Page 1

STREAMING! ARE DISNEY+ AND APPLE TV+ WORTH IT? PAGE 48

LANDLORDS VS. TENANTS SPOKANE LOOKS TO CREATE NEW RULES PAGE 18

DECEMBER 5-11, 2019 | FREE!

Ideas for everyone on your list!

Page 20

SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER


Whatever it is, we’ll help you get there. See how people in the Northwest are finding their awesome at watrust.com/awesome


INSIDE VOL. 27, NO. 8 | COVER ILLUSTRATION: ALI BLACKWOOD

COMMENT NEWS GIFT GUIDE CULTURE

5 13 20 45

FOOD 50 FILM 53 MUSIC 56 EVENTS 60

I SAW YOU GREEN ZONE ADVICE GODDESS BULLETIN BOARD

62 64 68 69

EDITOR’S NOTE

I

n our gut, we usually know. If the gift we’re about to give sucks, we’ll offer a preemptive apology or at minimum tell a long and winding story about how we valiantly tried but epically failed to get something better and that we really hope they like it. In response to which any feeling person will always lie and heartily say, “No, I love it! I reeeeaaalllly love it! This [garden hose, birdhouse or pair of wool socks] will come in handy!” On the other hand, when we’ve nailed it, we rest easy with a selfsatisfied smile and perhaps punctuate the opening of the gift with a sound effect, with a “pow,” “bam” or “ka-boom!” Your friends at the Inlander are going to help you chase that elusive, gift-giving high with this week’s GIFT GUIDE recommendations (beginning on page 20), as well as a second installment next week. One final thought: By buying your gift from a locally owned shop, you’re getting a gift that, in a way, also gives back to your own community. — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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INLANDER SPOKANE • EASTERN WASHINGTON • NORTH IDAHO • INLANDER.COM 1227 WEST SUMMIT PARKWAY, SPOKANE, WA 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634 | EMAIL: INFO@INLANDER.COM

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DECEMBER 5, 2019 INLANDER 3


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Tigers in the Room Getting over the fear of public speaking BY AILEEN KEOWN VAUX

W

hen I was an English teacher, I asked students each quarter to deliver a final classroom presentation. The guidelines were simple: Stand in front of the room, with or without a visual aid, and talk to the class about a research paper they wrote for class. If you guessed what I asked my students to do based on their reactions alone, you may have surmised I wanted them to confess their love to a secret crush or climb Mount Everest. Teaching others to speak publicly was how I learned most people fear public speaking.

Ironically, I once counted myself as a member of that club. I would have stress dreams about being on stage — despite never even considering trying out for a school play. In my own college classes, when asked to speak in front of the class, I would panic: My hands would sweat, my voice would quaver, and all the blood would rush to my face. I was

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“I’ve lived around domestic violence and I’m very aware of how Native women can be vulnerable and susceptible to some of the issues that happen.”

CLIMATE DIE-IN PROTEST: The Sunrise Movement of Eastern Washington hosts a “die-in” protest at Riverfront Park in front of the ice ribbon. This youth-led protest depicts the deadly consequences climate change poses if action is not taken immediately. Fri, Dec. 6 at 3 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St., sunrisemovement.org

Margo Hill, a member of the Spokane Tribe of Indians, speaking about new efforts to address the rates of violence impacting Native women. Find that story on page 13.


24 years old before I cracked the code on being a confident public speaker by getting my first job in the restaurant industry. By many metrics, 75 percent of the population has glossophobia, or a fear of public speaking. It wasn’t until recently that I learned that there is a biological root to this fear. When we were evolving, if we ever found ourselves exposed in an open clearing and saw a pair of eyes peering at us, our bodies put us in fight-or-flight mode because we were most likely about to be eaten by a lion, tiger or other large predator. When we stand in front of a boardroom or classroom, with many pairs of eyes looking back at us, our brains sound the alarm and politely inform us that we are about to die.

I quickly realized there were no tigers in the room at all. And that I was in a position to help others. I thought, though, if I gave my students an opportunity to practice public speaking, simple exposure would dissipate their fear. I based this on my own experience of working in the restaurant industry. Each week, I would talk to approximately 100 strangers about their food or beverage preferences. And also, because so many people are lonely, my role as a server often operated as a sounding board for people to share their day-to-day experiences. However, I think my new capacity for speaking in public was less about repetitive exposure than the motivation behind my speaking. If the body goes into automatic “fight or flight” mode in response to public speaking, then the first line of defense to a successful speech is to moderate the body’s adrenal response. That’s where the vagus nerve comes into play. Deep breathing activates the body’s response to calm “fight or flight.” And, interestingly, so does acting from a place of kindness or generosity. “Can I get you another drink?” or “How was your food today?” were catchphrases that activated parts of my brain that told my body that we were not in danger. Listening to people who needed someone to care was also an act of generosity. I quickly realized there were no tigers in the room at all. And that I was in a position to help others. Reframing the experience of public speaking as an opportunity to help others liquidates any stress associated with public speaking. If you identify yourself as one of the 75 percent of all humans who fear public speaking, I dare you to flip the script on the situation. The next time you have to toast the bride, present to a client or interview for a job, ask the tigers to leave the room by taking a few deep breaths and imagining how you will be of service to the people to whom you are speaking. n Aileen Keown Vaux is an essayist and poet whose chapbook Consolation Prize was published by Scablands Books in 2018.

FROM THE VAULT DEC. 5, 2002: This week, the Inlander featured a story on the reopening of the then-newly-renamed Northwest Museum of Art & Culture, previously known as the Cheney Cowles Museum. The museum now boasts over 100,000 visitors a year and serves a vital cultural role in Spokane’s Browne’s Addition, with a Norman Rockwell exhibit currently being showcased and exhibits on the Mount St. Helens’ eruption and Pompeii coming up later this winter.

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COMMENT | NEWSMAKERS

Q&A ROB McCANN Talking homelessness, criminals and Jeff Bezos with the CEO of Catholic Charities of Eastern Washington INTERVIEW BY JACOB H. FRIES

S

eventy-thousand different people. That’s how many are served by Catholic Charities of Eastern Washington every year, a figure that includes veterans, seniors, teen mothers, new immigrants and people with drug or mental health issues, says CEO Rob McCann, 49. But it’s a tiny sliver of that total — the chronically homeless people on the streets — who gets the most attention. “I spend 90 percent of my time talking about the less than 1,000 people we serve” at the House of Charity shelter and at other Catholic Charities’ properties, he says. McCann believes that Spokane can actually solve homelessness, that our region is better positioned than most to do it. But he sees a growing trend that won’t make it any easier: “There is a new ideological premise about serving the poor that did not exist five years ago, but it exists very firmly today … that there are such things as ‘deserving’ and ‘undeserving’ poor.” Our interview with McCann has been edited for clarity and space. INLANDER: What do you think the community — and local leaders — misunderstand about homelessness? McCANN: There are a lot of misperceptions about what we’re doing with homelessness in Spokane. The most common one is: Are we attracting more homeless people? You know, we use data to answer these questions. And about 80 percent to 85 percent of our House of Charity folks are born and raised within 75 miles of downtown Spokane. So we’re not attracting new homeless people. The food is not so good at the House of Charity that they’re coming from Alabama, Texas and Florida. The second one is that we’re enabling people, that when we let people come into the House of Charity who are still actively

struggling with their addiction, we are enabling them to keep using or keep drinking. Our response to that is pretty simple: We believe every human being is made in the image and likeness of God. And if that’s true, then every human being deserves the dignity and the basic respect of going to the bathroom, eating and sleeping indoors. We both probably hear anecdotes from people who say they’re scared to go downtown, who say, “Downtown is getting overrun by homeless people.” What’s your short answer to them? When someone says they’re unsafe downtown, that’s coded language. What they’re really saying is, “I feel uncomfortable, because I don’t like to look at that. I don’t like to go to the Apple store to buy my new iPhone and have to walk by someone who’s sitting on the sidewalk in front of the store. That makes me feel bad.” You know, it’s our job as a community to make it a safe place, to make it a respectful and dignified place. It’s not necessarily our job to make everyone feel comfortable about how they feel about people who are in need. But there are people downtown who are up to no good. They are typically not our Catholic Charities people. … We are so sure that those criminal people aren’t our people that we absolutely want them arrested because the No. 1 people they rob or beat up are our clients. So we want them out of the downtown core just the same as the business owners do. Talk about what happened to the 24/7 shelter model, because that did seem like a moment of great optimism, but then it suddenly collapsed. There was very good news and very bad news. The good news was that we came as close to solving street homelessness in

Spokane as we ever have when we had 24/7 sheltering. There were very few people left outside in downtown Spokane. Business owners would tell you that, the police would tell you that. When 24/7 was open at the House of Charity, we were really close to functional zero on-street homelessness in Spokane. The bad news is it made the block around House of Charity look like a war zone. House of Charity was built to sleep 109 men only. During 24/7 we were sleeping between 300 and 400 men, women, couples and their dogs. The front of the House of Charity, unfortunately, looked like Eastern State Hospital and the jail were having a Woodstock Festival. We realized the House of Charity can’t do it all. There needed to be a second shelter. Then the city funding ran out. The city’s plan was, “We’re going to stop 24/7 shelter, but we’re going to open another shelter.” We said, “Great, let us know how we can help.” Then the city did everything they could, but they still have not opened that second shelter. Your organization was recently awarded a $5 million grant from Jeff Bezos’ foundation. What will that mean? That money is specifically for family homelessness. So unfortunately, I can’t pump any of that money into the House of Charity, but we can put it into our family shelters, into our homeless family housing — all of our programs that serve anyone who’s in a family that’s homeless or at risk of being homeless. … We’re going to use some of this money to get to functional zero on family homelessness in the rural areas of Eastern Washington. n

DEREK HARRISON PHOTO

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DECEMBER 5, 2019 INLANDER 9


M A R T I N

W O L D S O N

T H E A T E R

A T

T H E

F O X

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Fox Presents

Spokane Symphony

MARK O’CONNOR’S “AN APPALACHIAN CHRISTMAS”

THE M SHOW WITH MATEUSZ WOLSKI

WHITWORTH UNIVERSITY CHRISTMAS FESTIVAL CONCERT: LOVE BE OUR SONG

EL GRAN FESTIVAL DE MUSICA CUBANA

Tuesday, Dec. 10, 7:30pm

Saturday, Dec. 14, 8pm Sunday, Dec. 15, 3pm

WHAT MORE ASTOUNDING: THE OAKS ANNUAL CHRISTMAS CONCERT Tuesday, Dec. 17, 7pm

Spokane Symphony Pops

HOLIDAY POPS WITH VANESSA WILLIAMS Saturday, Dec. 21, 8pm Sunday, Dec. 22, 2pm

Friday, Jan 10, 8pm | Saturday, Jan. 11, 8pm At the Knitting Factory Saturday, Jan. 11, 7pm

SPOKANE YOUTH SYMPHONY: 70 YEARS OF EDUCATION Sunday, Jan. 12, 4pm

Spokane Symphony Masterworks

MUSIC FOR VALENTINE’S DAY Saturday, Feb. 8, 7pm Sunday, Feb. 9, 2pm

Spokane Symphony Chamber Soirées

SOIRÉE ON THE STAGE: VALENTINE’S Tuesday, Feb. 11, 7:30pm Wednesday, Feb. 12, 7:30pm

Wednesday, Jan. 15, 7:30pm

GONZAGA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA WITH MIDORI

JAY AND SILENT BOB REBOOT ROADSHOW WITH KEVIN SMITH Spokane Symphony Masterworks

Thursday, Feb. 13, 7:30pm

Saturday, Jan. 18, 8pm Sunday, Jan. 19, 3pm

SPOKANE STRING QUARTET WITH SPOKANE KANTOREI CHOIR

BEETHOVEN’S 250 BIRTHDAY

Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 7:30pm

Spokane Symphony Movies & Music

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Saturday, Jan. 25, 7pm Sunday, Jan. 26, 3pm

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Saturday, Feb. 1, 8pm

Fox Presents

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NEW YEAR’S EVE: TUESDAY, DEC. 31 SPOKANE SYMHONY: BEETHOVEN’S NINTH

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CHERRY POPPIN’ DADDIES

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Sunday, Feb. 16, 3pm

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Spokane Symphony/Davenport Hotel

“AN APPALACHIAN CHRISTMAS”

WITH VANESSA WILLIAMS

BEETHOVEN’S NINTH

MARK O’CONNOR’S

Dec 10 7:30PM

Grammy-winning composer and fiddler Mark O’Connor and family perform Christmas classics and original compositions, a joyous collection of instrumental and vocal arrangements in bluegrass and other American music genres.

Media sponsor: KPBX

HOLIDAY POPS

Dec 21 8PM

Dec 22 2PM

American pop icon Vanessa Williams stars in this season’s Holiday Pops, singing hits from her two holiday albums, and more. Holiday Pops is a beloved event that brings joy to the whole family. Conductor: James Lowe Spokane Symphony Chorale

Sponsored By: Residents of Rockwood Retirement Community and

NEW YEAR’S EVE

Dec 31 7:30PM Concert 9PM Gala

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Sponsors: Billie M. Severtsen, Martin and Betty Deeg

T i c k e t s • 5 0 9 6 2 4 1 2 0 0 • S p o k a n e S y m p h o n y. o r g • F o x T h e a t e r S p o k a n e . o r g 10 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019


COMMENT | FROM READERS

The second floor of the STA Plaza will become a temporary home for the downtown library. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Readers respond to an Inlander article about where homeless people who use the downtown Spokane library will go during its reconstruction (“A Space for the Displaced,” 11/28/19):

KENNETH DEGENSTEIN: Well everybody that’s really worried about it, I have a few questions. How many of them do you take into your home? How much do you donate to the cause? How much time do you volunteer to take care of them? Think about it. Ninety percent of everybody that is complaining about it does not do or help do anything about it. I believe Spokane is gone over and beyond to help out. Maybe it’s all your turn to help. JEREMY THORNTON: There’s roughly 1,300 homeless people in Spokane. Many of these people become homeless by less than $400. My research has shown to be about half. We need to invest in keeping people from becoming homeless. It’s much, much cheaper then getting people back on their feet, once they are homeless. DAVID ANDERSON: They can all hang out in Nadine’s new office. NICHOLAS GADBERRY: Start the get clean or go to jail program. Then said people that get clean can get help with work and become a functioning member of society instead of handing out a hand and expecting other people to take care of them. MATTHEW FORD: Maybe the people who love to virtue signal could open their doors to these poor people… oh wait, they would never do that. They expect others to do it for them. CALVIN ULBRICHT: The library is not a homeless shelter. SCOTT WELDON: So if you feel that taxpayer funded facilities for the general public should be the answer, feel free to be the first to open your home or better yet question why the churches that pay no taxes aren’t doin it. n

DECEMBER 5, 2019 INLANDER 11


WHEN WOMEN RULED THE WORLD THURS., FEBRUARY 13 – 7:00 PM 

KARA COONEY

MARISSA STEVENS

EGYPTOLOGIST

SOCIAL BY NATURE

THURS., APRIL 16 – 7:00 PM

RONAN DONOVAN

PHOTOGRAPHER


Margo Hill, a member of the Spokane Tribe, knows from her work as a tribal attorney and tribal court judge that the U.S. justice system isn’t always fair to Native American victims of serious crimes.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

FOR THE MISSING

Eastern Washington federal court will hire help for cases involving missing, murdered indigenous people

L

ong before government reports were released earlier this year, leaders of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women movement knew that Native American and Indigenous people face significantly higher rates of sexual and lethal violence. For years, the women-led movement has demanded justice for their lost loved ones in the U.S. and Canada, where there’s a lack of comprehensive data on how many have gone missing. They called attention to the stories of their sisters, mothers and grandmothers, which they often felt had gone unheard. They pointed to the fact that more than half of Native American women face sexual or intimate-partner violence during their lifetime, and that in some areas, Native women are murdered at rates

BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL more than 10 times the national average, according to the Justice Department. The movement prompted a national inquiry in Canada, culminating in a June 2019 report that tried to quantify the problem. While thousands of missing and murdered cases could be documented, the report found that ultimately, it was likely many thousands more never had been. The authors pulled no punches, calling the substantial violence a “genocide” that “has been empowered by colonial structures.” Meanwhile in Washington state, lawmakers tasked the Washington State Patrol with documenting missing Native women’s cases. For 2018, Native American women were missing at a rate more than four times higher

than white women in the state. To tackle disconnects in the system, the State Patrol has since hired a tribal liaison on the west side and is currently looking to hire another in Eastern Washington. Now, the U.S. government is jumping in to address the issue as well. U.S. Attorney General William Barr announced on Nov. 22 that the Justice Department will spend $1.5 million hiring 11 coordinators around the country to lead a new Missing and Murdered Indigenous Persons Initiative. Their focus will be on changing protocols to make law enforcement investigations of missing people more coordinated, on improving the collection and analysis of data for those cases, and on providing training for local law enforcement. ...continued on next page

DECEMBER 5, 2019 INLANDER 13


NEWS | CRIMINAL JUSTICE “FOR THE MISSING,” CONTINUED... “American Indian and Alaska Native people suffer from unacceptable and disproportionately high levels of violence, which can have lasting impacts on families and communities,” Barr announced. “This important initiative will further strengthen the federal, state, and tribal law enforcement response to these continuing problems.” One of those 11 coordinators will be stationed in the Eastern District of Washington. “Ending the violence that disproportionately affects Native American communities is a top priority,” says Eastern District U.S. Attorney William Hyslop, in a news release. The initiative also calls for faster deployment of the FBI’s rapid response teams, which can offer expertise in serious crimes when requested by tribal, state or local law enforcement. While all those moves signal a shift in the right direction, some with experience prosecuting cases for area tribes say there’s still more work to do.

WHO’S IN CHARGE HERE?

One of the major obstacles to justice for Native Americans is a patchwork legal system on reservations that starts with confusing police jurisdiction and extends through the court system, says Margo Hill, a member of the Spokane Tribe of Indians. “I have a very unique understanding of murdered and missing indigenous women. I grew up on the reservation. I’m a Spokane tribal member,” Hill says. “I’ve lived around domestic violence and I’m very aware of how Native women can be vulnerable and susceptible to some of the issues that happen.” Hill served as an attorney for the Spokane Tribe

for a decade, helping prosecute crimes, and later served as a tribal court judge for both the Spokane and Coeur d’Alene tribes. In her experience, the problems can start from the time a call comes in. First, officers have to determine whether the reservation land they’re responding to is held in trust by the U.S. government or fee land owned by a tribal member, which can change who needs to do an investigation, Hill says. Next, if there’s a crime committed by a non-Native American against a tribal member, the tribe’s police department and courts are limited in what they can do because of a Supreme Court decision that held tribal courts can’t prosecute non-Natives, she says. “If we have a situation where there’s a non-Native sexually abusing or raping somebody, we have to call maybe the FBI. If it’s assault, we have to call the local county sheriff, and maybe that’s an hour away in Colville. Sometimes they don’t show up,” Hill says. “As tribal cops we can hold and detain non-Indian perpetrators, but we can’t prosecute them.” For major crimes such as murder, rape, or arson, and in cases involving non-Natives, the tribes rely on the U.S. District Courts for prosecution. But in Hill’s years of experience, U.S. attorneys often declined to take cases, leaving tribal courts with few options to get justice for victims. “Perpetrators become emboldened when they know they can’t be prosecuted,” Hill says. “It’s immoral for

us to not be able to protect our Native women because of the race of their boyfriend or their abuser. It’s just insane.” However, things have been changing for the better in the federal court system recently, she says, with U.S. attorneys more willing to go after crimes on reservations. She thinks the new initiative is at least a start. “I think $1 million is kind of a little bit of a drop in

“It’s immoral for us to not be able to protect our Native women because of the race of their boyfriend or their abuser. It’s just insane.” the bucket. It’s going to take all of us doing our jobs, including law enforcement and media,” Hill says. “I think that definitely will help, but it doesn’t answer all of our issues. We need enhanced jurisdiction over perpetrators in Indian Country.”

MORE TO CHANGE

In addition to her legal background, Hill is a professor of urban planning at Eastern Washington University, where some of her research looks at tribal mobility, as Native Americans often travel between urban and rural areas to visit and care for relatives and attend traditional ceremonies. Part of that means looking at the complicated history of federal policies regarding Native Americans, she says.

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Initially forced onto reservations, many were later torn away and placed in urban centers in an attempt to force assimilation. Native children are often placed in the foster care system outside of their families, where they’re more likely to age out of the system and then become homeless, Hill says. Hill has also created a model showing the compounding risk factors that put Native women at a disadvantage. The list includes higher rates of poverty, a lack of reliable transportation and greater vulnerability due to using a cash system, as many reservations don’t have banks. Cultural representations can also promote harmful stereotypes and problematic law enforcement norms. “The United States government, and the history of federal Indian law and policies, have put tribal communities at a disadvantage,” Hill says. She highlights the case of a woman she knows only as Marlene, who was found half naked in a Spokane alleyway this summer. The woman later died, and as far as Hill can find out, her death was written off as drug-related, despite the fact that she was only ever known to have a drinking problem. “She ends up dead, there’s nothing in the media … then we’re not in the statistics,” Hill says. Cases like that leave Hill skeptical about the effects of the new national initiative. “Shit, we have to take to the streets, we have to get special legislation just to get police to do the investigation, just to get the U.S. Attorney’s Office to prosecute these cases,” Hill says. “I’m LETTERS somewhat skeptical, because we Send comments to have to go to great lengths just editor@inlander.com. to get them to count the cases, just to get them to look at the data, and a lot needs to be done. Not only does prosecuting and investigation need to be changed, laws need to be changed and programs need to be funded for these victims.” n samanthaw@inlander.com

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Cold Cases, New Life Washington continues to work toward justice for old rape cases

H

undreds of previously UNTESTED RAPE KITS are being matched to offenders in a national DNA database as Washington state continues to work through a backlog of nearly 10,000 kits. After testing about one-third of the sexual assault kits that sat in evidence storage for years, and uploading about 1,200 DNA profiles into the database so far, state crime labs have found 440 new matches, with 76 matching more than one case, according to the state Attorney General’s Office. Now, an advisory group tasked with tracking progress on the backlog has issued new recommendations to the state Legislature, including a request for funding to investigate and prosecute those cold cases. As more cases get matches, the group notes, more resources will be needed for trauma-informed training, gathering witnesses and bringing cases to court. Already, after a kit taken in 2007 was finally tested in 2017, a suspect was charged with child rape, according to the annual report from the Washington Sexual Assault

16 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019

Forensic Examination Best Practices Advisory Group. The group’s other recommendations include creating a standardized process to get victims access to advocates when they’re in the hospital; storing unreported kits (where a victim hasn’t requested police look into their case yet) for a longer period of time; offering local law enforcement agencies financial resources to store those unreported kits; and collecting DNA from offenders who are required to provide it before they leave the courtroom at their sentencing. The last recommendation comes after the Attorney General’s Office found there could be more than 30,000 offenders in Washington who were required by the state to provide DNA, but never did. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

FULL-TIME JOB CREATORS

Officially, the Spokane city charter doesn’t specify whether the job of a CITY COUNCIL member is a part-time or a full-time job. But over the last decade, as the council has become more ambitious about developing policies and scrutinizing mayoral actions, the time council members say they spend working has increased significantly. But back in 2014, when then-City Councilmen Steve Salvatori and Mike Allen proposed putting an advisory question on the ballot to ask voters if they think council members should be full-time or part-time. The other council members scoffed at the idea. “I don’t have any interest in making this a full-time job and making this a full-time position,” Councilwoman Candace Mumm said. “We ran to be part-time.” But after a little more time, Mumm’s views changed, she told the Inlander in 2016, believing it was already a full-time job. And on Monday, the Spokane City Council Rules of

Procedure made it a bit more official, clarifying that “a time commitment of approximately 30-50 hours per week is normally required to adequately fulfill the role of City Council member.” In a statement, Mayor David Condon objected, accusing the council of burying the job description in a routine update of council procedures without a public vote. “I am concerned that this change could limit the number of potential candidates for City Council and lead to higher costs for citizens,” Condon wrote. In particular, city spokeswoman Marlene Feist confirms, Condon believes that “it could be used to justify higher council salaries during the next Salary Review ComMayor David Condon mission process.” Indeed, Salary Review Commission board member Christopher Savage says, the board heavily takes into account the hours council members work to determine their salaries. But Savage doubts the new language will be the thing that triggers further raises — the commission already assumed in 2018 that the council members were working at least 40-hour weeks. Council President-elect Breean Beggs, meanwhile, says that the added language isn’t a roundabout way to hike council salaries. He says it’s more about letting council candidates know how time-consuming the job actually is. “It’s not changing anything,” Beggs says, “it’s recognizing what the current reality is.” (DANIEL WALTERS) n


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NEWS | HOUSING

Breean Beggs hasn’t been able to rally enough support on council to pass a package of proposed tenants rights ordinances. DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO

‘Totally Broken Right Now’ A long-in-the-works tenants rights ordinance gets delayed until March BY DANIEL WALTERS

I

n an interview with the Inlander, held before his narrow election to City Council president, Councilman Breean Beggs stressed that his penchant for compromise sometimes meant that he was willing to wait for agreement instead of shoving through an ordinance that only makes one side happy. And as one example, he cited the meetings between landlords and tenants groups over the past two years, hoping to forge an agreement over new tenant protections. “They’re so passionate,” Beggs says. “They’re so committed.” Yet he hadn’t been able to figure out that “sweet-spot” of compromise. Still, after the election, he said, he’d likely pass some “lowhanging fruit,” the stuff that almost everyone could get behind. It would be a package of compromise reforms that he suggested “landlords would be fine with” and the tenants “would like.” Indeed, late last month, Beggs, outgoing Council President Ben Stuckart and Councilwoman Kate Burke proposed a slew of reforms intended to protect tenants, including banning most nocause evictions and requiring landlords to assist some low-income tenants with rental relocation assistance. But the landlords weren’t fine with it: As soon as the language of the ordinances was announced, landlords and Realtors began rallying their allies to show up to the Dec. 9 council meeting when a vote on the ordinance was scheduled. Washington Association of Realtors Vice President Tom Hormel warned on Facebook that the ordinance would backfire, making “some landlords sell and others raise rents to offset the risk.” Ultimately, Beggs, Stuckart and Burke couldn’t even get any

18 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019


of the other council members to support the current proposals. So on Monday afternoon, every council member but Burke voted to delay the vote for three more months. “There is a housing crisis,” Stuckart stressed to his fellow council members on Monday. “Rents are rising at over 20 percent per year in Spokane. The market is clearly not working. So sometimes you then have to put protections in place. I urge you not to use this time up until March 1 to just delay this and do nothing.’

