ROSA CLUB (208-255-2100), Justin Lantrip MAX AT MIRABEAU (922-6252), Plastic Saints J MOOTSY’S, Space Movies (see story on page 41), The Kitchen, Mirror Mirror RED LION RIVER INN (328-9526), Chris Rieser and the Nerve J SAGLE COMMUNITY HALL, North Idaho Metalfest feat. Odyssey, Eninent Throne, Symptoms of Insanity, Devoured Soul, Valley of Nod SPLASH, Steve Denny, Karma’s Circle SULLIVAN SCOREBOARD (891-0880), Triple Shot THE VIKING, London Get Down, The


Lion Oh My, Facedown, Diamond Speedboat, Evolved, Elude, Thunder and Lightning, Death by Pirates, Hexxus WEBB’S SLOUGH , Peter Rivera, Big Mumbo Blues Band, Java Kola ZOLA, Hot Club of Spokane

Sunday, 7/21,

ARBOR CREST WINERY (927-9463), Big Mumbo Blues CDA CASINO, Echo Elysium  CDA CITY PARK, Tuxedo Junction Big Band CONKLING MARINA (208-686-1151), Devon Wade CURLEY’S, The Usual Suspects DALEY’S, VooDoo Church THE DISTRICT BAR, Devon Wade  THE HOP!, Mobile Deathcamp, Hollywood Jesus, Fueling the Heathen, Helldorado, Crytikal Mass JOHN’S ALLEY, Scott Pemberton THE ROADHOUSE, John Arthur Martinez ZOLA, The Bucket List

Monday, 7/22,

EICHARDT’S, Truck Mills  THE HOP!, Fun Police, Johnny and the Moondogs, Facedown, B. Radicals MOOTSY’S, John Kirlin and the High Plains Drifters, Jacob Jones ZOLA, Nate Ostrander

Tuesday, 7/23,

 THE HOP!, Adestria, To The Wind, Deserters, Deviance, Outlier

MUSIC | VENUES

 KNITTING FACTORY, Son Volt (see story on page 43), Colonel Ford  RED ROOSTER COFFEE (2029138), Open mic  ROCKET MARKET (343-2253), Just Plain Darin ZOLA, Dan Conrad & the Urban Achievers

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Wednesday, 7/24,

ARBOR CREST (927-9463), Diane Schuur THE CELLAR, Robbie French CONKLING MARINA (208-686-1151), Sammy Eubanks  DOWNTOWN CDA, The Fat Tones FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho JOHN’S ALLEY, Science!  KNITTING FACTORY, Randy Houser, Adam Craig Band  LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Dario Re  MEZZO PAZZO, Joe Caruso  PHAT HOUSE, Neo Soul  THE NEST AT KENDALL YARDS, Terrible Buttons ZOLA, Island Soul

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315 RESTAURANT • 315 E. Wallace Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-9660 AVENUE PIZZARIA • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 624-0236 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BELLTOWER • 125 SE Spring St., Pullman • 509-334-4195 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division • 467-9638 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 CARR’S CORNER • 230 S. Washington • 474-1731 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-9463 THE CENTER • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. • 433-7328 THE CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 South Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2467 CURLEY’S BAR & BISTRO • 26433 W. Hwy. 53, Hauser • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St. Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, Coeur d’Alene • 208-765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGAN’S • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GIBLIANO BROTHERS • 718 W. Riverside Ave. • 315-8765 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-7314 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague Ave. • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 4480887 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th Ave. • 863-9313 MOON TIME • 1602 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-2331 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 NORTHERN QUEST CASINO • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague • 474-1621 O’SHAY’S • 313 Coeur d’Alene Lake Drive, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-4666 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne St. • 443-4103 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR • 20 N. Raymond Rd., Spokane Valley • 413-1894 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPLASH • 115 S. Second St., Coeur d’Alene • 208-765-4000 THE SWAMP • 1904 W 5th Ave • 458-2337 VIKING BAR & GRILL • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 ZOLA • 22 W. Main • 624-2416

JULY 18, 2013 INLANDER 45


Garland Street Fair TREVOR PATRICK PHOTO

FESTIVAL STREET FAIR FRENZY

Summer in the Inland Northwest is packed with outdoor events, meaning there’s plenty to do just about every weekend. This coming Saturday is host to two outdoor community street fairs: the Garland Street Fair and the South Perry Street Fair. Up on Garland, it’s all about the Wizard of Oz. The 11thannual event features a flying monkey pet costume contest as one of many activities. Across town, the Perry District’s community fair includes a parade, bouncy castle, vendors, interactive booths and plenty of neighborhood charm. And hey, there’s definitely enough time in the day to attend both. — CHEY SCOTT Garland Street Fair • Sat, July 20 from 10 am-5 pm • Free • garlanddistrict.com • South Perry Street Fair • Sat, July 20 from 10 am-5 pm • Free • southperry.org

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46 INLANDER JULY 18, 2013

SPORTS MUD SLOG

This weekend, “Puddle Jumpers” and “Extreme Muddy Buddies” are lacing up their running shoes for Coeur d’Alene’s third-annual Muddy Miles race. In past years, the 2-mile fun run has attracted tutu-wearing, business-suited and bikini-clad teams of three or more willing to muck it up in the obstacle-laden course of puddles and goo. It’s free to watch, but spectators can purchase water balloons to bean their favorite runners in support of the fundraiser. — BETH NOTTURNO Muddy Miles • Sat, July 20 from 3-6 pm • $10-$35 • North Idaho Fairgrounds • 4056 N. Government Way, Coeur d’Alene • muddymiles.com • 208-415-0292

MUSIC CAN’T BEAT IT

It’s been four years since Michael Jackson’s untimely death, but we’re not willing to let go of the King of Pop just yet. An MJ tribute concert performance is coming to Spokane, featuring Kenny Wizz, a famous Jackson impersonator. Transport yourself back in time to the Jackson 5 before all the moonwalking, “woo-hooing,” and pelvic thrusting, and through Michael Jackson’s life and music. Audiences can relive legendary Jackson moments or see them for the first time in this one-night show that melds the pop star’s iconic choreography and costumes into stage renditions of 20 hit songs. — MYCHAELA NICKOLOFF Michael Jackson HIStory II • Wed, July 24 at 8 pm • $39-$59 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • ticketswest.com • 279-7000


