Inlander 12/02/2021

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C’MON NOW JOAQUIN PHOENIX’S WINNING NEW ROLE PAGE 48

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WHITHER IDAHO? GEM STATE POLITICS GET WILD IN 2022 PAGE 14 LEGACY CELEBRATION SPOKANE’S COMMUNITY BUILDING TURNS 20 PAGE 44

DECEMBER 2-8, 2021 | ALWAYS GIVING OUR BEST

I FT E D I U PAGE 16

E H T R O F S A E ID N A F N E K A R NEW K IN YOUR LIEFLSEE

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INSIDE VOL. 29, NO. 8 | COVER PHOTO: YOUNG KWAK

COMMENT NEWS GIFT GUIDE CULTURE

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FOOD SCREEN MUSIC EVENTS

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54 57 62 63

EDITOR’S NOTE

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ven recognizing that the world’s struggle with COVID wasn’t close to finished, the news of the new Omicron variant that blossomed over Thanksgiving weekend was a gut punch. While we count on the scientists to help beat back this latest challenge, and our neighbors to keep getting vaccinated, we now enter full force into the holiday season — perhaps a little more cautiously. If you’re like me, no matter how much advance planning or shopping you do, you still have plenty of friends and family to account for, and in this week’s GIFT GUIDE we have dozens of suggestions to help you check them off your shopping list. Also this week, reporter Samantha Wohlfeil explores whether an old library should become a new community center or perhaps an addition to the C.O.P.S. network of Spokane (page 8). We profile EWU superstar quarterback Eric Barriere ahead of the team’s playoff game Friday night (page 42), get ready to celebrate the Community Building (page 44) and review what just might be Joaquin Phoenix’s best-ever performance in the new movie C’mon C’mon (page 48). — DAN NAILEN, editor

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A Hero’s Lonely Journey Life lessons stretch from the past and an old notebook to Marcia’s mountains of Idaho BY CMARIE FUHRMAN

I

am Christmas shopping this weekend when, again, I think of Marcia. I found her journal in a box donated to the thrift store where I volunteer. I keep it on my desk.

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11/7/97

I love this time of year. I love Christmastime. I buy myself Christmas presents… I wrap them so as to forget what I have… so on Christmas morning I have something to open. I learned this from someone who is also alone… Marcia writes in a small Pen-Tab Pocket Notebook. Burgundy cover with a sticker on it. A cherub-cheeked little girl with her hands to her mouth and the words “OH, NO” hanging above her wide eyes.

8/12/97

How my life is: I have had no hot water since April. My refrigerator, dryer, and stove do not work... I’m tired anyway nothing gets done. Marcia lived in a house not far from my own, worked for the Forest Service where my partner works. She writes of the love of her dog, Abby, of the woods, and of books. She wanted time to work on her “inner self.” She wanted to be a writer.


8/21/97

How many sad lives do we have to live before we learn everything we are supposed to? Lives of ‘quiet desperation’ is right. She doesn’t leave McCall, I don’t want to go to Boi... The single letter I find in her belongings is from her mother, who writes, “Marcia, if you can just make it home.”

8/29/97

Yesterday I borrowed a rake… so I could sit on the couch and use it to pull stuff on the floor towards me. Abby barely has room to lie down anywhere and the cats travel across the future [sic] and avoid the floor. Marcia is in pain. Debilitating pain. She goes to work, the grocery store, the pharmacy. Home. She writes, there is a haze, a mist over things, beyond the swamp, the bend in the river…

11/5/97

It is surprising how a person can slip into a desperate situation without realizing it… as a person gets older they have to rely on other people to help them… I expected it at 65 not at 45. “No one really knew Marcia,” a retired Forest Service employee tells me. There was no obituary. Marcia writes about the cures she’s dreamed of, from the “magical medicine basket” to a “spiritual guide.” And then, I conclude that I am a failure, that something is “wrong” with me.

“The storms in life are inevitable, their passing reveals the beauty of the day.” 9/4/97

Yesterday was wretched. I took 6 Darvocet and 4 Vicodin. I guess getting sick on Vicodin will keep me from taking too many. The doctors prescribe Marcia DurAct, which will be pulled from the market a year later. Side effects included abnormal dreams, amnesia, anxiety, emotional lability, euphoria, hallucination, incoordination, insomnia, paresthesia, psychosis, tremor… pain.

11/5/97

The storms in life are inevitable, and yet their passing often reveals the beauty of the day. The regular entries conclude with, there is not a lot of sympathy for something that doesn’t show.

M

y friend Kim is right, there is something about Marcia I recognize in myself. That’s the reason I hang on to her journal. Keep her ceramic turtle on my desk. Why I open its back to see the tiny turtles inside. Why I think about Marcia while looking for Christmas gifts. Why everything in her box has come to mean something else. Becomes a reminder of all I cannot see. Behind doors, windows, in written words. Why I check in. With neighbors, students, friends. Myself. Why I write. Especially now, in pandemic times, when our ways in (and out) are limited. In these times it is easy to assume that others want to be left alone. That they know how to reach out, can reach out, are able to name the things that cause their pain. Our pain. We assume they know; we assume that everyone has a gift to open on Christmas morning. In her final entry, Marcia copies “Ithaka” by the Greek poet Constantine Cavafy. And if you find her poor, Ithaka won’t have fooled you. / Wise as you will have become, so full of experience, / you’ll have understood by then what these Ithakas mean. This Ithaka of yours, Marcia, I understand. n CMarie Fuhrman is the author of Camped Beneath the Dam: Poems (Floodgate 2020) and co-editor of Native Voices (Tupelo 2019). Fuhrman is also the director of the Elk Rivers Writers Workshop and resides in the mountains of West Central Idaho.

DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 7


COMMUNITY

COPS OR CULTURE? With pitches for its empty library, East Central debates how to strengthen community ties and safety

BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

L

ate this year, East Central welcomed the city’s first new library space paid for with a 2018 levy. Not only did the neighborhood gain the new space, but it also saw an opportunity open up for the old East Side Library, which shares a parking lot with the Martin Luther King Jr. Community Center just off South Stone Street and East Sixth Avenue. While ideas for the old library space were first floated a few years ago, the neighborhood is now heading into a full outreach process to figure out the best ways to grow a sense of community in that space while addressing safety concerns in the area. So far, two major proposals for very different uses have been considered: a multicultural community center focused on bringing different immigrant communities together, or a police precinct/ community policing office that would increase the visibility of law enforcement in a neighborhood that has struggled in recent years. East Central has seen at least two deadly shootings in the last year, and it has one of the highest crime rates in the city, according to data from both the Spokane Police Department and Spokane County Sheriff’s Office. While other ideas are welcomed, the community discussion so far has raised crucial questions about how to build a safer community in East Central. Do residents want to have more police in the area who’d potentially be able to respond to calls faster? Or do they want to build a safer place by increasing opportunities for people from all walks of life to interact and receive services they need? ...continued on page 10

Lili Navarrete (left) and Miguel Gonzales hope to see a Hispanic Community Center in the old East Side Library. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

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NEWS | COMMUNITY

Duffleboard Flatstick Pub | 618 W Main Should this vacant library become a health clinic? Community center? A C.O.P.S. shop?

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“COPS OR CULTURE?,” CONTINUED... Not everyone agrees on the right answer. But in early November, Spokane City Councilmember Betsy Wilkerson asked the City Council to commit not to vote on who may lease that space until the residents of East Central have had a thorough chance to weigh in. The council agreed, unanimously passing a resolution that formalized that commitment. “I know there’s two proposals out there, but I’m hoping there are others,” Wilkerson says. “I’m hoping that whatever comes will activate that space for young people and seniors so there’s lots of positive activity going on around there.”

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The earliest ideas for the old library space included the possibility of a police precinct or a shared space with a C.O.P.S. shop. The Spokane Police Department funds the nonprofit Spokane C.O.P.S. (Community Oriented Policing Services), which operates about a dozen locations around the city staffed by volunteers. People can use those spaces to coordinate neighborhood watch groups, report small crimes and in some cases get help with fingerprinting a small crime scene (such as a broken car window). Police sometimes park their patrol cars at the C.O.P.S. locations while on duty as they write reports and communicate with residents, increasing visibility of the force in the area. The idea is to help build community relationships. There’s already an East Central C.O.P.S. location north of the freeway on East First Avenue, but the current proposal would move that shop to the East Side Library space. Usually requests for C.O.P.S. locations come from the neighborhoods themselves, with areas hit by crime asking for a shop to be put there, explains Patrick Striker, executive director of Spokane C.O.P.S. “It’s really asking, ‘What does the community want?’ and if a precinct seems like a great idea, great. If there’s pushback against police presence, that’s where a C.O.P.S. shop can bridge that gap,” Striker says. “But I think just listening to the community is important.”

In late September, another serious contender for the old library space entered the fold. The Hispanic Business/Professional Association (HBPA) submitted plans to the city to build out a Hispanic Community Center that would serve as a multicultural hub in that space. The organization already works with a variety of immigrant groups and people from different cultures, many of whom speak English as their second language, says Lili Navarrete. She serves as the professional association’s director of social justice, and she is the state’s commissioner on Hispanic affairs for the northeast region. “We want it to be a place where people of different ethnic backgrounds can gather,” Navarrete says. “We would like to see that building turned into a center where we can all gather and support each other. Regardless of which country we come from, the struggle is the same: acceptance by the White community in Spokane.” East Central is a diverse neighborhood, with a greater density of minorities than some nearby neighborhoods, according to the 2020 Census. The Hispanic business association already works with Spanish-speaking immigrants and business owners, along with immigrants from around the world who need help with everything from navigating taxes to accessing food assistance. Navarrete, who moved to Spokane as a child in the 1980s, recalls how her family needed food bank assistance, but the foods available didn’t always make sense to the family. “We had no idea how to cook, like, boxed mashed potatoes,” she says. “HBPA holds food drives with culture-appropriate food.” The association also provides scholarships and facilitates business connections within the community. With the cultural center, the association could expand on the work they and other nonprofits are already offering out of a small office downtown, explains Miguel Gonzales, HBPA president. “We’ve outgrown our space, really, we have,” Gonzales says.


The association envisions using the East Side space to offer things like indoor small business markets, dance and art presentations or classes from different cultures, and office space where people can get help accessing services and understanding civil rights, Gonzales says. HBPA could also potentially provide private space for another organization that helps people escape domestic violence, he says. “If we were located in the East Central neighborhood, that puts us in the middle of where we need to be,” Gonzales says. “That puts us between the Valley and our [Spanish-speaking] community that lives in Cheney and Airway Heights.”

COMMUNITY INPUT

During a special meeting of the East Central Neighborhood Council on Nov. 16, the voting residents of the volunteer council were prepared to support a proposal to use the East Side Library space for some type of police presence. The MLK Center supported that proposal during the meeting, noting that recent graffiti and violence in the area have been a concern. But the neighborhood council was unaware of the proposal for the multicultural community center, which has received letters of support from organizations like the Carl Maxey Center, the multiethnic business association AHANA and WSU’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine. After hearing about the additional possibility for the site, the neighborhood council opted to table the vote until they can gather more input, says Randy McGlenn, council chair. “This has been culminating over a couple of years, but now we’re down to the wire, and we’re seeing lots of people stepping up and having proposals and ideas,” McGlenn says. “It’s very interesting to see more people engaging.”

“It is a gathering space. How do we help use that space to really grow the neighborhood?” Councilmember Wilkerson says she has also talked with different groups about whether the site might be good for a health clinic, while McGlenn says other ideas have included a technology center or a location for Community Court. “While I’m sure the decision about the East Side Library might be a contentious one amongst some of our advocates, I think the outcome is we’re getting better engagement in our neighborhood,” McGlenn says. Wilkerson says she hopes to have a more formal outreach plan to make sure the whole East Central neighborhood knows about the opportunity to weigh in on the future of that space (not just the neighborhood council). That process could include sending mailers and hosting public meetings in the community spaces that already exist in the neighborhood. As of Monday, the council opened a “ThoughtExchange” link where anonymous feedback for suggested use of the space can be shared at tejoin.com/ scroll/418291364. “One of the deciding factors will be whoever occupies that space has to be sustainable,” Wilkerson says, noting that the city can agree to a long-term lease, but likely not long-term funding. “It is a gathering space. How do we capitalize on that, and how do we help use that space to really grow the neighborhood?” Gonzales says he understands safety and security concerns in the area, but he also hopes that neighbors will see the value in building safety through community activities. “I feel if we were to bring community together in a space where we could share, where we could celebrate not just our culture but any culture, that would bring down those barriers of mistrust,” Gonzales says. “That would truly bring some unity to the neighborhood. True security comes through unity.” n samanthaw@inlander.com

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DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 11


NEWS | EDUCATION

What’s in a Word? Spokane school board adds “equity” to district motto in plan funded by Gates Foundation grant BY WILSON CRISCIONE

F

or years, “Excellence for Everyone” has been the motto of Spokane Public Schools. Those three words have been attached to the district logo and plastered onto signs and the side of buildings. But last week, the district’s board decided to modify the motto by adding two more words. Now, the motto is “Excellence for Everyone Through Equity.” The change is part of a new strategic plan that also includes an updated mission statement, new priorities and new initiatives meant to guide the school district for the next six years, such as investing in early learning opportunities for young kids. The school district used a grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to develop the plan by hiring a consultant firm based in New York called TNTP, formerly known as The New Teacher Project. Spokane Public Schools spokesperson Sandra Jarrard would not share the size of the grant, though the Gates Foundation website shows it gave the district a $150,000 grant in January 2021. Jarrard, in a statement, says the grant was for our “exceptional response to the pandemic” and for the purpose of partnering with “technical assistance providers to support navigating and emerging from the pandemic.” The plan continues the school district’s stated commitment to equity, coming more than a year after the school board passed a racial equity resolution aimed at reducing racial disparities in student discipline and other aspects of education. School Board President Jerrall Haynes says the overall strategic plan is “truly centered around students on an individual level.” Adding “through equity” to the

12 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021

Spokane Public Schools’ motto is about to get a little longer. vision statement, he says, is just a small piece of charting a course for Spokane schools. “They’re two short, quick words that mean a whole lot,” Haynes says. Yet that might present a challenge in itself. The word “equity” has become contentious at times, with some right-leaning school board candidates viewing it as an extension of critical race theory. And the Spokane School Board? It hasn’t provided an exact definition. Instead, the board hopes the community can reach a definition of equity that works. “We ultimately don’t want to get too far ahead of the community in regards to how we are defining that,” Haynes says. “Part of the issue we’ve experienced over the last seven months is that everybody has a different definition for it.”

T

he Spokane Public Schools strategic plan, meant to serve as a sort of road map for the district moving forward, is updated about every six years. This time, the district hired TNTP to develop the plan because the board felt an outside group might have a better perspective. Haynes adds that because of the Gates Foundation grant, the cost to do so “didn’t come out of our pockets.” The change to the vision statement represents a more visible change to the strategic plan than in years past. During the meeting to approve the plan two weeks ago, board member Aryn Ziehnert requested that district leadership more clearly explain to the public what the new motto, “Excellence for Everyone Through Equity,” actually means. Haynes says the board as a whole doesn’t necessarily have a definition yet, though members have a general idea. Board member Nikki Lockwood has said that for her, equity in education means recognizing that certain students or schools need more support based on their circumstances. A representative from TNTP explained that equity meant “making sure that every decision is made to create an equitable outcome.” The school district will work with the community to try to come up with a definition that works for everyone, Haynes says. That will involve partnering with stakeholders and getting public feedback. “The word ‘equity’ has become pretty politically charged and polarizing,” Haynes says. “That’s why it’s important to arrive at an adequate definition together as a community.”

E

quity isn’t the only education buzzword that’s included in the strategic plan. The mission statement says this: “Every Spo-

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kane Public Schools student engages in joyful and challenging learning experiences throughout their educational journey that enable them to become lifelong learners and graduate with knowledge, skills, habits, agency and community connections necessary to pursue their passions and desired post-secondary opportunities.” The plan also contains a “graduate profile,” envisioning the ideal student to make it through high school. It says students should have skills in critical thinking, empathy, learning mindset, collaboration, connectedness and life skills. And then there are four new priorities: connected and caring school community; strong foundation; transitions and supports; and 21st century learning and career pathways. All of this may sound like high-level educational jargon, but Haynes insists that these goals and priorities will have a direct impact on students in the classroom. The graduate profile is “very specific to our LETTERS students,” he says, just Send comments to like the other priorities. editor@inlander.com. It contains goals like increasing inclusion for special education students and improving English language development services. The next step for the district will be outlining indicators holding the district accountable for those goals. “Ultimately the entire plan is truly centered around students on an individual level,” Haynes says. At the board meeting, board member Mike Wiser says he hopes that every staff member including teachers will understand the core elements of the plan and that some may even be able to recite it from memory. “I really hope that in six years, when this is done again, that the board says, ‘We don’t need to change this,’” Wiser says. Lockwood says she’s “honored” to have been part of this process. “I know it’s just words, and we are a big system. But it feels like it’s working towards building community, versus just a system,” Lockwood says. “Our words and intentions do matter.” And for Haynes, the update to the strategic plan to include “equity” is a fitting end to his tenure on the board. Haynes didn’t run for re-election, and the November board meeting was his last full meeting as a member. “I’ve really valued being able to participate in this process, and I genuinely hope and believe this strategic plan is the next step in our district development to be able to serve all students,” Haynes says. n wilsonc@inlander.com


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DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 13


NEWS | POLITICS

Parting the Red State The pandemic has made the fissure dividing Idaho’s Republican party even wider BY DANIEL WALTERS

I

daho state Rep. Priscilla Giddings was unrepentant. As she stood before the Idaho House of Representatives in mid-November, she was charged with sharing a far-right blog post outing and shaming a woman who had accused an Idaho legislator of rape, and then being dishonest and uncooperative when the House Ethics Committee tried to question her about it back in August. But Giddings, referencing the Bible, Hitler-opposing pastor Dietrich Bonhoeffer and “communist China,” insisted that her “intent was pure,” that she only shared the article because it had “both sides of the story,” and promised that she “will continue to fight for freedom.” And when she ended, a crowd of those watching burst into applause and cheers. “If there is another outburst like that,” Speaker of the House Scott Bedke said, “we will clear the gallery.” Over two-thirds of the House voted to censure Giddings, stripping her of one of her committee assignments. And it pushed Luke Malek, a former state representative from Coeur d’Alene, to make a decision. He’d announced his 2022 run for Idaho lieutenant governor more than a year ago, but decided he’d drop out long before the May 17 primary. Giddings was running for the same position. So was Bedke. With them all running as Republicans next year, Malek was worried he would split the vote with Bedke, paving the way for a Giddings victory. (Giddings’ campaign had not responded to the Inlander’s questions by press time.) “I couldn’t have Priscilla Giddings as lieutenant governor on my conscience,” Malek says. “She actually would have influence in that body despite the fact that she does not respect basic decent principles. That’s a scary thought.” He’d seen exactly the sort of damage a lieutenant governor could do: Idaho Lt. Governor Janice McGeachin had gone to war with Idaho’s governor, preparing to challenge him for his seat next year. In other words, in a deep red state like Idaho, the true fight isn’t between Republicans and Democrats, but between mainstream Republicans and more pugilistic and reactionary conservatives. To Malek, it’s the difference between those in the “problem-solving lane” and those who say, “Let’s turn a nonissue into something we can raise our name ID and cash over.” But Branden Durst, a Boise Republican candidate for state superintendent of schools, characterizes it as a fight between business-aligned Republicans and “constitutional conservatives.” “I never identified with the business Republicans,” says Durst, a one-time conservative Democratic exlegislator who says he finally switched to the GOP in

14 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021

Ever since COVID hit, Idaho Gov. Brad Little and Lt. Gov. Janice McGeachin have been at war over how to respond. 2016. “My family is not wealthy.” And if there’s one thing everyone can agree on it’s that the pandemic has become the wedge that has been hammered in deeper and deeper, widening that divide. “The pandemic has done everything for this election cycle, in my race and a lot of other races,” says Durst. “The pandemic has crystalized a lot of issues.”

THE GOVERNOR AND HIS LIEUTENANT

Idaho Gov. Brad Little is a Republican. But in the eyes of some of his fellow Republicans, Little’s leadership was so toxic that even those who hadn’t fought against him were unworthy of the Republican label. After Idaho state Sen. Jim Woodward, R-Sagle, declined to override Little’s veto of legislation constraining the governor’s pandemic-era emergency emergency powers, the Bonner County Republican Central Committee passed a resolution calling upon him to resign, accusing Woodward of siding with Little’s “anti-freedom agenda.” The view was hardly universal — a former Bonners Ferry mayor decried the Bonner County Republicans leadership as “newly minted radicals who are trying to co-opt our party” in the Coeur d’Alene Press — but there’s no question that COVID has intensified the rhetoric of the critics of Little. “I think he’s felt lonely a lot,” Malek says. “There has not been a lot of vocal support.” Little has tried to hew to a middle ground. Unlike Washington’s Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee, he never imposed vaccine mandates or mask mandates, calling on Idaho to follow “personal responsibility.” But unlike, say, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, he hasn’t tried to ban local school districts from implementing vaccine or mask mandates. “He’s playing both sides, and he’s not done either very well,” Durst says of Little. “Why can’t he be more like DeSantis? Why can’t he stand up that way? Frankly he’s in a safer political position to do it.” Despite Little championing the vaccines, Idaho has

the second-lowest vaccination rate in the country. When COVID first hit, and Little joined most governors in imposing a shutdown order, his lieutenant governor responded with outright defiance: McGeachin reopened the tavern her family owns in a display of contempt for Little’s lockdown order. In an Idaho Freedom Foundation video decrying Little’s lockdowns, McGeachin made an appearance holding a gun and a Bible, sitting in a pickup truck draped in the American flag. And when Little has ventured out of the state, McGeachin has been more than happy to wield the governor’s pen. He left briefly in May, and McGeachin issued an executive order banning mask mandates. Little reversed it as soon as he returned, calling it “an irresponsible, self-serving political stunt.” Little left again in early October. McGeachin tried the same ploy, extending Little’s limited ban on state agency vaccine mandates and applying the ban to schools and colleges. Again Little reversed it, citing the Idaho attorney general’s opinion that he wasn’t giving McGeachin control of his office every time he left. Even Durst, no supporter of Little, is critical of McGeachin’s actions in this fight. “It’s just grandstanding,” Durst says. “I would say those tactics have been incredibly divisive.”

