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HAMMER TIME

TRAINED LAWYERS MAKE COURT DECISIONS, RIGHT? NOT ALWAYS PAGE 13

THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT INTRODUCING WASHINGTON’S NEW COVID-TRACING APP PAGE 16

DECEMBER 3-9, 2020 | LET’S SHOP LOCAL THIS YEAR!

PA GE

24


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INSIDE VOL. 28, NO. 8 | COVER ILLUSTRATION: JON MERRELL

COMMENT NEWS CULTURE GIFT GUIDE

5 13 18 24

FOOD FILM MUSIC EVENTS

50 52 54 55

ADVICE GODDESS I SAW YOU GREEN ZONE BULLETIN BOARD

57 58 59 63

EDITOR’S NOTE

R

emember after 9/11 when George W. Bush told us we should all go shopping lest the terrorists win? Oh, how we laughed! What dullard would make such a cold-hearted suggestion while we grieved the loss of nearly 3,000 souls! I’m not going to make the same mistake, certainly not with 260,000 Americans already dead from the coronavirus. But with millions unemployed, the economy in lockdown and the federal government unconscionably crapping the bed, I am going to suggest that we’d all be better off if — when we shopped — we made a special effort to patronize businesses local and small. Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos doesn’t need any more of our money: His personal wealth has grown by $70 billion since the start of the pandemic. You need not be a Bernie Bro to root for a neighborhood business in a battle against a monopoly like his. You can be pro-commerce, pro-capitalism, probusiness, pro-worker and pro-jobs (including the million at Amazon) and still be concerned about what happens when one company crushes all the rest. So after you browse through this week’s GIFT GUIDE (starting on page 24), consider this final appeal to your patriotism: Shop local lest the Bezoses of the world win. — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

ElementsMassage_SpreadCheerGiftCard_110520_3H_

Read All About ’Em! Inlander Histories Make a Great Gift!

Available at INLAND NORTHWEST HISTORY

FORGET BEING NICE PAGE 6

WHO’S TO JUDGE? PAGE 13

Atticus & Auntie’s Bookstore

Timeless Tales of Spokane and the Inland Northwest, Volume 1

T i m e l e s s Ta l e s o f S p o k a n e a n d t h e I n l a n d N o r t h we s t , Vo l u m e 1 EDITED BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

I

f you call yourself an Inlander, you need to know the stories. Do you remember those ancient ivory tusks pulled from a farm down on the Palouse? What happened after fur trappers set up their first trading post on the Spokane River? Or how a local basketball team captivated the nation? What about “The Biggest Thing That Man Has Ever Done”? A World’s Fair? Those are just a few of the tales that define the rich history of the Inland Northwest — stories that were first retold in the pages of the Inlander newspaper starting in 1993. In Inlander Histories, you’ll meet Nell Shipman, the silent film star who launched her own studio on the shores of Priest Lake. You’ll hop a flight over Mt. St. Helens on a particularly memorable day. And you’ll learn how Walt Worthy kept the dream of Louis Davenport alive in downtown Spokane. Noted local historians Jack Nisbet, Robert Carriker and William Stimson join Inlander staff writers, including Sheri Boggs, Andrew Strickman and Mike Bookey, to take you on a tour of some of the most important moments in the region’s past. Collected together for the first time, Inlander Histories pieces together the tapestry of Eastern Washington and North Idaho culture, creating a rare document of life in the “inland” part of this corner of the continent. $14.95

SERVING IN THE PANDEMIC PAGE 50

WARM JETS PAGE 54

COVER DESIGN BY CHRIS BOVEY

inlanderbooks SPOKANE,WASHINGTON INLANDER.COM/BOOKS

• dining • • shopping • • culture •

PAGE 10

INLANDER

1227 W. Summit Parkway, Spokane, WA 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634 EMAIL: info@inlander.com

SPOKANE • EASTERN WASHINGTON • NORTH IDAHO • INLANDER.COM THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. It’s printed on newsprint that is at least 50 percent recycled; please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x213 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email frankd@inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2020, Inland Publications, Inc.

4th Annual MAC HOLIDAY VIRTUAL ARTIST

STUDIO TOUR December 4, 5 & 6

View anytime or multiple times Friday-Sunday Visit local artists in their studios – virtually – see where they create and how they work.

Art available for sale online.

Tickets: $10

Purchase tickets online at www.northwestmuseum.org.

Hazen Audel · Sheila Evans · Kimber Follevaag Melissa Lang · Cheryl Metcalf · Gay Waldman Gordon Wilson

DECEMBER 3, 2020 INLANDER 3


KNOCK OUT THE FLU WITH ONE SHOT It’s more important than ever to get vaccinated against the flu. The flu vaccine can keep you from getting the flu and spreading it to others. This is critical during the COVID-19 pandemic to help keep our hospitals from being overwhelmed.

DID YOU KNOW DOH recommends a yearly flu vaccine for everyone aged six-months and older, including pregnant and nursing women. Most insurance plans, including CHIP and Medicaid, cover the cost of flu vaccine for adults. Children aged 18 and under in Washington can get a flu vaccine and other recommended vaccines at no cost.

CONTACT US TODAY! Our free and confidential services can help connect your family to health insurance coverage, point you toward free vaccine clinics, and much more. (509) 340-9008 healthykids@betterhealthtogether.org @BetterHealthTogether

healthy kids together

This printed material is supported by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $250,000. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by CMS, HHS or the U.S. Government.

4 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020


COMMENT

ANNE PERKINS: My brother gave us a Wii when we had nothing, and it changed our lives. We were able to watch Netflix and play games and many of the games were cooperative. This was before the TV became Netflix capable and we didn’t have a converter box to watch broadcast TV. The most recent system he has gifted us is the XBox One and it is amazing.

ENJOY A MESMERIZING EVENING DOWNTOWN

Need a spark?

their Shoppers looking to update good wardrobe or homes are in area’s hands when perusing the many local retailers. In women’s fashion, ultra-personalized s the Inland Northwest’s shopping experiences can Boo Radley’s biggest urban hub, the be found at Cues, Boutique Bleu and Audrey’s Boutique Spokane-Coeur d’Alene metro in Spokane, and at T-Blue area is a go-to shopping source Boutique in Coeur d’Alene. for both some of the most the what popular national retailers and If a unique vintage look is most charming, locally owned for your For the you seek, whether head boutiques and gift shops. definitely home, or clothing the former, look no further than shops in Spokane’s many the to region’s major malls, including North Monroe Business District, n River Park Square in downtow Midtown sole or Coeur d’Alene’s Spokane, home to the area’s neighborhood. Boulevard Boutique Bleu is Nordstrom, Williams Sonoma, Mercantile in central Spokane and Pottery Barn, Apple Store one of the best-curated vintage many more. stores in the area, alongside you’ll Tossed and Found, 1889 Also in the downtown core gift Salvage Co. and Lucky Vintage find a pair of longtime local its & Pretty Things. shops: Boo Radley’s and sibling Atticus Coffee & Gifts. For more places that specialize at Both are a must-visit. And in unique home goods and some River Park Square, the From furniture, some vintage and Tin Here store operated by arts new, make sure to hit up the its nonprofit Terrain, offers, as and Two goods Roof, Savvy Home all name implies, locally made Lucky Vintage & Women Vintage Goods — Pretty Things from artists and makers around three are treasure troves. the Northwest.

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KATE RAU: From my then-18-yearold daughter: A beautiful vessel that I’d been coveting, filled with dozens On The Terrace! Enjoy a Frost-Kissed Evening and dozens of slips of paper on which she’d written something she admires and loves about me.

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Taste of the Inland Northwest

his winter, maybe more than up your ever, you’ll need to warm Spokane body and your soul. Luckily, tasting has plenty of taprooms and For rooms for just such an occasion. a great community atmosphere and Goat pint of beer, check out Iron Brewing, No-Li Brewhouse, and Brick West Brewing. Or, for a cozier environment, try Whistle Punk Brewing.

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HEATHER KLOTZBACH RIVIERE: One year my dad sent me an electric wine bottle opener set complete with foil cutter and aerator bulb. Best.gift.ever that gives me a James Bond-like thrill every time I open a bottle.

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CONTRIBUTORS

5

Lake Lou

Asia at from many parts of Southeast noodles, you can find dishes this little gem. you’ll find lovely city of Liberty Lake, In the other direction, in the s, Hay like seafood, steak or shareable Hay J’s Bistro. Whether you And a little food in a beautiful setting. J’s serves up some delicious there’s even more to try, including farther east, in North Idaho, with a d’Alene’s Sherman Avenue, Crafted on downtown Coeur and an urban vibe. creative menu, great beer e? Go to a modern dining experienc In the mood to splurge on that truly downtown Spokane, for dishes Inland Pacific Kitchen, in the g dishes in a casual setting, mix art with flavor. For fine-dinin r Grill, in northwest Spokane, seasonal, fresh menu at Downrive of the including Wednesday’s burger has options for everyone, moment. early Week, late February through Also, Inlander Restaurant of Spokane and Coeur d’Alene. March, is a great culinary showcase

R.

Fraser

Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture

Amy Alkon, Mindy Cameron, Gary Crooks, Will Maupin, Claire Munds, Alex Sakariassen Carrie Scozzaro, Sharma Shields, Quinn Welsch

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9

e Vil Sunshin

t quickly discover what locals isitors to the Inland Northwes g area has a bit of everythin have long known: the Spokane of some possibilities. Here’s a sampling when it comes to culinary ts. of the hundreds of area restauran d pizza or a burger? Wooden Wanna go casual with wood-fire of their n has that and more. Try some City Spokane in downtow toast and such as the smoked salmon creative and delicious dishes tastebuds. drinks will also tickle your beet ravioli. Expertly crafted to Airway Asia, go a few minutes west For the flavors of Southeast Choi, owner of D’Bali Asian Heights. There “Mama” Jeannie rice or Whether you want curry, fried Bistro, will take care of you.

of your choosing.

Maryhill Winery is your choice if Iron Goat Brewing you’re looking Brick & Steel IPA to take in a spectacular Yards. view of the city from Kendall of the city Or venture into the heart Barrister for some excellent wine at the Winery where you can hear town. If rumblings of the train through be sure to cider is more of your vibe, And head to One Tree Cider House. the Dry Fly you can never go wrong at the spirits Distilling Tasting Room for

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Normally, we ask our question of the week of people we randomly encounter on the street. But with the coronavirus pandemic, we instead asked our followers on social media to share their thoughts.

MARY STOVER: When I was 11, my oldest brother got me a Harvard sweatshirt for Christmas. Growing up, we didn’t have money for anything like that — he earned the money himself working hard his senior year. It wasn’t just that he spent his hard-earned money on me, it was that he encouraged my little girl dream of going to Harvard and becoming a lawyer. I cherished that sweatshirt and the knowledge that he believed in me. Best. Present. Ever.

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A Deadly State of Grace We’re supposed to be kind to the fine folks prolonging this pandemic? BY GARY CROOKS

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oomscrolling: bad. Accepting the current state of affairs: worse. As the pandemic rages and the president un-elect retreats into tantrums, we need to find that sweet spot where productive rage replaces “WTF!” fatigue. Bone-weary doctors and nurses are confronted with deficits of sleep, supplies and co-workers and a surplus of patients angry with them for diagnosing and treating a virus they believe to be a hoax. Public health officials, including one in Spokane County, are being chased out of their jobs by anti-shutdown mobs for telling the truth. Struggling Americans are about to be kicked out of their homes in the dead of winter. Long lines stretch around food banks. Congress can’t be bothered to pass another round of relief, because the leader of the Senate persuaded the president that confirming judges was a more pressing concern. The forces behind this depressing drumbeat refuse to wear masks, refuse to keep their distance and refuse to entertain the idea that their actions have a direct effect on the rest of us. They are immune to the facts and proudly flaunt their

callous disregard. They certainly are not reading this. But they are reading, and what they’re finding in the dark recesses of the internet eventually percolates to the surface. And it isn’t all kooky misinformation about the coronavirus. There’s plenty of noxious nuttery about the presidential election, too. In the past, conspiracy theories and quackery were contained by their own lunacy. Now the leader of the free world tweets this trash, and the unwavering 40 percent of Americans in the Trump tribe amplifies the lies.

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o, while I don’t expect to persuade “refuseniks,” I would like to address the “defuseniks.” These are the well-meaning people who absorb all of this and ask that we post more cute cat photos online. They preach civility, calm and grace. They don’t take sides during the greatest health crisis in a century or an unprecedented


attempt to steal an election. No, they just tell everyone to chill, because conflict makes them sad. As in: “I can’t wait to get back to Facebook being enjoyable.” Under normal circumstances, a trip to Graceland would be fine, but — and I can’t emphasize this enough — this is not normal. Telling people who are appropriately outraged to “calm down” normalizes insanity and provides cover for bad-faith actors. Defuseniks want the world to sing in perfect harmony, and their nonjudgment suggests this is a “both sides” problem. It is not. It’s the Luftwaffe scanning for nighttime targets over England and yahoos crying “freedom!” as they flip on the lights. Do we grant them grace from beneath the rubble, or wring their necks?

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Telling people who are appropriately outraged to “calm down” normalizes insanity and provides cover for badfaith actors. It’s the federal government’s abdication of responsibility as COVID-19 claims an inordinate number of Americans. Are you just going to shrug that off? The death rate for the coronavirus is 81 Americans for every 100,000 people. In Canada, it’s 32 deaths per 100,000. If Americans were dying at the same rate as Canadians, there would’ve been 105,920 total deaths as of Nov. 28. Instead, there were 268,110, a staggering difference of 162,190 souls. To be fair, Americans have more underlying health conditions and a lower life expectancy, and America doesn’t have universal health care, so a somewhat higher death rate is to be expected (and how sad is that?). But a fatality rate that is more than double that of Canada’s ought to stoke universal outrage. It’s a mountain of unnecessary death and a monument to low expectations and cowardly blame-shifting. No wonder Canadians won’t let us visit.

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his will only get worse if we fail to demand better. Voters dumped Trump, so that’s a start. But long-awaited vaccines are in the pipeline, and anti-vaxxers are already trying to sow doubt about their safety. We need to make it clear to our leaders that we will not accept the same fatal fecklessness. What the peacemakers are missing is that this isn’t a typical political argument. It isn’t even political. It’s one side recognizing that pandemics require collective, disciplined action and the other side being dicks. Health care workers are exhausted, students are trapped online, businesses are shuttering, people are out of work, and loved ones can’t visit for the holidays. But we’re supposed to be kind to the fine folks prolonging this? Politicians who are afraid to tell you the truth rally to “civility” as a diversion. U.S. Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers has written a couple of columns on this theme. What she hasn’t done is criticize the Trump administration for one of the worst COVID-19 responses in the world. It’s really quite simple. Want to ease shutdowns? Wear and promote masks. Want schools to reopen? Mind your distance. Don’t want to do either? You’re the problem. Everything we hate about our coronavirus existence has been exacerbated by selfish inhumanity. I’m all for forgiveness, but typically that’s preceded by apologies and remorse. We’re not seeing that, but we are seeing messages like this: “In this time of strife and tragic loss, let’s grant each other grace. People are hurting. People are scared. Let’s set aside politics and focus on our common humanity.” I’m raising a middle finger to every bit of that. n Gary Crooks is the former editorial page editor of the Spokesman-Review.

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Steven A. Smith once thought that Cathy McMorris Rodgers was a person of principle. Lately, not so much.

Readers respond to a guest column by Steven A. Smith (11/26/20) asking when Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers would finally speak out against President Trump’s baseless claims of election fraud:

ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

JULIE KATZER: She needs to go. One of the truly despicables. JOSH MCGUIRE: Same regurgitated opinion of liberals. Very boring and nothing new in this piece. BRAD JACKSON: Dear Cathy, Don’t give in to liberal tears, leftists are losers! Keep up your efforts! SHANE MABREY: The Republican Party is dead. It is forever the party of 45. Lie, cheat, steal, do whatever it takes to hold onto power; ends justify the means. The vast majority of people don’t support conservative ideals or values, but we refuse to fight dirty like they do, so nothing changes. When they go low, we should go much lower. ANDY DYER: You communists love your liberal dictators. RALPH JAMESON: She sold her soul to Trump. Totally worthless woman. LINDA SAFFORD: I know what Cathy said to me about Donald Trump in 2016. It gave me (nonpartisan) hope. I am sad to see that her allegiance to party politics has superseded her very principled remarks then. I too have continued to hope she would publicly stand up for the values she espouses, but I have yet to see it. DIANA BOLCH: A very good opinion article. However, he assumes that she listens to anybody from Spokane. Her support is outside Spokane, so she has closed ears. As long as the Republicans keep forking over money to keep her in office, she will go on supporting any and all who get into office, no matter how ugly and awful they may be. PAT MASTERSON: Deaf ears, every time. JOE TUCKER: She serves Washington — just the wrong one. TERESA TORKELSON BAXTER: How does an elected representative get voted in and then vanish from sight? Let’s ask Cathy! As our representative, where are you and please tell us where you stand with this outlandish and corrupt administration? JACK O’DEA: You have to pull the string to hear her talking points. n

8 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020


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dining • shopping • culture Businesses are working hard to serve customers and stay safe: Support them and you support our region’s recovery.