THEATER FAIRY TALE REDUX

The Stinky Cheese Man and other Fairly Stupid Tales, adapted from the popular children’s book by Jon Scieszka, is taking the stage at the Pullman Civic Theatre. The small, historical theater that dates back to the 1890s is recreating the award-winning book’s fairy tale parodies through costumed characters based on illustrations that make up the book. The Gingerbread Man is now stinky and delusional, the Princess sleeps on a bowling ball instead of a pea, and “Little Red Running Shorts” is without her cape. It’s a show that will entertain all ages, and your favorite fairy tales will never be the same. — ANNA CLAUSEN The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales • July 18-28, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $10-$15 • Pullman Civic Theatre • 1220 N.W. Nye St. • pullmancivictheatre.org • 332-8406

FILM BACK-TO-BACK TO THE FUTURE

From 1985 through 1990, Robert Zemeckis gifted upon the universe three films about time travel, the consequences of our actions and the dangers of accidentally hooking up with your mom or ancestor. Of course, we’re talking about the Back to the Future trilogy. This trio of films should be viewed in one sitting in order to truly appreciate all the tie-ins and inside jokes the filmmakers introduced throughout the films. Mobius Science Center teams up with the Bing Crosby Theatre for back-to-back-to-back screenings of these Michael J. Fox classics. — MIKE BOOKEY Back to the Future Trilogy • Sat, July 20 beginning at 10 am • Bing Crosby Theatre • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • $15

EVENTS | CALENDAR

COMEDY

STAND-UP COMEDY Local comedians. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy, 2721 N. Market St. (4837300) MUSIC IN YOUR FACE Improv comedy show based on a Medieval Minstrel Show. Fridays at 8 pm through July 26. $7-$9. All-ages. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) SAFARI Short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) IMPROV SHOWDOWN Family-friendly improv comedy show featuring a team from Seattle’s ComedySportz up against Spokane improvisers. July

20 at 7 pm and 9 pm. $8-$10. Ignite Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway Ave. (795-0004)

COMMUNITY

SPOKENYA Fourth annual 7K run/ walk benefiting efforts to bring clean water to Adeido, Kenya. July 20 at 9 am. $20-$25. Starts at Life Center Church, 1202 N. Government Way. spokenyarun.org SPOKANE HUMANE SOCIETY BIRTHDAY BASH Celebrate the organization’s 116th birthday and its alumni pets, volunteers and supporters. July 20 from 11 am-2 pm. Free. Spokane Humane Society, 6607 N. Havana St. (979-9996)

JULY 18, 2013 INLANDER 47


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess THE JAWS OF EX-WIFE

I have had a huge crush on a man for several months and finally asked him out for drinks. During our “date,” he mentioned his friend he wanted to set me up with, and I told him that HE is the person I’m interested in. He laughed nervously and seemed a little shocked. We went back to his place and spent hours just talking. He revealed that he’s dating his ex-wife. She lives four hours away, and he visits her a couple times a month. We’ve since hung out at AMY ALKON the pool and had drinks, but he again mentioned that he’s dating his ex-wife. I’ve never been this attracted to a man, and I can’t stop fantasizing about meeting him for much more than drinks! Do I lie low, waiting for him to drop his ex-wife, or do I make a move? —Magnetized There was a reason the guy wasn’t asking you out, and it wasn’t because a cartoon witch put a spell on him and he was unable to say “How about a drink on Friday night?” until three animated teapots and several woodland animals broke the evil curse. The wisdom of grandmas remains wise: If you want to catch a boy, don’t run after him. As I explain with some frequency, women evolved to be the harder-to-get sex because having sex meant they could end up a single mother dragging a kid around the Sahara. Men coevolved to expect women to be choosier and to suspect that something’s wrong with a woman when she’s doing the chasing. This evolution and coevolution got burned into human psychology over millions of years — as contrasted by the drop in the bucket of human existence that is the women’s movement in the past 50-some years. So, even if a man’s ego is saying “Well, how groovy that she’s pursuing me!” his genes are probably starting a betting pool for whether you are seriously loose, are seriously needy, or will soon be frying up his pet koi and feeding it to him in a little lemon butter sauce. Assuming some guy isn’t too fragile a flower to lay his ego on the line (in which case he’s lame partner material anyway), if he isn’t asking you out, he either isn’t interested enough or isn’t available enough. You’re now making this guy out to be the greatest thing since the four-slice toaster, probably to justify hanging around like a dog waiting for a scrap of food to get knocked off the counter. (In the wake of making a mistake, we have an unfortunate ego-coddling tendency to come up with reasons it wasn’t a mistake instead of admitting that, in fact, it was, which would allow us to move on.) Any further date-flavored get-togethers with this man are a bad idea. By continuing to throw yourself at him, you’ll turn your self-respect into a chew toy. And even if he eventually detached himself from his ex-wife, there’s a good chance that, by chasing him, you’ve already screwed up the equilibrium for any relationship. A more productive deployment of your time and ego would be dating that man he offered up as a decoy or finding men on your own — the available kind — and flirting with them, which alerts them that you’re there for the chasing and interested in being chased. Flirting actually allows a woman to to make the first move — but far more alluringly than by yelling “Can’t you see I want you, you moron?!” while clubbing a man over the head with the poolside clue phone.

ZERO THUMB GAME

Do you text a guy after getting home from a fabulous date to hint that you want to see him again? Maybe to tell him how awesome he is or hint at your schedule? My girlfriend says no, but I think a guy should know you liked him so he feels he can ask for a second date. —Considerate There are times when a guy knows better than to ask a woman for a second date, like when she ended the first one by throwing herself out of his car while it was still moving. Otherwise, a man doesn’t need hand-holding and encouragement in the form of texts: “Here are all the dates I’m free through 2015. Also, I’m double-jointed. Pick me! Pick me!” When you like a guy, you tell him so during your date by seeming happy and engaged and thanking him for a great time at the end, which suggests you’d be amenable to another date without also suggesting that you’re controlling and desperate. Just because we have all these fabulous high-tech ways of communicating doesn’t mean we should always be quick to use them, tempting as it can be to help a man along to the thought, “Wow…what a wonderful helicopter mom she’ll make someday.” n ©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

48 INLANDER JULY 18, 2013

EVENTS | CALENDAR A NIGHT IN PERSIA Themed dinner hosted by Solace for the Children featuring Persian and American dishes, auctions and performance by the children staying here for medical treatment. July 25 at 5:30 pm. $50. Best Western, 506 W. Appleway Blvd., CdA. solacenispo.com/nightinpersia (208-660-8088)

ETC.

