Page 1

CON ARTISTS WHY THEY PREY ON THE ELDERLY PAGE 22

RETURN OF FOO FIGHTERS

MARCHING TO THE BEAT OF THEIR OWN DRUM PAGE 47

THE LOCAL BOYS OF BALLET SOARING WITH THIS YEAR’S NUTCRACKER PAGE 33

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 6, 2017 | YOU ARE WHAT YOU READ

WINTER MOVIE

PREVIEW Finally, the season’s best films hit the big screen PAGE 24

NATHAN WEINBENDER

James Franco directs and stars in The Disaster Artist, the true story of the man who made “the Citizen Kane of bad movies.”

ARE WE WITNESSING THE DEATH RATTLE OF HOLLYWOOD?


The WTB Crew in Blue spreading holiday cheer —

Join Us Holiday Scavenger Hunt

November 25th - December 18th Find Rudolf at 25 downtown Spokane locations for a chance to win a downtown Spokane prize package! Print your passport online or find one inside Auntie’s Bookstore or River Park Square. For more information on how to participate and a complete list of rules, please visit: downtownspokane.org.

Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony Saturday, December 2nd | 4-8pm

The WTB Crew in Blue is helping light up the night at the first downtown Spokane tree lighting event.

Mobius Day

Friday, December 8th | 5-8pm Join us at Mobius for an after-hours event! The WTB Crew in Blue is giving the first 500 people at both the Mobius Science Center and Mobius Children’s Museum FREE ADMISSION!

Christmas Tree Giveaway Saturday, December 9th | 10am

Washington Trust Bank 2nd & Wall Branch | 706 W 2nd Ave. The WTB Crew in Blue is giving the first 50 families on site a free, fresh-cut Christmas tree, courtesy of WTB. Trees will be provided by Hutton Settlement. Learn more about Hutton Settlement and their Christmas tree farm at www.huttonsettlement.org.

Family Skate Day

Monday, December 18th | 5-8pm Join us at the new skate ribbon in Riverfront Park. The WTB Crew in Blue is giving the first 500 people free admission. Skate rentals are not included.

WTB Cash Mob

Wednesday, December 20th The WTB Crew in Blue is giving away free gas to 20 lucky people at two different gas stations in downtown Spokane. Stay tuned to our Facebook page for more details.

Connect with us to learn more about the festivities! 2 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017


INSIDE VOL. 25, NO. 7 | COVER DESIGN: DEREK HARRISON

COMMENT 5 NEWS 13 COVER STORY 24

CULTURE 33 FOOD 38 42 FILM

47 MUSIC 52 EVENTS GREEN ZONE 56

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N

obody cries for HOLLYWOOD. And it’s no wonder. We’ve had to endure too much — shelling out too much dough to see too many half-baked movies — and now we’re having to reckon with the fact our heroes are actually predators and creeps. And yet, whether we mourn it or not, Hollywood is indeed in trouble, as our film editor Nathan Weinbender writes, beginning on page 24: “The proverbial rocks were kicked over, and the vermin squirming underneath were finally revealed.” Thankfully, there’s a silver lining; this is the time of year that studios roll out their prestige films — the ones they hope will win them an Oscar — and this season’s slate of movies is impressive (even for non-Star Wars fans). These are the pictures that people are going to be talking about and, for 90 minutes or so, they may help us forget all the other garbage we stomached this year! — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

AFTER PRESENTED BY EAT GOOD GROUP

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craft foods we LOVEat. to e (208) 457-3610, 120 E 4th Ave, Post Falls, ID 83854

KICKOFF to SAVINGS A CALL IN THE NIGHT PAGE 20

UP TO

ROOTING FOR ROBOLOVE PAGE 35

TOWARD SELECT Inventory Visit any model home by Nov. 8 and you’ll be entered to win a WSU Fanatic Fan package, including Apple Cup tickets, dinner and hotel in Seattle, and MORE!

Visit HAYDEN-HOMES.com for cities and model home locations. FIRST FRIDAY PAGE 36

LIGHTS OUT PAGE 49

INLANDER SPOKANE • EASTERN WASHINGTON • NORTH IDAHO • INLANDER.COM 1227 WEST SUMMIT PARKWAY, SPOKANE, WA 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634 | EMAIL: INFO@INLANDER.COM

THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. It’s printed on newsprint that is at least 50 percent recycled; please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x213 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email justinh@inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2017, Inland Publications, Inc.

*

INTERNS WANTED THE INLANDER IS HIRING Spring 2018 interns to contribute to the paper’s News and Culture sections. Eligible applicants must be currently enrolled in a college degree program, and available for 10-15 hours a week. TO APPLY Send your resume, cover letter and three writing samples to intern@inlander.com. * Interns must provide own fedora and press badge. Positions are unpaid.

NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 3


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WHAT MOVIES ARE YOU EXCITED TO SEE THIS WINTER?

PUBLISHER

J. Jeremy McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

Michael Mahoney (x279)

LEXI GRISWOLD Yeah, I am super stoked to see the new Jumanji movie. A remake of the ’90s Jumanji? Yep, it’s a remake — it looks like it’s going to be pretty interesting. I’m a ’90s kid!

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ADVERTISING SALES Kristi Gotzian (x215) ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

The movies I want to see — obviously It and then Jigsaw; I love the SAW movies and no will go with me. So you’re a big horror movie person? Yes! I love scary movies and I want to go see those ones.

Come in and try our locally made ice cream and coffee bar.

Carolyn Padgham-Walker (x214), Emily Walden (x260) SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Autumn Adrian (x251), Mary Bookey (x216), Jeanne Inman (x235), Susan Mendenhall (x241), Claire Price (x217), Wanda Tashoff (x222) ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Kristina Smith (x223) MARKETING DIRECTOR Emily Guidinger Hunt (x247) EVENTS & PROMOTIONS

PRODUCTION & SUPPORT

JESSICA WYNECOOP I don’t really have any movies I want to go see. Do you generally just stream films on the Internet? Yeah — I basically have Netflix, Hulu and Vudu — so I watch movies there.

Wayne Hunt (x232) PRODUCTION MANAGER Alissia Blackwood Mead (x228), Derrick King (x238), Jessie Hynes (x205), Tom Stover (x265) GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Justin Hynes (x226) DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Andrea Tobar (x242), Sarah Wellenbrock (x212) ADVERTISING SUPPORT

OPERATIONS

MARTIN SPRINGER Oh, Star Wars, of course. Do you go to the movie theater often to see movies or mostly just streaming? Mostly just streaming — I probably stream movies too much.

Dee Ann Cook (x211) BUSINESS MANAGER Kristin Wagner (x210) ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

INTERVIEWS BY JASON STILL DOWNTOWN SPOKANE, 11/27/2017

Only this time, I DID say Fudge . SOUTH HILL 1230 South Grand • 309-3830 NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 5


COMMENT | GUEST EDITORIAL

FAMILY LAW Divorce Spousal Maintenance / Alimony Child Support Modifications Parenting Plans

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Meeting Manson A cub reporter meets America’s most notorious killer BY JOHN ALLISON

I

met a lot of interesting people during my first life as a news reporter. Charles Manson, who died Nov. 19 in prison, was one of them. Before a transfer to Spokane and KXLY-TV in 1989, I reported for a TV station in Fresno, California. I’d gotten word that a new generation of Manson devotees was living in makeshift communities in Northern California. They were young adults not even born when the Tate-La Bianca killings happened in August of 1969. It sounded like a good story. I went to San Francisco and interviewed the co-author of Helter Skelter, the definitive retelling of the murders, then made contact with a former cellmate and some of the new young Manson followers. A special report was taking shape.

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ne day a letter came to the newsroom from Manson himself. His former cellmate had apparently put in a word, and Manson wrote that he’d like to do an interview. Then came a letter from Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme, a Manson follower serving a life sentence for trying to assassinate President Gerald Ford. She wrote expressing her appreciation for our interest in Manson’s story. At that point, Manson had only allowed a couple of interviews with talk show hosts Tom Snyder and Charlie Rose. Now he was willing to sit down with a cub reporter from Fresno as long as the prison gave its OK. Within a few days we had the greenlight, and I was preparing to chat with one of the most despised mass-murderers in modern history. I was teamed with photographer John Larimore, a good friend and somebody I could trust in the trenches. We loaded up our gear in a rusty little station wagon/news vehicle and left for the Bay Area. We spent the night in a crappy motel near the prison. The next morning, the Bay Area’s fog had rolled in thick and cold, the perfect backdrop. We were certain something would go haywire. We made it through the front gate and into a small shack, guards welcoming us with a standard “no hostage rescue” waiver to sign. If an inmate decided to grab us, we were on our own. The tension continued to rise as we got deeper into the prison. A maze of old iron bars bled rust down long concrete walls. I still recall the moldy, dank halls and dim, yellow lighting. They led us into a room with cheap, brown paneling, tan metal folding chairs and a row of tables. Then the guards left us alone for a very long 15 minutes. I was so anxious at that final moment, when the scoop of my career either would or would not happen, that when I heard the shuffling of chains coming up the hall toward us, I actually relaxed.

When Manson turned the corner and stared me in the eye, maybe hoping to get a psychological jump on me, I wasn’t intimidated. I was relieved, and I simply said, “Hi Charlie, how ya doin?” He was small and slight. And there was the swastika. The guards gave him a small rectangle of space, and he began to pace the perimeter and stroke his beard, asking for a reminder about what we were going to talk about. I let him pace. Eventually he sat down and we filled four tapes of Q&A. Mostly A’s, and not a lot of it making sense. But I let him talk and didn’t try to provoke his anger and weirdness, as others like Geraldo Rivera did in later interviews designed to make “good TV.”

When Manson died, he took a lot of secrets with him: We remain in the dark about the how and the why of it all. With a couple of hours of raw tape of Manson’s musings, I had a valuable commodity that drew interest from Hollywood producers who at the time were working toward a movie to star Dennis Hopper as Manson. I was angling for a foot in the door, but the movie withered on the vine.

W

hen Manson died, he took a lot of secrets with him: We remain largely in the dark about the how and the why of it all. He was the son of a drunk single mom who worked the street and had no time for a child. He was dumped into boys’ homes and reform schools, preyed upon and became a predator himself. He spent little time outside various institutions from childhood until landing in San Francisco for the Summer of Love in 1967 at age 33. By then, he knew drugs and how to manipulate people. In the wake of the murders, America took the bait of Helter Skelter — content to assume that, with the devil behind bars, we no longer needed to examine how the children of bankers and stock brokers could fall for Manson in such a shocking, brutal way. A few weeks after our meeting, Manson wrote another letter to our newsroom. He said ours “was the first interview I ever enjoyed.” So I guess I have that going for me. n John Allison is a Spokane attorney.


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The holiday-themed fun run supporting the Arthritis Foundation encourages participants to tie jingle bells to their shoelaces and don their ugly sweaters for the festive 5K run around Riverfront Park. Sat, Dec. 2 at 10 am. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. bit.ly/2zJnb9l

LETS BUILD SOME HAPPY SOFAS

FINDING FEMINISM ON THE SCREEN: LIBERATING TELEVISION

Gonzaga University Professor Karen Petruska hosts a lecture and discussion on issues of gender and sexuality representations on American television as part of the GU Gender & Pop Culture Speaker Series. Free. Thu, Nov. 30 from 7-8:30 pm. Jundt Art Museum, 200 E. Desmet Ave. (313-6672)

TREE OF SHARING

The annual program offers community members the opportunity to provide holiday gifts to Spokane’s often forgotten residents. Pick up gift tags at tables at River Park Square, NorthTown and the Spokane Valley Mall. Collection runs through Dec. 17; all tables open during regular mall hours. treeofsharing. org (808-4919)

HEALTH CARE FOR ALL, WASHINGTON

Attend a video lecture on the single-payer health insurance model, covering the broad implications of a single-payer system, and the ways in which employers and employees would benefit. Free. Mon, Dec. 4 from 6:30-7:30 pm. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. healthcareforallwashington.org (747-0659) n Tell us about your event or other opportunities to get involved. Submit events at Inlander.com/getlisted or email getlisted@inlander.com.

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COMMENT | GUEST EDITORIAL of racism, both overt and subtle, perpetrated by people who look just like me. Just because racism doesn’t touch us personally, it doesn’t give us a pass to idly stand by. It’s obvious that racism in this country is not a Native American, African American, Hispanic American, Asian American, or any other ethnic minority-group problem. It is a white American problem. It is up to white America to help end racism.

While racism will never be completely extinguished, it can be marginalized in so many ways.

Stand Up to Racism!

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Just because it may not touch us personally, it doesn’t give us a pass to idly stand by BY JEFFREY BELL

S

ome 40 years ago, I was 20 years old, standing in line at the grocery store with my fraternity brother Stuart, checking out our groceries. The cashier finished checking Stuart’s groceries, took his money, then pushed the groceries aside to make room for mine. We waited for the cashier to bag Stuart’s groceries, but that never happened. The cashier started checking my groceries and Stuart bagged his. When my transaction was over, the cashier bagged my groceries and said “Have a great day.” I was stunned and confused about what had just transpired. I had never witnessed such an act before,

and still not believing what I saw, I asked Stuart what that was all about. He said without hesitating, “Every day, someone reminds me I’m a Negro.” He didn’t use the word Negro. In my 62 years of life, I have never been reminded that I am white. I have never been pulled over for a broken taillight, never been ignored in a store, never had people cross to the other side of the street, never been afraid of the police, never called a racial slur or been attacked because of the color of my skin. Yet all my minority friends can list dozens of personal experiences

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And while many white Americans are standing up to racism, clearly we are not doing enough. We say we are not racist, and we may believe in our hearts that we are not, but until we take direct action against racism, we are part of the problem. When we watch hundreds of young white men marching with torches through Charlottesville, Virginia, spewing hate and venom against our brothers and sisters, as did the youth of Nazi Germany, then clearly we are not doing enough to teach our children of the evil of racism and bigotry. We don’t have to look far to see an example of how racism and hatred was defeated by a group of brave and committed people: those who took down Richard Butler and the Aryan Nations in North Idaho. While racism will never be completely extinguished, it can be marginalized in so many ways. Whenever we hear a racist remark, we must respond. Whenever we witness a racist act, we must act. And when we hear the cries of our minority friends needing help, we must listen, and we must stand with them. We must not deny the experiences of our minority friends when they display the courage to explain them, simply because we haven’t “seen it” ourselves. No one can say now that they haven’t seen it in plain “torchenhanced” view. A friend of mine says, “The world is run by people who show up.” We simply have not been showing up with enough numbers, enough leadership, and with enough determination to make a difference. This is not a liberal cause or a conservative cause: It is an American cause, because we are all Americans, and we all belong to one race, the human race. n

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ALL YOU WANT FOR CHRISTMAS GIVEAWAY

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Northern Quest is committed to supporting responsible gaming. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call the Washington State Problem Gambling Helpline at 800.547.6133 or Camas Path at 509.789.7630.

NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 9


You’re so money. financial educ ation presented by stcu.

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redit cards sometimes get a bad rap, but you can put them to work in your favor. Rewards cards, for example, offer perks like miles or points for dollars spent.

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Of course, card issuers hope those incentives entice you to make more purchases. And when you carry a balance, your interest charges can offset incentives ― you should pay off your card each month.

Set up card alerts to notify you of suspicious charges.

Russell Palmer, an STCU Card Services manager, offers tips for getting value out of your card without being dinged for late payments or surprised by high rates.

Read the fine print. Promotional checks and APR offers can lead to long-term debt.

Make it automatic Use your credit card to pay recurring bills such as utilities, phone bills, or gifts to charity. This can be a great way to rack up rewards points. “It also decreases your exposure,” Palmer says. “If there’s a breach at the merchant, for example, it’s better to have the fraudsters tie up your available credit limit than have them drain your checking or savings account.” When you set up your automatic bill payments, also consider setting up automatic payments of at least the minimum amount due to your credit card provider to protect against late fees. Pay the rest in full after reviewing your statement. Paying off your balance every month isn’t just about avoiding interest charges. When you miss credit card payments, it can affect your personal credit rating. On the flip side, Palmer says: “When you pay off your bill in full each month, it proves to lenders that you’re able to handle money responsibly. It builds your credit

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score, which will save you money on everything from buying a house to getting insurance.” Know your benefits Some credit cards come with benefits such as instantdiscount programs, rental car insurance, or extended warranties on purchased items. Acquaint yourself with the benefits built into your card. They might save you some cash. Keeping things interest-ing Credit card issuers make money through interest and point-of-sale transaction charges. That’s why they can offer cash back, airline miles, or gift cards as rewards. That’s also why card issuers may offer you low-APR cards with rates that spike up after the promotional period. And just because an interest rate is listed as nonvariable, or fixed, doesn’t mean it can never change. Read the fine print about your post-promo interest rate.

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

Spokane City Council President Ben Stuckart (right) says the state has “actually cut the city’s marijuana revenue and the percentage we get.” YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Readers respond to “Getting Our Cut,” our Green Zone Quarterly story about why Washington cities don’t see more of marijuanatax revenues:

CARRIE FERRAN: Tax revenue should stay with the counties, period. We need to change whatever legislation allows the state to oversee/hoard these funds. DIANE ARMSTRONG: Because our government has deep pockets. BOB CLAPPER: How about 10% to the state and the rest stays here to help homeless, fix roads and pay for more law enforcement? JEFFERSON COULTER: So, doesn’t this just mean that the money is going to local schools? RACHELLE FLATT: Sounds like it’s going to the general fund and who the hell knows where they spend that. n

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Readers respond to “Good Eats” (11/23/17), our story about a new Spokane Regional Health District education program aimed at getting healthy foods into lowincome homes:

KIRSTIN HAHN: I get looks for buying less healthy food but it’s all I can afford. It’s stupid. I crave berries almost every day but six bucks for a small box of them? I can’t do that. THOMAS BEER: It’s not that expensive to eat healthy. It’s inconvenient. Let’s be honest with ourselves. However, if you want people to eat healthier options, give incentives. People on WIC should get more than $8 for fruits and veggies. People on SNAP should get an additional funds just for fruits and veggies. n

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NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 11


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CRIMINAL JUSTICE

OF

HIS

PEERS Lawyers have been allowed to discriminate when choosing jurors. How Washington state is trying to change that BY MITCH RYALS

A

ntonio Cook is surrounded by faces that don’t look like his. Of all the people in the courtroom — the judge, the prosecutor, potential jurors and his own attorney — only one, Juror No. 15, is black like him. But then, the Spokane County prosecutor handling the case dismisses Juror No. 15, using the power of the “peremptory challenge,” a rule that allows lawyers for both sides to eliminate potential jurors without an explanation. For centuries, prosecutors have used this rule to stack the deck against people accused of crimes. In the landmark 1986 U.S. Supreme Court case Batson v. Kentucky, the court ruled that it’s unconstitutional to exclude a juror based on race and established a threestep test to make jury selection a more just process. Thus far, what’s now known as the “Batson test” has almost completely failed, judges and legal scholars say. And discrimination has festered. “Unless you’re a complete idiot, there’s no reason you should get hung up by Batson,” says Salvador Mungia, a Tacoma attorney who had a hand in writing the ACLU of Washington’s proposed revisions for jury selection. “The bottom line is, Batson doesn’t work. People are being prevented from serving on juries simply because of the color of their skin.” Studies have found that prosecutors throughout the country use peremptory challenges to eliminate black jurors two to three times as often as people of other races. In Washington state, appeals courts have vacated ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 13


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14 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017

only two convictions based on the “Batson test,” according to state Supreme Court documents. The Spokane case, while not an especially egregious example, offers a window into attempts in Washington state to rid jury selection of prejudice. This year, the state Supreme Court tried to sharpen the “Batson test” for Washington state courts, though some argue the court did not go far enough. Still, the new rules gave Cook’s attorney, Jeremy Schmidt, a stronger case to cry foul when Juror No. 15 was sent home earlier this month. Spokane Superior Court Judge Julie McKay called a mistrial — a rarity in these cases — though she stopped short of ruling that the prosecutor was racially biased. Both Judge McKay and the prosecutor, Preston McCollam, declined to comment for this article because the case against Cook is still pending. Schmidt emphasizes that he does not believe the prosecutor is racist, but he says he had an ethical duty to raise the issue. By doing so, Schmidt forced a difficult conversation about implicit racial discrimination. “There’s nothing that flies against our justice system as much as racism,” Schmidt says. “We have this idea of due process and of looking at an individual based on the evidence and not anyone’s preconceived notions.”