A HOUSE DIVIDED

Meanwhile, Bedke, the House speaker running for lieutenant governor, has tried to straddle the divide between the two wings of his party in his own way: In April 2020, he warned Little that “the way you exercise legislative powers now will affect how the Legislature views those powers when it next convenes.” And this year, he attempted to make good on his warning, supporting bills intended to strip away some of the governor’s pandemic authority. Malek says he hopes Bedke views his opposition to the governor as a mistake, but says he gives Bedke the benefit of the doubt that he’s trying to find solutions. “The speaker has been trying to wrangle a House of


Representatives that is very diverse. I think there’s a lot happening behind the scenes that we don’t see,” Malek says. While Bedke has opposed government vaccine mandates, he’s also resisted calls from McGeachin to ban private vaccine mandates, like those imposed by hospitals. For observers like Durst, Bedke’s not aggressive enough. Last month, the Idaho Legislature met to debate pushing back against Biden’s vaccine and testing mandates. But while a bill passed in the House to further limit vaccine-related restrictions in the state, it couldn’t pass the Senate. Durst blames Bedke. “The speaker didn’t play hardball with the Senate,” Durst says. “And he needed to.” But Giddings’ approach draws detractors too: Malek points to the $6 million early learning grant that Giddings helped convince a slim majority of the House to reject back in March. Her objection? Since the grant involved a partnership with the Idaho Association for the Education of Young Children, an affiliate of a national organization that believes in the concept of White privilege, the Legislature would be “voting for social justice ideology to be given, through grant money, to our little ones.” “She accused them of being ‘critical race theory apologists,’ and killed the bill,” Malek says. “Just conjured it up out of nowhere.” But in her fears about “critical race theory” — an academic term conservatives have repurposed to attack a broad array of leftwing racial justice concepts — Giddings is hardly alone in Idaho. In April, McGeachin picked Giddings to serve on her “task force examining indoctrination in Idaho education based on critical race theory, socialism, communism, and Marxism.” Sure, the task force got McGeachin accused of McCarthyism by plenty of those inside and outside Idaho. But it also got her invited on Fox News’ Tucker Carlson Tonight, and that led to a high-level Trump 2022 Tower meeting afterward REPUBLICAN with Donald Trump CANDIDATES himself. And in November, GOVERNOR McGeachin was handed Gov. Brad Little (has not officially the ultimate trump card: announced a re-election campaign) an endorsement from the Lt. Governor Janice McGeachin former president. Ed Humphreys “She will make a fanAmmon Bundy tastic Governor, and will never let you down!” DonLIEUTENANT GOVERNOR ald Trump wrote, while Rep. Priscilla Giddings McGeachin trumpeted in a Speaker of the House Scott Bedke press release that “President Trump at great personal cost fought not only our enemies abroad, but he also had to fight… even some from within his own Republican Party.” McGeachin had echoed Trump’s election conspiracy theories by calling for “forensic audits” in all 50 states of the 2020 election results. Malek doesn’t deny that Trump’s endorsement carries weight in Idaho. “Obviously, that’s a mark in her column, but I think Idahoans are looking for more than an endorsement from Trump,” Malek says. “The extremism that Janice McGeachin has shown in the disregard for decorum and decent policy in the lieutenant governor’s office would be a disastrous thing for Idaho.” McGeachin has received plenty of flak for her embrace of figures like far-right activist Ammon Bundy, calling the words of the man who kicked off the 2016 Malheur National Wildlife Refuge standoff in Oregon “truly inspiring” in a Facebook post a few years ago. But if there’s one advantage Little has over McGeachin, it’s the field of other candidates competing to challenge the governor, which includes Republican Party activist Ed Humphreys — who Malek calls “indistinguishable” from McGeachin — and Ammon Bundy himself. And unlike Malek, Bundy shows no signs of stepping aside to avoid splitting the vote with McGeachin. n danielw@inlander.com

numericacu.com Federally insured by NCUA DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 15


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GIVING THE BEST Our handy guide to helping please every person on your holiday gift list The holiday season has different meanings for everyone obviously, but one of the joys we can hopefully all partake in is buying a little something for a friend, family member, even a faraway pen pal. Of course, sometimes our shopping is done out of obligation — a white elephant for a work party, or something to exchange with your oh-so-thoughtful aunt who sends socks every year — instead of inspiration. Whatever the case is for you, as we enter December and shopping season begins in earnest, the Inlander is here to help with gift suggestions for everyone from the music lover to gardener, fantasy fan or new hockey nut. Good luck out there, and as always, shop local. — DAN NAILEN, editor

16 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021


GIFTS FOR

Video Gamers

A winning array of gifts for the hardcore gamer in your life

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021 has teased the biggest technology shifts of the last five years. The whole of Gen Z was born into a gaming world. The generation that held iPads before walking directs the economy with every dollar it spends. VR matures as a viable mainstream platform and tantalizes as a new step in the technological revolution. Even your sweet septuagenarian grandma can strap a VR headset to her face and slam out some songs on Beat Saber. Another shift — content consumers are becoming content creators. Novice gamers looking to stream can hop on Twitch and be upand-running within hours. The world is progressing anew, and the hot gifts of 2021 jump on board.

BOYFRIEND DUNGEON (RATED T, WINDOWS, MAC) This game might be a fever dream, but it’s certainly a new flavor of dating simulators. Boyfriend Dungeon somehow combines dungeon crawling and finding love. Art style? Very anime-uwu-cute. Premise? As a dating novice, your character can transform potential suitors into people-weapons that represent the date’s personality. With your person-weapon in tow, you descend into a dungeon to battle it out against baddies. “They really will think of everything,” was my first response to Boyfriend Dungeon. With modern dating themes (and forebodings), this is a great gift for teens and young adults. MERINO WOOL UNDIES AND SOCKS

I was turned on to merino wool underthings by a human who spends his free time devoted to researching fabrics. His opinion on merino wool was steadfast — the fabric is the superior material for breathability, absorbing sweat and reducing odor. Wicking moisture and permitting airflow are particularly relevant to anyone who spends extended time in chairs. Merino is an absolutely stellar gift for gamers holed up in a computer room, butts pancaked on a vinyl or leather seat. A perfect gift for any humanoid who exudes sweat from any sort of gland. A 100 percent stink-free gaming experience takes several steps. Showering is 70 percent. Changing clothes is an additional 20 percent. The last 10 percent is the glory of merino wool.

BLUETOOTH PHONE CLIP

Start a game on your phone. Grab an Xbox controller. Duct tape both to your hands to create a technological frankenstein mobile-

BY CLAIRE MUNDS gaming platform. Luckily, you can swap the duct tape for a controller phone clip to take your game on the road. Xbox’s bluetooth controllers conveniently connect to most phones, so pick one up if your giftee likes to mobile game. Big hint — glance at your giftee in the car. Are they precariously balancing their phone and controller on their knees or window sill? Would one deep pothole upend the whole setup? The phone clip might be a good idea.

MANIFOLD GARDEN

(RATED E, WINDOWS, MAC, PLAYSTATION, SWITCH, XBOX) Every couple of years there’s “that game,” the timeless, intriguing, classy one that promises a place on your game shelf forever. Manifold Garden is just that — a spatial, geometric and gravity-driven puzzler reminiscent of both Portal games. Challenges are intuitive instead of explicit. Levels are challenging, but not sadistic. If your giftee likes crossword puzzles, enjoys architecture or reads tidbits about outer space for fun, they’ll probably like this game.

VUZE XR

Virtual-reality tech is on the rise after Zuckerberg’s Metaverse announcement, a proclamation of his intent to create an allimmersive online virtual reality “experience.” Dystopian at best, humankind has been edging further and further toward total virtual reality since we figured out how to display cat gifs on computers. The “metaverse,” a term used to describe fully immersive augmented reality, originates from a 1990s science fiction novel that explicitly discusses why the metaverse is a bad idea. It’s the plot of Ready Player One. It’s the game Sims, but with real people. It’s the downfall of humanity, disguised as the next big revolution. The revolutions of the industrial and agricultural variety were fine, but were they faultlessly good for humankind? Jurassic Park once espoused, “Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether they could, they didn’t stop to think if they should.” Then everyone was eaten by dinosaurs. Anyways, the Vuze XR camera captures images and videos with two lenses, producing 3D content perfect for VR headsets. The two camera lenses rotate, allowing users to record 360-degree content as well. Fun!

OCULUS QUEST 2

Oculus has been minting quality VR devices as of late, and its Quest 2 is solid enough to get a thumbs-up. VR tech has clunked along to product maturity over the years, but we’ve finally arrived at something usable. There was a bit of backlash over the fact that the Quest 2 requires a Facebook login. This now makes sense with Zuckerberg’s Metaverse secret incubation.

BLUE YETI PRO MICROPHONE

In 2021, everyone is a content creator. We have internet followers and carefully curated personas to share filtered pics of lunches, quirky videos of cats sleeping, and sepia sunsets with inspirational and spiritual quotes. When we sit down to game, we turn on a camera and mic, sharing our next hour or two of gameplay with our followers. The Blue Yeti Pro is a solid mic for streaming, recording, even Zoom calls. If your giftee records any sound at all and shares it online, get them a mic that will record those noises well.

TASTEFUL VIDEO GAME ART

Setting the gaming-room ambience sets gamers up for success. A solid wall-art display is also pivotal for any giftee who spends time on video. Separate your giftee from the common riffraff with some top tier art. Now your giftee is trendy and cool. Step one — ask your giftee about their current video game obsession. Step two — go to websites like Redbubble or Society6 to find a cool art print of that game. Both sites will canvas mount or frame your selected artwork. Easy peesy.

ICARUS (RATING PENDING, WINDOWS) I like flexin’ my graphics card muscles and really experiencing grass texture and sunlit streams on screen. Icarus (currently in beta) promises to do just that. Minecraft with Skyrim graphics, meshed with the recurring nightmare that you were left to die on an alien planet. Forest fires, storms, not getting eaten by bears — the classic suspects of survival. But the session-based gameplay adds something interesting: no permanent bases. You’re in and out in either solo or co-op mode. Hop on the preorder now to take part in beta weekends until release. n DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 17


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GIFTS FOR

Music Lovers Shopping for music fans isn’t easy, but this guide makes it easier

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he problem with buying for music fans: Albums are the easiest gift, but they tend to already own all the records they’re passionate about. Sure, you could buy them some new tunes you think they’d dig, but that’s always a risk. With that in mind, here are a few vinyl options they’re unlikely to already have in their catalogs, plus some more outside-the-box ideas.

VINYL

THE ROLLING STONES, TATTOO YOU

(40TH ANNIVERSARY REMASTERED 5 LP BOX SET) It is absolutely wild that it’s been 40 years since the Rolling Stones last truly classic album. This new box set captures the glory of the Tattoo You era with a remastered version of the record, nine unreleased Lost & Found songs, and a three-LP rendition of the band’s 1982 Still Life tour stop at Wembley Stadium. As “Start Me Up” suggests, the band seemingly will never stop. (A four-CD box set is also available.) $198 • therollingstonesshop.com

ALMOST FAMOUS: MUSIC FROM THE MOTION PICTURE

(20TH ANNIVERSARY SUPER DELUXE BOX SET) Hit the road with Stillwater again via this expansive catalog of the music from Cameron Crowe’s cinematic classic rock ode, Almost Famous. Spanning seven vinyl LPs, five CDs and a Stillwater 7-inch, the collection spans well over 100 tracks including Nancy Wilson’s

18 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021

BY SETH SOMMERFELD score, original songs from the movie, classics used in the movie (Led Zeppelin, Jimi Hendrix, etc.), beloved dialogue from the movie, and outtake jams. Almost Famous fans will also be delighted with the 40-page photo book, a re-creation of William Miller’s Rolling Stone cover story on Stillwater, replica Stillwater ticket stubs, photos and more memorabilia. (Six-LP box sets and five-CD box sets are also available.) $300 • shop.udiscovermusic.com

BO BURNHAM, INSIDE (VINYL) You can finally physically bring Inside inside. Bo Burnham’s Netflix musical film/comedy special might be the only meaningful piece of pandemic art to date. The album surprisingly stayed at the top of the Billboard charts for a few months based only on streaming numbers, thanks to the catchy and emotionally cutting digital-age humor of “Welcome to the Internet” and “All Eyes On Me” (plus the incredibly TikTok-able “Bezos I”). Now it’s finally a tangible product for our intangible times. $35 • Releases Dec. 17

BOOKS

THE STORYTELLER: TALES OF LIFE AND MUSIC BY DAVE GROHL

It’s too bad Dave Grohl doesn’t have any stories to tell. What’s that you say? He actually grew up around the thriving Washington, D.C., hardcore punk scene, became the drummer in Nirvana as they created a cultural moment and became the biggest band in the world,

then turned his self-recorded solo project Foo Fighters into another one of the biggest bands in the world, and met every major music star along the way?! OK, fine, yeah. His new memoir might have an interesting story or two... $30 • Auntie’s Bookstore

MUSIC IS HISTORY BY QUESTLOVE As anyone who saw his documentary Summer of Soul can attest, Questlove is a viable musical historian. In his new book, Music Is History, he picks one song for each of the past 40 years (starting in 1971) and uses it as a lens through which culture, politics, race and the music of the moment can be viewed. Considering how much of our own personal history and memories can be tied to the music we were listening to in a given year, the book’s structure really makes sense as a framework for analysis. $30 • Auntie’s Bookstore SELLOUT: THE MAJOR-LABEL FEEDING FRENZY THAT SWEPT EMO, PUNK, AND HARDCORE (1994-2007) BY DAN OZZI

There’s no dirtier word in the punk rock lexicon than “sellout.” Music journalist Dan Ozzi digs deep into the last pre-streaming industry boom period for the genre by telling the stories of the major label debut albums from 11 of the era’s most notable bands — ranging from the massive successes (Green Day, My Chemical Romance) to the commercial failures (Jawbreaker, The Distillers), and even the bands that flopped only to rebound (Jimmy Eat World). $28 • Auntie’s Bookstore


MISCELLANEOUS

TEXSENS BLUETOOTH COLOR-CHANGING LIGHTBULB SPEAKER

Texsens is here to answer the musical question: Why can’t I listen to Lorde’s “Green Light” on a green light bulb? Yes, this eight-watt LED bulb has a builtin bluetooth speaker and adjustable color wheel (controlled via app) to turn any space into your own private dance club. Snag multiple lightbulbs for a surround sound (and color) experience. $30, texsens.com

VINYL RECORD COASTERS

Etsy shop 2VinylCats came up with the perfect solution for what to do with old beat-up vinyl records — pop out the center with the album info labeling and turn them into drink coasters. Sold in sets of four, these nostalgiapacked colorful creations come in a variety of genres: ’70s classic rock, jazz, country, British Invasion, folk, R&B, and even Christmas. It’s certainly the coolest place to rest your cool drinks. $25 • etsy.com/shop/2VinylCats

CUSTOM SONG WOOD CARVING

Looking for a way to represent someone’s favorite song? Georgia artists Jenny Lee and Justin Roberts came up with a gorgeous solution in the form of their custom-made wood carvings of sound waves. The couple will transform any tune into a hangable piece of art (28 by 8 inches) finished with a black or walnut stain. You can further personalize things with customized wording above and below the wavelength, be it the artist/title info, lyrics, or your own heartfelt message. $250 • uncommongoods.com

MUSIC GENIUS PLAYING CARDS

Even if you’re not a card shark, the Music Genius deck of cards is rad simply as a work of art. Illustrator Rick Lee divides 54 musical icons into suits — pop for hearts (Prince, Madonna, Beyoncé), blues/soul/ R&B for clubs (Billie Holiday, B.B. King, Winehouse), folk/country for diamonds (Cash, Dylan, Dolly), rock for spades (Elvis, Springsteen, Cobain), and jokers (Bowie and Bjork) — creating a vividly drawn cast for the most sonically diverse game of Go Fish around. $10 • ucommongoods.com

Join us for the Circling Raven 2021 Holiday Sale! LOOKING FOR THE PERFECT GIFT FOR THE GOLF LOVER THIS HOLIDAY SEASON? Buy an Advantage Member Card, Get a Player Development Card for FREE $25 Introductory Indoor Golf Lessons Limit of one per customer

Discounts on all Indoor Winter Golf Lessons Purchase Entire Summer Couples Date Nights Series for the Price of 4 Nights Receive Discounts and Added Perks on all Academy Program Purchases Any purchase from now through December 31ST online or in-person receives an entry into a drawing. Scan the QR code for more details.

KARAOKE MICROPHONE SPEAKER

An underdiscussed heartbreaking loss during COVID times? Karaoke bars. But you can make anywhere your karaoke stage for friends and/or family with this combination bluetooth microphone and speaker. Connect to your phone and hear music blast out of the side speakers, then belt along with controls to tweak your voice’s treble, bass, and echo. (I call dibs on singing “Wrecking Ball.”) $50 • uncommongoods.com

MASTERCLASS SUBSCRIPTION

If your music lover is more of a doer than just a listener, a subscription to MasterClass might be a perfect fit. The online lesson service has a cache of 20 music classes from massive names in the industry. Want to learn the songwriting craft? Alicia Keys, St. Vincent and Nas are here to help. Trying to pick up an instrument? Study guitar with Carlos Santana or Tom Morello, drumming with Sheila E., or violin with Itzhak Perlman. Want to learn about film scoring? Take Hans Zimmer or Danny Elfman’s classes. $180 (one-year membership) • masterclass.com. n

W E LC O M E H O M E .

CASINO | HOTEL | DINING SPA | CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF 3 7 9 1 4 S O U T H N U K WA LQ W • W O R L E Y, I D A H O 8 3 8 7 6 1 800-523-2464 • CDACASINO.COM

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GIFTS FOR

Fantasy Freaks

Get your sci-fi, fantasy or cosplay fan something they’ll really love

Stan Miller Exhibition

Watercolor and Egg Tempera Paintings

Dec 10 | 5-9 pm Dec 11 | noon to 6 pm Dec 12 | noon to 4 p.m

3138 E. 17th Ave. Spokane, WA FOR MORE INFO:

509.768.9354 stan@stanmiller.net stanmiller.net

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BY QUINN WELSCH

e’re living in the age of the nerd. Our obsession with comic books, science fiction and fantasy has become a thing to be celebrated. Lucky for you, that makes finding a gift for the anime superfan or Marvel cosplayer in your life easier than ever. There are a ton of fun and funky shops that cater specifically to this demographic in our region, and even more options online. But don’t just go for the collectibles or toys that you can find at any generic bookstore. Get them something that you know they will put to good use.

PAPERBLANKS SKETCH BOOK

At its core, we love science fiction and fantasy because they inspire our imagination, whether it’s Marvel Comics or Magic: The Gathering. Encourage that imagination by gifting someone you love a sketch pad and some high-quality pencils from Spokane Art Supply. Maybe your gift inspires them to pursue a career as an artist or designer. $25 • Spokane Art Supply • 1303 N. Monroe St.

NEMESIS BOARD GAME

You and up to four of your friends are trapped on a ship infested with murderous aliens known as “intruders.” You must work together to survive, but deception comes into play as you each work to complete your secret assignments. Nemesis is a horror-survival game billed as a “cinematic” experience akin to Ridley Scott’s Alien franchise. The gameplay is something like Dungeons & Dragons mixed with the hit video game Among Us. It comes with some really sleek (and paintable!) models used to represent the player characters and the baddies. $149 • B Side Games • 2525 E. 29th Ave. Ste. 9

THE HAND OF THE SUN KING

The Inland Northwest has no shortage of novelists. This year, give the gift of a fantasy novel from one of our local authors, like J.T. Greathouse. His novel The Hand of the Sun King, released in August, is a coming-of-age story about an adolescent who must choose between two paths: that of his father, the loyal hand of the god-like Sienese emperor; or that of his mother, who represents the free-spirited resistance to the empire. This internal conflict is merely the beginning of a clash between two forces that will erupt in a cosmic war. $18 • Auntie’s Bookstore • 402 W. Main Ave.

SEGA GENESIS

SAT. DEC. 11 10AM-6PM SUN. DEC. 12 12-4PM FREE ADMISSION!

SUPPORT LOCAL ARTISTS!