EXTREME SCIENCE Science presentation for kids. July 18 at 3 pm, Hillyard branch July 19 at 2 pm, South Hill branch July 23 at 2 pm and 3:30 pm, Shadle branch July 24 at 3 pm, Indian Trail branch. spokanelibrary.org WOODSTALK Music and arts festival featuring vendors, food, activities and more. July 20 from noon-8 pm. All-ages. Free. Unity Spiritual Center, 4465 N. 15th St., CdA. unitycenter.org (208-772-1695) MANITO ROSE HILL TOUR Lead gardener Steve Smith leads a tour of the Rose Hill and lectures on rose care. July 20 at 10 am. Free, registration required. Manito Park Meeting Room, West 21st Ave. thefriendsofmanito.org (456-8038) VERMICOMPOSTING Learn how to incorporate worms into your garden through composting. July 20 from 11 am-1 pm. $5, registration required. Sun People Dry Goods Co., 32 W. Second Ave. (368-9378) WATER AND PERMACULTURE An interactive workshop on better managing water usage in the yard and garden. July 20 from 3-5 pm. $11, pre-registration required. Sun People Dry Goods Co., 32 W. Second Ave. (368-9378) SALON Small group discussion on books, movies, poetry and more. July 21 from 3:30-5:30 pm. Free. Address provided to those interested in attending. (Contact Susan at 326-0364) CONCENTRATION MEDITATION Learn the techniques and benefits of concentration meditation. July 21 from 9:30 am-4 pm. Free. Community Building, 25 W. Main Ave. concentrationmeditation.eventbrite.com (263-7213) BEGINNING SOAP MAKING Design your own fragrance and make 3 pounds of soap. July 23-24 from 6:308:30 pm. $55. Greencastle Soap, 203 N. Stone St. greencastlesoap.com (466-7223) GIRL SCOUT SCIENCE CAMP Participants learn new skills while exploring science through activities at Riverfront Park. July 24-26 from 9:30 am-3 pm. $45-$55. Girls in grades 1-8 including non-Girl Scouts. Mobius Science Center, 811 W. Main Ave. (800-827-9478)

FESTIVAL

CHERRY PICKERS TROT & PIT SPIT Live music, food and drink, pit spit, 5K and more. July 18 from 5-7 pm. Green Bluff Growers, Mead, Wash. greenbluffgrowers.com RENDEZVOUS IN THE PARK Family entertainment, live music, food/drink, special kids activities and more. July 18-21; concerts at 6 pm each evening. East City Park, Moscow, Idaho. rendezvousinthepark.com NORTHWEST BIPLANE FLY-IN Biannual historic plane fly-in featuring vintage aircraft, food, guest speakers and more. July 19-21. Fri from 1-7 pm, Sat

from 6:30 am-7:30 pm, Sun from 6:30 am-10 am. Felts Field, 6105 E. Rutter Ave. nwbiplane.com DAVENPORT PIONEER DAYS Chalk art contest, kids and family activities, food and drink, car show, vendors, petting zoo and more. July 19-21. Downtown Davenport, Wash. pioneerdays.org (994-8188) RATHDRUM DAYS Community days featuring live music, food, beer garden, classic car show and more. July 19-21. Lakeland High School, 7006 W. Hwy. 53, Rathdrum. rathdrumchamberofcommerce.com (208-687-2866) NORTHWEST RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL Reenactments, vendors, performances and more. July 20-21 from 11 am-7 pm. $6-$35. 6493 Hwy. 291, Nine Mile Falls. nwrf.net (278-7728) CHERRY FESTIVAL Cherry picking picking, arts and crafts, vendors and more. July 20-21. Green Bluff Growers, Mead, Wash. greenbluffgrowers.com GARLAND STREET FAIR 11th annual “Wizard of Oz”-themed neighborhood street fair featuring family events, food, live music, car show, arts and crafts and more. July 20 from 10 am-5 pm. Free to attend. Garland Business District. (939-8970) HUCKLEBERRY FESTIVAL Arts and crafts, food, live music, entertainment, family activities and more benefiting the Priest Lake Search & Rescue. July 20. Priest Lake Golf Club, 152 Fairway Dr. (208-443-2525) KURONEKOCON Cosplay and anime convention. July 20-21. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. kuronekocon.com OLD MILL DAYS Fun run, pancake breakfast, parade, family activities, food and drink, vendors and more. July 20 starting at 8 am. Downtown Oakesdale. oakesdalemuseum.com SOUTH PERRY STREET FAIR Parade, live music, food and drink, family events, vendors and more. July 20 from 10 am-5 pm. Free. Grant Park, 1015 S. Arthur. southperry.org (714-8804)

FILM

KIDS SUMMER MOVIE SERIES Movies shown on Wed and Thu at 1 pm, through Aug. 15. $3/show or $15/pass. Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St., Moscow. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) RISE OF THE GUARDIANS Free summer movie screening. July 18 at 1:45 pm. Free. The Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. (208-667-1865) BEFORE MIDNIGHT Screening of the drama/rom-com. July 18 and 20 at 7:30 pm. $6-$7. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint. (208-263-9191) PINOCCHIO Outdoor movie screening. July 19 at dusk. Free. Rocky Hill Park, Mission Ave. and Winrock St., Liberty Lake. pavillionpark.org (755-6726) 42 Outdoor screening of “42.” July 19 at 8:30 pm. Free. University of Idaho, 1001 W. Paradise Creek St., Moscow. uidaho.edu 101 DALMATIANS Outdoor screening of the Disney animated film. July 19 at 9:30 pm. Free. Lidgerwood Presbyterian, 4449 N. Nevada St. (287-9667) BACK TO THE FUTURE TRILOGY Screening of all three films as part of Mobius Science Center’s summer film series. July 20 at 10 am, 12:30 pm and

3 pm. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com JURASSIC PARK Screening as part of the South Perry Summer Theater series. July 20 at dusk. Free. The Shop, 924 S. Perry St. (534-1647) TANGLED Outdoor movie screening. July 20 at dusk. Free. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd., Liberty Lake. pavillionpark.org (755-6726) THE INCREDIBLES Outdoor movie screening featuring pre-show performances, food and more. July 24 at dusk. $5. Riverfront Park, Lilac Bowl, 507 N. Howard St.