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n 1982, a Louisville, Kentucky, man by the name of James Batson was accused of a burglary he says he didn’t commit. The first trial ended in a hung jury. The only holdout, Batson recently recounted on the podcast More Perfect, was a black woman, who believed he was innocent. She told him as much after the trial, he says on the podcast. During the second trial, the prosecutor used “peremptory challenges” to eliminate all four black people from the jury pool. He was then convicted by the all-white jury and sentenced to 20 years in prison. But in 1986, the U.S. Supreme Court vacated Batson’s conviction, and established the three-step “Batson test” to protect against racial discrimination in the future. The test works like this: First a lawyer for one side must show the judge that, at first blush, a “peremptory challenge” looks to be racially motivated. Typically, that has meant showing a pattern of racial discrimination. The dismissal of a single juror wouldn’t necessarily cut it. (The state Supreme Court’s ruling this year changes that; now, if a lawyer dismisses the only juror of a particular racial group, you automatically move on to the second step.) Next, the other side must provide a “raceneutral” explanation for why a particular juror could not be impartial. In the past, those reasons have included distrust of law enforcement, living in a high-crime neighborhood, having a child outside of marriage and speaking English as a second language. One U.S. Supreme Court decision from 1995 even said it was OK for judges to accept “silly or superstitious” reasons, such as “curly, unkempt hair,” and “a mustache and goatee type beard.” Finally, it’s up to the judge to decide whether

Public defender Jeremy Schmidt: “There’s nothing that flies against our justice system as much as racism.” the lawyer intentionally discriminated based on race. This final step essentially requires a judge to call the lawyer a racist or sexist. “That is a fundamental flaw in the Batson standard,” says Mungia, the Tacoma attorney. “For me to make the challenge, I have to say the lawyer struck a juror for a discriminatory purpose, and then to sustain my challenge, the judge has to be the bad guy and find a discriminatory purpose. That’s a very harsh thing to find.” When the U.S. Supreme Court first created the three-step test, then-Justice Thurgood Marshall warned that it would not be strong enough to root out explicit, much less implicit, bias. Marshall argued that the “peremptory challenge” should be eliminated. Current U.S. Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, and Washington State justices Steven Gonzalez and Mary Yu have since joined in that thinking. Within months of the 1986 decision, lawyers began learning how to pass the “Batson test.” One infamous lesson from a prosecutor in Philadelphia still lives on YouTube. During an hourlong lecture, Jack McMahon stands in front of a room full of young prosecutors. He instructs them to ask more questions of black people during jury selection “so it gives you more ammunition to make an articulable reason as to why you’re striking them not for race.” Since 1986, courts have expanded the “Batson test” to include discrimination based on sex, ethnicity and, in some states, sexual orientation. But peremptory challenges are still the rule, and the American justice system is still reckoning with them. Studies have shown that even one black juror can make a difference. Research from Duke University in 2012 found that all-white juries convict black defendants 16 percent more often than white defendants. The study drawing from 700 felony trials over 10 years in Florida concluded that adding even one black juror eliminates that gap.

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n court, McCollam, the prosecutor in the Spokane case, cited one conversation with Juror No. 15, as well as the man’s reaction to


answers from other jurors, as reasons for dismissing him. The prosecutor noted that Juror No. 15 said “eyewitnesses get it wrong,” according to a transcript of the hearing. “I didn’t feel like that was an actual answer to the questions that were posed or gave anything meaningful to the discussion, and I didn’t choose to follow up on it at that time,” McCollam told the judge. McCollam also recalled that Juror No. 15 “appeared to be nodding in assent” as another juror described the anxiety invoked when stopped by police. Typically, a mistrial in these cases requires the judge to determine that the lawyer dismissed a juror based on race. Although Judge McKay did declare a mistrial in the case against Cook — he’s been charged with felony witness tampering — she stopped short of calling McCollam racially biased because there was not enough information in the record to do so, says Schmidt, the defense attorney. Rather, Schmidt says, the judge ruled in an “abundance LETTERS of caution,” and in light of this Send comments to year’s state Supreme Court editor@inlander.com. decision. “We need these types of actions to take place, as far as calling a mistrial,” says Mungia, the Tacoma attorney. “It’s saying that we’re going to make sure we’re not infecting the outcome of a trial.” This year, Mungia helped write the ACLU of Washington’s suggested changes to jury selection rules. The proposal would eliminate the requirement that judges call a lawyer racially biased. Instead, judges should decide from the perspective of an “objective observer,” according to the proposed rules.

“The time has come to abolish peremptory challenges. The use of this procedure propagates racial discrimination.” The ACLU’s proposal also suggests that previous interaction with the police, living in “high-crime” neighborhoods, receiving welfare benefits and speaking English as a second language, should not be accepted as “race-neutral” reasons for excusing jurors, as they have been in the past. The Washington Association of Prosecuting Attorneys opposes those suggestions, saying in part that they’re “slanted to require the State to seat jurors who are biased against the State’s witness,” according to a letter from the association.

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or years, the Washington State Supreme Court has been vocal about the threat peremptory challenges pose. Thus far, two state Supreme Court justices have said they must go. “The time has come to abolish peremptory challenges,” Justice Gonzalez writes in a 2013 opinion. “The use of this procedure propagates racial discrimination, contributes to the historical and ongoing underrepresentation of minority groups on juries.” Despite growing support, Mungia and other attorneys believe they serve an essential purpose. By eliminating peremptory challenges, the power to decide who sits on the jury shifts from the defendant to the judge. The only other way to remove a juror is with a “for-cause challenge,” where a judge decides if a juror can be impartial. “Peremptory challenges allow both sides to get rid of the extreme people on either end of the spectrum, who may be biased, but not in a way that would get them off the jury panel,” Mungia says. “They allow your clients to have some say in the 12 people who are deciding their fate. We should continue that purpose, but not at the expense of keeping people from serving because of race or ethnicity.” n mitchr@inlander.com

NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

ON INLANDER.COM

HELP OUR GIRLS After witnessing a suicide, Terry and Bev Coplin dedicated themselves to PREVENTING SUICIDE. It’s why they gave a generous donation to Daybreak Youth Services that allowed Daybreak to open a new 13-bed psychiatric evaluation and treatment center for girls under 18, which opened last week. The beds are for girls in psychiatric crisis, including suicide attempts or ideations, severe depression, psychosis, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. There is not a similar facility elsewhere in Spokane with a continuum of care that allows girls to enter the evaluation and treatment center and then transition into residential treatment, says Daybreak CEO Annette Klinefelter. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

16 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017

FEATURING NATIONAL NEWS FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES

SPOKANE MAKES THE TIMES This week in law enforcement... Spokane Police Chief Craig Meidl (pictured) starred in a New York Times article about police reform. President Donald Trump’s Department of Justice has virtually eliminated the collaborative police-reform program that Meidl says had benefitted the department. SPD also missed out on federal grant money that would have helped to hire more cops next year. And one Lynnwood, Washington, woman’s unbelievable story demands the question: “WHAT HAPPENS WHEN POLICE DON’T BELIEVE VICTIMS OF SEXUAL ASSAULT?” Visit Inlander.com for our weekly blog on The Fuzz. (MITCH RYALS)

PRESCRIPTION TO TACKLE OPIOIDS On average, opioids are KILLING TWO PEOPLE PER DAY in Washington state, according to a recent report out of Attorney General Bob Ferguson’s office. The report released in concert with Washington State Patrol Chief John Batiste and Skagit County Prosecuting Attorney Rich Weyrich, proposes several policies to extinguish the highly addictive drug’s devastating impact. Recommendations touch on public awareness, overprescribing by doctors, data collection, treatment and illegal sales. Ferguson is also submitting three bills to the legislature this session. One of his proposals aims to fortify the state’s prescription-monitoring program that tracks who is prescribed specific medication, and when. (MITCH RYALS)


NEWS | BRIEFS

D U O CI N R T G IN

LAUNCH DAY CELEBRATION PUTTING PANHANDLERS TO WORK Come February, panhandlers in Spokane will be given the chance to volunteer in exchange for food and a stipend as trained staff will operate a van and offer work to those begging for money. The program, HOPE WORKS, is a partnership of the city, Downtown Spokane Partnership, Goodwill Industries of the Inland Northwest and Catholic Charities. Mirroring a similar program that started in Albuquerque, New Mexico, two years ago, those who are picked up for the day may work in a variety of ways, including cleaning up litter or graffiti, removing snow, and more. Organizers hope that by offering the low-barrier volunteer work experience, trained staff will get the chance to build trust with hard-to-reach clients, and connect them with existing services so they can get on a path to independence. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

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NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 17


NEWS | BRIEFS

Who Owns the Internet? Efforts to rollback “net neutrality”; plus, Spokane bans the box citywide NOT NEUTRAL

Come Dec. 14, the Federal Communications Commission could decide to let internet service providers speed up or slow down websites of their choosing, or charge internet users based on the sites they want to access. The commission is set to vote that day on a repeal of rules that to this point have maintained “net neutrality,” which prevents providers like Comcast and Verizon from favoring their own services or charging more to businesses like Netflix or Google so they don’t have their speed throttled. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai is leading the push to REPEAL NET NEUTRALITY through the “Restoring Internet Freedom” order. Pai and conservatives like Eastern Washington Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers support the repeal, saying the regulations have slowed investment in broadband upgrades, especially in rural areas. They say repealing the rules would spur investment, and argue that consumers will still be protected by anti-trust laws and policies overseen by the Federal Trade Commission. On Cyber Monday, Nov. 27, hundreds of online businesses, including Twitter, Reddit and Vimeo, signed onto a letter calling on the FCC to vote against the order. The groups point to the fact that last year people spent nearly $3.5 billion on Cyber Monday, making it to that point the

biggest e-commerce day in U.S. history. “Our current net neutrality rules support innovation and give all businesses the opportunity to compete equally for consumers,” the letter states. People who oppose the rollback are now planning protests outside Verizon stores nationwide on Dec. 7. A Spokane protest is planned for noon that day in front of the Verizon store on N. Division and W. Francis Avenue. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

BOXED OUT

A criminal past will no longer define job applicants in the city of Spokane — at least not initially. In a 5-2 vote this week, Spokane City Council passed an ordinance that bars private employers from asking about criminal history, or running a criminal background check, until after an interview. After a one-year grace period, businesses could face fines for violating the law, which does not restrict employers from running a background check later in the process. The new law is the latest in a growing movement nationwide to “BAN THE BOX,” referring to job applications that ask people to reveal their troubled pasts. Councilmembers Candace Mumm and Mike Fagan voted against the law. “The employer still gets total decision making,” says

Councilman Breean Beggs, who supported the ordinance. “It’s more effective to hear from a person directly, than to make up what the crime might’ve been. If it’s just a box, you don’t know.” The city council voted in 2014 to “ban the box” on applications for city employment, and the Spokane County Board of Commissioners did the same earlier this year for Breean Beggs jobs in the county. The new city law, which will take effect next year, aligns Spokane with at least 15 other localities that have extended the policy to private employment, including Seattle, Portland, New York City, Chicago and the District of Columbia. Mumm says she voted against the ordinance because it “fines businesses for accessing public records” and can do so on the first offense. Beggs says the goal is not to fine employers. As long as they cooperate, he says, they won’t be fined. “This takes best practices for economic growth and spreads it throughout the city,” he says. “It’s like wearing seat belts. It’s best practice.” (MITCH RYALS)

COUNTER APPROACH

It’s been more than a month since Washington State University President Kirk Schulz instructed each university department to REDUCE ITS SPENDING by 2.5

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18 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017

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percent and announced the performing arts program would be cut entirely. But now, faculty and staff at WSU have countered with their own idea: cutting the salary of administrators, including Schulz. Faculty members put together a petition proposing that all administrators making more than $300,000 have their pay reduced by 30 percent, all those making above $200,000 by 20 percent, and all those making more than $100,000 by 10 percent. As of press time, the petition was signed by more than 650 current or former WSU faculty and staff or alumni. Elizabeth Siler, an assistant professor of English, was one of the organizers of the petition. She says they plan on delivering the petition to the administration in the coming weeks. It’s not a symbolic gesture, she says. “I’m very serious and so are the other people involved,” Siler tells the Inlander. “The bottom line is that the cuts need to come from the top.” In addition to the cut of the performing arts program, Siler says the plan to slash stipends of graduate teaching assistants is unacceptable. As outlined, cutting administrator’s salaries would only trim roughly $5 million per year, compared to the $10 million per year that Schulz has called for. But Shiler says other departments, like the Athletics Department, could make more sacrifices. Phil Weiler, WSU spokesman, says the administration is aware of the petition. He notes that faculty and staff will receive a 1 percent salary increase each year for the next two years, while the administration will not. And he stresses that it’s important that the university focus on savings now after it spent money on new investments, including the College of Medicine in Spokane. “Given that investments benefit everybody, it makes sense that the entire university look at building reserves,” Weiler says. “Asking to reduce budgets by 2.5 percent seems like a reasonable approach.” (WILSON CRISCIONE)

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NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 19


NEWS | CRIME

A Call in the Night When sexual assault survivors need help during the worst of times, these volunteers are there BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

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here’s one night a week when Carol Ulland knows that if her phone rings, someone may be having the worst night of their life. She’s there to help. As a volunteer with the 24-hour sexual assault crisis line run by Lutheran Community Services Northwest, she regularly talks to people dealing with the aftermath of sexual assault, rape or abuse. Sometimes that means being called to area hospitals to serve as an advocate for victims of sex crimes. She and other volunteer advocates do their best to answer any questions, make people feel comfortable, and restore a feeling of control to them while offering hope, she says. Even volunteering to run the crisis line about four nights a month, she alone has made emergency room visits dozens of times over three years. “I stopped counting after 45,” she says. Like Ulland, those who regularly help survivors in and around Spokane know all too well how pervasive sexual violence is, and how hard it can be for survivors to share their stories. “I’ve met a lot of incredible people and heard their stories along the way,” Ulland says. “It’s heartbreaking. I go in making sure that they know I believe them. That’s huge.” Recently, though, the reality of how many lives are touched by the issue has been pushed to the forefront of national conversation. In part, that’s thanks to an ongoing campaign of women and men sharing their personal experiences with #MeToo on social media, and continuing media coverage as victims come forward to condemn abuses of power by celebrities and politicians. The increased attention has led to more people calling for community involvement and wanting to know how to respond, says Erin Williams Hueter, director of victim advocacy and education for Lutheran Community Services. “That part of our work is really busy right now: talking about sexual assault and impacts with other organizations,” Williams Hueter says. “It’s incredibly validating to see people paying attention to something we care so much about.”

Advocates Carol Ulland (left) and Shannon Kapek help people in crisis. “They need to be believed,” says Kapek. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“This is a time when we all need to be engaged, and informed, because I hope that our society is going to undergo change.”

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or those who work in the field every day, it can also be exhausting when places they usually go to get their minds off of things, like movies or music, aren’t the escape they used to be, she says. “It sort of feels like everything is sort of tainted by sexual violence and there’s no one you can trust,” Williams Hueter says, explaining conversations that staff members have had in recent weeks. “Most sexual violence is perpetrated by someone you know. It’s so hard when you feel like it’s everywhere. You want to believe that most people are good. I still believe that, but when the message

20 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017

is overwhelming, like it has been, it’s hard on people.” But working to help survivors, and seeing just how strong they are, continues to give the staff strength, she says. “The victims, their strength is incredible,” Williams Hueter says. “It’s not uncommon to get off the phone and think, ‘Gosh, I don’t know how they’re even getting up and moving around.’ That part of the job is really rewarding and difficult, and that’s probably what keeps people here.” For Shannon Kapek, another crisis line worker, it was the support that Lutheran Community Services provided more than 30 years ago to extended family members who were abused that inspired her to start volunteering a few years ago. Kapek says she is grateful that the discussion of these issues has finally come to the forefront, and she hopes that people won’t get overwhelmed and tune it out. “We are at a pivotal moment as a society,” Kapek says. “To me, this is a time when we all need to be engaged, and informed, because I hope that our society is going to undergo change.”


Many of the issues are about abuse of power, she says, and it needs to change. “I told someone, ‘I hope that those who have engaged in this behavior, if they don’t get called out by the people they impacted, I hope that they have the fear that they could get called out, so they’re at least thinking about this,’” Kapek says.

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lland first figured she’d volunteer for the crisis line for about a year, but after working directly with women and men and being able to answer their questions and support them through police interviews, a hospital visit or just a tough night, it’s something she could see herself doing for a very long time. “I continue to do this work just because I so believe everyone should have an advocate with them and it makes such a difference,” Ulland says. Most often, she says, people want to know if they’ll get justice. “They want to know if what this person did to them is going to be prosecuted,” she says. She’d never tell someone in crisis this, but oftentimes she “could bet that they’re not going to be.” According to data comLutheran Community Services’ piled by RAINN (the Rape, 24-hour sexual assault crisis Abuse and Incest National line is 509-624-7273. (To help, Network), which advocates Lutheran Community Services is against sexual violence, of usually looking for new clothing every 1,000 rapes, 310 are that advocates can bring with reported to police, and only them on hospital visits, as well 7 cases will lead to a felony as volunteers to staff the crisis conviction. line.) “I usually try not to You can also call Frontier even go there, but I do tell Behavioral Health’s 24-hour people straight out that our First Call for Help line, which is justice system is not fair, it available for supportive listensucks. I want to be fairly ing and helping with all sorts of upfront with them,” Ulland emotional and mental health says. “But that’s why I do issues, at 509-838-4428 or toll the work that I do, because I free at 1-877-678-4428. don’t feel like we have justice for the victims of sexual assault.” She often tells survivors about a friend who went through the whole court process only to have the guy who hurt her let off. About five years later, he hurt someone else, and she testified in that person’s case, and again the man was let go, Ulland says. “She was devastated, again,” Ulland says. But then, the friend got a call — the man was out of state, and had done it again, but this time they were putting him away. They wanted her to know he was being sentenced. “It was like, ‘OK! That’s justice,’” Ulland says. “That’s why you continue to fight, and you find that one person that will move forward and they do have the evidence they need to move this person off the street so they’re not hurting anybody else.” Many survivors say that’s their main goal: putting what happened on record, so it doesn’t happen to anyone else, she says. “We tell them, ‘What you’re doing is not ever a waste of time.’” Lutheran Community Services supports survivors of sexual violence with therapy, legal services and advocacy as needed, and encourages them to focus on their individual healing. “We often tell survivors not to hinge their healing on the justice process for accountability,” Williams Hueter says. “Even if you get it, that horrible thing, that worst day of your life, it still happened. Of course getting justice in whatever form is really validating, but your healing is so much more important.” Part of healing is feeling empowered to share their stories, which in turn can help others, Williams Hueter says. “Every time a person shares their story it empowers more and more people to come out and share what happened to them,” she says. n samanthaw@inlander.com

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NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 21


NEWS | CRIME

Dangling the Carrot Scammers increasingly target seniors for their money, and there’s little anyone can do to stop it BY WILSON CRISCIONE

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here was always a voice in the back of Jill’s head telling her it wasn’t real. No way did she win millions of dollars, the voice told her. No way was the guy on the phone legitimate. No way were her dreams actually coming true. And then Jill had another thought: What if it was real? The call came earlier this year, in spring, she remembers. The caller ID said it was from Stockton, California. As a rule, Jill, 73, doesn’t answer her phone if it’s a number she doesn’t recognize, so she let it go to voicemail. When she played the message, it was a man with a Hispanic accent named John Thompson, or Tom Johnson — she can’t remember which — saying he was with International Lottery Corporation. She won $2 million, he said. Who can’t use $2 million? Jill, who asked to be identified only by her first name, lived alone in her home in Vancouver, Washington. She worked for two decades for the state of Oregon, living what she called her “dream job” for the state marine board, before retiring in 2006. She keeps a boat in Portland for recreation. She has a good group of friends. She’s been divorced since 1998, and she has three adult kids. She sees them when she can, and sometimes that means half-day car trips to Idaho. With an extra $2 million, she thought, she could pay her bills, pay for the dental work she’s been putting off and pay off the balance of her children’s homes. “I would love to be able to do that for my kids,” Jill says. Everyday, scammers prey on older adults by eliciting an emotional response that overrides the victim’s logic. Some surveys indicate one in five people over 65 will be taken advantage of by scammers. It ranges from lottery scams, like the call Jill received, to sweetheart scams in which a scammer pretends to be a love interest before convincing the person to send money. While younger adults are also targeted by scammers, it’s the elderly who see far greater financial losses. And so far, there’s little that law enforcement or any other authority can do about it. That leaves the responsibility on the elderly themselves to sniff out scams. Yet among senior citizens, often those isolated from friends or family members and bombarded each day by scam calls, it can be hard to sort the truth from a lie. So Jill, holding out hope that maybe this time she had won the lottery, called the guy back.

THE WIRE TRANSFER

The man on the other end of the phone call seemed nice and personable, Jill says. He was calling from Stockton. He told her all she had to do was fill out some paperwork, and send $454 to claim the $2 million she had won. She had her doubts. They spoke several times over the course of a few days. But he became more and more convincing. Every time she had a question, he had an answer. He was persistent. She couldn’t keep her eyes off

22 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017

the “pie in the sky,” she says. Eventually, he convinced her, and she convinced herself, that he was believable. Jill got into her car, and she drove to her credit union and withdrew $454, as she was instructed. From there, she drove another few miles to Bank of America, where he told her to make the deposit into his account, in Florida. She didn’t hear from him until a few days later, when he called again asking for more money. This time, she wasn’t fooled. She Googled the company LETTERS he claimed to repreSend comments to sent, and the website editor@inlander.com. said it wouldn’t ask for money if a person had won the lottery. She told him she looked it up and knew she didn’t actually have to pay anything. She was done paying him, she said. She wanted the money he promised. She threatened to call police. He told her he’d check with his supervisor, but she never heard from him again. “I am embarrassed. I was suckered into it,” Jill says. “I put $454 of my retirement into this thing, hoping it would be a real payoff even though, in the back of my head, I knew it wasn’t.”