“The small landlords that often provide the most flexible and affordable housing are disappearing from the market.” To be sure, it’s tough to be a low-income tenant right now in Spokane. For years, the supply of apartments in the city has struggled to keep up with demand. And with a crowd of tenants desperate to snatch up any apartment available, many landlords have responded by either raising their rents or their standards for the type of people they would like to rent to. For many renters, an eviction can mean homelessness. Under Beggs’ ordinance, landlords would need to provide tenants 90 days heads up before increasing rent. Refundable damage deposits would be limited to the equivalent of one month’s rent. Landlords would have to take out a business license, pay for independent inspections of new housing and pay an annual $10 to the city for each housing unit. Most controversially, it would require that, whenever they raise rents by 5 percent or more, landlords would need to offer rental relocation assistance — $2,000, plus their damage deposit — to “cost-burdened” tenants who want to relocate as a result. (The ordinance defines “cost-burdened” as anyone paying at least 30 percent of their income in rent.) But Steve Corker, president of the Landlord Association of the Inland Northwest, worries that the proposed ordinance could harm the very same small landlord businesses who are the most willing to work with tenants who struggle to pay their rent. “The small landlords that often provide the most flexible and affordable housing are disappearing from the market,” Corker says. Complicating matters, Beggs says, was a related ordinance from Stuckart that would limit evictions even further, only allowing eviction for a handful of reasons, such as a tenant’s failure to pay rent, the property owner’s desire to rehab the unit or live in the unit themselves. Beggs says that Stuckart wanted to get his ordinance passed while he was still on council, but having both measures on the docket at the same time “aggravated the issue somewhat.” And while Councilwoman Burke stressed that the council had been debating this issue for nearly two years, other council members, like Karen Stratton and Lori Kinnear, shared some of the landlords’ concerns and frustrations with the process. Councilwoman Candace Mumm, who owns a small real estate company with income from three properties herself, argues it’s better to have the state Legislature, instead of local city councils, solve this issue. “My preference is that we should address these kinds of issues on a statewide level,” Mumm says. Tenants Union of Washington Co-Executive Director Terri Anderson, meanwhile, portrayed the delay in an email to council as “unfair, unnecessary and cruel.” “Why do only landlord voices matter to City Council?” Anderson wrote. “The imbalance of power is now made worse.” Beggs is OK with the delay. But he also argues that the system is “totally broken right now” and something needs to be done. “People are just scared to death of when their lease is up, what’s going to happen,” Beggs says. n danielw@inlander.com

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ILLUSTRATIONS BY ALI BLACKWOOD

GIFTS FOR

Disastrous Cooks

Five ideas the failing blossoming chef in your life is too proud to admit they need BY DANIEL WALTERS

E

veryone has to start somewhere. For the blossoming chef, that could be the difference between burning a cup of noodles or possibly burning their entire home. We aren’t judging. In fact, we’re here to help. Whether your home chef is simply in need of some new tools of the trade, classes or, perhaps, a motivational apron, we’ve got some gift ideas this year.

COOKING CLASSES FROM MODERNIST COOKS (a)

How to fix a disastrous home cook without insulting them? Offer them fun cooking classes, like those from Modernist Cooks. Maybe they’ll listen to reason, if reason is wearing a chef’s hat. Amanda Hillmann, owner-operator of Modernist Cooks, suggests her classes are great for beginning cooks, ambitious three-course-dinner-party socialites, dry-ice-using gastronomists and even kids who want to up their mac-and-cheese game. “I do a lot of their prep work for them,” Hillmann says. “They’re just doing the fun parts. We do all the cleanup, too.” Class with Modernist Cooks • $27-$47 for kids, $35-$80 for adults • 1014 N. Pines Rd., Spokane Valley • modernistcooks.com

A SHARPER KNIFE FROM KITCHEN ENGINE (b)

You can always tell a disastrous home cook when their trusty chef’s knife struggles to pierce through an egg yolk. But rather than mocking them mercilessly, head to Kitchen Engine and buy the kind of high-end knife sharp enough to chiffonade hairs and

20 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019

cleave through atoms. If you’re strapped for cash, snag their lousy knife, drop it off at the Kitchen Engine, and they’ll sharpen it for a mere $1. Nothing like giving a person their own possession, but upgraded. Kitchen Engine’s 6-inch Wusthof Classic Cook’s Knife • $120; 8-inch version for $150 • Flour Mill, 621 W. Mallon Ave. #416

A BIG-ASS CUTTING BOARD (c)

So much of cooking is just standing over a board, slicing pieces into smaller pieces. The way to make that less painful? A big-ass cutting board, ideally approaching the size of a ping-pong table, means you spend a lot less time picking scraps of onions and garlic off the linoleum. (This is not to be confused with “big ass-cutting boards,” which are mostly used for rump roasts.) If you’re handy, head to Ziggy’s and make your own. Otherwise, purchase a quality cutting board from a local business. Either way stick with wood: Don’t get one of those pretty glass ones that turn even good knives into useless slag. 19x15-inch cutting board at the Culinary Stone • $130 • 2129 Main St., Coeur d’Alene

SPICEOLOGY’S SMOKY HONEY HABANERO RUB (d)

Great cooking is about great flavor. So if you’re not a great cook, you can just cheat by adding some spices that come preloaded with amazing flavor. Our local mad scientists at Spiceology have cooked up one of my favorite spice blends, a rub that’s filled with heat, sweetness and smokiness all the same time. Smoky Honey Habanero Rub is so good it even makes vegetables delicious. Wow! Spiceology Smoky Honey Habanero Rub • $19.50 per pound • Huckleberry’s Natural Market, 926 S. Monroe St. • spiceology.com

F-WORD APRON

They undercook, overseason and can’t even make toast without potentially causing a small kitchen fire. Help your beloved yet disastrous home cook own their ineptitude in style with an apron that covers any and all mishaps with variations on one of the world’s most versatile curse words. F-word apron at Lucky Monkey • $29 • 412 E. Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene (CARRIE SCOZZARO) n


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GIFTS FOR

Teen Climate Activists

Equip your teen with the right tools to fight climate change this holiday season BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

S

o your teen who has only ever known a post9/11 world is less interested in the Kardashians’ makeup tips and more intrigued by the latest global crisis. They look up to Greta Thunberg and shun gifts that wouldn’t come in handy during a climate protest. Their fight for the planet feels urgent

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because they stand to lose more than any other living generation. As they feel like they’re taking the weight of the world on their shoulders, the least you can do is support their budding activism while keeping your shopping footprint local. Here are some good places to start.

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AWARD-WINNING WINES

REUSABLE COFFEE TUMBLER (a)

Plastic straws have started to go the way of the dodo bird, and disposable coffee cups should eventually go the same way. A reusable mug is better on the environment as you sip to stay awake on those long nights chained to oil industry infrastructure. Plus, they often pay for themselves over time, as many local shops offer discounts for bringing your own cup! $29.95 • Thomas Hammer Coffee Roasters • 14700 E Indiana Ave., Spokane Valley

KAYAKING LESSONS (b)

All the best kayaktivists have to start somewhere, and where better than learning to paddle and roll with Spokane’s Flow Adventures. Classes offered include introductory lessons, a roll clinic, moving water and white water. $75 to $400 bundle • Flow Adventures • 2807 W. Euclid Ave.

LOTION BARS, SOAPS AND MORE (c)

One of the best ways to reduce impacts on the environment is to shop locally whenever possible for food, clothing and even beauty products. Orchard Farm out of Moscow, Idaho, makes small-batch beauty and self-care products with locally grown botanicals. Their Etsy shop has a variety of lotion bars, soaps, bath soaks and lip balms for sale that can help keep your teen activist from falling into the stinky old hippie stereotype. Generally $4 to $16 • Orchard Farm Soap • etsy.com/shop/orchardfarmsoap

ECOGEAR DARTER BACKPACK (d)

Ecogear bags like the Darter Backpack are made from Repreve fabric, which comes from recycled plastic water bottles. Super lightweight, the bag has a built-in space for a hydration bladder and can roll in on itself for smaller storage when not in use. $26 • The General Store • 2424 N. Division St.

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LOST HORIZONS FINGERLESS GLOVE (e)

Teen climate activists might be concerned with global warming yet they still want to keep their digits warm during colder months. They can do both and feel good about it with fingerless gloves from Lost Horizons, which ships wool from down under to the Kathmandu Valley in Nepal, where women earn wages for knitting the hats, scarves and other wares the company sells internationally. $39 • Mix It Up • 513 E. Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene (CARRIE SCOZZARO) n

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GIFTS FOR

Woke Parents Stay woke with these socially conscious gifts for new parents knee deep in current affairs BY WILSON CRISCIONE 483-3033 • 102 E. Francis | 926-5009 • 15530 E. Sprague

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B

e careful. Those baby clothes you were going to buy for the new parents in your life? Turns out they all assume an outdated gender role (oh, and it’s theybie now). That new toy? Turns out it was manufactured in a factory directly causing the rapid heating of the planet and the inevitable end of the human race. Those cute leather baby shoes? An animal was murdered for those. Yes, it seems like everything is #problematic when you’re looking for a gift for woke parents. But don’t worry, we have some gifts that they’ll find acceptable, at least until they see the latest Slate article.

FEMINIST BABY BOOK (a)

Woke parents know that their baby will grow up in a patriarchal society that still reveres and rewards some truly terrible men. So it’s never too early for their child to learn about some inspiring women. With Baby Feminists, your infant or toddler will learn the names of feminists like activist Gloria Steinem, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and astronaut Mae Jemison. $10 • Kizuri 35 • W. Main Ave.

VEGAN LEATHER SHOES (b)

Now, your friend’s small child can walk around comfortably without the heavy guilt that comes with contributing

to an industry profiting off the slaughter of sad, helpless animals. These Sweet N Swag leather shoes are not only vegan, but the company says it donates hundreds of pairs to children in need each year. Plus, they come in a variety of styles and colors. $24 • French Toast Children’s Boutique • 1170 W. Summit Pkwy.

SUSTAINABLE PLAY GYM (c)

The world around them may be changing, but children will always love to play. Don’t ruin that simple joy by buying a woke parent toys that contribute to climate change and pollute the ocean. This play gym was made with sustainability in mind, from the manufacturing to the materials. It has two suspended toys to give a baby a workout and is designed to optimize child safety. $60 • French Toast Children’s Boutique • 1170 W. Summit Pkwy.

BAG OF COFFEE (d)

How do woke parents have the energy to stay awoke all day? Coffee. And lots of it. It’s hard to find better coffee than at Indaba, which is locally owned with several locations around downtown Spokane. Buy the woke parents you know a bag of coffee and make sure to tell them that Indaba donates a meal to someone who needs it with each bag sold. $15 • Indaba • 1425 W. Broadway Ave. n


DECEMBER 5, 2019 INLANDER 25


GIFTS FOR

Amateur Interior Decorators Four Instagram-worthy gifts for people with (or trying to create) pretty homes BY CHEY SCOTT

T

hese days, anyone and everyone can make an Instagram account and show off their savvy home styling looks, no interior decorating degree required. Whether your best friend, sister, mom, aunt or cousin is into the midcentury modern revival, a neutral indie-boho vibe or the charming and rustic farmhouse style, there’s a bevy of locally owned shops across the Inland Northwest to find a unique piece that your recipient will proudly feature in dozens of posts to come.

BOTANICAL ART PRINTS (a)

Spokane artist and graphic designer Vanessa Swenson has a nature-inspired style that will blend seamlessly with most modern home decor themes. Her soft-edged botanical paintings are done in natural palettes of golds, blues, greens and oranges, while her letterpress designs feature the sharper lines of original pen-and-ink drawings of wildflowers, birds, bees and other natural motifs. Other designs, meanwhile, blend both styles and media into occasionally abstract designs that would look pretty on any wall or shelf. Find Swenson’s limited edition print runs on her website, and stocked by local artisan shop From Here, which also has a few custom-framed pieces ($200 each) available, along with Fellow Coworking. Prints from $26-$68 • vanessaswenson.com or From Here • 808 W. Main Ave.

POTTED HOUSEPLANT (b)

Houseplants are so hot right now, literally and figuratively since they require warm inside temps to thrive. Ask any home decor expert or scroll through any lifestyle account on Instagram, and pretty inside greenery is everywhere. Even if your recipient doesn’t have the greenest of thumbs, don’t fear. The staff at Fern plant shop in downtown Spokane can help pick a newbie-friendly variety, like snake plants or the easy-to-care-for “ZZ” plant, and will even repot it in your chosen vessel for free. Fern offers a huge variety of both common and rare plants in a variety of sizes, including tiny succulents and air plants that are perfect for display in terrariums (also available at Fern

26 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019

from local maker Sage + Moss) and small spaces, or homes with mouthy pets and young kids. $12+ • Fern • 1516 W. Riverside Ave.

THROW PILLOWS GALORE (c)

If there’s more space on your sofa or occasional chairs occupied by pillows than there is room for sitting, that’s actually not a bad look. Throw pillows in large quantities can instantly transform any space into a cozy, hygge haven and are an easy and affordable way to refresh a space throughout the seasons. At newly opened downtown decor shop Savvy Home, a huge selection of throw pillows range from traditional plaids to bumpy, texture-adding chenille and other woven fibers to ultra fluffy faux furs and cozy sweater knits. While you’re there, peruse the shop’s large inventory of barware and other items ideal for host/hostess gifts, like evergreen-scented candles, hammered copper mugs and much more. $34-$63 • Savvy Home • 1407 W. First Ave.

MACRAME / FIBER ART WALL HANGINGS (d)

Fiber art, and especially macrame, has seen a huge resurgence of late. But don’t confuse this classy modern boho look with some of the gaudier pieces popular during the artform’s first wave in the 1970s. Local artist Laurie Ann Greenberg, who works under the name Roving Goddess, stocks her hand-woven and knotted pieces in a range of materials, shapes and sizes at many retailers in the Spokane area. One of her macrame wall hangings, often attached to pieces of driftwood, can add a layer of texture and interest to any space. The artist also has a collection of fiber mandala necklaces, macrame tree ornaments and leather key fobs, which are all great gift options for smaller budgets. See samples of her latest work on Instagram at @ rovinggoddess. $28-$250 • Online at etsy.com/rovinggoddess; locally at From Here (808 W. Main Ave.), Helix Wines (824 W. Sprague Ave.), Boutique Bleu (1184 W. Summit Pkwy.) and more. n


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GIFTS FOR

Cinephiles

Ideas for the film-obsessed, from Criterion to card games BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

I

materials you’d get on a Criterion disc, like behind-the-scenes documentaries, commentaries and interviews with filmmakers and actors. Move over, Netflix. $10 a month • criterionchannel.com

CRITERION CHANNEL SUBSCRIPTION (a)

The discerning cinephile isn’t content with merely multiplex offerings, so it’s a good thing we have the Magic Lantern, Spokane’s premier arthouse theater. They often play off-the-beaten-path selections — documentaries, foreign imports and indies — and give longer runs to specialty films that the AMC only plays for a week; regardless of what you see, odds are it’ll be unique, challenging and will inspire great post-movie conversations. Individual tickets start at just $9, but you can also spend it on concessions like beer, wine and — best of all — popcorn with real melted butter. Magic Lantern Theatre • 25 W. Main Ave.

n this era of Marvel films and neverending streaming content, what even is a cinephile? Well, it’s someone who’s not just a movie fan but who’s obsessed with the medium: A cinephile can rattle off their top five Ingmar Bergman films, swears by the theatrical experience and still clings to their old LaserDisc collection. Ignoring the obvious choices of Blu-rays and DVDs — you’ll probably just buy them something they already own anyway — here are some off-beat gift ideas for the wannabe Tarantino in your life.

We’re not exactly in a drought of streaming sites, but the Criterion Channel is the go-to service for the serious cinephile. A spinoff of the esteemed Criterion Collection distributors, the channel features a curated selection of classic, indie and international films, a mix of arthouse essentials and more contemporary works. New titles are added every month, and the folks at Criterion have also put together themed packages, from paranoid ’70s thrillers to Judy Garland musicals to the gory exploitation movies of director Herschell Gordon Lewis. You can also peruse the kind of supplemental

MAGIC LANTERN GIFT CERTIFICATE (b)

SPOILER ALERT (c)

Movie buffs love flexing their trivial knowledge, and your memory of famous movie plots will come in real handy with the fast-paced card game Spoiler Alert. It’s a lot like that Parker Brothers classic

Taboo: Players get a card with a specific film title on it, and then have their teammates guess that title but without using a series of no-no words. For instance, can you describe The Good, the Bad and the Ugly without saying “gunfight”? Or Despicable Me without “minions”? It’s rapid-fire and fun, and the game also mixes in a couple TV shows and books, so you can invite more than just your cinephile friends. $20 • Uncle’s Games, Puzzles & More • 404 W. Main Ave.

BOSE SOLO 5 SOUND BAR (d)

Any cinephile worth their salt has an extensive media library, and if you’re spending a lot of time in front of the TV, then the state of your home theater is terribly important. One of the most imperative aspects of watching movies at home is a good, booming sound system — particularly if you’re indulging in a fast-paced, explosionfilled blockbuster — but shelling out for an expensive pair of speakers might not be your best option. The comfortable middle ground is this Bose brand sound bar, which connects to your TV with a single cable (and to your phone via Bluetooth) and automatically brings an immersive aural experience to your basement den. It’s sleek, it’s compact and it won’t break the bank. $199 • Huppins • 8016 N. Division St.

GOURMET POPCORN BUCKET (e)

Remember Jiffy Pop stovepop popcorn, the tinfoil bag mushrooming magically into shape as the kernels pop? So does your cinephile, who is equally particular about taste as they are about movies. The popcorn gift bucket is butter-flavored olive oil (more healthful for your sedentary cinephile), black truffle sea salt and 26-ounces of premium popcorn, for nearly 100 cups of popcorn, enough to last the entire Star Wars saga. $29.95 • Migliore Olive Oil in Coeur d’Alene • 512 E. Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene (CARRIE SCOZZARO) n

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GIFTS FOR

Cookbook Collectors Nine cookbook suggestions for the home chef on your gift list BY ALEX SAKARIASSEN

I

n an age when digital touchscreens control nearly every aspect of household life, one room continues to hold to old traditions: the kitchen. Market research data revealed last fall that cookbook sales had jumped 21 percent in early 2018 compared to early

2017. Put another way, Americans are gobbling up cookbooks like mini quiches, and the volumes of recipes pouring out of publishing houses are as diverse as the spread at a hipster potluck. The choices are downright daunting. So whether you’re getting a gift

for an already avid cookbook collector or someone whose library desperately needs something more than The Joy of Cooking, here’s a list of suggestions guaranteed to give this Christmas some extra flavor.

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BETTY CROCKER LOST RECIPES

to Kraft Easy Mac and Cup Noodles. With 30-Minute One-Pot Meals, meals can be both fast and fancy. And the 192-page cookbook is broken into chapters centered on specific cooking vessels — be it a saucepan, a bowl or a Dutch oven — making it a snap for even the most preoccupied or lackadaisical chef on your gift list to find a recipe that fits their comfort level.

Few names are as synonymous with cookbooks as Betty Crocker, and no doubt every aficionado’s bookshelf features some variation of her original tome. Betty Crocker Lost Recipes puts a new twist on a classic, diving into some vintage from-scratch recipes that modern cooks can still pull off. Soups, salads, stroganoff — it’s all here, and it’s all time-tested and Crocker-approved. These pages also feature some useful tips on putting together themed parties, and the illustrations throughout are kitschy, familiar nods to the author’s celebrated history in the cookbook world. In the right hands, Betty Crocker Lost Recipes is sure to deliver a healthy helping of nostalgia straight to the tastebuds.

STAR WARS GALAXY’S EDGE

With the final entry into the Skywalker saga set to hit theaters Dec. 20, Star Wars fans everywhere are hankering for a taste of a galaxy far, far away. How better to satisfy that hunger than a plate of fried Endorian tip-yip on a bed of mashed chokeroot and veggies, topped off with a slice of Mandalorian uj cake for dessert? The Official Black Spire Outpost Cookbook contains 70 recipes straight from Walt Disney World’s expansive new Galaxy’s Edge theme park. With this book under the tree, that fanboy or fangirl on your Christmas list can still nerd out even if a trip to the Outer Rim isn’t in the cards.

THE SINGLE PERSON’S COOKBOOK

Perhaps the worst thing about being single is cooking a nice meal and having that second portion stare back at you like a flashing neon reminder of your solitude. But cooking for one doesn’t have to be an exercise in loneliness. In The Single Person’s Cookbook, author Tony Wilkins gives the solo crowd some fantastic recipes for seafood, salad and one-pot pasta dishes, as well as an entire chapter on romantic meals designed to impress that potential new someone. Wilkins peppers each section with lived lessons on fitness, sex and navigating the single life in general, making this an ideal guide-indisguise for any bachelor or bachelorette you happen to be shopping for this Christmas.