FOOD

HEALTHY COOKING CLASS Learn what changes to make to diet and lifestyle to lower the risk for heart disease. July 18 from 6:30-8 pm. Free. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt St. cherspokane.org (232-8138) SPANISH STYLE COOKING Learn to make gazpacho soup and sangria. July 19 from 6-8 pm. $50. Inland Norwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St., Bldg. 1 (533-8141) COLD BREW COFFEE Class on techniques to make cold-brew coffee. July 20 at 10 am. Free, RSVP requested. Roast House Coffee, 423 E. Cleveland Ave., Ste. C. (995-6500) OVERBLUFF CELLARS RELEASE PARTY Release of the winery’s 2010 Syrah, featuring live music by The Wreckers and a dusk screening of the film Bottle Shock. July 20. Ages 21+. Overbluff Cellars, 620 S. Washington. (991-4781) SUMMERTIME PIES Learn to innovate classic favorites and how to make a flaky crust. July 23 at 5:30 pm. $45. Kitchen Engine, 621 W. Mallon Ave. thekitchenengine.com (328-3335) NORTHWEST CUISINE Chef Adam Hegsted leads a cooking class using Inland Northwest ingredients. July 24 from 5:30-8 pm. $50. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 William St., Post Falls. (208-457-8950) EAT TO LIVE WORKSHOP Six-week workshop on the benefits and how-tos of eating a plant-based diet including cooking demos, meal planning and more. July 24-Aug. 28, Wed from noon-1:30 or 5:30-7 pm. $10/class or $50/program. Center for Spiritual Living, 2825 E. 33rd Ave. (951-5557)

MUSIC

SUMMER CONCERTS IN RIVERSTONE Concerts in the park featuring local bands and artists. Thursdays from 6:30-8 pm, July 11-Aug. 29. Free. Riverstone Park, 1800 Tilford Lane. artsincda.org (208-292-1629) COEURIMBA GROUP A South African marimba music concert. July 18. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 William St., Post Falls. (208-457-8950) JONNY LANG Concert by the Grammywinning guitarist. July 18 at 8 pm. $57$67. All-ages. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7638) KPBX KIDS’ CONCERT Sing-along with folk musician Dan Maher, host of Inland Folk. July 19 from noon-1 pm. Free. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd., CdA. (328-5729) MOUNTAIN MUSIC FESTIVAL Outdoor music festival featuring food and drink and kids activities. July 20. Free. Sch-


weitzer Mountain Resort, Sandpoint. schweitzer.com (208-255-3081) JOHN MAYER, PHILLIP PHILLIPS Concert by the singer-songwriters. July 20 at 7:30 pm. $46-$95. All-ages. The Gorge Amphitheatre, 754 Silica Rd, George, Wash. livenation.com MOUNTAIN MUSIC FESTIVAL Family events, barbecue, live music, beer gardens and more. July 20. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 1000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555) PETER RIVERA Concert as part of the Summer Squeeze event, also featuring food and drink, vendors, camping and more. July 20 at 3 pm. $30-$40. Allages. Webb’s Slough, St. John, Wash. webbsslough.com MICHAEL JACKSON HISTORY II Tribute performance of the pop star’s hit songs. July 24 at 8 pm. $39-$59. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (279-7000) CONCERT IN THE PARK Music by Eric E., picnics welcome and food available to purchase. July 24 from 6-8 pm. Free. Reaney Park, Pullman, Wash. pullmanparksandrec.com (338-3227)

men’s, women’s and co-ed divisions. North Idaho College, Yap-Keehn-Um Beach, Coeur d’Alene. (208-769-3290) BIG KAHUNA GOLF TOURNAMENT Golf scramble tournament benefiting the Pat Chicoine and Bob Moriarty Memorial Scholarship at Lakeside HS. July 20 at 1 pm. $75-$300. Sundance Golf Course, 9725 N. Nine Mile Rd. thebigkahunaspokane.com (939-5504) RIDE THE PASS 10-, 17-, 35- or 50mile cycling ride. July 21 starting at 8:30 am. $30-$4th of July Pass, Coeur d’Alene. bicycleservice.com/4thJuly (208-667-8969) SUMMER FUN RUN SERIES Annual 5K fun run series hosted by U District PT. July 23 and 30 at 6:30 pm. $5/adults, kids/free. U District PT, 730 N. Hamilton St. (458-7686) SPOKANE INDIANS Spokane Indians vs. Vancouver Canadians. July 23-25 at 6:30 pm. $5-$11. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana St. (325-7328) TUBBS HILL HIKE Group hike around Tubbs Hill at Lake Coeur d’Alene. July 23 from 2-4 pm. Free. Meet at trailhead at 210 S. Third St., CdA. exploringfamilies.com

SPORTS

THEATER

ALOHA STAND-UP PADDLEBOARD SERIES Stand-up paddleboard series hosted by Mountain Gear. July 18 and 25 and Aug. 1 and 8 at 6:30 pm. $15/night. Nine Mile Recreation Area, 14925 N. Hedin Rd. mountaingear.com (340-1151) SPOKANE SHOCK Arena football game vs. San Antonio Talons. July 19 at 7 pm. $14-$35. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. (242-7462) YFC GOLF CLASSIC Golf tournament benefiting Spokane Youth for Christ. July 19 at 1 pm. $100. Downriver Golf Course, 3225 N. Columbia Circle. spokaneyfc.smartevents.com (327-7721) JEDERMANN GRAN FONDO Second annual 112-, 66- or 30-mile cycling race through the farming communities of Eastern Wash. July 20 at 7 am. $25-$80. Cheney. emdesports.com (953-9924) MOUNTAIN TRAIL RUN The second annual 3.5-mile or 10-mile trail race. July 20 at 10 am. $15-$45. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. smtrailrun. com (208-263-9555) MUDDY MILES A 2-mile obstacle course mud race. July 20 from 3-6 pm. $8-$140. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way, Coeur d’Alene. muddymiles.org CONQUEST OF THE CAGE Mixed martial arts fighting. July 20 at 6 pm. $35$85. Northern Quest, 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights. (481-6700) GEOCACHING TRIP Learn the outdoor, family-friendly activity of geocaching along the Pack River Delta. July 20 from 10:30 am-3 pm. Free. 2-3 miles roundtrip, easy terrain. Meet at East Bonner County Library in Sandpoint, 1407 Cedar St. Idahoconservation.org MT. SPOKANE HIKE Hosted hike to the old-growth forests of Mt. Spokane, affected by the ski area expansion. July 20 at 10 am. Discover Pass required ($10-$30). Mt. Spokane Vista House. savemtspokane.org (209-2406) SAND VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT Two-on-two Hotfoot Classic tournament. July 20 at 9 am. $50/team,