SPOKANE SYMPHONY AT THE FOX, PRE-COVID

The Band Plays On As hard as the COVID-19 pandemic has been on industries like retail and hospitality, it’s been especially tough on the culture and entertainment sector. Faced with the impossibility of offering live performances for the foreseeable future, organizations like the Spokane Symphony have had to figure out ways to adapt to public health guidelines while still staying afloat. “Just like other performing arts organizations, the pandemic has been devastating to our financial well-being,” says Jeff vom Saal, the symphony’s executive director. He estimates that the operating budget has been cut by about 80 percent. “Because we own the Fox Theater, it’s been doubly hard. Everything has been canceled — not just the things that we produce but also the events where we rent the venue. So it hits us a number of times.” And with funding from the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loan soon to run out, vom Saal acknowledges that pressure is only building. However, as chronicled in The Sound of Spokane, a new history of the symphony by local author Jim

Kershner, this isn’t the first serious setback to be overcome. Over the past 75 years, Spokanites have rallied time and time again to support their hometown orchestra. “This organization has been through various difficult periods in its history, although I would say that this is more severe than others,” vom Saal says. “But we’re going to survive. We have our community, and that’s really what it comes down to. There’s some unique energy here that you don’t find elsewhere.” The recent gala is further testament to that community support. During that one-night event in November, the symphony succeeded in raising over $165,000. And while the Spokane Symphony Associates’ annual Christmas Tree Elegance fundraiser has been postponed until 2021, there are other ways to support the symphony and its players in this difficult time. Find the “Support” button on spokanesymphony.org, and you can donate to the Musicians’ Relief Fund or the Annual Fund — or both. In the meantime, vom Saal and Music Director James Lowe haven’t ruled out virtual concerts or streaming events

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for the coming 2021-22 season. But much of that will depend on resources, audience receptivity and the ever-changing situation on the ground. When it comes to exploring new online performance models, the Northwest BachFest has found itself in a slightly better position over the turbulent course of the last nine months. “We’ve been preparing for this new chapter, not knowing that the new chapter was going to be what it was,” says internationally acclaimed cellist Zuill Bailey, who also serves as the festival’s artistic director. “We’ve been expanding for years to this exact moment. We were all ready to go, we just had to implement it faster.” In anticipation of moving from a limited-run festival to a year-round event calendar, Bailey and the Northwest BachFest had already spent several years creating a video catalogue of concerts and educational community engagements. Across the Miles, for example, is a pay-to-view concert series that streams via the BachFest’s private YouTube channel. Tickets for individual performances are just $20 per household. Using “mini-concerts” that he recently recorded in Spokane, Bailey is also still able to do community outreach during COVID-19 without putting himself or others at risk. “Under normal circumstances, I would be going into the hospitals and playing for ZUILL BAILEY the doctors and nurses as well as the patients. In this case, we’re taking the videos and playing them in each room, so everyone gets a personal concert from us,” he says. “During this time, I can now play for thousands at once. That infinitely increases our reach to enrich and inspire our next generation through music education.” u Proceeds from Jim Kershner’s The Sound of Spokane benefit the Spokane Symphony. To place your order or find out more while waiting for news about the 2021-22 season, visit spokanesymphony.org. The Northwest BachFest’s payto-view streaming concerts and upcoming performance schedule, including individual tickets and season packages, can be found at nwbachfest.com.


HANK'S HATCHETS NORTH SPOKANE Hank’s Hatchets is an upbeat, urban indoor axe-throwing venue. Soft drinks available for purchase, and we allow in outside food and non-alcoholic beverages. Also in Coeur d’Alene, at 2506 N. Fourth St. Hank’s Hatchets sanitizes after each group, and masks are required when checking in and moving around the building. There is plenty of space to maintain distances between groups. 3904 N. Division St., 309-2722, hankshatchets.com

KSPS PBS

THE BING BING CROSBY THEATER DOWNTOWN The Bing Crosby Theater has been providing a space for the arts and community to come together since 1915. This historical treasure has been restored to feature state of the art sound and projection and still features original murals painted over 100 years ago. Located in the heart of Downtown Spokane, it is the perfect venue to experience a musical concert, live play, film or even to host an unforgettable wedding or party with your loved ones. We look forward to welcoming you back once this COVID intermission is over! We have installed sanitation stations throughout the building and are developing procedures that will allow our guests to safely enter and exit the building. Our staff are hard at work creating a safe, clean and fun environment to welcome you and your family soon. 901 W. Sprague Ave., 4132915, bingcrosbytheater.com

EPICUREAN DELIGHT This re-imagined version of Epicurean Delight gives our guests the opportunity to support our local restaurants, wineries, breweries and cideries who need our support now more than ever, while still supporting Vitalant and the Blood Center Foundation of the Inland Northwest. Epicurean Bites and Delights packages consist of two parts: 1. A voucher book with a complimentary item from each of our participating restaurants and 2. A voucher book with a complimentary item or tasting at each of our participating libation establishments. BLUE Package for $100 contains: Restaurant Voucher Book

and Libation Voucher Book. GOLD Package for $200 contains: Restaurant Voucher Book, Libation Voucher Book, Bottle of Epicurean Delight Signature Wine, Epicurean Delight Signature Spiceology Blend, Twigs Martini Ticket, 1 Raffle Entry for a Table of 10 at Epicurean Delight 2021. Vouchers are valid until Aug. 31, 2021 and can be used for pickup and to-go options. To purchase and/or view a list of participating restaurants and libations visit www.epicureandelight.org

THE GAMER'S HAVEN SPOKANE VALLEY The Gamer’s Haven is more than just a game store, it’s a venue for people to be themselves and engage in their hobbies with their peers. The Haven, as it is dubbed by members of the gaming community, is just that: a place to safely meet up with other gamers. Founded over 20 years ago by its owner Bob Kelley, the Gamer’s Haven has continued to evolve and adapt, continually setting the bar higher as the pinnacle of gaming in the Inland Northwest. We offer curbside pickup as well as shipping. We have regulations for small events that include but are not limited to: Temperature taken at the door and recorded; masks are required at all times; barriers between players; marked pathways to keep social distance; tables wiped down with disinfectant between rounds; Hand sanitizer and disinfectant wipes available at each table. 2114 N. Pines Rd., 443-5992, thegamershaven.net

Viewer-supported PBS and original local Public Television programming for the Inland Northwest and western Canada. Programming content provided FREE over the air, plus via Comcast cable and satellite services as well as online via ksps.org. Channels include KSPS-TV, PBS World, PBS Create and PBS Kids 24/7. We have provided a ‘virtual venue’ for ‘live’ performances by local artists though a new program called Inland Sessions. The performances air FREE over-the-air on KSPS-TV and are available online at www.ksps.org/inlandsessions. 443-7700, ksps.org

ROW ADVENTURE CENTER DOWNTOWN ROW Adventure Center is the region’s leading adventure travel company with whitewater rafting, cycling, kayaking, fishing and more. Since 1979 ROW has led thousands of people on local and international tours, winning accolades from National Geographic, Travel+Leisure, Outside, Sunset, AFAR and more! Read our full update to travel policies including a full COVID-19 operations and mitigation plan at www.rowadventures.com/ current-travel-information. 209 S. Washington St., 770-2517, rowadventurecenter.com

SPOKANE FALL FOLK FESTIVAL The mission of the Fall Folk Festival is to present the diversity of our community through traditional music, dance and the arts. For 24 years, we have done this with a two-day festival in November. In 2020, in lieu of a live event, we are presenting a virtual festival on our website. It will be available from Nov. 14 to Dec. 30, 2020, and will include links to some of the vendors who generally participate in the live event. 828-3863, spokanefolkfestival.org

ABOUT Back to business • These weekly pages are part of a local marketing effort in support of the hospitality

sector brought to you by leading institutions and businesses to help promote the Spokane County economy, supported in part by Cares Act funding. With the goal of balancing commerce and public safety, you can follow along here in the Inlander, and via the links below, as local restaurants, shops and more share their stories and invite your support.

Fresh sheet deals • specials • updates 1889 SALVAGE CO SPOKANE [ NORTH ] Open Sunday 11-4 now through Dec. 20. 2824 North Monroe Street

PAINTING WITH A TWIST SPOKANE VALLEY Enjoy our take home painting experience! We offer free curbside pickup on Thursday for anyone feeling like relaxing and enjoying painting. 11703 East Sprague Avenue

RUMORS SALON SPOKANE VALLEY Holiday gift sets for at-home hair care. 1515 North Pines Road

ADORKABLE FLOWERS AND GIFTS, LLC LIBERTY LAKE If you purchase a 6- or 12-month flower service by Dec. 20, 2020, you get 1 free bonus bouquet and free delivery. Some limitations apply. 1326 North Liberty Lake Road

KATZE BOUTIQUE SPOKANE [ EAST ] Mention this ad for 10% off. 1816 E Sprague

FRESH DESIGN GALLERY & RENTALS, LLC MEDICAL LAKE Purchase 2 paddleboard gift certificates or 2 kayak gift certificates before Dec. 31, 2020, to receive $10 off the total purchase. 116 North Lefevre Street

FRESH SHEET CONTINUES ON THE NEXT PAGE

more to come • Through the end of the year, watch

the Inlander for special Back To Business guides, along with special sections, sharing more recovery stories and community business features.

Safe business practice resources KindnessNotCovid.org • Financial resources for businesses InlandBizStrong.org

DECEMBER 3, 2020 INLANDER 11


Fresh sheet deals • specials • updates THE SALVATION ARMY THRIFT STORE SPOKANE [ NORTH ] Week tag sale color: Mon-Wed 50% off, Thu-Sat 75% off. Military: 20% daily with ID. Seniors: 20% Wed. Students: 20% Sat. 2020 N Divsion

SPOKANE COUNTY LIBRARY DISTRICT [ 11 LOCATIONS ] In December, we’re creating ornaments, digital art & watercolor paintings, playing holiday movie trivia, and reading during a Winter Camp Read-a-Rama. www.scld.org

THE ARTHRITIS FOUNDATION, INC. SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] Join the 2020 Virtual Jingle Bell Run - Inland Northwest - jbr.org/ inlandnorthwest The Arthritis Foundation, Inc.

POP BALLOON BAR + PARTY SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] Pop now offers delivery and appointment Sun-Tues. 1003 East Trent Avenue

NORTHWEST WINTERFEST AT THE MIRABEAU PARK HOTEL

LIGHTING UP THE NIGHT IN SPOKANE VALLEY

A spark of light in the darkness is the resounding theme of this year’s holiday season, and this new-in-2020 event offers just that. It’s also a familiar throwback to a popular event first hosted here five years ago, the Chinese Lantern Festival in Riverfront Park. Northwest Winterfest features a collection of fabric-

covered lanterns inside the Mirabeau Park Hotel, arranged in a way to allow for proper social distancing. Visitors encounter a fearsome dragon, playful pandas and, available at auction, a collection of holiday trees hand painted by local multicultural groups. Families can also partake in a scavenger hunt to find

ALZHEIMER'S ASSOCIATION

RUBY RIVER STROLL

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] Register for The Longest Day by 12/21/20 and receive a free pair of sunglasses and a performance T-shirt. To learn more, visit: alz. org/tld PO Box 10060

WISHING STAR FOUNDATION SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] Taste Spokane is back with a 1950s theme on Friday, Feb. 5, 2021, at Northern Quest Resort & Casino. Granting wishes never taste so good! 9 South Washington Street #420

Rudolph and seven of his reindeer friends. This new event is intended to become another lasting local tradition, with plans to return in 2021 to Mirabeau Meadows Park, where organizers had originally envisioned hosting the bright and festive display. For details, visit northwestwinterfest.com. u

THE PATIO AT RUBY RIVER HOTEL

Here’s another holiday option that keeps you outdoors: Enjoy a festive walk along the banks of the Spokane River, punctuated by a beautiful light display sponsored by Wheatland Bank. It all happens along the trail in front of the Ruby River Hotel; swing by any time to take an evening stroll along the river, and perhaps grab dinner to-go from the hotel’s Osprey Restaurant to take home afterward. The restaurant’s patio remains open for parties of five or less from the same household, with heaters and fire pits to ward off winter’s chill. For details, visit rubyriverlights.com. u

MORE FRESH SHEET follow up-to-date info at btb.inlander.com 12 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020

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COURTS

Who’s to Judge? Trained lawyers make court rulings, right? That hasn’t been the case, however, in Cheney and Airway Heights BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

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his year, two small cities in Spokane County have found themselves defending themselves over an interesting question for the court system: Can someone who never went to law school make city-level court decisions in anything but the smallest of communities? In a case against Airway Heights and Cheney, multiple plaintiffs who’ve had their cases heard by a non-lawyer municipal court commissioner argue that unless a city has fewer than 5,000 people, anyone making those decisions needs to be an attorney to get that job. State law only allows non-lawyers to become judges in towns under that threshold, and the plaintiffs argue that same requirement applies to the commissioners those judges may appoint, too. If the plaintiffs prevail, the case could call into question potentially thousands of cases that have been heard by municipal court commissioner Terri Cooper, who’s worked for the Airway Heights court since late 2018, and Cheney’s court since 2004. If that happened, anyone who wrongfully spent a day in jail or paid fines could be entitled to refunds and/or damages. But both cities have argued that state law’s small-town requirement doesn’t apply to municipal court commissioners, even as it is an eligibility requirement for non-lawyers to hear cases in other instances. In a good early sign for the cities, they were awarded summary judgment in Spokane Superior Court this summer, meaning the court didn’t take the case to a full trial before deciding in their favor. The Washington Supreme Court declined to take the case on Nov. 4, so instead, the plaintiffs will go before the Court of Appeals. There, they will make their case that their right to due process was infringed upon by the cities’ negligence or deliberate indifference in hiring a non-lawyer for a job they argue can’t be held by someone not admitted to practice law. “This is a lady who seems genuinely liked by people, seems generally capable of doing this job, and she’s done it

without issues, except that it’s against the law,” says Chad Freebourn, one of the attorneys representing plaintiffs Shonto Pete and Monie Tulee. He believes there’s room for others to join the suit, as many cases would be affected if the cities are in the wrong. “She has no law degree, she is not a licensed lawyer, she can’t practice law in Washington, she couldn’t even go to court to appear and represent anybody, and yet she’s the judge.” Freebourn says the number of clients whose cases could be affected is vast, even though Cooper can’t oversee criminal trials or civil jury trials. She can oversee things like sentencing defendants to jail if they have a plea deal, can issue fines, and can handle other matters before the court. “No lawyer who appears before a person with black robes on thinks to ask, ‘Does this person even have the authority to bind my client?’” Freebourn says. “That’s absurd, but it’s an objection every single one of these attorneys should have made.”

ONE SIZE FITS ALL?

The main disagreement isn’t over Cooper’s credentials. She and the cities all agreed in court that she hadn’t been to law school, but had instead passed a qualifying exam in late 2002 that enabled her to apply for municipal court commissioner jobs. The state constitution says no one can be a supreme court or superior court judge unless they’re admitted to practice law — i.e., they’re an attorney. The Legislature only allows for non-lawyers to fill municipal and district court judge and commissioner positions if they passed that test before Jan. 1, 2003, so Cooper would have barely met the cutoff, but it’s agreed she did meet it. With that requirement in place, non-lawyer judges and commissioners will eventually be phased out over time. ...continued on next page

DECEMBER 3, 2020 INLANDER 13


NEWS | COURTS “WHO’S TO JUDGE?,” CONTINUED... The other element of that requirement, however, is that those qualifying lay people can only serve as district or municipal court judges for small cities under 5,000 people. The thinking was that it’s hard to find enough lawyers in rural communities to fill those jobs. But the laws that spell out eligibility to be a district or municipal court commissioner — who are appointed by the judges they serve under and have similar authority — simply say applicants need to be an attorney or someone who passed the same qualifying examination for lay judges found under RCW 3.34.060. That’s the law that spells out Terri Cooper the eligibility for district court judges, who, as stated above, need to be a lawyer or, “In those districts having a population of less than five thousand persons, a person who has taken and passed by January 1, 2003, the qualifying examination for a lay candidate for judicial officer as provided by rule of the supreme court.” Airway Heights and Cheney both argued in their requests for summary judgment that if lawmakers meant for the population limit to apply to municipal court commissioners, they would have explicitly stated so as they did with the judges, instead of just referencing the exam. “The fact that the Legislature included the same population limit in the statutes for district court judges (RCW 3.34.060(2)) and municipal court judges (RCW 3.50.040) but not municipal court commissioners (RCW

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3.50.075(3)) should be read as a deliberate omission by the Legislature,” the lawyers for Airway Heights argued, citing another Washington court case for precedent. But Freebourn argues that when one part of the law references another part, you need to read both parts together fully to understand the requirements. Therefore, you can’t ignore the population limit in that referenced RCW. “If you read it how the cities want you to read that statute, it would just say the person has to take a test,” Freebourn says. “What they asked the court to do was render the entire first part of a sentence obsolete.”

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14 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020

“The city of Airway Heights believes that the trial court’s ruling was correct in dismissing the plaintiff’s lawsuit.”

The cities were pleased with the summary judgment issued in their favor by Spokane Superior Court Judge Maryann Moreno on July 2. “The city of Airway Heights believes that the trial court’s ruling was correct in dismissing the plaintiff’s lawsuit and is optimistic that the court of appeals will uphold that decision,” says Casey Bruner, one of the multiple teams of attorneys representing the cities, in a statement. He declined to comment further on the record. Attorney Christopher Kerley, who is representing Cheney, says the city also agrees with that statement and likewise, declined to comment further on the record. The summary judgment at the superior court level could alternatively be interpreted as saving everyone time and money rather than going through a full trial that could last years only to be appealed later, Freebourn says. The plaintiffs now need to file their opening brief

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with the Court of Appeals Division III by Dec. 14, he says. Their legal team maintains there’s a case to be made that non-lawyer commissioners are only allowed in those smaller cities, and that neither Cheney nor Airway Heights were that small at any time during Cooper’s tenure. Cheney had more than 8,800 people as of the 2000 census, and was estimated at more than 12,400 in 2019; Airway Heights had more than 6,100 people as of the 2010 census and was estimated to have more than 9,500 by 2019.