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OK, so Snoop Dogg might not be the first name that springs to mind when you think of celebrity chefs. But Snoop has a smooth-yet-spicy style (he did just edit the cover of People magazine to declare himself “Sexiest Man Alive”), and he knows a thing or two about the munchies. From Crook to Cook has something goodgood for every meal, from Stack’d Up Flap Jacks to Bow Wow Brownies and Ice Cream, plus drink recipes, party tips and a few opening words from Martha Stewart. Snoop’s cookbook is as helpful as it is entertaining, an ideal Christmas-gift blend of utility and whimsy. ...continued on next page

30-MINUTE ONE-POT MEALS

For some, cooking is a rather utilitarian pursuit best accomplished quickly and with as few dishes as possible. But that approach shouldn’t restrict a loved one’s diet

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GIFTS FOR

Cookbook Collectors continued...

THE MEATEATER FISH AND GAME COOKBOOK

BONG APPÉTIT

Forget covertly digging through the mudroom to see what the family hunter or angler might need. With the help of renowned hunter, conservationist and podcast host Steven Rinella, you can put a fun spin on Christmas that everyone in the house will appreciate. The MeatEater Fish and Game Cookbook offers more than 100 recipes for everything from moose to grouse to rainbow trout, plus some helpful tips from Rinella on skinning, butchering and storing big game. Whether the next meal takes place around a campfire or the kitchen table, this is the type of must-have cookbook for anyone who gets their kicks by matching wits with the wild.

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An unavoidable side-effect of living in a state where marijuana’s legal is that someone you know will inevitably bring weed into the kitchen. It’s probably best for everyone that when they do, they’ve got a handy set of recipes on hand. Bong Appétit: Mastering The Art Of Cooking With Weed has 65 such recipes ranging from sweet to savory. The book kicks off with a guide on food infusions and tinctures, and includes tips on dosage and strain usage. For the truly adventurous, there’s also a selection of recipes for pot-infused cocktails. Bong Appétit will make an ideal gift for anyone that’s looking to trade in their white Christmas for a green one.

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THE KING ARTHUR FLOUR COOKIE COMPANION

There are all manner of rich, velvety, jelly-filled delicacies out there. Sometimes, though, you just want a cookie. And that’s exactly what The King Arthur Flour Cookie Companion brings to the table: a classic compendium of simple, easy-to-bake recipes guaranteed to satisfy any sweet tooth. Every type of cookie gets a thorough treatment here. Want your batch of chocolate chip to come out doughy? There’s a recipe for that. Prefer a crisper edge? There’s a recipe for that, too. The companion also offers a variety of ingredient substitutions and historical tidbits on where certain recipes originated. Just bear in mind that whoever gets this gift at Christmas will probably need a taste-tester.

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MIXTAPE POTLUCK COOKBOOK

Everyone knows what to expect from a cookbook crammed with recipes from famous chefs. But if you threw a potluck with the likes of Marisa Tomei, Fred Armisen and Zooey Deschanel, what would the spread look like? Hot off the October 2019 presses, Questlove’s Mixtape Potluck Cookbook offers a chance to find out. Each chapter covers a different end of any given party, right down to the “Veg Friends You Want to Impress.” Each recipe comes from a different once-starving artist, from Tariq Trotter (better known as rapper Black Thought) and his South Philly Seafood Stew to Amy Poehler and her Easy Veggie Party Quiche. Questlove breaks into some insightful musical commentary throughout, too, giving this cookbook the kind of unique, conversational flavor you’d expect from a celebrity potluck. n

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UNTITLED GOOSE GAME

GIFTS FOR

Gamers

Wreak havoc as a goose, outdrink Satan himself or just shoot up some bad guys — here’s what to get your gamer BY SARAH MUNDS

C

hristmas Eve. You hear a rustling in the basement. The dull murmur of perpetually played video games falls silent. Footsteps up the stairs. A door opens. Your gamer, dressed in the uniform attire of nerds across the land, creeps quietly into view. Their pale skin dances with the twinkling of Christmas lights as they wipe Cheeto-ed fingers across plaid pajama pants. They ask quietly, “Is there eggnog in the fridge?” What gift do you bestow upon this creature of the night? What offerings will they clutch with fervor as they scurry back down the stairs with glee? Is it a game about geese? Is it a video game subscription service? A virtual drinking game? Find out below.

UNTITLED GOOSE GAME

(PC, MAC, SWITCH, RATED E) Color me unsurprised that Untitled Goose Game (pictured above) has ballooned into a virulent meme. As a goose, players cruise around a city with one mission — be as much of an asshole as possible to the townspeople. You honk loudly at passing children. You steal picnic supplies. You break things. You are an unstoppable agent of chaos in an otherwise uneventful suburbia. The game puts the reins of petty revenge into our greedy little mitts, enlivening our darkest fantasies of being a minor annoyance. In real life, when someone is a jerk at work, we fantasize

34 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019

about intentionally spilling yogurt on their keyboards so that every key they press is inexplicably sticky, driving them slowly insane. We want to dent someone’s car door when they park three inches away from our car so that we can’t get back in without crawling through the passenger’s side and over the center console. We want to slowly and deliberately pour soda into the laps of customers who definitely didn’t tell us no pickles on their burger and now they’re yelling at us because there are pickles on their burger. People go to strip clubs to live out a fantasy of chatting up beautiful, young women who are actually interested in them. I play Untitled Goose Game so I can live out the fantasy of taking petty revenge on people for no reason. Untitled Goose Game is a compass pointing straight at a gleefully sadistic lodestone hidden deep in my psyche. But screw it — I can’t spill tuna sauce on my asshole boss’s computer chair so that the scent of rotting tuna follows him around everywhere he goes. I might as well steal picnic supplies in the form of a goose.

AFTERPARTY (PC, RATING PENDING)

My liver was grateful when I picked up the controller for Afterparty, a narrative drinking game, instead of picking up another mixed drink in real life. The premise of the game is pretty neat —

you’ve somehow ended up in Hell, and the only way to get out is to outdrink Satan himself. By cunningly choosing the right drinks and talking to the right people, you have a chance of cheating death. Afterparty engrossed me with its silly dialogue and witty twists. Refreshingly different, I’d throw this game as a good gift contender for your 21+ friends.

THE CALL OF DUTY/ LET’S DANCE/POKEMON/ MORTAL KOMBAT THING

Every single year I write these gift guides, I face a dilemma. Do I include the list of standards like Super Smash Bros and whatever Pokemon is popular that year? After all, a large majority of your giftees will want these games. On the flip side, you’ll probably already know your giftee wants these “big box” games by taking a gander at their game shelf. If they have every Call of Duty game since 2003, probably a safe bet that they’ll want this year’s. So here’s a list of the annual must-have franchise games all in one shot: Pokemon, Mario anything, Call of Duty, Let’s Dance, Zelda anything, MLB, FIFA, NBA, Madden, Borderlands, Kingdom Hearts. As these game developers have so cunningly figured out, “wash, rinse, repeat.”


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HELLA-COOL NEW MONITOR (a)

Don’t get your giftee “just a monitor,” get them a “really, really good monitor.” When I first started gaming, I played on a monitor with a lower resolution than a potato. I only had one screen. I suffered in ways mankind should never. Here’s a handy guide to point you in the right direction based on what your giftee already has. Do they have one awful monitor? Get them one slightly better monitor. Already have one good monitor? Get them a second matching one. Have two monitors? Get them one of those cool double-wide 38-inch curvy bad boys. Already have three monitors? Cut a hole in the bedroom wall so they can have a fourth monitor that looks out to the outside world where there is sunlight, nature and socialization.

HDMI SWITCH (b)

You plug a bunch of HDMI cords into this little contraption. In turn, the little box only needs one HDMI cord to plug into your TV. This solves the issue of only having one or two HDMI ports on your TV and having too many consoles to plug in. Bingo! Pro tip — when choosing your HDMI switch, make sure it supports whatever resolution you use with your TVs and consoles.

MY FRIEND PEDRO (c)

(SWITCH, RATED M) An inexplicably sentient banana barks orders and tasks you with missions. There isn’t much plot past that — you get assignments to kill people and away you go into the night with weapons and a lustful thirst for death. My Friend Pedro thrives on its stunts and bullet time feature (when a shot slows down during an action sequence so you can see the cool stuff). This really lets you savor every single moment of your dope flips, shots and combos. Gameplay is short, sweet and action-packed, much

like a good jazz jam band session on the streets of New Orleans during a warm, drawling Southern night — a crazy and cool thing to stumble upon, but something that won’t toil on forever.

DEATH STRANDING (d)

(PS4, PC, RATED M) I love chaos. I love indecision. I love spice and tension. That’s why I like Death Stranding. Keep in mind I haven’t played the game (although I watched someone play it at a party drunk). Instead, I’ve been enraptured by everyone else’s absolute-bananas reactions to it. No one can decide if we, the collective consciousness, like this game or not. One player claimed this game was “one of the most important games of the decade.” Some people described it as a snoring bore-fest. Another person liked it because it was insanely tedious and thus extremely soothing to his OCD. The description “strange new post-apocalyptic Amazon delivery simulator” was tossed around… and we all know how fun American Trucking Simulator was. Who knows what’s going on with this game? But I’ve always found that insanely polarizing things are usually absolutely great or hella weird. But “great” and “weird” things are always interesting, which makes this a strong gift contender.

MONTHLY HUMBLE BUNDLE SUBSCRIPTION (e)

Hate making choices? Want to throw money at your problems? Get your giftee unlimited games forever! Humble Bundle is a cool website that puts together curated groups of games that players can buy in bundles at a solid discount. A Humble Bundle subscription signs them up for bundles each month (even cheaper than usual), starting an everlasting conveyor belt of new content straight to their computer. This choice appeals to me because I often don’t know what to get a person who has super-tuned tastes, and hate the personal-touch-less feel of cash. n

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DECEMBER 5, 2019 INLANDER 35


GIFTS FOR

Music Fans Vinyl, Blu-rays and books that any music loverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gotta have

36 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019

BY DAN NAILEN AND NATHAN WEINBENDER


THE WHITWORTH UNIVERSITY

CHRISTMAS FESTIVAL CONCERT

M

usic fans aren’t the easiest to shop for, due to their individual tastes and propensity for buying things for themselves to complete their collection of, say, Hendrix live bootlegs or Guided By Voices singles. We speak from experience. But because there’s so much music product out there, it’s pretty easy to score something awesome that your music-loving friend or spouse hasn’t picked up yet. Here’s some of the best of the 2019 holiday-season finds:

SATURDAY, DEC. 14 | 8 P.M. SUNDAY, DEC. 15 | 3 P.M.

VINYL REISSUES & SPECIAL EDITIONS

MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX

THE BAND, THE BAND 50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION (a) A year after a dynamite celebration of their legendary 1968 debut Music from Big Pink, the Band’s self-titled sophomore album gets a special reissue that’s every bit the equal of its predecessor. The Band features a slew of the roots-rock pioneers’ best and most familiar songs, including “Up on Cripple Creek,” “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down” and “Rag Mama Rag.” This anniversary release adds 13 outtakes and alternative versions of several songs (six of them never before released), as well as the Band’s Woodstock set, previously only available as a bootleg. The fact Woodstock was the Band’s second-ever gig is kind of mind-blowing, and the original rough mixes of the set included here are killer. (DN) THE FLAMING LIPS, THE SOFT BULLETIN: LIVE AT RED ROCKS FEAT. THE COLORADO SYMPHONY (b) Yup, that title is a mouthful for what is essentially (and much more simply) a live performance of the Flaming Lips’ best album (don’t @ me). Of course, nothing is simple with the Flaming Lips. And while the original studio version of this album was incredibly ornate and thrilling upon its release 20 years ago — serious ear candy with the right pair of headphones — this live version recorded in 2016 features a 68-piece orchestra and 57-member choir adding their considerable heft to Wayne Coyne and company’s masterpiece. (DN) GARTH BROOKS, LEGACY (c) Garth Brooks is one of the few major artists who has yet to put his catalog up on Spotify, so physical media is still the way to go when it comes to listening to his deep catalog in sparkling quality. And you can’t get much better than this limited edition set, which features vinyl and CD copies of four of the country superstar’s biggest ’90s albums — No Fences, The Chase, In Pieces and Fresh Horses, which have collectively sold more than 40 million copies — as well as the career spanning Triple Live. Maybe the biggest Garth fan in your life couldn’t get tickets to one of his seven sold-out Arena shows a couple years ago; a copy of this set might make up for it. At least a little. (NW)

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PRINCE, 1999 (d) Since Prince died, every year has brought new reissues and cash-ins, most of which aren’t worth your time. But here’s a true must-own: A remastered re-release of his iconic 1982 album 1999, and it comes straight out of Paisley Park. First off, the record itself is one of Prince’s best, a vivid snapshot of the moment when his distinct blend of disco, funk, rock and R&B elevated him from Minneapolis phenom to global superstar. Its breakthrough success also led to Purple Rain two years later. Secondly, the repackagings (because you just know there are multiple editions at various price points) are stunning, and they boast unreleased tracks, live recordings, demos and liner notes with never-before-seen material. Oh, and you can get it on purple vinyl. (NW) GRATEFUL DEAD, READY OR NOT (e) Few bands consistently serve up new goodies for their fans like the Grateful Dead, and this live album is noteworthy for consisting of new songs the band was working on for its 14th studio album — a record never recorded due to Jerry Garcia’s death in 1995. The nine songs here all debuted at shows in 1992 and 1993, and the versions on Ready or Not include versions from gigs up to shows played just four months before Garcia’s death. Songs like “Lazy River Road” and “Days Between” are probably familiar to your favorite Deadhead from late-era bootlegs, but these versions are supposed to be the best versions from the band’s own archives. (DN) ...continued on next page

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GIFTS FOR

Music Fans continued...

BOOKS

ROCK MEMOIRS (a) Not all books written by rock stars are worth your time to read. They can be inordinately fluffy, or self-aggrandizing, or simply show a lack of creativity you would have never guessed from their music. Occasionally, though, your favorite rocker might drop a thoroughly thoughtful autobiography, or at least a bit of trashy fun as they recount their off-stage antics. This holiday season, there are several rock memoir options with a lot of potential. If you saw the Rocketman Elton John movie, you know he’s got some demons in his past along with those ridiculous costumes. His new

Royal Badness. Liz Phair can always be counted on to be almost uncomfortably open and honest, and her memoir Horror Stories recounts her meteoric rise in the sexist indie-rock world of the ’90s, and the challenges and triumphs of her career since Exile in Guyville made her a star. (DN)

book Me is being billed as his “official autobiography.” Face It: A Memoir is Debbie Harry’s new book, and considering her role fronting Blondie and delving into punk, rap and disco back in the ’70s and early ’80s, it could be a great read. Anthony Kiedis of the Red Hot Chili Peppers put out his book a few years back, now it’s Flea’s turn with Acid for the Children: A Memoir, which recounts his, um, unconventional childhood and years before the band. The Beautiful Ones could have been amazing if Prince had the chance to finish it before he died. Notoriously interview-shy, he announced this autobiography in 2016 but never finished it. The Beautiful Ones includes what he had finished, as well as plenty of never-beforeseen photos and sketches that will surely thrill any fanatics of His

BOOZE & VINYL: A SPIRITED GUIDE TO GREAT MUSIC & MIXED DRINKS (b) Ever hear Frank Sinatra croon over a loudspeaker and think, “Man, this song would sound so much better with a glass of Gentleman Jack?” Then this book is for you. From authors André and Tenaya Darlington, Booze & Vinyl is a mixology recipe guide that’ll assist

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you during your next record listening party, because it suggests both fancyschmancy craft cocktails and simple sips that will mesh with specific albums — for instance, a porter and rum concoction called the Rattle Skull that pairs perfectly with the Guns N’ Roses opus Appetite for Destruction, or a vodka and ginger drink that makes Björk’s Debut all the more evocative. Consider it for your next music nerd get-together. (NW)

BLU-RAYS

CHUCK BERRY: HAIL! HAIL! ROCK ’N’ ROLL (c) When you look at the Rolling Stones’ Keith Richards, you likely consider him a pretty cool customer. One of the joys of this 1987 documentary is watching cool Keith deal with his cantankerous hero Chuck Berry, as the Stones guitarist tries to organize 60th birthday celebration concerts in Berry’s beloved St. Louis. The rehearsals get pretty entertaining as Richards tries to get Berry to play nice with guests ranging from Linda Ronstadt to Eric Clapton to Etta James. This new Blu-ray version features rehearsals, a making-of documentary, interviews with director Taylor Hackford and a bunch of big-time musicians (Jerry Lee Lewis, Bo Diddley, Little Richard). And most importantly, great music delivered with great sound. (DN) 2019 MUSIC MOVIES (d) Movie theaters were full of hummable tunes all throughout 2019, and some of the year’s finest musical films are now available on Blu-ray. Perhaps the best of the bunch is Amazing Grace, the document of an earth-shaking 1972 gospel performance by the late Aretha Franklin, finally completed and released 47 years after it was filmed. For Beatlemaniacs, the romantic fantasy Yesterday is filled with cheeky references and classic tunes, and Blinded by the Light is a treat for Bruce Springsteen fans, the true story of a Pakistani teenager who found solace in the music of the Boss. Wild Rose is one of the year’s true hidden gems, a drama centered on a breakout performance of Jessie Buckley as a troubled Scottish woman with aspirations of country music stardom. And on the biographical documentary front, Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice and David Crosby: Remember My Name are both informative, empathetic portraits of two of the most iconic rock stars of the ’60s and ’70s. (NW) n

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GIFTS FOR

Readers

Ideas for the book worm on your list BY MINDY CAMERON AND TED S. McGREGOR JR.

L

ooking for a book to wrap up for holiday giving? Here are suggestions for the reader on your list who appreciates quality fiction or revealing memoir, for the never-Trumper or the cookbook aficionado.

A PILGRIMAGE TO ETERNITY

BY TIM EGAN Lapsed/questioning/confused Catholics would seem to be a subculture just waiting for a great book written just for them. Looking around the Roman Catholic Church, let’s just say there are problems. Reformer Pope Francis has his hands full. But really, it’s always been like that, and in times of trouble many Catholics through the centuries have decided to get back to the basic tenets of their faith… by going on a walkabout! Of course, they call them pilgrimages, from where the faithful lived to some of the key holy sites of Europe and beyond. To recreate that grand tradition, and to contemplate some of his own complicated feelings about God and religion, Timothy Egan traced the Via Francigena, from Canterbury in England to Rome.

40 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019

There’s a time during Catholic mass, just after communion, when you sit in the pew, in silent reflection. It might be the best part — a rare quiet moment amid a busy, distracted life. For the faithful, it’s a time to listen to God. Pilgrimages strike me as kind of the same thing — 1,000 miles to shut up and think. In A Pilgrimage to Eternity you get to hear Egan’s inner monologue, exploring doubt and beauty, and his own thoughts on the church’s many sins and mixed history. Oh, and his blisters! (Pro tip: Duct tape helps.) Egan, a Spokane native who was raised Catholic at Assumption Parish and Gonzaga Prep, is one of our most thoughtful writers, and this is his most personal book yet. You’re in good hands, so jump on the Via Francigena with Tim as your guide. The only blisters you’ll get will be on your thumbs as you can’t stop turning the pages. (TSM)

really left the headlines, as over the past couple years the art world was consumed by the provenance of a newly discovered Leonardo painting, Salvator Mundi. In 2017, it was bought by a Saudi prince for $450 million — the most any painting has ever sold for. And that’s where art critic, author and filmmaker Ben Lewis picks up the trail. Lewis traces the twists and turns, from Mundi emerging out of obscurity in 2005 to be sold for $1,175 to that jaw-dropping Christie’s auction in London. Along the way, you get a crash course in da Vinci’s sprawling genius along with a trip through the sketchy swamp of art dealers, arriving at the still controversial determination that Mundi is, indeed, a da Vinci. Lewis has layered a detective novel on top of a masterpiece, underlining that, like beauty, truth can be in the eye of the beholder. (TSM)

THE LAST LEONARDO

SEA PEOPLE

BY BEN LEWIS This year marks the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci, perhaps humanity’s greatest intellect. And he’s never

BY CHRISTINA THOMPSON One of the enduring human mysteries is how Polynesia was settled. Made up of more than 1,000 tiny specks spread across


more than 100,000 square miles, Harvard Review editor Christina Thompson has set out to reconcile the mess of theories that have tried to explain how people got to some of the most remote places on the planet and made a go of it. Spanish silver ships sailed right past the inhabited islands for 200 years before Captain Cook “discovered” Hawaii and Australia. Visitors immediately puzzled over how the natives got there, as does Thompson, who pays special attention to the most recent archaeological discoveries, filtered through new technologies. Like others, she debunks, among others, the popular Kon-Tiki theory that settlement started in South America. Instead, she starts by believing the oral histories of this rich, fascinating culture, including the tale of the legendary seafarer Rata. Those early voyages really were like space shots, Thompson concludes, with the pioneers packing up everything they needed to survive, then more or less floating away, out into the great unknown. (TSM)

SOLID STATE

BY KENNETH WOMACK The classic album Abbey Road came out 50 years ago — almost exactly at the same time the Beatles broke up. Talk about going out on top! As epitaphs go, it’s unmatched — a tour-de-force that continues to make the case that the Beatles remain the greatest band of all time. Beatles devotee Kenneth Womack is celebrating with a new book detailing the making of Abbey Road and the end of the band. Unlike many critics, Womack is not one to blame anybody (cough, Yoko). He just unspools the story, interviewing those who were there about the magic behind such eternal tracks as “Come Together” and “Here Comes the Sun.” From how they set the dials in the studio, to which guitars they played to what they argued and laughed about, it’s all here. So if you’re buying that Beatles superfan the Abbey Road 50th Anniversary Super Deluxe set, with three discs, an LP and a coffee table book, all packaged in an official Abbey Road gift bag, you might as well toss in a copy of Solid State. (TSM)

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MOBITUARIES

BY MO ROCCA Remember when movies were based on books? Now it’s books that are based on podcasts. Whatever it takes to hear more from Mo Rocca, I’m in. Perfecting the hipster-nerd paradigm, Rocca first made an impression on The Daily Show and now CBS This Morning. He has a kind of meandering interest in the things you never really think about. The conceit here is to rewrite the obituaries of people — a couple of places and things, too — that we let slip by with too little notice. Some are serious, like Elizabeth Jennings, a black woman who climbed aboard a whites-only streetcar 100 years before Rosa Parks. Others are quirky, like Billy Carter, the president’s good-old-boy brother best known for having a beer named after him. Prussia, a place, gets a Mobit, as does the great American station wagon, clearly a thing. “The Ford Country Squire at one point was 19 feet long,” Rocca told NPR. “I mean, you couldn’t… there weren’t even parking spaces big enough for them.” Mobituaries delivers Rocca’s trademark style — random information, with an addictive dash of panache. (TSM)

CATCH AND KILL

BY RONAN FARROW If insider entertainment gossip is your thing, Catch and Kill is the culmination of years of investigations starting with Harvey Weinstein but spilling over to Matt Lauer, NBC and The National Enquirer. Farrow is a controversial figure on his own, with lots of powerful people now his sworn enemies. He is steeped in weird Hollywood controversy, being the estranged son of Woody Allen. No surprise he has turned his sights on the moral rot he sees there. As a journalist, he’s a badass, winning the Pulitzer for his Weinstein reporting in The New Yorker. This new book clears out his reporter’s notebook, detailing not only Weinstein’s alleged crimes but how other media helped keep it all under wraps for years — they “catch and kill” embarrassing stories. “I follow a trail of clues from how Harvey Weinstein weaponized The National Enquirer all the way up to how Trump weaponized The National Enquirer and used them to suppress stories,” Farrow told WBUR in Boston. “This had a bearing on our democracy.” (TSM) ...continued on next page

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GIFTS FOR

Readers continued...