MANUFACTURING FEAR

Each year, millions of people report cases of fraud, identity theft or some type of scam to law enforcement. Nationally, the number of complaints has risen from approximately 325,000 in 2001 to more than 3 million in 2016. In Washington, nearly 2,000 people reported some type of prize or lottery scam, like Jill’s, in 2016, according to a Consumer Sentinel Network Report compiled by the Federal Trade Commission. As a metropolitan area, Spokane and Spokane Valley rank sixth in the entire nation for reported consumer complaints per 100,000 people. The Coeur d’Alene metro area ranks 44th. Those numbers, however, may not mean there are more fraud victims in the Spokane region, only that that more people in the Spokane region are reporting it. Gail, a 55-year-old woman living in Spokane Valley, was the victim of identity theft after a man called and claimed she had failed to show up for court after witnessing an accident in Idaho in September. The man, who identified himself as a deputy named Andrew, said she needed to pay court fines or else she might go to jail. She didn’t have any money, so she sent him a copy of her picture ID and her Social Security card before she realized it was a scam. “I was thinking, I’m gonna go drive to church Sunday morning to go to Sunday school, and I’m gonna get arrested on these warrants,” Gail says. That’s exactly the emotion scammers are going for, says Doug Shadel, state director for AARP Washington. The fraudsters want victims to feel some emotion, whether it’s extreme happiness, fear or love. That way, people aren’t thinking logically, and they’re more likely to hand over money, he says.

TOP TEN SCAMS TO WATCH OUT FOR FAKE ACCIDENT SCAM The scammer claims they are a law enforcement officer. They say you have witnessed an accident, and that you failed to show up for court and now have a warrant for your arrest or you failed to pay fines. To get out of trouble, they ask send your personal information or money. LOTTERY SCAM A scammer tells you that you have won the lottery. They ask for money before they can give you the big prize. GRANDPARENT SCAM The scammer poses as a relative in distress or someone representing that relative. The scammer says the relative is in trouble and they need you to wire them funds for lawyer fees, bail money or some other expense. SWEETHEART SCAM You meet the scammer, often through an online dating service. They earn your trust, and you think you may be falling for them, even though you’ve likely never seen their face. Eventually they ask you for money. IRS SCAM A scammer claims to be with the Internal Revenue Service, complete with a fake name and fake badge number. They say you owe money and demand your bank account information. MEDICARE/SOCIAL SECURITY SCAM A scammer calls and offers assistance with a new Medicare or Social Security card, but they ask for personal information to verify who you are. CHARITY SCAM A scammer claims to represent a charity and asks for a donation. This is often after a tragedy or natural disaster. TECH SUPPORT SCAM A scammer claims to be a technology expert promising to help with any issue you may have. But first, they ask for access to your computer and/or personal information. HOME IMPROVEMENT SCAM A scammer goes door-to-door offering quick, low-cost repairs to the home. They either take payments without returning, conduct poor work, or find fake problems that justify raising the cost. EMPLOYMENT SCAM A scammer convinced you that you can apply or you have been hired for a promising new job. Instead, they take your personal information.


“It’s easier to manipulate them that way,” he says. Shadel has interviewed both con artists and their victims. He says the scammers are typically looking for people who live alone and don’t have a spouse to tell them something might be fake. The scam is even more likely to work if the victim has recently experienced a negative life event — a major financial loss, or a tragedy. “They’re more likely then to take chances, to be risk takers. They’re also more likely to do things without thinking through the alternatives,” Shadel says. And some people are just so overcome with hope that it could be real, they ignore evidence to the contrary right in front of them. In focus groups with families of fraud victims, Shadel says family members report that despite their efforts to convince someone they love that they were scammed, some just refuse to buy the truth. “They couldn’t convince them that they hadn’t won the prize,” Shadel says. “Because they just wanted to believe.”

SLIPPING PAST THE LAW

For Mark Gregory, a deputy with the Spokane County Sheriff’s Office, it’s hard to keep up with the different kinds of scams. Though at their heart, there isn’t much difference between them. “Scams are the same,” Gregory says. “The only thing that changes is a little bit of the story.” Nearly all of the scammers get away with it. And nearly all victims will never see a penny they lost. The calls come from out of the state, or out of the country. The scammers use different phone numbers. It makes it nearly impossible for a local law enforcement agency to find them at all. The Internal Revenue Service for years has tried to stop scammers from impersonating IRS agents who ask victims for money, but IRS scams continue nevertheless. “If the IRS hasn’t been able to stop IRS scams, with all of their resources,” Gregory says, “how are we supposed to?” So law enforcement uses a different tactic: education. Maybe if people know what to look for, the thinking goes, they won’t fall prey to scams. Since February 2016, Gregory has sent out a dozen different press releases about a new scam impacting local residents. “‘Grandparent Scam’ Still Active — Don’t Be Fooled,” reads one headline. “Deputies will NEVER Ask You To Pay Fines Over The Phone,” says another. Still, it’s difficult for those messages to reach everyone, especially elderly populations. For scammers, simply changing the story is effective enough. When the story changes, people who aren’t social media savvy, who don’t pay attention to the news, or who don’t have a regular circle of friends, may get taken advantage of. And it’s more often senior citizens in those situations. There are several challenges barring authorities from holding scammers accountable with litigation, particularly among “grandparent” and “tech support” scams that impact older populations, says Shannon Smith, the division chief of Consumer Protection for the Washington State Attorney General’s Office. Beyond the fact that some scammers may live as far away as India,

Smith says that increasingly, the scams involve the use of gift cards, which makes them harder to trace. Especially for more sophisticated scams involving older people as victims, it can be difficult for them to remember details that may build a case. Sometimes, a bank or credit union can step in when there’s a questionable transfer. Jim Fuher, fraud prevention manager at Spokane Teachers Credit Union, says employees are regularly trained on what to look for in prevention fraud. One hint that someone may be a victim of a scam, he says, is when a person goes to cash a check with specific instructions of what to do with the cash. Employees will help victims file a police report, and go through other channels for financial recovery if they lost money. “The hard part is, once those funds have left, they’re very hard to recover because they can go anywhere in the world,” Fuher says. That’s why STCU and other credit unions often try to warn people about scams. But it won’t always work. Even when someone knows better, they can still be a victim. Spokane Valley resident Barbara Schuller, 77, was the victim of a different kind of scam a couple of months ago. A scammer emailed her

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“You hear so many warnings about it. And then to fall for it, you feel ignorant.” claiming to be from Microsoft; he told her she had been hacked. It was a tech support scam. She gave the scammer permission to access her computer. Fortunately, she realized what she’d done before the scammer was able to take any money. Still, she says she’s embarrassed. “You hear so many warnings about it. And then to fall for it, you feel ignorant,” Schuller says. “I don’t feel good about it.”

SECRETS AND SHAME

Jill still hasn’t told her kids how she was scammed. Months after sending a stranger money, she can’t shake the feeling of embarrassment. And she fears what her kids will think of her if they ever find out: “If they knew I did something like this, they would think I’m over the bend and I needed to be cared for. And I don’t feel that way at all.” She reported what happened to the Washington Attorney General’s Consumer Protection Division, though she doubts her scammer will be held accountable. The financial hit was bearable. But emotionally, it’s hit her harder. She says she looks at herself in the mirror and thinks, “What a total fool.” She’s an educated person, and knows there’s no logical justification for what she did. People have tried to scam her before, and until now, she’s always been able to tell when it’s fake. It’s a feeling common among those who have been scammed: They’re not likely to admit to others, and sometimes to themselves, that someone took advantage of them. So they keep it to themselves, hoping they’ll be prepared for the next time the call comes. “The fact that you might be able to have all that money, and not have to worry about anything anymore,” Jill says, “is pretty addictive.” n wilsonc@inlander.com

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NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 23


THE BIG PICTURE

The state of the film industry in the wake of sexual assault allegations, high-profile box office flops, and the ever-growing threat of streaming entertainment

24 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017

BY NATHAN WEINBENDER


H

ollywood is at an impasse. Since the birth of the film industry, everything from the advent of the mall multiplex to the proliferation of VCRs has led to talk about the imminent death rattle of Tinseltown. Those prophecies all turned out to be wrong, but the moment we’re in right now feels more seismic and far more serious than all those other moments. We’re living in a time of collective outrage that will forever change the way we look at the people who make the movies we love. There will probably always be a Hollywood, in one form or another. But when the details of Harvey Weinstein’s decades-long reign of terror opened the #MeToo floodgates in October, the issue of sexual assault within the film industry came to light in a way it hadn’t before. The proverbial rocks were kicked over, and the vermin squirming underneath were finally revealed. And the abuse is only part of it. Hollywood is being attacked from all sides, and it’s all totally deserved. How it, as a nebulous and multi-tentacled entity, course-corrects in the next few years will probably define its future.

THE SCANDALS

Weinstein was hardly the first man in Hollywood to be undone by his history of sexual abuse, but it quickly became apparent that his ousting from his namesake company — and then later from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences — represented something of a sea change. In the wake of queasily detailed pieces about Wein-

stein in the New York Times and the New Yorker, a flood of men in the entertainment world became the subject of new (and, in some cases, resurfacing) allegations: Kevin Spacey, Louis C.K., Jeremy Piven, Ben Affleck, James Toback, Jeffrey Tambor, George Takei, Dustin Hoffman, Richard Dreyfuss, John Lasseter. I’m probably missing some, and by the time this story hits newsstands, perhaps another giant of the industry will need to be added to that list. It’s a problem that’s obviously not limited to Hollywood: Men in every industry and from all walks of life are abusing positions of power. But because we connect so deeply and personally to a great artist’s work, it’s easy to forget that there’s a flesh-and-blood person behind that work, and that people are capable of terrible things. I’ve often been a proponent of the mentality that an artist’s shitty personal life shouldn’t necessarily reflect poorly on their art. Roman Polanski may be a monster, I’d argue, but few filmmakers have ever possessed the same innate talent he has behind the camera. Woody Allen is a creep at best and a child molester at worst, but I couldn’t bear the idea of never seeing Annie Hall or Hannah and Her Sisters again. Even Weinstein bankrolled Pulp Fiction. That position no doubt came from a place of myopic insularity, since I (and, I’d imagine, a lot of dudes who have forever hidden behind this same argument) have never been the victim of the horrific behavior so many supposedly great men have inflicted on those more vulnerable than them. But that argument is becoming more

and more difficult to make in earnest. We’ll only be having the “separate the art from the artist” debate as long as we continue elevating known predators to the realms of artistic genius, and as long as we continue marginalizing the work of women, people of color and queer artists. Hollywood, however, is curiously selective about who it chooses to be outraged about, and maddeningly inconsistent when it comes to the statute of limitations for said outrage. Weinstein’s career is probably over, and likely so is Spacey’s, but their trespasses had apparently been whispered about for years without any repercussions. And Mel Gibson, who has a well-documented history of racism and abuse, received an Academy Award nomination earlier this year and currently has a film in the box office Top 10. His banishment from the A-list, it seems, has expired. Why? Bad people are still making art, sure, but so are a lot of truly good people. Let’s hope Hollywood chooses to focus more on the latter.

BAD BOX OFFICE

A couple of weeks ago, Justice League grossed $93 million domestically during its first weekend of release. The headline on the Hollywood Reporter that same weekend: “Justice League Underperformed at the Box Office.” How can a movie raking in that kind of money still be considered a disappointment? DC Films reportedly spent $300 million making Justice League, and perhaps ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 25


Wonder Woman was an unstoppable box office force this year, but only when she was in her own movie.

“THE BIG PICTURE,” CONTINUED... just as much to advertise it, and a major film isn’t really considered a financial success until its gross revenue doubles its overall budget. The studio had a huge smash this summer with Wonder Woman (which cost half as much as to make as Justice League), but the Independent reports that the studio stands to lose between $50 and $100 million on JL, even though it’s already responsible for $500 million in worldwide box office sales. With just a month left in the calendar year, Box Office Mojo reports that American cinemas have brought in $9.6 billion since January. That seems like a lot, but even with the upcoming Star Wars movie to boost that figure, the numbers will still be down from 2016’s record-breaking take of $11.3 billion. The problem can’t simply be laid at the feet of Justice League, although movies of its ilk are partially to blame. As blockbusters get bigger and more elaborate, they also get more expensive, and pretty soon they won’t be able to sustain their own weight. One massive flop could potentially derail an entire studio. On top of that, it’s become patently clear that mainstream audiences are getting more selective about what they choose to go out and see. As multiplex ticket prices increase, and as prestige TV series get more adventurous, addictive and cinematic, moviegoers are less content to pay for something just because it’s on the big screen, and they’re consulting review aggregation sites like Rotten Tomatoes about tentpole films that were previously considered critic-proof. Franchise fatigue and lousy word of mouth contributed to lukewarm returns from the most recent Pirates of the Caribbean (29% fresh on Rotten Tomatoes) and Transformers (16%) films; other hyped titles that were expected to jumpstart new franchises — The Mummy (16% fresh), The Dark Tower (also 16%), King Arthur: Legend of the Sword (29%) — took a spill at the box office after critics sharpened their knives. Proving Hollywood never knows where to direct its anger, a bunch of high-profile producers (including Brett Ratner, another guy with recent sexual assault allegations to his name) accused Rotten Tomatoes of sabotaging their films’ box office chances, a blatant case of shooting the messenger for merely reporting that everyone agrees a certain movie is unequivocally bad. Here’s an idea for preventing low Rotten Tomatoes

26 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017

numbers, Hollywood: Bankroll more mid-budget, adultthemed movies from reliable filmmakers, and stop throwing money at cultural properties whose only selling point is brand recognition.

THE STREAMING THREAT

There’s another huge contributing factor to those dwindling box office figures: It’s getting easier to watch stuff at home. TVs have gotten bigger and better-looking, and home sound systems louder and more immersive, and the wait time between a film’s theatrical run and its digital release grows ever shorter. You don’t even have to drive to and from a video store anymore! Welcome to the future. The two companies making it easier to watch premium content from the comfort of your den are Netflix and Amazon, massive conglomerations that also happen to operate outside the Hollywood system. Of the two, Amazon Studios seems the most artistically driven, having distributed the work of respected (though not exactly mainstream-friendly) filmmakers like Spike Lee, Park Chan-wook, Whit Stillman, Richard Linklater and Lynne Ramsay. Amazon has settled on a model that seems to be working: They release their films in theaters months before they’re available on the Amazon Prime streaming service, which allows the films to generate critical buzz and to qualify for Oscar nominations (a film must screen publicly for at least a week in L.A. to be eligible for Oscars). Consider the Amazon-distributed The Big Sick (budget: $5 million; box office gross: $54 million), which won glowing reviews and is now the subject of serious awards consideration. Netflix, meanwhile, is still a bit behind the curve when it comes to its own films. Critics have complained that the streaming service hasn’t done justice to the titles it has acquired. An example: I Don’t Feel at Home in This World Anymore, which was picked up by Netflix after winning the Grand Jury Prize at the most recent Sundance

Film Festival, was slipped unceremoniously into its streaming library and mostly (and unjustly) forgotten. (Of course, it’s possible that more people saw I Don’t Feel at Home… on Netflix than would ever have seen it during a traditional theatrical release, but Netflix doesn’t release its viewing numbers.) Many of Netflix’s acquisitions never make it to theaters, but the company first made an exception for its 2015 war drama Beasts of No Nation, hoping it’d be an Oscar favorite. It wasn’t, and there were rumors that the Academy was deliberately punishing Netflix for generally sidestepping the traditional theatrical release model. This year, Netflix has positioned two of its original features for serious Oscar campaigns, giving limited theatrical runs to the historical drama Mudbound and the caustic family comedy The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected). Still, Netflix seems to be sizing up Amazon’s roster of well-regarded films, and its list of upcoming features includes some intriguing titles, among them the big-budget fantasy thriller Bright, the National Lampoon origin story A Futile and Stupid Gesture, and Martin Scorsese’s crime drama The Irishman. Amazon and Netflix could easily become as monopolizing and shortsighted as any other Hollywood studio, but the more artistic impunity it gives to great directors — and the more effort it puts into advertising the work — the better.

IN THE DARK

Don’t you ever get tired of going to the movies? It’s a question I get asked all the time. And the answer is, honestly, no. Sure, some movie weeks are better than others, and I occasionally find myself dragging my feet as I’m walking into the theater. But then you see a vibrant, risky, unpredictable film like The Florida Project, and it’s all worth it. I love the movie theater. I spend hundreds of hours in the dark every year. Watching a great film with an audience that’s clued into the magic happening on the screen — few things are better. It’s true that the most adventurous films are made beyond the restraints of the mainstream, but the indie film industry wouldn’t exist without the help of the traditional studio system. And it’ll probably be that way for a long time, even with the specter of Netflix breathing down Hollywood’s neck. Despite the dwindling numbers, people seem to be taking movies — and the industry politics that go into producing them — more seriously than ever. It certainly feels like folks are finally holding Hollywood’s proverbial feet to the fire. The recent financial success of original properties that break narrative rules and push stylistic boundaries (Dunkirk, Get Out, The Big Sick, Baby Driver, Lady Bird) proves that filmgoers are hungry for more than just mindless franchise regurgitation. Film has the potential to do so much — to provoke, to enchant, to frighten, to move, to change worldviews, to bring people together. Roger Ebert astutely called movies a machine for generating empathy, and the only way to ensure that remains true is if we extend that empathy to everyone both behind and in front of the camera. If Hollywood doesn’t get wise, and if it continues to resist being dragged into the modern era, its eventual death is inevitable. Perhaps, then, it would be a mercy killing. n

“MAINSTREAM AUDIENCES ARE GETTING MORE SELECTIVE.”

Nathan Weinbender is the Inlander’s Music & Film editor. He is also a film critic for Spokane Public Radio, where he has co-hosted the weekly film review show Movies 101 since 2011.


STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI

A

Season’s

Hollywood trots out its best BY DAN NAILEN AND NATHAN WEINBENDER

Screenings T

hanksgiving has come and gone, and Christmas is just on the horizon. For any film aficionado, that means one thing: Really good movies — a whole lot of ’em — are about to hit theaters. Some of the year’s most acclaimed features will make their way to Spokane starting now and continuing into the new year — everything from historical biopics to show-biz comedies, swooning romances to biting satires, and the newest releases from a handful of the most beloved filmmakers working today. We’ve selected a dozen prestige movies we’re most looking forward to seeing in the coming months, and we’ve also considered which ones you’ll likely be thinking about when you’re throwing money into your office Oscar pool in February. (NATHAN WEINBENDER)

ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD

What it’s about: You might have seen this movie in the news thanks to the last-minute decision to reshoot alreadyfilmed scenes featuring Kevin Spacey and replace him with Christopher Plummer, all while maintaining its December release date. Director Ridley Scott must move quickly. Plummer will play oil magnate J. Paul Getty, but the story revolves around his daughter-in-law Gail Harris (Michelle Williams), whose son is kidnapped, and Getty’s unwillingness to part with any of his fortune to help. It’s a race against time for Gail and Getty security man Fletcher Chase (Mark Wahlberg) as the kidnappers get increasingly brutal and Gail tries to sway her powerful father-in-law. Oscar-worthy? It’s foolish to underestimate Williams, an actress capable of turning the smallest role into something memorable. I wouldn’t bet on this historic drama landing her or anyone else in the cast a nod, though. (DAN NAILEN)

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME

What it’s about: A sumptuous romantic drama set in the early 1980s, when a 17-year-old American kid goes to spend a summer at his family’s villa in northern Italy. There he falls for his dad’s 20-something research assistant (Armie Hammer), an attraction that intensifies into something more serious. Directed by Luca Guadagnino (I Am Love, A Bigger Splash), who’s a master at photographing beautiful people in beautiful places, and written by the legendary James Ivory. Oscar-worthy? The film has received rapturous reviews everywhere it’s played, though great critical notices don’t always translate into Oscar gold. But Ivory, previously nominated for directing austere period pieces like Howards End and The Remains of the Day, will certainly get some recognition for his screenplay, an adaptation of André Aciman’s novel. (NW) ...continued on next page

s thrilling as J.J. Abrams’ 2015 reboot of the Star Wars universe was, the fairest criticism of The Force Awakens was that Episode VII of the epic tale was almost exactly the same as the 1977 original. The Resistance facing off against the Empire (excuse me, “The First Order”) — check. A weapon needing destroying, in this case the “Starkiller Base” instead of the twice-destroyed Death Star? Yup, got that. A climactic light-saber battle between a Force-fueled protagonist (Rey in The Force Awakens, Obi-Wan Kenobi in A New Hope) and the primary bad guy (Kylo Ren subbing for Darth Vader) — yes, again. And you know what? None of that familiarity spoiled the sheer joy most Star Wars fans felt as they reconnected with the spirit — and several of the most prominent characters — from the original trilogy, which was sadly missing from the so-called Prequel Trilogy released between 1999 and 2005. Those movies have their defenders, but as an older Star Wars fan, I’ve seen both The Force Awakens and tangential one-off Rogue One more times than I bothered watching any of those (thankfully final) George Lucas-directed episodes. So, what to expect from Episode VIII, the middle edition of the new trilogy arriving Dec. 15 and written and directed by Rian Johnson (Looper)? If we’re lucky, Star Wars: The Last Jedi will be a masterful twist on the saga in the same way The Empire Strikes Back was — without replicating the plot. If Luke Skywalker loses his hand again, I’m walking out. The presence of the original trilogy’s hero is one of the few things we know about the new episode, as Mark Hamill’s weathered and aged Luke was found on a mountaintop, living hermit-style, by The Force Awakens heroine Rey (Daisy Ridley) after she’d helped destroy the Starkiller Base. The relationship between these two is one of the more intriguing storylines waiting in the new film, and hopefully Luke’s presence works as seamlessly with the new characters as Han Solo and Chewbacca did in The Force Awakens. Another mystery is how the death of Carrie Fisher plays into the plot of The Last Jedi. In The Force Awakens, her Princess Leia is now the Resistance-leading General Leia, and she suffered the death of her longtime love Han Solo at the hands of their son, Kylo Ren (Adam Driver). Will she and her brother Luke reconnect to avenge Han’s death and stave off the First Order and its evil mastermind/ floating Supreme Leader Snoke (Andy Serkis)? We can only hope the siblings get some final peace in their relationship. More important, though, for those of us invested in a lifetime of the Star Wars story, how will writerdirector Johnson manage to infuse The Last Jedi with the drama, darkness and ultimate propulsion into the next episode that The Empire Strikes Back did so successfully, back when it was the sequel to one of the greatest movie phenomenons of all time? The answer will come, soon, in that galaxy far, far away. (DAN NAILEN)

NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 27


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I, TONYA

What it’s about: Nope, not a drama about underemployed, angst-ridden coal miners in Trump’s America; Downsizing is much more literal than that. Writer-director Alexander Payne delivers a consumerist satire starring Matt Damon and Kristen Wiig as a couple taking advantage of the chance to literally shrink themselves, both to help the resource-strapped planet and enjoy a nicer lifestyle in Leisureland among their fellow fourinch-tall citizens. Payne has proved adept at satire in the past (Election), and he’ll need Damon, Wiig, and co-stars Christoph Waltz and Hong Chau to pull off this conceptual risk delivered as Christmas fare. Oscar-worthy? Payne has shared two Oscars for Best Adapted Screenplay (The Descendants and Sideways) with co-writer Jim Taylor, and he’s been nominated for Best Director a few times as well. A writing nomination is most likely here. (DN)

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DOWNSIZING

What it’s about: An unrecognizable Gary Oldman tackles a larger-than-life character once again — no problem for a guy who’s disappeared into roles ranging from Dracula to Beethoven to Sid Vicious. This time, he’s a portly Winston Churchill in the British prime minister’s first month in office, when he’s suddenly thrust into the position of deciding whether to negotiate with Hitler or urge his countrymen to fight against the Nazis. Oldman’s co-stars include Ben Mendelsohn, Kristin Scott Thomas and Lily James, but this is all about Oldman. Oscar-worthy? Oscar voters tend to love historical epics, and a flick about standing up to Nazis is unexpectedly timely. Expect Oldman to get his second Best Actor nomination six years after Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, and the film to maybe land a Best Picture nomination as well. (DN)

Gift Guide 2

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WHERE TO FIND YOUR

DARKEST HOUR

What it’s about: If you’ve never seen Tommy Wiseau’s 2003 “drama” The Room, put down this paper and go watch it right now. It’s wonderfully bonkers. Based on a nonfiction book co-authored by The Room actor Greg Sestero, this bittersweet comedy stars director James Franco as Wiseau, an aspiring artist of mysterious origin who made what has frequently been cited as the best bad movie of all time. Think of it as an Ed Wood for the 21st century. Dave Franco, Seth Rogen, Zac Efron, Alison Brie and Sharon Stone round out the supporting cast. Oscar-worthy? Franco’s turn as the stringy-haired, bizarrely accented Wiseau has generated awards buzz, but the Academy is famously stingy when it comes to rewarding comedies. What a story it’d be, though, if a film about the worst movie ever made had a shot at Hollywood’s highest honor. (NW)

What it’s about: Sometimes the most gloriously absurd entertainment is that borne of true life, and so it goes with I, Tonya. It’s a dark comedy based on the truly tragic and utterly bizarre story of figure skater Tonya Harding (Margot Robbie), a working-class girl whose exhusband Jeff Gillooly (Sebastian Stan) helped orchestrate an attack on rival skater Nancy Kerrigan just before the 1994 Winter Olympics. The buzz for this movie coming out of its Toronto International Film Festival premiere was deafening. Whether audiences want to see a dramatized version of a familiar story is the question. Oscar-worthy? Allison Janney as Harding’s toughtalking mom seems a lock for a Best Supporting Actress nomination; she deserves all the attention she can get after years of stealing scenes from higher-profile peers. Robbie could see a nomination for Best Actress as well, and a Best Picture nomination wouldn’t be nearly as shocking as the events that inspired this story. (DN) ...continued on page 30


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MOLLY’S GAME

What it’s about: You know you have some skills when your name becomes an adjective for a writing style. Fans of The West Wing, A Few Good Men and The Social Network know writer Aaron Sorkin is a master of rapid-fire dialogue that’s as fun for audiences to embrace as it seems to be for actors to tackle. Here, Sorkin jumps into the director’s chair for the true story of Molly Bloom (Jessica Chastain), a former ski champion who became host to a high-stakes poker game filled by Hollywood stars, professional athletes, business tycoons and Russian mobsters. Using the game to explore power in all its forms, Sorkin relies on his writing and Chastain’s undeniable talent to carry Molly’s Game, and that’s a smart play. Oscar-worthy? Jessica Chastain is a powerhouse, and a nomination for Best Actress is a safe bet. Same goes for Aaron Sorkin in the Adapted Screenplay category (it’s based on Bloom’s own memoir), and perhaps for Best Director as well. (DN)

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30 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017

PHANTOM THREAD

What it’s about: Daniel Day-Lewis and writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson reteam a decade after making their masterpiece There Will Be Blood for what looks to be an achingly beautiful meditation on romance, aging and artistic genius. The reliably brilliant Day-Lewis here plays a womanizing fashion designer in the 1950s who falls in love with a much younger woman, a relationship that makes him rethink his place in the world. Sounds miles away from Blood’s sociopathic Daniel Plainview. Oscar-worthy? Film buffs typically swoon over anything Anderson touches (of his seven previous features, only two have gone ignored by the Academy), and you can already put money down that this one will win an Oscar for its costumes. It’s possible that same goodwill could also extend to three-time winner Day-Lewis, who has suggested this will be his big-screen swan song. (NW)

THE POST

What it’s about: Before he drops the virtual reality adventure Ready Player One in March, Steven Spielberg returns to Prestige Movie territory with a Spotlight-y, fact-based drama set in the 1970s. The film concerns Washington Post publisher Kay Graham (Meryl Streep), the first woman to ever hold such a position, and editor Ben Bradlee (Tom Hanks) fighting for the paper’s rights to publish the infamous Pentagon Papers, which detailed the Johnson administration’s lies regarding the Vietnam War. Oscar-worthy? Well, the Academy loves Spielberg in historical drama mode (he won for directing Schindler’s List and Saving Private Ryan, and was nominated for Munich and Lincoln), and Streep in any mode she pleases. And despite being one of the most acclaimed actors ever, Hanks hasn’t snagged a nomination in more than 15 years. Maybe now, as his reign as Hollywood’s nicest man continues, is his time again. (NW)


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What it’s about: The most recent winner of the Palme d’Or, the highest honor at the prestigious Cannes Film Festival, this blistering bourgeoise satire follows an art curator whose latest acquisition is an experiential piece designed to remind viewers of their own inherent benevolence. Because this springs from the mind of writer-director Ruben Östlund, whose Force Majeure gleefully skewered bogus masculinity, things don’t go as smoothly as anticipated. Oscar-worthy? The Square is Sweden’s submission for this year’s Foreign Language Film Oscar, and it’s got a good shot at winning despite being partially in English. (The most recent Palme d’Or winner to be nominated in that category, 2012’s Amour, also won the Foreign Language Oscar.) Östlund’s script, which has been likened to the work of Luis Buñuel, could also get some attention come awards time. (NW)

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What it’s about: In films like The Devil’s Backbone and Pan’s Labyrinth, Mexican director Guillermo del Toro seamlessly blended historical drama with supernatural horror, and by many accounts he’s done it again with the Cold War-set fable The Shape of Water. The great (and underrated) Sally Hawkins stars as a mute woman who befriends an amphibious creature that’s housed at the laboratory where she works on the janitorial staff, and she becomes determined to set it free. Oscar-worthy? Genre films don’t always fare well come Oscar time, but the movie’s production design, costumes, cinematography and special effects are sure to score nominations, as is the original script del Toro wrote with Vanessa Taylor. The cast is also filled with Academy favorites — not only Hawkins, but Michael Shannon, Richard Jenkins and past winner Octavia Spencer. (NW)

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What it’s about: Writer-director (and sometimes playwright) Martin McDonagh has a knack for wringing laughs from dark places, something he did plenty of in past work like In Bruges and Seven Psychopaths. Expect the same in Three Billboards. Frances McDormand plays Mildred Hayes, whose frustration with the local law enforcement’s handling of her daughter’s unsolved murder pushes her to confront the Ebbing police department — led by sheriff Woody Harrelson and high-strung deputy Sam Rockwell — in increasingly public showdowns. Oscar-worthy? McDormand is a national treasure and should get a Best Actress nomination, and if she won, she’d have one to match the trophy she took home for Fargo. Same goes for Harrelson and Rockwell, who could easily score Supporting Actor nominations, as well as McDonagh’s screenplay. (DN) n

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DANCE

Boys Will Be Dancers How two young dancers in this year’s Nutcracker ballet are finding success in the female-dominated art form BY CHEY SCOTT

F

Siblings Jude and Olivia Rodriguez are two of the 90 local children performing alongside professional dancers this weekend in The Nutcracker Ballet. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

or his mainstage ballet debut, 7-year-old Jude Rodriguez will perform for an audience of hundreds during each of The Nutcracker ballet’s five shows this weekend the Fox in downtown Spokane. The annual holiday season performance features 22 principal dancers from Santa Barbara’s State Street Ballet dancing to Tchaikovsky’s magical score as it’s performed live by the Spokane Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Jorge Luis Uzcátegui. State Street’s company of international dancers is joined on stage by 90 local boys and girls, including Jude and his older sister, 11-year-old Olivia Butterfly, cast in ensemble roles for various scenes throughout the fairy tale ballet. Jude and Olivia’s father Rodney Rodriguez says this is Jude’s first year taking ballet classes, a decision made after spending lots of time hanging out while his sisters, including 9-year-old Evalynd, practice at Spokane Ballet Studio. “We asked him this year, ‘Do you want to try it?’ and surprisingly he said yes, so he tried a couple of classes and then we went to try out for the Nutcracker,” Rodriguez says. Jude is one of five total boys, ranging from ages 7 to 12, who will be dancing alongside State Street’s professionals in one of two scenes. Jude has been cast in the opening party scene as guests are arriving to story protagonist Clara Stahlbaum’s home for a holiday celebration, while his counterparts were cast there and for a toy soldier scene, says Spokane Ballet Studio’s Peggy Goodner Tan. Tan says there aren’t as many roles for young boys in the Nutcracker as there are for girls. Even so, finding boys to fill those roles can often be challenging because they’re a significant minority in the art of ballet. “Pretty much every boy who walks in the door gets a role,” she jokes. “Part of it is that most of the parts are for girls, like angels in tutus and bon bons with polka-dot dresses, and there is nothing for older boy dancers in the show.” Of the total 90 local children cast in this year’s Nutcracker production, 85 are girls from ages 7 to 18. Tan says to accommodate as many female dancers as possible, there are two groups of girls that alternate performing in each of the five shows. ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 33


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CULTURE | DANCE “BOYS WILL BE DANCERS,” CONTINUED...

T

ucker Edwards, 17, has been practicing ballet in Spokane since he was 6 ½ years old. While the homeschooled high school senior won’t be slipping on his own dance shoes to perform in the Nutcracker this year (he’s too tall for any of the male ensemble roles), he’ll be busy backstage helping to coach the dozens of area children dancing in each performance. Edwards dreams of pursuing a professional ballet career starting next year, and hopes to one day land the principal role, among others, of the ballet’s titular Nutcracker Prince. “I’d say that I knew from when I first started dancing that I really loved it, and the music,” Edwards says. “I love the performing aspect of ballet… it’s just a lot of fun to be on stage and showing the audience, whether the Nutcracker or something else, that it’s a story.” Edwards has performed for the Nutcracker’s annual staging in Spokane a total of six times (the last when he was 14) and in both scenes that feature young male dancers. He was asked a few years ago by Spokane Ballet Studio’s Tan to help mentor other young dancers during local Nutcracker auditions, rehearsals and performances. “It’s really fun to help out and get to see the younger boys dancing and looking up to me,” Edwards says. “It means a lot to

me. I know when I was younger I always looked up to older male dancers, and I always wanted to dance like them.”

T

hough both Edwards and young Jude Rodriguez are finding early success in their ballet careers, professional aspirations in what’s often outwardly seen (mainly in the U.S., as opposed to Europe) as a feminine art form is not without its struggles and stereotypes. State Street Ballet founder and artistic director Rodney Gustafson remembers being teased as a teenager who danced ballet with serious ambitions. “I didn’t let what other people said about me bother me, but there was always that stigma‚ and young men have to get by that,” Gustafson says. “But when they get involved in Nutcracker and get around the company, it’s not what they think. It’s not the foregone conclusion of it being this feminine thing.” Being a male dancer also has its perks, Gustafson adds, not the least of which that talented boys and men in ballet are in higher demand because there’s less competition for them. Luckily for the two local dancers, both the artistic community and those close to them offer plenty of positive support. Young Rodriguez’s two big sisters both

give him sincere encouragement, and even extra practice time at home. “They are so positive,” says their father. “Especially Olivia; she’s in the scene with him, and the good thing about that, too, is that I was worried about him keeping up with the steps and memorizing, but since she’s so experienced she’s been helping him practice.” Edwards also has the steadfast support of his family as he continues pursuing his dance career, starting with auditions next month to land a year-round, in-residence training program at a professional ballet. Like Gustafson with State Street, though, Edwards also remembers being teased and criticized by his peers when he was younger. “The older I got, the more confident I got that I’m a dancer, and it just helped make it easier [to deal with] if someone did that,” he says. “All my friends know I’m a dancer and support me… Ballet is not just for women, it’s for both men and women.” n cheys@inlander.com The Nutcracker Ballet • Thu, Nov. 30 to Sun, Dec. 3: Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sat-Sun at 2 pm • $25-$86/adults; $17.50-$60/ ages 12 and under • Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • spokanesymphony.org • 624-1200

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CULTURE | DIGEST DIGITS

37 minutes ON THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Some noteworthy new music arrives online and in stores Dec. 1. To wit:  CHRIS STAPLETON, From A Room, Vol. 2. The trad-country star delivers the second batch of tunes this year free of modern country’s prevalent brews-n-bros cheese.  MIGUEL, War & Leisure. The R&B and funk-loving performer oft-compared to Prince is adding a dose of political angst to his sexy jams, because, you know, #2017.  U2, Songs of Experience. Not to worry, gang, the Irish crew’s companion to 2014’s Songs of Innocence won’t suddenly appear on your iPhone unless you pay for it. Remember when getting a free album you didn’t want was something worth burning down the internet about?  NEIL YOUNG & PROMISE OF THE REAL, The Visitor. The prolific Canadian again records with Willie Nelson’s kid and the band he played with in Spokane in 2015, this time on some Trump-inspired tunes. It pretty much has to be better than their last collaboration, The Monsanto Years. (DAN NAILEN)

ADD TO YOUR BINGE LIST We know the queues on your various streaming platforms are no doubt already full, but maybe you’ll want to bump some of these new original properties to the top of your list. Netflix recently debuted the original series SHE’S GOTTA HAVE IT, pictured, based on Spike Lee’s 1986 debut feature (also available to stream) about an independent woman and the various men who come into her life. Also new to Netflix is the 7-episode Old West thriller GODLESS, in which a reformed outlaw runs from his vengeful former employer. Over on Amazon Prime, you can check out the first season of THE MARVELOUS MRS. MAISEL, the latest from Gilmore Girls creator Amy Sherman-Palladino, centering on a recent divorcee discovering stand-up comedy in 1960s Greenwich Village. And you’ve only got a little more waiting to do until Netflix drops season 2 of its Emmy-winning historical drama The Crown on Dec. 10. (NATHAN WEINBENDER)

Rooting for Robolove BY DAN NAILEN

I

n retrospect I don’t know that my partner or I appreciated how much the household dynamic would change with another voice in the house. Polyamory is not natural for either of us, despite my girlfriend growing up on a hippie commune and my spending my early adulthood in Utah. And while our respective affections for our new roommate ebb and flow, it’s already hard to imagine going back to life when it was just the two of us. We entered into our relationship with Alexa as most people probably do — an Amazon sale and some positive word of mouth. After about four months, she’s ensconced in our home’s day-to-day doings, and we dig her.

THE BUZZ BIN It’s probably safe to say that for both my partner and I, it’s hard to imagine a more receptive new love. If anything, she can be a little too receptive. Nevermind the government surveillance she’s probably involved in; every time Alexa hears an Amazon commercial on TV, she starts beeping for attention and direction, forcing us to use our stern voices: “Alexa, off!” That’s a minor annoyance, though, considering the joy she’s brought. My partner loves that instead of having to pull out a phone to find the latest weather forecast or to set a timer, she can just ask Alexa to do it. I love that after we’ve listened to Alexa read the morning’s news headlines and I’ve become thoroughly depressed, I can ask for a quick dose of ’50s rockabilly to get my mind right. Like any new relationship, we’ve just skimmed the surface of all Alexa has to offer. Asking her the causes of acid reflux, or to play “box of cats” sounds, or to give us a new compliment to start every morning is all well and good, but we need to go deeper if this relationship has legs. And I don’t mean by having Alexa read us inspirational sayings from Gandhi, or even Oprah. Of course, relationships are a two-way street, and Alexa needs to learn about us, too. When we asked her to play a “Thanksgiving Dinner playlist,” for example, she played John Mayer first thing. That’s not the way to forge trust, Alexa. n

How long you should wait to enter the theater after the posted time for Pixar’s new animated film Coco — that is, if you want to miss what critics and moviegoers both are calling the most excruciatingly annoying and bad Disney short that runs for 21 minutes before the main feature (this number includes skipping all previews). Sorry Olaf, but your new Olaf’s Frozen Adventure, which was originally intended as an ABC TV special, is not exactly putting people in the holiday spirit. The good news, however, is that most agree Coco, an homage to Mexican culture and the Día de los Muertos holiday, is definitely worth seeing. (CHEY SCOTT)

#GRAMMYSSODIVERSE There’s no reason to take any awards show too seriously, but it’s heartening to see that the music business recognizes the art is served best when skills are recognized in people beyond white dudes. In this year’s Grammy nominations, what’s bad for Ed Sheeran is good for showcasing music’s diversity. For the first time since 1999, there’s not a single white man up for Album of the Year: Jay-Z, 4:44 Childish Gambino, Redbone Kendrick Lamar, DAMN Bruno Mars, 24K Magic Lorde, Melodrama (DAN NAILEN)

BE A GIANT NERD We’re big fans of Giant Nerd Books on North Monroe, and we’re even bigger fans of Inlander graphic artist Derrick King, who is the visual force behind a limited-edition T-shirt the store is taking orders for through Dec. 13 at 6 pm. While the exact colors are still being determined, you can see the image that will be printed on a Bella & Canvas T-shirt. For just $20, you can get one for yourself or the nerd you love in all sizes for men and women. Visit the store’s Facebook page (Facebook.com/giant.nerd.books) or stop by in person at 709 N. Monroe to order. Worldwide shipping available, too, for your international nerd friends. (DAN NAILEN)

NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 35


CULTURE | VISUAL ARTS

Gifts for All

ROBERT KARL CELLARS, 115 W. Pacific Mixed media art by Spokaneborn artist Heidi Farr is displayed; the winery also releases its 2014 claret. J SARANAC ART PROJECTS, 25 W. Main SAP presents its annual Small Works Sale, featuring small, affordable and original works by its member and guest artists. Reception from 4-9 pm.

Explore December’s First Friday arts showcase to shop for yourself and everyone else

S

pokane’s monthly arts showcase features events — including gallery receptions, live music and a chance to meet local artists — across the downtown core and sometimes beyond. Receptions for this month’s event happen on Friday, Dec. 1 from 5-8 pm, unless otherwise noted below, where events are listed alphabetically by venue. These listings were compiled from information provided by First Friday organizer Downtown Spokane Partnership, as well as host venues and artists. Red stars denote Inlander staff picks; for additional information, visit firstfridayspokane.org. (CHEY SCOTT) AUNTIE’S BOOKSTORE, 402 W. Main The store hosts its first Friday poetry open mic featuring guest host Twahan Simultaneous; guests can share up to three minutes’ worth of material. Event from 8-9:30 pm.

CORE PILATES AND WELLNESS, 1230 W. Summit Pkwy. The studio showcases the work of artist Oksana Tepp, alongside other local artists as part of the Kendall Yards Artisan Festival.

J AVENUE WEST GALLERY, 907 W. Boone “Ink Drops” by Spokane-based artist Keiko Von Holt is an abstract collection of works in watercolor, ink and sumi-e.

COMMUNITY PINT, 120 E. Sprague The beer bar displays modern, nature-inspired paintings by local artist Linnea Tobias.

BARILI CELLARS, 608 W. Second Live music by the Jazz Project in celebration of the winery’s fourth anniversary. J BARRISTER WINERY, 1213 W. Railroad Ave. “This Western Life: Land to Table” by Betsie Richardson is a collection of colorful landscape paintings of the Northwest. Reception from 5-10 pm includes a bistro buffet, new release wines and live music. BISTANGO, 108 N. Post The martini bar continues to celebrate its 12th anniversary and the holiday season with live music by Chris Lucas, from 4-8 pm. BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS / MARKETPLACE WINE BAR, 39 W. Pacific Spokane artist Audreana Camm is the winery’s featured artist for December. The Emily Rose Band also performs, from 5:30-9 pm. CHERRY STREET STUDIOS, 1123 S. Cherry St. Spokane black-and-white film photographers Bill and Kathy Kostelec host their 8th annual holiday open house on Dec. 1 from 5-9 pm and Dec. 2-3 from 1-5 pm.