“According to [the defendants], if you’re in Spokane, Seattle, Tacoma, anywhere, you don’t have to be a lawyer in any of those places as long as you’re a municipal court commissioner,” Freebourn says. “Even though, if you’re any other type of judge or commissioner you do.” But under what they argue is a clear reading of the law, knowingly hiring a non-lawyer commissioner in a city with 5,000-plus people is illegal. “This is what it comes down to: If the government is not following the law, how can it expect any of its citizens to follow the law?” Freebourn says. “Defendants have rights.” n samanthaw@inlander.com

When planning your year-end giving, please consider a donation to Providence Health Care Foundation. Your gift is an investment in the health of our community. As we continue to battle the COVID-19 pandemic, frontline caregivers face incredible strains as they assist patients who are already struggling with poverty, homelessness and mental illness. Your support will help our local Providence hospitals sustain the communitywide response needed to fight the virus and continue our legacy of compassionate service. Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center | Providence Holy Family Hospital | Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital Providence Mount Carmel Hospital | St. Luke’s Rehabilitation Institute | Providence St. Joseph’s Hospital


Charitable Giving and 2020 Taxes By Milagros Yoch

What can you give this week? VOLUNTEER EVENTS Bite2Go Volunteers Wanted - SECOND HARVEST Help hungry kids in our community by joining Second Harvest volunteers distributing Bite2Go food kits to area schools. There are two shifts available on Thursdays, from 8:45 am to noon and from noon to 3pm. Please note these are outdoor shifts and volunteers must be 18 or older. Sign up online to help. 2-harvest.org/volunteer-spokane

Adopt a Family Volunteers and Donors Needed - THE SALVATION ARMY The Salvation Army of Spokane needs assistance providing new gifts for local vulnerable children and adults this Christmas. Local businesses, organizations, churches or families can all help. An additional 25 sponsors are needed to adopt a family for Christmas. Each sponsor is given the family’s wish list, and then purchases gifts for the family members, as well as a gift card for a Christmas Day meal. The Salvation Army also needs volunteers to help get gifts from its sponsor families out to its adopted families. There are three days they need volunteers; Dec. 14, 15 and 17. For more information, please contact Joshua Schulz, Volunteer & Event Coordinator, at Joshua. Schulz@usw.salvationarmy.org, or 509-329-2721. spokane.salvationarmy.org

VIRTUAL EVENTS AND BENEFITS Act Now For Daybreak Mental wellness has never been more important than it is right now. During this virtual event on Dec.10, you will hear from community partners, leaders, and professionals including the founder of Daybreak and an inspiring Daybreak alumni as they share the importance of mental health in their lives and our community. You also don’t want to miss out on awesome COVID-19 self care packages and getaways designed to enhance your personal wellbeing and own mental wellness and raise money for Daybreak. Registration is free online. Dec. 10, 6-6:30 pm. daybreakyouthservices.org

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As we enter the end of the calendar year, holiday festivities are typically at the forefront of our thoughts. Lingering at the back of our mind, however, lurks end-of-year tax considerations. While this year has been overwhelming for all of us, luckily there are some bright spots when planning for 2020 taxes. With the impact of COVID-19, many people are looking for a way to make a difference in their communities. New options from the 2020 Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act mean that you can support your favorite nonprofit charity while reducing your 2020 tax bill. Based on the new CARES Act regulations, taxpayers who do not itemize can claim an ‘above-the-line’ deduction for charitable gifts up to $300. This means that for taxpayers that use the standard deduction, a donation to a qualified 501(c)(3) nonprofit of up to $300 can reduce your adjusted gross income (AGI) up to $300. For a single donation of $250 or more, remember to get a receipt from the nonprofit organization and keep it with your tax records.

“It’s possible to have a sizable deduction if you make a cash donation to a public charity.”

Taxpayers that itemize deductions will see more benefits under the CARES Act guidelines. The level of deduction for charitable gift deductions has increased from 60% of AGI in 2019 to 100% of AGI in 2020. For corporations, the limit on qualified charitable deductions was increased from 10% of taxable income to 25% with changes in the 2020 CARES Act. “It’s possible to have a sizeable deduction if you make a cash donation to a public charity.” Bill Simer, a partner at Eide Bailly in Spokane, said, “Different limitations apply to non-cash donations and donations to donor-advised funds.” Why is it important to think about your giving this year, especially when budgets are tight? First, nonprofits serving our community depend on individual generosity. According to the 2020 Giving USA report, 70% of charitable giving comes from individuals, with $310 billion donated in 2019. Second, nonprofits are facing unprecedented challenges meeting escalating needs. A November 2020 survey found that 65% of nonprofits cancelled fundraising events and nearly half (45%) faced other losses of expected funding. Adding a donation to your 2020 tax planning can go a long way to benefit both you and community members in extreme need. Consult a professional advisor to see how these rules apply to your situation before filing your 2020 taxes. At Innovia Foundation, a public charity, we encourage giving within our own communities. If you have been thinking about how you can help your community in the midst of this devastating pandemic, the time to act is now, before tax year comes to a close on December 31, 2020. Hopefully, we can all look forward to a truly new year in 2021. Milagros Yoch is an Innovia Foundation Fellow and a senior at Gonzaga University

DECEMBER 3, 2020 INLANDER 15


NEWS | HEALTH

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Pandemic Push Notifications Virus got your contact tracers overwhelmed? There’s now an app for that BY DANIEL WALTERS

T

he hope was that contact tracing — the public health detective work that tracks down the web of each exposure — would defeat the coronavirus. But right now, in places like Spokane County, the coronavirus has essentially defeated contact tracing. “Over the holiday weekend we had 1,200 cases reported,” says Susan Sjoberg, epidemiology program manager at the Spokane Regional Health District. “Not only can we not do a thorough case investigation into the actual positive cases, it means we can’t elicit all of those contacts for each case, and contact them.” So, a week before Thanksgiving, the district effectively handed off much of the responsibility for contract tracing to the COVID positive. Before, if you got a positive diagnosis, the health district might have asked you to identify your closest contacts. Their contract tracers would reach out to those contacts, letting them know they might have been exposed. Today, you’re more likely to be told to do it yourself. Sjoberg says that the health district helps guide patients through what alerting those they’ve exposed could look like, whether by “calling them directly and saying, ‘Hey, just got

diagnosed with COVID’” or by contacting them anonymously using a site like tellyourcontacts. org. While professional contract tracers are still actively tracking down possible exposures in high-risk settings, like nursing homes or hospitals, the shift amounts to a tactical retreat in face of the virus’s growing surge. At a press conference on Monday, Gov. Jay Inslee announced we’re in the “season of survival” — a period when effective vaccines are on the horizon, but reaching them means first weathering a brutal winter.

“It’s particularly innovative because it will alert people without having to share personal information.”

16 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020

But Inslee had good news, too: He announced the launch of what he called “a very elegant and important tool in a fight against a potentially fatal disease.” An app called “WA Notify” promises to automatically let some people know they’ve come into contact with those who’ve contracted the disease. Here’s how it works: Any time you officially come into “contact” — less than 6 feet apart, for


more than 15 minutes — with anyone else who’s downloaded the app, your phones quietly exchange a random code. If they contract COVID, then their public health agency will give them a verification code. They enter the code and, depending on their proximity, distance and how long ago your contact was, you’ll get notified. That’s true even if you run across an infected person with another state’s version of the app, like someone from Colorado. Early on during the pandemic, countries like South Korea were praised for their technological response that included tracking apps to enforce quarantine and even alerting app users in real time about the locations of infected patients. Yet those tactics raised major privacy concerns — some of that same data, a software engineer found, was easily accessible by hackers. But Washington state’s app is different. “It’s particularly innovative because it will alert people without having to share personal information,” Inslee says. “And this is the beauty of it.” While it uses Google and Apple technology, WA Notify was created by the University of Washington, which brought together not only academics from public health and engineering, but civil liberties advocates to ensure that privacy on the app is protected.

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This week, Gov. Jay Inslee announced the release of WA Notify, a new app to help in the fight against COVID-19. “Privacy is absolutely paramount,” UW President Ana Mari Cauce says. “And it’s completely voluntary.” It doesn’t share where you were, who you are, or any other information. But that focus on privacy also underscores some potential weaknesses: To start with, the app only works if both you and your contact have it downloaded and installed. If either you or your contact have your Bluetooth turned off, say, to stop it from draining your cellphone’s battery, it won’t do you any good. And it relies on the infected person entering in the verification code to alert their potential contact. Not only that, but the app only looks backward: If you come into contact with an infectious person after they’d entered in the verification code, you won’t get an alert. “We could give them another verification code that could then notify others,” says John Wiesman, Washington state’s secretary of health. “But again, we’re asking people if they’re positive, to isolate themselves at home and not put others at risk. Still, a model examining three Western Washington counties — King, Pierce and Snohomish — estimated that even if a small number of people used the app, it could reduce infections by up to 11 percent and deaths by up to 15 percent. And by the time Inslee gave his press conference on Monday afternoon, the app had already been downloaded more than 200,000 times. The Spokane Regional Health District, Sjoberg says, will be promoting the app as well. “Today’s a good day in this ongoing effort,” Inslee says. “Because it’s another day where we have more power against this pandemic.” n danielw@inlander.com

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DECEMBER 3, 2020 INLANDER 17


Jim Brickman contemplates his next Christmas jam.

18 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020


BENEFIT

PLAYING

FOR

KEEPS

Jim Brickman has a Spokane-centric show in store to celebrate the season and support the First Interstate Center for the Arts BY DAN NAILEN

W

hile his talents have taken piano man Jim Brickman in myriad directions, onto the charts and to the audiences of gospel, country, jazz, pop and more, for many his name is synonymous with Christmas. It makes sense, as his solo piano renditions of classic carols and original holiday fare are kind of ideal background music for dinner in December or a gift-wrapping session. Brickman recognizes that, and caters to it, and it’s clearly struck a chord as he’s released several Christmas collections to the delight of millions of record buyers. “A lot of why my music is popular at holiday time is, you can put it on while you’re trimming the tree, and it’s like the soundtrack,” Brickman tells the Inlander from his Cleveland home. “It’s not obtrusive … Sometimes, especially this year, people want a little bit of calm.” Brickman’s also a hard-touring artist who, like so many, saw the pandemic throw a wrench in his plans for 2020. And while he’s not able to do his annual holiday tour, Brickman has decided to play a series of “Comfort and Joy At Home” shows to support individual towns’ theater and arts communities. One is slated for Spokane on Dec. 4, when Brickman will host a show via Zoom, raising money for the First Interstate Center for the Arts and giving Inland Northwest fans the chance to mingle with one another, and Brickman, from the comfort of their own homes. We talked with Brickman about his virtual tour, his life during the pandemic and more; the conversation below has been lightly edited for length and clarity. INLANDER: What’s your pandemic life been like? What got canceled, and what have you been working on? BRICKMAN: In the summer, I usually tour in Europe and Asia. So that was definitely a little disappointing. But we’ve always been inventive. And I’m by nature optimistic. At least for me, creatively, it’s presented an opportunity to write a little bit more, think a little bit more about what my after-pandemic life might be like, or what sort of creative pursuits. And it also ...continued on next page

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CULTURE | BENEFIT “PLAYING FOR KEEPS,” CONTINUED... presented some opportunities. I did, for the first time, an album with all Broadway stars, I had always wanted to do something with Broadway. And because all of these great performers have been, you know, not performing, they were able to record with me, and I did a big Christmas album, all for charity [The Actors Fund, a group dedicated to supporting workers in the performing arts]. Were you actually able to record together, or were you trading music files and working long-distance? It was a combination, but I would say that, you know, a handful of people came into the studio. And it was just them on one side of the glass and me on the other, with all of the precautions. I think five of them, and the rest did it at home. But, you know, performances that I never would have been able to do with artists, Tony-winning artists, in everything from Hamilton to The King and I, and people like Kelli O’Hara, Leslie Odom Jr., and, you know, Megan Hilty. Broadway, it’s kind of its own world. The talent is just... it’s like nothing I’ve ever seen before, and I’ve worked with a lot of pop artists, country artists. Your tour is helping a lot of individual theaters around the country. Why was that important to you? Places like First Interstate [Center for the Arts] or the quote-unquote “Broadway houses” that bring in Wicked or A Chorus Line, they’re devastated because Broadway is such an income-producing opportunity. They’re really devastated … The other problem is not just for performers like me, but for crew, lighting, sound, box office, stage hands. For headliners, it’s not as bad. It’s the support crews where it really is challenging. And, of course, the buildings, depending on if they’re city-owned or privately

funded. What we’re doing is completely unique, because we’re doing it by city and by community. So it’s just for our friends in Spokane and for the First Interstate Center, and to come together as a community to give money back to the arts community in Spokane and the theater. Why did you decide to do a bunch of shows for a bunch of different towns instead of one big online fundraiser? I used the model in my mind of what we would normally be doing, and we’d be touring in all these markets. I would already be in a different city every night. And because we’re doing this as a Zoom Room and not as a passive stream, it presents a much more intimate, as-closeas-possible quality to the interactive experience that a live show does in a town. You can be more specific about the people you’re talking to where you are, whether it is something as simple as the weather or something specific to the theater itself and what it’s like to see a show there. I think that’s really important. Much more so than ‘OK, one night from Lincoln Center!’ Anybody can watch that anytime on YouTube. [At the Comfort and Joy At Home shows] you can interact, so I’ll be seeing you and you’ll be seeing me, and in addition to the Zoom Room there’s also a meet and greet opportunity. And for every [“gold” and “diamond”-level] ticket that that is sold, we send you a Christmas stocking that’s all kinds of goodies, it arrives on your doorstep the week prior to the concert, with a music CD and chocolate and jingle bells, a program to the show like you were in the lobby, a ticket to get into

the show, singalong lyrics for a singalong that we’re doing. We’re trying our best to make it as close to the [normal] live experience as possible. You’ve had a lot of success with Christmas music. What is it about a song that resonates with you, or makes you want to record some classic? When I do covers — because, you know, I write a lot of holiday songs — but when it’s a cover, one thing that I feel like I can do that not a lot of people can is, most of them are solo piano. And that’s what I do. And you don’t

“The problem is not just for performers, but for crew, lighting, sound, box office, stage hands.” hear a lot of that. So what you get when you play a solo piano version of “Silent Night” or “The Christmas Song” or whatever it is, you get the essence of it without any sort of comparison to the iconic, definitive version of it … There’s no reason to re-record the vocals of “White Christmas” — Crosby, that’s definitive. But when you do it as an instrumental, it takes on a different quality, because it’s familiar. And it’s peaceful, There’s something very comfortable about hearing it in that context. n Jim Brickman: Spokane At Home for the First Interstate Center for the Arts • Fri, Dec. 4, at 7:30 pm • $40 concert/$75 includes concert, meet-and-greet and gift stocking/$125 includes concert, meet-and-greet, gift stocking and post-show party • jimbrickman.com/spokane for tickets and more information

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DECEMBER 3, 2020 INLANDER 21


CULTURE | DIGEST

Splat!

S.W.A.T.’S PROTEST-PACKED PRESENT When anti-police brutality protests rose up this summer, most TV cop shows kept silent. But S.W.A.T. showrunner Aaron Rahsaan Thomas — a Black man — was an exception, giving interviews to everyone from the Hollywood Reporter to the Inlander. Back for its fourth season, we can now see the results of Thomas’s introspection, as the show amps up the internal “Black versus blue” tension of Hondo, its African-American police officer main character. The first episode ends with Hondo and his son and his father all kneeling in front of a mural of George Floyd and other minorities killed by the police. S.W.A.T. has to deal with the real-world coronavirus this season, too. And there are, of course, unrealistic aspects: For example, on this show, the police officers often wear masks. (DANIEL WALTERS)

T

BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

he Orange Years: The Nickelodeon Story is a new documentary specifically engineered to trigger the “I remember that fondly” reflex of ’80s and ’90s kids everywhere. It’s nothing but a nostalgia trip, outlining how the titular TV channel grew into a juggernaut of zany sitcoms and messy game shows, and nary a critical word is breathed about precious Nickelodeon. It’s not a compelling piece of journalism, but it still did its job: It got me thinking about my childhood, when Nickelodeon was such a precious commodity that it was essentially a parenting bargaining chip: Don’t do your chores, no Nickelodeon. I looked at my favorite Nick programming of yesteryear to see if any of it still holds up. DOUG and RUGRATS Two of the earliest Nicktoons (the third was Ren & Stimpy, which I was not allowed to watch) remain some of the best. Doug follows the world’s most naive preteen as he learns a lesson each week, while Rugrats takes on the absurdities of the adult world from a baby’s POV. Both series’ early episodes are still charming and refreshingly soft-spoken for kids’ entertainment.

THE BUZZ BIN ALL THAT Nickelodeon’s answer to Saturday Night Live, and it even spawned the career of future SNL stalwart Kenan Thompson. It’s not nearly as funny to me now as 20 years ago, but it has some appealingly strange recurring characters (including failed presidential candidate Ross Perot) and surprisingly rad musical guests (never forget that TLC recorded the theme song).

THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Some noteworthy new music hits online and in stores Dec. 4. To wit: ARCTIC MONKEYS, Live at Royal Albert Hall. ’Tis the season of live albums, and all proceeds from this 20-song set go to the War Child charity. CALEXICO, Seasonal Shift. Calexico is one of the few bands I’d get excited about releasing a holiday album, thanks to their multicultural sonic approach. DEAFHEAVEN, 10 Years Gone. Smart-metal dudes celebrate their anniversary with a studiorecorded live set. (DAN NAILEN)

22 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020

GET AN EYEFUL Local artist Reinaldo Gil Zambrano recently put the finishing touches on a mural outside Feast World Kitchen, its imagery a combination of urban cool and, fittingly, food! Do yourself a favor and give it a little drive-by at 1321 W. Third Ave. Better yet, order up some food from the internationally oriented incubator kitchen, and check out the mural while you pick up some delicious dinner. (DAN NAILEN)

LEND A HAND EWU’S Get Lit! literary festival is one of the cultural highlights of Spokane life, and you can help them pull off their online version in 2021. It involves you scoring some killer reads courtesy of faculty, grad students and alums of the school’s writing program. For $20, you’ll get at least three books, as well as some literary magazines. Visit facebook.com/ EWUGetLitPrograms and hit the link to the sale, or drop by Feast World Kitchen Saturday afternoon and buy in person. (DAN NAILEN)

HEY ARNOLD! This was my favorite Nicktoon as a kid, and I still think it belongs in the pantheon of the channel’s best shows. It’s got a diverse cast of characters and deals with thorny real world issues in thoughtful ways, and it contains the great unrequited romance between bully Helga and pacifist Arnold. THE ADVENTURES OF PETE & PETE A delightful bit of after-school weirdness about two brothers (both named Pete) and the quirky characters in their small town. The show has so much charm and visual invention, and I now realize it had actual hipster cred: The likes of Iggy Pop, Debbie Harry, Michael Stipe and Patty Hearst make cameos, and Polaris’ theme song still rips. LEGENDS OF THE HIDDEN TEMPLE Arguably Nick’s best game show, in which pairs of kids compete in physical challenges for the chance to hunt for treasure in an elaborate Mayan temple set. Watching now, I’d forgotten how ridiculously difficult the show was, and it’s rare that the final team makes it through the temple. Curse you, Shrine of the Silver Monkey! n

QUITE THE CELEBRATION The Spokane Symphony has been stuck in silence since March and postponed its entire 2020-21 season due to the pandemic, but the organization’s hopes for coming back strong got a boost with its recent gala. The online event included performances by symphony musicians, a look at the future from Music Director James Lowe beaming in from the United Kingdom, and ultimately raised more than $165,000. You can still donate to keep the music coming at spokanesymphony.org. (DAN NAILEN)


keep washing your hands. (it's icky not to!)

DECEMBER 3, 2020 INLANDER 23


24 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020


Gifts for

MUSIC FANS

Books, box sets, BluRays and more treasures for the music lover in your life

T

BY DAN NAILEN AND NATHAN WEINBENDER

ruth be told, buying presents for a hardcore music fan is tricky, because part of the joy of that fandom is the hunt for new tunes. At the same time, every music fan has stuff they’d never treat themselves to, or

releases they missed, or a need for some funky accessory they don’t even know exists. So don’t fear buying for your favorite amateur DJ, just get them something guaranteed to please, like our suggestions below.