LOOKOUT, MULLAN Performance of an original play by Pat Grounds. Through July 28, Wed-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. All-ages. Sixth Street Melodrama, 212 Sixth St., Wallace. (208-752-8871) ARSENIC AND OLD LACE Performance by Davenport Theatrical. Through July 20, Thu-Fri at 6:30 pm, Sat at 2 pm. $10-$15. Davenport High School Theatre, 801 7th St. (725-5758) THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR Shakespearean comedy. July 18 and 20 and 25-26 at 7:30 pm, July 28 at 2 pm. $10-$20. University of Idaho, Hartung Theater. (208-882-6465) THE STINKY CHEESE MAN Performance based on the illustrated book “The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales.” July 18-28, ThursSat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10-$15. Pullman Civic Theater, 1220 NW Nye St. (332-8406) REMIX: IMPROV & SCRIPTED TOGETHER Performances featuring a blend of scripted and improvised acting in two-character scenes. July 18 at 7:30 pm. $10-$15. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard St. (455-7529) STUFF HAPPENS Staged reading of David Hare’s “Stuff Happens,” a narrative of events during the Iraq War. July 19-28, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. spokanestageleft.org THE MYSTERY OF IRMA VEP Satire. July 19 and 24 at 7:30 pm. $10-$20. University of Idaho, Hartung Theater, Moscow. (208-882-6465) BYE BYE BIRDIE Musical. July 19-28, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. Shows at 3 pm and 7 pm on July 20. $9-$12. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cytnorthidaho.org (208-277-5727)

VISUAL ARTS

SUMMER CREATIVITY SERIES Series of creative arts sessions for children ages 6-12. Thursdays from 1-3:45 pm, through Aug. 15. $12/session. Dahmen Barn, 419 Park Way, Uniontown, Wash. artisanbarn.org (229-3414)

ROBERT HODGIN Interactive digital art installation with new art featured each week. Through July 21, open from sunset to sunrise. Free. Laboratory, 301 W. Main Ave. (230-5718) TEXTILE ART SHOW Textile artists working in a variety of medium showcase their work. July 19-Sept. 7. Artist reception July 19 from 5-7 pm; gallery hours Mon-Fri from 10 am-5 pm. Free. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 William St., Post Falls. g (208-457-8950) AARON CORDELL JOHNSON & JARED SHEAR Artist showcase. July 19-Aug. 10. Gallery hours Thu-Sat from noon5:30 pm. Free. Redtail Gallery, Oak St. and Sixth Ave, Sandpoint. redtailartgallery.com (208-946-8066) PULLMAN ARTWALK Annual summer arts tour. July 19-20. Fri from 4-8 pm. Kids ArtWalk on Sat from 11 am-2 pm. Free. Locations vary throughout Pullman. (334-3565) ART UP SPOKANE A 21-hour artists, coder and maker collaboration event hosted by Terrain and Startup Weekend Spokane. July 19 at 8 pm to July 20 at 6 pm. Free. Merlyn’s, 17 W. Main Ave. artupspokane.eventbrite.com GARDEN PARTY Weekend art exhibtion featuring work by member artists, activities, refreshments and more. July 19-20, Fri from 5-9 pm, Sat from noon8 pm. Free. Manic Moon & More, 1007 W. Augusta Ave. (413-9101) VISION SEEKERS American Indian potter Kathleen Wall teaches a session on ceramics. July 21. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 William St., Post Falls. jacklincenter.org (208-457-8950)

Live Music Country Cookin’ Crafts Family Fun For All!

For more information go to

greenbluffgrowers.com

WORDS

WILLIAM KENOWNER Reading of “Write Within Yourself.” July 18 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (483-0206) LECIA BROOKS The director of outreach for the Southern Poverty Law Center speaks on human rights, tolerance and diversity. July 18 at 7 pm. Free. Human Rights Education Institute, 414 W. Mullan Ave., CdA. hrei.org (208-292-2359) KELLY MILNER HALLS Reading by the nonfiction children’s author. July 19 at 1 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (483-0206) BILL O’REILLY AND DENNIS MILLER On-stage show featuring the Fox News host and radio personality. July 20 at 8 pm. $55+. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (279-7000) WILLIAM PENDLEY “Sagebrush Rebel” reading by the author, who served in the Reagan Admin. for Energy and Minerals of the Dept. of the Interior. July 20 at 1 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. (483-0206) DOUGLAS WARRICK “Plow the Bones” short story collection reading. July 23 at 7:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (483-0206) DON GILMORE “Our Best for His Glory” devotional book reading. July 24 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (483-0206) n

WEEKEND COUNTDOWN

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JULY 18, 2013 INLANDER 49


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? N STIO

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The Nethercutt Foundation is offering local 4th, 8th and 12th graders the chance to win scholarships, prizes and even a trip to Washington D.C.