5 MILE GRANGE 3024 W. STRONG • SPOKANE URBANARTCOOP.ORG 20 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021

Digital purchases and subscription services have taken all the fun out of giving the gift of video games. A Microsoft Store gift card really doesn’t bring the same excitement as, say, a copy of Sonic the Hedgehog 2. Bring back some of that excitement with a retro gaming console, like Sega Genesis. You can find one at the Gaming Grotto, along with some old game cartridges to go along with it. Just make sure you have a compatible TV! $50 • Gaming Grotto • 3808 N. Monroe St.

DUNE BOOKS

You’ve recently seen Dune (part one), and now you’re hooked. Lucky for you, part two is in production. But why wait? You could easily learn the conclusion for yourself before the second film. And you don’t have to end there. Author Frank Herbert, a Pacific Northwest native, released five additional books in the Dune series, and they all hold up. Follow the twists and turns of space and spice. You may be surprised where they lead. Auntie’s Bookstore has the first three novels in the series on the shelf, or you can order a boxed six-book set through Auntie’s or Wishing Tree Books. $108 for six-book boxed set • Auntie’s Bookstore • 402 W. Main Ave. • Wishing Tree Books • 1410 E. 11th Ave.

CRUNCHYROLL SUBSCRIPTION

Maybe your giftee has been bitten by the anime bug. I’m sorry to inform you the only cure is, sadly, more anime. Chances are, they’ve already been exposed to heavy hitters like Neon Genesis Evangelion and Attack on Titan. Impress them with a subscription to Crunchyroll, an anime-only streaming service that boasts a galaxy of vibrant and weird TV series you would probably never guess existed. For example, Sekko Boys is a show about the manager of a popular boy band whose members comprise four talking Greco-Roman stone busts. There are countless hours in the Crunchyroll library, and it’s always growing. $8/month • crunchyroll.com

COWBOY BEBOP HOODIE

Netflix’s live adaptation of the beloved anime classic Cowboy Bebop was released in November and the reviews are… well, not good. But whether your gift recipient is an anime purist or a newfound fan of the space-western, they’ll probably still dig some merch. Pick up a black Cowboy Bebop hoodie from atsuko.com, the official merch store for the show. $54.40 • atsuko.com n


Our brand-new gaming floor features twice as much room with over 400 new machines including industry favorites like The Walking Dead by Aristocrat and South Park by Everi. We’ve also added a larger non-smoking section, expanded table games, additional dining option, sports book and poker room coming soon. Visit our website for the latest in expansion news!


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GIFTS FOR

Hockey Heads

A night watching the Spokane Chiefs could be just what the new hockey fan needs. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

What to get for the new Kraken fan in the family

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ases of hockey fever are at an all-time high in Washington this winter, thanks to the establishment of the Seattle Kraken as the newest team in the National Hockey League. Whether they’re a longtime, die-hard hockey fan, or new to the game and swept up in the excitement, someone on your list is most likely captivated by the most wintery of team sports. Maybe you’re one of those people, too, in which case there are a few self-serving but not selfish ideas to consider.

STREAMING SERVICE

Watching the Seattle Kraken on TV here in Spokane is pretty easy. Almost all of their games are broadcast on ROOT Sports. If your cable package doesn’t include it, you’ve certainly got a friend who does, as does probably every bar in town. But the Kraken aren’t the only team in the NHL. If the arrival of an NHL team in Washington has made a new hockey fan out of someone in your life, give them the gift of diving head first into as much hockey as they please. A subscription to ESPN+, ESPN’s streaming service, provides live and on-demand access to more than 1,000 out-of-market NHL games this season. $7/month or $70/year • plus.espn.com/nhl

A NIGHT OUT

If the Kraken fan you know and love could use a few friends to root with, treat them to dinner, drinks and a show at one of Spokane’s

22 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021

BY WILL MAUPIN two hockey hotspots. The Hub Tavern has been serving hockey fanatics in Spokane for nearly a decade, since the days when an NHL team in Seattle was nothing more than a pipedream. A much more recent addition to the local hockey scene is Lord Stanley’s, which opened earlier this year as a dedicated hockey bar. The name, honoring the Lord Stanley who gave his name to the NHL’s famous Stanley Cup trophy, says it all. Both bars are part of the Anchor Alliance, the Kraken’s official network of fan bars. If you want an established community of fans, consider The Hub. If a more expansive menu is what you’re looking for, try Lord Stanley’s. If you’re going to do it right, though, treat your loved one to a game at both. Lord Stanley’s • 108 N. Washington St., Suite 101 • The Hub Tavern • 2926 N. Monroe St.

CHIEFS TICKETS

You don’t have to travel across the state to catch quality hockey live and in person. The Chiefs have been playing hockey here in Spokane since 1985. In that time the team has produced more than 60 future NHL players. Plus, unlike tickets to an NHL game, Chiefs tickets won’t break the bank. Like all Spokane sports teams, the Chiefs have a strong and passionate following. The Chiefs consistently rank among the top 10 teams in terms of average attendance among the 60 teams in the Canadian Hockey League. $18-$30 • spokanechiefs.com

KRAKEN JERSEY

Clothes aren’t usually the most exciting gift to receive, but jerseys are an exception to that rule. If you know someone who is a budding Kraken fan but struggling to show their true colors with the right shades of blue — ice and deep sea, to be specific — the gift of a Kraken jersey would be just what the doctor ordered. Do some digging to learn who their favorite player is, or play it safe and grab them a jersey with no name or number on the back. Replica jerseys aren’t quite the real thing, but they do the trick at a lower price point. Authentic jerseys run more expensive, but they’re made to the same standards of the jerseys the players wear on the ice. $130-$180 • Just Sports NorthTown Mall • 4750 N. Division St. n


GIFTS FOR

The Crafty Finding the perfect goodies for a family of DIY fanatics

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BY NATALIE RIETH

IY projects are the perfect way to de-stress. During the holiday season, when rowdy family gatherings, extensive shopping lists and extreme holiday baking come into play, the demand for a therapeutic craft night is surely heightened. Looking for the perfect holiday gift for a family of DIY fanatics? Here is a mix of holiday and non-holiday DIY gifts that are guaranteed to equip the perfect family craft night for adults and kids of varying ages.

Gift cards are available at the Coeur Rewards booth, Spa Ssakwa’q’n and Golf Pro Shop. Shop with your Coeur Rewards points at all locations.

Mountain Lodge Gift Shop

KNITTING SUPPLIES

SUNDAY – THURSDAY | 9 AM – 9 PM FRIDAY & SATURDAY | 9 AM – 11 PM

A self-assembled basket of used knitting supplies is the perfect gift for knitting-enthused families who have a heart for sustainability. Art Salvage has a variety of used knitting needles, colored yarn and instruction books to supply the perfect family knitting night. And what’s a better holiday project than knitting a new scarf or hat to keep you warm in the frigid winter weather? Light the fireplace, gather the family, and get those knitting needles moving! $1-$10 per item • Art Salvage Spokane • 1925 N. Ash St.

Open daily year-round for your gift needs. Jewelry, casino logo items, holiday decor, Native American artwork, premium and imported cigar gift boxes and more.

Circling Raven Pro Shop DECEMBER 1 ST – DECEMBER 23 RD WEDNESDAY – SATURDAY | 10 AM – 6 PM SUNDAY | 10 AM – 3 PM Shop the award-winning Pro Shop to find unique gift items and we’ll do the holiday gift wrapping for you! Plus, our Circling Raven Advantage or Player Development Cards make the perfect gift and are available in-store or online. The Circling Raven Pro Shop is closed December 24TH and 25TH.

Spa Ssakwa’q’n Boutique

PAINT WORKS KITS

SUNDAY, MONDAY & THURSDAY | 10 AM – 6 PM TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY | 10 AM – 4 PM FRIDAY & SATURDAY | 10 AM – 8 PM

Paint-by-number kits are a crafting classic DIY-able for creators of all ages willing to invest time in a long-term painting project. Spokane Art Supply has Paint Works kits that range in difficulty, size and theme and include the necessary paint colors, brushes and canvas to help you channel your inner Van Gogh. If the final masterpiece is worthy of hanging on the family gallery wall, take a trip back to Spokane Art Supply for custom framing. $10-$20 • Spokane Art Supply • 1303 N. Monroe St.

BABOR cosmetics, NuFace products, Miracle Hair Oil, Spa Ssakwa’q’n Spa Scents Eucalyptus products and leading professional skin care lines such as BABOR, Farmhouse Fresh, Blue Beautifly, Naturopathica, and more!

MACRAME GARLAND KIT

The spa closes at 4 PM on December 24TH and is closed on December 25TH.

Macrame is back, and in DIY form! Those who lived through the 1970s are definitely exuding a melodramatic eye roll at the mere thought of this trend revival, but you must admit that this darling macrame garland would be the perfect addition to any room’s decor. This DIY kit includes rope, beads and instructions — all you need is a pair of crafting scissors. A beginner macrame design, this DIY kit is perfect for crafters of all ages who are feeling rather groovy. $34 • From Here • 808 W. Main Ave. #251

HOLIDAY SIGN WORKSHOP

A holiday-themed workshop at Board & Brush Creative Studio is the perfect gift for crafty parents in need of some new holiday decor or a date away from the kids. Board & Brush Creative studio offers a variety of new holidaythemed designs of framed signs, front porch planks, mason jar holders, seasonal trays, advent calendars and more. All materials are provided by the workshop, and those of age have the opportunity to indulge in a refreshing beer, cider or seltzer while DIY-ing. Board & Brush Creative Studio’s workshops are open to all who are 16 years and older. $68 • Board & Brush Creative Studio • 1314 S. Grand Blvd. n

W E LC O M E H O M E .

CASINO | HOTEL | DINING SPA | CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF 3 7 9 1 4 S O U T H N U K WA LQ W • W O R L E Y, I D A H O 8 3 8 7 6 1 800-523-2464 • CDACASINO.COM

DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 23


Downtown Spokane for the Holidays

PINK FERN PINK FERN

Can’t-Miss Destinations Inside Downtown

W

hile the entirety of downtown Spokane ensures that you’ve got just about everything on your holiday shopping and to-do list covered, sometimes it’s just as fun to explore small sections. You’ll find clusters of shops with similar vibes, which in turn lends each area a unique character. On the North Bank, for example, eclecticism is the watchword, proudly embraced by METRO ECLECTIC (604 N. Monroe St., metroeclectic.com) and its variety of mid-century and Danish modern furniture. WONDERS OF THE WORLD (621 W. Mallon Ave., wondersoftheworldinc.com) in the historic Flour

Mill and TELEPORT VINTAGE + CO. (917 W. Broadway Ave. teleportvintage.com) are excellent places to stumble across the unexpected. For the latest in ultra-local handmade designer fashion, there’s BIRDS IN THE COAST (709 N. Monroe St., birdsinthecoast.com). Round off your visit at the WONDER BUILDING (835 N. Post St., wonderspokane.com), which hosts a Saturday indoor market through the holiday season, featuring a number of local food and craft vendors. The Carnegie Square/West End district has a flair for budget-friendly fashion, thanks to popular boutiques like THE PINK FERN (1107 W. 1st Ave., shoppinkfern.com), ECHO

CONTINUED ON PAGE 26 

24 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021


HAPPY HOLIDAYS Come visit us for great holiday gifts and self care. And don't miss our great holiday promotions coming up. Treatments Available: Cosmetic Injectables IPL - Laser Treatments Skin Treatments Facials Hydrafacials

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C E L E B R AT E W I T H SUS TAINAB LE GIF TS FROM OUR LOCAL SUPPLY CHAIN

Taste the City

W

ith so many amazing tasting rooms and breweries in downtown Spokane, wine aficionados and beer lovers might feel like they’re spoiled for choice. But there’s never been a better reason to start visiting these establishments one by one. This year, the HOLIDAY WINE WALK and SANTA’S PUB HOP will reward adults aged 21+ for stopping in and sampling some of the most special vintages and incredible craft beers that Spokane has to offer. And starting your journey is super easy. Just pick up a map at participating locations like Tempus Cellars, Barrister Tasting Room, Mountain Lakes Brewing Co. or Dry Fly Distilling. Then collect stamps on your loyalty card with each beverage purchase — including cider and non-alcoholic drinks. To claim your promotional prize, return your completed card to the Visit Spokane Visitors Center at the Howard Street entrance to Riverfront Park. 

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Independent since 1978 Downtown Spokane for the Holidays

On the corner of Main & Washington, across from the Grand Hotel

402 W. Main • (509) 838-0206 • auntiesbooks.com

Spokane’s biggest and best Comic, Game, Magic the Gathering and more store Mon-Sun: 10 am - 9 pm (509) 624-0957 • 15 W Main Ave • Spokane, WA 99201 • merlyns.biz

KITCHEN NOW OPEN!

SHOP & DINE ENJOY A DELICIOUS MEAL AND STOCK UP FOR HOLIDAY ENTERTAINING IN OUR BOTTLE SHOP.

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METRO ECLECTIC “CAN’T-MISS DESTINATIONS,” CONTINUED: & ECHO ANNEX (1033 W. 1st Ave., echoconsignment.com) and FRINGE & FRAY (1325 W. First Ave., fringeandfray.net). If home décor is more your thing, A MODERN PLANTSMAN (110 S. Madison St., amodernplantsman.com) is opening soon at the sidewalk level of Hotel Indigo, and makes it easy to find just the right botanical accent. For now, you can find their plants at Boulevard Mercantile. THE BIKE HUB (1403 W. 1st., thebikehubspokane.com), on the other hand, has everything you need for pedal-powered sports and commuting. Coming soon to the area is SPOKANE REFIL-

LERY (110 S. Madison St., spokanerefillery. com), a zero-waste, bring-your-own-container shop that carries eco-conscious skincare and cleaning products. For now you can find them at many holiday markets. The area between Washington and Stevens along Main caters to a mix of cultural pursuits. Conveniently located next door to UNCLE’S GAMES (404 W. Main Ave., unclesgames.com) is the one and only AUNTIE’S BOOKSTORE (402 W. Main Ave., auntiesbooks.com), where bestsellers sit comfortably alongside the classics. Right around

LET US HOST YOUR HOLIDAY PARTY! ASK ABOUT OUR TOURS, PRIVATE EVENTS COCKTAIL/WHISKEY CLASSES [drink responsibly]

TASTING ROOM NOW OPEN MON-WED 4-8 | THU-FRI 2-9 | SAT 12-9 | SUN 12-4 1021 W RIVERSIDE AVE | 509.489.2112 | dryflydistilling.com

26 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021

w 45-seat banquet room available no m events@shawnodonnells.co lity Come in and enjoy our Irish Hospita

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queenofshebaspokane.com 509.328.3958

AUNTIE’S BOOKSTORE

the corner is POTTERY PLACE PLUS (203 N. Washington St., potteryplaceplus.com), an art co-op with pottery, decorative glassworks and more. DECORUM (126 N. Washington St., decorumgift.com) has a selection of quirky, niche and trendy gifts. And what hot drink pairs well with any winter activity? “We launched our ‘I’m Dreaming of

a Chai Christmas’ on Black Friday. It’s our famous chai, but we add mint, peppermint and pine needles for a special holiday blend,” says Drew Henry, founder of REVIVAL TEA (415 W. Main Ave., revivalteacompany.com). On top of Revival’s festively wrapped boxed gift set with four different blends, all teas are buy-one-get-one-halfoff during the pre-Christmas season.  Learn from the

#1 WATL World Record Axe Thrower

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www.Bruttles.com • 509 228-9509 12609 E. Sprague & 828 W. Sprague

803 N POST • SPOKANE, WA

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DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 27


Downtown Spokane for the Holidays

Give The

gift swag

PURGATORY WHISKEY BAR

of

Buy $50 in gift cards, get $10 for yourself-now through Jan 1 10 n post downtown spokane (509) 474-9618

WONDERS OF THE WORLD One of a kind world import shop

LORD STANLEY’S

Food Specials + Drink Deals = Happy Hour

I Wonders of the World has a variety of salt lamps from Pakistan. Bring in this ad or a photo of this ad on your phone for

20% Off

Any one item or total bead purchase. IN THE FLOUR MILL

621 W. Mallon, Spokane • wondersoftheworldinc.com • 509.328.6890

28 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021

LORD STANLEY’S

s it any coincidence that happy hour always has such impeccable timing? In Downtown Spokane, there’s a happy hour around every corner. And what makes them great is the perfect pairing of food and drink specials like you’ll find at TAVOLÁTA (221 N. Wall St., ethanstowellrestaurants.com). Between 4 and 6 pm, the discounted menu offers everything from light nibbles up to full dishes such as the Old World-style spaghetti. As for drinks, there are clever combos like the Assistant to the Regional Manager (bourbon, cassis, beet, black pepper, lemon), local brews like Brick West’s ‘Brick by Brick’ IPA and refreshing herb soda mocktails. Sports fans won’t need to look much further than LORD STANLEY’S (108 N. Washington St., lordstanleysspokane.com), where happy hour can strike at almost any time — although usually when there’s a game on the massive 165-inch projector screen. Typical specials are $1 off draft beers and well drinks. “We’re open for a lot of the famous sports events that take place during winter, like the NHL Winter Classic, so every once in a while, we’ll pick a hockey game and do some kind of special. And we’re proud to be a Seattle Kraken bar, so every time the team scores a goal, we do $3 shots,” says manager Travis Hill, of his establishment that’s named for the NHL championship trophy. “During the holidays, we also do seasonal shots that are festive and fun. Along with drinks like our hot buttered rum, we’ll have chocolate orange shots and candy cane shots.” Based on the success of the original in Tracy, California, PURGATORY WHISKEY BAR (524 W. Main Ave., thepurgatory.com) opened a sister location in downtown Spokane just this past autumn. Their recently introduced “flight of the week” lets you sample a selection of three of Purgatory’s 180+ top-quality whiskies at a great price point. Word has it that they go down even smoother with the artisan bar food like brisket sliders or an elk burger. 


2.6” wide by 3.6” high Gift Cards Available!

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C

Toy Soldiers on the March

elebrating a decade of collaboration, Santa Barbara’s State Street Ballet and the Spokane Symphony are reuniting once again to perform Tchaikovsky’s classic Nutcracker. Between December 2 and 5, you can experience the “Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairies” and other memorable scenes from this holiday tale amid the grandeur of the historic Fox Theater. More than 40 local young ballet dancers from area studios are scheduled to take part as well; Morihiko Nakahara conducts. Tickets and more info are available at spokanesymphony.org — or just stop in at the theater box office (1001 W. Sprague Ave.) while you’re downtown. 

COUPON

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“Best Southern Food in Washington”

Downtown Holiday Events WINTER MARKET AT THE PAVILION

Riverfront’s second annual Winter Market hosts 35 local vendors and artisans offering a variety of goods, including handmade items, prepared food, gifts and more. Wednesdays from 3-7 pm, through Dec. 22. Free. Pavilion at Riverfront, 574 N. Howard St. riverfrontspokane.com (509-6256000)

CHRISTMAS TREE ELEGANCE

Spokane Symphony Associates hosts this annual 13-day event that attracts more than 100,000 attendees around the PNW and features the raffle of 15 themed, decorated trees on display at the Historic Davenport Hotel (10 S. Post St.) and River Park Square (808 W. Main Ave). Through Dec. 12. Raffle tickets are $1 each. spokanesymphonyassoc.org

CHEAP SKATE TUESDAY

Try one of our Gourmet Hot Dogs, Veggie Dogs, Sausages or Flatbreads!

Free skate rentals are included with each paid admission, every Tuesday through Feb. 22 during regular hours. $5.95-$7.95. Numerica Skate Ribbon, 720 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. my.spokanecity.org/riverfrontspokane(509-625-6600)

COMING NEXT WEEK Check out the latest in Downtown Spokane in next week’s edition of CITY SIDEWALKS inside the Inlander. Find out where to find great holiday gifts, take a tour of downtown’s craft brewing scene and get hyped for some Spokane Chiefs hockey.

Holiday deals all season long! GIFTS THAT TURN BACK TIME!

BOO ATTICUS RADLEY’S COFFEE & GIFTS DOWNTOWN SPOKANE • HOWARD ST.

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102 N Howard St • Spokane

(509) 255-3688 wilddawgs.com

DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 29


Gifts for the Holidays Everything must go clearance sale!

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Downtown Spokane for the Holidays

DECORUM downtown spokane

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11am -5pm through the Holiday season

126 N WASHINGTON ST

509.340.9830 • DECORUMGIFTS.COM

Strange and unusual

Downtown Spokane on Howard St.

30 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021

Windows on Holiday History

ince making their return in 2017 after several decades in storage, the historic WINTERTHEMED WINDOW DISPLAYS from the former Crescent department store have quickly resumed their place as a seasonal tradition for families, visitors and downtown shoppers. The restored figurines — which include holiday icons like elves, nutcrackers and gingerbread houses — can be found in their usual spot at the Grand Hotel, where local artists like Stephanie Bogue, Melanie Lieb, Derrick Freeland Jazmin Ely and Mallory Battista have designed and arranged this year’s installations under the creative direc-

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

tion of Tiffany Patterson. However, the displays have also expanded to new locations across downtown this year. It’s now possible to catch them at The Fox Theater and the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture, too. They’re all on show until January 2. 


G

I FT UIDE

GIFTS FOR

Wine Lovers

Why sit at home when you can enjoy a glass at Whim Wine Bar? ALICIA HAUFF PHOTO

A variety of gifts for the vino lover in your life — even if that’s you

W

hen it comes to holiday gifts, few things are as versatile as wine, with its vast bouquet of flavors, accessories and tasting experiences. In recent years, the Spokane wine scene has grown to include excellent options for everyone from novice drinkers to those with more sophisticated palettes.