MODERN LOVE

EDITED BY DANIEL JONES Since 2004, the New York Times has published its “Modern Love” feature, with essays on the joys — and terrors — of dating in modern New York. Also a podcast, now it’s a series streaming on Amazon Prime. This new book compiles the greatest hits of the beloved feature, including the columns that inspired the TV shows. Daniel Jones, who has edited the essays (and yes, the writers bravely use their own names) since the start, says he has pored over probably 100,000 stories over the years. “One of the best things about love…” he wrote recently, “is how impossible it is to master.” But people keep trying! Dates with guys who look like dad. Dates that end at the ER. Cyber-stalking your ex. It’s all there, delivered in quick, columnlength bites, making it a book you can jump in and out of. It’s entertainment, for sure, both cringe-worthy and tear-jerking. But it also adds up to some pretty solid relationship advice. (TSM)

gonzaga.edu/mwpac |

BY RICHARD POWERS Unlike most of the books on this list, The Overstory was published last year, but recently released in paperback. At 500 pages it may be overlooked by some but is gift-worthy for serious readers. A National Book Award winner, it is a masterfully woven tale of a disparate collection of people who came to love trees in their own unique way and become unlikely warriors in a battle to save the biggest, most majestic trees of Northern California and Southwest Oregon. Each character is introduced with a vignette of family backstory. Powers provides a few clues so that the reader knows all these people will somehow become part of a larger story. But how? Powers’ skill as a writer and storyteller intertwines plant life from below the soil to the treetops with the lives and history of his characters. The result is a tale full of life and death, love and loss, a contest for survival of people and landscapes, and one heck of a story. (MC)

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THE OVERSTORY

THE TESTAMENTS

BY MARGARET ATWOOD This may not be the appropriate gift for every reader, but for the feminist on your list who has read The Handmaid’s Tale — now a classic — the recently released sequel is a must-read. The story is set 15 years after the first book ended as the misogynistic Gilead empire, which rules much of the former U.S., faces threats from inside. Atwood is a lucid writer able to capture the voices of three main female characters who drive the plot to its thrilling conclusion. An even better gift idea for someone who has not read The Handmaid’s Tale would be a two-book set. (MC)


WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING

BY DELIA OWENS Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a reason Where The Crawdads Sing has been on the New York Times bestseller list all year. It is a captivating story told by a writer with deep knowledge of the natural world who creates a place and a fictional character that together carry the story from a lonely unkempt childhood in the marshes of North Carolina to adulthood and dangers beyond. The reader falls in love with Kya and roots for her as she matures beyond the marsh. The originality and readability of this book has made it a favorite of book clubs and would be a welcome surprise under the tree. (MC)

FALL BACK DOWN WHEN I DIE

BY JOE WILKINS This is a beautifully written, complex story about bonds created and broken â&#x20AC;&#x201C; between individuals, between people and the land and between past and present. The protagonist, Wendell, is a gentle soul in the not-so-gentle Montana environment. This is a story about the consequences of grievance and entitlement as Western myth confronts the complicated reality of the modern West. Any reader who lives in or near open spaces of the West and experiences the inevitable culture clash in daily life will appreciate Fall Back Down When I Die for the beauty of the language as well as for the well-told story of a good man. (MC) ...continued on next page

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THE EDUCATION OF AN IDEALIST

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BY SAMANTHA POWER This memoir hits the book market like a beacon to remind us how idealism can play a role in our national life. The timing is ideal as we experience in real time what has come to be called a transactional presidency, a leader as deal maker. Power was a feisty youngster who immigrated from Ireland with her family. She took that feistiness into her work as a freelance journalist covering the horrors of war in the Balkans in the 1990s. There she met humanitarians who influenced her career trajectory. She campaigned for Obama, joined his administration as a foreign service advisor, and was named U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. Her resume, which includes Harvard Law School, is impressive, but the strength of this memoir is Power’s honesty

and intensity in telling her life story, revealing her mistakes, both personal and professional, and her abiding belief in fundamental ideals of America. (MC)

have this updated version, but I browsed through it at a bookstore. Santa, are you reading this? (MC)

HOW TO COOK EVERYTHING

BY ANONYMOUS Is there a never-Trumper on your gift list? He or she might be interested in A Warning by “Anonymous.” The book came out on Nov. 19. I have not yet read it, but plan to, despite some misgivings about the author’s anonymity. Much as been written about the book, however, and it’s known that the author is a Republican who supports the president’s agenda, if not his behavior, and wrote the anonymous op-ed that caused a stir inside the White House when it appeared last year in the New York Times. This is for that someone who relishes insider accounts of political turmoil, especially as we head toward the 2020 presidential election. (MC) n

BY MARK BITTMAN For the ambitious cook on your list there is no better surprise under the tree than a colorful all-purpose cookbook. For years, Mark Bittman’s How To Cook Everything has been my go-to book in the kitchen, which years ago replaced my mother’s tattered and grease-spattered Joy of Cooking. So, I was happy to learn that Bittman, a New York Times food writer, has updated his book on its 20th anniversary with lots of color, while keeping the basic goal of making food and its preparation understandable. I don’t yet

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A WARNING


VISUAL ARTS

ONE BUSY ARTIST Saranac Art Projects’ Small Works show is just one place Reinaldo Gil Zambrano has made a name for himself in the Inland Northwest art scene BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

R

einaldo Gil Zambrano is more used to working with ink in his printmaking studio than he is receiving it in the form of media attention, which has been abundant since he first made an impression on the Northwest arts scene a few years ago. His most recent efforts include a show at North Idaho College and a November exhibition at Saranac Art Projects, where he is a member and where he’ll

participate in the gallery’s annual Small Works show. Gil Zambrano joined the gallery in 2018, when he was the beneficiary of an emerging artist residency program Saranac had created through a Spokane Arts grant. He became familiar with the gallery the year prior while still at the University of Idaho completing his master of fine arts degree. ...continued on next page

Artist Reinaldo Gil Zambrano.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO


CULTURE | VISUAL ARTS “ONE BUSY ARTIST,” CONTINUED... A native of Caracas, Venezuela, Gil Zambrano was already familiar with the Northwest, however, having earned his bachelor of fine arts in 2013 from College of Idaho in Caldwell. Although he considered two master’s programs in the United Kingdom, he chose Idaho, where he also distinguished himself as a teacher. “I do enjoy teaching but I also enjoy a sense of community,” says Gil Zambrano, who is an adjunct instructor at both Eastern Washington University as well as the Spokane Print and Publishing Center, which he cofounded. His goal in the classroom, says Gil Zambrano, is “creating this environment of openness, just creating this space where it’s OK to be vulnerable.” Since 2017, Gil Zambrano has been all over the place. He brought his printing expertise to Emerge Gallery in Coeur d’Alene for its first Ink Rally, which used a steamroller to print bedsheet-sized prints, then resurrected the event in a 2019 collaboration with Terrain called Spokane Print Fest. In 2018 alone, he participated in more than a dozen exhibitions, from a juried show at Chase Gallery to an exhibition entitled Left Behind: Memory & Migration at Richmond Art Collective, as well as several out-of-area exhibitions. “What I try to do every day is wake up, have breakfast with my wife [fellow Saranac member Ashley Vaughn] and spend two hours on emails.” His to-do list includes responding to opportunities such as visiting artist programs, exhibitions and grants, like the $5,000 Spokane Arts SAGA grant he won in 2018 to purchase a printing press and launch RGZ Prints. And he’s been getting ready for the annual Small

Reinaldo Gil Zambrano designed a pattern for paper birds you can construct yourself — or just buy one of his. Works show and exhibition, where he will be showing several prints, including a pattern he designed for paper birds you can put together yourself. The Small Works show features small or mediumsized pieces — hence the name — that are ideally more affordable for gift-giving. Some of the artists’ works will also be included in one of two gift boxes. Although the contents of one box is visible, the other box is available by silent auction only and with artworks hidden from bidders. Other items in the exhibition, which runs through Dec. 29, have been specifically created for the December show like ceramics from longtime member Lisa Nappa or jewelry by returning member Melanie Lieb. Lieb was a member two years ago, took a year off, showing work around town, including at Kolva-Sullivan, and yet returned to Saranac this year. The location gets a lot of foot traffic, says Lieb, including from the nearby

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Magic Lantern, Saranac Public House and visitors to Main Avenue. “There’s nothing else like this in Spokane,” Lieb says. “There’s no other art spaces, at least, that speak to me that have that contemporary vibe.” In addition to works by Lieb and Gil Zambrano, the following members will have artwork available at the Saranac Small Works show: Alan Chatham, Ann Porter, Bradd Skubinna, Chris Tyllia, Dan McCann, Hannah Koeske, Jenny Hyde, Jessica Earle, Joshua Hobson, Kurt Madison, Lisa Nappa, Louise Kodis, Margot Casstevens, Mariah Boyle, Mary Farrell, Roger Ralston, Roin Morigeau and Tobe Harvey. n Saranac Small Works Show and exhibition • Dec. 6-29, Thur 2-6 pm, Fri-Sat 12-8 pm, Sun 4-9 pm • Free • Saranac Art Projects • 25 W. Main Ave. • Facebook: Saranac Art-Projects

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CULTURE | DIGEST

Five Best Fall TV Streams BIZARRE ROYALTY In a three-part The Daily podcast, The New York Times’ Ellen Barry investigates the fantastical story of an eccentric Indian family who claimed to be descendants of ancient Muslim royalty. Their antics included camping at a Delhi train station while the mother demanded a mansion from the Indian government (a request that was eventually granted), tantalizing foreign journalists with intrigue, and a suicide that allegedly involved crushed diamonds. But the family was not who they said they were. The violence and partition of India in 1947 tore them apart and the mother was confined to a mental hospital. Amidst the traumatic impacts of partition, the family concocted a fantastical narrative for themselves to channel their grievances. (JOSH KELETY)

M

BY BILL FROST

ost review columns are dropping their “Best of 2019” lists thanks to holiday resignation and critical narcissism. It’s almost Christmas, so who cares? On the other hand, critics absolutely must disseminate their hot takes because how will the Sheep know what was good if they’re not told? I’m not playing like that; there are too many shows. Here are five series from this fall alone you might have missed. SUCCESSION (seasons one and two on HBO Now) Forget Game of Thrones and The Sopranos — the most cutthroat family on HBO is Succession’s Roy clan. A black AF satire of wealth and passive-aggressive family dysfunction, Succession follows a vaguely demented patriarch (Brian Cox) dangling the keys to the empire before his damaged, power-hungry kids. It’s Arrested Development from the darkest timeline. MRS. FLETCHER (season one on HBO Now) Scene-stealing side player Kathryn Hahn finally headlines her own show (well, seven-episode mini series). As

THE BUZZ BIN Eve Fletcher, she’s a single mom who’s just sent her only son Brendan (Jackson White) off to college — midlife crisis, come on down! Eve’s newly adrift life has its highs (lots of lesbian porn) and lows (heartbreaking loneliness), and Hahn embodies it all perfectly.

NOT COUGIN’ IT! Among all the Thanksgiving hubbub and Mike Leach’s whining after another loss for WSU in the Apple Cup, you might have missed the most exciting development in Coug athletics in recent memory. WSU’s women’s soccer team has gone on a torrid run through the NCAA tournament, knocking off three ranked teams on their way to the Final Four, aka the College Cup. On Friday, Dec. 6, they’ll play in a national semifinal against perennial power North Carolina; the game is at 4 pm and will show on ESPNU. (DAN NAILEN)

KICKOFF You’ve probably heard by now that the Spokane Shock is back, and they’ll be competing in the Indoor Football League in 2020. Now we know exactly when you can hit the Arena for all the action. The Shock’s home opener will be March 27 against the San Diego Strike Force. The Shock will host seven home games in all; visit thespokaneshock.com for all the deets. (DAN NAILEN)

HARLEY QUINN (season one on DC Universe) Margot Robbie may have nailed the role in Suicide Squad, but Kaley Cuoco’s Harley Quinn is funnier — and R-rated and animated. This Harley is also so over the Joker (Alan Tudyk) and angling to join the Legion of Doom with help from Poison Ivy (Lake Bell). If DC’s liveaction movies were as fun and profane as Harley Quinn… they’d still find a way to screw it up. THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Some noteworthy new music arrives online and in stores Dec. 6. To wit: CAMILA CABELLO, Romance. The woman has a serious knack for pop music. Resistance is futile. ARTISTS UNITED AGAINST APARTHEID, Sun City. Reissue of the 1985 album features Little Steven, Bono, Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock, Keith Richards and more. IDLES, A Beautiful Thing: IDLES Live at Le Bataclan. The British punks captured one of their legendary live shows in Paris. (DAN NAILEN)

STUMPTOWN (season one on Hulu) One of the few bright spots in a dismal fall 2019 TV broadcast rollout, ABC’s Stumptown is essentially The Rockford Files wearing Jessica Jones’ leather jacket: a broke private investigator (Cobie Smulders) solves cases while dealing with intense past trauma. Stumptown is smart, funny, twisty and full of intriguing characters — and craft beer, because Portland. DOLLFACE (season one on Hulu) Kat Dennings’ rom-com career was derailed by six seasons of CBS’ 2 Broke Girls and two Thor movies you’ve already forgotten; Dollface puts her back on track. When Jules (Dennings) gets dumped by her boyfriend, she has to win back the female friends she’s neglected. Dollface is fluffy, fantastical fun and co-stars Brenda Song and Esther Povitsky own every scene. n

PUPPET POWER Even if you weren’t able to make it home for a turkey dinner, there are some Thanksgiving traditions that you can enjoy by yourself. Chief among them, the annual Mystery Science Theater 3,000 movie marathon. The show landed its own 24/7 streaming channel on twitch.tv in November, making binge-watching easier than it really needs to be. But the best part of the Twitch stream is the “commercial sign” breaks that show the behind-the-scenes puppeteering and set design of MST3K Live: The Great Cheesy Movie Circus Tour. The bots get some sweet upgrades. The live show hits the FIC in Spokane on Jan. 16, 2020, for a showing of No Retreat, No Surrender. (QUINN WELSCH)

Visit billfrost.tv for more trenchant TV coverage.

DECEMBER 5, 2019 INLANDER 47


CULTURE | TV

Sea of Streaming

The Morning Show (left) falls flat, while The Mandalorian explores the seedier side of the Star Wars universe.

Are Disney+ and Apple TV+ worth adding to your screen options? BY JOSH BELL

T

he streaming wars are just getting started, and the recent launches of Apple TV+ and Disney+ have added major players to the landscape, with big, splashy original content (alongside, in Disney’s case, a vast library of vintage material). If you’re having trouble deciding whether these services are worth the money ($5 a month for Apple, $7 a month for Disney), here’s a rundown of the most notable original programming that’s available now or soon (on both services, new episodes of series premiere on Fridays).

FLAGSHIP SERIES

THE MANDALORIAN (Disney+) Easily the most high-profile offering on either service, The Mandalorian is the first live-action Star Wars series, set between the events of Return of the Jedi and The Force Awakens. Pedro Pascal stars as the title character, a bounty hunter who’s yet to remove his face-covering helmet in the first four episodes. That makes him tough to connect with, but the series looks gorgeous and has an epic sweep reminiscent of classic Westerns, and it offers a deep dive into the seedier side of the Star Wars universe. Plus, Baby Yoda! THE MORNING SHOW (Apple TV+) With a star-studded cast including Jennifer Aniston, Reese Witherspoon and Steve Carell, and a timely hook about a Me Too-style scandal at a national morning news program, The Morning Show is Apple’s biggest prestige-TV swing, but it comes off more like bargain-bin Aaron Sorkin, a glossier, soapier version of his HBO misfire The Newsroom. There are plenty of strident speeches about the future of journalism, along with some salacious liaisons, but none

48 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019

of it rings true, even as it shamelessly appropriates sensitive real-life scandals.

COMEDIES

HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL: THE MUSICAL: THE SERIES (Disney+) The convoluted premise of the mockumentary-style sitcom (students at the school where the original High School Musical was shot decide to mount their own stage production) is a bit of a stumbling block, but this wholesome, tween-friendly show is fresh and funny, right in that Disney sweet spot of family entertainment with broad appeal. DICKINSON (Apple TV+) The deliberate anachronisms (modern pop music and slang) in this period dramedy about young Emily Dickinson lose their comedic value quickly, but there’s a lot to like in Hailee Steinfeld’s performance as the moody poet, and the show effectively uses its hybrid style to connect to universal emotions about growing up. PIXAR’S SPARKSHORTS AND FORKY ASKS A QUESTION (Disney+) If you’ve seen the short films that play in front of Pixar’s animated features, you’ll mostly know what to expect from the endearing SparkShorts series, although at least one short (Purl) is aimed at a more mature audience (including mild swearing!). Toy Story 4 breakout character Forky explores life’s absurdities in the slight but amusing Forky Asks a Question shorts.

FEATURE FILMS

LADY AND THE TRAMP (DISNEY+) Disney’s remake mania continues with this live-action take on the

1955 animated film about a pampered suburban dog falling in love with a carefree stray. It’s perfunctory and antiseptic, adding a half-hour to the story while losing most of the wonder and expressiveness that made the original great. NOELLE (Disney+) Anna Kendrick plays Santa Claus’ overachieving daughter in this aggressively cute Christmas comedy, co-starring Bill Hader as the reluctant heir to the Santa gig. Kendrick is charming, but the story, with its fish-out-of-water jokes and wan empowerment message, is mostly a dud, and the special effects are barely TV-worthy. HALA (Apple TV+, Dec. 6) This Sundance-premiered coming-of-age story follows some familiar beats, but it finds a new perspective in the character of the American-born daughter of Pakistani immigrants (played wonderfully by Geraldine Viswanathan), who has to navigate cultural and generational divides along with typical teenage angst. ALSO ON APPLE TV+: Fantasy drama See, starring Jason Momoa, is a plodding, absurdly grim take on a post-apocalyptic future in which all humans are blind (except, of course, for the requisite Chosen One). Alternate history drama For All Mankind, from Battlestar Galactica and Outlander producer Ronald D. Moore, imagines a world where the Soviets got to the moon first, but it’s more of a stodgy period piece than a bold reinvention of history. Psychological thriller Servant, produced by M. Night Shyamalan, has a creepy baby-swapping premise and some unsettling style and atmosphere, but is a little low on incident. ALSO ON DISNEY+: Feel-good reality show Encore! reunites the casts of high school stage productions to recreate their past performances, to no apparent purpose. Self-congratulatory documentary series The Imagineering Story traces the history of Disney’s theme parks, and feels like the kind of thing that would be shown to people stuck in line at Disneyland. Edutainment series The World According to Jeff Goldblum features its namesake star at his most irritatingly quirky, playing up his oddball personality as he talks over the experts ostensibly helping him learn about everyday topics. n


CULTURE | VISUAL ARTS

FIRST FRIDAY

A piece by Manal Deeb (left) at Marmot Art Space and a white stoneware mug from Aubrey Purdy Rude for Trackside Studio’s annual Cup of Joy show.

Spokane’s monthly arts showcase features gallery receptions, live music and a chance to meet local artists across the downtown core and beyond. Receptions for this month’s events are Friday, Dec. 6, from 5-8 pm, unless otherwise noted below, where events are listed alphabetically by venue. Listings were compiled from information provided by First Friday’s organizer, Downtown Spokane Partnership, Spokane Arts and host venues/artists. Red stars denote Inlander staff picks. For additional information visit firstfridayspokane.org or the Inlander’s online event calendar, at Inlander.com/events. (CHEY SCOTT) AUNTIE’S BOOKSTORE, 402 W. Main Ave. The monthly Three Minute Mic, hosted by Spokane Poet Laureate Chris Cook, from 8-9 pm. AVENUE WEST GALLERY, 907 W. Boone Ave. Abstract geometric art by Amanda Caldwell. BARRISTER WINERY, 1213 W. Railroad Ave. Art by Marge and Patty Murphy, and music by Grand Avenue. CHERRY STREET STUDIOS, 1123 S. Cherry St. Local photographers Bill and Kathy

Kostelec host their 10th Anniversary Open House. Fri, Dec. 6 from 5-9 pm; continues Sat, Dec. 7 and Sun, Dec. 8 from 1-5 pm. J CRAFTSMAN CELLARS, 1194 W. Summit Pkwy. Abstract paintings by Todd Mires. FIRST AVENUE COFFEE, 1011 W. First Ave. Floral-themed art by Nora Comito. GIANT NERD BOOKS, 709 N. Monroe St. The Black X-Mas Art Show features local artists Izzy Comito, Audreana Camm, Brian Deemy, Thomas Froese, Derrick King, Chad Scheres,

Erica Schisler, Chris Spriggs and Mikal Vollmer. J IRON GOAT BREWING CO., 1302 W. Second Ave. Time & Space by Kay West features close-up photography of deteriorating surfaces. KENDALL YARDS WELCOME CENTER, 1335 W. Summit Pkwy. The annual Artisan Festival features handcrafted artwork by more than a dozen regional artisans. Fri, Dec. 6 from 4-8 pm and Sat, Dec. 7 from 10 am-3 pm. J KOLVA-SULLIVAN GALLERY, 115 S. Adams St. Laura, or Scenes from a Common World is a multimedia installation bridging film, literature and fine art by Charles M. Pepiton, Rebekah WilkinsPepiton, Wes Kline and Damon Falke. J LUCKY LEAF CO., 1111 W. First Ave. Collage art by Ian Sears and mixed media sculpture by James Barrett. J MARMOT ART SPACE, 1202 W. Summit Pkwy. Featuring art by Palestinian-born guest artist Manal Deeb.

NEW MOON GALLERY, 1326 E. Sprague Ave. Fantastic Circumstance features paintings by Kim Long, alongside Lisa Maddux, Melissa Cole, Ric Gendron and Tim Lord. Reception 5-9 pm. POTTERY PLACE PLUS, 203 N. Washington St. December’s featured guest is wood carver and wildlife artist Jerry Simchuk. Reception 5-9 pm. J RICHMOND ART COLLECTIVE, 228 W. Sprague Ave. Laboratory presents two interactive installations: Power Line Feeds by Ursula Endlicher and Stationary Fruit by Lizzy Lubitsky. ROBERT KARL CELLARS, 115 W. Pacific Ave. Featuring art by painter and photographer Kay West and painter Terri Grove Griffin. J SARANAC ART PROJECTS, 25 W. Main Ave. The annual Small Works Sale features small, affordable and original works by SAP members and invited guests. Reception 4-9 pm; show continues through the month.