Look for answer in next week’s issue of the Inlander! 2

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50 50 INLANDER INLANDER JULY JULY 18, 18, 2013 2013

60. Arab nation that’s not in OPEC 61. “____ ears!” 62. Info in an apartment ad 63. “Baywatch” actress ____ Lee Nolin 64. Kardashian/West as a tabloid twosome 65. ____ moss

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“M*A*S*H” 12. Fizzled out 13. Asian outbreak of 2003 18. EPA concern 19. Black-and-white swimmers

TO LEARN MORE: nethercuttfoundation.org

THIS

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DOWN 1. “Hey ... stop that!” 2. Buried treasures 3. Richard of “Brooklyn’s Finest” 4. White House web address ending 5. Graduates 6. Zap 7. Melville’s Billy 8. “Either you do it ____ will” 9. “Live ____” (Taco Bell slogan) 10. Jeter and Jacobi 11. Director of the last episode of

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34. Where pastrami may be put 35. Some wedding guests 36. A, in Abruzzi 37. Droids, e.g. 38. Words to live by 39. Vitamin also known as PABA 40. “East” on a grandfather clock 41. Native parka wearer 42. ____-Grain cereal bars 43. Relaxed people talk smack about a job opening? 46. Fusses 47. Chicago trains 48. Windows button 51. Dandy 53. Film villain who sings “Daisy, Daisy, give me your answer, do!” 56. Counsel’s request for an order to talk smack about a young woman?

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ACROSS 1. Snoop ____ 5. “Tuesdays With Morrie” author 10. Some school play attendees 14. ____ Blizzard (Dairy Queen offering) 15. Michelle’s predecessor 16. “Splender in the Grass” director Kazan 17. Fearful people talk smack about a diner’s request? 20. Mao ____-tung 21. “T.J. Hooker” actor Adrian 22. Has a novel experience? 23. Cryer in a sitcom 24. “It was the beginning of the Eighties when ____ started to become unbearable”: Keith Richards 26. Enormous people talk smack about a flower that blooms in the fall?

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COMING THIS FALL!

First woman admitted to Harvard Fought for womenʼs rights Was the first woman to cast a vote for president Was the first woman Director of the US Mint

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LAST WEEK’S QUESTION: Who did the United States fight in World War II?

TOURNAMENT

What did Susan B. Anthony do? A B C D

QUEST RESORT & CASINO

23. Blue birds 24. “I have a good ____ ...” 25. Analogy words 26. Something to talk about 27. Home of Bollywood

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28. Bring ANSW EEK’S E up the PAGE RS ON rear 53 29. Light touch 30. Next 31. Half of an ice cream flavor 32. El Dia de Martin Luther King, Jr. falls in it 33. Arrested 38. Award coveted in “Mad Men” 39. Partner of “ifs” and “ands” 41. Supplement 42. “Frasier” character 44. Yacht site 45. 90% off? 48. Unwanted cloud 49. Hefty volume 50. ____ early age 51. Cappuccino feature 52. How doodles are often drawn 53. Take on 54. No longer in port 55. It tests reasoning skills: Abbr. 57. Suffix with beat or neat 58. “OMG! Spare me!” 59. It can be hard to refold


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52 INLANDER JULY 18, 2013

IT’S FREE

1. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers, Jeers). 2. Provide basic info about you: name, address, phone. 3. Email it to ISawYou@inlander.com by 3 pm Monday.

I Saw You

I Saw You

Cheers

Cheers

True Story destiny is undeniably at play. I believe that lightning strikes one’s heart at rare moments, purposefully capturing your attention to the divine at work. However, I have little experience understanding the collision that takes place when this happens to two people at the same time, as they happen to catch a surprised glimpse at each other in disbelief. That being said, I have never been an all or nothing sort of thinker, and can’t see that changing drastically any time soon. If I were adding a chapter, I would write you in to be the most beautiful person I have yet to know. Like your new favorite book that you just can’t put down, this is one true story that I wouldn’t wish to end. I would take my time and soak it all in, with love.

running into you again, this time maybe we can split an enchilada melt, my treat!

those that help others when they are down. I say thank you to all the loving, caring people who put their time and energy into making the world a better place. It makes me want to be a better person. Love to you all including the person who broke my windshield.

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

of the Autovue in Colville. I grew up in Chewelah and drive-in nights were always the highlight of the summer. There was nothing better than floating the Kettle River by day and catching a movie under the stars on the way home. Mom would stuff the back of the Wagoneer with blankets and pillows, we were usually asleep by the second film. My biggest regret is that I don’t have my own children to share this experience with before it closes down. So thank you again, for letting this little peice of small town history have its moment of fame.

Hoopfest To the court monitor for Hoopfest at the B&B court between Main and Washington on Howard, if you’re single I would love to talk.

I Love You Two weeks of marriage in and I’ve never felt more loved by anyone in my life. I love spending my life with you and growing with you each day.

Priest Lake I saw you 7/03 on the beach watching the stars. Site #116 you’re my neighbor. Boy I’m not done with you yet let’s kayak! Shadle Walmart I saw you at 1:00 am. You: stunning, tall, slim blond. Me: tall, shaved head. I asked you if it was possible to fall in love at first sight? You replied “yes”. You are all I can think about. I hope we can meet again? Soon! Some Beach Somewhere 1st date by the dock, you on water, cute. Thanks for spending time with me teaching me poetry. I’ll buy us lunch at McDonalds, W. 500 3rd and S. 300 Howard, from 1:30-2:30 pm on the 17th day of each month for a year. Me: Green T. If you have moved on, I hope you stay safe, happy and well. Always, from Man Late. Dog Park I met you at the dog park on the South Hill. Well, I really should say our dogs met each other, and then brought us together for a few laps around the park. Maybe they saw something between us that I was blind to at the time, but much to my own disappointment, I never worked up the courage to ask for your number. I hope I see you there again for a second chance. Indian Trail Subway To the wonderful guy at the Subway who offered to buy me an enchilada melt on 7 July around 8:30 at night. Thank you for making me smile! You were buying sandwiches for your 10 and 12 year old daughters, and told me that your youngest won’t eat meat because of her love for animals. Even though I was covered in dirt, had messy hair, and no make-up after working in my dad’s yard, you took the time to notice me and spark up a conversation. I wish I would have gotten your number, but I was too shy to ask. I guess Subway will be my new hangout in hopes of

Blue Truck you waved at me and you made my night! I have been looking for you..

TO CONNECT

Glover Mansion Wedding I saw you on Saturday. You are gorgeous, 5’3”, blue eyes and flowing blonde hair twisted in curls. Your blue dress hugged you perfectly. I wished I had asked your name when you smiled the most perfect set of teeth my way.