WINE BAR EXPERIENCE

Start your shopping downtown with a glass and a slice of pizza at Whim Wine Bar. Whim offers an extensive wine list featuring wines from around the world, as well as beer and cider. Their food menu includes charcuterie, and Frasier-themed thin crust pizzas. Stop by on a weekend to listen to live music while you peruse the bottle shop for gifts. Prices vary • Whim Wine Bar • 808 W. Main Ave. • whimwinebar.com

WINE OR CHEESE CLUB MEMBERSHIP

For wine lovers who’re also foodies, Wanderlust Delicato is a wonderland, with dining, retail and teaching kitchen spaces all in one spot. Check out the gift shop or set up a membership for Wanderlust’s wine or cheese clubs, both of which can be purchased as three-month trials. Cooking classes in the shop’s teaching kitchen, which often feature local chefs and wine makers, also make a great interactive gift! Three-month wine or cheese club memberships $164-$180; two-hour cooking classes (reserve online) $65-$125 • Wanderlust Delicato • 421 W. Main Ave. • wanderlustdelicato.com

BY LEANN BJERKEN BOTTLES, BASKETS & TUMBLERS

Spokane Valley specialty gift shop Simply Northwest has a great selection of locally made wine, wine accessories, gift baskets and other regionally themed gifts for the holidays. Marti’s Mistletoe Magic is a favorite gift basket for wine lovers, containing a bottle of Washington red wine, a smoked Gouda cheese spread, savory crackers and an assortment of chocolate truffles. Looking for something smaller? The Spokane wine tumbler is a great choice for visitors and returning locals alike, with a detailed map of Spokane streets to help navigate to downtown wineries. $30-$65 • Simply Northwest • 11806 E. Sprague Ave., Spokane Valley • simplynorthwest.com

HANDCRAFTED COASTERS, GLASSES & STOPPERS

If you’re looking for something handmade, consider a custom order from local artist Mikayla Orion. Orion creates colorful, hand-painted home decor and kitchen items including marble coaster sets, wine glasses (stemmed or stemless) and wine stoppers.

Shoppers can order online via Orion’s website or reach out through the business’s Facebook or Instagram pages. A small selection of Orion’s products are also available at The Plant Project in Spokane Valley. $15-$45 • Orion’s Original Designs • orionsoriginaldesigns.com

PERSONALIZED BOTTLES & BASKETS

Wine enthusiasts who appreciate a personal touch might enjoy a gift from Latah Creek Winery. This Spokane Valley winery is one of the few that offers holiday shoppers the chance to personalize wine labels. Choose from templates with pre-made holiday themes and greetings, create your own message, or include a special photo! Bottles with personalized labels can also be added into one of Latah’s gift basket options, which pair wine with everything from smoked salmon to huckleberry jam. To order personalized labels, call 509-926-0164. $29-$140 • Latah Creek • 13030 E. Indiana Ave., Spokane Valley • latahcreek.com

A PAINTING NIGHT

For artistically inclined sippers, consider the gift of a night of wine and painting. Two national franchises, Painting with a Twist and Pinot’s Palette, have locations in the greater Spokane area. Each studio offers a selection of in-person and online events, private parties and take-home painting kits. Plan your own party, or purchase gift certificates for friends. Visit their websites for locations, contact information and shopping options. Prices vary • pinotspalette.com • paintingwithatwist.com n

DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 31


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GIFTS FOR

Board Gamers

The best new games, from a Dune offshoot to extreme Monopoly BY T.J. TRANCHELL Chefs Caleb Smith & Chad White are busy creating our new Fall menu for your next visit to Arbor Crest.

Our Mediterraneaninspired menu is full of new dishes like Kashmiri Sweet Fries and Charred Cod Gyro. Try our Marsala Spiced Carrot Cake or Pomegranate Molasses Cookies with Cinnamon ice cream for dessert!

E

very game in the house has been played dozens of times by now, and maybe some pieces are lost. While those games get a chance to collect dust, here are some new games to work into the rotation for your holiday break and beyond. Check Uncle’s Games’ locations or Figpickels in Coeur d’Alene.

ArborCrest.com 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd Spokane, WA

BLUEY: SHADOWLANDS

We can’t all live up to the dad standards set by Bandit, but we can spend some time re-creating an episode of the Australian cartoon. Like the show, this game is rated for 3 years old and up. Players attempt to stay out of the sun in order to reach the cupcake picnic. Setup includes a plastic palm tree that players spin to change the directions on the game board. Playing Shadowlands is a great excuse to watch the show with — or without — your kids. $15

Open Year Round 12-5pm Daily (509) 927-9463

Buy Tickets

Sat. 12/4 vs. Seattle Thunderbirds

32 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021

Toss a teddy bear on the ice when the Chiefs score their first goal. All bears collected will be donated to The SpokesmanReview Christmas Bureau. Plus it’s Family Feast night! Presented By:

Game Time:

7 PM


DUNE: IMPERIUM

This deck-building game includes all the fun of the movie but with much less sand. Yes, there’s a chance the movie wasn’t your thing, but for those intrigued by asserting capitalism in a foreign territory by using a deck of cards and a game board, this is a hot-ticket game. Estimates for this one- to four-player game say it should take between one and two hours to play, which means you won’t spend the last 35 minutes wondering when it will end and needing to use the restroom. The cards themselves are collectible quality, so if you get sick of the game, throw those cards into your Magic: The Gathering deck just to mess with other people. $45-$55, depending on where you find it.

PHOTOSYNTHESIS

Leave behind those Dune deserts, and go plant some trees! That’s the theory behind Blue Orange’s Photosynthesis. The age 8-and-up, two- to four-player game asks players to spend time with the life cycle of trees and engage in environmental awareness. It’s not just about planting trees, though. Players gain more points for having more trees reach maturity and then giving way for younger trees to take over. Sounds like there’s a good lesson to learn. $38

Spice up your holiday season! Find what you need in spices and seasonings at our Spokane store, or find us online at spokanespice.com

TACO VS BURRITO

If you’ve thrown burritos or avocados at your loved ones, or you can’t decide which Americanized food item is better, this card game is for you. The cardbased strategy game was a Kickstarter hit after being invented by a 7-year-old boy. Pour out some hot sauce and act quick: This two- to four-player game takes about 10 minutes to get through, and you should still be on good terms with your family afterward. $20

One block west of Altamont, Two blocks north of Sprague

130 N. Stone St., Spokane, WA • 509-624-1490 • spokanespice.com

MONOPOLY: LONGEST GAME EVER

There are Monopoly games designed for every interest: film franchises, sports teams, cities, other games, and bacon. But what about a game for those players who think they are the best at it and are determined to see every game to its end, instead of just quitting before punches are thrown and you say something you can’t take back? Monopoly: Longest Game Ever is designed to create that ultimate winner. You went bankrupt? Tough; you can’t quit. The game doesn’t end until one player owns everything: every property, every utility, every railroad. The good news is that if that person lands on the right space, they still have to pay taxes on all that equity. It’s a game, after all, not real life. The game is recommended for players 8 and up, and if you lose to a preteen, you deserve it. $21 n

Expe ence Ch stmas Fresh Cut Noble Fir Trees Handmade Wreaths Live Potted Trees Gifts, Decor and More

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DELIVERED TO YOU R INBOX A special Inlander preview, a day early EVERY WEDNESDAY

Food news you can use EVERY THURSDAY

Our top 5 picks for weekend entertainment EVERY FRIDAY Sign up now at Inlander.com/newsletters DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 33


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Does your spirit need a lift this holiday season? If so, consider joining us in meaningful gift giving by adopting a house or an individual for the 3rd Annual Giving Tree event supporting youth and adults with developmental disabilities in residential services in our community. Last year was a huge success and NAC is committed to this project for years to come! Information to the Giving Tree website is below where you can choose a house to support in 2021! We couldn’t do this without you!!

go to www.nwautism.org and follow the Giving Tree link a gift under We are reaching out to you – our community of partners and friends – for help in getting December every tree. All items are to be unwrapped and dropped off at Northwest Autism Center by (s) through 10th so they can be wrapped and delivered in time for Christmas. If you order your purchase to the correct Amazon, you may ship the gift(s) directly to our address and we will see that it is delivered , WA 99202. Spokane 14, Suite Blvd., Falls Spokane E. 528 Center, house and individual: Northwest Autism ly for this Consider making a cash donation if you don’t have time to shop—the money is used exclusive large ticket project and the funds are used to purchase gifts that may not have been adopted or are le. deductib tax items. Remember your donations are s please Please feel free to share this with your friends and family. For additional information or question contact givingtree@nwautism.org or call 509-328-1582

SPONSORED BY

GIFTS FOR

Home Chefs

Perfect additions for cookbook collectors and aspiring foodies The Best Christmas Gift is the One that You Can Create With! 16002 E Broadway Ave Spokane Valley, WA 99037 (509) 928-6037 quiltingbeespokane.com

L

BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

ast year’s culinary adventures might have been about getting reacquainted with our kitchens (and discovering which to-go items reheat successfully in the microwave). This year, the culinary adventurer on your list can take their cooking to the next level with these gifts.

THE DIRTY GOURMET

In Coeur d’Alene, Well-Read Moose owner Melissa Demotte’s staff picks include The Dirty Gourmet, which she’s been field-testing and happily reports that the recipes convert well to at-home use. Peruse 120 recipes for day trips, car camping and backcountry cooking and be ready to impress with dishes like one-pot pasta puttanesca and pineapple upsidedown cake.

GASTRO OBSCURA – FOOD ADVENTURER’S GUIDE

Your beloved cooking enthusiast is also into travel? Perfect. And they’re a trivia buff? Even better. This 448-page tome offers all three with glorious color photos and an insider’s view to cuisine the world over, from the bar inside a Missouri bat cave to the way sloths helped spread avocados throughout Mexico via their poop.

34 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021


NOW OPEN New to downtown Spokane Washington, Roses & Thread is a locally owned women’s boutique. We provide a personalized shopping experience by offering only the most current and classic fashion brands & pieces.

1407 W. First Ave, Spokane, WA 99019 + rosesthreadboutique.com +

Tuesday-Friday 11-5pm Saturday 11-6pm Sunday 11-4pm Monday Closed

rosesthreadboutique

CREATE YOUR

FREE LISTING TODAY

THE COMPLETE COOKBOOK FOR YOUNG SCIENTISTS

Why tell the kids that cooking is all about science, unless of course your progeny is basically a young version of Bill Nye the Science Guy. Join them in geeking out to 75 kid-tested recipes like cinnamon-swirl bread and huevos rancheros, all presented using scientific language to encourage predicting, observing, experimenting and reflecting on results. They’re also learning kitchen safety and measuring — math! — in this new book by America’s Test Kitchen.

OTTOLENGHI TEST KITCHEN - SHELF LOVE

Last year celebrated Israeli-born British chef Yotam Ottolenghi released FLAVOUR, following up on earlier tomes — Plenty, Jerusalem and Plenty More. Go to Spokane’s Wishing Tree Books to get your oven mitts on his Shelf Love, which promises “85+ irresistible recipes for flexible, everyday home cooking that unlock the secrets of your pantry, fridge, and freezer.” Because for most of us, cooking is still a chore, and we can all use a little extra lovin’.

BLACK FOOD

A cookbook can be a cultural roadmap, showing how history, geography and current events shaped the evolution of culinary traditions. Black Food, from Bryant Terry, the James Beard award-winning author of Afro-Vegan and Vegetable Kingdom, is such a map. Available at Auntie’s Bookstore, Black Food features 100 guest contributors throughout the United States, as well as Africa, the Caribbean and South America, and essays, poetry, artwork and Terry’s personal Spotify music playlist.

NEW NATIVE KITCHEN

Until there’s an Indigenous restaurant in our region, there are an increasing number of Native American cookbooks, like New Native Kitchen from the former chef of the Smithsonian Museum of the American Indian’s Mitsitam Native Foods Café. What resonates here is the emphasis on seasonal ingredients and the generous cultural narratives that accompany the wide range of dishes.

BOWLS & BROTHS

When Bre Pickens’ friends got married, she gave them a basic cookbook, says Moscow Book People’s assistant manager. Her cookbook pick this year? Bowls & Broths. “I don’t know how to make dumplings but this book makes me want to learn.” n

Vinegar Flats Farm, Spokane, Tarawyn Waters

Eat Local First for The Holidays Buy local, eat local and support local for the holidays with Eat Local First and the Washington Food & Farm Finder. With over 1,700 listings including farms, markets, CSAs, restaurants and locally made goods for all your holiday festivities including our Holiday Food & Farm Finder and enter to win with gift certificates from LINC Foods and more! Visit eatlocalfirst.org today and celebrate the holidays with a farmer!

Get your farm or local business listed and connect with consumers across WA. Visit eatlocalfirst.org/register or email info@eatlocalfirst.org for more information.

DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 35


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GIFTS FOR

Environmentalists The perfect presents for your eco-conscious bestie

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veryone knows that one person who seems to always be up-to-date on the latest news about sustainability — the environmental enthusiast if you will. Whether that person is a relentless recycler, a sucker for succulents or grows their own goods, searching for sustainable gifts for your eco-conscious best friend or family member might sound like a daunting task. Fear not, there are plenty of local stores stocked with a wide range of gifts sure to satisfy the sweet spot of being both environmentally conscious and fun, from gifts made from recycled materials to those good for the environment.

SUSTAINABLE SHOPPING BAGS

Boo Radley’s is a downtown Spokane shopping staple, filled with treasures galore and something for everyone. For your eco-conscious friend, pick out a Blue Q shopping bag, which is made from 95 percent post-consumer material and features bright colors and quirky designs, so there is no shortage of options. Not only do 1 percent of sales of Blue Q bags support environmental initiatives around the world, but having an extra tote bag for grocery shopping is always helpful for reducing waste. $13 • Boo Radley’s • 232 N. Howard St.

BY LILLIAN PIEL PERSONABLE POTTED PLANTS

I’m willing to bet that anyone who is environmentally conscious also has an affinity for plants, so make your way to Fern Plant Shop, where you can select the perfect plant and pot to match. There are a host of colors, shapes, sizes and styles of pots, so you can choose one that best suits the person on your list. Fern Plant Shop will even transplant for free, so you don’t have to worry about actually getting the plant into whatever pot you select, and it will be all ready to go home to its new plant parent. $6-$45 • Fern Plant Shop • 1526 W. Riverside Ave. and 309 W. Second Ave., Spokane • 211 E. Lakeside Ave., Coeur d’Alene

ARTSY ARTISAN T-SHIRTS

Shopping at From Here is a great way to support local artists, and everything in the store is either designed or handmade locally. Many of the items also feature nature themes, from prints to jewelry made of hand-pressed flowers, to clothing adorned with designs of various local plants. Opt for either a cozy sweatshirt or T-shirt with naturey patterns for the fashionable friend who also wants to show off their love for Mother Earth. $28 • From Here • 808 W. Main Ave., Ste. 251

HAND-POURED CANDLES

Winter nights are long and dark, so bring someone an extra bit of brightness this holiday season with a good scented candle. Anchored Northwest, a local business known for its hand-made candles, offers plenty of scents to fit every occasion or season. A great choice for your environmentally oriented friend, these candles are made from soy wax, which is biodegradable and made from renewable resources, and burns cleaner and longer than regular paraffin wax candles. Anchored Northwest candles also feature a wooden wick made from sustainable U.S. forests and don’t contain any dyes or stearic acid. $19.50 • Anchored Northwest • 2324 E. Euclid Ave. n

Meet the People Who Shaped the Inland Northwest

Inlander Histories Volume 1 & 2

On Sale Now

Inlander.com/books 36 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021


DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 37


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GIFTS FOR

Gardeners

What to get for your favorite plant-loving green thumb

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BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

he gardener on your list gets excited when seed catalogs arrive, goes ga-ga over the color green and can finagle the finickiest of plants back to life in a cinch. Whether the gardener on your list is all about flowers, fruits, veggies, herbs or some other greenery they tend, these gifts are sure to make your favorite gardener’s heart go bloom.

TATTOOS

Temporary tattoos let you express yourself without the obvious drawbacks: pain, permanence and expense. Nature Tats temporary tattoos last from two-five days, are waterresistant and can be placed anywhere on the body (except the eye, duh). Their original, hand-drawn plant, animal and other nature-inspired designs are “artistic accessories for awesome people,” according to company founder Allison Wilcoxen. Even better, product proceeds help benefit both a nature organization in the company’s home state of Texas, and a local art organization — the Moscow gallery where we found these little cuties. $5 • Moscow Contemporary • 414 S. Main St., Moscow

SOLAR DECORATIVE LIGHTS

Grow your own white oyster mushrooms with a kit from Happy Mountain Mushrooms. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

38 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021

The right lighting can transform any space from mundane to magical, including garden spaces indoors and out. Solar light designs continue to evolve with an array of sizes and styles. Choose battery-powered for eco-friendliness and ease of assembly. This trio of OxyLED trippy lights with little figures — a hummingbird, butterfly, and dragonfly — glow rainbow colors for a touch of whimsy wherever they’re installed, even an indoor plant in a sunny window. $8 • Harbor Freight • 6506 N. Nevada St.

MUSHROOM KIT

What is it about creatives that has them thinking about what’s next — the next dish they’re going to make, the next painting or, in the case of a gardener, next year’s garden design? Maybe that’s how they, uh, keep growing as a creative. Get them a grow-your-own kit from Happy Mountain Mushrooms. Bonus: These kits grow food, in case your gardener happens to be a cook as well. Varieties include white oyster, blue oyster, lion’s mane and chestnut mushrooms. Want to sample the goods before you buy? Find Happy Mountain selling fresh mushrooms and kits every other Sunday at Lumberbeard Brewing’s indoor market. $25 • facebook. com/happymountainmushrooms

WORM FARM

The local farming community includes one unexpected yet delightful farm in its own category: Marlé Worm Growers farm. Go to their Otis Orchards location to learn about worms, or order online (MarleWormGrowers.com). Then place your order to have the worm farm shipped right to your door. Your kit includes four stackable trays and all the necessary materials to set up this compact composting station. By then, the second shipment should arrive with half a pound of hungry little red wiggler worms. They’ll be only too happy to make use of your kitchen scraps, but you also get 2 pounds of supplemental worm “chow.” Pretty soon the squirming mass will create worm castings, and you’ve just given your gardener liquid gold when it comes to fertilizing. $180 • Marlé Worm Growers • 24411 E. Joseph Ave., Otis Orchards n


GIFTS FOR

Horror Fans How to find an appropriately creepy present for the scare fans in your life

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BY T.J. TRANCHELL

inter holidays, and Christmas in particular, aren’t always celebrated the same by everyone. Come late December, you might run into someone decked out in their Tim Burton skulls instead of cute elves. It could be your offspring, a sibling or even your spouse (OK, it’s me. You caught me. Everything on this list is something I want.) Those people for whom Halloween is a yearlong celebration still enjoy giving and getting presents, so don’t be afraid to think outside the box a bit this year.

13 DAYS OF HORROR SOCKS

Sometimes we have to go interact with other people and dress “normal.” Socks are a great way to let your inner darkness shine in a way that won’t lose you your job. This lucky pack of socks includes 10 ankle-length and three crew-length pairs with characters from Warner Bros.-owned horror films. One day, you can have Freddy Krueger tickling your toes, and another day the face of that creepy doll Annabelle on your feet. One pair shows the iconic poster from The Exorcist, and that makes the set worth it to me. $29.90 from Hot Topic

HALLOWEEN VHS THROW BLANKET

After a long day of dressing like a human, even with our spooky socks on, we horror fans still like to come home and curl up under a warm blanket. We just like it a little more if the blanket matches the movie we are watching. So get us the Halloween VHS throw. The 60-by-50-inch blanket re-creates the VHS box of the 1978 slasher hit but in soft fleece. Other versions include Goosebumps, Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, and The Evil Dead. Unless your grandma can make you a quilt with Michael Myers on it, this blanket is for you. $35 from Creepy Company

PUPPET MASTER COMPLETE: A FRANCHISE HISTORY

Here’s the thing about horror fans: We like a lot of movies that aren’t “good.” You might even say they are “bad.” But we also like to know everything we can about those movies. Author Nat Brehmer goes deep into one of the best/worst horror franchises around in his 252-page book Puppet Master Complete: A Franchise History. For the fan who knows Blade is a puppet with knife hands and not just a day-walking vampire, this book delves into the origins, controversies and special effects that helped bring these 14 films to a variety of audiences. Published by academic press McFarland, the book is both fun and informative. Brehmer manages to make even the made-for-TV entries sound better than they might actually be. $40, order through Auntie’s Bookstore • 509-838-0206

NIGHT WORMS SUBSCRIPTION BOX

Monthly subscription boxes are a great way to give someone a gift all year long. Night Worms (a Pacific Northwest company) specializes in the latest horror fiction including bestselling authors like Stephen Graham Jones, Kathe Koja and Grady Hendrix, along with independent authors like Chad Lutzke, Ronald Malfi and Sarah Tantlinger. Horror fans love to read as much as we love movies. Why not get your fan a couple of new books — along with stickers, coffee samples and other surprises — every month? One-off boxes sell out fast, so subscribe for a year. $44/month, nightworms.com

SCREAM TICKETS

You want to get our horror fan something they really want? The reboot of the Scream franchise hits theaters on Jan. 14, 2022. With internet purchasing, you could buy tickets to their local theater for someone on the other side of the country. After all the holiday parties and family time, a couple hours watching fictional characters meet their doom is just what every horror fan needs. Prices vary based on theater and showtimes. n T.J. Tranchell is a horror author and teacher whose book Cry Down Dark was named by the New York Times as the scariest book set in Utah. Learn more at tjtranchell.wordpress.com.

DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 39


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SPOKANE’S ONLY COMPLETELY GLUTEN-FREE RESTAURANT Dairy Free, Vegan and Keto options also available.

W FOR ORDER NO AYS ID THE HOL

Gluten Free Pies, Choc. Creme Roll, Gingerbread House & Cookie Kits, Cookie Trays and more!

521 E. HOLLAND, SPOKANE • 509-413-1739 • colesbakeryandcafe.com

1325 N DIVISION ST. STE 103

GIFTS FOR

Coffee Fanatics

OPEN DAILY

DECEMBER 4TH - 25TH, 2021

Buzzworthy gifts for the coffee lover in your life

D O U B L E - U P O N DA I LY D E A L S

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BY S. MICHAL BENNETT

t’s undeniable that coffee is an integral component of life in the Inland Northwest. In 2019, Livability, a website that ranks small and midsized cities in a variety of categories, mentioned Spokane at No. 2 out of 10 on its list of “unexpectedly awesome coffee cities.” With drive-through stands on just about every corner — over 325 coffee shops in Spokane alone — and more roasters and cafes opening throughout the Inland Northwest than we can keep up with, people are enjoying the variety of options and experiences available around town and in their neighborhoods. However, during the 2020 quarantine, more people also upped their homebrewing game, and homebrew novices quickly became connoisseurs. This probably means that they already have some sweet coffee gear on the counter, so finding a gift might be tough. Either way, here are a handful of unique coffee items that your homebrewing junkie would love to find under the tree this year.

A GOOD GRINDER

While your coffee human may have a kettle, a scale and some fancy brewing equipment, a decent burr grinder may still be on their wish list. Hand grinders can be tiring and flimsy, while electric conical burr grinders can get very expensive. For a hand grinder for home or trail, you can’t go wrong with the Troy, Idaho-made Orphan Espresso Manual Coffee Grinders. I recommend one of the Lidos, but their entire selection is meticulously crafted and highly durable. Of course, Baratza is the top choice for a quality electric coffee grinder. You can find a range of Baratza grinders at The Kitchen Engine, and occasionally at local coffee roasters like Indaba or Evans Brothers. Orphan Espresso Manual Coffee Grinders • $195-$285 • oehandgrinders.com

A NEW EXPERIENCE IN COFFEE

While you may have your coffee routine and a customized

40 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021

drink you rattle off at the drive-thru, coffee can also be an intriguing culinary adventure. Sign your loved one up for a coffee bean or cold brew coffee subscription, and they will discover a plethora of tastes, aromas and textures that exist in coffee. Most roasters offer a subscription of some kind, so find out who your coffee friend or family member enjoys, and gift them a new coffee experience. Customize your coffee, roast and schedule with Post Falls-based DOMA’s coffee subscription, or sign up for Coeur d’Alenebased Created Coffee’s monthly subscription for just $15. Price varies • domacoffee.com • createdroasters.com

KEEP THAT COFFEE FRESH

Your coffee geek has to keep all that coffee fresh, right? Airtight canisters have become more readily available on the retail market in recent years, and the two most popular, elegant brands are Airscape and Fellow’s Atmos. Each has a different method for removing the oxygen from the canister to keep coffee fresher longer, but both are high quality, durable products. Check your local coffee shop or favorite roaster to see which canister they have to offer. $30-$40 • Kitchen Engine • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 509-328-3335

THE LAST WORD ON COFFEE

James Hoffman is my go-to professional for all things coffee, from equipment reviews to brewing techniques to drink recipes. His YouTube channel is starred on my browser menu, and his advice has expertly carried me through a myriad of coffee conundrums. His book, The World Atlas of Coffee, is the perfect geek-out read for anyone interested in learning more about the wide world of coffee. It covers how coffee is produced, from harvest through roasting, and includes step-by-step guides for all the core home-brewing methods. Look for the updated second edition in hardback from local booksellers. $39.95 • The Well-Read Moose • wellreadmoose.com n


Wearing an extra layer is worth it when you hit the nighttime slopes for wide-open runs. MT. SPOKANE PHOTO

GIFTS FOR

The Outdoorsy

Ideas for the winter-sports enthusiasts who don’t let subzero temperatures slow them down

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or some, winter is a time to hunker down and stay indoors. Around here, though, many more are the intrepid, adventure-seeking type, drawn out into the snow and ice looking to trample through the elements, fly down a mountain or pull fish out of a frozen lake. Here are a few ideas to consider for the outdoor enthusiast who doesn’t let the weather keep them inside.

NIGHT SKI LIFT TICKET

Finding gifts for the skier in your life isn’t easy. Chances are they’ve already got all the gear they need, and if they’re serious about it maybe even a season pass to a local mountain. If they don’t, getting one at this point will put you back hundreds of dollars. Even single-day lift tickets are spendy these days. But there’s a way to go easy on the wallet without sacrificing quality. Mt. Spokane offers night skiing from 3-9 pm on certain days throughout the season. It’s a great way to beat the crowds without missing out on the fun. $36 • mtspokane.com

TUNE UP

It’s important to keep gear in good shape. Just like your car, a good pair of skis deserves a regular tune up. Spokane’s got one of the best in the business in Fred Nowland, who has been tuning up skis for three decades. Since 2004, he’s been plying his trade at the Spokane Alpine Haus on the South Hill. A fresh coat of wax and a

BY WILL MAUPIN sharp edging will make that old pair of skis good as new. A good tuneup makes the skiing experience safer and more fun. $12-$50 • Spokane Alpine Haus • 2925 S. Regal St.

SMARTWOOL SOCKS

This might be one of the more utilitarian gifts you can buy, but just because it’s not very fun doesn’t mean it’s not a great present. An outdoor enthusiast can never have enough great socks, especially in wintertime. Nobody wants cold feet when out in the elements, miles and miles from civilization. Skiers, boarders, snowshoers and ice fishermen all will love a new pair of quality wool socks. If you’re looking for a gift that is guaranteed to be put to good use, look no further. $20 • REI • 1125 N. Monroe St.

GENERAL STORE GIFT CARD

If you need something for your next trip out into the winter wonderland, there’s a great chance the General Store has it in stock. Gift cards can sometimes seem like a lazy excuse for a present, but sometimes they just make sense. The General Store is a Spokane landmark that’s been serving our community for 75 years. They’ve got something for everyone on your list, and with a gift card you’re giving your loved one the gift of choice. Plus, you’ll be supporting a locally owned business. The General Store • 2424 N. Division St.

FLEXIBLE FLYER SLED

You don’t need to make a trek into the mountains to get out and be active this winter, all you need is a sled and a trip to the neighborhood park. There are a ton of options out there from simple saucers and toboggans to hulking plastic monstrosities with steering and braking capabilities. And then there’s the tried and true steel and wood design that has been bringing joy to riders since the 1800s. Paricon Sleds manufactures the classic Flexible Flyer brand that looks straight out of a Norman Rockwell painting. The steel runners are like skis that cut through the snow, and the elevated wooden platform makes it feel like the user is flying just above the ground. Unlike flimsy plastic sleds, this design is built to last. It’s no wonder they’ve been made for well over 100 years. $150 • Cabela’s • 101 N Cabela Way, Post Falls n

DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 41


Eric Barriere (left) always displays complete control over EWU’s offense.

EWU ATHLETICS PHOTO

FOOTBALL

Soaring Eagle Eastern Washington’s record-breaking QB Eric Barriere still has doubters to silence as he makes one final run for a national championship BY SETH SOMMERFELD

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he general response when witnessing athletic greatness is to be in awe. Without even thinking, we rise to our feet, let out oohs and aahs (and occasionally “holy [expletives]”), pump our fists, and clap like crazy when we see stellar catches, unbelievable runs, highlight dunks and other manners of elite performance that only the best of the best can achieve. But there’s an even higher level of involuntary response that’s the ultimate indicator of sporting excellence, one rarely achieved. Pure laughter. Cheers are great, but when witnessing dominance on such a level that our brains’ only response is to chuckle uncontrollably, that’s truly remarkable. Watching Eastern Washington University’s Eric Barriere play against Idaho on a cold October 2021 after-

42 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021

noon felt like witnessing quarterback transcendence. Barriere vandalized the Vandals’ defense in a way bordering on cruel. He threw for 600 yards (17.1 yards per completion) and seven touchdowns (plus he ran for another TD), but that actually undersells the dominance. Barriere — who didn’t even play most of the 4th quarter — could’ve easily passed for 750 yards and 10 passing TDs if EWU really wanted to rub it in (as if winning 71-21 wasn’t rubbing it in enough). The absurdity of Barriere’s performance made the game an unintentional laugh riot, but really it was a serious display of the work that’s led the sixth-year senior to be statistically the best quarterback in EWU and Big Sky Conference history. “It’s kind of crazy because as I woke up, I could just

feel it,” Barriere says of the Idaho game. “As soon as I stepped on the field pregame, it felt like it was about to be special that day.”

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irst arriving on Eastern’s campus in 2016, Barriere craved a change of pace from his Southern California upbringing. After redshirting his first year and seeing the field mostly in mop-up time during his freshman campaign, Barriere was thrown into the fire in 2018 when the Eagles’ All-American quarterback Gage Gubrud suffered a season-ending knee injury. To say he seized the opportunity would be putting it mildly, leading EWU all the way to the FCS Championship Game that season. “He was a backup, but prepared to be a starter as


the backup,” says EWU head coach Aaron Best. “And when Gage went down, there was no time to think. And he never looked back.” This season, Barriere has led Eastern to a 10-2 record — averaging a whopping 378 passing yards per game while tossing 41 TDs (and rushing for four more) against 7 INTs — and shattering records along the way. He’s a finalist for the Walter Payton Award (given to the best FCS player), won Big Sky Offensive Player of the Year for the second straight year, and now holds the school and conference records for total yards, passing yards, and passing TDs. Those records are even more impressive considering EWU has become a QB factory: Seven of the last eight starting QBs for Eastern Washington have won at least one Big Sky Offensive Player of the Year award, with an EWU QB taking home the honors 11 of the last 21 seasons. Barriere doesn’t take his place in the record books lightly. “It means a lot,” he says. “And it just kind of makes me like, ‘Why me?’ ’Cause it’s like there’ve been so many great quarterbacks here ... and for me to pass these records, you know, it just shows the work and time and effort that I’ve put into my game.” From Best’s perspective, it’s Barriere’s demeanor that’s allowed him to reach this elite level. “I think the one thing that separates Eric from all the others [is]… he’s unflappable,” Best says. “He actually enjoys the people that are doubters.” “When he speaks, people listen,” Best adds. “He’s not a loud person by nature, but he plays really loud. There have been a couple moments in his career where we’ve gotten the ball back to the offense, and [Eric] in a calm, cool, collected way has just winked at me and said, ‘OK, now it’s time to go. This is the series we’re gonna get this done. We’re gonna walk out of here with a W.’”

critics try to say, I’m still going out there and obviously showing them I do what these 6-feet quarterbacks can do.” Eastern Washington play-by-play announcer Larry Weir would argue there’s a playmaking intangible that makes Barriere special. Barriere could probably find a place in the Canadian Football League, where EWU alumni Bo Levi Mitchell and Vernon Adams have thrived. But when Weir recalls his favorite Barriere plays — scrambling bombs versus North Dakota State in the 2021 Spring FCS Playoffs, and the QB’s 92-yard touchdown run versus Sacramento State in 2019 — they feel like NFL highlights.

“When [Eric] speaks, people listen. He’s not a loud person by nature, but he plays really loud.”

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et’s play a game of Mystery FCS Quarterbacks.  QB 1: 5,115 yards passing (64.1% completions) with 45 TDs and 14 INTs; 1,028 yards rushing with 13 TDs  QB 2: 2,947 yards passing (65.4% completion) with 30 TDs and 1 INT, 1,325 yards rushing with 18 TDs  QB 3: 12,537 yards passing (62% completion) with 109 TDs and 26 INTs; 1,518 yards rushing with 20 TDs The first two quarterbacks are North Dakota State products Carson Wentz and Trey Lance. They respectively went No. 2 and No. 3 overall when they entered the NFL Draft. QB 3? The one who blows away their combined passing stats? That’s Barriere. And good luck finding him on the top QB prospect lists put out by any leading NFL Draft experts. A few random deep-dive draft sites have mentioned Barriere, but for most of the NFL Draft industrial complex, he’s not even on the radar. The main reason? Wentz is 6-foot-5. Lance is 6-foot-4. EWU lists Barriere at 6-foot-1, but that may be a very generous measurement. For Barriere, the criticism feeds motivation. “I see it. I hear it. I hear it all. Hand size. Height. Different things. They say a bunch, but at the end of the day, I let my playing do the talking,” says Barriere. “And no matter what the

“You know, Tom Brady or some of those guys, they’re not running 92 yards for a score,” Weir says. “It just shows his capability of being able to score from anywhere on the football field, either by passing the ball or running the ball. Kyler Murray, who’s with the Arizona Cardinals, that’s probably the closest comparable. As far as what the NFL scouts are looking for, the only thing that he lacks is height. And he can’t do anything about that.”

HOME OF THE S P O K A N E SYM P H O N Y

THE FOX THEATER Spokane Symphony with State Street Ballet

THE NUTCRACKER BALLET

Morihiko Nakahara, conductor Thurs, Dec. 2 , 7:30pm • Fri, Dec. 3, 7:30pm Sat, Dec. 4, 2pm & 7:30pm • Sun, Dec. 5, 2pm Whitworth University Symphony Orchestra Presents

IMPRESARIO

Tues, Dec. 7, 7pm Whitworth University Christmas Festival Concert

A BRAND NEW MORN

Sat, Dec. 11, 8pm •Sun, Dec 12, 3pm Spokane Symphony

HOLIDAY POPS WITH THE SWEEPLINGS Morihiko Nakahara, conductor Sat, Dec. 18, 8pm • Sun, Dec. 19, 2pm Spokane Symphony

NEW YEAR’S EVE: BEETHOVEN’S NINTH James Lowe, conductor Fri Dec. 31, 7:30pm

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arriere doesn’t seem to be sweating his perceived draft stock too much. The calm demeanor those around him rave about translates when talking to him. The quiet of Cheney suits him, as he’s more likely to be deepdiving music and comedy videos on YouTube than getting wild. His family keeps him grounded — he talks to his mom and sister daily — and also gives him perspective for whenever his football career runs its course. Heck, he even has dreams of opening a family restaurant so the world can experience the glory of his mom and sis’ cooking (baked mac and cheese is a specialty). Besides, for now, his sole focus is on bringing another national title to EWU. The loss to North Dakota State in the 2019 FCS championship still fuels his proverbial fire, and there’s certainly an element of this final season that feels like the Eric Barriere Revenge Tour. “I still think about [that game] a lot, because I know how close we was, and I know I didn’t play my best game that day,” Barriere says. The path ahead is clear for Barriere and his Eagles. After gritting out a 19-7 win Saturday in the first round of the playoffs, EWU heads to Missoula Friday for a Big Sky showdown (EWU squeaked out the regular season matchup 34-28). If Eastern can get through the Griz and the following game, Barriere would likely come face-to-face with North Dakota State for a spot in the championship. It will likely take some superstar performances by Barriere to get the Eagles that far, but he’s determined to end his college career by getting the last laugh. n Eastern Washington plays Montana on Fri, Dec. 3, at 6 pm. The game will be streamed on ESPN+

H O L I DAY

C L ASS I C

R E T U R N S

with State Street Ballet THURS, DEC. 2 7:30PM • FRI, DEC. 3 7:30PM SAT, DEC. 4 2PM & 7:30PM • SUN, DEC. 5 2PM

JAMES LOWE, MUSIC DIRECTOR

SAT, DEC. 18 8PM SUN, DEC. 19 2PM

WITH

THE SWEEPLINGS

Cami Bradley & Whitney Dean

JAMES LOWE, MUSIC DIRECTOR

BEETHOVEN’S NINTH

JAMES LOWE, MUSIC DIRECTOR

FRI, DEC. 31 7:30PM

Box Office 624-1200 SpokaneSymphony.org • FoxTheaterSpokane.org DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 43


CULTURE | DIGEST

THE BUZZ BIN

TACO DIPLOMACY Talk about the U.S.-Mexico border is often fraught with negativity, focusing more on people who pass through (or want to) than on the region’s permanent residents. In her new PBS series, La Frontera, chef Pati Jinich reframes the narrative, traveling both sides of Mexico’s more than 1,200-mile border with Texas to explore culture, history, geography and, of course, food. That beef you’re eating? It’s a prime example of border cooperation from episode one, while episode two looks at a ranching family with roots predating any border wall. Jinich is a James Beard Foundation award-winning chef and host of Pati’s Mexican Table, with an ebullient personality that makes the show as refreshing as a huge squeeze of lime. (CARRIE SCOZZARO)

REVOLUTION ON MAIN A new book hails the Community Building and its 20-year legacy in Spokane BY MADISON PEARSON

T

he Community Building campus is situated right downtown — it welcomes visitors and Spokane natives alike into the heart of our city. With a plethora of stores selling local handmade goods, art lining the walls and spaces for people to gather, the building is a testament to what makes Spokane Spokane. When Jim Sheehan inherited a large sum of money 24 years ago, he immediately got to work on a Main Avenue building creating a space for nonprofits to gather and where innovation thrives. “It’s not the building that’s inherently special,” says his daughter, Katy Sheehan. “It’s the community that makes the building special.” Katy is just one contributor included in the new book One-Block Revolution: 20 Years of Community Building. It’s not every day that you get a book written about a specific building in your city, but the Community Building warrants that kind of attention. “This building welcomes everyone,” Katy Sheehan says. “When my dad started this project 20 years ago, this wasn’t ‘downtown’ yet. People thought he was crazy, asking, ‘Why are you doing this?’ The buildings are beautiful and were originally a part of Chinatown, so they have significance and importance to the AsianAmerican community. This was a place of gathering before we got here and was absolutely worth saving.” It turns out that a couple dozen other Spokanites feel the same way. The book contains essays by 20 Spokane natives who describe their connection to and adoration for the Community Building, including Summer Hess, the book’s editor and Jim Sheehan’s previous executive assistant and project manager. Hess split the book into two parts: “Community Building is a Noun”

44 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021

and “Community Building is a Verb.” “We weren’t trying to write a history,” Hess says. “It’s a representation of the kinds of players that help a place like this run.” In Hess’ introduction to the book, she mentions the mission statement of the Community Building: “To host, inspire, and catalyze social change in the Spokane region.” The statement is reflected in the tenants of the Community Building: the Spokane chapter of the NAACP, Refugee Connections Spokane, the city’s beloved independent movie theater, the Magic Lantern, and the Saranac Commons. “That mission statement is still true to this day,” Hess says. “And it will evolve and change along with our city. Spokane is constantly evolving, so of course we should move along with it.” A celebration for the release of One-Block Revolution will be held at the Community and Saranac buildings on Friday Dec. 3, from 5-8 pm. Festivities will include appetizers, live music, a no-host bar, tours of the building, and conversations with building residents and book contributors. There will also be a panel moderated by Hess, which features several of the book’s contributors at 6 pm. “We’re so excited to invite the community to a celebration of this book hosted in the space that it’s about,” Hess says. n One-Block Revolution Release Celebration • Fri, Dec. 3, 5-8 pm • Free (donations in support of the Salish School are accepted) • Community and Saranac Buildings • 25-35 W. Main Ave • communitybuilding.org

OOH, SHINY! Yes, the release of Pokémon Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl fell on my birthday this year; however, I was way more excited about one of those things than the other. The feeling of turning a year older is nothing compared to the feeling of nostalgia while playing the newly remade version of your favorite childhood video game. And let me tell you, it did not disappoint. I felt 10 years old again: choosing Piplup as my starter, setting off to explore the Sinnoh region and collecting as many gym badges as I could before sleep caught up to me. I know that remakes are often disappointing and not worth the price tag, but the memories that I was able to relive were worth every penny. (MADISON PEARSON) THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Noteworthy new music arriving in stores and online Dec. 3: TOM MORELLO, The Atlas Underground Flood. The guitarist rages against single releases, putting out his second LP of the year, this one featuring contributions from IDLES, Manchester Orchestra, Rodrigo y Gabriela, and more. VOLBEAT, Servant of the Mind. Volbeat is probably the premiere Danish metal band, but that raises the question: Who is the premiere Croissant metal band? TOUCHED BY GHOUL, Cancel the World. Is Cancel the World a new album by noisy Chicago rock band Touched by Ghoul or the 2024 GOP platform? n


A chocolate, raspberry and vanilla Bûche de Noël at the Culinary Stone. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

DESSERTS

COOKIES, CUSTARDS AND CAKES

Exploring the common ancestry of European holiday desserts — and where to find those sweet treats locally BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

A

n increase in local, outdoor holiday markets mixed with memories of growing up among Polish, Italian, German and other Christian European traditions inspired this exploration of festive desserts featured from December onward. Many desserts are synonymous with their respective cultural traditions. Yet in addition to using similar ingredients — starches, fats, flavorings and, above all, sugar — many also share common ancestry across Europe.