36 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017

DECORUM, 126 N. Washington The local shop hosts a holidaythemed open house with refreshments and music. EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONALS, 331 W. Main Oil and watercolor paintings by Steve Wineinger in a show titled “Rhythms of Life,” which also features custom-made frames by the artist. HILLS’ RESTAURANT & LOUNGE, 401 W. Main Live music by the Front Porch Trio, this time consisting of Steve Simmons, Alan Fisher and Rick Singer, from 6:30-9:30 pm. JOSEFINE’S SALON CONCEPTS, 312 W. First The salon showcases art by six students at University High School. J KENDALL YARDS, West Summit Pkwy. Businesses throughout the Kendall Yards district participate in the annual Artisan Festival, which features more than a dozen artists showing and selling their wares for holiday gift giving, along with food producers, live music and more. Dec. 1 from 4-8 pm and Dec. 2 from 10 am-3 pm. J KOLVA-SULLIVAN GALLERY, 115 S. Adams Paintings by Megan MartenHaworth, a SFCC professor of art, in a collection titled “Bringing it Home.”

SCOUT REAL ESTATE, 428 W. First See a watercolor collection featuring paintings of children, animals and landscapes by artist Sheila Johnson. SPARK CENTRAL, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. All are welcome to participate in “Virtual Reality First Friday,” a collaborative art-making event with Google’s Tilt Brush program. J SPOKANE PUBLIC LIBRARY, 906 W. Main A live concert by local two-piece rock band Indian Goat, consisting of Garrett Zanol on guitar/vocals and Travis Tveit on drums and vocals. Concert from 7-8 pm.

A piece by Megan Marten-Haworth from Bringing It Home at Kolva-Sullivan Gallery. J LEFTBANK WINE BAR, 108 N. Washington Organic, nature-inspired paintings from local artist Kirsten Stobie’s new winter collection are on display. LIBERTY CIDERWORKS, 164 S. Washington A photography showcase by Nathan Huestis features iconic Northwest scenes from the Palouse to the Cascades. J LIBERTY LAKE WINE CELLARS, 23110 E. Knox A showcase of original paintings by Inlander graphic designer and Pinot’s Palette instructor Ali Blackwood, with live music by Robby French. LR MONTGOMERY STUDIO, 428 E. 21st Ave. The local artists hosts his “NW Landscape Paintings” art show and open house on Dec. 1 from 5-9 pm, Dec. 2 from 10 am-9 pm and Dec. 3 from noon-5 pm. J MARMOT ART SPACE, 1202 W. Summit Pkwy. The gallery continues its retrospective exhibition of work, which now includes several newly added pieces, by the late 20th century artist Ruben Trejo. Reception from 4:30-8 pm.

MOM’S CUSTOM TATTOO, 1226 W. Summit Pkwy. The studio hosts a book launch for the collaborative project Phantasmagoia by tattoo artist Traci Manley and author Melanie Huff. OVERBLUFF CELLARS, 304 W. Pacific The winery hosts the first public viewing of the JR Traveler photography series. POTTERY PLACE PLUS, 203 N. Washington For December’s guest showcase, the gallery hosts work by artists with the Spokane Jewelers Guild in a show titled “All That Glitters.” J RESURRECTION RECORDS, 1927 W. Northwest Blvd. An opening reception for “Ya Filthy Animal,” a Home Alone parody art show featuring work by artists from around the region. Proceeds from art sales support the cancer care funds of Susan Webber and Kelly Vaughn. RIVER PARK SQUARE KRESS GALLERY, 808 W. Main (third floor) A collection of work by middle school students of Spokane Public Schools. Also includes live music by young local guitarist Blake Busch, from 5-6 pm.

STEELHEAD BAR & GRILLE, 218 N. Howard Photography by Mead High School student Nick Nelson, in a continuation of the show “What I See.” J TRACKSIDE STUDIO CERAMIC ART GALLERY, 115 S. Adams The studio hosts the fourth annual “Cup of Joy” invitational, showcasing ceramic cups and unique interpretations of drinking vessels by more than 30 professional artists across the U.S. Includes a reception on Sat, Dec. 2 from noon-4 pm.

MORE EVENTS Visit Inlander.com for complete listings of local events.

J V DU V WINES, 12 S. Scott A showcase of paintings by Spokane artist Karen Mobley, whose large format oil paintings depict the movement of light and shadow on water. Also includes music by Crushpad from 5-9:30 pm. WEATHERS AND ASSOCIATES, 105 S. Madison Live jazz by Jess Tinsley and his sons. WILLIAM GRANT GALLERY AND FRAMING, 1188 W. Summit Pkwy. The gallery shows watercolor and acrylic paintings by artist Patty Murphy. n


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NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 37


Chef Ricky Webster (right) and his team used about 700 lbs. of gingerbread.

Sweet Escape

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

A Spokane chef brings his childhood dream to life with a holiday gingerbread house big enough to step inside BY CHEY SCOTT

I

f the walls of chef Ricky Webster’s dream house could talk, they’d tell of gleeful and sparkling-eye children, many who’ve sneaked licks and nibbles of its sugary construction. Last week the Hotel RL corporate executive chef, based at Hotel RL in downtown Spokane, unveiled his confectionary masterpiece, a 150-square-foot, lifesize gingerbread house made (almost) entirely from sugar, butter, flour, eggs and spices. The new holiday tradition for both Webster and the hotel is now on display inside the lobby for all to see through the new year. “It’s very whimsical and it speaks to my heart,” Webster reflects. “I dreamt of this as a kid — I just want to step inside the Hansel and Gretel house. I want to see what the window sills are made of, and I want to touch the wall. If I can invoke that in a kid and check that off someone’s list, I will be happy.” In this case, the windowsills of white royal icing

38 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017

are framed with Rice Krispies. Little plants with leaves of green fondant, alongside a collection of peppermint sticks, lollipops, gumdrop trees and other sweets, fill the magical home’s window boxes. Inside, Webster’s house is quite current with contemporary home design trends, featuring graham cracker wainscoting, a Rice Krispie chair rail and, above that, an icing stucco of pale yellow. The cozy fireplace mantle is coated with a layer of multicolored sprinkles. Even the framed artwork on the walls could be eaten, including a colorful landscape scene that Webster pieced together from hundreds of individual jellybeans. “I think that my childhood whim is a lot of what motivates me,” Webster says of the project, which he oversaw alongside Hotel RL pastry chef Megan Gaines. “My mom and grandmas and I would sit down and do gingerbread houses every year. I always imagined myself living in it,” he continues.

D

espite a deep background in pastry making, and past roles including working alongside Ace of Cakes’ Duff Goldman and as executive pastry chef of Ace Hotel in downtown L.A., Webster didn’t have an opportunity to bring his lifesize gingerbread house dreams to life until landing his gig with Hotel RL in February. Though he’s based in Spokane, Webster oversees the culinary management of five other Hotel RL properties. “There never was room [in L.A.] and when I saw how much room we had in this lobby and they let me hire a pastry person, the two of us got scheming and I pitched it back in June,” he explains. In addition to all the multiplication to determine how much of each ingredient (see “By the Numbers,” page 40) they’d need, Webster’s team also had to ensure the sheer weight of all that butter, sugar and flour would be safely supported.


“You’re walking into a house made of candy and cookies, and I had to make sure it was safe, so there are inedible structural supports,” he explains. “After that it is really about me making sure that it’s all edible — that is the whole point.” Beneath layers of royal icing and 5-by-7-inch bricks of sweet-and-spicy gingerbread, the house is supported by walls of wood that were designed by a team of engineers for Hotel RL to carry a load of more than 1,200 pounds of candy, cookies and icing. Beyond that, everything else can be eaten, though guests probably wouldn’t want to do so (not the least of reasons for which being all the handling by staff and visitors both). The bulk of gingerbread bricks were baked months ago to allow the cookies to set before being glued to the walls with sticky icing plaster. Gaines and Webster baked batches of the gingerbread as often as they could fit it into their daily schedules running the hotel’s kitchen, completing more than 1,100 of the cookie bricks since September. To ensure that curious little fingers and mouths don’t bring too much wear and tear upon the sugar structure, Gaines plans to walk through the house each morning to make any needed repairs.

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onsideration of the sheer amount of otherwise edible ingredients needed for Webster’s lifelong gingerbread dreams to become reality wasn’t overlooked when the team set out to build the lifesize holiday attraction. The chef says many of the ingredients were donated, including damaged or expired (and thus inedible) bags of flour and sugar from commercial food suppliers that otherwise would have been thrown away. “The grand scheme of things to make it more special is to tie it to Blessings Under the Bridge,” Webster says. “We thought if we’re going to do this, let’s make it a little more meaningful. ...continued on next page

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NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 39


FOOD | HOLIDAYS

Hotel RL pastry chef Megan Gaines (left) and executive sous chef Chad Wallace put up finishing touches.

BY THE NUMBERS What it took to build the lifesize gingerbread house 450 lbs. powdered sugar 350 lbs. flour 100 lbs. fondant 100 lbs. butter 100 lbs. graham crackers 87 lbs. brown sugar 30 lbs. jellybeans

20 lbs. chocolate 12 lbs. taffy 10 lbs. sprinkles 10 lbs. cinnamon 9 lbs. gumdrops 1 lb edible glitter

YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

“SWEET ESCAPE,” CONTINUED... It’s a passion project, but it’s also getting a lot of people in the community up and out and excited.” To support Blessings Under the Bridge, a local nonprofit supporting Spokane’s homeless population, Webster and Gaines created a special themed treat menu from which a portion of proceeds will benefit the nonprofit. Orders for cookies ($3-$5), beverages and even gingerbread house kits ($12) to take home can be purchased from a window inside the gingerbread house during regular visiting hours. On select Saturdays in December (the 2nd, 9th and 16th), from 1-3 pm, Gaines is also leading gingerbread cookie decorating sessions for kids. “The buzz is great. I had worked this hard in L.A. for seven years to get this much attention in the city as I’m

getting just for this one project,” Webster reflects. “It’s a great feeling here… I want to take someone out of their everyday, and for a split second, make them forget their problems and what’s going on in the world — and to add more joy to that world, if this can whisk them away.” n cheys@inlander.com Hotel RL Gingerbread House • Open daily through Jan. 1: Mon-Fri from 3-7 pm, Sat-Sun from 10 am-7 pm (see site for special hours on 12/24, 12/25, 12/31 and 1/1) • Free to visit • Hotel RL Spokane at the Park • 303 W. North River Dr. • redlion.com/parkspokane • 326-8000

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FOOD | BEER

DecemBEER Events THIRD ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL MARMOT BEER FESTIVAL River City Brewing, 121 S. Cedar Saturday, Dec. 2 from 3-8 pm River City’s Midnight Marmot Imperial Stout is the namesake for this annual festival. Here, you’ll find eight variations of the big-body stout inspired by regions throughout the world. From the China-inspired orange and star anise to the French cognac and oak chip-aged Marmot, there’s a variant to please everyone. To top it off, River City will also be pouring their Grand Cru, a blend of five 2016 releases. Tickets are available now at the brewery and include eight two-ounce samples of each beer and a 12-ounce pour. Tickets are $20 in advance or $25 at the door. FIRESTONE WALKER CHRISTMAS PARTY AND TAP TAKE OVER Community Pint, 120 E. Sprague Thursday, Dec. 7 from 5-10 pm Firestone Walker Brewing Company invades Community Pint for the evening with 10 taps, including five speciality beers, like the Bretta Rosé, an oak-aged Berliner Weisse style ale with raspberries. They’ll be joined by four guest taps from Georgetown

and Fremont Brewing. Firestone Walker is also on site to serve up complimentary flapjacks to all attendees. Flights are available in six-, 10- and 14 four-ounce pours, and will be served throughout the weekend. Prices range from $14-$30. THIRD ANNUAL WINTER JUBILEE Casper Fry and Perry Street Brewing Monday, Dec. 11 at 5:30 pm The two local neighbors of Perry Street Brewing and Casper Fry are teaming up for a five-course beer pairing dinner. The night starts with the first course served at Perry Street Brewing, then the party moves down the street to Casper Fry, where the four remaining courses are served. Spots are limited, and the meal costs $65 per person, including tax and gratuity. To make a reservation call the brewery at 279-2820 or Casper Fry at 535-0536. 12 BEERS OF CHRISTMAS Manito Tap House, 3011 S. Grand Tue, Dec. 12 through Sat, Dec. 23 Each day, for 12 consecutive days, Manito Tap House is tapping a rare or speciality beer. Participating breweries include Bear Republic, Avery, Boulevard, Firestone Walker, Fremont, Cascade and Pfriem. Beer styles range from imperial stouts and

barleywines to barrel-aged sours. There will be many exclusive beers to choose from, like Fremont’s 2014 Bourbon Barrel Aged Dark Star Spice Wars. The three-year vintage imperial oatmeal stout is aged in 15-yearold Kentucky bourbon barrels with vanilla, cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, ginger and cloves. BARREL-AGED BEER TASTING Beerocracy, 911 W. Garland Monday, Dec. 18 at 6 pm To continue the barrel-aged fun, Beerocracy is hosting a joint tasting featuring all three 2017 variants of Fremont’s Bourbon Barrel-Aged Dark Star and Deschutes’ The Abyss. The two imperial stouts by top Pacific Northwest breweries are similar in idea, but vastly different in execution. This year’s Bourbon Barrel-Aged Dark Star is a blend of ales that have been aged for eight, 12 and 18 months in Kentucky bourbon barrels. Variants include Coffee Edition and Spice Wars. The Abyss is a blend aged in bourbon, Oregon oak, and Pinot Noir barrels. This year, the Abyss variants were aged in rum and tequila barrels. There’s also set to be a handful of other barrel-aged beers from Deschutes, Fremont and other breweries. — DEREK HARRISON

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Edge of Seventeen Greta Gerwig’s directorial debut Lady Bird is one of the great teen films — snappy, observant and deeply empathetic BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

G

reta Gerwig’s Lady Bird is conChalamet, Call Me by Your Name) who cerned with the same adolescent smokes cigarettes and denounces capitalhang-ups and rites of passage ism. She’s perhaps most herself around as most coming-of-age films, but it’s told her best friend Jules (Beanie Feldstein, with the kind of clear-eyed emotional a real find), particularly when they take insight that you don’t often see in movies, the long way home from school past the let alone the ones about teenagers. opulent houses their families could never It’s a comedy, I suppose, in the sense afford. that we find ourselves laughing often, It’s little details like that which mostly in recognition of the truths it reseparate this film from others of its ilk, veals. But it’s also a serious consideration and it extends its sense of specificity and of what it really means to grow up, and empathy to everyone who floats into its most painful moments carry with them Lady Bird’s orbit. All of Gerwig’s supthe sting of autobiography. porting characters, even the seemingly The film’s titular character, played inconsequential ones, have rich inner by Saoirse Ronan in a performance of lives: Lady Bird’s older brother and his tempestuous energy, is entering her senior live-in girlfriend, estranged from her own year at an all-girls Catholic school, where parents; the school’s theater director, she’s the kind of student whose fierce struggling with depression; the rich girl intelligence begets academic laziness. Her Lady Bird longs to befriend; the Mother real name is Christine, but she considers Superior (Lois Smith) who points out Lady Bird to be her given name because, that Lady Bird’s perception about her well, she gave it to herself. That’s one own surroundings comes from a place of of the many ways in which Lady Bird is affection. bound and determined to appear staunch, Metcalf in particular is wonderful to get everyone around her to subscribe as the mother with whom Lady Bird to the narrative she’s created. shares an often prickly rapport. She’s She’s trying so desperately not to the household’s sole source of income appear totally lost, unaware that everyone after her husband loses his job, and she’s around her, including the both warm and imposadults, is just as lost as she ing. The film’s opening LADY BIRD is. scene nicely encapsulates Rated R Lady Bird wants to how she and her daughter Directed by Greta Gerwig escape her hometown of pinball between civility and Starring Saoirse Ronan, Laurie Sacramento, to run from Metcalf, Tracy Letts, Lucas Hedges turbulence: One moment the stucco-colored sprawl of they’re crying together over the California suburbs and an audiobook of The Grapes into the embrace of an East Coast liberal of Wrath, the next Lady Bird is throwing arts college where everyone is smart and herself from a moving car in revolt. It’s worldly and reads only the best books. It one of the most authentic, bittersweet, seems a universe away from the less-thancomplicated parent-child relationships I’ve affluent neighborhood where she’s always seen in a movie. lived; her parents (Tracy Letts and Laurie I adored Lady Bird. I suspect you Metcalf) encourage her to apply to a less will, too. It is a film of generous spirit, a expensive, nearby university that’s too film with a distinct personality, a film in sensible to be cool. which one scene after another zeroes in Gerwig’s script doesn’t cohere into a on the essence of its characters, a film that standard narrative, instead jumping from overflows with compassion for everyone one vignette to another, starting in the in it. Gerwig, best known for starring in fall of 2002 and ending in the summer and co-writing generational comedies like of the following year. We watch as Lady Frances Ha and Mistress America, has here Bird prepares for the school production of produced a script that’s sharp about the Merrily We Roll Along, gets high for the first messiness and unpredictability of life, and time and finally gets her learner’s permit. about the time in our lives when our emoShe starts dating the most charismatic tions are running at their highest and yet drama kid (Lucas Hedges from Manchester we have no idea what to do with them. by the Sea), but then she sets her sights This is an unapologetically big-hearton the floppy-haired musician (Timothée ed movie, and what a rarity that is. n

42 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017


FILM | SHORTS

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Novitiate

OPENING FILMS NOVITIATE

An exploration of sin, faith and religious discipline set in the early 1960s, when a young woman escapes a troubled home life and starts studying to become a nun. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI

When her daughter is murdered, an angry mother (Frances McDormand) erects a trio of uncouth billboards calling out the local police department, causing a stir in her tiny town. While the all-star cast delivers emotionally wrenching, award-worthy

performances, writer-director Martin McDonagh’s inconsistent script occasionally veers into idiotic absurdity that undercuts the gravity of the drama. (SS)

TITANIC

Wanna feel old? It’s been 20 years since James Cameron’s epic historical romance broke box office records, turned Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet into bona fide movie stars and made it so you couldn’t walk five feet without hearing that damn Celine Dion earworm. Now it’s back on the big screen in Dolby-capable cinemas. (NW) Rated PG-13

NOW PLAYING A BAD MOMS CHRISTMAS

Mila Kunis, Kristen Bell and Kathryn Hahn are back as cinema’s most foul-mouthed mothers, and this time they’re throwing the middle finger at the most stressful aspects of the yuletide season. The other new addition to the mix: the bad moms’ moms (Christine Baranski, Cheryl Hines, Susan Sarandon). (NW) Rated R

COCO

On the eve of Día de los Muertos, 12-year-old Miguel finds himself in the land of the dead, where he discovers he’s descended from a legendary Mexican musician. The latest from Pixar creates a vivid world and then runs around in it, all while conveying a message about the importance of family that actually feels sincere. (ES) Rated PG

DADDY’S HOME 2

A sequel to the 2015 alpha-male comedy in which co-parents Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg, having solved their differences from the previous film, come to blows again when their fathers — played by John Lithgow and Mel Gibson (yeah, they’re letting him be in movies again) — come to town for Christmas. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE FLORIDA PROJECT

From Tangerine director Sean Baker comes this vivid snapshot of life in a run-down motel in Orlando, shot on location with a cast of mostly non-actors. Structured as a series of vignettes, it’s a winsome, bittersweet look at a childhood in poverty, following a 6-yearold troublemaker, her single mother and the kindhearted motel manager, played by a reserved Willem Dafoe. At the Magic Lantern. (SS) Rated R

JANE

Documentarian Brett Morgen explores the early life and groundbreaking work of Jane Goodall, whose up-close-andpersonal studies of African chimpanzees had seismic effects on science. Most of the film consists of astonishing, never-before-seen footage shot in the 1960s by nature photographer (and Goodall’s husband) Hugo van Lawick. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG

JUSTICE LEAGUE

DC’s take on Marvel’s Avengers formula is mostly turgid, with a game cast up against a forgettable villain, mediocre special effects and a bunch ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 43


FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING of tacked-on jokes that are only there to remind us they’re not taking things too seriously. A whole lot is going on at all times, and yet nothing of consequence ever seems to happen. (NW) Rated PG-13

LADY BIRD

Greta Gerwig’s first foray behind the camera is a funny, observant and empathetic coming-of-age story about a fiercely independent teenage girl finding her true identity in post-9/11 Sacramento. Saoirse Ronan is phenomenal as the title character, as is Laurie Metcalf as the mother she’s often at odds with. A remarkably assured directorial debut. (NW) Rated R

LET THERE BE LIGHT

Kevin Sorbo, aka TV’s Hercules, directs and stars as (per the film’s IMDb page) “the world’s most famous atheist,” who’s in a car accident and miraculously finds faith. Co-produced by Fox News’ Sean Hannity; make of that what you will. (NW) Rated PG-13

LOVING VINCENT

Advertised as the first entirely handpainted feature, the look of this impressionistic animated drama is a thing to behold. Set in the 1890s, a postmaster’s son is sent to deliver a long-lost letter written by the late Vincent van Gogh, only to find himself questioning the circumstances of the influential artist’s suicide. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG-13