VINYL REISSUES AND BOX SETS TOM PETTY, WILDFLOWERS & ALL THE REST

Given how consistent and deep his catalog, it’s saying something to pronounce Wildflowers Tom Petty’s best album. I’m here to say just that about his 1994 release, and this reissue of a remastered Wildflowers along with a slew of other previously unreleased songs from the same era is a real treat beginning to end. The original holds some of Petty’s best songs; “You Wreck Me” wrecks me every time. The All the Rest portion generally doesn’t rise to the same level, but they’re stronger than most outtakes for sure. Get the “deluxe edition” and you’ll also get discs of home recordings of Petty demos from the Wildflowers sessions, as well as a live disc. (DAN NAILEN)

PYLON, PYLON BOX

If I hadn’t been an R.E.M. obsessive as a high school kid, I never would have discovered the wonders of fellow Athens, Georgia, band Pylon. Back in 1987, R.E.M. released an odds-and-ends collection called Dead Letter Office, and they covered Pylon’s “Crazy” as the album’s first track. The same year, a documentary called Athens, GA: Inside/

Out included both bands, and Pylon’s “Stop It” was a highlight. The jagged guitars, shriek-y vocals (but tuneful shrieks!) and stop-start rhythms presaged the sound of sonically similar bands like Pixies and Nirvana. Now Pylon’s early days — 1979 to 1983, specifically — are getting the box set treatment, and it includes their first two albums (Gyrate and Chomp), available on vinyl for the first time in decades, plus two more discs of singles, live tunes and unreleased tracks. (DN)

JOHN LENNON, GIMME SOME TRUTH. THE ULTIMATE MIXES.

You’ll be forgiven for thinking this just another rejiggering of Lennon’s solo catalog for a holiday cash grab, but no! (OK, maybe a little.) Lennon’s widow, Yoko Ono, and their son, Sean Ono Lennon, oversaw the remixing of these 36 cuts in the deluxe edition, and the sound quality far exceeds previous Lennon solo releases. His voice is pushed forward, and the instruments are more crisp on tunes like “Cold Turkey” and “Instant Karma! (We All Shine On).” The deluxe edition includes two CDs, a Blu-Ray audio disc with the songs in 5.1 surround and hi-def stereo, and a 124-page book. (DN)

PRINCE, SIGN O’ THE TIMES REMASTERED BOX SET

In 1987, Prince was at a creative impasse. He had dissolved his band the Revolution, his recent feature film Under the Cherry Moon was a flop, and several of his pet projects were in limbo. Perhaps that discord informed the restless energy of Sign O’ the Times, an eccentric, eclectic double LP cobbled together from a trio of unreleased concept albums and new tracks Prince recorded mostly by himself. Its 16 songs run from lithe R&B to disco raveups, from sexy slow jams to straight-faced social commentary, and it’s now widely regarded as Prince’s magnum opus. A new deluxe box set (available in CD and vinyl versions) not only features a remastered Sign O’ the Times but a bunch of previously unreleased bits and pieces that illustrate how the final product came to be. Also included is a coffee table book filled with pictures and a 1987 concert film pairing the Purple One with jazz legend Miles Davis, making this the ideal gift for any Prince fan. (NATHAN WEINBENDER) ...continued

Gifts for... GAMERS........................................30 READERS.......................................36 MORE READERS..........................38

CINEPHILES ................................ 40 GLOBETROTTERS........................ 41 BOARD GAMERS..........................42

HIPPIES.........................................44 SPORTS FANS..............................45 COOKBOOK COLLECTORS .......46

INDOOR GARDENERS................48 JOB HUNTERS..............................49

DECEMBER 3, 2020 INLANDER 25


Personalized & Custom Gifts available! Gifts for

MUSIC FANS

continued...

BOOKS

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REMAIN IN LOVE

BY CHRIS FRANTZ The beating heart of Talking Heads from his drum kit, Chris Frantz writes a story of rock and roll success in his memoir, covering the band’s beginnings through its troubled splintering as lead singer David Byrne pulled away. Frantz also casts his eyes on his peers helping New York City become a punk-rock launching pad, and names like Debbie Harry, Andy Warhol, Grace Jones and Lou Reed dot his memories. As intriguing as those parts are for Talking Heads and punk fans, though, the book truly soars as a love letter to Frantz’s wife and longtime musical partner, Tina Weymouth. As fellow Talking Heads and as co-founders of Tom Tom Club, the duo has held on to one of popular music’s most inspiring creative and romantic partnerships for a half-century now. (DN)

DOLLY PARTON, SONGTELLER: MY LIFE IN LYRICS

She’s a multi-instrumentalist, a singer, an actress, a philanthropist and an all-around cultural icon, but country legend Dolly Parton still considers herself a songwriter first. By her own account, she’s penned thousands of them since she was a child growing up in Tennessee’s Great Smoky Mountains, and her new mixed-media memoir Dolly Parton, Songteller explores her life and career by way of her autobiographical lyrics and the circumstances that led to their eventual recording. With her co-author, music journalist Robert K. Oermann, Parton weaves her trademark Southern charm into anecdotes about her most famous songs, like the childhood humiliation that inspired “Coat of Many Colors” and the fateful day in which she wrote both “Jolene” and “I Will Always Love You.” It’s like leafing through Dolly’s family photo albums with the legend herself. (NW)

THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT: HOW KENDRICK LAMAR IGNITED THE SOUL OF BLACK AMERICA

BY MARCUS J. MOORE Read enough music journalism and you’ll eventually stumble upon the byline of Marcus J. Moore, who has written intuitively about every imaginable genre for countless publications. Moore’s first book, The Butterfly Effect: How Kendrick Lamar Ignited the Soul of Black America, is also the first published biography of the rap superstar, and as is typical of Moore’s writing, it’s part artist profile and part cultural thesis. The book begins with Lamar’s fraught childhood in Compton, then traces his career from plucky hip-hop upstart to celebrated urban poet to Pulitzer Prize winner. The Butterfly Effect, which gets its title from Lamar’s already-classic album To Pimp a Butterfly, is an in-depth analysis of how the world at large has influenced Kendrick’s lyrics, and vice versa. (NW) ...continued

26 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020


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DECEMBER 3, 2020 INLANDER 27


Gifts for

MUSIC FANS

continued...

CONCERT FILMS & MORE

PINK FLOYD: DELICATE SOUND OF THUNDER

Delicate Sound of Thunder

Pink Floyd had been a band for nearly 25 years before they released their first live album, a 1988 release called Delicate Sound of Thunder. Recorded at Long Island’s Nassau Coliseum shortly after founding member Roger Waters’ departure from the group, the concert setlist featured the entirety of their 1987 record A Momentary Lapse of Reason, interspersed with Floyd classics like “Wish You Were Here” and “Comfortably Numb.” An accompanying concert film was released on VHS back in the day, and it was just remastered and re-edited last year for a retrospective box set of the back half of Pink Floyd’s career. That version is now available as a standalone release on BluRay and DVD, and it runs a full halfhour longer than its original home video version. (NW)

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Gift Guide

RECORD ROOTS VINYL ALBUM WALL FRAMES

Album artwork is one reason the vinyl revival is popular — it’s just better exploring the artist’s visual approach when it’s vinyl-sized. And frames for album covers have been around for a while, but they always seem prohibitively expensive, or too permanent a set-up to be able to both showcase your cool album and play the thing. That’s how I got sold on Record Roots frames, which hold eight covers at a time and use rubber frame edges that make the albums easy to pop in and out. For just about $75, you have ever-changing wall art, and a sturdy frame that hangs on the wall using provided superstrong sticky stuff, so no drilling required. (DN)

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE AT ALL LOCATIONS. SHOP WITH YOUR COEUR REWARDS POINTS AT ALL LOCATIONS.

Mountain Lodge Gift Shop MONDAY – THURSDAY | 9 AM – 11 PM FRIDAY & SATURDAY | 9 AM – 11 PM SUNDAY | 9 AM – 10 PM

PERSONALIZED MIXTAPE DOORMAT

There’s something about a welcome mat that really ties your whole porch together, but most of the ones you can pick up at your local Target don’t exactly scream “personality.” Now your guests can experience a little burst of analog joy every time they wipe their feet on your personalized mixtape doormat courtesy of graphic designer Jim Holodak. Sold through the homemaking site Uncommon Goods, customers can pick out a doormat that looks uncannily like an old-school cassette tape with their own name (or the name of their giftee) scrawled in Sharpie on the top label. How groovy is that? But Holodak’s collection goes beyond tapes: You can also pick out mats that look just like shiny vinyl records and guitar amps. (NW) n

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Half Life: Alyx

Gifts for

GAMERS

Introducing

Aymen El-Khatib

Ideas for the player in lockdown

DDS, Dentist

Dr. Aymen El-Khatib’s interest in high-quality dental care led him to the United States. His passion for helping patients and getting to know them, led him here, to Unify Community Health. Dr. El-Khatib enjoys educating patients on proper dental hygiene, and working with the patient to create treatment plans. His favorite visit is the first visit where he gets to know you, your goals for your dental health, and helps you set a plan for treatment.

Now accepting new patients.

Northeast Community Center 4001 North Cook Street Spokane, WA 99207 (509) 483-3427

A weekly email for food lovers Subscribe at Inlander.com/newsletter

30 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020

yvfwc.com

G

BY CLAIRE MUNDS

amers cackled with joy when society went to stay-at-home, closed-door lockdown. They’ve been quarantining for years! Lockdown is neither a lifestyle change nor an inconvenience! For every extrovert who struggles to stay home and distanced during quarantine, there’s a gamer huddled in a basement happy that they’re no longer pressured to “leave the house” or “for the love of God, socialize.” Lockdown also means that an entire new, fledgling generation of Quarantine Gamers has been born. Locked up with nothing to do, many have turned to the sweet nothingness of video games to pass the time. These new gamers are going to need hella stuff and to start building a collection, thus becoming straightforward targets for easy gifting.

overcome a lot of hurdles as it’s grown as a platform — if players weren’t throwing up, they were quitting after an hour with a headache. But I can say Half Life: Alyx is the first game that’s done VR right. For starters, it’s a VR game I didn’t get sick playing, so 100 points for that. But the real sparkle is the attention to detail — you can pick up, toggle, pull and grip almost everything in the game. The textures and visuals of the game multiply tenfold when you’re immersed in them. If you don’t have a VR set at home, presenting your loved one with a pass to a local VR arcade is a great gift.

COUCH GAMING LAPBOARD

Apocalypse dinners, but make them fancy! This cookbook sets a table of all of your Fallout favorite foods. Some recipes call for interesting spices and kinda-rare ingredients, adding a little fun for those more seasoned in the kitchen. Gift idea — this cookbook, a copy of the Fallout games, and a cute little Fallout apron set.

When I began working from home, I didn’t set up a desk or workspace. I didn’t buy myself an ergonomic office chair. Instead, I got a piece of cardboard, slapped my laptop on it, and started working from my couch. Is my back shot to hell? Yes. Have I lost all muscle tone and posture? Absolutely. But the most egregious crime here is that I’ve been using a flattened Amazon box as a table for my laptop for eight months. Along come couch lapboards — a tremendous improvement over my paltry piece of cardboard. These inventions sit over the lap, providing a solid workspace for those of us who prefer to live life from the sofa now. If you notice that your giftee frequents the couch, this might be a great gift.

HALF LIFE: ALYX

(NOT RATED, VIRTUAL REALITY) The first time I strapped into a VR headset and opened a game two years ago, I immediately fell to the ground with nausea because my brain could not handle the visuals without my body actually moving. VR has had to

FALLOUT: THE VAULT DWELLER’S OFFICIAL COOKBOOK AND MATCHING APRON

KEY OR RING LIGHT

As the Zoom era bustles forth, we’re learning the basics of how to be on a video chat without looking like garbage. As lesson number one — anyone who needs to have their face on video needs a key or ring light at their desk. Streamers have been using key lights for years because they know the tricks to getting your face all nice and shiny for the screen. Light source behind you? Your face is dark, and no one can see you. Light source next to you? You look like a creepy shadow elf. Poorly lit bedroom or office? Everything is grey and depressing. Ring light in front of you, illuminating your beautiful features with soft, glowing light? Now you’re a supermodel, and your coworkers can see all of your reactions and facial movements in crisp detail.


Our journalism makes a NECROBARISTA (NOT RATED, NINTENDO SWITCH,

PLAYSTATION 4, MICROSOFT WINDOWS, MAC) This game originally crossed my radar because the name Necrobarista seemed too intriguing to pass up. A dead barista? Barista in hell? What could it be! As it turns out, this visual novel tells the tale of the Terminal cafe, a quick afterlife rest stop for the dead, run by necromancer baristas who serve coffee to the dead and living alike. I’m all for games that burgeon into new storytelling realms. I think of visual novels or narrative-heavy story games as an extension of traditional movies — sort of a choose-your-own-adventure in digital form. Necrobarista’s story ponders grief and mortality in such a thoughtful way. Thumbs up.

difference, and so can you.

Learn more at Inlander.com/Insider

DREAMS (RATED T, PLAYSTATION 4, PLAYSTATION 5) When I was first reading reviews for Dreams, I struggled to figure out what the game actually… was. Every description was a vague “it’s creative!” platitude that lacked concrete examples. Turns out, Dreams is like LittleBigPlanet, but on steroids. The game descriptions were vague because this game does everything. The game is painted as the ultimate creative digital outlet — music creation, how-to guides, social media platform, game development engine. You can take Dreams any direction you want to. I know that’s vague, but that’s the most concise summary any human can say about this game. If your giftee is artsy fartsy and a bit technical, this is probably a good gift.

Spice up your holiday season! Find what you need in spices and seasonings at our Spokane store, or find us online at spokanespice.com

Pokemon

LITERALLY ANY BIG VIDEO GAME FROM THE LAST DECADE

So you want to talk about easy? If you have a new Quarantine Gamer, you’re pretty safe to slap some dollars down on literally any game from the last decade. This year couldn’t be easier for gift-giving. You will also (more than likely) be able to find these games second-hand or at a discount — meaning you can grab a couple of them, slap on a bow and add to someone’s new collection. Here’s a list of easy wins — Fallout, BioShock, Half Life, Stardew Valley, Kerbal Space Program, Overcooked, Rocket League, Just Dance, Pokemon, Minecraft, Red Dead Redemption, Borderlands, Elder Scrolls, Witcher, Fallout, Halo, Assassins Creed, Fortnite, and Counter Strike. n

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DECEMBER 3, 2020 INLANDER 31


EUR D’ALENE O C FOR THE

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A Merry CDA Christmas Celebrate the holidays with these traditions you’ll only find in the Lake City

J

ust last month, Coeur d’Alene was crowned one of the most festive Christmas towns in America by a leading travel website. “Coeur d’Alene is a beautiful town that’s even more stunning in winter, with a white Christmas practically guaranteed,” gushes Trips to Discover. The article highlights several North Idaho holiday traditions, but we’re going to take it one step further. Here are five of the most festive holiday attractions you’ll only find in Coeur d’Alene. 1. Holiday Lights (1.5 million of them) Each year, more than a million lights shimmer and sparkle along Lake Coeur d’Alene. The elaborate display features more than 250 different lit vignettes, from a fire breathing dragon and the world’s tallest floating Christmas tree, to all of Santa’s reindeer taking flight into the night sky. Many of the displays can be seen from inside the cozy comfort of The Coeur d’Alene Resort, either at Beverly’s, Dockside or Whispers, or from the banks of Lake Coeur d’Alene. 2. Journey to the North Pole Cruises The best views of the largest on-thewater holiday light display in America are definitely aboard The Coeur d’Alene Resort’s fleet of merry cruise boats. The final destination — Santa’s workshop, of course — where Santa will call each child by name and a fireworks display will light up the night. 3. The Elf on the Shelf in Downtown Coeur d’Alene Every Saturday and Sunday through Dec. 22, dozens of scout elves will be hiding in

32 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Downtown Coeur d’Alene. Like all elves, these scout elves are sneaky and will be tucked in between rows of folded sweaters or hiding between mugs on store shelves or and other sneaky places. Find an elf, and get your passport stamped. The more stamps you get, the better chance you have to win some amazing prizes like Seahawks tickets, an overnight stay at the Coeur d’Alene Resort and gift cards from local businesses. More details at cdawinter.com. 4. Lake City Igloo Vibes Crafted, in downtown Coeur d’Alene was the first restaurant in the region to introduce outdoor dining igloos. This year, Crafted’s outdoor patio features six magical igloos that provide all the wonder of eating outdoors in the winter, but all the warmth of sitting by the fire. This year’s heated igloos are bigger, allowing a large family of eight to eat inside together. Reservations can be made on Crafted’s website. Lakefront igloos are also available in Coeur d’Alene this winter at Whisper’s at the Coeur d’Alene Resort. Enjoy frosted lake views while holding a hot toddy. The igloos have open seating from 10 am-3 pm. Reservations are required in two-hour time slots from 4-10 pm. But don’t delay getting those reservations — they are already filling up! 5. Wonders from Around the World With more than 100 unique shops and restaurants in downtown Coeur d’Alene, you can find truly special gifts for everyone on your list. All Things Irish is stocked with authentic gifts from the old country, from Claddagh rings and pendants to fisherman knit sweaters. Migliore means “best” in Italian, and you’ll definitely find top notch

continued on page 34


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oils, vinegars and other gourmet sundries any home chef will love at this tasty Sherman Avenue shop. No Coeur d’Alene holiday shopping trip would be complete without a stop at Figpickels Toy Emporium — the region’s premiere toy shop. And no adult wouldn’t love a pair of handcrafted sheepskin slippers from Leather Works. Gifts from around the world or crafted in Coeur d’Alene are all available in charming downtown Coeur d’Alene.

DON’T MISS Journey to the North Pole Cruises Dec. 3 - Jan. 1

Take an unforgettable holiday lake cruise across sparkling waters to view more than 250 elaborate light displays and visit Santa Claus and his elves at his waterfront toy workshop, where he magically speaks to each child by name! These 40-minute cruises depart daily from Dec. 3 to Jan. 3. Visit cdawinter.com for departure times and tickets.

Eagle Cruises Dec. 5 - Jan. 3

Every year, hundreds of magnificent bald eagles return to Lake Coeur d’Alene to feast on Kokanee salmon. View these spectacular eagles up close from the lake aboard a two-hour eagle-watching cruise. For tickets and times, visit cdawinter.com.

51 NIGHTS. 1.5 MILLION LIGHTS. Stunning fireworks shows on every cruise, every night! Experience the magic on our Journey to the North Pole cruises.