FRENCH

The word dessert, like roughly one-third of English language words, is rooted in French — desservir — meaning to clear the table for the final course. Just as French fine dining traditions have shaped the American restaurant industry, France has also defined our notion of desserts from cookies, custards, confections and cakes to pies, pastries and more. However, you needn’t wait until the end of a meal to enjoy a sweet treat, which for French-born Patricia Hebert-Jenks should be both beautiful to look at and to eat. “In my family, even if it’s just us, we go fancy,” says Hebert-Jenks, who relocated to Idaho in 2009, having traded international banking experience for a career in culinary arts. “In France, the [holiday] tradition is more about ordering from a bakery and being proud and excited to bring something wonderful,” says Hebert-Jenks, whose quiches and truffles can be found at the Culinary Stone in Coeur d’Alene, where she also teaches French cooking classes. For Christmas, Hebert-Jenks might make Bûche de Noël, or a Christmas Yule log cake, which can also be found in Belgian and Swiss cultures. Bûche de Noël is a thin cake layered with cream filling — Hebert-Jenks likes incorporating chocolate or raspberry — and rolled into a log, or buche in French. Many restaurants in France simply don’t have the capacity to do all their own baking, especially when baked goods can have a very short shelf life. So patisseries abound in France; locally, their counterparts include Madeleine’s Café & Patisserie (415 W. Main Ave.) and miFlavour (3403 E. Sprague Ave.). ...continued on next page

DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 45


FOOD | DESSERTS “COOKIES, CUSTARDS AND CAKES,” CONTINUED...

ITALIAN

France and Italy share a more than 320-mile border. Thus the “spoon cookies” in another of Hebert-Jenks’ favorite desserts, charlotte aux marrons, are better known as lady fingers. When they get soaked in espresso and coffee liqueur and layered with mascarpone cream, that creates the classic Italian tiramisu. Find tiramisu at Europa Restaurant & Bakery in downtown Spokane, whose extensive dessert menu from longtime baker Christie Sutton includes roulade, a rolled up cake comparable to French buche cakes. They also have (German) apfelstrudel, and several (French-inspired) mousses and tarts. In addition to tiramisu, Italia Trattoria in Browne’s Addition serves a bread pudding made with French brioche and roasted pears from chef Anna Vogel, reflecting the James Beard Award semifinalist’s European training and heritage.

PORTUGUESE

Italia Trattoria’s fried zeppole breakfast doughnuts are also similar to Portuguese sonhos, says Rind & Wheat bakery owner Ricky Webster, who’s Portuguese and Italian. His Spokane bakery produces a smattering of European

Northern Europe is well-represented in the Inland Northwest’s population, but hardly at all in its food scene. Although Scandinavian venues are noticeably absent here, desserts and other baked goods occasionally pop up in the culinary landscape, like at Breaüxdoo Bakery in Spokane Valley. On Dec. 11, chef-owner Gage Lang and his grandmother will be making — and selling — Norway’s version of a tortilla, known as lefse, and the lighter-than-air crispy cookie called krumkake, using recipes from his great-greatgrandmother for both. Visit the bakery’s Facebook page for more details on the upcoming pop-up.

GERMAN

SLAVIC

Stollen is more like a bread than a cake, with a core of dried fruits, sometimes nuts, or a thick, sweetened paste of ground almonds called marzipan. Its sweetest component is a dusting of confectioner’s sugar on top. That’s typical of German baking, says Alpine Deli owner Andrea Lejeune-Weiler, who was raised in Bernkastel-Kues, about 40 miles east of Germany’s border with Luxembourg. “Most German — most European baking, really — is not as sweet as here in America,” says Lejeune-Weiler, who earned her culinary degree in America. Prior to that she worked at Alpine Deli under its original owners. (They sold it to a Bosnian family, who eventually sold it to Lejeune-Weiler and her husband in 2019.) For her family, Christmas is all about cookies, says Lejeune-Weiler, who is partial to lebkuchen (similar to gingerbread), and vanillekipferl, a crescent-shaped, shortbread cookie from Austria.

Stollen is a traditional German sweet bread.

46 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021

NORWAY

desserts like French madeleine cookies and financier cakes, as well as a Portuguese egg tart, but holiday baking is special, he says. “At Christmastime in Portugal, or really all over Europe, it’s about using special ingredients… that may be a bit too expensive to indulge in all year long,” Webster says. In Portugal that includes egg yolks, cream, candied fruits, oil for frying and sugar, he says. Last year Webster made Portuguese Bolo-Rei or King’s Cake, which is French in origin, yet has similarities to a German cake Webster occasionally offers at Rind & Wheat called stollen.

When my grandfather visited friends or family, he’d stop by the Polish bakery for some kind of cake or cookie, like kolaczki, Polish fruit-filled cookies also found in Austria, Denmark and Russia. That white box tied with red and white string meant goodies in my future (if I behaved). Although our region lacks a dedicated Polish bakery, it is rich in Slavic businesses, which offer foods — both scratch-made and imports — that represent Poland, Ukraine, Russia, Hungary, Belarus, Czech, Romania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Moldova, Latvia and Serbia. Owned by Ukrainian Irina Ustimenko, Sweet World Cakes in North Spokane, for example, supplies decadent desserts for numerous businesses, including Magnolia, her recently opened deli and modest grocery in Airway Heights. Try the layered and cream-filled honey cake or Ustimenko’s layered-cake version of Italian tiramisu. Yummy Snamy is one of several deli/markets catering to the Slavic community. Formerly Mariupol, the shop regularly has Russian vatrushka, a light pastry similar to a cheese Danish. It also recently added made-to-order crepes, which one might otherwise associate with France. Additional Slavic markets where locals might find in-house baked desserts include Odessa European Deli, Matreshka European Deli and the three locations of Kiev Market. Finally, International Coffee and Bakery serves scratch-made treats with a Russian accent. Formerly Malinka Euro Market, the bakery’s traditional Russian desserts include a baked meringue called pavlova (the origin of which is also claimed by Australia and New Zealand). Its spin on Italian cannoli consists of a delicate wafer cylinder reminiscent of Norwegian lefse and a filling flavored with passion fruit native to South America. Its peach cookies filled with the Russian version of caramel that in Mexican cuisine is called dulce de leche are very popular not just this time of year, but all the time, says Roman Chebotarev, who co-owns the store with family. n


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DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 47


REVIEW

FAMILY TIME C’mon C’mon delivers a tender tale of healing driven by a never-better Joaquin Phoenix and newcomer Woody Norman BY CHASE HUTCHINSON

Sit’on sit’on

48 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021


IC LANTERN THEATER MAG

T

he work of Oscar-nominated writer-director Mike Mills (20th Century Women, Beginners) has always been grounded in an inescapable sense of empathy — for the world, the people who live in it, and the characters he crafts a film around. Not only is the meditative black-and-white film C’mon C’mon yet another precise example of Mills crafting that empathy — it is also his best work to date. It is a tender family story told with overflowing love, from the grace given to the performances to the sense of care given to capturing a sense of place. The film stars a career-best Joaquin Phoenix as Johnny, a radio journalist who’s disconnected from his sister Viv, played by an exceptional Gaby Hoffmann, and her son Jesse, portrayed by the wonderful newcomer Woody Norman. Viv’s husband, Paul, seen through the compassionate performance of Scoot McNairy, is experiencing a mental health crisis after moving away from his family for a job. When Viv goes to ensure he gets the help he needs, it’s left to Johnny to look after her son whom her brother hasn’t seen for nearly a year. The film that follows takes us from Detroit to Los Angeles, New York and New Orleans as Johnny, with an adorable Jesse in tow, goes around interviewing children about what they think of their future. It is a film that delicately captures the ebb and flow of life with a kind eye for all its subjects, rebuilding the sense of connection Johnny had lost with his family. This may sound like a film you’ve seen before. After all, there are many stories about family reconnecting. The presentation on display ensures it absolutely isn’t. The pacing and editing of C’mon C’MON C’MON C’mon maintains a peaceful, melodic Rated R cadence that makes everything Directed by Mike Mills feel alive. The interviews with real Starring Joaquin Phoenix, children are seamlessly interwoven Woody Norman, Gaby Hoffmann into the story, imbuing it with an unending sense of authenticity. The observations and reflections the children share are astutely illuminating, reflecting the value of listening to young people about what they think when facing an uncertain future. Not only is the work of radio journalism brought to life, but so too are the places the film takes us to. It is remarkable that a location like New York, which holds a ubiquitous presence in cinema, can feel fresh. Every angle and perspective feels like one you haven’t seen before. As Johnny himself remarks about his work, it is that ability to transform the mundane into something immortal that makes the film so transcendent. It also is deeply funny, eliciting many a chuckle at the push and pull between the two travelers as they learn from each other’s quirks along the way. From the first moment when Jesse begins to experiment with the radio equipment, capturing recordings of his own, there is a spectacular use of sound that wraps you up in the vibrancy of the world. From the waves crashing on the beach to the roller skaters going by a pianist playing a song on the street, everything is just so perfectly attuned to the rhythm of the world around them. This includes the rich relationships between the characters as they begin to care for each other even as they are at difficult points in their lives. Johnny is facing down loneliness, a feeling he acknowledges he masks with humor in one of many recorded monologues. Jesse is trying to cope with what he knows about the challenges facing Paul, a father we see he deeply loves in many near-silent scenes that speak volumes about their relationship. Viv and Johnny are working through the loss of their mother, something they both mourned in different ways and are able to finally discuss from a distance over the phone. Every performance absolutely shines, giving these complex emotions shape and form. Some of this feels like familiar ground for Mills. Like his outstanding 20th Century Women in 2016, this film is about family and relationships. Like that film, he weaves in characters reading specific texts that appear on screen. From children’s books to an incisive essay by filmmaker Kirsten Johnson, they serve as reflections on the themes of the story. Yet here, it all feels more fully realized. The family at the core is given more depth, and the texts speak more cohesively with the images on screen. It is Mills rising above the high bar he has set for himself. The result is a sublime work of art that, while a humble story about a family, serves as a vast reflection on life which becomes as immortal as the interviews embedded within it. n

FRI, DEC 3RD - THU, DEC 9TH

TICKETS: $9

NOW SHOWING: BELFAST C’MON C’MON

FOR SHOWTIMES: 509-209-2383 or MAGICLANTERNONMAIN.COM For all rental information email: MagicLanternEvents@gmail.com 25 W Main Ave #125 • MagicLanternOnMain.com

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ALSO OPENING THE BOX

Filmmaker Dan Fox (also a clinical social worker) made this short sci-fi action comedy. Children are free, adult tickets are $5, with proceeds going to Passages Family Support, a group dedicated to providing mental health support Northwest children and teens. At the Magic Lantern. (DN) Not rated

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SWORD ART ONLINE PROGRESSIVE: ARIA OF A STARLESS NIGHT

The second film in this anime sci-fi franchise revolves around a virtual reality role-playing game. The catch is this: If players die in the game or attempt to take off their VR headsets before clearing all 100 floors in the game, they’ll die in real life. (SS) Rated R

WOLF

A man who believes he’s a wolf is sent to undergo a “curative” therapy where he meets a woman/cat who makes him question his sense of self, and his love for her. (DN) Rated R

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DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 49


DOCUMENTARY

BEATLEMANIA,

THE GET BACK AWARDS

REVISITED

Best Dressed: George Harrison; Runner-up: Ringo Starr Most Reliable: Ringo Starr Most Valuable Musician: Billy Preston

Reflections on Get Back, the new Beatles docuseries, from a lifelong Beatlemanic

Most Disruptive (band): John Lennon Most Disruptive (guest): Heather McCartney Least Disruptive: Yoko Ono Dirtiest Hair: John Lennon Bossiest: Paul McCartney Most Productive Songwriter (tie): Paul McCartney and George Harrison Goofiest Outtake: “Two of Us” as sung by John and Paul pretending to be ventriloquists Best Fan: Old man on the street: “I think the Beatles are cracking! I said, you can’t beat ’em!”

H

BY CHEY SCOTT

ow many hours of the Beatles is too much? For this lifelong fan, there is no limit, although my attention span did wear a bit thin at times during the nearly eight-hours-long documentary The Beatles: Get Back. Premiering this past Thanksgiving weekend on Disney+, the three-part series offers an unprecedented look into the legendary band’s closing days in January 1969 while recording their final album, Let It Be. Directed by Peter Jackson (The Lord of the Rings, They Shall Not Grow Old), Get Back was cut from 60-plus hours of archival footage shot in 1969 for the initial Let It Be documentary, released in 1970. While I’ve seen every minute of every other Beatles’ film — including the eight-part The Beatles Anthology docuseries from the mid’90s — Let It Be is the single title missing from my enthusiastic fan repertoire. And that’s only because in the early 2000s, when I first experienced Beatlemania three decades too late as a tween/teen,

Let It Be was unavailable on VHS or DVD. (The film is reportedly being remastered in conjunction with Get Back, although an official release date has yet to be announced.) I’ve been fine maintaining this cinematic blind spot, since the documentary was widely reputed to be a depressing, dismal look into the fractured finale of the greatest band of all time. John Lennon even called the album’s recording sessions “miserable.” But miserable, dear reader, Get Back is not. Apart from a tense disagreement in the first episode between Paul McCartney and George Harrison, after which Harrison quits the band for a couple of days, Get Back mostly shows a

Get Back is streaming on Disney+.

50 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021


group of talented musicians and close friends having a damn fine time. They goof off a lot, and occasionally pull hit songs out of thin air, as McCartney does with the titular “Get Back.” Seeing that particular moment caught on camera is truly astounding. Because of Let It Be’s expedited deadline, many songs workshopped in-studio were old unrecorded tracks (like the early Lennon/McCartney tune “One After 909”) or half-baked ideas from individual bandmates.

E

ven though we know how the story ends, Get Back still presents plenty of fresh insight and context to the Beatles’ legacy. For one, the film’s fly-on-the-wall perspective offers plenty of evidence that the John Lennon-Yoko Ono relationship, and Ono’s constant presence by Lennon’s side, wasn’t especially disruptive to the Beatles’ creative process. While maybe a slight inconvenience to the others at times, Ono hardly ever speaks, and certainly doesn’t give unsolicited feedback about the music. Other Beatle partners also hang out on set; second most is Linda (Eastman) McCartney, who’s often joined by her rambunctious, 7-year-old daughter, Heather. As a former teenage Lennon fangirl enamored with his constant attention-seeking, goofball antics, at 33, I now find his behavior more annoying than funny. From the unending on-mic quips and silly singing voices to showing up late with greasy, unwashed hair in the same outfit day after day, I for the first time thought Lennon grating. While he wasn’t always like this, and was often encouraged by the others, seeing McCartney try to keep the group on track in the wake of another Lennon-caused derailment got old after the third or fourth time. The Beatle I enjoyed most — besides steady, good-hearted Ringo Starr — was George Harrison. This period saw Harrison finally blossoming into his own as a songwriter at the young age of 25. (Lennon and Starr were both 29; McCartney was 27.) Some of Harrison’s best songs — “Something,” “Old Brown Shoe,” “All Things Must Pass” — were in early creation during Get Back, and yet none made it onto Let It Be. A revealing moment of Harrison’s discontent (besides the aforementioned row with McCartney) comes during an intimate talk with Lennon near the end of episode three. Harrison floats doing an album of his own songs, separate from the Beatles. Lennon fully supports the idea. By the end of Get Back, as the Beatles performed live for the last time ever in that famous Apple Corps rooftop show, I was emotionally charged and physically on the edge of my seat. All the buildup — the highs, lows, laughter and frustration — led us and them to this final moment. Only when the London police, delayed as long as possible by Apple’s staff, finally pop out from the stairwell and the ecstatically grinning foursome put their instruments down do I finally release my breath, there at the bittersweet end. n

UPCOMING SHOWS THE PINK SOCKS, BUFFALO JONES, CITY OF EMBER, DAVID JOSEPH Sat, Dec. 4 at 7:15 pm The Big Dipper $8 MAT AND SAVANNA SHAW Tue, Dec. 7 at 8 pm Knitting Factory $28-$55 JANGO, INDIAN GOAT, THE BLACK TONES, KARMA Fri, Dec. 10 at 8 pm Lucky You Lounge $15-$20

NOAH KAHAN, BLAKE ROSE Sat, Dec. 11 at 8 pm Knitting Factory $22-$99 SPOKANE JAZZ ORCHESTRA: THE CHRISTMAS MUSIC OF NAT KING COLE WITH ALEXANDER YOUNG Sat, Dec. 11 at 7:30 pm Bing Crosby Theater $27-$32 CRAIG OWENS Mon, Dec. 13 at 7 pm The Big Dipper $18

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DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 51


Robert Tombari returns as the Poet in An Iliad at Stage Left. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

THEATER EPIC RETURN

Back in January, Stage Left Theater streamed a prerecorded production of An Iliad, Lisa Peterson and Denis O’Hare’s compelling chronicle of human bellicosity that took its inspirational cues from Homer’s ancient epic about the Trojan War. Now the theater is bringing that same well-received show — still directed by Susan Hardie and starring Robert Tombari as the war-weary poet — to its stage for an in-person run. Along with marking the theater’s anticipated return to live entertainment for the first time since the pandemic, An Iliad doubles as a fundraiser for its upcoming season and is the first live show inside the newly remodeled venue. — E.J. IANNELLI An Iliad • Fri, Dec. 3 through Sun, Dec. 5 at 7 pm • $30 • Stage Left Theater • 108 W. Third Ave. • stagelefttheater.org • 509-838-9727

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52 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021

ARTS SELF-GUIDED SIGHTS

MELISSA COLE

Eight hours, seven artists, six locations and lots of great art. This year’s Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture’s artist studio tour includes bonus artists and a view inside the home of Kolva-Sullivan gallery owners Jim Kolva and Pat Sullivan. Artists Louise Kodis and Melissa Cole are at their home studios, while Neicy Frey is at Suzanne Ostersmith’s pad (so you get to see her stuff, too!). Similarly, Nicholas Sironka is hosted by M.A.D. Co. Labs, and Reinaldo Gil Zambrano is holding forth with friend and fellow printmaker Mel Hewitt at the Spokane Print and Publishing Center. Visit one or all, and for $5 more, join the artists at Ella’s Supper Club for a post-tour reception, with an opportunity to win a printmaking lesson with Zambrano or original artwork from Kodis. — CARRIE SCOZZARO MAC Holiday Artist Studio Tour • Fri, Dec. 4; tour from 10 am-4 pm; reception from 4-6 pm • $15-$20 • northwestmuseum.org • 509-456-3931

CULTURE CELEBRATE, ITALIAN-STYLE

Holy Cannoli! That’s the theme of the inaugural Festa Italiana, which includes free cannoli — a crispy cylinder of pastry filled with a creamy ricotta cheese filling — plus hourly raffles, Italian music, and food and beverages available for purchase from restaurant host, David’s Pizza. Also planned: a fashion show in collaboration with Fringe & Fray, the Italian film Ciao, Professore!, and a slideshow of travel photos. Some of those are from organizer and Spokane Cagli Sister City Association President John Caputo’s nearly 20 years of Gonzaga University student trips to Cagli, Italy, which might inspire you to go there yourself someday. — CARRIE SCOZZARO Festa Italiana • Sun, Dec. 5 from 12:30-5 pm • Free • All ages • David’s Pizza • 803 W. Mallon Ave. • spokanesistercities.org • 509-483-7460


MUSIC LOCAL LEGEND

Whenever Peter Rivera plays a show in these parts, it’s a celebration. The former lead singer and drummer of Rare Earth always puts together a killer show based around some of the giant hits that made him classic-rock royalty way back when: “Get Ready,” “Born to Wander,” “I Just Want to Celebrate!” On Saturday, he’ll pack his Celebrate orchestra (sensing a theme yet?) along with backup singers and a horn section to the Bing for a show that not only offers a great reason to get out of the house; it’s also one of the few nonholiday-themed parties in store this month! Local up-and-comer Olivia Vika and her band the Velvets will open the show with a taste of psychedelic blues that should fit right in with Rivera’s jams. — DAN NAILEN Peter Rivera with Vika and the Velvets • Sat, Dec. 4 at 7:30 pm • All ages • $27 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • bingcrosbytheater.com • 509-227-7638

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VISUAL ART ONE MAN’S TRASH...