J SPARK CENTRAL, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. Join EWU students for “Art as a Social Act,” an interactive art event. STAN MILLER STUDIO, 3138 E. 17th Ave. The internationally recognized artist showcases recent watercolor and egg tempera paintings in his home studio. Reception 5-9 pm; continues through the weekend. J TRACKSIDE STUDIO, 115 S. Adams St. The annual Cup of Joy show features more than three dozen artists from around the U.S. showcasing collectible and functional ceramic cup forms. URBAN ART CO-OP, 3209 N. Monroe The co-op hosts its annual Holiday Market featuring work by local artists in a variety of media. Fri, Dec. 6 from 6-9 pm; continues Dec. 7 from 10 am-6 pm and Dec. 8 from 10 am-4 pm. J WONDER SPOKANE, 835 N. Post St. The AS2 gallery hosts Wonderful: Holiday Small Works Show & Sale. n

DECEMBER 5, 2019 INLANDER 49


DINING

Name Game Local menus encourage diners to read between the lines with word plays, homages and other unexpected inspirations BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

TEAM SPIRIT

Prohibition Gastropub’s top-selling Voot Burger. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

F

ood descriptions don’t always match the ingredients. Mincemeat, for example, is actually made from fruit, while there is absolutely no dairy in head cheese. Although we’re conditioned to accept a wide range of nomenclature — crab Louis salad, Reuben sandwich, Buffalo chicken wings — sometimes a menu item’s name alone really stands out. Pubs, diners and places that serve sushi, burgers and pizza seemed to be especially prone to quirky item names on their menus. What follows are the backstories of several local dishes that caught our eye. Some places convey a whimsical menu from the outset. At CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN (523 Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene), the menu is a series of amusing nonsequiturs, including many dishes honoring famous historical figures like tycoon-turned-philanthropist John D. Rockefeller, tributed with the Rockafella Ya’ll chicken and waffles ($16), and baseball great Jackie Robinson with the #42 Burger

50 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019

($15). Rainbows and Tunacorns ($15), however, is simply a mirthful way of saying ahi tuna poke and grilled corn. “Voot” in 1920s parlance is money, hence the two meanings behind the Voot Burger ($16) at PROHIBITION GASTROPUB (1914 N. Monroe St.), where much of the menu is named after Prohibition-era slang. “We thought it was a fun and fitting name,” notes Jill Leonetti, who owns the restaurant with her husband and chef John D. Leonetti. Even more interesting, the burger patty is a mix of coffee-infused beef and cremini mushrooms — the latter a requirement of the James Beard Foundation’s Blended Burger Project competition into which it was first entered — and topped with onion, tomato, candied bacon and fontina cheese on a pretzel bun. Unicorns are also a thing at the whimsical GILDED UNICORN (110 S. Monroe St.), which does its own take on the Cobb salad; a dish originally invented in the 1930s

Not surprisingly, many Inland Northwest eateries demonstrate their support of local universities and their respective sports teams through menu tributes. At HEROES N SPORTS (245 NE Kamiaken St., Pullman), try the Coug-It Club ($6-$13), from the menu’s “All Stars” section. Across the state line in Idaho, the VARSITY DINER (203 W. Third St., Moscow) is serving the doublepatty Vandal Burger ($12). Also located in Moscow and using local Vandal Brand Meats, RANTS & RAVES BREWERY (308 N. Jackson St., Moscow) nonetheless splits the difference of team support with the Cougar/Vandal Win Burger ($14), featuring aged havarti and pesto mayo. Although it doubly honors Washington State with the Cougar Gold Burger (Cougar Gold cheese being made by WSU’s creamery), WADDELL’S BREWPUB & GRILLE (6501 N. Cedar St.) also pays tribute to hometown favorite Gonzaga University with its Big Dawgg Burger ($17.50), featuring jalapenos, Zag sauce (chipotle mayo), cheddar, bacon, grilled ham, pepper jack and topped with an onion ring. Located just blocks from Gonzaga’s campus, LOGAN TAVERN (1305 N. Hamilton St.) serves the Kennel Wrap ($11) with crispy boneless chicken, blue cheese and optional buffalo sauce, the latter two standing in for Gonzaga’s red and blue. (CARRIE SCOZZARO)


FOOD | OPENING

at the historic Brown Derby Restaurant in Beverly Hills. Gilded Unicorn, however, swaps out some of the classic salad ingredients like labneh cheese for Roquefort and squash for chicken. But it’s the Devils on Horseback ($9) — bacon-wrapped dates — that conjures Tolkienesque visions, and with good reason, it turns out. “They are classic pub fare from England,” says chef-owner Adam Hegsted. “Norman raiders would disguise themselves in suits of armor made by layering rashers of bacon.” Not only did it provide the wearer roughly the same protection as leather, the garb also frightened villagers in the area being raided. “Then, when the job was done,” says Hegsted, “the armor could be cooked and eaten.” Owners have made merry with menu names at HERITAGE BAR AND KITCHEN (122 S. Monroe St.), from Dough Boys (cheesy garlic bread; $6.50) to the Cheese Louise (grilled cheese with tomato and bacon; $13.50). The Fancy Nancy ($16), according to co-owner Gabe Wood, is a family recipe from co-owner Alex King’s mother, Nancy. The handheld meat pie features scratch-made dough, ground beef, cheddar, onions and tomatoes. WASABI ASIAN BISTRO’S (10208 N. Division St.) Nightmare on Division Street Roll ($15.60), is a double entendre, both a nod to the city and a reference to the Wes Craven slasher classic Nightmare on Elm Street. The roll packs in a considerable amount of ingredients: asparagus, shrimp tempura, crab, tuna, salmon, eel and spicy lobster sauce. At SYRINGA SUSHI (1710 N. Fourth St., Coeur d’Alene), the rolls are, like much of what owners Viljo and Autumn Basso serve in their other restaurants, a reflection of their lives, like the Coeur d’Alene Roll ($8) with smoked Idaho trout. Many names, however, have been contributed by or are about people they know, including the EZ-B Roll ($8), named for their son, who is partial to the eel, avocado and cucumber concocted in his honor.

B

ack in downtown Spokane at the SATELLITE DINER (425 W. Sprague Ave.), diners must suss out sustenance in several items, like the Hen Fruit on the Red River ($12). What is the fruit of a hen’s efforts but an egg, of course; although some may still ponder the Red River reference. It’s chili, served over the cheese-smothered hash browns and under the two eggs. Another Satellite dish, the Billy Breen ($15), honors the father of a longtime patron, says kitchen manager Michael Glenn. “It is based off of many ‘all-inclusive’ sandwiches that are served in the Midwest and East Coast that include protein, cheese and fries in a whole sandwich,” Glenn says. A locally made pizza named after a nearby ski hill is a nobrainer, but what impresses is the description of the Schweitzer Ski Flake ($16-$23) at SECOND AVENUE PIZZA (215 S. Second St., Sandpoint). It’s got fresh spinach, tomatoes “avalanched” with feta cheese, garlic, “moguls” of mushrooms, black olives and at “the peak, knee deep” in Asiago cheese. Another local pizza spot, the FLYING GOAT (3318 W. Northwest Blvd.) is all about community, a mission reflected in their menu, and much of which is named for local geography like the Milton muffaletta sandwich and Waikiki pizza. The Kerri Lynn Margherita Pizza ($13.50), however, is more personal; it’s named for co-owner Jonathan Sweatt’s cousin who passed away from cancer. The restaurant donates $1 from each sale of the pie to families in need. When he wasn’t scaling mountains, the late Spokane mountaineer Jess Roskelley often ate at the Flying Goat and was partial to its dumplings ($11.50) now named after him. The Roskelley Dumplings feature house sausage, roasted jalapeno and goat cheese, all wrapped in dough and deep fried. “It’s a tragedy that we wanted to acknowledge and honor [Jess and his wife Allison’s] contribution to the community,” says Sweatt. As Flying Goat’s menu indicates, restaurants have numerous ways to go when creating names for their food, from supportive to serious to downright silly, adding to the region’s dining experience with dishes that are memorable to both eat and say. n

HearthCooked Comfort Crimson Hearth in Spokane Valley offers affordable, home-cooked staples from breakfast through dinner BY CHEY SCOTT

A

“breakfast nest” at Crimson Hearth, and is based on a mid-1800s German recipe passed down in the family. The cheesy hashbrown bowl is topped with German sausage, two eggs and a side of sourdough toast. “Most of the breakfast and lunch menu are my father’s recipes from cooking with his grandmother,” Pedersen says. “Although my family is from Denmark, there is a lot of cuisine here that has a French influence, and of course we do burgers, soups and sandwiches.” Rather than focus solely on breakfast and brunch, the Pedersens also wanted to revitalize the hearth oven cooking techniques the family used on the farm where Rick grew up. That detail, paired with collaboration from executive chef George Turner, inspired the creation of a traditional dinner menu, a highlight of which is the Crimson pub steak ($26). The top sirloin is dry-aged for 30 days, seared at 600 degrees, topped with butter made using an 80-year-old recipe from a famous Swiss restaurant and served with garlic mashed potatoes and seasonal veggies. There’s also a variety of hearth-fired pizzas ($13-$15), and an oven-roasted chicken breast ($16). Yet, Pedersen says the restaurant’s most popular lunch/dinner menu item is its mac and cheese ($11).

Spokane-area family marked their return to restaurant ownership after more than a decade with the opening last month of Crimson Hearth in Spokane Valley. Located in a bright white building with a contrasting black roof and a crimson red door on busy Sprague Avenue, Crimson Hearth serves breakfast, lunch and dinner with a European-inspired menu and focus on hearth oven cooking. The restaurant is owned by father-and-son duo Rick and Kaston Pedersen; the elder Pedersen is the original founder of regional chain Old European. The family spent the last two years remodeling the building, which sat empty for many years before that, Kaston Pedersen says. “My dad has been in the restaurant industry for quite some time, he had Old European for 20 [years] but we unfortunately had to get out of it, and for the last decade we The Pickup Sticks appetizer: sirloin steak, prawns, pork belly and chicken breast skewers. jumped around,” he explains. “We want to be a place where people can come to get quality, made“We do it a little differently, it’s a lot creamier from-scratch food for a really fair price.” than people are used to, but it’s our number one The menu rotates throughout the day; breakseller,” he says. fast is served daily from 7 am to 2 pm, while Soon the Pedersens hope to open the restaulunch runs 7 am to 3 pm. Dinner service is from rant’s drive-through espresso window, which will 3 to 9 pm, except for Monday and Sunday. also offer some quicker to-go items like pastries On the breakfast side, Crimson Hearth offers and beignets. some nostalgic fare from Rick Pedersen’s Old “It’s been really good so far,” Pedersen says European days, like aebleskivers, crepes ($7-$11) of the restaurant’s first month. “A lot of people and beignets (two for $2), along with omelets who’ve followed my dad around have come to ($10-$14), eggs Benedict ($13-$16) and other check us out. People have been waiting for a traditional breakfast combos. place like this in the Valley.” n A signature item is the tarteflette ($14; also spelled tartiflette), a dish of potatoes, cheese, Crimson Hearth • 11003 E. Sprague Ave. • butter and meat originating in the French Alps. Open Tue-Sat 7 am-9 pm; Sun-Mon 7 am-3 Pronounced tart-eh-flay, the dish also goes by pm • facebook.com/crimsonhearth • 598-8927

DECEMBER 5, 2019 INLANDER 51


Christmas dinner

FOOD | TREATS

SERVED ON CHRISTMAS DAY

OPEN AT 11 AM

NFL ALL GAMES, SEASON ALL THE TIME! TICKET & POKER $ @7PM ON

WEDNESDAYS

15 APPETIZER

SAMPLER PLATTER

32OZ DOMESTIC BEERS $5.50

12303 E Trent, Spokane Valley • (509) 862-4852 • www.norms.vip

Holiday treats from Sandpoint Chocolate Bear/Chocolate Apothecary.

After the Fire

Sandpoint’s Chocolate Bear recovers from an unexpected meltdown with a new facility in Spokane Valley BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

T People across Washington need an accurate census to make sure we get funding and representation for everyone that lives here—no exceptions. All ages, regardless of immigration status should be counted.

An email for food lovers

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52 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019

he melting point of chocolate is somewhere between 86 and 90 degrees, just below body temperature. Beyond that, it can burn. So when a fire ripped through Sandpoint Chocolate Bear this past February, the chocolate was obliterated, yet the spirit of the company persevered. “We spent a whole year looking for the perfect place,” says Dennis Powell, who opened Sandpoint Chocolate Bear in 2012 with wife Carrie. They acquired Spokane’s Chocolate Apothecary last year, and stocked both locations with the from-scratch sweets they produced in Sandpoint. The Powells could find nothing comparable to their former location — one of Sandpoint’s busiest downtown corners and steps from City Beach — in a building that has since been condemned. Yet within six months of the fire, the couple converted a Spokane Valley house they owned through Dennis’ construction company into their new production space. They kept Sandpoint in the name, Dennis says, because they plan to someday return. In the meantime, the Powells are doing what they’ve done from the outset: figuring stuff out. They purchased the former Coeur d’Alene Chocolates’ molds and old Spokandy display cases, the latter’s logo still faintly visible. “That’s how sustainable we are,” says Dennis, pointing to the case. The business also needed all new equipment, like a fudge cooker and a grinder to make cocoa powder for its popular drinking chocolate ($4/cup or $10/half-pound). Some tools had to be improvised. The Powells roast and shell their own beans, for example, which they source from all over: Mexico, Fiji, India, Bolivia, Honduras, Sierra Leone, Peru, Madagascar and Tanzania. To crack the husks,

Dennis cobbled together a tool attached to a drill motor and rigged a blower to winnow the husks from the crushed cacao beans, called nibs. Nibs are sold ($15/half pound) and used in specialty items, like Dennis’ single-origin chocolate Bean2Bars ($5). Dennis is the maker, he says, referring to his tools and Bean2Bar, but Carrie is the chocolatier. Armed with a can-do attitude, boundless curiosity and her certification through Ecole Chocolat Professional School of Chocolate Arts, Carrie does the bulk of the production. When she makes caramel, for example, it’s 12 pans at a time. The product sells quickly, although the shelf life is easily a month, she says. Caramel is available per piece ($1.24) or in gift boxes, like a 15-piece salted caramel set ($25) and a nine-piece “stocking stuffer” ($16.50) of caramels and truffles, another popular item. Carrie also makes hard and soft brittle ($5), assorted flavors of bark including marshmallow and peppermint ($8), and specialty items inspired by everything from the season to things she sees in books, and reimagined combinations of familiar ingredients like her new Grizzly Bear peanut butter cups ($5). Yes, admits Carrie; she really is like a kid in a candy store at her job. She and Dennis also receive a lot of help, including from their children. “And we have a lot of people volunteer for quality control,” she laughs. n Sandpoint Chocolate Bear • 11425 E. Trent Ave., Spokane Valley • Open daily 11 am-6 pm • sandpointchocolate.com • 304-8101 Chocolate Apothecary • 621 W. Mallon Ave., Suite 419 • Open Mon-Thu 10 am-5 pm, FriSat 10 am-6 pm • chocolateapothecarycoffee. com • 324-2424


Irreconcilable Differences

Scarlett Johansson and Adam Driver are at their best in Marriage Story.

with a single off-hand comment, and slowly boil over into shouting matches. Charlie and Nicole are both shouldering the pressure of legal minutiae, and spending more and more time in antiseptic, fluorescent-lit meeting rooms and crowded courtrooms, where audiences of strangers joylessly eavesdrop on their personal problems. The movie is really a showcase for its two main performances, and Johansson and Driver have never been better. Baumbach’s script provides them with extended dialogue passages, some of which are shot in long, unbroken takes fittingly reminiscent of a theater piece. The movie’s dramatic centerpiece is an extended argument in of explosive anger, and it’s all depicted with the blunt Charlie’s barely furnished apartment, as he and Nicole honesty of events that were first rehearsed in real life. It’s deliberately try to hurt one another, finding the freshest the sort of movie that a lot of couples will be watching emotional wounds and prodding at them mercilessly. through their fingers. Baumbach’s films can sometimes strain too hard for We get the sense that Charlie and Nicole have been effect, and he often asks us to empathize with characters drifting apart for awhile. He had a brief we hardly like spending time with. affair with his stage manager, which Nicole MARRIAGE STORY But here he exhibits a lightness of discovered by hacking into his emails. She’s touch, both in the ever-shifting tone Rated R moving to L.A. to star in a new TV series, of the material and in the perceptive Directed by Noah Baumbach leaving Charlie behind to oversee a new ways he checks the privilege of his Starring Adam Driver, Scarlett Broadway production. Charlie is estranged characters. Like the work of James L. Johansson, Laura Dern, Alan Alda from his own family, and he’s obviously Brooks (particularly his 1983 film Terms Streaming on Netflix concerned about repeating the failings of his of Endearment), Marriage Story captures parents. Nicole has always felt like a creative the absurdity of life, how a pratfall can subordinate to her husband, and sees her new gig as a swing right into a moment of tragedy, and observes how chance to break out independently, as both an artist and the people who love you most are capable of hurting you a person. Their young son Henry (Azhy Robertson), most deeply. meanwhile, is caught in the middle. It belongs in the rarified company of such great They’ve agreed to go through the divorce process works as Ingmar Bergman’s Scenes from a Marriage and sans legal advice, but Nicole eventually hires Nora (LauAsghar Farhadi’s A Separation, movies about long-term ra Dern), a flashy family attorney who thinks she can get partnerships straining beneath the weight of a lifetime of Nicole full custody of Henry. Charlie lawyers up, too, but microaggressions. It doesn’t grandstand. It doesn’t pick he has a narrower pool to choose from — he’s not allowed sides. Neither Nicole or Charlie is a villain, although to hire any lawyer that has previously consulted with his we’re often stunned by their penchant for cruelty, and we wife — and he settles on Bert (Alan Alda), an old-timer wonder if they really mean some of the things they say. who’s willing to roll over and meet Nora’s demands. And amidst the bitterness and brutal honesty are notes of Every conversation between the former couple is a warmth and compassion and comedy, and ultimately a minefield. Forced, businesslike discussions of visitation sense that everything will be alright. It’s easily one of the rights and pick-up schedules veer head-on into hostility best films of the year. n

Noah Baumbach’s great Marriage Story finds comedy and empathy in the details of a painful divorce BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

N

oah Baumbach’s Marriage Story begins as its central marriage is coming to an end. Our two protagonists are fiercely independent, articulate, opinionated creative types: Charlie (Adam Driver) is the director of an avant-garde theater troupe in New York City; Nicole (Scarlett Johansson) is an actress and one of his primary collaborators. They’re the kind of couple that seems genetically engineered to inspire New Yorker profiles. The movie opens with dual montages, as Charlie and Nicole take turns reading laundry lists of the qualities they most love about the other. Nicole has a generous spirit and an infectious personality, is messy but in an endearing way. Charlie is thoughtful and organized, and he’s able to tell you when you have food in your teeth without making you feel embarrassed. It’s a sequence of romantic virtuosity, set to a swooning Randy Newman score, and we feel like we’re watching two people fall for each other all over again. And then there’s a hard cut to Charlie and Nicole in a cramped mediator’s office, sitting in chairs that might as well have a miles-wide gulf between them. What we’ve been listening to hasn’t been a spontaneous outpouring of feeling, but rather an assignment from their counselor. That tonal whiplash is typical of Marriage Story, which will be streaming on Netflix starting Dec. 6 and documents how a single crack in a relationship can spread into a cobweb of fractures. It is as funny as it is painful, a film that captures grubby mundanity as well as moments

DECEMBER 5, 2019 INLANDER 53


FILM | SHORTS Honey Boy

OPENING FILMS DARK WATERS

Mark Ruffalo plays a corporate defense attorney who turns the tables on his most high-profile clients, uncovering a conspiracy to keep a major chemical company’s pollution under wraps. (NW) Rated PG-13

HONEY BOY

Shia LaBeouf didn’t just write this metaautobiography about his own tumultuous childhood, but he has cast himself as his own abusive, drug-addicted father. (NW) Rated R

NO SAFE SPACES

Dennis Prager and Adam Carolla were so mad that identity politics and PC

NOW PLAYING 21 BRIDGES

A detective (Chadwick Boseman) chases two drug runners through the streets of New York, only to find he’s after the wrong villains. A decent, meat-andpotatoes cop thriller that nearly derails in its third act. (NW) Rated R

A BEAUTIFUL DAY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

A lovely ode to the power of kindness, with an Esquire journalist learning to live more authentically after writing about none other than Mister Rogers. Tom Hanks, Hollywood’s nicest man, plays the beloved TV personality. (MJ) Rated PG

CHARLIE’S ANGELS

The ’70s TV show gets yet another bigscreen adaptation, with a new trio of secret agents — Kristen Stewart, Naomi Scott and Ella Balinska — engaging in global espionage. (NW) Rated PG-13

DOCTOR SLEEP

Making a sequel to the horror classic The Shining seemed a fool’s errand, but director Mike Flanagan succeeded. Now grown-up, Danny Torrance encounters a girl who shares his gift for telepathy and is being chased by child-killing vampires. (MJ) Rated R

FANTASTIC FUNGI

The culinary, medicinal and psychotropic properties of mushrooms are explored and celebrated in this scientific nature documentary. At the Magic Lantern. (NW)

FORD V. FERRARI

From director James Mangold, a slick dramatization of the relationship between the Ford auto designer (Matt Damon) and the pro driver (Christian Bale) who set out to beat Ferrari in the ’66 24 Hours of Le Mans race. (ES) Rated PG-13

FROZEN II

Solid sequel to the Disney juggernaut,

54 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019

with Queen Elsa, Princess Anna and friends venturing into the wintry wilderness to save their kingdom from a mysterious force of the past. There’s no “Let It Go,” but it’s good enough. (NW) Rated PG

THE GOOD LIAR

Ian McKellen is a career con artist who worms his way into the life of a widow played by Helen Mirren, who has secrets of her own. The central performances are fun; the plot is preposterous. (NW) Rated R

HARRIET

The humanitarian and abolitionist Harriet Tubman finally gets a biopic deserving of her legacy, anchored by an electric performance by Cynthia Erivo. Old-fashioned filmmaking of the highest order. (MJ) Rated PG-13

THE IRISHMAN

Martin Scorsese’s decades-spanning epic is one of his best, the saga of a mid-level gangster (Robert De Niro) who cultivates a relationship with the ill-fated Jimmy Hoffa (Al Pacino). At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R

JOJO RABBIT

In Taika Waititi’s WWII-set satire, a little boy with an imaginary friend who looks just like Hitler befriends the Jewish girl being hidden by his mother. Its juggling tones and bleak subject matter might not work for everyone. (ES) Rated PG-13

JOKER

The Clown Prince gets his own origin story, with Joaquin Phoenix as a failed stand-up who violently lashes out at society. A Scorsese pastiche that’s not nearly as edgy as it thinks it is. (MJ) Rated R

KNIVES OUT

Rian Johnson’s all-star whodunit centers on the death of a wealthy patriarch, and the craven relatives that would profit off

culture are destroying free speech that they made this feature-length documentary about how totally not triggered they are. (NW) Rated PG-13

PLAYMOBIL: THE MOVIE

Human siblings are sucked into the world of the smiley plastic toy line, and the results are lifeless and corporate. The Lego Movie, this is not. (MJ) Rated PG

WAVES

A highly stylized, music-filled portrait of a black family in Florida, told primarily through the relationship of an ambitious teenager and his overbearing father. (NW) Rated R

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE INLANDER

NEW YORK TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

21 BRIDGES

51

A BEAUTIFUL DAY IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD

80

FORD V FERRARI

81

FROZEN II

65

JOJO RABBIT

58

KNIVES OUT

83

PARASITE

96

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

his demise. As a mystery, it’s merely OK. As an evisceration of the one percent, it’s satisfying. (NW) Rated PG-13

LAST CHRISTMAS

Paul Feig directs this holiday dramedy about a reckless 20-something (Emilia Clarke) who starts to get her act together after falling for a mysterious, handsome stranger. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE LIGHTHOUSE

Robert Eggers’ follow-up to The Witch is another slow-burn period piece, with Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson as isolated lighthouse keepers going stir crazy. But unlike The Witch, this unnerving sea chantey is more bemusing than terrifying. (ES) Rated R

MALEFICENT: MISTRESS OF EVIL

The Sleeping Beauty villain returns, again played by Angelina Jolie and here going cheekbone to cheekbone with wicked queen Michelle Pfeiffer. The few good ideas of the original are traded in for endless spectacle resembling a video game cut-scene. (NW) Rated PG

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

MIDWAY

The 1942 Battle of Midway gets the noisy epic treatment from schlock king Roland Emmerich, with a sprawling cast that includes Woody Harrelson and Dennis Quaid. (NW) Rated PG-13

PARASITE

Satire, slapstick and secrecy collide in Bong Joon-ho’s twisty, Palme d’Orwinning contraption, about a poor South Korean family that insinuates itself into the lives of an upper class clan. Surprises abound. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R

PLAYING WITH FIRE

John Cena stars as the captain of an elite firefighter squad that meets its match when it takes in a trio of troublemaking kids. (NW) Rated PG

QUEEN & SLIM

A black couple are pulled over on their first date, the cop ends up dead and they go on the run, becoming villains and folk heroes in the process. Daniel Kaluuya and Jodie Turner-Smith star. (NW) Rated R n


FILM | REVIEW

TER GIC LAN N THEATER MA TH TH FRI, DEC 6 – THU, DEC 12 TICKETS: $9

PARASITE (132 MIN) FRI: 3:30, 8:00 SAT: 1:20, 3:30, 8:00 SUN: 12:30, 7:05 MON-THU: 1:30, 4:30 HARRIET (125 MIN) FRI/SAT: 3:50, 6:00 SUN: 1:45, 4:45 MON-THU: 2:00 FANTASTIC FUNGI (79 MIN) FRI: 6:20 SAT: 1:45, 6:20 SUN: 12:00, 3:00 MON-THU: 7:00 THE LIGHTHOUSE (110 MIN) FRI/SAT: 8:30 SUN: 4:05 MON: 3:45 WED-THU: 6:15 JOJO RABBIT (108 MIN) TUES-THU: 4:00 THE IRISHMAN (210 MIN) SUN: 6:15