Small Artworks Invitational Dec. 3 - Dec. 23

Every holiday season, Art Spirit Gallery features works by more than 24 of the region’s most esteemed or most exciting emerging artists. These smaller pieces are perfect for gift giving. Open Wed-Sun 11 am-6 pm.

Packages Include: Overnight accommodations Two Journey to the North Pole adult cruise tickets $30 breakfast credit at Dockside Restaurant or via room service Special milk & cookie delivery to your room by Santa’s Elves! Nightly Fireside Storytime

12 Skates of Christmas Dec. 21-Jan. 1

The 12 Skates of Christmas at Frontier Ice Arena will have you smiling ear to ear as you circle the glorious Christmas tree in the center of the rink. This familyfriendly event runs Dec. 21-Jan. 1 noon-5:30 pm.

For more events, things to do & places to stay, go to cdawinter.com FOR RESERVATIONS, VISIT CDARESORT.COM OR CALL 855.388.0540

34 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

COEUR D’ALENE


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BY MINDY CAMERON ure, we may all seek distraction, but this list of books features seriously hefty tomes for these times.

CASTE: THE ORIGINS OF OUR DISCONTENTS

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36 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020

BY ISABEL WILKERSON Many fine books about race in America were published in this year of racial upheaval. Isabel Wilkerson’s Caste is among the most original and thought-provoking. She calls out the underlying fallacy of race as a real thing, citing genetic experts who dismiss it as “a social concept, not a scientific one.” In fact, study of the human genome finds all humans are 99.9 percent the same.

From that foundation Wilkerson argues that race is an idea used by the privileged class to defend its privileges. She traces the history of caste as a rigid hierarchy in India and draws an unsettling connection between America’s eugenics movement in the early 20th century and its race-based laws to Hitler’s Germany. Not an easy read, but an important one.

JACK

BY MARILYNNE ROBINSON Fans of Marilynne Robinson will not be disappointed by Jack, her fourth novel in the Gilead collection that revolves around the mythical town of Gilead, Iowa, and the family of an aging pastor, John Ames Broughton. Jack


is the prodigal son who has made brief appearances in the earlier stories. Robinson, widely hailed as one of America’s finest writers, proves it again as she tells the story of Jack, a complicated man, a drifter and occasional grifter, but also a charmer — sometimes called “Slick” — who is capable of warmth and deep affection for Della, a refined Black school teacher and daughter of a pastor. The setting is St. Louis in the ’50s. Robinson subtly weaves undercurrents of race and religion into the story, much of which takes place inside Jack’s head as he contemplates his life, past regrets and uncertain future.

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BY S.M. HULSE One way to judge the power of a book is how long a key character lingers in your mind. Jo, the central character of Eden Mine, stays with you long after you put the book down. The story, set in northwestern Montana, revolves around an act of terrorism in a small town. Jo is the sister of the suspect and narrator of the story. She is also a paraplegic who uses a wheelchair, a detail that recedes into the background as Hulse creates a compelling story with a strong, independent, artistic young woman of grit and determination at the center.

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TOO MUCH AND NEVER ENOUGH

BY MARY TRUMP Now that we know for sure the Trump presidency is over, it’s time to ponder: “What just happened?” Of the scores of books published this year and those bound for the shelves in 2021, Mary Trump’s may provide the clearest answer. It’s the only book by a family member who witnessed “neglect and abuse” and “casual dehumanization of people” inside the Trump home. Mary Trump is not only the president’s niece, but a trained clinical psychologist able to understand what she witnessed and explain how it damaged the man Donald Trump would become. Her story describing the family dynamics is told in lucid and believable prose. If not for all the lies and damage done to U.S. institutions — and nearly to our democracy — one could almost feel sorry for a guy raised to be a winner at all things and believe failure was not to be endured at any cost.

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THE GREAT INFLUENZA: THE STORY OF THE DEADLIEST PANDEMIC IN HISTORY

BY JOHN BARRY This book was first published in 2004 but returned to bestseller status this year due to the eerily familiar sweep of the story. John Barry is an awardwinning historian and author, and his telling of the 1918 flu epidemic is broad and deep. There are scenes of makeshift hospitals not unlike what we’ve seen a century later. We have mobile refrigerated morgues; they had mass graves. This may not sound like holiday reading, but it belongs on the bookshelf of any serious reader on your list. From the breakout of a lethal influenza in a Kansas army camp to Barry’s clear-eyed lessons the book engages and informs. It is as much a history of science and medicine — and the heroes of that era — as it is of the worldwide horrors of 100 million lost lives. As for those lessons, Barry leaves us with this: “Those in authority must retain the public’s trust … distort nothing … put the best face on nothing … manipulate no one.”

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A PROMISED LAND

BY BARACK OBAMA This is a big, heavy book of 700 pages (including two sections of color photos). Released this month, it’s timed for the holiday season and, thanks to nearly 80 million voters, the end of the Trump presidency. Anyone who has read Obama’s earlier books already knows he is a fine writer. But this? Yes. Barack Obama stands out as a singular figure in American political history — a Black man elected twice to the pinnacle of American public life. He tells of his trajectory to this place at length because, as he admits, “I felt obliged to provide context for the decisions we made.” Obama’s story is long, but reads short, thanks to graceful writing organized into episodic vignettes that blend historic moments with personal details. Warning: A Promised Land ends with the death of Osama bin Laden. A second volume will follow. n Mindy Cameron is a writer who lives in Sandpoint. Her memoir, Leaving the Boys: A story of Motherhood and Career, Feminism and Romance, was published in July.

DECEMBER 3, 2020 INLANDER 37


A WEALTH OF STORIES Gift ideas from an indie bookstore employee BY SHARMA SHIELDS

M

ore than a year ago now I started working at Wishing Tree Books, an indie bookstore in the Perry District that has weathered quite an extraordinary first year of operation. Opening a small business is always a harrowing ordeal, and the pandemic intensified matters greatly. The compassionate, thoughtful resolve of Wishing Tree owners Janelle Smith and Ivan Smith has been particularly moving to me, and I’m also grateful for the steadfast support of Spokane’s bookloving community, which increasingly turns away from greedy price-undercutting retailers like Amazon to support our town’s notable independents. My hope is that more and more people in our region will choose to order from local bookstores like Auntie’s, Wishing Tree and The Well Read Moose — we should all be committed to the #buylocal and #shopsmall movements, especially now. This is how a robust, healthy reading community is formed. All of that said, one of the delights of being a bookseller again is the absolute joy I feel at being surrounded by a vast wealth of stories for all ages. I’ve chosen a few titles here that I believe will make treasured gifts.

FOR BABIES (AGES 0-2) THE GOING TO BED BOARD BOOK

BY SANDRA BOYNTON AND STUFFED BEAR “The sun has set not long ago. / Now everybody goes below / to take a bath in one big tub / with soap all over — SCRUB SCRUB SCRUB!” I read this adorable Sandra Boynton rhyming book (1995, $5.99) almost nightly to my children when they were babies, and I still have it memorized. I squealed with glee when I saw the wide-eyed stuffed bear in his red pajamas. The bear (MerryMakers, $20) is safe for all ages and will surely charm parents, too.

INDESTRUCTIBLES

There are several titles in the Indestructibles series (various titles available, $5.95 each), and they really do live up to their name — these books are rip-proof, waterproof and chew-proof, not to mention nontoxic and easy to wipe clean. And they are absolutely adorable, with vibrant colors and few or no words — perfect for the littlest book lovers. Some favorites in the series include: Let’s Go Outside; Baby, See the Colors; All Year Round (A Book of Seasons); and Bebé, Vamos a Comer.

38 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020

FOR TODDLERS (AGES 2-3) IT’S A GREAT BIG COLORFUL WORLD

BY TOM SCHAMP This huge, eye-catching book (2020, $19.95) is a delightful exploration of color, and children young and old will pore over the pages and see something new every time. Adults, too, will enjoy discussing the book and its images with their kiddos. This is a fun, joyful read.

FOR EARLY READERS

(AGES 4-8) KIND

BY VARIOUS WRITERS AND ILLUSTRATORS Thirty-eight of the publishing industry’s best illustrators come together in this lovely book (2020, $17.99) to celebrate kindness and encourage kids to help make the world a better place.

THE CAMPING TRIP

BY JENNIFER K. MANN A perfect outdoorsy book (2020, $17.99) for kids that tells the story of two cousins who go camping together, one who is familiar with the woods and one who is not. This is a great title about embracing a new experience.

HOME IN THE WOODS

BY ELIZA WHEELER In this breathtaking story (2019, $17.99) set during the Great Depression, a mother and her eight children who recently lost their father move to a tar paper shack in the Wisconsin woods. As the seasons pass and the family scrabbles to make ends meet, the little shack in the woods becomes a warm and joy-filled home. Based on the author’s grandmother’s childhood, this is a moving and inspiring testament to family and fortitude and togetherness.

AN ELEPHANT AND PIGGIE BIGGIE

BY MO WILLEMS These anthologies (there are three volumes in all, collecting the many books in the series, $16.99) are the perfect gift for kiddos just beginning to read on their own. The stories are hilarious, sweet and awesome at teaching necessary literary devices such as decoding, inflection and comprehension. But you don’t need to tell the kids this boring stuff, just give them the book and watch them laugh over the lovely friendship between Gerald and Piggie.

FOR MIDDLE READERS

(AGES 8-12)

OUT OF WONDER: POEMS CELEBRATING POETS

BY KWAME ALEXANDER, ILLUSTRATED BY COLLAGE ARTIST EKUA HOLMES Is there any more thoughtful gift than a collection of poetry? This one (2017, $16.99) will inspire kids to take up the pen, themselves. Here, award-winning writers Kwame Alexander, Chris Colderly and Marjorie Wentworth take turns sharing poems and responding to them with original verses of their own. This is an amazing poetic seminar for kids, introducing them to Emily Dickinson, Matsuo Bashō, Terrance Hayes and more.

CRYPTID CREATURES

BY KELLY MILNER HALLS, ILLUSTRATED BY RICK SPEARS My son and his friends love this charming field guide (2019, $16.99) from local children’s writer Kelly Milner Halls. It’s well-researched, awesomely illustrated, and, well, just plain fun for the young monster lovers in your life.

GAME ON! 2021

Your young gamers will go gaga for this book (2020, $14.95). There are great details here not just about the most popular games of 2020 but also about how they were developed and how to conquer them.

TWINS: A GRAPHIC NOVEL

BY VARIAN JOHNSON AND SHANNON WRIGHT For your fans of Raina Telgemeier and Victoria Jamieson I recommend this wonderful new graphic novel (2020, $12.99) about twin sisters who seem to be growing apart in junior high — especially when they decide to run against one another for class president. Other graphic novels to gift: Stargazing by Jen Wang, New Kid and Class Act by Jerry Craft and the Hilo series by Judd Winick.

THE DRAGONET PROPHECY, WINGS OF FIRE #1

By Tui Sutherland My son, age 11, recommends starting your kids on The Wings of Fire series. This is a rich, imaginative world where dragons are the central characters, and my son, who’s about to read the 13th book, says it’s filled with excitement and surprise ($7.99).

WHERE THE MOUNTAIN MEETS THE MOON

BY GRACE LIN My daughter, age 8, recommends this title (2011, $11.99) from her favorite author (she’s read all of Grace Lin’s books), which, using Chinese folklore and stunning imagery, tells the story of a brave girl named Minli who is determined to help change her family’s difficult circumstances. This is a gorgeously illustrated title and will make a lovely gift for your grade schooler.


FOR TEENS/YA SLAY

BY BRITTNEY MORRIS Slay (2019, $11.99) won the Washington State Book Award in young adult fiction this year, and for good reason: This is a glorious novel about multitudinous, indefinable Black girlhood — featuring an international cast of likeable characters — and is a great commentary on friendship, racism, misogyny and video game culture. The plot is thrilling, too, involving a murder and its legal repercussions; I had a blast reading the video game scenes and loved the celebration at the book’s end.

MARCH: TRILOGY SLIPCASE SET

BY JOHN LEWIS WITH ANDREW AYDLIN, ILLUSTRATED BY NATE POWELL These three graphic novels ($49.99 for the set), collected now in this handsome slipcovered set, should be required reading for all. John Lewis, the great statesman from Georgia who recently passed away, narrates his experiences with the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s, illustrated powerfully by graphic novelist Nate Powell. This series reflects and informs our current era and encourages our own civil disobedience. As John Lewis famously says, “Get in good trouble, necessary trouble.”

FOR ADULTS THE BEADWORKERS: STORIES

BY BETH PIATOTE Piatote (Nez Perce, Chief Joseph Band, enrolled with the Colville Confederated Tribe) writes breathtaking, lyrical, moving stories about Indigenous life, many of them set alongside the rivers of the Inland Northwest. This is one of the best story collections (2019, $16.95) of the last decade and makes a beautiful gift for your literary fiction lovers.

IN ACCELERATED SILENCE

BY BROOKE MATSON For the poetry lovers in your life, I highly recommend this collection by local writer Brooke Matson, winner of the prestigious Jake Adam York Prize. The speaker of these poems stitches together her grief over losing a beloved partner with a wondrous consideration of mortality, physics and cosmos. This is a glittering and profound study of loss, existence and reemergence ($16).

URBAN TRAILS: SPOKANE AND COEUR D’ALENE

BY RICH LANDERS AND DAVID TAYLOR The perfect size for a pocket or a stocking, these new full-color field guides to hikes around town are flying off of the shelves (2020, $16.95). Get one for the urban hiker in your life (I’m wishing for one of these myself!).

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THE COLD MILLIONS

BY JESS WALTER It goes without saying, really, that this deft historical novel — highlighting wealth disparity and protest, and set right here in Spokane — is sure to be one of the most oft-gifted books of the season, and deservedly so (2020, $28.99). Most of the indie bookstores in town have signed copies, too, which will delight any Walter-phile. So #shopsmall and #buylocal, fellow Spokanites, and support our knowledgeable, community-oriented indie bookstores this holiday season: They need your help now more than ever. n Sharma Shields is the author of a story collection, Favorite Monster, and two novels, The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac and The Cassandra. Her novels and short stories have won the Autumn House Fiction Prize, the Washington State Book Award, and the 2020 PNBA. Sharma lives in Spokane, where she is a bookseller at Wishing Tree.

SUPPORTERS OF THE 2020 DRINK LOCAL CAMPAIGN

Dry Fly, No-Li, Townshend, One Tree Hard Cider, and the Inlander are working together to spread the word that drinking local has a positive and lasting effect on our community.

DECEMBER 3, 2020 INLANDER 39


Gifts for

CINEPHILES For the Roger Ebert on your list BY WILL MAUPIN

M

ovie buffs, cinephiles and binge watchers aren’t so different from the rest of us anymore. What was once a category of gift reserved for the guy on your list who won’t shut up about Quentin Tarantino is now open to us all. We’re all living in the world of TV and movies these days, spending an inordinate amount of time sitting on our couches and looking at our screens. Consider getting a gift that improves the viewing experience.

PROJECTOR

The days of sitting down in front of the TV are over. The LG CineBeam LED Projector, with its wireless connectivity, lets you create a home theater-quality viewing experience anywhere in, or outside, of your home. Movie marathon in bed? Check. Backyard showing on a summer night? You bet. Anywhere with a solid white surface

can become your own personal movie theater. $499.99 • Huppin’s • 8016 N. Division

BRITPOP CINEMA

The ’90s were a good decade for British cinema. Films like Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, Trainspotting and numerous others were critical and commercial successes on both sides of the pond in the middle of the decade. Take a look back at the motion picture version of the British invasion with Britpop Cinema by author and critic Matt Glasby. Loaded with interviews and behind-the-scenes information, this is a read that will make you want to revisit these now-classic films. $24 • Auntie’s Bookstore • 402 W. Main

PRIME TIME

If there’s a die-hard TV fan in your life, give them the opportunity

to test their knowledge of the industry in board game form. In Prime Time by Elad Goldsteen, players attempt to air the hit show of the season. Target specific demographics, bring in talented writers and actors, and watch as your ratings go through the roof. $59.99 • Uncle’s Games • 14700 E. Indiana, Suite 2110

APPLE HDMI ADAPTER

Cutting the cord? Congratulations, you’re probably going to have to replace it with a new cord. Maybe an adapter, too, especially if you’ve got an Apple product. The California tech giant’s extremely popular iPod and iPad products are great for watching streaming video or checking in with friends via video chat. But they’re so small compared to that big TV over there! And there’s no HDMI port to plug into. Thankfully, Apple’s got a solution. Buy a Lightning Digital AV Adapter. $49 • Apple Store • 710 W. Main n

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CUSTOM PRINTED MUG

If this world traveler has been in your life for long, you’re familiar with the coffee mug souvenir. Printed with a generic logo from whatever paradise your friend visited without you, these mugs invariably conjure up vague resentment every time you drink from them in your alley-facing apartment. Guess what? A local printing shop in the Valley will put any image on a mug. For instance… your face photoshopped in front of the Eiffel Tower. $21 • Anderson Ink • 14700 E. Indiana Ave. #2088 • andersonink2.com

KOREAN HOME COOKING

There’s never been a better time to pick up some international cooking skills. Just because your friend is stuck at home doesn’t mean that they need to eat like it. Korean Home Cooking by Sohui Kim will give them a great place to start. Plus, they might need a taste tester. $35 • Auntie’s Bookstore • 402 W. Main Ave. • auntiesbooks.com

Gifts for

GLOBETROTTERS

Ideas for the world traveler who’s quarantining at home BY LAUREN GILMORE

W

e all have a friend who spends way too much time clicking through photos from their last vacation or doling out souvenirs with perfectly tanned hands. As much as COVID-19 has exacerbated and brought to light extreme social disparities, it has been a bit of a travel equalizer. No one’s going anywhere anytime soon, and if you have a friend who’s

had to block Expedia from their computer to keep them from melancholy, you might be wondering what to get them that could possibly compare to them getting to go somewhere — anywhere — else. To satiate the globetrotter in your life, here are a handful of ideas, ranging from the earnest to the borderline passiveaggressive.