TIFFANY PATTERSON

When at our most pessimistic, it’s easy to feel like we live in a garbage world surrounded by garbage people and literal garbage everywhere. The final Chase Gallery exhibit of 2021 embraces this idea. Fast Trash brings together three local artists to create in the medium of refuse as a response to lives that seem ever-more defined by disposable consumerism. Spearheading the project is Thom Caraway, who finds value in literal trash art because it undercuts artistic self-seriousness while also making something meaningful out of the “useless.” Tiffany Patterson tackles fast fashion via “Looking Fresh,” a series of faux fashion designs crafted from old sewing patterns, cardboard and collected rubbish materials (a La Croix box bikini, anyone?). Whitworth professor Katie Creyts’ work for the show plays off the pollution of the oceans with a piece that evokes death and a beached whale. — SETH SOMMERFELD Fast Trash • Through Dec. 30, Mon-Fri from 8 am-5 pm • Free • Chase Gallery • 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • spokanearts.org/programs/chasegallery • 509-844-5303

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DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 53


PLEASE RESPOND Wallace Idaho, July 11, 2015, Blues Festival weekend. Charlie Butts was playing at the Red Light Garage/cafe. You: long hair, long dress, slender, very pretty. Me: long curly blond hair, ivy cap, blue eyes, jeans. We danced! WOW!!!!!!! We danced like we had been dancing together for years. Your name: Deby, sax player Rathdrum area? My name: Gary. Let’s dance again. unclemac@email.com

CHEERS

I SAW YOU YOU NEED A LADDER? Shopping at Walmart Sat. afternoon I noticed you reaching up to get some Sprite soda, and I asked if you needed a ladder. As fate would have it I believe we were meant to meet and get to know each other because this is the third time I’ve seen and briefly talked to you. The first time was last year in Liberty Lake at the grocery store and you were with your Dad around Fathers Day. I wished him a Happy Fathers day, but then I left soon after. The second time I saw you was a couple weeks ago shopping at Fred Meyer’s as you were reaching up for something on the top shelf and asked you if you needed a ladder. Now the third time at Walmart in the Valley, I asked you about a ladder again. I want to actually have a conversation over coffee or go out on a date with you for a fun activity or something. Get in touch through this ad, and let’s get to know each other. You are about 5 feet 2 inches wearing gray sweets and stocking cap with a black coat. Hope we see each other again! RIVERSIDE AND MONROE Me: stached guy with grey backpack. You: handsome man with a grey newsboy cap and a messenger bag that looked far too full. A few weeks ago we made eye contact from opposite sides of the crosswalk next to the library, and I caught your handsome glance twice looking back as I walked away. I wish I had the guts to turn around and say hi.

SOUND OFF

NOT GIVING UP To everybody out there who know the struggles life throws but have chosen to rise up and conquer your dreams and overcome the obstacles, you are amazing and example of strength — for it isn’t easy making ends meet, especially if you come from nothing; but you, my friend, look at you aganist all odds, you’re becoming strong. It shows your hard work and your heart for others, and goodness doesn’t go unnoticed. This is for overcoming addiction or changing lifestyles. The l fact that you decided you want more from life and are taking the step to achieve a better life. I hope you go far for you have people cheering for you, strangers out there rooting for you and praying you stay strong and move on fullfilling your dreams. Here’s to all of you out there choosing to give your best and live life to the fullest. I’m rooting for you always — From a lady in your town CHEERS, MY NEARLY PERFECT “KNIGHT IN SHINING ARMOR!” Happy 2nd anniversary to the tall gentleman from the short lady you met in the waiting room of Perfection Tires five years ago!! I love you so much, and I love the life that we’ve put together. I’m so glad you asked me for the phone number... IT WAS MARCH. IT WAS MADNESS. IT WAS LOVE... I still have your love letters, your blue Priest Lake sweatshirt and the poem I wrote for you... I think of you each morning when I call the birds, and I think of French paintings, pink champagne, tanzanite rings and the streets of Paris with you. Are you the other half of the missing link in the story and film by Doug Block...? Why does the date we met, and your birthdate, and a thousand other signs and signals and reminders and memories continue to appear in my daily life, all

these lonely years later...? I really miss our phone calls, I still miss you on Fridays, and I miss being in love with a Kindred Soul that I love talking to — it’s the chemistry and dynamic that I compare any possible new relationship to... dear “Will,” if you read this, just know I’ve never stopping loving you... and I’ll never forget how you pulled me onto the dance floor, just after

wish dearly to this day to have changed. To have been there and have them see how much I loved them. Not being able to share those words of kindness with them ever again tears me apart. So, in my own way, seeing the words of kindness and the plea for it isn’t as much of a wish to change the world entirely, because i know that some words might not be enough, but to change

You didn’t need him to be the biggest man at that table, but the dad with the biggest heart.

our introductions... beer, basketball and, oh baby, your blue eyes... HEALTH CARE WORKERS ROCK! Specifically, to Nurse Susan & Dr. Peters @ PF Family Medicine, to Dr. Hough @ Providence Urgent Care in the Valley, and to Sammy (Nurse? MA?) @ the NWSH vaccine clinic in Post Falls — THANK YOU for being awesome! Whether we’ve only met once recently, or we’ve had regular visits for years… This anxious/neurotic patient of yours appreciates you more than you know. <3 CHEERS TO KYLE I didn’t hear you say much at the restaurant; in fact, I didn’t hear a single word you said for the hour we were sitting next to you. You are either a soft-spoken individual or the situation provided you with little talking room, or maybe both. But I want to give you my cheers, because you sat through hell for that hour. And the worst part is you were sharing a table with your dad. Cheers to you for sticking it out. I would have left very early on in that verbal beating. Cheers to you for attempting to share your understanding of the past. It honestly doesn’t matter if everything that your dad said to you was the truth; he doesn’t have the right to belittle you in that way. He was being an asshole, and you didn’t deserve it...especially on Thanksgiving night. Maybe he was always the parent there for you growing up, and maybe he did pay for everything, and maybe your

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

54 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021

mom is the worst. But he failed to show you an ounce of respect for the young man you are now, and that he actually loves you as much as the glasses of red wine he was consuming. Finally, cheers to you for what I hope happened after we left: You opened up. You told him how small and insignificant he made you feel and how controlling he was being in conversation

by saying your name 500 times and how you didn’t need him to be the biggest man at that table, but the dad with the biggest heart. Then respectfully, and only because he is your dad, you told him to shut the hell up. And you asked him the question that he probably never asked you, “What are you thankful for this year?” Because you are the bigger man. Cheers to you, Kyle.

the world around me and let those who do read this know that there is kindness out there. There is love, there are people who are willing to sit and listen ... I’m not trying to sway your mind, I clearly read your jeer here and thought about it before writing this, and I wanted you to know that while I don’t agree with what you are saying entirely, I see you and understand you.

CHEERS TO THE AVISTA LINEMEN The linemen that go out in storms day and night until the power is back on. Untangling wires during high winds, rain and lightning. That’s heroic. Much respect.

GRUMPY AT YOKES To the gentleman grouchy that my son and I were parked next to you at the Latah Creek Yoke’s: Yep, I heard you mutter “son of a b*tch” and noted your attitude as you loaded your groceries into your car. What I can’t determine is why. We were parked well within our lines, in a small vehicle, and you were able to get into your car. Don’t worry, we took care of the cart you rudely left behind, since our being parked by you was such a terrible inconvenience. n

JEERS RE: IT’S TIME TO FACE THE FACTS It saddens me to see someone suggest cutting out kindness and pleas for it here. You say that those who read the Inlander don’t need to be reminded to be kind, but I think this just proves that people do. Not just reminded to be kind, but see the kindness in others. Oh I know, completely focusing on the good isn’t the best, but I think more than not seeing words of encouragement and the search for love in the world isn’t a bad endevour. Maybe the world will not be changed by a weekly paragraph, maybe the world might continue to be a dark place, but I quite enjoy opening this paper up and seeing the light in it as well. I’ve lost quite a few friends, and some of them to something I

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS F A N C A E I O T R A N J G O S O R O B B A M A S N P R T A R S H O P R A M E I T A L R O N I A N I M

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NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

CHRISTMAS TREE ELEGANCE Spokane Symphony Associates’ annual 13-day event that attracts more than 100,000 attendees and features the raffle of 15 themed, decorated trees on display at the Historic Davenport Hotel and River Park Square. Through Dec. 12. Raffle tickets $1. spokanesymphonyassoc.org HUTTON SETTLEMENT’S ANNUAL CHRISTMAS TREE SALE The Hutton Settlement Tree Farm offers a wide selection of pre-cut wild and farmed trees, u-cut options, fresh garland and wreaths for purchase. All proceeds fund Hutton’s on-campus, youth-led education programs. Mon-Fri 12-6 pm, SatSun 10 am-6 pm (while supplies last) through Dec. 17. Hutton Settlement Children’s Home, 9907 E. Wellesley. huttonsettlement.org (509-838-2789) SANTA EXPRESS This locally organized holiday retail store is for kids ages 4-12 (encouraged), many of whom make this shopping experience part of their holiday tradition. With the assistance of an elf, kids shop for everyone on their list from a wide selection of gifts priced from $1 to $10. For those who prefer to shop from home, an online shopping experience is also available at santaexpress.org. Proceeds benefit Vanessa Behan. Mon-Fri 11 am-7 pm, Sat 10 am-7 pm, Sun 11 am-5 pm. through Dec. 23. River Park Square, 808 W. Main Ave. santaexpress.org (509-415-3506) CHRISTMAS TREE ELEGANCE HOLIDAY LUNCHEONS This annual luncheon is held as part of Christmas Tree Elegance. In addition to a menu created by Davenport Hotel chefs, Spokane Symphony Music Director James Lowe directs a group Symphony musicians playing holiday favorites. Dec. 7-8 at 11 am. $55. Historic Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. spokanesymphonyassoc.org

COMEDY

HA!MARK HOLIDAY SPECIAL The BDT players improvise a holiday movie full of twists, turns and romance. Fridays in December (Dec. 3, 10 and 17) at 7:30 pm. Rated for general audiences. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) KEVIN JAMES THORNTON The rising TikTok star has over 700k followers and 100 million views. Kevin has built a loyal following posting hilarious, heartfelt and occasionally cringey moments of self reflection that are relatable to audiences young and old alike (with a splash of autotune). Dec. 4, 4:30 pm. $30-$40. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com SAFARI Blue Door’s version of “Whose Line,” a fast-paced improv show with a few twists and turns added. Rated for mature audiences/ages 16+. Reservations recommended. Saturdays from 7:30-9 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com

COMMUNITY

CELEBRATION OF LIGHTS The annual event includes holiday music from the Ridgeline High School Marching Band and the Central Valley High School Choir, a reading from “The Night Before Christmas” by Spokane Valley’s City Council, a visit from Santa Claus and the ceremonial lighting of the tree. Dec. 2, 5:30 pm. Free. Spokane Valley City Hall, 10210 E. Sprague. spokanevalley.org/

CRESCENT HOLIDAY WINDOWS Enjoy a holiday stroll down Main Avenue and step back in time with five classic window scenes featuring vintage holiday decor rescued from the basement of the former Crescent Department Store. Fri-Sat 12-10 pm; Sun-Thu 3-8 pm through Jan. 2. Free. Davenport Grand Hotel, 333 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. davenporthotelcollection.com DROP IN & PLAY Join staff, volunteers and other members of the creative community to play board and card games together in a relaxing, positive environment. Thursdays from 12-2 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org THE FESTIVAL OF TREES The community is invited to tour The Festival of Trees on display at The Center adjacent to the Colfax Library. Cast a vote for your favorite tree in-person or online for the “People’s Choice” award. Through Dec. 28; Mon-Fri 10 am-6 pm, Sat 1-5 pm. Colfax Library, 102 S. Main St. whitcolib. org/events (509-397-4366) JOURNEY TO THE NORTH POLE A festive lake cruise across Lake Coeur d’Alene while viewing more than 1.5 million holiday lights, and a visit with Santa Claus and his elves at the North Pole waterfront toy workshop. Daily departure times are 5:30, 6:30 and 7:30 pm, through Jan. 2 from the Resort Plaza Shops. $10.50-$26.50. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdacruises.com (208-765-4000) LOUIS COMFORT TIFFANY: TREASURES FROM THE DRIEHAUS COLLECTION A celebration of the artistry and craftsmanship of the Tiffany artworks from Chicago’s distinguished Richard H. Driehaus Collection, highlighting masterworks never before presented in a comprehensive exhibition. Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm through Feb. 13. $7-$12. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (509-456-3931) NORTHWEST WINTERFEST A holiday lantern display and cultural celebration featuring dozens of lighted holiday lantern displays and holiday cultures of the world. Open daily from 5-9 pm through Jan. 2. $12-$18. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. northwestwinterfest.com (509-477-1766) DECK THE FALLS The weekend begins with the “Red Neck Parade” on Friday and the craft fair on Saturday, ending with a community Christmas concert on Sunday. Dec. 3-5. Cutter Theatre, 302 Park St., Metaline Falls. cuttertheatre. com (509-446-4108) HOLIDAY BALL A semi-formal event by USA Dance Sandpoint. Come at 7 pm for a beginners rumba lesson, followed by general dancing to a DJ, refreshments, door prizes and mixers. Singles or couples, as well as all levels of dancers, are welcome. Bring a non-perishable food item to donate. Dec. 3, 7-10 pm. $5-$9. Ponderay Events Center, 401 Bonner Mall Way. (208-699-0421) HOLIDAY FIREWORKS CELEBRATION A free community fireworks show hosted by the Kendall Yards Business District, held in conjunction with the Annual Winter Festival featuring an array of local vendors featured each weekend in the Kendall Yards Welcome Center and throughout Kendall Yard’s businesses. Dec. 3, 6:30 pm. Free. facebook.com/KendallYards JURASSIC QUEST Walk through the Cretaceous, Jurassic and Triassic pe-

riods to see the dinos that ruled on land, and “deep dive” into the “Ancient Oceans” exhibit to come face to face with the largest apex predator that ever existed, a moving, life-size, 50-footlong megalodon. Dec. 3 from 1-8 pm, Dec. 4-5 from 9 am-8 pm. $19-$36. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. jurassicquest.com KENDALL YARDS WINTER FESTIVAL Shop local during this two-weekend festival hosting handcrafted jewelry, art and crafts and more. Hosted in the Kendall Yards Welcome Center, and throughout Kendall Yard’s business district. Dec. 3 from 10 am-7 pm, Dec. 4 from 10 am-3 pm. Free. facebook.com/ KendallYards LGBTQ+ SENIORS OF THE INW All LGBTQ+ seniors are invited to join weekly Zoom meetings, Fridays at 4 pm. “Senior” is roughly ages 50+. If interested in this socialization opportunity, email NancyTAvery@comcast.net. Free. facebook.com/SpokaneLGBTSeniors MILLWOOD COMMUNITY TREE LIGHTING & WINTERFEST CHRISTMAS MARKET Inland Empire Paper Company, the City of Millwood and Millwood community host a traditional lighting of the Millwood community Christmas tree with hot chocolate, cookies, music, and Santa. The WinterFest Christmas Market also runs from 4-7 pm on Dalton at Argonne, along with a Friends of Argonne Library craft giveaway. Dec. 3, 4-6:30 pm. Free. Bottles, 3223 N. Argonne Rd. millwoodnow.org OUTDOOR EUROPEAN CHRISTMAS MARKET A two-day family event hosted by the Hayden Chamber, coinciding with the city parade and tree lighting on Saturday. Enjoy warming fires, twinkly lights and shopping for antique and vintage items, homemade crafts and gifts, food trucks, warm beverages and more. Fri, Dec. 3 from 4-8 pm; Sat, Dec. 4 from 10 am-6 pm. $5-$7. McIntire Family Park, 8930 N. Government Way. haydenchamber.org (208-762-1185) TRAINS & TREES Two special weekends at the Inland Northwest Rail Museum feature trees aglow with lights with a different scale model train circling the base of each tree. Tour the museum, walk through restored train cars, view the exhibits, ride the 2-foot gauge train and shop in the gift shop. Free refreshments. $10/adults $10, $8/senior, military, $6/ages 6-12. Dec. 3, 10 am-5 pm. $6-$10. Inland Northwest Rail Museum, 23700 Sprinkle Rd., Reardan. inlandnwrailmuseum.com (509-796-3377) ATHOL CHRISTMAS MARKET Local farms, artisans and vendors from the summer Athol Farmers Market are on site offering goods from specialty foods to locally made goat soaps, blended herbal teas, Christmas ornaments, wood crafts and more. Dec. 4, 10 am-4 pm and Dec. 5, 12-4 pm. Athol Community Hall, 30355 Third St. facebook.com/ events/456613122396643/ CRAZY CHRISTMAS CATASTROPHE - A FAMILY FRIENDLY MURDER MYSTERY In Christmas Village at the North Pole, preparations for Christmas happen 364 days a year. Each year, the coveted Christmas Icon award is bestowed upon the hardest working and most effective holiday helper. Expect the unexpected, as anybody in the town is a potential winner. (Family-friendly event; it does involve murder, but there’s no gore.) Dec. 4, 6-9 pm. $29. Crime Scene Entertainment, 1701 N. Fourth St. facebook.com/events/929991814594919

VIRTUAL BAZAAR 3 Cheney, WA Churches!!! 24/7 FROM Now TO Dec 4 A weekly email for food lovers Subscribe at Inlander.com/newsletter

cheney-wa-churches-holiday-bazaar.com

SPOKANE’S OFFICIAL FIRST FRIDAY

PRESENTED BY THE DOWNTOWN SPOKANE PARKING & BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT

T F I I R D S N I T F tfridayspoka ne.o w.firs w w rg t a Join us for First Friday in downtown Spokane and be the first to experience local art, food, drink, sales, specials, and more.

EXPERIENCE THE MOST ON FIRST FRIDAY. enter to win prizes by visiting five participating venues and completing the Find it First Passport.

Completed Passports good for $1-off parking at River Park Square

DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 55


EVENTS | CALENDAR DAHMEN BARN HOLIDAY MARKET Visiting artists and craftspeople from throughout the region join the Barn’s resident artists to sell their one-of-a-kind products. Dec. 4, 10 am-4 pm. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way., Uniontown. artisanbarn.org (509-229-3414) HOLIDAY EXTRAVAGANZA CRAFT FAIR The annual craft and holiday extravaganza at Cheney High School offers gift ideas, home decor, jewelry, bath and body items, candles, lavender, smoked salmon, cotton candy and more from over 80 local vendors. Santa pictures also offered. Dec. 4, 10 am-4 pm. Free. Cheney High School, 460 N. 6th St. (509559-4001) ROCK & ROLL HOLIDAY PARTY Come in and meet Rock & Roll Santa, sit on Santa’s lap, listen to his saxophone, get a treat and do a craft, all in a festival holiday shop full of Santas and a treasure trove of gifting options. Dec. 4, 11 am-3 pm. Free. Spokane Gallery and Framing, 409 S. Dishman Mica Rd. pacificflywaygallery.blogspot.com (509-747-0812) COLFAX WINTERFEST The Colfax Chamber of Commerce and Colfax Downtown host a traditional lighted parade down Main Street, followed by a lively fireworks show. Events also happen all day, starting with the Perkins House Victorian Christmas from 10 am-2 pm and Santa Selfies at the library from 1-3 pm. The lighted Holiday Parade starts at 5:30 pm on Main street with fireworks to follow. Dec. 4, 126:30 pm. Free. explorecolfax.com/events WINTER WONDERLAND To celebrate the holidays, the Wonder Building hosts an inaugural winter market with activities including live music, movies, arts and gifts, Christmas trees, hot cocoa and more. Saturdays from 10 am-2 pm through Dec. 18. Free. The Wonder Building, 835 N. Post St. fb.me/e/1T4pVlbVM HOLIDAY REMEMBRANCE SERVICE Any and all are invited to attend, even if you have not used the funeral home’s services. Includes a ceremony, ornaments for those gone before us, and refreshments. RSVP required; call 509-328-2600. Dec. 5, 2 pm. Free. Hennessey Funeral Home, 2203 N Division St. (509-328-2600) 20TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE MAC EXHIBITIONS BUILLDING Join the MAC for cake and coffee to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the MAC’s exhibitions building and the change in name to the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture. See historic photos of the museum campus and visit “Louis Comfort Tiffany: Treasures from the Driehaus Collection,” plus four more exhibits featuring American Indian and Pacific Northwest art and history. Dec. 5, 1-4:30 pm. Included with admission. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (509-456-3931) SVAS CRAFT FAIR Several local vendors are offering handmade items, holiday decor and more. Dec. 5, 10 am-4 pm. Free admission. Spokane Valley Adventist School, 1603 S. Sullivan Rd. tinyurl. com/svas2021 (509-926-0955) BUILDING WITH BOOKS: LEGO STORYTIME Enjoy listening to a fun read-aloud story. Afterwards, recreate a part of the story, such as a character, scene, or setting, using LEGO bricks or other craft materials in your home. Then, share your creations with the group! For families and all ages. Registration required for each session. Dec. 7 and Dec. 21, 4-4:45 pm. Free. scld.org WINTER MARKET AT THE PAVILION Riverfront’s second annual Winter Market

56 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021

hosts 35 local vendors and artisans offering a variety of goods, including handmade items, prepared food, gifts and more. Wednesdays from 3-7 pm, through Dec. 22. Free. Pavilion at Riverfront, 574 N. Howard St. riverfrontspokane.com WHITMAN HERITAGE HOLIDAY SCAN DAY A project of Whitman County Library is holding a special holiday scanning event. Community members may bring in up to 15 historically significant photographs from holidays or celebrations to be added to the collection. After photographs have been copied, all originals will go with you, along with digital copies. Scanning done by appointment only. Dec. 9, 2-4 pm. Colfax Library, 102 S Main St. whitco.lib.wa.us (509-397-4366) WSU GATEWAY PROJECT CELEBRATION Enjoy refreshments and mingle with students of an interdisciplinary design studio class exploring the connections between WSU and downtown Pullman. Learn about the project, speak with students about their master plan concepts and individual projects that support the overarching goals of connecting downtown Pullman and the WSU flagship campus. Dec. 9, 5-6:30 pm. Free. Elson S. Floyd Cultural Center, 405 SE Spokane St., Pullman. research.wsu.edu/ innovation/gateway (509-335-2584)