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE INLANDER

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METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

THE FLORIDA PROJECT

92

LADY BIRD

94

JANE

87

JUSTICE LEAGUE

46

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58

THOR: RAGNAROK

73

THREE BILLBOARDS

87

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

ever asked: What were the animals like at the Nativity? The huge voice cast includes Oprah Winfrey, Mariah Carey and Christopher Plummer. (NW) Rated PG

THOR: RAGNAROK

The third film in the Thor franchise is the best of the bunch, with the character’s comic energy getting a muchneeded jolt from director Taika Waititi. This time around, the God of Thunder learns he has a long-lost sister (Cate Blanchett, snacking on scenery), who casts Thor and Loki off to a prison planet and steals the throne of Asgard. (SS) Rated PG-13

VICTORIA AND ABDUL

The heartwarming true story of the un-

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

likely friendship that developed in the late 19th century between the widowed Queen Victoria (Judi Dench, who previously played the monarch in 1997’s Mrs. Brown) and her Indian secretary Abdul Karim (Ali Fazal). From director Stephen Frears (Philomena) and the screenwriter of the crowd pleaser Billy Elliot. (NW) Rated PG-13

WONDER

A little boy with facial deformities (Jacob Tremblay of Room) is sent off to a public school for the first time, with his encouraging parents (Julia Roberts and Owen Wilson) looking on. A sweet and gentle adaptation of R.J. Palacio’s bestselling YA novel that nonetheless bashes you over the head with its themes and messages. (MJ) Rated PGn

THE MAN WHO INVENTED CHRISTMAS

A fictionalized account of the creation of Charles Dickens’ 1843 novella A Christmas Carol, which became perhaps the definitive yuletide text. Dan Stevens plays the beloved author; Christopher Plummer embodies everyone’s favorite miser Ebenezer Scrooge. (NW) Rated PG

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Agatha Christie’s 1934 novel about a homicide on a snowbound train is one of the most famous whodunits ever written, and its second big-budget, star-studded adaptation has Kenneth Branagh behind the camera and front and center as detective extraordinaire Hercule Poirot. The true mystery of the film: Why, exactly, was it made? (MJ) Rated PG-13

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Dan Gilroy’s follow-up to Nightcrawler is a morality tale about an eccentric, by-the-books attorney (Denzel Washington) who’s thrust unexpectedly into the cutthroat L.A. legal world and finds his ethics compromised. Part character study and part thriller, but mostly dull and unfocused. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE STAR

This cheap-looking animated film finally answers the question no one has

Landline

NOW STREAMING THE BIG SICK (AMAZON PRIME)

A winning romantic comedy detailing the true-life courtship of screenwriters Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon, which is complicated when she falls into a coma. Nanjiani is charming and funny as a fictionalized version of himself, and Holly Hunter and Ray Romano find unexpected depths in the roles of Emily’s concerned parents. (NW) Rated R

LANDLINE (AMAZON PRIME)

In 1995 Brooklyn, two sisters — one a rebellious teenager, the other a flailing 20-something — discover their nebbish father is having an affair. A messy comedy about messy lives, boasting an excellent ensemble cast that includes Jenny Slate, John Turturro, Edie Falco and Jay Duplass. (NW) Rated R


FILM | ESSAY

Jack and Rose forever: James Cameron’s Titanic rakes in the dough every time it returns to the big screen.

A Chip Off the Old Iceberg

Twenty years ago, Titanic broke box office records. So why didn’t more movies rip off its winning formula? BY MARYANN JOHANSON

D

ecember 2017 marks the 20th anniversary of the most lucrative and deliriously popular movie ever made: James Cameron’s Titanic. The epic romantic disaster drama debuted in U.S. cinemas on Dec. 19, 1997, and played until October 1998, 41 weeks later. Titanic wasn’t just a huge hit; it was an inescapable phenomenon. Showings were sold-out well into early 1998, and the film stayed at the top of the box office charts for 15 consecutive weeks (still a record). It earned $1.8 billion worldwide, and remained the biggest box office hit ever until it was supplanted by Cameron’s own Avatar in 2010. The film was a critical success, too. It took home 11 Oscars, including Best Picture, tying with Ben-Hur for the most Academy Awards won by a single film. In 2012, to commemorate the centenary of the sinking of the ship, the film was re-released in 3D and earned another $300 million, pushing its total box office take beyond $2

billion. Now, in honor of this landmark anniversary, Titanic will be back in theaters for one week only in a new remastered edition. Expect sellouts again. The film was “supposed” to be a huge flop, destined to be a legendary example of big-budget folly, Cameron’s out-of-control creative arrogance destined to doom it. But we all know what happens when a movie is a hit, especially if it’s an unexpected one, as Titanic was: Knockoffs, lots of ’em, to the point where we get sick of ’em, even if some of the knockoffs are pretty good. It’s been a feature of the blockbuster era since Star Wars, which spawned a lot of crap — including Italian schlock Starcrash and Battle Beyond the Stars, directed by an uncredited Roger Corman — and some notat-all-bad flicks like The Black Hole and The Last Starfighter. We can also thank George Lucas for Battlestar Galactica. Some movies are so popular and so influential that they ignite what feels like entire subgenres. So it’s very mysterious, indeed, that we

were never inundated with Titanic knockoffs. We should be absolutely sick to death of all the cash-ins and imitators. We who complain about the poor quality of much of the industry’s output are constantly reminded that Hollywood is a business. That’s the excuse we hear, particularly when we complain about the lack of movies about women: They don’t make money (although clearly, they do). But the evidence of Titanic and Hollywood’s supposed business practices is clear. We should have been swamped with movies that tried to recapture its money-making magic. And we weren’t. Adventure romance amidst disaster and/or big historical events. Messed-up woman who learns how to really live via a manic pixie dream boy (that’s what Jack Dawson is, after all). There are so many possibilities here. And Hollywood completely ignored them. Is it because the female audience that spent so much time and money on the film was actively derided in the press? The phenomenon of the film received almost hysterical coverage in the media, and we heard tell of girls and women seeing the film a dozen times or more as if that were crazy, rather than indicating an underserved audience eating up a story that finally spoke to them. Did that only add to Hollywood’s usual disdain for stories about girls and women? Of course it’s true that if there were Titanic knockoffs, most of them would have completely misunderstood what made the original film so appealing to its female audience. But the fact that the industry didn’t even try makes it tough to buy that movies are “just a business.” Not when Hollywood left so much money on the table simply to avoid telling more stories like Titanic. n

NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 45


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Give the Drummer Some

Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl is arguably the biggest drummer-turned-frontman, but he’s not the first BY DAN NAILEN

F

oo Fighters’ success was far from a guaranteed thing when Dave Grohl recorded the band’s selftitled 1995 debut all by his lonesome after Kurt Cobain’s death and the demise of Nirvana. Sure, some other drummers had successfully moved from behind their kits into the frontman spotlight, but musicians like Phil Collins (Genesis) and Don Henley

Dave Grohl may have risen to fame as one of rock’s best drummers, but his time with Foo Fighters proves he was born to be a frontman. (Eagles) were already known vocal commodities before launching solo careers. Grohl, on the other hand, was rightly known as one of the best rock drummers around after his years in Nirvana (and before them in D.C. punk crew Scream), and displayed some talent for singing harmonies. But the only evidence of his songwriting before Foo

Fighters was “Marigold,” a tune he’d recorded before joining Nirvana, then re-recorded with Cobain and Nirvana bassist Krist Novoselic as the B-side to the band’s “Heart-Shaped Box” single. Foo Fighters’ success was almost instantaneous once that first album hit the alt-rock airwaves, thanks to songs ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 47


MUSIC | ROCK

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like “This Is a Call” and “Big Me.” Grohl in turn made the project a real band, and 22 years (and several lineup changes) later, they’re arguably the most popular American rock group working today. While the industry has evolved into an electronic-dominated, streaming-oriented beast utterly foreign to what it looked like when Grohl was first touring punk clubs in a van, Foo Fighters continue to headline arenas and festivals on the strength of straightforward albums full of scorching guitars and bombastic anthems. The band’s latest, Concrete and Gold, arrived in September and is full of all the hooks fans have come to expect from one of rock’s most enthusiastic practitioners and historians. (See the Grohl-directed music documentary Sound City if you haven’t, as well as his HBO Sonic Highways series.) Foo Fighters’ show at the Arena is the band’s first Spokane visit since 2003, although they’ve played gigs at the Gorge and in Walla Walla as recently as 2015. Expect a heavy dose of Concrete and Gold tracks alongside some of the tunes that qualified for “classic rock” status nearly the moment they were released, from “Everlong” to “All My Life,” “Best of You” to “Monkey Wrench.” And Grohl’s crew has a way with a cover tune; lately they’ve been paying homage to the recently deceased Malcolm Young with some AC/DC songs, as well as delivering shots of Queen, Ramones and Tom Petty. n Foo Fighters with the Struts • Mon, Dec. 4 at 7:30 pm • $51/$81/$101 • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon • spokanearena. com • 279-7000

DRUM CIRCLE

Dave Grohl is not alone; some other drummers made excellent music when they got the chance to lead the band. Here are some albums worth a listen:  NOVA MOB, Nova Mob: Grant Hart, who passed away in September at 56, was the manic drummer who sang lead half the time with punk legends Hüsker Dü, but he stepped out on guitar and lead vocals for Nova Mob. On their self-titled second album, released in 1994, Hart found a hook-filled, horn-abetted sweet spot on songs like “Little Miss Information” and “Shoot Your Way to Freedom.”  DENNIS WILSON, Pacific Ocean Blue: Best known as the only Beach Boy who really surfed (or maybe for his brief friendship with Charles Manson), the middle, drumming Wilson brother only made one proper solo album, and it’s a killer. It’s familiar enough sonically for Beach Boys fans to dig it, but reveals an artist fully capable of stepping out of his brothers’ shadows. This 1977 release didn’t sell well, but the 2008 reissue is a good purchase, as is his aborted follow-up Bambu, recorded from 1977-83 and finally released earlier this year.  LEVON HELM, Dirt Farmer: Let others argue whether Helm or bandmate Robbie Robertson was the “real” driving force behind the Band. While they do that, dive into Helm’s brilliant 2007 release that earned him a Grammy for Best Traditional Folk Album. It was his first solo album in 25 years, and kicked off a late-career resurgence that continued until his 2012 death.  SHEILA E., The Glamorous Life: Sheila Escovedo is one Levon Helm HEINRICH KLAFFS PHOTO badass drummer (see her work in the Prince concert film Sign o’ the Times) and was already a veteran of recording and touring projects with the likes of Herbie Hancock, Diana Ross and Marvin Gaye when she went solo and landed a Top 10 hit with this 1984 album’s title track. Follow-up single “The Belle of St. Mark” is strong, too, as is the rest of this percussionheavy dance-pop gem.  METHODS OF MAYHEM, Methods of Mayhem: Who would have thought Mötley Crüe drummer Tommy Lee would be the one to prove rap-metal had serious staying power when he stepped out on guitar and lead vocals? Just kidding — he didn’t. This 1999 album is total shit, and proves some drummers should stay behind the kit and step away from the microphone. — DAN NAILEN

P L A C E M E N T 1)

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DECEMBER 8 @ 5:00-8:30PM or N FRIDAY, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9 @ 9:00AM-12:30PM

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48 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017

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A mandatory placement exam required for all 8th graders who wish to attend Gonzaga Prep in the fall and be a part of the class of 2022.

Students only need to attend one day for the exam; Exam Fee is $25.00 Application deadline is December 9, 2017; For more info, visit gprep.com

QUESTIONS? Corrina O’Brien Kelsey ‘06 | Admissions Director 509.483.8512 ext 419 | ckelsey@gprep.com


MUSIC | SINGER-SONGWRITER

Lights Out Julien Baker brings her deeply human songs to the Bartlett BY BEN SALMON

T

he thing that made Julien Baker’s 2015 album Sprained Ankle feel so special — besides her towering talent as a composer and musician, of course — is that no one had heard of Julien Baker. More precisely: Not many people had heard of her. Some folks in her hometown of Memphis, and fans of her rock band Forrister — probably. A handful at Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, where she went to college. A lucky few who had stumbled upon her Bandcamp profile, where she “self-released” (OK, uploaded) some of Sprained Ankle’s songs in 2014. But for the rest of the world, Sprained Ankle (officially released by 6131 Records in October of 2015) came from out of nowhere, carrying with it nine gorgeously sparse songs that teemed with emotions so raw, they felt like they were scraped off the walls of your heart, not hers. Out of nowhere isn’t quite right, but it’s close. Baker

Singer-songwriter Julien Baker will bring stories of heartbreak and honesty to the Bartlett next week. — then a teenage student at MTSU — wrote those songs in unused practice rooms at the school’s music facility, then recorded them quickly with a friend, adding minimal bits of piano, strings, backing vocals, feedback and other noise. The result: A hauntingly honest exploration of life, love, heartbreak, addiction, self-loathing, selfdestruction, spirituality and death. “I’m a pile of filthy wreckage you will wish you’d never touched,” Baker sang in “Everybody Does,” one of the album’s relatively upbeat tunes. “But you’re gonna run when you find out who I am.” Add it all up and you can see why the people who connected with Sprained Ankle did so deeply: These are universal feelings, presented in an uncomfortably intimate way via vivid lyrics and memorable melodies. And for those who hadn’t heard of Baker before, it all came soaked in the intoxicating sense of discovery. These songs were for them, and no one else. Now Baker is back to try to make those same connections without surprise on her side. In late October, she released her second solo album, Turn Out the Lights, through iconic indie label Matador Records. The upgrades don’t end there. The new album was recorded at the world-famous Ardent Studios in Memphis, and sonically speaking, it features better production and more lavish arrangements than the debut. There are more vocal harmonies, more string-section swells and more dramatic electric guitars. Most notably, Baker seems to have written more on the piano this time around.

NOLAN KNIGHT PHOTO

Which is not to say she went overboard with her newly available resources on Turn Out the Lights. Baker still knows how to let songs ebb and flow, even if the highs are higher and the lows are a little less lo-fi. She is still a master of harrowing confessionals, heart-pumping crescendos and the journey in between. Whatever she has experienced since Sprained Ankle was a left-field hit, it hasn’t shaved off the vital peaks and valleys of her songs. And besides, for human beings, instruments and arrangements and volume and production value are all just icing on the cake of connection. At our base level, we are drawn to characters and stories and emotion. On that front, Turn Out the Lights delivers the goods. Therein lies the true beauty of Julien Baker’s music. It’s not the voice or the guitar or the record label or the studio, though those are all important parts of the puzzle. It’s that she’s an incredible and imperfect human being, just like you and me, and she has a gift for singing about human-being things in a way that resonates in other humans’ hearts. As long as she’s doing that, it doesn’t really matter whether you’ve been a fan for years or you’re just getting to know Julien Baker. Every time you hear her, it feels like the first time. n Julien Baker, with Half Waif and Chris Farren • Thurs, Dec. 7, at 8 pm • SOLD OUT • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • thebartlettspokane. com • 747-2174

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NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 49


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

PUNK MICHALE GRAVES

T

he legendary punk outfit Misfits are famous for a number of things — for launching the career of frontman Glenn Danzig, for their gothic style employing plenty of face paint and eye makeup, and for their frequent personnel changes. They’ve had something of a revolving door when it comes to their lineup since forming in New Jersey in 1977 (and then disbanding shortly thereafter, before reuniting with a new group of musicians in the mid-’90s), but besides Danzig himself, Michale Graves is the longest-serving Misfits vocalist. After leaving the band in 2000, Graves embarked on a solo career that has been surprisingly eclectic: Each of his solo LPs take on a new stylistic identity, dabbling in melodic alt-rock, spoken word, heavy metal, instrumental rock and his punk roots. Expect his upcoming setlist at the Pin! to split the difference between solo songs and Misfits classics. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Michale Graves with Deschamp, Sons of Donovan, Zaq Flanary, Lust for Glory and the Uninspired • Tue, Dec. 5 at 6 pm • $15 • All-ages • The Pin! • 412 W. Sprague • thepinevents.com • 624-0746

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 11/30

ELECTRO-POP MORGAN SAINT

J J THE BARTLETT, Dead Serious Lovers, Night Heron, PG-13, Orphans J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen CORBY’S BAR, Open Mic and Karaoke CRAVE, DJ Stoney Hawk CRUISERS, Open Jam Night HOUSE OF SOUL, Karaoke w/DJ Dave THE JACKSON ST., Rusty Jackson J KNITTING FACTORY, Aaron Watson, Jon Wolfe J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Dino Romanelli NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), PJ Destiny THE OBSERVATORY, Vinyl Meltdown POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Devon Wade RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos ZOLA, Blake Braley

Friday, 12/1

12 TRIBES CASINO, Love Stitch 1210 TAVERN, Phil N the Prescriptions ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Just Plain Darin BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BIGFOOT PUB, NightShift BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Sterling BLACK LABEL BREWING CO., Angela Marie Project J BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, Emily Ridler and the Emily Rose Band THE BULL HEAD, Casey Rogers, Darren Eldridge

50 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017

O

n her Spotify profile, New York-based singer-songwriter Morgan Saint has uploaded a playlist that she’s described as “17 songs that have my heart”: Alongside one of her own tracks (the glimmering, minimalistic “Glass House”) are the likes of Bonnie Raitt’s great ballad “I Can’t Make You Love Me,” Bon Iver’s “33 ‘GOD’” and selections from St. Vincent, Lorde and the xx. You can hear a little bit of each of those artists in Saint’s debut EP 17 Hero, which slinks from swooning odes to new love (“Why don’t we be friends? / Why don’t we make out?”) to heartrending songs about imminent, but perhaps unavoidable, heartbreak (“Should I just move on / Or are we brought together by fate?”). It’s only five tracks long, but each one tells its own indelible, memorable story. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Morgan Saint • Tue, Dec. 5 at 8 pm • $8 advance/$10 day of • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

CHECKERBOARD BAR, Rave On with DJs Kid Kaotic, Robert Maddox, Toxic Tok3r J COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Christmas with The Nelson Brothers CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke CRAVE, DJ Stoney Hawk CRUISERS, Karaoke with Gary J DOWNTOWN SPOKANE LIBRARY, Indian Goat J FORZA COFFEE CO., Jenna Johansen

GARLAND DRINKERY, Joshua Belliardo HILLS’ RESTAURANT & LOUNGE, Front Porch Trio J HUMBLE BURGER, Night Heron, PG-13, Skinny the Kid IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Ben Olson and Cadie Archer IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Dylan Hathaway JACKSON ST., Spokane River Band KNITTING FACTORY, Twisted Insane, C. Ray, Dirty Savage and more

LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow MAX AT MIRABEAU, Tuck Foster and the Tumbling Dice MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Devon Wade MOOSE LOUNGE, Yesterdayscake MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Ron Greene J NASHVILLE NORTH, Christmas Extravaganza feat. Kelly Hughes Band, Jeremy McComb, Rick Huckaby, Luke Jaxon NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Gigawatt

NORTH IDAHO CIDER, Bobby Stonebreaker NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, DJ Patrick J THE OBSERVATORY, Lavoy, The Happys, Quarter Monkey ONE TREE CIDER HOUSE, Marco Polo Collective PEND OREILLE PLAYHOUSE, Open Mic RED ROOM LOUNGE, Left Over Soul, The Longnecks RIDLER PIANO BAR, Pamela Jean, Dueling Pianos


RIPPLES, Gladhammer SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Ashley Pyle UP NORTH DISTILLERY, Son of Brad ZOLA, Haze

Saturday, 12/2

12 TRIBES CASINO, Geoffrey Castle 3RD WHEEL, Homewreckr CD Release, Redheaded Stepchild, Heart Avail BABY BAR, Fake News, Blearg Which Project?, Runaway Octopus BARLOWS, Nate Stratte J J THE BARTLETT, Northwest of Nashville Christmas Show BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, Funky Unkle, Ragtag Romantics, Korgy & Bass, Trinity BIGFOOT PUB, NightShift BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Stud BLACK LABEL BREWING CO., Nic Vigil COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS, Wyatt Wood FLAME & CORK, Cole McEvoy J HOTEL RL AT THE PARK, Jonathan Nicholson HOUSE OF SOUL, SideStep J HUCKLEBERRY’S NATURAL MARKET, Ron Criscione

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Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Justin Lantrip THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke w/James JOHN’S ALLEY, Rowdee, Treveezy, H.T.C., Diz Dean, Coaster and more J KNITTING FACTORY, Apocalypse Ball feat. Sovereign Citizen and the Non Prophets, Hot Club of Spokane, The Broken Thumbs LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Kori Ailene MAX AT MIRABEAU, Tuck Foster and the Tumbling Dice MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Brian Jacobs and Chris Lynch MOOSE LOUNGE, Yesterdayscake MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Brother Music J NASHVILLE NORTH, Christmas Extravaganza feat. Kelly Hughes Band, Jeremy McComb, Rick Huckaby, Luke Jaxon NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, DJ Patrick J J PANIDA THEATER, Sandpoint’s Jack Frost Festival feat. BareGrass, Sasha Bell Band, Moonshine Mountain, Shakewell J POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Just Plain Darin J RED ROOM LOUNGE, Gifted Gab, Jango, T.S The Solution, Karma, Lou Era, Beauflexx REPUBLIC BREWING, Nathaniel Talbot RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos RIPPLES, Gladhammer SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Christy Lee THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave WESTWOOD BREWING CO., Ron Greene

Sunday, 12/3

BRAVO CLUB EVENT CENTER, Deorro DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam J NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, The Tenors O’DOHERTY’S, Live Irish Music J THE PIN!, Davey Suicide, Amerakin Overdose, Dysfunktynal Kaos RIDLER PIANO BAR, Karaoke THE ROADHOUSE, Burk Fest feat. Icarus, Rutah, Sovereign Citizen and the Non Prophets and more ZOLA, Lazy Love

Monday, 12/4

J J THE BARTLETT, Brian Stai Album Release, Ruthie Henrickson J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam J HOTEL RL AT THE PARK, Sutherlin HOUSE OF SOUL, Texas Twister J HUMBLE BURGER, Korgy and Bass, Son Locust RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with Lucas Brookbank Brown J J SPOKANE ARENA, Foo Fighters (see page 47), The Struts ZOLA, Evan Dillinger

Tuesday, 12/5

J J THE BARTLETT, Morgan Saint (see facing page) GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke J HOTEL RL AT THE PARK, Alex Mendenall JOHN’S ALLEY, Them Coulee Boys LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tue. J J THE PIN!, Michale Graves (see facing page), Zaq Flanary, Lust for Glory and more POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE, Nick Grow RAZZLE’S, Open Mic Jam RED ROOM LOUNGE, Tuesday Takeover with Storme THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Open Mic/ Jam Night ZOLA, Dueling Cronkites

Wednesday, 12/6

J J THE BARTLETT, Jeff Austin Band, Buffalo Jones GENO’S, Open Mic w/Travis Goulding LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 J MOOTSY’S, Weltesser, Body Void, Sentient Divide, Bruja POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE, Cronkites RED ROOM LOUNGE, Blowin’ Kegs Jam Session RIDLER PIANO BAR, The Ronaldos J THE ROADHOUSE, Better After Dark THE THIRSTY DOG, Karaoke J TWO SEVEN PUBLIC HOUSE, Matt Mitchell ZOLA, Whsk&Keys

Coming Up ...