MAC HOLIDAY VIRTUAL ARTIST STUDIO TOUR

Sometimes it doesn’t take much to shake off that stuck feeling we’ve all grown accustomed to during quarantine. If your traveling buddy is a fan of visual art, consider gifting them tickets to virtually tour a local artist’s studio. Featured artists include National Geographic’s Hazen Audel and pastel and oil painter Sheila Evans. $10 • Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture • northwestmuseum.org

SPO VINTAGE TEE

Call it reverse psychology (especially if you’re talking to someone who doesn’t know much about psychology), but there’s something therapeutic about just… accepting where you are. So your friend couldn’t go to Hawaii this year. That doesn’t mean that she doesn’t still need a shirt with the name of a place on it! $44 • From Here • 808 W. Main Ave. #251 • fromherespokane.com n

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BOARD GAMERS Seven games to keep game night small, simple and lively BY ALEX SAKARIASSEN BLOCKBUSTER

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42 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020

Like a McFly kid in a photograph, the storefronts once synonymous with family movie night have all but faded from the planet. But with this late 2019 entry into the annals of party games, the name at least will live on. Blockbuster caters to Hollywood die-hards and casual moviegoers alike, pitting teams of at least two against each other in a film-centric battle royale. No trivia here. Just a relentless test of your movie memory through alternating rounds of word association and charades, all of it housed in a VHS-style case that’s sure to trigger a few wistful memories. Ages 12 and up; $14.89

PIT

Jostling for commodities has become a mainstay of modern board games. But long before Settlers of Catan turned game night into a pitched battle for wheat, PIT had families and friends shouting over one another in a bid for market dominance. This century-old classic captures all the competitive chaos of a real trading floor, with players calling out numbers and blindly swapping cards until the bell rings, signifying that someone has cornered the market on coffee or barley or corn. Just beware. Same as on Wall Street, the Bull might save you, but the Bear will cost you big. Ages 8 and up; $12.99


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H O M E G R OW N H O L I DAY S ! VILLAINOUS

The likes of Maleficent, Ursula and Captain Hook have sent shivers up the spines of youngsters for decades. Now board game enthusiasts can stir up a little terror of their own. In lieu of the traditional hero’s quest, Villainous puts players in the shoes of some of Disney’s most iconic cartoon baddies. Pursue your own dastardly goals using tricks from your villain’s film or foil your opponents by unleashing their respective heroes against them. Several expansion sets are also available for those looking to add more villains and more evil to their next game night. Ages 10 and up; $34.99

LEFT, RIGHT, CENTER

In Vegas, one roll of the dice can bring an evening to a screeching, moneyless halt. With Left, Right, Center, though, even the broke have a chance at a comeback. This popular, kid-friendly addition to game night keeps things simple and lively as players roll dice to see how many chips they get to hang onto — and how many they have to surrender to their opponents. A player may lose their final chip one round only to have three slide their way to the next. In the end, however, some rules are universal, and here as in Vegas, it’s the player with all the chips who wins. Ages 5 and up; $6.99

ONE NIGHT ULTIMATE WEREWOLF

If Hollywood’s long string of wolf-man-centric classics have taught us anything, it’s that werewolves aren’t the only menace lurking in the shadows. One Night Ultimate Werewolf takes that trope to a more immersive level, casting players — well, most of them at least — as the

frightened villagers bent on sniffing out the changeling in their midst. Unaware of one another’s true identities, players must work together to identify the threat even as that threat secretly attempts to throw them off the scent. When dawn breaks, a vote is taken, and the villagers find out if they’ve slain the beast or turned their fear on the innocent. Ages 14 and up; $24.99

POETRY FOR NEANDERTHALS

Fred Flinstone may have had a fairly extensive vocabulary, but the notion that our cave-dwelling, club-wielding forebears gave grammar little more than a passing glance still persists in pop culture. Poetry for Neanderthals puts a humorous spin on this widespread and anthropologically unfounded concept, challenging players to guess complex words from mono-syllabic clues. For example, a player may have to describe a sloppy joe with phrases like “beef on bun” and “big mess.” Better keep it simple, because anyone who uses a word with more than one syllable gets smacked with the inflatable “NO!” stick. Ages 7 and up; $15.99

STET!

Those looking for a more linguistically robust addition to game night will get a competitive kick out of the new 2020 card game Stet!, which puts players’ grasp of grammar and syntax to the ultimate test. Each card contains a sentence, and players must race to spot errant apostrophes or homonyms or to correct style issues with a small lingual flourish (sorry, editors, no rewrites allowed). Don’t be too quick to find fault, though. Some cards are red herrings, in which case you better be first to shout “stet!” and prove you know a rock-solid sentence when you see one. Ages 13 and up; $19.99 n

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DECEMBER 3, 2020 INLANDER 43


Gifts for

HIPPIES

Suggestions for the old toker on your list BY WILL MAUPIN

F

or some, it was just a youthful phase grown out of, or covered up, long ago. Still, others rock their tie-dye on the regular to this day. Vestiges of the hippie movement live among us even now. They’re grandparents, co-workers, friends and neighbors, sure, but they’re still hippies, too. Why not remind them of that with the gift of weed? Mitch Anderson, purchasing manager at Cinder Valley (1421 N. Mullan), helped us find a few products perfect for that old hippie in your life.

SHIATSU KUSH BY ROOT DOWN

This season, go green.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

While it’s THC concentration of 24.6 percent is well above anything from the ’60s or ’70s, this strain originally from Japan would fit perfectly for the old hippie who looks to the wisdom of the far east. It’s no shiatsu massage, but true to its name, this strain has been bred to replace pain and tension with relaxation and relief. $12 a gram of flower

NORTHERN LIGHTS BY TRAIL BLAZIN PRODUCTIONS

Rumor has it this strain originated outside of Seattle in the ’70s, making it one of the few on the market that an old hippie might remember from the good old days. Trail Blazin Productions’ version is grown without pesticides, which should play well with those who were in on the ground floor of the environmental movement. Preroll for $10 a gram

ACAPULCO GOLD BY HOUSE OF CULTIVAR

Northern Lights has history, but it pales in comparison to that of Acapulco Gold. An iconic strain in the ’60s lauded for its incredibly high potency for the time, coming in around 23 percent THC, Acapulco Gold was referenced in countless literary works and was the namesake for films, albums and songs throughout the ’60s and ’70s. $45 an eighth of flower n

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Gifts for

SPORTS FANS We all need something to root for right now

S

BY WILL MAUPIN

ports fans just want something, anything, to go their way in 2020. The NCAA Tournament was canceled, the Seahawks don’t have their 12th man and there won’t be an Apple Cup — which might be a blessing in disguise for the Cougar fans among us. That’s just to name a few of the disasters which have befallen the sports world. Now, more than ever, the sports fan you know and love needs someone, something, to tell them that they still matter. That sports still exist, even if it doesn’t seem quite like it these days.

FAKE FANS

There won’t be fans in the stands at Gonzaga games for the foreseeable future, but don’t let that keep your loved one — or, rather, a photo of your loved one — from being present at the games. Fan cutouts, like the ones that popped up at baseball and football stadiums in the past months, are coming to The Kennel. Send in a photo of the Zag nut in your life, and they’ll land a spot in the stands all season long. $70 • gozags.com

BASEBALL STICKERS

If you’re not a baseball fanatic, 6-4-3 might just sound like a series of numbers, rather than the scoresheet slang for a common type of double play. 60 feet, 6 inches isn’t just some arbitrary distance, it’s the distance between the

pitcher’s mound and home plate. Curveball Keepsakes sells these and other baseball numbers on black-andwhite oval stickers perfect for the baseball fan’s bumper, window or water bottle. $4.95 • From Here • 808 W. Main, #251

SPEAK OUT SPORTS EDITION Imagine a game that combines all the fun of a dentist appointment without the awful experience that is an actual dentist appointment. That’s Speak Out, a multiplayer game in which players attempt to effectively communicate while their mouth is stretched wide open. The sports and games expansion is perfect for the sports buff in your life who knows enough to talk sports even if they physically can’t talk. $6.99 • Uncle’s Games • 404 W. Main. SPOKANE CHIEFS KNIT HAT

Taking in some Chiefs hockey at Spokane Arena is a classic winter activity around here. Unfortunately, that won’t happen this year, and maybe not at all this season, which has already been delayed until Jan. 8. That shouldn’t stop the hockey lover you know from showing their Spokane pride. Pick up one of these classic winter hats in bold red, white and blue, complete with a pom on top. They’ll stay warm this winter, at the rink or otherwise. $23 • Spokane Chiefs Team Store • 700 W. Mallon n

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Gifts for

COOKBOOK COLLECTORS Let’s get cooking!

N

ot only has the inordinate amount of time you’re likely spending online these days got you clamoring for an actual cookbook, making your own meals has been both a necessity and a tactile pleasure in a year otherwise devoid. That makes 2020 another banner year for cookbooks, which can take you anywhere you want to go (culinarily speaking), bring you comfort, or insight or a laugh, and help you manage mealtime with renewed interest.

that look and sound like a trip to the movies or theme park. The photos alone will have you smiling. Lots of colorful, whimsical images like chocolate-dipped strawberries ala Mickey Mouse with blueberries for “ears” and Ariel’s Deep Blueberry Sea Bowl with starfruit for starfish. Fun, right? And that’s something we could all use a little more of in the kitchen and beyond.

THE BOB ROSS COOKBOOK: HAPPY LITTLE RECIPES FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS

Your cookbook collection is not complete without at least one volume from Ina Garten, aka the Barefoot Contessa. Well-educated and well-heeled, Garten left her White House job in the ’70s to develop what would become a foodie empire, starting with a specialty store, then progressing to cookbooks, guest columns for Oprah and Martha Stewart, and her own Food Network television show. Twelve cookbooks later, Garten shares her down-to-earth yet elegant style with a cookbook focusing on comfort foods, many of them from her childhood, like cheesy chicken enchiladas and decadent Boston cream pie.

Bob Ross painted his way into our hearts and minds for just over a decade, beginning in 1983 when his Joy of Painting first aired on PBS stations. His melodic voice encouraged all ages to paint “happy little trees” until 1994, when his show ended. By then, however, his perfectly round, permed white guy ’fro and easy smile had hit home. Author Robb Pearlman’s new cookbook capitalizes on Ross’ iconic and widespread appeal, with Bob Ross paintings plus comfort-food recipes that emulate his laid-back style. Try Nothing-to-it Pot Roast, Van Dyke Browned Meatballs and — wait for it — Happy Little Roasted Chicken.

DISNEY EATS

more info at www.wedonthaveone .com 46 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020

BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

You might not be able to visit a Disney theme park anytime soon, but this cookbook brings the magic of Mickey’s world home to our kitchen. Joy Howard’s Disney Eats will appeal to kids and adults alike with mostly healthy meals

MODERN COMFORT FOOD

HOMEGROWN BY FATHER & SON

The pandemic did a number on the hospitality industry, yet for British chef John Burton-Race, it was an opportunity to not only rethink his relationship to food but also to strengthen his relationship with his son. The Michelinstarred celebrity chef returned to England from his former job in Vietnam to build a garden with his son, Pip, which he documented and turned into part how-to and part cookbook. The recipes and revelations that follow are unpretentious, vegetable-forward and heart-filled.


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London-based and Israeli-born Yotam Ottolenghi knocked us out with Plenty, a tome to make anyone reconsider eating vegetarian, followed by Plenty More and (my fave) Jerusalem, which doubles as a cultural guide to the ancient city. His newest, Flavour, offers a follow-up of sorts to Plenty, with vegetarian dishes, yet with the same deconstructed approach to understanding why flavors work that made Samrin Nosrat’s Salt Fat Acid Heat such a hit.

THE ULTIMATE SPAM COOKBOOK

Whether it’s because you’re down to the dregs in your kitchen cabinet and avoiding going to the store or cutting corners with canned over fresh, the cured meat phenomena known as SPAM presents a culinary conundrum. Namely, how do you cook it so it doesn’t taste like the dense, gelatinous pseudo-meat product it is? A new cookbook offers to “Elevate Ramen, Pizza, Sliders, Breakfast, & More with Hormel’s Little Blue Can.” As stomach-churning as it may seem, SPAM has fans, including a few B-team celebrity chefs who have contributed recipes.

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Instead of the extra pounds known as the “freshman 15” that college kids typically put on their first year, a friend calls pandemic weight gain the “COVID 19.” Indeed, increased time in the kitchen (not to mention stress) could be a factor. If so, don’t try the new cookbook from the creators of The Great British Bake Off television series and their beloved judges, Paul and Prue. Pies, cakes, bread, cookies, even savory treats are all mah-velously illustrated and all a very nice bake.

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Alexander Smalls is an extraordinary chef. In addition to being recognized by the James Beard Foundation, the Harlem, New York-based restaurateur and author has won a Grammy and a Tony for his opera singing. He blends both his passions in his third cookbook (Meals, Music, and Muses: Recipes from My African American Kitchen), which offers insight into life in the Low Country and the vast range of African American cuisine. Each chapter pairs a genre of music originating in the South with food. So sauteed green beans and gospel. Hoppin’ John Cakes, jazz, Carolina Bourbon Barbecue, the blues… it’s all in there.

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CBD COCKTAILS

It’s Mary Jane meets Manhattans in this high-flying primer, one of many such tutorials for “taking the edge off.” Author Sailene Ossman has been a cannabis advocate since the ’90s, producing a web series Smoke in the Kitchen with Mama Sailene, and creating pop-up events for the hoi polloi of Los Angeles’ celebrity scene. Dovetailing neatly with the rise in craft cocktails, this how-to offers seasonal, classic, and even alcohol-free mocktails featuring cannabidiol (CBD), the non-psychoactive ingredient in marijuana often touted as an alternative pain reliever. n

DECEMBER 3, 2020 INLANDER 47


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INDOOR GARDENERS Yes, help cultivate their green thumb

I

t might be a few more months before you get to chillax with your fave indoor gardener, which is too bad because theirs might be the most chillaxble indoor place to spend a winter. Indoor gardeners have a knack for nurturing, which is all the more impressive to those among us who couldn’t even grow a Chia pet. Give a great gift this year, and hope they add you to their postCOVID party list where you’ll surely marvel at their home full of happy, green growing things.

GREENCASTLE SOAPS HAND CREAM

The plants may be happy, but your gardener friend’s hands surely aren’t. Turns out getting your hands dirty comes with a price: rough, dry, chapped skin. Give your gardener a head start on healthy hands with a 2-ounce jar of hand cream using all-natural ingredients like palm and olive oils from a beloved local maker and teacher. Try Washington Apple Extra Rich Cream. $5 • Greencastle Soaps • 203 N. Stone

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48 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020

BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

Even if the indoor gardener on your list is especially adept at coaxing flowers from the soil year-round (like orchids), the floral abundance of the outdoors can’t be easily matched inside. Approximate the look and feel of colorful flowers with Vanessa Swenson’s playful floral artwork prints. Shop online at FromHereSpokane.com or choose a gift card and know the recipient will have an abundance

of artworks from which to choose. $28, unframed • From Here • 808 W. Main, #251

LUCKY BAMBOO

Who couldn’t use a little more luck this year? Two stalks of “lucky bamboo,” for example, are supposed to double your luck in love, according to Chinese tradition, while seven represent wealth, happiness and good health. Although technically not bamboo — it’s a variation of the dracaena plant — these vibrant green stalks are easy to grow in a glass of water with a few pebbles at the bottom. Start small with single stalks, 4-inch to 24-inch in either straight or curled versions, which can be trained to take on all kinds of shapes as they grow — and hopefully will bring the recipient good luck. $1.59-$7.99 • Northwest Seed & Pet • 7302 Division, 2422 E. Sprague

SARAH SMILES CALENDAR

Planting, watering, fertilizing, pruning, transplanting and all the other items on the gardener’s to-do list require careful planning and tracking. In her 2021 calendar, Sarah Smiles nature-based artwork features images — hearts, a peace sign, mandalas — created with repurposed leaves, petals and other plant materials, giving your fave gardener a beautiful image to inspire them as they plot out their plant care regimen. So inspiring! And if your indoor gardener is also an outdoor gardener, this calendar is a beautiful and uplifting reminder that spring and seed-ordering time is right around the corner. $30 (or 4 for $100) • Sarah Smiles Creations • SarahSmilesCreations.com n


Adding some tech skills to one’s resume is one of the best ways to stay ahead of the curve.

Gifts for

JOB HUNTERS The gift (a job) that keeps on giving

T

BY QUINN WELSCH

hings are going to be different this holiday season for a lot of reasons. Our needs and wants have changed vastly since March 2020. Many of us are out of work as a result of the pandemic (or working with reduced hours) and are in need of a new job — or maybe even an entirely new career path. For the job hunter on your holiday list, get something that will make a real impact on their life this year. Get them something that will help them nail their next job interview and change the course of their professional career. Here are a few ideas.

BUSINESS PORTRAIT

First impressions are everything. If your LinkedIn page is still rocking a profile photo you took on an iPhone 4, maybe it’s time for an update. What better way to do that than with a professional portrait from Jerome Pollos Photography? After a Zoom consultation, clients can get a 15-minute photoshoot for a much-needed refresh on their business portrait. $125 for 15-minute session • Jerome Pollos Photography • 2115 E. Sherman Ave., Suite 106, Coeur d’Alene

BUSINESS SOCKS

No one can escape socks during the holidays! No one! Hahaha! And why should they? Just because we (maybe)

haven’t worn real pants in 10 months doesn’t mean our feet should be cold. Give your job hunter’s feet the cozy confidence they need with a new pair of socks (for men or women). My favorite place to go for high-end threads is Banana Republic, which also carries ties, bags and other accessories for professionals. $7-$20 • Banana Republic • 722 W. Main Ave.

CODING CLASS

In this day and age, adding some tech skills to one’s resume is one of the best ways to stay ahead of the curve, regardless of profession. Register for a class in web development fundamentals through Unicorn Coding Academy, a Spokane-based coding boot camp that offers classes right here in town. $280 • Unicorn Coding Academy • unicorncode.org

BUS PASS

You can’t make money without transportation, but you can’t get transportation without money. It’s one of the worst catch-22s. Here’s where you come in. Purchase your job hunter a pack of bus passes this year from the Spokane Transit Authority. Make your dollar go the extra mile and get a pack of day passes, sold in sets of five that can be used throughout the day. $20 • Spokane Transit Authority • 701 W. Riverside Ave. n

DECEMBER 3, 2020 INLANDER 49


COVID-19

Service with a… Smile? Local front-of-house workers reflect on COVID-19, masks and financial stress BY LAUREN GILMORE

H

ere’s a secret: the unskilled worker doesn’t exist. My first job was selling elephant ears at the interstate fair. After that, I worked various gigs — the cash register at a greasy pizza restaurant, the cafe in the corner of Barnes and Noble — trying (and failing) to perfect the art of customer service amid sweat, tears and fry oil. All of these endeavors demanded a skill set imparted through the sink-or-swim of lunch rushes and on-the-job training. Now, nearly everyone in my immediate family works in the service industry in some capacity. My partner, mom and siblings all work at our restaurant, Allie’s Vegan Pizzeria and Cafe. Servers and other front-of-house workers like us have had a particularly challenging battle in 2020. As COVID-19 cases surge across the country, and each new press conference from the governor Rachel Fisher at South Perry’s brings a different list of restrictions on Meeting House ERICK DOXEY PHOTO public businesses, servers have had to adapt to rapidly changing workplaces, job descriptions and income precarity. Rachel Fisher, a barista who works at Meeting House in the South Perry District, says the biggest shift has been in the expectations between customers and servers. “It’s not as easy to just have a seamless, smooth meal with people,” she says. “Instead of being a welcoming spot of hospitality, I am the rule keeper. I have to remind them to keep their masks on, and not to talk to people on their way to the bathroom. I am now the police of when people can sit near each other and how many people can be at a table. It feels like a lot of reprimanding people, which is so the opposite of what I got into this industry for.”