FILM

SILVER VALLEY FILM COMMUNITY PREMIERE Across Bank Street hosts the opening of the new community movie, “Dimensions.” The red carpet premeire at the Wallace Elks Lodge is formal or casual, with dinner and no-host cocktails. Tickets available from Nancy Hanks, request at Across Bank Street Facebook page, email at acrossbankstreet@gmail. com or call 208-215-7888. Dec. 5, 5-8 pm. $20. Wallace Elks Lodge, 419 Cedar Street. wallace.idahoelks.org A MATCH MADE AT CHRISTMAS The locally-made holiday film comes to Hayden. The film was made in Coeur d’Alene, and written/directed/produced locally with Coeur d’Alene’s Abundant House Films and Micah Lynn Hanson. Dec. 8, 7-9 pm. $8. Hayden Discount Cinema, 300 W. Centa Ave. hdcmovies.com

FOOD

ROCKET WINE CLASS Rocket Market hosts weekly wine classes; sign up in advance for the week’s selections. Fridays at 7 pm. Call to reserve a seat, or register online. Price varies. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket.com BREAKFAST & PHOTOS WITH SANTA See Santa before he returns to the North Pole. Have breakfast and get affordable, professional photos before you leave. Breakfast includes pancakes, eggs, sausage, juice, hot chocolate, applesauce, milk and coffee and tea. Also includes activities and gifts for children, and live Christmas music by Taylor Belote on steel drums. Free parking. Dec. 4, 11 and 18 from 9 am-noon. Prices vary. Southside Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. soutsidescc.org (509-535-0803) SUDS & SCIENCE SEMINAR SERIES Dr. Andrew M. Oster, PhD Associate Professor of Applied Mathematics at Eastern Washington University presents “Development of the Primary Visual Cortex.” Dec. 4, 7-8 pm. Free. The Golden Handle Project, 111 S. Cedar. goldenhandle.org TASTE OF GINGERBREAD Decorate a gingerbread house in person, or take it home to DIY. You’ll get a pre-constructed

gingerbread house, frosting and a bag of candy. Proceeds support local children and families touched by autism and other special needs. Dec. 4, 10 am-3 pm. $25. The ISAAC Foundation, 6607 E. Broadway Ave. theisaacfoundation.configio. com/page/eventsgingerbread-2021 FESTA ITALIANA A festive event hosted by the Spokane Cagli Sister City Association with food, fun, fashion, film, games, raffles, wine tasting and more. Dec. 5, 12:30-5 pm. Free. David’s Pizza, 803 W. Mallon Ave. spokanesistercities.org PERFECT APPETIZERS FOR ANY PARTY Make Christmas canapes, including perfect stuffed mushrooms; pear, cambozola and bacon bruschetta; baby potato canapes and a sundried tomato and goat cheese bruschetta. Dec. 9, 6-8 pm. $69. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. campusce.net/spokane/ course/course.aspx?c=1096 NAILED IT! GINGERBREAD HOUSE EDITION How will you do when you try to build one of the most elaborate gingerbread houses you have ever built? Compete by yourself or recruit members of your household to form a team and find out. SCLD provides a challenge at the start of the event. Then, use the graham crackers or gingerbread, frosting and whatever you have on hand to assemble and decorate your most elaborate and festive gingerbread house. Registration required. Dec. 11, 2-3 pm. Free. scld.org

MUSIC

DICKENS CAROLERS Dressed for the occasion with top hats and bow ties, the Coeur d’Alene Dickens Carolers sing warming holiday melodies in and around the resort. Wed-Sat from 6-9 pm, Sun from 11 am-2 pm through Dec. 23. Free. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdaresort.com (208-765-4000) GONZAGA JAZZ CHRISTMAS CONCERT A concert of Christmas favorites performed by the Gonzaga Jazz Ensemble, including Ella Fitzgerald’s “Winter Wonderland” and “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas,” plus other holiday favorites. Dec. 2, 7-8:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center, 211 E. Desmet Ave. gonzaga. edu/music (509-313-6733) SPOKANE SYMPHONY: THE NUTCRACKER WITH STATE STREET BALLET The Spokane Symphony welcomes back State Street Ballet of Santa Barbara for their 10th year of dancing with us to Tchaikovsky’s memorable score. More than 70 local young dancers complete the cast. Dec, 2-3 at 7:30 pm, Dec. 4 at 2 and 7:30 pm, Dec. 5 at 2 pm. $32+. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. spokanesymphony.org COEUR D’ALENE SYMPHONY: HOLIDAY POPS The holiday program “Sounding the Horn: Illuminated Carols” includes Franck’s Symphony in D minor; Mozart’s Horn Concerto no. 4, ft. Casey Traver on French horn; Selections from the Polar Express; Herbert’s “March of the Toys” and a Christmas carol sing-a-long. Dec. 4, 7:30 pm. $10-$20. Schuler Performing Arts Center, 1000 W. Garden Ave. cdasymphony.org/events GONZAGA WIND ENSEMBLE CONCERT: ARISE The Gonzaga Wind Ensemble conducted by Peter J. Hamlin performs their concert, Arise, with music by Kevin Day, Ryan George, Gustav Holst, Omar Thomas, James David and Robert Spittal. Dec. 4, 3-4:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts

Center, 211 E. Desmet Ave. gonzaga.edu/ music (509-313-6733) HOLIDAY CELEBRATION: LET IT GLOW WSU School of Music’s inaugural holiday celebration in the fully-decorated Bryan Hall Theatre is family-friendly and includes a silent auction to benefit student scholarships. Dec. 4, 2-4 pm. Free. Bryan Hall Theatre (WSU), 605 Veterans Way. events.wsu.edu/event/holiday-concert-8 PETER RIVERA The former lead singer and drummer of Rare Earth comes to the Bing with his Celebrate orchestra complete with horn section, back-up singers and accomplished side players. Dec. 4, 7:30 pm. $25. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com RUSTY JACKSON’S WHITE CHRISTMAS “White Christmas” with Danny Kaye, Bing Crosby and Rosemary Clooney is retold by Rusty Jackson in his own inimitable way, performing the music from the show and narrating to fill in the rest of the story, with special guest Mel Dalton. Dec. 4, 6-8 pm. $20. Lake City Center, 1916 N. Lakewood Dr. (208-262-1655) WASHINGTON IDAHO SYMPHONY: HOLIDAY BRASS Program includes Duke Ellington’s jazzy take on the Nutcracker Suite and holiday selections by the brass and string nonet. Dec. 4, 7:30 pm. $10$25. Pullman High School, 510 NW Greyhound Way. wa-idsymphony.org HOLY NAMES MUSIC CENTER PRESENTS: A HOLIDAY CONCERT SERIES Tune into the Holy Names Music Center YouTube channel Sundays at 2 pm until Dec. 19 for a holiday concert featuring faculty, students and friends of Holy Names Music Center. 2 pm through Dec. 19. Free. youtube.com/channel/UCu4TPEyVChJVmVld7uGwBYQ GONZAGA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The Gonzaga Symphony Orchestra’s winter program features Rimsky-Korsakov’s epic showpiece “Scheherazade” and the three winners of the Concerto/Aria Competition. Dec. 6, 7:30-9 pm. $14-$17; GU students, employees free. Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center, 211 E. Desmet Ave. (509-313-6733) MAT & SAVANNA SHAW The group’s studio album debut “Picture This” debuted at No. 1 on Billboard’s Emerging Artists Chart; recently followed by the release of “The Joy of Christmas.” Dec. 7, 8 pm. $27.50-$55. Knitting Factory, 919 W. Sprague Ave. sp.knittingfactory.com

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. PRINCE GEORGE COUGARS Regular season match. Dec. 3, 7 pm. $17-$37. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanechiefs.com EAGLE WATCHING CRUISES A two-hour cruise on to view some of the 100s of American bald eagles on their annual migration each winter, stopping to feed on lake-bound salmon. Cruises on Sat-Sun from 12-2 pm between Dec. 4-19, daily from 12-2 pm Dec. 26-Jan. 2. $16.50$22.50. Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdacruises.com SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. SEATTLE THUNDERBIRDS Regular season match. Special: Teddy Bear Toss. Dec. 4, 7 pm. $17$37. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanechiefs.com (279-7000) CROSS COUNTRY SKI LESSON Learn the basics of cross-country skiing at Mt. Spokane. Lessons taught by Spokane Nordic Ski Association’s certified instructors. Fee

includes a daylong ski equipment rental and 2 hours of instruction. Additional information emailed after registration. Dec. 11, 10 am-2 pm, Dec. 12, 10 am-2 pm, $34/$59. spokanerec.org

THEATER

ELLEN TRAVOLTA PRESENTS: SAVING CHRISTMAS Ellen Travolta, Molly Allen and Abbey Crawford read and tell stories, sing songs, and bring a little brightness to your holiday. Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 5 pm through Dec. 19. $30. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. Cdachristmas.com (208-765-4000) BABES IN TOYLAND Enjoy the wonderful characters of Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary; Tom-Tom, the Piper’s Son; Jack and Jill; Little Miss Muffet in this Christmas classic. Nov. 26-Dec. 19; shows are Fri-Sun (times vary). $12-$16. Spokane Children’s Theatre, 2727 N. Madelia. spokanechildrenstheatre.org (509-328-4886) A CHRISTMAS CAROL A holiday theatrical event that’s family-friendly and nostalgically new, in a world premier stage adaptation by Kendra Phillips (MFA Playwriting ‘21). Dec. 3-4 and Dec. 11 at 7:30 pm, Dec. 4-5 and Dec. 12 at 2 pm. $6-$22. Hartung Theater, 875 Perimeter Dr. uidaho.edu/theatre (208-885-6111) AN ILIAD Stage Left comes full-circle, bringing An Iliad live to the stage. Directed by Susan Hardie and starring Robert Tombari, this first streamed production back in January 2021 makes its in-person debut as a fundraiser show to help with production costs in 2022. Dec. 3-5 at 7 pm. $30. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. stagelefttheater.org MET LIVE IN HD: EURYDICE American composer Matthew Aucion now carries a tradition into the 21st century with a captivating new take on the story — a product of the Met’s commissioning program. Dec. 4, 9:55 am and Dec. 6, 6 pm. $15/$20. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) STAGE LEFT HOLIDAY PATRON GALA Hosted by radio personality Molly Allen with live jazz music by the Mardi Gras Growlers, this evening of music and festivities offers a glimpse into new changes coming to Stage Left in 2022 and beyond. Dec. 8, 7-10 pm. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. stagelefttheater.org

VISUAL ARTS

HOLIDAY ARTISTS’ SHOP Shop from local vendors of handmade baskets, hand-turned wood bowls, fused glass, fiber arts, hand-thrown pottery, books, cards, jewelry and more. Refreshments available. Dec. 2-4 from 10 am-6 pm, Dec. 5 from 10 am-3 pm. Free. Create Arts Center, 900 W. Fourth St., Newport. createarts.org (509-447-9277) CUP OF JOY Trackside’s 8th annual group invitational of drinking vessels features over 150 ceramic cups in many forms, colors and treatments. Opening reception Dec. 3, 5-8 pm, Dec. 4, 12-4 pm. Gallery open Wed-Fri 11 am-5 pm through Jan. 7. Trackside Studio, 115 S. Adams St. tracksidestudio.net (509-863-9904) TIS THE SEASON OF THE MOON Featuring the artwork of Moon Gallery artist members and artist consignors, including small works, ornaments, fiber art, jewelry, pottery, paintings and more. Through Dec. 31, open Wed-Sat from 12-6 pm. Reception Dec. 3, 5-8 pm. New Moon Art Gallery, 1326 E. Sprague. newmoonartgallery.com n


SCIENCE

Trying Out Terpenes Take your cannabis knowledge to the next level with a crash course in these odorous chemicals BY WILL MAUPIN

T

he old standby categories of indica and sativa can only tell you so much about a strain. Astute budtenders can help shoppers find their perfect strain by going into detail about terpenes. Unfortunately for casual consumers, terpenes are much more complicated than the simple difference between indica and sativa. Simply put, terpenes are chemical compounds found in plants that contribute to its smell and taste. There are thousands of known terpenes, about 150 of which have been identified in cannabis. Each strain has its own unique mix of those 150 or so terpenes, and the specific balance contributes to each strain’s individual effects. Some terpenes are much more common than others, however. If you’re looking to learn more about terpenes and cannabis, here are three of the most common terpenes to start with.

CARYOPHYLLENE

This peppery terpene is found in cloves, rosemary,

black pepper, hops and cannabis, among other plants. In some strains it can account for nearly 40 percent of the plant’s essential oil content. It has also been shown to bind directly to cannabinoid receptors in our bodies, making it the first compound other than the plant’s cannabinoids — THC, CBD, etc. — to do so. While other terpenes serve more of a sensory role with their aroma and flavor, caryophyllene has an active and proven role in our body, even if scientists are still not entirely sure what it’s up to. Caryophyllene is the dominant terpene in the popular strain Gorilla Glue.

LIMONENE

Here’s one where the name almost says it all. Limonene is lemony, and if you’ve ever had a tropical, citrusy experience with a specific strain, chances are it was loaded with limonene. As you might expect, it’s the dominant terpene in citrus peels. Scientists are studying the positive effects

of limonene on the immune system. In cannabis, it’s often associated with anti-anxiety properties. Limonene is the dominant terpene in the popular strain Wedding Cake.

MYRCENE

The most common terpene of them all, in cannabis at least, is myrcene. Research from cannabis website Leafly showed that myrcene was the most dominant terpene in more than 40 percent of strains available commercially. It’s thought to contribute to a strain’s calming effects. Other plants containing relatively high levels of myrcene have a long history as sleep aids in folk medicine. It is also found in high concentrations in lemongrass, bay leaves and hops. Myrcene is the dominant terpene in the popular strain OG Kush. n

It’s terpene time!

DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 57


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Advice Goddess I’m a divorced guy in my 40s using dating apps. I’m keenly aware of what I do and don’t want in a woman and make it clear in my profile. For example, I write, “If you’re in a weird co-dependent relationship with a five-pound dog,” we are not a match. A friend looked at my profile and was all, “Man, you have to delete that.” I see no problem with what I’ve written. Who’s right? —Constructive Honesty

Admittedly, when people advise women, “Find a man who’s like a dog!” they mean like a big loyal black Lab, not a purse-sized poodledoodle that spends a quarter of its life getting foofed up at Monsieur Marcel, the doggie hairdresser. Of course, because a woman has a tiny ridiculous dog doesn’t mean she’s rife with psychological shortcomings. Including that bit in your profile — and especially as you worded it — says a few things about you, none of them lady-magnetizing. And sure, you wrote, “IF you are...” (in some sort of unhealthy relationship with your micro dog). However, even women who are emotionally together (and maybe even dog-free) are likely to swipe left or knock your profile into the little trash can icon. Most problematically, this remark and other similarly cutting ones in your profile suggest you’re an angry guy: a big flashing skull-’n’-crossbones “STEER CLEAR!” for women. “Anger-prone individuals are volatile and frequently dangerous” — to the point of violence, evolutionary social psychologist Andrew Galperin and his colleagues explain. Women, on average, are smaller, physically weaker, and thus more physically vulnerable than men, which is likely why they err on the side of overperceiving signs that a guy might be a Mr. Angry. In fact, per the Galperin team’s research: “A single instance of angry behavior” in “new acquaintances” is enough to provoke this keepaway motive — even when their anger seems justified by the situation at hand! Your sneering about behavior being “weird” and “co-dependent” is another red flag — suggesting you view life through puke-colored glasses and are quick to think the worst of total strangers. That’s Bigotry 101: using one infobit about an individual to leap to all sorts of ugly assumptions about them. It’s toxic, irrational, and unfair — and, if it’s your go-to thinking, perhaps something to work on changing, lest you pay an unintended price (both in an ugly-first view of others and in others seeing you as a person to block, delete, and/or avoid). By the way, “co-dependent” is an insulting term that’s in need of either retirement or scientific validation. It’s generally understood to describe two individuals in a persistent dysfunctional dance. The “enabling” individual temporarily eases the suffering of the other person (or pet!) — in ways that, in the long term, are harmful to both. “Co-dependence” was flung on the public by self-help authors — without any scientific basis: no evidence for the long lists of its supposed symptoms. It’s now promiscuously applied to shame people — to the point where showing none of the supposed symptoms gets used as proof of one’s co-dependence! That said, you’re wise to try to proactively shoo off women who are wrong for you, as it could keep you from wasting your time and theirs on the phone (or worse, on a happy hour date that flies by like a week of medieval torture). However, there’s a way to tell the wrong women, “Yoohoo, move on!” without coming off scolding or demeaning (and in turn throwing out the babes with the bathwater). Probably the best constructive yoohoo is subtle fact-stating, like mentioning you’re an atheist to discourage interest from those on Team God. Similarly, in the “who am I?” portion on a dating app, a 40-something, Johnny Depp-alicious hottie of a guy posted, “Living a plant-based life,” suggesting he doesn’t just eat vegan; it’s major in his identity. If, like me, you are committed to “steak-based living,” you know to give a big sad pass to Mr. Pirates of the Cauliflower-ribbean. It’s tempting to try to escape the emotional toddlers by announcing you’re seeking someone “psychologically healthy” or “emotionally solid.” Probably pretty useless. Those who have an unhealthy relationship with their dog — or their mom, crystal meth, or tennis — are often the last to know or admit it. Ultimately, you might simply accept that you’ll likely end up on a date or two with women you’d do anything to avoid. Keep first dates casual -- like meeting for coffee for an hour — and your disasters will at least be Hobbesian: nasty, brutish, and short. Finally, I must say — while typing this with my tiny, “My Little Pony”-like Chinese crested curled up asleep in my lap: Five pounds of dog may elicit laughs — till it’s cleanup time and you need a single sheet of Kleenex instead of a backhoe. n ©2021, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)


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ACROSS 1. With 71-Across, popular children’s book series by Jane O’Connor 6. Like cabernet sauvignon 9. March Madness, with “the” 14. Quintet followed by “. . . and sometimes Y” 15. Electric guitar, slangily 16. MD you don’t need an appointment to see 17. Like someone associated with a blue, pink and white flag, for short 18. Surveillance device, briefly 19. Item on a wrist 20. Popular children’s book series by Megan McDonald 23. Treat leniently, with “on” 26. “Yippee!” 30. Eldest Stark son on “Game of Thrones” 31. Cling wrap brand 35. Bleak genre 36. Reddit Q&A sessions 37. Middle of Venezuela? 38. With no assistance

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22. Have title to 23. Endowments for the arts 24. Two notes from a tuba 25. Pizza chain in many malls and airports

27. Ado 28. Prepares for a Mr. Universe competition, say 29. Pitcher Jesse with a record 1,252 regular-season appearances

THIS W ANSWE EEK’S I SAW RS ON YOUS 32. Ancient worshipper of Tezcatlipoca and Tlaloc 33. “Parks and ____” (200915 TV show, informally) 34. American Eagle intimate apparel brand 40. Video game starting point 41. Like many dinar spenders 42. Waited at a light, say 43. Attached 50. Qualifying race at the Olympics, for short 52. State capital founded during a gold rush 55. Buckets 56. ____-pedi 57. Palo ____ 58. Noggin 59. Brand with a Buzzy Bee

Waffle recipe 60. Aerosmith’s “Love ____ Elevator” 61. Suffix for symptom or problem 62. Roth ____ 65. Trick ending?

DECEMBER 2, 2021 INLANDER 63


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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 18 TH 5 PM – 7 PM | 30 WINNERS OF CASH, EXTRA PLAY CASH & PREQUALIFY INTO THE 7:30 PM DRAWING 7:30 PM | F-150 4X4 XLT SUPERCREW & CASH WINNER We’re revving up the winnings by giving away a brand new F-150 Truck during the Keep on Truckin’ Giveaway at Coeur d’Alene Casino! Join us on Saturday, December 18TH, and you could win one of 30 cash and Extra Play Cash prizes valued between $1,000 and $12,000. Plus, one of the lucky winners in the 5 pm to 7 pm giveaway will also win a truck and cash grand prize package valued at $58,000.

Keep On Truckin’ Bingo

ALL NOVEMBER & DECEMBER WIN A NEW FORD RANGER! Play the Keep On Truckin’ game this November and December during Regular Bingo sessions. If you get a blackout in 48 numbers or less, you’ll win a brand new Ford Ranger! Once the truck is won, the promotion is over. Please see Bingo Venue for full promotion rules.

Play your favorite video gaming machines starting November 1ST to earn entries into the giveaway. Get one entry for every 500 points earned with your Coeur Rewards card.

10 PlayStation® PS5 Winners Each Week! FRIDAYS IN NOVEMBER | 7 PM

It’s like Black Friday every Friday in November! We’re giving away ten PlayStation® PS5 consoles on each Friday in November at Coeur d’Alene Casino. Earn entries by playing your favorite gaming machines with your Coeur Rewards card starting November 1ST. Get one entry for every 500 points earned. Must be present to win. Must be a Coeur Rewards member to participate. Joining Coeur Rewards is free and easy - just be 18 years or older and have a valid ID. Promotion rules available at cdacasino.com.

See the Coeur Rewards booth, CDA Casino app or cdacasino.com for promotional rules.

W E LC O M E H O M E .

64 INLANDER DECEMBER 2, 2021

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