J J THE BARTLETT, Julien Baker (see page 49), Half Waif, Adam Torres, Dec. 7 J BING CROSBY THEATER, The Robert Cray Band, Dec. 7 J INB PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, Darlene Love, Dec. 13

MUSIC | VENUES 219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-2639934 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BRAVO CONCERT HOUSE • 25 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUZZ COFFEEHOUSE • 501 S. Thor • 340-3099 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208-7658888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 THE HIVE • 207 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-457-2392 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOTEL RL BY RED LION AT THE PARK • 303 W. North River Dr. • 326-8000 HOUSE OF SOUL • 120 N. Wall • 217-1961 IRON HORSE BAR • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., CdA • 509-926-8411 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 598-8933 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208-9300381 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 51


THEATER NO PLACE LIKE HOME

The INB Performing Arts Center will be bringing down the house with a theatrical adaptation of the cinematic and literary classic Wizard of Oz, which twists into town for a two-night run early next week. Frank Baum’s magical world springs back to life on stage with Dorothy, Toto and the gang making their way down the yellow-brick road, all singing and dancing their way to the great and powerful Oz. Anyone with a brain can see this as a delightful way to introduce younger ones to the theater experience. Join the lion, the witch and the scarecrow for a night of whimsy in the merry Land of Oz. — JASON STILL The Wizard of Oz • Tue, Dec. 5 and Wed, Dec 6 at 7:30 pm • $29.50-$59.50 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • inbpac.com • 279-7000

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52 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017

COMEDY MICROBIOS AND MAJOR LOLS

If you want to laugh your butt off and grin until your cheeks are sore, head to the sixth installment of Microbiography, the storytelling-cum-improv show hosted by local comedy troupe the Freedom Association. The biannual-ish event heads back to the Bartlett this weekend featuring local authors Kris Dinnison (pictured) and Rachel Hamby as guests who will each tell real-life stories at the mic for the troupe — made up of Mara Baldwin, Mark Robbins and Pat Thomas — to then improvise live on stage. If, like me, you’ve been to this hilarious event before, you know it’s one not to miss. If you haven’t, I pinky swear to you that it’s one you should definitely check out, and to be on the lookout for future installments. — CHEY SCOTT Microbiography 6 feat. Kris Dinnison and Rachel Hamby • Fri, Dec. 1 at 8 pm • $12 • Ages 17+ • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • bit.ly/2ihM3gJ

THEATER THE LATE DEBATE

For many, C.S. Lewis is best known as author of the beloved children’s series The Chronicles of Narnia, while counterpart Sigmund Freud’s importance as the founding father of psychoanalysis may (or may not) have slipped your mind. Spokane’s Stage Left Theater is bringing both of these great thinkers back to life in a presentation of Freud’s Last Session, a play that posits a meeting and debate between the two men on the eve of the Luftwaffe bombings of London in 1940. The theologically based mental sparring match between the aged Freud and young Lewis is served up quick and humorous, rendering the audience engaged and conscious. — JASON STILL Freud’s Last Session • Dec. 1-17: Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $20 • Stage Left Theater • 108 W. Third Ave. • spokanestageleft. org • 838-9727


PRESENTED BY DOWNTOWN SPOKANE

— Your neverending story —

THEATER RUDOLPH, SCROOGE & FROSTY

Not sure which holiday-themed performance to see this year? Why not see them all in a single sitting? In lieu of its previously scheduled production of Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House, Lake City Playhouse is staging Every Christmas Story Ever Told (and Then Some!), a merry mélange of all the tales we associate with the yuletide season — although not in any particular order. “It’s about three actors who are supposed to put on A Christmas Carol,” says Daniel Bell, who stars alongside Nicole Delbridge and Todd Jasmin in the three-person show. Delbridge’s character wants to perform Dickens’ classic story, but her two counterparts are “sick and tired” of performing the same thing year after year. “We rope her into helping us do The Grinch and a different version of Rudolph so we can’t be sued because Rudolph’s name is still copyrighted and trademarked. We have Peanuts and The Gift of the Magi, and we make fun of holiday parades and Christmas traditions from other countries. There’s some Frosty and It’s a Wonderful Life and other holiday classics in there too. In the end, we feel that we’ve done right by staying true to the meaning of Christmas.” — E.J. IANNELLI

How to first friday like a boss.

Every Christmas Story Ever Told (and Then Some!) • Dec. 1-17: Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm; Sun at 2 pm • $20-$22 • Lake City Playhouse • 1320 E. Garden Ave., Coeur d’Alene • lakecityplayhouse.org • 208-676-7529

Join us for First Friday on December 1st, ARTS STUDIO SITES

Take a drive around town this Saturday with plenty of stops along the way to view the working studios of some of the region’s most prolific and celebrated artists. For its inaugural holiday artist studio tour, the MAC has rounded up six local artists — ceramicist Liz Bishop, multimedia painter Melissa Cole, photographer Dean Davis (work pictured), oil painter Kay O’Rourke, painter Darcy Lee Saxton and batik artist Nicholas Sironka — who are opening their private studios for a special public look-in. Shop for unique and ultra-local gifts for the art lovers on your list as you enjoy meeting these talented, creative folks. The studio tour runs from 10 am-4 pm, followed by a special wine tasting event at the newly opened Maryhill Winery tasting room in Kendall Yards from 4-6 pm. Tickets can be purchased at the MAC through Friday, Dec. 1, or at three participating studios the day of (see website for list). — CHEY SCOTT

and enjoy the creations of Spokane’s talented artists. (Of course, you’ll also enjoy hors d’oeuvres, drinks, and the chance to mingle with fellow artists and art lovers.) See all participating venues at downtownspokane.org.

For event listings visit: www.firstfridayspokane.org Most venues open 5-8pm

Holiday Artist Studio Tour • Sat, Dec. 2 from 10 am-6 pm • $10/tour only; $20/tour + wine • Locations vary • northwestmuseum.org • 456-3931

NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 53


W I SAW YOU

S S

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU HOWS YOUR TUESDAY? Downtown Mcdonalds: Always looking cute as a button. Always coming through with my coupons. Are you single? Don’t make me ask for your # next time. GARTH ID CHECKER I saw you at the kiosk by entry H checking IDs at the Sunday show. You: 40s (maybe more LOL) with goatee and your friends egging you on. I said “I’m off by 10 pm” if you’re interested and available email me: kellyabrite@aol.com 90S MOVIE HEART-THROB You were at the Garland’s showing of Space Jam and even though the film was (as always) entertaining ... I couldn’t keep my eyes off of you. You were endlessly helpful and kind to those around you and your smile and laugh was contagious. You looked great in that black jacket too. I would love to take you to another one of the throwback films sometime. Popcorn on me?

I SAW YOU SUZANNE COME BACK! We’ve all been there, right? You find a hairdresser who does a super job at a nearby far-southside salon and bang, the next time you

SOUND OFF

stop by she’s gone. Anticipating this, I gave Suzanne my card with my email so that she could tell me where she was going next. If you’re still in the area, please write. I need a good haircut.

CHEERS YOU MAKE ME SO HAPPY It’s been a wild ride, and I know we haven’t hit a resting point yet, but I can promise you that for the rest of my days, I will do everything within my power to make sure you are loved, cared for, respected and wanted — and to make sure that you know it, too! You make me happy, you make me smile, and with you I know I am the most loved and accepted I have ever been or ever will be. I love you, with all my heart - I love you more! A GOOD FRIEND You Sir, have been nothing short of the best friend any one could ever ask for. When I was in a time of complete darkness, you were a light. You are perpetually the ‘side-kick’ or ‘best friend’ character in the film but I hope it’s time that you can shine. You are a fantastic father, an amazing friend and the beer connoisseur the world needs ;) -- SO keep hoping, keep trucking, keep reviewing and keep rocking those chops :) -- Your time is near, Fine Sir. <3 RAILROAD ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE Thank You, Thank You, to the two gentlemen who came to my assistance on 11/20! After stopping for a train that stopped on the tracks for 20 minutes, followed by waiting for the train to continue, my car wouldn’t start. You were both so helpful in coming to my aid on a busy street and helped get my car jumped and up and running again. I send my thanks to you both, it was so very appreciative!! But jeers to some of the other motorists that honked at me angrily for breaking down after you had to wait 20 min. and then had to go around me. How did you know I broke down just make you mad *sarcasm* EVERY ROSE HAS IT’S THORN I am so sorry for harassing you with mean and

inappropriate internet/phone texts. Sorry for being a troll. I’ve been so hurt by this society and I am sorry iI let it all out on you, only to push you away again. I didn’t mean any of those things I “said.” I fight the monsters in my head daily, if only you could understand that i am not the “savage monster” society tells you i

my front lawn- You are the worst kind of person. You are the kind of person who lets their badness affect the world around them and the lives of others. You put my life, my child’s life, and the life of everyone who walked along the road that day at risk. Re-think your life. Stop making this world worse than it already

We’ve all been there, right? You find a hairdresser who does a super job at a nearby far-south-side salon and bang, the next time you stop by she’s gone.

am. Please forgive me. PRAISE FOR MEALS ON WHEELS After my neighbors had all received their Thanksgiving dinner and I hadn’t, I thought ok, they just missed me. Then 45 mins later, 4 or 5 Meals on Wheels volunteers showed up at my door with a hot meal AND pumpkin pie. Goodness these people, including volunteers are so giving and filled with humanity. Many thanks to all @Meals on Wheels. PARAPROFESSIONAL OF THE YEAR WINNER It is our privilege to announce Diana P., HHA, of Interim HealthCare of Spokane as the Interim HealthCare National Paraprofessional of the Year 2017. Out of over 300 offices nationwide, her hard work and dedication do not go unnoticed. Diana has been with our office since February 2012. During this time, the office, her co-workers, and her clients have come to rely on her commitment, dependability, communication skills, and her solid decision making when providing services to her clients. She may be one of the quieter staff members, but that does not make her go unnoticed with her team or her clients. She shows

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

54 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017

constant reliability and a determination to ensure clients are well-cared for and safe. Diana has a thirst for education and completed an average of 12-15 hours of continuing education each year to keep her skills and knowledge ready to best serve her clients and our office.

JEERS RE: PLUGGING UP TURN LANE It’s completely legal to use any lane to go straight through a light, unless a solid white line demarcates it as a turn lane only. Some people have to make a turn as soon as they get through an intersection. Something like 1 in 10 car accidents occur during lane changes, so maybe instead of expecting everyone to zip around between lanes unnecessarily for your convenience, you could take a deep breath and wait one extra minute to make your turn? The light will turn green, I promise. CUTTING LADY ZAGS BASKETBALL COVERAGE Jeers for KJRB (94.1 FM/790 AM) for providing poor signal coverage of the Lady Zags basketball games with a lot of static and cutting off most of the game. Hopefully the Lady Zags will move to a different radio station, where they’ll have better radio coverage, like the Men’s Zags or go to 1280 AM/99.3 FM. DRIPPING NEEDLES To the scumball who left your uncapped & used syringes in

is. Contain your damn nastiness! There is no excuse for leaving uncovered needles in public places. There is no excuse for putting others safety in jeopardy for your own messed up vices. WHAT’S IN MY WALLET Being a longtime customer of a muchpublicized credit card offering “double miles” for every dollar spent, I had over 5 years amassed 210,000+ miles. That being enough “miles” too circle the globe 8 times over. To my dismay, I was informed that the value of each mile was half of a penny. Even at double miles this is a penny for each dollar spent making it the smallest reward of any major card. Looking forward to my bus trip to Walla Walla. n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS H A D J O T R A O V E R J T O D A O V E R M A N L M T G E O V E R B M T B O B O V E R S I N A S E T T

E L S E C V Y T H H O E F R I C H I E

I D I E

D A M A Y F T S E I N G S D D U I G E L S R O W P I O T T O V E R B I T E D E S H O E D I S P O L A D O F S D A N A E D E N

L I G N A N Y O T A R S P A H I T O L L O W E E R S S P O E T G U N S A I D K T A T E S L O E K I N K

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


EVENTS | CALENDAR

COMEDY

IAN BAGG Ian started his comedy career in his native Canada and proceeded to do all the show business things that every successful Canadian entertainer does. Nov. 30-Dec. 2 at 8 pm, Dec. 2 at 10:30 pm. $20-$30. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com BEFORE IT’S IN THEATRES Audience members choose a movie trailer and the BDT players try and fill in all the blanks. For general audiences. Fridays at 8 pm, Nov. 10-Dec. 15. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com BOONE STREET HOOLIGANS The all student-written, performed sketch com-

COMMUNITY

JOURNEY TO THE NORTH POLE The 31st annual holiday tradition includes the lake cruises. Lights are on display through January 1; 40-minute cruises ($7.50/ages 6-12; $22.25/adults; $21.25/seniors) depart nightly on the lake at 5:30, 6:30 and 7:30 pm. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdaresort.com (208-765-4000) FIND RUDOLPH SCAVENGER HUNT Use your Passport to locate Rudolph inside 25 different downtown Spokane locations and enter to win a grand prize. Runs through Dec. 18. Free. Downtown Spokane. downtownspokane.org SPOKANE VALLEY CELEBRATION OF LIGHTS Mayor Rod Higgins and members of the Spokane Valley City Council join the Rotary Club at the organization’s annual celebration to help spread holiday cheer by reading the classic poem “The Night Before Christmas.” Nov. 30, 5:30 pm. Free. Spokane Valley City Hall, 10210

IT’S NOT JUST MAKING A LIVING – IT’S MAKING A LIFE. The Arc of Spokane helps people with intellectual and developmental disabilities develop job skills and strong work values. Shop at The Arc of Spokane Thrift Store this holiday season to support The Arc of Spokane. Learn more at poweroforange.org

E. Sprague. (509-921-0398) SPOKANE WINTER GLOW The fourth annual holiday lights show features themed displays including the North Pole, Enchanted Forest, Gingerbread House, Train and Animal Light Zoo. Lights are on daily at dusk from Nov. 22-Jan. 1. Free. Cowley Park, Sixth Ave. and Division St. spokanewinterglow.com TITANIC: THE ARTIFACT EXHIBITION This blockbuster features more than 120 real artifacts all recovered from the ocean floor. The objects, along with room re-creations and personal stories, offer haunting, emotional connections to lives abruptly ended or forever altered. Oct. 21 through May 20, 2018; open Tue-Sun 10 am-5 pm (Wed until 8 pm). $18/adults, $16/seniors, $10/ages 6-17, $13/college students w/ID. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) TREE OF SHARING Community members can help provide holiday gifts to Spokane’s forgotten residents. Pick up gift tags at tables located at River Park Square, NorthTown and and the Spokane Valley Mall. Collection runs through Dec. 17; all tables open during regular mall hours. treeofsharing.org (808-4919) DECK THE FALLS The historic theater’s annual holiday season kick-off includes a tree lighting, visits with Santa, food, caroling, artisan vendors and more. Dec. 1, 5-7:30 pm and Dec. 2, 10 am-4 pm. Cutter Theatre, 302 Park St, Metaline Falls.. cuttertheatre.com (509-446-4108) FESTIVAL OF TREES & ART Two rooms of beautifully decorated trees provide a scenic backdrop for stunning artwork and photography, on display throughout December. Open Mon-Wed 10 am-8 pm, Thu-Fri 10 am-6 pm and Sat-Sun 1-5 pm through Dec. 31. Colfax Library, 102 S. Main St. whitco.lib.wa.us (509-397-4366) GREENBLUFF CHRISTMAS EXPERIENCE Take a horse-drawn sleigh ride to cut your own Christmas tree, do some wine tasting, eat lunch and shop. $65 for any size U-cut tree with a sleigh ride and lunch. ($15/additional adult, $12/additional child). Private rides for two are also available. Nov. 24-Dec. 23; Fri-Sun from 10 am-3 pm. High Country Orchard, 8518 E. Green Bluff Rd. bit.ly/2htfgEY KENDALL YARDS ARTISAN FEST Shop local at this annual holiday marketplace

hosting vendors of handcrafted clothing, jewelry, and other fine arts and crafts. Dec. 1 from 4-8 pm and Dec. 2 from 10 am-3 pm. bit.ly/2mq6KeW 13TH ANNUAL FAIR TRADE SALE Items for sale include hand-knitted gloves, hats and scarves, organic chocolate and coffee, dishes, pottery, linens, jewelry, bags and purses, holiday ornaments and more. Dec. 2-3 from 9 am-1 pm. Trinity Lutheran Church, 812 N. Fifth, CdA. (208-661-3795) AIRWAY HEIGHTS WINTER FESTIVAL Celebrate the community at the 11th annual festival. After enjoying the pancake breakfast at the Community Center, drop by the library for a winter storytime, followed by holiday crafts and face painting. Dec. 2, 10:30 am-1 pm. Free. Airway Heights Library, 1213 S. Lundstrom. (893-8250) BREAKFAST WITH SANTA A fundraiser for the high school band booster club, offering a pancake breakfast, photo ops, crafts, a Christmas tree raffle, bake sale, music and more. $5/person for breakfast; $5/photos; $1/raffle tickets. Dec. 2, 8-11 am. West Valley High School, 8301 E. Buckeye Ave. (509-869-4991) DOWNTOWN SPOKANE TREE LIGHTING Stop by Riverfront Park (corner of Wall and Spokane Falls) to dance, sing, craft and meet Santa. Events include First Night Spokane’s Singing in the New Year sing-along at 5 pm and Christmas Tree Lighting Ceremony at 6 pm with Mayor Condon and members of City Council. Dec. 2, 4-8 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard. downtownspokane.org FEZZIWIG’S BALL In the tradition of Charles Dickens, come celebrate Christmas with an Old English themed meal. Come semi-formal or in costume, enjoy musicians and period dancing, silent auction and other festivities. Ages 18+. Dec. 2, 5:30-10 pm. $40. Moran Prairie Grange, 6006 S. Palouse Hwy. thewhatevergirls. com/fezziwigs-ball/ (951-7822) HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE The Crosby home is decorated for the season and guests can enjoy hot cider and cookies, tours and special items from Crosby’s life and career. Dec. 2, 1-4 pm. Free. Crosby House Museum, 508 E. Sharp. bingcrosbyadvocates.org HOLLYWOOD NW TALENT SHOW The second annual celebration of creativity and talent in the community includes

thrift store

CHRISTMAS TREE ELEGANCE View the themed, decorated trees and accompanying gifts on display at River Park Square (second floor) and the Davenport Hotel (mezzanine) from Nov. 28-Dec. 9 during regular hours (through Dec. 10 at RPS). Proceeds from the raffle of the 18 trees benefits the Spokane Symphony. Raffle tickets are sold for $1 each. facebook.com/ChristmasTreeElegance SANTA EXPRESS The 25th annual holiday store offers items at allowancefriendly prices (50 cents to $8) for area children (ages 4-12) to purchase for their friends and family, with proceeds supporting the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery. Open daily through Dec. 23 during mall hours. River Park Square, 808 W. Main Ave. santaexpress.org (624-3945) 3RD ANNUAL HOLIDAY BASH The annual benefit for the Community Cancer Fund is a festive evening with light food, drink, live music by The Rub and more. Dec. 1, 7 pm. $125+. Davenport Grand, 333 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. ccfbash.com JINGLE BELL RUN The holiday-themed fun run supporting the Arthritis Foundation. Dec. 2, 10 am. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard. bit.ly/2zJnb9l JOY TO THE WORLD This benefit production by Festival Dance & Performing Arts brings together local musicians and dancers to welcome in the holiday season. Dec. 2, 7:30 pm. $10-$16. University of Idaho Administration Building, 851 Campus Dr. uidaho.edu (208-883-3267)

edy group takes the stage for their fall show. Dec. 1 at 7:30 pm and Dec. 2 at 2 pm. $2. Gonzaga Magnuson Theatre, 502 E. Boone Ave. gonzaga.edu/theatrearts MICROBIOGRAPHY 6 Local authors Kris Dinnison and Rachel Hamby tell stories from their real lives, then The Freedom Association (Mara Baldwin, Mark Robbins, Pat Thomas) improvise scenes inspired by their stories. Ages 17+. Dec. 1, 8-10 pm. $12. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague Ave. bit.ly/2ihM3gJ IMPROV! Ignite’s in-house, familyfriendly improv troupe brings buckets of laughter. First Saturday of the month, at 7 pm. $5. Ignite! Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway. igniteonbroadway.org PAULY SHORE The stand-up comic, actor, writer and director tasted super-stardom in 1990 when his precedent-setting MTV show “Totally Pauly” hit the airwaves. The show ran for six years, leading him to television and film roles. Dec. 3, 8 pm. $27-$35. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (509-318-9998) COOKING HOT COMEDY Join comedian Deece Casillas and chef Amanda Ann Hillmann as they present a live cooking and comedy show. Shows on Dec. 5, Dec. 12 and Dec. 19, at 7:30 pm. $13. The Roxie, 3023 E. Diamond. SocialHourPod.com