ONE NIGHT ONLY

25 W Main Ave #125 • MagicLanternOnMain.com

Child’s Play

now she has been raising her little brother for the past four years instead of traveling the world, like she’d planned. (Charlie gets transformed into an awesome Viking in the Playmobil world. Marla remains stickin-the-mud pseudo-mom… until running around Plastic World cures her. Ugh.) I wish I could say that if you squint hard enough, you might see this whole thing as a sort of stress-induced delusion 8thtoo ANNUAL suffered by a young woman with much responsibility and clearly no help whatsoevshould end up making you feel worse about er. But that’s not the case. The Vikings get that toy. to sing a song about what a buzzkill Marla And yet here we are. When two human is; Del sarcastically scoffs about the possibilsiblings, 20-something Marla (Anya Taylority of her having a good time. Eventually Joy) and tween Charlie (Gabriel Bateman), the fairy godmother (Meghan Trainor) will get sucked into a world of Playmobil regale her with a wannabe “showstopper” realms, they discover 18th-century pirates about how Marla just needs to believe in doing contract work for Roman emperors herself, as if that’s been an issue at all. It and fairy godmothers hanging out with hasn’t. robots. But it’s all pointlessly random The animation is weird and inconsisand head-smackingly dumb, even when tent: A big joke is made out of how Marla, it sounds on paper like it might be funny: in her Playmobil body, Daniel Radcliffe as the can’t walk because she voice of an idiot James PLAYMOBIL: THE MOVIE has no knees… and Bond knockoff called Rated PG then knees inexplicably Rex Dasher, anyone? Directed by Lino DiSalvo appear and she can walk Embarrassing. Here be Starring Anya Taylor-Joy, Jim Gaffigan, fine. Everyone has eldragons… and here’s a bows, too, which the toy guy, Del (the voice of Jim Daniel Radcliffe, Kenan Thompson figures also don’t have. Gaffigan), who drives And everyone is stuck with those clamshell a food truck and sells “enchanted hay”? hands, yet are still able to manipulate chopSure, what children’s movie doesn’t call for sticks. There’s no rhyme or reason to any a major character who’s a weed dealer and of it; it’s just stuff the movie doesn’t want to makes burritos as his side gig? have to cope with. Bad enough, the crotch-injury “humor” The massive collection of narrative and deeply terrible songs; yes, this is nomiclichés that make up this sorry excuse for a nally a musical. Worse is the setup for the movie don’t even make sense or have any entire ordeal, which posits Marla as a noflow from one to the next. There’s not a fun curmudgeon whose love of having adsingle thing to like here. It’s all joyless, lifeventures was squashed merely because the less and aimless. n kids’ parents were killed in a car crash and

You’ll be wishing for Lego while enduring the plastic horrors of Playmobil: The Movie BY MARYANN JOHANSON

W

e could blame the enormous — and justifiable — success of the Lego flicks for the existence of Playmobil: The Movie, but that would be unfair to all the shameless knockoffs and cinematic coattail riders. Such criminals usually make a nod at attempting to capture some of the magic of whatever box-office smash they’re copying. Yet it’s plain that no one involved in this cartoon nightmare could be bothered to even blatantly steal any of the delightful wit and keen selfawareness of that other franchise. This plastic horror is nothing more than an insipid exercise in corporate filmmaking and mercenary marketing, which reads more like an ’80s Saturday morning cartoon attempt to sell toys than an actual movie. The movie thinks it has captured the feeling of playing with Playmobil fantasy and historical playsets, mishmashing Vikings and gladiators, dinosaurs and cowboys, etc. But it’s so crass and phony that it actually makes me reconsider my love of the toys themselves, which I adored as a kid and still have a soft spot for. Was I merely a brainwashed little consumer, a blissfully ignorant object of cheap manipulation by a global company shilling bits of colorful polymer? Call me weird, but I don’t think a movie about a beloved toy

You’d rather step on one of these barefoot than watch them in a movie.

Less tweezer, more salt. wedonthaveone.com

h 8t ANNUAL

Tradofitions

CHRISTMAS

A MUSICAL SPECTACULAR

December 13-23, 2019 KROC CENTER, COEUR D’ALENE

Order Tickets Online:

TraditionsofChristmasNW.com or call (208) 292-8750 Current Shows: OFF-BROADWAY Producer ALL IS CALM: THE CHRISTMAS TRUCE OF 1914 BROADWAY Co-Producer COME FROM AWAY

Produced by Laura Little Theatricals

DECEMBER 5, 2019 INLANDER 55


HOLIDAYS

Have a Country Christmas Mark O’Connor brings an Appalachian Christmas and his family band back to Spokane BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

I

t’s official: It’s the first post-Thanksgiving week, and so we’re now officially in the thick of Christmas season. That means we’re about to be inundated with holiday concerts, and one of the most high profile events comes courtesy of Mark O’Connor, fiddler extraordinaire. Last year, O’Connor brought his Appalachian Christmas tour to Spokane, and it obviously went over well, because he’s back again 12 months later. It’s a true family affair, too: Not only is it an all-ages celebration of all things Yuletide, but O’Connor himself will be performing alongside his wife and kids, who are natural musicians themselves. O’Connor spoke to the Inlander via email in the weeks before the show, discussing the art of the Christmas song, what it’s like performing with your kids and the lessons he’s learned in his 45 years in the biz. Responses have been edited for space and clarity.

CHRISTOPHER MCALLEN PHOTO


MUSIC | MIXTAPE INLANDER: How has this year’s Appalachian Christmas tour been thus far? O’CONNOR: We are excited to get this eighth annual tour underway, as it is the biggest Christmas tour I have done thus far. This year we are playing 16 performing arts centers and concert halls. I am just thrilled how it has grown; the first year we performed just five concerts for Christmas.

ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

ALICIA HAUFF PHOTO

What is it like touring and performing with your family? The Christmas tours were how each of my family members in the current Mark O’Connor Band began playing together. [My son] Forrest was first to join the tour, then my wife Maggie, and then daughter-in-law Kate Lee. It is amazing for me to play with them — the most enjoyable times I have had on stage that I can remember. It feels so wonderful. And they are good! That fact obviously helps greatly. What’s your process for taking a well-known Christmas song and giving it a country flavor? And how do you know when a song is worthy of being included on your setlists? I have a range of Americana styles that I apply to the Christmas songs I choose — principally bluegrass, old-time, spirituals, gospel, blues and swing. These are all traditions from the Appalachians, the part of the country where I live now in North Carolina. I have worked on some new arrangements for this tour. I am going to play four instruments during the concerts, so I am mindful of each instrument’s character and what they can offer any song. We also have three lead singers in the family so that has been enjoyable, seeing what song fits each person’s voice. We have a few non-Christmas pieces I always add in. One part of the music at Christmastime for me is that it always included good ol’ fashioned American music around the tree growing up. What can people expect from the concert? We have the four O’Connors in the group. Beyond that, we have our longtime guitarist Joe Smart, who is from Pasco, Washington, and actually took music lessons from Tony WEEKEND Ludiker in Spokane when he C O U N T D OW N was growing up. Our bassist Get the scoop on this Jeff Picker will play his first tour weekend’s events with with us. He plays regularly with our newsletter. Sign up at Ricky Skaggs and before that Inlander.com/newsletter. Sarah Jarosz. The ensemble is going to be really good on this tour. One of the surprises for the tour is a recently rediscovered 100-year-old instrument I’ve had since I was age 14, the mandocello. It sounds fantastic on stage, a 1922 Gibson. My fiddle, though, is the central voice to the evening. You recently celebrated your 45th year as a solo recording artist. What would you say is the most valuable lesson you’ve learned in that time? I perhaps learned just how stubborn I am to protect the integrity of the music and the artistry of it. I began recording my feature albums 45 years ago when I was a kid, performing the very music that I wanted to record, mostly original compositions or my arrangements of classics. Forty-five albums later, nothing much has changed. It is exactly the music I want to record and release — nothing less, nothing more. I suppose that makes me 100 percent artist and basically 0 percent a commercial musician. I have recorded on other people’s albums, of course, playing on a lot of commercial music, but those are not my albums. What I have learned in that equation, for me as a solo artist, is that I can be really proud of all the music that I have created, and I don’t have to blame someone else for forcing me to record a bunch of stuff I never liked that much. I can sleep at night [knowing] that I put myself out there as an artist, every bit of what I had conceived, and did exactly what was in my heart and mind. n Mark O’Connor: An Appalachian Christmas • Tue, Dec. 10 at 7:30 pm • $30-$65 • All ages • Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • foxtheaterspokane.org • 624-1200

Jango (left) and Indian Goat co-headline at Lucky You this Friday.

Rock ’n’ Roll Roundup

A sonic collaboration, a holiday benefit show and more local music news BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

H

eading into the holiday season, there’s a lot going on in pretty much everyone’s lives, and that extends to the live music beat. So we’ve made a list — and yes, we’ve checked it twice — of shows and benefits happening in the next week that we don’t think you should miss.

COLLABORATE & LISTEN

The Spokane scene has lately been producing some high profile team-ups between the rap world and the rock world. Most recently, hip-hop performer and producer T.S the Solution teamed up on a track with the electro-pop project Water Monster, and long-running hip-hop fusion collective Flying Spiders has often appeared alongside the Spokane Symphony. This time around, it’s hip-hop artist Jango and the drums-and-guitar rock duo Indian Goat, two of the biggest names within the local music scene, that will be sharing the stage. The hard-rock band has been selling out local venues for a couple years now and completed a short tour in the summer, and Jango has similarly been expanding his reach beyond the Inland Northwest with out-of-town collabs and viral videos. Both acts will be taking over the Lucky You Lounge this Friday night, alongside local blues-rock favorites Fat Lady and Seattlebased hip-hop act New Track City, for a show that’ll bring two different fan bases together and might inspire some unexpected mashups. 1801 W. Sunset Blvd., 21+, $7-$10, luckyyoulounge.com

WINE & SONG

When you go to a winery to hear live music, you’re probably expecting to sip a nice merlot while an artist plucks gentle pop tunes on an acoustic guitar. But Bridge Press Cellars, 39 W. Pacific Ave., is changing that. The corner store-

front is apparently the first winery in the state to obtain a liquor license, and the “grand opening” for their full bar is happening this Friday at 5 pm. You can order a craft cocktail right alongside the wine you’d normally enjoy, and take in live music from the Kenny James Miller Band. Meghan Sullivan and Howard Davis perform Saturday night. See bridgepresscellars.com for details.

ROCKIN’ IN THE FREE WORLD

There’s nothing better than something that’s free, particularly when it’s also something that you’d happily pay for anyway. Case in point: This ongoing series hosted by local hard rockers Elephant Gun Riot, called Free for All, which is a perfect excuse to get out of the house and rock out. This weekend’s lineup at the Big Dipper features the Riot alongside Still We Rise, Civiliance and Sovereign Citizen and the Non Prophets. Take that pocketful of cash you’d normally spend on a cover charge and put it toward a couple of tasty beverages instead. 171 S. Washington St., all ages, free, bigdipperevents.com.

GET WHAT YOU GIVE

’Tis the season for giving, and the folks at the Pin are hoping to put some extra presents under local Christmas trees. To benefit those in need, the all-ages venue is opening on Wednesday night, Dec. 11, and staging live music for a good cause. If you show up, bring a gift that will go to a local child via the local foster facilities Sally’s House and Evangeline’s House. The musical lineup, which leans toward hip-hop and EDM, includes CCB Krew and Dustfuzzz, and raffles will be held for those who donate. And if you don’t have time to wrap a gift, cash will do. Doors open at 7 pm. 412 W. Sprague Ave., all ages, free, thepinspokane.com. n

DECEMBER 5, 2019 INLANDER 57


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

NEW AGE KENNY G

O

K, before you laugh, here are some facts you might not know about Kenny G. The saxophonist born as Kenneth Gorelick graduated from the University of Washington and has sold more than 75 million records. He’s a master at circular breathing, a difficult technique that landed him in the Guinness World Records when he held a single note for 45 minutes. And he’s leaned into his cheesy bona fides, taking potshots at his easy listening past on social media. So yeah, he’s a good musician, and we predict that his Northern Quest show is going to convert some new fans who had no concept of his undeniable musical dexterity. Expect to hear some holiday classics as well. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Kenny G • Wed, Dec. 11 at 7:30 pm • $49-$79 • All ages • Northern Quest Resort & Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • northernquest.com • 481-2800

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 12/5

A&P’S BAR AND GRILL, Open Mic BERSERK, Vinyl Meltdown BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J BOOTS BAKERY, The Song Project BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, Open Mic J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen CRUISERS, Open Jam Night CURLEY’S, Kosta la Vista FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Country Dance GARLAND DRINKERY, Becoming Ghosts, The Canned Vegetables J HOUSE OF SOUL, Jazz Thursdays J KNITTING FACTORY, Kai Wachi, Sam Lamar, Beauflexx, VitaminV J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin LION’S LAIR, Karaoke J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Harriet Brown, Eliza Catastrophe J MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE, Open Mic Hosted by Scott Reid MOOSE LOUNGE, Last Chance Band J MOUNTAIN LAKES BREWING CO., Joel Haugen MY PLACE, DJ Dave NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Kicho THE NYC PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos THE ROCK BAR & LOUNGE, Jam Series STEAM PLANT KITCHEN, Nick Grow TAPP’D OFF, Karaoke on the Patio YAYA BREWING COMPANY, Jonathan Tibbetts ZOLA, Blake Braley Band

Friday, 12/6

219 LOUNGE, Cedar and Boyer 1210 TAVERN, Jan Harrison Jazz Trio ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Sara Brown BARLOWS, Into the Drift Duo BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn

58 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019

ROCK THE AQUADOLLS

I

t’s not a surprise to learn that the Aquadolls hail from California, with their sun-bleached, surfy rock sounding like one of those lazy afternoons at the beach that moves over to the dive bar down the street at midnight. The band is the brainchild of singer-songwriter Melissa Brooks, and both their debut LP Stoked on You, released on Burger Records in 2014, and its follow up The Dream and the Deception feature fuzzy psych-rock with more experimental, synth-driven elements. The latter album features 19 songs written over the course of five years, sequenced in the order they came to be, catchy and blissed-out pop interspersed by brief bursts of aggro punk. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Aquadolls with the Pink Socks and SOT • Sat, Dec. 7 at 7:30 pm • $10 • All ages • The Big Dipper • 171 S. Washington St. • theaquadolls. bpt.me • 863-8098 J J THE BIG DIPPER, Free for All with Elephant Gun Riot, Still We Rise, Civiliance & Sovereign Citizen & The Non Prophets BOLO’S, Pastiche BOOMBOX PIZZA, Karaoke J BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, Kenny James Miller Band J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Brothers from Other Mothers THE BULL HEAD, Chicken on the Bone CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke J COSMIC COWBOY, Just Plain Darin CRUISERS, Karaoke with Gary CURLEY’S, Kosta la Vista THE FISCHIN’ HOLE, Joey Anderson HONEY SOCIAL CLUB, The DIGaddie IRON HORSE (CDA), Karma’s Circle THE JACKSON ST., Vinyl Tendencies JOHN’S ALLEY, Brass Tacks J KNITTING FACTORY, The Dead South

LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Amanda Tsubota LIBERTY LAKE WINE CELLARS, Son of Brad J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Indian Goat, Jango, New Track City, Fat Lady LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, DJ Storme MATCHWOOD BREWING CO., Truck Mills & Carl Ray MAX AT MIRABEAU, 3D Band MICKDUFF’S, Right Front Burner MOONDOLLARS BISTRO, Dallas Kay MOOSE LOUNGE, My Own Worst Enemy MULLIGAN’S, The Cole Show MY PLACE, DJ Dave NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Dangerous Type NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, Tom Pletscher THE NYC PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos

OLD MILL BAR, Glenn & Rachael PACIFIC PIZZA, 528 Tribe PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, BareGrass PEND OREILLE PLAYHOUSE, Open Mic J THE PIN, A Day on Earth Album Release with Ghost Heart, Day in Eternity & Dysfunktynal Kaos J RED ROOM LOUNGE, Landon Wordswell, Rouzer, Red the Bully, Modest Musik, Brotha Nature RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos RIVER CITY BREWING, Deer J SARANAC COMMONS, Kevin Partridge STORMIN’ NORMAN’S, Sara Brown UP NORTH DISTILLERY, Bill Bozly ZOLA, Loose Gazoonz

Saturday, 12/7

1210 TAVERN, Diamond Trio Band ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Spare Parts Trio

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J J THE BIG DIPPER, The Aquadolls (see above), The Pink Socks, SOT BOLO’S, Pastiche BRANDYWINE BAR & BOTTLE SHOP, Carey Brazil J BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, Meghan Sullivan & Howard Davis J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Colby Acuff THE CORK & TAP, Pamela Jean COSMIC COWBOY GRILL, Tod Hornby CRUISERS, The Sunshine Wall, Enemy Mine, Chase the Sun GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Into the Drift J HUCKLEBERRY’S NATURAL MARKET, Talmadge IRON HORSE (CDA), Karma’s Circle THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke JOHN’S ALLEY, Jeremy Abbott LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Saffron City MARYHILL WINERY, Joey Anderson


MAX AT MIRABEAU, 3D Band MOOSE LOUNGE, My Own Worst Enemy NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Dangerous Type NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, Tom Pletscher THE NYC PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos ONE TREE CIDER HOUSE, Dario Ré & Michael Starry PACIFIC PIZZA, Tyler Aker without Matt Mitchell PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Nick Wiebe J THE PIN, Glass Park’s 509TakeOver POST FALLS BREWING, Son of Brad RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos RIVER CITY BREWING, John Firshi J SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Just Plain Darin STORMIN’ NORMAN’S, DJ Danger WHIM WINE BAR, Nick Grow ZOLA, Loose Gazoonz

Sunday, 12/8

CRAVE, DJ Dave DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Rev. Yo’s VooDoo Church of Blues Jam GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke HOGFISH, Open Mic

GET LISTED! Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

J JACKLIN ARTS & CULTURAL CENTER, Honey Bee LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam THE NYC PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos O’DOHERTY’S, Traditional Irish Music PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Piano with Bob Beadling RED ROOM LOUNGE, Jason Perry Trio THE ROXIE, Hillyard Billys J SOUTH HILL GRILL, Just Plain Darin ZOLA, Glass Honey

Monday, 12/9

THE BULL HEAD, Songsmith Series J CALYPSOS COFFEE, Open Mic COSMIC COWBOY GRILL, Pat Coast CRAVE, DJ Dave EICHARDT’S, Jam with Truck Mills THE NYC PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic STORMIN’ NORMAN’S, DJ Danger

Tuesday, 12/10

219 LOUNGE, Karaoke with DJ Pat 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS, SedonaMusic BOOMBOX PIZZA, Karaoke CRAVE, DJ Dave GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke LITZ’S BAR & GRILL, ShuffleDawgs Blues Power Happy Hour J J MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX, Mark O’Connor’s Appalachian Christmas (see page 56) THE NYC PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos RAZZLE’S, Colin Burgeson RIDLER PIANO BAR, Country Swing Dancing THE ROXIE, Open Mic/Jam STORMIN’ NORMAN’S, DJ Danger

MUSIC | VENUES

SWEET LOU’S, Pat Coast TAPP’D OFF, Karaoke on the Patio THE VIKING, Pamela Jean ZOLA, Desperate 8s

Wednesday, 12/11

219 LOUNGE, Truck Mills & Carl Rey J 291 BREWHOUSE, Just Plain Darin BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J BLACK DIAMOND, Tommy G CRAVE, DJ Dave CRUISERS, Open Jam Night GENO’S, Open Mic IRON HORSE (CDA), Open Jam IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Kevin Shay Band THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke J KNITTING FACTORY, HELLYEAH, Nonpoint, Deepfall LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LION’S LAIR, Storme LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 MAD BOMBER BREWING, Open Mic J J NORTHERN QUEST, Kenny G (see facing page) THE NYC PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos J J THE PIN, Gifts for Kids feat. CCB Krew, Dustfuzzz, Drey 808, Nathan Chartrey & more RED ROOM LOUNGE, Jam Session RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Open Mic ZOLA, Cruxie

Coming Up ...

BABY BAR, Winter Formal w/Milonga, Jeff Peterson & DJ CA$E, Dec. 14 NORTHERN QUEST, Queensrÿche, Dec. 15

12/5 FREE BASEMENT SHOW: HARRIET BROWN + ELIZA CATASTROPHE 12/6 INDIAN GOAT & JANGO WITH NEW TRACK CITY AND FAT LADY 12/8 ZONKY JAZZ NIGHT 12/12 FREE BASEMENT SHOW: B-RADICALS AND MORE 12/14 EGGY SUE & BABY TOAST PRESENT: BREAKFAST 12/19 FREE BASEMENT SHOW: JACK YODER 12/21 CLASSY CHRISTMAS PARTY: LIVE MUSIC AND DJ 12/26 FREE BASEMENT SHOW: SINGER-SONGWRITER NIGHT 12/28 EVERGREEN AFRODUB ORCHESTRA 12/31 80’S NEW YEAR’S EVE

DJ’S EVERY FRIDAY & SATURDAY 10PM-2AM IN THE BASEMENT 12/6 STORME 12/7 SAFFRON CITY 12/13 ROSETHROW 12/14 OFFICIAL CALEB 12/20 SAFFRON CITY 9/22 NOAH GUNDERSEN 12/21 DJ WESONE 12/27 ROSETHROW 12/28 AYZIM 1801 W SUNSET BLVD. LUCKYYOULOUNGE.COM

219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-2639934 A&P’S BAR & GRILL • 222 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-263-2313 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. BERSERK • 125 S. Stevens • 714-9512 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS • 39 W. Pacific • 838-7815 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 THE BULL HEAD • 10211 S. Electric • 838-9717 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 COSMIC COWBOY GRILL • 412 W. Haycraft, CdA • 208-277-0000 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 FIRST INTERSTATE CENTER FOR THE ARTS • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • 279-7000 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 THE HIVE • 207 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-457-2392 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HONEY EATERY & SOCIAL CLUB • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-930-1514 HOUSE OF SOUL • 25 E. Lincoln • 598-8783 IRON GOAT BREWING • 1302 W. 2nd • 474-0722 IRON HORSE BAR • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., CdA • 509-926-8411 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside • 456-5678 LUCKY YOU LOUNGE • 1801 W. Sunset LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MARYHILL WINERY • 1303 W. Summit Pkwy, Ste. 100 • 443-3832 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PACIFIC PIZZA • 2001 W. Pacific • 443-5467 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN • 412 W. Sprague • 385-1449 POST FALLS BREWING CO. • 112 N. Spokane, Post Falls • 208-773-7301 RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL • 10325 N. Government Way, Hayden • 208-635-5874 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON • 12303 E. Trent • 862-4852 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

DECEMBER 5, 2019 INLANDER 59


STAGE SUNNY DAYS

It’s been a big year of fun and memories for the beloved PBS kids show Sesame Street, celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2019. The magic continues during the next tour stop for Sesame Street Live!, which brings favorite characters like Elmo, Abby, Big Bird, Grover, Cookie Monster and friends to the Spokane Arena. Everyone’s excited about a magician’s visit to Sesame, and Elmo dreams of performing alongside him, but for one small hitch: Elmo doesn’t know any magic tricks. Of course, all ends happily as Elmo and friends learn a valuable lesson about perseverance and patience, and that there are many magical moments to be found all around us if we simply look. The family-friendly show offers two performances, and kids under 1 year can attend without a ticket. — CHEY SCOTT Sesame Street Live! Make Your Magic • Sun, Dec. 8 at 2 pm and 6 pm • $22-$77 • All ages • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon Ave. • spokanearena.com • 279-7000

60 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019

SPORTS TRAVELIN’ COUGS

MUSIC SWING TIME

WSU vs. New Mexico • Sat, Dec. 7 at noon • $10/$20/$60 • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon Ave. • spokanearena.com • 279-7000

Spokane Jazz Orchestra with Cami Bradley • Sat, Dec. 7 at 7:30 pm • All ages • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • bingcrosbytheater.com • 227-7638

Only the most hardcore of WSU basketball fans would have gone out of their way to travel to Pullman for a game the last couple of years. It was pretty rough going at Beasley Coliseum as former coach Ernie Kent’s squad struggled mightily. With a new coach comes new hope, though, and Matt Smith already has the Cougs looking like a much tougher defensive team, while returning star sophomore CJ Elleby is back filling up the stat sheet, averaging more than 20 points a game. The Cougs take on the New Mexico Lobos Saturday, and you don’t even have to go to Pullman to root for WSU. — DAN NAILEN

Since 1975, the Spokane Jazz Orchestra has been bringing swing to the Inland Northwest, and their Christmas concerts always draw a crowd. This year’s holiday show will be even more special thanks to the inclusion of guest vocalist Cami Bradley, the local singersongwriter best known for her stint on America’s Got Talent and for performing with duo the Sweeplings in addition to her solo work. The centerpiece of the SJO Christmas show is Glenn Miller’s Nutcracker Suite, the 1940s jazz composer’s reinterpretation of the Tchaikovsky opera, while Bradley will bring her own interpretations of some Christmas classics to the evening. — NATHAN WEINBENDER


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MUSIC + STAGE SUGARPLUM DREAMS

A classic holiday tradition returns to the Inland Northwest when the State Street Ballet joins the Spokane Symphony orchestra and 75 local youth dancers to perform The Nutcracker for five engagements. Whether you’ve seen it once, twice, dozens of times or never, there’s something about the sparkling holiday story that mesmerizes audiences of all ages; it’s in the sweeping score by Pyotr Tchaikovsky, the timelessness of E.T.A. Hoffman’s tale of toys come to life and a journey to a magical dreamland. This year marks the 41st season of Nutcracker performances for the symphony; each night includes a pre-show gift shop, winter treats and beverages, and the splendor of the historic Fox Theater all decked out for the holidays. — CHEY SCOTT Spokane Symphony: The Nutcracker • Dec. 5-8; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, SatSun at 2 pm • $19.50-$140 • Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox • 1001 W. Sprague Ave. • spokanesymphony.org • 624-1200

NOW OPEN EXPERIENCE THE inland Northwest’s coolest new venue.