50 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020


FOOD | TO-GO BOX It’s also the opposite of what customers have come to expect from service workers. “People expect us to break the rules for them because they know my whole job is hospitality: the customer’s always right,” Fisher continues. “So people expect servers to say, ‘You’re right, I’ll let eight of you sit together.’ But I can’t. I don’t make the rules.” Fisher has worked in the service industry for eight years, all but the last of which she spent in Boston. With the pandemic spiking again, she’s less worried about getting sick and more concerned about the financial toll it will take on her and other workers in similar positions. “For a lot of people in the service industry, this is our skill, so there’s not other jobs we could even be qualified for,” she explains. “It’s stressful not knowing how long this will last and what the job market will look like on the other side. Also, I know a good chunk of the service industry cannot afford health insurance and is not offered health insurance through their work. So we’re at the forefront of having to talk to people all day, in very close proximity to other people, and we can’t afford health insurance.”

M

ikayla Matheson, who has worked at Rüt Bar and Kitchen since its 2019 opening and is the sister of one of its owners, expresses similar concerns regarding the pandemic’s long-term effects on the service industry. “We had a loan when the pandemic first hit and that was a cushion,” Matheson says. “But now there are more and more months where we’re consistently not making as much as we normally do. Month after month, it does start to affect the business financially.” On a personal level, Matheson has become less worried about the health risks of working as she’s become more confident with the safety procedures being taken. She’s also been able to take advantage of recent slowdowns to learn a new skill: bartending. “I moved from being just a server to bartending as well. I had the advantage of learning when it was super slow,” she explains. “It’s been cool to develop a new skill set while I have this ability to learn at a slower pace, or not feel as much pressure to be super good at it right away. By the time we’re back to normal, I’ll be totally efficient with it.” Both Matheson and Fisher speak about wearing masks as a surprisingly significant game-changer. Now, “body language and facial expression are a big part of interacting with customers,” Matheson says. “My hand gestures have gotten more dramatic.” “People can’t even tell you’re smiling at them,” Fisher says. “Human interaction is such a huge part of the business, so that’s been hard. In general, restaurants have been adapting really well. I worry about all the small businesses and want them to stay open, and it’s nice to see them doing what they can.”

A

tania Gilmore, my mom and the owner of Allie’s Vegan Pizzeria and Cafe, has been working increased serving shifts throughout the pandemic, and says that interactions with the community have certainly changed. “Running a restaurant right now is so very different than running a restaurant 12 months ago,” Gilmore says. “I hear over and over, ‘Thank you for being open. I’m glad you’re staying open.’ There’s a real concern from the community that we will survive this. They want to know how they can help, what they can do.” While people don’t always correlate the work of service industry professionals with other frontline tasks, they’re at a significant level of risk of contracting the virus through daily interaction. “As a person over 60, one of the big fears I have is not knowing exactly how my body is going to react. I hear that fear a lot: the unknown — not knowing how it’s going to affect you personally.” This uncharted dimension is where financial questions and the more elusive fears of health and well-being merge. Like many industries, no one can predict what the final toll will be on local restaurants, coffee shops and bars. We do know, however, that the workers who populate these spaces deserve to be treated with grace, patience and generous tips. n

Eat Like a Chef takes Spokane cooking to television.

Return of the “Quaranteam” Local do-gooder Rick Clark relaunches nightly fundraisers and Adam Hegsted takes on TV BY CHEY SCOTT

N

ine months ago when restaurants across Washington were forced to shut down for the first time to slow the spread of COVID-19, Spokane philanthropist Rick Clark took to social media to rally support. Logging on to Facebook each night, Clark hosted 15-minute livestreams to collect donations from the public, which he used to buy dozens of full-price meals from a local restaurant to feed an area nonprofit’s staff and clients the next day. Each night, Clark was averaging between $800 and $1,000 in donations, and after 43 days he’d raised more than $50,000 that was spent at 60 local restaurants, providing more than 3,000 meals to those in need. Clark paused his efforts after restaurants were able to reopen for in-person service in mid-May. However, with another dine-in ban lasting until at least mid-December, Clark has been logging online almost daily for the past two and a half weeks. Those interested in donating or tuning in to follow along can join the Facebook group “Spokane Quaranteam,” which boasts more than 4,200 members and counting. Streams are held at 5 pm Monday through Saturday, but donations are also accepted anytime via Venmo (@Helpspokane), the Cash App ($Helpspokane) and PayPal (helpspokane@gmail.com). Recent beneficiaries of Spokane Quaranteam’s efforts include Scratch feeding the YWCA of Spokane’s domestic violence shelter, Lost Boys Garage supporting Crosswalk teen shelter, Allie’s Vegan Pizzeria & Cafe making

meals for Open Doors family shelter, The Viking providing food for clients of Truth Ministries, and Brooklyn Deli supporting the UGM Men’s Shelter.

LOCAL EAT LIKE A CHEF SERIES NOW AIRING

Prolific chef and restaurateur Adam Hegsted has another project in the works — not a new restaurant, but a locally televised cooking series bringing tips from inside area restaurant kitchens to viewers’ homes. Eat Like a Chef airs on Saturdays at 9 pm on local channel Fox 28. Hosted by Hegsted and local food blogger Chandler Baird of Spokane Eats, each episode is filmed inside a different local restaurant. The two hosts and a guest chef from that restaurant or the regional foodie community then prepare a three-course meal together on camera. Meals made on the show are also available for local households to purchase through Share Farm, which Hegsted co-owns. The company started out as a local grocery delivery service but has since shifted focus to selling complete meal kits, along with a selection of regionally made artisan food products. Many of the cook-yourself options feature dishes popularized at several of Hegsted’s restaurants, including Gilded Unicorn and Wandering Table. While Share Farm’s kits are the focus of each meal prepared on Eat Like a Chef, Hegsted says anyone can access the recipes by creating a free Share Farm account. Find out more at sharefarm. com and eatlikeachef.com/tv. n

DECEMBER 3, 2020 INLANDER 51


THE SOUND AND THE FURY

Hillbilly Elegy has gotten some of the worst reviews of the year. How bad could it really be? BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

E

ver since its super-earnest, awards bait-y trailer dropped online in October, Hillbilly Elegy has elicited the kinds of responses you’d expect from a Yelp review of a restaurant that gave the writer food poisoning. The Atlantic knocked it as one of the worst movies of the year, while Vox critic Alissa Wilkinson went even further, proclaiming it as “one of the worst movies I’ve seen in years.” So, now that the movie is finally streaming on Netflix for all to see, how bad is it really? Turns out, it’s pretty bad. The movie is well-intentioned, I think, but it’s a real howler, a MAD Magazine version of a serious drama, the sort that tries to tackle a number of deeply complex issues — domestic abuse, drug addiction, economic displacement — through the sort of flashy performances and heart-tugging monologues we’ve seen in a million made-for-TV dramas. You probably know that it’s based on a memoir/ cultural dissertation by one J.D. Vance, unread by me, which sparked countless think pieces in the thick of the 2016 presidential election. From what I can gather, it is Vance’s reflection on his difficult upbringing in Middletown, Ohio, a once-thriving steel town where most of his counterparts stay put and live in abject poverty. Vance himself was raised by a single mother, Bev (played in the

52 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020

Hillbilly Elegy was directed by Ron Howard, whose film by Amy Adams), who was always bouncing between filmography is a string of titles that inspire such burning boyfriends and struggling with drug addiction, and by his questions as, “Wait, Ron Howard directed that?” He has tough-as-nails Mamaw (Glenn Close), who has her own made his share of good-to-great middlebrow dramas, but history of abuse and neglect. this is not one of them. Save for the near-constant (and Vance managed to “escape” Middletown, enlisting no doubt accurate) barrage of expletives that pepper in the Marines and earning a law degree from Yale on the dialogue, a lot of the film plays out like one of those his way to a venture capital gig under Peter Thiel. Ah, low-budget, Christian-friendly ClearFlix movies. He the American dream! The script, adapted by The Shape of also renders some emotionally harrowing scenes — Bev Water’s Vanessa Taylor, vacillates between two timelines: having a mental breakdown in the street, or Mamaw Young J.D. (Owen Asztalos) contending with Bev’s lighting her deadbeat husband on fire — in intensifying opioid addiction, which she slo-mo, as if stretching out the picked up while working as a nurse, and HILLBILLY ELEGY torturous torture somehow makes it more intense. later returning to Middletown as an adult Rated R (It doesn’t.) (Gabriel Basso) when she relapses, this Directed by Ron Howard Pundits like Ben Shapiro and David time with heroin. Starring Amy Adams, Glenn Close, Brooks, ever the arbiters of egalitarianism, If Hillbilly Elegy deserves plaudits, it’s in Gabriel Basso, Haley Bennett have blamed the film’s lukewarm recepthe acting department. The performances Streaming on Netflix tion on haughty liberal writers’ inherent here are technically impressive, particularrejection of the conservative trappings of ly Adams’ and Close’s, and they practicalits source material. But this turns out to be — no surprise ly beg to have a “for your consideration” chyron burned — a specious argument (the most negative reviews I’ve at the bottom of the screen. They will no doubt receive seen are from critics who grew up in the region where the awards accolades they signed up for, but their work is the film is set), because to consider the politics of Hillbilly a bit too show-offy for my taste. I think the best work in Elegy would have required the film to consider its own the film comes courtesy of Haley Bennett as J.D.’s sister politics, which it does not do. (Would you expect anyLindsay, because she conveys the same struggles without thing less from noted political firebrand Ron Howard?) the benefit of histrionics and speechifying.


Save for passing mentions to Monica Lewinsky and Al Gore, the movie sands down all of the sharp but complicated sociopolitical edges that made Vance’s book so buzzworthy in the lead-up to the 2016 election, which is fine by me, but the human drama we’re left with simply isn’t compelling. But I’m going to blame Vance, anyway — not as an author, but as an executive producer. This film is less a paean to hardscrabble Appalachians than it is a self-imposed tribute to the sheer virtuosity of J.D. Vance. He’s portrayed as the greatest, most gracious guy on God’s green earth: The first time we see him as a teenager, he’s hopping off his bike to move an injured turtle out of the road. Save for a brief adolescent outburst where he smokes some weed and commits some minor vandalism, he’s squeaky clean. He is so thoroughly uncompelling in every conceivable way that the film may as well cut to white noise whenever his storyline takes over, especially in the allegedly gripping sequence where he’s at a fancy dinner and can’t differentiate the salad fork from the dessert fork. This is not the height of human drama, I assure you. I have to wonder what Hillbilly Elegy might have looked like were it given to a filmmaker with actual grit — someone like Sean Baker (The Florida Project, Tangerine) or Deborah Granik (Winter’s Bone, Leave No Trace), whose portraits of people on the fringes are bursting with life and drama. There are minor touches in Hillbilly Elegy that suggest a truer, more humane movie — Lindsay washing plastic silverware after a barbecue, for instance, or Mamaw watching her VHS copy of Terminator 2 for the hundredth time — but the script is a tiring series of melodramatic highs followed by crushing lows. Life can seem like that sometimes, and for the people who inspired this movie, it seems like that most of the time. But this movie doesn’t really care about those people. It just wants some Oscar nominations. n

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RETROSPECTIVE

Warm Jets

Brian Eno: International man of mystery. CECILY ENO PHOTO

With a new compilation of Brian Eno’s work in stores, we look at back at the composer and producer’s pioneering career

often cited as one of the most influential records of its type, both for its pioneering use of sampling and for its fusion of Byrne’s fascination with world music and Eno’s ear for sonic adventurousness.

BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

B

rian Eno: Music nerds know him, critics adore him, and electronic musicians worship him. But the pioneering Brit has done a lot more in his career than make weird soundscapes designed to calm you down while you wait around in the airport. On the occasion of a new compilation of his work as a film composer — titled, appropriately, Film Music 1976-2020 — we’re looking back at Eno’s career, from the sonic experiments you may never have heard of to the Top 40 radio hits you never knew he produced. Here are some facts about the incomparable Eno. HE WAS A FOUNDING MEMBER OF ROXY MUSIC. Roxy Music was one of the greatest of all British pop bands, racking up a string of ’70s hits in their homeland but only ever achieving cult status in the states. Founded by the suave, velvety-voiced Bryan Ferry, the group fused glam-rock and baroque chamber-pop into a package that was as sensual and dance-y as it was artsy and cool, and Eno joined the band in its nascent phases as a “technical adviser” (mainly because he knew his way around a synth and owned a reel-to-reel machine). Though he would frequently butt heads with Ferry and depart the band before they’d score their first U.K. No. 1 with 1973’s Stranded (he only appears on their self-titled debut LP and the landmark For Your Pleasure), Eno’s influence lingered, and Roxy Music would lean into lush synthesized soundscapes in their later and most celebrated albums. HIS EARLY SOLO RECORDINGS ARE SOME OF THE BEST OF THE ’70S. Upon his departure from Roxy Music, Eno got right into producing solo material his way. At only 25, he released the terrific Here Come the Warm Jets (1974), with the equally

54 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020

dextrous Taking Tiger Mountain (By Strategy) coming less than a year later. Those were followed in late 1975 by Another Green World, which is often cited as Eno’s masterpiece and still sounds remarkably fresh and contemporary in 2020. Considering the narrow release window, this trio of albums revolves through remarkably varying styles: Compare the itchy nervousness of “Needles in the Camel’s Eye” and “Baby’s on Fire” from Jets with the enveloping ambient sounds of Green World’s “The Big Ship,” and it hardly sounds like the same artist. It’s one of the most exciting, unpredictable stretches in any musician’s discography. HE’S THE GODFATHER OF AMBIENT MUSIC. Eno became obsessed with what he now calls “generative” music in his 20s, setting out to create soundscapes from electronic patterns and preprogrammed noises. Ambient music, which tends to prioritize tone and texture over melody or rhythm, wasn’t invented by Eno, but he’s credited with popularizing it and defining its most basic tenets. Beginning with 1975’s Discreet Music, Eno is responsible for some of the most important texts of the contemporary ambient movement, including 1978’s Ambient 1: Music for Airports and Music for Films (though some critics questioned whether any of its tracks were actually intended to be used in movies, some of them were featured in the works of outsider artist Derek Jarman). 1981’s My Life in the Bush of Ghosts, one of Eno’s many collaborations with Talking Heads frontman David Byrne, is

HE’S NO DOUBT PRODUCED AN ARTIST YOU LOVE. Ever since he added electronic embellishments to Genesis’ 1974 opus The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway and contributed to David Bowie’s more experimental mid-period albums like Low and Heroes, Eno has been synonymous with collaboration and studio wizardry. Eno’s work with Talking Heads pushed them from art-punk wunderkinds to new wave innovators, and Eno’s inventive use of the studio shaped the sounds on three early Heads albums — More Songs About Buildings and Food, Fear of Music and Remain in Light — that are now considered among the greatest rock records ever made. Eno also had a long working relationship with U2, producing six of their studio albums, including smash hits like The Joshua Tree, Achtung Baby and All That You Can’t Leave Behind. Other notable credits include Devo’s Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo, Coldplay’s Viva La Vida and James Blake’s Overgrown, suggesting that he’s as comfortable helming boundary-pushing experimentation as radio-friendly hits. THE SAME GOES FOR FILMMAKERS. In a recent podcast interview with the U.K. critic Mark Kermode, Eno talked about his process when composing film scores: He’ll produce a wealth of material without ever having seen footage, and the filmmakers are free to use what they wish. It’s an unusual approach, but scrolling through Eno’s filmography, it kind of makes sense considering his film credits are as allover-the-place as his discography. Among his composer credits: Dario Argento’s stylish 1987 slasher Opera (which also features contributions from Rolling Stone member Bill Wyman), the moon landing documentary For All Mankind (1989), Peter Greenaway’s erotic drama The Pillow Book (1996) and Peter Jackson’s divisive adaptation of The Lovely Bones (2009). Eno is also said to have recorded a complete score for David Lynch’s much-maligned adaptation of Dune (1984), but only fragments of his work remain in the finished version. The band that ended up composing the final score? Toto, best known for “Africa.” Weird. n


MUSIC SPARKLE SEASON

Hopefully by this point you’ve had more than a few household-only dance parties to help you get through until we can all be busting moves together again. Super Sparkle is here to help, so you can take a night off from DJing for yourself and get down to some sweet, soulful, sweaty sounds from Spokane’s finest pop-rock purveyors. The band is celebrating the release of a new EP, Shine Through, that originally was going to push the band around the Northwest on tour through the summer. That didn’t happen, and rather than wait for an unpredictable future for safe shows, they’re putting out the tunes and throwing a gig online from Lucky You Lounge, sharing the bill with T.S. The Solution. So clear yourself some space and get ready to get down. — DAN NAILEN Live at Lucky You with Super Sparkle, T.S. The Solution and host Yung Crown • Fri, Dec. 4 at 8 pm • $10-$20 • Online; details at luckyyoulounge.veeps.com

VISUAL ART CUPS RUNNETH OVER

WORDS A WINTER LIGHT

Cup of Joy Sale and Exhibit • Opens Fri, Dec. 4 at 5 pm; continues through Jan. 15 • Trackside Studio Ceramic Art Gallery • 115 S. Adams St. • tracksidestudio.net • 863-9904

Kathleen Flenniken and Chris Howell • Sat, Dec. 5 at 7pm • Free • Online; details at auntiesbooks.com

For the last seven years, Trackside Ceramic Studio on downtown’s west end has hosted this annual celebration of vessels of all kinds. Known as the Cup of Joy exhibit, artists from all over the country are invited to each present a quartet of unique cups — glasses, mugs, goblets, steins. They don’t even necessarily need to be functional; the finished product is whatever their interpretation of the prompt happens to be. This year’s exhibit features 150 different pieces made by several dozen participating artists, from local to regional names to folks who are sprinkled around the country. Online sales of the exhibited pieces begin Friday and continue through the end of the exhibit on Jan. 15. — NATHAN WEINBENDER