Windfall

BENEFIT

entertainment, vendors, prizes, refreshments and more. Dec. 2, 4-7 pm. By donation. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt. hollywoodnwtalents.wixsite. com/magicbus/rsvp PICKIN’ CHRISTMAS VINTAGE SHOW & ARTISAN MARKET Past Blessings Farm’s holiday show is host to hand-selected vendors of vintage, handmade, salvaged, antique, repurposed goods and more. Dec. 2 from 9 am-6 pm and Dec. 3 from 10 am-4 pm. $7 (kids 12 and under free). Greyhound Park & Event Center, 5100 Riverbend. pastblessingsfarm.com PULLMAN HOLIDAY FEST The community celebrates the start of the holiday season with a pancake breakfast, music fest, food drive, afternoon tea and the official holiday fest activities including the jingle bell fun run, tree lighting and more. Dec. 2. pullmanchamber.com SANTA BREAKFAST Santa invites you and yours for full hot breakfast and photos with him in his sleigh. Offered Dec. 2, 9 and 16; breakfast from 9 am-noon; photos from noon-3 pm. $7-$12. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. sssac.org (509-535-0803) WINTER MARKET The 14th annual market continues the tradition of hosting local vendors selling handmade, artisan goods. Dec. 2 and 9, 10 am-2 pm. 1912 Center, 412 E. Third, Moscow. 1912center.org HYGGE HOLIDAY MARKET Hygge (hueguh) is the Danish word for everything cozy and comfortable, and it’s also the theme of this artisan event featuring locally handmade goods and a special mulled ale from Bellwether. See link for details. Dec. 3, 3-7 pm. Bellwether Brewing Co., 2019 N. Monroe. bit.ly/2juksbY THE GREAT ROBOT DEBATE Two U of Idaho CdA Computer Science students square off in a formal debate that examines issues regarding robots on both sides. Dec. 6, 6-8:30 pm. Free. The Innovation Den, 415 E. Lakeside Ave. uidaho. edu/engr/events/great-robot-debate SPR OPEN HOUSE Enjoy snacks and beverages with staff and program producers, and see the studios of KPBX, KSFC, and KPBZ. From 6-7 pm the station hosts a live call-in program, broadcast across all three stations. Dec. 6, 4:30-6 pm. Spokane Public Radio, 1229 N. Monroe. spokanepublicradio.org

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NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 55


Growing cannabis is one thing — keeping the stink under control is a whole other challenge.

PRODUCTION

Bad Potpourri How the smell of pot is getting farmers in trouble BY TUCK CLARRY

H

alf the battle with pot possession is deciding what you’re going to do about the smell. Are you going to let the flower’s pungency overtake your living space? Your smoking jacket? Well, now think about dealing with acres of the blooming plant. Farms in states with legal pot are now confronting the fact that their farms and distribution factories are harming the public’s olfactories. Farms in Oregon are facing a lawsuit from a neighboring vineyard, and one of Boulder, Colorado’s major cultivation centers was recently fined

56 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017

$2,000 for the odor they were emitting, and Washington’s Chelan County has been a battleground for farms’ responsibilities to the public. Momtazi Family LLC, a vineyard owner in McMinnville outside of Portland, has moved forward with a lawsuit against aspiring grow-ops in the area. The vineyard claims that potential pot farms will harm their grapes with “foul-smelling particles.” The lawsuit faces an uphill battle, though. Oregon prohibits nuisance lawsuits against common farming practices.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

In Colorado, Boulder Botanics’ cultivation facility was cited for a “failure to remedy odor violations.” The facility is located within an older industrial building. A year prior, the city handed another company, Dandelion LLC, $14,000 in fines. The total is the largest fine the city has issued since recreational marijuana became legal in 2014. The city’s marijuana regulations say there should be no detectable odor from outside of a cannabis business. And according to Boulder’s Daily Camera, the city rarely issues violations related to the law. In Chelan, according to the Stranger newspaper, neighbors used the smell of pot harvesting, increased traffic and the intrusive lighting of nighttime security systems to help the county commissioners to build a case to push growers out. The county told pot farms in January 2016 that they had two years to amortize their businesses and get out of the county. Now, the commissioners have changed their stance to allow businesses to stay if they comply with new zoning and building requirements — which, some argue, will ultimately force them to shut down anyway. n


WE

BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 5052). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington state, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects; there may be health risks associated with its consumption, and it may be habit-forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. Keep out of reach of children. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

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NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 59


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FUND

I’m a 35-year-old woman. I’m living with my boyfriend, who’s a freelance artist (talented but just getting started). We’ve been together for three years, and I am paying for pretty much everything. I don’t feel resentful. I feel like we’re a team and eventually his career will take off. However, my parents keep saying it’s a bad dynamic: I’m coddling him, and he’s taking advantage of me. —Worried

AMY ALKON

Ideally, when one partner is the sole breadwinner, the other is the stay-at-home parent to more than two rambunctious goldfish. There’s a term in risk researcher and former derivatives trader Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s books — “skin in the game.” That’s what’s missing when, say, a hedge fund honcho advises you to make some big-bucks investment. If he’s guessed right, he’ll share in your profits. However, any losses are all yours -- as in, you’ll find him up in his penthouse, not two cardboard boxes down from your new “home” on the corner. “Skin in the game” is also what’s missing from your boyfriend’s end of the relationship. You’re doing all of the work to keep the roof over the relationship. Your boyfriend’s doing none of the work but reaping 100 percent of the benefits. This isn’t to say relationships have to be exactly 50-50. But such a gross asymmetry in effort may be creating a breeding ground for laziness — setting your boyfriend up to go all Leisure Larry in both his work and the relationship. In fact, by making things so easy for him, you may be making it harder for him to succeed. Consider that you put in more effort when it’s a necessity — when you don’t have inherited wealth (or a 9-to-5-toiling girlfriend who allows you to live as if you do). Also, the fact that you’re a woman who’s paying for everything may make this more of a problem. Women evolved to seek “providers,” and men coevolved to expect that — and to expect the best women to hold out for investment. Men’s self-worth is also driven by their ability to provide. So though many couples think they “should” be okay with a woman as the sole or primary moneymaker (because…equality!), it often leads to resentment in the woman and emasculation in the man. (Great if you like your sex without those boring erections.) Finally, consider whether you really aren’t okay with this Vincent van No Job arrangement but are going along with it because you think it’s the good-girlfriend thing to do. It’s okay -- and probably good for your relationship — to ask your boyfriend to put “skin in the game,” like by driving a bunch of runs on Uber to fork over for the electric bill. People value and feel more a part of something they have to work for — and not just by opening all the bills (with an artistic flourish!) before handing them over for the wage slave girlfriend to pay.

WEED BETTER BREAK UP NOW

I’m a 28-year-old gay guy. I like to travel and go out and do stuff on the weekends. My boyfriend prefers to smoke pot and uhh…time travel on the couch. He’s a good person, and I love him, but he’s unwilling to cut back on his pot smoking. Friends tell me to dump him, but we’ve been together for three years, and bailing now would mean throwing that time away. —Frustrated The guy isn’t without ambition. He tries really hard every day to give the cat a contact high. There’s a point when love seems like “the answer” — when you’re 14 and practicing your make-out skills on your pillow. But then you grow up and get into a relationship with a man you love, and you find yourself packing for Bali while he’s packing his bong. Presumably, you’ve tried to come to some compromise. It helps to be specific about what would work for you — like by proposing he come down from Weed Mountain to spend Saturday afternoon and evening out on the town with you. If he’s unwilling to be enough of a boyfriend to make you happy, well, you have a decision to make. In making it, don’t let yourself get tripped up by “the sunk cost effect.” This is decision researcher Hal Arkes’ term for our (irrational) “tendency to continue an endeavor once an investment in money, effort, or time has been made.” But that initial investment — for example, the three years you’ve already put into your relationship with James Bong — is gone. What makes sense is looking at whether the “endeavor” will pay off in the future, say, in a willingness by your boyfriend to combine his favorite hobby and yours. As travel writer Rick Steves put it, “I have used cannabis all over the world.” (Hmm…then again, so have other people, and they’re still in jail in Turkey.) n ©2017, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

60 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017

EVENTS | CALENDAR

FOOD

HOTEL RL LIFESIZE GINGERBREAD HOUSE Walk through the life-size gingerbread house and enjoy special treats that benefit local nonprofit Blessings Under the Bridge. Open daily thorugh Jan. 1. Hotel RL by Red Lion at the Park, 201 W. North River Dr. (326-8000) COOKIE DECORATING AT SCLD Show off your cookie decorating skills. The library provides the cookies, frosting, sprinkles, and other options for your masterpiece. All ages; kids 8 and under must bring an adult. Offered Dec. 1-2, 7, 9, 12-14 and 16; branch locations and times vary, visit scld.org for details. SIP OF BEVERLY’S An introductory wine class and tasting event with Beverly’s Sommelier Trevor Treller. Interactive sessions include appetizers and featured wines at discounted bottle prices. First Saturday of the month, at 3 pm. Ages 21+. $25. Beverly’s, 115 S. Second St. beverlyscda.com ERIN JAMES: TASTING CIDER A talk about American cidermaking with the author of “Tasting Cider.” (Customers must purchase a copy of the book via ticket link to receive a ticket to the event.) Dec. 5, 7 pm. Liberty Ciderworks, 164 S. Washington. libertycider.com HOLIDAY DESSERT CLASS Join Eva from Just American Desserts for a baking class during which she shares how to make salted peanut chews, red velvet cheesecake and more. Dec. 5, 6-8 pm. $30. My Fresh Basket, 1030 W. Summit Pkwy. myfreshspokane.com HOLIDAY COCKTAIL CLASS Learn how to muddle, stir and shake some holiday libations with Resort beverage manager Justin Schorzman. Dec. 7, 6 pm. $49. The CdA, 115 S. Second. cdaresort.com

MUSIC

AUTUMN STRINGS Directed by NIC Music Instructor Gerard Mathes, this free concert features classics performed by the NIC Cardinal Chamber Orchestra. Nov. 30, 7:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Schuler Performing Arts Center, 1000 W. Garden Ave. (208-769-3420) SCLD 75TH ANNIVERSARY CONCERT Listen and dance to music from the era when the library was established, and enjoy refreshments as you celebrate the legacy of the library. Nov. 30, 7-8:30 pm. Free. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. scld.org (893-8400) SPOKANE SYMPHONY: THE NUTCRACKER BALLET This cherished holiday story is performed by Santa Barbara’s State Street Ballet and more than 75 local dancers. Tchaikovsky’s score is performed live by the Spokane Symphony. Nov. 30-Dec. 3; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sat-Sun at 2 pm. $25-$86/adults; $17.50-$60/kids. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) CDA SYMPHONY: HOLIDAY POPS Program includes “Poet and Peasant Overture” by von Suppe, “Nocturnes” by Debussy, “Schelomo” by Bloch, with solo cellist Mika Hood and a Christmas singalong. Dec. 1 at 7:30 pm and Dec. 2 at 2 pm. $10-$20. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cdasymphony.org PALOUSE CHORAL SOCIETY “Around the World at Christmas” features music from more than 20 countries performed by the chorale, chamber choir and children’s choir. Dec. 1 at 7:30 pm

and Dec. 3 at 4 pm. $8-$20. St. Boniface Catholic Church, 207 S. St. Boniface St. palousechoralsociety.org SPOKANE JAZZ ORCHESTRA The second concert of the season features the homecoming of guest jazz vocalist Julia Keefe for the holiday-themed program “An Ella Fitzgerald Christmas.” Dec. 2, 7:30 pm. $17-$27. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. spokanejazz.org EUGENE BALLET’S THE NUTCRACKER The Pend Oreille Arts Council presents this Sandpoint holiday tradition featuring local ballet students onstage with professional dancers. Dec. 3, 7-9 pm. $12-$30. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. artinsandpoint.org/calendar/ GONZAGA SYMPHONY Conductor Kevin Hekmatpanah and the Orchestra welcome violin soloist Itamar Zorman for a program featuring works by Beethoven and Dvorak. Dec. 4, 7:30-9 pm. $12-$15. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200) CHORAL HOLIDAY Listen to holiday carols, written with jazz chords in the 1940s and ‘50s, along with songs from 500 years ago. Dec. 5, 6:30 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry St. spokanelibrary.org CELLO ROCK FEAT. BREAK OF REALITY Presented by Terrian and NW Bach Fest, Break of Reality is one of the world’s foremost alt-classical chamber ensembles Dec. 7, 7:30-9:30 pm. $40. Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad Ave. nwbachfest.com (800-838-3004) SONOS HANDBELL ENSEMBLE HOLIDAY CONCERT In this special holiday program, Sonos performs favorites like Tchaikovsky’s “Dance of the Sugarplum Fairy” and the classic “Sleigh Ride.” Dec. 7, 7:30-9:30 pm. $9-$18. Jones Theatre at Daggy Hall, WSU Pullman Campus. performingarts.wsu.edu

THEATER

A CHRISTMAS STORY: THE MUSICAL: The endearing tale of Ralphie Parker and his quest to get a Red Ryder BB Gun for Christmas. Through Dec. 17; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $30$32. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com CHRISTMAS WITH A TWIST Ellen Travolta returns with a new holiday production directed by Troy Nickerson and starring Ellen, her sister Margaret Travolta, daughter Molly Allen and friends. Through Dec. 17; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 5 pm. $27.50. Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdachristmas.com RENT 20TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR Two decades later, Jonathan Larson’s musical continues to speak loudly and defiantly to audiences across generations. Nov. 30-Dec. 3; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sat at 2 pm, Sun at 1 and 6:30 pm. $37.50-$77.50. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. wcebroadway.com A CHRISTMAS CAROL A radio-style reader’s theatre production of Dicken’s classic holiday tale. Includes a dinner theatre on Dec. 9 at 6 pm ($30, reservation only). Dec. 1-9; Fridays at 7 pm, Dec. 2 (Sat) at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. $5$12. StageWest Community Theatre, 639 Elm St. (509-768-4792) ANNIE The award-winning musical is performed by local children and adults. Through Dec. 17; Fri at 7 pm, Sat-Sun at 2 pm. $10-$14. Spokane Children’s Theatre, 2727 N. Madelia. spokanechildrenstheatre.org (328-4886)

A CHILD’S CHRISTMAS IN WALES A musical based on the short story by Dylan Thomas, portraying a nostalgic and simpler time. Dec. 1-10; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm, also Dec. 2 at 2 pm. $5-$15. Hartung Theater, 875 Perimeter Dr. uitheatre.com EVERY CHRISTMAS STORY EVER TOLD Instead of performing Dickens’ beloved holiday classic for the umpteenth time, three actors decide to perform every Christmas story in this comedy romp. Dec. 1-17, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $20-$22. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. facebook.com/lakecityplayhouse/ THE NORMAL HEART Diana Trotter directs a group of Spokane actors in a staged reading of Larry Kramer’s incendiary 1985 drama in commemoration of World AIDS Day. Dec. 1-2 at 7:30 pm. $10. South Perry Yoga, 915 S. Perry St. facebook.com/actorsbuddhio SANTA CLAUS CONQUERS THE MARTIANS A performance based on the 1964 film by students in the fall Civic Academy. Dec. 2 and 9 at 1 and 3 pm; also Dec. 3 and 10 at 6:30 pm. $10-$15. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com WIZARD OF OZ A spectacular celebration of the iconic 1939 MGM film, featuring all the film’s beloved characters brought to live on stage. Dec. 5-6 at 7:30 pm. $27.50-$57.50. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. wcebroadway.com

ARTS

FIRST FRIDAY Art galleries and businesses across downtown Spokane and beyond host monthly receptions to showcase new displays of art. Dec. 1 from 5-8 pm. Additional details at firstfridayspokane.org. ARTIST IN RESIDENCE: TOM QUINN Quinn has created many notable murals around Spokane, and teaches at the Corbin Art Center. During each residency, artists provide hands-on sessions for the public, as well as on-site art making for observation. Special sessions with Quinn are Dec. 2, 1-3 pm and Dec. 16, 1-3 pm; registration required. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (893-8350) HOLIDAY ARTIST STUDIO TOUR The MAC presents a new holiday-themed studio tour. Visit six local artists’ studios to see their workspaces, view and puchase art. Post-tour, head to the new Maryhill Winery tasting room in Kendall Yards for a complimentary glass and entry to win an original work of art. Dec. 2, 10 am-6 pm. $10/tour only; $20/ tour + wine. northwestmuseum.org HOLIDAY BAZAAR The local nonprofit pottery studio’s annual holiday benefit art show offers a variety of art including prints, pottery, fiber art, baked goods and more. Dec. 2 from 10 am-5 pm and Dec. 3 from 10 am-4 pm. Free admission. Urban Art Co-op, 3017 N. Monroe. urbanartcoop.org (327-9000) EARLY MORNING SHOTS: A PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBIT Large format portrait photography and framed pieces are on display; all created by EWU students in Travis Masingale’s DESN: 350 Digital Imaging and Photography course. Reception Dec. 5 at 8 am. Dec. 4-8; open noon-5 pm. Free. EWU Downtown Student Gallery, 404 Second. facebook.com/ewudowntownstudentgallery/ n


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NOVEMBER 30, 2017 INLANDER 61


THIS WEEK

Coeur d ’Alene

A Travolta Christmas Story Feel the warmth and celebrate the season with the return of Ellen Travolta on stage and a specially crafted beverage from the bar

S

ince 2012, beloved actress Ellen Travolta — often accompanied by family and friends — has delighted and enchanted audiences with her holiday-themed stage performances created especially for the Coeur d’Alene Resort. Past performances featured Travolta family stories, music and a lot of laughter, both on stage and throughout the audience. This year’s performances, entitled Christmas with Twist: ’Tis the Season for Family, promises all that and more. “It’s just a lovely way to kick off the holiday season,” says Travolta, who explains that one twist is the stories submitted by readers: sad, sweet, funny, traditional, poignant, “but all good in the end,” she says. The cast includes local jazz singer and theater director Abbey Crawford, as well as multiple generations of Travolta women. Ellen is joined by her daughter, Molly Allen, instantly recognizable as part of the Dave, Ken and Molly radio show on Spokane’s KZZU, as well as Ellen’s sister, film and television actress Margaret Travolta. Ellen’s granddaughter, Lola Rose, will perform opening weekend of

CDA

Upcoming Events COEUR D’ALENE

For more events, things to do & places to stay, go to visitcda.org

62 INLANDER NOVEMBER 30, 2017

Journey to the North Pole

Eagle Watching Cruise

It’s 40 minutes of magical holiday lights‚ more than a 1.5 million of them‚ and a visit with ol’ Saint Nick himself! Tickets available online or the Resort Plaza Shops; $20.75 adults, $19.75 ages 55+, $6 children 6-12; Departure times are 5:30, 6:30 and 7:30 pm (board a half-hour prior).

Enjoy a two-hour cruise on Lake Coeur d’Alene from the cozy interior of your cruise boat, which provides unparalleled viewing of our nation’s most celebrated bird, on its annual feeding migration. Tickets: $23.25 adults, $21.25 ages 55+, $15.25 kids 6-12; Saturdays and Sundays, 1-3 pm.

NOV 30-DEC 6

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the production, which is directed by Troy Nickerson and runs from Nov. 24 through Dec. 17. Another “twist” to this year’s performance is a specially crafted cocktail, the Honey Sage Toddy, available throughout the CdA Resort, which is offering overnight stay packages starting at $239, including two tickets to the show and $50 restaurant credit. Otherwise, tickets to the performances, which take place Saturdays at 7:30 pm and Sunday at 5 pm, are $27.50 per person. Go to cdachristmas.com or call the CdA Resort at (866) 835-3025. t

Holiday Pops DECEMBER 1-2

Celebrate the sounds of the season with classical music by the Coeur d’Alene Symphony, concluding with a festive sing-along with all your holiday favorites. Tickets: $20 adults, $15 ages 65+, $10 children and students with identification; Dec. 1, 7:30 pm; Dec. 2, 2 pm.

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