Not all of us look forward to flurries and blizzards, but skiers and snowboarders — they practically pray for the white fluffy stuff. And that’s exactly what Millwood Brewing’s upcoming SnowJam Party is for, a gathering of winter sports junkies ushering in the snowiest season. They’ll be screening ski clips, pouring some of Millwood’s delicious beers and raffling off premium winter gear and Mt. Spokane season passes, with all proceeds going directly to the resort’s ski race team. And be sure to put on your most bodacious neon snowsuit because this year’s theme is the ’80s. Might we recommend gathering some friends and dressing up as the cast of the 1985 ski comedy classic Better off Dead? — NATHAN WEINBENDER SnowJam Party • Sat, Dec. 7 at 5 pm • Free • Millwood Brewing Co. • 9013 E. Frederick Ave.• millwoodbrewery.com • 368-9538

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DECEMBER 5, 2019 INLANDER 61

v

PARTY LET IT SNOW


I SAW YOU THRIFT-SHOP BEAUTY To the downtown Value Village babe with the tattooed finger: I’m still smitten. Hoping you know how hot you are. A fleeting glance and you’ve made my day. CAROUSEL CUTIE I saw you at the Gesa Carousel of Dreams. You were comically excited about the horses and old school fortune teller and enthusiastically helpful to the staff. Your cheer and liveliness was contagious. SMILES DOWN THE AISLE. I saw you at Trader Joe’s last Tuesday. I was impressed with your ability to navigate that mess with ease. I loved catching your smile down the aisle. The holiday cheese selection has increased — maybe a cheese plate is in order?

CHEERS RIDE HOME FROM CASINO Dear wonderful man waiting for your Uber/ Lyft: I was drunk, but awake enough I knew to ask for help from someone who seemed trustworthy. I was in the casino and had lost my friends. The security wouldn’t let me charge my

phone on any wall... (dirtbags) and I only had an address to give you. You let me ride with you and after we had dropped you off, you let me continue on the journey. I may have left my keys in the car... but I’ll never know because the “Uber”/”Lyft” people wont give me info unless it was my ride. If it was you and you know anything about said keys-please email me!!!! If you know nothing about keys, you should still message! Regardless, thank you for good people in this world and especially men. You did a nice thing during a terrible “Me Too” movement. Every second counts... you gave me beautiful and safe many seconds — enough to get home and sleep soundly. Cannot thank you enough. A modern day Prince Charming. Love, Ash TO BRITTANY Thanks for being one of my favorite sisters even while being at college. I really think you are great. HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO MY GORGEOUS WIFE I cannot imagine a world without you in it, and I am so grateful that I don’t have to. Thank you for always showering me with love and affection. You are everything a man could ever hope for in a wife. I love you more today than yesterday but not as much as tomorrow.

JEERS MOB BOSS Jeers to Trump for running his administration like the Corleone family. I wouldn’t be surprised if Joe Biden woke up one morning with a severed donkey head in his bed. LEGAL AND STILL HARASSED? I know an older man who is a Vietnam vet and he told me that he’s been pulled over twice now for no apparent reason given other then “you have a con-

cealed carry permit” said by Spokane Police meaning they are running your license without you having to break the law. Literally when he asked this last “young police man” “What did I do?” The response given was “you

mayor-elect Nadine Woodward’s biggest challenges when she takes office.” Wow. 5/5 snarky comments. She DID win by majority votes. Seems like you could have printed at least one encouraging, kind comment.

sonnel. Most WSDOT employees would not survive in the private sector as there, they would be held accountable. I won’t touch on the harassment and bulling that goes on. That’s a different ball game. When WSDOT decides to

I wouldn’t be surprised if Joe Biden woke up one morning with a severed donkey head in his bed.

have a concealed carry permit, where is your gun?” I’m not sure if the officer was just concerned about the possibility of a gun while issuing a ticket but there was NO ticket given for either time this man was pulled over. Both times the man did not have a weapon with him and no ticket was issued??? So... Is it Illegal then to have a concealed carry? Because if that is the ONLY reason given for pulling a person over I think the police in this town need to review the laws about proper procedure. If you haven’t done anything wrong then they can’t pull you over just to check on your weapon or if you actually have one. What is going on in this town? You go through legal channels and you still get harassed. I guess I could mention this is a man of darker skin color, maybe they thought he could be illegal and then they ran his plate and see the license to carry? Still, seems like being harassed in my book. Once again someone with power wasting taxpayer money on harassing innocent people. TO THE INLANDER Re: “Readers respond to an Inlander story about

SOUND OFF

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

$30 CAR TABS Washington state has put a hold on the $30 car tab stating “We the public were confused with the initiative” Instead of putting it out for a re-vote. A higher source believes to just cancel out our vote. I knew exactly what I was voting for. You see, I used to work for WSDOT in engineering, 25+ yrs. During those 25+ yrs of employment, I was pretty much free to come and go as I please. I wasn’t alone. There is no clock to punch, no one watching, no one really cares. Our 15 min breaks were really 30 min or more, it takes more than 15 mins to take a walk around the neighborhood. Our 30 min lunch was really 45 min to an hour No one is watching, no one really cares. Its really hard to go to a restaurant and order a meal, eat a meal and get back to the office all within 30 min. I can remember going shopping at Costco with my supervisor on state time. We ran personal errands quite often. Again, No one is watching, no one really cares. Women styling their hair and putting on makeup at work on state time, instead of at home. They are now so top heavy it is crazy. Friends are promoted vs qualified per-

clean up their own house, it will be much easier to give them more money. SORRY FOR YOUR MASCULINITY Sorry to hurt your masculinity Mr. Sandwich because of the unwarranted d*ck video you sent. Maybe focus on positive dreams and not telling me about your actual ones. P.S. Never in your *dreams* n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS S W I T C H

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T H L O H I O V A T B T S T R A T E A O H D A N E E R G S E T U N D S E E E P T W L W D O O N A

B L O W I E R R E T C H E D

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S T O T O L B L A T N R C R E E E T F A T E R A R E S A B I O R

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S N E E Z E E A A T S T I N E D U R R A O G

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NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

MEMORIES A RE WA I TI N G We have the perfect space for holiday parties, weddings, and social events. Picturesque river views, award-winning catering, and a dedicated event team will help make your next event truly memorable.

Book today and celebrate with us!

62 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019

spokanecenter.com


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

CORK PARTY FUNDRAISER A festive evening of wine and crafting. Ticket includes a glass of Maryhill wine and access to three DIY craft tables hosted by Art Salvage. Dec. 5, 5:30 pm. $25. Maryhill Winery Spokane, 1303 W. Summit Pkwy. maryhillwinery.com DECK THE HALLS The annual event raises funds for One More Time, which helps adults with life-limiting conditions to have a memorable experience, one more time. Dec. 5, 6 pm. $25-$100. Garden Plaza of Post Falls, 545 N. Garden Plaza. gardenplazaofpostfalls.com JINGLE BELL RUN Wear a holidaythemed costume, tie jingle bells to your shoelaces and show off your ugly Christmas sweater to this annual 5K run/walk supporting the Arthritis Foundation. Dec. 7, 8 am. $30. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. bit.ly/2Ojen1M POST FALLIDAYS TINY TREE FEST The fourth annual brunch event includes a mimosa bar, tiny tree auction and entertainment. All proceeds benefit educational program and opportunities through the Post Falls Chamber of Commerce. Dec. 7, 10 am-noon. $30. Templin’s Red Lion, 414 E. First Ave. postfallschamber.com (208-773-1611) SPOKANIMAL UGLY CHRISTMAS SWEATER PUB CRAWL Registration starts at Logan Tavern, then pub crawlers can head out to Jack & Dan’s, Geno’s, Pita Pit, DiNardi’s Pizza and the Star before returning to Logan by 8:45 pm. Dec. 7, 5 pm. $20. Logan Tavern, 1305 N. Hamilton. bit.ly/2qdVeWQ GINGERBREAD BUILD-OFF Kick off the holidays with the 15th annual gingerbread house competition benefiting Christ Kitchen. Guests can watch local culinary teams create sweet masterpieces, vote for a favorite and create mini versions ($7). Houses are displayed through Dec. 22. Dec. 8, 10 am-4 pm. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com CHRISTMAS TREE ELEGANCE HOLIDAY LUNCHEONS Music Director James Lowe and musicians from the Spokane Symphony present “Christmas on the Orient Express,” with a silent auction. Dec. 10-11 at 11 am. $55. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post. thedavenporthotel.com

COMEDY

VICKI BARBOLAK’S TRAILER NASTY TOUR Vicki was a fan favorite and top 10 finalist on 2018 America’s Got Talent.

Dec. 5-7 at 7:30 pm, Dec. 7 at 10 pm. $15-$30. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com SEASON’S GREETINGS Join the BDT for a night of laughs and improvised comedy celebrating the holiday season. Fridays in December at 7:30 pm. ​$8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) FIRE BRIGADE IMPROV The theater’s in-house, family friendly comedy troupe. Dec. 7 at 7 pm. $5. Ignite! Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway Ave. igniteonbroadway.org SAFARI The BDT’s version of “Whose Line,” a fast-paced short-form improv show with a few twists added. Rated for mature audiences. Fridays at 7:30 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) TREVOR WALLACE The LA-based standup comedian and actor has collectively built a digital thumbprint of over 300 million views since 2018. Dec. 9, 7:30 & 10 pm. $25/$50. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (318-9998)

COMMUNITY

ALTERNATIVE GIVING MARKET OF THE PALOUSE This year, 32 area nonprofits offer gifts in the form of donations. For every donation, receive a card to send to a loved one as a meaningful holiday gift. Dec. 5, 5-8 pm. 1912 Center, 412 E. Third St. agmpalouse.org CELEBRATION OF LIGHTS The annual event includes holiday music, a reading of “The Night Before Christmas,” the lighting of the tree and a visit from Santa. Dec. 5, 5:30 pm. Spokane Valley City Hall, 10210 E. Sprague. (921-0398) CHRISTMAS TREE ELEGANCE The 37th annual fundraiser for Spokane Symphony Associates features 18 holiday displays valued up to $5,000 that are raffled off to support the nonprofit. Raffle tickets are $1 each. Dec. 3-14 at the Davenport Hotel; Dec. 3-15 at River Park Square. spokanesymphony.org COLFAX WINTERFEST Activities include a visit from Santa, the Festival of Trees, a lighted Main Street parade, fireworks, store specials and more. Dec. 5. Free. Colfax, Wash. (397-4366) HOMEBUYER EDUCATION SEMINAR Explore the major aspects of the home-buying process in an unbiased format with SNAP Spokane instructors certified by the Washington State Housing Finance Commission. Registration required. Dec. 5, 6-8:30 pm. Free.

Moran Prairie Library, 6004 S. Regal St. snapwa.org (319-3040) JOURNEY TO THE NORTH POLE Take a festive holiday cruise across Lake Coeur d’Alene and view more than 1.5 million twinkling holiday lights on the way to visit Santa Claus at a waterfront toy workshop. Nov. 29-Jan. 1; daily at 5:30, 6:30 and 7:30 pm. Kids 5 and under free. $8.50-$23.25. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdaresort.com KRAMPUS KAROLING The Spokane Magickal Moot is putting on a ‘Karoling’ event, including a sing-a-long, talk about the figure of Krampus and his origins, and treats. Dec. 5, 7-8 pm. Free. Barnes & Noble, 15310 E. Indiana. facebook.com/groups/SpokaneMagickalMoot/ (608-7588) LANDS COUNCIL HOLIDAY PARTY The holiday party and membership drive offers complimentary food, wine and sparkling drinks, with live jazz music from the Cheney High School Band and other surprises. Dec. 5, 6 pm. Hamilton Studio, 1427 W. Dean. (327-9501) OPEN HOUSE & TREE LIGHTING CEREMONY Vera Water and Power’s (601 N. Evergreen Rd.) fourth annual open house. Stop by for a hot chocolate and sweet treats. Bring a camera and take some selfies with Santa. While you’re there, learn about energy-saving LED holiday lights. Dec. 5, 4-6 pm. Free. verawaterandpower.com (509-720-9312) PUNDERGROUND A local monthly punning competition. Dec. 5, 6-10 pm. Downtown Spokane Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanelibrary.org SANTA EXPRESS The annual holiday retail store for kids (ages 4-12) offering gift items priced from $1 to $10. Proceeds benefit the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery, a safe shelter for kids in crisis situations. Through Dec. 23; Mon-Fri 11 am-8 pm; Sat 10 am-8 pm; Sun 11 am-6 pm. This year located at 221 N. Wall (old Runner’s Soul space). santaexpress.org SANTA VISITS AVISTA STADIUM Get your picture taken with Ole Saint Nick, Mrs. Claus, and OTTO the Mascot at the Spokane Indians ticket office. Includes complimentary coffee/hot cocoa, and a sale in the Spokane Indians store. Dec. 3 and 5 from 5-7 pm. Free. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana. spokaneindians.com WINTER GLOW SPECTACULAR Orchard Park is lit up with holiday lights and displays, including animation and music. Walkable or drivable around the perimeter. Through Jan. 1. Orchard Park, 20298 E. Indiana. facebook.com/ spokanewinterglow

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This winter we’re turning retirement on its head. At Fairwinds – Spokane, winter is known for its deluge of socializing, events, parties, travel and downright fun. How’s that for a switch? Come see for yourself. Call (509) 252-0268 now to schedule your complimentary lunch and tour.

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DECEMBER 5, 2019 INLANDER 63


GIFT GUIDE

The Gift of Ganja

literally, because it fits in your hand. The small, personal air filter is designed to help limit the amount of smoke that you breathe out after taking a hit. Smokebuddy has a variety of models available starting at $22 a pop.

PRE-ROLLED BLUNTS (d)

Stuff your stockings with these goodies BY WILL MAUPIN

F

inding a gift for the weed lovers in your life doesn’t have to be tough or expensive. In fact, there are plenty of wonderful gifts you won’t even need to wrap. A good amount of the stuff in a marijuana user’s toolbox would fit nicely in a stocking. And, since this stuff is kind of small, it has a tendency to go missing a bit easier than, say, a big bong. They might not be the most thought-intensive gifts you’ve ever given, but the things on this list will surely make someone smile.

ROLLING PAPERS (a)

One of the most widely available pieces of paraphernalia, even before legalization, rolling papers are among the smoker’s bare necessities. Unfortunately, each pack eventually runs out. Which means, you can’t go wrong giving some as a gift even if the receiver already has their own. There are tons of brands to choose from including the more natural Raw papers and the stoner-culture clas-

sic Zig Zag, immortalized on the cover of Dr. Dre’s 1992 debut album, The Chronic.

GRINDER CARD (b)

Once you have rolling papers, you’re able to roll a joint. It won’t be a very good one, though, if you don’t have some way to grind the flower. Any smart stoner in your life already has a grinder sitting at home, but what about when they’re on the go? The grinder card is a walletsized card that looks like one-part credit card, one-part cheese grater. Simply run your bud across the card and watch the ground flower fall through, ready to go.

PERSONAL AIR FILTER (c)

Whether you’re sharing a space with non-smokers or simply trying to avoid living in a cloud, it’s hard to smoke weed without creating at least some pungent byproducts. This is where Smokebuddy comes in handy,

Reaching into a stocking often leads to pulling out something that you’d never have in your hand at any other time. Weird, Lego-shaped hard candy or those orange shaped chocolates come to mind. Just because you’re shopping for a smoker doesn’t mean you don’t get to surprise them with something unexpected. Never in my life have I bought a pre-rolled blunt. I normally even stay away from whole-gram pre-roll joints. Buying something that size for myself just isn’t practical. But getting something like that for a gift? Yes, please! Consider the 1.5 gram Kimbo Kush by Top Shelf, available for $15 at Apex Cannabis on North Division.

MINTY FRESH BREATH (e)

The worlds of traditional and stoned stocking stuffers collide with a tin of Mr. Moxey’s Mints. The Seattle company, founded by Mr. Tim Moxey, has spread nationwide and is one of the bigger names in the edible market. The packaging is simple, clean and reminiscent of a sprucedup tin of Altoids. They’re available at dispensaries all over town as both THC and CBD mints spiced up with herbs like peppermint, cinnamon and ginger. n

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www.greenhandrecreational.com Warning: This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Should not be used by women that are pregnant or breast feeding. For USE only by adults 21 and older. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.

64 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019


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RESEARCH

A Kick in the Head A new WSU study shows cannabis can reduce headache severity BY WILL MAUPIN

A

new study led by Washington State University assistant professor of psychology Carrie Cuttler confirms what cannabis users have long known: A quick puff can help ward off a headache. According to the study, which was published online in the Journal of Pain, inhaled cannabis reduces headache severity by 47.3 percent. It’s even more effective against migraine-related pain, reducing severity by 49.6 percent. The study included over 1,300 headache patients and 653 migraine patients who contributed more than 19,600 data points. Using an app, participants recorded their symptoms before and after consuming cannabis. The study shows that concentrates like cannabis oil were more effective than whole flower. On the other hand, it was unable to find significant evidence that strains higher in THC or CBD were more or less effective than strains with lower levels of those two compounds. This is a big deal not only because of the study’s findings but also because of its methodology. “We wanted to approach this in an ecologically valid way, which is to look at actual patients using whole plant cannabis to medicate in their own homes and environments,” Cuttler tells WSU News. In the world of medical marijuana, a lot is said but very little is known. Advocates of the plant claim myriad health benefits. Scientifically, though, there’s not much evidence to support most of their claims. In large part that is due to the longstanding federal prohibition of cannabis which impeded scientific study. Prior to this study, there had been only one other conducted on the efficacy of cannabinoids to treat headache pain. A 2012 study from the University of Modena in Italy compared ibuprofen and nabilone, a synthetic cannabinoid administered orally just like ibuprofen. Nabilone proved more effective. But the fact is, nobody’s using nabilone. You can’t just go out and buy it like you could a bottle of Advil or a pre-roll joint. That’s what makes the WSU study so important. It serves as a bridge connecting the clinical and the real worlds. “We were motivated to do this study because a substantial number of people say they use cannabis for headache and migraine, but surprisingly few studies had addressed the topic,” Cuttler says. So, now there are two studies addressing the topic. More research is needed, of course, but this study could be what leads to more research. “In the meantime,” Cuttler says, “this at least gives medical cannabis patients and their doctors a little more information about what they might expect from using cannabis to manage these conditions.” n

66 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019

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EVENTS | CALENDAR CLIMATE ‘DIE-IN’ PROTEST The Sunrise Movement of Eastern Washington hosts a ‘die-in’ protest. This youth-led protest depicts the deadly consequences climate change poses on our generation if action is not taken immediately. Dec. 6, 3 pm. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. sunrisemovement.org DECK THE FALLS TREE LIGHTING + PARADE The annual holiday kickoff in downtown Metaline Falls includes the parade, Santa’s arrival, hot food and drink in the park and other festivities. Dec. 6, 5 pm. Free. Cutter Theatre, 302 Park St. cuttertheatre.com (446-4108) DUNGEONS & DRAGONS Join the library for a game of D&D. All skill levels welcome. Club meets on the first and third Friday of the month for students grades 6-12. Dec. 6, 3:30-5:30 pm and Dec. 20, 3:30-5:30 pm. Free. Hillyard Library, 4005 N. Cook St. (444-5300) HOLIDAY MARKET Featuring artists in pottery, print, jewelry, fiber art and more. Opening night includes appetizers for a $5 suggested donation. Dec. 6, 6-9 pm; Dec. 7, 10 am-6 pm; Dec. 8, 10 am-4 pm. Urban Art Co-op, 3209 N. Monroe. urbanartcoop.org JOURNEY TO BETHLEHEM The annual walk-through Christmas pageant features more than 100 actors from eight denominations, and many live animals. Dec. 6, 6-8 pm; Dec. 7-8, 5-8 pm. Free. South Hill Seventh Day Adventist Church, 5607 S. Freya. jtbspokane.org KENDALL YARDS ARTISAN MARKET Shop local at this annual holiday marketplace offering handcrafted jewelry, art and crafts from over a dozen of talented vendors. See link for complete vendor list. Dec. 6, 4-8 pm and Dec. 7, 10 am-3 pm. Kendall Yards, Summit Parkway. bit.ly/32K5jYB MILLWOOD TREE LIGHTING & GINGERBREAD BUILD After the annual tree lighting, build and decorate a house with graham crackers, icing, and candy. The library provides building materials. This activity is limited to one per family, while supplies last. All ages. At the Millwood Masonic Center, 3219 N. Argonne Rd. Dec. 6, 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. scld.org/events (893-8260) WINTERFEST COMMUNITY CELEBRATION Kick-off the holiday season with family and friends at this community festival offering a local vendor market, lighting of the community tree, caroling choirs, outdoor campfires, historic tours, food drive and more. Events take place at Post Falls City Hall Plaza. Dec. 6, 4-8 pm. Free. bit.ly/2KD5Sxu ADVENTURE OUTPOST Eat food, listen to live music, visit a petting zoo and support local and global missions such as World Relief, Partners International, UGM, and many others. Dec. 7, 10 am-2 pm. Free. Whitworth Community Presbyterian Church, 312 W. Hawthorne Rd. bit.ly/2QwxWGy BING CROSBY HOUSE MUSEUM OPEN HOUSE The museum, at 508 E. Sharp Ave. on the Gonzaga campus, is decorated for the holidays, and offers free hot cider and cookies to visitors. Dec. 7, 1-4 pm. Free. bingcrosbyadvocates.org BREAKFAST WITH SANTA Breakfast includes pancakes, sausage and fruit. Guests can take photos with Santa and decorate a gingerbread house ($7). Family packages for up to five are $25 (additional people are $2 each). Dec. 7, 9 am-noon. $25. St. Charles School, 4515 N. Alberta. anastasiaallen11@gmail.com