Kathleen Flenniken is a Washington state treasure. The author of three collections of poetry: Famous, Plume, and now Post Romantic, Flenniken served as State Poet Laureate in 2012. Her work addresses personal and local political histories with aching clarity. After Thanksgiving is over, and you’re settling into the next phase of this brutal winter, consider joining Flenniken and another local poetry luminary, Chris Howell, for an evening of poetry, conversation and community. Flenniken will be reading from her newest collection Post Romantic, which came out last month and has received a glowing initial reception. The event is free to listeners and hosted through Auntie’s Bookstore. — LAUREN GILMORE

DECEMBER 3, 2020 INLANDER 55


EVENTS | PICKS

OUTDOORS I’LL FLY AWAY

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One thing the pandemic won’t change in 2020 is the migratory patterns of American bald eagles, which is good news for those of us who live in the Inland Northwest, because they just love congregating on the north end of Lake Coeur d’Alene to chow down on Kokanee salmon. Sure, you might see one or two of the majestic birds on your own, but if you head to this particular spot in December, you can see potentially hundreds of them at once, a truly inspiring sight. Lake Coeur d’Alene Cruises offers two-hour tours to check out the birds, on heated boats with cocktails served. This year there are special COVID-related protocols in place, like reduced capacity on the boats and masks required, so be sure to book either a “deluxe” or “value” tour early to get a spot. — DAN NAILEN Lake Coeur d’Alene Cruises Eagle Tours • Offered Dec. 5-Jan. 3, 2021; times vary • $15-$28 • Book online at cdacruises.com

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COMMUNITY THE MAC GETS MERRY

While its galleries are unfortunately closed to the public for at least another week or so, the MAC is getting into the holiday spirit. By finding some safe workarounds, museum staff are bringing festive cheer in the form of a holiday lights display at the historic Campbell House, along with a vintage window display from Spokane’s bygone Crescent department store. Both are viewable outdoors from a safe distance. Visitors can also partake in a scavenger hunt and catch a video feed of the Campbell family’s cook Hulda baking and prepping the house for the holidays. She’ll even be passing out prepackaged sugar cookies. While you’re there, consider doing some holiday shopping at the museum store, which remains open with safety measures in place. Visitors also need to reserve a time slot in advance to experience this special event. — CHEY SCOTT Ho-Ho-Holiday Celebration • Saturdays from 4-6 pm through Dec. 26 • $5 suggested donation • Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture • 2316 W. First Ave. • northwestmuseum.org • 456-3931

56 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess KNIGHT VISION

My boyfriend is very successful, with a high-profile job in finance. He’s very romantic, and I felt I’d found “the one.” However, he has cheated on previous girlfriends, is unusually protective of his phone around me, and otherwise acts secretively. For example: He began disappearing for three hours on Wednesday nights. He didn’t return any texts, which is unlike him. He claimed he was at “therapy,” forgetting he’d told me he instead uses life coaches at his job. Another example: I stopped AMY ALKON over one morning and saw remains of a pizza and a dainty box of sparkly champagne gummy bears (not exactly a man’s snack). After I called him on these incidents, he began texting me periodically on Wednesday nights and stockpiling cheap drugstore gummies, which he eats when I’m over. He has angrily denied he’s seeing other women and refuses to discuss it further. I’m in love with him, and I want to believe him. —Benefit Of The Doubt? Believing you’ve found love has a dark side: wanting to keep believing. The most outrageous claims can take on an air of plausibility, like when your friend tells you she spotted your boyfriend licking some woman’s tattoo, and he angrily insists he was saving somebody dying of snakebite — uh, in Midtown Manhattan. Your brain is partly to blame. Human brains have a collective set of built-in errors in reasoning called “cognitive biases” that prompt otherwise smart people to act like they have the IQ of a root vegetable. Crazy as it is that our brain would evolve to have built-in errors, this is actually not a bug, but a feature: one that sometimes acts like a bug. Our mind needs to take mental shortcuts whenever it can. If we had to methodically think out our every action (starting with, “How do you turn on the light in the kitchen, and is that even a good idea?”), we’d wake up at 8 a.m. and need a nap by about 8:17. So, we’re prone to cut out the wearying middleman — careful deliberation of all the facts at hand — and leap to conclusions about what to do or believe. However, we don’t do this at random; we default to “heuristics” (aka “rules of thumb”) — broad, general principles that evolved out of human experience — to make semi-informed, “quick and dirty” guesses. Though these guesstimates are typically “good enough” solutions in do-or-die situations, they also lead to cognitive biases, those absurd errors in reasoning that can muck up our lives. Two that might be mucking up yours are the “sunk cost fallacy” and “confirmation bias.” The sunk cost fallacy is the irrational tendency to continue investing time, money, or effort in some losing endeavor (like an unhappy relationship) based on the investment we’ve already “sunk” into it. Of course, that prior investment is gone. The rational approach would be future -oriented thinking: assessing whether we’d get enough out of any further investment to make it worth throwing in more love, money, or time. Confirmation bias reflects our tendency to favor information that confirms a belief we already have — like, “I found Mr. Right!” — and reject information that says (or screams) otherwise: “I found Mr. Juggles Women Like A Moscow Circus Bear.” If you are succumbing to these cognitive biases, they probably have a coconspirator. Cross-cultural research suggests that female emotions evolved to subconsciously push women to seek high-status “providers,” even when women are high-earning bigwigs themselves. In other words, you might be prone to ignore any intel suggesting your wolf of Wall Street spends a good bit of his week raiding the hussy henhouse (aka Tinder). In short, though we humans (the snobs of the mammalian world!) smugly refer to ourselves as “rational animals,” we are able to reason, but we don’t always get around to doing it. Psychologist Daniel Kahneman explains that our brain has two information processing systems, our “fast” emotion-driven system and our “slow” rational system. The emotion-driven fast system is behind our mental shortcuts. It rises up automatically, requiring no work on our part. (We just experience emotions; we don’t sit around emotionally dead until we put effort into yanking one up.) Reasoning, on the other hand, takes work: mental exertion to pore over and analyze information in order to make a decision. Tempting as it is to believe you’ve found “the one,” making yourself take the slow approach — doing the work to see who a man really is — will, at the very least, help you boot the bad eggs faster. Sadly, we live in an imperfect world — one in which “pants on fire” is merely a figure of speech, not what happens when your half-undressed boyfriend says (with a totally straight face): “Amber and I were just about to have a work meeting.” You: “In our bed?” n ©2020, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

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TO THE RESCUE When I parked my car to run an errand on Garland Avenue I noticed you outside your bicycle shop cleaning the window and sidewalk. Little did I know that 20 minutes later you would rescue me with a jumpstart as my battery died! It was starting to rain when you noticed my distress, and came out of your shop carrying a battery and cables! I am so appreciative! I made it down to the Dealer after that and bought a new battery. I also appreciate the fact that you were doing your bit to keep the Garland business district clean, and at the same time being a good example to others. Thanks again!

CHEERS EVERYDAY HEROES I don’t see you. I don’t hear ads thanking you. Sometimes, as I scrub my home and resent the unending necessity of everyday cleaning, I think about you. What stores, public facilities, hospitals do you silently maintain. You make it possible for the community to continue. Others are applauded. You are the silent heroes. Thank you, custodians, maintenance personnel, for your competence and dedication. Those who take bows stand on your shoulders. GRATEFUL Thank you to the people who took the time to help me with my dead car on Ash and Northwest Blvd. on 11/23/2020 around 9:00 am. I hope you get to read this because I’m grateful for your kindness and obviously... You’re Awesome! VOLUNTEER ANGELS I would like to give a shout out to the National Guard and other Volunteers for making the Turkey drive happen at the fairgrounds. It went so smoothly. The World needs more people like you. Good bless. Happy Thanksgiving.

SOUND OFF

A REAL THANKSGIVING Many of the tenants at Cathedral Plaza (mostly women) prepared & delivered a hot delicious turkey & ham dinner with sides, to 70+ other tenants. These hardworking & thoughtful ladies took this upon themselves with feelings of joy & thankfulness because they were able to do all this for others who couldn’t, for a number of reasons, leave their apartments. Andrea, our social coodinator, pitched in along with assistance from Catholic Charities to serve dinners (with pumpkin pie) that the tenants would not have had otherwise. So, with thanks & appreciation we all send our love to these loving people. JUST KEEP SWIMMING To the Green City Saloon in Greenacres....hang in there! Keep swimming!! The tent and heaters are amazing! The TV set is up is the best that it can be and... your people are here for you! We love that you are doing your best to keep the bar open... for us!! I don’t know what I would do without THE BEST FRIES in town!!! (Love the burgers, too... but the fries KILL it!) Chin up and if you keep pushing forward, WE will, too! COSTCO GIRL To the short-haired girl at the Valley Costco exit door! Thank you for keeping the line moving and

catching different receipt issues! Not only did you catch an overcharge, but your smiling face and happy attitude were an improvement to my day! It makes life easier when you know that someone is watching out for you! THANK YOU! MERRY CHRISTMAS! LIBRARY SUPERHEROES You make a difference Spokane library team!! We are so lucky to have you!! With

small fee to find what you must. Police records... arrests, charges, incidents. They are public records. The information that can be shared is “out there.” They lurk and crawl amongst us. Be careful. Beware. Be informed. Share. NO, GO AHEAD AND BE A KAREN IF IT MEANS CALLING OUT WHITE SUPREMACY Last week another local apologist for the banality of evil called

Little did I know that 20 minutes later you would rescue me with a jumpstart as my battery died!

every curbside pickup my spirit is lifted and my therapy costs go down. When you added the ability to add extra items by genre/interest, my mind was blown! Such careful consideration has gone into the additional items you’ve selected for me. You’ve supported me through my covid cooking phase, my language learning phase, my Wes Anderson phase, and my f-ed up memoir phase. Without judgment or delay you’ve provided a weekly lifeline in a tied white grocery bag. I’ve laughed with Bridget Jones, cried with Dickens and cooked with Martha. Sanity saved. Thank you for all you do dear library staff, you are truly Spokane treasures.

JEERS ANTI-VAXXERS You already cause problems with dangerous diseases that should have been eradicated. Putting all of our children at unnecessary risk. And now you are poised to inhibit our ability to get beyond this

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

58 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020

Covid pandemic and back to living normal lives. But I bet many of you are gung ho to send our soldiers off to war. Yet they need to get multiple vaccinations in one day before shipping out and then they get shot at. And most of you have tattoos. Despite the fact that the tattoo ink contains very dangerous toxins. Grow a brain and be a patriot. Get the Covid shot. I will be first in line.

JEERS ON ME To the person driving the SUV by Manito golf course, I know it looked like I didn’t stop at 4 way stop but was trying to stay close to the car in front of me. They were driving so erratically and was really worried! Driving barely 20 miles an hour and in the bike lane and then in the other lane! I was close to calling 911 but they finally pulled over thank goodness. You sped around me which really wasn’t smart but I get it. Just didn’t want anyone close to this other car. So sorry but I did have a reason. CABIN CREEPER High flying attendant working a small regional NW airline. How about you stay away from others’ Significant Others. Haven’t you already wrecked one home? You wanna do selfish and stupid?..., contain the damage to yourself! You’re not impressing anyone with your cute-sie kitsch!! BLUE-EYED SNAKE ...is the one responsible. You are correct to call him out. Indeed check Google, but don’t stop there. Records searches. Pay the

out a neighbor for holding the guy on Mt. Vernon accountable for his decision to use his property on an arterial leading directly to an elementary school as a venue to peddle his reactionary and hateful views. I don’t care how well he treats those he knows personally. His political views are morally disqualifying and deserve to be noted as such. Speech is free, but it also has consequences. Buy the ticket, take the ride. Jeers to both of you. n

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TOPICALS

It’s Bath Time! Getting warm and cozy with bath bombs BY WILL MAUPIN

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inter may not start officially for a few more weeks, but it’s December. It’s cold, it’s dark, and it’s winter. Which means long nights and finding ways to stay warm. What better way than with The author followed a budtender’s advice and cut a 100 mg bath bomb in half. a nice, hot bath? Well, a nice, hot bath with cannabis, of They’re basically steroids for your bathing experiexperienced. They’ll lead to the most relaxed mindset course. ence. you can imagine. Bath bombs, the fizzy, colorful and cooler cousin of @Shane Schantz I’ve tried the hibiscus and mint varieties by Honu in The body high is overwhelming — I cut my 100 mg bath salts, have been trendy in the self-care world for recent weeks, and let me tell you, I’m as relaxed as ever. bath bomb in half, as was recommended by a budtender, years now. It’s no surprise that these products, made to They’re like your garden variety bath bombs in that and I am thankful for that advice. You won’t get high enhance the relaxing nature of a bath with soothing salts Lets change the background photo to bethey’re a "nug'' that's and decorated tree, with a GLfrom "G"these at the top. White withenvelop nug tree and m moisturizing they smelllike great,aand in that products, but theybackdrop will quite literally and essential oils, have come to embrace the relaxing efif we can add presents that regard they’re worth the $12 price point. But they’re a lot your entire body. The body high is unlike anything you fects of cannabis as well. more than that. can achieve through smoking or eating. It’s not debilitatProducts on the market come in three basic varieties: Personally speaking, a normal bath is a relaxing expeing, and it’s not intoxicating, but it is strong. It made me THC-only, CBD-only and ones with both. However, unwording rience. Adding a cannabis-infused bath bomb doesn’t lead ready to fall asleep like I’ve never felt before. like other forms of cannabis, bath bombs and other kinds to me being stoned, but it does lead to me being ready If it’s cold, and you’ve got nothing to do on a winof topicals containing THC won’t result in a traditional to go to bed. Throwing some THC into the bathwater ter’s night, drop yourself in a bath with a cannabis bath high. These products are meant to ease muscle pain, - "Stay Merry & Bright, Get your weed at has GreenLight" given me a body high the likes of which I’ve never bomb. n relieve stress and induce feelings of relaxation.

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LOOK FOR THE

Local representative, free information

Larry Waters NMLS# 400451

p 208.762.6887 Serving Idaho and Washington

LOCAL, INDEPENDENT AND FREE SINCE 1993!

GET YOUR INLANDER INSIDE

MORTGAGE

Mutual of Omaha Mortgage, NMLS# 1025894. These materials are not from, or approved by, HUD or FHA. Subject to Credit Approval. MOOMR.1219.23

Available at more than 1,000 locations throughout the Inland Northwest.

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1. ____ stick 2. They’re 21,780 square feet 3. Only U.S. state motto in Spanish 4. Villainous conglomerate on “Mr. Robot” 5. Paleontologist’s find 6. CPR pro 7. People who’ve moved from left to right 8. Key of Mozart’s clarinet concerto: Abbr. 9. Chipotle order 10. Diner order 11. Otherworldly

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“FRIENDS”

12. “If I Were a Rich Man” singer 13. Gird (oneself) 18. Acronym for a class taught over the Internet 22. Amer. currency 25. Bread served with saag aloo 26. “... ____ can do it the hard way” 27. Bro or sis 28. Letter-shaped girder 29. Song snippet

THIS W ANSWE EEK’S I SAW RS ON YOUS

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60. More tidy 61. FiveThirtyEight creator Silver 62. F1 neighbor 63. Stop working, as a car battery 64. ____ point (embroidery stitch) 65. Atlanta-to-Miami dir.

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ACROSS

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32. Many corp. hirees have them 33. Shout of pain 36. With 38-Across, how some secrets are kept ... or how this puzzle’s circled letters are divided 38. See 36-Across 40. Asian antelope seen on the “Grasslands” episode of BBC’s “Planet Earth” 41. Sacagawea dollar, e.g. 42. Toll 43. Southeast Florida city 45. Pitch in 46. Vexes 49. “Ka-pow!” 50. MGM founder Marcus 51. Part of many a three-day weekend: Abbr. 52. Volunteer’s words 54. Red wine from France 56. Marcos of the Philippines 58. “For real”

444-SELL

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1. “A good bowl of ____ will always make me happy”: Anthony Bourdain 4. Clark Kent’s father, in 1950s TV 8. Plate appearances 14. Dinghy thingy 15. “Join us!” 16. Whack-a-mole implement 17. Grab hold of 19. Unlike a couch potato 20. In olden times 21. Scary St. Bernard of fiction 23. Pupil’s place 24. Per person 25. Turndowns 26. Scott Turow memoir about law school 27. Civil rights org. formed after the Montgomery bus boycott 28. Comedian who wrote the book “Are You There, Vodka? It’s Me, Chelsea” 31. Roth ____ (investment)

to advertise:

30. Irish-born children’s book author Colfer 32. Huge opening? 34. Weakens 35. Flower in a “Sound of Music” song title 37. Something to keep about you 38. Fire extinguisher output 39. Mo. with Talk Like a Pirate Day 41. Straining to see

44. Lawyers’ org. 45. News anchor Lester 46. Using WhatsApp, say 47. Lady Montague’s

son 48. Work, as dough 50. Olympic pool divisions 52. What may come to mind 53. Ace or deuce 54. “Hello ____” (cellphone ad catchphrase) 55. 12-time Grammy winner Winans 57. 4G ____ (standard for mobile devices) 59. ____ es Salaam

DECEMBER 3, 2020 INLANDER 63


Play where the big winners play. Taste the New Menu

Prime Rib Special FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS | 4:30 PM – 9:30 PM $23 | $28 without Coeur Rewards Discount 8 oz. prime rib served with a deep-fried red potatoes and a mixed green salad.

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Prawn Scampi CHRISTMAS EVE & CHRISTMAS DAY $23 | $28 without Coeur Rewards Discount

One-night stay in a Spa Tower Room Couples Massage Two Complimentary Beverages

Savor the holidays with this dish of five prawns sautéed in a garlic white wine lemon butter sauce. Served with a chili citrus rice and mixed green salad.

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VISIT CDACASINO.COM TO BOOK YOUR PACKAGE TODAY.

Savor the new year with this special dinner for two. Start with a mixed green salad. For the entrée, enjoy our center cut beef tenderloin roast crusted with fresh herbs, pan seared and roasted to your desired temperature. It’s served with a veal demi-glace, mashed potatoes and seasonal vegetables. End your meal with a Chambord Trifle.

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W E LC O M E H O M E .

64 INLANDER DECEMBER 3, 2020

CASINO

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SPA

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CHAMPIONSHIP

GOLF

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Inlander 12/03/2020  

Inlander 12/03/2020