Cheers My Man Cheers to the man that constantly puts up with my moodswings, anxieties, bitchiness, complaining, and never ending questions. Who tells me I’m beautiful and means it. Who came into my life when I needed him most. The man who occasionally lets me lay on him to snuggle, even though it kills your stomach. I love you and I’m glad we found each other. I love how I feel I can be myself around you, even if it’s only possible sometimes when it’s just me and you. You’ve worked very hard to stay sober and to change your life for the better. I love alcohol-free Joel! You’re my best friend. You have helped me to grow in so many ways, and I hope that I can do the same for you. So here’s my way of saying thank you for sharing your life with me. I feel blessed/lucky to get to wake up next to you everyday. P.S. I Love you, (and Coco wants you to know she loves you too, and thanks you for the porterhouses!) Marilyn Annalisa Love is a shelter from the s*** storm...A real man sticks around to admire the flowers fertilized by the downpour. Call me the Dudest Buddhist. A Shout Out! This is a shout out to BJH to thank you for the best 1st half of 2013! It just keeps getting better everyday! SQUAB! Karma Great job Karma. Keep up the good work!

Thank You! The biggest of cheers to Carla, who helped me change my flat tire outside the Thor/Freya Fred Meyer on 7/5! It was almost 11 PM and I was all dressed up - certainly not in tire-changing attire! I told you all I needed help with was placing the jack in a secure place but you changed the whole tire with a smile and a kind-hearted attitude. Thank you, thank you! And more cheers to the numerous people who stopped to ask if we needed help - it’s so nice to experience a sense of community Happy 45th Birthday! Despite all that has gone down, you remain one of my favorite people on this planet. Hope you have a great year. xo Stimpy. Megan T you were schlepping through my neighborhood, in 90kknd degree heat, for a cause you believe in. I actually disagree with your cause, but your commitment and devotion to your cause fire me up. I am a child of the 60’s who despairs that the young will ever again look up from their video consoles and try to change the world. You are the future, girl, and when you run for Congress you will have my vote. God bless you. G.C.S. I saw you in your green shirt, sandals and jeans in the cleaning supplies at Shadle Walmart. You told me once that no one ever sees you... but I have been seeing you in my thoughts every day. You make my heart smile. Thank you for being in my life.

A Big Thank You! I would like to thank the people who helped me, put ice on my face and walked me to the medical tent when I tripped and fell while working a water booth at Hoopfest. The expertise and compassion these individuals showed me was OUTSTANDING. Thank You! Help! Reward! Cheers to the kind person who finds and returns to me my lost keys. Lost weekend of 6/29 in Spokane. Two Toyota remote fobs, a car key, three other keys. I’ll be so grateful and you’ll get a big fat reward! lostkeysspokane@ yahoo.com Pongzilla Cheers to all the fans that supported Empty Pockets throughout the tournament. What a night! Couldn’t have got through some of those epic battles without you guys. While we lost the 1,000$ game by one cup, the night was still one for the books. Also, special shout out to Pete and his crew that helped organize the event, absolutely great job guys! -Empty RE: Reconnected I was already struck by you. I watched the same site hoping your profile would reappear- a couple of years, I think. But I wasn’t prepared to be brought to my knees when you plugged in to reconnect. I realize that I am lost in you more than imagined, and step back to find myself again. This time, I feel that I may be lost without you, as well. Still, here I am...smiling in over my head, and yes- a bit shaken! Your beauty continues to shine new light exposing different glimpses of that heart of gold. You have blown my

Be Cheerful! ...get free sweets

Caring People Originally, I wanted to post a Jeer to the person that smashed in my windshield at the grocery store but I decided that it was not worth my time and energy. I would like to cheer all

Submit your Cheers at

inlander.com /sweet and be entered to win:

1 Dozen “Cheers” Cupcakes Courtesy of

Winners drawn bi-weekly at random. Summer Nights Cheers to the Must be 18 or older to enter. Inlander for the story on the closing “I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


Cheers

Jeers

Jeers

brilliantly wicked mind too many times to ignore, so what does that say about yours? Nobody can take me to the moon and back as you have and keep me faithfully patient for more. There are factors wrapped in my heart that I am not eager to see change. Maybe the same ones that lead you to disconnect the first time? You’ve seen me for who I am. I love with confidence and trust. I love without regret. I am thankful that you have effortlessly shared yourself with me, as I have shared my love deeply with you. We should make this last, say...forever? Click away, my love!

RE: Donation No This is REAL information for the rude person that said “if people would eat better they wouldn’t get prostate cancer” and the equally ignorant follow up that said all our food is killing us. First off, the main contribution to causing cancer? Genetics! Your parents and the genetic material they bestowed upon you are the number one reason anyone gets cancer. Next cause? Aging! Live long enough and cells will mutate to the point your body can’t control it any longer and then you get cancer. Third biggest culprit? Smoking (duh!),then combine lack of exercise, obesity, excessive alchohol consumption and environmental factors. Food doesn’t even make the list other than excess intake! Stop the ignorance and believing everything you read on facebook!

explain to your dog that it’s just some idiots who like things that go BOOM! Weee, what fun. And whatever you do, don’t let them off one after another, oh no, let’s space them out so another one booms just after we’ve settled back down and almost fallen asleep. Yeah. I hope you had a great time.

Faith In Humanity Cheers to whoever turned in my debit card from either the Plaza or the 39! Thank you, thank you! You have restored some faith in humanity! Karma will getcha back! Thank you! My Boo Boo You are everything I’ve wanted and more! I’m very blessed that God brought us together even through the hardest of times. I wish I saw sooner what you were to me but it’s better than never. I can’t wait to start my life with you and Ali! I’m happier than ever, and it’s all because of you! I will love you forever! Thank You! I can’t thank you enough for allowing my little boy to come over to view your fabulous firework display. He slept through the city’s display and was heartbroken that he missed it. When we got home, we could see your ariel displays. We parked across from your home to watch. You were so gracious to invite us to join your family and friends. Thank you again for making a little boy so happy. He still talks about this. Your generosity made a lasting memory for all of us! To The Good Samaritan To the Good Samaritan: On 7/8, I left my keys in my car’s trunk and you took the time to bring them to Security in the County Court house and leave me a note. Thank you so much. You are a good soul and I will do my best to pass it on.