BREAKFAST, PHOTOS & STEEL DRUM MUSIC WITH SANTA Enjoy breakfast and take photos with Santa and his North Pole teddy bears on Dec. 7, 14 and 21 from 9 am-noon. Includes steel drum Christmas music by Taylor Belote Dec 14 and 21. $4-$15. Southside Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. sssac. org (509-535-0803) THE DAHMEN BARN HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE Join festivities and sample local food products, and view a holidaythemed exhibit of work by over 20 resident artists along with an expanded gift shop. Dec. 7-8 from 10 am-5 pm. Free. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way., Uniontown. artisanbarn.org DOWNTOWN LIVE NEIGH-TIVITY & SANTA VISITS A live animal petting stable, manger scene photo booth, carolers, hot chocolate, coffee and more. At Sherman Square Park (316 Sherman). Dec. 7, 12-5 pm. Free. Downtown Coeur d’Alene. bit.ly/2Lg9PHD GREENBLUFF CHRISTMAS EXPERIENCE Take a 20 minute horse-drawn sleigh or wagon ride across the bluff, through the trees and back. Offered Dec. 7-8, 14-15, 21-23 from 10 am-3:30 pm. High Country Orchard, 8518 E. Green Bluff Rd. bit.ly/32Iv63y HAYDEN LIGHTS Join the city of Hayden for its annual Christmas parade followed by a tree lighting ceremony in McIntire Family Park. Dec. 7, 5 pm. Free. Hayden, Idaho. cityofhaydenid.us HOLIDAY CRAFT & BAKE SALE A holiday event featuring baked goods, decor, woodcraft, paper and fiber arts, sewn and quilted items, jewelry and more. Proceeds support various charitable programs. Dec. 7, 10 am-4 pm. Spokane Valley Community Church of Christ, 11515 E. Broadway. (535-2513) HOSPICE OF SPOKANE MEMORIAL TREE CELEBRATION Honor loved ones by decorating a paper dove in their memory and hanging it on the tree. Dec. 6-15; Mon-Sat 11 am-7 pm, Sun 12:30-4:30 pm. Free. River Park Square, 808 W. Main. (456-0438) MONEY & RELATIONSHIPS Learn from the pros how to manage this issue effectively and maintain harmony in your life. Dec. 7, 1-2 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley. spokanelibrary.org OPEN HOUSE FT. SANTA & HIS FIREFIGHTER HELPERS Spokane County Fire District 9 hosts open houses with Santa, and escort him through selected neighborhoods. Bring donations for the Mead food bank. Dec. 7-21 from 6-9 pm. Fire Station No. 91, 616 W. Hastings Rd. scfd9.org (466-4602) PRIVACY & SECURITY BASICS WORKSHOP WITH FUTURE ADA Learn the basics of keeping yourself safe online in this one-hour workshop. Bring your device of choice. Dec. 7, 4:30-5:30 pm. Free. Liberty Lake Library, 23123 E. Mission. (593-0840)

10), join local STEM group Future Ada for this film, which focuses on three women dealing with online harassment. Dec. 9, 6 pm. Free. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main. (509-209-2383) MOVIE NIGHT: THE LION KING (2019) The new, live-action remake, directed by Jon Favreau. Dec. 11, 5:45-7:45 pm. Free. Downtown Spokane Library, 906 W. Main. spokanelibrary.org THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE KSPS Saturday Night Cinema co-host Shaun Higgins continues his classic movie screenings with the third of four films based on “The Western: Myth, Legend and Reality.” Dec. 12, 1:30 pm. $7. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org

FILM

MUSIC

15TH ANNUAL BACKCOUNTRY FILM FESTIVAL Selkirk Outdoor Leadership & Education (SOLE)’s annual fundraiser supports getting underserved youth unplugged and connected to local wildlands. Dec. 6, 5 pm. $7-$35. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org NETIZENS SCREENING & NETWORKING SOCIAL To celebrate the holiday season, Grace Hopper’s birthday (Dec. 9) and Ada Lovelace’s birthday (Dec.

FOOD

COOKIE DECORATING WITH SANTA Kids can decorate a holiday cookie and have their picture taken with Santa. Event runs while supplies last. Dec. 6, 4-6 pm. Free. My Fresh Basket, 1030 W. Summit Pkwy. bit.ly/2QbTqYY GRAND OPENING: THE BAR AT BRIDGE PRESS The new venue hosts a grand opening with music by the Kenny James Miller band. Bridge Press is now the first and only winery in Spokane that offers a full bar and wine. Dec. 6, 5:30-11:20 pm. $5. Bridge Press Cellars, 39 W. Pacific. bridgepresscellars.com 12 ALES OF CHRISTMAS Tickets include 12 winter beers, all-you-can-eat buffet, T-shirt, goodie bag and cab ride home. Dec. 7, 6-11:30 pm. $50. Capone’s, 751 N. Fourth St., CdA. bit.ly/37qCX9C DOCKSIDE SUNDAY BRUNCH WITH SANTA Enjoy Dockside’s legendary brunch with Santa. Sundays from 9 am-2 pm, Dec. 8, 15 and 22. Dockside Restaurant, 115 S. Second St. docksidecda.com (208-666-5799) HOLIDAY BRUNCH BUFFET Includes mimosas, coffee, biscuits and gravy, fried chicken and more. Dec. 8; seatings at 9 and 10:30 am. $30; reservations required. Allie’s Vegan Pizzeria & Cafe, 1314 S. Grand Blvd. (321-7090) K VINTNERS WINE EXPERIENCE Each wine featured scored from 94 to 98 points in various wine publications. Dec. 11 at 4:30, 6 or 7:30 pm. $20. Nectar Wine & Beer, 1331 W. Summit Pkwy. nectarkendallyards.com POP-UP PIE SHOP Bean & Pie is back with festive flavors: classics, plus new holiday hand pies: eggnog blondie, peppermint brownie, brownie with hot cocoa crumb. Dec. 11, 4-7 pm. Wonder Building, 835 N. Post. beanandpie.com HOLIDAY FAMILY VOLUNTEERING + TREATS & CRAFTS Support Second Harvest this holiday season, with one part volunteering and one part holiday treat making and crafts. Dec. 12, 5:308 pm. $15. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front. secondharvestkitchen.org

THE NUTCRACKER BALLET WITH THE SPOKANE SYMPHONY The story of Clara and the Nutcracker Prince is brought to life by the State Street Ballet and more than 75 local dancers. Tchaikovsky’s beloved score is performed live by the Spokane Symphony. Dec. 5-7 at 7:30 pm, Dec. 7-8 at 2 pm. $19.50+. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org

DECEMBER 5, 2019 INLANDER 67


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess BABY GOT BACKUP

AMY ALKON

I’ve been dating this really great woman for three months. She’s just decided that she needs to be single right now, despite our forming a pretty strong connection. She explained that she really, really likes me, but she’s never been single for very long and thinks it’s best for her at the moment. I can respect that. She also says we can keep sleeping together if I want. I want to do that, but I’m wondering: Could that ruin our chances of having a real relationship again in the future? —Wanna Play It Smart

People give you a reason for their behavior. It may not be the real reason. Like, I’d tell somebody, “So sorry...got a work thing!” and not, “I’d shave off my eyebrows to get out of your 8-year-old’s oboe recital.” There’s a good chance you’ve been demoted from boyfriend to emergency penis. Research by evolutionary psychologist Joshua Duntley suggests that we evolved to cultivate backup mates — plan B partners we can quickly pivot to in case a partner ditches us or dies in a freak accident. Many or most of us seem to have a backup mate or two — somebody we flirt with regularly or otherwise set up as our romantic fallback, though we aren’t always consciously aware of it. Maybe you’re all, “Hey, fine by me if she wants to keep me as her sexual service department while she’s shopping around.” Maybe you’re hoping she’ll find other dudes lame in comparison. Totally possible. But if what really matters to you is having a relationship with her, all that availability on your part is not a good look. The problem is “the scarcity principle.” Psychologist Robert Cialdini explains that we value what’s scarce or out of reach, fearing that we’ll lose access to it. In fact, the desirability of the very same person or thing often increases or decreases according to shifts in its perceived accessibility. (Picture Denny’s with a velvet rope and a scary bouncer instead of “Open 24 hours! Seat yourself!”) Once your value is perceived to be low, there might not be much chance of rehabbing it. So it might pay to find other sex partners and give this woman a chance to miss you. It ultimately serves your purpose better than turning yourself into the man version of those freeze-dried food packs sold for earthquake or apocalypse prep kits: delicious like seasoned particle board but just the thing while you’re waiting for rescue in the remains of your office building with nothing to eat but your arm.

THE TRUTH FAIRY

My boyfriend recently proposed to me. I’ve gotten to thinking that if I’d never worn braces, he wouldn’t have been interested in me. I had a terrible underbite. I always felt very unattractive in regard to my teeth, lip, and jaw region until I eventually had this corrected years ago through braces. I constantly have the nagging thought that my boyfriend could do better — that is, find a woman who is more naturally beautiful, more on a par with his level of attractiveness. Basically, I feel that my braces led to a form of unnatural beauty, a kind of cheating, and I don’t deserve him. —Distressed Though some men are put off by fake breasts, it’s unlikely that anybody will find corrective dental work a vile form of deception, like you’re the Bernie Madoff of the perfect smile. Research in “dental anthropology” (who knew?!) by Peter Ungar, Rachel Sarig, and others suggests the cause of your underbite could be genetic — or it could be environmental (perhaps deficiencies in maternal nutrition during pregnancy). Sorry. I was hoping for something a little more definitive, too. Might you and your fiance have a kid with a funky bite? Sure. But unlike in ancestral human societies, we live in a world teeming with orthodontists. Just look for the “STR8TEETH” and “SMILEDOC” plates on cars that cost as much as a small, slightly used private jet. Allay your fears by being honest: Tell your fiance that you got braces to correct a really bad underbite. A dude who’s attracted to the way you look now is unlikely to dump you upon learning about your supposedly sordid orthodontic history. Looks are vital for attraction, but they’re just part of what matters. A massive cross-cultural survey by evolutionary psychologist David Buss finds that men, like women, prioritize kindness and intelligence in a partner. In fact, these are men’s and women’s top asks. And these are things that can’t be engineered with $7K in oral railroad tracks and years spent covering your mouth when you laugh lest those tiny rubber bands shoot across the room and put out somebody’s eye. n ©2019, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

68 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019

EVENTS | CALENDAR COEUR D’ALENE SYMPHONY: A FESTIVE CELEBRATION Mozart’s majestic “Prague Symphony” opens the Symphony’s December. Musicians from North Idaho Youth Symphony join the Orchestra for the second half of the program playing holiday favorites, concluding with the annual singalong. Dec. 6 at 7:30 pm, Dec. 7 at 2 pm. $10-$20. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. kroccda.org (208-667-1865) AN ACAPELLA CHRISTMAS The Pages of Harmony Barbershop Chorus and quartets perform Christmas and holiday music in the barbershop style. Dec. 7, 6:30-8 pm. $5/$15. Millwood Presbyterian, 3223 N. Marguerit. (710-7444) AMAHL & THE NIGHT VISITORS An opera performed by students in the U of I’s Lionel Hampton School of Music. Dec. 7 at 4 pm and 7:30 pm, Dec. 9 at 7:30 pm. $5-$8. The Forge Theater, 404 Sweet Ave., Moscow. uidaho.edu/class/ music/events (208-885-2558) CANDLELIGHT CHRISTMAS CONCERT Gonzaga’s 125 singers combine to present multicultural and participatory carols from around the world. Also featuring the Spokane Brass Quintet. Dec. 7 at 7:30 pm; Dec. 8 at 3 pm. $10-$25. Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center, 211 E. Desmet. gonzaga.edu/music MANNHEIM STEAMROLLER CHRISTMAS A show that features Christmas classics along with a selection of compositions from Chip’s groundbreaking Fresh Aire series. Dec. 7, 7:30-9:30 pm. $44.50-$100. First Interstate Center for the Arts, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. broadwayspokane.com SOUNDS OF CHRISTMAS Featuring the North Idaho College Wind Symphony under the direction of Bryan Hannaford, with the Cardinal Choral and NIC Chamber Singers. Dec. 7 at 7:30 pm and Dec. 8 at 2 pm. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. nic.edu (208-769-3300) WASHINGTON IDAHO SYMPHONY: FAMILY CHRISTMAS A program of holiday classics, including music from Frozen, with festive decor and special treats for kids. Dec. 7, 7:30 pm. $10-$25. Pullman High School, 510 NW Greyhound Way. wa-idsymphony.org WSU SCHOOL OF MUSIC HOLIDAY CONCERT Featuring the WSU Madrigal Singers and Concert Choir conducted by Lori Wiest, Treble Choir and Tenor/ Bass Choir conducted by Christopher Nakielski, and the Symphony Orchestra conducted by Danh Pham. Dec. 7, 2-3 pm. $10/$15. Bryan Hall Theatre (WSU), 605 Veterans Way. (335-7696) TUBACHRISTMAS An annual event in more than 280 cities where tuba and euphonium players of all ages from the region gather to play traditional Christmas carols. Dec. 8, 3:30-5 pm. Free. Spokane Transit Plaza, 701 W. Riverside Ave. spokanetransit.com (928-8561) AFFINITI: A CELTIC TRIO CHRISTMAS CONCERT The award-winning Irish trio, along with special guest Howard Crosby, bring the haunting sounds of Ireland and the magic of Christmas to the Panida. Dec. 10, 7:30-9:30 pm. $16$18. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-255-7801)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

EAGLE WATCHING CRUSIES Take a Lake Coeur d’Alene cruise to Wolf Lodge Bay to see these magnificent

birds in the wild. Offered Dec. 7-8, 1415, 21-22 and Dec. 26-Jan. 1 at 10 am, noon and 1 pm. $13-$25. Coeur d’Alene. cdacruises.com (855-379-5478) SNOWJAM A celebration of all winter outdoor activities. With an 80s theme, the event includes ski movies, photo opps, contests, food, a raffle and more. Dec. 7, 5-9 pm. Free. Millwood Brewing, 9013 E. Frederick Ave. bit.ly/2qOLzG9 SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. TRI-CITY AMERICANS Includes the annual Teddy Bear Toss and Family Feast Night. Dec. 7, 7:05 pm. $11-$26. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com WINTERFEST TURNBULL REFUGE BUS TOUR A tour of closed areas of the Refuge with a biologist, to see wildlife and scenery. Dec. 7, 1 pm. Free. Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge, 26010 S. Smith Rd. fws.gov/refuge/turnbull

THEATER

A CHRISTMAS STORY A stage adaptation of Ralphie Parker’s quest for the Holy Grail of Christmas gifts. Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm through Dec. 15. $23-$25. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. lakecityplayhouse.org ELLEN TRAVOLTA PRESENTS: CHRISTMAS MIRACLES Starring Ellen, sister Margaret Travolta, daughter Molly Allen and featuring Abbey Crawford, and directed by Troy Nickerson with accompaniment by Jennifer Twitchell on piano and Eugene Jablonsky on Bass. Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 5 pm through Dec. 22. $27.50. Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdaresort.com IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE The saga of George Bailey, the Everyman from the small town of Bedford Falls, whose guardian angel descends on Christmas Eve to save him from despair. Thu-Fri at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm through Dec. 22. $15-$35. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com TIGER DRAMA: HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL A stage adaptation of the Disney musical. Dec. 5-7 and 12-13 at 7 pm, Dec. 14 at 2 pm. $8-$10. Lewis and Clark High School, 521 W. Fourth. (354-7000) VENUS IN FUR This sizzling 90-minute play is a witty, unsettling look at the power dynamics not only of the sexes, but the actor and the director. Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm through Dec. 8. $15-$25. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. spokanestageleft.org 12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS Christmas is just around the corner, and Shirley the Partridge is a bit nervous because it’s her very first time carrying out the ancient family tradition of gathering for the official singing of “The Twelve Days of Christmas.” Dec. 6-15; Thu-Sat at 7 pm, Sat at 3 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $12$14. TAC at the Lake, 22910 E. Appleway Ave. tacatthelake.com (995-6718) ELEMENTARY HOLIDAY A series of 36 holiday mini-plays written by local kids, performed by teens and adults. Dec. 6-15; Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. $7-$12. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 236 S. Union Ave., Newport. (447-9900) LITTLE WOMEN: THE MUSICAL This timeless story of sisters Jo, Meg, Beth and Amy March is brought to life in a musical filled with personal discovery, heartache, hope and everlasting love. Dec. 6, 7, 12 and 14 at 7:30 pm; Dec. 8, 14 and 15 at 2 pm. $6-$22. Hartung Theater, 875 Perimeter Dr. uidaho.edu/ class/theatre

MIRACLE ON 34TH STREET A reader’s theater production of the 1947 Lux Radio Theatre classic. Dec. 6-7 and 13 at 7 pm, Dec. 14 at 6 pm (dinner theater, $30; reserve by Dec. 11) and Dec. 8 and 15 at 3 pm. $5-$10. StageWest Community Theatre, 639 Elm, Cheney. stagewestct.org ‘TWAS THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS It’s four days before Christmas, and the New York Evening Post needs a holiday feature story, but Clement Moore has writer’s block. Fri at 7 pm; Sat-Sun at 2 pm through Dec. 22. $12-$16. Spokane Children’s Theatre, 2727 N. Madelia. spokanechildrenstheatre.org SHAKESPEARE’S THE TEMPEST Local students perform Shakespeare’s hilarious tale of comedy, forgiveness and redemption. Dec. 7 at 2 and 6 pm. $8. The Oaks Classical Christian Academy, 2303 S. Bowdish Rd. theoakscca.org

ARTS

HOLIDAY POP-UP SERIES The winery hosts local photographer Ira Garner and fiber artist Laurie Ann Greenberg. Dec. 5, 4-8 pm. Free. Helix Wines, 824 W. Sprague. helixwine.com FIRST FRIDAY Art galleries and businesses across downtown Spokane and beyond host monthly receptions to showcase new displays of art. Dec. 6, from 5-8 pm. Details on page 49. LR MONTGOMERY STUDIO/GALLERY CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE The local artists hosts an open house and studio sale: “NW Places We Love - Original Impressionistic Oil Paintings.” Fri, Dec. 6 from 12-9 pm; Sat, Dec. 7 from 10 am-9 pm; Sun, Dec. 8 from 12-5 pm. LR Montgomery Studio & Gallery, 428 E. 21st Ave. (624-0261) POWER LINE BRUNCH WITH INSULATORS Laboratory hosts a three-course sampling dinner and interactive installation by Ursula Endlicher. Dec. 6, 6:30 pm. $10. Richmond Art Collective, 228 W. Sprague. richmondartcollective.org WINTER ART MARKET AND ORNAMENT DISPLAY The 5th annual market at the POAC Gallery features small artworks by local fine artists, including handmade gifts from painting to jewelry and ceramics. Dec. 6-27; Mon-Fri 10 am-5 pm. Free. Pend Oreille Arts Council Gallery, 110 Main St. artsinsandpoint. org (208-263-6139) BANK LEFT HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE An open house featuring artwork by local artists Dick Domey, Nelson Duran, Louanne Deerkop and Tamara Helm, along with original vintage paintings, a Christmas bakery and luncheon (11 am-3 pm), and a pop-up Christmas at Shady Acres Farm. Dec. 7, 8:30 am-3 pm. Free. Bank Left Gallery, 100 S. Bridge St., Palouse. bankleftgallery.com GRAND STUDIO OPENING & JARRETT BLDG. OPEN HOUSE Visit the new working studio of artist Tiffany Patterson to see projects by her and guest studio artist Karli Ingersoll, along with other nearby arts groups: Spokane Print and Publishing Center, Art Salvage and Ammonite Screen Printing. Dec. 7, 10 am-6 pm. Free. 1921 N. Ash St. bit.ly/2KHoU5H THIRD ANNUAL MAC HOLIDAY ARTIST STUDIO TOUR Visit seven local artists in their studios and see where they create and how they work. Tour from 9 am-3 pm; reception 3-5 pm at Barrister Winery. Dec. 7. $10/$20. The MAC, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org n


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DECEMBER 5, 2019 INLANDER 69


COEUR D ’ ALENE

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Desperately Seeking Santa

On the trail of Saint Nick in North Idaho

S

anta isn’t the only one to make lists. We’ve made our own this year. But don’t look to our list for an accounting of who’s been naughty or nice. Instead, our list consists of all the places you can spot the jolly ol’ fellow in North Idaho this holiday season. And guess what: They’re all nice! On Dec. 7, look for Santa to arrive in style to downtown Coeur d’Alene, where the DOWNTOWN LIVE NEIGH-TIVITY and SANTA VISITS take place. Santa’s ride is none other than the Coeur d’Alene Fire Department’s vintage fire truck, which they’ve decked out with hundreds of twinkling lights. Have your photo taken with Santa from 4-6 pm at Second and Sherman and drop off your canned food donations, too. Everyone knows Santa lives at the North Pole, which makes the Coeur d’Alene Resort’s annual JOURNEY TO THE NORTH POLE CRUISE a natural way to keep the kids believing in the magic of the holidays. The 40-minute cruise gives you plenty of time to have some hot chocolate, enjoy the holiday light show and sing a few carols while the elves zip on ahead and ensure that Santa knows exactly C O E U R

D ’A L E N E

Upcoming Events

COEUR D’ALENE

Christmas Miracles THROUGH DECEMBER 22

The Travolta Christmas show at the Coeur d’Alene Resort is a beloved holiday tradition starring Ellen, sister Margaret Travolta, daughter Molly Allen and featuring Abbey Crawford, and directed by Troy Nickerson. It’s a show filled with music, laughter, memories and of course, miracles. $27.50; Thursday-Saturday at 7:30 pm, Sundays at 5 pm; the Coeur d’Alene Resort. Not recommended for ages 8 and under.

70 INLANDER DECEMBER 5, 2019

Sounds of Christmas

DECEMBER 7

Celebrate the sounds of Christmas at this festive concert featuring the North Idaho College Wind Symphony, the Cardinal Choral and NIC Chamber Singers. Saturday at 7:30 pm, Sunday at 2 pm; 208-769-3300.

what your kiddos have on their gift list. Won’t they be surprised when he calls them out by name? Tickets through Jan. 1 range from $7.50-$23.25, depending on the day of the week and the age of ticket-holder (children 5 and under are free). Head to the SILVER LAKE MALL for professional kid photos with Santa, through Dec. 24 and starting at $35. Don’t forget the fur-babies (dogs or cats only, please). Their day for pet pictures with Santa at the mall is Dec. 9 (starting at $35). You can also bring your four-legged friends for photos with Santa at the COUNTRY STORE (6265 N. Government Way) from 1-4 pm on Dec. 7 and again at PETCO (420 W. Wilbur Ave.) from 1-4 pm on Dec. 14. The suggested donation of $10 benefits the Kootenai Humane Society. What to do after opening presents and downing all that eggnog? Why, ski SILVER MOUNTAIN, of course. Rumor has it that when Santa is done delivering presents on Christmas Day, he trades his sled for skis and shreds it old school down the slopes.

Downtown Live Neigh-tivity DECEMBER 7

The Coeur d’Alene Downtown Association is partnering with First Presbyterian and Trinity Lutheran to host a free live animal petting zoo, manger scene photo booth, carolers, hot chocolate, coffee and more. 1-4 pm; Sherman Square Park, 316 Sherman Ave.; 208-415-0116.

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Donnie Emerson & Nancy Sophia Band at the Nighthawk Ultra Lounge

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