Scammer To the jerk that hangs out in store parking lots telling people he is out of gas and left his money at home. Says he works at a local hospital and needs 5 dollars and will repay 10 dollars. Over the last 4 months he has approched me three times with the same story. Just know its a scam. He likes to hit on old ladies. About 5 ft 7in and 35 yrs old with short hair and slim. Hit me up at Riverfront park, Costco, and Safeway. Bike Riders I’ve been riding bicycle for 40 plus years and most places that I have ridden, other bike riders are friendly at least wave to you, but not here in Spokane. You can go buy all the stretchy pants you want, bright colored shirts, a goofy clip on shoes and you can participate in your once a year bike to work event, that doesn’t make you fellow bike rider, but 30 miles out on the trail a simple nod or wave to another bike rider certainly does. Just a thought to my sister and brother bike riders

Fireworks Jeers! Jeers! Jeers once again to the thoughtless neighbors who insist on discharging illegal fireworks this past week. Not only on the 4th, but the day before, after and last night - at midnight. Thanks so much D A D S for waking me B O M L A G G O D E L I A up and causing L A U R A O R E O R D E R - once again O S D I my dog to freak N E R V O U S R E A D S out. It’s hard to Z M E D T S E M I C K J O N I S A S T E R D T I T A N I C U N A A U N T S HIS WEEK’S O N R Y E E N T T B O D E C R ANSWERS! P D A S N U T R I T U E L A I I I N P O S I T I O C A L M D I S L S E S O D A H A L F I N E S T A R T M I S S S I D O T N M O T I O A R E A I M A L L O M A N P E A T E Y M I K G E N A DIS

Learn To Drive Jeers to the stupid biatch in your red Toyota Rav 4 this morning (Monday the 8th) at the intersection of Grove Rd. and 40th off the Geiger exit. Apparently, the stop sign you blew through must have been put there only as a consideration not an actual law. It’s a good thing my 5 year old daughter was with me, or I would have t-boned your worthless ass only because it would have been your fault. Pull your head out of your ass and learn to drive is a responsible manner. Maybe next time, it will be a semi you pull in front of, then they can pick the pieces out of the bumper. Panhandling Professional in downtown Spokane. You approached me on my lunch break claiming that you had just been kicked out of rehab for smoking a cigarette. When you asked me for 15 dollars to catch the Greyhound, I originally thought to myself that I should consider taking the Greyhound more often if that’s all it cost to get to Seattle. Unfortunately, I was not certain at that moment that I was supporting your heroine addiction. I mean, I knew it was a possibility I suppose. Jeers to you for not making up a better story. It took 3 minutes of research to obtain vivid imagry of my money being used for you to achieve your euphoric cocoon like state, only to follow with tremendous depression and your search for your next high. Jeers to me, (and a serious Jeers that is) for if you really were 9 months clean and I equipped you with the tools for failure...and you failed. I feel real bad now. Tied Up Dogs Audubon Park tie up. To the pair of idiots who tied their poor little dogs to a pipe (which is right near traffic by the way), whilst they go sip on coffee across the street: Bad idea, please stop. Your dogs can’t stop themselves from barking at anyone trying to walk dogs by, legally, on a leash. It is disturbing the peace of this quiet neighborhood and park. It is extremely inconsiderate of you to do this. Not to mention the angst it is causing your poor dogs. Maybe next time I will just call animal control and let them deal with it. At least you could stop it just for the consideration of others. I’m sorry to inform you but the world does not revolve around your selfish little lives.

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JULY 18, 2013 INLANDER 53


Construction of the Grand Coulee Dam took eight years and claimed 77 lives. CHARLES LIBBY PHOTO/NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS & CULTURE/EASTERN WASHINGTON STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Wonder of the World This week marks 80 years since ground was broken for the Grand Coulee Dam BY JACOB JONES

A

staggering giant of concrete and steel, the Grand Coulee Dam looms large along the basalt rock hills and high desert of Eastern Washington. Shouldering 150 miles of Columbia River, the 550-foottall dam marks the height of mankind’s ambition, its audacity to master the elements in an unforgiving new country. The Grand Coulee Dam forever reshaped the Northwest. The bold project diverted the region’s greatest river, harnessed its currents, carried power to new frontiers, irrigated more than 650,000 acres of dry farmland and provided much-needed jobs for a desperate nation. Thousands of people — state dignitaries, tribal leaders and onlookers — gathered on an empty hillside of sand and sagebrush 80 years ago this week to launch that

54 INLANDER JULY 18, 2013

dream. On July 16, 1933, Gov. Clarence Martin oversaw the groundbreaking for the dam. As described by the Spokane Daily Chronicle, the immense crowd gathered around a ceremonial first stake in the summer heat, “where the basalt rocks were too scorching to sit upon.” With a sledgehammer in hand, Martin promised the dam would deliver cheap power, electric light and countless gallons of new irrigation water to a country upended by the Great Depression. “Ultimately a great tract of farmland will be redeemed, that will call people back to the land from the breadline,” Martin told the crowd. With local Colville Tribe chief Jim James kneeling to hold the ceremonial stake, Martin brought the sledge-

hammer down and sealed the river’s fate. Historic photos show Martin later assisting with the first concrete pour for the dam in December of 1935. The dam would take more than eight years to build and claim at least 77 lives. The first power started to flow from the facility in 1941. Historic and far-reaching, the Grand Coulee Dam has always drawn controversy. Long before the first stake was struck, Spokane-based power companies railed against the project. In years since, environmental concerns over its effects on wildlife and river flow have continued to plague the project. The 5,223-foot-long Grand Coulee Dam is now capable of producing 6,809 megawatts of electricity, more than three times that of the Hoover Dam. The dam still lights the West 80 years later, towering as a monument to oversized dreams. In 1941, power officials commissioned legendary folk singer Woody Guthrie to visit the dam and compose ballads immortalizing the scale and labor of the effort. He wrote 26 songs about the dam, the workers and the surrounding country. In “The Song of the Grand Coulee Dam,” he sings: “It’s 92 miles northwest of Spokane, “There you will see her Grand Coulee Dam, “Woodwork and steel, and cement and sand, “Biggest thing built by the hand of a man.” n jacobj@inlander.com


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www.FestivalAtSandpoint.com JULY 18, 2013 INLANDER 55


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Inlander 7/16/13